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Sample records for chronic intracorporeal radiation

  1. Intracorporeal pneumatic shock application for the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis: a randomized, double blind prospective clinical trial.

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    Dogramaci, Yunus; Kalaci, Aydiner; Emir, Anil; Yanat, Ahmet Nedim; Gökçe, Ahmet

    2010-04-01

    Plantar fasciitis (PF) is a common clinical condition that usually resolves with non-operative treatments. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been used in the treatment of chronic PF not responding to other conservative measures; however, ESWT devices are expensive and available for daily practice in only few centers (In developing countries). A pneumatic lithotripter is a cheap and readily available device which uses pneumatic shock application for the intracorporeal lithotripsy. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of intracorporeal pneumatic shock therapy (IPST) application for the treatment of chronic PF using a cheap and readily available pneumatic lithotripter. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted. A total of 50 patients with clinically and radiologically confirmed PF were randomly allocated to either an active- (treatment) (n = 25) or inactive (placebo) (n = 25) group. Under local anesthesia and posterior tibial nerve block, a rigid probe was directly introduced into the calcaneal spur under fluoroscopic control; a standard protocol of 1,000 shock was applied during a single session into the calcaneal spur. The main outcome measure was the patients' subjective assessment of pain by means of a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the Roles and Maudsley Score before the treatment and 6 months later. At the 6 months, the rate of successful outcomes (excellent + good results) in the treatment group (92%) were significantly higher comparing to the control group (24%) (P < 0.001). Heel pain measured 6 months after using the VAS were 2.04 +/- 1.67 in treatment group and 7.16 +/- 1.57 in control group as compared to 8.92 +/- 1.22 and 9.12 +/- 1.23 before the commencement of the treatment. No complications attributable to the procedure such as rupture of the planter fascia, hematoma, or infection were observed during the study. This pilot study showed that IPST is an effective and safe method of treatment of

  2. Stone technology: intracorporeal lithotripters.

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    Scotland, Kymora B; Kroczak, Tadeusz; Pace, Kenneth T; Chew, Ben H

    2017-09-01

    Intracorporeal lithotripsy is becoming the most commonly used surgical method of stone treatment in Urology. The five major types of intracorporeal lithotripters are ultrasonic, ballistic, and combination lithotripters as well as laser and electrohydraulic lithotripters. The advantages and disadvantages of choosing each of these treatment modalities are reviewed. Extensive review of literature was performed to identify the types of intracorporeal lithotripters. An investigation was undertaken of the early development of each modality of intracorporeal lithotripsy and/or the mechanism of action. Challenges of each technique were identified and presented. Finally, a determination was made of how these lithotripters compare on the basis of effectiveness of action and cost based on information provided in primary literature as well as previous reviews of these modalities. Contemporary lithotripters have found widespread use in the management of urinary lithiasis. Holmium laser lithotripsy has become one of the most commonly used tools for intracorporeal lithotripsy. There is a wide variety of intracorporeal lithotripters which can be chosen based on the characteristics of each modality and the requirements of the urologist.

  3. Chronic radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akleyev, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of chronic radiation syndrome, covering epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathoanatomy, diagnosis and treatment. Based on observations in a unique sample of exposed residents of the Techa riverside villages in the Urals. Casts new light on the condition. Of value for all practitioners and researchers with an interest in chronic radiation syndrome. This book covers all aspects of chronic radiation syndrome (CRS) based on observations in a unique sample of residents of the Techa riverside villages in the southern Urals who were exposed to radioactive contamination in the 1950s owing to releases of liquid radioactive wastes from Mayak Production Association, which produced plutonium for weapons. In total, 940 cases of CRS were diagnosed in this population and these patients were subjected to detailed analysis. The opening chapters address the definition and classification of CRS, epidemiology and pathogenesis, covering molecular and cellular mechanisms, radioadaptation, and the role of tissue reactions. The pathoanatomy of CRS during the development and recovery stages is discussed for all organ systems. Clinical manifestations of CRS at the different stages are then described in detail and the dynamics of hematopoietic changes are thoroughly examined. In the following chapters, principles of diagnosis (including assessment of the exposure doses to critical organs) and differential diagnosis from a wide range of other conditions are discussed and current and potential treatment options, described. The medical and social rehabilitation of persons with CRS is also covered. This book, which casts new light on the condition, will be of value for all practitioners and researchers with an interest in CRS.

  4. Acute radiation syndrome and chronic radiation syndrome.

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    Grammaticos, Philip; Giannoula, Evanthia; Fountos, George P

    2013-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) or sickness or poisoning or toxicity is induced after a whole body exposure of men to high doses of radiation between 1-12Gy. First symptoms are from the gastrointestinal system, which together with bone marrow are the most sensitive parts of our body. Chronic radiation syndrome (CRS) may be induced by smaller than 1Gy radiation doses or after a mild form of ARS. Prophylaxis and treatment suggestions are described. In cases of ARS, a large part of the exposed population after proper medical care may survive, while without medical care this part of the population will be lost. Prophylaxis may also save another part of the population.

  5. Laparoscopic right colon resection with intracorporeal anastomosis.

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    Chang, Karen; Fakhoury, Mathew; Barnajian, Moshe; Tarta, Cristi; Bergamaschi, Roberto

    2013-05-01

    This study was performed to evaluate short-term clinical outcomes of laparoscopic intracorporeal ileocolic anastomosis following resection of the right colon. This was a retrospective study of selected patients who underwent laparoscopic intracorporeal ileocolic anastomosis following resection of the right colon for tumors or Crohn's disease by a single surgeon from July 2002 through June 2012. Data were retrieved from an Institutional Review Board-approved database. Study end point was postoperative adverse events, including mortality, complications, reoperations, and readmissions at 30 days. Antiperistaltic side-to-side anastomoses were fashioned laparoscopically with a 60-mm-long stapler cartridge and enterocolotomy was hand-sewn intracorporeally in two layers. Values were expressed as medians (ranges) for continuous variables. There were 243 patients (143 females) aged 61 (range = 19-96) years, with body mass index of 29 (18-43) kg/m(2) and ASA 1:2:3:4 of 52:110:77:4; 30 % had previous abdominal surgery and 38 % had a preexisting comorbidity. There were 84 ileocolic resections with ileo ascending anastomosis and 159 right colectomies with ileotransverse anastomosis. Operating time was 135 (60-220) min. Estimated blood loss was 50 (10-600) ml. Specimen extraction site incision length was 4.1 (3-4.4) cm. Conversion rate was 3 % and there was no mortality at 30 days, 15 complications (6.2 %), and 8 reoperations (3.3 %). Readmission rate was 8.7 %. Length of stay was 4 (2-32) days. Pathology confirmed Crohn's disease in 84 patients, adenocarcinoma in 152, and other tumors in 7 patients. Laparoscopic intracorporeal ileocolic anastomosis following resection of the right colon resulted in a favorable outcome in selected patients with Crohn's disease or tumors of the right colon.

  6. Completely Intracorporeal Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Ileovesicostomy

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    MaryEllen T. Dolat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a report of a completely intracorporeal robotic-assisted laparoscopic ileovesicostomy with long term follow-up. The patient was a 55-year-old man with paraplegia secondary to tropical spastic paresis resulting neurogenic bladder dysfunction. The procedure was performed using a da Vinci Surgical system (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA and took 330 minutes with an estimated blood loss of 100 mL. The patient recovered without perioperative complications. He continues to have low pressure drainage without urethral incontinence over two years postoperatively.

  7. Intracorporal suturing--driving license necessary?

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    Romero, P; Brands, O; Nickel, F; Müller, B; Günther, P; Holland-Cunz, S

    2014-07-01

    Intracorporeal suturing and knot tying (ICKT) in minimal invasive surgery (MIS) represents a key skill for advanced procedures. Different methods exist for measuring knot quality and performance, but the heterogeneity of these methods makes direct comparisons difficult. The aim of this study is to compare the quality of a laparoscopic knot to one that is performed open. To compare open and laparoscopic knot-tying methods we used a surgeon's square knot. For laparoscopic knot tying we used a Pelvitrainer. The 32 participants were divided among 4 groups of different skill levels. Group 1 consisted of 6 senior physicians. Group 2 was made up of 10 first to fourth year interns. Groups 3 and 4 contained 16 medical students who had never performed either laparoscopic procedures or open sutures before. Group 3 participants received a 1-hour hands-on training in suturing, whereas group 4 participants received no prior training. Total time, knot quality, suture placement accuracy, and performance defined the parameters for assessment in this study. All participants, irrespective of education level were inferior in ICKT compared to open suturing. Only Group 1 showed no significant difference in knot quality and accuracy between the open and laparoscopic suture performance. It is well documented that psychomotor skills need to be developed before more advanced skills can be put into practice. Training centres for minimally invasive surgery should be an integral part of surgical education. The variables in our study are meaningful and easy to implement. They can be used to measure personal progress and as objective parameters in the development of laparoscopic trainee education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.; Friesecke, I.

    1997-01-01

    This document approaches the radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure, presenting examples occurred, the pathophysiologic mechanisms for cell system tolerance in elevated radiation fields, and the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities

  9. Chronic radiation disease. Consequences and outcomes

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    Okladnikova, N.D.; Pesternikova, V.S.; Sumina, M.V.; Azizova, T.V.; Vologodskaya, I.A.; Kabasheva, N.Ja.; Mikhailina, T.N. [Branch No 1 State Research Center of Russia, Ozyorsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Biophysics

    2000-05-01

    Chronic Radiation Disease (CRD), induced by chronic external gamma-irradiation in cumulative dose 1.0-10.0 Gy ever a period of employment from 7 months to 7 years was described for the atomic enterprise workers during adjustment of that enterprise (1948-54). Key clinical syndromes of CRD were cytopenia in the peripheral blood (decrease of a number of thrombocytes, leukocytes, neutrophils to 50-60% from an initial level), changes in the nervous system (vegetative-vascular dysfunction of the hypotonic type, asthenic syndrome and at a cumulative dose more than 4.0 Gy - demyelinatied encephalomyelosis). The annual medical examination allowed assessing consequences of CRD for long-term period of monitoring (35-40 years) of 632 workers. By 10-15 years after termination of an exposure the characteristics of the peripheral blood are reverted to initial level (before employment at enterprise). However even by 40th year of observation in a part of cases the moderate hypoplasia of bone marrow (7.3%) and partial hypoplasia granulocytopoiesis (4.3%) is diagnosed. In lymphocytes of the peripheral blood the frequency of chromosome aberrations 4-5 times greater than a spontaneous level. Decrease of parameters of T-cell immunity remains. In cases of high exposure doses (cumulative dose more than 3.5-4.0 Gy) the early cerebral atherosclerosis (not older than 45) was diagnosed. By 40th year of monitoring the radiation cataracts were not detected. During the first decade of monitoring prevailing causes of death were an acute myeloid leukemia, during subsequent 30 years of monitoring - lung cancer was prevailing causes of death for worker who had contact with plutonium 239. (author)

  10. Acute macular edema following intracorporeal prostaglandin injection for erectile dysfunction

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    Asahi MG

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Masumi G Asahi, Calvin Chou, Ron P Gallemore Retina Macula Institute, Torrance, CA, USA Purpose: We aimed to describe the first case of macular edema following intracorporeal injection of alprostadil, a prostaglandin E1. Methods: This was a retrospective case report followed with optical coherence tomography, fundus photos, and fluorescein angiography images. Results: A patient developed bilateral cystoid macular edema following intracorporeal injection of alprostadil, a prostaglandin E1 for treatment of erectile dysfunction. The edema resolved following treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and corticosteroids, with subsequent recovery in visual acuity. Discussion: Systemic prostaglandin administration can cause macular edema and vision loss, indicating that elevated systemic prostaglandin levels may affect visual function. This has potential implications for other systemic disorders and treatments that could affect macular function. Keywords: alprostadil, inflammation

  11. Chronic radiation-induced dermatitis: challenges and solutions

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    Spałek M

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mateusz Spałek Department of Radiotherapy I, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland Abstract: Chronic radiation dermatitis is a late side effect of skin irradiation, which may deteriorate patients’ quality of life. There is a lack of precise data about its incidence; however, several risk factors may predispose to the development of this condition. It includes radiotherapy dose, fractionation, technique, concurrent systemic therapy, comorbidities, and personal and genetic factors. Chronic radiation dermatitis is mostly caused by the imbalance of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines. Clinical manifestation includes changes in skin appearance, wounds, ulcerations, necrosis, fibrosis, and secondary cancers. The most severe complication of irradiation is extensive radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF. RIF can manifest in many ways, such as skin induration and retraction, lymphedema or restriction of joint motion. Diagnosis of chronic radiation dermatitis is usually made by clinical examination. In case of unclear clinical manifestation, a biopsy and histopathological examination are recommended to exclude secondary malignancy. The most effective prophylaxis of chronic radiation dermatitis is the use of proper radiation therapy techniques to avoid unnecessary irradiation of healthy skin. Treatment of chronic radiation dermatitis is demanding. The majority of the interventions are based only on clinical practice. Telangiectasia may be treated with pulse dye laser therapy. Chronic postirradiation wounds need special dressings. In case of necrosis or severe ulceration, surgical intervention may be considered. Management of RIF should be complex. Available methods are rehabilitative care, pharmacotherapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and laser therapy. Future challenges include the assessment of late skin toxicity in modern irradiation techniques. Special attention should be paid on genomics and

  12. Two children with chronic progressive radiation myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Hideaki; Takai, Kenji; Hosoi, Gaku; Okamura, Takayuki; Osugi, Yuko; Ishihara, Shigehiko; Hara, Junichi; Tawa, Akio; Okada, Shintaro

    1995-01-01

    We report two patients who developed chronic progressive radiation myelopathy (CPRM). Patient 1 was a 16-year-old boy with group IV rhabdomyosarcoma of cervical soft tissue. He underwent partial excision of the tumor and received systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy and 44 Gy of local radiotherapy (C4 through Th3). These therapies were followed by high-dose chemotherapy including thio-TEPA and busulfan with autologous bone marrow rescue. One year after the completion of the therapies, he developed CPRM. Patient 2 was a 15-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia on the 3rd complete remission. She received 18 Gy of irradiation to whole brain during the 1st remission and another 18 Gy to whole brain and 9 Gy to spinal cord after her 1st CNS relapse. After successful reinduction therapy for the 2nd relapse in CNS and bone marrow, she underwent an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The preconditioning regimen consisted of 12 Gy total body irradiation, thio-TEPA and cyclophosphamide. Seven months after BMT, she developed CPRM at C0-C1 level, which was included in the area of whole-brain irradiation. In both patients, MR images showed a swelling of the cervical cord and ring-like images by gadolinium enhancement. Their neurological disability transiently responded to the administration of corticosteroid, but they developed progressive quadriplegia. Although it is reported that a dose of 45-50 Gy may be safe, these cases suggest that administration of high-dose chemotherapy combined with intrathecal chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the cord might increase the rink of developing CPRM. (author)

  13. Formalin irrigation for hemorrhagic chronic radiation proctitis.

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    Ma, Teng-Hui; Yuan, Zi-Xu; Zhong, Qing-Hua; Wang, Huai-Ming; Qin, Qi-Yuan; Chen, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Lei

    2015-03-28

    To assess the efficacy and safety of a modified topical formalin irrigation method in refractory hemorrhagic chronic radiation proctitis (CRP). Patients with CRP who did not respond to previous medical treatments and presented with grade II-III rectal bleeding according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were enrolled. Patients with anorectal strictures, deep ulcerations, and fistulas were excluded. All patients underwent flexible endoscopic evaluation before treatment. Patient demographics and clinical data, including primary tumor, radiotherapy and previous treatment options, were collected. Patients received topical 4% formalin irrigation in a clasp-knife position under spinal epidural anesthesia in the operating room. Remission of rectal bleeding and related complications were recorded. Defecation, remission of bleeding, and other symptoms were investigated at follow-up. Endoscopic findings in patients with rectovaginal fistulas were analyzed. Twenty-four patients (19 female, 5 male) with a mean age of 61.5 ± 9.5 years were enrolled. The mean time from the end of radiotherapy to the onset of bleeding was 11.1 ± 9.0 mo (range: 2-24 mo). Six patients (25.0%) were blood transfusion dependent. The median preoperative Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS) was 3 points. Nineteen patients (79.2%) received only one course of topical formalin irrigation, and five (20.8%) required a second course. No side effects were observed. One month after treatment, bleeding cessation was complete in five patients and obvious in 14; the effectiveness rate was 79.1% (19/24). For long-term efficacy, 5/16, 1/9 and 0/6 patients complained of persistent bleeding at 1, 2 and 5 years after treatment, respectively. Three rectovaginal fistulas were found at 1 mo, 3 mo and 2 years after treatment. Univariate analysis showed associations of higher endoscopic VRS and ulceration score with risk of developing rectovaginal fistula. Modified formalin irrigation is an effective and safe

  14. Intracorporeal hybrid single port vs conventional laparoscopic appendectomy in children

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    Paul Anthony Karam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Transumbilical laparoscopic assisted appendectomy combines laparoscopic single port dissection with open appendectomy after exteriorization of the appendix through the port site. Compared to the conventional three-port approach, this technique provides an alternative with excellent cosmetic outcome. We developed a safe and effective technique to perform an intracorporeal single port appendectomy, using the same laparoscope employed in the extracorporeal procedure. Retrospective review of 71 consecutively performed intracorporeal single port appendectomies and 30 conventional three-port appendectomies in children 6 to 17 years of age. A straight 10-mm Storz telescope with inbuilt 6 mm working channel is used to dissect the appendix, combined with one port-less 2.3 mm percutaneous grasper. Polymer WECK® hem-o-lock® clips are applied to seal the base of the appendix and the appendiceal vessels. No intraoperative complications were reported with the hybrid intracorporeal single port appendectomy or three-port appendectomy. There were two post-operative complications in the group treated with the single port hybrid technique: one intra-abdominal abscess and one surgical site infection. Groups did not differ in age, weight, and types of appendicitis. Operative times were shorter for the hybrid technique (70 vs 79 minutes but did not differ significantly (P=0.19. This modified technique to a previously described single port extracorporeal appendectomy is easy to master and implement. It provides exposure similar to a three-port laparoscopic appendectomy, while maintaining virtually scarless results and potentially reduces the risk for surgical site infections compared to the extracorporeal technique.

  15. Chronic neuroendocrinological sequelae of radiation therapy

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    Sklar, C.A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Constine, L.S. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States)

    1995-03-30

    A variety of neuroendocrine disturbances are observed following treatment with external radiation therapy when the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA) is included in the treatment field. Radiation-induced abnormalities are generally dose dependent and may develop many years after irradiation. Growth hormone deficiency and premature sexual development can occur following doses as low as 18 Gy fractionated radiation and are the most common neuroendocrine problems noted in children. Deficiency of gonadotropins, thyroid stimulating hormone, and adrenocorticotropin are seen primarily in individuals treated with > 40 Gy HPA irradiation. Hyperprolactinemia can be seen following high-dose radiotherapy (>40 Gy), especially among young women. Most neuroendocrine disturbances that develop as a result of HPA irradiation are treatable; patients at risk require long-term endocrine follow-up. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Case of basal cell epithelioma occurring on chronic radiation dermatitis

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    Kase, Kayoko; Matsuoka, Yoshitaka; Urushibata, Osamu; Nishiwaki, Soichi (Toho Univ. Ohashi Hosp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-05-01

    A 52-year-old woman had been treated with radiation therapy for lymphoid tuberculosis on the right side of the neck 40 years before. Chronic radiation dermatitis occurred on that site. Blackish small mass has appeared 2 years before on the central part of the dermatitis. Histological examination revealed thinning of the epidermis, swelling of the dermal collagen fibers, and follicular clusters composed of basaloid cells from the epidermis to the upper layer of the dermis. (Namekawa, K).

  17. Chronic low dose radiation exposure and oxidative stress in radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.S.; Bhatt, M.B.; Kulkarni, MM.; Rajan, R.; Singh, B.B.; Venkataraman, G.

    1996-01-01

    Free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases. In this study free radical stress due to low dose chronic radiation exposures of radiation workers was examined as a possible atherogenic risk factor. Data on lipid profiles, lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione content in blood indicated an absence of correlation with radiation doses up to 125 mSv. (author). 13 refs., 1 fig

  18. Streptococcus bovis septicemia and meningitis associated with chronic radiation enterocolitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadeja, L.; Kantarjian, H.; Bolivar, R.

    1983-01-01

    We describe the first patient with simultaneous S bovis septicemia and meningitis associated with chronic radiation enterocolitis. This case underlines the value of a thorough gastrointestinal evaluation of all patients with S bovis infection, and the need for a neurologic investigation even with minor neurologic manifestations

  19. Acute and chronic radiation syndrome in domestic animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuessel, M.

    1974-11-01

    The paper reports on the incidence and the clinical picture of the radiation syndrome in domestic animals, especially in pigs which are often used in animal experiments. The following parameters which influence the radiation reaction are discussed: type of irradiation (whole-body, partial-body and local irradiation), mean lethal radiation dose, radiation quality and RBE, age and individual radiosensitivity. The auther then describes the various symptoms of the radiation syndrome and the lesions which lead to death (death due to intestinal lesions, death following changes in the central nervous system). The next few chapters treat the symptoms manifested after chronic and internal irradiation. The paper closes with some remarks on the usability of irradiated animals for human consumption. (MG/AK) [de

  20. Diagnosis of 20 cases with chronic radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hongshou; Shen, Zhezhong; Wen Zhigen; Xie, Xiaoping; Ni, Jinxian

    1984-01-01

    Twenty cases with chronic radiation syndrome were diagnosed in our department during 1957-1980. All except one were radiologists, and eight of them had worked in radiological departments for over 20 years. Owing to the use of out-dated x-ray machines as well as radium sources without adequate protection, all these cases were apparently overexposed to radiation. They presented following signs and symptoms of chronic radiation syndrome: excitability, palpitation, fatigue, general weakness, loss of weight, oversweating accompanied by tendency of lowered metabolism, peripheral blood cell changes, and chromosome aberrations. The diagnosis of this syndrome was based on definitive professional and over-exposure history, clinical picture and abnormal laboratory findings. (author)

  1. A modified overlap method using a linear stapler for intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy after laparoscopic total gastrectomy.

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    Yamamoto, Michihiro; Zaima, Masazumi; Yamamoto, Hidekazu; Harada, Hideki; Kawamura, Junichiro; Yamaguchi, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy represents the most difficult step during laparoscopic total gastrectomy (LTG). A novel technique for intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy was recently developed and named the "overlap method." However, this procedure is thought to have some technical disadvantages. To facilitate intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy, we developed some modifications for the overlap method. From October 2009 to July 2013, 63 consecutive patients with gastric cancer underwent LTG at our institution. Our modified overlap method was used for 54 patients with the following modifications. First, the esophagus was transected while being rotated by approximately 90 degrees in the clockwise direction. Second, an endoscopic linear stapler was used through the right lower trocar to create a side-to-side esophagojejunostomy. Third, the entry hole of the linear stapler was closed with intracorporeal hand-sewn continuous suturing. This procedure was termed the "modified overlap method." In 53 patients with the exception of one case, the modified overlap method was successfully completed (98.1%). Only one patient developed esophagojejunal anastomotic leakage (1.9%), which recovered well with conservative management. No postoperative anastomotic stricture or bleeding occurred. Our modified overlap method for intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy provides amazingly satisfactory outcomes. We believe this procedure could become a standard method for intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy after LTG.

  2. Intracorporeal suture closure of the internal inguinal and vaginal rings in foals and horses.

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    Caron, John P; Brakenhoff, Jeffrey

    2008-02-01

    To report a technique for repair or prevention of inguinal hernia in horses using intracorporeal suture closure of the internal inguinal and vaginal rings. Case series. Foals (n=6) and geldings (n=2). After selection of a peri-umbilical telescope portal, instrument portals were made unilaterally or bilaterally, as needed. Herniated viscera was reduced, castration (foals) or spermatic cord remnant transection at the internal inguinal ring (adults) performed, and then simple interrupted intracorporeal sutures of synthetic absorbable suture material were used to close the internal inguinal and vaginal rings. There was no recurrence of inguinal hernia. Postoperative morbidity was minimal and cosmetic outcome was comparable to that achieved with conventional, open techniques. Laparoscopic, primary closure of the internal inguinal ring by use of intracorporeal sutures provides a secure barrier to herniation and costs considerably less than using endoscopic staples. Laparoscopic suture closure of the internal inguinal and vaginal rings provides safe and effective repair of inguinal hernia in horses.

  3. Cytogenetic studies in workers with chronic occupational radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grynszpan, D.

    1989-01-01

    The technique of chromosomal aberration detection on peripheral lymphocytes blood samples from monazite industry workers was used to study the cytogenetic effect of low chronic radiation doses. Cells from 51 workers and 21 controls were analysed. Cytogenetic data from individuals from different working areas were statistically compared among themselves and with the control group. The possible correlations between chromosomal aberration frequencies and cumulative external dose and working time were investigated. The influence of smoking was also tested. The link to the wives spontaneous abortions was analysed. Our results indicate possible biological effects on this sample of workers. (author)

  4. The radiation response of cells recovering after chronic hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, T.T.; Sutherland, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the influence of hypoxic pretreatment on the radiation response of A431 human squamous carcinoma cells. Reaeration for 10 min after chronic hypoxia (greater than 2 h) was found to enhance the radiosensitivity of A431 cells, and the maximal effect was seen for those cells reaerated after 12 h of hypoxia. The radiosensitivity enhancement for reaerated cells after 12 h of hypoxia was maximized by 5 min after the return to aerobic conditions and reached the control level by 12 h of reaeration. This enhanced radiosensitive state was characterized by a reduced shoulder region and increased slope of the radiation dose-response curve for cells in both the exponential and plateau phases of growth. There was a slight increase in the number of G1 and decrease in the number of S and G2 + M cells for both exponential- and plateau-phase cultures following 12 h hypoxic treatment. Although growth inhibition induced by 12 h of hypoxia was seen for cells in the exponential phase, there was no cell number change in the plateau-phase culture after hypoxia. Plating efficiency (PE) of cells in both growth phases was reduced by 30% after hypoxia. Furthermore, in the exponential-phase culture, the extent of reduction in PE after hypoxia was similar among cells in different phases of the cell cycle. Although S-phase cells in exponentially growing cultures were relatively more resistant to radiation than G1 and G2 + M cells, the cell age-response pattern was the same whether the cells had been aerobic or hypoxic before reaeration and irradiation. Furthermore, the enhancement ratio associated with reaeration after 12 h of hypoxia for these three subpopulations of cells was 1.3. Our results indicate that the increase in radiosensitivity due to reaeration after chronic hypoxia is unlikely to be related to the changes of cell cycle stage and growth phase during hypoxic treatment

  5. Effects in Plant Populations Resulting from Chronic Radiation Exposure

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    Geras' kin, Stanislav A.; Volkova, Polina Yu.; Vasiliyev, Denis V.; Dikareva, Nina S.; Oudalova, Alla A. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, 249032, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    environment activates genetic mechanisms, changing a population's resistance to exposure. However, there are ecological situations in which enhanced resistance has not evolved or has not persisted. Consequently, there are good theoretical and practical reasons for more attention being paid to the mechanisms by which populations becomes more radioresistant and to those situations where radio-adaptation appears not to be taking place. Since radio-adaptation plays an important role in response of populations on radiation exposure, this process needs to be incorporated into management programmes. To this very day, the effects of chronic exposure on living organisms and populations remain poorly explored, and represent a much needed field of research. In spite of the long history of the research, we are still far from complete understanding underlying processes in exposed populations. Neglecting field-collected data in favour of simplified short-term experiments that tend to overestimate adverse effects will obviously have detrimental effect for understanding, predicting, and mitigating consequences of the radiation impact on the environment. Much more is to be elucidated in our understanding before we will be able to give an objective and comprehensive assessment of the biological consequences of chronic, low-level radiation exposures to natural plant and animal populations. (authors)

  6. Radiation doses and possible radiation effects of low-level, chronic radiation in vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoads, W.A.; Franks, L.A.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made of radiation doses in soil and vegetation in Pu-contaminated areas at the Nevada Test Site with the objective of investigating low-level, low-energy gamma radiation (with some beta radiation) effects at the cytological or morphological level in native shrubs. In this preliminary investigation, the exposure doses to shrubs at the approximate height of stem apical meristems were estimated from 35 to 140 R for a ten-year period. The gamma exposure dose estimated for the same period was 20.7 percent +- 6.4 percent of that recorded by the dosimeters used in several kinds of field instrument surveys. Hence, a survey instrument reading made at about 25 cm in the tops of shrubs should indicate about 1 / 5 the dosimeter-measured exposures. No cytology has yet been undertaken because of the drought since last winter. (auth)

  7. Late health effects of chronic radiation exposure of bone marrow

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    Yarmoshenko, Ilia V.; Malinovsky, Georgy P.; Konshina, Lidia G.; Zhukovsky, Michael V. [Institute of Industrial Ecology UB RAS, 620219, 20, Sophy Kovalevskoy St., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Tuzankina, Irina A. [Institute of Immunology and Physiology UB RAS, 620049, 106, Pervomayskaya St., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    infectious etiology, which are unexpected due to low doses absorbed in those organs and tissues. To analyze the unexpected results recent findings on strong attributability of stomach, liver and cervix cancers to bacterial and viral infections was taken into account. According to IARC, stomach cancer relative risk associated with helicobacter pillory is 5.6, liver cancer relative risks associated with HBV and HCV are 23 and 17 respectively, cervix cancer relative risk associated with HPV is >100. At the same time association of lung cancer, colon cancer and some other common malignancies with infections is either not established or of low significance. To explain observed effects we suggested that excess mortality due to cancer and non-cancer diseases of infectious etiology is associated with radiation exposure of bone marrow due to Sr-90. Irradiation of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells damages hematopoiesis and suppresses the immune response. Secondary immune deficiency induced by chronic radiation increases susceptibility to the bacterial and viral infections. Such late effect of radiation exposure can be considered within the concept of deterministic tissue reactions. (Under support of UB RAS project 12-P-2-1033). (authors)

  8. Analysis of reproductive function in persons exposed to chronic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossenko, M.M.; Ostroumova, E.V.; Vyushkova, O.V. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation)

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the reproductive function in individuals exposed to radiation in the riverside villages on the Techa in the Southern Urals. The exposure of the population, numbering 28000, occurred in 1950-1956 as a result of discharges into the river of radioactive wastes from the Mayak facility for processing weapon plutonium. The residents were exposed to chronic radiation, both external and internal. The range of exposure doses to gonads was sufficiently wide: 20-1270 mSv. However, the distribution of doses among the exposed individuals was ununiform, and the proportion of people whose dose was below 120 mGy accounted for 74%. The following characteristics of exposed women were analyzed: menstrual function, outcomes of pregnancy, birth rates, health status for newborns. The analysis of the menstrual function in exposed women showed that in persons exposed in childhood, menarche was registered at the age of 14.3 years, on the average (based on literature sources, menarche is attained at the age of 13 for unexposed population). The mean age at menopause was 47.9 years for exposed women (the respective mean value for Russia is 50.8 years). Pregnancy outcomes were analyzed in 9000 exposed women. The rate of medical and criminal abortions was estimated as 79 per 100 labors. The rate of spontaneous abortions for exposed women was slightly higher, 3.11%, than for controls, 2.30%; these difference, however, were statistically insignificant. The total loss of fetus or neonate (unfavorable outcomes of pregnancy: spontaneous abortions, stillbirths, early neonatal death) was estimated to be 4.58% at zero dose. Exposure to gonads at the dose 1 Sv, estimated using the above-indicated method, yielded 3% of additional unfavorable outcomes of pregnancy. It was shown, based on the analysis of birth rates for the Techa Cohort that they had not undergone any essential changes over the first 25 years of exposure compared to the respective coefficients for

  9. Analysis of reproductive function in persons exposed to chronic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossenko, M.M.; Ostroumova, E.V.; Vyushkova, O.V.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the reproductive function in individuals exposed to radiation in the riverside villages on the Techa in the Southern Urals. The exposure of the population, numbering 28000, occurred in 1950-1956 as a result of discharges into the river of radioactive wastes from the Mayak facility for processing weapon plutonium. The residents were exposed to chronic radiation, both external and internal. The range of exposure doses to gonads was sufficiently wide: 20-1270 mSv. However, the distribution of doses among the exposed individuals was ununiform, and the proportion of people whose dose was below 120 mGy accounted for 74%. The following characteristics of exposed women were analyzed: menstrual function, outcomes of pregnancy, birth rates, health status for newborns. The analysis of the menstrual function in exposed women showed that in persons exposed in childhood, menarche was registered at the age of 14.3 years, on the average (based on literature sources, menarche is attained at the age of 13 for unexposed population). The mean age at menopause was 47.9 years for exposed women (the respective mean value for Russia is 50.8 years). Pregnancy outcomes were analyzed in 9000 exposed women. The rate of medical and criminal abortions was estimated as 79 per 100 labors. The rate of spontaneous abortions for exposed women was slightly higher, 3.11%, than for controls, 2.30%; these difference, however, were statistically insignificant. The total loss of fetus or neonate (unfavorable outcomes of pregnancy: spontaneous abortions, stillbirths, early neonatal death) was estimated to be 4.58% at zero dose. Exposure to gonads at the dose 1 Sv, estimated using the above-indicated method, yielded 3% of additional unfavorable outcomes of pregnancy. It was shown, based on the analysis of birth rates for the Techa Cohort that they had not undergone any essential changes over the first 25 years of exposure compared to the respective coefficients for

  10. Endoscopic diode laser therapy for chronic radiation proctitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polese, Lino; Marini, Lucia; Rizzato, Roberto; Picardi, Edgardo; Merigliano, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of endoscopic diode laser therapy in patients presenting rectal bleeding due to chronic radiation proctitis (CRP). A retrospective analysis of CRP patients who underwent diode laser therapy in a single institution between 2010 and 2016 was carried out. The patients were treated by non-contact fibers without sedation in an outpatient setting. Fourteen patients (median age 77, range 73-87 years) diagnosed with CRP who had undergone high-dose radiotherapy for prostatic cancer and who presented with rectal bleeding were included. Six required blood transfusions. Antiplatelet (three patients) and anticoagulant (two patients) therapy was not suspended during the treatments. The patients underwent a median of two sessions; overall, a mean of 1684 J of laser energy per session was used. Bleeding was resolved in 10/14 (71%) patients, and other two patients showed improvement (93%). Only one patient, who did not complete the treatment, required blood transfusions after laser therapy; no complications were noted during or after the procedures. Study findings demonstrated that endoscopic non-contact diode laser treatment is safe and effective in CRP patients, even in those receiving antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant therapy.

  11. Chronic otitis media with effusion following radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Anya; Hall, Francis; Ahsan, Syed

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of chronic otitis media with effusion (COME) after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal or sinonasal tumors is relatively high. It is often a difficult-to-treat problem in these patients. In this retrospective study, we sought to describe the clinical course of COME in 51 patients-33 men and 18 women, aged 39 to 90 years (mean: 58.9 ± 15)-who had been referred to the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit between 2001 and 2011 for management of a tumor that had involved either the nasopharyngeal area or the sinonasal area. The median length of follow-up from the time of cancer diagnosis was 32 months. Of the 51 patients, 23 (45.1%) developed COME before, during, or after radiation therapy. Of these 23 patients, 13 (56.5%) did not experience any improvement after treatment with various combinations of therapies, including myringotomy, tympanostomy tube placement, otic drops, oral antibiotics, and corticosteroid nasal sprays. No patient- or tumor-specific factors were found to be significantly associated with the incidence of COME after irradiation to the sinonasal area. Older age and squamous cell tumor pathology were found to be significant factors for the resolution of COME after it had developed, whereas treatments with tympanostomy tubes and ear drops were not. Because of the high incidence of COME after radiotherapy and the high rate of COME's failure to resolve after tympanostomy tube insertion, we suggest that these patients require an alternative treatment.

  12. 311 Pathogenesis of Radiation-induced Pneumonitis in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Politi, Ekaterini; Tolia, Maria; Makrilia, Nektaria; Psarros, Fotis; Dannos, Ioannis; Syrigos, Kostas N.; Syrigou, Ekaterini

    2012-01-01

    Background Chest radiation is a common therapeutic approach in the management of lung cancer, as well as in other malignancies, rendering radiation-induced pneumonitis a rather commonly reported adverse event. A large proportion of patients undergoing radiation have underlying chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We aim to elucidate the pathogenetic pathways implicated in radiation-induced pneumonitis particularly in this subgroup of patients. Methods A literature search was performe...

  13. Crushing Stones: Mechanical, Intracorporeal and Extracorporeal Lithotripsy in the Clearance of Common Bile Duct Lithiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Liguory, Claude; Lefebevre, Jean Francois; Bonnel, Didier; Vitale, Gary C

    1990-01-01

    Mechanical, intracorporeal and extracorporeal lithotripsy were used in the treatment of common bile duct lithiasis in a series of 80 patients in whom initial extraction attempts with the Dormia basket and balloon catheter failed. Mechanical lithotripsy was performed in 74 cases and was successful in 38 (51.3%). Among the 36 patients with failure of mechanical lithotripsy, five had an initial attempt at stone dissolution w1th methyl terr-butyl ether (MTBE) infused through a n...

  14. Intracorporeal Circular Stapled Esophagojejunostomy Using Conventional Purse-String Suture Instrument After Laparoscopic Total Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiguo; Guo, Yongfang; Qiu, Zhigang; Niu, Dongguang; Zhang, Jianli

    2017-12-01

    An optimal alimentary tract reconstruction technique after laparoscopic total gastrectomy (LTG) remains controversial. The authors developed a new simple technique for intracorporeal esophagojejunal anastomosis that employs a conventional purse-string suture instrument (PSI) and circular stapler. From May 2014 to April 2016, 41 consecutive patients with gastric cancer underwent LTG in the author's institution. Intracorporeal esophagojejunal anastomosis using the following method was attempted for all patients. After total gastrectomy was completed laparoscopically, a small vertical incision (about 40 mm) was created at the left midclavicular line and retracted by a wound retractor. An anvil of a 25 mm circular stapler was introduced into the abdominal cavity. Then a previously prepared surgical glove, which was cut open at the thumb and the little finger through which the two hand shafts of the PSI were passed separately and sealed by ties, was attached to the wound retractor to maintain airtightness, and the PSI was introduced into the abdominal cavity. The following procedure was similar to conventional open surgery except that it was performed under laparoscopic vision. Intracorporeal esophagojejunal anastomosis was performed successfully for all 41 patients. No case required extension of the initial incision for difficulties during anastomosis. The mean operation time was 245 minutes, and the mean time for the purse-string suture and anvil placement was 15 minutes. Tumor-free margins were achieved in all 41 patients. There were no anastomosis-related complications or other major surgical complications. With the described method, intracorporeal esophagojejunal anastomosis can be performed easily and safely.

  15. Dissimilar genome response to acute and chronic low-dose radiation in male and female mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalchuk, Olga; Ponton, Andre; Filkowski, Jody; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2004-01-01

    The long-term genetic consequences of chronic exposure to low-dose irradiation constitutes a major concern to the general public and research community, especially as chronic radiation has recently been proven to be much more mutagenic and carcinogenic than previously thought. Here we report the results of the first ever comparison of the effects of acute and chronic whole body low-dose radiation exposure on global gene expression. We found a substantial difference between males and females in the expression of genes involved in signaling, growth control, transcription and other pathways upon acute and chronic radiation exposure. Specifically, we found sex differences in the expression of genes coding for G protein-coupled receptors and nuclear receptors. We also found different induction of PKCδ, PKCβ and PKCμ, members of PKC signaling pathway as well as in TGF and WNT signaling in males and females. Very pronounced difference, that was confirmed on the level of protein, was observed in the expression of WNT5A that plays an important role in carcinogenesis and muscle regeneration. WNT5A expression was significantly elevated only in chronically exposed females. We also provide the first evidence of the effect of ionizing radiation on the estrogen receptor in females. Repetitive irradiation of muscle tissue has been linked to development of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), which, enigmatically, occurs more frequently in males. Our data may be used to study possible mechanisms of RMS development upon chronic radiation exposure. They may provide some clues about the molecular background of the sex differences of RMS occurrence and may in the future lead to the discovery of new biomarkers for RMS predisposition in the irradiated tissue. Overall, differences in male and female responses to acute and chronic low-dose radiation obtained by this study were more drastic than we could have predicted. If confirmed in other experimental systems, these findings could potentially lead

  16. Clinical experience in 89 consecutive cases of chronic radiation enterocolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Cheng Chen

    2011-02-01

    Conclusions: We confirmed that as compared with recently developed innovative techniques, early primitive radiotherapy techniques were associated with more severe radiotherapy complications that required surgery. Smoking may enhance patients’ vulnerability to severe radiation injury. Surgery for radiation-induced intestinal obstruction, intestinal fistula and perforation is warranted because QOL, serum albumin level and body mass index were similar between the surgical and nonsurgical groups.

