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Sample records for chronic kidney injury

  1. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

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    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats. PMID:27593574

  2. Vitamin D deficiency aggravates chronic kidney disease progression after ischemic acute kidney injury.

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    Janaína Garcia Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Despite a significant improvement in the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD, its incidence and prevalence has been increasing over the years. Progressive renal fibrosis is present in CKD and involves the participation of several cytokines, including Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1. Besides cardiovascular diseases and infections, several studies show that Vitamin D status has been considered as a non-traditional risk factor for the progression of CKD. Given the importance of vitamin D in the maintenance of essential physiological functions, we studied the events involved in the chronic kidney disease progression in rats submitted to ischemia/reperfusion injury under vitamin D deficiency (VDD.Rats were randomized into four groups: Control; VDD; ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI; and VDD+IRI. At the 62 day after sham or IRI surgery, we measured inulin clearance, biochemical variables and hemodynamic parameters. In kidney tissue, we performed immunoblotting to quantify expression of Klotho, TGF-β, and vitamin D receptor (VDR; gene expression to evaluate renin, angiotensinogen, and angiotensin-converting enzyme; and immunohistochemical staining for ED1 (macrophages, type IV collagen, fibronectin, vimentin, and α-smooth mucle actin. Histomorphometric studies were performed to evaluate fractional interstitial area.IRI animals presented renal hypertrophy, increased levels of mean blood pressure and plasma PTH. Furthermore, expansion of the interstitial area, increased infiltration of ED1 cells, increased expression of collagen IV, fibronectin, vimentin and α-actin, and reduced expression of Klotho protein were observed. VDD deficiency contributed to increased levels of plasma PTH as well as for important chronic tubulointerstitial changes (fibrosis, inflammatory infiltration, tubular dilation and atrophy, increased expression of TGF-β1 and decreased expression of VDR and Klotho protein observed in VDD+IRI animals.Through inflammatory

  3. Losartan reduces ensuing chronic kidney disease and mortality after acute kidney injury

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    Cheng, Shun-Yang; Chou, Yu-Hsiang; Liao, Fang-Ling; Lin, Chi-Chun; Chang, Fan-Chi; Liu, Chia-Hao; Huang, Tao-Min; Lai, Chun-Fu; Lin, Yu-Feng; Wu, Vin-Cent; Chu, Tzong-Shinn; Wu, Ming-Shiou; Lin, Shuei-Liong

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important risk factor for incident chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinical studies disclose that ensuing CKD progresses after functional recovery from AKI, but the underlying mechanisms remain illusive. Using a murine model representing AKI-CKD continuum, we show angiotensin II type 1a (AT1a) receptor signaling as one of the underlying mechanisms. Male adult CD-1 mice presented severe AKI with 20% mortality within 2 weeks after right nephrectomy and left renal ischemia-reperfusion injury. Despite functional recovery, focal tubular atrophy, interstitial cell infiltration and fibrosis, upregulation of genes encoding angiotensinogen and AT1a receptor were shown in kidneys 4 weeks after AKI. Thereafter mice manifested increase of blood pressure, albuminuria and azotemia progressively. Drinking water with or without losartan or hydralazine was administered to mice from 4 weeks after AKI. Increase of mortality, blood pressure, albuminuria, azotemia and kidney fibrosis was noted in mice with vehicle administration during the 5-month experimental period. On the contrary, these parameters in mice with losartan administration were reduced to the levels shown in control group. Hydralazine did not provide similar beneficial effect though blood pressure was controlled. These findings demonstrate that losartan can reduce ensuing CKD and mortality after functional recovery from AKI. PMID:27677327

  4. Effects of Sodium Citrate on Salt Sensitivity and Kidney Injury in Chronic Renal Failure

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    Kim, Sejoong; Yang, Jin Young; Jung, Eun Sook; Lee, Jeonghwan; Heo, Nam Ju; Lee, Jae Wook; Na, Ki Young; Han, Jin Suk

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis, which is observed in salt-sensitive hypertension, is also associated with kidney injury. Alkali therapy in chronic renal failure (CRF) may ameliorate the progression of kidney disease; however, few studies have examined the effects of alkali therapy on salt sensitivity and kidney injury in CRF. We randomly administered standard diet (SD), sodium chloride with 20% casein diet (NACL), or sodium citrate with 20% casein diet (NACT) to Sprague-Dawley rats after a CRF or a sham ...

  5. Chronic kidney disease-induced HMGB1 elevation worsens sepsis and sepsis-induced acute kidney injury

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    Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Huang, Yuning; Hu, Xuzhen; Zhou, Hua; Tsuji, Takayuki; Chen, Richard; Jeffrey B Kopp; Schnermann, Jürgen; Yuen, Peter S.T.; Star, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    We previously showed that kidney dysfunction/interstitial fibrosis by folate predisposes mice to sepsis mortality (normal/sepsis: 15%; folate/sepsis: 90%); agents that increased survival in normal septic mice were ineffective in the two-stage model. We used a recently characterized 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx) mouse model of progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) to study how CKD impacts sepsis and acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by cecal ligation-puncture (CLP). CKD intensified sepsis severity (...

  6. Kidney Disease and the Nexus of Chronic Kidney Disease and Acute Kidney Injury: The Role of Novel Biomarkers as Early and Accurate Diagnostics.

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    Yerramilli, Murthy; Farace, Giosi; Quinn, John; Yerramilli, Maha

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and acute kidney injury (AKI) are interconnected and the presence of one is a risk for the other. CKD is an important predictor of AKI after exposure to nephrotoxic drugs or major surgery, whereas persistent or repetitive injury could result in the progression of CKD. This brings new perspectives to the diagnosis and monitoring of kidney diseases highlighting the need for a panel of kidney-specific biomarkers that reflect functional as well as structural damage and recovery, predict potential risk and provide prognosis. This article discusses the kidney-specific biomarkers, symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), clusterin, cystatin B, and inosine. PMID:27485279

  7. Early Stage of Chronic Kidney Disease with Renal Injury Caused by Hypertension in a Dog

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    Akira Yabuki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old spayed female Papillon weighing 4.0 kg presented with a history of persistent hematuria and pollakiuria. Concurrent bladder calculi, a mammary gland tumor, and nonazotemic early stage of chronic kidney disease with contracted kidneys were noted in this dog. The dog underwent cystectomy, unilateral mastectomy, and intraoperative renal biopsy. On the basis of histopathological analysis of renal biopsy results, it was suspected that renal injury of the dog was caused by persistent hypertension, and a follow-up examination revealed severe hypertension. The dog was treated with a combination of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and calcium channel blocker. The treatment produced a good outcome in the dog, and there has been no progression of the chronic kidney disease for over 2 years.

  8. Effects of sodium citrate on salt sensitivity and kidney injury in chronic renal failure.

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    Kim, Sejoong; Yang, Jin Young; Jung, Eun Sook; Lee, Jeonghwan; Heo, Nam Ju; Lee, Jae Wook; Na, Ki Young; Han, Jin Suk

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic acidosis, which is observed in salt-sensitive hypertension, is also associated with kidney injury. Alkali therapy in chronic renal failure (CRF) may ameliorate the progression of kidney disease; however, few studies have examined the effects of alkali therapy on salt sensitivity and kidney injury in CRF. We randomly administered standard diet (SD), sodium chloride with 20% casein diet (NACL), or sodium citrate with 20% casein diet (NACT) to Sprague-Dawley rats after a CRF or a sham operation. Four weeks after 5/6 nephrectomy, serum bicarbonate levels were higher in the NACT-treated group. On the pressure-natriuresis curve, NACT-treated CRF rats were more salt-resistant than NACL-treated CRF rats. Additionally, the NACT-treated CRF group showed less tubulointerstitial damage than the NACL-treated CRF group. The expression and immunoreactivity of NHE3 in the kidney in the NACT-treated CRF group were lower than those in the NACL-treated CRF group. We observed that dietary NACT as alkali therapy in CRF might improve the altered salt-sensitivity and ameliorate the progression of kidney injury compared to the NACL diet, which may be related to reduced renal NHE3 expression.

  9. T1-mapping for assessment of ischemia-induced acute kidney injury and prediction of chronic kidney disease in mice

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    Hueper, Katja; Gutberlet, Marcel; Wacker, Frank; Hartung, Dagmar [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiology, Hannover (Germany); Hannover Medical School, REBIRTH Cluster of Excellence, Hannover (Germany); Peperhove, Matti; Tewes, Susanne; Barrmeyer, Amelie [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiology, Hannover (Germany); Rong, Song [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nephrology, Hannover (Germany); Zunyi Medical College, Laboratory of Organ Transplantation, Zunyi (China); Gerstenberg, Jessica; Haller, Herman; Gueler, Faikah [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nephrology, Hannover (Germany); Mengel, Michael [University of Alberta, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Edmonton (Canada); Meier, Martin [Hannover Medical School, REBIRTH Cluster of Excellence, Hannover (Germany); Hannover Medical School, Institute for Animal Science, Hannover (Germany); Chen, Rongjun [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nephrology, Hannover (Germany); Zhejiang University, The Kidney Disease Center of the First Affiliated Hospital, Hangzhou (China)

    2014-09-15

    To investigate whether T1-mapping allows assessment of acute kidney injury (AKI) and prediction of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in mice. AKI was induced in C57Bl/6N mice by clamping of the right renal pedicle for 35 min (moderate AKI, n = 26) or 45 min (severe AKI, n = 23). Sham animals served as controls (n = 9). Renal histology was assessed in the acute (day 1 + day 7; d1 + d7) and chronic phase (d28) after AKI. Furthermore, longitudinal MRI-examinations (prior to until d28 after surgery) were performed using a 7-Tesla magnet. T1-maps were calculated from a fat-saturated echoplanar inversion recovery sequence, and mean and relative T1-relaxation times were determined. Renal histology showed severe tubular injury at d1 + d7 in both AKI groups, whereas, at d28, only animals with prolonged 45-min ischemia showed persistent signs of AKI. Following both AKI severities T1-values significantly increased and peaked at d7. T1-times in the contralateral kidney without AKI remained stable. At d7 relative T1-values in the outer stripe of the outer medulla were significantly higher after severe than after moderate AKI (138 ± 2 % vs. 121 ± 3 %, p = 0.001). T1-elevation persisted until d28 only after severe AKI. Already at d7 T1 in the outer stripe of the outer medulla correlated with kidney volume loss indicating CKD (r = 0.83). T1-mapping non-invasively detects AKI severity in mice and predicts further outcome. (orig.)

  10. T1-mapping for assessment of ischemia-induced acute kidney injury and prediction of chronic kidney disease in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate whether T1-mapping allows assessment of acute kidney injury (AKI) and prediction of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in mice. AKI was induced in C57Bl/6N mice by clamping of the right renal pedicle for 35 min (moderate AKI, n = 26) or 45 min (severe AKI, n = 23). Sham animals served as controls (n = 9). Renal histology was assessed in the acute (day 1 + day 7; d1 + d7) and chronic phase (d28) after AKI. Furthermore, longitudinal MRI-examinations (prior to until d28 after surgery) were performed using a 7-Tesla magnet. T1-maps were calculated from a fat-saturated echoplanar inversion recovery sequence, and mean and relative T1-relaxation times were determined. Renal histology showed severe tubular injury at d1 + d7 in both AKI groups, whereas, at d28, only animals with prolonged 45-min ischemia showed persistent signs of AKI. Following both AKI severities T1-values significantly increased and peaked at d7. T1-times in the contralateral kidney without AKI remained stable. At d7 relative T1-values in the outer stripe of the outer medulla were significantly higher after severe than after moderate AKI (138 ± 2 % vs. 121 ± 3 %, p = 0.001). T1-elevation persisted until d28 only after severe AKI. Already at d7 T1 in the outer stripe of the outer medulla correlated with kidney volume loss indicating CKD (r = 0.83). T1-mapping non-invasively detects AKI severity in mice and predicts further outcome. (orig.)

  11. NADPH-Oxidase 4 Protects against Kidney Fibrosis during Chronic Renal Injury

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    Nlandu Khodo, Stellor; Dizin, Eva; Sossauer, Gaetan; Szanto, Ildiko; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Feraille, Eric; Krause, Karl Heinz; De Seigneux, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    NADPH oxidases synthesize reactive oxygen species that may participate in fibrosis progression. NOX4 and NOX2 are NADPH oxidases expressed in the kidneys, with the former being the major renal isoform, but their contribution to renal disease is not well understood. Here, we used the unilateral urinary obstruction model of chronic renal injury to decipher the role of these enzymes using wild-type, NOX4-, NOX2-, and NOX4/NOX2-deficient mice. Compared with wild-type mice, NOX4-deficient mice exh...

  12. [Acute kidney injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, D.; Kooman, J.P.; Lance, M.D.; Heurn, L.W. van; Snoeijs, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    - 'Acute kidney injury' is modern terminology for a sudden decline in kidney function, and is defined by the RIFLE classification (RIFLE is an acronym for Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-stage kidney disease).- Acute kidney injury occurs as a result of the combination of reduced perfusion in the

  13. The Role of M2 Macrophages in the Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease following Acute Kidney Injury.

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    Myung-Gyu Kim

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a major risk factor in the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD. However, the mechanisms linking AKI to CKD remain unclear. We examined the alteration of macrophage phenotypes during an extended recovery period following ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI and determine their roles in the development of fibrosis.The left renal pedicle of mice was clamped for 40 min. To deplete monocyte/macrophage, liposome clodronate was injected or CD11b-DTR and CD11c-DTR transgenic mice were used.Throughout the phase of IRI recovery, M2-phenotype macrophages made up the predominant macrophage subset. On day 28, renal fibrosis was clearly shown with increased type IV collagen and TGF-β. The depletion of macrophages induced by the liposome clodronate injection improved renal fibrosis with a reduction of kidney IL-6, type IV collagen, and TGF-β levels. Additionally, the adoptive transfer of the M2c macrophages partially reversed the beneficial effect of macrophage depletion, whereas the adoptive transfer of the M1 macrophages did not. M2 macrophages isolated from the kidneys during the recovery phase expressed 2.5 fold higher levels of TGF-β than the M1 macrophages. The injection of the diphtheria toxin into CD11b or CD11c-DTR transgenic mice resulted in lesser depletion or no change in M2 macrophages and had little impact on renal fibrosis.Although M2 macrophages are known to be indispensible for short-term recovery, they are thought to be main culprit in the development of renal fibrosis following IRI.

  14. Acute Kidney Injury in Elderly Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: Do Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors Carry a Risk?

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    Chaumont, Martin; Pourcelet, Aline; van Nuffelen, Marc; Racapé, Judith; Leeman, Marc; Hougardy, Jean-Michel

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), mainly excreted by the liver, the dosage of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, cleared by the kidney, must be adapted to account for renal clearance in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to avoid acute kidney injury (AKI). Community-acquired AKI and the use of ACE inhibitors or ARBs in the emergency department were retrospectively assessed in 324 patients with baseline stage 3 or higher CKD. After stepwise regression analysis, the use of ACE inhibitors (odds ratio [OR], 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-3.1; P=.02) and the presence of dehydration (OR, 30.8; 95% CI, 3.9-239.1) were associated with AKI. A total of 45% of patients using ACE inhibitors experienced overdosing, which causes most of the excess risk of AKI. These results suggest that dosage adjustment of ACE inhibitors to renal function or substitution of ACE inhibitors with ARBs could reduce the incidence of AKI. Moreover, ACE inhibitors and ARBs should be stopped in cases of dehydration. PMID:27080620

  15. Chronic Kidney Disease Induced Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Damage Associated with Intestinal Oxidative Stress Injury

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    Yu, Chao; Wang, Qiang; Zhou, Chunyu; Kang, Xin; Zhao, Shuang; Liu, Shuai; Fu, Huijun; Yu, Zhen; Peng, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate whether intestinal mucosal barrier was damaged or not in chronic kidney disease progression and the status of oxidative stress. Methods. Rats were randomized into two groups: a control group and a uremia group. The uremia rat model was induced by 5/6 kidney resection. In postoperative weeks (POW) 4, 6, 8, and 10, eight rats were randomly selected from each group to prepare samples for assessing systemic inflammation, intestinal mucosal barrier changes, and the status of intestinal oxidative stress. Results. The uremia group presented an increase trend over time in the serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-10, serum D-lactate and diamine oxidase, and intestinal permeability, and these biomarkers were significantly higher than those in control group in POW 8 and/or 10. Chiu's scores in uremia group were also increased over time, especially in POW 8 and 10. Furthermore, the intestinal malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase levels were significantly higher in uremia group when compared with those in control group in POW 8 and/or 10. Conclusions. The advanced chronic kidney disease could induce intestinal mucosal barrier damage and further lead to systemic inflammation. The underlying mechanism may be associated with the intestinal oxidative stress injury. PMID:27493661

  16. Chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... 2012_CKD_GL.pdf . McCullough PA. Interface between renal disease ... patients with kidney failure. N Engl J Med . 2010;362(14):1312- ...

  17. Severe metabolic alkalosis and recurrent acute on chronic kidney injury in a patient with Crohn's disease

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    Schmid Axel

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrhea is common in patients with Crohn's disease and may be accompanied by acid base disorders, most commonly metabolic acidosis due to intestinal loss of bicarbonate. Case Presentation Here, we present a case of severe metabolic alkalosis in a young patient suffering from M. Crohn. The patient had undergone multiple resections of the intestine and suffered from chronic kidney disease. He was now referred to our clinic for recurrent acute kidney injury, the nature of which was pre-renal due to profound volume depletion. Renal failure was associated with marked hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis which only responded to high volume repletion and high dose blockade of gastric hypersecretion. Intestinal failure with stomal fluid losses of up to 5.7 litres per day required port implantation to commence parenteral nutrition. Fluid and electrolyte replacement rapidly improved renal function and acid base homeostasis. Conclusions This case highlights the important role of gastrointestinal function to maintain acid base status in patients with Crohn's disease.

  18. Chronic Kidney Disease

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    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  19. Novel Imaging Techniques in Acute Kidney Injury

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    Kalantarinia, Kambiz

    2009-01-01

    Imaging of the kidneys can provide valuable information in the work up and management of acute kidney injury. Several different imaging modalities are used to gather information on anatomy of the kidney, to rule out obstruction, differentiate acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease and to obtain information on renal blood flow and GFR. Ultrasound is the most widely used imaging modality used in the initial work up of AKI. The utility of contrast enhanced computerized tomography a...

  20. Clinical value of renal injury biomarkers in diagnosis of chronic kidney disease

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    Cheng-lu ZHANG

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the levels of renal injury biomarkers in patients with chronic kidney disease(CKD and evaluate their clinical significances in diagnosis of CKD.Methods A total of 66 subjects(37 patients with CKD and 29 healthy individuals were involved in this study.Serum blood urea nitrogen(SBUN was determined by Glutamate dehydrogenase method;serum creatinine(SCr and urinary creatinine(UCr were detected by sarcosine oxidase method;serum uric acid(SUA was measured by uricase colorimetry;serum cystatin C(Cys C and urinary microalbumin(UmAlbwere analyzed by immunological transmission turbidimetry;urinary protein(U-PROwas measured by Coomassies Brilliant Blue(CBB assay.The UmAlb and U-PRO levels were expressed in units of mg/mmolUCr.Results The results of independent samples t test indicated that significant differences were found in SBUN,SCr,SUA,Cys C,UmAlb and U-PRO(P < 0.05 between patient group and healthy control group.The evaluation of diagnostic effects showed that the areas under the curve at ROC plot for SBUN,SCr,SUA,Cys C,UmAlb and U-PRO were 0.907,0.912,0.742,0.982,0.984 and 0.991,respectively.Conclusions U-PRO,UmAlb and Cys C are ideal biomarkers,SCr and SBUN come next,SUA is the weakest when the above biomarkers are applied to evaluate the renal injury and its severity of the patients with CKD.

  1. Angiostatin overexpression is associated with an improvement in chronic kidney injury by an anti-inflammatory mechanism.

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    Mu, Wei; Long, David A; Ouyang, Xiaosen; Agarwal, Anupam; Cruz, Pedro E; Roncal, Carlos A; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Yu, Xueqing; Hauswirth, William W; Johnson, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Angiostatin, a proteolytic fragment of plasminogen, is a potent anti-angiogenic factor recently shown also to have an inhibitory effect on leukocyte recruitment and macrophage migration. Because both angiogenesis and inflammation play key roles in the progression of chronic kidney disease, we evaluated the effect of angiostatin treatment in the rat remnant kidney model. Rats were pretreated for 4 wk with recombinant adeno-associated viruses expressing either angiostatin or green fluorescence protein. Chronic renal disease was then induced by a subtotal nephrectomy, and rats were killed 8 wk later for analysis. Angiostatin treatment was associated with significantly less proteinuria but no alterations in serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, and blood urea nitrogen levels. Treatment with angiostatin reduced renal peritubular capillary number and decreased urinary nitric oxide levels. Despite reducing capillary density, angiostatin diminished interstitial fibrosis in association with reduced macrophage and T-cell infiltration and renal monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 mRNA levels. In conclusion, angiostatin overexpression was associated with attenuated renal disease progression in a model of chronic kidney injury, likely because of its anti-inflammatory actions. However, its anti-angiogenic actions suggest countering effects that could partially offset its benefit in chronic kidney diseases. PMID:18971211

  2. Kidney injury in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Krag, Aleksander; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequent in patients with cirrhosis. AKI and hyponatraemia are major determinants of the poor prognosis in advanced cirrhosis. The hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) denotes a functional and potential reversible impairment of renal function. Type 1 HRS, a special type of AKI...

  3. Contrast-associated Acute Kidney Injury.

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    Weisbord, Steven D; Palevsky, Paul M

    2015-10-01

    Contrast-associated acute kidney injury (CAAKI) is a common iatrogenic condition. The principal risk factors for CAAKI are underlying renal impairment; diabetes in the setting of kidney disease; and intravascular volume depletion, effective or absolute. CAAKI is associated with serious adverse short-term and long-term outcomes, including mortality and more rapidly progressive chronic kidney disease, although the causal nature of these associations remains unproved. Patients with chronic kidney disease and other risk factors for CAAKI who present with acute coronary syndrome should undergo indicated angiographic procedures.

  4. Unilateral Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion as a Robust Model for Acute to Chronic Kidney Injury in Mice.

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    Nathalie Le Clef

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is an underestimated, yet important risk factor for development of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Even after initial total recovery of renal function, some patients develop progressive and persistent deterioration of renal function and these patients are more likely to progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Animal models are indispensable for unravelling the mechanisms underlying this progression towards CKD and ESRD and for the development of new therapeutic strategies in its prevention or treatment. Ischemia (i.e. hypoperfusion after surgery, bleeding, dehydration, shock, or sepsis is a major aetiology in human AKI, yet unilateral ischemia-reperfusion is a rarely used animal model for research on CKD and fibrosis. Here, we demonstrate in C57Bl/6J mice, by both histology and gene expression, that unilateral ischemia-reperfusion without contralateral nephrectomy is a very robust model to study the progression from acute renal injury to long-term tubulo-interstitial fibrosis, i.e. the histopathological hallmark of CKD. Furthermore, we report that the extent of renal fibrosis, in terms of Col I, TGFβ, CCN2 and CCN3 expression and collagen I immunostaining, increases with increasing body temperature during ischemia and ischemia-time. Thus, varying these two main determinants of ischemic injury allows tuning the extent of the long-term fibrotic outcome in this model. Finally, in order to cover the whole practical finesse of ischemia-reperfusion and allow model and data transfer, we provide a referenced overview on crucial technical issues (incl. anaesthesia, analgesia, and pre- and post-operative care with the specific aim of putting starters in the right direction of implementing ischemia in their research and stimulate them, as well as the community, to have a critical view on ischemic literature data.

  5. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation on Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) . This recommendation ...

  6. A nationwide survey of clinical characteristics, management, and outcomes of acute kidney injury (AKI) - patients with and without preexisting chronic kidney disease have different prognoses.

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    Pan, Heng-Chih; Wu, Pei-Chen; Wu, Vin-Cent; Yang, Ya-Fei; Huang, Tao-Min; Shiao, Chih-Chung; Chen, Te-Chuan; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Lin, Jui-Hsiang; Yang, Wei-Shun; Sun, Chiao-Yin; Lin, Chan-Yu; Chu, Tzong-Shinn; Wu, Mai-Szu; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Chen, Yung-Chang; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2016-09-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in hospitalized patients. The International Society of Nephrology implemented the "0 by 25" initiative aimed at preventing deaths from treatable AKI worldwide by 2025 and conducted a global snapshot survey in 2014. We joined in the project and conducted this study to compare the epidemiology, risk factors, and prognosis between patients with pure AKI and those with acute-on-chronic kidney disease (ACKD). In this study, we prospectively collected demographic parameters and data on clinical characteristics, baseline comorbidities, management, and outcomes of 201 AKI patients in 18 hospitals in Taiwan from September 2014 to November 2014. The in-hospital mortality rate was 16%. AKI was mostly attributed to sepsis (52%). Multivariate logistic regression indicated that oliguria was a positive independent predictor of in-hospital mortality, whereas preexisting CKD and exposure to nephrotoxic agents were negative independent predictors. The prevalence of vasopressor use, intensive care unit care, and mortality were significantly higher in pure AKI patients than in ACKD patients. Moreover, serum creatinine (SCr) levels significantly increased within 7 days after AKI diagnosis in nonsurvivors but not in survivors in the pure AKI group. By contrast, SCr levels were persistently lower in nonsurvivors than in survivors in the ACKD group during the same period. We thus determined that the prognosis of ACKD patients differed from that of pure AKI patients. Considering the CKD history in the future AKI staging system may improve prognosis prediction. PMID:27684854

  7. Subcutis calcinosis caused by injection of calcium-containing heparin in a chronic kidney injury patient

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    Lilia Ben Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Subcutis calcinosis, characterized by abnormal calcium deposits in the skin, is a rare complication of using calcium-containing heparin occurring in patients with advanced renal failure. We report the case of an 83-year-old female, a known case of chronic kidney disease (CKD for four years with recent worsening of renal failure requiring hospitalization and hemodialysis. She developed subcutis calcinosis following injection of calcium-containing heparin. Biochemical tests showed serum parathormone level at 400 pg/dL, hypercalcemia, elevated calcium-phosphate product and monoclonal gammopathy related to multiple myeloma. She developed firm subcu-taneous nodules in the abdomen and the thighs, the injection sites of Calciparin ® (calcium nadroparin that was given as a preventive measure against deep vein thrombosis. The diagnosis of subcutis calcinosis was confirmed by the histological examination showing calcium deposit in the dermis and hypodermis. These lesions completely disappeared after discontinuing calcium nadro-parin injections. Subcutis calcinosis caused by injections of calcium-containing heparin is rare, and, to the best our knowledge, not more than 12 cases have been reported in the literature. Pathogenesis is not well established but is attributed to the calcium disorders usually seen in advanced renal failure. Diagnosis is confirmed by histological tests. Outcome is mostly favorable. The main differential diagnosis is calciphylaxis, which has a poor prognosis. Even though rarely reported, we should be aware that CKD patients with elevated calcium-phosphorus product can develop subcutis calcinosis induced by calcium-containing heparin. When it occurs, fortunately and unlike calci-phylaxis, outcome is favorable.

  8. Subcutis calcinosis caused by injection of calcium-containing heparin in a chronic kidney injury patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatma, Lilia Ben; El Ati, Zohra; Azzouz, Haifa; Rais, Lamia; Krid, Madiha; Smaoui, Wided; Maiz, Hédi Ben; Béji, Soumaya; Zouaghi, Karim; Zitouna, Moncef; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2014-09-01

    Subcutis calcinosis, characterized by abnormal calcium deposits in the skin, is a rare complication of using calcium-containing heparin occurring in patients with advanced renal failure. We report the case of an 83-year-old female, a known case of chronic kidney disease (CKD) for four years with recent worsening of renal failure requiring hospitalization and hemodialysis. She developed subcutis calcinosis following injection of calcium-containing heparin. Biochemical tests showed serum parathormone level at 400 pg/dL, hypercalcemia, elevated calcium-phosphate product and monoclonal gammopathy related to multiple myeloma. She developed firm subcutaneous nodules in the abdomen and the thighs, the injection sites of Calciparin ® (calcium nadroparin) that was given as a preventive measure against deep vein thrombosis. The diagnosis of subcutis calcinosis was confirmed by the histological examination showing calcium deposit in the dermis and hypodermis. These lesions completely disappeared after discontinuing calcium nadroparin injections. Subcutis calcinosis caused by injections of calcium-containing heparin is rare, and, to the best our knowledge, not more than 12 cases have been reported in the literature. Pathogenesis is not well established but is attributed to the calcium disorders usually seen in advanced renal failure. Diagnosis is confirmed by histological tests. Outcome is mostly favorable. The main differential diagnosis is calciphylaxis, which has a poor prognosis. Even though rarely reported, we should be aware that CKD patients with elevated calcium-phosphorus product can develop subcutis calcinosis induced by calcium-containing heparin. When it occurs, fortunately and unlike calciphylaxis, outcome is favorable. PMID:25193911

  9. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from our online catalog. Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page ... What you need to know Because you have chronic kidney disease, you should take steps to protect your kidneys. ...

  10. Perioperative acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvert Stacey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI is a serious complication in the perioperative period, and is consistently associated with increased rates of mortality and morbidity. Two major consensus definitions have been developed in the last decade that allow for easier comparison of trial evidence. Risk factors have been identified in both cardiac and general surgery and there is an evolving role for novel biomarkers. Despite this, there has been no real change in outcomes and the mainstay of treatment remains preventive with no clear evidence supporting any therapeutic intervention as yet. This review focuses on definition, risk factors, the emerging role of biomarkers and subsequent management of AKI in the perioperative period, taking into account new and emerging strategies.

  11. Angiostatin overexpression is associated with an improvement in chronic kidney injury by an anti-inflammatory mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Mu, Wei; Long, David A.; Ouyang, Xiaosen; Agarwal, Anupam; Cruz, Pedro E; Roncal, Carlos A.; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Yu, Xueqing; Hauswirth, William W.; Johnson, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Angiostatin, a proteolytic fragment of plasminogen, is a potent anti-angiogenic factor recently shown also to have an inhibitory effect on leukocyte recruitment and macrophage migration. Because both angiogenesis and inflammation play key roles in the progression of chronic kidney disease, we evaluated the effect of angiostatin treatment in the rat remnant kidney model. Rats were pretreated for 4 wk with recombinant adeno-associated viruses expressing either angiostatin or green fluorescence ...

  12. Hyperphosphatemia of Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hruska, Keith A.; Mathew, Suresh; Lund, Richard; Qiu, Ping; Pratt, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Observational studies have determined hyperphosphatemia to be a cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Mechanistic studies have elucidated that hyperphosphatemia is a direct stimulus to vascular calcification, which is one cause of morbid cardiovascular events contributing to the excess mortality of chronic kidney disease. This review describes the pathobiology of hyperphosphatemia that develops as a consequence of positive phosphate balance in chronic kidney disease and the me...

  13. Acute kidney injury in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merouani, A; Flechelles, O; Jouvet, P

    2012-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 5% of critically ill hospitalized children and is a risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality. The current review focuses on new definitions of acute kidney injury, standardized to reflect the entire spectrum of the disease, as well as on ongoing research to identify early biomarkers of kidney injury. Its also provides an overview of current practice and available therapies, with emphasis on new strategies for the prevention and pharmacological treatment of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome. Furthermore, a decision-making algorithm is presented for the use of renal replacement therapies in critically ill children with AKI. PMID:22495187

  14. [Ascites and acute kidney injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, Salvatore; Tonon, Marta; Angeli, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Ascites is the most common complication of cirrhosis. Ascites develops as a consequence of an abnormal splanchnic vasodilation with reduction of effecting circulating volume and activation of endogenous vasoconstrictors system causing salt and water retention. Patients with ascites have a high risk to develop further complications of cirrhosis such as hyponatremia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and acute kidney injury resulting in a poor survival. In recent years, new studies helped a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ascites and acute kidney injury in cirrhosis. Furthermore, new diagnostic criteria have been proposed for acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome and a new algorithm for their management has been recommended with the aim of an early diagnosis and treatment. Herein we will review the current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of ascites and acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and we will identify the unmet needs that should be clarified in the next years.

  15. [Ascites and acute kidney injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, Salvatore; Tonon, Marta; Angeli, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Ascites is the most common complication of cirrhosis. Ascites develops as a consequence of an abnormal splanchnic vasodilation with reduction of effecting circulating volume and activation of endogenous vasoconstrictors system causing salt and water retention. Patients with ascites have a high risk to develop further complications of cirrhosis such as hyponatremia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and acute kidney injury resulting in a poor survival. In recent years, new studies helped a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ascites and acute kidney injury in cirrhosis. Furthermore, new diagnostic criteria have been proposed for acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome and a new algorithm for their management has been recommended with the aim of an early diagnosis and treatment. Herein we will review the current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of ascites and acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and we will identify the unmet needs that should be clarified in the next years. PMID:27571467

  16. Perioperative acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, O; Matot, I

    2015-12-01

    Perioperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is not uncommon and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Recently, several definition systems for AKI were proposed, incorporating both small changes of serum creatinine and urinary output reduction as diagnostic criteria. Novel biomarkers are under investigation as fast and accurate predictors of AKI. Several special considerations regarding the risk of AKI are of note in the surgical patient. Co-morbidities are important risk factors for AKI. The surgery in itself, especially emergency and major surgery in the critically ill, is associated with a high incidence of AKI. Certain types of surgeries, such as cardiac and transplantation surgeries, require special attention because they carry higher risk of AKI. Nephrotoxic drugs, contrast dye, and diuretics are commonly used in the perioperative period and are responsible for a significant amount of in-hospital AKI. Before surgery, the anaesthetist is required to identify patients at risk of AKI, optimize anaemia, and treat hypovolaemia. During surgery, normovolaemia is of utmost importance. Additionally, the surgical and anaesthesia team is advised to use measures to reduce blood loss and avoid unnecessary blood transfusion. Hypotension should be avoided because even short periods of mean arterial pressure patients. Urine output can be reduced significantly during surgery and is unrelated to perioperative renal function. Thus, fluids should not be given in excess for the sole purpose of avoiding or treating oliguria. Use of hydroxyethyl starch needs to be reconsidered. Recent evidence indicates a beneficial effect of administering low-chloride solutions. PMID:26658199

  17. Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Linagliptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandikanti, Deepak K; Gosmanova, Elvira O; Gosmanov, Aidar R

    2016-01-01

    Linagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. About 5% of linagliptin is eliminated by the kidneys and no dose adjustment is recommended in kidney impairment. We report a first case of linagliptin-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) in a patient with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD). We hypothesize that AKI was due to renal hypoperfusion from linagliptin-induced natriuresis and intravascular volume contraction in the setting of concomitant lisinopril use, which is known to impair autoregulation and potentiate hypotension-induced AKI. It may be prudent to exert caution and closely monitor kidney function when initiating linagliptin in combination with ACE-inhibitors in CKD patients. PMID:26981294

  18. Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Linagliptin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak K. Nandikanti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Linagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. About 5% of linagliptin is eliminated by the kidneys and no dose adjustment is recommended in kidney impairment. We report a first case of linagliptin-associated acute kidney injury (AKI in a patient with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD. We hypothesize that AKI was due to renal hypoperfusion from linagliptin-induced natriuresis and intravascular volume contraction in the setting of concomitant lisinopril use, which is known to impair autoregulation and potentiate hypotension-induced AKI. It may be prudent to exert caution and closely monitor kidney function when initiating linagliptin in combination with ACE-inhibitors in CKD patients.

  19. Nephrology Update: Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabu, Nagaraju; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) refers to any acute decrease in glomerular filtration rate, regardless of etiology. Staging of AKI has been recommended to stratify AKI patients according to severity of the condition, based on serum creatinine level and urine output. Classification of AKI into prerenal, intrinsic renal, and postrenal etiologies is helpful in differential diagnosis and management. AKI in hospitalized patients typically occurs due to decreased renal perfusion. Drug-induced, contrast-associated, postoperative, and sepsis-associated AKI also can occur. Clinical assessment of a patient with AKI involves a medical record review, thorough history and physical examination, urinary and blood tests, renal imaging, and, in some instances, renal biopsy. Contrast-induced nephropathy is a common iatrogenic etiology of AKI associated with administration of intravenous iodinated contrast media. Measures to prevent AKI should be taken before administration of intravenous iodinated contrast. AKI can result in many short- and long-term complications, including chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. Appropriate treatment of AKI patients involves management of the underlying etiology, when possible, and use of nondialytic and dialytic therapies. PMID:27163760

  20. Acute-on-Chronic Kidney Injury in Thyroid Hormone Withdrawal: A Case with Possible Implications for Radioactive Iodine Planning

    OpenAIRE

    McAninch, Elizabeth A.; Lagari, Violet S.

    2015-01-01

    The association between renal dysfunction and hypothyroidism is of increasing clinical importance as thyroid hormone replacement may attenuate decline in renal function and improve cardiovascular outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although multiple mechanisms for the induction of renal insufficiency in hypothyroidism have been described, the renal impact of short-term, acute hypothyroidism is unknown, which has possible implications for thyroid cancer patients preparing t...

  1. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... York Golf Classic The 11th Annual New York Golf Classic Each August, supporters in our Northeast Region hit the links in support of AKF. Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Learn about our signature outreach event. Free health screenings ...

  2. Radiation-Associated Kidney Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kidneys are the dose-limiting organs for radiotherapy to upper abdominal cancers and during total body irradiation. The incidence of radiotherapy-associated kidney injury is likely underreported owing to its long latency and because the toxicity is often attributed to more common causes of kidney injury. The pathophysiology of radiation injury is poorly understood. Its presentation can be acute and irreversible or subtle, with a gradual progressive dysfunction over years. A variety of dose and volume parameters have been associated with renal toxicity and are reviewed to provide treatment guidelines. The available predictive models are suboptimal and require validation. Mitigation of radiation nephropathy with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and other compounds has been shown in animal models and, more recently, in patients.

  3. Risk Factors for Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Webinars Tips & Stories Links & Resources Learn About Chronic Kidney Disease Kidney Glossary Ask Our Expert Toll-Free Helpline: ... Questions What You Can Do Download all the chronic kidney disease information presented here. Preview Our CKD Booklets Stage ...

  4. Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sarvesh Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. The definition, staging, risk factors, biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury in children is detailed in the following review article.

  5. Diet - chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this special diet to limit the buildup of waste products in the body. Limiting fluids between dialysis ... up when the kidneys no longer function well. Dangerous heart rhythms may result, which can lead to ...

  6. Acute Kidney Injury in the Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Palevsky, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The aging kidney undergoes a number of important anatomic and physiologic changes that increase the risk of acute kidney injury (formerly acute renal failure) in the elderly. This article reviews these changes and discusses the diagnoses frequently encountered in the elderly patient with acute kidney injury. The incidence, staging, evaluation, management, and prognosis of acute kidney injury are also examined with special focus given to older adults.

  7. Kidneys in chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Hartleb; Krzysztof Gutkowski

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI),defined as an abrupt increase in the serum creatinine level by at least 0.3 mg/dL,occurs in about 20% of patients hospitalized for decompensating liver cirrhosis.Patients with cirrhosis are susceptible to developing AKI because of the progressive vasodilatory state,reduced effective blood volume and stimulation of vasoconstrictor hormones.The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis are pre-renal azotemia,hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular necrosis.Differential diagnosis is based on analysis of circumstances of AKI development,natriuresis,urine osmolality,response to withdrawal of diuretics and volume repletion,and rarely on renal biopsy.Chronic glomeruIonephritis and obstructive uropathy are rare causes of azotemia in cirrhotic patients.AKI is one of the last events in the natural history of chronic liver disease,therefore,such patients should have an expedited referral for liver transplantation.Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is initiated by progressive portal hypertension,and may be prematurely triggered by bacterial infections,nonbacterial systemic inflammatory reactions,excessive diuresis,gastrointestinal hemorrhage,diarrhea or nephrotoxic agents.Each type of renal disease has a specific treatment approach ranging from repletion of the vascular system to renal replacement therapy.The treatment of choice in type 1 hepatorenal syndrome is a combination of vasoconstrictor with albumin infusion,which is effective in about 50% of patients.The second-line treatment of HRS involves a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt,renal vasoprotection or systems of artificial liver support.

  8. The Kidney-Vascular-Bone Axis in the Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Michael E; Hruska, Keith A

    2016-03-01

    The last 25 years have been characterized by dramatic improvements in short-term patient and allograft survival after kidney transplantation. Long-term patient and allograft survival remains limited by cardiovascular disease and chronic allograft injury, among other factors. Cardiovascular disease remains a significant contributor to mortality in native chronic kidney disease as well as cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease more than doubles that of the general population. The chronic kidney disease (CKD)-mineral bone disorder (MBD) is a syndrome recently coined to embody the biochemical, skeletal, and cardiovascular pathophysiology that results from disrupting the complex systems biology between the kidney, skeleton, and cardiovascular system in native and transplant kidney disease. The CKD-MBD is a unique kidney disease-specific syndrome containing novel cardiovascular risk factors, with an impact reaching far beyond traditional notions of renal osteodystrophy and hyperparathyroidism. This overview reviews current knowledge of the pathophysiology of the CKD-MBD, including emerging concepts surrounding the importance of circulating pathogenic factors released from the injured kidney that directly cause cardiovascular disease in native and transplant chronic kidney disease, with potential application to mechanisms of chronic allograft injury and vasculopathy.

  9. Chronic Kidney Isograft and Allograft Rejection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严群; 张鹏; 杨传永

    2002-01-01

    Summary: In this study antigen-independent factor in the pathogenesis of chronic rejection of organ transplants was examined. Kidney isografts and allografts were transplanted orthotopically into bilaterally nephroectomized rat recipients and studied functionally, morphologically and immunohistologically, at serial intervals up to 52 weeks after transplantation. Allograft recipients developed progressive proteinuria after 12 weeks, with gradual renal failure ultimately leading to death. At the same time, morphological changes, including progressive arteriosclerosis and glomerulosclerosis, tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis, developed. Immunohistologically, macrophages infiltrated glomeruli during this period and cytokines became unregulated. Our resuits showed that antigen-independent functional and morphological changes occurred in long-term kidney isografts and mimicked those appearing much earlier in allografts that reject chronically.Initial injury and extent of functioning renal mass is suggested to be important factor for such late changes.

  10. Metformin in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James

    2014-01-01

    Metformin has traditionally been regarded as contraindicated in chronic kidney disease (CKD), though guidelines in recent years have been relaxed to permit therapy if the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is > 30 mL/min. The main problem is the perceived risk of lactic acidosis (LA). Epidemiological...

  11. Berberine ameliorates chronic kidney injury caused by atherosclerotic renovascular disease through the suppression of NFκB signaling pathway in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Impaired renal function in atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARD may be the result of crosstalk between atherosclerotic renovascular stenosis and amplified oxidative stress, inflammation and fibrosis. Berberine (BBR regulates cholesterol metabolism and exerts antioxidant effects. Accordingly, we hypothesized that BBR treatment may ameliorate ARD-induced kidney injury through its cholesterol-lowering effect and also suppression of the pathways involved in oxidative stress, inflammation and NFκB activation. METHODS: Male rats were subjected to unilateral renal artery stenosis with silver-irritant coil, and then fed with 12-week hypercholesterolemic diet. Rats with renal artery stenosis were randomly assigned to two groups (n = 6 each - ARD, or ARD+BBR - according to diet alone or in combination with BBR. Similarly, age-matched rats underwent sham operation and were also fed with hypercholesterolemic diet alone or in combination with BBR as two corresponding controls. Single-kidney hemodynamic metrics were measured in vivo with Doppler ultrasound to determine renal artery flow. The metrics reflecting hyperlipidemia, oxidative stress, renal structure and function, inflammation and NFκB activation were measured, respectively. RESULTS: Compared with control rats, ARD rats had a significant increase in urinary albumin, plasma cholesterol, LDL and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS and a significant decrease in SOD activity. When exposed to 12-week BBR, ARD rats had significantly lower levels in blood pressure, LDL, urinary albumin, and TBARS. In addition, there were significantly lower expression levels of iNOS and TGF-β in the ARD+BBR group than in the ARD group, with attenuated NFκB-DNA binding activity and down-regulated protein levels of subunits p65 and p50 as well as IKKβ. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that BBR can improve hypercholesterolemia and redox status in the kidney, eventually ameliorating

  12. The cell cycle and acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Peter M.; Safirstein, Robert L.; Megyesi, Judit

    2009-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) activates pathways of cell death and cell proliferation. Although seemingly discrete and unrelated mechanisms, these pathways can now be shown to be connected and even to be controlled by similar pathways. The dependence of the severity of renal-cell injury on cell cycle pathways can be used to control and perhaps to prevent acute kidney injury. This review is written to address the correlation between cellular life and death in kidney tubules, especially in acute ki...

  13. Association between the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system and renal injury in chronic kidney disease of dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Sawane; Yabuki, Akira; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-02-01

    The association of renin and angiotensin II, which are potent components of the renin-angiotensin system, with the severity of chronic renal disease was investigated immunohistochemically in dogs and cats. Immunoreactivities of renin and angiotensin II were evaluated quantitatively, and their correlations with the degrees of glomerulosclerosis, glomerular hypertrophy, interstitial cell infiltration and interstitial fibrosis were statistically analyzed. Immunoreactivities for renin were detected in afferent arteries in both dogs and cats. The score of renin-positive signals showed no correlation with plasma creatinine concentration or any of the histopathological parameters, except for the diameter of glomeruli in dogs. Immunoreactivities for angiotensin II were detected in tubules (primarily proximal tubules) and interstitial mononuclear cells in both dogs and cats. The score of tubular angiotensin II correlated with glomerulosclerosis and cell infiltration in cats but not in dogs. The score of interstitial angiotensin II correlated with plasma creatinine concentration, glomerulosclerosis, cell infiltration and fibrosis in dogs and with glomerulosclerosis and cell infiltration in cats. In conclusion, the results of the study suggest that intrarenal renin-angiotensin system is correlated with the severity of kidney disease, with the underlying mechanism differing between dogs and cats. PMID:22986274

  14. Lower blood glucose and variability are associated with earlier recovery from renal injury caused by episodic urinary tract infection in advanced type 2 diabetic chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Fang Chiu

    Full Text Available In our previous study, type 2 diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD patients with glomerular filtration rates of 9 days, Group B groups. The differences in the continuous and categorical variables of the two groups were assessed separately. The mean glucose levels and their variability (using the standard deviation and the coefficient of standard deviation were compared at the fasting, midday pre-meal, evening pre-meal, and evening post-meal time points during hospitalization. We have organized the manuscript in a manner compliant with the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology statement.Acute kidney injury occurred within the two groups (p = 0.007 and p = 0.001, respectively. The early-morning blood glucose levels (149.7±44.0 mg/dL and average blood glucose levels (185.6±52.0 mg/dL were better in Group A (p = 0.01, p = 0.02. Group A patients also had lower glucose variability than Group B at the different time points (p<0.05. Group A also had earlier renal recovery. More relevant pathogens were identified from blood in Group B (p = 0.038.Early-morning fasting and mean blood glucose levels and their variability can be good indicators of severe infection and predictors of renal outcome in type 2 diabetic patients with CKD and UTI.

  15. Acute kidney injury in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peco-Antić Amira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a clinical condition considered to be the consequence of a sudden decrease (>25% or discontinuation of renal function. The term AKI is used instead of the previous term acute renal failure, because it has been demonstrated that even minor renal lesions may cause far-reaching consequences on human health. Contemporary classifications of AKI (RIFLE and AKIN are based on the change of serum creatinine and urinary output. In the developed countries, AKI is most often caused by renal ischemia, nephrotoxins and sepsis, rather than a (primary diffuse renal disease, such as glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, renovascular disorder and thrombotic microangiopathy. The main risk factors for hospital AKI are mechanical ventilation, use of vasoactive drugs, stem cell transplantation and diuretic-resistant hypervolemia. Prerenal and parenchymal AKI (previously known as acute tubular necrosis jointly account for 2/3 of all AKI causes. Diuresis and serum creatinine concentration are not early diagnostic markers of AKI. Potential early biomarkers of AKI are neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, cystatin C, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1, interleukins 6, 8 and 18, and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP. Early detection of kidney impairment, before the increase of serum creatinine, is important for timely initiated therapy and recovery. The goal of AKI treatment is to normalize the fluid and electrolyte status, as well as the correction of acidosis and blood pressure. Since a severe fluid overload resistant to diuretics and inotropic agents is associated with a poor outcome, the initiation of dialysis should not be delayed. The mortality rate of AKI is highest in critically ill children with multiple organ failure and hemodynamically unstable patients.

  16. Kidney Stones and the Risk for Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rule, Andrew D.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Melton, L. Joseph; Li, Xujian; Amy L. Weaver; Lieske, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Kidney stones lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD) in people with rare hereditary disorders (e.g., primary hyperoxaluria, cystinuria), but it is unknown whether kidney stones are an important risk factor for CKD in the general population.

  17. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Kidney Injury: Present Status

    OpenAIRE

    Hai Ying Zhou; Tian Wu Chen; Xiao Ming Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of hospitalization that is characterized by a sudden loss of renal excretory function and associated with the subsequent development of chronic kidney disease, poor prognosis, and increased mortality. Although the pathophysiology of renal functional impairment in the setting of AKI remains poorly understood, previous studies have identified changes in renal hemodynamics, perfusion, and oxygenation as key factors in the development and progres...

  18. HIV and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naicker, Saraladevi; Rahmanian, Sadaf; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a frequent complication of HIV infection, occurring in 3.5 - 48.5%, and occurs as a complication of HIV infection, other co-morbid disease and infections and as a consequence of therapy of HIV infection and its complications. The classic involvement of the kidney by HIV infection is HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN), occurring typically in young adults of African ancestry with advanced HIV disease in association with APOL1 high-risk variants. HIV-immune complex disease is the second most common diagnosis obtained from biopsies of patients with HIV-CKD. CKD is mediated by factors related to the virus, host genetic predisposition and environmental factors. The host response to HIV infection may influence disease phenotype through activation of cytokine pathways. With the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART), there has been a decline in the incidence of HIVAN, with an increasing prevalence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Several studies have demonstrated the overall improvement in kidney function when initiating ART for HIV CKD. Progression to end stage kidney disease has been reported to be more likely when high grade proteinuria, severely reduced eGFR, hepatitis B and/C co-infection, diabetes mellitus, extensive glomerulosclerosis, and chronic interstitial fibrosis are present. Improved renal survival is associated with use of renin angiotensin system blockers and viral suppression. Many antiretroviral medications are partially or completely eliminated by the kidney and require dose adjustment in CKD. Certain drug classes, such as the protease inhibitors and the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, are metabolized by the liver and do not require dose adjustment. HIV-infected patients requiring either hemo- or peritoneal dialysis, who are stable on ART, are achieving survival rates comparable to those of dialysis patients without HIV infection. Kidney transplantation has been performed successfully in HIV

  19. Controversies in Chronic Kidney Disease Staging

    OpenAIRE

    Polkinghorne, Kevan R

    2011-01-01

    In 2002, a new chronic kidney disease staging system was developed by the US National Kidney Foundation. The classification system represented a new conceptual framework for the diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (moving to a schema based on disease severity defined by the glomerular filtration rate). While the introduction of the staging system stimulated significant clinical and research interest in kidney disease, there has been vigorous debate on its merits. This mini-review aims to summ...

  20. Acute Kidney Injury – An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Varrier

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of acute kidney injury (AKI occurs frequently in hospitalised patients, leading to increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare expenditure. In the context of a precipitating insult, disturbances in both global and microcirculatory renal blood flow, tubular cell damage, and activation of pro- inflammatory pathways lead to impairment of numerous elements of renal function. Classification systems, including the recent ‘Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes’ (KDIGO classification, typically define and stage AKI in terms of the magnitude of rise in serum creatinine (SCr and the presence of oliguria. At present there is no cure for AKI and the key principles of its management include early recognition, haemodynamic optimisation, correction of hypovolaemia, ceasing and avoidance of nephrotoxic medications, and treatment of the underlying cause. Recent data show that the type and volume of fluid therapy can affect renal function and that further guidance is required. In the future it is hoped that novel technologies, including biomarkers and real-time measurement of glomerular filtration rate will allow the earlier identification of patients with AKI, whilst a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of AKI will lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. Despite SCr usually recovering after an episode of AKI, there is growing recognition that survivors of AKI are at an increased risk of subsequent chronic kidney disease, including end-stage renal failure and premature death.

  1. Ghrelin in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai W. Cheung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD often exhibit symptoms of anorexia and cachexia, which are associated with decreased quality of life and increased mortality. Chronic inflammation may be an important mechanism for the development of anorexia, cachexia, renal osteodystrophy, and increased cardiovascular risk in CKD. Ghrelin is a gastric hormone. The biological effects of ghrelin are mediated through the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR. The salutary effects of ghrelin on food intake and meal appreciation suggest that ghrelin could be an effective treatment for anorexic CKD patients. In addition to its appetite-stimulating effects, ghrelin has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties. The known metabolic effects of ghrelin and the potential implications in CKD will be discussed in this review. The strength, shortcomings, and unanswered questions related to ghrelin treatment in CKD will be addressed.

  2. Obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall ME

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Hall,1,2 Jussara M do Carmo,2 Alexandre A da Silva,2 Luis A Juncos,1,2 Zhen Wang,2 John E Hall2 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Mississippi Center for Obesity Research, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA Abstract: Obesity is a major risk factor for essential hypertension, diabetes, and other comorbid conditions that contribute to development of chronic kidney disease. Obesity raises blood pressure by increasing renal tubular sodium reabsorption, impairing pressure natriuresis, and causing volume expansion via activation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and by physical compression of the kidneys, especially when there is increased visceral adiposity. Other factors such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and lipotoxicity may also contribute to obesity-mediated hypertension and renal dysfunction. Initially, obesity causes renal vasodilation and glomerular hyperfiltration, which act as compensatory mechanisms to maintain sodium balance despite increased tubular reabsorption. However, these compensations, along with increased arterial pressure and metabolic abnormalities, may ultimately lead to glomerular injury and initiate a slowly developing vicious cycle that exacerbates hypertension and worsens renal injury. Body weight reduction, via caloric restriction and increased physical activity, is an important first step for management of obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. However, this strategy may not be effective in producing long-term weight loss or in preventing cardiorenal and metabolic consequences in many obese patients. The majority of obese patients require medical therapy for obesity-associated hypertension, metabolic disorders, and renal disease, and morbidly obese patients may require surgical interventions to produce sustained weight loss. Keywords: visceral adiposity, type II diabetes, sodium reabsorption

  3. Laboratory test surveillance following acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Matheny

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with hospitalized acute kidney injury (AKI are at increased risk for accelerated loss of kidney function, morbidity, and mortality. We sought to inform efforts at improving post-AKI outcomes by describing the receipt of renal-specific laboratory test surveillance among a large high-risk cohort. METHODS: We acquired clinical data from the Electronic health record (EHR of 5 Veterans Affairs (VA hospitals to identify patients hospitalized with AKI from January 1st, 2002 to December 31st, 2009, and followed these patients for 1 year or until death, enrollment in palliative care, or improvement in renal function to estimated GFR (eGFR ≥ 60 L/min/1.73 m(2. Using demographic data, administrative codes, and laboratory test data, we evaluated the receipt and timing of outpatient testing for serum concentrations of creatinine and any as well as quantitative proteinuria recommended for CKD risk stratification. Additionally, we reported the rate of phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH monitoring recommended for chronic kidney disease (CKD patients. RESULTS: A total of 10,955 patients admitted with AKI were discharged with an eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. During outpatient follow-up at 90 and 365 days, respectively, creatinine was measured on 69% and 85% of patients, quantitative proteinuria was measured on 6% and 12% of patients, PTH or phosphorus was measured on 10% and 15% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of creatinine was common among all patients following AKI. However, patients with AKI were infrequently monitored with assessments of quantitative proteinuria or mineral metabolism disorder, even for patients with baseline kidney disease.

  4. The innate immune response in ischemic acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Hye Ryoun; Rabb, Hamid

    2008-01-01

    Kidney ischemia reperfusion injury is a major cause of morbidity in both allograft and native kidneys. Ischemia reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury is characterized by early, allo-antigen independent inflammation. Major components of the innate immune system are activated and participate in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury, plus prime the allograft kidney for rejection. Soluble members of innate immunity implicated in acute kidney injury include the complement system, cytokines, an...

  5. Iron metabolism in the pathogenesis of iron-induced kidney injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martines, A.M.; Masereeuw, R.; Tjalsma, H.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Swinkels, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    In the past 8 years, there has been renewed interest in the role of iron in both acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). In patients with kidney diseases, renal tubules are exposed to a high concentration of iron owing to increased glomerular filtration of iron and iron-containin

  6. Chronic kidney disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becherucci, Francesca; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Romagnani, Paola

    2016-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem worldwide. Although relatively uncommon in children, it can be a devastating illness with many long-term consequences. CKD presents unique features in childhood and may be considered, at least in part, as a stand-alone nosologic entity. Moreover, some typical features of paediatric CKD, such as the disease aetiology or cardiovascular complications, will not only influence the child's health, but also have long-term impact on the life of the adult that they will become. In this review we will focus on the unique issues of paediatric CKD, in terms of aetiology, clinical features and treatment. In addition, we will discuss factors related to CKD that start during childhood and require appropriate treatments in order to optimize health outcomes and transition to nephrologist management in adult life. PMID:27478602

  7. Assessment of Plasma and NGAL for the Early Prediction of Acute Kidney Injury After Cardiac Surgery in Adults Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-11

    Acute Kidney Injury (AKI); Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD); End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD); Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR); Neutrophil Gelatinase-associated Lipocalin (NGAL); Serum Creatinine (SCr); Urine Creatinine (UCr); Urine Albumin (UAlb)

  8. Acute Kidney Injury due to Crescentic Glomerulonephritis in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Maggard, Reuben; Makary, Raafat; Monteiro, Carmela l.; James, Leighton R.