  17. Injury of the blood-testies barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Hoon; Bae Min Ji; Lee, Chang Geun; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jur, Kyu; Kim, Jong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportionally with the dose and dose rate. Little is known concerning the relationships between harmful effects and accumulated dose, which is derived from continuous low-dose rate radiation exposure. Recent our studies show that low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) causes adverse effects in the testis at a dose of 2 Gy (6 mGy/h). However, the mechanism of the low-dose-rate 2 Gy irradiation induced testicular injury remains unclear. The present results indicate that low-dose rate chronic radiation might affect the BTB permeability, possibly by decreasing levels of ZO-1, Occludin-1, and NPC-2. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is a risk of male infertility through BTB impairment even with low-dose-rate radiation if exposure is continuous.

  18. Recovery after intracorporeal anastomosis in laparoscopic right hemicolectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milone, Marco; Elmore, Ugo; Vignali, Andrea; Gennarelli, Nicola; Manigrasso, Michele; Burati, Morena; Milone, Francesco; De Palma, Giovanni Domenico; Delrio, Paolo; Rosati, Riccardo

    2018-02-01

    Although intracorporeal anastomosis (IA) appears to guarantee a faster recovery compared to extracorporeal anastomosis (EA), the data are still unclear. Thus, we performed a systematic review of the literature with meta-analysis to evaluate the recovery benefits of intracorporeal anastomosis. A systematic search was performed in electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, EMBASE) using the following search terms in all possible combinations: "laparoscopic," "right hemicolectomy," "right colectomy," "intracorporeal," "extracorporeal," and "anastomosis." According to the pre-specified protocol, all studies evaluating the impact of choice of intra- or extracorporeal anastomosis after right hemicolectomy on time to first flatus and stools, hospital stay, and postoperative complications according to Clavien-Dindo classification were included. Sixteen articles were included in the final analysis, including 1862 patients who had undergone right hemicolectomy: 950 cases (IA) and 912 controls (EA). Patients who underwent IA reported a significantly shorter time to first flatus (MD = - 0.445, p = 0.013, Z = - 2.494, 95% CI - 0.795, 0.095), to first stools (MD = - 0.684, p < 0.001, Z = - 4.597, 95% CI - 0.976, 0.392), and a shorter hospital stay (MD = - 0.782, p < 0.001, Z = -3.867, 95% CI - 1.178, - 0.385) than those who underwent EA. No statistically significant differences in complications between the IA and EA patients were observed in the Clavien-Dindo I-II group (RD = - 0.014, p = 0.797, Z = - 0.257, 95% CI - 0.117, 0.090, number needed to treat (NNT) 74) or in the Clavien-Dindo IV-V (RD = - 0.005, p = 0.361, Z = - 0.933, 95% CI - 0.017, 0.006, NNT 184). The IA procedure led to fewer complications in the Clavien-Dindo III group (RD = - 0.041, p = 0.006, Z = - 2.731, 95% CI - 0.070, 0.012, NNT 24). Although intracorporeal anastomosis appears to be safe in terms of

  19. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the lymphocytes of rats chronically exposed to radiation and chemical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.V.

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative characteristics of lymphocytes in peripheral blood, thymus and spleen of rats chronically exposed to combined external γ-radiation trichlorfon pesticide effect have been studied. It is shown that chronical combined trichlorfon and γ irradiation effect is accompanied by suppression of lymphopoiesis already at the early stages of the experience. The observed effects are formed depending on both daily and cumulative doses of the effect. The development of the combined effect is based on the summation of effects of chronical effect of ionizing radiation and pesticide. The revealed changes in lymphocytes population exposed to radiation and chemical factors can lead to substantial decrease of natural immunity thereby decreasing to various diseases

  20. Direct Effects Of Chronic Gamma Radiation On Musa Acuminata Var. Berangan, A Local Malaysia Banana Cultivar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maimum Tahir; Azhar Mohamad; Rozeita Laboh; Umikalsum Mohd Bahari

    2014-01-01

    Musa acuminata var. Berangan, is a popular variety of our local banana known as Pisang Berangan. The variety is a triploid banana, use mainly for dessert and has a great value for commodity fruit crops. However, production of PisangBerangan has been threatened by diseases such as Fusarium wilt, black sigatoka, Fusarium wilt, burrowing nematodes and viral diseases like Banana streak virus, Banana bunch top virus and Banana bract mosaic virus. The scenario becoming worst as Musa has a narrow genetic background for breeding and/or selection program. The banana breeding program of edible bananas is hampered by high sterility, and very limited amounts of seeds. Mutation induction via chronic gamma radiation is an alternative ways in creating more variants for selections towards a better quality and disease tolerance. A total number of 75 samples at nursery stage (1 month) were exposed to chronic gamma radiation in Gamma Greenhouse at Malaysian Nuclear Agency for 28 weeks. The samples were accordingly arranged with distance ranging from 1 m to 15 m from gamma source (Cesium-137). Plant height and new buds were used as measurement parameters in evaluating the direct effects of the chronic gamma radiation. Results showed effective dose of chronic gamma radiation in Pisang Berangan was 20 Gy. Number of new emerging sucker was ranging from 1-3 pieces with the highest at ring-4 and ring-5. Plant height was observed ranging from 22.1 to 110.5 cm. Effects of chronic radiation were observed after 3-4 months in the GGH. The samples revealed as striking leaves, short inter node and new emergence of suckers. The objective of this work is to get a dose response for chronic gamma radiation in Pisang Berangan. As for selection of potential mutant variants, new emerging suckers were tissue cultured in segregating chimeras and to get required numbers of samples for further field evaluation. (author)

  1. Expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase in radiation-induced chronic human skin ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Po; Li Zhijun; Lu Yali; Zhong Mei; Gu Qingyang; Wang Dewen

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of the catalytic subunit of telomerase, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TRT) and the possible relationship between the TRT and cancer transformation or poor healing in radiation-induced chronic ulcer of human skin. Methods: Rabbit antibody against human TRT and SP immunohistochemical method were used to detect TRT expression in 24 cases of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embed human skin chronic ulcer tissues induced by radiation, 5 cases of normal skin, 2 of burned skin, and 8 of carcinoma. Results: The positive rate for TRT was 58.3%(14/24) in chronic radiation ulcers, of which the strongly positive rate was 41.7%(10/24) and the weakly positive 16.7%(4/24), 0% in normal (0/5) and burned skin (0/2), and 100% in carcinoma (8/8). The strongly positive expression of TRT was observed almost always in the cytoplasm and nucleus of squamous epithelial cells of proliferative epidermis but the negative and partly weakly positive expression in the smooth muscles, endothelia of small blood vessels and capillaries, and fibroblasts. Chronic inflammtory cells, plasmacytes and lymphocytes also showed weakly positive for TRT. Conclusion: TRT expression could be involved in the malignant transformation of chronic radiation ulcer into squamous carcinoma, and in the poor healing caused by sclerosis of small blood vessels and lack of granulation tissue consisting of capillaries and fibroblasts

  2. A new technique of laparoscopic intracorporeal anastomosis for transrectal bowel resection with transvaginal specimen extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Emilie; Albornoz, Jaime; Messori, Pietro; Leroy, Joël; Wattiez, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    To show a new technique of laparoscopic intracorporeal anastomosis for transrectal bowel resection with transvaginal specimen extraction, a technique particularly suited for treatment of bowel endometriosis. Step-by-step explanation of the technique using videos and pictures (educative video). Endometriosis may affect the bowel in 3% to 37% of all endometriosis cases. Bowel endometriosis affects young women, without any co-morbidities and in particular without any vascular disorders. In addition, affected patients often express a desire for childbearing. Radical excision is sometimes required because of the impossibility of conservative treatment such as shaving, mucosal skinning, or discoid resection. Bowel endometriosis should not be considered a cancer, and consequently maximal resection is not the objective. Rather, the goal would be to achieve functional benefit. As a result, resection must be as economic and cosmetic as possible. The laparoscopic approach has proved its superiority over the open technique, although mini-laparotomy is generally performed to prepare for the anastomosis. Total laparoscopic approach in patients with partial bowel stenosis, using the vagina for specimen extraction. This technique of intracorporeal anastomosis with transvaginal specimen extraction enables a smaller resection and avoidance of abdominal incision enlargement that may cause hernia, infection, or pain. When stenosis is partial, this technique seems particularly suited for treatment of bowel endometriosis requiring resection. If stenosis is complete, the anvil can be inserted above the lesion transvaginally. Copyright © 2013 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Robot-Assisted Radical Cystectomy with Total Intracorporeal Urinary Diversion: Comparative Analysis with Extracorporeal Urinary Diversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyun, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyung Keun; Cho, Seok; Kang, Sung Gu; Cheon, Jun; Lee, Jeong Gu; Kim, Je Jong; Kang, Seok Ho

    2016-05-01

    To compare the perioperative outcomes, postoperative complications, and early oncologic outcomes of intracorporeal urinary diversion (ICUD) with those of extracorporeal urinary diversion (ECUD) following robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) performed by a single surgeon at a tertiary referral hospital. We reviewed a prospectively maintained, institutional review board-approved database of 70 patients treated with RARC and pelvic lymph node (LN) dissection for bladder cancer performed from 2007 through 2014. Data were collected for 64 patients who underwent either ICUD or ECUD. Thirty-eight patients underwent ECUD, and the remaining 26 underwent ICUD. Urinary diversion was performed extracorporeally in the first 37 cases and performed intracorporeally thereafter. There were no significant differences in patient characteristics between the ECUD and ICUD groups. Mean total operative time was 468 minutes for ECUD and 581 minutes for ICUD (P group and 26.9% in the ICUD group had pathologic stage T3 or T4 (P > .05). The mean LN yield was 23.2 and 31.8, respectively (P transfusion and complication rates than ECUD. A larger series and long-term follow-up data will be necessary to support our results.

  4. Pressure and intracorporal acceleration measurements in pigs exposed to strong shock waves in a free field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassout, P.; Franke, R.; Parmentier, G.; Evrard, G.; Dancer, A.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical study on the propagation of a pressure wave in a diphasic medium, when compared to the onset mechanism of pulmonary lesions in subjects exposed to strong shock waves, shows an increase in the incident overpressure at the interface level. Using hydrophones, intracorporal pressure was measured in pigs. The authors recorded the costal wall acceleration on the side directly exposed to the shock wave and calculated the displacement of the costal wall after a shock wave passed by. These experiments were conducted for shock waves in a free field, at an overpressure peak level ranging from 26 kFPa to 380 kPa and for a first positive phase lasting 2 ms. Sensors placed in an intracorporal position detected no increase of the overpressure level for any value of the incident pressure. A comparison of the costal wall displacement, measured experimentally, relative to the theoretical displacement of the entire animal mass indicates that the largest relative displacement of the costal wall could be the origin of the pulmonary lesions found. 5 refs., 13 figs

  5. Estimation of doses to patients with chronic radiation sickness from external occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Delin; Dai Guangfu

    1991-01-01

    The doses to patients with chronic radiation sickness who had engaged in diagnostic radiology have been estimated according to the radiation work load, type and capacity of X-ray equipment, protection conditions, data of nationwide survey on doses to X-ray workers in China, or the data of dose monitoring in working places. Based on the activities of radium sources, time taken up in performing radium therapy, distance to radium sources and radiation work load, the doses to patients who had engaged in radium therapy have been estimated. The results of estimated average doses for 29 cases of chronic radiation sickness are given. Their average red marrow dose, trunk dose and effective dose equivalent are 1.3 Gy, 1.2 Gy and 1.6 Sv, respectively

  6. Effect of chronic forced swimming stress on whole brain radiation induced cognitive dysfunction and related mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yuan; Sun Rui; Zhu Yaqun; Zhang Liyuan; Ji Jianfeng; Li Kun; Tian Ye

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore whether chronic forced swimming stress could improve whole brain radiation induced cognitive dysfunction and possible mechanism. Methods: Thirty-nine one month old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into sham control group(C), swimming group(C-S), radiation group(R), and radiation plus swimming group(R-S). Radiation groups were given a single dose of 20 Gy on whole-brain. Rats in the swimming groups were trained with swimming of 15 min/d, 5 d/w. Rat behavior was performed 3 months after radiation in an order of free activity in an open field and the Morris water maze test including the place navigation and spatial probe tests. Then, the protein expressions of BDNF, P-ERK, T-ERK, P-CREB and T-CREB in the rat hippocampus tissue were assayed by Western blot. Results: On the day 2, in the place navigation test of Morris water maze, the latency of swimming group was significantly shorter than that of sham group, the latency of sham group was significantly shorter than that of radiation group, and the latency of radiation swimming group was significantly shorter than that of radiation group(P < 0.05). In the open field test, the latencies of the place navigation and spatial probe tests of Morris water maze had no significant difference among four groups (P > 0.05). Western blot assay showed that the expressions of BDNF and its downstream signals including P-ERK and P-CREB were markedly reduced by radiation (P < 0.05), but this reduction was attenuated by the chronic forced swimming stress. Conclusion: The chronic forced swimming stress could improve whole brain radiation induced cognitive dysfunction by up-regulating the expressions of BDNF and its downstream signal molecules of P-ERK and P-CREB in hippocampus. (authors)

  7. Modeling of chronic radiation-induced cystitis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette M.M. Zwaans, PhD

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: We developed an RC model that mimics the human pathology and functional changes. Furthermore, radiation exposure attenuates the urothelial integrity long-term, allowing for potential continuous irritability of the bladder wall from exposure to urine. Future studies will focus on the underlying molecular changes associated with this condition and investigate novel treatment strategies.

  8. Gametogenesis disturbances in fish at chronic influence of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petukhov, V.B; Petrikov, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    The results of histological analysis of fish oocytes under chronic radionuclide environment contamination after Chernobyl accident are presented. The oocyte degenerative alterations (oocyte resorption, changes of oocyte asynchronous growth character, changes of oocyte envelope structure) in the investigated fish (perch, roach, bream as the dominant species) from the water reservoirs under different radionuclide contamination level (Pripyat river, Smerzhov lake) were identified. It was shown that the alterations are bound up with the radionuclide concentration in fish tissue and organs

  9. Pathophysiology of chronic exposure to radiation of the organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.; Nothdurft, W.

    1985-01-01

    Exemplified by chronic irradiation of dogs, it could be shown that haemocytogenesis is maintained. There are some signs in the blood picture indicating increased cell turnover through increased formation in the bone marrow. Readjustment to increased blood cell production levels is accompagnied by changes in humoral regulation factors. Concerning the issue of the pathogenesis of late sequelae, special attention should be given to the miro-ecology of the stem-cell storage tissue. (DG) [de

  10. Effect of chronic radiation on rape genotype formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, A.; Hannich, K.; Cerny, J.; Vyvadilova, M.

    1975-01-01

    The F 1 generation of hybrid plants of the Canadian erucic acid-free rape cross-bred with some European winter rape varieties with a high content of erucic acid were chronically irradiated in a gamma-field with doses ranging from 5978 to 329 R er vegetation. In segregating F 2 generations, the irradiation significantly increased the proportion of winter genotypes; a matroclinous influence on the developmental characteristics of plants occurred in irradiated segregating F 2 hybrid populations. As against spring rape, winter rape varieties used as the maternal form during hybridization caused a statistically significant increase in the frequency of winter genotypes. The segregation of half-winter forms in irradiated segregating hybrid populations of the F 2 generation proved the incomplete dominance of the spring habit of oil rape. Chronic irradiation significantly increased erucic-free (0 - 10% of erucic acid) and low-erucic (10 - 20% of erucic acid) genotype frequencies in segregating F 2 generations. Chronic irradiation of the hybrid plants of erucic-free spring rapes and erucic winter rapes with doses ranging from 5978 to 329 R per vegetation, together with the temperature screening of winter forms and with the determination of the fatty acid content, may be considered as an effective method of creating non-erucic and low-erucic winter forms of oil rape. (author)

  11. Genomic instability in normal human fibroblasts for chronically low-dose radiation in heavy-ion radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Fujitaka, Kazunobu; Ishizaki, Kanji; Hayashi, Hiroko; Yamane, Y.; Nakamura, H.

    2003-01-01

    We have been studying genomic instability of biological effects in normal human fibroblasts exposed to chronically low-dose radiation in heavy-ion radiation field. Cells were cultured in a CO 2 incubator, which was placed in the irradiation room for biological study of heavy ions in the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) and irradiated with scattered radiations produced with heavy-ion beams throughout the life span of the cell population. Genomic instability in cellular responses was examined to measure either cell killing or mutation induction in low-dose accumulated cell populations after exposing to X-ray challenging doses. The results showed that there was no enhanced effect on cell killing between the low-dose accumulated and non-irradiated cell populations after exposing to defined challenging doses of 200 kV X rays. On the contrary, the mutation frequency, which 2 was measured as the induction of a 6-thioguanine resistant clone focused on hprt locus, of the low-dose accumulated cell population was much higher than that of non-irradiated cell population. The results suggested that genomic instability was induced in mutagenesis by the chronic low-dose irradiations in heavy-ion radiation field. (author)

  12. Relationship between kidney burden and radiation dose from chronic ingestion of U: Implications for radiation standards for the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    Metabolic models for U in adults recommended by Wrenn et al. (1985) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1979a) were used to study the relationship between kidney burden and radiation dose from chronic ingestion of soluble 238U or natural U and whether current radiation standards for the public provide adequate protection against chemical toxicity from U in the kidney. We assumed that the threshold concentration for chemical toxicity is 1 microgram of U g-1 of kidney and that a safety factor of 10 should be applied in limiting kidney burdens for maximally exposed individuals in the general public. We found that a limit on annual effective dose equivalent of 1 mSv (0.1 rem) for chronic exposures of the public from all sources, as recommended by the ICRP (1985) and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP 1987), corresponds to concentrations of U in the kidney from chronic ingestion that exceed the assumed threshold for chemical toxicity of 1 microgram g-1 only for 238U using the metabolic model of the ICRP (1979a). However, using either metabolic model (ICRP 1979a; Wrenn et al. 1985), the predicted concentrations of U in the kidney exceeded the limit of 0.1 microgram g-1, based on the assumed safety factor for protection of the public, for both 238U and natural U. From these results, we concluded that chemical toxicity should be considered in developing health protection standards for the public for ingestion of soluble 238U or natural U. Environmental radiation standards for certain practices established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (EPA 1987a, 1987b, 1987c, 1987d; NRC 1988a) are consistent with a limit on annual effective dose equivalent of 0.25 mSv (25 mrem) per practice. If the metabolic model of Wrenn et al. 27 references

  13. Highly Integrated MEMS-ASIC Sensing System for Intracorporeal Physiological Condition Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ning; Wang, Chao; Liu, Cunxiu; Sun, Jianhai

    2018-01-02

    In this paper, a highly monolithic-integrated multi-modality sensor is proposed for intracorporeal monitoring. The single-chip sensor consists of a solid-state based temperature sensor, a capacitive based pressure sensor, and an electrochemical oxygen sensor with their respective interface application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs). The solid-state-based temperature sensor and the interface ASICs were first designed and fabricated based on a 0.18-μm 1.8-V CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) process. The oxygen sensor and pressure sensor were fabricated by the standard CMOS process and subsequent CMOS-compatible MEMS (micro-electromechanical systems) post-processing. The multi-sensor single chip was completely sealed by the nafion, parylene, and PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) layers for biocompatibility study. The size of the compact sensor chip is only 3.65 mm × 1.65 mm × 0.72 mm. The functionality, stability, and sensitivity of the multi-functional sensor was tested ex vivo. Cytotoxicity assessment was performed to verify that the bio-compatibility of the device is conforming to the ISO 10993-5:2009 standards. The measured sensitivities of the sensors for the temperature, pressure, and oxygen concentration are 10.2 mV/°C, 5.58 mV/kPa, and 20 mV·L/mg, respectively. The measurement results show that the proposed multi-sensor single chip is suitable to sense the temperature, pressure, and oxygen concentration of human tissues for intracorporeal physiological condition monitoring.

  14. Anastomotic leak rate and outcome for laparoscopic intra-corporeal stapled anastomosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goriainov Vitali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims :A prospective clinical audit of all patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery with the intention of primary colonic left-sided intracorporeal stapled anastomosis to identify the rate of anastomotic leaks on an intention to treat basis with or without defunctioning stoma. Materials and Methods : All patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery resulting in left-sided stapled anastomosis were included with no selection criteria applied. All operations were conducted by the same surgical team and the same preparation and intraoperative methods were used. The factors analyzed for this audit were patient demographics (age and sex, indication for operation, procedure performed, height of anastomosis, leak rate and the outcome, inpatient stay, mortality, rate of defunctioning stomas, and rate of conversion to open procedure. Results for anastomotic leakage were compared with known results from the Wessex Colorectal Audit for open colorectal surgery. Results : A total of 69 patients (43 females, 26 males; median age 69 years, range 19 - 86 years underwent colonic procedures with left-sided intracorporeal stapled anastomoses. Of these, 14 patients underwent reversal of Hartmann′s, 42 - Anterior Resection, 11 - Sigmoid Colectomy, 2 - Left Hemicolectomy. Excluding reversals of Hartmann′s, 29 operations were performed for malignant and 26 for benign disease. Five patients were defunctioned, and 3 were subsequently reversed. The median height of anastomosis was 12 cm, range 4 - 18 cm from anal verge as measured either intra-operatively, or by rigid sigmoidoscopy post-operatively. Four cases were converted to open surgery. There was 1 post-operative death within 30 days. There was 1 anastomotic leak (the patient that died, and 1 patient developed a colo-vesical fistula. Median post-operative stay was 7 days, range 2-19. Conclusion : This clinical audit confirms that the anastomotic leak rate for left-sided colorectal stapled anastomosis is no

  15. Chronic myeloid leukemia and its induction by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozubek, S.; Lukasova, E.; Kozubek, M.; Bartova, E.; Skalnikova, M.; Kroha, V.

    1998-01-01

    Physical distance can play an important role in the process leading to the translocations that are responsible for oncogenic transformation of cells. Thus, e.g., one of the reasons of a high incidence of ABL/BCR fusion may be the physical closeness of ABL and BCR genes in cells. The average distance of ABL-BCR genes in interphase lymphocytes is only 24% of the nuclear radius; after stimulation, this distance increases to 35%. The mean value for randomly distributed genes in a sphere is 43%. This means that the mutual distance of the critical genes is largely smaller than the random distance. The distance between chromosomes 9 and 22 in prometaphase plates (rosettes) of human fibroblasts was also investigated. In many prometaphase rosettes, each copy of chromosome 9 was located near a copy of chromosome 22 and the pairs were located on opposite sides of the plate. Thus both in the interphase and in mitosis, the distance between ABL and BCR genes, located in chromosomes 9 and 22, is substantially shorter than the random value. This contributes to the observed incidence of leukemia. The positions of ABL and BCR genes in irradiated and stimulated lymphocytes are shifted to the centre of the nucleus. They are closer to each other, and also the distances between heterologous ABL and BCR genes are shorter. In 15% of the cell nuclei irradiated with gamma rays (5 Gy), the volume in which the genes appear is 6 times smaller than in control nuclei. Hence, the probability of interaction between ABL and CBR genes increases 6 2 x 0.15 = 5.4 times. Thus, radiation increases substantially the probability of induction of leukemia not only through DNA damage but also due to changes in the chromatin structure in irradiated cells, which concentrates the critical genes in a relatively small volume

  16. A case of chronic progressive radiation myelopathy treated with long-time corticosteroid administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Higashino, Takanori; Obayashi, Kayoko; Takada, Yoshiki [Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi (Japan); Hishikawa, Yoshio

    1998-05-01

    This is a report of one patient who developed chronic progressive radiation myelopathy at a gap of two portals 31 months after 40 Gy irradiation. He presented an unusual clinical course with over 5 years and 6 months administration of oral corticosteroid, very slow progression and long-lasting presentation of Gd-DTPA enhanced area in the suffered cord by MRI. It is suggested that corticosteroid administration from initial onset for a long period may change the natural course of radiation myelopathy, that is, may delay progress of it. (author)

  17. Microbial cells can cooperate to resist high-level chronic ionizing radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Shuryak, Igor; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Tkavc, Rok; Grichenko, Olga; Klimenkova, Polina; Volpe, Robert P.; Daly, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding chronic ionizing radiation (CIR) effects is of utmost importance to protecting human health and the environment. Diverse bacteria and fungi inhabiting extremely radioactive waste and disaster sites (e.g. Hanford, Chernobyl, Fukushima) represent new targets of CIR research. We show that many microorganisms can grow under intense gamma-CIR dose rates of 13–126 Gy/h, with fungi identified as a particularly CIR-resistant group of eukaryotes: among 145 phylogenetically diverse strain...

  18. Long-term outcome after extensive intestinal resection for chronic radiation enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiot, Aurelien; Joly, Francisca; Lefevre, Jérémie H; Corcos, Olivier; Bretagnol, Frederic; Bouhnik, Yoram; Panis, Yves; Messing, Bernard

    2013-02-01

    Management of chronic radiation enteritis is often controversial, particularly due to the risk of short bowel syndrome. One hundred and seven chronic radiation enteritis patients with short bowel syndrome were studied retrospectively between 1980 and 2009. Survival and home parenteral nutrition dependence rates were evaluated with univariate and multivariate analysis. The survival probabilities were 93%, 67% and 44.5% at 1, 5 and 10 years, respectively. On multivariate analysis, survival was significantly decreased with residual neoplastic disease (HR=0.21 [0.11-0.38], p3 (HR=0.38 [0.20-0.73], p=0.004) and an age of chronic radiation enteritis diagnosis >60 years (HR=0.45 [0.22-0.89], p=0.02). The actuarial home parenteral nutrition dependence probabilities were 66%, 55% and 43% at 1, 2 and 3 years, respectively. On multivariate analysis, this dependence was significantly decreased when there was a residual small bowel length >100 cm (HR=0.35 [0.18-0.68], p=0.002), adaptive hyperphagia (HR=0.39 [0.17-0.87], p=0.02) and the absence of a definitive stoma (HR=0.48 [0.27-0.84], p=0.01). The survival of patients with diffuse chronic radiation enteritis after extensive intestinal resection was good and was mainly influenced by underlying comorbidities. Almost two-thirds of patients were able to be weaned off home parenteral nutrition. Copyright © 2012 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Chronic Radiation Syndrome Among the Population of the Techa River Basin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akleyev, V

    2015-01-01

    Presented in the article is the analysis of the cases of the chronic radiation syndrome (CRS) diagnosed among members of the population exposed for multiple years to radiation due to radioactive contamination of the Techa River. The results of the more than 60-year period of observations have allowed us to assess not only the clinical manifestations of CRS during the period of its formation, but also the efficiency of the restoration processes going on in the human body after chronic radiation exposure, as well as its remote effects. The article discusses the problems of CRS diagnostics and especially its course in the cases of a combined (internal and external) radiation exposure when the red bone marrow becomes a critical organ. The analysis of CRS cases in dynamics for the exposed population characterized by a significant heterogeneity in terms of age, the initial health status and other factors modifying the person's radiosensitivity, allows us to regard the initial stage of CRS as a stereotypic dysregulating pathology.

  20. Long-term follow-up observation of patients with chronic radiation sickness due to external irradiation treated with thymopeptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shenyong; Sun Wenji; Zhang Aizhen; Ye Anfang

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To provide the clinical data and prognosis judgement, the authors observed the results and progression of 11 cases of chronic radiation sickness due to external irradiation treated with thymopeptide. Methods: The clinical symptoms, hematopoiesis, T lymphocyte percentage and chromosome aberration rate were used as the judgement indexes for recovery from the chronic radiation sickness. Results: Thymopeptide treatment greatly improved the neurasthenic syndrome and increased the T lymphocyte percentage (P 0.05), and improvement of neurasthenic syndrome occurred 3.5 years after they left radiation work or diminished the exposure level. 5 to 8 years after, bone marrow hematopoiesis also restored to the normal level. However, the chromosome aberration rate restored to the normal level 10 years after. Conclusion: According to the judgement criteria, the chronic radiation sickness due to external radiation exposure can recover and thymopeptide is a helpful and simple means to treat it

  1. Robotic Assisted Radical Cystoprostatectomy and Intracorporeal Ileal Conduit Urinary Diversion for a Kidney Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Caputo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction and Objectives: Robotic assisted radical cystectomy (RARC is an alternative to open radical cystectomy. As experience is gained with the RARC approach the technique is being applied to more complex surgical cases. We describe here our technique for RARC with intracorporeal ileal conduit urinary diversion for a renal transplant recipient. Materials and Methods: The patient is a 60-year old man with high-grade muscle invasive bladder cancer. He has a history of renal failure due to polycystic kidney disease and received a deceased donor renal transplant in 2008. His hospital course at time of transplant was complicated by low-level BK virus viremia. Interestingly his trans-urethral bladder tumor resection specimen at time of bladder cancer diagnosis stained positive for SV40. His native kidneys were anuric so bilateral laparoscopic nephrectomy was performed in a staged fashion 2 weeks prior to RARC. Our surgical technique utilizes 6 trocars, of note a 12-mm assistant trocar is placed 1 cm superior to the pubic symphysis, and this trocar is solely used to pass a laparoscopic stapler to facilitate the excision of the ileal segment and the stapled enteric anastomosis. Surgical steps include: identification of native ureters bilaterally (removed en bloc with the bladder specimen; identification of the transplanted ureter at the right bladder dome; posterior bladder and prostate dissection along Denonvilliers’ fascia; development of the space of Retzius; ligation and transection of the bladder and prostate vascular bundles; apical prostate dissection and transection of urethra; left pelvic lymphadenectomy; ilium resection for creation of the ileal conduit; stapled enteric anastomosis; ureteroileal anastomosis; maturation of the ileal conduit stoma. Results: The surgery had no intraoperative complications. Operative time was 443 minutes (7.4 hours. Estimated blood loss was 250 cc. Length of hospital stay was 5 days. The patient

  2. Full robot-assisted gastrectomy with intracorporeal robot-sewn anastomosis produces satisfying outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin-Xin; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Yan; Pan, Hua-Feng; Li, Jie-Shou

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of full robot-assisted gastrectomy with intracorporeal robot hand-sewn anastomosis in the treatment of gastric cancer. METHODS: From September 2011 to March 2013, 110 consecutive patients with gastric cancer at the authors’ institution were enrolled for robotic gastrectomies. According to tumor location, total gastrectomy, distal or proximal subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy was fully performed by the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System. All construction, including Roux-en-Y jejunal limb, esophagojejunal, gastroduodenal and gastrojejunal anastomoses were fully carried out by the intracorporeal robot-sewn method. At the end of surgery, the specimen was removed through a 3-4 cm incision at the umbilicus trocar point. The details of the surgical technique are well illustrated. The benefits in terms of surgical and oncologic outcomes are well documented, as well as the failure rate and postoperative complications. RESULTS: From a total of 110 enrolled patients, radical gastrectomy could not be performed in 2 patients due to late stage disease; 1 patient was converted to laparotomy because of uncontrollable hemorrhage, and 1 obese patient was converted due to difficult exposure; 2 patients underwent extra-corporeal anastomosis by minilaparotomy to ensure adequate tumor margin. Robot-sewn anastomoses were successfully performed for 12 proximal, 38 distal and 54 total gastrectomies. The average surgical time was 272.52 ± 53.91 min and the average amount of bleeding was 80.78 ± 32.37 mL. The average number of harvested lymph nodes was 23.1 ± 5.3. All specimens showed adequate surgical margin. With regard to tumor staging, 26, 32 and 46 patients were staged as I, II and III, respectively. The average hospitalization time after surgery was 6.2 d. One patient experienced a duodenal stump anastomotic leak, which was mild and treated conservatively. One patient was readmitted for intra-abdominal infection and was

  3. Ways of pharmacological prophylaxis of stochastic and deterministic effects of chronical radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirillova, E.N.; Muksinova, K.N.; Revina, V.; Smirnov, D.; Sokolnikov, M.; Lukyanova, T.

    1996-01-01

    The prophylactics of late effects of exposure is the actual medico-social problem, because now there are large groups of persons who were exposed during occupational contact and living on territories contaminated by radionuclides. Most probable consequences of external and internal chronic influence of radiation may be the increase of malignant tumour frequency, the development of secondary myelo- and immuno-depressions, the earlier forming of sclerous and destructive processes, and the acceleration of senescence. The role of damages in immune system was not yet understood in pathogenesis of the late effects of radiation, but there are evidences that the decreasing of the immunologic supervision in period of forming the consequences of radiation influence enables to realize the cancerogenic effect of radiation. The purposes of this investigation are to decrease the frequency or to prevent the development of radiation consequences dangerous for health and life by using the method of modification of radiogenic damages in hemopoietic and immune systems by applying the pharmacological preparations with immunomodulating effects. The investigation tasks include: the study of modifying influence of pharmacological substances with different mechanisms of effect: myelopid (immunomodulating, and regulatory), β-carotin, Calendula officinalis (immunomodulating, and antioxidant), lipamid (detoxicating); the separate or complex applications of these substances; and the development of the optimum medico-prophylactic schemes. The advantages of these indicated preparations in comparison with the known (T-activin, thymogen, cytokines, etc.) are the absence of contraindications and the possibility to use per os. (author)

  4. Hybrid NOTES: TEO for transanal total mesorectal excision: intracorporeal resection and anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Aracil, Xavier; Mora-López, Laura; Casalots, Alex; Pericay, Carles; Guerrero, Raul; Navarro-Soto, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for rectal TME achieves better patient recovery, lower morbidity, and shorter hospital stay than open surgery. However, in laparoscopic rectal surgery, the overall conversion rate is nearly 20%. Transanal TME combined with laparoscopy, known as Hybrid NOTES, is a less invasive procedure that provides adequate solutions to some of the limitations of rectal laparoscopy. Transanal TME via TEO with technical variants (intracorporeal resection and anastomosis, TEO review of the anastomosis) attempts to standardize and simplify the procedure. Prospective observational study was used describe and assess the technique in terms of conversion to open surgery, overall morbidity, surgical site infection and hospital stay. The sample comprised consecutive patients diagnosed with rectal tumor less than 10 cm from the anal verge who were candidates for low anterior resection using TME (except T4). Demographic, surgical, postoperative, and pathological variables were analyzed, as well as morbidity rates. From September 2012 to August 2014, 32 patients were included. The conversion rate was 0%. Overall morbidity was 31.3%, SSI rate was 9.4%, and mean hospital stay was 8 days. Oncological radical criteria were achieved with pathological parameters of 94% of complete TME and a median circumferential margin of 13 mm. The introduction of technical variants of TEO for transanal resection can facilitate a procedure that requires extensive experience in transanal and laparoscopic surgery. Studies of sphincter function, quality of life, and long-term oncological outcome are now necessary.

  5. Comparison of Ultrasonic and Pneumatic Intracorporeal Lithotripsy Techniques during Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Karakan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare the effectiveness and safety of ultrasonic and pneumatic lithotripters in the treatment of renal stone disease. Materials and Methods. A total of 227 consecutive percutaneous nephrolithotomy procedures for renal calculi were performed. In 107 patients ultrasonic lithotriptors were used (group I and in 83 patients pneumatic lithotriptors were used (group II. In the remaining 37 patients, stones were managed with both pneumatic and ultrasonic lithotripters. Follow-up studies included intravenous urography (IVU and/or computed tomography (CT. Results. The mean operative time and duration of hospitalization were similar between the groups. In the ultrasonic treatment group, 100 (96.9% patients were stone-free on postoperative day 1 and 5 (4.6% went on to undergo an additional treatment modality, resulting in a total stone-free rate of 97.2%. In the pneumatic lithotripsy group, 68 (81.9% patients were stone-free after the primary procedure on the first day and 15 (18.1% went on to undergo an additional treatment modality, resulting in a stone-free rate of 91.5%. The final stone-free rates at 3 months postoperatively in groups I, II, and III were 97.2%, 91.5%, and 87.9%, respectively (P=0.826. Conclusions. We conclude that both ultrasonic and pneumatic lithotripters are effective and safe for intracorporeal lithotripsy. However, the ultrasonic lithotripter provides higher stone-free rates with similar morbidity compared with pneumatic devices.

  6. Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical cystectomy with complete intracorporeal urinary diversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Sandberg

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Robot-assisted radical cystectomy with intracorporeal urinary diversion (RARC-ICUD has only recently been explored as a viable surgical option for patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer seeking satisfactory oncologic control while benefiting from minimally invasive surgical techniques. Inspired by earlier open and laparoscopic work, initial descriptions of RARC-ICUD were published in 2003, and have since been followed by multiple larger case series which have suggested promising outcomes for our patients. However, the rate of adoption has remained relatively slow when compared to other robot-assisted procedures such as the radical prostatectomy, likely owing to longer operative times, operative complexity, costs, and uncertainty regarding oncologic efficacy. The operative technique for RARC-ICUD has evolved over the past decade and several high-volume centers have shared tips to improve efficiency and make the operation possible for a growing number of urologists. Though there are still questions regarding economic costs, effectiveness, and generalizability of outcomes reported in published data, a growing dataset has brought us ever closer to the answers. Here, we present our current operative technique for RARC-ICUD and discuss the state of the literature so that the urologist may hold an informed discussion with his or her patients.

  7. In vitro analysis of nanotoxicity of metallic nanoparticles in simulated intracorporeal bio-environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Huan; Chen Zhen; Zhang Chengcheng; Zhao Yuliang; Xing Gengmei; Yuan Hui; Chen Chunying; Zhao Feng; Ye Chang; Jia Guang; Wang Xiang

    2005-01-01

    The wildly uses of copper in the various aspects of the life and industry have proved that microsized copper is a substance of very low toxicity. However, the recent experimental results indicate that the acute toxicity of nanosized particles in mice is dramatically different from the microsized particles of copper. The biological toxicity of copper showed increasing feature with the decrease of the particle size. To further study these observations, chemical oxidation-reduction titration analysis was carried out to study the kinetics of nano copper particles in simulated gastric juice. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) (Thermo Elemental X7) was used to detect the content of copper in the organs of mice exposed to a wide range of doses. These in vitro studies of chemical reactivity suggest that the nano-sized copper is extremely reactive in simulated intracorporeal environment. The nano copper particles can be converted into ionic form much easier than micro particles of the identical quantity under the same conditions in vitro. The hydrogen ion consumed by nano-sized copper in stomach is dramatically quicker than by micro copper particles. At the presentation, we will discuss the analyzed results for the different distribution of nanoparticles, the different mortality in nano copper treated animal groups between male and female mice, and show evidences demonstrating that the huge surface area as well the ultrahigh chemical reactivity would be the main causes dominating the biological activity/toxicity of metallic nanoparticles in vivo.

  8. Effects of chronic exposure to acidic environment on the response of tumor cells to radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So-Ra; Kim, Eun-Hee

    2016-09-01

    The influence of short-term exposure to an acidic environment on the radiosensitivity of tumor cells has been extensively explored, but the implication of chronic exposure to an acidic environment for the response of tumor cells to radiation has not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the effects of chronic pre- and post-irradiation exposure of tumor cells to an acidic environment on the radiation-induced clonogenic death. Rat gliosarcoma cells were used throughout the in vitro study. Cells were exposed to pH 6.6 medium for varying durations of up to 4 days before and after X-irradiation. Cell viability, apoptosis, clonogenic cell death and cell cycle distribution were observed. Incubation of tumor cells in pH 6.6 medium for 2 or 4 days extended cell cycle, decreased cell viability, and induced apoptotic and clonogenic cell death. The radiation-induced clonogenic death was increased by 2- or 4-day pre-irradiation exposure of tumor cells to pH 6.6 medium, whereas it was reduced by 4-day post-irradiation exposure to an acidic medium. Prolonged exposure to an acidic environment enhanced the sensitivity of tumor cells to subsequent X-irradiation. However, the radiosensitization by pre-irradiation exposure was almost completely nullified by prolonged post-irradiation exposure to an acidic environment.

  9. Gastrointestinal function in chronic radiation enteritis -effects of loperamide-N-oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeoh, E.K.; Horowitz, M.; Russo, A.; Muecke, T.; Chatterton, B.E.; Robb, T.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of loperamide-N-oxide, a new peripheral opiate agonist precursor, on gastrointestinal function were evaluated in 18 patients with diarrhoea caused by radiation enteritis. Each patient was given loperamide-N-oxide and placebo for 14 days, separated by a washout period of 14 days. Gastrointestinal symptoms; absorption of bile acid, vitamin B12, lactose, and fat; gastric emptying; small intestinal and whole gut transit; and intestinal permeability were measured during placebo and loperamide-N-oxide phases. Data were compared with those obtained in 18 normal subjects. In the patient, in addition to an increased frequency of bowel actions there was reduced bile acid absorption, higher prevalence of lactose malabsorption associated with a reduced dietary intake of dairy products and faster small intestinal and whole gut transit when compared with the normal subjects. There was no significant difference in gastric emptying between the two groups. Treatment with loperamide-N-oxide was associated with a reduced frequency of bowel actions, slower small intestinal and total gut transit, more rapid gastric emptying improved absorption of bile acid and increased permeability to 51 Cr EDTA. These observations indicate that: (1) diarrhoea caused by chronic radiation enteritis is associated with more rapid intestinal transit and a high prevalence of bile acid and lactose malabsorption, and (2) loperamide-N-oxide slows small intestinal transit, increases bile acid absorption, and is effective in the treatment of diarrhoea associated with chronic radiation enteritis. (Author)

  10. Changes in lymphocytes size under chronic exposure of the organism to factors of radiation and chemical origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    Results of the analysis of changes in peripheral blood lymphocytes size under chronic exposure to external gamma radiation and pesticide chlorofoz in combination and separately are presented. It has been found out that under exposure of animals to radiation or the pesticide it is small and big lymphocytes respectively which most significantly suffer quantitatively. Under the joint radiational-chemical exposure of the organism the number of both types of cells is reduced simultaneously

  11. Applications of acoustic radiation force impulse quantification in chronic kidney disease: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liang [Dept. of Ultrasound, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2016-08-15

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an emerging technique with great promise in the field of elastography. Previous studies have validated ARFI quantification as a method of estimating fibrosis in chronic liver disease. Similarly, fibrosis is the principal process underlying the progression of chronic kidney disease, which is the major cause of renal failure. However, the quantification of tissue stiffness using ARFI imaging is more complex in the kidney than in the liver. Moreover, not all previous studies are comparable because they employed different procedures. Therefore, subsequent studies are warranted, both in animal models and in clinical patients, in order to better understand the histopathological mechanisms associated with renal elasticity and to further improve this imaging method by developing a standardized guidelines for its implementation.

  12. Applications of acoustic radiation force impulse quantification in chronic kidney disease: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an emerging technique with great promise in the field of elastography. Previous studies have validated ARFI quantification as a method of estimating fibrosis in chronic liver disease. Similarly, fibrosis is the principal process underlying the progression of chronic kidney disease, which is the major cause of renal failure. However, the quantification of tissue stiffness using ARFI imaging is more complex in the kidney than in the liver. Moreover, not all previous studies are comparable because they employed different procedures. Therefore, subsequent studies are warranted, both in animal models and in clinical patients, in order to better understand the histopathological mechanisms associated with renal elasticity and to further improve this imaging method by developing a standardized guidelines for its implementation

  13. Genomic instability in normal human fibroblasts for chronically low-dose radiation in heavy-ion radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Uchihori, Yukio; Ishizaki, Kanji; Hayashi, Hiroko; Yamane, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Hideaki

    2004-01-01

    We have been studying genomic instability of biological effects in normal human fibroblasts exposed to chronic low-dose radiation in heavy-ion radiation field. This year we try to irradiate cells with low-density carbon ions using faint beams. Genomic instability in cellular responses was examined to measure either cell killing or mutation induction in low-dose accumulated cell populations after exposing to X-ray challenging doses. The results showed that there was no enhanced effect on cell killing between the low-dose pretreated and unirradiated cell populations with carbon-ion faint beams after exposing to defined challenging doses of 200 kV X rays. On the other hand, the frequency of mutation induction, which was measured as the induction of a 6-thioguanine resistant clone focused on hprt locus, of the low-dose pretreated cell population was much higher than that of unirradiated cell population. The results suggested that genomic instability was induced in mutagenesis by the pretreatment of low-density carbon ions. (author)

  14. Radiation exposure from medical imaging in patients with chronic and recurrent conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Evan G; Haramati, Linda B; Bellin, Eran; Ashton, Lori; Mitsopoulos, Gus; Schoenfeld, Alan; Amis, E Stephen

    2010-05-01

    Advances in medical imaging have been associated with increased utilization and increased radiation exposure, especially for patients with chronic and recurrent conditions. The authors estimated the cumulative radiation doses from medical imaging for specific cohorts with chronic and recurrent conditions. All patients diagnosed with hydrocephalus (n = 1,711), pulmonary thromboembolic disease (n = 3,220), renal colic (n = 5,855), and cardiac disease (n = 11,072) from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2005, were retrospectively identified. Each imaging examination that used ionizing radiation from 2000 to 2008 was incorporated into an estimate of total effective dose and organ-specific doses. Patients with high levels of radiation exposure after 3 years (total effective dose > 50 mSv; dose to the ocular lens > 150 mSv) were identified. The mean estimated effective doses for the surviving diagnostic cohorts after 3 years were 12.3 mSv for patients with hydrocephalus, 21.7 mSv for those with pulmonary thromboembolic disease, 18.7 mSv for those with renal colic, and 14.0 mSv for those with cardiac disease. Among patients with hydrocephalus, 26.3% (339 of 1,291) had radiation doses > 150 mSv to the ocular lens within 3 years. In all cohorts, the proportion of patients with total effective doses > 50 mSv within 3 years was significantly higher for those diagnosed in 2004 and 2005 than for those diagnosed in 2000 and 2001. Patients with hydrocephalus, pulmonary thromboembolic disease, renal colic, and cardiac disease received radiation exposures that may put them at increased risk for cancer. Moreover, the proportion who received estimated total effective doses > 50 mSv within 3 years was significantly higher for those diagnosed most recently. It is the responsibility of institutions and physicians to critically evaluate their infrastructures, diagnostic strategies, and imaging techniques for each individual patient, with an eye toward minimizing cumulative medical

  15. The health status of grandchildren of subjects occupationally exposed to chronic radiation. Communication 2. Morphofunctional parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrushkina, N.P.; Musatkova, O.B.

    1996-01-01

    The study was aimed at investigation of the parameters of physical development and specific features in the development of psychomotor habits and peripheral blood parameters in children aged 0 to 7 grandchildren of exposed individuals. A dynamic follow-up of physical and psychomotor development, as well as regular check-ups of peripheral blood were carried out in 877 grandchildren of test subjects occupationally exposed to chronic radiation before conception. Multifactorial analysis did not show a correlation between the deviations in the physical development of children in the studied cohort and exposure of their grandparents and/or parents. Factors other than radiation (poor health status of mother, gestosis) did influence the studied parameters. The mean levels of hemoglobin, red cells, platelets, and leukocytes in the test group were virtually the same as in controls and coincided with published data [ru

  16. Effects of combined exposure of F344 rats to radiation and chronically inhaled cigarette smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, G.L.; Nikula, K.J.; Barr, E.B.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear workers may be exposed to radiation in various forms, such as low-LET γ-irradiation or α-irradiation from inhaled 239 PuO 2 particles. These workers may then have increased risk for lung cancer compared to the general population. Of additional concern is the possibility that interactions between radiation and other carcinogens may increase the risk of cancer induction, compared to the risks from either type of agent alone. An important and common lung carcinogen is cigarette smoke. The purpose of this project is to better determine the combined effects of chronically inhaled cigarette smoke and either inhaled 239 PuO 2 or external, thoracic X-irradiation on the induction of lung cancer in rats. Histologic and dosimetric evaluations of rats in the CS + 239 PuO 2 study continue, and the study of CS + X rays is beginning

  17. Health status of grandchildren of subjects occupationally exposed to chronic radiation. Communication 3. Disease incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrushkina, N.P.; Musatkova, O.B.

    1996-01-01

    The morbidity of 1557 grandchildren of subjects occupationally exposed to chronic radiation were analyzed. Three groups were singled out. Group 1 consisted of children whose grandfathers were exposed, group 2 of children grandmothers were exposed and group 3 of children whose both grandparent were exposed. Total morbidity level and morbidity structure for 13 classes of diseases and 60 nosological entities was assessed. The study showed that disease incidence in general, structure by disease and individual nosological entities, the share of frequently falling ill children, and health index in the test group corresponded to those in controls. Reliable differences were observed only for respiratory diseases, at the expense of acute respiratory diseases, which were frequent during the second-third years of life in children whose both grandparents were occupationally exposed to radiation [ru

  18. Effects of combined exposure of F344 rats to radiation and chronically inhaled cigarette smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, G.L.; Nikula, K.J.; Barr, E.B. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Nuclear workers may be exposed to radiation in various forms, such as low-LET {gamma}-irradiation or {alpha}-irradiation from inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} particles. These workers may then have increased risk for lung cancer compared to the general population. Of additional concern is the possibility that interactions between radiation and other carcinogens may increase the risk of cancer induction, compared to the risks from either type of agent alone. An important and common lung carcinogen is cigarette smoke. The purpose of this project is to better determine the combined effects of chronically inhaled cigarette smoke and either inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} or external, thoracic X-irradiation on the induction of lung cancer in rats. Histologic and dosimetric evaluations of rats in the CS + {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} study continue, and the study of CS + X rays is beginning.

  19. Alteration of cytokine profiles in mice exposed to chronic low-dose ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Suk Chul [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung-Mi [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yu Mi [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwanghee [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Cha Soon; Yang, Kwang Hee; Jin, Young-Woo [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chong Soon [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 612-030 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Sun, E-mail: hskimdvm@khnp.co.kr [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-09

    While a high-dose of ionizing radiation is generally harmful and causes damage to living organisms, a low-dose of radiation has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of animal models. To understand the basis for the effect of low-dose radiation in vivo, we examined the cellular and immunological changes evoked in mice exposed to low-dose radiation at very low (0.7 mGy/h) and low (3.95 mGy/h) dose rate for the total dose of 0.2 and 2 Gy, respectively. Mice exposed to low-dose radiation, either at very low- or low-dose rate, demonstrated normal range of body weight and complete blood counts. Likewise, the number and percentage of peripheral lymphocyte populations, CD4{sup +} T, CD8{sup +} T, B, or NK cells, stayed unchanged following irradiation. Nonetheless, the sera from these mice exhibited elevated levels of IL-3, IL-4, leptin, MCP-1, MCP-5, MIP-1{alpha}, thrombopoietin, and VEGF along with slight reduction of IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17, and IFN-{gamma}. This pattern of cytokine release suggests the stimulation of innate immunity facilitating myeloid differentiation and activation while suppressing pro-inflammatory responses and promoting differentiation of naive T cells into T-helper 2, not T-helper 1, types. Collectively, our data highlight the subtle changes of cytokine milieu by chronic low-dose {gamma}-radiation, which may be associated with the functional benefits observed in various experimental models.

  20. The use of free musculocutaneous flaps to cover chronic radiation ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujiguchi, Kounosuke; Tajima, Sadao; Tanaka, Yoshio; Hira, Michiya; Imai, Keisuke; Fukae, Eiichi; Omiya, Yuka.

    1992-01-01

    Three patients with chronic radiation ulcer treated with free musculocutaneous flap transfer are described. The first patient was a 66-year-old woman who developed sacral ulcer 7 years after radiation combined with surgery for uterine cancer. After debridement of this ulcer, interpositional vein grafts 30 cm in length was used to reconstruct an 'extended' latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap. The second patient was a 62-year-old woman. She developed ulcer on her chest 15 years after postoperative irradiation for breast cancer. Radiation damage extended to the myocardium and pulmonary parenchyma. After careful debridement, reconstruction was performed by using the free rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. The last patient was a 72-year-old woman. Ulcer of the right axilla developed 19 years after postoperative irradiation for breast cancer. Reconstruction was performed by using a free rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. In these patients in whom radiation-damaged tissue was not completely excised, favorable results could be attained by using the transfer of the free musculocutaneous flaps. (N.K.)

  1. Acoustic radiation force impulse shear wave elastography (ARFI) of acute and chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goertz, Ruediger S., E-mail: ruediger.goertz@uk-erlangen.de; Schuderer, Johanna, E-mail: Johanna@schuderer-floss.de; Strobel, Deike, E-mail: deike.strobel@uk-erlangen.de; Pfeifer, Lukas, E-mail: Lukas.Pfeifer@uk-erlangen.de; Neurath, Markus F., E-mail: Markus.Neurath@uk-erlangen.de; Wildner, Dane, E-mail: Dane.Wildner@uk-erlangen.de

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • ARFI elastography of the pancreas is feasible. • Shear wave velocities in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis or carcinoma are higher than those occurring in normal tissue. • ARFI values considerable overlap between different pathologies. - Abstract: Introduction: Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography evaluates tissue stiffness non-invasively and has rarely been applied to pancreas examinations so far. In a prospective and retrospective analysis, ARFI shear wave velocities of healthy parenchyma, pancreatic lipomatosis, acute and chronic pancreatitis, adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the pancreas were evaluated and compared. Material and methods: In 95 patients ARFI elastography of the pancreatic head, and also of the tail for a specific group, was analysed retrospectively. Additionally, prospectively in 100 patients ARFI was performed in the head and tail of the pancreas. Results: A total of 195 patients were included in the study. Healthy parenchyma (n = 21) and lipomatosis (n = 30) showed similar shear wave velocities of about 1.3 m/s. Acute pancreatitis (n = 35), chronic pancreatitis (n = 53) and adenocarcinoma (n = 52) showed consecutively increasing ARFI values, respectively. NET (n = 4) revealed the highest shear wave velocities amounting to 3.62 m/s. ARFI elastography showed relevant differences between acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis or adenocarcinoma. With a cut-off value of 1.74 m/s for the diagnosis of a malignant disease the sensitivity was 91.1% whereas the specificity amounted to 60.4%. Conclusion: ARFI shear wave velocities present differences in various pathologies of the pancreas. Acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as neoplastic lesions show high ARFI values. Very high elasticity values may indicate malignant disease of the pancreas. However, there is a considerable overlap between the entities.

  2. Population sensitivities of animals to chronic ionizing radiation-model predictions from mice to elephant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazykina, Tatiana G

    2018-02-01

    Model predictions of population response to chronic ionizing radiation (endpoint 'morbidity') were made for 11 species of warm-blooded animals, differing in body mass and lifespan - from mice to elephant. Predictions were made also for 3 bird species (duck, pigeon, and house sparrow). Calculations were based on analytical solutions of the mathematical model, simulating a population response to low-LET ionizing radiation in an ecosystem with a limiting resource (Sazykina, Kryshev, 2016). Model parameters for different species were taken from biological and radioecological databases; allometric relationships were employed for estimating some parameter values. As a threshold of decreased health status in exposed populations ('health threshold'), a 10% reduction in self-repairing capacity of organisms was suggested, associated with a decline in ability to sustain environmental stresses. Results of the modeling demonstrate a general increase of population vulnerability to ionizing radiation in animal species of larger size and longevity. Populations of small widespread species (mice, house sparrow; body mass 20-50 g), which are characterized by intensive metabolism and short lifespan, have calculated 'health thresholds' at dose rates about 6.5-7.5 mGy day -1 . Widespread animals with body mass 200-500 g (rat, common pigeon) - demonstrate 'health threshold' values at 4-5 mGy day -1 . For populations of animals with body mass 2-5 kg (rabbit, fox, raccoon), the indicators of 10% health decrease are in the range 2-3.4 mGy day -1 . For animals with body mass 40-100 kg (wolf, sheep, wild boar), thresholds are within 0.5-0.8 mGy day -1 ; for herbivorous animals with body mass 200-300 kg (deer, horse) - 0.5-0.6 mGy day -1 . The lowest health threshold was estimated for elephant (body mass around 5000 kg) - 0.1 mGy day -1 . According to the model results, the differences in population sensitivities of warm-blooded animal species to ionizing radiation are generally

  3. Central blood circulation in children at chronic combined low dose radiation and chemical action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arinchin, A.N.

    2000-01-01

    The state of central blood circulation and its hormonal regulation were studied in 1465 children living permanently under chronic low dose radiation and chemical action. Basic group consisted of 1093 children (579 boys and 514 girls) . 372 children (115 boys and 227 girls permanently living on 'clean' areas) were investigated in control group. Average age was 10,8 years old in basic group and 10,4 years old in the control group. Such parameters as arterial pressure, level of lead in blood and urine, adrenaline, noradrenaline and dophamine content in urine, thyroxine, iodothyronine, prostaglandins and cyclic AMP content in the blood serum has been controlled. Hypotensive states were determined to prevail in children living permanently under chronic low dose radiation and chemical action. The main pathogenic mechanism of this defeat is consider to be a reduction of the sympathoadrenal system activity combined with a decreasing of the thyroid system activity and of cyclic AMP level as well as predominance of prostaglandin depressive activity

  4. Reassessment of radiation therapy for the management of lung cancer in patients with chronic pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, N.; Weinstein, H.

    1983-01-01

    Surgery has remained the mainstay of definitive treatment for lung cancer. Radiation therapy has been advocated when the location of the lung cancer precludes resection or the severity or the cardiopulmonary impairment indicates that the patient cannot withstand the proposed resection. Extended field irradiation has been shown to improve tumor control and survival. However, in patients with chronic pulmonary disease, extended field irradiation may exacerbate pulmonary insufficiency and compromise survival. Between 1975 and 1980, 29 patients with lung cancer and chronic pulmonary disease were treated by involved field irradiation (IFR). This was compared to the experience of 41 patients who had been treated prior to 1975 by extended field irradiation (EFR). The frequency of subjective response and tumor control were comparable in each group. One patient treated by IFR developed a marginal recurrence. Radiation pneumonitis was observed in 7/41 (17%) EFR patients versus 2/29 (7%) IFR. Treatment related death occurred in 2/41 (5%) EFR versus 1/29 (3.3%) IFR. One year disease free survival was 8/41 (19%) EFR versus 12/29 (41%) IFR. Two of 14 (14%) IFR patients at risk five years are alive without evidence of disease

  5. Performance analysis of a miniature turbine generator for intracorporeal energy harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfenniger, Alois; Vogel, Rolf; Koch, Volker M; Jonsson, Magnus

    2014-05-01

    Replacement intervals of implantable medical devices are commonly dictated by battery life. Therefore, intracorporeal energy harvesting has the potential to reduce the number of surgical interventions by extending the life cycle of active devices. Given the accumulated experience with intravascular devices such as stents, heart valves, and cardiac assist devices, the idea to harvest a small fraction of the hydraulic energy available in the cardiovascular circulation is revisited. The aim of this article is to explore the technical feasibility of harvesting 1 mW electric power using a miniature hydrodynamic turbine powered by about 1% of the cardiac output flow in a peripheral artery. To this end, numerical modelling of the fluid mechanics and experimental verification of the overall performance of a 1:1 scale friction turbine are performed in vitro. The numerical flow model is validated for a range of turbine configurations and flow conditions (up to 250 mL/min) in terms of hydromechanic efficiency; up to 15% could be achieved with the nonoptimized configurations of the study. Although this article does not entail the clinical feasibility of intravascular turbines in terms of hemocompatibility and impact on the circulatory system, the numerical model does provide first estimates of the mechanical shear forces relevant to blood trauma and platelet activation. It is concluded that the time-integrated shear stress exposure is significantly lower than in cardiac assist devices due to lower flow velocities and predominantly laminar flow. Copyright © 2014 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Expression of blood serum proteins and lymphocyte differentiation clusters after chronic occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybkina, Valentina L.; Azizova, Tamara V.; Adamova, Galina V.; Teplyakova, Olga V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Bannikova, Maria V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Scherthan, Harry; Meineke, Viktor; Doerr, Harald [University of Ulm, Bundeswehr Institute of Radiobiology, Munich (Germany); Zurochka, Alexander V. [Immunology Institute, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    This study aimed to assess effects of chronic occupational exposure on immune status in Mayak workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). The study cohort consists of 77 workers occupationally exposed to external gamma-rays at total dose from 0.5 to 3.0 Gy (14 individuals) and workers with combined exposure (external gamma-rays at total dose range 0.7-5.1 Gy and internal alpha-radiation from incorporated plutonium with a body burden of 0.3-16.4 kBq). The control group consists of 43 age- and sex-matched individuals who never were exposed to IR, never involved in any cleanup operations following radiation accidents and never resided at contaminated areas. Enzyme-linked immunoassay and flow cytometry were used to determine the relative concentration of lymphocytes and proteins. The concentrations of T-lymphocytes, interleukin-8 and immunoglobulins G were decreased in external gamma-exposed workers relative to control. Relative concentrations of NKT-lymphocytes, concentrations of transforming growth factor-β, interferon gamma, immunoglobulins A, immunoglobulins M and matrix proteinase-9 were higher in this group as compared with control. Relative concentrations of T-lymphocytes and concentration of interleukin-8 were decreased, while both the relative and absolute concentration of natural killers, concentration of immunoglobulins A and M and matrix proteinase-9 were increased in workers with combined exposure as compared to control. An inverse linear relation was revealed between absolute concentration of T-lymphocytes, relative and absolute concentration of T-helpers cells, concentration of interferon gamma and total absorbed dose from external gamma-rays in exposed workers. For workers with incorporated plutonium, there was an inverse linear relation of absolute concentration of T-helpers as well as direct linear relation of relative concentration of NKT-lymphocytes to total absorbed red bone marrow dose from internal alpha-radiation. In all, chronic

  7. Expression of blood serum proteins and lymphocyte differentiation clusters after chronic occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybkina, Valentina L.; Azizova, Tamara V.; Adamova, Galina V.; Teplyakova, Olga V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Bannikova, Maria V.; Scherthan, Harry; Meineke, Viktor; Doerr, Harald; Zurochka, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess effects of chronic occupational exposure on immune status in Mayak workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). The study cohort consists of 77 workers occupationally exposed to external gamma-rays at total dose from 0.5 to 3.0 Gy (14 individuals) and workers with combined exposure (external gamma-rays at total dose range 0.7-5.1 Gy and internal alpha-radiation from incorporated plutonium with a body burden of 0.3-16.4 kBq). The control group consists of 43 age- and sex-matched individuals who never were exposed to IR, never involved in any cleanup operations following radiation accidents and never resided at contaminated areas. Enzyme-linked immunoassay and flow cytometry were used to determine the relative concentration of lymphocytes and proteins. The concentrations of T-lymphocytes, interleukin-8 and immunoglobulins G were decreased in external gamma-exposed workers relative to control. Relative concentrations of NKT-lymphocytes, concentrations of transforming growth factor-β, interferon gamma, immunoglobulins A, immunoglobulins M and matrix proteinase-9 were higher in this group as compared with control. Relative concentrations of T-lymphocytes and concentration of interleukin-8 were decreased, while both the relative and absolute concentration of natural killers, concentration of immunoglobulins A and M and matrix proteinase-9 were increased in workers with combined exposure as compared to control. An inverse linear relation was revealed between absolute concentration of T-lymphocytes, relative and absolute concentration of T-helpers cells, concentration of interferon gamma and total absorbed dose from external gamma-rays in exposed workers. For workers with incorporated plutonium, there was an inverse linear relation of absolute concentration of T-helpers as well as direct linear relation of relative concentration of NKT-lymphocytes to total absorbed red bone marrow dose from internal alpha-radiation. In all, chronic

  8. Acoustic radiation force impulse shear wave elastography (ARFI) of acute and chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, Ruediger S; Schuderer, Johanna; Strobel, Deike; Pfeifer, Lukas; Neurath, Markus F; Wildner, Dane

    2016-12-01

    Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography evaluates tissue stiffness non-invasively and has rarely been applied to pancreas examinations so far. In a prospective and retrospective analysis, ARFI shear wave velocities of healthy parenchyma, pancreatic lipomatosis, acute and chronic pancreatitis, adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the pancreas were evaluated and compared. In 95 patients ARFI elastography of the pancreatic head, and also of the tail for a specific group, was analysed retrospectively. Additionally, prospectively in 100 patients ARFI was performed in the head and tail of the pancreas. A total of 195 patients were included in the study. Healthy parenchyma (n=21) and lipomatosis (n=30) showed similar shear wave velocities of about 1.3m/s. Acute pancreatitis (n=35), chronic pancreatitis (n=53) and adenocarcinoma (n=52) showed consecutively increasing ARFI values, respectively. NET (n=4) revealed the highest shear wave velocities amounting to 3.62m/s. ARFI elastography showed relevant differences between acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis or adenocarcinoma. With a cut-off value of 1.74m/s for the diagnosis of a malignant disease the sensitivity was 91.1% whereas the specificity amounted to 60.4%. ARFI shear wave velocities present differences in various pathologies of the pancreas. Acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as neoplastic lesions show high ARFI values. Very high elasticity values may indicate malignant disease of the pancreas. However, there is a considerable overlap between the entities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Chronic restraint-induced stress has little modifying effect on radiation hematopoietic toxicity in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Katsube, Takanori; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Vares, Guillaume; Nakajima, Tetsuo; Nenoi, Mitsuru; Liu Qiang; Morita, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    Both radiation and stresses cause detrimental effects on humans. Besides possible health effects resulting directly from radiation exposure, the nuclear plant accident is a cause of social psychological stresses. A recent study showed that chronic restraint-induced stresses (CRIS) attenuated Trp53 functions and increased carcinogenesis susceptibility of Trp53-heterozygous mice to total-body X-irradiation (TBXI), having a big impact on the academic world and a sensational effect on the public, especially the residents living in radioactively contaminated areas. It is important to investigate the possible modification effects from CRIS on radiation-induced health consequences in Trp53 wild-type (Trp53wt) animals. Prior to a carcinogenesis study, effects of TBXI on the hematopoietic system under CRIS were investigated in terms of hematological abnormality in the peripheral blood and residual damage in the bone marrow erythrocytes using a mouse restraint model. Five-week-old male Trp53wt C57BL/6J mice were restrained 6 h per day for 28 consecutive days, and TBXI (4 Gy) was given on the 8th day. Results showed that CRIS alone induced a marked decrease in the red blood cell (RBC) and the white blood cell (WBC) count, while TBXI caused significantly lower counts of RBCs, WBCs and blood platelets, and a lower concentration of hemoglobin regardless of CRIS. CRIS alone did not show any significant effect on erythrocyte proliferation and on induction of micronucleated erythrocytes, whereas TBXI markedly inhibited erythrocyte proliferation and induced a significant increase in the incidences of micronucleated erythrocytes, regardless of CRIS. These findings suggest that CRIS does not have a significant impact on radiation-induced detrimental effects on the hematopoietic system in Trp53wt mice. (author)

  10. Autologous adipose-derived regenerative cells are effective for chronic intractable radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akita, S.; Yoshimoto, H.; Ohtsuru, A.; Hirano, A.; Yamashita, S.

    2012-01-01

    Effective therapy for chronic radiation injuries, such as ulcers, is prone to infection. Stiffness is expected since the therapeutic radiation often involves wider and deeper tissues and often requires extensive debridement and reconstruction, which are not sometimes appropriate for elderly and compromised hosts. Autologous adipose-derived regenerative cells (ADRCs) are highly yielding, forming relatively elderly aged consecutive 10 cases, 63.6±14.9 y (52-89 y), with mean radiation dose of 75.0±35.4 Gy (50-120 Gy) were included with at least 10-month follow-up. Minimal debridement and ADRC injection in the wound bed and margin along with the injection of mixture of fat and ADRCs in the periphery were tested for efficacy and regenerated tissue quality by clinically as well as imaging by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Uncultured ADRCs of 1.6±1.3 x 10 7 cells were obtained. All cases healed uneventfully after 6.6±3.2 weeks (2-10 weeks) post-operatively. The done site morbidity was negligible and without major complications, such as paralysis or massive haematoma. The regenerated tissue quality was significantly superior to the pre-operative one and the mixture of fat and ADRCs connected to the intact tissue was very soft and pliable. Mean follow-up at 1.9±0.8 y (0.9-2.9 y) revealed no recurrence or new ulceration after treatment. Thus, the ADRCs treatment for decades-long radiation injuries is effective, safe and improves the quality of wounds. (authors)

  11. A case of chronic effusive-constrictive pericarditis with slight myocardial involvement caused by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horimoto, Masashi; Funayama, Naoki; Takenaka, Takashi; Igarashi, Takeki; Sekiguchi, Morie.

    1985-01-01

    A 25-year-old female was admitted with shortness of breath and abdominal swelling. Six years before the admission, she had received resection of 7th to 9th left ribs and subsequent radiation of 5,000 rads to the thorax for the treatment of rib osteoblastoma. One year after the radiation, marked pericardial effusion associated with acute pericarditis was observed and was improved by digitalization and diuretic therapy. Since two years after the radiation, she had felt easy fatigability, swelling of face and foot, and transient faintness on more than 10 meters running. On admission, chest X-ray photograph showed increased pulmonary vascularity without cardiac enlargement. Electrocardiogram indicated systolic right ventricular strain, mitral P, and nonspecific S-T segment depression in left precordial leads. Two-dimensional echocardiography presented pericardial effusion with posterior pericardial thickening, while M-mode echocardiography showed diastolic posterior movement of interventricular septum and diastolic flattening of left ventricular posterior wall. Cardiac catheterization revealed marked elevation of mean right atrial pressure, pulmonary arterial diastolic pressure, right and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, accompanied with their equalization. In addition, pressure waves of right and left ventricle showed diastolic dip and plateau. Phono-cardiogram and apexcardiogram presented pericardial knock sound and systolic retraction, respectively. Cardiac angiography showed diastolic restriction of left ventricle without any stenosis of coronary artery. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest revealed thickening of anterior and left lateral pericardium with expansion of inferior vena cava, and abdominal CT revealed ascites with slight enlargements of liver and spleen. From above obtained data, chronic effusive-constrictive pericarditis, which was attributed to radiation, was strongly suggested. (J.P.N.)

  12. Combined Exposure to Simulated Microgravity and Acute or Chronic Radiation Reduces Neuronal Network Integrity and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Giuseppe; Verslegers, Mieke; Quintens, Roel; Samari, Nada; de Saint-Georges, Louis; van Oostveldt, Patrick; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed Abderrafi

    2016-01-01

    During orbital or interplanetary space flights, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiations and microgravity. However, most earth-based studies on the potential health risks of space conditions have investigated the effects of these two conditions separately. This study aimed at assessing the combined effect of radiation exposure and microgravity on neuronal morphology and survival in vitro. In particular, we investigated the effects of simulated microgravity after acute (X-rays) or during chronic (Californium-252) exposure to ionizing radiation using mouse mature neuron cultures. Acute exposure to low (0.1 Gy) doses of X-rays caused a delay in neurite outgrowth and a reduction in soma size, while only the high dose impaired neuronal survival. Of interest, the strongest effect on neuronal morphology and survival was evident in cells exposed to microgravity and in particular in cells exposed to both microgravity and radiation. Removal of neurons from simulated microgravity for a period of 24 h was not sufficient to recover neurite length, whereas the soma size showed a clear re-adaptation to normal ground conditions. Genome-wide gene expression analysis confirmed a modulation of genes involved in neurite extension, cell survival and synaptic communication, suggesting that these changes might be responsible for the observed morphological effects. In general, the observed synergistic changes in neuronal network integrity and cell survival induced by simulated space conditions might help to better evaluate the astronaut's health risks and underline the importance of investigating the central nervous system and long-term cognition during and after a space flight.

  13. Combined Exposure to Simulated Microgravity and Acute or Chronic Radiation Reduces Neuronal Network Integrity and Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Pani

    Full Text Available During orbital or interplanetary space flights, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiations and microgravity. However, most earth-based studies on the potential health risks of space conditions have investigated the effects of these two conditions separately. This study aimed at assessing the combined effect of radiation exposure and microgravity on neuronal morphology and survival in vitro. In particular, we investigated the effects of simulated microgravity after acute (X-rays or during chronic (Californium-252 exposure to ionizing radiation using mouse mature neuron cultures. Acute exposure to low (0.1 Gy doses of X-rays caused a delay in neurite outgrowth and a reduction in soma size, while only the high dose impaired neuronal survival. Of interest, the strongest effect on neuronal morphology and survival was evident in cells exposed to microgravity and in particular in cells exposed to both microgravity and radiation. Removal of neurons from simulated microgravity for a period of 24 h was not sufficient to recover neurite length, whereas the soma size showed a clear re-adaptation to normal ground conditions. Genome-wide gene expression analysis confirmed a modulation of genes involved in neurite extension, cell survival and synaptic communication, suggesting that these changes might be responsible for the observed morphological effects. In general, the observed synergistic changes in neuronal network integrity and cell survival induced by simulated space conditions might help to better evaluate the astronaut's health risks and underline the importance of investigating the central nervous system and long-term cognition during and after a space flight.

  14. Intracorporeal Traction of the Rectum with a Beaded Plastic Urinary Drainage Bag Hanger: Comparison with Conventional Laparoscopic Rectal Cancer Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sang Woo; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Kim, Young Jin

    2018-01-01

    Laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery with proper total mesorectal excision is a challenge for colorectal surgeons during trouble shooting. We used a beaded plastic urinary drainage bag hanger to encircle the rectum and clamp laparoscopic rectal transaction in this study. Sixty-three patients with rectal cancer underwent laparoscopic radical rectal resection with curative intent between February 2015 and December 2015. Plastic beaded form urinary Foley catheter bag hanger was inserted intracorporeally via right lower 12-mm trocar, encircling the rectal tube distal to the rectal lesion followed by fastening. Thirty patients in the rectal resection group (28 laparoscopic, 2 robotic-assisted) using the commercial beaded plastic hanger for Foley catheter drainage were compared to 33 patients who underwent conventional laparoscopic rectal resection. Low anterior resection was performed for both groups. The Foley bag hanger group had less operation time (162.6 min vs. 187.3 min, p = 0.006) and fewer numbers of stapler cartilage (1.6 vs. 2.1, p = 0.001). Intracorporeal ligation of the rectum with a beaded plastic Foley catheter bag hanger could be used as a valuable method for rectal handling and transaction in laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery.

  15. Health status of grandchildren of subjects occupationally exposed to chronic radiation. Communication 4. Congenital developmental defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrushkina, N.P.; Musatkova, O.B.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence and structure of cogenital developmental defects in the grandchildren of subjects occupationally exposed to chronic external gamma-irradiation. For 830 children only grandfather was exposed, for 259 only grandmother, and for 468 grandfather and grandmother. The mean equivalent doses for gonads by the moment of conception of future parents of the cohort examined ranged from 17.3 to 145.3 sSv. The incidence and structure of congenital developmental defects in 1557 grandchildren of occupationally exposed subjects differed from that in controls. Multifactorial analysis failed to establish the effect of grandparents' and parents' exposure on the development of diseases in the progeny. Factors other than radiation proved to be significant. 13 refs.; 1 tab

  16. Immune homeostasis disturbances in different generations of rats at chronic exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mel'nikov, O.F.; Sambur, M.B.; Timchenko, S.V.; Rozenfel'd, L.G.; Yindik, V.M.; Zayats, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the work was to study immune homeostasis disturbance in six generations of rats which were kept under the conditions of chronic exposure to small doses of low-intensity radiation resembling those after the accident at Chernobyl Atomic Power Station. The controls included the animals from Kiev vivarium. Leukopenia and lymphopenia of different stage, decrease of the absolute number of immunocompetent cell having Fc receptor to lg G, inhibition of their functional activity, increase of mastocytelike lymphocytes in the peripheral blood, stable suppression of natural cytotoxic cells activity has been found out in the rats of the experimental groups examined at the age 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. The revealed disturbances of cell immunity indices and nonspecific resistance factors depended on the age of the animals and their generation to greater extend in the young rats of F 1 -F 2 generation

  17. Endothelial dysfunction in rectal cancer patients chronically exposed to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhypbekov, Tolebay; Pak, Laura; Chaizhunusova, Nailya; Manambayeva, Zukhra; Tokanova, Sholpan; Madiyeva, Madina [Semey State Medical University, Semey (Kazakhstan); Inoue, Ken [Kochi University, Health Service Center, Kochi (Japan); Kawano, Noriyuki; Hoshi, Masaharu [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Takeichi, Nobuo [Takeichi Clinic, Hiroshima (Japan); Noso, Yoshihiro [Shimane University, Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Shimane (Japan); Khozhayev, Arman; Molgazhdarov, Maulen [The Kazakh National Medical University of S.D.Asfendiyarov, Department of Oncology, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Olzhaev, Sayakhat [Almaty Regional Oncologic Hospital, Department of Oncology, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2017-08-15

    We sought to identify the features of endothelial function in rectal cancer patients who were exposed to chronic ionizing radiation from a nuclear test site in Kazakhstan. We examined 146 individuals, 76 of whom were rectal cancer patients. The existence of a complex of disturbances of the endothelium and hemostasis systems in patients vs non-patients was revealed. Endothelial dysfunction was expressed as an increase of nitric oxide (NO) production along with decreases in vasodilatation function, and increased levels of von Willebrand factor in blood, along with an increase in the number of circulating endotheliocytes. Significant correlations between indicators of endothelial function and vascular-platelet hemostasis were observed. These changes and their interrelations were expressed more strongly in the patients who lived in the contaminated area around the nuclear test site. Such patients could have an increased risk of thrombosis and other complications after the treatment of a malignant neoplasm. (orig.)