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease is an inherited condition, characterized by the development of cysts in the kidney, as well as in other organs. Patients with polycystic kidney can suffer from the same causes of acute kidney injury as the general population. Nephritic syndrome is an uncommon cause of acute kidney injury in the general population and less common in patients with polycystic kidney disease. We report the second case of crescentic glomerulonephritis, causing acute kidney injury, in a pa...

  9. New biomarkers of acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruya Ozelsancak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury is a clinical syndrome which is generally defined as an abrupt decline in glomerular filtration rate causing accumulation of nitrogenous products and rapid development of fluid, electrolyte and acid-base disorders. It is an important clinical problem increasing mortality in patient with several co-morbid conditions. The frequency of acute kidney injury occurrence varies from 5% on the inpatients wards to 30-50% in patients from intensive care units. Serial measurement of creatinine and urine volume do not make it possible to diagnose acute kidney injury at early stages. Serum creatinine may be influenced by age, weight, hydration status and become apparent only when the kidneys have lost 50% of their function. For that reasons we need new markers. Here, we are reviewing the most promising new acute kidney injury markers, neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin, cystatin-C, kidney injury molecule-1, liver fatty acid binding proteins and IL-18. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 221-229

  10. Spectroscopic Monitoring of Kidney Tissue Ischemic Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S G; Fitzgerald, J T; Michalopoulou, A P; Troppmann, C

    2004-03-11

    Noninvasive evaluation of tissue viability of donor kidneys used for transplantation is an issue that current technology is not able to address. In this work, we explore optical spectroscopy for its potential to assess the degree of ischemic damage in kidney tissue. We hypothesized that ischemic damage to kidney tissue will give rise to changes in its optical properties which in turn may be used to asses the degree of tissue injury. The experimental results demonstrate that the autofluorescence intensity of the injured kidney is decreasing as a function of time exposed to ischemic injury. Changes were also observed in the NIR light scattering intensities most probably arising from changes due to injury and death of the tissue.

  11. Imaging in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) diagnosis and staging are based on estimated or calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urinalysis and kidney structure at renal imaging techniques. Ultrasound (US) has a key role in evaluating both morphological changes (by means of B-Mode) and patterns of vascularization (by means of color-Doppler and contrast-enhanced US), thus contributing to CKD diagnosis and to the follow-up of its progression. In CKD, conventional US allows measuring longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness and evaluating renal echogenicity and urinary tract status. Maximum renal length is usually considered a morphological marker of CKD, as it decreases contemporarily to GFR, and should be systematically recorded in US reports. More recently, it has been found to be a significant correlation of both renal longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness with renal function. Conventional US should be integrated by color Doppler, which shows parenchymal perfusion and patency of veins and arteries, and by spectral Doppler, which is crucial for the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis and provides important information about intrarenal microcirculation. Different values of renal resistive indexes (RIs) have been associated with different primary diseases, as they reflect vascular compliance. Since RIs significantly correlate with renal function, they have been proposed to be independent risk factors for CKD progression, besides proteinuria, low GFR and arterial hypertension. Despite several new applications, US and color Doppler contribute to a definite diagnosis in <50% of cases of CKD, because of the lack of specific US patterns, especially in cases of advanced CKD. However, US is useful to evaluate CKD progression and to screen patients at risk for CKD. The indications and the recommended frequency of color Doppler US could differ in each case and the follow-up should be tailored. PMID:27170301

  12. Acute liver failure and acute kidney injury: Definitions, prognosis, and outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Włodzimirow, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to investigate definitions, prognostic indicators and their association with adverse events, mainly mortality for acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) and acute kidney injury (AKI).

  13. Ritonavir-induced acute kidney injury: kidney biopsy findings and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Shafi, T.; Choi, M.J.; Racusen, L. C.; Spacek, L. A.; Berry, C; Atta, M.; Fine, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    Ritonavir therapy is not generally considered nephrotoxic. We report a case of acute kidney injury secondary to ritonavir, with kidney biopsy demonstrating extensive acute tubular injury. This is the first report of a kidney biopsy and pathology in acute kidney injury associated with ritonavir. A review of published medical literature on the topic is also presented.

  14. Exploring metabolic dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Slee Adrian D

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Impaired kidney function and chronic kidney disease (CKD) leading to kidney failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a serious medical condition associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and in particular cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. CKD is associated with multiple physiological and metabolic disturbances, including hypertension, dyslipidemia and the anorexia-cachexia syndrome which are linked to poor outcomes. Specific hormonal, inflammatory, and nutritional-metabol...

  15. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy and Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sairam, Krish; Scoffone, Cesare M; Alken, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    by glomerular filtration rate, including chronic kidney disease stages 0/I/II-greater than 60, stage III-30 to 59 and stages IV/V-less than 30 ml/minute/1.73 m(2). Patient characteristics, operative characteristics, outcomes and morbidity were assessed. RESULTS: Estimated glomerular filtration rate data were...... available on 5,644 patients, including 4,436 with chronic kidney disease stages 0/I/II, 994 with stage III and 214 with stages IV/V. A clinically significant minority of patients with nephrolithiasis presented with severe chronic kidney disease. A greater number of patients with stages IV/V previously...... underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy, ureteroscopy or nephrostomy and had positive urine cultures than less severely affected patients, consistent with the higher incidence of staghorn stones in these patients. Patients with chronic kidney disease stages IV/V had statistically significantly worse...

  16. Nutrition in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cereals Bran cereals Egg whites Egg yolks Sorbet Ice cream Source: Phosphorous: Tips for People with Chronic Kidney ... for Scientists Current Funding Opportunities Funded Grants & Grant History Funding Process Research Programs & Contacts Research Training & Career ...

  17. A Review of Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, C D W; Bholah, R; Bunchman, T E

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is complex in both adults and children, but the disease is far from the same between these populations. Here we review the marked differences in etiology, comorbidities, impact of disease on growth and quality of life, issues unique to adolescents and transitions to adult care, and special considerations of congenital kidney and urinary tract anomalies for transplantation. PMID:26766175

  18. Malarial acute kidney injury: Prognostic markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhi Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malaria has protean clinical manifestations and acute kidney injury (AKI is one of its serious and life threatening complications. This study was carried out to describe the clinical characteristics, and factors associated with adverse outcomes, in patients with malarial AKI. Materials and Methods: Data of 100 patients with AKI and smear positive malaria was retrospectively analyzed to evaluate the incidence, clinical profile, outcome and predictors of mortality among all cases presented to us at the Nephrology unit of Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh between November 2010 to October 2011. Results were expressed as mean, standard deviation (SD and range. Results: One hundred (22.1% (68 males, 32 females cases of malaria induced AKI, amongst 452 total cases of AKI, were evaluated. The mean age (± SD was 30 ± 11.23 years. Male to female ratio was 3.3:1. Plasmodium falciparum was reported in 76%, P. vivax in 11%, and both in 13% patients. The mean serum creatinine was 8.7 ± 3.7 mg%, and oligo/anuria was present in 84% of the patients. 78% of the patients required hemodialysis. 67% of the patients recovered completely, 12% did not show full recovery, and 6% developed chronic kidney failure. Mortality occurred in 15% of the patients. Conclusion : Malarial AKI most commonly occurs in patients infected by Plasmodium Falciparum. Falciparum malaria associated with AKI is a life threatening condition. Prolonged disease duration, low hemoglobin, oligo/anuria on admission, hyperbilirubinemia, cerebral malaria, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and high serum creatinine were the main predictors of mortality in our study.

  19. Hypothyroidism causing paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Chaturaka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a patient with severe hypothyroidism complicated by paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury. A 65 year old male patient, diagnosed with hypothyroidism one year ago was transferred to our unit in a state of drowsiness and confusion. He was severely hypothyroid and had paralytic ileus and impaired renal function at the time of transfer. Hypokalaemia was present, and was likely to have contributed to the paralytic ileus and this together with dehydration was likely to have contributed to renal injury. Nonetheless, hypothyroidism is very likely to have been the principal precipitant of both these complications, and both paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury improved with thyroxine replacement. Unfortunately, the patient died unexpectedly eight days after admission to the unit. Hypothyroidism may induce de novo acute kidney injury or it may exacerbate ongoing chronic kidney disease. This rare complication is assumed to be due to the hypodynamic circulatory state created by thyroid hormone deficiency. Paralytic ileus is an even rarer fatal manifestation of hypothyroidism and is thought to be due to an autonomic neuropathy affecting the intestines that is reversible with thyroxine replacement. To our knowledge, both these complications have not been observed in a single patient so far. It is important that clinicians are aware of these rare manifestations of hypothyroidism as in most occasions, thyroxine deficiency may be missed, and treatment can reverse the complications.

  20. Clinical analysis of risk factors of acute kidney injury in patients with chronic kidney disease%慢性肾脏病基础上出现急性肾损伤相关因素的临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁利; 徐贵华; 李雁; 谢平; 陈永华; 赵晋媛; 黄艳玲; 郭洁; 曹凯

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the risk factors of patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) for the early detection and early treatment of CKD.Methods One hundred and twenty-seven CKD patients were divided into groups according to AKI existing, 60 cases with out AKI (CKD group), 67 cases with AKI (A/C group) and then A/C group patients were divided into non-older age group (35 cases, <60 years old) and older age group (32 cases, ≥60 years old).The protopathy, causative factors and so on were analyzed.Results There was different causative factors in different age group.Logistic regression model indicated that the major risk flactors of AKI in CKD were severe infection (OR = 5.236),hypovolemia (OR = 5.083 ),heart failure (OR = 8.283) and using renal toxicity medicine (OR = 5.246),P < 0.05.Conclusion The major risk factors of AKI in CKD patients include severe infection, hypovolemia, heart failure and renal toxicity medicine.%目的 探讨慢性肾脏病(CKD)基础上出现急性肾损伤(AKI)的相关危险因素,为早期干预、延缓CKD进程提供依据.方法 将127例CKD患者根据有无合并AKI分组,未合并AKI者60例(CKD组),合并AKI者67例(A/C组),再将MC组患者按年龄分组,其中<60岁35例(非老年组),≥60岁32例(老年组).就其原发病、诱发因素等进行分析.结果 不同年龄组CKD患者诱发AKI的病因有不同特点;CKD基础上出现AKI相关危险因素如严重感染、血容量不足、心力衰竭、使用肾毒性药物的OR值分别为5.236、5.083、8.283、5.246,P<0.05.结论 CKD患者易受多种因素影响,重视CKD基础上出现AKI的高危因素并及早发现,争取在短时间内纠正危险因素和保护肾功能,对延缓CKD的进程和改善患者的预后有重要意义.

  1. Age, estimated glomerular filtration rate and ejection fraction score predicts contrast-induced acute kidney injury in patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease: insight from the TRACK-D study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jing; Li Yi; Wang Xiaozeng; Yang Shuguang; Gao Chuanyu; Zhang Zheng; Yang Chengming

    2014-01-01

    Background The occurrence of contrast induced acute kidney injury (CIAKI) has a pronounced impact on morbidity and mortality.The aim of the present study was to appraise the diagnostic efficacy of age,estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and ejection fraction (AGEF) score (age/EF(%)+1 (if eGFR was <60 ml·min-1·1.73 m2)) as an predictor of CIAKI in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and concomitant chronic kidney disease (CKD).Methods The AGEF score was calculated for 2 998 patients with type 2 DM and concomitant CKD who had undergone coronary/peripheral arterial angiography.CIAKI was defined as an increase in sCr concentration of 0.5 mg/dl (44.2 mmol/L) or 25% above baseline at 72 hours after exposure to the contrast medium.Post hoc analysis was performed by stratifying the rate of CIAKI according to AGEF score tertiles.The diagnostic efficacy of the AGEF score for predicting CIAKI was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis.Results The AGEF score ranged from 0.49 to 3.09.The AGEF score tertiles were defined as follows:AGEFlow ≤0.92 (n=1 006); 0.92 <AGEFmid ≤1.16 (n=1 000),and ACEFhigh >1.16 (n=992).The incidence of CIAKI was significantly different in patients with low,middle and high AGEF scores (AGEFlow=1.1%,AGEFmid=2.3% and AGEFhigh=5.8%,P <0.001).By multivariate analysis,AGEF score was an independent predictor of CIAKI (odds ratio=4.96,95% CI:2.32-10.58,P <0.01).ROC analysis showed that the area under the curve was 0.70 (95% CI:0.648-0.753,P <0.001).Conclusion The AGEF score is effective for stratifying risk of CIAKI in patients with DM and CKD undergoing coronary/peripheral arterial angiography.

  2. Chronic kidney disease - pediatric risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasic, Velibor; Janchevska, Aleksandra; Emini, Nora; Sahpazova, Emilija; Gucev, Zoran; Polenakovic, Momir

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge about the progression of chronic kidney disease is an important issue for every pediatric nephrologist and pediatrician in order to implement appropriate measures to prevent wasting of renal function and the final consequence - end stage renal disease with the need for the dialysis and transplantation. Therefore it is important to know, treat or ameliorate the standard risk factors such as hypertension, proteinuria, anemia, hyperparathyroidism etc. In this review devoted to the World Kidney Day 2016 we will pay attention to the low birth parameters, obesity, hyperuricemia and smoking which emerged as particularly important risk factors for children and adolescent with chronic kidney disease. PMID:27442412

  3. Chronic Kidney Disease, Obesity, and Hypertension: The Role of Leptin and Adiponectin

    OpenAIRE

    Tesauro, M.; A. Mascali; Franzese, O.; Cipriani, S.; C. Cardillo; Di Daniele, N.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major public health problem and characterized by a progressive loss in renal function over a period of months or years as defined by structural or functional abnormalities of the kidney. Several elements contribute to determine a progression of the kidney injury, inducing a worsening of renal damage and accelerating the decline of renal function: obesity and hypertension are two known factors of kidney progression. Remarkable improvements have been recently achieve...

  4. Acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis due to multiple wasp stings

    OpenAIRE

    Hemachandar Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    In most patients, wasp stings cause local reactions and rarely anaphylaxis. Acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis are unusual complications of wasp stings. We report a case of acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis secondary to multiple wasp stings. A 55-year-old farmer developed multi organ dysfunction with acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis 3 days after he had sustained multiple wasp stings. The etiology of acute kidney injury is probably both rhabdomyolysis and acute tubular necrosis....

  5. Acute kidney injury following isotretinoin treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Armaly, Zaher; Haj, Shehadeh; Bowirrat, Abdalla; Alhaj, Mohammed; Jabbour, Adel; Fahoum, Yumna; Abassi, Zaid

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 17 Final Diagnosis: Acute kidney injury Symptoms: Flank pain • nausea • vomiting Medication: Isotretinoin Clinical Procedure: Acne treatment Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Unknown etiology Background: Isotretinoin is widely used for the treatment of acne that is unresponsive to topical therapy. Despite its efficacy, isotretinoin has various adverse effects, including cheilitis, increased risk of cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infections, and liver function abnormalities. C...

  6. Acute Kidney Injury: Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Briosa Neves

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common problem highly associated with hospitalisation. AKI is the cause of harmful short-term consequences: longer hospital stays, greater disability after discharge, and greater risk of in-hospital mortality, as well as adverse long-term outcomes, such as progression to chronic kidney disease, development of cardiovascular disease, and increased risk of long-term mortality. The concept of AKI has changed since the introduction of the ‘Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, End-stage kidney disease’ (RIFLE classification. More recently, the ‘Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes’ (KDIGO classification appears to have provided increased diagnostic sensitivity and outcome-prediction capability. Novel biomarkers and further research on the role of the immune system in AKI may help improve the diagnosis, severity, outcome evaluation, and treatment of the condition. In this review we describe the epidemiology, diagnosis, and prognosis of AKI, as well as possible future directions for its clinical management.

  7. The potential of alkaline phosphatase as a treatment for sepsis-associated acute kidney injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Esther; Masereeuw, R.; Pickkers, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with a high attributable mortality and an increased risk of developing chronic kidney failure in survivors. As a successful therapy is, as yet, unavailable, a pharmacological treatment option is clearly warranted. Recently, two small phase II

  8. Renal imaging in children with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wiwit Rahmawati; Heru Muryawan; Farah Prabowo

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney failure is a cause of death in children. Diagnosing chronic kidney disease is often made by clinical manifestations, laboratory findings and ultrasonography or other imaging tests. Early detection of chronic kidney disease is needed for education and management of the disease. Objective To describe renal imaging findings and mortality in children with chronic kidney disease. Methods This was a cross-sectional study on children with kidney diseases who were in...

  9. Acute Kidney Injury Classification in Neuro-ICU Patient Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Akıncı

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the role of acute kidney injury (AKI classification system for kidney injury outcome in neuro-Intensive care unit (ICU patients. Material and Method: Total 432 patients who admitted to ICU between 2005 and 2009 evaluated in this study. All patients’ AKI stage, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE-II, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Score (SOFA, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS, Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS, mortality rate, length of ICU stay, need for intubation, and mechanical ventilation were recorded. Results: AKI was found in 24 of all 432 patents’ (5.5%. We found that, patients with AKI had higher APHACE-II score, SOFA score and mortality rates; longer ICU stay, duration of mechanical ventilation and intubation and lower GCS and GOS than without AKI group. Conclusion: Length of ICU stay and mortality rate were higher in AKI positive group.

  10. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Chronic Tubulointerstitial Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tubulointerstitial diseases are a common final pathway toward chronic renal failure regardless the primary damage (glomerular, vascular or directly the tubulointerstitium). Chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (CTN) is characterized by interstitial scarring, fibrosis and tubule atrophy, resulting in progressive chronic kidney disease. Most frequent causes of CTN are drugs, heavy metals, obstructive uropathy, nephrolithiasis, reflux disease, immunologic diseases, neoplasia, ischemia, metabolic diseases, genetics and miscellaneous. At ultrasound (US), kidneys' morphological aspect is similar in all forms of chronic interstitial nephropathy and only chronic pyelonephritis with or without reflux shows distinguishing characteristics. In interstitial nephropathy, kidneys' profiles are finely irregular and corticomedullary differentiation is altered because of a diffused hyperechogenicity. The only indirect sign of chronic interstitial damage can be derived from the value of intrarenal resistive indexes that hardly overcome 0.75. US is mandatory in clinical chronic pyelonephritis work-up because it provides information on kidney's diameter and on growth nomogram in children. Renal profiles can be more or less altered depending on the number of cortical scars and the presence of pseudonodular areas of segmental compensatory hypertrophy. In the early stages, US diagnosis of renal tuberculosis is difficult because parenchymal lesions are non-specific. US sensitivity in the diagnosis of hydronephrosis is very high, close to 100% and, finally, US is the first choice imaging technique in the diagnosis of urinary lithiasis. PMID:27169608

  11. Acute kidney injury: current concepts and new insights

    OpenAIRE

    Yavuzer Koza

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Acute kidney injury, which was previously named as acute renal failure, is a complex clinical disorder and continues to be associated with poor outcomes. It is frequently seen in hospitalized patients, especially in critically ill patients. The primary causes of acute kidney injury are divided into three categories: prerenal, intrinsic renal and postrenal. The definition and staging of acute kidney injury are mainly based on the risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage kid...

  12. Mediators of Inflammation in Acute Kidney Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Akcay; Quocan Nguyen; Edelstein, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains to be an independent risk factor for mortality and morbidity. Inflammation is now believed to play a major role in the pathopathophysiology of AKI. It is hypothesized that in ischemia, sepsis and nephrotoxic models that the initial insult results in morphological and/or functional changes in vascular endothelial cells and/or in tubular epithelium. Then, leukocytes including neutrophils, macrophages, natural killer cells, and lymphocytes infiltrate into the in...

  13. Pregnancy in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellanki, Kavitha

    2013-05-01

    Despite vast improvements in fetal outcomes, pregnancy in women with CKD is fraught with hazards; worsening of renal function and complications like preeclampsia and premature delivery are common. To date, there is no accurate formula to calculate glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Also, whether the current CKD classification is better than the older classification at predicting outcomes in pregnant women with CKD is unknown. Women with an estimated GFR ≥1.4 mg/dL are at increased risk of progressive worsening of renal function regardless of the cause of the underlying kidney disease. Preeclampsia is difficult to diagnose in pregnant women with underlying CKD, and serum markers such as soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1) and placental growth factor (PIGF) may lead the way for definitive diagnosis. New-onset lupus or lupus flare is an indication for kidney biopsy during pregnancy; cyclosporine is safe and is the most effective agent that can be used during pregnancy. Women with adult polycystic kidney disease are at increased risk of hypertension and preeclampsia during pregnancy, as well as hepatic cysts later in life, the latter occurring with multiple pregnancies. Strict blood pressure control is important in pregnant women with diabetic nephropathy. A multidisciplinary team that includes nephrologists and obstetricians who deal with high-risk pregnancies should be involved in the care of pregnant women with CKD for successful pregnancy outcomes. PMID:23928386

  14. Hyperparathyroidism with hypercalcaemia in chronic kidney disease: primary or tertiary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Mitchell R; Muñoz Mendoza, Jair; Pasche, Lezlee J; Norton, Jeffrey A; Ayco, Alexander L; Chertow, Glenn M

    2010-08-01

    Objective . This study aims to highlight the challenges in the diagnosis of hyperparathyroidism (HPT) in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods . In this report, we describe a middle-aged Filipino gentleman with underlying CKD who presented with intractable nausea, vomiting, severe and medically refractory hypercalcaemia and parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations in excess of 2400 pg/mL. The underlying pathophysiology as well as the aetiologies and current relevant literature are discussed. We also suggest an appropriate diagnostic approach to identify and promptly treat patients with CKD, HPT and hypercalcaemia. Results . Evaluation confirmed the presence of a large parathyroid adenoma; HPT and hypercalcaemia resolved rapidly following resection. Conclusion . This case report is remarkable for its severe hypercalcaemia requiring haemodialysis, large adenoma size, acute-on-chronic kidney injury and markedly elevated PTH concentration in association with primary HPT in CKD.

  15. Direct renin inhibition in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Frederik; Rossing, Peter; Parving, Hans-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    that renin inhibition could hold potential for improved treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease, with diabetic nephropathy as an obvious group of patients to investigate, as the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is enhanced in these patients and as there is an unmet need....... In addition, combination treatment seemed safe and effective also in patients with impaired kidney function. These initial findings formed the basis for the design of a large morbidity and mortality trial investigating aliskiren as add-on to standard treatment. The study has just concluded, but was terminated...... early as a beneficial effect was unlikely and there was an increased frequency of side effects. Also in non-diabetic kidney disease a few intervention studies have been carried out, but there is no ongoing hard outcome study. In this review we provide the current evidence for renin inhibition in chronic...

  16. Circulating Adipocytokines and Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, Katherine T.; L Lee Hamm; A Brent Alper; Chad Miller; Alhakam Hudaihed; Saravanan Balamuthusamy; Chung-Shiuan Chen; Yanxi Liu; Joseph Tarsia; Nader Rifai; Myra Kleinpeter; Jiang He; Jing Chen

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adipokines have been associated with atherosclerotic heart disease, which shares many common risk factors with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but their relationship with CKD has not been well characterized. METHODS: We investigated the association of plasma leptin, resistin and adiponectin with CKD in 201 patients with CKD and 201 controls without. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)

  17. The Western Diet and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Divya; Vellanki, Kavitha; Kramer, Holly

    2015-03-01

    Characteristics of the Western diet that fueled the obesity epidemic may also impact kidney disease incidence and progression. Enlarging portion sizes over the past half century has been accompanied by increased intake of protein, sodium, and processed foods while consumption of fruits and vegetables has declined. Overall dietary patterns play a strong role for chronic disease risk including chronic kidney disease. While dietary patterns high in fresh fruits and vegetables and low in red meats, such as the Mediterranean diet, decrease the risk of chronic diseases, the Western diet, characterized by high intake of red meat, animal fat, sweets, and desserts and low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables and low-fat dairy products, increases risk of chronic diseases. In this article, we review the potential mechanisms whereby several key characteristics of the typical Western diet may impact kidney disease incidence and progression. We also discuss a public health policy initiative to improve dietary choices. Reducing protein intake to the recommended daily allowance of 0.8 g/kg/day and increasing intake of fruit and vegetables and fiber may mitigate kidney disease progression and reduce risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. PMID:25754321

  18. Screening of Elderly for Chronic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lezaic, Visnja; Bajcetic, Sanja; Perunicic-Pekovic, Gordana; Bukvic, Danica; Dimkovic, Nada; Djukanovic, Ljubica

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims: The frequency of chronic kidney disease (CKD) markers was assessed in two groups of patients over 60 years - one without and the other with hypertension. Methods: The cross-sectional study involved 585 asymptomatic elderly patients (227 males), 93 without and 492 with hypertensi

  19. Pathophysiology and Clinical Work-Up of Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Mario; Nalesso, Federico; Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), also known in the past as acute renal failure, is a syndrome characterized by the rapid loss of kidney excretory function. It is usually diagnosed by the accumulation of end products of nitrogen metabolism (urea and creatinine) or decreased urine output or both. AKI is the clinical consequence of several disorders that acutely affect the kidney, causing electrolytes and acid-base imbalance, hyperhydration and loss of depurative function. AKI is common in critical care patients in whom it is often secondary to extrarenal events. No specific therapies can attenuate AKI or accelerate renal function recovery; thus, the only treatment is supportive. New diagnostic techniques such as renal biomarkers might improve early diagnosis. Also ultrasonography helps nephrologists in AKI diagnosis, in order to describe and follow kidney alterations and find possible causes of AKI. Renal replacement therapy is a life-saving treatment if AKI is severe. If patients survive to AKI, and did not have previous chronic kidney disease (CKD), they typically recover to dialysis independence. However, evidence suggests that patients who have had AKI are at increased risk of subsequent CKD. PMID:27169469

  20. Myocardial Ischemia Assessment in Chronic Kidney Disease: Challenges and Pitfalls

    OpenAIRE

    Susie Fei Cen Parnham; Gleadle, Jonathan M.; De Pasquale, Carmine G; Selvanayagam, Joseph B

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the chronic kidney disease population and often presents with atypical symptoms. Current diagnostic investigations of myocardial ischemia in chronic kidney disease lack sensitivity and specificity or may have adverse effects. We present a case vignette and explore the challenges of diagnostic myocardial stress investigation in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  1. Screening for chronic kidney disease : Where does Europe go?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Paul E.; van der Velde, Marije; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Zoccali, Carmine

    2008-01-01

    This review discusses various screening approaches for chronic kidney disease that are used in Europe. The criterion for defining chronic kidney disease in the various programs differs but is frequently limited to estimated glomerular filtration rate, thus offering only data on chronic kidney diseas

  2. Chronic Kidney Disease: What Does It Mean for Me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our online catalog. Alternate Language URL Españ​ol Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Basics Page Content Chronic Kidney Disease: The ... and My Lifestyle CKD: Tracking My Test Results Chronic Kidney Disease: The Basics You've been told that you ...

  3. Renal endothelial injury and microvascular dysfunction in acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sudhanshu Kumar; Molitoris, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    The kidney is comprised of heterogeneous cell populations that function together to perform a number of tightly controlled, complex and interdependent processes. Renal endothelial cells contribute to vascular tone, regulation of blood flow to local tissue beds, modulation of coagulation and inflammation, and vascular permeability. Both ischemia and sepsis have profound effects on the renal endothelium, resulting in microvascular dysregulation resulting in continued ischemia and further injury. In recent years, the concept of the vascular endothelium as an organ that is both the source of and target for inflammatory injury has become widely appreciated. Here we revisit the renal endothelium in the light of ever evolving molecular advances. PMID:25795503

  4. Nanoparticle Detection of Urinary Markers for Point-of-Care Diagnosis of Kidney Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Jung Chung

    Full Text Available The high incidence of acute and chronic kidney injury due to various environmental factors such as heavy metals or chemicals has been a major problem in developing countries. However, the diagnosis of kidney injury in these areas can be more challenging due to the lack of highly sensitive and specific techniques that can be applied in point-of-care settings. To address this, we have developed a technique called 'micro-urine nanoparticle detection (μUNPD', that allows the detection of trace amounts of molecular markers in urine. Specifically, this technique utilizes an automated on-chip assay followed by detection with a hand-held device for the read-out. Using the μUNPD technology, the kidney injury markers KIM-1 and Cystatin C were detected down to concentrations of 0.1 ng/ml and 20 ng/ml respectively, which meets the cut-off range required to identify patients with acute or chronic kidney injury. Thus, we show that the μUNPD technology enables point of care and non-invasive detection of kidney injury, and has potential for applications in diagnosing kidney injury with high sensitivity in resource-limited settings.

  5. Acute kidney injury: A rare cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, Satish; Barki, Satish; Mishra, Mayank; Kumar, R S V; Gupta, Devika; Gupta, Pooja

    2015-09-01

    We present a young lady who consumed hair dye, which contained paraphenylene diamine (PPD), as a means of deliberate self-harm. This resulted in severe angio-neurotic edema for which she had to be ventilated, and thereafter developed rhabdomyolysis leading to acute kidney injury (AKI). The unusual aspect was that the patient continued to have flaccid quadriparesis and inability to regain kidney function. Renal biopsy performed 10 weeks after the dye consumption revealed severe acute tubular necrosis with myoglobin pigment casts. This suggests that PPD has a long-term effect leading to ongoing myoglobinuria, causing flaccid paralysis to persist and preventing the recovery of AKI. In such instances, timely treatment to prevent AKI in the form alkalinization of urine should be initiated promptly. Secondly, because PPD is a nondialyzable toxin, and its long-term effect necessitates its speedy removal, hemoperfusion might be helpful and is worth considering. PMID:26354573

  6. Acute kidney injury: A rare cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Mendonca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a young lady who consumed hair dye, which contained paraphenylene diamine (PPD, as a means of deliberate self-harm. This resulted in severe angio-neurotic edema for which she had to be ventilated, and thereafter developed rhabdomyolysis leading to acute kidney injury (AKI. The unusual aspect was that the patient continued to have flaccid quadriparesis and inability to regain kidney function. Renal biopsy performed 10 weeks after the dye consumption revealed severe acute tubular necrosis with myoglobin pigment casts. This suggests that PPD has a long-term effect leading to ongoing myoglobinuria, causing flaccid paralysis to persist and preventing the recovery of AKI. In such instances, timely treatment to prevent AKI in the form alkalinization of urine should be initiated promptly. Secondly, because PPD is a nondialyzable toxin, and its long-term effect necessitates its speedy removal, hemoperfusion might be helpful and is worth considering

  7. [Mechanism of Platinum Derivatives Induced Kidney Injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Feifei; Duan, Jianchun; Wang, Jie

    2015-09-20

    Platinum derivatives are the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents to treat solid tumors including ovarian, head and neck, and testicular germ cell tumors, lung cancer, and colorectal cancer. Two major problems exist, however, in the clinic use of platinum derivatives. One is the development of tumor resistance to the drug during therapy, leading to treatment failure. The other is the drug's toxicity such as the cisplatin's nephrotoxicity, which limits the dose that can be administered. This paper describes the mechanism of platinum derivatives induced kidney injury. PMID:26383983

  8. Mechanism of Platinum Derivatives Induced Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei YAN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Platinum derivatives are the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents to treat solid tumors including ovarian, head and neck, and testicular germ cell tumors, lung cancer, and colorectal cancer. Two major problems exist, however, in the clinic use of platinum derivatives. One is the development of tumor resistance to the drug during therapy, leading to treatment failure. The other is the drug’s toxicity such as the cisplatin’s nephrotoxicity, which limits the dose that can be administered. This paper describes the mechanism of platinum derivatives induced kidney injury.

  9. Pharmacological Strategies to Prevent Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattharawin Pattharanitima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI is the most common iatrogenic cause of acute kidney injury after intravenous contrast media administration. In general, the incidence of CI-AKI is low in patients with normal renal function. However, the rate is remarkably elevated in patients with preexisting chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, old age, high volume of contrast agent, congestive heart failure, hypotension, anemia, use of nephrotoxic drug, and volume depletion. Consequently, CI-AKI particularly in high risk patients contributes to extended hospitalizations and increases long-term morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of CI-AKI involves at least three mechanisms; contrast agents induce renal vasoconstriction, increase of oxygen free radicals through oxidative stress, and direct tubular toxicity. Several strategies to prevent CI-AKI have been evaluated in experimental studies and clinical trials. At present, intravascular volume expansion with either isotonic saline or sodium bicarbonate solutions has provided more consistent positive results and was recommended in the prevention of CI-AKI. However, the proportion of patients with risk still develops CI-AKI. This review critically evaluated the current evidence for pharmacological strategies to prevent CI-AKI in patients with a risk of developing CI-AKI.

  10. Slowing progression of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawz, Paul E; Rosenberg, Mark E

    2013-12-01

    Early identification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) provides an opportunity to implement therapies to improve kidney function and slow progression. The goal of this article is to review established and developing clinical therapies directed at slowing progression. The importance of controlling blood pressure will be discussed along with the target blood pressure that should be achieved in CKD patients. Therapy directed at inhibiting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system remains the mainstay of treatment with single-agent inhibition of this system being as good as dual blockade with fewer adverse effects. Other therapies that may be used include correction of metabolic acidosis, dietary protein restriction, and new models for delivering care to patients with CKD. Emerging therapies targeting endothelin, uric acid, kidney fibrosis, and oxidant stress hold promise for the future. PMID:25019022

  11. Kidney injury and heme oxygenase-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-xing MAI

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available     Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is one of the main pathways to degrade heme in mammals, and the main degradation products are free iron (Fe2+, carbon monoxide (CO, and bilirubin. Heme plays an important role in promoting cell survival, circulation of intracellular substrates, and immune regulation. Previous studies suggest that HO-1 pathway is an important internal factor in determining the susceptibility and severity of acute kidney injury (AKI. The induction of HO-1 expression can attenuate the severity of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI, and the inhibition of HO-1 expression will aggravate IRI. The present article summarizes the latest advances in research abroad and at home on protective mechanism by which HO-1 prevents AKI to further deepen our understanding of the role of HO-1 in the treatment of AKI.   

  12. Acute Kidney Injury Predicts Mortality after Charcoal Burning Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chin; Tseng, Yi-Chia; Huang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Liu, Shou-Hsuan; Yang, Huang-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Chen, Hui-Ling; Fu, Jen-Fen; Lin, Wey-Ran; Wang, I-Kuan; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2016-01-01

    A paucity of literature exists on risk factors for mortality in charcoal burning suicide. In this observational study, we analyzed the data of 126 patients with charcoal burning suicide that seen between 2002 and 2013. Patients were grouped according to status of renal damage as acute kidney injury (N = 49) or non-acute kidney injury (N = 77). It was found that patients with acute kidney injury suffered severer complications such as respiratory failure (P = 0.002), myocardial injury (P = 0.049), hepatic injury (P acute kidney injury. Moreover, patients with acute kidney injury suffered longer hospitalization duration (16.9 ± 18.3 versus 10.7 ± 10.9, P = 0.002) and had higher mortality rate (8.2% versus 0%, P = 0.011) than patients without injury. In a multivariate Cox regression model, it was demonstrated that serum creatinine level (P = 0.019) and heart rate (P = 0.022) were significant risk factors for mortality. Finally, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with acute kidney injury suffered lower cumulative survival than without injury (P = 0.016). In summary, the overall mortality rate of charcoal burning suicide population was 3.2%, and acute kidney injury was a powerful predictor of mortality. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27430168

  13. Acute kidney injury in critically ill cancer patients: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameire, Norbert; Vanholder, Raymond; Van Biesen, Wim; Benoit, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cancer represent a growing group among actual ICU admissions (up to 20 %). Due to their increased susceptibility to infectious and noninfectious complications related to the underlying cancer itself or its treatment, these patients frequently develop acute kidney injury (AKI). A wide variety of definitions for AKI are still used in the cancer literature, despite existing guidelines on definitions and staging of AKI. Alternative diagnostic investigations such as Cystatin C and urinary biomarkers are discussed briefly. This review summarizes the literature between 2010 and 2015 on epidemiology and prognosis of AKI in this population. Overall, the causes of AKI in the setting of malignancy are similar to those in other clinical settings, including preexisting chronic kidney disease. In addition, nephrotoxicity induced by the anticancer treatments including the more recently introduced targeted therapies is increasingly observed. However, data are sometimes difficult to interpret because they are often presented from the oncological rather than from the nephrological point of view. Because the development of the acute tumor lysis syndrome is one of the major causes of AKI in patients with a high tumor burden or a high cell turnover, the diagnosis, risk factors, and preventive measures of the syndrome will be discussed. Finally, we will briefly discuss renal replacement therapy modalities and the emergence of chronic kidney disease in the growing subgroup of critically ill post-AKI survivors. PMID:27480256

  14. Chronic Kidney Disease and Its Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Robert; Kanso, Abbas; Sedor, John R

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disease impacting more than twenty million individuals in the United States. Progression of CKD is associated with a number of serious complications, including increased incidence of cardiovascular disease, hyperlipidemia, anemia and metabolic bone disease. CKD patients should be assessed for the presence of these complications and receive optimal treatment to reduce their morbidity and mortality. A multidisciplinary approach is required to accomplish...

  15. Hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Sengul, Sule; Erdem, Yunus; Batuman, Vecihi; Erturk, Sehsuvar

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, both hypertension and chronic kidney disease are major public health problems, due to their epidemic proportions and their association with high cardiovascular mortality. In 2003, the first Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Turkey (the PatenT) study was conducted in a nationally representative population (n=4910) by the Turkish Society of Hypertension and Renal Diseases, and showed that overall age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of hypertension in Turke...

  16. Ex vivo exposure of bone marrow from chronic kidney disease donor rats to pravastatin limits renal damage in recipient rats with chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppen, A. van; Papazova, D.A.; Oosterhuis, N.R.; Gremmels, H.; Giles, R.H.; Fledderus, J.O.; Joles, J.A.; Verhaar, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Healthy bone marrow cell (BMC) infusion improves renal function and limits renal injury in a model of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in rats. However, BMCs derived from rats with CKD fail to retain beneficial effects, demonstrating limited therapeutic efficacy. Statins have been reported

  17. Update on the Current Status of Kidney Transplantation for Chronic Kidney Disease in Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Lillian R

    2016-11-01

    Kidney transplantation is a novel treatment option for cats suffering from chronic renal failure or acute irreversible renal injury. Improvement in quality of life as well as survival times of cats that have undergone transplantation has helped the technique to gain acceptance as a viable treatment option for this fatal disease. This article reviews information regarding the optimal time for intervention, congenital and acquired conditions that have been successfully treated with transplantation, recipient and donor screening, immunosuppressive therapy, recent advances in anesthetic and surgical management, postoperative monitoring and long-term management, and troubleshooting perioperative and long-term complications. PMID:27593577

  18. Differential effects of kidney-lung cross-talk during acute kidney injury and bacterial pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Singbartl, Kai; Bishop, Jeffery; Wen, Xiaoyan; Murugan, Raghavan; Chandra, Saurabh; Filippi, Marie-Dominique; John A Kellum

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and acute lung injury (ALI) represent serious, complex clinical problems. The combination of AKI and ALI drastically decreases survival. However, detailed knowledge about the interactions between these two organs is scarce.

  19. ISCHEMIA in chronic kidney disease: improving the representation of patients with chronic kidney disease in cardiovascular trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Christina M; Shineski, Matthew; Chertow, Glenn M; Bangalore, Sripal

    2016-06-01

    Despite the high cardiovascular risk associated with chronic kidney disease, a recent systematic review confirmed that patients with kidney disease remain underrepresented in cardiovascular trials. Two ongoing trials are assessing the risk:benefit of aggressive evaluation and intervention for ischemic heart disease in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

  20. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 deficiency is protective in rhabdomyolysis-induced kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddu, Ravindra; Hull, Travis D; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Hu, Xianzhen; Moehle, Mark S; Daher, João Paulo Lima; Kamal, Ahmed Ibrahim; Joseph, Reny; George, James F; Agarwal, Anupam; Curtis, Lisa M; West, Andrew B

    2015-07-15

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene are the most common known genetic cause of Parkinson's disease, and LRRK2 is also linked to Crohn's and Hansen's disease. LRRK2 is expressed in many organs in mammals but is particularly abundant in the kidney. We find that LRRK2 protein is predominantly localized to collecting duct cells in the rat kidney, with much lower expression in other kidney cells. While genetic knockout (KO) of LRRK2 expression is well-tolerated in mice and rats, a unique age-dependent pathology develops in the kidney. The cortex and medulla of LRRK2 KO rat kidneys become darkly pigmented in early adulthood, yet aged animals display no overt signs of kidney failure. Accompanying the dark pigment we find substantial macrophage infiltration in LRRK2 KO kidneys, suggesting the presence of chronic inflammation that may predispose to kidney disease. Unexpectedly, the dark kidneys of the LRRK2 KO rats are highly resistant to rhabdomyolysis-induced acute kidney injury compared with wild-type rats. Biochemical profiling of the LRRK2 KO kidneys using immunohistochemistry, proteomic and lipidomic analyses show a massive accumulation of hemoglobin and lipofuscin in renal tubules that account for the pigmentation. The proximal tubules demonstrate a corresponding up-regulation of the cytoprotective protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which is capable of mitigating acute kidney injury. The unusual kidney pathology of LRRK2 KO rats highlights several novel physiological roles for LRRK2 and provides indirect evidence for HO-1 expression as a protective mechanism in acute kidney injury in LRRK2 deficiency. PMID:25904107

  1. Reflex anuria: a rare cause of acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Dhakarwal, Pradeep; Adediran, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acute Kidney Injury results from pre renal, post renal or intrinsic renal causes. Reflex anuria is a very rare cause of renal impairment which happens due to irritation or trauma to one kidney or ureter, or severely painful stimuli to other nearby organs.Case Presentation: Here we present a case of acute kidney injury secondary to reflex anuria in a patient who underwent extensive gynecological surgery along with ureteral manipulation which recovered spontaneously.Conclusion: Refl...

  2. Acute kidney injury from cherry concentrate in a patient with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Randy L

    2014-03-01

    Nutraceuticals are supplements and medical foods that offer numerous health benefits. However, these substances may have adverse effects on multiple organ systems, leading to significant morbidity. I present a patient with chronic kidney disease who experienced hemodynamically mediated acute kidney injury and hyperkalemia after daily consumption of cherry concentrate. The method of injury was most likely cyclooxygenase inhibition by the compounds in cherries that mimic the mechanism of action of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications. Ceasing cherry concentrate consumption led to improvements in both the patient's hyperkalemia and kidney injury. Physicians should be aware of the potentially harmful side effects of cherry concentrate and approach the use of cherry extract or concentrate with caution in patients with underlying kidney disease. PMID:24290246

  3. Acute Kidney Injury after Using Contrast during Cardiac Catheterization in Children with Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Young Ju; Hyun, Myung Chul; Choi, Bong Seok; Chun, So Young; Cho, Min Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is closely associated with the mortality of hospitalized patients and long-term development of chronic kidney disease, especially in children. The purpose of our study was to assess the evidence of contrast-induced AKI after cardiac catheterization in children with heart disease and evaluate the clinical usefulness of candidate biomarkers in AKI. A total of 26 children undergoing cardiac catheterization due to various heart diseases were selected and urine and blood ...

  4. Preischemic targeting of HIF prolyl hydroxylation inhibits fibrosis associated with acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kapitsinou, Pinelopi P.; Jaffe, Jonathan; Michael, Mark; Swan, Christina E.; Duffy, Kevin J.; Erickson-Miller, Connie L.; Haase, Volker H.

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) due to ischemia is an important contributor to the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Key mediators of cellular adaptation to hypoxia are oxygen-sensitive hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF), which are regulated by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD)-containing dioxygenases. While activation of HIF protects from ischemic cell death, HIF has been shown to promote fibrosis in experimental models of CKD. The impact of HIF activation on AKI-induced fibrosis has not b...

  5. Suramin protects from cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupre, Tess V; Doll, Mark A; Shah, Parag P; Sharp, Cierra N; Kiefer, Alex; Scherzer, Michael T; Saurabh, Kumar; Saforo, Doug; Siow, Deanna; Casson, Lavona; Arteel, Gavin E; Jenson, Alfred Bennett; Megyesi, Judit; Schnellmann, Rick G; Beverly, Levi J; Siskind, Leah J

    2016-02-01

    Cisplatin, a commonly used cancer chemotherapeutic, has a dose-limiting side effect of nephrotoxicity. Approximately 30% of patients administered cisplatin suffer from kidney injury, and there are limited treatment options for the treatment of cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin, which is Federal Drug Administration-approved for the treatment of trypanosomiasis, improves kidney function after various forms of kidney injury in rodent models. We hypothesized that suramin would attenuate cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin treatment before cisplatin administration reduced cisplatin-induced decreases in kidney function and injury. Furthermore, suramin attenuated cisplatin-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis in the kidney cortex. Treatment of mice with suramin 24 h after cisplatin also improved kidney function, suggesting that the mechanism of protection is not by inhibition of tubular cisplatin uptake or its metabolism to nephrotoxic species. If suramin is to be used in the context of cancer, then it cannot prevent cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity of cancer cells. Suramin did not alter the dose-response curve of cisplatin in lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro. In addition, suramin pretreatment of mice harboring lung adenocarcinomas did not alter the initial cytotoxic effects of cisplatin (DNA damage and apoptosis) on tumor cells. These results provide evidence that suramin has potential as a renoprotective agent for the treatment/prevention of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury and justify future long-term preclinical studies using cotreatment of suramin and cisplatin in mouse models of cancer.

  6. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  7. ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY: HISTORICAL ASPECTS AND DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. V. Kopylova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The in-depth review is dedicated to the acute kidney injury. This conception is wider than acute renal failure. Even minor decline of renal function bias outcomes, so early diagnosis of acute renal injury is exceedingly important. The new markers of kidney injury are actively investigated. RIFLE criteria provide universal approach to a problem at first, and allow comparison of study results at second. 

  8. Acute kidney injury in asphyxiated neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Amardiyanto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Asphyxia neonatorum may result in multiorgan dysfunction including renal involvement. There is no consensus on the determination of acute kidney injury (AKI in neonates making establishment of the diagnosis and its management becomes difficult. The Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN recommends AKI criteria based on increased serum creatinine level and reduced urine output. Objectives To identify the prevalence of AKI in asphyxiated neonates using the AKIN criteria, to compare the difference of AKI stages, and the glomerular filtration rates (GFR between moderate and severe asphyxia. Methods This was a cross-sectional analytical study conducted between July 2012 and January 2013. Subjects were all asphyxiated neonates (Apgar score 35 weeks delivered and hospitalized in Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital and Koja District Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. Glomerular filtration rate was calculated using the components of urine creatinine, serum creatinine, and urine output; while AKI stages were determined according to AKIN criteria. Urinary output was measured via urethral catheterization. Results Of 94 subjects, there were 70 neonates with moderate and 24 neonates with severe asphyxia, with the prevalence of AKI was 63%. Twenty one out of 24 neonates with severe asphyxia experienced AKI, while neonates with moderate asphyxia who experienced AKI was 38 out of 70 subjects (54%. Two third of neonates with severe asphyxia who experienced AKI had stage 3 of AKI. More severe AKI stages and lower median GFR were found in neonates with severe compared to moderate asphyxia (P<0.001. Conclusion The prevalence of AKI in neonatal asphyxia is high (63%. The more severe degree of neonatal asphyxia, the more severe AKI stage and the lower median GFR. [Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:232-8.].

  9. Myocardial Ischemia Assessment in Chronic Kidney Disease: Challenges and Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Fei Cen Parnham

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the chronic kidney disease population and often presents with atypical symptoms. Current diagnostic investigations of myocardial ischemia in chronic kidney disease lack sensitivity and specificity or may have adverse effects. We present a case vignette and explore the challenges of diagnostic myocardial stress investigation in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  10. Molecular determinants of acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Husi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI is a condition that leads to a rapid deterioration of renal function associated with impairment to maintain electrolyte and acid balance, and, if left untreated, ultimately irreversible kidney damage and renal necrosis. There are a number of causes that can trigger AKI, ranging from underlying conditions as well as trauma and surgery. Specifically, the global rise in surgical procedures led to a substantial increase of AKI incidence rates, which in turn impacts on mortality rates, quality of life and economic costs to the healthcare system. However, no effective therapy for AKI exists. Current approaches, such as pharmacological intervention, help in alleviating symptoms in slowing down the progression, but do not prevent or reverse AKI-induced organ damage. Methods: An in-depth understanding of the molecular machinery involved in and modulated by AKI induction and progression is necessary to specifically pharmacologically target key molecules. A major hurdle to devise a successful strategy is the multifactorial and complex nature of the disorder itself, whereby the activation of a number of seemingly independent molecular pathways in the kidney leads to apoptotic and necrotic events. Results: The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system (RAAS axis appears to be a common element, leading to downstream events such as triggers of immune responses via the NFB pathway. Other pathways intricately linked with AKI-induction and progression are the tumor necrosis factor alpha(TNF and transforming growth factor beta (TGF signaling cascades, as well as a number of other modulators. Surprisingly, it has been shown that the involvement of the glutamatergic axis, believed to be mainly a component of the neurological system, is also a major contributor. Conclusions: Here we address the current understanding of the molecular pathways evoked in AKI, their interplay, and the potential to pharmacologically

  11. Vitamin K status in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Kristin M; Adams, Michael A; Holden, Rachel M

    2013-11-07

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the research to date on vitamin K status in chronic kidney disease (CKD). This review includes a summary of the data available on vitamin K status in patients across the spectrum of CKD as well as the link between vitamin K deficiency in CKD and bone dynamics, including mineralization and demineralization, as well as ectopic mineralization. It also describes two current clinical trials that are underway evaluating vitamin K treatment in CKD patients. These data may inform future clinical practice in this population.

  12. Ivabradine, heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Di Lullo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of congestive heart failure are actually increasing worldwide, especially in Western countries. In Europe and the United States, congestive heart failure represents a disabling clinical disease, accountable for increased hospitalization and health care costs. European guidelines have underlined the importance of pharmacological treatment to improve both patients’ outcomes and quality of life. The latest clinical trials to evaluate ivabradine’s efficacy have underlined its usefulness as a stand-alone medication and in combination with conventional congestive heart failure therapy, including in chronic kidney disease patients.

  13. Vitamin K Status in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. Holden

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to summarize the research to date on vitamin K status in chronic kidney disease (CKD. This review includes a summary of the data available on vitamin K status in patients across the spectrum of CKD as well as the link between vitamin K deficiency in CKD and bone dynamics, including mineralization and demineralization, as well as ectopic mineralization. It also describes two current clinical trials that are underway evaluating vitamin K treatment in CKD patients. These data may inform future clinical practice in this population.

  14. Vascular cognitive impairments in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    I. V. Rogova; Fomin, V. V.; I. V. Damulin; E. G. Minakova; O. Yu. Selivanova; Yu. A. Petleva

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to study the specific features of development of cognitive impairments (CIs), the role of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and renal failure-induced factors in patients with Stages I–IV chronic kidney disease (CKD) and to assess an association of CIs with the signs of vascular wall remodeling in them. Patients and methods. Fifty-one patients aged 53±10 years with CKD were examined. Among them, there were 20 patients with Stages I–II CKD: a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of...

  15. Arterial Stiffness and Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Garnier, Anne-Sophie; Briet, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health concern due to the high prevalence of associated cardiovascular (CV) disease. CV mortality is 10-30 times higher in end-stage renal disease patients than in the age-adjusted general population. The last 20 years have been marked by a huge effort in the characterization of the vascular remodeling process associated with CKD and its consequences on the renal, CV and general prognosis. By comparison with patients with normal renal function, w...

  16. Renal imaging in children with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwit Rahmawati

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Chronic kidney failure is a cause of death in children. Diagnosing chronic kidney disease is often made by clinical manifestations, laboratory findings and ultrasonography or other imaging tests. Early detection of chronic kidney disease is needed for education and management of the disease. Objective To describe renal imaging findings and mortality in children with chronic kidney disease. Methods This was a cross-sectional study on children with kidney diseases who were inpatients at Dr. Kariadi Hospital from January 2008 to June 2011. Data were taken from medical records. Chronic kidney disease was confirmed by clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and radiologic imaging. Renal ultrasound findings were determined by the radiologist responsible at that time. Results were presented as frequency distributions. Results Of 37 chronic kidney disease cases, 27 were males and 10 were females. Subjects’ most common complaints were dyspnea (7 out of 37 and edema (30 out of 37. Renal ultrasound imaging of subjects with chronic kidney disease yielded the following findings: reduced cortico-medullary differentiation (30 out of 37, bilateral echogenic kidneys (21 out of 37, reduced renal cortex thickness (4 out of 37 and small-sized kidneys (4 out of 37. Eight of the 37 children died. These 8 subjects had the following radiologic imaging findings: both kidneys appeared small in size (4 out of 8, reduced ‘renal cortex’ thickness (4 out of 8, echogenic kidneys (6 out of 8, and reduced cortico-medullary differentiation (8 out of 8. Conclusion Renal ultrasound imaging of pediatric subjects with chronic kidney disease revealed findings of reduced cortico-medullary differentiation, bilateral echogenic kidneys, reduced renal cortex thickness, and small kidneys bilaterally. [Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:193-9.].

  17. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD. PMID:27152260

  18. Hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul, Sule; Erdem, Yunus; Batuman, Vecihi; Erturk, Sehsuvar

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide, both hypertension and chronic kidney disease are major public health problems, due to their epidemic proportions and their association with high cardiovascular mortality. In 2003, the first Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Turkey (the PatenT) study was conducted in a nationally representative population (n=4910) by the Turkish Society of Hypertension and Renal Diseases, and showed that overall age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of hypertension in Turkey was 31.8%. The PatenT study also reported that overall awareness (40.7%), treatment (31.1%), and control rates (8.1%) of hypertension were strikingly low. Only 20.7% of the patients who were aware of their hypertension and receiving treatment had their blood pressure controlled to diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome were reported as 32.7%, 12.7%, 76.3%, 20.1%, and 31.3%, respectively. The prevalence and awareness of hypertension in CREDIT population was 32.7% and 48.6%, respectively. According to the data obtained from national surveys, the prevalence of hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey is alarmingly high. To improve prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of these major public health problems, appropriate health strategies should be implemented by the government, together with medical societies, non-governmental organizations, industry, health-care providers, and academia. PMID:25019009

  19. Chronic Kidney Disease in Southwestern Iranian Children

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    Mehrnaz Zangeneh Kamali

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the etiology of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD among children attending the pediatric nephrology service at Abuzar children's hospital in Ahvaz city, the referral center in Southwest of Iran.Methods: We reviewed the records of 139 children, diagnosed to have CKD over a 10-year period. CKD was defined a glomerular filtration rate (GFR below 60 ml/1.73 m2/min persisting for more than 3 months.Findings: Among 139 children 81 (58% were males. The mean age at diagnosis of CKD in the patients was 4.2 (±3.6 years. Mean level of serum creatinine at presentation was 1.9 (±1.4 mg/dl. The mean GFR at presentation was 33.5 (±15.4 ml/1.73m2/min while 22% of the patients were already at end stage renal failure indicating that these children were referred too late. Congenital urologic malformation was the commonest cause of CKD present in 70 (50.4% children [reflux nephropathy (23.1%, hypo/dysplastic kidney (15.8%, obstructive uropathy (10.8%, and prune belly syndrome (0.7%]. Other causes included hereditary nephropathies (17.2%, chronic glomerulo-nephritis (6.5%, multisystemic diseases (4.3%, miscellaneous and unknown (each one 10.8%. The mean duration of follow-up was 26 (±24.67 months. Peritoneal or hemodialysis was performed in 10 patients. Six patients underwent (4 live-related and 2 non-related renal transplantation. The rest have died or received standard conservative management for CKD.Conclusion: The commonest causes of CKD were reflux nephropathy, hypo/dysplastic kidney, hereditary nephropathy and obstructive uropathy. Patients presented late, had severe CKD and were malnourished and stunted.

  20. Recurrent acute kidney injury associated with metastatic bronchial carcinoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, James C; Barton, J Clayborn; Bertoli, Luigi F

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rare complication of carcinoid syndrome. A 61-year-old man developed carcinoid syndrome 51 months after pneumonectomy for bronchial carcinoid, and 8 episodes of AKI 101 to 118 months after pneumonectomy. Serum chromogranin A and urine 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels were elevated for more than 1 year before AKI occurred. Each episode was characterized by flushing, facial edema, mild diarrhea, necrosis of hepatic metastatic nodules, mild oliguria, hyponatremia, acidosis, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia and hyperphosphatemia. He did not have elevated urine sodium levels or osmolality, hypotension or hypertension. Plasma levels of dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine, measured during a single episode, were markedly elevated. Serum creatinine levels returned to normal after most episodes. Hyponatremia persisted but was more severe during AKI. Elevated plasma levels of vasoactive substances other than 5-hydroxytryptamine, perhaps dopamine or other catecholamines, could explain recurrent AKI. The natriuretic effect of elevated plasma dopamine levels could explain chronic hyponatremia. PMID:22008780

  1. Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Page ... choices? Points to Remember Clinical Trials Why is nutrition important for someone with early chronic kidney disease ( ...

  2. Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Page Content On this page: Why ... Why is nutrition important for someone with early chronic kidney disease (CKD)? Controlling blood glucose, also called blood sugar, ...