  18. Effect of low dose radiation on expression of p16 gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Longzhen; Ding Xin; Li Xiangyang; Cen Jiannong; Shen Hongjie; Chen Zixing

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of low dose radiation on the expression on p16 gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia. Methods: Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) which expressed CD34 +, CD38 - and CD123 + were isolated from bone marrow cells obtained from twenty patients newly-diagnosedas chronic myeloid leukemia with EasySep TM magnet beads. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) which expressed CD34 + and CD38 - were isolated from human cord blood cells obtained from twenty full-term deliveries with EasySep TM magnet beads as control. HSCs vs LSCs samples were further divided into three dose groups, including 0, 12.5 and 50 cGy, respectively. RT-PCR and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction methods were used to detect mRNA expression of p16 gene in HSCs and LSCs after irradiation. Cells were harvested at different time for detection of cell cycle and apoptosis by flow cytometer. Results: p16 mRNA level in CML-LSCs was increased slightly at 12.5 cGy, and significantly increased at 50 cGy (Z=-3.39, P 0 /G 1 stagewas increased 48 h after 12.5 cGy irradiation, and 72 h post-irradiation with 50 cGy. The apoptosis rate of CML-LSCs was gradually raised after LDR, especially at 72 h post-irradiation of 50 cGy [(17.75±11.760% vs (6.13±4.71)%, Z=-2.37, P<0.01]. Conclusions: p16 gene transcription could be up-regulated by low dose radiation, which might provide a theoretical evidence for CML therapy and LDR in leukemic clinical application. (authors)

  19. Chronic radiation-induced leukemogenesis: alterations of hematopoietic progenitor repair functions during preclinical phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.M.; Kaspar, L.V.; Grdina, D.J.; Frazier, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Chronic exposure to low daily doses of whole-body gamma irradiation elicits a high incidence of myeloid leukemia (ML) and related myeloproliferative diseases (MPD) in beagles. Previously, the authors identified and partially characterized a four-phase sequence of evolving MPD as a consequence of chronic radiation exposure. With a focus on preclinical alterations in granulocyte/monocyte-committed stem cells, they have identified two critical events in the process: (i) an early event, involving the coupling of acquired radioresistance of the stem cell with renewed proliferative capacity; and (ii) a late event, involving acquired autocrine functions and associated change in stem cell clonality. In terms of the early event, repair-associated parameters are currently being examined on the cellular level by both split-dose and low dose-rate-type assays with survival enhancement used as the measured end point. On the molecular level, these parameters are examined by microfluorometric alkaline elution assays with DNA damage and repair used as end points

  20. EFFECT OF CHRONIC RADIATION ON PLANT-PATHOGEN INTERACTIONS IN 30-KM CHERNOBYL ZONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriev A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It was established in pot experiments that infection with powdery mildew (Erysiphe graminis DC. f. sp. tritici Em. Marchal and brown rust (Puccinia triticana Erikss. & Henn. of three wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cultivars ('Mironovskaya 808', 'Polesskay 70', and 'Kiyanka' grown from seeds, collected in the Chernobyl exclusion zone, was 1.5–2.0 times higher than that of plants grown from control seeds. On filed plots in the Chernobyl zone, wheat plant resistance to biotic stress was reduced. At artificial infection with brown rusts, the disease development was enhanced on plots with increased radiation background. One of the mechanisms of declined phytoimmunity potential under the action of low doses of chronic irradiation is evidently a reduced activity of plant proteinase inhibitors. Thus, in wheat and rye (Secale cereale L., cv. ‘Saratovskaya’ kernels, their activity reduced by 35–60% as compared to control. Active form and race formation in the population of the grass stem rust causal agent (Puccinia graminis Pers. was observed in the Chernobyl zone. A “new” population of this fungus with high frequency of more virulent clones than in other Ukraine regions was distinguished. The results obtained independently in greenhouse and field trials performed in the Chernobyl zone demonstrated radiation stress influence on the pathogen–plant system. They indicate a necessity of monitoring the microevolutionary processes occurring in both plants and their pathogens under conditions of technogenic stresses.

  1. A case of radiation-induced chronic constrictive pericarditis developing 16 years after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, Yoshiaki; Ishida, Yoshio; Hayashida, Kohei; Toyama, Takuji; Hamada, Seiki; Miyatake, Kunio; Imakita, Masami (National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)); Uehara, Toshiisa; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    1993-09-01

    We reported a 51-yr-old female with radiation-induced chronic constrictive pericarditis. At age 29, she had received mastectomy and postoperative irradiation because of left breast cancer. At age 45, she had syncope and was diagnosed with complete atrioventricular block and a pacemaker was implanted. At that time, pericardial thickening with effusion was noted. The following year, tricuspid regurgitation was noted. On catheter study, a dip and plateau pattern of the right ventricular pressure curve appeared. At age 50, tricuspid regurgitation worsened due to the lead wire of the pacemaker compressing the leaflet, and the pacemaker was reimplanted. However, the following year, she complained of general fatigue and dyspnea and was admitted to our hospital. On [sup 67]Ga study, diffuse accumulation in the cardiac region appeared. There was no perfusion defect detected in the myocardium, but right myocardial damage was suspected by thallium study. In [sup 99m]Tc-HSA RI angiography, right atrium dilatation appeared and a pericardial halo around the ventricles was seen. She underwent pericardectomy, tricuspid replacement and pacemaker reimplanted, but she died. On autpsy, pericardial thickening and adhesion, right myocardial fibrosis, the fibrotic change of the bundle branches were seen. We reported a case of radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis. Radionuclide studies were useful in diagnosing and following the patient. (author).

  2. Changes of medullary hemopoiesis produced by chronic exposure to tritium oxide and external γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murzina, L.D.; Muksinova, K.N.

    1982-01-01

    A comparative study of a chronic effect of tritium oxide ( 3 HOH) and external γ-radiation by 137 Cs on medullary hemopoiesis was conducted in experiments on Wistar rats. 3 HOH was administered for 3mos., 37x10 4 Bk per lg per of body mass daily (the absorbed dose 10.8 Gy), external irradiation was given in correlated values of dose rates and integral doses. Bone marrow depopulation was 1.9 times as deeper in rats exposed to 3 HOH as compared to that in irradiated rats. This difference is caused by early and stable inhibition of erythropoiesis with the administration of the radionuclide. The integral index showing the injuring effect of tritium on erythropoiesis was 4 times as high as compared to that of external γ-irradiation by 137 Cs. The time course of value of the proliferative pool of bone marrow granulocytes with the exposure to 2 types of radiation was monotypic. Differences in maturing and functioning granulocytic pools were marked in early time of the experiment

  3. Modelling the propagation of effects of chronic exposure to ionising radiation from individuals to populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonzo, F. [Laboratory of Environmental Modelling, DEI/SECRE/LME, Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Cadarache, Building 159, BP3, 13115 St-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, DEI/SECRE/LRE, Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Cadarache Building 186, BP3, 13115 St-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)], E-mail: frederic.alonzo@irsn.fr; Hertel-Aas, T. [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, 1432 Aas (Norway); Gilek, M. [School of Life Sciences, Soedertoern University College, 14189 Huddinge (Sweden); Gilbin, R. [Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, DEI/SECRE/LRE, Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Cadarache Building 186, BP3, 13115 St-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Oughton, D.H. [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, 1432 Aas (Norway); Garnier-Laplace, J. [Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, DEI/SECRE/LRE, Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Cadarache Building 186, BP3, 13115 St-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2008-09-15

    This study evaluated the potential effect of ionising radiation on population growth using simple population models and parameter values derived from chronic exposure experiments in two invertebrate species with contrasting life-history strategies. In the earthworm Eisenia fetida, models predicted increasing delay in population growth with increasing gamma dose rate (up to 0.6 generation times at 11 mGy h{sup -1}). Population extinction was predicted at 43 mGy h{sup -1}. In the microcrustacean Daphnia magna, models predicted increasing delay in population growth with increasing alpha dose rate (up to 0.8 generation times at 15.0 mGy h{sup -1}), only after two successive generations were exposed. The study examined population effects of changes in different individual endpoints (including survival, number of offspring produced and time to first reproduction). Models showed that the two species did not respond equally to equivalent levels of change, the fast growing daphnids being more susceptible to reduction in fecundity or delay in reproduction than the slow growing earthworms. This suggested that susceptibility of a population to ionising radiation cannot be considered independent of the species' life history.

  4. Response of shortgrass Plains vegetation to chronic and seasonally administered gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraley, Jr., Leslie [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1971-08-01

    In order to determine the effect of radiation on the structure of native shortgrass plains vegetation, an 8750 Ci 137Cs source was installed on the Central Plains Experimental Range near Nunn, Colorado; The experimental area was divided into 6 treatment sectors, a control, 2 sectors for chronic exposure (irradiation initiated April 1969 and continuing as of August 1971), and one each for spring, summer and late fall seasonal semi-acute (30 day), exposures which were administered during April, July and December, 1969, respectively. Community structure was measured by coefficient of community and diversity index. Yield was determined by clipping plots in September 1970 and visual estimates in September 1969 and 1970 for the grass-sedge component of the vegetation. Individual species sensitivity was determined by density data recorded in April, June and September of 1969 and 1970 and by a phenological index recorded at weekly intervals during the 1969 and 1970 growing seasons. The response of the vegetation was similar whether determined by coefficient of community or diversity with diversity being a more sensitive measure of effects. In the chronically exposed sectors, the exposure rate which resulted in a 50 per cent reduction in these 2 parameters (CC50 or D50) was still decreasing the second growing season and was approximately 18 R/hr for the CC50 as of June 1970 and 10 R/hr for the D50 as of September 1970. For the seasonally exposed sectors, the late fall period (December, 1969) was the most sensitive, summer (July, 1969) the least sensitive and spring (April, 1969) intermediate with CC50 and D50 values of 195 and 90, 240 and 222, and 120 and 74 R/hr for the spring, summer and late fall exposed sectors, respectively. Yield and density data indicated a rapid revegetation of the spring and summer exposed sectors during 1970 as a result of an influx of invader species such as Salsola kali tenuifolia, Chenopodium leptophyllum and Lepidium densiflorum and the

  5. The effects of chronic radiation on reproductive success of the polychaete worm Neanthes arenaceodentata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, F.L.; Anderson, S.L.

    1988-12-01

    The effects of lifetime exposure to chronic irradiation on reproductive success were assessed for laboratory populations of the polychaete worm Neanthes arenaceodentata. Lifetime exposure was initiated upon the spawning of the P 1 female and was terminated upon spawning of the F 1 female. Groups of experimental worms received either no radiation (controls) or 0.19, 2.1, or 17 mGy/h. The total dose received by the worms was either background or approximately 0.55, 6.5, or 54 Gy, respectively. The broods from the F 1 mated pairs were sacrificed before hatching occurred, and information was obtained on brood size, on the number of normal and abnormal embryos, and on the number of embryos that were living, dying, and dead. The mean number of embryos in the broods from the F 1 females exposed to lifetime radiation of 0.19 and 2.1 mGy/h was not significantly different from the mean number of embryos from control females; however, the mean number of embryos was different from those F 1 females exposed to 17 mGy/h. There was a significant reduction in the number of live embryos in the broods from the F 1 mated pairs that were exposed to the lowest dose rate given, 0.19 mGy/h, as well as those exposed to 2.1 and 17 mGy/h. Also, increased percentages of abnormal embryos were determined in the broods of all the radiation-exposed groups. 39 refs., 10 figs., 15 tabs

  6. The effects of chronic radiation on reproductive success of the polychaete worm Neanthes arenaceodentata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, F.L.; Anderson, S.L.

    1988-12-01

    The effects of lifetime exposure to chronic irradiation on reproductive success were assessed for laboratory populations of the polychaete worm Neanthes arenaceodentata. Lifetime exposure was initiated upon the spawning of the P1 female and was terminated upon spawning of the F1 female. Groups of experimental worms received either no radiation (controls) or 0.19, 2.1, or 17 mGy/h. The total dose received by the worms was either background or approximately 0.55, 6.5, or 54 Gy, respectively. The broods from the F1 mated pairs were sacrificed before hatching occurred, and information was obtained on brood size, on the number of normal and abnormal embryos, and on the number of embryos that were living, dying, and dead. The mean number of embryos in the broods from the F1 females exposed to lifetime radiation of 0.19 and 2.1 mGy/h was not significantly different from the mean number of embryos from control females; however, the mean number of embryos was different from those F1 females exposed to 17 mGy/h. There was a significant reduction in the number of live embryos in the broods from the F1 mated pairs that were exposed to the lowest dose rate given, 0.19 mGy/h, as well as those exposed to 2.1 and 17 mGy/h. Also, increased percentages of abnormal embryos were determined in the broods of all the radiation-exposed groups. 39 refs., 10 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. Influence on cell proliferation of background radiation or exposure to very low, chronic gamma radiation. [Paramecium tetraurelia; Synechococcus lividus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planel, H.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Tixador, R.; Richoilley, G.; Conter, A.; Croute, F.; Caratero, C.; Gaubin, Y.

    1987-05-01

    Investigations carried out on the protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia and the cyanobacteria Synechococcus lividus, which were shielded against background radiation or exposed to very low doses of gamma radiation, demonstrated that radiation can stimulate the proliferation of these two single-cell organisms. Radiation hormesis depends on internal factors (age of starting cells) and external factors (lighting conditions). The stimulatory effect occurred only in a limited range of doses and disappeared for dose rates higher than 50 mGy/y.

  8. Telomere Length in Aged Mayak PA Nuclear Workers Chronically Exposed to Internal Alpha and External Gamma Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherthan, Harry; Sotnik, Natalia; Peper, Michel; Schrock, Gerrit; Azizova, Tamara; Abend, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Telomeres consist of GC-rich DNA repeats and the "shelterin" protein complex that together protect chromosome ends from fusion and degradation. Telomeres shorten with age due to incomplete end replication and upon exposure to environmental and intrinsic stressors. Exposure to ionizing radiation is known to modulate telomere length. However, the response of telomere length in humans chronically exposed to radiation is poorly understood. Here, we studied relative telomere length (RTL) by IQ-FISH to leukocyte nuclei in a group of 100 workers from the plutonium production facility at the Mayak Production Association (PA) who were chronically exposed to alpha-emitting ((239)Pu) radiation and/or gamma (photon) radiation, and 51 local residents serving as controls, with a similar mean age of about 80 years. We applied generalized linear statistical models adjusted for age at biosampling and the second exposure type on a linear scale and observed an age-dependent telomere length reduction. In those individuals with the lowest exposure, a significant reduction of about 20% RTL was observed, both for external gamma radiation (≤1 Gy) and internal alpha radiation (≤0.05-0.1 Gy to the red bone marrow). In highly exposed individuals (>0.1 Gy alpha, 1-1.5 Gy gamma), the RTL was similar to control. Stratification by gender revealed a significant (∼30%) telomere reduction in low-dose-exposed males, which was absent in females. While the gender differences in RTL may reflect different working conditions, lifestyle and/or telomere biology, absence of a dose response in the highly exposed individuals may reflect selection against cells with short telomeres or induction of telomere-protective effects. Our observations suggest that chronic systemic exposure to radiation leads to variable dose-dependent effects on telomere length.

  9. Cytogenetic damage at low doses and the problem of bioindication of chronic low level radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geras'kin, S.A.; Dikarev, V.G.; Nesterov, E.B.; Vasiliev, D.V.; Dikareva, N.S.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis undertaken by us of the experimentally observed cellular responses to low dose irradiation has shown that the relationship between the yield of induced cytogenetic damage and radiation dose within low dose range is non-linear and universal in character. Because of the relationship between the yield of cytogenetic damage and dose within low dose range is non-linear, the aberration frequency cannot be used in biological dosimetry in the most important in terms of practical application case. The cytogenetic damage frequency cannot be used in biological dosimetry also because of the probability of synergistic and antagonistic interaction effects of the different nature factors simultaneously acting on test-object in real conditions is high within low dose (concentration) range. In our experimental study of the regularities in the yield of structural mutations in conditions of combined influence of ionizing radiation, heavy metals and pesticides it was found that synergistic and antagonistic effects are mainly induced in conditions of combined action of low exposure injuring agents. Experiments on agricultural plants were carried out in 1986-1989 at the 30-km zone around Chernobyl NPP. It was shown that chronic low dose exposure could cause an inheritable destabilization of genetic structures expressing in increase of cytogenetic damage and yield karyotypic variability in offspring's of irradiated organisms. Obviously exactly this circumstance is the reason of the phenomenon found in our researches of significant time delay of cytogenetic damage reduction rate from radioactive pollution reduction rate from time past from the accident moment. Research of cytogenetic damage of reproductive (seeds) and vegetative (needles) plant organs of the Pinus sylvestris tree micropopulations growing in contrast by radioactive pollution level sites of the 30-km ChNPP zone and also in the vicinity of the industrial plant > for processing and temporary storage of

  10. Effects of chronic exposure to ionising radiation in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fievet, B.; Devos, A.; Voiseux, C.; Leconte-Pradines, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete' Nucleaire (France); Dallas, L.; Jha, A. [University of Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    The Cotentin peninsula (Normandy, France) hosts nuclear industry facilities which operate with controlled discharges of radionuclides in the marine environment. Compared to natural radioactivity, the increase by artificial radionuclides is small but constant. As a consequence, marine species are chronically exposed to low additional doses of ionizing radiation (IR). The effects of chronic exposure to radionuclides were investigated in early stages of development of the Japanese oyster Crassostrea gigas. On the basis of literature, mollusks are expected to be particularly resistant to acute IR (UNSCEAR, 1996. Sources and effects of ionizing radiation. Report to the General Assembly, with Scientific Annex. 86 p). Two different chronic exposure conditions consisted in external ({sup 137}Cs) and internal ({sup 241}Am) irradiation for two weeks. Biological endpoints were analyzed in parallel at both the integrated (growth) and molecular (target stress gene expression) levels. To identify potential biological targets of IR, oysters were first exposed to very high dose rates and radionuclide activities with the perspective to reduce the levels and to derive dose-response curves. Although the initial exposure levels ({sup 137}Cs 30 000 μGy.h{sup -1}; {sup 241}Am 57 000 Bq.L{sup -1}) were many orders of magnitude higher than those encountered in the natural environment, no significant change in the measured parameters was observed. This result was surprising because data from the literature showed that exposure of mussel Mytilus edulis to {sup 3}H at lower doses rates (10-100 μGy.h{sup -1}) induced DNA damage in hemocytes (Jha et al., 2005. Impact of low doses of tritium on the marine mussel, Mytilus edulis: Genotoxic effects and tissue-specific bioconcentration. Mutation Research/Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis 586, 47-57). To understand this apparent discrepancy between those two filtering bivalves, a new experiment was performed to compare the response

  11. Evaluation of the genotoxic effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation exposure on nuclear medicine workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Ali; Tatar, Abdulgani; Oztas, Sitki; Seven, Bedri; Varoglu, Erhan; Yesilyurt, Ahmet; Ayan, Arif Kursad

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Nuclear medicine workers are occupationally exposed to chronic ionizing radiation. It is known that ionizing radiation may have damaging effects on chromosomes. In the present study, we investigated the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation on nuclear medicine workers. We used two different indicators of genotoxicity methods: sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronucleus (MN). Methods: The present research was carried out using 21 nuclear medicine workers (11 females and 10 males) during two periods: during normal working conditions and after a 1-month vacation. The radiation dose varied from 1.20 to 48.56 mSv, which accumulated during the occupational exposure time between two vacations. Peripheral blood samples were taken from each subject for two distinct lymphocyte cultures (SCE and MN) in each period. Results: In nearly all subjects, SCE values increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Similarly, MN frequencies in most of the subjects increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Conclusions: This study revealed that both SCE and MN frequencies in most of the subjects were significantly higher during exposure to ionizing radiation than after a 1-month vacation period. However, this genotoxic effect was reversible in most of the subjects.

  12. Evaluation of the genotoxic effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation exposure on nuclear medicine workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Ali [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Medical School, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey)], E-mail: alibabam2001@yahoo.com; Tatar, Abdulgani; Oztas, Sitki [Department of Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Seven, Bedri; Varoglu, Erhan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Medical School, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Yesilyurt, Ahmet [Department of Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Ayan, Arif Kursad [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Medical School, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2009-07-15

    Introduction: Nuclear medicine workers are occupationally exposed to chronic ionizing radiation. It is known that ionizing radiation may have damaging effects on chromosomes. In the present study, we investigated the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation on nuclear medicine workers. We used two different indicators of genotoxicity methods: sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronucleus (MN). Methods: The present research was carried out using 21 nuclear medicine workers (11 females and 10 males) during two periods: during normal working conditions and after a 1-month vacation. The radiation dose varied from 1.20 to 48.56 mSv, which accumulated during the occupational exposure time between two vacations. Peripheral blood samples were taken from each subject for two distinct lymphocyte cultures (SCE and MN) in each period. Results: In nearly all subjects, SCE values increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Similarly, MN frequencies in most of the subjects increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Conclusions: This study revealed that both SCE and MN frequencies in most of the subjects were significantly higher during exposure to ionizing radiation than after a 1-month vacation period. However, this genotoxic effect was reversible in most of the subjects.

  13. Efficacy of Radiation Synovectomy with Y-90 in chronic knee joint synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roiz, C.; Raigoso, P.; Suarez, J.P.; Llana, B.; Zeidan, N.; Dominguez, M.L.; Bernardo, L.; Fernandez, J.A.; Nunez, R.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficiency of Radiation Synovectomy (RSO) with Y-90 in knee joints of patients with chronic synovitis (CS) resistant to classical conventional therapy, and assess its long-term prognosis. Material and Methods: 22 patients (7 males,15 females, mean age 50, range 12-81) with CS of the knees, of a duration ranging from 2 to 48 years, were included in the study. All patients had suffered from CS for more than 6 months, and were resistant to anti-inflammatory drugs, immunosuppressants and intraarticular (IA) steroid therapy. The cases included:10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 5 psoriatic arthritis (PA), 3 pigmented villonodular synovitis, 2 seronegative oligo-polyarthritis and 2 chronic mono arthritis. We used an IA dose of 3 to 5 mCi (37-185 MBq)of Y-90. The effect of the therapy with Y-90 on 22 knees was evaluated from 3 to 12 months after the RSO. Patients' response was assess and classified according to the results of plain radiology and following conventional rheumatological criteria as: A) Excellent (E) with a visual improvement (VI) of 80-100mm, no pain in motion, little or no palpable swelling, no inflammation; B) Good (G) VI of 60-90mm, minimal pain in motion, little palpable swelling; C) Mild (M) VI of 20-59mm, moderate reduction of pain, obvious swelling; D) Bad (B) VI of only 0-19 mm, no changes or an increase of pain in the swollen joints. Results: The response observed was classified as: E in 5 patients (23%); G in 10 patients (45%); M in 3 patients (14%); and B in 4(18%). The 4 patients with a response B, had all of them joint erosion on plain radiology. Furthermore, one of the patients was a failure from prior surgical synovectomy (SS). The other 3 patients subsequently had SS. In contrast, all the responses E and G were obtained exclusively in patients with RA or PA. No short or long-term adverse side effects were noted. Conclusion: RSO is an effective treatment for patients with persistent CS, specially in RA and PA. The

  14. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  15. Quantitative dose-response of growth and development in Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to chronic gamma-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, K.; Thompson, K.H.

    1975-01-01

    The response of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (Cruciferae) to a gradient of chronic gamma-radiation was examined under field conditions. Plants that were initially introduced to the gamma field as dry seeds received exposures of 1.34 to 18 800R/20 hour day from the time of seed germination. Regression analysis demonstrated a significant, but non-linear, response for three variables, number of seedlings emerging, number of plants flowering, and plant volume; the response of a fourth variable, number of leaves per plant, was not related to daily exposure. LD 50 values ranged from 66R/20 hour day for plant volume to 1231R/20 hour day for seedling emergence. Flowering and plant volume were the most sensitive indicators of radiation exposure. The demonstration of a variable threshold at low levels of exposure indicates that in nature A. thaliana may be exposed to environmental radiation throughout its life-cycle without significant modification of growth or development. (author)

  16. Ionizing radiation and risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the 15-country study of nuclear industry workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrijheid, Martine; Cardis, Elisabeth; Ashmore, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to other types of leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has long been regarded as non-radiogenic, i.e. not caused by ionizing radiation. However, the justification for this view has been challenged. We therefore report on the relationship between CLL mortality and external...... ionizing radiation dose within the 15-country nuclear workers cohort study. The analyses included, in seven countries with CLL deaths, a total of 295,963 workers with more than 4.5 million person-years of follow-up and an average cumulative bone marrow dose of 15 mSv; there were 65 CLL deaths....... In conclusion, the largest nuclear workers cohort study to date finds little evidence for an association between low doses of external ionizing radiation and CLL mortality. This study had little power due to low doses, short follow-up periods, and uncertainties in CLL ascertainment from death certificates...

  17. The effect of chronic exposure to artificial UVB radiation on the survival and reproduction of Daphnia magna across two generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Judith D; Loadman, Nancy L; Wiegand, Murray D; Young, Donna L W; Warszycki, Laura-Anne

    2009-01-01

    We examined the effects of daily (chronic) exposure to artificial UVB radiation on the survival and reproduction of Daphnia magna over two generations. Control and experimental animals in each generation (parental and F1) were exposed to 16 h of UVA radiation and photosynthetically active radiation daily. In addition, experimental animals were exposed to 6 h of UVB during the middle of the light period. Survival and reproduction were followed for 12 days for each individual. Survival and production of F1 were significantly lower in the UVB exposed parental generation Daphnia than in controls. F1 exposure to UVB significantly decreased F1 survival and reproduction. Reproduction was lowest in UVB exposed F1 animals whose parents were also exposed to UVB. Adverse effects of UVB on offspring production may be magnified in successive generations suggesting that short-term experiments could underestimate the impact of increased UVB exposure on populations.

  18. Possible cause for altered spatial cognition of prepubescent rats exposed to chronic radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sareesh Naduvil; Kumar, Raju Suresh; Karun, Kalesh M; Nayak, Satheesha B; Bhat, P Gopalakrishna

    2015-10-01

    The effects of chronic and repeated radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RFEMR) exposure on spatial cognition and hippocampal architecture were investigated in prepubescent rats. Four weeks old male Wistar rats were exposed to RF-EMR (900 MHz; SAR-1.15 W/kg with peak power density of 146.60 μW/cm(2)) for 1 h/day, for 28 days. Followed by this, spatial cognition was evaluated by Morris water maze test. To evaluate the hippocampal morphology; H&E staining, cresyl violet staining, and Golgi-Cox staining were performed on hippocampal sections. CA3 pyramidal neuron morphology and surviving neuron count (in CA3 region) were studied using H&E and cresyl violet stained sections. Dendritic arborization pattern of CA3 pyramidal neuron was investigated by concentric circle method. Progressive learning abilities were found to be decreased in RF-EMR exposed rats. Memory retention test performed 24 h after the last training revealed minor spatial memory deficit in RF-EMR exposed group. However, RF-EMR exposed rats exhibited poor spatial memory retention when tested 48 h after the final trial. Hirano bodies and Granulovacuolar bodies were absent in the CA3 pyramidal neurons of different groups studied. Nevertheless, RF-EMR exposure affected the viable cell count in dorsal hippocampal CA3 region. RF-EMR exposure influenced dendritic arborization pattern of both apical and basal dendritic trees in RF-EMR exposed rats. Structural changes found in the hippocampus of RF-EMR exposed rats could be one of the possible reasons for altered cognition.

  19. Transumbilical single-incision laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy and total intracorporeal reconstruction of the digestive tract in the treatment of benign peptic ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-Sheng; Wu, Shuo-Dong; Kong, Jing

    2014-12-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is being applied increasingly in many surgical specialties. However, few reports are available regarding its use in the treatment of benign peptic ulcer disease. We report here on nine patients with gastric or duodenal ulcers who underwent transumbilical single-incision laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy (SILSG) between November 2010 and June 2013. All procedures were performed with conventional laparoscopic instruments placed through a single operating portal of entry created within the umbilicus. Total intracorporeal gastrojejunostomy or gastroduodenostomy was then performed for reconstruction of the digestive tract. Only one case required conversion from single-incision to multiple-incision surgery. Among the eight patients who successfully underwent SILSG, total intracorporeal gastroduodenostomy was performed in two and gastrojejunostomy in six. The mean operation time was 290 ± 50 min (range 230-360 min), and blood loss was 200 ± 66 mL (range 100-300 mL). The patients recovered fully, and the single umbilical scars healed well. We believe this is the first report of SILSG with total intracorporeal gastrojejunostomy or gastroduodenostomy in the treatment of benign peptic ulcers. On the basis of this initial experience, SILSG for this indication in the hands of experienced surgeons appears to be feasible and safe. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Curcumin protects against radiation-induced acute and chronic cutaneous toxicity in mice and decreases mRNA expression of inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okunieff, Paul; Xu Jianhua; Hu Dongping; Liu Weimin; Zhang Lurong; Morrow, Gary; Pentland, Alice; Ryan, Julie L.; Ding, Ivan M.D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether curcumin ameliorates acute and chronic radiation skin toxicity and to examine the expression of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1, IL-6, IL-18, IL-1Ra, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, and lymphotoxin-β) or fibrogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor [TGF]-β) during the same acute and chronic phases. Methods and Materials: Curcumin was given intragastrically or intraperitoneally to C3H/HeN mice either: 5 days before radiation; 5 days after radiation; or both 5 days before and 5 days after radiation. The cutaneous damage was assessed at 15-21 days (acute) and 90 days (chronic) after a single 50 Gy radiation dose was given to the hind leg. Skin and muscle tissues were collected for measurement of cytokine mRNA. Results: Curcumin, administered before or after radiation, markedly reduced acute and chronic skin toxicity in mice (p < 0.05). Additionally, curcumin significantly decreased mRNA expression of early responding cytokines (IL-1 IL-6, IL-18, TNF-α, and lymphotoxin-β) and the fibrogenic cytokine, TGF-β, in cutaneous tissues at 21 days postradiation. Conclusion: Curcumin has a protective effect on radiation-induced cutaneous damage in mice, which is characterized by a downregulation of both inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines in irradiated skin and muscle, particularly in the early phase after radiation. These results may provide the molecular basis for the application of curcumin in clinical radiation therapy

  1. Relationship Between Radiation-Induced Apoptosis of T Lymphocytes and Chronic Toxicity in Patients With Prostate Cancer Treated by Radiation Therapy: A Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foro, Palmira, E-mail: pforo@parcdesalutmar.cat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Algara, Manuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Lozano, Joan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Rodriguez, Nuria; Sanz, Xavier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Torres, Erica [Pathology Department, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Carles, Joan [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Oncology, Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Reig, Anna; Membrive, Ismael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Quera, Jaume [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Fernandez-Velilla, Enric; Pera, Oscar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Lacruz, Marti [Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Radiation Protection Department, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Bellosillo, Beatriz [Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Pathology Department, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the correlation of radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro of CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes with late toxicity of prostate cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: 214 patients were prospectively included in the study. Peripheral blood was drawn from patients before treatment and irradiated with 8 Gy. The percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes that underwent radiation-induced apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. Toxicity and mortality were correlated in 198 cases with pretreatment apoptosis and clinical and biological variables by use of a Cox proportional hazards model. Results: The mean percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte radiation-induced apoptosis was 28.58% (±14.23) and 50.76% (±18.9), respectively. Genitourinary (GU) toxicity was experienced by 39.9% of patients, while gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity was experienced by 19.7%. The probability of development of GU toxicity was nearly doubled (hazard ratio [HR] 1.99, P=.014) in those patients in whom the percentage of in vitro radiation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T-lymphocytes was ≤28.58%. It was also almost double in patients who received doses ≥50 Gy in 65% of the bladder volume (V65 ≥50) (HR 1.92, P=.048). No correlation was found between GI toxicity and any of the variables studied. The probability of death during follow-up, after adjustment for different variables, was 2.7 times higher in patients with a percentage of CD8+ T lymphocyte apoptosis ≤50.76% (P=.022). Conclusions: In conclusion, our study shows, in the largest prospective cohort of prostate cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy, that in vitro radiation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T lymphocytes assessed before radiation therapy was associated with the probability of developing chronic GU toxicity. In addition, the radiation dose received in the urinary bladder (V65 ≥50) affected the occurrence of GU toxicity. Finally, we also demonstrate that radiation-induced apoptosis of

  2. Effects of chronic low level radiation in the population residing in the high level natural radiation area in Kerala, India: employing heritable DNA mutation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shazia; Koya, P K M; Seshadri, M

    2013-03-18

    To study the effect of chronic low level radiation, 4040 meiosis were screened at eight microsatellite and five minisatellite (2485 and 1555 meiosis respectively) marker loci in people residing in high and normal level natural radiation areas of Kerala. Variants in the repeat length of allele were considered as mutants. Mutation rates (expressed as the number of mutations observed in the total number of meiosis) were 6.4×10(-3) (16/2485) and 2.6×10(-3) (4/1555) at microsatellite and minisatellite respectively. The germline microsatellite mutation frequency of father was 1.78 times higher at 7.52×10(-3) (8/1064) compared to 4.22×10(-3) (6/1421) of mother (P=0.292, Fisher's Exact two-sided test). The paternal and maternal mutation rates at minisatellite loci were more or less similar at 2.78×10(-3) (2/719) and 2.39×10(-3) (2/836), respectively (P=1.0, Fisher's Exact two-sided test). Higher but statistically non-significant microsatellite mutation frequency was observed in HLNRA compared to NLNRA (7.25×10(-3) vs 3.64×10(-3); P=0.547). The apparent increase in the mutation rate of microsatellite loci with the increase in radiation dose was also not statistically significant. All the four minisatellite mutation observed were from HLNRA (1198 meiosis) and no mutation was observed among 357 meiosis screened from NLNRA families. All the markers used in the present study were in the non-coding region and hence mutations in these regions may not cause adverse health effects, but the study is important in understanding the effect of chronic low level radiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Repair of accurate radiation damage and development and consequence of chronic radiation damage of the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehlert, W.; Brendlein, F.

    1976-01-01

    The first part of the essay deals with structural, proliferation kinetic, and functional considerations important for the understanding of the pathogenesis of radiolesions and their repair. Then acute radiolesions of the vesophagus, the gastric mucosa and the mucosa of the small intestine and the colon as well as its repair are discussed with reference to experiments on rats. Another chapter deals with the histo- and pathogenesis of chronic radiolesions and the development of radiolesions in the capillary system. Late radiolesions in the vesophagus and phrenic ampulla, in the glandular stomach, duodenum and jejunum, colon and capillary and vessel system in the gastro-intestinal tract of rats are discussed in detail. Finally the importance of chronic radiolesions in the gastro-intestinal tract for civil protection is shown. It is required to protect persons with primary radiolesions from infections during the following time and to assure cell regeneration by suitable nutrition. (MG) [de

  4. The status of the nervous system of persons exposed to occupational chronic radiation (45 years of observation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizova, T.V.

    2000-01-01

    The retrospective study of a state of the nervous system in dynamics in 1090 workers of the first Russian atomic enterprise was carried out. The main unfavorable factor of occupational effect in the yearly years of work (1948-1954) was chronic external gamma-radiation in doses from 0.4 to 5.7 Gy per one year. During maximal radiation exposure a vegetative dystonia of a hypotensive type (51.8%), asthenic syndrome (35.2%) and syndrome of microorganic changes of the central nervous system (5.9%) were most frequently registered in workers. Frequency and the periods of the development of these syndromes depended on an annual exposure dose (p<0.001). Alongside with an occupational chronic exposure non-radiation factors (age at the moment of an exposure, initial state of health, intense nature of job regarding nervous loads) exerted the certain influence on the development of these neurologic syndromes. In the long-term period after an exposure the cerebrovascular diseases were most frequent. Their incidence was naturally related with the age of patients. However, it was determined that the initial clinical manifestations of a cerebral atherosclerosis in persons exposed to irradiation in doses more of 2.5 Gy/year were registered in younger age than in control group. The frequency of their development depended on an annual dose of a gamma-irradiation, age at the moment of an exposure, degree of manifestation and duration of preceding vegetative - vascular disorders. (author)

  5. Studies of adaptive response and mutation induction in MCF-10A cells following exposure to chronic or acute ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manesh, Sara Shakeri; Sangsuwan, Traimate; Wojcik, Andrzej; Haghdoost, Siamak, E-mail: Siamak.haghdoost@su.se

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • 50 mGy at 1.4 mGy/h induces adaptive response in MCF-10A at mutation level. • Low dose rate γ-radiation does not induce adaptive response at survival level. • Overall, a dose rate effect is absent at the level of mutation in MCF-10A cells. - Abstract: A phenomenon in which exposure to a low adapting dose of radiation makes cells more resistant to the effects of a subsequent high dose exposure is termed radio-adaptive response. Adaptive response could hypothetically reduce the risk of late adverse effects of chronic or acute radiation exposures in humans. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of such responses is of relevance for radiation protection as well as for the clinical applications of radiation in medicine. However, due to the variability of responses depending on the model system and radiation condition, there is a need to further study under what conditions adaptive response can be induced. In this study, we analyzed if there is a dose rate dependence for the adapting dose, assuming that the adapting dose induces DNA response/repair pathways that are dose rate dependent. MCF-10A cells were exposed to a 50 mGy adapting dose administered acutely (0.40 Gy/min) or chronically (1.4 mGy/h or 4.1 mGy/h) and then irradiated by high acute challenging doses. The endpoints of study include clonogenic cell survival and mutation frequency at X-linked hprt locus. In another series of experiment, cells were exposed to 100 mGy and 1 Gy at different dose rates (acutely and chronically) and then the mutation frequencies were studied. Adaptive response was absent at the level of clonogenic survival. The mutation frequencies were significantly decreased in the cells pre-exposed to 50 mGy at 1.4 mGy/h followed by 1 Gy acute exposure as challenging dose. Importantly, at single dose exposures (1 Gy or 100 mGy), no differences at the level of mutation were found comparing different dose rates.

  6. Transfer of training in the development of intracorporeal suturing skill in medical student novices: a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muresan, Claude; Lee, Tommy H; Seagull, Jacob; Park, Adrian E

    2010-10-01

    To help optimize the use of limited resources in trainee education, we developed a prospective randomized trial to determine the most effective means of teaching laparoscopic suturing to novices. Forty-one medical students received rudimentary instruction in intracorporeal suturing, then were pretested on a pig enterotomy model. They then were posttested after completion of 1 of 4 training arms: laparoscopic suturing, laparoscopic drills, open suturing, and virtual reality (VR) drills. Tests were scored for speed, accuracy, knot quality, and mental workload (National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA] Task Load Index). Paired t tests were used. Task time was improved in all groups except the VR group. Knot quality improved only in the open or laparoscopic suturing groups. Mental workload improved only for those practicing on a physical laparoscopic trainer. For novice trainees, the efficacy of VR training is questionable. In contrast, the other training methods had benefits in terms of time, quality, and perceived workload. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Low Dose Chronic Radiation and Heavy Metals on Plants and Their Fungal and Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dmitriev

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of low dose chronic radiation on plant disease resistance and fungal and virus infections have been studied. The results obtained in the 10-km Chernobyl zone demonstrated a decrease in plant disease resistance and appearance of a "new" population of stem rust agents of cereal with a high frequency of more virulent clones. Radionuclide contamination and heavy metals lead to wider virus spread and a higher diversity of virus species. The Chernobyl zone is a territory of enhanced risk and potential threats for the environment. A special type of monitoring of microevolution processes in plant pathogens should provide better understanding of how serious these potential threats are.

  8. Risk assessment of chronic stress at work place and work environment of persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation at work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milanovic, S.; Ilic, Z.; Spasojevic-Tisma, V.; Milanovic, S.)

    2007-01-01

    Interactions of factors at work and worker's health have been analyzed through indicators of chronic professional stress. The examinees have been persons working with sealed sources of radiation with various professional risks among which we have stressed exposure to different radiation doses. Health professionals (medical doctors, radiologist, technicians) working in radio diagnostic and radiotherapy of oncology deceases have been examined. It was concluded that examinees among the subgroup 'therapy' has higher values of stress indicators expressed through all examined indicators: work motivation, personal opinion of work load, behavioral dysfunctions (smoking, alcoholism, drug abuse), increase incidence of health dysfunctions and general neuroticism of examinees. Obtained results are values for which statistical significant have not been established, so they have certain theoretical and practical importance in the frame research with descriptive nature [sr

  9. Analysis of cellular response by exposure to acute or chronic radiation in human lymphoblastoid TK-6 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, T.; Yasumoto, J.; Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, K.

    To clarify the biological effects of low-dose rate radiation on human health for long-term stay in space, we analyzed the induction of apoptosis and apoptosis-related gene expression after irradiation with different dose-rate in human lymphoblastoid TK-6 cells harboring wild-type p53 gene. We irradiated TK-6 cells by X-ray at 1.5 Gy (1 Gy/min) and then sampled at 25 hr after culturing. We also irradiated by gamma-ray at 1.5 Gy (1 mGy/min) and then sampled immediately or 25 hr after irradiation. For DNA ladder analysis, we extracted DNA from these samples and electrophoresed with 2% agarose gel. In addition, we extracted mRNA from these samples for DNA-array analysis. mRNA from non-irradiated cells was used as a control. After labeling the cDNA against mRNA with [α -33P]-dCTP and hybridizing onto DNA array (Human Apoptosis Expression Array, R&D Systems), we scanned the profiles of the spots by a phosphorimager (BAS5000, FUJI FILM) and calculated using a NIH Image program. The data of each DNA-array were normalized with eight kinds of house keeping genes. We analyzed the expression level of apoptosis-related genes such as p53-related, Bcl-2 family, Caspase family and Fas-related genes. DNA ladders were obviously detected in the cells exposed to a high dose-rate radiation. We detected the induction of the gene expression of apoptosis-promotive genes. In contrast, almost no apoptosis was observed in the cells exposed to the chronic radiation at a low dose-rate. In addition, we detected the induction of the gene expression of apoptosis-suppressive genes as compared with apoptosis promotive-genes immediately after chronic irradiation. These results lead the importance of biological meaning of exposure to radiation at low dose-rate from an aspect of carcinogenesis. Finally, the effects of chronic irradiation become a highly important issue in space radiation biology for human health.