  3. Frontiers in Research: Chronic Kidney Diseases: The pivotal role of pericytes in kidney fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kida, Yujiro; Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2011-01-01

    Kidney pericytes were recently identified as collagen-Iα1 producing cells in healthy kidney, but the developmental, physiological and pathological roles of kidney pericytes remain poorly understood. Pericytes are stromal-derived cells that envelop, and have intimate connections with adjacent capillary endothelial cells (ECs). Recent studies in eye and brain have revealed that pericytes are crucial for angiogenesis, vascular stability and vessel integrity.In response to kidney injury, pericyte...

  4. Untethering an unusual cause of kidney injury in a teenager with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Elizabeth; Miele, Niel F; Barone, Joseph G; Tyagi, Rachana; Weiss, Lynne S

    2014-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is characterized by the acute nature and the inability of kidneys to maintain fluid homeostasis as well as adequate electrolyte and acid-base balance, resulting in an accumulation of nitrogenous waste and elevation of serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine values. Acute kidney injury may be a single isolated event, yet oftentimes, it results from an acute chronic kidney disease. It is critical to seek out the etiology of AKI and to promptly manage the underlying chronic kidney disease to prevent comorbidities and mortality that may ensue. We described a case of a 16-year-old adolescent girl with Down syndrome who presented with AKI and electrolyte aberrance.Abdominal and renal ultrasounds demonstrated a significantly dilated bladder as well as frank hydronephrosis and hydroureter bilaterally. Foley catheter was successful in relieving the obstruction and improving her renal function. However, a magnetic resonance imaging was pursued in light of her chronic constipation and back pain, and it revealed a structural defect (tethered cord) that underlies a chronic process that was highly likely contributory to her AKI. She was managed accordingly with a guarded result and required long-term and close monitoring.

  5. Design of Clinical Trials in Acute Kidney Injury: Lessons from the Past and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, Steven D; Palevsky, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common condition with multiple etiologies and variable clinical findings and pathologic manifestations. AKI is associated with serious adverse clinical outcomes, including the development of de novo chronic kidney disease, accelerated progression of pre-existing chronic kidney disease, end-stage kidney disease, and increased mortality. Past research has advanced our understanding of the pathophysiology, epidemiology, and outcomes of AKI significantly, however, little progress has been made in the development of evidence-based interventions for its prevention and treatment. In this review, we discuss key considerations in the design of clinical trials in AKI and highlight significant methodologic limitations that precluded many past studies from determining the effectiveness of preventive and therapeutic strategies for this common and serious condition.

  6. Acute Kidney Injury:Global Health Alert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philip Kam TaoLi; Emmanuel A Burdmann; Ravindra L Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly prevalent in developing and developed countries and is associated with severe morbidity and mortality.Most etiologies of AKI can be prevented by interventions at the individual,community,regional and in-hospital levels.Effective measures must include community-wide efforts to increase an awareness of the devastating effects of AKI and provide guidance on preventive strategies,as well as early recognition and management.Efforts should be focused on minimizing causes of AKI,increasing awareness of the importance of serial measurements of serum creatinine in high risk patients,and documenting urine volume in acutely ill people to achieve early diagnosis; there is as yet no definitive role for alternative biomarkers.Protocols need to be developed to systematically manage prerenal conditions and specific infections.More accurate data about the true incidence and clinical impact of AKI will help to raise the importance of the disease in the community,increase awareness of AKI by governments,the public,general and family physicians and other health care professionals to help prevent the disease.Prevention is the key to avoid the heavy burden of mortality and morbidity associated with AKI.

  7. Renal Cell Protection of Erythropoietin beyond Correcting The Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid Nasri

    2013-01-01

    Currently many patients with chronic renal failure have profited from the use of erythropoietin to correct anemia (1,2). In chronic kidney disease, anemia is believed to be a surrogate index for tissue hypoxia that continues preexisting renal tissue injury (1-3). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and facilitates erythropoiesis. It is a 30.4 kD glycoprotein and class I cytokine containing 165 amino acids (3,4). App...

  8. Exploring metabolic dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

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    Slee Adrian D

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Impaired kidney function and chronic kidney disease (CKD leading to kidney failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD is a serious medical condition associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and in particular cardiovascular disease (CVD risk. CKD is associated with multiple physiological and metabolic disturbances, including hypertension, dyslipidemia and the anorexia-cachexia syndrome which are linked to poor outcomes. Specific hormonal, inflammatory, and nutritional-metabolic factors may play key roles in CKD development and pathogenesis. These include raised proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 and −6, tumor necrosis factor, altered hepatic acute phase proteins, including reduced albumin, increased C-reactive protein, and perturbations in normal anabolic hormone responses with reduced growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis activity. Others include hyperactivation of the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS, with angiotensin II and aldosterone implicated in hypertension and the promotion of insulin resistance, and subsequent pharmacological blockade shown to improve blood pressure, metabolic control and offer reno-protective effects. Abnormal adipocytokine levels including leptin and adiponectin may further promote the insulin resistant, and proinflammatory state in CKD. Ghrelin may be also implicated and controversial studies suggest activities may be reduced in human CKD, and may provide a rationale for administration of acyl-ghrelin. Poor vitamin D status has also been associated with patient outcome and CVD risk and may indicate a role for supplementation. Glucocorticoid activities traditionally known for their involvement in the pathogenesis of a number of disease states are increased and may be implicated in CKD-associated hypertension, insulin resistance, diabetes risk and cachexia, both directly and indirectly through effects on other systems including activation of the mineralcorticoid

  9. Chronic kidney disease: considerations for nutrition interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiber, Alison L

    2014-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is highly prevalent and has major health consequences for patients. Caring for patients with CKD requires knowledge of the food supply, renal pathophysiology, and nutrition-related medications used to work synergistically with diet to control the signs and symptoms of the disease. The nutrition care process and International Dietetic and Nutrition Terminology allow for systematic, holistic, quality care of patients with this complex, progressive disease. Nutrition interventions must be designed with the individual patients needs in mind while prioritizing factors with the largest negative impact on health outcomes and mortality risk. New areas of nutrition treatment are emerging that involve a greater focus on micronutrient needs, the microbiome, and vegetarian-style diets. These interventions may improve outcomes by decreasing inflammation, improving energy and protein delivery, and lowering phosphorus, electrolytes, and fluid retention.

  10. Achieving Salt Restriction in Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Emma J. McMahon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is consistent evidence linking excessive dietary sodium intake to risk factors for cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD progression in CKD patients; however, additional research is needed. In research trials and clinical practice, implementing and monitoring sodium intake present significant challenges. Epidemiological studies have shown that sodium intake remains high, and intervention studies have reported varied success with participant adherence to a sodium-restricted diet. Examining barriers to sodium restriction, as well as factors that predict adherence to a low sodium diet, can aid researchers and clinicians in implementing a sodium-restricted diet. In this paper, we critically review methods for measuring sodium intake with a specific focus on CKD patients, appraise dietary adherence, and factors that have optimized sodium restriction in key research trials and discuss barriers to sodium restriction and factors that must be considered when recommending a sodium-restricted diet.

  11. Genetic Considerations in Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshman, Lyndsay A; Zepeda-Orozco, Diana

    2016-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children is an irreversible process that, in some cases, may lead to end-stage renal disease. The majority of children with CKD have a congenital disorder of the kidney or urological tract arising from birth. There is strong evidence for both a genetic and epigenetic component to progression of CKD. Utilization of gene-mapping strategies, ranging from genome-wide association studies to single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis, serves to identify potential genetic variants that may lend to disease variation. Genome-wide association studies evaluating population-based data have identified different loci associated with CKD progression. Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms on an individual level suggests that secondary systemic sequelae of CKD are closely related to dysfunction of the cardiovascular-inflammatory axis and may lead to advanced cardiovascular disease through abnormal vascular calcification and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Similarly, genetic variants affecting cytokine control, fibrosis, and parenchymal development may modulate CKD through development and acceleration of renal interstitial fibrosis. Epigenetic studies evaluate modification of the genome through DNA methylation, histone modification, or RNA interference, which may be directly influenced by external or environmental factors directing genomic expression. Lastly, improved understanding of the genetic and epigenetic contribution to CKD progression may allow providers to identify a population at accelerated risk for disease progression and apply novel therapies targeted at the genetic mechanism of disease. PMID:27617141

  12. Thyroid Disorders and Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Mohamed Mohamedali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones play a very important role regulating metabolism, development, protein synthesis, and influencing other hormone functions. The two main hormones produced by the thyroid are triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4. These hormones can also have significant impact on kidney disease so it is important to consider the physiological association of thyroid dysfunction in relation to chronic kidney disease (CKD. CKD has been known to affect the pituitary-thyroid axis and the peripheral metabolism of thyroid hormones. Low T3 levels are the most common laboratory finding followed by subclinical hypothyroidism in CKD patients. Hyperthyroidism is usually not associated with CKD but has been known to accelerate it. One of the most important links between thyroid disorders and CKD is uremia. Patients who are appropriately treated for thyroid disease have a less chance of developing renal dysfunction. Clinicians need to be very careful in treating patients with low T3 levels who also have an elevation in TSH, as this can lead to a negative nitrogen balance. Thus, clinicians should be well educated on the role of thyroid hormones in relation to CKD so that proper treatment can be delivered to the patient.

  13. Complications of Diabetes: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD and Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    iyabet Dunyagoz Hospitals G

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, almost half of the patients who are on chronic kidney replacement therapy have diabetes. The enormous worldwide rise in these cases pose potential economic burden for every country and therefore monitoring kidney function should be a practice provided in outpatient settings. Poorly controlled diabetes will not only result in chronic renal failure, but also patients with chronic renal disease will have some metabolic abnormalities that will increase both morbidity and mortality of the patients. While hypertension may associate with most of the diabetic cases, those people with diabetes who have no rise in blood pressure will eventually develop hypertension at later stage of the chronic kidney disease.

  14. Recent advances in understanding of chronic kidney disease [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junna Yamaguchi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is defined as any condition that causes reduced kidney function over a period of time. Fibrosis, tubular atrophy and interstitial inflammation are the hallmark of pathological features in CKD. Regardless of initial insult, CKD has some common pathways leading CKD to end-stage kidney disease, including hypoxia in the tubulointerstitium and proteinuria. Recent advances in genome editing technologies and stem cell research give great insights to understand the pathogenesis of CKD, including identifications of the origins of renal myofibroblasts and tubular epithelial cells upon injury. Environmental factors such as hypoxia, oxidative stress, and epigenetic factors in relation to CKD are also discussed.

  15. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Kidney Injury: Present Status

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    Hai Ying Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common complication of hospitalization that is characterized by a sudden loss of renal excretory function and associated with the subsequent development of chronic kidney disease, poor prognosis, and increased mortality. Although the pathophysiology of renal functional impairment in the setting of AKI remains poorly understood, previous studies have identified changes in renal hemodynamics, perfusion, and oxygenation as key factors in the development and progression of AKI. The early assessment of these changes remains a challenge. Many established approaches are not applicable to humans because of their invasiveness. Functional renal magnetic resonance (MR imaging offers an alternative assessment tool that could be used to evaluate renal morphology and function noninvasively and simultaneously. Thus, the purpose of this review is to illustrate the principle, application, and role of the techniques of functional renal MR imaging, including blood oxygen level-dependent imaging, arterial spin labeling, and diffusion-weighted MR imaging, in the management of AKI. The use of gadolinium in MR imaging may exacerbate renal impairment and cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Therefore, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging will not be discussed in this paper.

  16. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Kidney Injury: Present Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hai Ying; Chen, Tian Wu; Zhang, Xiao Ming

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of hospitalization that is characterized by a sudden loss of renal excretory function and associated with the subsequent development of chronic kidney disease, poor prognosis, and increased mortality. Although the pathophysiology of renal functional impairment in the setting of AKI remains poorly understood, previous studies have identified changes in renal hemodynamics, perfusion, and oxygenation as key factors in the development and progression of AKI. The early assessment of these changes remains a challenge. Many established approaches are not applicable to humans because of their invasiveness. Functional renal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers an alternative assessment tool that could be used to evaluate renal morphology and function noninvasively and simultaneously. Thus, the purpose of this review is to illustrate the principle, application, and role of the techniques of functional renal MR imaging, including blood oxygen level-dependent imaging, arterial spin labeling, and diffusion-weighted MR imaging, in the management of AKI. The use of gadolinium in MR imaging may exacerbate renal impairment and cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Therefore, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging will not be discussed in this paper. PMID:26925411

  17. Coronary heart disease is not significantly linked to acute kidney injury identified using Acute Kidney Injury Group criteria

    OpenAIRE

    Yayan J

    2012-01-01

    Josef YayanDepartment of Internal Medicine, Vinzentius Hospital, Landau, GermanyBackground: Patients with unstable angina or myocardial infarction are at risk of acute kidney injury, which may be aggravated by the iodine-containing contrast agent used during coronary angiography; however, the relationship between these two conditions remains unclear.Objective: The current study investigated the relationship between acute kidney injury and coronary heart disease prior to coronary angiography.M...

  18. Negative Regulation of TGFβ Signaling by Stem Cell Antigen-1 Protects against Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury.

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    Troy D Camarata

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury, often caused by an ischemic insult, is associated with significant short-term morbidity and mortality, and increased risk of chronic kidney disease. The factors affecting the renal response to injury following ischemia and reperfusion remain to be clarified. We found that the Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1, commonly used as a stem cell marker, is heavily expressed in renal tubules of the adult mouse kidney. We evaluated its potential role in the kidney using Sca-1 knockout mice submitted to acute ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI, as well as cultured renal proximal tubular cells in which Sca-1 was stably silenced with shRNA. IRI induced more severe injury in Sca-1 null kidneys, as assessed by increased expression of Kim-1 and Ngal, rise in serum creatinine, abnormal pathology, and increased apoptosis of tubular epithelium, and persistent significant renal injury at day 7 post IRI, when recovery of renal function in control animals was nearly complete. Serum creatinine, Kim-1 and Ngal were slightly but significantly elevated even in uninjured Sca-1-/- kidneys. Sca-1 constitutively bound both TGFβ receptors I and II in cultured normal proximal tubular epithelial cells. Its genetic loss or silencing lead to constitutive TGFβ receptor-mediated activation of canonical Smad signaling even in the absence of ligand and to KIM-1 expression in the silenced cells. These studies demonstrate that by normally repressing TGFβ-mediated canonical Smad signaling, Sca-1 plays an important in renal epithelial cell homeostasis and in recovery of renal function following ischemic acute kidney injury.

  19. Biomarkers in acute kidney injury: Evidence or paradigm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombi, Fernando; Muryan, Alexis; Canzonieri, Romina; Trimarchi, Hernán

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury in the critically ill represents an independent risk factor of morbidity and mortality in the short and long terms, with significant economic impacts in terms of public health costs. Currently its diagnosis is still based on the presence of oliguria and/or a gradual increase in serum creatinine, which make the diagnosis a delayed event and to detriment of the so-called 'therapeutic window'. The appearance of new biomarkers of acute kidney injury could potentially improve this situation, contributing to the detection of 'subclinical acute kidney injury', which could allow the precocious employment of multiple treatment strategies in order to preserve kidney function. However these new biomarkers display sensitive features that may threaten their full capacity of action, which focus specifically on their additional contribution in the early approach of the situation, given the lack of specific validated treatments for acute kidney injury. This review aims to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of these new tools in the early management of acute kidney injury.

  20. Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalikias, George; Drosos, Ioannis; Tziakas, Dimitrios N

    2016-04-01

    Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is defined as an abrupt deterioration in renal function associated with the administration of iodinated contrast media. This type of acute kidney injury is frequently encountered as a complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and is associated with adverse short- and long-term outcomes including mainly mortality, cardiovascular morbidity and prolongation of hospitalization. The incidence of CI-AKI after PCI ranges from 2 to 20 % according to baseline kidney function. It may also range according to the clinical setting, being higher after emergency PCI. The primary manifestation is a small decline in kidney function, occurring 1 to 3 days after the procedure. Kidney function usually returns to preexisting levels within 7 days. Incidence of acute renal failure requiring dialysis following PCI is rare (hospital epidemic. PMID:26780748

  1. Environmental injury to the kidney: Interstitial nephritis

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    James C. Chan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The First Emperor of China (Qin Shi Huang: 259–210 BCE would have been interested in interstitial nephritis. He might conceivably be fascinated to know that consumption of mercury elixir, instead of giving him immortality, might have shortened his life by giving him interstitial nephritis. In the Balkan region of Eastern Europe, clustering of a peculiar interstitial nephritis is prevalent. One environmental risk contributing to Balkan endemic nephritis is aristolochic acid contamination of cooking flour, drinking water, and herbal medicine. In addition, the popular use of nonprescription Chinese weight reduction herbs and public unawareness of the consequential aristolochic acid nephropathy has become a worldwide problem. Finally, the mighty Romans of antiquity lost their empire, arguably due to lead in their wine containers, lead water pipes, and lead cooking utensils. In modern times, lead paint has become universally banned, which has resulted in a reduction of lead-induced interstitial nephritis. In recent decades, bisphenol A (BPA has been identified as a new environmental risk. BPA is in the plastic coating of food and beverage containers to prevent corrosion. BPA is so ubiquitous that urinary BPA and proteinuria are present in a high percentage of the population. BPA-induced kidney injury and other health concerns have led certain countries to ban BPA. Now, BPA-free containers are being introduced with great fanfare by manufacturers, but safety issues on all plastic products remain. It begs the question whether “plastics” of today take the place of “lead” in ancient Rome. This is a challenging question without an answer at this point.

  2. Herbal Medicines for Acute Kidney Injury: Evidence, Gaps and Frontiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérian Bunel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a major health threat worldwide. The literature on herbal intervention in AKI was searched from English and Chinese databases and reports were critically analyzed in terms of preventing AKI, promoting repair and regeneration, enhancing extrarenal clearance of uremic toxins, and preventing progression to chronic kidney disease (CKD. Altogether, 16 herbal formulae and a few extracts derived from individual herbs were reported to prevent or mitigate AKI in animal models induced by renal ischemia/reperfusion, cisplastin, gentamicin, glycerol, adenine, sepsis or physical exhaustion. Four formulae and six individual herbs were reported to accelerate recovery and/or to prevent CKD in established AKI animal models. Intrarectal herbal medicines, with or without simultaneous oral administration, were reported in six clinical trials and in an animal model to increase extrarenal clearance of uremic toxins. Additional 13 clinical trials reported oral or intravenous herbal interventions in AKI of different etiologies. Despite recurring problems, notably poor compliance with good practice guidelines for clinical trials and for authentication, naming and quality control of herbal materials, accumulating experimental data on the preventive effects of herbal medicines in AKI look encouraging and urge for better, definitive trials to guide clinical practice. Herbal enemas promoting extrarenal clearance of uremic toxins seem cost-effective, but better clinical evidence is certainly needed before any affirmative recommendation be made for AKI patients without access to dialysis. New frontiers, however, lie in those herbal remedies that promote repair/regeneration and prevent chronicity after AKI. Recent experimental data suggest that this may be possible.

  3. Inflammatory Mechanisms of Organ Crosstalk during Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. White

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common complication during inpatient hospitalization, and clinical outcomes remain poor despite advancements in renal replacement therapy. AKI in the setting of multiple organ failure (MOF remains a formidable challenge to clinicians and incurs an unacceptably high mortality rate. Kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI incites a proinflammatory cascade and releases cellular and soluble mediators with systemic implications for remote organ injury. Evidence from preclinical models cites mechanisms of organ crosstalk during ischemic AKI including the expression of cellular adhesion molecules, lymphocyte trafficking, release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and modification of the host innate and adaptive immune response systems. In this paper, the influence of kidney IRI on systemic inflammation and distant organ injury will be examined. Recent experimental data and evolving concepts of organ crosstalk during ischemic AKI will also be discussed in detail.

  4. Mild systemic thermal therapy ameliorates renal dysfunction in a rodent model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashita, Yoshihiro; Kuwabara, Takashige; Hayata, Manabu; Kakizoe, Yutaka; Izumi, Yuichiro; Iiyama, Junichi; Kitamura, Kenichiro; Mukoyama, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    Thermal therapy has become a nonpharmacological therapy in clinical settings, especially for cardiovascular diseases. However, the practical role of thermal therapy on chronic kidney disease remains elusive. We performed the present study to investigate whether a modified thermal protocol, repeated mild thermal stimulation (MTS), could affect renal damages in chronic kidney disease using a mouse renal ablation model. Mice were subjected to MTS or room temperature (RT) treatment once daily for 4 wk after subtotal nephrectomy (Nx) or sham operation (Sh). We revealed that MTS alleviated renal impairment as indicated by serum creatinine and albuminuria in Nx groups. In addition, the Nx + MTS group showed attenuated tubular histological changes and reduced urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin excretion approximately by half compared with the Nx + RT group. Increased apoptotic signaling, such as TUNEL-positive cell count and cleavage of caspase 3, as well as enhanced oxidative stress were significantly reduced in the Nx + MTS group compared with the Nx + RT group. These changes were accompanied with the restoration of kidney Mn-SOD levels by MTS. Heat shock protein 27, a key molecular chaperone, was phosphorylated by MTS only in Nx kidneys rather than in Sh kidneys. MTS also tended to increase the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and Akt in Nx kidneys, possibly associated with the activation of heat shock protein 27. Taken together, these results suggest that modified MTS can protect against renal injury in a rodent model of chronic kidney disease.

  5. Chronic kidney disease and the skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    Fractures across the stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) could be due to osteoporosis, some form of renal osteodystrophy defined by specific quantitative histomorphometry or chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). CKD-MBD is a systemic disease that links disorders of mineral and bone metabolism due to CKD to either one or all of the following: abnormalities of calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone or vitamin D metabolism; abnormalities in bone turnover, mineralization, volume, linear growth or strength; or vascular or other soft-tissue calcification. Osteoporosis, as defined by the National Institutes of Health, may coexist with renal osteodystrophy or CKD-MBD. Differentiation among these disorders is required to manage correctly the correct disorder to reduce the risk of fractures. While the World Health Organization (WHO) bone mineral density (BMD) criteria for osteoporosis can be used in patients with stages 1-3 CKD, the disorders of bone turnover become so aberrant by stages 4 and 5 CKD that neither the WHO criteria nor the occurrence of a fragility fracture can be used for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. The diagnosis of osteoporosis in stages 4 and 5 CKD is one of the exclusion-excluding either renal osteodystrophy or CKD-MBD as the cause of low BMD or fragility fractures. Differentiations among the disorders of renal osteodystrophy, CKD-MBD or osteoporosis are dependent on the measurement of specific biochemical markers, including serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and/or quantitative bone histomorphometry. Management of fractures in stages 1-3 CKD does not differ in persons with or without CKD with osteoporosis assuming that there is no evidence for CKD-MBD, clinically suspected by elevated PTH, hyperphosphatemia or fibroblast growth factor 23 due to CKD. Treatment of fractures in persons with osteoporosis and stages 4 and 5 CKD is not evidence-based, with the exception of post-hoc analysis suggesting efficacy and safety of specific

  6. Chronic kidney disease and the skeleton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul D Miller

    2014-01-01

    Fractures across the stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) could be due to osteoporosis, some form of renal osteodystrophy defined by specific quantitative histomorphometry or chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD). CKD–MBD is a systemic disease that links disorders of mineral and bone metabolism due to CKD to either one or all of the following:abnormalities of calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone or vitamin D metabolism;abnormalities in bone turnover, mineralization, volume, linear growth or strength;or vascular or other soft-tissue calcification. Osteoporosis, as defined by the National Institutes of Health, may coexist with renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD. Differentiation among these disorders is required to manage correctly the correct disorder to reduce the risk of fractures. While the World Health Organization (WHO) bone mineral density (BMD) criteria for osteoporosis can be used in patients with stages 1–3 CKD, the disorders of bone turnover become so aberrant by stages 4 and 5 CKD that neither the WHO criteria nor the occurrence of a fragility fracture can be used for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. The diagnosis of osteoporosis in stages 4 and 5 CKD is one of the exclusion—excluding either renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD as the cause of low BMD or fragility fractures. Differentiations among the disorders of renal osteodystrophy, CKD–MBD or osteoporosis are dependent on the measurement of specific biochemical markers, including serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and/or quantitative bone histomorphometry. Management of fractures in stages 1–3 CKD does not differ in persons with or without CKD with osteoporosis assuming that there is no evidence for CKD–MBD, clinically suspected by elevated PTH, hyperphosphatemia or fibroblast growth factor 23 due to CKD. Treatment of fractures in persons with osteoporosis and stages 4 and 5 CKD is not evidence-based, with the exception of post-hoc analysis suggesting efficacy and

  7. The relationship between hyperuricemia and the risk of contrast-induced acute kidney injury after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with relatively normal serum creatinine

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Liu; Ning Tan; Jiyan Chen; Yingling Zhou; Liling Chen; Shiqun Chen; Zhujun Chen; Liwen Li

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hyperuricemia is a risk factor for contrast-induced acute kidney injury in patients with chronic kidney disease. This study evaluated the value of hyperuricemia for predicting the risk of contrast-induced acute kidney injury in patients with relatively normal serum creatinine who were undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 788 patients with relatively normal baseline serum creatinine (7 mg/ dL in males and >6 mg/dL in females. The incidence...

  8. [Acute Kidney Injury, Type - 3 cardiorenal syndrome, Biomarkers, Renal Replacement Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lullo, Luca; Bellasi, Antonio; Barbera, Vincenzo; Cozzolino, Mario; Russo, Domenico; De Pascalis, Antonio; Santoboni, Francesca; Villani, Annalisa; De Rosa, Silvia; Colafelice, Marco; Russo, Luigi; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease and major cardiovascular events represent main cause of death in both acute and chronic kidney disease patients. Kidney and heart failure are common and frequently co-exist This organ-organ interaction, also called organ cross-talk, leads to well-known definition of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). Here we will describe cardiovascular involvement in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Also known as Type-3 CRS or acute reno-cardiac CRS, it occurs when AKI contributes and/or precipitates development of acute cardiac injury. AKI may directly or indirectly produces an acute cardiac event and it can be associated with volume overload, metabolic acidosis and electrolytes disorders such as hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia, coronary artery disease, left ventricular dysfunction and fibrosis which has been also described in patients with AKI with the consequence of direct negative effects on cardiac performance. PMID:27374388

  9. Chronic Kidney Disease: Highlights for the General Pediatrician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Quigley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease in the pediatric population has been increasing. Early detection and treatment can slow down the progression of kidney disease and help prevent the development of end stage renal disease. In addition, as the kidney function declines, there are many pathophysiologic interactions with other organ systems that need to be monitored and treated. In particular, because of impaired vitamin D metabolism, calcium and phosphorus homeostasis is dysregulated and results in secondary bone disease. Anemia is common due to a number of factors including impaired erythropoietin production. Growth is often impacted by chronic kidney disease but can be improved by proper treatment. Complications of chronic kidney disease can be minimized by proper monitoring and treatment of these parameters. The general pediatrician plays a critical role in this process.

  10. Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-03

    Chronic Kidney Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkin Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Aplastic Anemia; AL Amyloidosis; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Disease; Sickle Cell Anemia; Autoimmune Diseases; Thalassemia

  11. Thiazide Diuretics in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Arjun D; Agarwal, Rajiv

    2015-03-01

    Widely prevalent in the general population, chronic kidney disease (CKD) is frequently complicated with hypertension. Control of hypertension in this high-risk population is a major modifiable cardiovascular and renal risk factor but often requires multiple medications. Although thiazides are an attractive agent, guidelines have previously recommended against thiazide use in stage 4 CKD. We review the updated guidelines on thiazide use in advanced CKD, the antihypertensive mechanism of thiazides, and the clinical studies of thiazides in CKD. Older uncontrolled studies have shown that metolazone reduces blood pressure in CKD, but more recently small randomized controlled trials of hydrochlorothiazide in CKD have shown significant improvement in mean arterial pressure of 15 mmHg. Two recent uncontrolled studies of chlorthalidone including one that used ambulatory blood pressure monitoring found significant improvements in blood pressure. These findings all suggest that thiazides may be efficacious even in advanced CKD; however, electrolyte abnormalities were common in the studies reviewed so close monitoring is necessary during use. Adequately powered randomized trials are now needed before the routine use of thiazide diuretics in advanced CKD can be recommended.

  12. Building the chronic kidney disease management team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spry, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The need to be efficient and the demands for performance-based service are changing how nephrologists deliver care. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs in patients with complex medical and social problems. CKD management requires that multidisciplinary professionals provide patient education, disease management, and psychosocial support. To remain cost-efficient, many physicians are training and supervising midlevel practitioners in the delivery of specialized health care. Specialized care that meets present CKD patient needs is best delivered in a CKD clinic. Three models of CKD clinic are identified: (1) anemia management CKD clinic, (2) the basic CKD clinic, and (3) the comprehensive CKD clinic. Each clinic model is based on critical elements of staffing, billable services, and patient-focused health care. Billable services are anemia-management services, physician services that may be provided by midlevel practitioners, and medical nutrition therapy. In some cases, social worker services may be billable. Building a patient-focused clinic that offers CKD management requires planning, familiarity with federal regulations and statutes, and skillful practitioners. Making services cost-efficient and outcome oriented requires careful physician leadership, talented midlevel practitioners, and billing professionals who understand the goals of the CKD clinic. As Medicare payment reforms evolve, a well-organized CKD program can be well poised to meet the requirements of payers and congressional mandates for performance-based purchasing.

  13. Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Stojceva-Taneva

    2016-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Our study showed that chronic kidney disease is frequent in the Republic of Macedonia and is associated with older age and diabetes. Diabetes had a significantly stronger association with CKD at younger age.

  14. Association of periodontitis and chronic kidney disease in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. U. Nabi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of our study is to study the etiopathogenesis of periodontitis in chronic kidney disease and to identify a correlation between periodontitis and chronic kidney disease, with the help of periodontal exaamination, ultrasonographic and hematobiochemical analysis. Materials and Methods: 46 dogs with renal failure were studied and classified as presenting a slight (56.52%, moderate (36.95% and severe (47.8% degree of periodontal disease. Results: Marked gingival recession involving whole maxillary dental arcade, Oral mucosa ulcers and tissue necrosis and mobility of mandibular incisors was observed in dogs with chronic kidney disease. Dogs with normal renal function were observed to have minimal gingival recession of the mandibular teeth only. Conclusion: In view of the causative association between periodontal infection, generalized inflammation and important systemic diseases like chronic kidney disease, we hypothesize that targeted prophylaxis and careful treatment of oral diseases can prevent the progression of renal failure

  15. Cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Julian Wright; Alastair Hutchison

    2009-01-01

    Julian Wright, Alastair HutchisonManchester Institute of Nephrology and Transplantation, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UKAbstract: Patients with chronic kidney disease have a high burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The vast majority of patients with chronic kidney disease do not progress to end stage renal failure, but do have a significantly higher incidence of all cardiovascular co-morbidities. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors only partially account for this ...

  16. Impaired vascular reactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetzner, Fabian; Scholze, Alexandra; Wittstock, Antje;

    2008-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show increased cardiovascular morbidity. We hypothesized that vascular properties which can be routinely evaluated noninvasively are related to different stages of CKD and their clinical and biochemical characteristics.......Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show increased cardiovascular morbidity. We hypothesized that vascular properties which can be routinely evaluated noninvasively are related to different stages of CKD and their clinical and biochemical characteristics....

  17. Adiponectin and chronic kidney disease; a review on recent findings

    OpenAIRE

    Heidari Maryam; Nasri Parto; Nasri Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin is a multifunctional cytokine that has a role in regulating inflammation. In patients without chronic renal failure (CRF) and type 2 diabetics, decreased adiponectin levels are associated with insulin resistance. Lower serum plasma adiponectin values are link to larger tumor size and metastasis in clear-cell carcinoma of the kidney too. However, in patients with established chronic kidney disease (CKD), adiponectin levels are elevated and positively predict progression of disease....

  18. Quality of life in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Carolina Cruz; Carolina Andrade; Milton Urrutia; Sergio Draibe; Luiz Antônio Nogueira-Martins; Ricardo de Castro Cintra Sesso

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To compare the dimensions of quality of life in the stages of chronic kidney disease and the influence of sociodemographic, clinical and laboratory data. INTRODUCTION: The information available on the quality of life of patients on conservative treatment and the relationship between the quality of life and glomerular filtration rate is limited. METHODS: 155 patients in stages 1-5 of chronic kidney disease and 36 in hemodialysis were studied. Quality of life was rated by the Medical Outco...

  19. Stroke and bleeding in atrial fibrillation with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Kamper, Anne-Lise;

    2012-01-01

    Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions.......Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions....

  20. Perioperative aspirin and clonidine and risk of acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garg, Amit X; Kurz, Andrea; Sessler, Daniel I;

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Acute kidney injury, a common complication of surgery, is associated with poor outcomes and high health care costs. Some studies suggest aspirin or clonidine administered during the perioperative period reduces the risk of acute kidney injury; however, these effects are uncertain...... and each intervention has the potential for harm. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether aspirin compared with placebo, and clonidine compared with placebo, alters the risk of perioperative acute kidney injury. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A 2 × 2 factorial randomized, blinded, clinical trial of 6905...... patients undergoing noncardiac surgery from 88 centers in 22 countries with consecutive patients enrolled between January 2011 and December 2013. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were assigned to take aspirin (200 mg) or placebo 2 to 4 hours before surgery and then aspirin (100 mg) or placebo daily up to 30 days...

  1. Vascular cognitive impairments in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Rogova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of development of cognitive impairments (CIs, the role of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and renal failure-induced factors in patients with Stages I–IV chronic kidney disease (CKD and to assess an association of CIs with the signs of vascular wall remodeling in them. Patients and methods. Fifty-one patients aged 53±10 years with CKD were examined. Among them, there were 20 patients with Stages I–II CKD: a glomerular filtration rate (GFR of і60 ml/min/1.73 m2, signs of renal lesion; 20 with Stages III CKD: a GFR of <60–30 ml/min/1.73 m2, and 11 with Stages VI CKD: a GFR of <30–15 ml/min/1.73 m2. Results and discussion. CIs were more common in the patients with Stages III–IV than in those with Stages I–II, as shown by the scores of the mini-mental state examination (p<0.001, the frontal assessment battery (p=0.001, and the regulatory function test (p<0.001. These tests showed that the magnitude of CIs increased with the higher stage of CKD. Stages III–IV CKD is an independent predictor of CIs in persons with predialysis-stage kidney lesion. CIs were found to be related to hyperhomocysteinemia, anemia, abdominal obesity, left ventricular hypertrophy, and patient age. The signs of atherosclerotic lesion of the common carotid arteries and the indicators of arterial stiffness were also associated with the incidence and magnitude of CIs in CKD. The detection of CIs in patients with early CKD allows one to timely initiate adequate therapy aimed particularly at improving cerebral circulation, eliminating the impact of risk factors, and slowing down the vascular remodeling. The management tactics for patients with CKD must involve the identification and correction of cardiovascular risk factors, and duplex scanning of the wall of the common carotid arteries may be used as a noninvasive method to assess the risk of the development and progression of CIs in predialysis CKD. 

  2. Potential Deleterious Effects of Vasopressin in Chronic Kidney Disease and Particularly Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, E.; Boertien, W. E.; Zietse, R.; Gansevoort, R. T.

    2011-01-01

    The antidiuretic hormone vasopressin is crucial for regulating free water clearance in normal physiology. However, it has also been hypothesized that vasopressin has deleterious effects on the kidney. Vasopressin is elevated in animals and patients with chronic kidney disease. Suppression of vasopre

  3. Update in sepsis and acute kidney injury 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schortgen, Frédérique; Asfar, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Sepsis and acute kidney injury (AKI) represent an important burden in intensive care unit clinical practices. The Journal published important contributions in sepsis for novel therapeutic approaches suggesting that combined molecular targets (e.g., dual inhibition of IL-1β and IL-18, and coadministration of endothelial progenitor cells and stromal cell-derived factor-1α analog) could perform better. The clinical effectiveness of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was reported in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Although its experimental properties appeared favorable in the pro- and antiinflammatory cytokine balance, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D failed to improve survival. Strategies for decreasing antimicrobial resistances are of particular importance. Effective (aerosolized antibiotics for ventilator-associated pneumonia) and ineffective (procalcitonin algorithm for antibiotic deescalation) approaches were published. In 2014, several publications raised an important point shared by survivors from sepsis and/or AKI. The increased number of survivors over time brought out long-term sequelae, leading to a poor outcome after hospital discharge. Among them, cardiovascular events and chronic kidney disease may explain the significant increase in the risk of death, which can persist up to 10 years and significantly increases the use of health care. Postdischarge survival represents a new target for future research in sepsis and AKI to find how we can prevent and manage long-term sequelae. A milestone of the year was the Ebola outbreak. The Journal contributed to our better understanding of Ebola virus disease with a paper underlying the crucial role of a large implementation of pragmatic supportive care, including fluid infusion and correction of metabolic abnormalities, to save more lives. PMID:26029837

  4. Circulating adipocytokines and chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine T Mills

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adipokines have been associated with atherosclerotic heart disease, which shares many common risk factors with chronic kidney disease (CKD, but their relationship with CKD has not been well characterized. METHODS: We investigated the association of plasma leptin, resistin and adiponectin with CKD in 201 patients with CKD and 201 controls without. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2 or presence of albuminuria. Quantile regression and logistic regression models were used to examine the association between adipokines and CKD adjusting for multiple confounding factors. RESULTS: Compared to controls, adjusted median leptin (38.2 vs. 17.2 ng/mL, p<0.0001 and adjusted mean resistin (16.2 vs 9.0 ng/mL, p<0.0001 were significantly higher in CKD cases. The multiple-adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval of CKD comparing the highest tertile to the lower two tertiles was 2.3 (1.1, 4.9 for leptin and 12.7 (6.5, 24.6 for resistin. Median adiponectin was not significantly different in cases and controls, but the odds ratio comparing the highest tertile to the lower two tertiles was significant (1.9; 95% CI, 1.1, 3.6. In addition, higher leptin, resistin, and adiponectin were independently associated with lower eGFR and higher urinary albumin levels. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that adipocytokines are independently and significantly associated with the risk and severity of CKD. Longitudinal studies are warranted to evaluate the prospective relationship of adipocytokines to the development and progression of CKD.

  5. Con: Phosphate binders in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestenbaum, Bryan

    2016-02-01

    Phosphate binders are prescribed to chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients based on associations of serum phosphate concentrations with mortality and calcification, experimental evidence for direct calcifying effects of phosphate on vascular smooth muscle tissue and the central importance of phosphate retention in CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Current knowledge regarding phosphate metabolism in CKD provides important insight into disease mechanisms and supports future clinical trials of phosphate binders in CKD patients to determine the impact of these medications on clinically relevant outcomes. The risks and benefits of phosphate binders cannot be inferred from association studies of serum phosphate concentrations, which are inconsistent and subject to confounding, animal-experimental data, which are based on conditions that differ from human disease, or physiological arguments, which are limited to known regulatory factors. Many interventions that targeted biochemical pathways suggested by association studies and suspected biological importance have yielded null or harmful results. Clinical trials of phosphate binders are of high clinical and scientific importance to nephrology. Demonstration of reduced rates of clinical disease in such trials could lead to important health benefits for CKD patients, whereas negative results would refocus efforts to understand and treat CKD-MBD. Clinical trials that employ highly practical or 'pragmatic' designs represent an optimal approach for determining the safety and effectiveness of phosphate binders in real-world settings. Absent clinical trial data, observational studies of phosphate binders in large CKD populations could provide important information regarding the benefits, risks and/or unintended side effects of these medications. PMID:26681747

  6. Aortic PWV in Chronic Kidney Disease: A CRIC Ancillary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Raymond R.; Wimmer, Neil J.; Chirinos, Julio A.; Parsa, Afshin; Weir, Matthew; Perumal, Kalyani; Lash, James P.; Chen, Jing; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Flack, John; Go, Alan S.; Rafey, Mohammed; Rahman, Mahboob; Sheridan, Angela; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Robinson, Nancy A.; Joffe, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Background Aortic PWV is a measure of arterial stiffness and has proved useful in predicting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several populations of patients, including the healthy elderly, hypertensives and those with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Little data exist characterizing aortic stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease who are not receiving dialysis, and in particular the effect of reduced kidney function on aortic PWV. Methods We performed measurements of aortic PWV in a cross-sectional cohort of participants enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study to determine factors which predict increased aortic PWV in chronic kidney disease. Results PWV measurements were obtained in 2564 participants. The tertiles of aortic PWV (adjusted for waist circumference) were 10.2 m/sec with an overall mean (± S.D.) value of 9.48 ± 3.03 m/sec [95% CI = 9.35–9.61 m/sec]. Multivariable regression identified significant independent positive associations of age, blood glucose concentrations, race, waist circumference, mean arterial blood pressure, gender, and presence of diabetes with aortic PWV and a significant negative association with the level of kidney function. Conclusions The large size of this unique cohort, and the targeted enrollment of chronic kidney disease participants provides an ideal situation to study the role of reduced kidney function as a determinant of arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness may be a significant component of the enhanced cardiovascular risk associated with kidney failure. PMID:20019670

  7. Chronic kidney disease in an adult with propionic acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, H J; Bagnasco, S; Hamosh, A; Sperati, C J

    2014-01-01

    We report an adult male with classic propionic acidemia (PA) who developed chronic kidney disease in the third decade of his life. This diagnosis was recognized by an increasing serum creatinine and confirmed by reduced glomerular filtration on a (99m)Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) scan. Histopathology of the kidney showed moderate glomerulo- and tubulointerstitial fibrosis with very segmental mesangial IgA deposits. This is the second reported case of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia possibly indicating that chronic kidney disease may be a late-stage complication of propionic acidemia. Additionally, this is the first description of the histopathology of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia. As more cases emerge, the clinical course and spectrum of renal pathology in this disorder will be better defined.

  8. An analysis of clinical characteristics of septic acute kidney injury by using criteria of Kidney Disease:Improving Global Outcomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    臧芝栋

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the value of kidney Disease:Improving Global Outcomes(KDIGO) criteria in investigating clinical feature and prognosis of acute kidney injury(AKI) patients with sepsis in ICU.Methods

  9. Genetic deficiency of adiponectin protects against acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Xiaogao; Chen, Jiyuan; Hu, Zhaoyong; Chan, Lawrence; Wang, Yanlin

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin is a multifunctional cytokine that has a role in regulating inflammation. Here we determined if adiponectin modulates ischemic acute kidney injury. Compared with wild-type mice, adiponectin knockout mice were found to have lower serum creatinine and less tubular damage or apoptosis following ischemia/reperfusion injury. This latter process was associated with decreased Bax and reduced activation of p53 and caspase-3. Targeted disruption of adiponectin was also found to inhibit the...

  10. Screening techniques for detecting chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, PE; Gansevoort, RT

    2005-01-01

    Purpose of review As patients with impaired kidney function are at increased risk not only for progressive renal function loss, but also for cardiovascular disease, it is of importance to have accurate techniques to screen patients for the presence of an impaired kidney function. Recent findings Glo

  11. Severe but reversible acute kidney injury resulting from Amanita punctata poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Eunjung; Cheong, Ka-Young; Lee, Min-Jeong; Kim, Seirhan; Shin, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Heungsoo; Park, In-Whee

    2015-01-01

    Mushroom-related poisoning can cause acute kidney injury. Here we report a case of acute kidney injury after ingestion of Amanita punctata, which is considered an edible mushroom. Gastrointestinal symptoms occurred within 24 hours from the mushroom intake and were followed by an asymptomatic period, acute kidney injury, and elevation of liver and pancreatic enzymes. Kidney function recovered with supportive care. Nephrotoxic mushroom poisoning should be considered as a cause of acute kidney i...

  12. Prevention of iodinated contrast induced acute kidney injury (ICI--AKI) - what have we learnt so far?

    OpenAIRE

    Asim Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    The use of imaging modalities and endovascular procedures has escalated phenol-menally in the last two decades. In view of increasing number of elderly patients, rising incidence of chronic kidney disease and diabetes along with the complication of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis with gadolinium, a large patient population will be at risk of developing iodinated contrast induced acute kidney injury (ICI-AKI) which is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and increased health care ...

  13. Kidney injury associated with telavancin dosing regimen in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Vincent H; Ledesma, Kimberly R; Bowers, Dana R; Zhou, Jian; Truong, Luan D

    2015-05-01

    The elevation of serum creatinine levels is a concern with telavancin therapy. We examined the onset of kidney injury associated with telavancin in an animal model. Urine samples were collected at baseline and daily to determine the concentrations of kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1), a marker for early kidney injury. When a clinically relevant exposure of telavancin was given daily to rats, some differences in kidney injury were attributed to the dosing regimen. Further investigations of alternative telavancin dosing regimens are warranted.

  14. Tubular kidney injury molecule-1 in protein-overload nephropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Timmeren, Mirjan M.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Vaidya, Vishal S.; Bailly, Veronique; Schuurs, Theo A.; Damman, Jeffrey; Stegeman, Coen A.; Bonventre, Joseph V.; van Goor, Harry

    2006-01-01

    Kim-1, a recently discovered membrane protein, is undetectable in normal kidneys but markedly induced in proximal tubules after ischemic and toxic injury. The function of Kim-1 is unclear, but it is implicated in damage/repair processes. The Kim-1 ectodomain is cleaved by metalloproteinases and dete

  15. Acute Kidney Injury Induced by Herbal Products: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan TATAR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, consumption of herbal products has become widespread both in Turkey and worldwide. However, the safety of these products is substantially controversial. We here present a case of acute kidney injury in a patient with excessive use of herbal products for cardio-protective purposes.

  16. Acute kidney injury: changing lexicography, definitions, and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelfarb, J; Ikizler, T A

    2007-05-01

    In recent years, there have been numerous advances in understanding the molecular determinants of functional kidney injury after ischemic and/or toxic exposure. However, translation of successful novel therapies designed to attenuate kidney functional injury from animal models to the clinical sphere has had modest results. This lack of translatability is at least in part due to lack of sufficient standardization in definitions and classification of cases of acute kidney injury (AKI), an incomplete understanding of the natural history of human AKI, and a limited understanding of how kidney injury interacts with other organ system failure in the context of systemic metabolic abnormalities. A concerted effort is now being made by nephrologists and intensivists to arrive at standardized terminology and classification of AKI. There have also been dramatic advances in our understanding of the epidemiology and natural history of AKI, particularly in the hospital and intensive care unit setting. Promising strategies are now being developed which may ultimately lead to improved outcomes for patients at risk for or who have developed AKI, which should be readily testable in the coming decade.

  17. Preliminary Experience of Integrative Medicine in Acute Kidney Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAO Xiang-rong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Acute kidney injury (AKI), a concept that replaces the traditional concept known as acute renal failure (ARF),has been adopted by more and more nephrologists and intensive-care specialists in recent years. The definition and diagnostic criteria of AKI are quite different from thoseof ARF(1).

  18. Acute kidney injury in imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Koopmans, L.C. (Liese); M.E. van Wolfswinkel (Marlies); D.A. Hesselink (Dennis); E.J. Hoorn (Ewout); R. Koelewijn (Rob); J.J. van Hellemond (Jaap); P.J. van Genderen (P.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a known complication of malaria, and is reported to occur in up to 40 % of adult patients with a severe Plasmodium falciparum infection in endemic regions. To gain insight in the incidence and risk factors of AKI in imported P. falciparum malaria,

  19. Clinical analysis on 624 elderly patients with acute kidney injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹琴

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the pathogens, clinical characteristic and therapeutic method of acute kidney injury(AKI).Methods The morbidity,composition of pathogeny,staging and prognosis of 624 cases with AKI recruited by our department from January 1999 to December 2009.

  20. Acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod Israelsen, Mads; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Krag, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    Cirrhosis is the eighth leading cause of "years of lost life" in the United States and accounts for approximately 1% to 2% of all deaths in Europe. Patients with cirrhosis have a high risk of developing acute kidney injury. The clinical characteristics of hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) are similar...

  1. Sappanone A protects mice against cisplatin-induced kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Lin; Zhao, Huanfen; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Xiuzhi; Xu, Mingtang; Duan, Huijun

    2016-09-01

    Cisplatin (CP) is an anti-cancer drug that often causes nephrotoxicity due to enhanced inflammatory response and oxidative stress. Sappanone A (SA), a homoisoflavanone isolated from the heartwood of Caesalpinia sappan, has been known to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we aimed to investigate the protective effects and mechanism of SA on CP-induced kidney injury in mice. The results showed that treatment of SA improved CP-induced histopathalogical injury and renal dysfunction. SA also inhibited CP-induced MPO, MDA, TNF-α and IL-1β production and up-regulated the activities of SOD and GSH-PX decreased by CP. SA significantly inhibited the apoptosis rate of kidney tissues induced by CP. Furthermore, SA was found to inhibit CP-induced NF-κB activation. Treatment of SA up-regulated the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 in a dose-dependent manner. In vitro, SA dose-dependently inhibited CP-induced TNF-α and IL-1β production and NF-κB activation in HK-2 cells. In conclusion, these results suggested that SA inhibited CP-induced kidney injury through activating Nrf2 and inhibiting NF-κB activation. SA was a potential therapeutic drug for treating CP-induced kidney injury. PMID:27318179

  2. Central Blood Pressure and Chronic Kidney Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie L. Cohen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension, diabetes, and proteinuria are well-recognized risk factors for progressive kidney function loss. However, despite excellent antihypertensive and antidiabetic drug therapies, which also often lower urinary protein excretion, there remains a significant reservoir of patients with chronic kidney disease who are at high risk for progression to end-stage kidney disease. This has led to the search for less traditional cardiovascular risk factors that will help stratify patients at risk for more rapid kidney disease progression. Among these are noninvasive estimates of vascular structure and function. Arterial stiffness, manifested by the pulse wave velocity in the aorta, has been established in a number of studies as a significant risk factor for kidney disease progression and cardiovascular endpoints. Much less well studied in chronic kidney disease are measures of central arterial pressures. In this paper we cover the physiology behind the generation of the central pulse wave contour and the studies available using these approaches and conclude with some speculations on the rationale for why measurements of central pressure may be informative for the study of chronic kidney disease progression.

  3. Early diagnosis saves lives: focus on patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ecder, Tevfik

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a global public health problem. Patients with chronic kidney disease have an increased risk of developing end-stage kidney disease and its complications. Early identification and management of patients with chronic kidney disease is important in order to decrease the morbidity and mortality. Early detection of chronic kidney disease is possible with screening programs targeting high-risk patients, such as patients with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, elderly patient...

  4. Cytokine and Chemokine Expression in Kidneys during Chronic Leptospirosis in Reservoir and Susceptible Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mariko; Roche, Louise; Geroult, Sophie; Soupé-Gilbert, Marie-Estelle; Monchy, Didier; Huerre, Michel; Goarant, Cyrille

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Humans can be infected after exposure to contaminated urine of reservoir animals, usually rodents, regarded as typical asymptomatic carriers of leptospires. In contrast, accidental hosts may present an acute form of leptospirosis with a range of clinical symptoms including the development of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is considered as a possible AKI-residual sequela but little is known about the renal pathophysiology consequent to leptospirosis infection. Herein, we studied the renal morphological alterations in relation with the regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, comparing two experimental models of chronic leptospirosis, the golden Syrian hamster that survived the infection, becoming carrier of virulent leptospires, and the OF1 mouse, a usual reservoir of the bacteria. Animals were monitored until 28 days after injection with a virulent L. borgpetersenii serogroup Ballum to assess chronic infection. Hamsters developed morphological alterations in the kidneys with tubulointerstitial nephritis and fibrosis. Grading of lesions revealed higher scores in hamsters compared to the slight alterations observed in the mouse kidneys, irrespective of the bacterial load. Interestingly, pro-fibrotic TGF-β was downregulated in mouse kidneys. Moreover, cytokines IL-1β and IL-10, and chemokines MIP-1α/CCL3 and IP-10/CXCL-10 were significantly upregulated in hamster kidneys compared to mice. These results suggest a possible maintenance of inflammatory processes in the hamster kidneys with the infiltration of inflammatory cells in response to bacterial carriage, resulting in alterations of renal tissues. In contrast, lower expression levels in mouse kidneys indicated a better regulation of the inflammatory response and possible resolution processes likely related to resistance mechanisms. PMID:27219334

  5. Cytokine and Chemokine Expression in Kidneys during Chronic Leptospirosis in Reservoir and Susceptible Animal Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Matsui

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Humans can be infected after exposure to contaminated urine of reservoir animals, usually rodents, regarded as typical asymptomatic carriers of leptospires. In contrast, accidental hosts may present an acute form of leptospirosis with a range of clinical symptoms including the development of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD is considered as a possible AKI-residual sequela but little is known about the renal pathophysiology consequent to leptospirosis infection. Herein, we studied the renal morphological alterations in relation with the regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, comparing two experimental models of chronic leptospirosis, the golden Syrian hamster that survived the infection, becoming carrier of virulent leptospires, and the OF1 mouse, a usual reservoir of the bacteria. Animals were monitored until 28 days after injection with a virulent L. borgpetersenii serogroup Ballum to assess chronic infection. Hamsters developed morphological alterations in the kidneys with tubulointerstitial nephritis and fibrosis. Grading of lesions revealed higher scores in hamsters compared to the slight alterations observed in the mouse kidneys, irrespective of the bacterial load. Interestingly, pro-fibrotic TGF-β was downregulated in mouse kidneys. Moreover, cytokines IL-1β and IL-10, and chemokines MIP-1α/CCL3 and IP-10/CXCL-10 were significantly upregulated in hamster kidneys compared to mice. These results suggest a possible maintenance of inflammatory processes in the hamster kidneys with the infiltration of inflammatory cells in response to bacterial carriage, resulting in alterations of renal tissues. In contrast, lower expression levels in mouse kidneys indicated a better regulation of the inflammatory response and possible resolution processes likely related to resistance mechanisms.

  6. Cytokine and Chemokine Expression in Kidneys during Chronic Leptospirosis in Reservoir and Susceptible Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mariko; Roche, Louise; Geroult, Sophie; Soupé-Gilbert, Marie-Estelle; Monchy, Didier; Huerre, Michel; Goarant, Cyrille

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Humans can be infected after exposure to contaminated urine of reservoir animals, usually rodents, regarded as typical asymptomatic carriers of leptospires. In contrast, accidental hosts may present an acute form of leptospirosis with a range of clinical symptoms including the development of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is considered as a possible AKI-residual sequela but little is known about the renal pathophysiology consequent to leptospirosis infection. Herein, we studied the renal morphological alterations in relation with the regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, comparing two experimental models of chronic leptospirosis, the golden Syrian hamster that survived the infection, becoming carrier of virulent leptospires, and the OF1 mouse, a usual reservoir of the bacteria. Animals were monitored until 28 days after injection with a virulent L. borgpetersenii serogroup Ballum to assess chronic infection. Hamsters developed morphological alterations in the kidneys with tubulointerstitial nephritis and fibrosis. Grading of lesions revealed higher scores in hamsters compared to the slight alterations observed in the mouse kidneys, irrespective of the bacterial load. Interestingly, pro-fibrotic TGF-β was downregulated in mouse kidneys. Moreover, cytokines IL-1β and IL-10, and chemokines MIP-1α/CCL3 and IP-10/CXCL-10 were significantly upregulated in hamster kidneys compared to mice. These results suggest a possible maintenance of inflammatory processes in the hamster kidneys with the infiltration of inflammatory cells in response to bacterial carriage, resulting in alterations of renal tissues. In contrast, lower expression levels in mouse kidneys indicated a better regulation of the inflammatory response and possible resolution processes likely related to resistance mechanisms. PMID:27219334

  7. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate in cats with chronic kidney disease undergoing chemical restraint during hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Karine Kleine Figueiredo dos Santos; Daniel Paulino Junior; Julio César Cambraia Veado; Juliana de Abreu Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Dialysis is one of the used methods for treatment of Acute Renal Injury (ARI) and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) to replace the function of the kidneys when refers to blood depuration. Hemodialysis removes toxins accumulated in the body directly from the blood, being a useful alternative therapy for dogs and cats with CKD in advanced stages. Because of the difficulty on handling the patient feline, this procedure requires sedation. However, few studies have been conducted to assess the safety o...

  8. Urinary Kidney Injury Molecule-1 (KIM-1 in Early Diagnosis of Acute Kidney Injury in Pediatric Critically Ill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Lestari Paramastuty

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI often associated with a high hospital morbi-mortality rate in the intensive care unit patients. Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1, has many characteristics of ideal biomarker for kidney injury. The aim of this study was to compared the temporal pattern of elevation urinary KIM-1 level following critically ill children with SCr as standart biomarker of AKI. Prospective analytic observational study was conducted during October to March 2014 in the Saiful Anwar General Hospital and Physiology Laboratory Brawijaya University. There were 13 critically ill as subjects. SCr and KIM-1 levels from all subjects were measured three times ( at admission, after 1st and 6th hour. Subjects were devided into AKI - non-AKI groups by SCr level and survivor - non survivor group at the and of the observations. Results showed that there were significantly increased levels of KIM-1 in the AKI and non-AKI and survivor-non survivor group at time point. However, we found that delta KIM-1 at time point increased significant in non AKI group and survivor group. KIM-1 at admission can diagnosed AKI in critically ill children. We conclude that urinary KIM-1 is a sensitive non-invasive biomarker to diagnosed acute kidney injury in critically ill children. Increase level of KIM-1 by time shows protective and good outcome in critically ill children.

  9. The origin of interstitial myofibroblasts in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Grgic, Ivica; Duffield, Jeremy S.; Humphreys, Benjamin D.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic kidney diseases (CKD), independent of their primary cause, lead to progressive, irreversible loss of functional renal parenchyma. Renal pathology in CKD is characterized by tubulointerstitial fibrosis with excessive matrix deposition produced by myofibroblasts. Because blocking the formation of these scar-forming cells represents a logical therapeutic target for patients with progressive fibrotic kidney disease, the origin of renal myofibroblasts is a subject of intense investigation....