  10. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and radiation: findings among workers at five US nuclear facilities and a review of the recent literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Daniels, Robert D; Fleming, Donald A; Markey, Andrea M; Couch, James R; Ahrenholz, Steven H; Burphy, Jenneh S; Anderson, Jeri L; Tseng, Chih-Yu

    2007-12-01

    The aetiology of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is largely unknown. Despite compelling evidence for ionising radiation as a cause of most forms of leukaemia, CLL was not found to be radiogenic in early studies. Herein we describe the recent evidence for causation of CLL by ionising and non-ionising radiation, including a nested case-control study conducted within a cohort of 94 517 US workers at four nuclear weapons facilities and a nuclear naval shipyard. Forty-three cases of CLL deaths and 172 age-matched controls were identified with follow-up up to between 1990 and 1996. Radiation exposure from external sources and plutonium (lagged 10 years) was assessed for each worker, based on monitoring records. The excess relative rate (ERR) was estimated for workers receiving elevated doses compared to unexposed workers, controlling for possible risk factors. The ERR per 10 mSv was -0.020 (95% confidence interval: <0, 0.14) based on all exposed workers. However, for workers receiving <100 mSv, the ERR per 10 mSv was 0.20 (-0.035, 0.96). Recent studies of uranium miners and other populations have shown elevations of CLL possibly associated with ionising and non-ionising radiation. New studies should use incident cases and sufficient latency to account for the expected lengthy induction period for CLL.

  11. Protective effect of topically applied polypeptide from Chlamys farreri against ultraviolet radiation-induced chronic skin damage in guinea pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Mingliang; Cao, Pengli; Yu, Guoying; Zhu, Li; Wang, Yuejun; Wang, Chunbo

    2003-12-01

    Polypeptide from Chlamys farreri (PCF), a topical polypeptide isolated from Chlamys farreri, was used in this experiment aimed to investigate the photoprotective effect of PCF against chronic skin damage induced by ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. The chronic ultraviolet-irradiated guinea pig model was established, and visible changes in the skin including wrinkling, sagging and erythema were observed. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px) in the dorsal skin were determined using biochemical methods. The results showed: (1) PCF (5 % and 20%) could greatly protect the dorsal skin of guinea pig against wrinkling, sagging and erythema induced by UV radiation in a concentration-dependent manner. (2) PCF could reduce MDA formation in the dorsal skin caused by UV irradiation, while increasing the activities of SOD and GSH-px. (3) The differences among the PCF groups and UV model group were significant ( Psolar UV spectrum photoprotection; and that the antioxidant property of PCF might play a role in photoprotection.

  12. Chronic gamma-radiation impact upon the state of thyroid gland of tundra voles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermakova, O.V.; Raskosha, O.V.

    2002-01-01

    The histomorphological estimation of the thyroid gland status of tundra voles living in the radiation polluted sites (30-km zone around Chernobyl nuclear plant and the Komi Republic) was given in the experiment. Nature populations of tundra voles have more high variety of the thyroid parenchyma morphological reconstructions in comparison with the experimental animals. Mechanisms of the response to the radiation influence in the nature and in the experiment are different. (author)

  13. Emergency laparoscopic ileo-colic resection and primary intracorporeal anastomosis for Crohn's acute ileitis with free perforation and faecal peritonitis: first ever reported laparoscopic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birindelli, A; Tugnoli, G; Beghelli, D; Siciliani, A; Biscardi, A; Bertarelli, C; Selleri, S; Lombardi, R; Di Saverio, S

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopy for abdominal surgical emergencies is gaining increasing acceptance given the spreading of advanced laparoscopic skills among modern surgeons, as it may allow at the same time an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment of acute abdomen. The use of the laparoscopic approach also in case of diffuse peritonitis is now becoming accepted provided hemodynamic stability, despite the common belief in the past decades that such severe condition represented an indication for conversion to open surgery or an immediate contraindication to continue laparoscopy. Crohn's Disease (CD) is a rare cause of acute abdomen and peritonitis, only a few cases of CD acute perforations are reported in the published literature; these cases have always been approached and treated by open laparotomy. We report on a case of a faecal peritonitis due to an acute perforation caused by a terminal ileitis in an undiagnosed CD. The patient underwent diagnostic laparoscopy followed by a laparoscopic ileo-colic resection and primary intracorporeal anastomosis, with a successful postoperative outcome. Complicated CD has to be considered within the possible causes of small bowel non-traumatic perforation. Emergency laparoscopy with resection and primary intra-corporeal anastomosis can be feasible and may be a safe and effective minimally invasive alternative to open surgery even in case of faecal peritonitis, in selected stable patients and in presence of appropriate laparoscopic colorectal surgical skills and experience. To the best of our knowledge the present experience is the first ever reported case managed with a totally laparoscopic extended ileocecal resection with intracorporeal anastomosis in case of acutely perforated CD and diffuse peritonitis.

  14. Impact of retrograde flexible ureteroscopy and intracorporeal lithotripsy on kidney functional outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Hoarau

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate renal function and to identify factors associated with renal function deterioration after retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS for kidney stones. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients with renal stones treated by RIRS between January 2010 and June 2013 at a single institute. We used the National Kidney Foundation classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD to classify Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR in 5 groups. The baseline creatinine level was systematically pre-operatively and post-operatively evaluated. All patients had a creatinine blood measurement in June 2013. A change toward a less or a more favorable GFR group following RIRS was considered significant. Results: We included 163 patients. There were 86 males (52.8% and 77 females (47.3% with a mean age of 52.8±17 years. After a mean follow-up of 15.5±11.5 months, median GFR was not significantly changed from 84.3±26.2 to 84.9±24.5 mL/min (p=0.675. Significant renal function deterioration occurred in 8 cases (4.9% and significant renal function amelioration occurred in 23 cases (14.1%. In univariate analysis, multiple procedures (p=0.023; HR: 5.4 and preoperative CKD (p=0.011; HR: 6.8 were associated with decreased renal function. In multivariate analysis these factors did not remain as predictive factors. Conclusion: Stone management with RIRS seems to have favorable outcomes on kidney function; however, special attention should be given to patients with multiple procedures and preoperative chronic kidney disease.

  15. Blood Transfusion Requirement and Not Preoperative Anemia Are Associated with Perioperative Complications Following Intracorporeal Robot-Assisted Radical Cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei Shen; Lamb, Benjamin W; Khetrapal, Pramit; Tan, Mae-Yen; Tan, Melanie El; Sridhar, Ashwin; Cervi, Elizabeth; Rodney, Simon; Busuttil, Gerald; Nathan, Senthil; Hines, John; Shaw, Greg; Mohammed, Anna; Baker, Hilary; Briggs, Timothy P; Klein, Andrew; Richards, Toby; Kelly, John D

    2017-02-01

    To assess the prevalence of preoperative anemia and the impact of preoperative anemia and blood transfusion requirement on 30- and 90-day complications in a cohort of patients undergoing robot-assisted radical cystectomy with intracorporeal urinary diversion (iRARC). IRARC was performed on 166 patients between June 2011 and March 2016. Prospective data were collected for patient demographics, clinical and pathologic characteristics, perioperative variables, transfusion requirements, and hospital length of stay. Thirty- and 90-day complications were classified according to the modified Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Clavien-Dindo system. Preoperative anemia was common (43.4%) and greatest in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (48.6%) (p blood transfusion (p = 0.001). Blood transfusion required in 20.4% of patients with intraoperative and postoperative blood transfusion rate was 10.2% and 13.9%, respectively. The 30-day all complication rate and 30-day major complication rate were 55.4% and 15.7%, respectively, while 90-day all complication rate and 90-day major complication rate were 65.7% and 19.3%, respectively. Intraoperative blood transfusion was not associated with increased complications, but postoperative blood transfusion requirement was independently associated with perioperative morbidity: all 30-day complications (p = 0.003), all 90-day complications (p = 0.009), and 90-day major complications (p = 0.004). The presence of preoperative anemia in patients undergoing iRARC is not associated with increased surgical risk, although preoperative anemic patients were significantly more likely to require blood transfusion. Blood transfusion requirement and specifically postoperative blood transfusion are independently associated with perioperative morbidity and are an important factor for the optimization of postoperative outcomes.

  16. Screening of illegal intracorporeal containers ("body packing"): is abdominal radiography sufficiently accurate? A comparative study with low-dose CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Canel, Laurent; Becker, Christoph D; Wolff, Hans; Elger, Bernice; Lock, Eric; Sarasin, François; Bonfanti, Monica S; Dupuis-Lozeron, Elise; Perneger, Thomas; Platon, Alexandra

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of abdominal radiography in the detection of illegal intracorporeal containers (hereafter, packets), with low-dose computed tomography (CT) as the reference standard. This study was approved by the institutional ethical review board, with written informed consent. From July 2007 to July 2010, 330 people (296 men, 34 women; mean age, 32 years [range, 18-55 years]) suspected of having ingested drug packets underwent supine abdominal radiography and low-dose CT. The presence or absence of packets at abdominal radiography was reported, with low-dose CT as the reference standard. The density and number of packets (≤ 12 or >12) at low-dose CT were recorded and analyzed to determine whether those variables influence interpretation of results at abdominal radiography. Packets were detected at low-dose CT in 53 (16%) suspects. Sensitivity of abdominal radiography for depiction of packets was 0.77 (41 of 53), and specificity was 0.96 (267 of 277). The packets appeared isoattenuated to the bowel contents at low-dose CT in 16 (30%) of the 53 suspects with positive results. Nineteen (36%) of the 53 suspects with positive low-dose CT results had fewer than 12 packets. Packets that were isoattenuated at low-dose CT and a low number of packets (≤12) were both significantly associated with false-negative results at abdominal radiography (P = .004 and P = .016, respectively). Abdominal radiography is mainly limited by low sensitivity when compared with low-dose CT in the screening of people suspected of carrying drug packets. Low-dose CT is an effective imaging alternative to abdominal radiography. © RSNA, 2012.

  17. Combined exposure to simulated microgravity and acute or chronic radiation reduces neuronal network integrity and cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benotmane, Rafi

    During orbital or interplanetary space flights, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiations and microgravity. This study aimed at assessing the effect of these combined conditions on neuronal network density, cell morphology and survival, using well-connected mouse cortical neuron cultures. To this end, neurons were exposed to acute low and high doses of low LET (X-rays) radiation or to chronic low dose-rate of high LET neutron irradiation (Californium-252), under the simulated microgravity generated by the Random Positioning Machine (RPM, Dutch space). High content image analysis of cortical neurons positive for the neuronal marker βIII-tubulin unveiled a reduced neuronal network integrity and connectivity, and an altered cell morphology after exposure to acute/chronic radiation or to simulated microgravity. Additionally, in both conditions, a defect in DNA-repair efficiency was revealed by an increased number of γH2AX-positive foci, as well as an increased number of Annexin V-positive apoptotic neurons. Of interest, when combining both simulated space conditions, we noted a synergistic effect on neuronal network density, neuronal morphology, cell survival and DNA repair. Furthermore, these observations are in agreement with preliminary gene expression data, revealing modulations in cytoskeletal and apoptosis-related genes after exposure to simulated microgravity. In conclusion, the observed in vitro changes in neuronal network integrity and cell survival induced by space simulated conditions provide us with mechanistic understanding to evaluate health risks and the development of countermeasures to prevent neurological disorders in astronauts over long-term space travels. Acknowledgements: This work is supported partly by the EU-FP7 projects CEREBRAD (n° 295552)

  18. Chronic risk assessment for the use of radiation in occupationally exposed personnel (OEP) in the oral health area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores H, C.; Huerta F, M. R.; Sosa A, M. A.; Diaz de Leon M, L. V.

    2017-10-01

    There is a scientific discordance in the amounts of radiation used in radio-diagnosis and received in practice by the occupationally exposed personnel (OEP), with the exception of radiologists who follow the safety and hygiene measures recommended by the regulations. The objective of this study was to quantify the risk of the OEP in the dental area by the use of ionizing radiation chronically. A fundamental variable to take into account in the study was the number of films taken day/shift. A comparative study was carried out, n = 70 study subjects. The information was collected by occupational clinical history, biological and occupational monitoring. The average age was 19.6 years for E-1 and E-2 was 50 years. The radiation emission in the calibrated equipment was 1.578 (Lp). The risk is 2:1 E-1:E-2. As a result of the study was found that in most cases the OEP does not use protection measures, only the patient. (Author)

  19. Cancer and non-cancer brain and eye effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picano, Eugenio; Vano, Eliseo; Domenici, Luciano; Bottai, Matteo; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle

    2012-04-27

    According to a fundamental law of radiobiology ("Law of Bergonié and Tribondeau", 1906), the brain is a paradigm of a highly differentiated organ with low mitotic activity, and is thus radio-resistant. This assumption has been challenged by recent evidence discussed in the present review. Ionizing radiation is an established environmental cause of brain cancer. Although direct evidence is lacking in contemporary fluoroscopy due to obvious sample size limitation, limited follow-up time and lack of focused research, anecdotal reports of clusters have appeared in the literature, raising the suspicion that brain cancer may be a professional disease of interventional cardiologists. In addition, although terminally differentiated neurons have reduced or mild proliferative capacity, and are therefore not regarded as critical radiation targets, adult neurogenesis occurs in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the olfactory bulb, and is important for mood, learning/memory and normal olfactory function, whose impairment is a recognized early biomarker of neurodegenerative diseases. The head doses involved in radiotherapy are high, usually above 2 Sv, whereas the low-dose range of professional exposure typically involves lifetime cumulative whole-body exposure in the low-dose range of brain equivalent dose around 500 mSv). At this point, a systematic assessment of brain (cancer and non-cancer) effects of chronic low-dose radiation exposure in interventional cardiologists and staff is needed.

  20. Occurrence of chronic esophageal ulcer after high dose rate intraluminal radiation therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soejima, Toshinori; Hirota, Saeko; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Obayashi, Kayoko; Takada, Yoshiki

    1995-01-01

    Ninety-eight patients with esophageal cancer were treated by high dose rate intraluminal radiation therapy at the Department of Radiology of the Hyogo Medical Center for Adults between January 1982 and December 1993. Twenty patients with complete response after intraluminal radiation therapy, who were followed up with esophageal fiberscopy in our institute, were reviewed. The one-year cumulative rate of occurrence of esophageal ulcers was 81%, and in 69% of the cases the ulcers occurred from 4 to 8 months after completion of intraluminal radiation therapy. We graded esophageal ulcer by fiberscopic findings. Grade 0 was defined as no ulcer, grade 1 as superficial ulcer, grade 2 as deep ulcer, grade 3 as circumferencial ulcer, and severe stenosis. Factors related to grade were studied, and shorter distances from the source to the surface of the mucosa and lower surface doses of intraluminal radiation therapy appear to reduce the severity as graded on the above scale, of the esophageal ulcer. Four of the five 2-year recurrence-free patients suffered esophageal ulcers, which were cured from 15 to 22 months after intraluminal radiation therapy. However ulcers recurred in two patients, ong term care was thought to be necessary. (author)

  1. Effects of chronic low-dose radiation exposure and non-radiation factors on eye pathology in the Techa River Cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikryukova, L.D.; Akleyev, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: As a result of the Mayak PA activities, radioactive wastes were discharged into the Techa River over the period 1949-1956. Data on eye pathology among Techa riverside residents chronically exposed to radiation (external and internal) have been collected and analyzed. The cohort which includes persons of the two genders born before 1950 gives one of the rare opportunities to assess the risk of late effects on human health associated with small-dose radiation exposure. Currently, the cohort numbers 29,749 individuals. In terms of ethnicity, 80 % of the cohort members are Slavs, and 20 % are Tartars and Bashkirs. The first study and analyses of eye pathology were conducted for this cohort during the period from 2001 through 2004. It was established that the cumulative rate of eye disease incidence increased with age and exposure dose. The relative risk value for development of ophthalmopathy among members of the study group was estimated taking into account the potential effects of gender, ethnicity and attained age. The relative risk value was 2.42 per 1 Gy of absorbed dose to soft tissues (95 % CI: 1.94; 3.03). With increase in attained age by 10 years an 8 % increase in the incidence of eye pathology was registered (p<0.001). The rate of eye disease incidence estimated for women was significantly higher than that for men (p<0.05 %). No significant differences were noted in the coefficient of eye disease incidence calculated for different ethnic groups. The structure of ophthalmopathy registered in residents of the Techa riverside villages chronically exposed in the dose range from 0 to 1,180 mGy is characterized by prevalence of cataracts, retinal and chorioid disorders. The rates of eye disease incidence were found to be dependent on external exposure dose; the highest doses were observed in the dose groups with doses 25 mGy. A statistically significant increase in the incidence of retinal angiosklerosis and a manifest tendency to develop cataracts was

  2. Laser Biophotometry in Assessing Microcirculation in Patients with Chronic Venous Insufficiency of Lower Limbs Against the Background of Non-ionizing Radiation Factors Application

    OpenAIRE

    Kukolnikova Е.L.; Zhukov B.N.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the research is to study by means of laser biophotometry the change dynamics of microcirculation indexes in patients with chronic venous insufficiency of lower limbs in complex treatment using non-ionizing radiation factors. Materials and Methods. There have been analyzed the examination and treatment results of 150 patients with chronic venous insufficiency of lower limbs over the period from 2006 to 2010. The dynamics of adaptive and compensatory capabilities of microcirculat...

  3. Adaptive response in frogs chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audette-Stuart, M.; Kim, S.B.; McMullin, D.; Festarini, A.; Yankovich, T.L.; Carr, J.; Mulpuru, S.

    2011-01-01

    Using the micronucleus assay, decreased levels of DNA damage were found after high dose ionizing radiation exposure of liver cells taken from frogs inhabiting a natural environment with above-background levels of ionizing radiation, compared to cells taken from frogs inhabiting background areas. The data obtained from a small number of animals suggest that stress present in the above-background environment could induce an adaptive response to ionizing radiation. This study did not reveal harmful effects of exposure to low levels of radioactivity. On the contrary, stress present in the above-background area may serve to enhance cellular defense mechanisms. - Highlights: → Frogs were collected from background and higher tritium level habitats. → The micronucleus assay was conducted on liver cells obtained from the frogs. → No detrimental effects were noted in frogs exposed to elevated tritium. → Adaptive responses were observed in frogs exposed to elevated tritium.

  4. Adaptive response in frogs chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audette-Stuart, M., E-mail: stuartm@aecl.ca [Environmental Technologies Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada); Kim, S.B.; McMullin, D.; Festarini, A.; Yankovich, T.L.; Carr, J.; Mulpuru, S. [Environmental Technologies Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Using the micronucleus assay, decreased levels of DNA damage were found after high dose ionizing radiation exposure of liver cells taken from frogs inhabiting a natural environment with above-background levels of ionizing radiation, compared to cells taken from frogs inhabiting background areas. The data obtained from a small number of animals suggest that stress present in the above-background environment could induce an adaptive response to ionizing radiation. This study did not reveal harmful effects of exposure to low levels of radioactivity. On the contrary, stress present in the above-background area may serve to enhance cellular defense mechanisms. - Highlights: > Frogs were collected from background and higher tritium level habitats. > The micronucleus assay was conducted on liver cells obtained from the frogs. > No detrimental effects were noted in frogs exposed to elevated tritium. > Adaptive responses were observed in frogs exposed to elevated tritium.

  5. Decision-making about chronic radiation exposure to the public: New recommendations from the ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.; Savkin, M.N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the recommendations of a new Publication 82 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) entitled 'Protection of the Public in Situations of Prolonged Radiation Exposure: The Application of the Commission's System of Radiological Protection to Controllable Radiation Exposure due to Natural Sources and Long Lived Radioactive Residues'. The report may have far reaching consequences for decision-makers dealing with the specific situations of the prolonged exposure of the public to relatively low levels of ionizing radiation, in particular, from high levels on natural background and from long-lived radioactive residues due to previous activities or accidents. The recommendations in the ICRP report are based on objective assessments of the health risks associated with prolonged exposure levels and on radiological protection attributes of various exposure situations. The decision-making process for the radiological protection of the public in situations of prolonged exposure may include the participation of relevant stakeholders rather than radiological protection specialists alone. (author)

  6. Evaluation of chromosomal aberrations in radiologists and medical radiographers chronically exposed to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuba, V.; Rozgaj, R.; Jazbec, A.

    2005-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are fairly reliable indicators of damage induced by ionising radiation. This study included 180 radiologists and medical radiographers (technicians) and 90 controls who were not occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. All exposed subjects were routinely monitored with film badge, and none was exposed to a radiation dose exceeding the limit for occupational exposure recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Two hundred metaphases for each person were scored. The frequencies of acentric fragments, dicentrics, ring chromosomes and chromosomal exchanges were determined and compared to those obtained in the control group. Chromosome aberrations were analysed using Poisson regression for profession, age, sex, smoking and years of exposure. Age, smoking, diagnostic exposure to X-rays and occupation were found to correlate with the occurrence of acentric fragments. The influence of exposure duration on the frequency of acentric fragments was greater in medical radiographers than in radiologists. Smoking and sex were found to correlate with the occurrence of dicentric chromosomes, which were more common in men than in women. As chromosome aberrations exceeded the expected level with respect to the absorbed dose, our findings confirm the importance of chromosome analysis as a part of regular medical check-up of subjects occupationally exposed to ionising radiation.(author)

  7. Lacunar infarction in brain tumor patients. Chronic stage complication after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazaki, Kiyoshi; Titoku, Shirou; Ota, Shinzou; Sato, Mitiyoshi; Kobanawa, Satoshi; Tutida, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Yasue; Goto, Katsuya; Ota, Taisei

    2007-01-01

    The authors reported two relatively young adults with lacunar infarction that took place many years after radiation therapy. The first case was that of a 41-year-old male presenting with a slight decrease in consciousness and right hemiparesis of sudden occurrence. MRI revealed a lacunar infarction in the left internal capsule. This patient had received radiation therapy and chemotherapy for a right basal ganglia germinoma when he was 24 years old. The tumor completely disappeared and he was able to return to work. The second case was a 24-year-old female presenting with dysesthesia in the right upper extremity and nausea of sudden occurrence. MRI disclosed a lacunar infarct in the right corona radiata. The patient had received radiation therapy for a suprasellar tumor when she was 11 years old. The tumor considerably decreased in size and the patient conducted normal social life thereafter. MRI showed a lacunar infarction in the right corona radiata. Review of the literature was made and the possibility of radiation therapy as a causative factor of the lacunar infarction in relatively young adults was discussed. (author)

  8. Efficacy of six weeks infrared radiation therapy on chronic low back ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of six weeks infrared radiation therapy on pain intensity and functional disability index in subjects suffering from ... pain level and functional disability scores were assessed using the lO point numerical rating pain scale and the Oswestry disability index questionnaire.

  9. Comparative investigations on xeroradiography and conventional X-radiation with chronical polyarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisl, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    We compared the roentgenologic and xeroradiographic findings of the hands of 50 patients suffering from polyarthritis. Both techniques were compared with respect to their imaging quality of roentgenologically significant alterations occurring with chronical polyarthritis. The superiority of xeroradiography bases on the better contour delineation facilities. Disadvantages are the loss of detailed information due to neutralisation effects and also to the impaired representation of areal density differences and of the absolute density of an object. The conventional roentgenologic method is superior with respect to the more informative imaging of areal density modifications, also to the partly better representation of cystic transluences and to a minor degree with respect to a more distinct reproduction of an atrophy of the subchondral lamina terminalis. However, in general it can be said that the results of the two compared techniques do not differ significantly. Consequently the traditional roentgenologic method appears to be the more suitable technique for the diagnosis of chronical polyarthritis. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Prospect, Practices and Safety for Quality Management of the Gamma Greenhouse, a Novel Facility for Chronic Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhar Mohamad; Sobri Hussein; Abdul Rahim Harun; Ahsanulkhaliqin Abdul Wahab

    2012-01-01

    Malaysia has a special facility for chronic irradiation, known as the Gamma Greenhouse (GGH), located at MINT-Tech Park in Jalan Dengkil, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia). The Gamma Greenhouse source of chronic irradiation comes from a 137 Cs double encapsulated 800 Ci Cesium-137 pencil, producing a low dose rate, which is considered to be more effective in recovering and producing useful mutants in comparison to acute irradiation at higher dose. The irradiation facility comprises an open-topped irradiation area, 30 m in diameter, protected by a partial concrete wall, with entrance maze and site topography. High safety features are in place, where the facility is protected by a sophisticated interlock system that only allows the source to be exposed when all the prerequisite safety conditions are met, and automatically returns the source to the safe storage position if any safety device is compromised. The main irradiation area is further protected by a 300 m diameter exclusion zone that is also protected by the safety interlock circuit. The facility can accommodate a wide range of plant materials such as seeds, seedlings in pots, cuttings, calluses, somatic embryos and suspension cell cultures. In practice, plant samples will be exposed to low dose gamma radiation over long periods of time (hours, weeks, months), depending on their nature and sensitivity. All procedures generate data for evaluation, which require accuracy; quality management is essential in irradiation service. The prospect of the gamma greenhouse is in research and services on induced mutation techniques for the improvement of plant varieties and microbe strains. Services are provided to academicians, planters, students and researchers working with plants and microorganisms. In addition, it is also useful in the teaching and training on breeding, nuclear and radiation technology. The activities in utilization the gamma greenhouse cover mainly Research and Development, Research

  11. Changes of some indicators of cellular immunity in rats under their chronic radiation and chemical exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvedov, V.L.; Anisimova, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    The experiments on rats exposed separately and in combination to radiation and chemical substances showed that the time of body pesticide intake (the total dose) was the leading factor affecting the phagocytosis indices. A daily pesticide dose had a credible impact on some indices. The combined effect was formed primarily due to chemical compounds. In general the effect could be regarded as less than additive though at some time it was additive and more than that

  12. Dynamics of organic matter in a Mediterranean mixed forest exposed to chronic gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabone, E.; Poinsot-Balaguer, N.

    1987-01-01

    An area of mixed forest [white oak (Quercus pubescens W.) and evergreen oak (Quercus ilex L.)] in Cadarache (Southern France) has been irradiated for 14 years by a 137 Cs source. Radiation effects on soil organic matter were investigaed at five stations along the gradient towards the source and in a control area of non-irradiatd forest. The highest radiation levels (60-100 mGy x h -1 ) killed trees and shrubs so that there were no ongoing litter inputs to soils in the three nearest stations to the source. Inputs from annuals and radiation tolerant perennials were insignificant in these sites. At lower radiation levels (15 mGy x h -1 ) litter standing crops are increasing. The carbon and nitrogen balance between input and the decomposition of organic matter showed two main patterns. In the areas without litter input the total C and N standing crops were significantly lower than in areas receiving litter, though maintained at a higher level than expected because of the residual organic matter from dead plants. Water trickling down the slope was also a source of N inputs. Principal components analysis showed ordination of the sites according to levels of irradiation and descriminating between C and N concentrations in sites according to litter inputs. On a basis of soil water contents the stations are located on the first axis according to soil organic matter concentrations. Irradiation has a range of direct and indirect effects on soil organic matter but lack of litter input is a key factor. (author)

  13. In-depth Critical Analysis of Complications Following Robot-assisted Radical Cystectomy with Intracorporeal Urinary Diversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei Shen; Lamb, Benjamin W; Tan, Mae-Yen; Ahmad, Imran; Sridhar, Ashwin; Nathan, Senthil; Hines, John; Shaw, Greg; Briggs, Timothy P; Kelly, John D

    2017-04-01

    Robot-assisted radical cystectomy with intracorporeal urinary diversion (iRARC) is an attractive option to open cystectomy, but the benefit in terms of improved outcomes is not established. To evaluate the early postoperative morbidity and mortality of patients undergoing iRARC and conduct a critical analysis of complications using standardised reporting criteria as stratified according to urinary diversion. A total of 134 patients underwent iRARC for bladder cancer at a single centre between June 2011 and July 2015. Radical cystectomy with iRARC. Patient demographics, pathologic data, and 90-d perioperative mortality and complications were recorded. Complications were reported according to the Clavien-Dindo (CD) classification and stratified according to urinary diversion type and either surgical or medical complications. The chi-square test and t test were used for categorical and continuous variables respectively. Multivariable logistic regression was performed on variables with significance in univariate analysis. The 90-d all complication rate following ileal conduit and continent diversion was 68% and 82.4%, and major complications were 21.0% and 20.6% respectively. The 90-d mortality was 3% and 2.9% for ileal conduit and continent diversion patients, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the blood transfusion requirement was independently associated with major complications (p=0.002) and all 30-d (p=0.002) and 90-d (p=0.012) major complications. Male patients were associated with 90-d major complications (p=0.015). Critical analysis identified that surgical complications were responsible for 39.4% of all 90-d major complications. The incidence of surgical complications did not decline with increasing number of iRARC cases performed (p=0.742, r=0.31). Limitations of this study include its retrospective nature, limited sample size, and limited multivariate analysis due to the low number of major complications events. Although complications following i

  14. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is implicated in the premature senescence of primary human endothelial cells exposed to chronic radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Yentrapalli

    Full Text Available The etiology of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease (CVD after chronic exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation is only marginally understood. We have previously shown that a chronic low-dose rate exposure (4.1 mGy/h causes human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs to prematurely senesce. We now show that a dose rate of 2.4 mGy/h is also able to trigger premature senescence in HUVECs, primarily indicated by a loss of growth potential and the appearance of the senescence-associated markers ß-galactosidase (SA-ß-gal and p21. In contrast, a lower dose rate of 1.4 mGy/h was not sufficient to inhibit cellular growth or increase SA-ß-gal-staining despite an increased expression of p21. We used reverse phase protein arrays and triplex Isotope Coded Protein Labeling with LC-ESI-MS/MS to study the proteomic changes associated with chronic radiation-induced senescence. Both technologies identified inactivation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway accompanying premature senescence. In addition, expression of proteins involved in cytoskeletal structure and EIF2 signaling was reduced. Age-related diseases such as CVD have been previously associated with increased endothelial cell senescence. We postulate that a similar endothelial aging may contribute to the increased rate of CVD seen in populations chronically exposed to low-dose-rate radiation.

  15. Cancer and non-cancer brain and eye effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picano, Eugenio; Vano, Eliseo; Domenici, Luciano; Bottai, Matteo; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    According to a fundamental law of radiobiology (“Law of Bergonié and Tribondeau”, 1906), the brain is a paradigm of a highly differentiated organ with low mitotic activity, and is thus radio-resistant. This assumption has been challenged by recent evidence discussed in the present review. Ionizing radiation is an established environmental cause of brain cancer. Although direct evidence is lacking in contemporary fluoroscopy due to obvious sample size limitation, limited follow-up time and lack of focused research, anecdotal reports of clusters have appeared in the literature, raising the suspicion that brain cancer may be a professional disease of interventional cardiologists. In addition, although terminally differentiated neurons have reduced or mild proliferative capacity, and are therefore not regarded as critical radiation targets, adult neurogenesis occurs in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the olfactory bulb, and is important for mood, learning/memory and normal olfactory function, whose impairment is a recognized early biomarker of neurodegenerative diseases. The head doses involved in radiotherapy are high, usually above 2 Sv, whereas the low-dose range of professional exposure typically involves lifetime cumulative whole-body exposure in the low-dose range of < 200 mSv, but with head exposure which may (in absence of protection) arrive at a head equivalent dose of 1 to 3 Sv after a professional lifetime (corresponding to a brain equivalent dose around 500 mSv). At this point, a systematic assessment of brain (cancer and non-cancer) effects of chronic low-dose radiation exposure in interventional cardiologists and staff is needed

  16. Consequences and outcomes of chronic radiation sickness induced by external γ-rays(50 years of clinical follow-up)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okladnikova, Nadezhda D.; Sumina, Margarita V.; Pesternikova, Valentina S.

    2002-01-01

    Health was analyzed for 673 workers of the first Russian nuclear facility. These nuclear workers had CRS induced by external overall exposure to γ -rays in high doses (total, 1.0-9.76 Gy). The study was focused on evaluation of the post-exposure recovery in most radiosensitive systems and organs, consequences and outcomes of chronic radiation sickness (CRS). The complex evaluation of peripheral blood data and results of bone marrow studies revealed a moderately pronounced bone marrow hypoplasia for 2% of cases and partial hypoplasia of granulocytopoiesis for 4.9% of cases (most patients aged over 70). The changes were clinically compensated and did not require any special treatment. Chromosome aberrations in somatic cells are still indicators of radiation past-exposures; their frequency has a correlation with total dose and 239 Pu incorporation. No high incidence of complications such as cerebrovasciular diseases (CVD) was revealed for CRS patients with high doses (total dose exceeded 4.0 Gy, maximum annual dose exceeded 2.0 Gy) and clinical symptoms of the early (up to 45 years) cerebral atherosclerosis (CAS). The retrospective analysis of clinical data for 370 CRS cases registered during 1950-60ss among workers with lower doses indicated that the moderately pronounced symptoms of CRS were formed at dose not less than 1.4 Gy accumulated during the first 1-2 years of work and annual dose, 0.73 Gy. Cardiovascular diseases prevailed followed by malignant neoplasms in the structure of death causes during 50 years of follow-up. Presented results for the cohort of individuals exposed in high doses can be used in health examination of those, who were involved in radiation accidents or exposure incidents

  17. A case of chronic progressive radiation myelopathy with a CT myelogram simulating intramedullary tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemaru, Kazutomi; Kamo, Hisaki; Yamao, Satoshi; Akiguchi, Ichiro; Kameyama, Masakuni

    1985-01-01

    A 58-year-old man underwent a right middle lobectomy in June, 1975, for poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the lung. Postoperative irradiation was given to the hilus (6100 rads), and to the right supraclavicular area (6000 rads). In 1980, 60 months after completion of irradiation, the patient noticed weakness of his legs particularly on the left side. In 1982, he noticed the girdle sensation in the upper thoracic region, and paresthesia in the lateral side of the right thigh. In Dec 1983, micturition disturbance appeared, and gait disturbance progressed, he was admitted to the Kyoto University Hospital. Neurological examination revealed an incomplete left Brown-Sequard syndrome with diminution of pain and thermal sensation on the right lower limb, and weakness and spasticity particularly on the left lower limb. Conventional myelogram with CT myelogram showed spinal cord swelling from T-2 through T-5. No extramedullary lesion was found. Laminectomy was performed through T-1 to T-6. When the dura was opened, the cord was swollen and necrotic with a cyst formation. Microscopic examination of the thickened part of the cord showed necrosis and gliosis. The lesion was correspond to the cord segments exposed to the radiation, and a diagnosis of radiation myelopathy was made. Several cases of radiation myelopathy with definite swelling of the cord at myelography were reported, but myelography in these cases was performed at most within 11 months after the onset. In this case, myelography was performed three years after the onset, and revealed difinite swelling of the cord due to a cyst formation. (author)

  18. Case of chronic progressive radiation myelopathy with a CT myelogram simulating intramedullary tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanemaru, Kazutomi; Kamo, Hisaki; Yamao, Satoshi; Akiguchi, Ichiro; Kameyama, Masakuni

    1985-05-01

    A 58-year-old man underwent a right middle lobectomy in June, 1975, for poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the lung. Postoperative irradiation was given to the hilus (6100 rads), and to the right supraclavicular area (6000 rads). In 1980, 60 months after completion of irradiation, the patient noticed weakness of his legs particularly on the left side. In 1982, he noticed the girdle sensation in the upper thoracic region, and paresthesia in the lateral side of the right thigh. In Dec 1983, micturition disturbance appeared, and gait disturbance progressed, he was admitted to the Kyoto University Hospital. Neurological examination revealed an incomplete left Brown-Sequard syndrome with diminution of pain and thermal sensation on the right lower limb, and weakness and spasticity particularly on the left lower limb. Conventional myelogram with CT myelogram showed spinal cord swelling from T-2 through T-5. No extramedullary lesion was found. Laminectomy was performed through T-1 to T-6. When the dura was opened, the cord was swollen and necrotic with a cyst formation. Microscopic examination of the thickened part of the cord showed necrosis and gliosis. The lesion was correspond to the cord segments exposed to the radiation, and a diagnosis of radiation myelopathy was made. Several cases of radiation myelopathy with definite swelling of the cord at myelography were reported, but myelography in these cases was performed at most within 11 months after the onset. In this case, myelography was performed three years after the onset, and revealed difinite swelling of the cord due to a cyst formation. (author).

  19. Impact of chronic, low-level ionising radiation exposure on terrestrial invertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hingston, J.; Wood, M.D.; Copplestone, D.; Zinger, I. [Liverpool Univ., School of Biological Sciences, Merseyside (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    There is a need to confirm that the environment is being adequately protected from the mixture of contaminants released into it. In the field of environmental radioactivity, tools have been developed to assess the impacts of ionising radiation on wildlife. The scientific data upon which these assessments are based is, however, lacking. New documentation has been produced by the UK Environment Agency to provide guidelines on structuring experiments (using environmentally relevant doses) and select suitable non-human species and endpoints for study. It is anticipated that this documentation will be used to direct future experiments in this field. This paper presents the results of the first of these experiments. Numbers of the earthworm Eisenia fetida and the wood louse Porcellio scaber were segregated and constantly exposed to one of six radiation doses (background, 0.1, 0.4, 1.5, 4.0 and 8.0 mGyh{sup -1}) for a total of 16 and 14 weeks respectively. The endpoints of mortality, number of viable offspring and average weight of an individual were recorded and the results of this study will be discussed here. (author)

  20. Effect of chronic low dose natural radiation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: Evaluation of DNA damage and repair using the alkaline comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P.R. Vivek, E-mail: prvkumar06@gmail.com [Low Level Radiation Research Laboratory, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, IRE Campus, Beach Road, Kollam 691 001, Kerala (India); Seshadri, M. [Low Level Radiation Research Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Jaikrishan, G. [Low Level Radiation Research Laboratory, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, IRE Campus, Beach Road, Kollam 691 001, Kerala (India); Das, Birajalaxmi [Low Level Radiation Research Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Effect of chronic low dose natural radiation in radio adaptive response studied. • PBMCs of subjects from NLNRA and HLNRA were challenged with gamma radiation. • DNA damage and repair in PBMCs was compared using the alkaline comet assay. • Significant reduction in DNA damage in subjects of high dose group from HLNRA noted. • Probable induction of an in vivo radio adaptive response in subjects from HLNRA. - Abstract: This study investigates whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from inhabitants of Kerala in southwest India, exposed to chronic low dose natural radiation in vivo (>1 mSv year{sup −1}), respond with a radioadaptive response to a challenging dose of gamma radiation. Toward this goal, PBMCs isolated from 77 subjects from high-level natural radiation areas (HLNRA) and 37 subjects from a nearby normal level natural radiation area (NLNRA) were challenged with 2 Gy and 4 Gy gamma radiation. Subjects from HLNRA were classified based on the mean annual effective dose received, into low dose group (LDG) and high dose group (HDG) with mean annual effective doses of 2.69 mSv (N = 43, range 1.07 mSv year{sup −1} to 5.55 mSv year{sup −1}) and 9.62 mSv (N = 34, range 6.07 mSv year{sup −1} to17.41 mSv year{sup −1}), respectively. DNA strand breaks and repair kinetics (at 7 min, 15 min and 30 min after 4 Gy) were evaluated using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. Initial levels of DNA strand breaks observed after either a 2 Gy or a 4 Gy challenging dose were significantly lower in subjects of the HDG from HLNRA compared to subjects of NLNRA (2 Gy, P = 0.01; 4 Gy, P = 0.02) and LDG (2 Gy P = 0.01; 4 Gy, P = 0.05). Subjects of HDG from HLNRA showed enhanced rejoining of DNA strand breaks (HDG/NLNRA, P = 0.06) during the early stage of repair (within 7 min). However at later times a similar rate of rejoining of strand breaks was observed across the groups (HDG, LDG and NLNRA). Preliminary results from

  1. Solid cancer mortality associated with chronic external radiation exposure at the French atomic energy commission and nuclear fuel company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz-Flamant, C; Samson, E; Caër-Lorho, S; Acker, A; Laurier, D

    2011-07-01

    nuclear workers, which should improve knowledge about the risks associated with chronic low doses and provide useful risk estimates for radiation protection.