  10. Chronic kidney disease and bone fracture: a growing concern

    OpenAIRE

    Nickolas, Thomas L.; Leonard, Mary B.; Shane, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Susceptibility to fracture is increased across the spectrum of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Moreover, fracture in patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) results in significant excess mortality. The incidence and prevalence of CKD and ESKD are predicted to increase markedly over the coming decades in conjunction with the aging of the population. Given the high prevalence of both osteoporosis and CKD in older adults, it is of the utmost public health relevance to be able to assess fract...

  11. Discriminants of Prevalent Fractures in Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nickolas, Thomas L.; Cremers, Serge; Zhang, Amy; Thomas, Valeri; Stein, Emily; Cohen, Adi; Chauncey, Ryan; Nikkel, Lucas; Yin, Michael T.; Liu, Xiaowei S.; Boutroy, Stephanie; Staron, Ronald B.; Leonard, Mary B.; McMahon, Donald J.; Dworakowski, Elzbieta

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have higher rates of fracture than the general population. Increased bone remodeling, leading to microarchitectural deterioration and increased fragility, may accompany declining kidney function, but there are no reliable methods to identify patients at increased risk for fracture. In this cross-sectional study of 82 patients with predialysis CKD, high-resolution imaging revealed that the 23 patients with current fractures had significantly lower are...

  12. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Cystic Renal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Cysts are frequently found in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and they have a different prognostic significance depending on the clinical context. Simple solitary parenchymal cysts and peripelvic cysts are very common and they have no clinical significance. At US, simple cyst appears as a round anechoic pouch with regular and thin profiles. On the other hand, hereditary polycystic disease is a frequent cause of CKD in children and adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are the best known cystic hereditary diseases. ADPKD and ARPKD show a diffused cystic degeneration with cysts of different diameters derived from tubular epithelium. Medullary cystic disease may be associated with tubular defects, acidosis and lithiasis and can lead to CKD. Acquired cystic kidney disease, finally, is secondary to progressive structural end-stage kidney remodelling and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27169740

  13. Acute kidney injury in burns: a story of volume and inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    COLPAERT, KIRSTEN; Hoste, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Acute kidney injury occurs in approximately one-quarter to one-third of patients with major burn injury. Apart from the usual suspects – such as older age, severity of burn injury, sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction – volume overload probably has an important role in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury.

  14. Unilateral Renal Ischemia as a Model of Acute Kidney Injury and Renal Fibrosis in Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiedt, C W; Brainard, B M; Hinson, W; Brown, S A; Brown, C A

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to define the acute and chronic effects of 1-hour unilateral in vivo renal ischemia on renal function and histology in cats. Twenty-one adult purpose-bred research cats were anesthetized, and 1 kidney underwent renal artery and vein occlusion for 1 hour. Serum creatinine and urea concentrations, urine protein:creatinine ratio, urine-specific gravity, glomerular filtration rate, hematocrit, platelet concentration and function, and white blood cell count were measured at baseline and variable time points after ischemia. Renal histopathology was evaluated on days 3, 6, 12, 21, 42, and 70 postischemia; changes in smooth muscle actin and interstitial collagen were examined. Following ischemia, whole animal glomerular filtration rate was significantly reduced (57% of baseline on day 6; P cats and demonstrates that ischemic acute kidney injury triggers chronic fibrosis, interstitial inflammation, and tubular atrophy in feline kidneys. These late changes are typical of those observed in cats with naturally occurring chronic kidney disease. PMID:26319781

  15. Structural Equation Modeling Highlights the Potential of Kim-1 as a Biomarker for Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Lesley; Akintola, Adebayo; Chen, Gang; Catania, Jeffrey M.; Vaidya, Vishal; Burghardt, Robert C.; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Trzeciakowski, Jerome; Parrish, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem, and despite continued research in the field, there is still a need to identify both biomarkers of risk and progression, as well as potential therapeutic targets. Structural equation modeling (SEM) is a family of statistical techniques that has been utilized in the fields of sociology and psychology for many years; however, its utilization in the biological sciences is relatively novel. SEM's ability to investigate complex relationships in an efficient, single model could be utilized to understand the progression of CKD, as well as to develop a predictive model to assess kidney status in the patient. Methods Fischer 344 rats were fed either an ad libitum diet or a calorically restricted diet, and a time-course study of kidney structure and function was performed. EQS, a SEM software package, was utilized to generate five CKD models of the Fisher 344 rat and identify relationships between measured variables and estimates of kidney damage and kidney function. Results All models identified strong relationships between a biomarker for CKD, kidney injury molecule-1 (Kim-1) and kidney damage, in the Fischer 344 rat CKD model. Models also indicate a strong relationship between age and renal damage and dysfunction. Conclusion SEM can be used to model CKD and could be useful to examine biomarkers in CKD patients. PMID:22269876

  16. Chronic Kidney Disease—Effect of Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subha Palaneeswari Meenakshi Sundaram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a growing health problem with increasing incidence. The annual mortality of end-stage renal disease patients is about 9%, which is 10–20 fold higher than the general population, approximately 50% of these deaths are due to cardiovascular (CV disease. CV risk factors, such as diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, are strongly associated with poor outcome. Many other nontraditional risk factors such as inflammation, infection, oxidative stress, anemia, and malnutrition are also present. In this review we will focus on the role of oxidative stress in chronic kidney disease.

  17. Pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Way, Fabrice; Lessard, Myriam; Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène

    2012-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) alters the metabolism of several minerals, thereby inducing bone lesions and vessel-wall calcifications that can cause functional impairments and excess mortality. The histological bone abnormalities seen in CKD, known as renal osteodystrophy, consist of alterations in the bone turnover rate, which may be increased (osteitis fibrosa [OF]) or severely decreased (adynamic bone disease [AD]); abnormal mineralization (osteomalacia [OM]), and bone loss. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is related to early phosphate accumulation (responsible for FGF23 overproduction by bone tissue), decreased calcitriol production by the kidneys, and hypocalcemia. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is associated with OF. Other factors that affect bone include acidosis, chronic inflammation, nutritional deficiencies, and iatrogenic complications.

  18. Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells Reduce Acute and Chronic Kidney Damage in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Burgos-Silva

    Full Text Available Acute and chronic kidney injuries (AKI and CKI constitute syndromes responsible for a large part of renal failures, and are today still associated with high mortality rates. Given the lack of more effective therapies, there has been intense focus on the use stem cells for organ protective and regenerative effects. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have shown great potential in the treatment of various diseases of immune character, although there is still debate on its mechanism of action. Thus, for a greater understanding of the role of MSCs, we evaluated the effect of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (AdSCs in an experimental model of nephrotoxicity induced by folic acid (FA in FVB mice. AdSC-treated animals displayed kidney functional improvement 24h after therapy, represented by reduced serum urea after FA. These data correlated with cell cycle regulation and immune response modulation via reduced chemokine expression and reduced neutrophil infiltrate. Long-term analyses, 4 weeks after FA, indicated that AdSC treatment reduced kidney fibrosis and chronic inflammation. These were demonstrated by reduced interstitial collagen deposition and tissue chemokine and cytokine expression. Thus, we concluded that AdSC treatment played a protective role in the framework of nephrotoxic injury via modulation of inflammation and cell cycle regulation, resulting in reduced kidney damage and functional improvement, inhibiting organ fibrosis and providing long-term immune regulation.

  19. Acute kidney injury in stable COPD and at exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barakat MF

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available MF Barakat,1 HI McDonald,1 TJ Collier,1 L Smeeth,1 D Nitsch,1 JK Quint1,2 1Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, 2Department of Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK Background: While acute kidney injury (AKI alone is associated with increased mortality, the incidence of hospital admission with AKI among stable and exacerbating COPD patients and the effect of concurrent AKI at COPD exacerbation on mortality is not known.Methods: A total of 189,561 individuals with COPD were identified from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Using Poisson and logistic regressions, we explored which factors predicted admission for AKI (identified in Hospital Episode Statistics in this COPD cohort and concomitant AKI at a hospitalization for COPD exacerbation. Using survival analysis, we investigated the effect of concurrent AKI at exacerbation on mortality (n=36,107 and identified confounding factors.Results: The incidence of AKI in the total COPD cohort was 128/100,000 person-years. The prevalence of concomitant AKI at exacerbation was 1.9%, and the mortality rate in patients with AKI at exacerbation was 521/1,000 person-years. Male sex, older age, and lower glomerular filtration rate predicted higher risk of AKI or death. There was a 1.80 fold (95% confidence interval: 1.61, 2.03 increase in adjusted mortality within the first 6 months post COPD exacerbation in patients suffering from AKI and COPD exacerbation compared to those who were AKI free.Conclusion: In comparison to previous studies on general populations and hospitalizations, the incidence and prevalence of AKI is relatively high in COPD patients. Coexisting AKI at exacerbation is prognostic of poor outcome. Keywords: acute renal failure, mortality, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, prognosis

  20. Large kidneys predict poor renal outcome in subjects with diabetes and chronic kidney disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Vendrely Benoit; Beauvieux Marie-Christine; Barthe Nicole; Raffaitin Christelle; Montaudon Michel; Laurent François; Lasseur Catherine; Garcia Magalie; Rigalleau Vincent; Chauveau Philippe; Combe Christian; Gin Henri

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Renal hypertrophy occurs early in diabetic nephropathy, its later value is unknown. Do large kidneys still predict poor outcome in patients with diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)? Methods Seventy-five patients with diabetes and CKD according to a Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR, by 51Cr-EDTA clearance) below 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or an Albumin Excretion Rate above 30 mg/24 H, had an ultrasound imaging of the kidneys and were cooperatively followed during five years by ...

  1. Renal Impairment with Sublethal Tubular Cell Injury in a Chronic Liver Disease Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokiko Ishida

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of renal impairment in chronic liver diseases (CLDs has been primarily studied in the advanced stages of hepatic injury. Meanwhile, the pathology of renal impairment in the early phase of CLDs is poorly understood, and animal models to elucidate its mechanisms are needed. Thus, we investigated whether an existing mouse model of CLD induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC shows renal impairment in the early phase. Renal injury markers, renal histology (including immunohistochemistry for tubular injury markers and transmission electron microscopy, autophagy, and oxidative stress were studied longitudinally in DDC- and standard diet-fed BALB/c mice. Slight but significant renal dysfunction was evident in DDC-fed mice from the early phase. Meanwhile, histological examinations of the kidneys with routine light microscopy did not show definitive morphological findings, and electron microscopic analyses were required to detect limited injuries such as loss of brush border microvilli and mitochondrial deformities. Limited injuries have been recently designated as sublethal tubular cell injury. As humans with renal impairment, either with or without CLD, often show almost normal tubules, sublethal injury has been of particular interest. In this study, the injuries were associated with mitochondrial aberrations and oxidative stress, a possible mechanism for sublethal injury. Intriguingly, two defense mechanisms were associated with this injury that prevent it from progressing to apparent cell death: autophagy and single-cell extrusion with regeneration. Furthermore, the renal impairment of this model progressed to chronic kidney disease with interstitial fibrosis after long-term DDC feeding. These findings indicated that DDC induces renal impairment with sublethal tubular cell injury from the early phase, leading to chronic kidney disease. Importantly, this CLD mouse model could be useful for studying the

  2. Topiramate as a rare cause of reversible Fanconi syndrome and acute kidney injury: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseeha, Marcelle G; Attia, Maximos N; Kolade, Victor O

    2016-01-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is a sulfa-derivative monosaccharide that has been used for multiple indications in the last several years. We describe a 53-year-old woman with known chronic kidney disease stage 2 and baseline creatinine of 1 mg/dL who developed acute kidney injury and proximal renal tubular dysfunction while on TPM for depression. The Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale indicated a probable relationship (score of 6) between TPM and acute kidney injury as well as proximal tubular dysfunction; these renal conditions resolved on withdrawal of TPM. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such a scenario. Patients receiving TPM therapy should be closely monitored for evidence of kidney dysfunction and electrolyte abnormalities. PMID:26908388

  3. Topiramate as a rare cause of reversible Fanconi syndrome and acute kidney injury: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle G. Meseeha

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Topiramate (TPM is a sulfa-derivative monosaccharide that has been used for multiple indications in the last several years. We describe a 53-year-old woman with known chronic kidney disease stage 2 and baseline creatinine of 1 mg/dL who developed acute kidney injury and proximal renal tubular dysfunction while on TPM for depression. The Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale indicated a probable relationship (score of 6 between TPM and acute kidney injury as well as proximal tubular dysfunction; these renal conditions resolved on withdrawal of TPM. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such a scenario. Patients receiving TPM therapy should be closely monitored for evidence of kidney dysfunction and electrolyte abnormalities.

  4. How to Read a Food Label: Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How to Read a Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) National Kidney Disease Education Program If you ... and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Kidney Disease Education Program 2

  5. TLR-2/TLR-4 TREM-1 signaling pathway is dispensable in inflammatory myeloid cells during sterile kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Campanholle

    Full Text Available Inflammatory macrophages are abundant in kidney disease, stimulating repair, or driving chronic inflammation and fibrosis. Damage associated molecules (DAMPs, released from injured cells engage pattern recognition receptors (PRRs on macrophages, contributing to activation. Understanding mechanisms of macrophage activation during kidney injury may lead to strategies to alleviate chronic disease. We identified Triggering-Receptor-in-Myeloid-cells (TREM-1, a regulator of TLR signaling, as highly upregulated in kidney inflammatory macrophages and tested the roles of these receptors in macrophage activation and kidney disease. Kidney DAMPs activated macrophages in vitro, independently of TREM-1, but partially dependent on TLR-2/-4, MyD88. In two models of progressive interstitial kidney disease, TREM-1 blockade had no impact on disease or macrophage activation in vivo, but TLR-2/-4, or MyD88 deficiency was anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic. When MyD88 was mutated only in the myeloid lineage, however, there was no bearing on macrophage activation or disease progression. Instead, TLR-2/-4 or MyD88 deficiency reduced activation of mesenchyme lineage cells resulting in reduced inflammation and fibrosis, indicating that these pathways play dominant roles in activation of myofibroblasts but not macrophages. To conclude, TREM-1, TLR2/4 and MyD88 signaling pathways are redundant in myeloid cell activation in kidney injury, but the latter appear to regulate activation of mesenchymal cells.

  6. Metabolic Syndrome, Chronic Kidney, and Cardiovascular Diseases: Role of Adipokines

    OpenAIRE

    Manfredi Tesauro; Maria Paola Canale; Giuseppe Rodia; Nicola Di Daniele; Davide Lauro; Angelo Scuteri; Carmine Cardillo

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease, whose incidence is alarmingly growing. It is associated with metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular complications. These complications are clustered in the metabolic syndrome (MetS) leading to high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity predisposes to diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis, and focal and segmental glomerular sclerosis and represents an independent risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease ...

  7. Chronic Kidney Disease, Obesity, and Hypertension: The Role of Leptin and Adiponectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tesauro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease is a major public health problem and characterized by a progressive loss in renal function over a period of months or years as defined by structural or functional abnormalities of the kidney. Several elements contribute to determine a progression of the kidney injury, inducing a worsening of renal damage and accelerating the decline of renal function: obesity and hypertension are two known factors of kidney progression. Remarkable improvements have been recently achieved in the study of the endocrine features of the adipose tissue and have been able to produce hormone-like peptides named adipokines or adipocytokines. Among these adipocytokines, which represent a link between obesity, hypertension, and chronic nephropathy, leptins and adiponectin appear to play an important role. Leptin not only is a prohypertension element (renal progression factor through the activation sympathetic nervous, but also is able to induce prosclerotic effects directly on the kidney. In contrast, a decline of adiponectin levels has been shown to be related to a picture of hypertension: an endothelial dysfunction has been described as the main pathogenic mechanism responsible for this phenomenon.

  8. Recently published papers: Acute kidney injury – diagnosis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jasmine BL; Forni, Lui G

    2009-01-01

    When faced with the management of the patient on intensive care with acute kidney injury, the clinician has various choices to consider. The conventional therapy, where appropriate, is renal replacement therapy. This technique used to be relatively straightforward but now a relative feast of alternatives is available, not least in choice of buffer and anticoagulant. Two recent studies add to the growing body of literature concerning alternative anticoagulant regimes, and one in particular sho...

  9. Acute kidney injury in sepsis: transient or intrinsic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörres, Achim

    2013-11-20

    The negative prediction of intrinsic versus transient acute kidney injury (AKI) in septic patients may be facilitated by combined assessment of fractional excretion of sodium and urea. If both excretions are high this would signal the presence of transient AKI and suggest that successful restoration of diuresis by conservative therapy is likely, thus supporting a wait-and-watch approach regarding the initiation of acute renal replacement therapy.

  10. Iron, hormesis, and protection in acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Sundararaman

    2016-07-01

    Iron is critical for cellular, organismal, and possibly universal existence. Use of iron complexes to treat human diseases is ancient and is described in detail in Ayurveda/Siddha systems of medicine. Old aphorisms from Siddha medicine ("Alavukku Minjinal Amirdhamum Nanjagum," an elixir turns poisonous when taken in excess) and Paracelsus ("Die Dosis macht das Gift," the dose makes the poison) are of practical relevance in understanding the role of this ancient metal in acute kidney injury. PMID:27312440

  11. [Uncaria tomentosa and acute ischemic kidney injury in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fátima Fernandes Vattimo, Maria; da Silva, Natalia Oliveira

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the renoprotective effects of Uncaria Tomentosa (cat's claw) on ischemic acute kidney injury induced by renal clamping in rats. The hypoxia and hypoperfusion increase the production of reactive species already present in the inflammatory process. Results showed that the renal function evaluated by creatinine clearance, the urinary excretion of peroxides and malondealdehyde indexes demonstrated that UT induced renoprotection, probably related to its antioxidant activities.

  12. Update on the diagnosis and management of acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Akcay; Kultigin Turkmen; DongWon Lee; et al, ...

    2010-01-01

    Ali Akcay, Kultigin Turkmen, DongWon Lee, Charles L EdelsteinDivision of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, University of Colorado and the Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado, USAAbstract: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an independent risk factor for morbidity and mortality. This review provides essential information for the diagnosis and management of AKI. Blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine are used for the diagnosis of AKI. The review also focuses on recent studies on the diagnosis o...

  13. Hypertension, Chronic Kidney Disease, and Renal Pathology in a Child with Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gordillo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a child with Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS and chronic kidney disease (stage II with histological diagnosis of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS. A 15-year-old male of Puerto Rico ancestry with history of HPS, hypertension (HTN, asthma, obesity, and chronic kidney disease (CKD stage II presented with new-onset proteinuria without edema. His blood pressure had been controlled, serum creatinine had been 0.9–1.4 mg/dL, and first morning urine protein/creatinine ratio (UPC ranged from 0.2 to 0.38. Due to persistent nonorthostatic proteinuria with CKD, renal biopsy was performed and FSGS (not otherwise specified with chronic diffuse tubulopathy (tubular cytoplasmic droplets and acute tubular injury was reported. Ceroid-like material is known to infiltrate tissues (i.e., lungs, colon, and kidney in HPS, but the reason for the renal insufficiency is unknown. Nonspecific kidney disease and in one adult case IgA nephropathy with ANCA-positive glomerulonephritis have previously been reported in patients with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. To our knowledge, we report the first pediatric renal pathology case of HPS associated with CKD. This paper discusses presentation and management of renal disease in HPS.

  14. Hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and renal pathology in a child with hermansky-pudlak syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, Roberto; Del Rio, Marcela; Thomas, David B; Flynn, Joseph T; Woroniecki, Robert P

    2011-01-01

    We report a child with Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS) and chronic kidney disease (stage II) with histological diagnosis of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). A 15-year-old male of Puerto Rico ancestry with history of HPS, hypertension (HTN), asthma, obesity, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage II presented with new-onset proteinuria without edema. His blood pressure had been controlled, serum creatinine had been 0.9-1.4 mg/dL, and first morning urine protein/creatinine ratio (UPC) ranged from 0.2 to 0.38. Due to persistent nonorthostatic proteinuria with CKD, renal biopsy was performed and FSGS (not otherwise specified) with chronic diffuse tubulopathy (tubular cytoplasmic droplets) and acute tubular injury was reported. Ceroid-like material is known to infiltrate tissues (i.e., lungs, colon, and kidney) in HPS, but the reason for the renal insufficiency is unknown. Nonspecific kidney disease and in one adult case IgA nephropathy with ANCA-positive glomerulonephritis have previously been reported in patients with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. To our knowledge, we report the first pediatric renal pathology case of HPS associated with CKD. This paper discusses presentation and management of renal disease in HPS.

  15. Prevalence and risk factors of atrial fibrillation in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王骄

    2013-01-01

    Objective Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained tachyarrhythmia in the general population.AF and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) share several common risk factors.We investigated the association between chronic kidney disease and risk of atrial fibrillation

  16. Pyridoxamine reduces postinjury fibrosis and improves functional recovery after acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrypnyk, Nataliya I; Voziyan, Paul; Yang, Haichun; de Caestecker, Christian R; Theberge, Marie-Claude; Drouin, Mathieu; Hudson, Billy; Harris, Raymond C; de Caestecker, Mark P

    2016-08-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and independent risk factor for death and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Despite promising preclinical data, there is no evidence that antioxidants reduce the severity of injury, increase recovery, or prevent CKD in patients with AKI. Pyridoxamine (PM) is a structural analog of vitamin B6 that interferes with oxidative macromolecular damage via a number of different mechanisms and is in a phase 3 clinical efficacy trial to delay CKD progression in patients with diabetic kidney disease. Because oxidative stress is implicated as one of the main drivers of renal injury after AKI, the ability of PM to interfere with multiple aspects of oxidative damage may be favorable for AKI treatment. In these studies we therefore evaluated PM treatment in a mouse model of AKI. Pretreatment with PM caused a dose-dependent reduction in acute tubular injury, long-term postinjury fibrosis, as well as improved functional recovery after ischemia-reperfusion AKI (IR-AKI). This was associated with a dose-dependent reduction in the oxidative stress marker isofuran-to-F2-isoprostane ratio, indicating that PM reduces renal oxidative damage post-AKI. PM also reduced postinjury fibrosis when administered 24 h after the initiating injury, but this was not associated with improvement in functional recovery after IR-AKI. This is the first report showing that treatment with PM reduces short- and long-term injury, fibrosis, and renal functional recovery after IR-AKI. These preclinical findings suggest that PM, which has a favorable clinical safety profile, holds therapeutic promise for AKI and, most importantly, for prevention of adverse long-term outcomes after AKI. PMID:27194713

  17. Revascularization options in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrith, Guha; Elayda, MacArthur A; Wilson, James M

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients who have chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease and are undergoing hemodialysis. Chronic kidney disease is a recognized risk factor for premature atherosclerosis. Unfortunately, most major randomized clinical trials that form the basis for evidence-based use of revascularization procedures exclude patients who have renal insufficiency. Retrospective, observational studies suggest that patients with end-stage renal disease and severe coronary occlusive disease have a lower risk of death if they undergo coronary revascularization rather than medical therapy alone. Due to a lack of prospective studies, however, the relative merits of percutaneous versus surgical revascularization are merely a matter of opinion. Several small, retrospective studies have shown that coronary artery bypass grafting is associated with higher procedural death but better long-term survival than is percutaneous coronary intervention. This difference appears to result from poor long-term results of percutaneous coronary intervention in patients who have chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease.Because randomized trials comparing percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass grafting have included patients undergoing balloon angioplasty and placement of bare-metal stents, their conclusions are suspect in the era of drug-eluting stents. In this review, we discuss different revascularization options for patients with chronic kidney disease, the outcomes of revascularization procedures, and the risk factors for adverse outcomes.

  18. Sarcopenia and Physical Inactivity in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Keiji; Ookawara, Susumu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Sarcopenia and physical inactivity synergistically progress in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are strong predictors of mortality in this population. Exercise training and essential amino acids and vitamin D supplements may contribute to improving sarcopenia and physical inactivity in CKD patients. PMID:27570755

  19. Novel biomarkers for progression of chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bi-cheng; L(U) Lin-li

    2010-01-01

    @@ CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PROGRESSION OF CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE (CKD) Although there are different initiators of CKD, it is generally recognized that the secondary pathological pathway is quite common to all CKD. CKD may inevitably progress to end stage renal disease (ESRD) due to a vicious cycle of nephron destruction by progressive glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis.

  20. Research on stage of chronic kidney disease in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈莹

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical value of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 45 ml·min-1·1.73 m-2for the stage assessment in the elderly patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) .Methods From June 2009 to December 2011,2258 patients were recruited and divided

  1. The epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in chronic kidney diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harskamp, Laura R; Gansevoort, Ron T; van Goor, Harry; Meijer, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway has a critical role in renal development, tissue repair and electrolyte handling. Numerous studies have reported an association between dysregulation of this pathway and the initiation and progression of various chronic kidney diseases such as diab

  2. Patient selection and preparation strategies for the use of contrast material in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Erik

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease and peripheral arterial disease is increasing. Thus, it is increasingly problematic to image these patients as the number of patients needing a vascular examination is increasing accordingly. In high-risk patients with impaired kidney function, intravascular...... administration of iodinated contrast media can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury and Gadolinium can induce nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). It is important to identify these high-risk patients by means of se-creatinine/e glomerular filtration rate. The indication for contrast examination should...

  3. Role of Bone Biopsy in Stages 3 to 4 Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sprague, Stuart M.

    2008-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism develops relatively early in chronic kidney disease as a consequence of impaired phosphate, calcium, and vitamin D homeostasis. The disease state in chronic kidney disease, which includes the histologic features of bone disease, defined as renal osteodystrophy, and the hormonal and biochemical disturbances, have recently been redefined as a disease syndrome and is referred to as “chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder.” As chronic kidney disease progres...

  4. Comparison of Plasma and Urine Biomarker Performance in Acute Kidney Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schley, Gunnar; Köberle, Carmen; Manuilova, Ekaterina; Rutz, Sandra; Forster, Christian; Weyand, Michael; Formentini, Ivan; Kientsch-Engel, Rosemarie; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Willam, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Background New renal biomarkers measured in urine promise to increase specificity for risk stratification and early diagnosis of acute kidney injury (AKI) but concomitantly may be altered by urine concentration effects and chronic renal insufficiency. This study therefore directly compared the performance of AKI biomarkers in urine and plasma. Methods This single-center, prospective cohort study included 110 unselected adults undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass between 2009 and 2010. Plasma and/or urine concentrations of creatinine, cystatin C, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM1), and albumin as well as 15 additional biomarkers in plasma and urine were measured during the perioperative period. The primary outcome was AKI defined by AKIN serum creatinine criteria within 72 hours after surgery. Results Biomarkers in plasma showed markedly better discriminative performance for preoperative risk stratification and early postoperative (within 24h after surgery) detection of AKI than urine biomarkers. Discriminative power of urine biomarkers improved when concentrations were normalized to urinary creatinine, but urine biomarkers had still lower AUC values than plasma biomarkers. Best diagnostic performance 4h after surgery had plasma NGAL (AUC 0.83), cystatin C (0.76), MIG (0.74), and L-FAPB (0.73). Combinations of multiple biomarkers did not improve their diagnostic power. Preoperative clinical scoring systems (EuroSCORE and Cleveland Clinic Foundation Score) predicted the risk for AKI (AUC 0.76 and 0.71) and were not inferior to biomarkers. Preexisting chronic kidney disease limited the diagnostic performance of both plasma and urine biomarkers. Conclusions In our cohort plasma biomarkers had higher discriminative power for risk stratification and early diagnosis of AKI than urine biomarkers. For preoperative risk stratification of AKI clinical models showed

  5. Comparison of Plasma and Urine Biomarker Performance in Acute Kidney Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Schley

    Full Text Available New renal biomarkers measured in urine promise to increase specificity for risk stratification and early diagnosis of acute kidney injury (AKI but concomitantly may be altered by urine concentration effects and chronic renal insufficiency. This study therefore directly compared the performance of AKI biomarkers in urine and plasma.This single-center, prospective cohort study included 110 unselected adults undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass between 2009 and 2010. Plasma and/or urine concentrations of creatinine, cystatin C, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP, kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM1, and albumin as well as 15 additional biomarkers in plasma and urine were measured during the perioperative period. The primary outcome was AKI defined by AKIN serum creatinine criteria within 72 hours after surgery.Biomarkers in plasma showed markedly better discriminative performance for preoperative risk stratification and early postoperative (within 24h after surgery detection of AKI than urine biomarkers. Discriminative power of urine biomarkers improved when concentrations were normalized to urinary creatinine, but urine biomarkers had still lower AUC values than plasma biomarkers. Best diagnostic performance 4h after surgery had plasma NGAL (AUC 0.83, cystatin C (0.76, MIG (0.74, and L-FAPB (0.73. Combinations of multiple biomarkers did not improve their diagnostic power. Preoperative clinical scoring systems (EuroSCORE and Cleveland Clinic Foundation Score predicted the risk for AKI (AUC 0.76 and 0.71 and were not inferior to biomarkers. Preexisting chronic kidney disease limited the diagnostic performance of both plasma and urine biomarkers.In our cohort plasma biomarkers had higher discriminative power for risk stratification and early diagnosis of AKI than urine biomarkers. For preoperative risk stratification of AKI clinical models showed similar discriminative performance

  6. Role of Myeloperoxidase in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Kisic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a worldwide public health problem. Patients with CKD have a number of disorders in the organism, and the presence of oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in these patients is the subject of numerous studies. Chronic inflammation joined with oxidative stress contributes to the development of numerous complications: accelerated atherosclerosis process and cardiovascular disease, emergence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, development of malnutrition, anaemia, hyperparathyroidism, and so forth, affecting the prognosis and quality of life of patients with CKD. In this review we presented the potential role of the myeloperoxidase enzyme in the production of reactive/chlorinating intermediates and their role in oxidative damage to biomolecules in the body of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In addition, we discussed the role of modified lipoprotein particles under the influence of prooxidant MPO intermediates in the development of endothelial changes and cardiovascular complications in renal failure.

  7. An Update on Coronary Artery Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Afsar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the improvements in diagnostic tools and medical applications, cardiovascular diseases (CVD, especially coronary artery disease (CAD, remain the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. The main factors for the heightened risk in this population, beside advanced age and a high proportion of diabetes and hypertension, are malnutrition, chronic inflammation, accelerated atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, coronary artery calcification, left ventricular structural and functional abnormalities, and bone mineral disorders. Chronic kidney disease is now recognized as an independent risk factor for CAD. In community-based studies, decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR and proteinuria were both found to be independently associated with CAD. This paper will discuss classical and recent epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical aspects of CAD in CKD patients.

  8. Male Rat Susceptibility for Liver and Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkawt H. Hamad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The experimental study of this paper was designed to investigate male rat susceptibility to liver injury. A combination of two experimental animal models (Lead acetate for tissue injury (80 mg / L and castration had been used on twenty male rats, they were divided into two groups sham (n = 10; castrated (n = 10. Results revealed that, liver weight reduced significantly (P < 0.05 in sham group in comparison with castrated rats, but kidney weight changed slightly. Also, serum aminotransferase (AST was significantly higher in sham versus castrated rats. Neither alanine aminotransferase (ALT and alkaline phosphatase (ALP nor malondialdehyde (MDA changed. In conclusion, the absence of male sex hormone would delay tissue injury of male rat organs especially liver organ.

  9. Biomarkers of delayed graft function as a form of acute kidney injury in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyszko, Jolanta; Lukaszyk, Ewelina; Glowinska, Irena; Durlik, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation ensures distinct advantages for patients with end-stage kidney disease. However, in some cases early complications can lead to allograft dysfunction and consequently graft loss. One of the most common early complications after kidney transplantation is delayed graft function (DGF). Unfortunately there is no effective treatment for DGF, however early diagnosis of DGF and therapeutic intervention (eg modification of immunosuppression) may improve outcome. Therefore, markers of acute kidney injury are required. Creatinine is a poor biomarker for kidney injury due principally to its inability to help diagnose early acute renal failure and complete inability to help differentiate among its various causes. Different urinary and serum proteins have been intensively investigated as possible biomarkers in this setting. There are promising candidate biomarkers with the ability to detect DGF. We focused on emerging biomarkers of DGF with NGAL is being the most studied followed by KIM-1, L-FABP, IL-18, and others. However, large randomized studies are needed to establish the value of new, promising biomarkers, in DGF diagnosis, prognosis and its cost-effectiveness. PMID:26175216

  10. A mouse model of Townes-Brocks syndrome expressing a truncated mutant Sall1 protein is protected from acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Sara; El-Achkar, Tarek; Robbins, Lynn; Basta, Jeannine; Heitmeier, Monique; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Rauchman, Michael

    2015-11-15

    It has been postulated that developmental pathways are reutilized during repair and regeneration after injury, but functional analysis of many genes required for kidney formation has not been performed in the adult organ. Mutations in SALL1 cause Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) and nonsyndromic congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract, both of which lead to childhood kidney failure. Sall1 is a transcriptional regulator that is expressed in renal progenitor cells and developing nephrons in the embryo. However, its role in the adult kidney has not been investigated. Using a mouse model of TBS (Sall1TBS), we investigated the role of Sall1 in response to acute kidney injury. Our studies revealed that Sall1 is expressed in terminally differentiated renal epithelia, including the S3 segment of the proximal tubule, in the mature kidney. Sall1TBS mice exhibited significant protection from ischemia-reperfusion injury and aristolochic acid-induced nephrotoxicity. This protection from acute injury is seen despite the presence of slowly progressive chronic kidney disease in Sall1TBS mice. Mice containing null alleles of Sall1 are not protected from acute kidney injury, indicating that expression of a truncated mutant protein from the Sall1TBS allele, while causative of congenital anomalies, protects the adult kidney from injury. Our studies further revealed that basal levels of the preconditioning factor heme oxygenase-1 are elevated in Sall1TBS kidneys, suggesting a mechanism for the relative resistance to injury in this model. Together, these studies establish a functional role for Sall1 in the response of the adult kidney to acute injury. PMID:26311113

  11. Vitamin D deficiency contributes to vascular damage in sustained ischemic acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bragança, Ana C; Volpini, Rildo A; Mehrotra, Purvi; Andrade, Lúcia; Basile, David P

    2016-07-01

    Reductions in renal microvasculature density and increased lymphocyte activity may play critical roles in the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) following acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). Vitamin D deficiency is associated with tubulointerstitial damage and fibrosis progression following IRI-AKI We evaluated the effect of vitamin D deficiency in sustained IRI-AKI, hypothesizing that such deficiency contributes to the early reduction in renal capillary density or alters the lymphocyte response to IRI Wistar rats were fed vitamin D-free or standard diets for 35 days. On day 28, rats were randomized into four groups: control, vitamin D deficient (VDD), bilateral IRI, and VDD+IRI Indices of renal injury and recovery were evaluated for up to 7 days following the surgical procedures. VDD rats showed reduced capillary density (by cablin staining), even in the absence of renal I/R. In comparison with VDD and IRI rats, VDD+IRI rats manifested a significant exacerbation of capillary rarefaction as well as higher urinary volume, kidney weight/body weight ratio, tissue injury scores, fibroblast-specific protein-1, and alpha-smooth muscle actin. VDD+IRI rats also had higher numbers of infiltrating activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells staining for interferon gamma and interleukin-17, with a significant elevation in the Th17/T-regulatory cell ratio. These data suggest that vitamin D deficiency impairs renal repair responses to I/R injury, exacerbates changes in renal capillary density, as well as promoting fibrosis and inflammation, which may contribute to the transition from AKI to CKD.

  12. Role of leptin in reverse epidemiology in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Tepel, Martin

    2007-01-01

    , indicating leptin resistance. In healthy subjects increased leptin concentration constitutes a biomarker for increased cardiovascular risk. On the other hand, a recent prospective long-term study in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy showed that reduced serum leptin......Leptin is mainly produced by adipocytes and metabolized in the kidney. Leptin is taken up into the central nervous system by a saturable transport system, and controls appetite in rodents and in healthy subjects. Leptin acts on peripheral tissue and increases the inflammatory response...

  13. Definition and classification of chronic kidney disease : A position statement from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, AS; Eckardt, KU; Tsukamoto, Y; Levin, A; Coresh, J; Rossert, J; de Zeeuw, D; Hostetter, TH; Lameire, N; Eknoyan, G

    2005-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem, with adverse outcomes of kidney failure, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and premature death. A simple definition and classification of kidney disease is necessary for international development and implementation of clinical practice g

  14. Definition and classification of chronic kidney disease: A position statement from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, A.S.; Eckardt, K.U.; Tsukamoto, Y.; Levin, A.; Coresh, J.; Rossert, J.; Hostetter, T.H.; Lameire, N.; Eknoyan, G.; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2005-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem, with adverse outcomes of kidney failure, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and premature death. A simple definition and classification of kidney disease is necessary for international development and implementation of clinical practice g

  15. Acute kidney injury: Renal disease in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seller-Pérez, G; Más-Font, S; Pérez-Calvo, C; Villa-Díaz, P; Celaya-López, M; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M E

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in the ICU frequently requires costly supportive therapies, has high morbidity, and its long-term prognosis is not as good as it has been presumed so far. Consequently, AKI generates a significant burden for the healthcare system. The problem is that AKI lacks an effective treatment and the best approach relies on early secondary prevention. Therefore, to facilitate early diagnosis, a broader definition of AKI should be established, and a marker with more sensitivity and early-detection capacity than serum creatinine - the most common marker of AKI - should be identified. Fortunately, new classification systems (RIFLE, AKIN or KDIGO) have been developed to solve these problems, and the discovery of new biomarkers for kidney injury will hopefully change the way we approach renal patients. As a first step, the concept of renal failure has changed from being a "static" disease to being a "dynamic process" that requires continuous evaluation of kidney function adapted to the reality of the ICU patient. PMID:27388683

  16. Acute kidney injury in pregnancy-current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Anjali; Santos, Jolina; Linde, Brian; Anis, Kisra

    2013-05-01

    Pregnancy-related acute kidney injury (PR-AKI) causes significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Management of PR-AKI warrants a thorough understanding of the physiologic adaptations in the kidney and the urinary tract. Categorization of etiologies of PR-AKI is similar to that of acute kidney injury (AKI) in the nonpregnant population. The causes differ between developed and developing countries, with thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) being common in the former and septic abortion and puerperal sepsis in the latter. The incidence of PR-AKI is reported to be on a decline, but there is no consensus on the exact definition of the condition. The physiologic changes in pregnancy make diagnosis of PR-AKI difficult. Newer biomarkers are being studied extensively but are not yet available for clinical use. Early and accurate diagnosis is necessary to improve maternal and fetal outcomes. Timely identification of "at-risk" individuals and treatment of underlying conditions such as sepsis, preeclampsia, and TMAs remain the cornerstone of management. Questions regarding renal replacement therapy such as modality, optimal prescription, and timing of initiation in PR-AKI remain unclear. There is a need to systematically explore these variables to improve care of women with PR-AKI. PMID:23928385

  17. Computational Biology: Modeling Chronic Renal Allograft Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegall, Mark D; Borrows, Richard

    2015-01-01

    New approaches are needed to develop more effective interventions to prevent long-term rejection of organ allografts. Computational biology provides a powerful tool to assess the large amount of complex data that is generated in longitudinal studies in this area. This manuscript outlines how our two groups are using mathematical modeling to analyze predictors of graft loss using both clinical and experimental data and how we plan to expand this approach to investigate specific mechanisms of chronic renal allograft injury.

  18. PLASMA NEUTROPHIL GELATINASE ASSOCIATED LIPOCALIN AS AN EARLY BIOMARKER OF ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY IN SNAKE BITE

    OpenAIRE

    Thamarai; Sivakumar,

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acute kidney injury due to snake bite represents a frequent and devastating problem. Currently, Acute Kidney Injury is diagnosed by biochemical monitoring of increase in serum creatinine. Increase in serum creatinine represents a late indication of a functional change in glomerular function rate. Studies have shown that Neutrophil Gelatinase Associated Lipocalin has been found to be very useful for the detection of acute kidney injury within few hours of neph...

  19. Biomarkers of acute kidney injury and associations with short- and long-term outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Schaub, Jennifer A.; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is strongly associated with increased mortality and other adverse outcomes. Medical researchers have intensively investigated novel biomarkers to predict short- and long-term outcomes of acute kidney injury in many patient care settings, such as cardiac surgery, intensive care units, heart failure, and transplant. Future research should focus on leveraging this relationship to improve enrollment for clinical trials of acute kidney injury.

  20. Effect of Redox Modulating NRF2 Activators on Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-hyun Choi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is featured by a progressive decline of kidney function and is mainly caused by chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension. CKD is a complex disease due to cardiovascular complications and high morbidity; however, there is no single treatment to improve kidney function in CKD patients. Since biological markers representing oxidative stress are significantly elevated in CKD patients, oxidative stress is receiving attention as a contributing factor to CKD pathology. Nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (NRF2 is a predominant transcription factor that regulates the expression of a wide array of genes encoding antioxidant proteins, thiol molecules and their generating enzymes, detoxifying enzymes, and stress response proteins, all of which can counteract inflammatory and oxidative damages. There is considerable experimental evidence suggesting that NRF2 signaling plays a protective role in renal injuries that are caused by various pathologic conditions. In addition, impaired NRF2 activity and consequent target gene repression have been observed in CKD animals. Therefore, a pharmacological intervention activating NRF2 signaling can be beneficial in protecting against kidney dysfunction in CKD. This review article provides an overview of the role of NRF2 in experimental CKD models and describes current findings on the renoprotective effects of naturally occurring NRF2 activators, including sulforaphane, resveratrol, curcumin, and cinnamic aldehyde. These experimental results, coupled with recent clinical experiences with a synthetic triterpenoid, bardoxolone methyl, have brought a light of hope for ameliorating CKD progression by preventing oxidative stress and maintaining cellular redox homeostasis.

  1. Outpatient nephrology referral rates after acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew, Edward D; Peterson, Josh F; Eden, Svetlana K; Hung, Adriana M; Speroff, Theodore; Ikizler, T Alp; Matheny, Michael E

    2012-02-01

    AKI associates with an increased risk for the development and progression of CKD and mortality. Processes of care after an episode of AKI are not well described. Here, we examined the likelihood of nephrology referral among survivors of AKI at risk for subsequent decline in kidney function in a US Department of Veterans Affairs database. We identified 3929 survivors of AKI hospitalized between January 2003 and December 2008 who had an estimated GFR (eGFR) <60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) 30 days after peak injury. We analyzed time to referral considering improvement in kidney function (eGFR ≥60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)), dialysis initiation, and death as competing risks over a 12-month surveillance period. Median age was 73 years (interquartile range, 62-79 years) and the prevalence of preadmission kidney dysfunction (baseline eGFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) was 60%. Overall mortality during the surveillance period was 22%. The cumulative incidence of nephrology referral before dying, initiating dialysis, or experiencing an improvement in kidney function was 8.5% (95% confidence interval, 7.6-9.4). Severity of AKI did not affect referral rates. These data demonstrate that a minority of at-risk survivors are referred for nephrology care after an episode of AKI. Determining how to best identify survivors of AKI who are at highest risk for complications and progression of CKD could facilitate early nephrology-based interventions.

  2. EPOXYEICOSATRIENOIC ACID ANALOG ATTENUATES ANGIOTENSIN II HYPERTENSION AND KIDNEY INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdul Hye Khan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs contribute to blood pressure regulation leading to the concept that EETs can be therapeutically targeted for hypertension and the associated end-organ damage. In the present study, we investigated anti-hypertensive and kidney protective actions of an EET analog, EET-B in angiotensin II (ANG II-induced hypertension. EET-B was administered in drinking water for 14 days (10mg/kg/d and resulted in a decreased blood pressure elevation in ANG II hypertension. At the end of the two-week period, blood pressure was 30 mmHg lower in EET analog-treated ANG II hypertensive rats. The vasodilation of mesenteric resistance arteries to acetylcholine was impaired in ANG II hypertension; however, it was improved with EET-B treatment. Further, EET-B protected the kidney in ANG II hypertension as evidenced by a marked 90% decrease in albuminuria and 54% decrease in nephrinuria. Kidney histology demonstrated a decrease in renal tubular cast formation in EET analog-treated hypertensive rats. In ANG II hypertension, EET-B treatment markedly lowered renal inflammation. Urinary monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 excretion was decreased by 55% and kidney macrophage infiltration was reduced by 52% with EET-B treatment. Overall, our results demonstrate that EET-B has anti-hypertensive properties, improves vascular function, and decreases renal inflammation and injury in ANG II hypertension.

  3. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid analog attenuates angiotensin II hypertension and kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Hye; Falck, John R; Manthati, Vijaya L; Campbell, William B; Imig, John D

    2014-01-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) contribute to blood pressure regulation leading to the concept that EETs can be therapeutically targeted for hypertension and the associated end organ damage. In the present study, we investigated anti-hypertensive and kidney protective actions of an EET analog, EET-B in angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension. EET-B was administered in drinking water for 14 days (10 mg/kg/d) and resulted in a decreased blood pressure elevation in ANG II hypertension. At the end of the two-week period, blood pressure was 30 mmHg lower in EET analog-treated ANG II hypertensive rats. The vasodilation of mesenteric resistance arteries to acetylcholine was impaired in ANG II hypertension; however, it was improved with EET-B treatment. Further, EET-B protected the kidney in ANG II hypertension as evidenced by a marked 90% decrease in albuminuria and 54% decrease in nephrinuria. Kidney histology demonstrated a decrease in renal tubular cast formation in EET analog-treated hypertensive rats. In ANG II hypertension, EET-B treatment markedly lowered renal inflammation. Urinary monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 excretion was decreased by 55% and kidney macrophage infiltration was reduced by 52% with EET-B treatment. Overall, our results demonstrate that EET-B has anti-hypertensive properties, improves vascular function, and decreases renal inflammation and injury in ANG II hypertension.

  4. Does Dexpantenol Protect the Kidney from Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury?

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    Sezen ÖZKISACIK

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Tissue injury occurs following reperfusion after creation of ischemia. Plenty of chemical agents have been shown to protect from such an injury. We planned to evaluate the protective effect of dexpanthenol (dxp in ischemia-reperfusion injury. MATERIAL and METHODS: 24 adult rats were used and divided into 3 groups. A right nephrectomy was performed through a median laparotomy incision in all groups. Additionally, in group 1 (sham group, left nephrectomy was made 6 hours later without creation of ischemia. In group 2 (Saline group, the left kidney was left ischemic for 1 hour and reperfusion was established for 6 hours. Saline was administered intraperitoneally thirty minutes before creation of ischemia and just before reperfusion. In group 3 (Dexpanthenol group, the left kidney was left ischemic for 1 hour and reperfusion was established for 6 hours. Dxp (500 mg/kg was administered intraperitoneally thirty minutes before creation of ischemia and just before reperfusion. A left nephrectomy was performed at the end of the 6 hours of reperfusion. Nephrectomy specimens were histopathologically analysed for congestion, inflammation and necrosis. Tissue NO, glutathione reductase, catalase and MDA levels were measured. RESULTS: There was no significant differences between the groups histopathologically or biochemically. CONCLUSION: Dexpanthenol is the biologically active form of pantothenic acid and has an antioxidant effect. Our study was not in correlation with the literature regarding a protective effect of dxp on various organs via its antioxidant effect.

  5. Acute kidney injury: from clinical to molecular diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The RIFLE classification was introduced in 2004 to describe the presence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and to define its clinical stage, based upon the serum creatinine level and urine output. The same criteria, although slightly modified, are used in the other scoring systems AKIN and KDIGO. Mortality and morbidity remain high in AKI, suggesting that current diagnostic methods are suboptimal, poorly accurate, and often timely inadequate in detecting the presence of early kidney injury. Conversely, a growing body of evidence indicates that new AKI biomarkers can be used to both rule out AKI and to assess high-risk conditions or the presence of subclinical forms. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin or cell cycle arrest biomarkers seem to be sensitive and specific enough to be used in conjunction with existing markers of AKI for better classifying renal injury as well as dysfunction. Improvements in diagnosis, risk identification, stratification, prognosis, and therapeutic monitoring may improve prevention and protection from organ damage and help to identify patients at risk, allowing individualized therapy. In this view, we may say that AKI diagnosis has finally moved from clinical to molecular level with potential benefits for the patients because similar progress has been shown in other disciplines. PMID:27384344

  6. SICK EUTHYROID SYNDROME IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

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    Jigar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sick euthyroid syndrome is an undermined entity seen in many chronic illness. CKD is one of the forerunners in terms of magnitude in the list of chronic illnesses. Also there is evidence of abnormal thyroid metabolism at several levels in uremia. Hence the need to evaluate thyroid function in CKD patients exists, as revealed by recent studies. AIMS: To study thyroid function test in patients of chronic renal failure. Also, to study the correlation between thyroid function test and severity of renal failure, defined by creatinine clearance. MATERIALS & METHODS : In a cross sectional observational case control study, 50 patients of chronic renal failure either on conservative management or on maintenance haemodialysis and 50 normal healthy subjects as control were enrolled. Creatinine clearance was calculated by Cockcroft – Gault Equation. Thyroid function tests were done by C.L.I.A (Chemiluminescence Immunoassay. RESULTS : Of the 50 patients (M:F – 58:42%, with a mean age 40.58 ± 12.65 years, 28 (56% were on conservative management, 22 (44% were on hemodialysis for a minimum period of three months. All patients were clinically euthyroid. Thyroid function tests were normal (all parameters within normal range in 13 (26% patien ts. However 37 (74% out of 50 patients of CKD had deranged thyroid function test (sick euthyroid syndrome. Mean Total T3 in patients of CKD and controls were 71.52 ± 27.88ng/dl and 95.34 ± 16.31ng/dl respectively (p < 0.005. Mean Free T3 in patients of CKD and controls were 2.19 ± 0.70pg/ml and 3.23 ± 0.79pg/ml respectively (p < 0.005. Mean Total T4 in patients of CKD and controls were 6.03 ± 1.60μg/dl and 6.88 ± 1.06μg/dl respectively (p < 0.005. Mean Free T4 in patients of CKD and controls were 1. 18 ± 0.55ng/ml and 1.29 ± 0.24ng/dl respectively (no statistically significant difference. Mean TSH in patients of CKD and controls were 2.90 ± 1.39 vs. 2.81 ± 0.99μIU/ml respectively (no

  7. Metabolic Syndrome, Chronic Kidney, and Cardiovascular Diseases: Role of Adipokines

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    Manfredi Tesauro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic disease, whose incidence is alarmingly growing. It is associated with metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular complications. These complications are clustered in the metabolic syndrome (MetS leading to high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity predisposes to diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis, and focal and segmental glomerular sclerosis and represents an independent risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Albuminuria is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs. Microalbuminuria has been described as early manifestation of MetS-associated kidney damage and diabetic nephropathy. Obesity and MetS affect renal physiology and metabolism through mechanisms which include altered levels of adipokines such as leptin and adiponectin, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Secretory products of adipose tissue also deeply and negatively influence endothelial function. A better understanding of these interactions will help in designing more effective treatments aimed to protect both renal and cardiovascular systems.

  8. Milk alkali syndrome in an infant with chronic kidney disease

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    Kari JA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Jameela A Kari, Sherif M El DesokyDepartment of Pediatrics and Pediatric Nephrology Unit, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: We report a case of milk alkali syndrome in a 15-month-old infant who had chronic kidney disease. His kidney function worsened, with creatinine raised from 1.11 mg/dL (98 µmol/L to 3.98 mg/dL (350.3 µmol/L, normal 0.4–1.0 mg/dL (35–91 µmol. He had hypercalcemia, serum calcium level 3.11 (normal 2.1–2.6 mmol/L, and metabolic alkalosis, HCO3 48.7 (normal 21–26 mmol/L. His kidney function returned to its base level and his calcium and bicarbonate levels normalized with adjustment of calcium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate doses. We report this case to highlight an unusual complication and to review the literature on milk alkali syndrome which is rare in children.Keywords: milk alkali syndrome, infants, chronic kidney disease

  9. Design of clinical trials in acute kidney injury: report from an NIDDK workshop on trial methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palevsky, Paul M; Molitoris, Bruce A; Okusa, Mark D; Levin, Adeera; Waikar, Sushrut S; Wald, Ron; Chertow, Glenn M; Murray, Patrick T; Parikh, Chirag R; Shaw, Andrew D; Go, Alan S; Faubel, Sarah G; Kellum, John A; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Liu, Kathleen D; Cheung, Alfred K; Weisbord, Steven D; Chawla, Lakhmir S; Kaufman, James S; Devarajan, Prasad; Toto, Robert M; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Greene, Tom; Mehta, Ravindra L; Stokes, John B; Thompson, Aliza M; Thompson, B Taylor; Westenfelder, Christof S; Tumlin, James A; Warnock, David G; Shah, Sudhir V; Xie, Yining; Duggan, Emily G; Kimmel, Paul L; Star, Robert A

    2012-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains a complex clinical problem associated with significant short-term morbidity and mortality and lacking effective pharmacologic interventions. Patients with AKI experience longer-term risks for progressive chronic ESRD, which diminish patients' health-related quality of life and create a larger burden on the healthcare system. Although experimental models have yielded numerous promising agents, translation into clinical practice has been unsuccessful, possibly because of issues in clinical trial design, such as delayed drug administration, masking of therapeutic benefit by adverse events, and inadequate sample size. To address issues of clinical trial design, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases sponsored a workshop titled "Clinical Trials in Acute Kidney Injury: Current Opportunities and Barriers" in December 2010. Workshop participants included representatives from academia, industry, and government agencies whose areas of expertise spanned basic science, clinical nephrology, critical care medicine, biostatistics, pharmacology, and drug development. This document summarizes the discussions of collaborative workgroups that addressed issues related to patient selection, study endpoints, the role of novel biomarkers, sample size and power calculations, and adverse events and pilot/feasibility studies in prevention and treatment of AKI. Companion articles outline the discussions of workgroups for model trials related to prevention or treatment of established AKI in different clinical settings, such as in patients with sepsis.

  10. Contrast-induced acute kidney injury: short- and long-term implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, Steven D; Palevsky, Paul M

    2011-05-01

    The intravascular administration of iodine-based contrast media remains a common cause of acute kidney injury and a leading cause of iatrogenic renal disease. Past research has elucidated the principal risk factors for contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CIAKI) and helped to establish the efficacy of various interventions for the prevention of this condition. The importance of preventing CIAKI has been underscored by a growing number of studies showing strong associations of CIAKI with serious adverse short- and long-term outcomes. However, it remains unclear whether these associations are causal. This is important because considerable health care resources are used to prevent CIAKI. If CIAKI is a marker, but not a mediator, of serious adverse downstream outcomes, more judicious and selective use of preventive care may be appropriate. Moreover, with an increasing number of studies reporting the underuse of coronary angiography in patients with acute coronary syndrome and underlying chronic kidney disease, presumably in part because of a fear of CIAKI, a clear understanding of whether this condition directly results in adverse downstream outcomes is essential. Careful inspection of past studies that investigated the association of CIAKI with adverse short- and long-term events sheds light on their strengths and weaknesses and provides insight into how future research may be better able to characterize the short- and long-term implications of this iatrogenic condition.

  11. Acute kidney injury after using contrast during cardiac catheterization in children with heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Young Ju; Hyun, Myung Chul; Choi, Bong Seok; Chun, So Young; Cho, Min Hyun

    2014-08-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is closely associated with the mortality of hospitalized patients and long-term development of chronic kidney disease, especially in children. The purpose of our study was to assess the evidence of contrast-induced AKI after cardiac catheterization in children with heart disease and evaluate the clinical usefulness of candidate biomarkers in AKI. A total of 26 children undergoing cardiac catheterization due to various heart diseases were selected and urine and blood samples were taken at 0 hr, 6 hr, 24 hr, and 48 hr after cardiac catheterization. Until 48 hr after cardiac catheterization, there was no significant increase in serum creatinine level in all patients. Unlike urine kidney injury molecule-1, IL-18 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, urine liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) level showed biphasic pattern and the significant difference in the levels of urine L-FABP between 24 and 48 hr. We suggest that urine L-FABP can be one of the useful biomarkers to detect subclinical AKI developed by the contrast before cardiac surgery.

  12. Exercise as an Adjunct Therapy In Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkman, Danielle L.; Edwards, David G.; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity levels are low in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Evidence indicates that a sedentary lifestyle contributes to increased morbidity and mortality risk; thus, increasing physical activity is an undeniable aspect of a healthy lifestyle. Despite the myriad of health benefits associated with exercise, as well as clinical guidelines in its favor, exercise is still not prescribed as part of routine care in the CKD patient population. This article briefly discusses the b...

  13. Relationship between Plasma Leptin Level and Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Anoop Shankar; Shirmila Syamala; Jie Xiao; Paul Muntner

    2012-01-01

    Background. Leptin is an adipose tissue-derived hormone shown to be related to several metabolic, inflammatory, and hemostatic factors related to chronic kidney disease. Recent animal studies have reported that infusion of recombinant leptin into normal rats for 3 weeks fosters the development of glomerulosclerosis. However, few studies have examined the association between leptin and CKD in humans. Therefore, we examined the association between plasma leptin levels and CKD in a representativ...

  14. Osteoporosis and adynamic bone in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cannata, J.B. (Jorge); Rodríguez, Minerva; Gómez, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Among the chronic kidney disease–mineral bone disease (CKD-MBD) disorders, osteoporosis and adynamic bone are highly prevalent, and they have been consistently associated with low bone mass, bone fractures, vascular calcifications and greater mortality in general and CKD populations. Despite the fact that osteoporosis and adynamic bone have similar clinical outcomes, they have different pathogeneses and clinical management. In osteoporosis, there is a lack of balance between bone format...