  2. Anorectal function following colo-anal sleeve anastomosis for chronic radiation injury to the rectum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varma, J.S.; Smith, A.N.

    1986-04-01

    This paper reports the results of anorectal manometry and electrophysiological studies of the pelvic floor in eight patients who had undergone anterior resection of the rectum with mucosal proctectomy and colo-anal sleeve anastomosis for radiation rectal injury. The group comprised six women and two men (age range 61-84 years, mean 71 years). Six bladder carcinoma patients had received small field (10 x 10 cm) external beam radiotherapy (5500 cGy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks); two cervical cancer patients had been given whole pelvis, external beam radiotherapy supplemented by a single caesium implant (cumulative dosage of 9500 cGy to the vaginal vault, equivalent to 7500 cG to point A).

  3. Anorectal function following colo-anal sleeve anastomosis for chronic radiation injury to the rectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, J.S.; Smith, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports the results of anorectal manometry and electrophysiological studies of the pelvic floor in eight patients who had undergone anterior resection of the rectum with mucosal proctectomy and colo-anal sleeve anastomosis for radiation rectal injury. The group comprised six women and two men (age range 61-84 years, mean 71 years). Six bladder carcinoma patients had received small field (10 x 10 cm) external beam radiotherapy (5500 cGy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks); two cervical cancer patients had been given whole pelvis, external beam radiotherapy supplemented by a single caesium implant (cumulative dosage of 9500 cGy to the vaginal vault, equivalent to 7500 cG to point A). (UK)

  4. Atrophy of sacrospinal muscle groups in patients with chronic, diffusely radiating lumbar back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laasonen, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    After surgery necessitated by lumbar back pain syndromes, radiolucency verified by CT may appear in the sacrospinal muscle group on the operate side. This radiolucency represents muscular atrophy and is in its most severe form a result of the replacement of muscle tissue with adipose tissue. Such muscular atrophy appeared in the present series in 31 out of all 156 patients (19.9%) and in 29 out of 94 patients operated on because of radiating lumbar back pain (30.9%). The radiological appearance, extent, and HU values of this muscular atrophy are presented in detail. Only weak correlations with the multitude of clinical symptoms and signs were found in this retrospective study. The effects of irreversible muscular atrophy on the indications for surgery and physiotherapy are discussed.

  5. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  6. Chronic radiation injury with mice and dogs exposed to external whole-body irradiation at the Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahn, D.; Fritz, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    This document describes studies on chronic radiation injury in experimental animals and the extrapolation of derived injury parameters to man. Most of the large studies have used mice given single, weekly, or continuous exposure to cobalt-60 gamma rays, or, more recently, single or weekly exposure to fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor. Primary measures of injury have been life shortening and the associated major pathological changes, particularly neoplastic diseases. Recent and ongoing studies compare the effects of extremely low neutron exposures with gamma irradiations delivered as a single dose or in 60 equal weekly increments. Total neutron doses range from 1 to 40 rads; gamma-ray doses range from 22.5 to 600 rads. Selected genetic studies are performed concurrently to provide a nearly complete matrix of somatic and genetic effects of these low exposures. Studies with the beagle have complemented those with mice and have shown a strong parallelism in the responses of the two species. Present exposures are at 0.3, 0.75, and 1.88 rads per day of continuous gamma irradiation to test a model for the prediction of life shortening in man which has evolved from Argonne's long-term studies. The dog offers the opportunity for longitudinal clinical evaluations that are not possible in the mouse, to develop a broader view of the neoplastic disease spectrum, and to study the mechanisms of radiation induction of leukemia. Diverse statistical approaches have been used to measure excess risk, dose-response functions, and rates of injury and repair. Actuarial statistical methods have been favored since they permit a more direct means of extrapolation to man. 50 refs., 4 figs

  7. Progression from laparoscopic-assisted to totally laparoscopic distal gastrectomy: comparison of circular stapler (i-DST) and linear stapler (BBT) for intracorporeal anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Tetsuo; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Hisamatsu, Yuichi; Ando, Koji; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Ohga, Takefumi; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Tsujitani, Shunichi; Kohnoe, Shunji; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Billroth I (B-I) gastroduodenostomy is an anastomotic procedure that is widely performed after gastric resection for distal gastric cancer. A circular stapler often is used for B-I gastroduodenostomy in open and laparoscopic-assisted distal gastrectomy. Recently, totally laparoscopic distal gastrectomy (TLDG) has been considered less invasive than laparoscopic-assisted gastrectomy, and many institutions performing laparoscopic-assisted distal gastrectomy are trying to progress to TLDG without markedly changing the anastomosis method. The purpose of this report is to introduce the technical details of new methods of intracorporeal gastroduodenostomy using either a circular or linear stapler and to evaluate their technical feasibility and safety. Seventeen patients who underwent TLDG with the intracorporeal double-stapling technique using a circular stapler (n = 7) or the book-binding technique (BBT) using a linear stapler (n = 10) between February 2010 and April 2011 were enrolled in the study. Clinicopathological data, surgical data, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed. There were no intraoperative complications or conversions to open surgery in any of the 17 patients. The usual postoperative complications following gastroduodenostomy, such as anastomotic leakage and stenosis, were not observed. Anastomosis took significantly longer to complete with DST (64 ± 24 min) than with BBT (34 ± 7 min), but more stapler cartridges were needed with BBT than with DST. TLDG using a circular or linear stapler is feasible and safe to perform. DST will enable institutions performing laparoscopic-assisted distal gastrectomy with circular staplers to progress to TLDG without problems, and this progression may be more economical because fewer stapler cartridges are used during surgery. However, if an institution has already been performing δ anastomosis in TLDG but has been experiencing certain issues with δ anastomosis, converting from δ anastomosis to BBT should be

  8. Changes in liver stiffness measurement using acoustic radiation force impulse elastography after antiviral therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Hung Chen

    Full Text Available To compare on-treatment and off-treatment parameters acquired using acoustic radiation force impulse elastography, the Fibrosis-4 (FIB-4 index, and aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC.Patients received therapies based on pegylated interferon or direct-acting antiviral agents. The changes in paired patient parameters, including liver stiffness (LS values, the FIB-4 index, and APRI, from baseline to sustained virologic response (SVR visit (24 weeks after the end of treatment were compared. Multiple regression models were used to identify significant factors that explained the correlations with LS, FIB-4, and APRI values and SVR.A total of 256 patients were included, of which 219 (85.5% achieved SVR. The paired LS values declined significantly from baseline to SVR visit in all groups and subgroups except the nonresponder subgroup (n = 10. Body mass index (P = 0.0062 and baseline LS (P < 0.0001 were identified as independent factors that explained the LS declines. Likewise, the baseline FIB-4 (P < 0.0001 and APRI (P < 0.0001 values independently explained the declines in the FIB-4 index and APRI, respectively. Moreover, interleukin-28B polymorphisms, baseline LS, and rapid virologic response were identified as independent correlates with SVR.Paired LS measurements in patients treated for CHC exhibited significant declines comparable to those in FIB-4 and APRI values. These declines may have correlated with the resolution of necroinflammation. Baseline LS values predicted SVR.

  9. Aspects of fitness of a mosquitofish Gambusia affinis population exposed to chronic low-level environmental radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trabalka, J.R.; Allen, C.P.

    1977-01-01

    Aspects of fitness of field and laboratory-reared populations of mosquitofish Gambusia affinis from a lake chronically contaminated with radioactive wastes were compared with control populations. The measured dose rate to the field population at the end of the study was 59 mrad/day, primarily received from γ irradiation from contaminated bottom sediments. Fecundity of the laboratory-reared irradiated and control groups did not differ significantly. This suggests that the higher fecundity of the irradiated field population previously reported by Blaylock is a response to high productivity in its eutrophic environment produced by nonradiological causes. The increased frequency of dead embryos relative to controls, which indicates the presence of radiation-induced recessive lethal mutations, has been maintained in the irradiated population since initial studies conducted in 1966. Significantly higher variance of certain morphological and physicological characteristics in laboratory-reared populations taken from the irradiated environment suggests increased heterozygosity resulting from the genetic load, coupled with semidominant effects of recessive lethals in the heterozygous condition. The field population is thriving, which is another indication that genetic load is not an index of population fitness

  10. Study of multi-generational effects of a chronic exposure to ionizing radiations at a model organism: the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buisset-Goussen, Adeline

    2014-01-01

    The environmental risk assessment of chronic exposure to ionizing radiation (natural and ubiquitous phenomenon enhanced by human activities) has become a major concern. Few studies relating to chronic exposure over several generations - essential knowledge to better understand the disruption caused by ionizing radiation and its possible consequences on the population - exist. In addition, it has become necessary to understand the mechanisms of disturbances related to ionizing radiation at the molecular and cellular level. Without this mechanistic understanding, it is difficult to extrapolate the effects observed between the different levels of biological organization and between different species. The aim of this PhD was to study the multi-generational effects of chronic gamma radiation in an integrated manner (to the life history traits from the subcellular mechanisms) in a model organism, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. A two-step strategy was implemented. First, studying the effects of chronic gamma radiation on the life history traits of C. elegans was performed. The objective of this experiment was to test the hypothesis of an increase of the sensitivity according generations. For that, three generations have been exposed to different dose rates. In parallel, two generations have been placed in 'control' environment after parental exposure to test a possible transmission of maternal effects. The second part of this thesis aimed to characterize the different subcellular mechanisms that could explain the observed effects on the life history traits after multi-generational exposure. The results showed that (i) the cumulative number of larvae was the most sensitive endpoint to gamma radiation, (ii) an increase in radiosensitivity was observed over three exposed generations and (iii) the effects of the parental generation were transmitted to the non-exposed generations. An increase in apoptosis, a reduction in the stock of sperm, and to a lesser

  11. Chronic radiation exposure: possibility of studying mutation process in generations based on the established DNA bank of exposed individuals and their offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusinova, Galina G.; Adamova, Galina V.; Dudchenko, Natalya N.; Azizova, Tamara V.; Kurbatov, Andrey V.

    2002-01-01

    Data were summarized on the DNA Bank establishment for workers of the Mayak nuclear facility in Southern Ural, who were exposed to different doses of chronic radiation from γ -rays during the first years of the enterprise operations (1948-1958) and their families. Some workers were exposed to combined radiation (external + internal radiation from incorporated 239 Pu). The DNA Bank was established to store the unique genetic material from these individuals and their offspring for future risk estimation of the late consequences of radiation exposure using modern molecular-genetic technologies. Today, DNA Bank contains genetic material from 1,500 individuals and 218 families. The computer database was generated for the DNA Bank. It included individual medical-demographic, occupational descriptions and doses, quantitative and qualitative DNA data. Literature data on radiation-induced genome instability (variability of hypervariable areas) were also analyzed. Prospects of the DNA Bank establishment are also presented. The work is carried out on extension of the DNA Bank of exposed individuals and their offspring

  12. Investigation of genomic instability by assay of DNA fingerprint from the offspring of male mice exposed to chronic low-level γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezlepkin, V.G.; Vasil'eva, G.V.; Lomaeva, M.G.; Sirota, N.P.; Gaziev, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    By polymerase chain reaction with arbitrary primer (AP-PCR), the possibility of transmission of genome instability to somatic cells of the offspring (F 1 generation) from male parents of mice exposed to chronic low-dose γ-radiation was studied. Male mice 15 days after exposure to 10-50 cGy were mated with unirradiated females. Biopsies were taken from tale tips of two month-old mice progeny for DNA separation. Primer in the AP-PCR was 20-mer oligonucleotide flanking the micro-satellite locus Atplb2 on chromosome 11 of the mouse. Comparative analysis of individual fingerprints of AP-PCR products on DNA-templates from the offspring of irradiated and unirradiated male mice revealed an increased variability of micro-satellite-associated sequences in the genome of the offspring of males exposed to 25 and 50 cGy. DNA-fingerprints of the offspring of male mice exposed to chronic irradiation doses 10 and 25 cGy. 15 days before fertilization (at the post-meiotic stage of spermatogenesis) showed an increased frequency of non-parent bands. Result of the study point to the possibility of transmission to the offspring somatic cells of changes increasing genome instability from male parents exposed to chronic low-dose radiation prior to fertilization [ru

  13. Evaluation of the impact of the urinary symptoms on quality of life of patients with painful bladder syndrome/chronic pelvic pain and radiation cystitis: EURCIS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapariz-González, M; Castro-Díaz, D; Mejía-Rendón, D

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of urinary symptoms of Painful Bladder/Pelvic Pain Syndrome and Radiation Cystitis (PBCPPS) on the Quality of Life, and self-esteem of the patient. An observational, multicenter, epidemiological and cross-sectional study was performed on patients with Painful Bladder/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome and Radiation Cystitis. Data was recorded on severity of urinary symptoms and QoL impairment using the PUF Score. The patients evaluated the QoL deterioration grade through the King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ), and the level of their anxiety and self-esteem with the Goldberg's Anxiety Scale (GAS) and Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), respectively. Post-hoc comparisons were performed between the results of the KHQ of this study and a sample of patients with urinary incontinence (UI). Results on RSES were analyzed with data from the general population and from patients with erectile dysfunction. A total of 530 cases, mostly female patients, who had been diagnosed with PBCPPS, were analyzed. High levels of deterioration in QoL were described: KHQ scores were significantly higher when compared with patients with UI (PBladder Syndrome/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome and Radiation Cystitis present high levels of anxiety, and significant reductions in both quality of life and self-esteem. Especially for men, this affectation is similar to that caused by erectile dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Combined effect of the environmental factors as ionizing radiation and a chronic iodine deficiency on the thyroid gland and the immune condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danyarova, L. [Department of Endocrynology, Research Institute of Cardiology and Internal Medicine, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2012-07-01

    The Semipalatinsk Test Site was the primary testing venue for the Soviet Union's nuclear weapons. It is located on the steppe in northeast Kazakhstan. The tragic situation of the Semipalatinsk region is an acute and chronic radiation, repeated in big and small doses and a total absence of territorial decontamination, created unique conditions for study of the long term influence of the radiation doses on the health of the population. The Semipalatinsk region of the Republic of Kazakhstan belongs also to an area of moderate and pronounced iodine deficiency. The purpose of the research is to study the prevalence of a thyroid gland pathology and the condition of a cytokine immune link that is likely to be influenced by a combine effect of ionizing radiation and a chronic iodine deficiency. 1100 people passed through the investigation and it appears that 56, 75% of them had a thyroid pathology. Thyroid gland functional condition analysis (TSH, FT3, FT4 a-TG, a-TPO) has shown the prevalence of a subclinical hypothyroidism (33%). 28, 8% resulted in the presence of antibodies to thyroglobulin and the thyroid peroxides, whereas in the areas located further to the nuclear range, the percentage was only 13, 0%

  15. Effects of acute and chronic exposure to both 900 MHz and 2100 MHz electromagnetic radiation on glutamate receptor signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçek-Saraç, Çiğdem; Er, Hakan; Kencebay Manas, Ceren; Kantar Gok, Deniz; Özen, Şükrü; Derin, Narin

    2017-09-01

    To demonstrate the molecular effects of acute and chronic exposure to both 900 and 2100 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR) on the hippocampal level/activity of some of the enzymes - including PKA, CaMKIIα, CREB, and p44/42 MAPK - from N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-related signaling pathways. Rats were divided into the following groups: sham rats, and rats exposed to 900 and 2100 MHz RF-EMR for 2 h/day for acute (1 week) or chronic (10 weeks), respectively. Western blotting and activity measurement assays were used to assess the level/activity of the selected enzymes. The obtained results revealed that the hippocampal level/activity of selected enzymes was significantly higher in the chronic groups as compared to the acute groups at both 900 and 2100 MHz RF-EMR exposure. In addition, hippocampal level/activity of selected enzymes was significantly higher at 2100 MHz RF-EMR than 900 MHz RF-EMR in both acute and chronic groups. The present study provides experimental evidence that both exposure duration (1 week versus 10 weeks) and different carrier frequencies (900 vs. 2100 MHz) had different effects on the protein expression of hippocampus in Wistar rats, which might encourage further research on protection against RF-EMR exposure.

  16. Comparison of Intracorporeal and Extracorporeal Esophagojejunostomy after Laparoscopic Total Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis Based on Short-Term Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xue-Yong; Pan, Yu; Chen, Ke; Gao, Jia-Qi; Cai, Xiu-Jun

    2018-03-20

    Laparoscopic total gastrectomy (LTG) is increasingly performed in patients with gastric cancer. However, the usage of intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy (IEJ) following LTG is limited, as the safety and efficacy remain unclear. The present meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of IEJ following LTG. Studies published from January 1994 to January 2017 comparing the outcomes of IEJ and extracorporeal esophagojejunostomy (EEJ) following LTG were reviewed and collected from the PubMed, EBSCO, Cochrane Library, Embase, and China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI). Operative results, postoperative recovery, and postoperative complications were compared and analyzed. The weighted mean difference (WMD) and odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using the Review Manager 5.3. Seven nonrandomized studies with 785 patients were included. Compared with EEJ, IEJ has less blood loss (WMD: -13.52 ml; 95% CI: -24.82--2.22; P = 0.02), earlier time to first oral intake (WMD: -0.49 day; 95% CI: -0.83--0.14; P 0.05). Compared with EEJ, IEJ has better cosmesis, milder surgical trauma, and a faster postoperative recovery. IEJ can be performed as safely as EEJ. IEJ should be encouraged to surgeons with sufficient expertise.

  17. Comparison of single-stapling and hemi-double-stapling methods for intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy using a circular stapler after totally laparoscopic total gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amisaki, Masataka; Kihara, Kyoichi; Endo, Kanenori; Suzuki, Kazunori; Nakamura, Seiichi; Sawata, Takashi; Shimizu, Tetsu

    2016-07-01

    Laparoscopic total gastrectomy is not widely performed because of the difficulty of esophagojejunal reconstruction. This study analyzed complication rates of two different methods for reconstruction by a circular stapler after totally laparoscopic total gastrectomy (TLTG). Between 2010 and 2014, clinical data of 19 patients who underwent TLTG for gastric adenocarcinoma were collected retrospectively. There were two methods to fix the anvil of a circular stapler into the distal esophagus: In the single-stapling technique (SST) group, Endo-PSI(II) was used for purse-suturing on the distal esophagus for reconstruction, and in the hemi-double-stapling technique (hemi-DST) group, the esophagus was cut by linear stapler with the entry hole of the anvil shaft opened after inserting the anvil tail. In both groups, surgical procedures were the same, except for the reconstruction. All TLTGs were performed securely without mortality. Intracorporeal laparoscopic esophagojejunal anastomosis was performed successfully for all the patients. In the hemi-DST group, four patients experienced anastomotic stenosis, three of whom required endoscopic balloon dilation. In contrast, no stenosis was seen in the SST group (p = 0.033). Anastomosis with SST is preferred to that with hemi-DST to minimize postoperative complications.

  18. Human circulating plasma DNA significantly decreases while lymphocyte DNA damage increases under chronic occupational exposure to low-dose gamma-neutron and tritium β-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzeneva, Inna B., E-mail: inna.korzeneva@molgen.vniief.ru [Russian Federal Nuclear Center – All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF) 607190, Sarov, 37 Mira ave., Nizhniy Novgorod Region (Russian Federation); Kostuyk, Svetlana V.; Ershova, Liza S. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 115478 Moscow, 1 Moskvorechye str. (Russian Federation); Osipov, Andrian N. [Federal Medial and Biological Center named after Burnazyan of the Federal Medical and Biological Agency (FMBTz named after Burnazyan of FMBA), Moscow (Russian Federation); State Research Center - Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of Federal Medical Biological Agency, Zhivopisnaya, 46, Moscow, 123098 (Russian Federation); Zhuravleva, Veronika F.; Pankratova, Galina V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center – All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF) 607190, Sarov, 37 Mira ave., Nizhniy Novgorod Region (Russian Federation); Porokhovnik, Lev N.; Veiko, Natalia N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 115478 Moscow, 1 Moskvorechye str. (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The chronic exposure to low-dose IR induces DSBs in human lymphocytes (TM index). • Exposure to IR decreases the level of human circulating DNA (cfDNA index). • IR induces an increase of DNase1 activity (DNase1 index) in plasma. • IR induces an increase of the level of antibodies to DNA (Ab DNA index) in plasma. • The ratio cfDNA/(DNase 1 × Ab DNA × TM) is a potential marker of human exposure to IR. - Abstract: The blood plasma of healthy people contains cell-fee (circulating) DNA (cfDNA). Apoptotic cells are the main source of the cfDNA. The cfDNA concentration increases in case of the organism’s cell death rate increase, for example in case of exposure to high-dose ionizing radiation (IR). The objects of the present research are the blood plasma and blood lymphocytes of people, who contacted occupationally with the sources of external gamma/neutron radiation or internal β-radiation of tritium N = 176). As the controls (references), blood samples of people, who had never been occupationally subjected to the IR sources, were used (N = 109). With respect to the plasma samples of each donor there were defined: the cfDNA concentration (the cfDNA index), DNase1 activity (the DNase1 index) and titre of antibodies to DNA (the Ab DNA index). The general DNA damage in the cells was defined (using the Comet assay, the tail moment (TM) index). A chronic effect of the low-dose ionizing radiation on a human being is accompanied by the enhancement of the DNA damage in lymphocytes along with a considerable cfDNA content reduction, while the DNase1 content and concentration of antibodies to DNA (Ab DNA) increase. All the aforementioned changes were also observed in people, who had not worked with the IR sources for more than a year. The ratio cfDNA/(DNase1 × Ab DNA × TM) is proposed to be used as a marker of the chronic exposure of a person to the external low-dose IR. It was formulated the assumption that the joint analysis of the cfDNA, DNase1, Ab

  19. Nonmonotonous changes of thymus nuclei lipid metabolism upon chronic gamma-radiation of rats at a dose-rate of 3 c Gy/Day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulagina, T.P.; Kolomijtseva, I.K.; Moiseeva, S.A.; Kuzin, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The dynamics of changes in the thymus nuclei lipid metabolism under chronic gamma-radiation in low doses with the dose rate of 3 cGy/day is studied. It is shown, that at the 25 cGy dose rate there takes place activation of exchange in the fatly-acid part of the phospholipid molecule with simultaneous activation of the cholesterol and fatty acids synthesis. The synthesis of cholesterol and fatty acids at 50 cGy remains activated, whereas metabolism of the fatty-acid part of the phospholipids molecule is sharply depressed. The identified changes reveal the similarity with the processes, proceeding by the apoptose induction. At the same time the dynamics of the thymocyte nuclei lipid exchange in the process of adaptation to the long radiation effect as nonmonotonous metabolic response to low dose impact is characterized for the first time [ru

  20. Use of Human Cadaveric Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cell Therapy of a Chronic Radiation-Induced Skin Lesion: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portas, M.; Coppola, A.; Mansilla, E.; Drago, H.; Dubner, D.; Radl, A.; Di Giorgio, M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute and late radiation-induced injury on skin and subcutaneous tissues are associated with substantial morbidity in radiation therapy, interventional procedures and also are of concern in the context of nuclear or radiological accidents. Pathogenesis is initiated by depletion of acutely responding epithelial tissues and damage to vascular endothelial micro-vessels. Efforts for medical management of severe radiation-induced lesions have been made. Nevertheless, the development of strategies to promote wound healing, including stem cell therapy, is required. From 1997 to 2014, over 248 patients were referred to the Radio-pathology Committee of Hospital de Quemados del Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Burns Hospital) for the diagnosis and therapy of radiation-induced localized lesions. As part of the strategies for the management of severe cases, there is an ongoing research and development protocol on 'Translational Clinical Trial phases I/II to evaluate the safety and efficacy of adult mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow for the treatment of large burns and radiological lesions'. The object of this work was to describe the actions carried out by the Radio-pathology Committee of the Burns Hospital in a chronic case with more than 30 years of evolution without positive response to conventional treatments. The approach involved the evaluation of the tissular compromise of the lesion, the prognosis and the personalized treatment, including regenerative therapy. (authors)

  1. Radiation Risk from Chronic Low Dose-Rate Radiation Exposures: The Role of Life-Time Animal Studies - Workshop October 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayle Woloschak

    2009-12-16

    As a part of Radiation research conference, a workshop was held on life-long exposure studies conducted in the course of irradiation experiements done at Argonne National Laboratory between 1952-1992. A recent review article documents many of the issues discussed at that workshop.

  2. Human circulating plasma DNA significantly decreases while lymphocyte DNA damage increases under chronic occupational exposure to low-dose gamma-neutron and tritium β-radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeneva, Inna B; Kostuyk, Svetlana V; Ershova, Liza S; Osipov, Andrian N; Zhuravleva, Veronika F; Pankratova, Galina V; Porokhovnik, Lev N; Veiko, Natalia N

    2015-09-01

    The blood plasma of healthy people contains cell-fee (circulating) DNA (cfDNA). Apoptotic cells are the main source of the cfDNA. The cfDNA concentration increases in case of the organism's cell death rate increase, for example in case of exposure to high-dose ionizing radiation (IR). The objects of the present research are the blood plasma and blood lymphocytes of people, who contacted occupationally with the sources of external gamma/neutron radiation or internal β-radiation of tritium N = 176). As the controls (references), blood samples of people, who had never been occupationally subjected to the IR sources, were used (N = 109). With respect to the plasma samples of each donor there were defined: the cfDNA concentration (the cfDNA index), DNase1 activity (the DNase1 index) and titre of antibodies to DNA (the Ab DNA index). The general DNA damage in the cells was defined (using the Comet assay, the tail moment (TM) index). A chronic effect of the low-dose ionizing radiation on a human being is accompanied by the enhancement of the DNA damage in lymphocytes along with a considerable cfDNA content reduction, while the DNase1 content and concentration of antibodies to DNA (Ab DNA) increase. All the aforementioned changes were also observed in people, who had not worked with the IR sources for more than a year. The ratio cfDNA/(DNase1×Ab DNA × TM) is proposed to be used as a marker of the chronic exposure of a person to the external low-dose IR. It was formulated the assumption that the joint analysis of the cfDNA, DNase1, Ab DNA and TM values may provide the information about the human organism's cell resistivity to chronic exposure to the low-dose IR and about the development of the adaptive response in the organism that is aimed, firstly, at the effective cfDNA elimination from the blood circulation, and, secondly - at survival of the cells, including the cells with the damaged DNA. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Retrospective results of radiation therapy of the Eustachian tube in chronic otitis media; Retrospektive Ergebnisse der perkutanen Strahlentherapie der Tuba Eustachii bei chronischer Otitis media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultze, J.; Reinke, C.; Kimmig, B. [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie), Universitaetsklinikum Kiel (Germany); Frese, K.A. [Klinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenheilkunde, Kopf- und Halschirurgie, Universitaetsklinikum Kiel (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    Background: The treatment results of symptomatic radiation therapy of the Eustachian tube in chronic otitis media had to be evaluated retrospectively. Patients and Methods: Between 1980 and 1997, 66 patients were referred for therapy. The median age was 58 years. In the clinical presentation, all the patients had a hearing impairment, 35 patients complained of pain, 21 had otorrhea. In their history, 20 patients indicated chronic recurrent infections. The complaints lasted for 4.7 years in the median, primary conservative (adstringentia, antibiotics) and surgical treatment (paracentesis, tympanic tubule, tympanoplastic) did not lead to lasting cure. In 40 of 66 patients, finally radiation therapy was done of both Eustachian tubes. With opposed fields and cobalt-60 photons a total dose of 6 Gy at single doses of 1 Gy, three times a week, was applied. Under the causes for exclusion of radiation therapy were non-acceptance of the patients (nine), prior radiation therapies (six) or spontaneous improvement after initial presentation in our department. The treatment results were evaluated by interviews of the patients and regular otorhinolaryngological examinations. Results: There were no side effects noticed. 28 of 40 (70%) patients reported a significant improvement that could be verified by objective otorhinolaryngological examinations. In the group of 26 nonirradiated patients, 22 could be interviewed indicating in 16 cases (72%) that the complaints were unchanged and chronic otitis media was lasting. In a subgroup analysis concerning the duration of otitis media radiation therapy proved more effective in an acute and subacute stadium of disease of up to 5 years duration, while the patients resistant to radiation therapy were entirely in a chronic stage of disease exceeding 5 years duration. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Die Behandlungsergebnisse der symptomatischen Radiotherapie bei chronischer Otitis media sollten retrospektiv evaluiert werden. Patienten und

  4. Risk of chronic myeloid and acute leukemia mortality after exposure to ionizing radiation among workers at four U.S. nuclear weapons facilities and a nuclear naval shipyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Daniels, Robert D; Fleming, Donald A; Markey, Andrea M; Couch, James R; Ahrenholz, Steven H; Burphy, Jenneh S; Anderson, Jeri L; Tseng, Chih-Yu

    2007-02-01

    A nested case-control study was conducted among workers at five U.S. nuclear facilities to evaluate leukemia mortality risk (excluding chronic lymphocytic) from ionizing radiation using worksite doses and adjusting for potential confounding. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the relative risk (RR) of exposed workers and the excess relative risk (ERR) per unit of radiation among 206 cases and 823 age-matched controls. Adjusting for sex and benzene, the RR of leukemia for workers receiving more than 10 mSv was higher compared to those receiving lower or no dose; however, the risk increase was attenuated in the highest dose group. The ERR per 10 mSv was 1.44% (95% CI: 100 mSv), the sex- and benzene-adjusted ERR per 10 mSv was 6.82% (95% CI: -2.87%, 24.1%). The results suggest that risks among these nuclear workers are comparable to those observed in high-dose populations, although no evidence was observed of a positive quadratic dose-response term in this study. This large study is among the first to jointly evaluate benzene and ionizing radiation risk.

  5. Illegal intra-corporeal packets: can dual energy CT be used for the evaluation of cocaine concentration? A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Minerva; Becker, Christoph D; Lock, Eric; Wolff, Hans; Perneger, Thomas; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2016-01-13

    The recent implementation of the dual energy technology on CT-scanners has opened new perspectives in tissue and material characterization. This study aims to evaluate whether dual energy CT can be used to assess the concentration of cocaine of intra-intestinal illegal packets. The study was approved by the institutional review board of our institution (CER 13_027_R). From November 2010 to May 2013, all consecutive conveyors in whom a low-dose abdominal CT (LDCT) revealed the presence of illegal intra-corporeal drug packets underwent a dual energy CT series (gemstone spectral imaging) targeted on one container. The mean radiological density (HU) of these packets was measured on the LDCT series, and on the monochromatic dual energy series, at 40 and 140 keV. The difference between the HU at 40 and 140 keV was reported as ∆HU. The effective atomic number Z(eff) was also measured on the monochromatic series. A chemical analysis was performed after expulsion to select cocaine containing packets, and to determine their cocaine concentrations. A correlation analysis was performed between HU, ∆HU and Z(eff), with regard to the percentage of cocaine. Fifty-four cocaine conveyors were included. The mean cocaine content of the packets was 36.8% (range 11.2-80, SD 15.4), the mean radiologic density 105 HU, the mean Z(eff) 8.7 and the mean ∆HU 163. The cocaine content was correlated with the ∆HU (0.57, p 200 was 0.9 (9 of 10) sensitive and 0.82 (36 of 44) specific to predict a cocaine concentration higher than 50%. Measuring ∆HU or Z(eff) on dual energy monochromatic CT series can be used to detect ingested packets with cocaine concentration >50%.

  6. The Use of Barbed Suture for Intracorporeal Mechanical Anastomosis During a Totally Laparoscopic Right Colectomy: Is It Safe? A Retrospective Nonrandomized Comparative Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracale, Umberto; Merola, Giovanni; Cabras, Francesco; Andreuccetti, Jacopo; Corcione, Francesco; Pignata, Giusto

    2018-03-01

    A totally laparoscopic right colectomy could be perceived as a more challenging procedure over a laparoscopic-assisted right colectomy owing to the difficulty of intracorporeal anastomosis and the closure of the enterotomy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the barbed auto-locking absorbable suture for the closure of an anastomotic stapler-access enterotomy during a totally laparoscopic right colectomy. From January 2010 to April 2016, data from patients who had undergone a laparoscopic right colectomy in 2 different departments of 2 institutions (the Department of General and Minimally Invasive Surgery, San Camillo Hospital in Trento and the Department of Surgical Specialties and Nephrology, University Federico II in Naples) were retrospectively analyzed. We compared the data of patients in whom the stapler-access enterotomy was closed through a conventional absorbable suture (Group A), with the data of patients in whom a stapler-access enterotomy was closed through a V-Loc 180 suture (Group B). Biometric features and intraoperative and postoperative data were collected and analyzed. The 2 groups (Group A: 40 patients; Group B: 40 patients) were comparable for biometric features and postoperative outcomes. The anastomosing time was lower in Group B. A statistically significant difference was noted in the mean operative time between Groups A and B (Group A = 134.92 ± 34.17; Group B = 120.92 ± 23.27, P = .035). Only one anastomotic leakage per group was recorded, each treated with an anastomosis redo. During the reoperations, we find in both groups an intact stapler-access enterotomy. On retrospective analysis, barbed suture appears to be safe and efficient for closure of the stapler-access enterotomy during totally laparoscopic right colectomy.

  7. Effects of chronic low level natural background radiation on the induction and rejoining of DNA strand breaks in human Go lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivek Kumar, P.R.; Cheriyan, V.D.; Seshadri, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thirty three inhabitants of the coastal areas of Kerala, from Chavara-Neendakara belt in Karunagappally taluk, were selected, as the population living here receives high level natural background radiation primarily due to the presence of thorium ( 232 Th) in the monazite containing beach sand. Eighteen individuals from a nearby normal background radiation area were included as control in this study. Participants in both groups were male, non- smokers and with comparable age (P=0.96, Student's t-test). Blood samples were collected with informed consent. Lymphocytes from these individuals were subjected to alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay to estimate DNA strand breaks. A challenge assay procedure is followed, in which lymphocytes from these individuals were exposed to 2Gy or 4Gy of 60 Co gamma radiation at a dose-rate of 1.4Gy/minute (Low dose irradiator 2000, BRIT, India) on ice and were investigated immediately (induction) or assayed after short durations (7, 14 and 30 minutes), that allowed repair of DNA damage (rejoining). In addition, comet assay coupled with endonuclease III (ENDO III) was used to assess oxidized pyrimidine bases. Results were expressed as 'DNA strand breaks per million base pairs' (SB/10 6 bp) calculated with the mean of 'percentage of DNA in comet tail' (%T) obtained from each sample, using a calibration curve. In this study data from the two groups were compared by the non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test, otherwise indicated. This pilot study suggest a possible adaptive process in individuals exposed to chronic low level natural background radiation, indicated by an increase in repair of DNA strand breaks. Results might also suggest an elevated level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging mechanism in HBRA subjects compared to the controls. However, our findings need to be validated in a larger study population

  8. Effect of chronic exposure to gamma radiation and of hormonal stimulation with serum gonadotropin on catecholamine levels in hypothalamus, epiphysis and adrenals of ewes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastorova, B.; Arendarcik, J.

    1989-01-01

    The effects were studied of exposure to whole body continuous irradiation and of the administration of serum gonadotropin (SG) on the concentration of catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine) in the hypothalamus, epiphysis and adrenal glands of ewes during the anestric period with synchronized estrus. The first group (young barren ewes) and second group (older ewes) were exposed to continuous radiation of 60 Co for five days. The radiation was applied at a rate of 0.020 Gy per hour. After the termination of irradiation the ewes were subjected to hormonal stimulation by fractionated administration of 1500 I.U. SG. The third and fourth experimental groups of ewes were stimulated with 1500 I.U. SG without irradiation. Catecholamines were separated from the tissue supernatants by adsorption chromatography and the catecholamine contents in the eluates were determined spectrofluorometrically. Chronic exposure to gamma radiation and hormonal stimulation with SG reduced the concentration of norepinephrine in the whole hypothalamus of the sheep. A statistically significant decrease (P<0.001) was recorded in the medial and caudal hypothalamus of the adult ewes and in the rostral and caudal hypothalamus regions of the young ewes. A decrease in norepinephrine concentration, statistically significant in the caudal (P<0.01) and medial hypothalamus was recorded in the group of adult ewes after hormonal stimulation with SG without irradiation. The experimental group of young ewes responded to hormonal stimulation by a greater reduction of norepinephrine contents as compared with combined exposure to radiation and hormonal stimulation. It is assumed that the decrease in catecholamine concentration after hormonal stimulation with SG is associated with the increase in the contents of estrogens which act on the adrenergic receptors of the hypothalamus. (author). 4 figs., 21 refs

  9. Studies on cytogenetic effects induced by chronic γ-radiation combined with benzene, toluene and carbon monoxide inhalation in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongyuan; Wang Yuexing; Wang Lanjin; Pan Yan

    1998-01-01

    8 experimental groups were conducted according to four factors two doses orthogonal layout [L8(2 7 )] in present investigation. 90 healthy male rabbits and 90 healthy male mice were equally divided into 8 experimental groups and control group. Exprimental animals were exposed to γ-radiation combined with benzene, toluene and CO vapour for 2h per day, 5 days per week for 8 weeks. Two doses of γ-radiation, benzene, toluene and CO were 0.0375 and 0.0075 Gy/d (for rabbits, 0.0473 and 0.0095 Gy/d for mice), 182 +- 33 and 40 +- 15 mg/m 3 , 407 +- 68 and 90 +- 39 mg/m 3 as well as 278 +- 18 mg/m 3 , respectively. The main results were showed as follows: (1) γ-radiation, benzene and toluene could all induce chromosome aberration, SCEs and micronuclei of lymphocytes in rabbits and chromosome aberrations of bone marrow cells in rabbits and mice, but those was no observed in carbon monoxide. (2) γ-radiation and benzene induced chromosome aberrations and micronuclei of lymphocytes in rabbits as well as chromosome aberrations of bone marrow cells in mice, γ-radiation and toluene induced chromosome aberrations of lymphocytes (in rabbits) and bone marrow cells (in mice), benzene and toluene induced chromosome aberrations of lymphocytes (in rabbits) and bone marrow cells (in mice). They showed all significantly interaction. (3) In combined effects, the yield of chromosome aberrations, SCEs and micronuclei induced by (1) experimental groups which four factors are all high doses were highest, however, those by induced (8) experimental groups which four factors are all low doses also were higher than those of control group and there were statistical difference except SCEs

  10. Mannan-binding lectin and healing of a radiation-induced chronic ulcer--a case report on mannan-binding lectin replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maaløe, Nanna; Bonde, C; Laursen, I

    2011-01-01

    with an insufficient level of mannan-binding lectin and a chronic radiation-induced ulcer following the treatment of breast cancer. After 15 months of initially conservative treatment and thereafter plastic surgery, the healing was still impaired with necrosis in the periphery of the ulcer. Immunological work......-up of the patient revealed pronounced insufficiency of mannan-binding lectin. Following a 6-week experimental intravenous treatment with mannan-binding lectin purified from human plasma, that is, 0.2-0.3 mg mannan-binding lectin per kg body weight twice a week, the defect was completely healed. We suggest...... that deficiency of mannan-binding lectin can explain cases of otherwise unexplained impaired healing, and that replacement therapy is considered in such cases....

  11. Stimulatory effects of chronic gamma radiation on growth and development of young custard apple (Annona squamosa) trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirale, A.S.; Gaur, B.K.

    1974-01-01

    Four month old seedlings of custard apple were transplanted in a sector of a Gamma Garden having a 600 Ci 60 Co γ-source in the center. The dose rates were 90-105, 195-240 and 480-640 mR/h. The cumulative doses averaged to 946, 2,064 and 5,300 R. Observations of tree height, trunk thickness and number of branches were performed at regular intervals. During the first fruiting season the number of fallen fruits and the number and weight of edible fruits were recorded. The trees in all 3 radiation zones grew taller than the controls for about 18 months. Radiation-induced greater thickness of the trunk was seen for 27 months, while an increase in the number of branches was observed throughout the experimental period (4 years). As to the fruiting pattern, inspite of the fewer fruits in the irradiated trees they gave higher fruit yield per tree. (MG) [de

  12. Estimation of health effects of long-term chronic exposure of the low level radiation among children exposed in consequence of the disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomko, E.I.; Romanneko, A.E.; Bomko, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    The low level dose effects have been studied for a long time within a framework of biological effects of radiation exposure. The estimation of the dose level of Ukrainian people who have been exposed in consequence of the Chernobyl accident allowed to consider that one of the critical populations which had been exposed to the low level radiation were children residing on the areas contaminated with radionuclides. The purpose of this work is - to reveal a regularity in morbidity and mortality of the critical populations having been exposed to long-term chronic exposure of the low level doses of radiation in consequences of the Chernobyl accident

  13. Effects of chronic exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation on the reproductive performance and outcome of an exposed population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannino, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that low doses of ionizing radiation (cumulative dose less than 5.0 rads/yr) effects the reproductive history and/or outcome of a human population. Medically-related personnel who were exposed to low doses of radiation in the course of their employment were compared with medically-related personnel who were not routinely exposed to ionizing radiation. Each population consisted of 3000 persons from the states of Michigan and Ohio. Reproductive performance, history, and outcome of each sample population was compared statistically. Nineteen congenital defects and 47 postnatal defects were recorded for conceptions of the non-exposed population and 50 congenital defects and 83 postnatal defects were recorded for the exposed group. These groups were further broken down as to whether conception took place before, during, or after exposure and the results statistically analyzed. It was found that the exposure population had greater than expected numbers of postnatal defects and less than expected numbers of normal conceptions

  14. Diagnostic radiation: a possible factor in malignancy in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases and other essays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    This short book is a compilation of five papers that attempt to explore the potential radiation risk of bowel cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease who receive excessive diagnostic radiological examinations. The editor is a co-author for each paper and he wrote the preface. Each paper represents a short series of case histories: in three patients with inflammatory bowel disease, one ultimately developed colon cancer, one esophageal cancer, and one renal cancer; one patients with Crohn disease developed acute myelocytic leukemia; of four patients with renal calculi there were no cancers; one patient is discussed twice. In general, the authors use the same approach: in a small number of patients, the number of radiologic examinations and the number of x-ray films are recorded; the dosage for each patient is calculated with considerable precision from this information; the cancer risk in the absence of additional radiation is cited from the literature; and the probability of the radiation causation of the cancer is discussed, but not proven. (JMT)

  15. Conditional reflex activity of the rats after chronic antenatal γ-radiation in the combination with mercazolil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlova, L.N.; Izmest'eva, O.S.; Zhavoronkov, L.P.

    1998-01-01

    The ability of rats antenatally subjected to separate and combined chronic γ irradiation effect with total dose of 1.25 Gy to develop the conditioned protective reflex in a shuttle chamber is studied. Essential decrease in the ability to formation and stabilization of associative bonds in the process of teaching for the conditioned reflex of avoidance is identified for animals in all experimental groups at the age of 2 months. The partial recreation of psychophysiological functions is revealed at the age of 7 months [ru

  16. Illegal intra-corporeal packets: can dual energy CT be used for the evaluation of cocaine concentration? A cross sectional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Minerva; Becker, Christoph D.; Lock, Eric; Wolff, Hans; Perneger, Thomas; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The recent implementation of the dual energy technology on CT-scanners has opened new perspectives in tissue and material characterization. This study aims to evaluate whether dual energy CT can be used to assess the concentration of cocaine of intra-intestinal illegal packets. The study was approved by the institutional review board of our institution (CER 13-027-R). From November 2010 to May 2013, all consecutive conveyors in whom a low-dose abdominal CT (LDCT) revealed the presence of illegal intra-corporeal drug packets underwent a dual energy CT series (gemstone spectral imaging) targeted on one container. The mean radiological density (HU) of these packets was measured on the LDCT series, and on the monochromatic dual energy series, at 40 and 140 keV. The difference between the HU at 40 and 140 keV was reported as ∆HU. The effective atomic number Z(eff) was also measured on the monochromatic series. A chemical analysis was performed after expulsion to select cocaine containing packets, and to determine their cocaine concentrations. A correlation analysis was performed between HU, ∆HU and Z(eff), with regard to the percentage of cocaine. Fifty-four cocaine conveyors were included. The mean cocaine content of the packets was 36.8 % (range 11.2–80, SD 15.4), the mean radiologic density 105 HU, the mean Z(eff) 8.7 and the mean ∆HU 163. The cocaine content was correlated with the ∆HU (0.57, p < 0.001), with the Z(eff) (r = 0.56, p < 0.001) but not with radiologic density (r = 0.25, p = 0.064). ∆HU >200 was 0.9 (9 of 10) sensitive and 0.82 (36 of 44) specific to predict a cocaine concentration higher than 50 %. Measuring ∆HU or Z(eff) on dual energy monochromatic CT series can be used to detect ingested packets with cocaine concentration >50 %

  17. A critical and comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis of studies comparing intracorporeal and extracorporeal anastomosis in laparoscopic right hemicolectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Claudio; Casadei, Riccardo; Alagna, Vincenzo; Zani, Elia; Taffurelli, Giovanni; Pacilio, Carlo Alberto; Minni, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    Two main techniques are commonly used during laparoscopic right hemicolectomy in order to perform the ileocolic anastomosis: intracorporeal (IA) and extracorporeal (EA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of the two techniques. A systematic review was carried out to identify studies comparing IA and EA. The primary endpoint was anastomotic leakage. The secondary endpoints were intra- and postoperative results. A meta-analysis was carried out using the random-effects model. Fourteen studies matched the selection criteria, enrolling 1717 patients (50.3 % IA, 49.7 % EA). The anastomotic leakage was similar in the IA and the EA groups (3.4 vs. 4.6 %, respectively) with a risk difference (RD) of -0.01 (95 % CI = -0.03 to 0.01; P = 0.120). IA group had lower overall complication rate (27.6 vs. 38.4 %; RD = -0.15; 95 % CI = 0.27 to -0.04; P = 0.009) and wound infection rate (4.9 vs. 8.9 %; RD = 0.52; -0.03; 95 % CI = -0.06 to -0.01; P = 0.030). Time to first oral intake (weighted mean difference (WMD) = -1; 95 % CI = -1.59 to -0.41; P < 0.001), length of hospital stay (WMD = -1.13; 95 % CI = -1.90 to -0.35; P = 0.004) and minilaparotomy size (WMD = -26; 95 % CI = -38 to -13; P < 0.001) were shorter in IA patients. The incisional hernia rate was lower in the IA group (2.3 vs. 13.7 %) with an RD of -0.09 (95 % CI = -0.17 to -0.02; P = 0.020). There were no differences in operative time, blood loss, conversion, internal hernia, reoperation, mortality, time to first flatus and defecation, analgesic required, number of lymph nodes harvested and length of distal margin. Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with IA is a safe alternative to EA. Additional well-structured, prospective randomised trials are needed to confirm all the advantages regarding postoperative results which were pointed out in our study.

  18. Acute and chronic intakes of fallout radionuclides by Marshallese from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak and related internal radiation doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L; Weinstock, Robert M

    2010-08-01

    Annual internal radiation doses resulting from both acute and chronic intakes of all important dose-contributing radionuclides occurring in fallout from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak from 1946 through 1958 have been estimated for the residents living on all atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Internal radiation absorbed doses to the tissues most at risk to cancer induction (red bone marrow, thyroid, stomach, and colon) have been estimated for representative persons of all population communities for all birth years from 1929 through 1968, and for all years of exposure from 1948 through 1970. The acute intake estimates rely on a model using, as its basis, historical urine bioassay data, for members of the Rongelap Island and Ailinginae communities as well as for Rongerik residents. The model also utilizes fallout times of arrival and radionuclide deposition densities estimated for all tests and all atolls. Acute intakes of 63 radionuclides were estimated for the populations of the 20 inhabited atolls and for the communities that were relocated during the testing years for reasons of safety and decontamination. The model used for chronic intake estimates is based on reported whole-body, urine, and blood counting data for residents of Utrik and Rongelap. Dose conversion coefficients relating intake to organ absorbed dose were developed using internationally accepted models but specifically tailored for intakes of particulate fallout by consideration of literature-based evidence to choose the most appropriate alimentary tract absorption fraction (f1) values. Dose estimates were much higher for the thyroid gland than for red marrow, stomach wall, or colon. The highest thyroid doses to adults were about 7,600 mGy for the people exposed on Rongelap; thyroid doses to adults were much lower, by a factor of 100 or more, for the people exposed on the populated atolls of Kwajalein and Majuro. The estimates of radionuclide intake and

  19. Preliminary data on chronic effects of ultraviolet radiation on the growth of some phytoplankton species of the Beagle Channel, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo P. Hernando

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Serious concerns exist that the thinning of stratospheric ozone and the resulting enhancement in the solar UVB radiation, may impair marine primary productivity. Also, UVB may alter food web dynamics and food availability for higher trophic levels in marine ecosystems inducing changes in phytoplankton species composition. The main goal of this study was to examine the responses of different species of marine phytoplankton to solar UVR. Specifically, we compared the UV sensitivity of a phytoplankton natural community isolated from the Beagle Channel (54°52´S, 68°18´W, Ushuaia, Argentina, as well as the response of two taxa which were isolated from that community (i.e., a pennate diatom, Navicula sp., and a phytoflagellate pertaining to the Class Cryptophyceae to UV radiation. Exposure to UVB or UVA radiation treatments had no significant effects (p > 0.05 on exponential growth rate in Navicula sp. However, when the phytoflagellate [Class Cryptophyceae] was exposed to UVB, the growth rate in the exponential phase was inhibited significantly (p < 0.01 compared with the PAR control. Marked changes in the relative abundance of the main taxonomic groups were observed in the community cultures: the relative abundance of phytoflagellates was significantly lower after exposure to the UVB treatment than after exposure to the PAR treatment (p < 0.05. However, the percentage of centric diatoms increased significantly (p < 0.05 when they were exposed to UVB. The growth rate at the end of the exponential phase of growth of the community was inhibited significantly (p < 0.01 when the algae were exposed to UVB and UVA.

  20. Effect of drink pattern and solar radiation on thermoregulation and fluid balance during exercise in chronically heat acclimatized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, José R Rodríguez; Rivera-Brown, Anita M; Frontera, Walter R; Rivera, Miguel A; Mayol, Pedro M; Bar-Or, Oded

    1995-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the thermoregulatory and body fluid balance responses in chronically heat acclimatized children, i.e., indigenous to a tropical climate, during exercise in four outdoor conditions and the effects of dehydration on their thermoregulatory response. Nine children (age = 13.3 ± 1.9 yr, VO 2 max = 45.5 ± 9.2 ml · kg -1 · min -1 ) cycled at 60% VO 2 max each under four conditions: sun exposure voluntary drinking (SuVD), sun exposure forced drinking (SuFD), shaded voluntary drinking (ShVD), and shaded forced drinking (ShFD). Exercise sessions consisted of four 20-min exercise bouts alternating with 25-min rest periods. Globe temperature and the WBGT index were higher during SuVD and SuFD compared to ShVD and ShFD (P dehydration and adequate heat dissipation. © 1995 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Copyright © 1995 Wiley-Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  1. Impact of chronic blood viral infection on lymphocyte telomere length in Chornobyl clean-up workers in a remote period after radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilienko, I M; Lyaskivska, O V; Belayev, O A; Pleskach, O Y; Shinkarenko, V I; Bazyka, D A

    2017-12-01

    To assess whether telomere length in lymphocytes of Chornobyl clean up workers at a late period 30 years after the exposure to ionizing radiation is influenced by a chronic blood viral infection and to determine role of viral carriage in cellular senescence. Study group included 70 Chornobyl cleanup male workers 30 years after exposure {doses of external exposure (602.67 ± 114.19) mSv (M ± m); age (59.75 ± 0.82) yrs}. Relative telomere length (RTL) was analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry, immune cell subsets by standard combinations of monoclonal antibodies (CD45/14, CD3/19, CD4/8, CD3/HLADR, CD3/16/56, TCRγδ) and flow cytometry; antiviral immunity was performed determining the chronic phase antibodies to viruses: Hepatitis C (HCV), Cytomegalovirus (CMV), Toxoplasma gondii (TOX), Herpes simplex (HSV) and Epstein Barr virus (EBV VCA IgG and EBV NA IgG). The object of the study was peripheral blood (PB) of clean up workers. RTL changes were associated at the group level with the carrier state of the viral infection. RTL shortening was demonstrated as a significant difference between the groups (M ± SD) (HCV negative 15.27 ± 3.35, HCV posi tive 13.09 ± 3.05, p C, Epstein Barr viruses carriage could form a background for an error prone DNA reparation system as a factor of accumulation of pathological conditions, including malignant transformation. I. M. Ilienko, O. V. Lyaskivska, O. A. Belayev, O. Y. Pleskach, V. I. Shinkarenko, D. A. Bazyka.

  2. Chronic TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle exposure to a benthic organism, Hyalella azteca: impact of solar UV radiation and material surface coatings on toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallis, Lindsay K. [Office of Research and Development, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN, 55804 (United States); Diamond, Stephen A. [Nanosafe Inc., Blacksburg, VA, 24060 (United States); Ma, Hongbo [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Zilber School of Public Health, Milwaukee, WI, 53211 (United States); Hoff, Dale J. [Office of Research and Development, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN, 55804 (United States); Al-Abed, Souhail R. [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Li, Shibin, E-mail: lishibinepa@gmail.com [Office of Research and Development, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN, 55804 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    There is limited information on the chronic effects of nanomaterials to benthic organisms, as well as environmental mitigating factors that might influence this toxicity. The present study aimed to fill these data gaps by examining various growth endpoints (weight gain, instantaneous growth rate, and total protein content) for up to a 21 d sediment exposure of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (nano-TiO{sub 2}) to a representative benthic species, Hyalella azteca. An uncoated standard, P25, and an Al(OH){sub 3} coated nano-TiO{sub 2} used in commercial products were added to sediment at 20 mg/L or 100 mg/L Under test conditions, UV exposure alone was shown to be a greater cause of toxicity than even these high levels of nano-TiO{sub 2} exposure, indicating that different hazards need to be addressed in toxicity testing scenarios. In addition, this study showed the effectiveness of a surface coating on the decreased photoactivity of the material, as the addition of an Al(OH){sub 3} coating showed a dramatic decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, this reduced photoactivity was found to be partially restored when the coating had been degraded, leading to the need for future toxicity tests which examine the implications of weathering events on particle surface coatings. - Highlights: • Chronic toxicity of nano-TiO{sub 2} to a benthic organism (Hyalella azteca) was examined. • Phototoxicity was investigated through exposure of solar simulated radiation (SSR). • The degradation of a surface coating resulted in an increase in photoactivity. • In this testing scenario, UV had a larger impact than chemical exposure in toxicity.

  3. DNA alterations and effects on growth and reproduction in Daphnia magna during chronic exposure to gamma radiation over three successive generations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parisot, Florian [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO, Cadarache, St Paul-lez-Durance 13115 (France); Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul [UMR 5805 EPOC – OASU, Station marine d’Arcachon, Université Bordeaux 1, Arcachon 33120 (France); Plaire, Delphine; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO, Cadarache, St Paul-lez-Durance 13115 (France); Alonzo, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.alonzo@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO, Cadarache, St Paul-lez-Durance 13115 (France)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • We exposed three successive generations of Daphnia magna to chronic gamma radiation. • We examined DNA alterations and effects on survival, growth and reproduction. • DNA alterations were accumulated over a generation and transmitted to the progeny. • Effects on survival and reproduction, and delay in growth increased over generations. - Abstract: This study examined chronic effects of external Cs-137 gamma radiation on Daphnia magna exposed over three successive generations (F0, F1 and F2) to environmentally relevant dose rates (ranging from 0.007 to 35.4 mGy h{sup −1}). Investigated endpoints included survival, growth, reproduction and DNA alterations quantified using random-amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR). Results demonstrated that radiation effects on survival, growth and reproduction increased in severity from generation F0 to generation F2. Mortality after 21 days at 35.4 mGy h{sup −1} increased from 20% in F0 to 30% in F2. Growth was affected by a slight reduction in maximum length at 35.4 mGy h{sup −1} in F0 and by reductions of 5 and 13% in growth rate, respectively, at 4.70 and 35.4 mGy h{sup −1} in F2. Reproduction was affected by a reduction of 19% in 21 day-fecundity at 35.4 mGy h{sup −1} in F0 and by a delay of 1.9 days in brood release as low as 0.070 mGy h{sup −1} in F2. In parallel, DNA alterations became significant at decreasing dose rates over the course of F0 (from 4.70 mGy h{sup −1} at hatching to 0.007 mGy h{sup −1} after ∼21 days) and from F0 to F2 (0.070 mGy h{sup −1} at hatching to 0.007 mGy h{sup −1} after ∼21 days), demonstrating their rapid accumulation in F0 daphnids and their transmission to offspring generations. Transiently more efficient DNA repair leading to some recovery at the organism level was suggested in F1, with no effect on survival, a slight reduction of 12% in 21 day-fecundity at 35.4 mGy h{sup −1} and DNA alterations significant at highest

  4. Radiation effects in normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.R.; Herrmann, T.; Doerr, W.

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of radiation effects in normal tissues is fundamental for optimal planning of radiotherapy. Therefore, this book presents a review on the following aspects: General pathogenesis of acute radiation effects in normal tissues; general pathogenesis of chronic radiation effects in normal tissues; quantification of acute and chronic radiation effects in normal tissues; pathogenesis, pathology and radiation biology of various organs and organ systems. (MG) [de

  5. A randomized control trial to evaluate the importance of pre-training basic laparoscopic psychomotor skills upon the learning curve of laparoscopic intra-corporeal knot tying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinas, Carlos Roger; Binda, Maria Mercedes; Sisa, Cesar Manuel; Campo, Rudi

    2017-01-01

    Training of basic laparoscopic psychomotor skills improves the acquisition of more advanced laparoscopic tasks, such as laparoscopic intra-corporeal knot tying (LICK). This randomized controlled trial was designed to evaluate whether pre-training of basic skills, as laparoscopic camera navigation (LCN), hand-eye coordination (HEC), and bimanual coordination (BMC), and the combination of the three of them, has any beneficial effect upon the learning curve of LICK. The study was carried out in a private center in Asunción, Paraguay, by 80 medical students without any experience in surgery. Four laparoscopic tasks were performed in the ENCILAP model (LCN, HEC, BMC, and LICK). Participants were allocated to 5 groups (G1-G5). The study was structured in 5 phases. In phase 1, they underwent a base-line test ( T 1 ) for all tasks (1 repetition of each task in consecutive order). In phase 2, participants underwent different training programs (30 consecutive repetitions) for basic tasks according to the group they belong to (G1: none; G2: LCN; G3: HEC; G4: BMC; and G5: LCN, HEC, and BMC). In phase 3, they were tested again ( T 2 ) in the same manner than at T 1 . In phase 4, they underwent a standardized training program for LICK (30 consecutive repetitions). In phase 5, they were tested again ( T 3 ) in the same manner than at T 1 and T 2 . At each repetition, scoring was based on the time taken for task completion system. The scores were plotted and non-linear regression models were used to fit the learning curves to one- and two-phase exponential decay models for each participant (individual curves) and for each group (group curves). The LICK group learning curves fitted better to the two-phase exponential decay model. From these curves, the starting points ( Y 0), the point after HEC training/before LICK training ( Y 1), the Plateau, and the rate constants ( K ) were calculated. All groups, except for G4, started from a similar point ( Y 0). At Y 1, G5 scored already

  6. Chronic cigarette smoke exposure increases the pulmonary retention and radiation dose of 239Pu inhaled as 239PuO2 by F344 rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, G.L.; Lundgren, D.L.; Barr, E.B.; Chen, B.T.; Griffith, W.C.; Hobbs, C.H.; Hoover, M.D.; Nikula, K.J.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    As a portion of a study to examine how chronic cigarette smoke exposure might alter the risk of lung tumors from inhaled 239 PuO 2 in rats, the effects of smoke exposure on alpha-particle lung dosimetry over the life-span of exposed rats were determined. Male and female rats were exposed to inhaled 239 PuO 2 alone or in combination with cigarette smoke. Animals exposed to filtered air along served as controls for the smoke exposure. Whole-body exposure to mainstream smoke diluted to concentrations of either 100 or 250 mg total particulate matter m -3 began at 6 wk of age and continued for 6 h d -1 , 5 d wk -1 , for 30 mo. A single, pernasal, acute exposure to 239 PuO 2 was given to all rats at 12 wk of age. Exposure to cigarette smoke caused decreased body weight gains in a concentration dependent manner. Lung-to-body weight ratios were increased in smoke-exposed rats. Rats exposed to cigarette smoke before the 239 PuO 2 exposure deposited less 239 Pu in the lung than did controls. Except for male rats exposed to LCS, exposure to smoke retarded the clearance of 239 Pu from the lung compared to control rats through study termination at 870 d after 239 PuO 2 exposure. Radiation doses to lungs were calculated by sex and by exposure group for rats on study for at least 360 d using modeled body weight changes, lung-to-body weight ratios, and standard dosimetric calculations. For both sexes, estimated lifetime radiation doses from the time of 239 PuO 2 exposure to death were 3.8 Gy, 4.4 Gy, or 6.7 Gy for the control, LCS, or HCS exposure groups, respectively. Assuming an approximately linear dose-response relationship between radiation dose and lung neoplasm incidence, approximate increases of 20% or 80% in tumor incidence over controls would be expected in rats exposed to 239 PuO 2 and LCS or 239 PuO 2 and HCS, respectively

  7. Influence of air pressure, humidity, solar radiation, temperature, and wind speed on ambulatory visits due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Bavaria, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Uta; Exner, Teresa; Wanka, Eva R.; Bergemann, Christoph; Meyer-Arnek, Julian; Hildenbrand, Beate; Tufman, Amanda; Heumann, Christian; Huber, Rudolf M.; Bittner, Michael; Fischer, Rainald

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. The disease is often aggravated by periods of increased symptoms requiring medical attention. Among the possible triggers for these exacerbations, meteorological factors are under consideration. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of various meteorological factors on the health status of patients with COPD. For this purpose, the daily number of ambulatory care visits due to COPD was analysed in Bavaria, Germany, for the years 2006 and 2007. The meteorological factors were provided by the model at the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). For the multivariate analysis, a generalised linear model was used. In Bavaria, an increase of 1% of daily consultations (about 103 visits per day) was found to be associated with a change of 0.72 K temperature, 209.55 of log air surface pressure in Pa, and a decrease of 1% of daily consultations with 1,453,763 Ws m2 of solar radiation. There also seem to be regional differences between north and south Bavaria; for instance, the effect of wind speed and specific humidity with a lag of 1 day were only significant in the north. This study could contribute to a tool for the prevention of exacerbations. It also serves as a model for the further evaluation of the impact of meteorological factors on health, and could easily be applied to other diseases or other regions.

  8. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  9. Assessment of thyroid system disruption in Rana pipiens tadpoles chronically exposed to UVB radiation and 4-tert-octylphenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, M.C., E-mail: maxinecroteau@hotmail.com [Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics (CAREG), Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 20 Marie Curie Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Davidson, M., E-mail: mdavi089@uottawa.ca [Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics (CAREG), Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 20 Marie Curie Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Duarte-Guterman, P., E-mail: duarte.paula@gmail.com [Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics (CAREG), Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 20 Marie Curie Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Wade, M., E-mail: mike_wade@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, 50 Columbine Driveway, Tunney' s Pasture, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0K9 (Canada); Popesku, J.T., E-mail: jpopesku@gmail.com [Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics (CAREG), Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 20 Marie Curie Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Wiens, S., E-mail: susannawiens@hotmail.com [Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics (CAREG), Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 20 Marie Curie Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Lean, D.R.S., E-mail: dlean@uottawa.ca [Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics (CAREG), Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 20 Marie Curie Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Trudeau, V.L., E-mail: trudeauv@uottawa.ca [Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics (CAREG), Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 20 Marie Curie Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2009-11-08

    Many studies have considered recent increases in ultraviolet B radiation (UVBR) and endocrine disrupting chemicals polluting the environment as possible contributing factors to the reduction in amphibian populations. It has been demonstrated that exposure of amphibians to estrogenic chemicals or UVBR can affect the timing of larval development and metamorphosis. However, amphibians in the wild are exposed to multiple environmental stressors simultaneously. Therefore, our study examines the effects of UVBR and the estrogenic chemical 4-tert-octylphenol (OP), alone and in combination, on the thyroid system of Rana pipiens tadpoles, which is the main regulator of amphibian metamorphosis. Results demonstrate that thyroid gland histomorphology measurements in Gosner stage 31 tadpoles continuously exposed to UVBR (0.21 W/m{sup 2}) were not different than those measured in animals from the control group. In a separate experiment, tadpoles exposed to environmentally relevant levels of UVBR (0.22 W/m{sup 2}) and/or OP (0.01 nM or 10 nM) exhibited significantly delayed development starting from Gosner stage 29, given that fewer tadpoles developed past stage 29 in these groups. In addition, significantly fewer UVBR-treated tadpoles developed past stage 34 and metamorphosed. Samples were collected from stages 29 and 34 tadpoles for gene expression analysis in tail tissue and measurements of T3 (triiodothyronine) whole body levels (minus tail). UVBR and/or OP exposure did not affect T3 levels in stages 29 and 34 tadpoles. However, a decrease in deiodinase type 2 (D2) or increase in deiodinase type 3 (D3) mRNA levels was observed in groups of tadpoles with slowed developmental rates at those developmental stages. Given that D2 activates and D3 inactivates thyroid hormones (TH), UVBR/OP mediated disruptions in development are likely caused by dysfunctions in the localized metabolism of THs through alterations in the expression of these enzymes in peripheral tissues. This is the

  10. Oral cholecalciferol versus ultraviolet radiation B: effect on vitamin D metabolites in patients with chronic pancreatitis and fat malabsorption - a randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich C; Matzen, Peter; Benfield, Thomas Lars Vibe

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) often develop fat malabsorption and are susceptible to hypovitaminosis D.......Patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) often develop fat malabsorption and are susceptible to hypovitaminosis D....

  11. [Evaluation of the risk of delayed adverse effects of chronic combined exposure to radiation and chemical factors with the purpose to ensure safety in orbital and exploration space missions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafirkin, A V; Mukhamedieva, L N; Tatarkin, S V; Barantseva, M Iu

    2012-01-01

    The work had the aim to anatomize the existing issues with providing safety in extended orbital and exploration missions for ensuing estimation of actual values of the total radiation risk for the crew, and risks of other delayed effects of simultaneous exposure to ionizing radiation and chemical pollutants in cabin air, and a number of other stressful factors inevitable in space flight. The flow of chronic experiments for separate and combined studies with reproduction of air makeup and radiation doses in actual orbital and predicted exploration missions is outlined. To set safety limits, new approaches should be applied to the description of gradual norm degradation to pathologies in addition to several generalized quantitative indices of adaptation and straining of the regulatory systems, as well as of effectiveness of the compensatory body reserve against separate and combined exposure.

  12. Hereditary effects of low and chronic radiation exposure: a case-control study of mental retardation and cleft lip/palate in the monazite bearing coastal areas of Southern Kerala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koya, P.K.M.; Cheriyan, V.D.; Chougaonkar, M.P.; Mayya, Y.S.; Jojo, P.J.; Predeep, P.; Seshadri, M.

    2010-01-01

    The high level natural radiation (HLNR) areas of Kerala in the south west coast of Kerala is suitable for direct human studies to assess the genetic and teratogenic effect of low and chronic radiation exposures. The radiation level in the region (about 55 km long and 0.5 km wide belt) range from ≤1.0 mGy to 45.0 mGy per year and is due to natural deposit of monazite sand containing Thorium (8-10%), Uranium (0.3%) and corresponding decay products. A population based case-control study was carried out in the area to assess the role, if any, of HLNR as a causative factor in the etiology of two relatively frequent and easily identifiable congenital malformations, viz., mental retardation (MR) and cleft lip/palate (CLP). Findings from the study are discussed in this paper

  13. Chronic Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infections that cause chronic diarrhea be prevented? Chronic Diarrhea What is chronic diarrhea? Diarrhea that lasts for more than 2-4 ... represent a life-threatening illness. What causes chronic diarrhea? Chronic diarrhea has many different causes; these causes ...

  14. Detection of genomic instability in descendants of male mice exposed to chronic low-level gamma-radiation using the test 'adaptive response'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanova, O.M.; Zaichkina, S.I.; Akhmadieva, A.; Aptikaeva, G.F.; Klokov, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The goal of the present study was to examine whether the genomic instability can be revealed in vivo using the test 'adaptive response' (AR). Two-month-old BALB/C male mice were subjected to chronic irradiation in the gamma-field with a dose of 0.1 Gy (0.01 Gy/day) and a dose of 0.5 Gy (0.01 and 0.05 Gy/day). Control animals were kept under similar conditions but without irradiation. Fifteen days after the irradiation, males from the irradiated and control groups were mated in separate cages with unirradiated females for 2 weeks. The males, descendants from irradiated and unirradiated parents, at an age of two months were subjected to additional irradiation with a dose of 1.5 Gy. To reveal the genetic instability using the AR test, another group of males, the descendants from irradiated and unirradiated parents, were exposed to acute irradiation by the scheme of AR: with an adapting dose (D1) of 0.1 Gy (0.125 Gy/min) followed after a day by a challenging dose (D2) of 1.5 Gy (0.47 Gy/min). After 28 h, the animals of all groups were killed. Bone marrow specimens for calculating micronuclei (MN) in polychromatophyl erythrocytes (PCE) were prepared. It was found that in descendants that resulted from unirradiated parents and the parents irradiated with a dose of 0.1 Gy, the percentages of PCE with injuries were nearly equal. Upon irradiation of parents with a dose of 0.5 Gy, the percentage of PCE with MN in descendants increased. The examination of radiosensitivity of descendants from irradiated parents showed that the percentage of PCE with MN decreased three-to-fourfold (depending on the dose of irradiation of the parents) compared to descendants from unirradiated parents. If the descendants from exposed parents were irradiated by the scheme of AR, no AR was observed. Thus, the experimental data indicated that, it is possible to detect the transition of gamma-radiation-induced genomic instability in sex cells of male parents into somatic cells of mice (F1

  15. Chronic TiO2 nanoparticle exposure to a benthic organism, Hyalella azteca: Impact of solar UV radiation and material surface coatings on toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study examined the chronic toxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) to a representative benthic species, Hyalella azteca, using an industry standard, P25, and a coated nano-TiO2 used in commercial products. There is limited information on the chronic effects of nano...

  16. Mimicking the effects of spaceflight on bone: Combined effects of disuse and chronic low-dose rate radiation exposure on bone mass in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kanglun; Doherty, Alison H.; Genik, Paula C.; Gookin, Sara E.; Roteliuk, Danielle M.; Wojda, Samantha J.; Jiang, Zhi-Sheng; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Weil, Michael M.; Donahue, Seth W.

    2017-11-01

    During spaceflight, crewmembers are subjected to biomechanical and biological challenges including microgravity and radiation. In the skeleton, spaceflight leads to bone loss, increasing the risk of fracture. Studies utilizing hindlimb suspension (HLS) as a ground-based model of spaceflight often neglect the concomitant effects of radiation exposure, and even when radiation is accounted for, it is often delivered at a high-dose rate over a very short period of time, which does not faithfully mimic spaceflight conditions. This study was designed to investigate the skeletal effects of low-dose rate gamma irradiation (8.5 cGy gamma radiation per day for 20 days, amounting to a total dose of 1.7 Gy) when administered simultaneously to disuse from HLS. The goal was to determine whether continuous, low-dose rate radiation administered during disuse would exacerbate bone loss in a murine HLS model. Four groups of 16 week old female C57BL/6 mice were studied: weight bearing + no radiation (WB+NR), HLS + NR, WB + radiation exposure (WB+RAD), and HLS+RAD. Surprisingly, although HLS led to cortical and trabecular bone loss, concurrent radiation exposure did not exacerbate these effects. Our results raise the possibility that mechanical unloading has larger effects on the bone loss that occurs during spaceflight than low-dose rate radiation.

  17. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people who have chronic pain may also have low self-esteem, depression, and anger. Symptoms of chronic pain Chronic ... itself often leads to other symptoms. These include low self-esteem, anger, depression, anxiety, or frustration. What causes chronic ...

  18. Postoperative C-reactive protein concentration and clinical outcome: comparison of open cystectomy to robot-assisted laparoscopic cystectomy with extracorporeal or intracorporeal urinary diversion in a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingo, Pernille Skjold; Nørregaard, Rikke; Borre, Michael; Jensen, Jørgen Bjerggaard

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to compare clinical outcome and postoperative systemic inflammatory response using C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, to quantify the degree of tissue injury in open mini-laparotomy cystectomy (OMC) versus robot-assisted laparoscopic cystectomy with extracorporeal (RALC-EUD) or intracorporeal urinary diversion (RALC-IUD). From September 2012 to September 2015, 309 patients diagnosed with bladder cancer underwent radical cystectomy with urinary diversion. Of these, 175 patients were eligible for the study and underwent OMC (n = 125), RALC-EUD (n = 12) or RALC-IUD (n = 38). Blood samples were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively on days 1-7. Clinical and perioperative parameters, including demographics, comorbidity, tumour stage and postoperative outcomes, were collected from medical records. Age, American Society of Anesthesiologists score and Charlson score were significantly higher in OMC than in the robotic groups (p = 0.020, 0.012 and 0.008, respectively). Other demographic data showed no significant group differences. Estimated blood loss and blood transfusion volume were higher in OMC (p OMC and RALC-EUD (p OMC CRP levels were higher than RALC-EUD. In this study, robotic techniques seem less traumatic overall than open surgery, as OMC had higher postoperative CRP levels than RALC-EUD. The higher CRP levels in RALC-IUD may be more reflective of the urinary diversion technique than the true tissue trauma.

  19. Publication of new results from the INWORKS epidemiological study about the risk of cancer among nuclear industry workers chronically exposed to low ionizing radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    In this cohort study, 308297 workers in the nuclear industry from France, the United Kingdom, and the United States with detailed monitoring data for external exposure to ionising radiation were linked to death registries. Excess relative rate per Gy of radiation dose for mortality from cancer was estimated. Follow-up encompassed 8.2 million person years. Of 66632 known deaths by the end of follow-up, 17?957 were due to solid cancers. Results suggest a linear increase in the rate of cancer with increasing radiation exposure. The average cumulative colon dose estimated among exposed workers was 20.9 mGy (median 4.1 mGy). The estimated rate of mortality from all cancers excluding leukaemia increased with cumulative dose by 48% per Gy (90% confidence interval 20% to 79%), lagged by 10 years. Similar associations were seen for mortality from all solid cancers (47% (18% to 79%)), and within each country. The estimated association over the dose range of 0-100 mGy was similar in magnitude to that obtained over the entire dose range but less precise. Smoking and occupational asbestos exposure are potential confounders; however, exclusion of deaths from lung cancer and pleural cancer did not affect the estimated association. Despite substantial efforts to characterise the performance of the radiation dosimeters used, the possibility of measurement error remains. The study provides a direct estimate of the association between protracted low dose exposure to ionising radiation and solid cancer mortality. Although high dose rate exposures are thought to be more dangerous than low dose rate exposures, the risk per unit of radiation dose for cancer among radiation workers was similar to estimates derived from studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Quantifying the cancer risks associated with protracted radiation exposures can help strengthen the foundation for radiation protection standards

  20. Analysis of the Effect of Chronic and Low-Dose Radiation Exposure on Spermatogenic Cells of Male Large Japanese Field Mice ( Apodemus speciosus ) after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takino, Sachio; Yamashiro, Hideaki; Sugano, Yukou; Fujishima, Yohei; Nakata, Akifumi; Kasai, Kosuke; Hayashi, Gohei; Urushihara, Yusuke; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Shinoda, Hisashi; Miura, Tomisato; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2017-02-01

    In this study we analyzed the effect of chronic and low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation on spermatogenic cells of large Japanese field mice ( Apodemus speciosus ) after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) accident. In March 2014, large Japanese field mice were collected from two sites located in, and one site adjacent to, the FNPP ex-evacuation zone: Tanashio, Murohara and Akogi, respectively. Testes from these animals were analyzed histologically. External dose rate from radiocesium (combined 134 Cs and 137 Cs) in these animals at the sampling sites exhibited 21 μGy/day in Tanashio, 304-365 μGy/day in Murohara and 407-447 μGy/day in Akogi. In the Akogi group, the numbers of spermatogenic cells and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells per seminiferous tubule were significantly higher compared to the Tanashio and Murohara groups, respectively. TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells tended to be detected at a lower level in the Murohara and Akogi groups compared to the Tanashio group. These results suggest that enhanced spermatogenesis occurred in large Japanese field mice living in and around the FNPP ex-evacuation zone. It remains to be elucidated whether this phenomenon, attributed to chronic exposure to LDR radiation, will benefit or adversely affect large Japanese field mice.

  1. Immunoassay in radiation hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shubik, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    Methods for estimation of nonspecific protection factors, T- and B-immunity system factors, which application is advisable when solving problems of radiation hygiene are described. Data on changes in immunity under chronic low dose irradiation of external and internl radiation by incorporated radiomechides are genralized and analysed. Combined action of ionizing radiation and factors of nonradiation nature is described. 120 refs.; 11 figs.; 33 tabs

  2. Health protection of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norwood, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    Essential information on the health protection of radiation workers which has accumulated since the advent of nuclear fission thirty years ago is presented in simple terms. Basic facts on ionizing radiation, its measurement, and dosimetry are presented. Acute and chronic somatic and genetic effects are discussed with emphasis on prevention. Radiation protection standards and regulations are outlined, and methods for maintaining these standards are described. Diagnosis and treatment of radiation injury from external radiation and/or internally deposited radionuclides is considered generally as well as specifically for each radioisotope. The medical supervision of radiation workers, radiation accidents, atomic power plants, and medicolegal problems is also covered. (853 references) (U.S.)