  15. The central nervous system in childhood chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Debbie S; Duquette, Peter J; Icard, Phil F; Hooper, Stephen R

    2007-10-01

    Neurodevelopmental deficits in pediatric and adult survivors of childhood onset chronic kidney disease (CKD) have been documented for many years. This paper reviews the available literature on central nervous system involvement incurred in childhood CKD. The studies reviewed include recent work in neuroimaging, electrophysiology, and neuropsychology, along with commentary on school functioning and long-term outcomes. The paper concludes with suggestions for monitoring the neurodevelopmental status and pursuing appropriate early interventions for children with CKD. PMID:17072652

  16. Coronary artery calcification in chronic kidney disease: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Stompór, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Arterial calcification is a well-recognized complication of advanced atherosclerosis. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by significantly more pronounced, disseminated and fast-progressing calcification of the vascular system, including the coronary arteries. New computed tomography-based imaging techniques allow for the noninvasive assessment and monitoring of calcification in different vascular sites. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) develops early in the course of CKD and is ...

  17. A Structural Approach to Skeletal Fragility in Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard, Mary B.

    2009-01-01

    Renal osteodystrophy is a multifactorial disorder of bone metabolism in chronic kidney disease (CKD). As CKD progresses, ensuing abnormalities in mineral metabolism result in distortions in trabecular microarchitecture, thinning of the cortical shell, and increased cortical porosity. Recent studies have demonstrated significantly increased hip fracture rates in CKD stages 3 and 4, in dialysis patients, and in transplant recipients. The majority of studies of bone loss in CKD relied on dual en...

  18. Aggressive blood pressure control for chronic kidney disease unmasks moyamoya!

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, T. Keefe; Halabi, Carmen M.; Siefken, Philp; Karmarkar, Swati; Leonard, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Hypertensive crises in children or adolescents are rare, but chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major risk factor for occurrence. Vesicoureteral reflux nephropathy is a common cause of pediatric renal failure and is associated with hypertension. Aggressive blood pressure (BP) control has been shown to delay progression of CKD and treatment is targeted for the 50th percentile for height when compared with a target below the 90th percentile for the general pediatric hypertensive patient. We pres...

  19. Influenza Vaccination Reduces Dementia Risk in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ju-Chi; Hsu, Yi-Ping; Kao, Pai-Feng; Hao, Wen-Rui; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lin, Chao-Feng; Sung, Li-Chin; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Taiwan has the highest prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) worldwide. CKD, a manifestation of vascular diseases, is associated with a high risk of dementia. Here, we estimated the association between influenza vaccination and dementia risk in patients with CKD. Data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan were used in this study. The study cohort included all patients diagnosed with CKD (according to International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revisio...

  20. Chronic kidney disease: identification and management in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, Simon; Blakeman, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Simon DS Fraser,1 Tom Blakeman2 1Academic Unit of Primary Care and Population Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, University of Southampton, Southampton, 2National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research Greater Manchester, Centre for Primary Care, Institute of Population Health, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important and common noncommunicable condition globally...

  1. Disparities in Periodontitis Prevalence among Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannidou, E; Swede, H.

    2011-01-01

    Because of adverse effects of uremia in the innate and adaptive immune systems, we hypothesized that chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients would have higher prevalence of moderate periodontitis compared with individuals without CKD. We examined this hypothesis using the NHANES III dataset, including 12,081 adults stratified by Race-Ethnicity. We followed the American Academy of Periodontology/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition for moderate periodontitis. Estimated glomerula...

  2. Treatment and Prevention of Common Complications of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Salahuddin Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a worldwide public health problem with an increasing incidence and prevalence. Outcomes of CKD include not only complications of decreased kidney function and cardiovascular disease but also kidney failure causing increased morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, CKD is often undetected and undertreated because of its insidious onset, variable progression, and length of time to overt kidney failure. Diabetes is now the leading cause of CKD requiring renal replacement therapy in many parts of the world, and its prevalence is increasing disproportionately in the developing countries. This review article outlines the current recommendations from various clinical guidelines and research studies for treatment, prevention and delaying the progression of both CKD and its common complications such as hypertension, anemia, renal osteodystrophy, electrolyte and acid-base imbalance, and hyperlipidemia. Recommendations for nutrition in CKD and measures adopted for early diabetic kidney disease to prevent further progression have also been reviewed. There is strong evidence that early detection and management of CKD can prevent or reduce disease progression, decrease complications and improve outcomes. Evidence supports that achieving optimal glucose control, blood pressure, reduction in albuminuria with a multifactorial intervention slows the progression of CKD. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-II receptor antagonists are most effective because of their unique ability to decrease proteinuria, a factor important for the progression of CKD.

  3. Renal Tissue Oxygenation in Essential Hypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Menno Pruijm

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal studies suggest that renal tissue hypoxia plays an important role in the development of renal damage in hypertension and renal diseases, yet human data were scarce due to the lack of noninvasive methods. Over the last decade, blood oxygenation level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI, detecting deoxyhemoglobin in hypoxic renal tissue, has become a powerful tool to assess kidney oxygenation noninvasively in humans. This paper provides an overview of BOLD-MRI studies performed in patients suffering from essential hypertension or chronic kidney disease (CKD. In line with animal studies, acute changes in cortical and medullary oxygenation have been observed after the administration of medication (furosemide, blockers of the renin-angiotensin system or alterations in sodium intake in these patient groups, underlining the important role of renal sodium handling in kidney oxygenation. In contrast, no BOLD-MRI studies have convincingly demonstrated that renal oxygenation is chronically reduced in essential hypertension or in CKD or chronically altered after long-term medication intake. More studies are required to clarify this discrepancy and to further unravel the role of renal oxygenation in the development and progression of essential hypertension and CKD in humans.

  4. Characterization of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

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    Niovis Sosa Barberena

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cienfuegos has a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease, which is a health problem of great social and economic impact. Objective: to characterize patients with chronic kidney disease receiving hemodialysis. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted in 80 patients treated at the Specialized Outpatient Center of Cienfuegos in 2013. General variables such as age, sex, and place of origin were analyzed, in addition to the causes of the disease, length of time on hemodialysis, type of vascular access, and prevalence of hepatitis C. Absolute frequencies, percentages, and rates were calculated. Results: the 45 to 54 age group was the most affected by the condition. Males accounted for 63.7%. Cienfuegos municipality showed the highest prevalence with 27.6 per 100 000 inhabitants. The most common cause of chronic kidney disease was nephroangiosclerosis (33.3%. Seventy three percent of patients started hemodialysis as an emergency therapy. The time on hemodialysis was less than one year and one to two years in more than half of patients. An arteriovenous fistula was used in 81.3% of cases. Hepatitis C showed a high prevalence. Conclusion: renal disease is more common in men of working age in Cienfuegos municipality. The major causes of this disease are associated with hypertension and diabetes mellitus.

  5. The evolution of nonimmune histological injury and its clinical relevance in adult-sized kidney grafts in pediatric recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naesens, M; Kambham, N; Concepcion, W; Salvatierra, O; Sarwal, M

    2007-11-01

    To describe the evolution, risk factors and impact of nonimmune histological injury after pediatric kidney transplantation, we analyzed 245 renal allograft protocol biopsies taken regularly from the time of transplantation to 2 years thereafter in 81 consecutive rejection-free pediatric recipients of an adult-sized kidney. Isometric tubular vacuolization was present early after transplantation was not progressive, and was associated with higher tacrolimus pre-dose trough levels. Chronic tubulo-interstitial damage and tubular microcalcifications were already noted at 3 months, were progressive and had a greater association with small recipient size, male donor gender, higher donor age and female recipient gender, but not with tacrolimus exposure. Renal function assessment showed that older recipients had a significant increase in absolute glomerular filtration rate with time after transplantation, which differed from small recipients who showed no increase. It is concluded that progressive, functionally relevant, nonimmune injury is detected early after adult-sized kidney transplantation in pediatric recipients. Renal graft ischemia associated with the donor-recipient size discrepancy appears to be a greater risk factor for this chronic histological injury, suggesting that the exploration of additional therapeutic approaches to increase allograft perfusion could further extend the graft survival benefit of adult-sized kidneys transplanted into small children.

  6. Prevention of iodinated contrast induced acute kidney injury (ICI--AKI - what have we learnt so far?

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    Asim Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of imaging modalities and endovascular procedures has escalated phenol-menally in the last two decades. In view of increasing number of elderly patients, rising incidence of chronic kidney disease and diabetes along with the complication of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis with gadolinium, a large patient population will be at risk of developing iodinated contrast induced acute kidney injury (ICI-AKI which is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and increased health care costs. Hence a search for more effective ways to prevent ICI-AKI continues to be a focus within the medical community.

  7. Factors associated with a vicious cycle involving a low nephron number, hypertension and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Go; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Haruhara, Kotaro; Koike, Kentaro; Ogura, Makoto; Shimizu, Akira; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    It has been reported that there is substantial variation in the nephron number between individuals. Previous studies using autopsy kidneys have demonstrated that a low nephron number, in relation to a low birth weight, may result in hypertension (HTN) and/or chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, recent studies have revealed that the association between a low nephron number and HTN is not a universal finding. This observation indicates that a low nephron number is unlikely to be the sole factor contributing to an elevated blood pressure. In addition to the nephron number, various genetic and congenital factors may contribute to increased susceptibility to HTN and/or CKD in a complex manner. Acquired factors, including aging, obesity and related metabolic abnormalities, and various causes of renal injury, may additionally promote further nephron loss. Such a vicious cycle may induce HTN and/or CKD via the common mechanisms of renal hemodynamic maladaptation. PMID:26084263

  8. K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines for chronic kidney disease: Evaluation, classification, and stratification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, Andrew S.; Coresh, Josef; Bolton, Kline; Culleton, Bruce; Harvey, Kathy Schiro; Ikizler, T. Alp; Johnson, Cynda Ann; Kausz, Annamaria; Kimmel, Paul L.; Kusek, John; Levin, Adeera; Minaker, Kenneth L.; Nelson, Robert; Rennke, Helmut; Steffes, Michael; Witten, Beth; Hogg, Ronald J.; Furth, Susan; Lemley, Kevin V.; Portman, Ronald J.; Schwartz, George; Lau, Joseph; Balk, Ethan; Perrone, Ronald D.; Karim, Tauqeer; Rayan, Lara; Al-Massry, Inas; Chew, Priscilla; Astor, Brad C.; De Vine, Deirdre; Eknoyan, Garabed; Levin, Nathan; Burrows-Hudson, Sally; Keane, William; Kliger, Alan; Latos, Derrick; Mapes, Donna; Oberley, Edith; Willis, Kerry; Bailie, George; Becker, Gavin; Burrowes, Jerrilynn; Churchill, David; Collins, Allan; Couser, William; de Zeeuw, Dick; Garber, Alan; Golper, Thomas; Gotch, Frank; Gotto, Antonio; Greer, Joel W.; Grimm Jr., Richard; Hannah, Ramon G.; Acosta, Jaime Herrera; Hogg, Ronald; Hunsicker, Lawrence; Klag, Michael; Klahr, Saulo; Lewis, Caya; Lowrie, Edmund; Matas, Arthur; McCulloch, Sally; Michael, Maureen; Nally, Joseph V.; Newmann, John M.; Nissenson, Allen; Norris, Keith; Owen Jr., William; Patel, Thakor G.; Payne, Glenda; Rivera-Mizzoni, Rosa A.; Smith, David; Star, Robert; Steinman, Theodore; Valderrabano, Fernando; Walls, John; Wauters, Jean-Pierre; Wenger, Nanette; Briggs, Josephine

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic kidney disease as a public health problem. Chronic kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem. In the United States, there is a rising incidence and prevalence of kidney failure, with poor outcomes and high cost. There is an even higher prevalence of earlier stages of

  9. Interactions between Cytokines, Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Tract and Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Cristina Simões e Silva; Flávia Cordeiro Valério; Mariana Affonso Vasconcelos; Débora Marques de Miranda; Eduardo Araújo Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Fetal hydronephrosis is the most common anomaly detected on antenatal ultrasound, affecting 1–5% of pregnancies. Postnatal investigation has the major aim in detecting infants with severe urinary tract obstruction and clinically significant urinary tract anomalies among the heterogeneous universe of patients. Congenital uropathies are frequent causes of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Imaging techniques clearly contribute to this purpose; however, sometimes, these exams are invasive, ...

  10. Acute Kidney Injury in Lymphoma: A Single Centre Experience

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    Muhammad Abdul Mabood Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common but least studied complication of lymphoma. Objective. To determine the frequency and predictors of AKI in lymphoma and to study the impact of AKI on hospital stay and mortality. Methods. Retrospective review of medical records of hospitalized lymphoma patients aged ≥14 years between January 2008 and December 2011 was done. Results. Out of 365 patients, AKI was present in 31.8% (116/365. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that independent predictors for AKI included sepsis (odds ratio (OR 3.76; 95% CI 1.83–7.72, aminoglycosides (OR 4.75; 95% CI 1.15–19.52, diuretics (OR 2.96; 95% CI 1.31–6.69, tumor lysis syndrome (OR 3.85; 95% CI 1.54–9.59, and R-CVP regimen (OR 4.70; 95% CI 1.20–18.36. AKI stages 2 and 3 was associated with increased hospital stay (OR 2.01; 95% CI 1.19–3.40. Conclusion. AKI was significantly associated with sepsis, aminoglycoside, diuretics, presence of tumor lysis syndrome, and use of R-CVP regimen. Presence of AKIN (Acute Kidney Injury Network stages 2 and 3 AKI had increased hospital stay. AKI was also associated with increased mortality.

  11. Effect of melatonin on kidney cold ischemic preservation injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslaner, Arif; Gunal, Omer; Turgut, Hamdi Taner; Celik, Erdal; Yildirim, Umran; Demirci, Rojbin Karakoyun; Gunduz, Umut Riza; Calis, Hasan; Dogan, Sami

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin is a potent free radical scavenger of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor and a well-known antioxidant secreted from pineal gland. This hormone has been reported to protect tissue from oxidative damage. In this study, we aim to investigate the effect of melatonin on kidney cold ischemia time when added to preservation solution. Thirty male Wistar albino rats were divided equally into three groups; Ringer Lactate (RL) solution, University of Wisconsin (UW) solution with and without melatonin. The serum Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) activities of the preservation solutions at 2nd, 24th, 36th, and 48th hours were determined. Tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were also measured and a histological examination was performed at 48th hour. Melatonin that added to preservation solution prevented enzyme elevation and decreased lipid peroxidation in preservation solution when compared to the control group (p<0.05). The histological examination revealed that UW solution containing melatonin significantly prevented the kidney from pathological injury (p<0.05). Melatonin added to preservation solutions such as UW solution seemed to protect the tissue preserved effectively from cold ischemic injury for up to 48 hour. PMID:24179573

  12. Acute kidney injury in septua- and octogenarians after cardiac surgery

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    Schmid Christof

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of septua- and octogenarians undergo cardiac surgery. Acute kidney injury (AKI still is a frequent complication after surgery. We examined the incidence of AKI and its impact on 30-day mortality. Methods A retrospective study between 01/2006 and 08/2009 with 299 octogenarians, who were matched for gender and surgical procedure to 299 septuagenarians at a university hospital. Primary endpoint was AKI after surgery as proposed by the RIFLE definition (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-stage kidney disease. Secondary endpoint was 30-day mortality. Perioperative mortality was predicted with the logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE. Results Octogenarians significantly had a mean higher logistic EuroSCORE compared to septuagenarians (13.2% versus 8.5%; p -1 × 1.73 m-2. In contrast, septuagenarians showed a slightly higher median body mass index (28 kg × m-2 versus 26 kg × m-2 and were more frequently active smoker at time of surgery (6.4% versus 1.6%, p The RIFLE classification provided accurate risk assessment for 30-day mortality and fair discriminatory power. Conclusions The RIFLE criteria allow identifying patients with AKI after cardiac surgery. The high incidence of AKI in septua- and octogenarians after cardiac surgery should prompt the use of RIFLE criteria to identify patients at risk and should stimulate institutional measures that target AKI as a quality improvement initiative for patients at advanced age.

  13. Biomarkers of acute kidney injury in neonatal encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweetman, D U

    2013-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of neonatal encephalopathy (NE). The accurate diagnosis of neonatal AKI, irrespective of the cause, relies on suboptimal methods such as identification of rising serum creatinine, decreased urinary output and glomerular filtration rate. Studies of AKI biomarkers in adults and children have shown that biomarkers can improve the early diagnosis of AKI. Hypoxia-ischaemia is the proposed aetiological basis of AKI in both NE and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, there is a paucity of studies examining the role of AKI biomarkers specifically in NE. Urinary cystatin C (CysC), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin-18, kidney injury molecule-1, liver-type fatty acid-binding protein, serum CysC and serum NGAL all show good ability to predict early AKI in a heterogeneous critically ill neonatal population including infants post-CPB. Moreover, serum and urinary NGAL and urinary CysC are early predictors of AKI secondary to NE. These findings are promising and open up the possibility of biomarkers playing a significant role in the early diagnosis and treatment of NE-related AKI. There is an urgent need to explore the role of AKI biomarkers in infants with NE as establishing the diagnosis of AKI earlier may allow more timely intervention with potential for improving long-term outcome.

  14. Large kidneys predict poor renal outcome in subjects with diabetes and chronic kidney disease

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    Vendrely Benoit

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal hypertrophy occurs early in diabetic nephropathy, its later value is unknown. Do large kidneys still predict poor outcome in patients with diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD? Methods Seventy-five patients with diabetes and CKD according to a Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR, by 51Cr-EDTA clearance below 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or an Albumin Excretion Rate above 30 mg/24 H, had an ultrasound imaging of the kidneys and were cooperatively followed during five years by the Diabetology and Nephrology departments of the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux. Results The patients were mainly men (44/75, aged 62 ± 13 yrs, with long-standing diabetes (duration:17 ± 9 yrs, 55/75 type 2, and CKD: initial GFR: 56.5 (8.5-209 mL/min/1.73 m2, AER: 196 (20-2358 mg/24 H. Their mean kidney lenght (108 ± 13 mm, 67-147 was correlated to the GFR (r = 0.23, p Conclusions Large kidneys still predict progression in advanced CKD complicating diabetes. In these patients, ultrasound imaging not only excludes obstructive renal disease, but also provides information on the progression of the renal disease.

  15. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of kidneys in patients with chronic kidney disease: initial study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xueqin; Fang, Wenqiang; Ling, Huawei; Chai, Weimin; Chen, Kemin [Ruijin Hospital Shanghai, Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China)

    2010-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Seventy-two healthy volunteers and 43 patients underwent coronal echo-planar DW MR imaging of the kidneys with a single breath-hold time of 16 s. The patients were grouped according to five stages as indicated by the K/DOQI CKD (kidney disease outcome quality initiative). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the kidneys was calculated with high b values (b = 500 s/mm{sup 2}). The ADC values were compared between patients and healthy volunteers, and among different stages. For statistical analysis, Student's t tests, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation tests, and Spearman's correlation tests were used. No difference between the cortex and medulla could be observed on DW images of all volunteers. Patients with CKD had significantly lower renal ADC (t = -4.383, P = 0.000) than volunteers. The ADC values of kidneys were significantly lower than normal at most stages of CKD, except CKD1. There was a negative correlation between the ADCs and serum creatinine (sCr) level (P = 0.000) amongst the patients. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is feasible in the assessment of renal function, especially in the detection of early stage renal failure of CKD. (orig.)

  16. Neurocognitive Outcomes in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: Current Findings and Contemporary Endeavors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Arlene C.; Butler, Robert; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Wentz, Alicia; Shinnar, Shlomo; Lande, Marc B.; Mendley, Susan R.; Warady, Bradley A.; Furth, Susan L.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    Given the rise in chronic kidney disease (CKD) in both children and adults, CKD has recently been targeted as a public health priority. Childhood onset kidney disease is generally a noncurable and progressive condition that leads to kidney failure by early adulthood. Fortunately, improved identification of kidney problems allows for early…

  17. The definition, classification, and prognosis of chronic kidney disease : a KDIGO Controversies Conference report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, Andrew S.; de Jong, Paul E.; Coresh, Josef; El Nahas, Meguid; Astor, Brad C.; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Kasiske, Bertram L.; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe

    2011-01-01

    The definition and classification for chronic kidney disease was proposed by the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) in 2002 and endorsed by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) in 2004. This framework promoted increased attention to chr

  18. Acute kidney injury is independently associated with higher mortality after cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandler, Kristian; Jensen, Mathias E; Nilsson, Jens C;

    2014-01-01

    , previous nephrectomy, preoperative sCr >2.26 mg/dL and selective cerebral perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass were used as exclusion criteria. Acute kidney injury was defined, using the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) criteria. Six hundred eight patients were included in the study. Mean age was 68...

  19. Contribution of bone marrow-derived cells in renal repair after acute kidney injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masereeuw, R.

    2009-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent clinical problem with a high mortality rate, generally caused by ischemic insults. Nevertheless, the kidney has a remarkably high capacity to regenerate after ischemic injury. Tubular cells can restore renal function by proliferation and dedifferentiation into

  20. Energy and Oxygen Metabolism Disorder During Septic Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-li Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Acute kidney injury (AKI during septic shock, which is one of the most common clinical syndromes in the intensive care unit (ICU, has a high mortality rate and poor prognosis, partly because of a poor understanding of the pathogenesis of renal dysfunction during septic shock. Although ischemic injury of the kidney has been reported to result from adenosine triphosphate (ATP depletion, increasing evidence has demonstrated that AKI occurs in the absence of renal hypoperfusion and even occurs during normal or increased renal blood flow (RBF; nevertheless, whether energy metabolism disorder is involved in septic AKI and whether it changes according to renal hemodynamics have not been established. Moreover, tubular cell apoptosis, which is closely related to ATP depletion, rather than necrosis, has been shown to be the major form of cell injury during AKI. Methods: We used canine endotoxin shock models to investigate the hemodynamics, renal energy metabolism, renal oxygen metabolism, and pathological changes during septic AKI and to explore the underlying mechanisms of septic AKI. Results: The present results revealed that the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ pool and the ATP/adenosine diphosphate (ADP ratio were significantly decreased during the early phase of septic AKI, which is accompanied by a decreased renal oxygen extraction ratio (O2ER% and decreased renal oxygen consumption (VO2. Furthermore, significant apoptosis was observed following renal dysfunction. RBF and renal oxygen delivery were not significantly altered. Conclusion: These results suggest that imbalanced energy metabolism, rather than tubular cell apoptosis, may be the initiator of renal dysfunction during septic shock.

  1. Influence of chronic kidney disease on cardiac structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Kunihiro; Ballew, Shoshana H; Coresh, Josef

    2015-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), the presence of kidney dysfunction and/or damage, is a worldwide public health issue. Although CKD is independently associated with various subtypes of cardiovascular diseases, a recent international collaborative meta-analysis demonstrates that CKD is particularly strongly associated with heart failure, suggesting its critical impact on cardiac structure and function. Although numerous studies have investigated the association of CKD and cardiac structure and function, these studies substantially vary regarding source populations and methodology (e.g., measures of CKD and/or parameters of cardiac structure and function), making it difficult to reach universal conclusions. Nevertheless, in this review, we comprehensively examine relevant studies, discuss potential mechanisms linking CKD to alteration of cardiac structure and function, and demonstrate clinical implications as well as potential future research directions. We exclusively focus on studies investigating both CKD measures, kidney function (i.e., glomerular filtration rate [GFR], creatinine clearance, or levels of filtration markers), and kidney damage represented by albuminuria, since current international clinical guidelines of CKD recommend staging CKD and assessing its clinical risk based on both GFR and albuminuria. PMID:26194332

  2. Influence of chronic kidney disease on the outcome of patients with chronic total occlusion

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qing-Bin; Chen, Li-Ming; Min LI; Cui, Yu-Qi; Zhao, Chuan-Yan; Cui, Lian-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) predicted a poor prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease. There is a paucity of data on outcomes after revascularization in patients with chronic total occlusion (CTO) and CKD. This study aims to investigate the impact of CKD on the revascularization of CTO. Methods: This study enrolled 1,092 CTO patients received treatments in our hospital between February 2009 and January 2014. Major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) and al...

  3. P2Y2 receptor deficiency aggravates chronic kidney disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Alexander Potthoff

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purinergic signaling is involved in a variety of physiological states. P2 receptors are mainly activated by adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Activation of specific P2Y receptor subtypes might influence progression of kidney disease. To investigate the in vivo effect of a particular P2 receptor subtype on chronic kidney disease progression, subtotal nephrectomy was performed on wild type (WT and P2Y2 receptor knockout (KO mice.During the observational period of 56 ± 2 days, survival of KO mice was inferior compared to WT mice after SNX. Subtotal nephrectomy reduced creatinine clearance in both groups of mice, but the decrease was significantly more pronounced in KO compared to WT mice (53.9±7.7 vs. 84.3±8.7µl/min at day 56. The KO mice also sustained a greater increase in systolic blood pressure after SNX compared to WT mice (177±2 vs. 156±7 mmHg and a 2.5-fold increase in albuminuria compared to WT. In addition, WT kidneys showed a significant increase in remnant kidney mass 56 days after SNX, but significant attenuation of hypertrophy in KO mice was observed. In line with the observed hypertrophy in WT SNX mice, a significant dose-dependent increase in DNA synthesis, a marker of proliferation, was present in cultured WT glomerular epithelial cells upon ATP stimulation. Markers for tissue damage (TGF-β1, PAI-1 and proinflammatory target genes (MCP1 were significantly upregulated in KO mice after SNX compared to WT SNX mice. In summary, deletion of the P2Y2 receptor leads to greater renal injury after SNX compared to WT mice. Higher systolic blood pressure and inability of compensatory hypertrophy in KO mice are likely causes for the accelerated progression of chronic kidney disease.

  4. Embryonic Stem Cells-loaded Gelatin Microcryogels Slow Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Dong Geng; Wei Zheng; Cong-Mei Wu; Shu-Qiang Wang; Quan Hong; Guang-Yan Cai; Xiang-Mei Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a public health problem.New interventions to slow or prevent disease progression are urgently needed.In this setting, cell therapies associated with regenerative effects are attracting increasing interest.We evaluated the effect of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) on the progression of CKD.Methods: Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 5/6 nephrectomy.We used pedicled greater omentum flaps packing ESC-loaded gelatin microcryogets (GMs) on the 5/6 nephrectomized kidney.The viability of ESCs within the GMs was detected using in vio two-photon fluorescence confocal imaging.Rats were sacrificed after 12 weeks.Renal injury was evaluated using serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, 24 h protein, renal pathology, and tubular injury score results.Structural damage was evaluated by periodic acid-Schiff and Masson trichrome staining.Results: In vitro, ESCs could be automatically loaded into the GMs.Uniform cell distribution, good cell attachment, and viability were achieved from day 1 to 7 in vitro.After 12 weeks, in the pedicled greater omentum flaps packing ESC-loaded GMs on 5/6 nephrectomized rats group, the plasma urea nitrogen levels were 26% lower than in the right nephrectomy group, glomerulosclerosis index was 62% lower and tubular injury index was 40% lower than in the 5/6 nephrectomized rats group without GMs.Conclusions: In a rat model of established CKD, we demonstrated that the pedicled greater omentum flaps packing ESC-loaded GMs on the 5/6 nephrectomized kidney have a long-lasting therapeutic rescue function, as shown by the decreased progression of CKD and reduced glomerular injury.

  5. Biomarkers in the assessment of acute and chronic kidney diseases in the dog and cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobrin, A R; Blois, S L; Kruth, S A; Abrams-Ogg, A C G; Dewey, C

    2013-12-01

    In both human and veterinary medicine, diagnosing and staging renal disease can be difficult. Measurement of glomerular filtration rate is considered the gold standard for assessing renal function but methods for its assessment can be technically challenging and impractical. The main parameters used to diagnose acute and chronic kidney disease include circulating creatinine and urea concentrations, and urine-specific gravity. However, these parameters can be insensitive. Therefore, there is a need for better methods to diagnose and monitor patients with renal disease. The use of renal biomarkers is increasing in human and veterinary medicine for the diagnosis and monitoring of acute and chronic kidney diseases. An ideal biomarker would identify site and severity of injury, and correlate with renal function, among other qualities. This article will review the advantages and limitations of renal biomarkers that have been used in dogs and cats, as well as some markers used in humans that may be adapted for veterinary use. In the future, measuring a combination of biomarkers will likely be a useful approach in the diagnosis of kidney disorders. PMID:24152019

  6. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Parenchymal Chronic Renal Diseases - Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Meola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Secondary nephropathies can be associated with disreactive immunological disorders or with a non-inflammatory glomerular damage. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis as in other connective tissue diseases, kidney volume and cortex echogenicity are the parameters that best correlate with clinical severity of the disease, even if the morphological aspect is generally non-specific. Doppler studies in SLE document the correlation between resistance indexes (RIs) values and renal function. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV) causes different types of renal damage. At ultrasound (US), kidneys have almost a normal volume, while during superinfection they enlarge (coronal diameter >13 cm) and become globular, loosing their normal aspect. Cortex appears highly hyperechoic, uniform or patchy. Microcalcifications of renal cortex and medulla are a US sign that can suggest HIV. In amyloidosis, kidneys appear normal or increased in volume in the early stages of disease. Renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic and pyramids can show normal size and morphology, but more often they appear poorly defined and hyperechoic. RIs are very high since the early stages of the disease. Nephromegaly with normal kidney shape is the first sign of lymphoma or multiple myeloma. In systemic vasculitis, renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic, while pyramids appear hypoechoic and globular due to interstitial edema. When vasculitis determines advanced chronic kidney disease stages, kidneys show no specific signs. Microcirculation damage is highlighted by increased RIs values >0.70 in the chronic phase. PMID:27169551

  7. Human embryonic mesenchymal stem cell-derived conditioned medium rescues kidney function in rats with established chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianne van Koppen

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a major health care problem, affecting more than 35% of the elderly population worldwide. New interventions to slow or prevent disease progression are urgently needed. Beneficial effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC have been described, however it is unclear whether the MSCs themselves or their secretome is required. We hypothesized that MSC-derived conditioned medium (CM reduces progression of CKD and studied functional and structural effects in a rat model of established CKD. CKD was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (SNX combined with L-NNA and 6% NaCl diet in Lewis rats. Six weeks after SNX, CKD rats received either 50 µg CM or 50 µg non-CM (NCM twice daily intravenously for four consecutive days. Six weeks after treatment CM administration was functionally effective: glomerular filtration rate (inulin clearance and effective renal plasma flow (PAH clearance were significantly higher in CM vs. NCM-treatment. Systolic blood pressure was lower in CM compared to NCM. Proteinuria tended to be lower after CM. Tubular and glomerular damage were reduced and more glomerular endothelial cells were found after CM. DNA damage repair was increased after CM. MSC-CM derived exosomes, tested in the same experimental setting, showed no protective effect on the kidney. In a rat model of established CKD, we demonstrated that administration of MSC-CM has a long-lasting therapeutic rescue function shown by decreased progression of CKD and reduced hypertension and glomerular injury.

  8. Genome-wide association studies in pediatric chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Jayanta; Kanetsky, Peter A; Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna; Schaefer, Franz; Wong, Craig S

    2016-08-01

    The genome-wide association study (GWAS) has become an established scientific method that provides an unbiased screen for genetic loci potentially associated with phenotypes of clinical interest, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD). Thus, GWAS provides opportunities to gain new perspectives regarding the genetic architecture of CKD progression by identifying new candidate genes and targets for intervention. As such, it has become an important arm of translational science providing a complementary line of investigation to identify novel therapeutics to treat CKD. In this review, we describe the method and the challenges of performing GWAS in the pediatric CKD population. We also provide an overview of successful GWAS for kidney disease, and we discuss the established pediatric CKD cohorts in North America and Europe that are poised to identify genetic risk variants associated with CKD progression.

  9. Anticoagulation in chronic kidney disease patients-the practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen; Szeki, Iren; Nash, Michael J; Thachil, Jecko

    2014-10-01

    There is an increasing awareness about the risks of arterial and venous thromboembolism (TE) in hospital patients and general public which has led to consideration of thrombosis prevention measures in earnest. Early recognition of the symptoms of TE disease has led to timely administration of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs, translating to better outcome in many of these patients. In this respect, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) represent a special group. They indeed represent a high-risk group for thrombosis both in the cardiovascular territory and also in the venous circulation. At the same time, abnormalities in the platelet membranes put them at risk of bleeding which is significantly more than other patients with chronic diseases. Anticoagulation may be ideal to prevent the former, but the co-existing bleeding risk and also that the commonly used drugs for inhibiting coagulation are eliminated by renal pathways pose additional problems. In this review, we try to explain the complex thrombotic-haemorrhagic state of chronic kidney disease patients, and practical considerations for the management of anticoagulation in them with a focus on heparins. PMID:25878775

  10. Quality of life in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Cruz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the dimensions of quality of life in the stages of chronic kidney disease and the influence of sociodemographic, clinical and laboratory data. INTRODUCTION: The information available on the quality of life of patients on conservative treatment and the relationship between the quality of life and glomerular filtration rate is limited. METHODS: 155 patients in stages 1-5 of chronic kidney disease and 36 in hemodialysis were studied. Quality of life was rated by the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36-Item (SF-36 and functional status by the Karnofsky Performance Scale. Clinical, laboratory and sociodemographic variables were investigated. RESULTS: Quality of life decreased in all stages of kidney disease. A reduction in physical functioning, physical role functioning and in the physical component summary was observed progressively in the different stages of kidney disease. Individuals with higher educational level who were professionally active displayed higher physical component summary values, whereas men and those with a higher income presented better mental component summary values. Older patients performed worse on the physical component summary and better on the mental component summary. Hemoglobin levels correlated with higher physical component summary values and the Karnofsky scale. Three or more comorbidities had an impact on the physical dimension. CONCLUSION: Quality of life is decreased in renal patients in the early stages of disease. No association was detected between the stages of the disease and the quality of life. It was possible to establish sociodemographic, clinical and laboratory risk factors for a worse quality of life in this population.

  11. Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of first-degree relatives of patients with chronic kidney disease toward kidney donation in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babawale T Bello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In most parts of Sub-Saharan Africa, kidney transplant programs are dependent on the willingness of relatives of patients with kidney failure to donate kidneys. This study assessed the attitudes of relatives of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD toward kidney donation. This was a cross-sectional survey of relatives of patients with CKD attending the nephrology service of our hospital. The respondents′ socio-demographic characteristics and knowledge and beliefs about kidney transplantation, as well as their willingness to donate a kidney, were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. There were 161 respondents who returned completed questionnaires; the mean age of the respondents was 34.8 ± 12.6 years and 52.2% of them were female. About 85.1% of the respondents were aware that kidney transplantation was a treatment option for end-stage renal failure, while 70% of them believed that kidney transplantation resulted in an improvement in the quality of life of these patients. However, 25.5% of the respondents believed that kidney donors were at risk of developing kidney failure in the future. Overall, 77.6% of the respondents were willing to donate a kidney, especially if the affected individual was their offspring. The majority of the respondents were willing to donate a kidney to a relative with CKD.

  12. Kidney injury molecule-1 expression is closely associated with renal allograft damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lianlian; Xue, Lijuan; Yu, Jinyu; Zhao, Jun; Zhang, Wenlan; Fu, Yaowen

    2013-08-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) in renal allograft biopsy samples and assess the clinical significance of its use as a biomarker for tissue damage. A total of 69 renal allograft biopsy samples from 17 patients with normal serum creatinine and 52 cases of increased serum creatinine were collected. They were divided into different groups according to the Banff 2007 diagnostic criteria. KIM-1 expression was detected by immunohistochemical methods and the association of KIM-1 and blood biochemical indexes was analyzed. KIM-1 expression increased as Banff 2007 classification grade increased and was positively correlated with tubular inflammation severity in the acute T-cell rejection group. Moreover, KIM-1 expression was strongly positive in the chronic active antibody-mediated rejection group. Interestingly, KIM-1 was weakly positive in the normal group without obvious acute rejection and injury of immunosuppressant toxicity. In this group, 27.3% (3/11) of the cases with normal serum creatinine level showed weakly positive KIM-1 expression in their renal tissues. KIM-1 expression level is positively correlated with renal allograft damage and tubular cell injury. KIM-1 is expressed in tubular epithelial cells before blood biochemical indexes become elevated and morphological changes occur. KIM-1 expression is an early, sensitive, and specific biomarker to determine renal tubular epithelial cell injury in renal allograft tissue.

  13. Wnt4 is a novel biomarker for the early detection of kidney tubular injury after ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shi-Lei; Wei, Shi-Yao; Wang, Yu-Xiao; Diao, Tian-Tian; Li, Jian-Si; He, Yi-Xin; Yu, Jing; Jiang, Xi-Yue; Cao, Yang; Mao, Xin-Yue; Wei, Qiu-Ju; Wang, Yu; Li, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Earlier intervention after acute kidney injury would promote better outcomes. Our previous study found that Wnt proteins are promptly upregulated after ischemic kidney injury. Thus, we assessed whether Wnt4 could be an early and sensitive biomarker of tubular injury. We subjected mice to bilateral ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). Kidney and urinary Wnt4 expression showed an early increase at 3 hours and increased further at 24 hours post-IRI and was closely correlated with histopathological alterations. Serum creatinine slightly increased at 6 hours, indicating that it was less sensitive than Wnt4 expression. These data were further confirmed by clinical study. Both kidney and urinary Wnt4 expression were significantly increased in patients diagnosed with biopsy-proven minimal change disease (MCD) with tubular injury, all of whom nevertheless had normal estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and serum creatinine. The increased Wnt4 expression also strongly correlated with histopathological alterations in these MCD patients. In conclusion, this is the first demonstration that increases in both kidney and urinary Wnt4 expression can be detected more sensitively and earlier than serum creatinine after kidney injury. In particular, urinary Wnt4 could be a potential noninvasive biomarker for the early detection of tubular injury. PMID:27600466

  14. Urinary L-FABP predicts poor outcomes in critically ill patients with early acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Parr, Sharidan K.; Clark, Amanda J.; Bian, Aihua; Shintani, Ayumi; Wickersham, Nancy E.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Siew, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Biomarker studies for early detection of acute kidney injury (AKI) have been limited by non-selective testing and uncertainties in using small changes in serum creatinine as a reference standard. Here we examine the ability of urine L-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), Interleukin-18 (IL-18), and Kidney Injury Moledule-1 (KIM-1) to predict injury progression, dialysis, or death within 7 days in critically ill adults with early AKI. Of ...

  15. [The role of zinc in chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Tatsuo

    2016-07-01

    Renal anemia is one of the most important complication as a cause of cardiovascular event in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The status of renal anemia has been ameliorated by using recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO), however, the EPO resistant anemia is sometimes seen in high stage CKD patients. Heavy metal deficiency including zinc deficiency is one of the cause of EPO resistant anemia. Recently, it is reported that zinc deficiency is seen in patients with CKD. In this article, we describe zinc deficiency in patients with CKD. The ability that zinc supplementation improves their anemia in CKD patients is also described. PMID:27455803

  16. [Epidemiology of acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Xiabing; Yang, Yi; Chen, Jianghua

    2016-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a disease spectrum ranging from minimal elevation of serum creatinine to complete renal failure. It is significantly associated with increased mortality, length of hospital stay and medical care cost. With the increasing awareness of the importance of AKI, several high quality and multicenter epidemiological studies have been published recently in China. However, the results differ a lot due to the differences in regional economic development, the selection of target population and testing indicators, the disease definition and study strategies. The reported incidence of AKI in China is much lower than that in the developed countries. This article will analyze the current status and the problems facing AKI epidemiological studies of hospitalized patients with our own data and those from literature. The article intends to clarify the burden of AKI,to increase the awareness of AKI among clinicians and policy makers for achieving the goal of "zero by 2025" in China. PMID:27273996

  17. Predictors of Renal Replacement Therapy in Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Koziolek

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: Criteria that may guide early renal replacement therapy (RRT initiation in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI currently do not exist. Methods: In 120 consecutive patients with AKI, clinical and laboratory data were analyzed on admittance. The prognostic power of those parameters which were significantly different between the two groups was analyzed by receiver operator characteristic curves and by leave-1-out cross validation. Results: Six parameters (urine albumin, plasma creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, daily urine output, fluid balance and plasma sodium were combined in a logistic regression model that estimates the probability that a particular patient will need RRT. Additionally, a second model without daily urine output was established. Both models yielded a higher accuracy (89 and 88% correct classification rate, respectively than the best single parameter, cystatin C (correct classification rate 74%. Conclusions: The combined models may help to better predict the necessity of RRT using clinical and routine laboratory data in patients with AKI.

  18. An Unusual Complication of Foam Sclerotherapy: Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müge EREK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sclerotherapy, in which an irritant solution is administered, is a method used to treat venous failure that results in complete venous destruction due to endothelial reaction and fibrosis. In recent years, foam sclerotherapy, in which a sclerosing agent (aethyl sclerole and air are mixed until they turn into foam and the resultant mixture is injected into noticeable veins directly and into other veins under ultrasonography in doses depending on the diameters of the varices, has been introduced. The drugs or gases used in foam sclerotherapy can cause local or systemic complications. Foam affects vessel endothelial cells and causes severe spasm in the vessel. It has been reported that endothelin-1 levels are high after foam sclerotherapy compared to the initial levels and that neurological complications vary with the endothelin levels. In this report, we present a case of acute kidney injury due to acute tubular necrosis probably caused by endothelin release following foam sclerotherapy.

  19. Metformin-Associated Acute Kidney Injury and Lactic Acidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Arroyo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Metformin is the preferred oral antidiabetic agent for type 2 diabetes. Lactic acidosis is described as a rare complication, usually during an acute kidney injury (AKI. Material and Methods. We conducted a prospective observational study of metformin-associated AKI cases during four years. 29 cases were identified. Previous renal function, clinical data, and outcomes were recorded. Results. An episode of acute gastroenteritis precipitated the event in 26 cases. Three developed a septic shock. Three patients died, the only related factor being liver dysfunction. More severe metabolic acidosis hyperkalemia and anemia were associated with higher probabilities of RRT requirement. We could not find any relationship between previous renal dysfunction and the outcome of the AKI. Conclusions. AKI associated to an episode of volume depletion due to gastrointestinal losses is a serious complication in type 2 diabetic patients on metformin. Previous renal dysfunction (mild-to-moderate CKD has no influence on the severity or outcome.

  20. Chlorogenic acid protects d-galactose-induced liver and kidney injury via antioxidation and anti-inflammation effects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yan; Yu, Ying-Hua; Wang, Shu-Ting; Ren, Jing; Camer, Danielle; Hua, Yu-Zhou; Zhang, Qian; Huang, Jie; Xue, Dan-Lu; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Huang, Xu-Feng; Liu, Yi

    2016-06-01

    Context Oxidative stress and inflammation are implicated in the aging process and its related hepatic and renal function decline. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is one of the most abundant polyphenol compounds in the human diet. Recently, CGA has shown in vivo and in vitro antioxidant properties. Objective The current study investigates the effects of protective effects of chlorogenic acid (CGA) on d-galactose-induced liver and kidney injury. Materials and methods Hepatic and renal injuries were induced in a mouse model by subcutaneously injection of d-galactose (d-gal; 100 mg/kg) once a day for 8 consecutive weeks and orally administered simultaneously with CGA included in the food (200 mg/kg of diet). The liver and renal functions were examined. Histological analyses of liver and kidney were done by haematoxylin and eosin staining. The oxidative stress markers and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the liver and the kidney were measured. Results CGA significantly reduced the serum aminotransferase, serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels in d-gal mice (p <0.05). CGA also restored superoxide dismutase, catalase, and malondialdehyde levels and decreased glutathione content in the liver and kidney in d-gal mice (p <0.05). Improvements in liver and kidney were also noted in histopathological studies. CGA reduced tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) protein levels in the liver and kidney in d-gal mice (p <0.05). Discussion and conclusion These findings suggest that CGA attenuates d-gal-induced chronic liver and kidney injury and that this protection may be due to its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:26810301

  1. Primary Injuries and Secondary Organ Failures in Trauma Patients with Acute Kidney Injury Treated with Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sigrid Beitland; Ingrid Os; Kjetil Sunde

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acute kidney injury (AKI) treated with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is a severe complication in trauma patients. The aim of the study was to assess primary traumatic injuries and secondary organ failures in severe posttraumatic AKI. Methods. Retrospective review of adult trauma patients admitted to the trauma centre at Oslo University Hospital Ullevål. Injury severity score (ISS) was used to assess the severity of primary injuries, and sequential organ failure asses...

  2. Kidney ischemic injury genes expressed after donor brain death are predictive for the outcome of kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, D; Kościelska-Kasprzak, K; Drulis-Fajdasz, D; Hałoń, A; Polak, W; Chudoba, P; Jańczak, D; Mazanowska, O; Patrzałek, D; Klinger, M

    2011-10-01

    The results of deceased donor kidney transplantation largely depend on the extent of organ injury induced by brain death and the transplantation procedure. In this study, we analyzed the preprocurement intragraft expression of 29 genes involved in apoptosis, tissue injury, immune cell migration, and activation. We also assessed their influence on allograft function. Before flushing with cold solution we obtained 50 kidney core biopsies of deceased donor kidneys immediately after organ retrieval. The control group included 18 biopsies obtained from living donors. Gene expression was analyzed with low-density arrays (Taqman). LCN2/lipocalin-2 is considered a biomarker of kidney epithelial ischemic injury with a renoprotective function. HAVCR1/KIM-1 is associated with acute tubular injury. Comparison of deceased donor kidneys to control organs revealed a significantly higher expression of LCN2 (8.0-fold P=.0006) and HAVCR1 (4.7-fold, PKidneys displaying delayed graft function and/or an acute rejection episode in the first 6 months after showed higher LCN2 expression compared to event-free ones (1.7-fold, P=.027). A significantly higher increase in expression of TLR2 (5.2-fold), Interleukin (IL) 18 (4.6-fold), HMGB1 (4.1-fold), GUSB (2.4-fold), CASP3 (2.0-fold) FAS (1.8-fold), and TP53 (1.6-fold) was observed among deceased donor kidneys compared with the control group. Their expression levels were not related to clinical outcomes: however, they showed significant correlations with one another (r>.6, Pkidneys after donor brain death were hallmarks of the organ injury process. LCN2 expression level in retrieved kidneys can predict kidney transplantation outcomes. PMID:21996181

  3. Targeted fibrillar nanocarbon RNAi treatment of acute kidney injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidori, Simone; Akhavein, Nima; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Behling, Katja; Romin, Yevgeniy; Queen, Dawn; Beattie, Bradley J.; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Bergkvist, Magnus; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference has tremendous yet unrealized potential to treat a wide range of illnesses. Innovative solutions are needed to protect and selectively deliver small interfering RNA (siRNA) cargo to and within a target cell to fully exploit siRNA as a therapeutic tool in vivo. Herein, we describe ammonium-functionalized carbon nanotube (fCNT)–mediated transport of siRNA selectively and with high efficiency to renal proximal tubule cells in animal models of acute kidney injury (AKI). fCNT enhanced siRNA delivery to tubule cells compared to siRNA alone and effectively knocked down the expression of several target genes, including Trp53, Mep1b, Ctr1, and EGFP. A clinically relevant cisplatin-induced murine model of AKI was used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of fCNT-targeted siRNA to effectively halt the pathogenesis of renal injury. Prophylactic treatment with a combination of fCNT/siMep1b and fCNT/siTrp53 significantly improved progression-free survival compared to controls via a mechanism that required concurrent reduction of meprin-1β and p53 expression. The fCNT/siRNA was well tolerated, and no toxicological consequences were observed in murine models. Toward clinical application of this platform, fCNTs were evaluated for the first time in nonhuman primates. The rapid and kidney-specific pharmacokinetic profile of fCNT in primates was comparable to what was observed in mice and suggests that this approach is amenable for use in humans. The nanocarbon-mediated delivery of siRNA provides a therapeutic means for the prevention of AKI to safely overcome the persistent barrier of nephrotoxicity during medical intervention. PMID:27009268

  4. Autophagy, Innate Immunity and Tissue Repair in Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Duann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Kidney is a vital organ with high energy demands to actively maintain plasma hemodynamics, electrolytes and water homeostasis. Among the nephron segments, the renal tubular epithelium is endowed with high mitochondria density for their function in active transport. Acute kidney injury (AKI is an important clinical syndrome and a global public health issue with high mortality rate and socioeconomic burden due to lack of effective therapy. AKI results in acute cell death and necrosis of renal tubule epithelial cells accompanied with leakage of tubular fluid and inflammation. The inflammatory immune response triggered by the tubular cell death, mitochondrial damage, associative oxidative stress, and the release of many tissue damage factors have been identified as key elements driving the pathophysiology of AKI. Autophagy, the cellular mechanism that removes damaged organelles via lysosome-mediated degradation, had been proposed to be renoprotective. An in-depth understanding of the intricate interplay between autophagy and innate immune response, and their roles in AKI pathology could lead to novel therapies in AKI. This review addresses the current pathophysiology of AKI in aspects of mitochondrial dysfunction, innate immunity, and molecular mechanisms of autophagy. Recent advances in renal tissue regeneration and potential therapeutic interventions are also discussed.

  5. A Stochastic Model for the Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Noura Anwar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Multistate Markov models are well-established methods for estimating rates of transition between stages of chronic diseases. The objective of this study is to propose a stochastic model that describes the progression process of chronic kidney disease; CKD, estimate the mean time spent in each stage of disease stages that precedes developing end-stage renal failure and to estimate the life expectancy of a CKD patient. Continuoustime Markov Chain is appropriate to model CKD. Explicit expressions of transition probability functions are derived by solving system of forward Kolmogorov differential equations. Besides, the mean sojourn time, the state probability distribution, life expectancy of a CKD patient and expected number of patients in each state of the system are presented in the study. A numerical example is provided. Finally, concluding remarks and discussion are presented.

  6. Vascular and Valvular Calcifications in Chronic Kidney Disease: An Update

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    Luca Di Lullo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In chronic kidney disease (CKD and end-stage renal disease patients cardiovascular disease is the main cause of morbidity and mortality, with incidence of cardiac related mortality increasing as renal function declines. Even after controlling for traditional cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, age, gender, dyslipidaemia, and arterial hypertension, patients with CKD have a higher incidence of major cardiovascular events. CKD is characterised by the presence of many other non-traditional cardiovascular risk factors, such as chronic inflammation and accelerated atherosclerosis, oxidative stress, and especially, secondary hyperparathyroidism. This review will summarise the current evidence on vascular calcifications and valvular heart disease in CKD patients, from pathophysiology to therapeutic strategies.

  7. Role of COX-2/mPGES-1/Prostaglandin E2 Cascade in Kidney Injury

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    Zhanjun Jia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2 cascade plays critical roles in modulating many physiological and pathological actions in different organs. In the kidney, this cascade is of high importance in regulating fluid metabolism, blood pressure, and renal hemodynamics. Under some disease conditions, this cascade displays various actions in response to the different pathological insults. In the present review, the roles of this cascade in the pathogenesis of kidney injuries including diabetic and nondiabetic kidney diseases and acute kidney injuries were introduced and discussed. The new insights from this review not only increase the understanding of the pathological role of the COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2 pathway in kidney injuries, but also shed new light on the innovation of the strategies for the treatment of kidney diseases.

  8. Involvement of the Hippo pathway in regeneration and fibrogenesis after ischaemic acute kidney injury: YAP is the key effector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Li, Pei-Xue; Wu, Jun; Gao, Yi-Jun; Yin, Meng-Xin; Lin, Ye; Yang, Ming; Chen, Dong-Ping; Sun, Hai-Peng; Liu, Zeng-Bo; Gu, Xiang-Chen; Huang, Hong-Ling; Fu, Li-Li; Hu, Hui-Min; He, Liang-Liang; Wu, Wen-Qing; Fei, Zhao-Liang; Ji, Hong-Bin; Zhang, Lei; Mei, Chang-Lin

    2016-03-01

    Renal tubule cells can recover after they undergo AKI (acute kidney injury). An incomplete repair of renal tubules can result in progressive fibrotic CKD (chronic kidney disease). Studies have revealed the relationship between tubular epithelial cells and kidney fibrogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Hippo pathway components were evaluated in complete/incomplete repair of I/R (ischaemia/reperfusion) AKI rat models, HK-2 cells and AKI human renal biopsy samples. We found that the expression levels of the Hippo pathway components changed dynamically during kidney regeneration and fibrogenesis in rat models of I/R-induced AKI and human renal biopsy samples. The transcription cofactor YAP (Yes-associated protein) might be a key effector of renal regeneration and fibrogenesis. Our results showed further that YAP might elicit both beneficial and detrimental effects on I/R AKI. After I/R injury occurred, YAP could promote the repair of the injured epithelia. The constant YAP increase and activation might be related to interstitial fibrosis and abnormal renal tubule differentiation. These results indicate that the proper modulation of the Hippo pathway, specifically the transcription cofactor YAP, during repair might be a potent therapeutic target in AKI-CKD transition after I/R injury.

  9. CXCR2 knockout mice are protected against DSS-colitis-induced acute kidney injury and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Punithavathi; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Manicassamy, Santhakumar; Ramesh, Ganesan

    2013-11-15

    Organ cross talk exists in many diseases of the human and animal models of human diseases. A recent study demonstrated that inflammatory mediators can cause acute kidney injury and neutrophil infiltration in a mouse model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-colitis. However, the chemokines and their receptors that may mediate distant organ effects in colitis are unknown. We hypothesized that keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC)/IL-8 receptor chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 2 (CXCL2) mediates DSS-colitis-induced acute kidney injury. Consistent with our hypothesis, wild-type (WT) mice developed severe colitis with DSS treatment, which was associated with inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression and neutrophil infiltration in the colon. DSS-colitis in WT was accompanied by acute kidney injury and enhanced expression of inflammatory cytokines in the kidney. However, CXCR2 knockout mice were protected against DSS-colitis as well as acute kidney injury. Moreover, the expression of cytokines and chemokines and neutrophil infiltration was blunted in CXCR2 knockout mice in the colon and kidney. Administration of recombinant KC exacerbated DSS-colitis-induced acute kidney injury. Our results suggest that KC/IL-8 and its receptor CXCR2 are critical and major mediators of organ cross talk in DSS colitis and neutralization of CXCR2 will help to reduce the incidence of acute kidney injury due to ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease in humans.

  10. Associations between thyroid dysfunction and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dănciulescu Miulescu Rucsandra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. The interactions between kidney and thyroid functions are well established: thyroid hormones are necessary for the maintenance of electrolyte and water homeostasis and kidney is involved in the regulation of thyroid hormones metabolism. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD. Material and Method. 23 patients with diabetes mellitus and CKD in pre-dialysis phase were recruited for this study. All subjects were investigated with thyroid ultrasound and laboratory tests to determine thyroid function, including: serum triiodothyronine (T3, free thyroxine (free T4, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH and antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (ATPO. Results were compared with the same measurements in 21 patients with diabetes mellitus but without CKD. Results. The prevalence of goiter (52.17% vs. 19.04%, p<0.05, subclinical hypothyroidism (23.80% vs. 9.52%, p<0.05, hypothyroidism (8.69% vs. 4.76 %, p<0.05 and low T3 syndrome (23.80% vs. 0.00% p<0.05 were significant high in diabetic patients with CKD compared with patients with diabetes mellitus but without CKD. Conclusions. We observed high prevalence of thyroid morphology abnormalities and thyroid function disorders in diabetic patients with CKD. Low T3 syndrome and subclinical hypothyroidism are the most frequently thyroid function disorders in CKD patients.

  11. Acute kidney injury in children: Enhancing diagnosis with novel biomarkers

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    Samuel Nkachukwu Uwaezuoke

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This narrative review aims to appraise the sensitivity and specificity of novel biomarkers in identifying acute kidney injury (AKI in children. Serum creatinine represents a poor traditional biomarker for AKI due to some limitations. Although alternative reliable biomarkers that would better identify individuals at high risk for developing AKI, identify AKI early enough, monitor its progression and patients' recovery, as well as identify those patients at higher risk for poor outcomes are not yet available in renal care, the search-light has recently been focused on various novel biomarkers, some of which could provide this information in time ahead. Several studies have established their predictive value. However, none of them could solely fulfill all the criteria of the ideal biomarker. Therefore, to increase their sensitivity and specificity and enhance the diagnosis of AKI, constellations of different biomarkers with specific features are probably required. In future, the diagnostic evaluation of AKI in intensive care units will have to undergo a paradigm shift from serum creatinine as the traditional biomarker to tissue-specific injury biomarkers. A panel of these novel biomarkers employed at the bedside setting will ultimately revolutionize the diagnosis and prognostication of AKI in children.

  12. The relationship between hyperuricemia and the risk of contrast-induced acute kidney injury after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with relatively normal serum creatinine

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    Yong Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Hyperuricemia is a risk factor for contrast-induced acute kidney injury in patients with chronic kidney disease. This study evaluated the value of hyperuricemia for predicting the risk of contrast-induced acute kidney injury in patients with relatively normal serum creatinine who were undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 788 patients with relatively normal baseline serum creatinine (7 mg/ dL in males and >6 mg/dL in females. The incidence of contrast-induced acute kidney injury was significantly higher in the hyperuricemic group than in the normouricemic group (8.1% vs. 1.4%, p75 years, emergent percutaneous coronary intervention, diuretic usage and the need for an intra-aortic balloon pump. CONCLUSION: Hyperuricemia was significantly associated with the risk of contrast-induced acute kidney injury in patients with relatively normal serum creatinine after percutaneous coronary interventions. This observation will help to generate hypotheses for further prospective trials examining the effect of uric acid-lowering therapies for preventing contrast-induced acute kidney injury.

  13. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Sierra, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN). Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day), including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2), with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is 300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase). The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health. PMID:27525285

  14. Chinese cohort study of chronic kidney disease: design and methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Bixia; Zhang Luxia; Wang Haiyan; Zhao Minghui

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common disorder associated with multiple adverse clinical consequences,especially cardiovascular risk and end-stage renal disease.A recent national survey demonstrated that CKD has become a leading health problem in China.There is an urgent need to implement an in-depth investigation of the CKD burden and also to explore underlying mechanisms of CKD progression and it association with adverse consequences.Methods The Chinese Cohort Study of Chronic Kidney Disease (C-STRIDE) is the first national CKD cohort in China.It will enroll approximately 3 000 pre-dialysis CKD patients aged between 18 and 74 years and follow-up for at least 5 years.Questionnaires,anthropometric measures,laboratory tests,and biomaterials will be collected at baseline and annually.The principal clinical outcomes of the C-STRIDE consist of renal disease events,cardiovascular events,and death.Based on the longitudinal clinical data and biomaterials,the risk factors with CKD progression and other outcomes will be analyzed,and candidate markers and predicted models will be established.Conclusion The C-STRIDE would provide important evidence for underlying mechanisms of CKD progression,valuable information for clinical guidelines,and healthcare policies in China.

  15. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Alejandra Guillermina Miranda-Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN. Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day, including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2, with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is 300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β, producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS. The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase. The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health.

  16. Cognitive Changes in Chronic Kidney Disease and After Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sandwijk, Marit S; Ten Berge, Ineke J M; Majoie, Charles B L M; Caan, Matthan W A; De Sonneville, Leo M J; Van Gool, Willem A; Bemelman, Frederike J

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive impairment is very common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is strongly associated with increased mortality. This review article will discuss the pathophysiology of cognitive impairment in CKD, as well as the effect of dialysis and transplantation on cognitive function. In CKD, uremic toxins, hyperparathyroidism and Klotho deficiency lead to chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and vascular calcifications. This results in an increased burden of cerebrovascular disease in CKD patients, who consistently have more white matter hyperintensities, microbleeds, microinfarctions and cerebral atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging scans. Hemodialysis, although beneficial in terms of uremic toxin clearance, also contributes to cognitive decline by causing rapid fluid and osmotic shifts. Decreasing the dialysate temperature and increasing total dialysis time limits these shifts and helps maintain cognitive function in hemodialysis patients. For many patients, kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment modality, because it reverses the underlying mechanisms causing cognitive impairment in CKD. These positive effects have to be balanced against the possible neurotoxicity of infections and immunosuppressive medications, especially glucocorticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors. A limited number of studies have addressed the overall effect of transplantation on cognitive function. These have mostly found an improvement after transplantation, but have a limited applicability to daily practice because they have only included relatively young patients. PMID:26479287

  17. Impact of chronic kidney disease stage on lower-extremity arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Brian F; Richard, Raveesh D; Bowen, Thomas R; Perkins, Robert M; Graham, Jove H; Foltzer, Michael A

    2014-07-01

    End-stage renal disease and dialysis is commonly associated with poor outcomes after joint replacement surgery. The goal of this study was to evaluate postoperative complications in patients with less advanced chronic kidney disease undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Patients who underwent THA or TKA between 2004 and 2011 with stage 1, 2, or 3 chronic kidney disease were retrospectively reviewed via an electronic medical record. The authors compared 377 patients who had stage 1 to 2 chronic kidney disease with 402 patients who had stage 3 chronic kidney disease. No significant differences in 90-day readmission or revision rates were found between the stage 1 to 2 and stage 3 patient groups. For patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease, the overall mortality rate was greater than that in patients with stage 1 to 2 chronic kidney disease. However, when adjusted for comorbid disease, no significant increases were seen in joint infection, readmission, or early revision between patients with stage 1 to 2 chronic kidney disease vs patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease. The overall incidence of infection was high (3.5%) but far less than reported for patients with end-stage renal disease, dialysis, and kidney transplant. In conclusion, patients with stage 1, 2, or 3 chronic kidney disease may have a higher than expected rate of prosthetic joint infection (3.5%) after total joint arthroplasty. Patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease are at higher risk for postoperative mortality compared with those with lesser stages of kidney disease. PMID:24992055

  18. Etiology and Outcome of Chronic Kidney Disease in Iranian Children

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    Neamatollah Ataei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Considering the significant geographical and ethnical differences in pattern of incidence, etiology and outcome of chronic kidney disease (CKD, the present study aimed to assess the etiology and outcome of CKD in Iranian children. Materials and Methods In a cross-sectional study etiology and outcome of 372 children aged 3 months to 18 years with CKD was studied during the period 1991 –2014. Children (186 boys, 186 girls with Stage 3 to 5 CKDs, defined as a glomerular filtration rate below 60 ml/min per 1.73 m2body surface area, were identified. Results Etiology was congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract in 125 (33.60%, cystic/ hereditary/ congenital diseases in 91 (24.46%, glomerulopathy in 73(19.62%, and cause unknown in 71 (19.09% patients. Forty-eight (13.22% were on conservative treatment, 174(47.93% had end-stage renal disease (ESRD with chronic hemodialysis, 24 (6.61% were on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Sixty-eight (18.74% underwent on renal transplant which was successful in 52 (14.33% patients but was associated with abnormal renal function in 16(4.41% children. Finally, 49 (13.50% patients died. Conclusion A large number of children developed CKD secondary to congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. Planning for screening, early detection and instituting timely treatment of preventable causes could lead to a lower incidence of CKD in this group of children.

  19. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagener, G.; Gubitosa, G.; Wang, S.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is proposed as an early marker of kidney injury. We report the association of urinary NGAL with indexes of intraoperative renal hypoperfusion (cardiopulmonary bypass time and aortic cross-clamp time) and acute kidney injury (AKI) after...... cardiopulmonary bypass time and aortic cross-clamp time to predict AKI were 0.592 (95% CI, 0.518 to 0.666) and 0.593 (95% CI, 0.523 to 0.665), respectively. LIMITATIONS: Limited sensitivity of changes in serum creatinine levels for kidney injury. CONCLUSIONS: Urinary NGAL has limited diagnostic accuracy to...

  20. Acute kidney injury associated with androgenic steroids and nutritional supplements in bodybuilders†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almukhtar, Safa E.; Abbas, Alaa A.; Muhealdeen, Dana N.; Hughson, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Four bodybuilders who injected anabolic steroids and ingested commercial protein (78–104 g/day) and creatine (15 g/day) products presented with serum creatinine levels between 229.84 and 335.92 µmol/L (2.6–3.8 mg/dL). Renal biopsies revealed acute tubular necrosis. Four weeks after discontinuing injections and supplements, serum creatinine was in the normal range and estimated glomerular filtration rate > 1.00 mL/s (60 mL/min), including two patients with biopsies showing >30% interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. The findings highlight a risk for acute and potentially chronic kidney injury among young men abusing anabolic steroids and using excessive amounts of nutritional supplements. PMID:26251708

  1. Interactions between Cytokines, Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Tract and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Simões e Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal hydronephrosis is the most common anomaly detected on antenatal ultrasound, affecting 1–5% of pregnancies. Postnatal investigation has the major aim in detecting infants with severe urinary tract obstruction and clinically significant urinary tract anomalies among the heterogeneous universe of patients. Congenital uropathies are frequent causes of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD. Imaging techniques clearly contribute to this purpose; however, sometimes, these exams are invasive, very expensive, and not sufficient to precisely define the best approach as well as the prognosis. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as potentially useful diagnostic tools in pediatric urological diseases. In this regard, recent studies suggest a role for cytokines and chemokines in the pathophysiology of CAKUT and for the progression to CKD. Some authors proposed that the evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help the management of postnatal uropathies and the detection of patients with high risk to developed chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of cytokines and the link between cytokines, CAKUT, and CKD by including experimental and clinical evidence.

  2. Myofibroblasts in Fibrotic Kidneys

    OpenAIRE

    Nakagawa, Naoki; Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis of the kidney glomerulus and interstitium are characteristic features of almost all chronic kidney diseases. Fibrosis is tightly associated with destruction of capillaries, inflammation, and epithelial injury which progresses to loss of nephrons, and replacement of kidney parenchyma with scar tissue. Understanding the origins and nature of the cells known as myofibroblasts that make scar tissue is central to development of new therapeutics for kidney disease. Whereas many cell lineag...

  3. Management of adynamic bone disease in chronic kidney disease: A brief review

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    Swathi K. Sista

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO work group released recommendations in 2006 to define the bone-related pathology associated with chronic kidney disease as renal osteodystrophy. In 2009, KDIGO released revised clinical practice guidelines which redefined systemic disorders of bone and mineral metabolism due to chronic kidney disease as chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorders. Conditions under this overarching term include osteitis fibrosa cystica, osteomalacia, and adynamic bone disease. We aim to provide a brief review of the histopathology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, and diagnostic features of adynamic bone disease, focusing on current trends in the management of this complex bone disorder.

  4. Clinical Implication of the Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone Blockers in Chronic Kidney Disease Undergoing Hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockers have been widely used in chronic kidney disease patients undergoing hemodialysis; however, whether RAAS blockers have beneficial effects for cardiovascular disease in those patients has not been fully defined. This review focuses on the effects of RAAS blockers in chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis for cardiovascular disease.

  5. The study of aortic stiffness in different hypertension subtypes in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    布海霞

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether there is any difference in aortic stiffness among different hypertension subtypes in patients with chronic kidney disease.Methods Six hundred and twenty-six patients with chronic kidney disease were included in the present analysis.They were classified into four groups:normotension(n=391)with systolic blood pressure(SBP)<140 mmHg and diastolic

  6. Low serum leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Rattensperger, Dirk; Zidek, Walter;

    2007-01-01

    Leptin, secreted from adipose tissue, regulates food intake, energy expenditure, and immune function. It is unknown whether leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy.......Leptin, secreted from adipose tissue, regulates food intake, energy expenditure, and immune function. It is unknown whether leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy....

  7. The renal arterial resistive index and stage of chronic kidney disease in patients with renal allograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Stine O; Thiesson, Helle C; Poulsen, Lene N;

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the optimal threshold value of renal arterial resistive index as assessed by Doppler ultrasonography determining chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher in patients with renal allograft.......The study investigated the optimal threshold value of renal arterial resistive index as assessed by Doppler ultrasonography determining chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher in patients with renal allograft....

  8. Impact of chronic kidney disease on serum tumor markers concentrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Hong-li; DONG Zhen-nan; WEN Xin-yu; GAO Jing; WANG Bo; TIAN Ya-ping

    2013-01-01

    Background Serum tumor markers have always been of clinical importance in the diagnosis,monitoring disease progression and therapy efficacy for patients with malignant diseases.However,elevated serum tumor markers are found in some benign conditions,especially in chronic kidney disease (CKD).The elevation of them in CKD might cause confusion and misuse of these tumor markers.We conducted this retrospective study to investigate which of the five widely used tumor markers including carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA),alpha-fetoprotein (AFP),cytokeratin 19 fragment antigen 21-1 (Cyfra21-1),squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC) and neuron specific enolase (NSE) are affected markedly by CKD,in order to use them more effectively.Methods Serum tumor marker concentrations,biochemical,hematological parameters,and urinalysis were measured in CKD patients and healthy controls.The positive rate and median tumor markers' level in CKD patients and controls,and those in CKD patients stratified by CKD grade were compared using nonparametric rank tests.Correlation analysis of serum tumor markers and other parameters in CKD patients were performed using the Spearman correlation coefficient.Multivariate Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the important variables that caused elevated serum concentrations of these markers in CKD patients.Results The overall positive rates and serum concentrations of Cyfra21-1,SCC,CEA in CKD group were significantly higher than those in control group.Positive rate and serum concentrations of those tumor markers increased as kidney function decreased.Both univariate analysis and multivariate regression analysis showed that the elevations of those tumor markers were not only associated with kidney function,but also with nutritional status.Conclusions Serum concentrations of Cyfra21-1,SCC,CEA are significantly influenced by kidney function,as well as nutritional status.Therefore,in clinical work,the indices of kidney function and nutritional

  9. Kidney Injury Molecule-1 Protects against Gα12 Activation and Tissue Damage in Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ola Z.; Zhang, Xizhong; Wei, Junjun; Haig, Aaron; Denker, Bradley M.; Suri, Rita S.; Sener, Alp; Gunaratnam, Lakshman

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic acute kidney injury is a serious untreatable condition. Activation of the G protein α12 (Gα12) subunit by reactive oxygen species is a major cause of tissue damage during renal ischemia-reperfusion injury. Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is highly up-regulated during acute kidney injury, but the physiologic significance of this up-regulation is unclear. Here, we report for the first time that Kim-1 inhibits Gα12 activation and protects mice against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury. We reveal that Kim-1 physically interacts with and inhibits cellular Gα12 activation after inflammatory stimuli, including reactive oxygen species, by blocking GTP binding to Gα12. Compared with Kim-1+/+ mice, Kim-1−/− mice exhibited greater Gα12 and downstream Src activation both in primary tubular epithelial cells after in vitro stimulation with H2O2 and in whole kidneys after unilateral renal artery clamping. Finally, we show that Kim-1–deficient mice had more severe kidney dysfunction and tissue damage after bilateral renal artery clamping, compared with wild-type mice. Our results suggest that KIM-1 is an endogenous protective mechanism against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury through inhibition of Gα12. PMID:25759266

  10. Development of MRI techniques for the assessment of chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Buchanan, Charlotte E.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) are more susceptible to develop cardiovascular disease in comparison to the healthy population. This thesis aims to develop and apply MRI techniques to assess the human heart and kidney in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to inform on structure, function, perfusion and blood flow, without the need for ionizing radiation. In order to assess blood flow using MRI, ga...

  11. Antioxidant protection of statins in acute kidney injury induced by sepsis

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    Franciele do Nascimento Santos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective Evaluating the effect of preconditioning with simvastatin in acute kidney injury induced by sepsis. Method Male adult Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: SHAM (control; SHAM+Statin (0.5 mg/kg simvastatin, orally; Sepsis (cecal puncture ligation – CPL; Sepsis+Statin. Physiological parameters, peritoneal fluid culture, renal function, oxidative metabolites, severity of acute kidney injury and animal survival were evaluated. Results The treatment with simvastatin in induced sepsis showed elevation of creatinine clearance with attenuation of generation of oxidative metabolites, lower severity of acute kidney injury and reduced mortality. Conclusion This investigation confirmed the renoprotection with antioxidant principle of the simvastatin in acute kidney injury induced by sepsis in an experimental model.

  12. Challenges of treating a 466-kilogram man with acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Allon N; Decker, Brian; Seele, Louis; Hellman, Richard N

    2008-07-01

    Caring for super obese patients (body mass index > 50 kg/m(2)) presents a number of complex and unique clinical challenges, particularly when acute kidney injury is present. We describe our experience treating the heaviest individual with acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy reported to date. A 24-year-old black man was admitted to our hospital with fever, vomiting, progressive weakness, shortness of breath, and hemoptysis. Admission weight was 1,024 lbs (466 kg), height was 6 ft 4 in (1.9 m), and body mass index was 125 kg/m(2). During hospitalization, the patient experienced oligoanuric acute kidney injury and required initiation of continuous and subsequently intermittent renal replacement therapy. This clinical scenario identifies the many challenges involved in caring for super obese patients with acute kidney injury and may be a harbinger of what awaits the nephrology community in the obesity pandemic era.

  13. Diagnostic Value of Urine Microscopy for Differential Diagnosis of Acute Kidney Injury in Hospitalized Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Perazella, Mark A.; Coca, Steven G.; Kanbay, Mehmet; Brewster, Ursula C.; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Urine microscopy is the oldest and one of the most commonly used tests for differential diagnosis of acute kidney injury (AKI), but its performance has not been adequately studied in the setting of AKI.

  14. Kidney injury, fluid, electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities in alcoholics

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    Adebayo Adewale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 21 st century, alcoholism and the consequences of ethyl alcohol abuse are major public health concerns in the United States, affecting approximately 14 million people. Pertinent to the global impact of alcoholism is the World Health Organisation estimate that 140 million people worldwide suffer from alcohol dependence. Alcoholism and alcohol abuse are the third leading causes of preventable death in the United States. Alcohol dependence and alcohol abuse cost the United State an estimated US$220 billion in 2005, eclipsing the expense associated with cancer (US$196 billion or obesity (US$133 billion. Orally ingested ethyl alcohol is absorbed rapidly without chemical change from the stomach and intestine, reaching maximum blood concentration in about an hour. Alcohol crosses capillary membranes by simple diffusion, affecting almost every organ system in the body by impacting a wide range of cellular functions. Alcohol causes metabolic derangements either directly, via its chemical by-product or secondarily through alcohol-induced disorders. Many of these alcohol-related metabolic disturbances are increased in severity by the malnutrition that is common in those with chronic alcoholism. This review focuses on the acute and chronic injurious consequences of alcohol ingestion on the kidney, as well as the fluid, electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities associated with acute and chronic ingestion of alcohol.

  15. Metabolic syndrome and its components associated with chronic kidney disease

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    Ali Maleki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is limited information on the relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS and chronic kidney disease (CKD in the Iranian population, a group that has a high prevalence of CKD and obesity. The aim of present study was to determine the relationship between MetS and CKD in West of Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 800 subjects aged more than 35 years admitted from 2011 to 2013 were enrolled in the study. MetS was defined based on the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, and CKD was defined from the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative practice guidelines. Waist circumference and body mass index were calculated, as well, blood samples were taken and lipid profile, plasma glucose levels, and serum creatinine were measured. Data were analyzed with SPSS version 17 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. Results: CKD was seen in 14.8% patients with MetS and 8.3% individuals without MetS. MetS was associated with an increased odds ratio (OR for a glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 (OR: 1.91; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22-2.99; P = 0.004. Individuals with 2, 3, 4, and 5 components of the MetS had an increased OR for CKD: 2.19 (95% CI: 0.95-3.62, 2.65 (95% CI: 1.03-4.71, 2.86 (95% CI: 1.08-5.53, and 5.03 (95% CI: 1.80-8.57, respectively, compared with individuals with none of the components. Conclusion: We found a high prevalence of CKD in patients with MetS compared with the subject without MetS. Our observations raised major clinical and public health concerns in Iran, where both the MetS and kidney diseases are becoming common.

  16. Chronic partial ureteral obstruction and the developing kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevalier, Robert L. [University of Virginia, Department of Pediatrics, Box 800386, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2008-01-15

    Although congenital urinary tract obstruction is a common disorder, its pathophysiology remains poorly understood and clinical practice is controversial. Animal models have been used to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for obstructive nephropathy, and the models reveal that renal growth and function are impaired in proportion to the severity and duration of obstruction. Ureteral obstruction in the neonatal rat or mouse leads to activation of the renin-angiotensin system, renal infiltration by macrophages, and tubular apoptosis. Nephrons are lost by glomerular sclerosis and the formation of atubular glomeruli, and progressive injury leads to tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Recovery following release of obstruction depends on the timing, severity, and duration of obstruction. Growth factors and cytokines are produced by the hydronephrotic kidney, including MCP-1 and TGF-{beta}1, which are excreted in urine and can serve as biomarkers of renal injury. Because MRI can be used to monitor renal morphology, blood flow, and filtration rate, its use might supplant current imaging modalities (ultrasonography and diuretic renography), which have significant drawbacks. Combined use of MRI and new urinary biomarkers should improve our understanding of human congenital obstructive nephropathy and should lead to new approaches to evaluation and management of this challenging group of patients. (orig.)

  17. Chronic active thrombotic microangiopathy in native and transplanted kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping L; Prichard, Jeffery W; Lin, Fan; Shultz, Michael F; Malek, Sayeed K; Shaw, John H; Hartle, James E

    2006-01-01

    We report 2 complicated cases of thrombotic microangiopathy with chronic features and active components. The first case was a 36-yr-old woman with positive anti-DNA antibody and possible lupus cerebritis, who developed thrombotic microangiopathy secondary to a series of syndromes, including preeclampsia and anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome. Renal biopsy revealed no evidence of lupus nephritis and her renal function returned to normal 1 week after the biopsy. The second case was a 46-yr-old man who developed thrombotic microangiopathy of unknown etiology, which led to end-stage renal disease within 6 mo. The patient received a living related-donor transplant, but thrombotic microangiopathy recurred in the donor kidney only 40 days after the renal transplantation. PMID:16951274

  18. Symptoms and their correlates in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, Steven D

    2007-10-01

    While there is a significant body of literature documenting the impairments in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) experienced by patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recent work has helped to elucidate the mediators of impaired well-being in this patient group. Physical and emotional symptoms have been shown to be common, frequently severe, and directly linked with impaired HRQOL. The following review explores the process of symptom assessment in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), presents an overview of the composite burden and importance of symptoms in patients with ESRD, highlights particularly common and distressing symptoms for which existing treatment strategies may be applicable, and discusses future directions for efforts to address and alleviate symptoms in the growing population of patients who suffer from CKD.

  19. Uric Acid in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Clinical Appraisal

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    Andrea Galassi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A consistent body of evidence supports an independent association between uric acid (UA level and the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD in humans. It has been observed in experimental data that UA is capable of inducing renal damage through several pathways, including activation of the renin-angiotensinaldosterone system (RAAS, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Treatment with urate lowering agents and RAAS inhibitors prevented renal insult mediated by UA in animal models. Both of the xanthine oxidase inhibitors available in clinical practice, allopurinol and febuxostat, were efficient in controlling gout flares. However, data from randomised controlled trials are still inconsistent in relation to their benefit for slowing CKD progression. This review discusses the metabolism of urates in humans as well as the experimental and clinical evidence linking UA to CKD. Current evidence about the effect of allopurinol and febuxostat on CKD progression is also considered.

  20. Framingham risk score with cardiovascular events in chronic kidney disease.

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    Szu-Chia Chen

    Full Text Available The Framingham Risk Score (FRS was developed to predict coronary heart disease in various populations, and it tended to under-estimate the risk in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients. Our objectives were to determine whether FRS was associated with cardiovascular events, and to evaluate the role of new risk markers and echocardiographic parameters when they were added to a FRS model. This study enrolled 439 CKD patients. The FRS is used to identify individuals categorically as "low" (4.7 cm, left ventricular hypertrophy or left ventricular ejection fraction<50% to the FRS model significantly improves the predictive values for cardiovascular events. In CKD patients, "high" risk categorized by FRS predicts cardiovascular events. Novel biomarkers and echocardiographic parameters provide additional predictive values for cardiovascular events. Future study is needed to assess whether risk assessment enhanced by using these biomarkers and echocardiographic parameters might contribute to more effective prediction and better care for patients.

  1. Symbolic representations of living with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makaroff, Kara Schick; Sheilds, Laurene; Molzahn, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Visual or aesthetic data can contribute to understanding experiences that may not be able to be fully understood through spoken or written words. This article describes stories of symbols that represent the experiences of individuals living with chronic kidney disease. Symbols included both objects (i.e., a family photograph) and intangible representations (i.e., apiece of music) that were chosen because they innately held meaning to the person. Descriptive themes of the symbols included hopes and inspirations, reflections on "who I am," and confrontations of illness. Participants' expressions through symbols were further described through the use of stories of memories, emotions, and poetic devices. We contend that symbols convey aspects of experience that cannot easily be translated into oral expression. PMID:24579398

  2. Diets for patients with chronic kidney disease, should we reconsider?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitch, William E; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Here we revisit how dietary factors could affect the treatment of patients with complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD), bringing to the attention of the reader the most recent developments in the field. We will briefly discuss five CKD-induced complications that are substantially improved by dietary manipulation: 1) metabolic acidosis and the progression of CKD; 2) improving the diet to take advantage of the benefits of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) on slowing the progression of CKD; 3) the diet and mineral bone disorders in CKD; 4) the safety of nutritional methods utilizing dietary protein restriction; and 5) evidence that new strategies can treat the loss of lean body mass that is commonly present in patients with CKD. PMID:27401192

  3. Management of hyperglycemia in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires Neto, Patrícia; Gomes, Henrique Vieira; Campos, Mário

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes currently accounts for approximately 45% of cases of end-stage renal failure in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Several observational studies have identified a positive correlation between measures of glycemic control and cardiovascular and microvascular benefits. Several randomized prospective studies have been conducted to quantify the impact of strict glycemic control on morbidity and mortality. These studies have consistently demonstrated an association between strict glycemic control and a reduction in microvascular events, but these results contrast with the lack of consistent results regarding macrovascular events. Treating diabetes has always been challenging. This challenge is increased in chronic kidney disease, due to changes in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of insulin and most oral antidiabetic agents. The available pharmacotherapeutic arsenal for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus currently involves approximately 6 different pharmacological classes of oral antidiabetic agents and different modalities of insulin therapy. PMID:23807643

  4. Valvular and perivalvular involvement in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Neelavathi Senkottaiyan; Saad Hafidh; Farrin A. Manian; Martin A. Alpert

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Mitral annular calcification (MAC) and aortic valve alcification (AVC) are the most common valvular and perivalvular bnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Both MAC and AVC occur at a younger age in CKD patients than in the general population. AVC progresses to aortic stenosis and mild aortic stenosis progresses to severe aortic stenosis at a more rapid rate in patients with CKD than in the general population. The use of calcium-free phosphate binders in such patients may reduce the calcium burden in valvular and perivalvular tructures and retard the rate of progression of aortic stenosis. Despite high rates of morbidity and mortality, the prognosis associated with valve surgery in patients with CKD is better than without valve surgery. Infective endocarditis remains an important complication of CKD, particularly in those treated with hemodialysis.

  5. Vegetarianism: advantages and drawbacks in patients with chronic kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauveau, Philippe; Combe, Christian; Fouque, Denis; Aparicio, Michel

    2013-11-01

    Vegetarian diet is a very old practice that is liable to confer some health benefits. Recent studies have demonstrated that modification of the dietary pattern with a reduction of animal protein intake and increased consumption of plant-based foods could influence cardiovascular risk profile and mortality rate. Moreover, phosphate bioavailability from plant proteins is reduced. These statements could lead to some benefits for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This review summarizes the characteristics and benefits of vegetarian diets in the general population and the potential beneficial effects of such a diet on phosphate balance, insulin sensitivity, and the control of metabolic acidosis in CKD patients. Potential drawbacks exist when a vegetarian diet is associated with protein intake that is too restrictive and/or insufficient energy intake, justifying an early and regular nutritional follow-up jointly assumed by a nephrologist and a renal dietitian. PMID:24070587

  6. Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury in Amateur Boxers

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    M. Rahmati

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & objective: Despite of young and adolescence intent to the boxing sport, because of dominant aggression and direct blows contact to head, face and central nervous system, it is continuously criticize by different groups. The groups of sporting and physician conventions are distinguished boxing with physical and neuropsychological disorders and some groups believe that side effects of this sport are not more than other sports. For this base the aim of this study was to determine the chronic traumatic brain injury in a group amateur boxers.Materials & Methods: In a case-control study, three groups of sport men were considered, each group contained 20 randomly selected cases. The first group were amateur boxers with 4 years minimal activity(directly has been presented to the head blows, second group were amateur soccer players with 4 years minimal activity(has been presented to the not very severe head blows, third group were non athlete subjects .The groups were matched in weight, height, age and education .To understand brain disorder interview by medicine method has been used, then Wiskancin, Bonardele, Bender geshtalt, Kim karad visual memory, Benton and wechler memory (Alef type tests has been performed and EEG has got in the same hour and condition.Results: The homogeneity of between group variances was gained by the statistical method. Also between structural–visual abilities neuropsychological aspect in groups, significant difference has been gained (p= 0.000. In Kim karad visual memory test at the mild and long term visual memory deficit, significant differences between three groups was observed (P= 0.000, P=0.009 that least score has been belonged to the boxers. Also in boxers 6 abnormal EEGs is observed.Conclusion: It can be said that of four years amateur boxing can affect on boxers visual and memory perception and their spatial orientation. Additionally our study have showed that amateur boxing has a significant

  7. New Targets for End-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease Therapy

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    Prakoura Niki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe forms of chronic kidney disease can lead to a critical, end-stage condition, requiring renal replacement therapy, which may involve a form of dialysis or renal transplantation. Identification and characterization of novel markers and/or targets of therapy that could be applied in these critically ill patients remains the focus of the current research in the field of critical care medicine and has been the objective of our studies for some years past. To this end, we used models of renal vascular disease, Ang II, L-NAME or mice overexpressing renin, treated with AT1 antagonists at different stages of progression, to create cohorts of animals during progression, reversal or escape from therapy. Transcriptomic analysis and comparisons were performed and genes were selected according to the following criteria: a not previously described in the kidney, b highly upregulated during progression and returning to the normal levels during reversal, and c producing proteins that are either circulating or membrane receptors.

  8. Systemic Redox Imbalance in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltsatou, Antonia; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Sakkas, Giorgos K.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience imbalance between oxygen reactive species (ROS) production and antioxidant defenses leading to cell and tissue damage. However, it remains unclear at which stage of renal insufficiency the redox imbalance becomes more profound. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an update on recent advances in our understanding of how the redox status changes in the progression of renal disease from predialysis stages 1 to 4 to end stage 5 and whether the various treatments and dialysis modalities influence the redox balance. A systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and Scopus by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. In total, thirty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Even from an early stage, imbalance in redox status is evident and as the kidney function worsens it becomes more profound. Hemodialysis therapy per se seems to negatively influence the redox status by the elevation of lipid peroxidation markers, protein carbonylation, and impairing erythrocyte antioxidant defense. However, other dialysis modalities do not so far appear to confer advantages. Supplementation with antioxidants might assist and should be considered as an early intervention to halt premature atherogenesis development at an early stage of CKD. PMID:27563376

  9. Systemic Redox Imbalance in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulianiti, Konstantina P; Kaltsatou, Antonia; Mitrou, Georgia I; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Maridaki, Maria; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Sakkas, Giorgos K; Karatzaferi, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience imbalance between oxygen reactive species (ROS) production and antioxidant defenses leading to cell and tissue damage. However, it remains unclear at which stage of renal insufficiency the redox imbalance becomes more profound. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an update on recent advances in our understanding of how the redox status changes in the progression of renal disease from predialysis stages 1 to 4 to end stage 5 and whether the various treatments and dialysis modalities influence the redox balance. A systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and Scopus by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. In total, thirty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Even from an early stage, imbalance in redox status is evident and as the kidney function worsens it becomes more profound. Hemodialysis therapy per se seems to negatively influence the redox status by the elevation of lipid peroxidation markers, protein carbonylation, and impairing erythrocyte antioxidant defense. However, other dialysis modalities do not so far appear to confer advantages. Supplementation with antioxidants might assist and should be considered as an early intervention to halt premature atherogenesis development at an early stage of CKD. PMID:27563376

  10. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in patients with chronic kidney disease

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    Mario Eandi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is a frequent complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD due to the inability of the kidneys to release sufficient erythropoietin to regulate the production of red blood cells. Administration of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs is highly effective in correcting anemia of CKD. The ESAs currently approved in Italy are epoetin alfa, epoetin beta, epoetin theta, darbepoetin alfa, CERA and biosimilars epoetin alfa and epoetin zeta. All the ESAs are effective in correcting renal anemia and increasing hemoglobin levels, but the choice of which to use should also take into account their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, their administration route, and economic issues. However, regarding the optimal use of ESAs an issue that remains controversial is the most appropriate dose conversion between epoetin alfa and darbepoetin alfa. In fact clinical experience demonstrates that the dose relationship between epoetin alfa and darbepoetin alfa is non proportional across the dosing spectrum. In this review is presented an update on the latest available evidence in the treatment of anemia in CKD patients, with particular reference to the definition of the correct conversion ratio EPO:DARB.

  11. Protein-Energy Wasting and Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Ezio Gianetta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-energy wasting (PEW is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and is associated with an increased death risk from cardiovascular diseases. However, while even minor renal dysfunction is an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular prognosis, PEW becomes clinically manifest at an advanced stage, early before or during the dialytic stage. Mechanisms causing loss of muscle protein and fat are complex and not always associated with anorexia, but are linked to several abnormalities that stimulate protein degradation and/or decrease protein synthesis. In addition, data from experimental CKD indicate that uremia specifically blunts the regenerative potential in skeletal muscle, by acting on muscle stem cells. In this discussion recent findings regarding the mechanisms responsible for malnutrition and the increase in cardiovascular risk in CKD patients are discussed. During the course of CKD, the loss of kidney excretory and metabolic functions proceed together with the activation of pathways of endothelial damage, inflammation, acidosis, alterations in insulin signaling and anorexia which are likely to orchestrate net protein catabolism and the PEW syndrome.

  12. Incidence and Outcome of Early Acute Kidney Injury in Critically-Ill Trauma Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Amber S Podoll; Kozar, Rosemary; Holcomb, John B; Kevin W Finkel

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence and effect on mortality of early acute kidney injury in severely injured trauma patients using the Acute Kidney Injury Network creatinine criteria. Design A retrospective cohort study of severely injured trauma patients admitted to the shock trauma intensive care unit. Setting Texas Trauma Institute, a state designated level I trauma unit certified by the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma. Patients 901 severely injured trauma patients admitt...

  13. Deletion of Rac1GTPase in the Myeloid Lineage Protects against Inflammation-Mediated Kidney Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Miki; Kurihara, Hidetake; Aiba, Atsu; Young, Morag J; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage-mediated inflammation has been implicated in various kidney diseases. We previously reported that Rac1, a Rho family small GTP-binding protein, was overactivated in several chronic kidney disease models, and that Rac1 inhibitors ameliorated renal injury, in part via inhibition of inflammation, but the detailed mechanisms have not been clarified. In the present study, we examined whether Rac1 in macrophages effects cytokine production and the inflammatory mechanisms contributing to kidney derangement. Myeloid-selective Rac1 flox control (M-Rac1 FC) and knockout (M-Rac1 KO) mice were generated using the cre-loxP system. Renal function under basal conditions did not differ between M-Rac1 FC and KO mice. Accordingly, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-evoked kidney injury model was created. LPS elevated blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, enhanced expressions of kidney injury biomarkers, Kim-1 and Ngal, and promoted tubular injury in M-Rac1 FC mice. By contrast, deletion of myeloid Rac1 almost completely prevented the LPS-mediated renal impairment. LPS triggered a marked induction of macrophage-derived inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNFα, in M-Rac1 FC mice, which was accompanied by Rac1 activation, stimulation of reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, and reactive oxygen species overproduction. These changes were inhibited in M-Rac1 KO mice. LPS evoked F4/80-positive macrophages accumulation in the kidney, which was not affected by myeloid Rac1 deficiency. We further tested the role of Rac1 signaling in cytokine production using macrophage cell line, RAW264.7. Exposure to LPS increased IL-6 and TNFα mRNA expression. The LPS-driven cytokine induction was dose-dependently blocked by the Rac1 inhibitor EHT1864, NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium, and NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082. In conclusion, genetic ablation of Rac1 in the myeloid lineage protected against LPS-induced renal inflammation and injury, by suppressing

  14. Chronic Kidney Disease, Fluid Overload and Diuretics: A Complicated Triangle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Yusra Habib; Sarriff, Azmi; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Khan, Amer Hayat; Mallhi, Tauqeer Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite promising role of diuretics to manage fluid overload among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, their use is associated with adverse renal outcomes. Current study aimed to determine the extent of renal deterioration with diuretic therapy. Methods A total 312 non-dialysis dependent CKD (NDD-CKD) patients were prospectively followed-up for one year. Fluid overload was assessed via bioimpedance spectroscopy. Estimated GFR (eGFR) was calculated from serum creatinine values by using Chronic Kidney Disease- Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Results Out of 312 patients, 64 (20.5%) were hypovolemic while euvolemia and hypervolemia were observed in 113 (36.1%) and 135 (43.4%) patients. Overall 144 patients were using diuretics among which 98 (72.6%) were hypervolemic, 35 (30.9%) euvolemic and 11 (17.2%) were hypovolemic. The mean decline in estimated GFR of entire cohort was -2.5 ± 1.4 ml/min/1.73m2 at the end of follow up. The use of diuretics was significantly associated with decline in eGFR. A total of 36 (11.5%) patients initiated renal replacement therapy (RRT) and need of RRT was more profound among diuretic users. Conclusions The use of diuretics was associated with adverse renal outcomes indicated by decline in eGFR and increasing risk of RRT initiation in our cohort of NDD-CKD patients. Therefore, it is cautiously suggested to carefully prescribe diuretics by keeping in view benefit versus harm for each patient. PMID:27442587

  15. Prevalence of anemia in predialysis chronic kidney disease patients

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    FAM Shaheen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the prevalence of anemia in a large cohort that comprises patients in different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA, we conducted a multi-center cross-sectional study of a cohort of CKD patients who have not started dialysis. The study patients were recruited from the nephrology clinics in 11 different medical centers distributed all over the regions of the KSA. For the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR, we used the Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI equation. There were 250 study patients who fulfilled the criteria for the study. The patients were stratified according to their GFR as follows: stage 1: 19 patients, stage 2: 35 patients, stage 3: 67 patients, stage 4: 68 patients, and stage 5: 61 patients. The composite of proteinuria and abnormal imaging in stages 1 and 2 was satisfied in 100% of the cases. The prevalence of anemia was elevated for the hemoglobin levels below 12 g/dL (the level at which the evaluation of anemia in CKD should be initiated in the different stages of CKD, that is, 42%, 33%, 48%, 71%, and 82% in the stages from 1 to 5, respectively. The prevalence was also elevated for the hemoglobin levels below 11 g/dL (the minimum hemoglobin level at which therapy should be initiated with erythropoietin, that is, 21%, 17%, 31%, 49%, and 72%, respectively for stages from 1 to 5. In conclusion, we found a large prevalence of anemia among the CKD population in Saudi Arabia, and the burden of patients who require treatment with erythropoietin is considerably large. However, the response to therapy will not require large doses according to the availability of long-acting erythropoiesis stimulating agents, which will render the therapy more convenient and less expensive.

  16. Chronic Kidney Disease, Fluid Overload and Diuretics: A Complicated Triangle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusra Habib Khan

    Full Text Available Despite promising role of diuretics to manage fluid overload among chronic kidney disease (CKD patients, their use is associated with adverse renal outcomes. Current study aimed to determine the extent of renal deterioration with diuretic therapy.A total 312 non-dialysis dependent CKD (NDD-CKD patients were prospectively followed-up for one year. Fluid overload was assessed via bioimpedance spectroscopy. Estimated GFR (eGFR was calculated from serum creatinine values by using Chronic Kidney Disease- Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI equation.Out of 312 patients, 64 (20.5% were hypovolemic while euvolemia and hypervolemia were observed in 113 (36.1% and 135 (43.4% patients. Overall 144 patients were using diuretics among which 98 (72.6% were hypervolemic, 35 (30.9% euvolemic and 11 (17.2% were hypovolemic. The mean decline in estimated GFR of entire cohort was -2.5 ± 1.4 ml/min/1.73m2 at the end of follow up. The use of diuretics was significantly associated with decline in eGFR. A total of 36 (11.5% patients initiated renal replacement therapy (RRT and need of RRT was more profound among diuretic users.The use of diuretics was associated with adverse renal outcomes indicated by decline in eGFR and increasing risk of RRT initiation in our cohort of NDD-CKD patients. Therefore, it is cautiously suggested to carefully prescribe diuretics by keeping in view benefit versus harm for each patient.

  17. Assessment of diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients

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    Dariusz Włodarek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction and objective[/b]. Nutrition is important in the therapy of predialysis patients. The aim of the presented single-centre descriptive study was to assess the diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention, in comparison with recommendations, as well as the analysis of the energy, protein and phosphate intake in correlation with chosen laboratory measurements. [b]materials and methods.[/b] The research was carried out in 31 female predialysis patients with CKD of different etiology, aged 29–79 years (GFR: 19.4±9.7ml/min/1.73m [sup]2[/sup] . Main outcome measures were self-reported data from three-day dietary recall. Nutrients content and energy value of diet were compared with guidelines for chronic kidney disease patients or, in case of nutrients when they are not settled, with the recommendations for healthy women. [b]results[/b]. All patients had a lower energy intake than the recommended level. At the same time, 35.8% of patients were characterised by improper protein intake – too low or too high. The majority of patients had low intake of most of vitamins and minerals. The total, animal and plant protein were positively correlated with the energy value of diet and with amount of most of the nutrients. Values of GFR were positively correlated with animal protein intake, while phosphate and creatinine in blood were negatively correlated with total and animal protein intake. [b]conclusions[/b]. The study highlights that diet of CKD predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention is not properly balanced.

  18. Cardiovascular Disease and Chronic Inflammation in End Stage Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Zyga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD is one of the most severe diseases worldwide. In patients affected by CKD, a progressive destruction of the nephrons is observed not only in structuralbut also in functional level. Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease of large and medium-sized arteries. It is characterized by the deposition of lipids and fibrous elements and is a common complication of the uremic syndrome because of the coexistence of a wide range of risk factors. High blood pressure, anaemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, high oxidative stress are some of the most common factors that cause cardiovascular disease and atherogenesis in patients suffering from End Stage Kidney Disease (ESRD. At the same time, the inflammatory process constitutes a common element in the apparition and development of CKD. A wide range of possible causes can justify the development of inflammation under uremic conditions. Such causes are oxidative stress, oxidation, coexistentpathological conditions as well as factors that are due to renal clearance techniques. Patients in ESRD and coronary disease usually show increased acute phase products. Pre-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-a, and acute phase reactants, such as CRP and fibrinogen, are closely related. The treatment of chronic inflammation in CKD is of high importance for the development ofthe disease as well as for the treatment of cardiovascular morbidity.Conclusions: The treatment factors focus on the use of renin-angiotensic system inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid, statins and anti-oxidant treatment in order to prevent the action of inflammatorycytokines that have the ability to activate the mechanisms of inflammation.

  19. Unusual presentations of acute kidney injury and neurologic complications due to snake bite

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid Noshad; Reza Rikhtegar; Mehdi Hagdoost; Masood Dinevari; Hosein Mahmoodi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Vascularity of kidneys is very high, so these organs are potentially susceptible to be affected with toxins including snake venom. Hypersensitivity to snake venous could cause some neurological problem. Case Report: We present a 14-year-old boy with acute kidney injury (AKI) due to snake bite. After a few days, kidney failure with hematuria was developed. His serum creatinine level rose to 3 mg/dl and following 2 weeks gradually and d...

  20. Relation between acute kidney injury and pregnancy-related factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Monchai Siribamrungwong; Pawadee Chinudomwong

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious problem during pregnancy. Once occurred, it brings about devastating maternal and fetal outcomes. Among developed nations, the trend of pregnancy-related AKI (PRAKI) is on a decline due to the advances in obstetrics care and the legality of abortion. On the contrary, this situation remains one of the major health problems in the developing countries. Though some improvements have been observed, PRAKI still causes high maternal morbidity and mortality, leading to fetal losses. This article aims to review current studies with regards to obstetrics related AKI. Most of the studies in this review were carried out in observational, both prospective and retrospective, studies. Results demonstrated a variety of major PRAKI causes such as hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, obstetric hemorrhage, sepsis, thrombotic micro-angiopathy and acute fatty liver in pregnancy. Aside from awareness of the etiologies of PRAKI, understanding the physiological renal adaptation during pregnancy is crucial for early detection, diagnosis, and proper management to prevent the obstetric complications.

  1. Metabonomics of acute kidney injury in children after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beger, Richard D; Holland, Ricky D; Sun, Jinchun; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Moore, Page C; Dent, Catherine L; Devarajan, Prasad; Portilla, Didier

    2008-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major complication in children who undergo cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. We performed metabonomic analyses of urine samples obtained from 40 children that underwent cardiac surgery for correction of congenital cardiac defects. Serial urine samples were obtained from each patient prior to surgery and at 4 h and 12 h after surgery. AKI, defined as a 50% or greater rise in baseline level of serum creatinine, was noted in 21 children at 48-72 h after cardiac surgery. The principal component analysis of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) negative ionization data of the urine samples obtained 4 h and 12 h after surgery from patients who develop AKI clustered away from patients who did not develop AKI. The LC/MS peak with mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) 261.01 and retention time (tR) 4.92 min was further analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and identified as homovanillic acid sulfate (HVA-SO4), a dopamine metabolite. By MS single-reaction monitoring, the sensitivity was 0.90 and specificity was 0.95 for a cut-off value of 24 ng/microl for HVA-SO4 at 12 h after surgery. We concluded that urinary HVA-SO4 represents a novel, sensitive, and predictive early biomarker of AKI after pediatric cardiac surgery.

  2. Acute Kidney Injury and Atypical Features during Pediatric Poststreptococcal Glomerulonephritis

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    Rose M. Ayoob

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common acute glomerulonephritis in children is poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN usually occurring between 3 and 12 years old. Hypertension and gross hematuria are common presenting symptoms. Most PSGN patients do not experience complications, but rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and hypertensive encephalopathy have been reported. This paper reports 17 patients seen in 1 year for PSGN including 4 with atypical PSGN, at a pediatric tertiary care center. Seventeen children (11 males, mean age of 8 years, were analyzed. Ninety-four percent had elevated serum BUN levels and decreased GFR. Four of the hospitalized patients had complex presentations that included AKI along with positive ANA or ANCAs. Three patients required renal replacement therapy and two were thrombocytopenic. PSGN usually does not occur as a severe nephritis. Over the 12-month study period, 17 cases associated with low serum albumin in 53%, acute kidney injury in 94%, and thrombocytopenia in 18% were treated. The presentation of PSGN may be severe and in a small subset have associations similar to SLE nephritis findings including AKI, positive ANA, and hematological anomalies.

  3. Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Paolo; Tonon, Marta; Pilutti, Chiara; Morando, Filippo; Piano, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and life-threatening complication in patients with cirrhosis. Recently, new criteria for the diagnosis of AKI have been proposed in patients with cirrhosis by the International Club of Ascites. Almost all types of bacterial infections can induce AKI in patients with cirrhosis representing its most common precipitating event. The bacterial infection-induced AKI usually meets the diagnostic criteria of hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Well in keeping with the "splanchnic arterial vasodilation hypothesis", it has been stated that HRS develops as a consequence of a severe reduction of effective circulating volume related to splanchnic arterial vasodilation and to an inadequate cardiac output. Nevertheless, the role of bacterial infections in precipitating organ failures, including renal failure, is enhanced when their course is characterized by the development of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), thus, when sepsis occurs. Sepsis has been shown to be capable to induce "per se" AKI in animals as well as in patients conditioning also the features of renal damage. This observation suggests that when precipitated by sepsis, the pathogenesis and the clinical course of AKI also in patients with cirrhosis may differentiate to a certain extent from AKI with another or no precipitating factor. The purpose of this review is to describe the features of AKI precipitated by bacterial infections and to highlight whether infection and/or the development of SIRS may influence its clinical course, and, in particular, the response to treatment.

  4. Hyperglycemia and Acute Kidney Injury During the Perioperative Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Carlos E; Der Mesropian, Paul J; Mathew, Roy O; Slawski, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia and acute kidney injury (AKI) are frequently observed during the perioperative period. Substantial evidence indicates that hyperglycemia increases the prevalence of AKI as a surgical complication. Patients who develop hyperglycemia and AKI during the perioperative period are at significantly elevated risk for poor outcomes such as major adverse cardiac events and all-cause mortality. Early observational and interventional trials demonstrated that the use of intensive insulin therapy to achieve strict glycemic control resulted in remarkable reductions of AKI in surgical populations. However, more recent interventional trials and meta-analyses have produced contradictory evidence questioning the renal benefits of strict glycemic control. Although the exact mechanisms through which hyperglycemia increases the risk of AKI have not been elucidated, multiple pathophysiologic pathways have been proposed. Hypoglycemia and glycemic variability may also play a significant role in the development of AKI. In this literature review, the complex relationship between hyperglycemia and AKI as well as its impact on clinical outcomes during the perioperative period is explored.

  5. Relation between acute kidney injury and pregnancy-related factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monchai Siribamrungwong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a serious problem during pregnancy. Once occurred, it brings about devastating maternal and fetal outcomes. Among developed nations, the trend of pregnancy-related AKI (PRAKI is on a decline due to the advances in obstetrics care and the legality of abortion. On the contrary, this situation remains one of the major health problems in the developing countries. Though some improvements have been observed, PRAKI still causes high maternal morbidity and mortality, leading to fetal losses. This article aims to review current studies with regards to obstetrics related AKI. Most of the studies in this review were carried out in observational, both prospective and retrospective, studies. Results demonstrated a variety of major PRAKI causes such as hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, obstetric hemorrhage, sepsis, thrombotic microangiopathy and acute fatty liver in pregnancy. Aside from awareness of the etiologies of PRAKI, understanding the physiological renal adaptation during pregnancy is crucial for early detection, diagnosis, and proper management to prevent the obstetric complications.

  6. Prediction and Prevention of Acute Kidney Injury after Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Rin Shin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery (CS-AKI ranges from 33% to 94% and is associated with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. The etiology is suggested to be multifactorial and related to almost all aspects of perioperative management. Numerous studies have reported the risk factors and risk scores and novel biomarkers of AKI have been investigated to facilitate the subclinical diagnosis of AKI. Based on the known independent risk factors, many preventive interventions to reduce the risk of CS-AKI have been tested. However, any single preventive intervention did not show a definite and persistent benefit to reduce the incidence of CS-AKI. Goal-directed therapy has been considered to be a preventive strategy with a substantial level of efficacy. Many pharmacologic agents were tested for any benefit to treat or prevent CS-AKI but the results were conflicting and evidences are still lacking. The present review will summarize the current updated evidences about the risk factors and preventive strategies for CS-AKI.

  7. Chronic liver injury induced by drugs: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stine, Jonathan G; Chalasani, Naga

    2015-11-01

    To examine the available literature and summarize what is known about chronic drug-induced liver injury. We reviewed PubMed/MEDLINE through March 2015. We developed a MEDLINE search strategy using PubMed medical subject heading terms chronic liver injury, hepatotoxicity, drug-induced liver injury, cirrhosis and chronic liver disease. We reviewed the reference list of included articles to identify articles missed in the database search. Chronic liver injury from drugs is more common than once thought with prevalence as high as 18% based on large national registries. Patients with cholestatic injury, age ≤65 years, and a long latency period (>365 days) are at increased risk. Of the most common drugs associated with drug-induced liver injury, antibiotics (amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, azithromycin) are most likely to cause chronic injury. The presence of autoantibodies is common with chronic DILI, however, it is not diagnostic nor is it specific to autoimmune-like drug-induced liver injury. Immunosuppressive therapy may be necessary for individual cases of autoimmune-like drug-induced liver injury where cessation of the drug alone does not result in resolution of injury, however, the lowest dose should be used for the shortest duration with careful attention to the development of side effects. The effectiveness of treament of cholestatic liver injury with corticosteroids or ursodiol remains unclear. Cases of drug-induced fatty liver, nodular regenerative hyperplasia and peliosis hepatitis are less common subtypes of chronic drug-induced liver injury that deserve special consideration. A high degree of clinical suspicion is required for the diagnosis of chronic drug-induced liver injury and should be suspected in any patient with liver associated enzyme abnormalities that persist out past 6 months of initial presentation. Treatment with drug removal and/or immunosuppressive therapy appears to be effective for the majority of cases

  8. Increased incidence of acute kidney injury with aprotinin use during cardiac surgery detected with urinary NGAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagener, G.; Gubitosa, G.; Wang, S.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Use of aprotinin has been associated with acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a novel, very sensitive marker for renal injury. Urinary NGAL may be able to detect renal injury caused by aprotinin. This study determined...... if the use of aprotinin is associated with an increased incidence of acute kidney injury and increased levels of urinary NGAL. METHODS: In this prospective, observational study 369 patients undergoing cardiac surgery were enrolled. 205 patients received aprotinin and 164 received epsilon amino-caproic acid...... intraoperatively. Urinary NGAL was measured before and immediately after cardiac surgery and 3, 18 and 24 h later. The association of aprotinin use with the incidence of acute kidney injury (increase of serum creatinine >0.5 mg/dl) and NGAL levels was determined using logistic and linear regression models. RESULTS...

  9. ADVANCE: Study to Evaluate Cinacalcet Plus Low Dose Vitamin D on Vascular Calcification in Subjects With Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-14

    Chronic Kidney Disease; End Stage Renal Disease; Coronary Artery Calcification; Vascular Calcification; Calcification; Cardiovascular Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Hyperparathyroidism; Kidney Disease; Nephrology; Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

  10. Protective effect of pioglitazone on kidney injury in diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hui Peng; Pei-Yu Liang; Shan-Ji Ou; Xiong-Bing Zu

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the protective effect of pioglitazone on kidney injury in diabetic rat model and its mechanisms.Methods:Forty healthySpragueDawley rats were selected and randomly divided into five groups, with8 rats in each group.GroupA served as control group and were administered with sterile citrate buffer(i.p.) as placebo.GroupsB,C,D andE rats were injected(i.p.) with streptozotocin to induce typeⅠdiabetes.Diabetic rats inGroupB were intragastrically administered with sterile saline solution alone.GroupsC,D andE rats were intragastrically given pioglitazone hydrochloride suspension at doses of10,20,30 mg/kg per day, respectively.After eight weeks of treatment, all rats were anesthetized and blood was withdrawn from the abdominal aortic for detection of hemoglobinA1c, serum creatinine(SCr) and blood urea nitrogen(BUN) levels.Rats were then sacrificed and the left kidney was excised for calculation of kidney hypertrophy index(KHI), observation of renal pathological changes using light microscope and electron microscope.Mean glomerular cross-sectional areas(MGA), mean glomerular volume (MGV), glomerular basement membrane thickness and foot process fusion ratio were calculated. RT-PCR was employed for detection of podocalyxin(PCX) protein expression.Results:Results showed that levels of hemoglobinA1c,BUN,SCr inGroupsB,C,D andE rats were significantly higher than those inGroupA(P<0.05), whileBUN andSCr levels in rats ofGroupsC,D andE were significantly lower than those inGroupB(P<0.05).KHI,MGA andMGV levels were significantly higher inGroupsB,C,D andE rats than those inGroupA(P<0.05);KHI andMGA levels inGroup B rats were significantly higher than those inGroupsC,D andE(P<0.05) andMGV inGroups D andE was significantly lower than that inGroupsB andC(P<0.05).Histology study showed normal glomerulus structure, morphology, volume, endothelial cells and mesangial cells as well as clear glomerular capillary inGroupA rats.Renal mesangial matrix proliferation and

  11. Protective effect of pioglitazone on kidney injury in diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hui; Peng; Pei-Yu; Liang; Shan-Ji; Ou; Xiong-Bing; Zu

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the protective effect of pioglitazone on kidney injury in diabetic rat model and its mechanisms.Methods:Forty healthy Sprague Dawley rats were selected and randomly divided into five groups,with 8 rats in each group.Group A served as control group and were administered with sterile citrate buffer(i.p.)as placebo.Groups B.C,D and E rats were injected(i.p.)with streptozotocin to induce type I diabetes,Diabetic rats in Group B were intragastrically administered with sterile saline solution alone.Groups C,D and E rats were iutragastrically given pioglitazone hydrochloride suspension at doses of 10,20,30 mg/kg per day.respectively.After eight weeks of treatment,all rats were anesthetized and blood was withdrawn from the abdominal aortic ofr detection of hemoglobin A1c,serum creatinine(SCr)and blood ures nitrogen(BUN)levels.Rats were then sacrificed and the left kidney was excised for calculation of kidney hypertrophy index(KHI),observation of renal pathological changes using light microscope and electron microscope.Mean glomerular cross-sectional areas(MGA).mean glomerular volume(MGV).glomerular basement membrane thickness and foot process fusion ratio were ealculated.RT-PCR was employed for detection of podocalyxin(PCX)protein expression.Results:Results showed that levels of hemoglobin A1c,BUN.SCr in Groups B,C.D and E rats were significantly higher than those in Group A(P<0.05),while BUN aud SCr levels in rats of Groups C,D and E were significantly lower than those in Group B(P<0.05).KHI,MGA and MGV levels were significantly higher in Groups B.C,D and E rats than those in Group A(P<0.05);KHI and MGA levels in Group B rats were significantly higher than those in Groups C.D and E(P<0.05)and MGV in Groups D and E was significantly lower than that in Gtoups B and C(P<0.05).Histology study showed normal glomerulus structure,morphology,volume,endothelial cells and mesangial cells as well as clear

  12. Acute kidney injury following cardiac surgery: current understanding and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Jason B; Shaw, Andrew D; Billings, Frederic T

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicates recovery from cardiac surgery in up to 30 % of patients, injures and impairs the function of the brain, lungs, and gut, and places patients at a 5-fold increased risk of death during hospitalization. Renal ischemia, reperfusion, inflammation, hemolysis, oxidative stress, cholesterol emboli, and toxins contribute to the development and progression of AKI. Preventive strategies are limited, but current evidence supports maintenance of renal perfusion and intravascular volume while avoiding venous congestion, administration of balanced salt as opposed to high-chloride intravenous fluids, and the avoidance or limitation of cardiopulmonary bypass exposure. AKI that requires renal replacement therapy occurs in 2-5 % of patients following cardiac surgery and is associated with 50 % mortality. For those who recover from renal replacement therapy or even mild AKI, progression to chronic kidney disease in the ensuing months and years is more likely than for those who do not develop AKI. Cardiac surgery continues to be a popular clinical model to evaluate novel therapeutics, off-label use of existing medications, and nonpharmacologic treatments for AKI, since cardiac surgery is fairly common, typically elective, provides a relatively standardized insult, and patients remain hospitalized and monitored following surgery. More efficient and time-sensitive methods to diagnose AKI are imperative to reduce this negative outcome. The discovery and validation of renal damage biomarkers should in time supplant creatinine-based criteria for the clinical diagnosis of AKI. PMID:27373799

  13. Preischemic targeting of HIF prolyl hydroxylation inhibits fibrosis associated with acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitsinou, Pinelopi P; Jaffe, Jonathan; Michael, Mark; Swan, Christina E; Duffy, Kevin J; Erickson-Miller, Connie L; Haase, Volker H

    2012-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) due to ischemia is an important contributor to the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Key mediators of cellular adaptation to hypoxia are oxygen-sensitive hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF), which are regulated by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD)-containing dioxygenases. While activation of HIF protects from ischemic cell death, HIF has been shown to promote fibrosis in experimental models of CKD. The impact of HIF activation on AKI-induced fibrosis has not been defined. Here, we investigated the role of pharmacologic HIF activation in AKI-associated fibrosis and inflammation. We found that pharmacologic inhibition of HIF prolyl hydroxylation before AKI ameliorated fibrosis and prevented anemia, while inhibition of HIF prolyl hydroxylation in the early recovery phase of AKI did not affect short- or long-term clinical outcome. Therefore, preischemic targeting of the PHD/HIF pathway represents an effective therapeutic strategy for the prevention of CKD resulting from AKI, and it warrants further investigation in clinical trials. PMID:22262480

  14. Chronic renoprotective effect of pulsatile perfusion machine RM3 and IGL-1 solution in a preclinical kidney transplantation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuillier Raphael

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Machine perfusion (MP of kidney graft provides benefits against preservation injury, however decreased graft quality requires optimization of the method. We examined the chronic benefits of MP on kidney grafts and the potential improvements provided by IGL-1 solution. Method We used an established autotransplantation pig kidney model to study the effects of MP against the deleterious effects of warm ischemia (WI: 60 minutes followed by 22 hours of cold ischemia in MP or static cold storage (CS followed by autotransplantation. MPS and IGL-1 solutions were compared. Results Animal survival was higher in MPS-MP and both IGL groups. Creatinine measurement did not discriminate between the groups, however MPS-MP and both IGL groups showed decreased proteinuria. Chronic fibrosis level was equivalent between the groups. RTqPCR and immunohistofluorescent evaluation showed that MP and IGL-1 provided some protection against epithelial to mesenchymal transition and chronic lesions. IGL-1 was protective with both MP and CS, particularly against chronic inflammation, with only small differences between the groups. Conclusion IGL-1 used in either machine or static preservation offers similar levels of protection than standard MP. The compatibility of IGL-1 with both machine perfusion and static storage could represent an advantage for clinical teams when choosing the correct solution to use for multi-organ collection. The path towards improving machine perfusion, and organ quality, may involve the optimization of the solution and the correct use of colloids.

  15. Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidants: Future Perspectives in Kidney Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Kezic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney ischemia/reperfusion injury emerges in various clinical settings as a great problem complicating the course and outcome. Ischemia/reperfusion injury is still an unsolved puzzle with a great diversity of investigational approaches, putting the focus on oxidative stress and mitochondria. Mitochondria are both sources and targets of ROS. They participate in initiation and progression of kidney ischemia/reperfusion injury linking oxidative stress, inflammation, and cell death. The dependence of kidney proximal tubule cells on oxidative mitochondrial metabolism makes them particularly prone to harmful effects of mitochondrial damage. The administration of antioxidants has been used as a way to prevent and treat kidney ischemia/reperfusion injury for a long time. Recently a new method based on mitochondria-targeted antioxidants has become the focus of interest. Here we review the current status of results achieved in numerous studies investigating these novel compounds in ischemia/reperfusion injury which specifically target mitochondria such as MitoQ, Szeto-Schiller (SS peptides (Bendavia, SkQ1 and SkQR1, and superoxide dismutase mimics. Based on the favorable results obtained in the studies that have examined myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury, ongoing clinical trials investigate the efficacy of some novel therapeutics in preventing myocardial infarct. This also implies future strategies in preventing kidney ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  16. Chronic kidney disease: pathological and functional assessment with diffusion tensor imaging at 3T MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhiling; Zhang, Jie; Cai, Shifeng; Yuan, Xianshun; Liu, Qingwei [Shandong University, Department of Radiology, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan (China); Xu, Ying; Wang, Rong [Shandong University, Department of Nephrology, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan (China); Zhen, Junhui [Shandong University, Department of Pathology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China)

    2014-10-11

    Our objective was to evaluate pathological and functional changes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at 3 T. There were fifty-one patients with CKD who required biopsy and 19 healthy volunteers who were examined using DTI at 3 T. The mean values of fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were obtained from the renal parenchyma (cortex and medulla). Correlations between imaging results and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), as well as pathological damage (glomerular lesion and tubulointerstitial injury), were evaluated. The renal cortical FA was significantly lower than the medullary in both normal and affected kidneys (p < 0.001). The parenchymal FA was significantly lower in patients than healthy controls, regardless of whether eGFR was reduced. There were positive correlations between eGFR and FA (cortex, r = 0.689, p = 0.000; and medulla, r = 0.696, p = 0.000), and between eGFR and ADC (cortex, r = 0.310, p = 0.017; and medulla, r = 0.356, p = 0.010). Negative correlations were found between FA and the glomerular lesion (cortex, r = -0.499, p = 0.000; and medulla, r = -0.530, p = 0.000), and between FA and tubulointerstitial injury (cortex, r = -0.631, p = 0.000; and medulla, r = -0.724, p = 0.000). DTI is valuable for noninvasive assessment of renal function and pathology in patients with CKD. A decrease in FA could identify the glomerular lesions, tubulointerstitial injuries, and eGFR. (orig.)

  17. Plasma Uromodulin Correlates With Kidney Function and Identifies Early Stages in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steubl, Dominik; Block, Matthias; Herbst, Victor; Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; Satanovskij, Robin; Angermann, Susanne; Hasenau, Anna-Lena; Stecher, Lynne; Heemann, Uwe; Renders, Lutz; Scherberich, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Uromodulin, released from tubular cells of the ascending limb into the blood, may be associated with kidney function. This work studies the relevance of plasma uromodulin as a biomarker for kidney function in an observational cohort of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and subjects without CKD (CKD stage 0). It should be further evaluated if uromodulin allows the identification of early CKD stages.Plasma uromodulin, serum creatinine, cystatin C, blood-urea-nitrogen (BUN) concentrations, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR CKD-EPIcrea-cystatin) were assessed in 426 individuals of whom 71 were CKD stage 0 and 355 had CKD. Besides descriptive statistics, univariate correlations between uromodulin and biomarkers/eGFR were calculated using Pearson-correlation coefficient. Multiple linear regression modeling was applied to establish the association between uromodulin and eGFR adjusted for demographic parameters and pharmacologic treatment. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis adjusted for demographic parameters was performed to test if uromodulin allows differentiation of subjects with CKD stage 0 and CKD stage I.Mean uromodulin plasma levels were 85.7 ± 60.5 ng/mL for all CKD stages combined. Uromodulin was correlated with all biomarkers/eGFR in univariate analysis (eGFR: r = 0.80, creatinine: r = -0.76, BUN: r = -0.72, and cystatin C: r = -0.79). Multiple linear regression modeling showed significant association between uromodulin and eGFR (coefficient estimate β = 0.696, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.603-0.719, P < 0.001). In ROC analysis uromodulin was the only parameter that significantly improved a model containing demographic parameters to differentiate between CKD 0° and I° (area under the curve [AUC] 0.831, 95% CI 0.746-0.915, P = 0.008) compared to creatinine, cystatin C, BUN, and eGFR (AUC for creatinine: 0.722, P = 0.056, cystatin C: 0.668, P = 0.418, BUN: 0.653, P = 0.811, and e

  18. The Role of the Gut Microbiome on Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio-Maia, B; Simões-Silva, L; Pestana, M; Araujo, R; Soares-Silva, I J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is estimated to affect nearly 500 million people worldwide and cardiovascular (CV) disease is a major cause of death in this population. However, therapeutic interventions targeting traditional CV risks are not effective at lowering the incidence of CV events or at delaying the progression of the disease in CKD patients. In recent years, disturbances of normal gut microbiome were recognized in the pathogenesis of diverse chronic diseases. Gut dysbiosis is being unraveled in CKD and pointed as a nontraditional risk factor for CV risk and CKD progression. The most often reported changes in gut microbiome in CKD are related to the lower levels of Bifidobacteriaceae and Lactobacillaceae and to higher levels of Enterobacteriaceae. Although metagenomics brought us an amplified vision on the microbial world that inhabits the human host, it still lacks the sensitivity to characterize the microbiome up to species level, not revealing alterations that occur within specific genus. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art concerning gut dysbiosis in CKD and its role in pathophysiological mechanisms in CKD, particularly in relation with CV risk. Also, the strategies towards prevention and treatment of gut dysbiosis in CKD progression will be discussed. PMID:27565581

  19. Herbal Product Use in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Cem BİÇEN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Recently, despite the developments in diagnosis and treatment of diseases, herbal product use in patients with chronic diseases has become more frequent. The aim of our study was to investigate the frequency of herbal medicine use in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, used products, source of information, whether they were giving information to their clinicians about this subject and cost of used products. MATERIAL and METHODS: The investigation has been performed with 100 CKD patients. A questionnaire form has been used in collecting data about the patients. RESULTS: The herbal use rate in our study was 37%. The most used herbal products were ready products and stinging nettle. There was no relation between herbal product use and age, gender, educatin level, marital status (p>0.05. 87% of the patients indicated that monthly cost of the product was lower than 50 Turkish Liras. 78.4% of the patients defined that they didn't give information to their clinicians about the herbal product they used. CONCLUSION: A significant part of the patients with CKD use herbal products and do not give information to the clinicians about this subject. The physicians following the patients with CKD should examine the use of herbal products.

  20. Proximal renal tubular injury in rats sub-chronically exposed to low fluoride concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cárdenas-González, Mariana C.; Del Razo, Luz M. [Departmento de Toxicología, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), México, D. F., México (Mexico); Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan [Unidad de Fisiología Molecular, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, México, D. F., México (Mexico); Jacobo-Estrada, Tania [Departmento de Toxicología, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), México, D. F., México (Mexico); López-Bayghen, Esther [Departamento de Genética y Biología Molecular, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), México, D. F., México (Mexico); and others

    2013-11-01

    Fluoride is usually found in groundwater at a very wide range of concentration between 0.5 and 25 ppm. At present, few studies have assessed the renal effects of fluoride at environmentally relevant concentrations. Furthermore, most of these studies have used insensitive and nonspecific biomarkers of kidney injury. The aim of this study was to use early and sensitive biomarkers to evaluate kidney injury after fluoride exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations. Recently weaned male Wistar rats were exposed to low (15 ppm) and high (50 ppm) fluoride concentrations in drinking water for a period of 40 days. At the end of the exposure period, kidney injury biomarkers were measured in urine and renal mRNA expression levels were assessed by real time RT-PCR. Our results showed that the urinary kidney injury molecule (Kim-1), clusterin (Clu), osteopontin (OPN) and heat shock protein 72 excretion rate significantly increased in the group exposed to the high fluoride concentration. Accordingly, fluoride exposure increased renal Kim-1, Clu and OPN mRNA expression levels. Moreover, there was a significant dose-dependent increase in urinary β-2-microglobulin and cystatin-C excretion rate. Additionally, a tendency towards a dose dependent increase of tubular damage in the histopathological light microscopy findings confirmed the preferential impact of fluoride on the tubular structure. All of these changes occurred at early stages in which, the renal function was not altered. In conclusion using early and sensitive biomarkers of kidney injury, we were able to found proximal tubular alterations in rats sub-chronically exposed to fluoride. - Highlights: • Exposure to low concentrations of fluoride induced proximal tubular injury • Increase in urinary Kim-1, Clu, OPN and Hsp72 in 50 ppm fluoride-exposed group • Increase in urinary B2M and CysC in 15 and 50 ppm fluoride-exposed groups • Fluoride exposure increased renal Kim, Clu and OPN mRNA expression levels.

  1. Tissue Kidney Injury Molecule-1 Expression in the Prediction of Renal Function for Several Years after Kidney Biopsy

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    Sanja Simic Ogrizovic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Retrospective study was designed to examine the importance of tissue kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1 expression in predicting kidney function in sixty patients (27 males aged 34.15 ± 12.23 years with different kidney diseases over three years after kidney biopsy. Materials and Methods. Tissue KIM-1 expression was determined immunohistochemically and KIM-1 staining was scored semiquantitatively, as well as tubulointerstitialis (TIN, inflammation, atrophy, and fibrosis. Kidney function (MDRD formula and proteinuria/day were evaluated at the time of biopsy (GFR0 and 6, 12, 24, and 36 months later. Results. Significantly positive correlations between tissue KIM-1 expression and age (r=0.313, TIN inflammation (r=0.456, fibrosis (r=0.317, and proteinuria at 6 months (r=0.394 as well as negative correlations with GFR0 (r=−0.572, GFR6 (r=−0.442, GFR24 (r=−0.398, and GFR36 (r=−0.412 were found. Meanwhile, TIN inflammation was the best predictor of all measured kidney functions during three years, while tissue KIM-1 expression (P=0.016 was a predictor only at 6 months after biopsy. Conclusion. Tissue KIM-1 expression significantly predicts kidney function solely at 6 months after biopsy, when the effects of immune and nonimmune treatments are the strongest.

  2. Successful Antiviral Triple Therapy in a Longstanding Refractory Hepatitis C Virus Infection with an Acute Kidney Injury

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    David Callau Monje

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The HCV infection is a common disease with many chronically infected patients worldwide. So far, the standard therapy of a chronic HCV infection consisted of interferon as single therapy or in combination with ribavirin. After approval of the two protease inhibitors, boceprevir and telaprevir, the standard therapy for patients with genotype 1 changed. In patients with acute kidney injury (AKI these therapies are not approved and have so far not been evaluated in studies. Case Report. In April 2012, a 58-year-old female was admitted due to a cryoglobulin-positive chronic HCV infection which had been treated with interferon and ribavirin. Currently, the patient was admitted because of severe complications with an acute kidney injury. We treated our patient successfully with a boceprevir based triple therapy. Conclusion. Limited data suggests that a therapy with ribavirin in patients with AKI seems to be safe under close monitoring. Our patient was treated successfully with a protease inhibitor based triple therapy. Nevertheless, it is necessary to plan an interventional study to evaluate the exact risk-benefit profile of triple therapy regimens in patients with AKI and hepatitis C.

  3. Improving compliance with iron infusion therapy in the treatment of chronic anemia in haemodialysis patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nuti, Amith

    2015-01-01

    This quality improvement project was conducted at the haemodialysis unit in the paediatric nephrology department at Noah's Ark Children's Hospital, Cardiff. Stakeholders involved were the medical and nursing staff at the haemodialysis unit, responsible for the care of children with chronic kidney disease CKD. Anaemia is prevalent among children with CKD. Iron infusion is administered to such children with chronic anaemia. Children on haemodialysis attending the Children's Kidney Center receiv...

  4. Acute kidney injury biomarkers for patients in a coronary care unit: a prospective cohort study.

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    Tien-Hsing Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Renal dysfunction is an established predictor of all-cause mortality in intensive care units. This study analyzed the outcomes of coronary care unit (CCU patients and evaluated several biomarkers of acute kidney injury (AKI, including neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, interleukin-18 (IL-18 and cystatin C (CysC on the first day of CCU admission. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Serum and urinary samples collected from 150 patients in the coronary care unit of a tertiary care university hospital between September 2009 and August 2010 were tested for NGAL, IL-18 and CysC. Prospective demographic, clinical and laboratory data were evaluated as predictors of survival in this patient group. The most common cause of CCU admission was acute myocardial infarction (80%. According to Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria, 28.7% (43/150 of CCU patients had AKI of varying severity. Cumulative survival rates at 6-month follow-up following hospital discharge differed significantly (p<0.05 between patients with AKI versus those without AKI. For predicting AKI, serum CysC displayed an excellent areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC (0.895 ± 0.031, p < 0.001. The overall 180-day survival rate was 88.7% (133/150. Multiple Cox logistic regression hazard analysis revealed that urinary NGAL, serum IL-18, Acute Physiology, Age and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II and sodium on CCU admission day one were independent risk factors for 6-month mortality. In terms of 6-month mortality, urinary NGAL had the best discriminatory power, the best Youden index, and the highest overall correctness of prediction. CONCLUSIONS: Our data showed that serum CysC has the best discriminative power for predicting AKI in CCU patients. However, urinary NGAL and serum IL-18 are associated with short-term mortality in these critically ill patients.

  5. Analyses of acute kidney injury biomarkers by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Ali, Badreldin H; ALOthman, Zeid A; Ali, Imran

    2016-01-01

    The newly developed acute kidney injury biomarkers are very important for the early and timely detection of kidney diseases. This review contains details of the analyses of several acute kidney injury biomarkers using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in urine and plasma samples. In this review we attempt to discuss some aspects of the types of the biomarkers, patents, sample preparation, and the analyses. Besides, efforts were also made to discuss the possible uses of superficially porous (core-shell) columns in traditional and inexpensive high-performance liquid chromatography instruments. Additionally, the challenges and the future prospects are also highlighted. The present review will be useful for the academicians, scientists, and clinicians for the early detection of acute kidney injury biomarkers.

  6. Efficacy of extracorporeal albumin dialysis for acute kidney injury due to cholestatic jaundice nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sens, Florence; Bacchetta, Justine; Rabeyrin, Maud; Juillard, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 37-year-old man with Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Youth (MODY) type 5, admitted for an episode of cholestasis and a simultaneous acute kidney injury (AKI). Chronic liver disease was due to a mutation in the transcription factor 2 (TCF2) gene, thus highlighting the need for a close liver follow-up in these patients. AKI was attributed to a cholemic nephropathy based on the following rationale: (1) alternative diagnoses were actively ruled out; (2) the onset of AKI coincided with the onset of severe hyperbilirubinaemia; (3) renal pathology showed large bile tubular casts and a marked tubular necrosis and (4) creatinine serum dramatically decreased when bilirubin levels improved after the first sessions of extracorporeal albumin dialysis (ECAD), thus suggesting its role in renal recovery. Even though cholestasis can precipitate renal injury, the diagnosis of cholemic nephropathy could require a renal biopsy at times. Future studies should confirm the benefits of ECAD in cholemic nephropathy. PMID:27389722

  7. Patient education for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease

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    Kalantar-Zadeh K

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kamyar Kalantar-ZadehHarold Simmons Center for Kidney Disease Research and Epidemiology, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of California Irvine’s School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, USAObjectives: This review explores the challenges and solutions in educating patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD to lower serum phosphorus while avoiding protein insufficiency and hypercalcemia.Methods: A literature search including terms “hyperphosphatemia,” “patient education,” “food fatigue,” “hypercalcemia,” and “phosphorus–protein ratio” was undertaken using PubMed.Results: Hyperphosphatemia is a strong predictor of mortality in advanced CKD and is remediated via diet, phosphorus binders, and dialysis. Dietary counseling should encourage the consumption of foods with the least amount of inorganic or absorbable phosphorus, low phosphorus-to-protein ratios, and adequate protein content, and discourage excessive calcium intake in high-risk patients. Emerging educational initiatives include food labeling using a “traffic light” scheme, motivational interviewing techniques, and the Phosphate Education Program – whereby patients no longer have to memorize the phosphorus content of each individual food component, but only a “phosphorus unit” value for a limited number of food groups. Phosphorus binders are associated with a clear survival advantage in CKD patients, overcome the limitations associated with dietary phosphorus restriction, and permit a more flexible approach to achieving normalization of phosphorus levels.Conclusion: Patient education on phosphorus and calcium management can improve concordance and adherence and empower patients to collaborate actively for optimal control of mineral metabolism.Keywords: hyperphosphatemia, renal diet, phosphorus binders, educational programs, food fatigue, concordance

  8. Biophysical approach to chronic kidney disease management in older patients

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    Alberto Foletti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD and its clinical progression are a critical issue in an aging population. Therefore, strategies aimed at preventing and managing the decline of renal function are warranted. Recent evidence has provided encouraging results for the improvement of renal function achieved through an integrated biophysical approach, but prospective studies on the clinical efficacy of this strategy are still lacking. This was an open-label prospective pilot study to investigate the effect of electromagnetic information transfer through the aqueous system on kidney function of older patients affected by stage 1 or 2 CKD. Patients received biophysical therapy every 3 months over a 1-year period. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR values were calculated using the CKD–Epidemiology Collaboration formula, and were recorded at baseline and at the end of treatment. Overall, 58 patients (mean age 74.8 ± 3.7 years were included in the study. At baseline, mean eGFR was 64.6 ± 15.5 mL/min, and it significantly increased to 69.9 ± 15.8 mL/min after 1 year (+5.2 ± 10 mL/min, p<0.0002. The same trend was observed among men (+5.7 ± 10.2 mL/min, p<0.0064 and women (+4.7 ± 9.9 mL/min, p<0.014. When results were analyzed by sex, no difference was found between the 2 groups. Although further and larger prospective studies are needed, our findings suggest that an integrated biophysical approach may be feasible in the management of older patients with early-stage CKD, to reduce and prevent the decline of renal function due to aging or comorbidities.

  9. Herbal Medicines for Acute Kidney Injury:Evidence, Gaps and Frontiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vale´ rian Bunel; Fan Qu; Pierre Duez; Qi-he Xu

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major health threat worldwide. The literature on herbal intervention in AKI was searched from English and Chinese databases and reports were critically analyzed in terms of preventing AKI, promoting repair and regeneration, enhancing extrarenal clearance of uremic toxins, and preventing progression to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Altogether, 16 herbal formulae and a few extracts derived from individual herbs were reported to prevent or mitigate AKI in animal models induced by renal ischemia/reperfusion, cisplastin, gentamicin, glycerol, adenine, sepsis or physical exhaustion. Four formulae and six individual herbs were reported to accelerate recovery and/or to prevent CKD in established AKI animal models. Intrarectal herbal medicines, with or without simultaneous oral administration, were reported in six clinical trials and in an animal model to increase extrarenal clearance of uremic toxins. Additional 13 clinical trials reported oral or intravenous herbal interventions in AKI of different etiologies. Despite recurring problems, notably poor compliance with good practice guidelines for clinical trials and for authentication, naming and quality control of herbal materials, accumulating experimental data on the preventive effects of herbal medicines in AKI look encouraging and urge for better, definitive trials to guide clinical practice. Herbal enemas promoting extrarenal clearance of uremic toxins seem cost-effective, but better clinical evidence is certainly needed before any affirmative recommendation be made for AKI patients without access to dialysis. New frontiers, however, lie in those herbal remedies that promote repair/regeneration and prevent chronicity after AKI. Recent experimental data suggest that this may be possible.

  10. Maximising Acute Kidney Injury Alerts--A Cross-Sectional Comparison with the Clinical Diagnosis.

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    Simon Sawhney

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is serious and widespread across healthcare (1 in 7 hospital admissions but recognition is often delayed causing avoidable harm. Nationwide automated biochemistry alerts for AKI stages 1-3 have been introduced in England to improve recognition. We explored how these alerts compared with clinical diagnosis in different hospital settings.We used a large population cohort of 4464 patients with renal impairment. Each patient had case-note review by a nephrologist, using RIFLE criteria to diagnose AKI and chronic kidney disease (CKD. We identified and staged AKI alerts using the new national NHS England AKI algorithm and compared this with nephrologist diagnosis across hospital settings.Of 4464 patients, 525 had RIFLE AKI, 449 had mild AKI, 2185 had CKD (without AKI and 1305 were of uncertain chronicity. NHS AKI algorithm criteria alerted for 90.5% of RIFLE AKI, 72.4% of mild AKI, 34.1% of uncertain cases and 14.0% of patients who actually had CKD.The algorithm identified AKI particularly well in intensive care (95.5% and nephrology (94.6%, but less well on surgical wards (86.4%. Restricting the algorithm to stage 2 and 3 alerts reduced the over-diagnosis of AKI in CKD patients from 14.0% to 2.1%, but missed or delayed alerts in two-thirds of RIFLE AKI patients.Automated AKI detection performed well across hospital settings, but was less sensitive on surgical wards. Clinicians should be mindful that restricting alerts to stages 2-3 may identify fewer CKD patients, but including stage 1 provides more sensitive and timely alerting.

  11. The alteration in peripheral neutrophils of patients with chronic kidney disease

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    Yevgenyevna Muravlyova Larissa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings have demonstrated the impaired functions of neutrophils of patients with chronic renal failure. The purpose of our research was to study oxidative modified proteins, as well as the histone spectrum in neutrophils drawn from patients with chronic kidney disease, and to estimate the ability of neutrophils to form spontaneous neutrophil extracellular traps. In this work, we have assumed that metabolic alteration in neutrophils may develop at early stages of chronic kidney disease. Materials and methods: Neutrophils obtained from patients with various stages of chronic kidney disease and degrees of chronic renal failure were used. As control, blood samples obtained from 32 healthy individuals was employed. In the examined neutrophils, advanced oxidation protein products, protein reactive carbonyl derivatives, as well as nucleosomal histones were detected. The ability of neutrophils to form spontaneous neutrophil extracellular traps was estimated. Our results have demonstrated an increase of nucleosomal histones in neutrophils of all patients with chronic kidney disease. Moreover, our work fixes the rate of growth of intracellular advanced oxidation protein products and the decreasing of protein reactive carbonyl derivatives in neutrophils from patients with chronic kidney disease. Furthermore, we demonstrate the presence of the neutrophils with altered oxidative status and the decomposition of the histone spectrum in the circulation of patients with chronic kidney disease.

  12. Psychological effects of chronic injury in elite athletes.

    OpenAIRE

    Shuer, M L; Dietrich, M S

    1997-01-01

    Many athletes train in a constant state of pain or injury while meeting the demands of an elite level program. It is hypothesized that the emotional distress experienced by athletes with chronic injuries is not inconsequential. A self-report battery, the Impact of Event Scale, was administered to 280 inter-collegiate athletes at a division I institution in an attempt to examine their response to chronic injury. Of the 280, 134 (48%) had been injured by study definition, with 117 (42%) meeting...

  13. Prevention programs for chronic kidney disease in low-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perico, Norberto; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important determinant of the poor health outcome for major noncommunicable diseases that are the leading cause of death worldwide. Early recognition with screening programs of CKD and co-morbid conditions, like hypertension, diabetes, or toxic environments, can potentially slow progression to renal failure, improve quality of life and reduce healthcare cost. Effective multimodal tools are available to prevent CKD by managing its risk factors, and to slow or even halt disease progression to end-stage renal failure (ESRF). They can be adapted even to poor-resource settings of low- and middle-income countries for individual at high risk of CKD. CKD is also linked to acute kidney injury (AKI), that in poorest part of Africa, Asia and Latin America is preventable, treatable and often reversible, if managed adequately and in timely manner as proposed by the program "AKI 0by25" launched by the international Society of Nephrology in 2013. In addition to saving lives, prevention programs will create major heath gains, eventually reducing the current health inequity that arises from unaffordable or unobtainable renal replacement therapies in many part of the developing world if ESRF is not prevented. PMID:26983956

  14. A phosphate-centric paradigm for pathophysiology and therapy of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuro-O, Makoto

    2013-12-01

    Extracellular phosphate is toxic to the cell at high concentrations. When the phosphate level is increased in the blood by impaired urinary phosphate excretion, premature aging ensues. When the phosphate level is increased in the urine by dietary phosphate overload, this may lead to kidney damage (tubular injury and interstitial fibrosis). Extracellular phosphate exerts its cytotoxicity when it forms insoluble nanoparticles with calcium and fetuin-A, referred to as calciprotein particles (CPPs). CPPs are highly bioactive ligands that can induce various cellular responses, including osteogenic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells and cell death in vascular endothelium and renal tubular epithelium. CPPs are detected in the blood of animal models and patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and associated with adaptation of the endocrine axes mediated by fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) and Klotho that regulate mineral metabolism and aging. These observations have raised the possibility that CPPs may contribute to the pathophysiology of CKD. This notion, if validated, is expected to provide new diagnostic and therapeutic targets for CKD. PMID:25019024

  15. Potassium: Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... melon l Lemons and limes l Mangoes l Papayas l Pears l Peaches l Plums l Pineapple ... KIDNEY (1-866-454-3639). The National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP) encourages people to get tested ...

  16. Chronic Treatment With an Erythropoietin Receptor Ligand Prevents Chronic Kidney Disease-Induced Enlargement of Myocardial Infarct Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Keitaro; Yano, Toshiyuki; Tanno, Masaya; Miki, Takayuki; Kuno, Atsushi; Tobisawa, Toshiyuki; Ogasawara, Makoto; Muratsubaki, Shingo; Ohno, Kouhei; Ishikawa, Satoko; Miura, Tetsuji

    2016-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is known to increase myocardial infarct size after ischemia/reperfusion. However, a strategy to prevent the CKD-induced myocardial susceptibility to ischemia/reperfusion injury has not been developed. Here, we examined whether epoetin β pegol, a continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA), normalizes myocardial susceptibility to ischemia/reperfusion injury by its effects on protective signaling and metabolomes in CKD. CKD was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy in rats (subtotal nephrectomy, SNx), whereas sham-operated rats served controls (Sham). Infarct size as percentage of area at risk after 20-minutes coronary occlusion/2-hour reperfusion was larger in SNx than in Sham: 60.0±4.0% versus 43.9±2.2%. Administration of CERA (0.6 μg/kg SC every 7 days) for 4 weeks reduced infarct size in SNx (infarct size as percentage of area at risk=36.9±3.9%), although a protective effect was not detected for the acute injection of CERA. Immunoblot analyses revealed that myocardial phospho-Akt-Ser473 levels under baseline conditions and on reperfusion were lower in SNx than in Sham, and CERA restored the Akt phosphorylation on reperfusion. Metabolomic analyses showed that glucose 6-phosphate and glucose 1-phosphate were reduced and malate:aspartate ratio was 1.6-fold higher in SNx than in Sham, suggesting disturbed flux of malate-aspartate shuttle by CKD. The CERA improved the malate:aspartate ratio in SNx to the control level. In H9c2 cells, mitochondrial Akt phosphorylation by insulin-like growth factor-1 was attenuated by malate-aspartate shuttle inhibition. In conclusion, the results suggest that a CERA prevents CKD-induced susceptibility of the myocardium to ischemia/reperfusion injury by restoration of Akt-mediated signaling possibly via normalized malate-aspartate shuttle flux. PMID:27456523

  17. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE of urinary protein in acute kidney injury

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    Sufi M Suhail

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental and clinical studies have shown the importance of urinary proteomics in acute kidney injury (AKI. We analyzed the protein in urine of patients with clinical AKI using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE for its diagnostic value, and followed them up for 40 months to evaluate prognosis. Urine from 31 consecutive cases of AKI was analyzed with SDS-PAGE to determine the low, middle and high molecular weight proteins. Fractional excretion of sodium (FENa was estimated from serum and urine creatinine and sodium (Na. The cases were followed-up for 40 months from the end of the recruitment of study cases. Glomerular protein was higher in the hematuria group when compared with the non-hematuria group (P <0.04 and in the AKI group than in the acute on chronic renal failure (AKI-on-CRF group (P <0.002. Tubular protein was higher in the AKI-on-CRF group (P <0.003 than in the AKI group. Tubular protein correlated with FENa in groups with diabetes mellitus (DM, AKI-on-CRF, and without hematuria (P <0.03, P <0.02 and P <0.004, respectively. Pattern of protein did not differ between groups with and without DM and clinical acute tubular necrosis (ATN. At the end of 40 months follow-up, category with predominantly glomerular protein progressed to chronic renal failure (CRF or end-stage renal failure in higher proportion (P <0.05. In clinical AKI, we observed that glomerular protein dominated in cases with glomerular insult, as indicated by hematuria. Tubular protein was common in the study cases with CRF, DM and cases without hematuria. This indicates tubulo-interstitial injury for AKI in these cases. Patients with predominantly glomerular protein had an adverse outcome.

  18. Elevated body mass index as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease: current perspectives

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    Garl

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Jocelyn S Garland Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is defined by the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative as the presence of reduced kidney function or kidney damage for a period of 3 months or greater. Obesity is considered a risk factor for CKD development, but its precise role in contributing to CKD and end stage kidney disease is not fully elucidated. In this narrative review, the objectives are to describe the pathogenesis of CKD in obesity, including the impact of altered adipokine secretion in obesity and CKD, and to provide an overview of the clinical studies assessing the risk of obesity and CKD development. Keywords: obesity, chronic renal disease, adipokine

  19. Overlooked Risk for Chronic Kidney Disease after Leptospiral Infection: A Population-Based Survey and Epidemiological Cohort Evidence.

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    Huang-Yu Yang

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is the most widespread zoonosis. Chronic human infection and asymptomatic colonization have been reported. However, renal involvement in those with leptospira chronic exposure remains undetermined.In 2007, a multistage sampling survey for chronic kidney disease (CKD was conducted in a southern county of Taiwan, an area with a high prevalence of dialysis. Additionally, an independent cohort of 88 participants from a leptospira-endemic town was followed for two years after a flooding in 2009. Risks of CKD, stages of CKD, associated risk factors as well as kidney injury markers were compared among adults with anti-leptospira antibody as defined by titers of microscopic agglutination test (MAT. Of 3045 survey participants, the individuals with previous leptospira exposure disclosed a lower level of eGFR (98.3 ± 0.4 vs 100.8 ± 0.6 ml/min per 1.73 m2, P < 0.001 and a higher percentage of CKD, particularly at stage 3a-5 (14.4% vs 8.5%, than those without leptospira exposure. Multivariable linear regression analyses indicated the association of leptospiral infection and lower eGFR (95% CI -4.15 to -1.93, P < 0.001. In a leptospiral endemic town, subjects with a MAT titer ≥ 400 showed a decreased eGFR and higher urinary kidney injury molecule-1 creatinine ratio (KIM1/Cr level as compared with those having lower titers of MAT (P < 0.05. Furthermore, two participants with persistently high MAT titers had positive urine leptospira DNA and deteriorating renal function.Our data are the first to show that chronic human exposure of leptospirosis is associated significantly with prevalence and severity of CKD and may lead to deterioration of renal function. This study also shed light on the search of underlying factors in areas experiencing CKD of unknown aetiology (CKDu such as Mesoamerican Nephropathy.

  20. Tubular atrophy in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelling, Jeffrey R

    2016-05-01

    The longstanding focus in chronic kidney disease (CKD) research has been on the glomerulus, which is sensible because this is where glomerular filtration occurs, and a large proportion of progressive CKD is associated with significant glomerular pathology. However, it has been known for decades that tubular atrophy is also a hallmark of CKD and that it is superior to glomerular pathology as a predictor of glomerular filtration rate decline in CKD. Nevertheless, there are vastly fewer studies that investigate the causes of tubular atrophy, and fewer still that identify potential therapeutic targets. The purpose of this review is to discuss plausible mechanisms of tubular atrophy, including tubular epithelial cell apoptosis, cell senescence, peritubular capillary rarefaction and downstream tubule ischemia, oxidative stress, atubular glomeruli, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, interstitial inflammation, lipotoxicity and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger-1 inactivation. Once a a better understanding of tubular atrophy (and interstitial fibrosis) pathophysiology has been obtained, it might then be possible to consider tandem glomerular and tubular therapeutic strategies, in a manner similar to cancer chemotherapy regimens, which employ multiple drugs to simultaneously target different mechanistic pathways.

  1. Restless Legs Syndrome in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Marta; Winkelman, John W; Unruh, Mark

    2015-07-01

    Symptoms of restless legs syndrome (RLS) are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on dialysis; symptoms of RLS are estimated to affect up to 25% of patients on dialysis when the international RLS diagnostic criteria are applied. RLS is a neurologic disorder with a circadian rhythmicity characterized by an overwhelming urge to move the legs during rest, which can be relieved temporarily by movement. RLS has been associated with an increase in sleep disturbance, higher cardiovascular morbidity, decreased quality of life, and an increased risk of death in patients with CKD. Although the exact pathophysiology of RLS is unknown, it is thought to involve an imbalance in iron metabolism and dopamine neurotransmission in the brain. The symptoms of moderate to severe RLS can be treated with several pharmacologic agents; however, data specific to patients on dialysis with RLS are lacking. The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between, and complications of, RLS and CKD both in dialysis and nondialysis patients, and discuss the treatment options for patients on dialysis with RLS.

  2. Rare mutations associating with serum creatinine and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Mikaelsdottir, Evgenia; Palsson, Runolfur; Indridason, Olafur S; Holm, Hilma; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Helgason, Agnar; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Magnusson, Olafur Th; Kong, Augustine; Masson, Gisli; Sulem, Patrick; Olafsson, Isleifur; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Stefansson, Kari

    2014-12-20

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disorder with a strong genetic component. A number of common sequence variants have been found to associate with serum creatinine (SCr), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and/or CKD. We imputed 24 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions/deletions identified by whole-genome sequencing of 2230 Icelanders into 81 656 chip-typed individuals and 112 630 relatives of genotyped individuals over the age of 18 with SCr measurements. The large set of sequenced individuals allowed accurate imputation of variants to a minor allele frequency (MAF) of 0.1%. We tested the imputed variants for association with SCr. In addition to replicating established loci, we discovered missense and loss-of-function variants associating with SCr in three solute carriers (SLC6A19, SLC25A45 and SLC47A1) and two E3 ubiquitin ligases (RNF186 and RNF128). All the variants are within coding sequences and all but one are rare (MAF Hartnup disease. PMID:25082825

  3. Vaccine administration in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Mastrolia, Maria Vincenza; Prada, Elisabetta; Pietrasanta, Carlo; Principi, Nicola

    2014-11-20

    Pediatric patients with severe chronic kidney disease (CKD) on conservative treatment, on dialysis, and those with renal transplantation are at a higher risk for infectious diseases as the result of impaired immune responses against infectious agents. Infections in these patients can have drastic consequences for disease morbidity and mortality. Immunization is a crucial preventive strategy for disease management in this pediatric population. However, vaccination coverage among children with CKD remains low due to safety concerns and doubts about vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy. In this study, we reviewed why children with CKD are at higher risk of infections, the importance of vaccinations among these children, barriers to vaccinations, and recommend the best vaccination schedules. Overall, vaccines have acceptable immunogenicity, efficacy, and safety profiles in children with CKD. However, in some cases, the protective antibody levels induced by vaccines and the benefits and risks of booster vaccine doses must be individually managed. Furthermore, close contacts and household members of these children should complete age-appropriate vaccination schedules to increase the child's indirect protection.

  4. Febuxostat for hyperuricemia in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Tetsu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Chiharu; Iimura, Osamu; Tsunematsu, Sadao; Watanabe, Yuko; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Febuxostat is a nonpurine xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor, which recently received marketing approval. However, information regarding the experience with this agent among advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is limited. In the current study, we investigated the effects of oral febuxostat in patients with advanced CKD with asymptomatic hyperuricemia. We demonstrated, for the first time, that not only the serum levels of uric acid (UA) but also those of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, an oxidative stress marker, were significantly reduced after six months of febuxostat treatment, with no adverse events. These results encouraged us to pursue further investigations regarding the clinical impact of lowering the serum UA levels with febuxostat in advanced CKD patients in terms of concomitantly reducing oxidative stress via the blockade of XO. More detailed studies with a larger number of subjects and assessments of the effects of multiple factors affecting hyperuricemia, such as age, sex, and dietary habits, would shed light on the therapeutic challenges of treating asymptomatic hyperuricemia in patients with various stages of CKD. PMID:25210423

  5. Disorders of Iron Metabolism and Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Bhupesh; Gutiérrez, Orlando M

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulated iron homeostasis plays a central role in the development of anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is a major contributor toward resistance to treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology requires an in-depth understanding of normal iron physiology and regulation. Recent discoveries in the field of iron biology have greatly improved our understanding of the hormonal regulation of iron trafficking in human beings and how its alterations lead to the development of anemia of CKD. In addition, emerging evidence has suggested that iron homeostasis interacts with bone and mineral metabolism on multiple levels, opening up new avenues of investigation into the genesis of disordered iron metabolism in CKD. Building on recent advances in our understanding of normal iron physiology and abnormalities in iron homeostasis in CKD, this review characterizes how anemia related to disordered iron metabolism develops in the setting of CKD. In addition, this review explores our emerging recognition of the connections between iron homeostasis and mineral metabolism and their implications for the management of altered iron status and anemia of CKD. PMID:27475656

  6. Sleep disorders in pediatric chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabouli, Stella; Papadimitriou, Eleni; Printza, Nikoleta; Dotis, John; Papachristou, Fotios

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of sleep disorders during childhood has been estimated to range from 25 to 43 %. The aim of this review is to determine the prevalence of sleep disorders and possible associations with chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related factors and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in children with CKD. An electronic systematic literature search for sleep disorders in children with CKD in Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library Databases identified seven relevant articles for review, all of which reported an increased prevalence of sleep disorders in children with CKD. Five studies included children with CKD undergoing dialysis, and two studies included only non-dialysis patients. In all studies the presence of sleep disturbances was assessed by questionnaires; only one study compared the results of a validated questionnaire with laboratory-based polysomnography. The prevalence of any sleep disorder ranged from 77 to 85 % in dialysis patients, to 32-50 % in transplanted patients and 40-50 % in non-dialysis patients. The most commonly studied disorder was restless legs syndrome, which presented at a prevalence of 10-35 %. Three studies showed significant associations between presence of sleep disorders and HRQOL. We found consistent evidence of an increased prevalence of sleep disturbances in children with CKD, and these seemed to play a critical role in HRQOL. PMID:26482250

  7. [Obesity in children and its relationship with chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita-Cruz, Jessie Nallely; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, obesity and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have increased worldwide, in parallel. This article focuses on the current issues of obesity on renal damage, with special emphasis on what happens at pediatric ages. While obesity has been linked closely with type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension, reduced insulin sensitivity is a direct mechanism for renal damage. The pathophysiologic mechanisms on renal damage include glomerular hyperfiltration and hypertrophy, hypercellularity and broadening of the mesangial regions, while the lack of sensitivity to insulin increases the effects of angiotensin II, exacerbates proteinuria and induces the production of inflammatory cytokines. Many epidemiological studies have documented the relationship of increased BMI with the development of ERC, but most of these studies have been conducted in adults. In children, the information is scarce, but is consistent with findings in adults. In contrast, there are studies which show that interventions aimed to improve weight loss and limit renal damage and proteinuria is reduced, the blood pressure and glomerular filtration rate. Allthe above make us think on the need to improve efforts to reduce the prevalence of obesity from the early stages of life, which could reduce the number of patients with CKD in the future.

  8. Congestive heart failure in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poskurica Mileta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disorders are the most frequent cause of death (46-60% among patients with advanced chronic renal failure (CRF, and on dialysis treatment. Uremic cardiomyopathy is the basic pathophysiologic substrate, whereas ischemic heart disease (IHD and anemia are the most important contributing factors. Associated with well-know risk factors and specific disorders for terminal kidney failure and dialysis, the aforementioned factors instigate congestive heart failure (CHF. Suspected CHF is based on the anamnesis, clinical examination and ECG, while it is confirmed and defined more precisely on the basis of echocardiography and radiology examination. Biohumoral data (BNP, NT-proBNP are not sufficiently reliable because of specific volemic fluctuation and reduced natural clearance. Therapy approach is similar to the one for the general population: ACEI, ARBs, β-blockers, inotropic drugs and diuretics. Hypervolemia and most of the related symptoms can be kept under control effectively by the isolated or ultrafiltation, in conjunction with dialysis, during the standard bicarbonate hemodialysis or hemodiafiltration. In the same respect peritoneal dialysis is efficient for the control of hypervolemia symptoms, mainly during the first years of its application and in case of the lower NYHA class (II°/III°. In general, heart support therapy, surgical interventions of the myocardium and valve replacement are rarely used in patients on dialysis, whereas revascularization procedures are beneficial for associated IHD. In selected cases the application of cardiac resynchronization and/or implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator are advisable.

  9. Chronic kidney disease aggravates arteriovenous fistula damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Stephan; Kokozidou, Maria; Heiss, Christian; Kranz, Jennifer; Kessler, Tina; Paulus, Niklas; Krüger, Thilo; Jacobs, Michael J; Lente, Christina; Koeppel, Thomas A

    2010-12-01

    Neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) and impaired dilatation are important contributors to arteriovenous fistula (AVF) failure. It is unclear whether chronic kidney disease (CKD) itself causes adverse remodeling in arterialized veins. Here we determined if CKD specifically triggers adverse effects on vascular remodeling and assessed whether these changes affect the function of AVFs. For this purpose, we used rats on a normal diet or on an adenine-rich diet to induce CKD and created a fistula between the right femoral artery and vein. Fistula maturation was followed noninvasively by high-resolution ultrasound (US), and groups of rats were killed on 42 and 84 days after surgery for histological and immunohistochemical analyses of the AVFs and contralateral femoral vessels. In vivo US and ex vivo morphometric analyses confirmed a significant increase in NIH in the AVFs of both groups with CKD compared to those receiving a normal diet. Furthermore, we found using histological evaluation of the fistula veins in the rats with CKD that the media shrank and their calcification increased significantly. Afferent artery dilatation was significantly impaired in CKD and the downstream fistula vein had delayed dilation after surgery. These changes were accompanied by significantly increased peak systolic velocity at the site of the anastomosis, implying stenosis. Thus, CKD triggers adverse effects on vascular remodeling in AVFs, all of which contribute to anatomical and/or functional stenosis.

  10. Chronic Kidney Disease Impairs Bone Defect Healing in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiqing; Kang, Ning; Seriwatanachai, Dutmanee; Dong, Yuliang; Zhou, Liyan; Lin, Yunfeng; Ye, Ling; Liang, Xing; Yuan, Quan

    2016-03-09

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been regarded as a risk for bone health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CKD on bone defect repair in rats. Uremia was induced by subtotal renal ablation, and serum levels of BUN and PTH were significantly elevated four weeks after the second renal surgery. Calvarial defects of 5-mm diameter were created and implanted with or without deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM). Micro-CT and histological analyses consistently revealed a decreased newly regenerated bone volume for CKD rats after 4 and 8 weeks. In addition, 1.4-mm-diameter cortical bone defects were established in the distal end of femora and filled with gelatin sponge. CKD rats exhibited significantly lower values of regenerated bone and bone mineral density (BMD) within the cortical gap after 2 and 4 weeks. Moreover, histomorphometric analysis showed an increase in both osteoblast number (N.Ob/B.Pm) and osteoclast number (N.Oc/B.Pm) in CKD groups due to hyperparathyroidism. Notably, collagen maturation was delayed in CKD rats as verified by Masson's Trichrome staining. These data indicate that declined renal function negatively affects bone regeneration in both calvarial and femoral defects.

  11. Disorders of Iron Metabolism and Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Bhupesh; Gutiérrez, Orlando M

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulated iron homeostasis plays a central role in the development of anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is a major contributor toward resistance to treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology requires an in-depth understanding of normal iron physiology and regulation. Recent discoveries in the field of iron biology have greatly improved our understanding of the hormonal regulation of iron trafficking in human beings and how its alterations lead to the development of anemia of CKD. In addition, emerging evidence has suggested that iron homeostasis interacts with bone and mineral metabolism on multiple levels, opening up new avenues of investigation into the genesis of disordered iron metabolism in CKD. Building on recent advances in our understanding of normal iron physiology and abnormalities in iron homeostasis in CKD, this review characterizes how anemia related to disordered iron metabolism develops in the setting of CKD. In addition, this review explores our emerging recognition of the connections between iron homeostasis and mineral metabolism and their implications for the management of altered iron status and anemia of CKD.

  12. The Importance of Magnesium in Chronic Kidney Disease: New Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat KARAMAN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is one of the 11 most abundant elements in the human body and it is required for the action of over 300 enzymes. It is the most common intracellular, bivalent cation. It is located in quite important structures from DNA/RNA to ATP. It interacts with negatively charged ions to provide an allosteric effect and therefore plays the role of a bridge in connecting different molecules. It is mostly found in dark green vegetables, the chlorophyl complex and unprocessed cereals. The current environmental pollution and the increased consumption of refined products cause serious problems with Mg uptake. Despite considerable advances over the last decades, cardiovascular diseases exact a very high toll as the leading cause of death in Western societies. This is mainly the result of the increasing prevalence of atherosclerosis, related to the aging of the population, the increase in diabetes and obesity, unhealthy diets, sedentary lifestyle, and particularly hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Chronic kidney diseases are quite common in the population at present and are associated with serious mortality and morbidity. Our aim in this review was to investigate the effect of Mg on endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and CKD.

  13. Association of dyslipidemia with renal outcomes in chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Chia Chen

    Full Text Available Dyslipidemia is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and the relationship between dyslipidemia with renal outcomes in patients with moderate to advanced CKD remains controversial. Hence, our objective is to determine whether dyslipidemia is independently associated with rapid renal progression and progression to renal replacement therapy (RRT in CKD patients. The study analyzed the association between lipid profile, RRT, and rapid renal progression (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] slope <-6 ml/min/1.73 m(2/yr in 3303 patients with stages 3 to 5 CKD. During a median 2.8-year follow-up, 1080 (32.3% participants commenced RRT and 841 (25.5% had rapid renal progression. In the adjusted models, the lowest quintile (hazard ratios [HR], 1.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01 to 1.49 and the highest two quintiles of total cholesterol (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.52 and HR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.65 respectively increased risks for RRT (vs. quintile 2. Besides, the highest quintile of total cholesterol was independently associated with rapid renal progression (odds ratio, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.83. Our study demonstrated that certain levels of dyslipidemia were independently associated with RRT and rapid renal progression in CKD stage 3-5. Assessment of lipid profile may help identify high risk groups with adverse renal outcomes.

  14. Left ventricular mass in chronic kidney disease and ESRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassock, Richard J; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Barberato, Silvio H

    2009-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and ESRD, treated with conventional hemo- or peritoneal dialysis are both associated with a high prevalence of an increase in left ventricular mass (left ventricular hypertrophy [LVH]), intermyocardial cell fibrosis, and capillary loss. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is the best way to detect and quantify these abnormalities, but M-Mode and 2-D echocardiography can also be used if one recognizes their pitfalls. The mechanisms underlying these abnormalities in CKD and ESRD are diverse but involve afterload (arterial pressure and compliance), preload (intravascular volume and anemia), and a wide variety of afterload/preload independent factors. The hemodynamic, metabolic, cellular, and molecular mediators of myocardial hypertrophy, fibrosis, apoptosis, and capillary degeneration are increasingly well understood. These abnormalities predispose to sudden cardiac death, most likely by promotion of electrical instability and re-entry arrhythmias and congestive heart failure. Current treatment modalities for CKD and ESRD, including thrice weekly conventional hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis and metabolic and anemia management regimens, do not adequately prevent or correct these abnormalities. A new paradigm of therapy for CKD and ESRD that places prevention and reversal of LVH and cardiac fibrosis as a high priority is needed. This will require novel approaches to management and controlled interventional trials to provide evidence to fuel the transition from old to new treatment strategies. In the meantime, key management principles designed to ameliorate LVH and its complications should become a routine part of the care of the patients with CKD and ESRD. PMID:19996010

  15. Heterozygosity for fibrinogen results in efficient resolution of kidney ischemia reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrendra Kumar Ajay

    Full Text Available Fibrinogen (Fg has been recognized to play a central role in coagulation, inflammation and tissue regeneration. Several studies have used Fg deficient mice (Fg(-/- in comparison with heterozygous mice (Fg(+/- to point the proinflammatory role of Fg in diverse pathological conditions and disease states. Although Fg(+/- mice are considered 'normal', plasma Fg is reduced to ~75% of the normal circulating levels present in wild type mice (Fg(+/+. We report that this reduction in Fg protein production in the Fg(+/- mice is enough to protect them from kidney ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI as assessed by tubular injury, kidney dysfunction, necrosis, apoptosis and inflammatory immune cell infiltration. Mechanistically, we observed binding of Fg to ICAM-1 in kidney tissues of Fg(+/+ mice at 24 h following IRI as compared to a complete absence of binding observed in the Fg(+/- and Fg(-/- mice. Raf-1 and ERK were highly activated as evident by significantly higher phosphorylation in the Fg(+/+ kidneys at 24 h following IRI as compared to Fg(+/- and Fg(-/- mice kidneys. On the other hand Cyclin D1 and pRb, indicating higher cell proliferation, were significantly increased in the Fg(+/- and Fg(-/- as compared to Fg(+/+ kidneys. These data suggest that Fg heterozygosity allows maintenance of a critical balance of Fg that enables regression of initial injury and promotes faster resolution of kidney damage.

  16. Establishing the flow cytometric assessment of myeloid cells in kidney ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Timothy M; Wise, Andrea F; Alikhan, Maliha A; Layton, Daniel S; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2014-03-01

    Polychromatic flow cytometry is a powerful tool for assessing populations of cells in the kidney through times of homeostasis, disease and tissue remodeling. In particular, macrophages have been identified as having central roles in these three settings. However, because of the plasticity of myeloid cells it has been difficult to define a specific immunophenotype for these cells in the kidney. This study developed a gating strategy for identifying and assessing monocyte and macrophage subpopulations, along with neutrophils and epithelial cells in the healthy kidney and following ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury in mice, using antibodies against CD45, CD11b, CD11c, Ly6C, Ly6G, F4/80, CSF-1R (CD115), MHC class II, mannose receptor (MR or CD206), an alternatively activated macrophage marker, and the epithelial cell adhesion marker (EpCAM or CD326). Backgating analysis and assessment of autofluorescence was used to extend the knowledge of various cell types and the changes that occur in the kidney at various time-points post-IR injury. In addition, the impact of enzymatic digestion of kidneys on cell surface markers and cell viability was assessed. Comparisons of kidney myeloid populations were also made with those in the spleen. These results provide a useful reference for future analyses of therapies aimed at modulating inflammation and enhancing endogenous remodeling following kidney injury.

  17. Erythropoietin stimulating agents in the management of anemia of chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hayat, Amir; Haria, Dhiren; Salifu, Moro O

    2008-01-01

    Anemia is a very common clinical problem in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in these patients. Erythropoietin is a hormone synthesized in the kidney responsible for red blood cell maturation in the bone marrow. It is deficient in the majority of patients with advanced kidney disease thereby predisposing to anemia. Since the approval of recombinant human erythropoietin (epoetin alfa) by the US FDA in 1989, epoetin alfa and sim...

  18. Erythropoietin stimulating agents in the management of anemia of chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Salifu, Moro O

    2008-01-01

    Amir Hayat, Dhiren Haria, Moro O SalifuDivision of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USAAbstract: Anemia is a very common clinical problem in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in these patients. Erythropoietin is a hormone synthesized in the kidney responsible for red blood cell maturation in the bone marrow. It is deficient in the majority of patients with advanced kidney disease ...

  19. Correlation of Ultrasonographic Parameters with Serum Creatinine in Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Siddappa, Jagdeesh K.; Saurabh Singla; Mohammed Al Ameen; Rakshith, S.C.; Naveen Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study is to correlate renal echogenicity with serum creatinine in order to determine the significance of renal echogenicity when it comes to identifying the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and for the sonographic grading of CKD. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients above 30 years of age who had been diagnosed with CKD according to the guidelines of the National Kidney Foundation were included in the study. Patients on kidney replacement therapy or wi...

  20. Pharmacological intervention of hypertension in proteinuric chronic kidney disease: how and what?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Fan-fan

    2008-01-01

    @@ Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant interactive disease in patients with diabetes,hypertension, and cardiovascular disease with major morbidity consequences and high costs to the healthcare system.

  1. N-acetylcysteine improves arterial vascular reactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittstock, Antje; Burkert, Magdalena; Zidek, Walter;

    2009-01-01

    Patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease show increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality that are partly related to impaired arterial vascular reactivity. We investigated whether intravenous administration of the antioxidant acetylcysteine improves arterial vascular reactivity...

  2. Features of ambulatory blood pressure in 540 patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王成

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the features and influencing factors of ambulatory blood pressure in chronic kidney disease(CKD)patients.Methods A total of 540 CKD patients from May 2010 to May 2012 in our department

  3. A study on the change of autophagy in skeletal muscle of patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄娟

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study skeletal muscle atrophy and the change of autophagy in skeletal muscle of patients with chronic kidney disease.Methods Mean muscle cross sectional area,mRNA and protein expression of

  4. Association between chronic kidney dysfunction and the complexity of coronary artery disease in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜利求

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between chronic kidney dysfunction and the complexity of coronary artery disease in elderly patients.Methods A prospective study was conducted on 1380 consecutive patients

  5. K/DOQI Clinical Practice Guidelines on Hypertension and Antihypertensive Agents in Chronic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, Andrew S.; Rocco, Michael V.; Anderson, Sharon; Andreoli, Sharon P.; Bailie, George R.; Bakris, George L.; Callahan, Mary Beth; Greene, Jane H.; Johnson, Cynda Ann; Lash, James P.; McCullough, Peter A.; Miller III, Edgar R.; Nally, Joseph V.; Pirsch, John D.; Portman, Ronald J.; Sevick, Mary Ann; Sica, Domenic; Wesson, Donald E.; Agodoa, Lawrence; Bolton, Kline; Cutler, Jeffrey A.; Hostetter, Tom; Lau, Joseph; Uhlig, Katrin; Chew, Priscilla; Kausz, Annamaria; Kupelnick, Bruce; Raman, Gowri; Sarnak, Mark; Wang, Chenchen; Astor, Brad C.; Eknoyan, Garabed; Levin, Adeera; Levin, Nathan; Bailie, George; Becker, Bryan; Becker, Gavin; Burrowes, Jerrilynn; Carrera, Fernando; Churchill, David; Collins, Allan; Crooks, Peter W.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Golper, Thomas; Gotch, Frank; Gotto, Antonio; Greenwood, Roger; Greer, Joel W.; Grimm Jr., Richard; Haley, William E.; Hogg, Ronald; Hull, Alan R.; Hunsicker, Lawrence; Klag, Michael; Klahr, Saulo; Lameire, Norbert; Locatelli, Francesco; McCulloch, Sally; Michael, Maureen; Newmann, John M.; Nissenson, Allen; Norris, Keith; Obrador, Gregorio; Owen Jr., William; Patel, Thakor G.; Payne, Glenda; Ronco, Claudio; Rivera-Mizzoni, Rosa A.; Schoolwerth, Anton C.; Star, Robert; Steffes, Michael; Steinman, Theodore; Wauters, John-Pierre; Wenger, Nanette; Briggs, Josephine; Burrows-Hudson, Sally; Latos, Derrick; Mapes, Donna; Oberley, Edith; Pereira, Brian J.G.; Willis, Kerry; Gucciardo, Anthony; Fingerhut, Donna; Klette, Margaret; Schachne, Elicia

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: CHRONIC KIDNEY disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health issue. In the United States, there is a rising incidence and prevalence of kidney failure (Fig 1), with poor outcomes and high cost. The prevalence of earlier stages of CKD is approximately 100 times greater than the prevalence

  6. Acute kidney injury secondary to lymphomatous infiltration and the roleof kidney biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a 47-year-old male patient who developed acute kidney injuryrequiring hemodialysis, associated with massive enlargement of both kidneys.A part from intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy, there was no other organ orlymph node involvement. A kidney biopsy established the diagnosis ofnon-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The patient received chemotherapy with good response.This case demonstrates that the kidney could be the primary organ involved inthe non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In addition, we have shown that renal biopsy isadequate to make a diagnosis of lymphoma without the need to do more invasivetesting. (author)

  7. Association between urinary sodium, creatinine, albumin, and long term survival in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    McQuarrie, Emily P.; Traynor, Jamie P.; Taylor, Alison H.; Freel, E. Marie; Fox, Jonathan G; Jardine, Alan G; Mark, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Dietary sodium intake is associated with hypertension and cardiovascular risk in the general population. In patients with chronic kidney disease, sodium intake has been associated with progressive renal disease, but not independently of proteinuria. We studied the relationship between urinary sodium excretion and urinary sodium:creatinine ratio and mortality or requirement for renal replacement therapy in chronic kidney disease. Adults attending a renal clinic who had at least one 24-hour ur...

  8. The Relationship between Health-Promoting Behaviors and Resilience in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Ching Ma; Hong-Jer Chang; Yueh-Min Liu; Hsiang-Li Hsieh; Lan Lo; Mei-Yu Lin; Kuo-Cheng Lu

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional research study explored differences in health-promoting behavior and resilience among three groups of chronic kidney disease patients (high-risk, early chronic kidney disease; early CKD and pre-end stage renal disease; pre-ESRD) treated at the Nephrology outpatient clinic in northern Taiwan. A total of 150 CKD outpatients were interviewed using structured questionnaires including a CKD Health to Promote Lifestyle Scale, and resilience scale. We found that the pre-ESRD gro...

  9. Gout and risk of chronic kidney disease and nephrolithiasis: meta-analysis of observational studies

    OpenAIRE

    Roddy, E.; Mallen, C.; Belcher, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To determine the prevalence of chronic kidney disease and nephrolithiasis in people with gout, and the association between gout and prevalent or incident chronic kidney disease and nephrolithiasis. Methods Systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies. Data sources; MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases, hand-searched reference lists, citation history and contact with authors. Eligibility criteria: cohort, case–control or cross-sectional studies which examined the...

  10. The Relationship Between Chronic Inflammation and Glucidic-Lipidic Profile Disorders in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Tarța I.D.; Căldăraru Carmen Denise; Gliga Mirela; Huțanu Adina; Bajko Z; Carașca E; Dogaru G.A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic inflammation has a proven role in atherogenesis, lipid profile parameters being related to cytokine production. In kidney transplant recipients, interleukin 6 (IL-6) is significantly associated with graft-related outcomes and also alterations of cholesterol and triglyceride metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between chronic inflammation and glucidic-lipidic metabolism disorders in a group of patients with kidney transplantation as renal...

  11. Prevalence and Correlates of Insomnia and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shahbaj Ahmad; Manan Gupta; Ravi Gupta; Mohan Dhyani

    2013-01-01

    Background: Poor sleep quality, insomnia, and restless legs syndrome (RLS) and sleep apnea are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinical correlates of these problems are poorly understood. Aims: This study was to find out the prevalence and correlates of insomnia and subjects with ′high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)′ in adults with chronic kidney disease. Materials and Methods: One hundred and four adults with CKD were included. Their demographic data, details re...

  12. Bone mineral disorder in chronic kidney disease: Klotho and FGF23; cardiovascular implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salanova Villanueva, Laura; Sánchez González, Carmen; Sánchez Tomero, José Antonio; Aguilera, Abelardo; Ortega Junco, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular factors are one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Bone mineral metabolism disorders and inflammation are pathological conditions that involve increased cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease. The cardiovascular risk involvement of bone mineral metabolism classical biochemical parameters such as phosphorus, calcium, vitamin D and PTH is well known. The newest markers, FGF23 and klotho, could also be implicated in cardiovascular disease.

  13. Hepatitis C virus viremia increases the incidence of chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Grint, Daniel; Lundgren, Jens;

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have reported on an association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody status and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the role of HCV viremia and genotype are not well defined.......Several studies have reported on an association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody status and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the role of HCV viremia and genotype are not well defined....

  14. Cardiovascular disease relates to intestinal uptake of p-cresol in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Poesen, Ruben; Viaene, Liesbeth; Verbeke, Kristin; Augustijns, Patrick; Bammens, Bert; Claes, Kathleen; Kuypers, Dirk; Evenepoel, Pieter; Meijers, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Background Serum p-cresyl sulfate (PCS) associates with cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. PCS concentrations are determined by intestinal uptake of p-cresol, human metabolism to PCS and renal clearance. Whether intestinal uptake of p-cresol itself is directly associated with cardiovascular disease in patients with renal dysfunction has not been studied to date. Methods We performed a prospective study in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 1 – 5 (NCT004416...

  15. Evaluation of regenerative capacity after kidney ischemic/reperfustion injury using 99mTc-DMSA

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    Kwak, W. J.; Kim, J. W.; Park, K. M.; Lee, S. W.; Ahn, B. C.; Lee, J. T.; Yoo, J. S. [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Acute renal failure can be caused by a reduced renal blood flow induced because of ischemic injury. The damaged kidney can be completely restored in structure and function. {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA binds to cortical tubules in kidney and its uptake has been suggested to indicate function of cortical mass. Herein, the generative capacity of kidney after bilateral or unilateral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury was evaluated non-invasively by scintigraphic imaging. Three different animal models were used. One or both kidneys of mice were subjected ischemic for 30 min for unilateral or bilateral I/R model, respectively. In third model, one kidney was excised and the other kidney was subjected ischemic for 30 min to give nephrectomy model. At 1 hr, 1 d, 3 d, 1 w, 2 w, 3 w after reperfusion, {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA (27.7 MBq) was injected via tail vein. After 3 hr, the mice were scanned for 30 min with pinhole equipped gamma camera. The ratio of ROI counts of kidney to total counts was calculated. In unilateral I/R mouse, the {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA uptake of injured kidney was decreased continuously up to 3 w (13.9 to 7.7%), while uptake in normal kidney is slowly increased. In case of nephrectomy model, {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA uptake of injured kidney was rapidly restored within 1 w after I/R operation (8.5 to 30%). Bilateral model showed reduced {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA uptake at 1 d, but total uptake in both I/R kidney was also increase up to 30% after 1 w and the uptake was maintained up to 3 w. In unilateral model, the {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA uptake of injured kidney kept decreasing up to 3 w while normal kidney showed increased {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA uptake. The restoration of I/R kidney was not observed within 3 w. However, in case of animal models which have only I/R kidneys such as bilateral and nephrectomy models, the {sup 99m}Tc-DMSA uptake was restored within 1 w and the excised kidney size was also normal in contrast to much smaller I/R kidney of unilateral model.

  16. Evaluation of regenerative capacity after kidney ischemic/reperfustion injury using 99mTc-DMSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute renal failure can be caused by a reduced renal blood flow induced because of ischemic injury. The damaged kidney can be completely restored in structure and function. 99mTc-DMSA binds to cortical tubules in kidney and its uptake has been suggested to indicate function of cortical mass. Herein, the generative capacity of kidney after bilateral or unilateral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury was evaluated non-invasively by scintigraphic imaging. Three different animal models were used. One or both kidneys of mice were subjected ischemic for 30 min for unilateral or bilateral I/R model, respectively. In third model, one kidney was excised and the other kidney was subjected ischemic for 30 min to give nephrectomy model. At 1 hr, 1 d, 3 d, 1 w, 2 w, 3 w after reperfusion, 99mTc-DMSA (27.7 MBq) was injected via tail vein. After 3 hr, the mice were scanned for 30 min with pinhole equipped gamma camera. The ratio of ROI counts of kidney to total counts was calculated. In unilateral I/R mouse, the 99mTc-DMSA uptake of injured kidney was decreased continuously up to 3 w (13.9 to 7.7%), while uptake in normal kidney is slowly increased. In case of nephrectomy model, 99mTc-DMSA uptake of injured kidney was rapidly restored within 1 w after I/R operation (8.5 to 30%). Bilateral model showed reduced 99mTc-DMSA uptake at 1 d, but total uptake in both I/R kidney was also increase up to 30% after 1 w and the uptake was maintained up to 3 w. In unilateral model, the 99mTc-DMSA uptake of injured kidney kept decreasing up to 3 w while normal kidney showed increased 99mTc-DMSA uptake. The restoration of I/R kidney was not observed within 3 w. However, in case of animal models which have only I/R kidneys such as bilateral and nephrectomy models, the 99mTc-DMSA uptake was restored within 1 w and the excised kidney size was also normal in contrast to much smaller I/R kidney of unilateral model

  17. Inhibition of lysosomal protease cathepsin D reduces renal fibrosis in murine chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christopher; Cocchiaro, Pasquale; Oakley, Fiona; Howarth, Rachel; Callaghan, Krystena; Leslie, Jack; Luli, Saimir; Wood, Katrina M; Genovese, Federica; Sheerin, Neil S; Moles, Anna

    2016-01-01

    During chronic kidney disease (CKD) there is a dysregulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) homeostasis leading to renal fibrosis. Lysosomal proteases such as cathepsins (Cts) regulate this process in other organs, however, their role in CKD is still unknown. Here we describe a novel role for cathepsins in CKD. CtsD and B were located in distal and proximal tubular cells respectively in human disease. Administration of CtsD (Pepstatin A) but not B inhibitor (Ca074-Me), in two mouse CKD models, UUO and chronic ischemia reperfusion injury, led to a reduction in fibrosis. No changes in collagen transcription or myofibroblasts numbers were observed. Pepstatin A administration resulted in increased extracellular urokinase and collagen degradation. In vitro and in vivo administration of chloroquine, an endo/lysosomal inhibitor, mimicked Pepstatin A effect on renal fibrosis. Therefore, we propose a mechanism by which CtsD inhibition leads to increased collagenolytic activity due to an impairment in lysosomal recycling. This results in increased extracellular activity of enzymes such as urokinase, triggering a proteolytic cascade, which culminates in more ECM degradation. Taken together these results suggest that inhibition of lysosomal proteases, such as CtsD, could be a new therapeutic approach to reduce renal fibrosis and slow progression of CKD. PMID:26831567

  18. Demographic data for urinary Acute Kidney Injury (AKI marker [IGFBP7]·[TIMP2] reference range determinations

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    Nandkishor S. Chindarkar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This data in brief describes characteristics of chronic stable comorbid patients who were included in reference range studies of [IGFBP7]·[TIMP-2] “Reference Intervals of Urinary Acute Kidney Injury (AKI Markers [IGFBP7]·[TIMP2] in Apparently Healthy Subjects and Chronic Comorbid Subjects without AKI” [1]. In order to determine the specificity of [IGFBP7]·[TIMP-2] for identifying patients at risk of developing AKI we studied a cohort with nine broad classification of disease who did not have AKI. Details regarding the population that was targeted for inclusion in the study are also described. Finally, we present data on the inclusion criteria for the healthy subjects used in this investigation to determine the reference range.

  19. Mouse model of ischemic acute kidney injury: technical notes and tricks

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Qingqing; Zheng DONG

    2012-01-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion leads to acute kidney injury (AKI), a major kidney disease associated with an increasing prevalence and high mortality rates. A variety of experimental models, both in vitro and in vivo, have been used to study the pathogenic mechanisms of ischemic AKI and to test renoprotective strategies. Among them, the mouse model of renal clamping is popular, mainly due to the availability of transgenic models and the relatively small animal size for drug testing. However, the ...

  20. SODIUM BICARBONATE INFUSION: TO PREVENT CARDIAC SURGERY - ASSOCIATED ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY

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    Ramesh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The incidence of cardiac surgery – associated acute kidney injury is 50% of patients and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. This study aimed to determine if perioperative urinary and plasma alkalization with sodium bicarbonate infusion re duces the incidence of cardiac surgery – associated acute kidney injury. SETTING AND DESIGN: This study is double blind randomized control trial conducted at U N Mehta Institute of Cardiology and Research Center , India. METHOD S AND RESULT: A total of 140 pat ients scheduled to undergo elective cardiac surgery , who were at increased risk of development of cardiac surgery – associated acute kidney injury using recognized risk factors. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either sodium bicarbonate (n = 70 o r sodium chloride (n = 70 infusion , commencing at the start of anesthesia , in a dose of 4 mmol/kg over 24 hour. The primary outcome measure was the number of patients with development of CSA - AKI , defined as an increase in creatinine greater than 25% from baseline to peak value within the first three postoperative days. Significant differences among the groups in both plasma and urinary pH were achieved 6 hours after commencement of the infusion , and these changes persisted for more than 24 hours. A total o f 7 out of 70(10% patients in the sodium bicarbonate group and 16 out of 70(22.85% patients in the sodium chloride group developed acute kidney injury within the first three postoperative days with p value of 0.06 which is statistically not significant . There were also no significant differences in ventilation hours , ICU or hospital length of stay , or mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Perioperative alkalization of blood and urine using an infusion of sodium bicarbonate did not result in a decrease in the incidence of acute kidney injury in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. KEYWORDS: Acute kidney injury; Cardiac surgery; Cardiopulmonary bypass; Creatinine

  1. Osteoporosis and adynamic bone in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannata-Andía, Jorge B; Rodriguez García, Minerva; Gómez Alonso, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Among the chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disease (CKD-MBD) disorders, osteoporosis and adynamic bone are highly prevalent, and they have been consistently associated with low bone mass, bone fractures, vascular calcifications and greater mortality in general and CKD populations. Despite the fact that osteoporosis and adynamic bone have similar clinical outcomes, they have different pathogeneses and clinical management. In osteoporosis, there is a lack of balance between bone formation and bone resorption, and less new bone is formed to replace bone losses. Osteoporosis is defined by the World Health Organization as "a disease characterized by low bone mineral density and micro architectural deterioration leading to low bone strength and increased risk of fractures." In the general population, there is a good correlation between dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements and bone fractures, but this is not the case with CKD patients. Despite the fact that we have a great number of active antiosteoporotic drugs, the experience in CKD patients is limited. Adynamic bone is suspected based on biochemical parameters, mainly parathyroid hormone (PTH) and bone alkaline phosphatase, but it needs to be proven using a bone biopsy, where a low or zero bone formation rate and a reduction or absence of osteoblasts and osteoclasts should be found. The clinical management of adynamic bone has important limitations and currently does not allow taking many active measures. Treatment is mainly based on the prevention of risk factors known to induce PTH oversuppression, such as aluminium and calcium load and very high doses of vitamin D receptor activators. Due to the limitations in the treatment of both conditions, prevention plays a key role in the management of these disorders. PMID:23023723

  2. Genetic studies in chronic kidney disease: interpretation and clinical applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witasp, Anna; Nordfors, Louise; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Luttropp, Karin; Lindholm, Bengt; Schalling, Martin; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The tools of modern molecular biology are evolving rapidly, resulting in vastly more efficient approaches to illuminating human genetic variations and their effects on common multifactorial disorders such as chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, candidate gene association studies and genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have generated novel genetic variants in previously unrecognized biological pathways, highlighting disease mechanisms with a potential role in CKD etiology, morbidity and mortality. Nephrologists now need to find ways to make use of these advancements and meet the increasingly stringent requirements for valid study design, data handling and interpretation of genetic studies. Adding to our prior article in this journal, which introduced the basics of genotype-phenotype association studies in CKD, this second article focuses on how to ascertain robust and reproducible findings by applying adequate methodological and statistical approaches to genotype-phenotype studies in CKD populations. Moreover, this review will briefly discuss genotype-based risk prediction, pharmacotherapy, drug target identification and individualized treatment solutions, specifically highlighting potentially important findings in CKD patients. This increased knowledge will hopefully facilitate the exciting transition from conventional clinical medicine to gene-based medicine. However, before this can be accomplished, unsolved issues regarding the complex human genetic architecture as well technical and clinically oriented obstacles will have to be overcome. Additionally, new policies and standardized risk evaluations for genetic testing in the clinical setting will have to be established to guarantee that CKD patients are provided with high-quality genotype-guided counseling that will help to improve their poor outcomes.

  3. Nutritional assessment in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aditi; Mantan, Mukta; Sethi, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Growth failure is a major problem in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the onset of the condition in infancy is more likely to have an adverse impact on growth than its development in later childhood. This study was aimed to assess nutritional intake and anthropometry of children presenting with CKD in a developing country. In this cross-sectional observational study, children (1-18 years) with CKD visiting the outpatient services were enrolled. The age of onset, cause of CKD, and anthropometry were recorded. Dietary intakes from three 24 h dietary recall (2 mid-week and 1 weekend day) were recorded. A blood sample was taken from all subjects for biochemical parameters. A total of 45 children (forty males and five females) with CKD underwent nutritional assessment. The median age at assessment was 108 months (13-167). Twenty-seven (60%) subjects had CKD stage 1, 2, or 3 while the remaining 40% had CKD stage 4 or 5. Of the 45 children, 27 (60%) had moderate to severe malnutrition at assessment. The mean weight and height (standard deviation scores) were -2.77 ± 2.07 and -2.30 ± 1.38, respectively. The prevalence of growth retardation was much higher in late stages of CKD; the difference was statistically significant (P iron (mean 48.9% deficit); deficient in calcium (mean -22.2%) and had excess phosphates (mean 18.3%). There was a progressive decrease in intake of nutrients in advanced stages of CKD. There was a high prevalence of malnutrition (60%) in children with CKD, especially in higher stages of CKD. An appropriate dietary assessment and nutritional counseling should be planned for all patients with CKD to prevent complications associated with malnutrition and anemia.

  4. Impaired postprandial lipemic response in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saland, Jeffrey M; Satlin, Lisa M; Zalsos-Johnson, Jeanna; Cremers, Serge; Ginsberg, Henry N

    2016-07-01

    Dyslipidemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is usually characterized by hypertriglyceridemia. Here we studied postprandial lipemia in children and young adults to determine whether an increasing degree of CKD results in a proportional increase in triglyceride and chylomicron concentration. Secondary goals were to determine whether subnephrotic proteinuria, apolipoprotein (apo)C-III and insulin resistance modify the CKD effect. Eighteen fasting participants (mean age of 15 years, mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 50 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) underwent a postprandial challenge with a high fat milkshake. Triglycerides, apoB-48, insulin, and other markers were measured before and 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours afterward. Response was assessed by the incremental area under the curve of triglycerides and of apoB-48. The primary hypothesis was tested by correlation to estimated GFR. Significantly, for every 10 ml/min/1.73 m(2) lower estimated GFR, the incremental area under the curve of triglycerides was 17% greater while that of apoB-48 was 16% greater. Univariate analyses also showed that the incremental area under the curve of triglycerides and apoB-48 were significantly associated with subnephrotic proteinuria, apoC-III, and insulin resistance. In multivariate analysis, CKD and insulin resistance were independently associated with increased area under the curve and were each linked to increased levels of apoC-III. Thus, postprandial triglyceride and chylomicron plasma excursions are increased in direct proportion to the degree of CKD. Independent effects are associated with subclinical insulin resistance and increased apoC-III is linked to both CKD and insulin resistance. PMID:27162092

  5. Arterial stiffness & Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J.; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies.

  6. Soluble α-Klotho Serum Levels in Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Silverio Rotondi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transmembrane α-Klotho (TM-Klotho, expressed in renal tubules, is a cofactor for FGF23-receptor. Circulating soluble-α-Klotho (s-Klotho results from TM-Klotho shedding and acts on Phosphate (P and Calcium (Ca tubular transport. Decreased TM-Klotho, described in experimental chronic kidney disease (CKD, prevents actions of FGF23 and lessens circulating s-Klotho. Thus, levels of s-Klotho could represent a marker of CKD-MBD. To evaluate the clinical significance of s-Klotho in CKD we assayed serum s-Klotho and serum FGF23 in 68 patients (age 58±15; eGFR 45±21 mL/min. s-Klotho was lower than normal (519±183 versus 845±330 pg/mL, P<.0001 in renal patients and its reduction was detectable since CKD stage 2 (P<.01. s-Klotho correlated positively with eGFR and serum calcium (Cas and negatively with serum phosphate (Ps, PTH and FGF23. FGF23 was higher than normal (73±51 versus 36±11, P<.0002 with significantly increased levels since CKD stage 2 (P<.001. Our data indicate a negative effect of renal disease on circulating s-Klotho starting very early in CKD. Assuming that s-Klotho mirrors TM-Klotho synthesis, low circulating s-Klotho seems to reflect the ensuing of tubular resistance to FGF23, which, accordingly, is increased. We endorse s-Klotho as an early marker of CKD-MBD.

  7. Relationship between Plasma Leptin Level and Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Anoop Shankar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Leptin is an adipose tissue-derived hormone shown to be related to several metabolic, inflammatory, and hemostatic factors related to chronic kidney disease. Recent animal studies have reported that infusion of recombinant leptin into normal rats for 3 weeks fosters the development of glomerulosclerosis. However, few studies have examined the association between leptin and CKD in humans. Therefore, we examined the association between plasma leptin levels and CKD in a representative sample of US adults. Methods. We examined the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey participants >20 years of age (n=5820, 53.6% women. Plasma leptin levels were categorized into quartiles (≤4.3 Fg/L, 4.4–8.7 Fg/L, 8.8–16.9 Fg/L, >16.9 Fg/L. CKD was defined as a glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 estimated from serum creatinine. Results. Higher plasma leptin levels were associated with CKD after adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, smoking, alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI, diabetes, hypertension, and serum cholesterol. Compared to quartile 1 of leptin (referent, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval of CKD associated with quartile 4 was 3.31 (1.41 to 7.78; P-trend = 0.0135. Subgroup analyses examining the relation between leptin and CKD by gender, BMI categories, diabetes, and hypertension status also showed a consistent positive association. Conclusion. Higher plasma leptin levels are associated with CKD in a representative sample of US adults.

  8. Salivary Alterations in Rats with Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Ana Carolina; Bergamaschi, Cassia Toledo; de Souza, Douglas Nesadal; Nogueira, Fernando Neves

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to analyze changes in saliva composition and salivary secretion process of rats with chronic kidney disease induced by 5/6 nephrectomy to set the foundation for salivary studies related to CKD. Methods CKD was induced in Wistar rats via 5/6 nephrectomy. Blood and saliva samples were collected from Control, Sham and CKD groups at 8 and 12 weeks after the surgery. Salivation was stimulated via intraperitoneal injections of pilocarpine (1.0 mg/Kg body weight) or isoproterenol (5.0 mg/Kg body weight). Saliva was collected and immediately stored at -80°C until analysis. The salivary flow rate, total protein, amylase and peroxidase activities, and urea concentrations were measured. The blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine concentrations were also evaluated. Results Increases in BUN and serum creatinine concentrations were observed in the CKD groups. Amylase activity was significantly reduced in response to both stimuli in the CKD groups at 8 weeks and increased in the CKD groups at 12 weeks in response to isoproterenol stimulus. The peroxidase activities of the CKD groups were significantly reduced in response to isoproterenol stimulation and were increased at 12 weeks in response to pilocarpine stimulation. Salivary urea was significantly increased in the CKD groups at 8 weeks in response to the isoproterenol stimuli and at 12 weeks in response to both salivary agonists. Conclusions The pattern of alterations observed in this experimental model is similar to those observed in patients and clearly demonstrates the viability of 5/6 nephrectomy as an experimental model in future studies to understand the alterations in salivary compositions and in salivary glands that are elicited by CKD. PMID:26859883

  9. Arterial stiffness &Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies. PMID:27586642

  10. Distinct injury markers for the early detection and prognosis of incident acute kidney injury in critically ill adults with preserved kidney function

    OpenAIRE

    Siew, Edward D.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Bian, Aihua; Shintani, Ayumi; Eden, Svetlana; Wickersham, Nancy; Cripps, Ben; Ikizler, T. Alp

    2013-01-01

    The use of novel biomarkers to detect incident acute kidney injury (AKI) in the critically ill is hindered by heterogeneity of injury and the potentially confounding effects of prevalent AKI. Here we examined the ability of urine NGAL (NGAL), L-type Fatty Acid Binding Protein (L-FABP), and Cystatin C to predict AKI development, death, and dialysis in a nested case-control study of 380 critically ill adults with an eGFR over 60 ml/min/1.73 m2. One-hundred thirty AKI cases were identified follo...

  11. Symmetric Dimethylarginine: Improving the Diagnosis and Staging of Chronic Kidney Disease in Small Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relford, Roberta; Robertson, Jane; Clements, Celeste

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common condition in cats and dogs, traditionally diagnosed after substantial loss of kidney function when serum creatinine concentrations increase. Symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) is a sensitive circulating kidney biomarker whose concentrations increase earlier than creatinine as glomerular filtration rate decreases. Unlike creatinine SDMA is unaffected by lean body mass. The IDEXX SDMA test introduces a clinically relevant and reliable tool for the diagnosis and management of kidney disease. SDMA has been provisionally incorporated into the International Renal Interest Society guidelines for CKD to aid staging and targeted treatment of early and advanced disease. PMID:27499007

  12. MicroRNAs as novel therapeutic targets to treat kidney injury and fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Ivan G; Nakagawa, Naoki; Duffield, Jeremy S

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs), a class of small noncoding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, have attracted increasing attention as critical regulators of organogenesis, cancer, and disease. Interest has been spurred by development of a novel class of synthetic RNA oligonucleotides with excellent drug-like properties that hybridize to a specific miR, preventing its action. In kidney disease, a small number of miRs are dysregulated. These overlap with regulated miRs in nephrogenesis and kidney cancers. Several dysregulated miRs have been identified in fibrotic diseases of other organs, representing a "fibrotic signature," and some of these fibrotic miRs contribute remarkably to the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease, affecting ∼10% of the population, leads to kidney failure, with few treatment options. Here, we will explore the pathological mechanism of miR-21, whose pre-eminent role in amplifying kidney disease and fibrosis by suppressing mitochondrial biogenesis and function is established. Evolving roles for miR-214, -199, -200, -155, -29, -223, and -126 in kidney disease will be discussed, and we will demonstrate how studying functions of distinct miRs has led to new mechanistic insights for kidney disease progression. Finally, the utility of anti-miR oligonucleotides as potential novel therapeutics to treat chronic disease will be highlighted. PMID:26911854

  13. DISSOCIATION OF STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION AFTER ISCHAEMIA-REPERFUSION INJURY IN THE ISOLATED PERFUSED RAT KIDNEYS

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    M. Kadkhodaee

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen-derived free radical* (OFR involvement in ischacmia-rcpcrfusion (IR injury was investigated in a rat isolated kidney model, using 20 minutes iscliaemia followed by 15 or 60 minutes reperfusion. Two antioxidants, the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol and the hydroxyl radical scavenger dimcthylthiourca (DMTU, were uscit to try and prevent OFR-relatcd damage. Renal function was estimated from the inulin clearance, fractional soiiium excretion and renal vascular resistance, location and extent of tubular damage, and type of cell death (apoptosis vs necrosis were used as morphological parameters of IR-iiuluced change. Cell damage was most extensive in the nephron segments of the outer zone of the outer medulla (straight proximal tubule and thick ascending limb (TAL. I're-treatment with allopttrinol or DMTU did not Improve renal function. Less structural damage was observed in the TAL of allopuriol - or DMTU - treated kidneys compared with IR alone. In allopurinol - treated kidneys, luminal debris was less extensive than that seen in IR kidneys. Most cell death was necrotic in type and morphological features of apoptosis were seen infrequently. Tlic beneficial effects of allopurinol and DMTU on structural change did not correlate with functional improvement during the reperfusion period, litis may require longer repcrfusion or multiple treatments. Tlie results suggest that OFR ■ injury is of limited significance in this model of renal IR injury. Targeting OFR injury may only be useful after very brief periods of iscliaemia where necrosis is minimal ami the potential for recover}- is greater, Tiie results confirm the different susccptibilitcs of individual nephron segments to injury within the intact kidney. Understanding the molecular response to injury in each segment should facilitate development of methods to accelerate repair after [R injury.

  14. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Tissue Inflammation Using an Animal Model of Acute Kidney Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Kenneth; Warram, Jason M.; Wang, Dezhi; Ratnayaka, Sithira; Traylor, Amie; Agarwal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of molecular ultrasound (US) imaging for monitoring the early inflammatory effects following acute kidney injury. Procedures A population of rats underwent 30 min of renal ischemia (acute kidney injury, N=6) or sham injury (N=4) using established surgical methods. Animals were divided and molecular US imaging was performed during the bolus injection of a targeted microbubble (MB) contrast agent to either P-selectin or vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1). Imaging was performed before surgery and 4 and 24 h thereafter. After manual segmentation of renal tissue space, the molecular US signal was calculated as the difference between time-intensity curve data before MB injection and after reaching steady-state US image enhancement. All animals were terminated after the 24 h imaging time point and kidneys excised for immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. Results Renal inflammation was analyzed using molecular US imaging. While results using the P-selectin and VCAM-1 targeted MBs were comparable, it appears that the former was more sensitive to biomarker expression. All molecular US imaging measures had a positive correlation with IHC findings. Conclusions Acute kidney injury is a serious disease in need of improved noninvasive methods to help diagnose the extent of injury and monitor the tissue throughout disease progression. Molecular US imaging appears well suited to address this challenge and more research is warranted. PMID:25905474

  15. [Prevention of Chronic Kidney Disease and strategies to counteract chronic diseases in Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrilli, Valeria; D'Elia, Roberto; Galeone, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The Prevention of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is placed in the more general context of prevention of major chronic Non Communicable Diseases (NCDs): cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, chronic lung diseases and tumors that are the main problem for public health worldwide. Any health policy strategy aimed to the prevention of NCDs has to provide knowledge of health and socioeconomic status of the population, to reduce the level of exposure to risk factors and to adapt health services to the request for assistance. To this purpose, population monitoring systems have been implemented in the last years. The NCDs share some risk factors that are related, in large part, to unhealthy individual behaviours: smoking, alcohol abuse, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. NCDs prevention has to be understood as the set of all actions, sanitary and not, aiming to prevent or delay the onset of diseases or their complications. Preventive measures should, therefore, involve not only the health sector but also all the actors that can help to prevent that disease. As for the Prevention of CKD, the Ministry of Health has established a working table, which handled the Drafting of the "Position paper for the CKD", approved in the State-Regions Conference on august 8th 2014. The document draws a national strategy to combat this disease through primary prevention, early diagnosis and the establishment of diagnostic - therapeutic pathways (DTP). PMID:27545630

  16. Arginine dimethylation products in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram E. El-Sadek

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Disturbed serum levels of arginine and its dimethyl derivatives may underlie development and/or progression of CKD. Elevated serum SDMA level is strongly correlated with impaired kidney functions and could be considered as a predictor for kidney functions deterioration and CKD progression.

  17. One risk assessment tool for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Alssema (Marjan); R.S. Newson (Rachel); S.J.L. Bakker (Stephan); C.D. Stehouwer (Coen); M.W. Heymans (Martijn); M.G.A.A.M. Nijpels (Giel); H.L. Hillege (Hans); A. Hofman (Albert); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); R.T. Gansevoort; J.M. Dekker (Jacqueline)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE - Individuals at high risk for chronic cardiometabolic disease (cardiovascular disease [CVD], type 2 diabetes, and chronic kidney disease [CKD]) share many risk factors and would benefit from early intervention. We developed a nonlaboratory-based risk-assessment tool for identi

  18. One Risk Assessment Tool for Cardiovascular Disease, Type 2 Diabetes, and Chronic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alssema, Marjan; Newson, Rachel S.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Stehouwer, Coen D. A.; Heymans, Martijn W.; Nijpels, Giel; Hillege, Hans L.; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Dekker, Jacqueline M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-Individuals at high risk for chronic cardiometabolic disease (cardiovascular disease [CVD], type 2 diabetes, and chronic kidney disease [CKDD]) share many risk factors and would benefit from early intervention. We developed a nonlaboratory-based risk-assessment tool for identification of p

  19. A stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casteleijn, Niek F.; Visser, Folkert W.; Drenth, Joost P. H.; Gevers, Tom J. G.; Groen, Gerbrand J.; Hogan, Marie C.; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain, defined as pain existing for >4-6 weeks, affects >60% of patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic disease (ADPKD). It can have various causes, indirectly or directly related to the increase in kidney and liver volume in these patients. Chronic pain in ADPKD patients is often severe,

  20. Metabolic Acidosis and Strong Ion Gap in Critically Ill Patients with Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Mei Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the influence of physicochemical parameters on survival in metabolic acidosis (MA and acute kidney injury (AKI patients. Materials and Methods. Seventy-eight MA patients were collected and assigned to AKI or non-AKI group. We analyzed the physiochemical parameters on survival at 24 h, 72 h, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after AKI. Results. Mortality rate was higher in the AKI group. AKI group had higher anion gap (AG, strong ion gap (SIG, and apparent strong ion difference (SIDa values than non-AKI group. SIG value was higher in the AKI survivors than nonsurvivors and this value was correlated serum creatinine, phosphate, albumin, and chloride levels. SIG and serum albumin are negatively correlated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IV scores. AG was associated with mortality at 1 and 3 months post-AKI, whereas SIG value was associated with mortality at 24 h, 72 h, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months post-AKI. Conclusions. Whether high or low SIG values correlate with mortality in MA patients with AKI depends on its correlation with serum creatinine, chloride, albumin, and phosphate (P levels. AG predicts short-term mortality and SIG value predicts both short- and long-term mortality among MA patients with AKI.

  1. STUDY OF ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY IN CHILDREN: ITS AETIOLOGY, CLINICAL PROFILE AND OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garuda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES : To determine the incidence , age & sex ratio , analyse the spectrum of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI in its aetiopathology , complications including mortality , prognostic factors and the role of dialysis in the management. METHODS : This prospective observational study was conducted on serial cases of 30 patients a dmitted in Paediatrics department from Feb 2012 - Aug 2014 (30 months. RESULTS : The incidence of AKI was 0.44%. Children in age group of 0 - 4 yrs were affected most , predominantly males. Distribution of AKI according to aetiopathogenesis was Acute Tubular Necrosis (ATN 50% , Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome (HUS 19.8% , Glomerulonephritis (GN 13.2% , Obstructive uropathy 9.9% and Acute on Chronic renal failure (CRF 6.6%. Dialysis was required in 53.3% of patients. Mortality was 57%. Patients with complications of sepsis , neurological & respiratory problems , hyperkalemia , metabolic acidosis and gastrointestinal bleeding were associated with high mortality. CONCLUSIONS : AKI is a common life threatening condition seen in childhood. Early referral , proper assessment , adequate & timely treatment and prompt institution of dialysis helps in decreasing mortality.

  2. Stage-to-stage progression of chronic kidney disease in renal transplantation with chronic allograft dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalkhali H

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Although the short-term results of kidney transplantation have improved greatly during the past decades, the long-term results have not improved according. Graft loss due to chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD is a major concern in renal transplant recipients (RTRs. There is little data about disease progression in this patient population. In this paper, we investigated history of kidney function as the pattern, waiting time and rate of pass from intermediate stages in RTR with CAD."n"nMethods: In a single-center retrospective study, 214 RTRs with CAD investigated at the Urmia University Hospital urmia, Iran from 1997 to 2005. Kidney function at each visit assessed with GFR. We apply NKF and K/DOQI classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD staging system to determine pattern of disease progression per stage in this group of patients. "n"nResults: The pure death-censored graft loss was 26% with mean waiting time 81.7 months. 100% of RTRs passed from stage I to II in mean waiting time 26.3 months. The probability of prognostic factors transition from stage II to III was 88.9% with mean waiting time 25.5 months, transition from III to IV was 55.7% with mean waiting time of 24.9 months and transition for

  3. Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein predicts adverse outcomes in acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Michael A.; Vaidya, Vishal S.; Waikar, Sushrut S.; Collings, Fitz B.; Sunderland, Kelsey E.; Gioules, Costas J.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2009-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common condition with significant associated morbidity and mortality. The insensitivity and non-specificity of traditional markers of renal dysfunction prevent timely diagnosis, estimation of the severity of renal injury, and the administration of possible therapeutic agents. Here, we determine the prognostic ability of urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), and further characterize its sensitivity and specificity as a biomarker of AKI. Initial ...

  4. Protective effects of amifostine on ischemia-reperfusion injury of rat kidneys

    OpenAIRE

    Ayse Arducoglu Merter; Burhan Mayir; Okan Erdogan; Taner Colak

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Amifostine is a drug which can eliminate free oxygen radicals that appear in the body after radiation or chemotherapeutic agent exposure. It is used to decrease the renal toxicity of cisplatin. The aim of this study was to determine the role of amifostine in warm ischemia kidney model for prevention of ischemia/reperfusion injury and also to find out the mechanism for prevention from ischemia/reperfusion injury if such an effect does exist. Materials and Methods: Adult female ...

  5. Increased angiotensinogen expression, urinary angiotensinogen excretion, and tissue injury in nonclipped kidneys of two-kidney, one-clip hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Weijian; Miyata, Kayoko; Katsurada, Akemi; Satou, Ryousuke; Seth, Dale M; Rosales, Carla B; Prieto, Minolfa C; Mitchell, Kenneth D; Navar, L Gabriel

    2016-08-01

    In angiotensin II (ANG II)-dependent hypertension, there is an angiotensin type 1 receptor-dependent amplification mechanism enhancing intrarenal angiotensinogen (AGT) formation and secretion in the tubular fluid. To evaluate the role of increased arterial pressure, AGT mRNA, protein expression, and urinary AGT (uAGT) excretion and tissue injury were assessed in both kidneys of two-kidney, one-clip Sprague-Dawley hypertensive rats subjected to left renal arterial clipping (0.25-mm gap). By 18-21 days, systolic arterial pressure increased to 180 ± 3 mmHg, and uAGT increased. Water intake, body weights, 24-h urine volumes, and sodium excretion were similar. In separate measurements of renal function in anesthetized rats, renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate were similar in clipped and nonclipped kidneys and not different from those in sham rats, indicating that the perfusion pressure to the clipped kidneys remained within the autoregulatory range. The nonclipped kidneys exhibited increased urine flow and sodium excretion. The uAGT excretion was significantly greater in nonclipped kidneys compared with clipped and sham kidneys. AGT mRNA was 2.15-fold greater in the nonclipped kidneys compared with sham (1.0 ± 0.1) or clipped (0.98 ± 0.15) kidneys. AGT protein levels were also greater in the nonclipped kidneys. The nonclipped kidneys exhibited greater glomerular expansion and immune cell infiltration, medullary fibrosis, and cellular proliferation than the clipped kidneys. Because both kidneys have elevated ANG II levels, the greater tissue injury in the nonclipped kidneys indicates that an increased arterial pressure synergizes with increased intrarenal ANG II to stimulate AGT production and exert greater renal injury. PMID:27194718

  6. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Agonists Attenuate Septic Acute Kidney Injury in Mice by Suppressing Inflammation and Proteasome Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Prodyot K.; Yeboah, Michael M.; Oonagh Dowling; Xiangying Xue; Powell, Saul R.; Yousef Al-Abed; Metz, Christine N

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of acute kidney injury (AKI). Septic patients who develop acute kidney injury (AKI) are at increased risk of death. To date there is no effective treatment for AKI or septic AKI. Based on their anti-inflammatory properties, we examined the effects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists on renal damage using a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced AKI where localized LPS promotes inflammation-mediated kidney damage. Administration of nicotine...

  7. Dexamethasone pretreatment attenuates lung and kidney injury in cholestatic rats induced by hepatic ischemia/reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liangyi; Yao, Xiangqing; Chen, Yanling

    2012-02-01

    Hepatic ischemia followed by reperfusion (IR) results in mild to severe organ injury, in which tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) seem to be involved. Thus, we aim to assess the influence of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury on remote organs in addition to cholestasis and consider the possible efficacy of steroid pretreatment in reducing the injury. A common bile duct ligation model was done on 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats. After 7 days, the rats were divided randomly into control group, IR group, and dexamethasone (DEX) group. The IR group showed significant increases in serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatinine levels compared with the control and DEX groups. By ELISA techniques, higher levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in lung and kidney tissues were measured in the IR group than in the control and DEX groups, these were verified by immunohistochemistry. The lung histology of the IR group rats showed neutrophil infiltration, interstitial edema, and alveolar wall thickening. Kidney histology of the IR group rats showed vacuolization of the proximal tubular epithelial cells and tubular dilatation with granular eosinophilic casts. Better morphological aspects were observed in the DEX-pretreated animals. Minimal lesions were observed in the control. The results suggest that hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury in cholestatic rats induced lung and kidney injuries. Pretreatment with dexamethasone reduced the IR-induced injury in addition to cholestasis.

  8. Prediction of differential creatinine clearance in chronically obstructed kidneys by non-contrast helical computerized tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng C.F.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We investigate the use of non-contrast helical computerized tomography (NCHCT in the measurement of differential renal parenchymal volume as a surrogate for differential creatinine clearance (CrCl for unilateral chronically obstructed kidney. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with unilateral chronically obstructed kidneys with normal contralateral kidneys were enrolled. Ultrasonography (USG of the kidneys was first done with the cortical thickness of the site with the most renal substance in the upper pole, mid-kidney, and lower pole of both kidneys were measured, and the mean cortical thickness of each kidney was calculated. NCHCT was subsequently performed for each patient. The CT images were individually reviewed with the area of renal parenchyma measured for each kidney. Then the volume of the slices was summated to give the renal parenchymal volume of both the obstructed and normal kidneys. Finally, a percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN was inserted to the obstructed kidney, and CrCl of both the obstructed kidney (PCN urine and the normal side (voided urine were measured two 2 after the relief of obstruction. RESULTS: From March 1999 to February 2001, thirty patients were enrolled into the study. Ninety percent of them had ureteral calculi. The differential CrCl of the obstructed kidney (%CrCl was defined as the percentage of CrCl of the obstructed kidney as of the total CrCl, measured 2 weeks after relief of obstruction. The differential renal parenchymal volume of the obstructed kidney (%CTvol was the percentage of renal parenchymal volume as of the total parenchymal volume. The differential USG cortical thickness of the obstructed kidney (%USGcort was the percentage of mean cortical thickness as of the total mean cortical thickness. The Pearson's correlation coefficient (r between %CTvol and %CrCl and that between %USGcort and %CrCl were 0.756 and 0.543 respectively. The regression line was %CrCl = (1.00 x %CTvol - 14.27. The %CTvol

  9. No increase in kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin excretion following intravenous contrast enhanced-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kooiman, Judith [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Leiden (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Nephrology, Leiden (Netherlands); Peppel, Wilke R. van de; Huisman, Menno V. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Leiden (Netherlands); Sijpkens, Yvo W.J. [Bronovo Hospital, Department of Nephrology, The Hague (Netherlands); Brulez, Harald F.H. [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Nephrology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vries, P.M. de [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Nicolaie, Mioara A.; Putter, H. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Medical Statistics and Bioinformatics, Leiden (Netherlands); Kooij, W. van der; Kooten, Cees van; Rabelink, Ton J. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Nephrology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-07-15

    To analyze kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (N-GAL) excretion post-intravenous contrast enhanced-CT (CE-CT) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Patients were enrolled in a trial on hydration regimes to prevent contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Blood and urine samples were taken at baseline, 4 - 6, and 48 - 96 h post CE-CT. Urinary KIM-1 and N-GAL values were normalized for urinary creatinine levels, presented as medians with 2.5 - 97.5 percentiles. Of the enrolled 511 patients, 10 (2 %) were lost to follow-up. CI-AKI occurred in 3.9 % of patients (20/501). Median KIM-1 values were 1.2 (0.1 - 7.7) at baseline, 1.3 (0.1 - 8.6) at 4 - 6 h, and 1.3 ng/mg (0.1 - 8.1) at 48 - 96 h post CE-CT (P = 0.39). Median N-GAL values were 41.0 (4.4 - 3,174.4), 48.9 (5.7 - 3,406.1), and 37.8 μg/mg (3.5 - 3,200.4), respectively (P = 0.07). The amount of KIM-1 and N-GAL excretion in follow-up was similar for patients with and without CI-AKI (P-value KIM-1 0.08, P-value N-GAL 0.73). Neither patient characteristics at baseline including severe CKD, medication use, nor contrast dose were associated with increased excretion of KIM-1 or N-GAL during follow-up. KIM-1 and N-GAL excretion were unaffected by CE-CT both in patients with and without CI-AKI, suggesting that CI-AKI was not accompanied by tubular injury. (orig.)

  10. No increase in kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin excretion following intravenous contrast enhanced-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (N-GAL) excretion post-intravenous contrast enhanced-CT (CE-CT) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Patients were enrolled in a trial on hydration regimes to prevent contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Blood and urine samples were taken at baseline, 4 - 6, and 48 - 96 h post CE-CT. Urinary KIM-1 and N-GAL values were normalized for urinary creatinine levels, presented as medians with 2.5 - 97.5 percentiles. Of the enrolled 511 patients, 10 (2 %) were lost to follow-up. CI-AKI occurred in 3.9 % of patients (20/501). Median KIM-1 values were 1.2 (0.1 - 7.7) at baseline, 1.3 (0.1 - 8.6) at 4 - 6 h, and 1.3 ng/mg (0.1 - 8.1) at 48 - 96 h post CE-CT (P = 0.39). Median N-GAL values were 41.0 (4.4 - 3,174.4), 48.9 (5.7 - 3,406.1), and 37.8 μg/mg (3.5 - 3,200.4), respectively (P = 0.07). The amount of KIM-1 and N-GAL excretion in follow-up was similar for patients with and without CI-AKI (P-value KIM-1 0.08, P-value N-GAL 0.73). Neither patient characteristics at baseline including severe CKD, medication use, nor contrast dose were associated with increased excretion of KIM-1 or N-GAL during follow-up. KIM-1 and N-GAL excretion were unaffected by CE-CT both in patients with and without CI-AKI, suggesting that CI-AKI was not accompanied by tubular injury. (orig.)

  11. The oxidative response in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, E.C.T.H.; Bahrami, S.; Kozlov, A.V.; Kurvers, H.A.J.M.; Laak, H.J. ter; Nohl, H.; Redl, H.; Goris, R.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the chronic constriction injury model of rat neuropathic pain, oxidative stress as well as antioxidants superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione (GSH) are important determinants of neuropathological and behavioral consequences. Studies of the chronic constriction injury model obse

  12. [Ultrasonographic study on kidneys in patients with chronic renal failure. Part II. Acquired cystic disease of the kidneys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, S; Fujii, H; Kaneko, S; Yachiku, S; Anzai, T; Inada, F; Kobayashi, T; Furuta, K; Ishida, H

    1990-08-01

    Ultrasonic examination of the kidney was performed on 280 patients undergoing chronic dialysis. Acquired cystic disease of the kidney (ACDK) was detected in 107 of 529 kidneys (20.2%). This paper presents an analysis of ultrasonotomograms of ACDK. Ultrasonic measurement of the size of ACDK was 72.5 +/- 15.2 mm in length and 41.7 +/- 9.8 mm in thickness. The size of ACDK was significantly greater than that of contracted kidneys by ultrasonographic diagnosis. With regard to sex distinction the length and thickness of ACDK were significantly greater in males than in females. As for laboratory data, patients with ACDK showed significantly higher values of red blood cell count, hematocrit and serum creatinine concentration compared with contracted kidneys. Prolongation of the dialysis peirod increased the incidence of ACDK. The size of ACDK showed a tendency to increase with duration of dialysis. However, no correlation was noted statistically between the incidence of ACDK and duration of dialysis and between the size of ACDK and duration of dialysis. There was a significantly lower incidence of ACDK in patients with diabetic nephropathy than those with chronic glomerulonephritis. A sonographic feature of ACDK is irregularity of the renal contour because of cystic transformation. Renal imaging, identification of the corticomedullary border, identification of the central echoes and increased parenchymal echogenicity were similar to other dialyzed kidneys. The main complications of ACDK are hemorrhage and tumor formation. We observed two retroperitoneal hematomas and one renal cell carcinoma developed within two years after this examination. The incidence of complications of ACDK was 5.1 per cent. We believe that patients with ACDK should be watched carefully by regular ultrasonic examination for early diagnosis and treatment of these complications. PMID:2232409

  13. Acute Superoxide Radical Scavenging Reduces Blood Pressure but Does Not Influence Kidney Function in Hypertensive Rats with Postischemic Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Miloradović

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in hypertensive surroundings. We investigated superoxide radical molecules influence on systemic haemodynamic and kidney function in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR with induced postischemic AKI. Experiment was performed in anesthetized adult male SHR. The right kidney was removed, and left renal artery was subjected to ischemia by clamping for 40 minutes. The treated group received synthetic superoxide dismutase mimetic TEMPOL in the femoral vein 5 minutes before, during, and 175 minutes after the period of reperfusion, while the control AKI group received the vehicle via the same route. All parameters were measured 24 h after renal reperfusion. TEMPOL treatment significantly decreased mean arterial pressure and total peripheral resistance P<0.05 compared to AKI control. It also increased cardiac output and catalase activity P<0.05. Lipid peroxidation and renal vascular resistance were decreased in TEMPOL P<0.05. Plasma creatinine and kidney morphological parameters were unchanged among TEMPOL treated and control groups. Our study shows that superoxide radicals participate in haemodynamic control, but acute superoxide scavenging is ineffective in glomerular and tubular improvement, probably due to hypertension-induced strong endothelial dysfunction which neutralizes beneficial effects of O2− scavenging.

  14. Prevalence and variation of Chronic Kidney Disease in the Irish health system: initial findings from the National Kidney Disease Surveillance Programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stack, Austin G

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a major non-communicable chronic disease that is associated with adverse clinical and economic outcomes. Passive surveillance systems are likely to improve efforts for prevention of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and inform national service planning. This study was conducted to determine the overall prevalence of CKD in the Irish health system, assess period trends and explore patterns of variation as part of a novel surveillance initiative.

  15. KNOW-CKD (KoreaN cohort study for Outcome in patients With Chronic Kidney Disease): design and methods

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Kook-Hwan; Park, Sue Kyung; Park, Hayne Cho; Chin, Ho Jun; Chae, Dong Wan; Choi, Kyu Hun; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae Hyun; Lee, Kyubeck; Kim, Yong-Soo; Chung, Wookyung; Hwang, Young-Hwan; Kim, Soo Wan; Kim, Yeong Hoon; Kang, Sun Woo

    2014-01-01

    Background The progression and complications of chronic kidney disease should differ depending on the cause (C), glomerular filtration rate category (G), and albuminuria (A). The KNOW-CKD (KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcome in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease), which is a prospective cohort study, enrolls subjects with chronic kidney disease stages 1 to 5 (predialysis). Methods/Design Nine nephrology centers in major university hospitals throughout Korea will enroll approximately 2,450 adult...

  16. Pre-pregnancy counselling for women with chronic kidney disease:a retrospective analysis of nine years’ experience

    OpenAIRE

    Wiles, Kate S; Bramham, Kate Macpherson; Vais, Alina; Harding, Kate R; Chowdhury, Paramit; Taylor, Cath; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Background Women with chronic kidney disease have an increased risk of maternal and fetal complications in pregnancy. Pre-pregnancy counselling is recommended but the format of the counselling process and the experience of the patient have never been assessed. This study examines the experience of women with chronic kidney disease attending pre-pregnancy counselling and evaluates their pregnancy outcomes. Methods This is a cross-sectional assessment of 179 women with chronic kidney disease at...

  17. Hemodialysis versus peritoneal dialysis: a case control study of survival in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maier, Alexandra; Stocks, Franziska; Pommer, Wolfgang;

    2009-01-01

    It is still controversial whether the mode of dialysis or preexisting comorbidities may influence the prognosis of patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5. Therefore, we performed a prospective case control study to evaluate whether the mode of dialysis may influence outcome. We found 25 cases...... dialysis, predicted death in patients with chronic kidney disease. It is concluded that age and comorbidities but not mode of dialysis are important to predict survival in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5....

  18. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell transplantation ameliorates burn-induced acute kidney injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Gang; Huang, Sha; Chen, Yongbin; Ma, Kui

    2013-09-01

    Excessive systemic inflammation following burns could lead to acute kidney injury (AKI). Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) suppress immune cell responses and have beneficial effects in various inflammatory-related immune disorders. However, autologous MSCs are not vital enough for the treatment because of the severely burned patients' deleterious condition. Umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) could be a suitable substitute cell candidate but no data are available on the therapeutic effectiveness of UC-MSCs transplantation for burn injury and its consequences. In this study, UC-MSCs or ulinastatin was administered intravenously in the rats with burn trauma, and the therapeutic effects of UC-MSCs on the survival of severe burn-induced AKI rats and functional protection of kidney were analyzed. Results showed that UC-MSCs promoted the survival and prevented commitment to apoptosis of resident kidney cells and reduced organ microscopic damage in kidneys after thermal trauma. Thus, our study demonstrates that intravenously delivered UC-MSCs protected the host from death caused by kidney injury subsequent to severe burn, identifying UC-MSCs transplantation may be an attractive candidate for cell-based treatments for burns and induced organ damage. PMID:24043673

  19. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the elderly -- a geriatrician's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munikrishnappa, Devaraj

    2007-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is becoming increasingly prevalent among many different populations all over the world, including the US and Europe. Its multitude of complications with devastating outcomes leads to a significantly higher risk for cardio-vascular and all-cause mortality in an individual. However, it is clear now that early detection of CKD might not only delay some of the complications but also prevent them. Therefore, various important public health organizations all over the world have turned their focus and attention to CKD and its risk factors, early detection and early intervention. Nevertheless, the general goals in preventing the increase in CKD and its complications are far from being completely achieved. Why is this so? What is the magnitude and complexity of the problem? How is it affecting the population - are there differences in its affection by age, gender or frail elderly versus the robust? Are we modifying the risk factors appropriately and aggressively? Are there subtle differences in managing the risk factors in those on dialysis versus the non-dialysis CKD patients? Is it important to treat anaemia of CKD aggressively, will it make a difference in the disease progression, its complications or to quality of life? What do these unfortunate individuals commonly succumb to? What do we advise patients who refuse dialysis or those who desire dialysis or transplant? Are there useful non-dialytic treatment recommendations for those who refuse dialysis? What is the role of the physicians caring for the elderly with CKD? When should the primary care givers refer a CKD patient to a nephrologist? The key to eventually controlling incident and prevalent CKD and improve quality of life of affected individuals, lies in not only knowing these and many other vital aspects, but also in applying such knowledge compulsively in day-to-day practice by each and every one us. As CKD is increasingly a disease of the elderly with men being affected more, this

  20. Interrelationship of Multiple Endothelial Dysfunction Biomarkers with Chronic Kidney Disease.

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    Jing Chen

    Full Text Available The interrelationship of multiple endothelial biomarkers and chronic kidney disease (CKD has not been well studied. We measured asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, L-arginine, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1, soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin, von Willebrand factor (vWF, flow-mediated dilation (FMD, and nitroglycerin-induced dilation (NID in 201 patients with CKD and 201 community-based controls without CKD. Multivariable analyses were used to examine the interrelationship of endothelial biomarkers with CKD. The multivariable-adjusted medians (interquartile ranges were 0.54 (0.40, 0.75 in patients with CKD vs. 0.25 (0.22, 0.27 μmol /L in controls without CKD (p<0.0001 for group difference for ADMA; 67.0 (49.6, 86.7 vs. 31.0 (27.7, 34.2 μmol/L (p<0.0001 for L-arginine; 230.0 (171.6, 278.6 vs. 223.9 (178.0, 270.6 ng/mL (p=0.55 for sICAM-1; 981.7 (782.6, 1216.8 vs. 633.2 (507.8, 764.3 ng/mL (p<0.0001 for sVCAM-1; 47.9 (35.0, 62.5 vs. 37.0 (28.9, 48.0 ng/mL (p=0.01 for sE-selectin; 1320 (1044, 1664 vs. 1083 (756, 1359 mU/mL (p=0.008 for vWF; 5.74 (3.29, 8.72 vs. 8.80 (6.50, 11.39% (p=0.01 for FMD; and 15.2 (13.5, 16.9 vs. 19.1 (17.2, 21.0% (p=0.0002 for NID, respectively. In addition, the severity of CKD was positively associated with ADMA, L-arginine, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin, and vWF and inversely associated with FMD and NID. Furthermore, FMD and NID were significantly and inversely correlated with ADMA, L-arginine, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin, and vWF. In conclusion, these data indicate that multiple dysfunctions of the endothelium were present among patients with CKD. Interventional studies are warranted to test the effects of treatment of endothelial dysfunction on CKD.