  3. Analyses of critical target cell responses during preclinical phases of evolving chronic radiation-induced myeloproliferative disease-exploitation of a unique canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.M.; Kaspar, L.V.; Tolle, D.V.; Fritz, T.E.; Frazier, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    This document briefly summarizes and highlights ongoing studies on the cellular and molecular processes involved in the induction and progression of myeloid leukemia in dogs chronically exposed to low daily doses of wholebody gamma irradiation. Under such conditions, select groups of dogs exhibit extremely high frequencies of myeloproliferative disease (MPD) (i.e., /congruent/50%) of which myeloid leukemia is most prominent. 2 figs

  4. Human circulating ribosomal DNA content significantly increases while circulating satellite III (1q12) content decreases under chronic occupational exposure to low-dose gamma- neutron and tritium beta-radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeneva, Inna B; Kostuyk, Svetlana V; Ershova, Elizaveta S; Skorodumova, Elena N; Zhuravleva, Veronika F; Pankratova, Galina V; Volkova, Irina V; Stepanova, Elena V; Porokhovnik, Lev N; Veiko, Natalia N

    A single exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) results in an elevated cell-free DNA (cfDNA) content in the blood plasma. In this case, the cfDNA concentration can be a marker of the cell death in the organism. However, a chronic exposure to a low-dose IR enhances both the endonuclease activity and titer of antibodies to DNA in blood plasma, resulting in a decrease of the total concentration of circulating cfDNA in exposed people. In this case, the total cfDNA concentration should not be considered as a marker of the cell death in an exposed body. We assumed that a pool of the cfDNA circulating in the exposed people contains DNA fragments, which are resistant to a double-strand break formation in the environment of the elevated plasma endonuclease activity, and can be accumulated in the blood plasma. In order to test this hypothesis, we studied the content of GC-rich sequences (69%GC) of the transcribed region of human ribosomal repeat (rDNA), as well as the content of AT-rich repeat (63%AT) of satellite III (1q12) in the cfDNA samples obtained from 285 individuals. We have found that a chronic exposure to gamma-neutron radiation (N=88) and tritium β-radiation (N=88) evokes an increase of the rDNA content (RrDNA index) and a decrease of the satellite III content (RsatIII index) in the circulating cfDNA as compared with the cfDNA of non-exposed people (N=109). Such index that simultaneously displays both the increase of rDNA content and decrease of satellite III content in the cfDNA (RrDNA/RsatIII) can be recommended as a marker of chronic processes in the body that involve the elevated cell death rate and/or increased blood plasma endonuclease activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiation enteropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farthmann, E.H. (Chirurgische Universitaetsklinik, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)); Imdahl, A. (Chirurgische Universitaetsklinik, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)); Eggstein, S. (Chirurgische Universitaetsklinik, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany))

    1994-08-01

    The pathogenesis, clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment of radiation damage to the gut are described. The progress of 90 patients operated on in the Chirurgische Universitaetsklinik Freiburg is retrospectively evaluated. Haemorrhage, vomiting, diarrhoea and, occasionally, perforation are the signs of acute radiation enteropathy, which appears weeks or months after radiotherapy. Expect for perforations, these can usually be treated conservatively. Chronic radiation enteropathy does not manifest itself until years after irradiation, with diarrhoea, obstruction and the development of fistulae. The acute ileus can often be relieved with decompression tubes. After localising the stenosis radiologically with a contrast medium, and improvement in the general condition, many cases require operative intervention. This usually consists of resection, the establishment of a bypass anastomosis or enterostomy. In 44% of the patients postoperative complications followed, with a mortality of 22%. The cause of the high complication rate is partly the poor general condition of the patient, and partly the radiation induced impairment in wound healing, which may lead to insufficiency of the anastomosis and the development of fistulae. (orig./MG)

  6. Radiation enteropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farthmann, E.H.; Imdahl, A.; Eggstein, S.

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenesis, clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment of radiation damage to the gut are described. The progress of 90 patients operated on in the Chirurgische Universitaetsklinik Freiburg is retrospectively evaluated. Haemorrhage, vomiting, diarrhoea and, occasionally, perforation are the signs of acute radiation enteropathy, which appears weeks or months after radiotherapy. Expect for perforations, these can usually be treated conservatively. Chronic radiation enteropathy does not manifest itself until years after irradiation, with diarrhoea, obstruction and the development of fistulae. The acute ileus can often be relieved with decompression tubes. After localising the stenosis radiologically with a contrast medium, and improvement in the general condition, many cases require operative intervention. This usually consists of resection, the establishment of a bypass anastomosis or enterostomy. In 44% of the patients postoperative complications followed, with a mortality of 22%. The cause of the high complication rate is partly the poor general condition of the patient, and partly the radiation induced impairment in wound healing, which may lead to insufficiency of the anastomosis and the development of fistulae. (orig./MG) [de

  7. Radiation and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Yusof Mohd Ali; Noriah Jamal

    1996-01-01

    Radiation consists of ionizing radiation (IR) and non-ionizing radiation (NIR). Apart from naturally occuring sources, these types of radiation are widely used in Malaysia and can easily be found in Malaysia environment. IR is widely used in industry, medicine and research; while NIR is widely used in industry, medicine, telecommunication, defence, entertainment and research. Recent studies indicate that these radiations are potentially harmful to human beings, in particular the chronic late effects. Based on this understanding, in 1986 (beginning IRPA RM5) Nuclear Energy Unit (NEU) had initiated a number of research projects which primary aims are to gather baseline informations and later to make assessments on the health impact of workers and the population. The projects started off by looking at problems associated with ionizing radiation and these were extended in late 1993, to include non-ionizing radiation

  8. Effects of chronic exposure of seeds and seeds and seedlings of Arabidopsis Thaliana by low doses of γ-radiation on plant growth and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinov, S.V.

    2013-01-01

    Article presents the results of research on the effect of chronic γ-irradiation in small doses on A. Thaliana seedlings and seeds growth and development. Exposure rate for the seeds was 0,45 mGy/h (total absorbed dose 30 cSv) and 0,18 mGy/h for seedlings (total absorbed dose 3 cSv). Statistically significant differences in the germination capacity, in the time of primary leaf rosette formation, in the hypocotyl length were revealed between irradiated and control seedlings. Plants from irradiated seeds differed by the higher growth rate of stem, they flowered and fruited earlier, but they also characterized on average shorter vegetative cycle in comparison with control plants. In our experiments it is shown significant impact of chronic low doses of γ-irradiation of seeds and seedlings on the ontogeny in A. Thaliana and on the parameters that reflect the growth and development of the irradiated plants

  9. Clinical observation of radiation urinary bladder disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Yuke; Liu Libo; Zhang Haiying; Liang Shuo; Chen Dawei; Wu Zhenfeng; Dong Lihua; Lu Xuejun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Clinical characteristic, diagnosis and treatment of radiation urinary bladder disease induced by radiation therapy for cancers in the pelvis were inquired into for providing diagnostic basis. Methods: Statistical analysis for the clinical cases was carried out. Results: The incidence of radiation bladder diseases induced by radiation therapy of cervix cancer are about 0.8%-2.96%, with an average of 2.14%. Radiation bladder disease is divided into acute radiation cystitis, chronic radiation cystitis and radiation vesical fistula. Chronic radiation cystitis is seen most often in the clinic and its main clinical symptom is painless macroscopic hematuria, which is again subdivided into slight and severe degrees. Diagnosis should include history of exposure to radiation, which dose exceed the dose threshold, and typical clinical characteristics. Conclusion: The characteristics, types and diagnostic basis of radiation urinary bladder disease analyzed in this study can provide the reference for drawing up diagnostic standard

  10. Chronic cholecystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholecystitis - chronic ... Most of the time, chronic cholecystitis is caused by repeated attacks of acute (sudden) cholecystitis. Most of these attacks are caused by gallstones in the gallbladder. These ...

  11. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. × ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. ...

  12. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1975-01-01

    Physical and radiological terms, quantities, and units. Basic principles of radiation protection (ICRP, IAEA, EURATOM, FRG). Biological effects of ionizing radiation. Objectives of practical radiation protection. (HP) [de

  13. Late radiation effect on the eye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Kozo; Uchiyama, Yukio; Horiuchi, Junichi; Masaki, Norie; Nishio, Masamichi.

    1987-01-01

    In order to analyze the chronic radiation injury onothe eye, 264 cases with carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses were accumulated from the four large hospitals. 50 % appearance dose of the chronic radiation injury, chiefly the radiation cataract, in 3, 5, 7 and 10 years after radiotherapy was 51.6 Gy, 28.3 Gy, 23.9 Gy and 21.6 Gy, respectively. (author)

  14. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1970-1992: The JANUS Program Survival and Pathology Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahn, D.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.; Williamson, F.S.; Fox, C.

    1995-02-01

    A research reactor for exclusive use in experimental radiobiology was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory in the 1960's. It was located in a special addition to Building 202, which housed the Division of Biological and Medical Research. Its location assured easy access for all users to the animal facilities, and it was also near the existing gamma-irradiation facilities. The water-cooled, heterogeneous 200-kW(th) reactor, named JANUS, became the focal point for a range of radiobiological studies gathered under the rubic of open-quotes the JANUS programclose quotes. The program ran from about 1969 to 1992 and included research at all levels of biological organization, from subcellular to organism. More than a dozen moderate- to large-scale studies with the B6CF 1 mouse were carried out; these focused on the late effects of whole-body exposure to gamma rays or fission neutrons, in matching exposure regimes. In broad terms, these studies collected data on survival and on the pathology observed at death. A deliberate effort was made to establish the cause of death. This archieve describes these late-effects studies and their general findings. The database includes exposure parameters, time of death, and the gross pathology and histopathology in codified form. A series of appendices describes all pathology procedures and codes, treatment or irradiation codes, and the manner in which the data can be accessed in the ORACLE database management system. A series of tables also presents summaries of the individual experiments in terms of radiation quality, sample sizes at entry, mean survival times by sex, and number of gross pathology and histopathology records

  15. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1970-1992: The JANUS Program Survival and Pathology Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grahn, D.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.; Williamson, F.S.; Fox, C.

    1995-02-01

    A research reactor for exclusive use in experimental radiobiology was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory in the 1960`s. It was located in a special addition to Building 202, which housed the Division of Biological and Medical Research. Its location assured easy access for all users to the animal facilities, and it was also near the existing gamma-irradiation facilities. The water-cooled, heterogeneous 200-kW(th) reactor, named JANUS, became the focal point for a range of radiobiological studies gathered under the rubic of {open_quotes}the JANUS program{close_quotes}. The program ran from about 1969 to 1992 and included research at all levels of biological organization, from subcellular to organism. More than a dozen moderate- to large-scale studies with the B6CF{sub 1} mouse were carried out; these focused on the late effects of whole-body exposure to gamma rays or fission neutrons, in matching exposure regimes. In broad terms, these studies collected data on survival and on the pathology observed at death. A deliberate effort was made to establish the cause of death. This archieve describes these late-effects studies and their general findings. The database includes exposure parameters, time of death, and the gross pathology and histopathology in codified form. A series of appendices describes all pathology procedures and codes, treatment or irradiation codes, and the manner in which the data can be accessed in the ORACLE database management system. A series of tables also presents summaries of the individual experiments in terms of radiation quality, sample sizes at entry, mean survival times by sex, and number of gross pathology and histopathology records.

  16. A lower dose threshold for the in vivo protective adaptive response to radiation. Tumorigenesis in chronically exposed normal and Trp53 heterozygous C57BL/6 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.; Burchart, P.; Wyatt, H.

    2008-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation to cells and animals may induce adaptive responses that reduce the risk of cancer. However, there are upper dose thresholds above which these protective adaptive responses do not occur. We have now tested the hypothesis that there are similar lower dose thresholds that must be exceeded in order to induce protective effects in vivo. We examined the effects of low dose/low dose rate fractionated exposures on cancer formation in Trp53 normal or cancer-prone Trp53 heterozygous female C57BL/6 mice. Beginning at 6 weeks of age, mice were exposed 5 days/week to single daily doses (0.33 mGy, 0.7 mGy/h) totaling 48, 97 or 146 mGy over 30, 60 or 90 weeks. The exposures for shorter times (up to 60 weeks) appeared to be below the level necessary to induce overall protective adaptive responses in Trp53 normal mice, and detrimental effects (shortened lifespan, increased frequency) evident for only specific tumor types (B- and T-cell lymphomas), were produced. Only when the exposures were continued for 90 weeks did the dose become sufficient to induce protective adaptive responses, balancing the detrimental effects for these specific cancers, and reducing the risk level back to that of the unexposed animals. Detrimental effects were not seen for other tumor types, and a protective effect was seen for sarcomas after 60 weeks of exposure, which was then lost when the exposure continued for 90 weeks. As previously shown for the upper dose threshold for protection by low doses, the lower dose boundary between protection and harm was influenced by Trp53 functionality. Neither protection nor harm was observed in exposed Trp53 heterozygous mice, indicating that reduced Trp53 function raises the lower dose/dose rate threshold for both detrimental and protective tumorigenic effects. (author)

  17. 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG): A biomarker of oxidative damage in yellow bullheads chronically exposed to low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCreedy, C.D.; Glickman, L.T.

    1995-01-01

    8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), an oxidation product of the nucleotide deoxyguanosine (dG) was used as a biomarker to assess oxidative damage in brain and gill tissues of yellow bullhead catfish (Ameiurus natalis; n = 18) inhabiting an abandoned reactor reservoir contaminated with low levels of d137 Cs (Pond B, Savannah River Site, SC). DNA was isolated by chloroform-isoamyl extraction, enzymatically digested with Nuclease P1/Calf Intestinal Phosphatase, and analyzed by HPLC with electrochemical detection.Length, weight, age, condition and muscle 137 Cs activity of each fish were also determined. Concentrations of 8-OH-dG were greater in brain than in gill tissues. 8-OH-dG in gill tissues decreased as condition of fish increased, but as age increased, the effect of condition declined. Brain 8-OH-dG concentration was not related to age or condition of fish, but was greater in females and the interaction between gender and 137 Cs was significant. Brain 8-OH-dG was positively associated with muscle 137 Cs concentration among females, but was unrelated to 137 Cs concentration in males. At lower 137 Cs concentrations, females tended to have fewer oxidative DNA adducts in brian than did males. Deposition of somatic lipids into eggs may provide females some anti-oxidant benefit by diminishing the contribution of lipid peroxidation to DNA damage. 8-OH-dG is a sensitive biomarker of low-level radiation exposure, however, its application in fish requires consideration of factors such as gender, age, body-condition, and the tissue type sampled

  18. Radiation enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation enteropathy; Radiation-induced small bowel injury; Post-radiation enteritis ... Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. The therapy ...

  19. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanem, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention.

  20. Radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumeister, K.

    1977-01-01

    This chapter is included in a textbook which is primarily intended for medical students. The following topics are dealt with: radiation effects on molecules; chemical and biochemical radiation effects; modification of radiation effects and radiosensitivity; radiation-induced pathomorphological and pathophysiological effects in organs and organ systems; radiation syndrome; radiation effects in embryos and fetuses; genetic radiation effects; carcinogenesis and leukemogenesis after irradiation; and radiation effects after intake of radionuclides

  1. The clinical characteristics of the radiation pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fuzheng; Wang Mingzhi; Chen Jianjiang; Wang Zhongxiang; Mao Yongjie

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the clinical characteristics of the radiation pneumonia, sum the experience and the basis of the radiation pneumonia for its prevention and treatment. Method: Twenty three cases with radiation pneumonia from 1991 to 1998 were retrospectively analysed. Its clinical manifestation, chest X-ray, thoracic CT and blood routine were evaluated. Result: The acute manifestation was fever, cough, dyspnea, and the chronic manifestation was cough and insufficiency of pulmonary function. Conclusion: The prevention of radiation pneumonia is more important, high dose cortical steroids and antibiotics were prescribed during the acute stage and the chronic radiation pneumonia is irreversible

  2. Evaluation of the oxidative stress modulation in Drosophila melanogaster strains deficient in endogenous antioxidants and with chronic exposure to casiopeina Cas II-gly and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez V, E. R.

    2013-01-01

    The casiopeinas are a family of coordination compounds with copper metallic center that have shown to have antineoplastic activity. The experimental evidences suggest that its action mechanism is through the generation of free radicals. The casiopeina (Cas II-gly) is believed to causes oxidative damage in the mitochondria, leading to the cellular death. The present study has the purpose to evaluate the antioxidant potential of the tetrapyrroles: cupro-sodica chlorophyllin (CSC), protoporphyrin-Ix (Pp-Ix) and the bilirubin (Bili) against the oxidant action of the Cas II-gly. The present study will also contribute in the characterization of the biological activity of the Cas II-gly. For this purpose is quantifies the effect of these compounds in the enzymes activity, superoxide dismutase (Sod) and catalase (Cat) in wild Drosophila melanogaster strains Canton-S and in the deficient in Sod and Cat. Two protocols were used, in the first male of 1-24 h of age were pre-treated with 0, 0.01, 0.1 and 1 m M of Cas II-gly and later on they were treated with radiation (15 Gy), and the second 69 m M of CSC, Pp-Ix or Bili, during 8 days and later they were treated with 0.1 m M of Cas II-gly during 24 h. The enzymatic activity was measured with the detection packages of enzymes Sod and Cat of Sigma. It was found that none of the three pigments increment the Sod activity but, if they diminished that of Cat (p≤0.007). The three concentrations of Cas II-gly did not increase the Sod activity significantly, only the concentration of 0.1 m M diminishes in 5.6 U the Cat activity (p <0.03) the same as the treatment with 15 Gy of gamma rays (8 U, p <0.004). The Cas II-gly combination 0.1 m M with the pigments does not modify the Sod and Cat activity. These results suggest that the proven pigments act as antioxidants, avoiding the induction of exogenous antioxidants caused by the gamma rays or the Cas II-gly. (Author)

  3. Image quality and radiation dose of single heartbeat 640-slice coronary CT angiography: A comparison between patients with chronic Atrial Fibrillation and subjects in normal sinus rhythm by propensity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Cesare, Ernesto, E-mail: ernesto.dicesare@cc.univaq.it [Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Division of Radiotherapy, Laboratory of Radiobiology, University of L’Aquila (Italy); Gennarelli, Antonio; Di Sibio, Alessandra; Felli, Valentina; Splendiani, Alessandra [Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Division of Radiology, Laboratory of Radiobiology, University of L’Aquila (Italy); Gravina, Giovanni Luca [Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Division of Radiotherapy, Laboratory of Radiobiology, University of L’Aquila (Italy); Masciocchi, Carlo [Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Division of Radiology, Laboratory of Radiobiology, University of L’Aquila (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Atrial Fibrillation (AF) may affect CCTA image quality. •We compare the results of single heartbeat CCTA in subjects with chronic AF and in sinus rhythm. •Single heartbeat CCTA may be feasible also in subjects with cAF and HR <72 bpm. •In cAF patients with heart rate higher than 72 bpm, CCTA has more movement-associated artefacts. •Mean effective dose of single heartbeat CCTA in cAF group was higher than in sinus rhythm one. -- Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of single heartbeat 640-slice coronary CT angiography (CCTA) in patients with chronic Atrial Fibrillation (cAF) in comparison with subjects in normal sinus rhythm. Methods: A cohort of 71 patients with cAF was matched with 71 subjects in normal sinus rhythm (NSR) and HR ≤ 65 bpm using a matched by propensity analysis. All subjects underwent a single heartbeat CCTA with prospective gating. In subjects with cAF, we manually established the acquisition of data only from a single heartbeat. Mean effective dose and image quality, with both objective and subjective measures, were assessed. Results: 96.4% of all segments in the cAF group had diagnostic image quality. The rate of subjects with at least one non-diagnostic segment was 14% and 2.8% (p = 0.031) in the cAF and NRS groups, respectively. In the cAF group, the percentage of patients with at least one non-diagnostic segment for acquisition HR ≤ 72 was 1.8% (1/55), and it did not significantly differ from the NSR group (2.8%; 2/71) (p = 1.0). Objective quality parameters did not show a statistically significant difference between the two groups. The mean effective dose was 4.24 ± 1.24 mSv in the cAF group and 2.67 ± 0.5 mSv in the sinus rhythm group (p < 0.0001) with an increase by 59% in the cAF group with respect to the SNR group. Conclusions: A single heartbeat acquisition protocol with a 640-slice prospectively ECG-triggered CT angiography may be feasible in patients with cAF and HR below 72

  4. Radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pao, C.T.; Green, W.K.

    1978-01-01

    A system for indicating radiation from a radioactive fluid such as a gas wherein simultaneous indications of the activity concentration of radioactivity of the gas, the radiation dose rate and average energy of the radiation are provided

  5. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ures Pantazi, M.

    1994-01-01

    This work define procedures and controls about ionizing radiations. Between some definitions it found the following topics: radiation dose, risk, biological effects, international radioprotection bodies, workers exposure, accidental exposure, emergencies and radiation protection

  6. Ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, J.

    1989-01-01

    Ionizing radiation results in biological damage that differs from other hazardous substances and is highly dangerous to man. Ionizing radiation cannot be perceived by man's sense organs and the biological damage cannot be detected immediately afterwards (except in very high doses). Every human being is exposed to low doses of radiation. The structure of the atom; sources of ionizing radiation; radiation units; biological effects; norms for radiation protection; and the national control in South Africa are discussed. 1 fig., 5 refs

  7. Radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  8. Radiation-induced enteropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sher, M.E.; Bauer, J. (Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The incidence of chronic radiation enteritis appears to have risen in recent years due to the increasing utilization of radiotherapy for abdominal and pelvic malignancies. The etiology, pathogenesis, and management of radiation enteritis are discussed. Two case reports exemplify the progressive nature of the disease. Case 1 demonstrates the classical picture of multiple exacerbations and remissions of partial small bowel obstruction and the eventual need for surgical management ten years after radiation therapy. Case 2 presents the more severe sequelae of an acute perforation with a 14-yr latency period. Predisposing factors in the progression of radiation injury include excessive radiation, underlying cardiovascular disease, fixation of the bowel, and an asthenic habitus. In both cases, radiation injury was localized to a discrete segment of bowel; therefore, resection with a primary end-to-end anastomosis was performed. In addition, diseased bowel was eliminated and, therefore, would not cause further complications such as intractable bleeding or fistula formation. The review focuses on current knowledge which may be applied to the treatment and prevention of radiation enteritis.

  9. Radiation effects and radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, R.K.; Bugalia, Saroj; Dakshene, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure causes damage to biological systems and these damages are mediated by the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species targeting vital cellular components such as DNA and membranes. DNA repair systems and the endogenous cellular biochemical defense mechanisms against reactive oxygen species and antioxidants enzymes like reduced Glutathione (GSH), Superoxide dismutase, Glutathione peroxidase catalase etc. fail upon exposures to higher as well as chronic radiation doses leading to alterations in cell functions, cell death or mutations. Radioprotectors prevent these alterations and protect cells and tissues from the deleterious effects of radiations. Radioprotectors are of great importance due to their possible and potential application during planned radiation exposures such as radiotherapy, diagnostic scanning, clean up operations in nuclear accidents, space expeditions etc. and Unplanned radiations exposures such as accidents in nuclear industry, nuclear terrorism, natural background radiation etc. Many of the available synthetic radioprotectors are toxic to mammalian system at doses required to be effective as radioprotector. Increasing uses of ionizing radiation have drawn the attention of many radiobiologists towards their undesired side effects produced in various tissues and for modifying them to facilitate the beneficial uses of radiation. Modification of radiation response is obtained by means of chemical substances that can significantly decrease the magnitude of response when present in a biological system during irradiation. Radioprotectors are chemicals that modify a cell's response to radiation. Radioprotectors are drugs that protect normal (non cancerous) cells from the damage caused by radiation therapy. These agents promote the repair of normal cells that are exposed to radiation. Various chemicals, like Cysteamine, MPG , WR-2721 have been tested for the protection against harmful effects of radiation. These radio

  10. Ear infection - chronic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... blocked, fluid can build up. When this happens, infection can occur. A chronic ear infection develops when ...

  11. Chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... that you do not have symptoms until your kidneys have almost ... end-stage renal disease (ESRD). At this stage, the kidneys are ...

  12. Symptoms of radiation disease in survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szirmai, E.; Medgyesy, G.

    1975-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the following headings: Thermal injuries; radiation injuries; course and sequence of the injuries after the explosions; acute injuries; chronic injuries; and genetic damage. Emphasis is on the late effects of the explosions. (U.K.)

  13. Radiation protection

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    This will be a simple explanation of the reasons why CERN has to be careful about radiation protections issues, a practical guide on how to recognize radiation dangers, the monitoring systems that make sure radiation levels are well tolerable norms, and a quick summary of what radiation levels mean in terms of personal risk.

  14. [Chronic diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, Teresa; Heuss, Ludwig Theodor

    2014-09-01

    Defined by lasting more than four weeks - is a common but often challenging clinical scenario. It is important to be aware that diarrhoea means different things to different patients. The evaluation of chronic diarrhoea depends on taking an excellent history and careful physical examination as well as planning investigations thoughtfully. Functional diarrhea ist the most common cause of chronic diarrhea in the developed countries and motility disorders are more common than inflammatory, osmotic or secretory causes. In some cases categorizing patients by their stool characteristics can be helpful in directing further evaluation.

  15. Principles of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, M.P.; Share, F.S.; Goodman, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation oncology now represents the integration of knowledge obtained over an 80-year period from the physics and biology laboratories and the medical clinic. Such integration is recent; until the supervoltage era following World War II, the chief developments in these three areas for the most part were realized independently. The physics and engineering laboratories have now developed a dependable family of sources of ionizing radiations that can be precisely directed at tumor volumes at various depths within the body. The biology laboratory has provided the basic scientific support underlying the intensive clinical experience and currently is suggesting ways of using ionizing radiations more effectively, such as modified fractionation schedules relating to cell cycle kinetics and the use of drugs and chemicals as modifiers of radiation response and normal tissue reaction. The radiation therapy clinic has provided the patient stratum on which the acute and chronic effects of irradiation have been assessed, and the patterns of treatment success and failure identified. The radiation therapist has shared with the surgeon and medical oncologist the responsibility for clarifying the natural history of a large number of human neoplasms, and through such clarifications, has developed more effective treatment strategies. Several examples of this include the improved results in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease, squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, seminoma, and epithelial neoplasms of the upper aerodigestive tract

  16. Chronic gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipponen, Pentti; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Prevalence of chronic gastritis has markedly declined in developed populations during the past decades. However, chronic gastritis is still one of the most common serious pandemic infections with such severe killing sequelae as peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. Globally, on average, even more than half of people may have a chronic gastritis at present. Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood is the main cause of chronic gastritis, which microbial origin is the key for the understanding of the bizarre epidemiology and course of the disease. A life-long and aggressive inflammation in gastritis results in destruction (atrophic gastritis) of stomach mucosa with time (years and decades). The progressive worsening of atrophic gastritis results subsequently in dysfunctions of stomach mucosa. Atrophic gastritis will finally end up in a permanently acid-free stomach in the most extreme cases. Severe atrophic gastritis and acid-free stomach are the highest independent risk conditions for gastric cancer known so far. In addition to the risks of malignancy and peptic ulcer, acid-free stomach and severe forms of atrophic gastritis may associate with failures in absorption of essential vitamins, like vitamin B12, micronutrients (like iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc), diet and medicines. PMID:25901896

  17. Chronic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipponen, Pentti; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2015-06-01

    Prevalence of chronic gastritis has markedly declined in developed populations during the past decades. However, chronic gastritis is still one of the most common serious pandemic infections with such severe killing sequelae as peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. Globally, on average, even more than half of people may have a chronic gastritis at present. Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood is the main cause of chronic gastritis, which microbial origin is the key for the understanding of the bizarre epidemiology and course of the disease. A life-long and aggressive inflammation in gastritis results in destruction (atrophic gastritis) of stomach mucosa with time (years and decades). The progressive worsening of atrophic gastritis results subsequently in dysfunctions of stomach mucosa. Atrophic gastritis will finally end up in a permanently acid-free stomach in the most extreme cases. Severe atrophic gastritis and acid-free stomach are the highest independent risk conditions for gastric cancer known so far. In addition to the risks of malignancy and peptic ulcer, acid-free stomach and severe forms of atrophic gastritis may associate with failures in absorption of essential vitamins, like vitamin B12, micronutrients (like iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc), diet and medicines.

  18. Chronic Meningococcaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    clinical features, complications, laboratory findings and treatment of this condition are discussed. The resemblance, both clinically and histologically, to allergic vasculitis is stressed. S. Air. Med. J., 48, 2154 (1974). Chronic meningococcaemia is an uncommon condition today, but was well recognised in the early decades of.

  19. Does a little radiation do you good?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of ionising radiation may not always be harmful. Numerous experiments in plants and animals have shown that low doses of radiation delivered slowly over a certain dose range, can increase the rate of growth and development, prolong lifespan and reduce the incidence of chronic diseases

  20. Chronic heart disease caused by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horimoto, Masashi; Matsuhashi, Hironobu; Nakano, Hiroshi; Honda, Hajime; Sekiguchi, Morie.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis was made of 5 patients who had chronic heart disease 18 months to 13 years after radiation therapy for breast cancer or rib osteoblastoma. A total dose of X-ray or electron beam was ≥50 Gy for each patient. Computed tomography of the chest and cardiac catheterization led to the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis with chronic pericardial effusion in one patient and chronic effusive pericarditis in the other three patients. Complete or incomplete right bundle branch block was observed on ECG in 3 patients. Endomyocardial biopsy of the right ventricle for 4 patients revealed nonspecific pathological findings, such as hypertrophy, disarray of cardiac muscle cells, various sized cell nuclei, rarefaction of myofibrils, and slight interstitial fibrosis with infrequent cellular infiltration. The results may implicate radiation-induced myocardial disturbance. Long-term follow-up is mandatory for the management of patients treated with radiation. (Namekawa, K.)

  1. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, from radioactive substances that a doctor places inside your body. The type of radiation therapy you receive depends on many factors, including The ...

  2. Radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    Sections include: dose units, dose limits, dose rate, potential hazards of ionizing radiations, control of internal and external radiation exposure, personal dosemeters, monitoring programs and transport of radioactive material (packaging and shielding)

  3. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kill any cancer cells that remain. Lifetime Dose Limits There is a limit to the amount of radiation an area of ... total dose of radiation more quickly or to limit damage to healthy cells. Different ways of delivering ...

  4. Radiation Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amounts of radiation and could be caused by Dirty bombs - a mix of explosives with radioactive powder Fallout from a nuclear bomb Accidental release from a nuclear reactor or a nuclear weapons plant A lot of radiation over a short ...

  5. Chronic motor tic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start at ...

  6. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Children/Pediatric Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child have? ... will develop diabetes in adolescence. Who gets chronic pancreatitis? Those at risk for chronic pancreatitis are children ...

  7. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    COPD; Chronic obstructive airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... The best test for COPD is a lung function test called spirometry . ... into a small machine that tests lung capacity. The results can ...

  8. About Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advocacy Donate A to Z Health Guide About Chronic Kidney Disease Tweet Share Print Email Chronic kidney disease (CKD) ... Learn about Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) What is chronic kidney disease (CKD)? Chronic kidney disease includes conditions that damage ...

  9. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... Kantarjian H, Cortes J. Chronic myeloid leukemia. In: Niederhuber JE, ... Oncology . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2014:chap ...

  10. Medical radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    This leaflet in the At-a-Glance Series describes the medical use of X-rays, how X-rays help in diagnosis, radiation protection of the patient, staff protection, how radioactive materials in nuclear medicine examinations help in diagnosis and the use of radiation in radiotherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging, a diagnostic technique involving no ionizing radiation, is also briefly examined. The role of the NRPB in the medical use of radiation is outlined. (UK).

  11. New labels for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Susumu; Mukai, Minoru; Kato, Hirotoshi

    1992-01-01

    In simulating radiotherapy, the bone and trachea identified by plain X-P and the other organs, such as the esophagus and bladder, outlined by contrast medium have so far been used as labels. However, irradiation with a high therapeutic ratio is required for an intracorporeal insertion of artificial labels that are identified by X-ray fluoroscopy. For this purpose, metal clips and seed dummies are available, although they cause artifacts in CT scans. Therefore, the authors are using an acupuncture needle and lipiodol for tracing as new artificial labels, since both are identified by X-ray fluoroscopy and CT scan and create few artifacts. (J.P.N.)

  12. New labels for radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Susumu; Mukai, Minoru; Kato, Hirotoshi (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan))

    1992-12-01

    In simulating radiotherapy, the bone and trachea identified by plain X-P and the other organs, such as the esophagus and bladder, outlined by contrast medium have so far been used as labels. However, irradiation with a high therapeutic ratio is required for an intracorporeal insertion of artificial labels that are identified by X-ray fluoroscopy. For this purpose, metal clips and seed dummies are available, although they cause artifacts in CT scans. Therefore, the authors are using an acupuncture needle and lipiodol for tracing as new artificial labels, since both are identified by X-ray fluoroscopy and CT scan and create few artifacts. (J.P.N.).

  13. Radiation watchdog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, R.

    1984-01-01

    Designated by WHO as a Collaborating Centre, the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee provides assistance to all countries of the Americas in radiation accidents including human contamination or overexposure. It also conducts courses in radiation emergency response for health professionals from throughout the world

  14. Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation is energy that travels in the form of waves or high-speed particles. It occurs naturally in sunlight. Man-made radiation is used in X-rays, nuclear weapons, nuclear power plants and cancer treatment. If you are exposed to small amounts of radiation over a long ...

  15. Delayed radiation neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Toshiko; Miyamoto, Kazuto; Beppu, Hirokuni; Hirose, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Katsuhiro

    1981-01-01

    A case of cervical plexus neuropathy was reported in association with chronic radio-dermatitis, myxedema with thyroid adenoma and epiglottic tumor. A 38-year-old man has noticed muscle weakness and wasting of the right shoulder girdle since age 33. A detailed history taking revealed a previous irradiation to the neck because of the cervical lymphadenopathy at age 10 (X-ray 3,000 rads), keroid skin change at age 19, obesity and edema since 26, and hoarseness at 34. Laryngoscopic examination revealed a tumor on the right vocal cord, diagnosed as benign papilloma by histological study. In addition, there were chronic radio-dermatitis around the neck, primary hypothyroidism with a benign functioning adenoma on the right lobe of the thyroid, the right phrenic nerve palsy and the right recurrent nerve palsy. All these lesions were considered to be the late sequellae of radiation to the neck in childhood. Other neurological signs were weakness and amyotrophy of the right shoulder girdle with patchy sensory loss, and areflexia of the right arm. Gross power was fairly well preserved in the right hand. EMG showed neurogenic changes in the tested muscles, suggesting a peripheral nerve lesion. Nerve conduction velocities were normal. No abnormal findings were revealed by myelography and spinal CT. The neurological findings of the patient were compatible with the diagnosis of middle cervical plexus palsy apparently due to late radiation effect. In the literature eight cases of post-radiation neuropathy with a long latency have been reported. The present case with the longest latency after the radiation should be included in the series of the reported cases of ''delayed radiation neuropathy.'' (author)

  16. Delayed radiation neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Beppu, H.; Hirose, K.; Yamada, K. (Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital (Japan))

    1981-07-01

    A case of cervical plexus neuropathy was reported in association with chronic radio-dermatitis, myxedema with thyroid adenoma and epiglottic tumor. A 38-year-old man has noticed muscle weakness and wasting of the right shoulder girdle since age 33. A detailed history taking revealed a previous irradiation to the neck because of the cervical lymphadenopathy at age 10 (X-ray 3,000 rads), keroid skin change at age 19, obesity and edema since 26, and hoarseness at 34. Laryngoscopic examination revealed a tumor on the right vocal cord, diagnosed as benign papilloma by histological study. In addition, there were chronic radio-dermatitis around the neck, primary hypothyroidism with a benign functioning adenoma on the right lobe of the thyroid, the right phrenic nerve palsy and the right recurrent nerve palsy. All these lesions were considered to be the late sequellae of radiation to the neck in childhood. Other neurological signs were weakness and amyotrophy of the right shoulder girdle with patchy sensory loss, and areflexia of the right arm. Gross power was fairly well preserved in the right hand. EMG showed neurogenic changes in the tested muscles, suggesting a peripheral nerve lesion. Nerve conduction velocities were normal. No abnormal findings were revealed by myelography and spinal CT. The neurological findings of the patient were compatible with the diagnosis of middle cervical plexus palsy apparently due to late radiation effect. In the literature eight cases of post-radiation neuropathy with a long latency have been reported. The present case with the longest latency after the radiation should be included in the series of the reported cases of ''delayed radiation neuropathy.'' (author).

  17. Radiation imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmayne, I.

    1986-05-21

    A detector for the detection of radiation such as X-ray radiation comprises an array of scintillation elements embedded in a sheet of radiation absorbing material. The scintillation elements are monitored individually, for example by a corresponding array of photodiodes, to build up a picture of the incident radiation. The front face of the sheet and the inner walls of the bores may be coated with a reflective material. The detector finds particular application in weld radiography. The detector may be stepped relative to the radiation source, the signals produced by the rows of the detector as they pass a predetermined point being summed.

  18. Radiation imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmayne, Ian.

    1986-01-01

    A detector for the detection of radiation such as X-ray radiation comprises an array of scintillation elements embedded in a sheet of radiation absorbing material. The scintillation elements are monitored individually, for example by a corresponding array of photodiodes, to build up a picture of the incident radiation. The front face of the sheet and the inner walls of the bores may be coated with a reflective material. The detector finds particular application in weld radiography. The detector may be stepped relative to the radiation source, the signals produced by the rows of the detector as they pass a predetermined point being summed. (author)

  19. Effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadmor, J.

    1984-05-01

    A sound evaluation of the consequences of releases of radioactivity into the environment, especially of those large amounts, and of the effectiveness of different protective measures, requires thorough concern of the various aspects of the radiological effects. The effects of ionizing radiation were reviewed according to the following characterization: Affected subject (somatic, genetic and psychological effects); Duration of irradiation (acute and chronic irradiation); Latent period (early and late effects); Dose-effect relationship (stochastic and non-stochastic effects); Population affected (e.g. children, pregnant women). In addition to the lethal effects which are generally considered extensively in all the evaluations of the consequences of radioactivity releases, such effects as early symptoms and morbidity are emphasized in this review. The dependence of the effects on dose rates, repair mechanism and medical treatment is discussed, and the uncertainties involved with their evaluation is highlighted. The differences between QF (quality factor) and RBE (relative biological effectiveness) of different radiation sources are interpreted. Synergystic effects and the effectiveness of various means of medication are discussed. It is suggested that all radiological effects, including those resulting from relatively low radiation doses, e.g. foetus deformations, fertility impairment, prodomal - leading to psychological effects, should be considered within the evaluation of the consequences of radioactivity releases and of the effectiveness of protective measures. Limits of the repair factors to be considered within the evaluation of the effects of chronic exposures are proposed

  20. Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics are two closely integrated programs whose joint purpose is to explore the connections between the primary physical events produced by radiation and their biological consequences in cellular systems. The radiation dosimetry program includes the theoretical description of primary events and their connection with the observable biological effects. This program also is concerned with the design and measurement of physical parameters used in theory or to support biological experiments. The radiation biophysics program tests and uses the theoretical developments for experimental design, and provides information for further theoretical development through experiments on cellular systems

  1. Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics are two closely integrated programs whose joint purpose is to explore the connections between the primary physical events produced by radiation and their biological consequences in cellular systems. The radiation dosimetry program includes the theoretical description of primary events and their connection with the observable biological effects. This program also is concerned with design and measurement of those physical parameters used in the theory or to support biological experiments. The radiation biophysics program tests and makes use of the theoretical developments for experimental design. Also, this program provides information for further theoretical development through experiments on cellular systems

  2. Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, James E

    2007-01-01

    Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection offers professionals and advanced students a comprehensive coverage of the major concepts that underlie the origins and transport of ionizing radiation in matter. Understanding atomic structure and the physical mechanisms of radiation interactions is the foundation on which much of the current practice of radiological health protection is based. The work covers the detection and measurement of radiation and the statistical interpretation of the data. The procedures that are used to protect man and the environment from the potential harmful effects of

  3. Chronic oxidative stress after irradiation: an unproven hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Samuel R; Cohen, Eric P

    2012-01-01

    Injury and organ failure after irradiation of late-responding tissues is a substantial problem in radiation oncology and a major threat after accidental or belligerent exposures. The mechanisms of injury may include death of clonogens, vascular injury, activation of cytokine networks, and/or chronic oxidative stress. Knowledge of mechanisms may guide optimal use of mitigators. The hypothesis of chronic oxidative stress as a mechanism of late radiation injury has received much attention. We re...

  4. Chronic Pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavrecka, A.; Bilicky, J.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an ongoing inflammatory process that may over time lead to mal digestion, malabsorption and diabetic syndrome. Identification of risk (etiological) factors based on classifications TIGAR-O or later M-ANNHEIM. These factors (environmental and / or genetic) leads to failure of the stability of the digestive and lysosomal enzymes in the acinar cells, resulting in premature activation of digestive enzymes in the pancreas, and repeated nekroinflamation and fibrosis. The incidence has of the upward trend. Clinically the disease manifests itself in most cases with pain and possibly with nonspecific dyspeptic troubles. Decisive role in the diagnosis playing imaging methods, trans abdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic cholangiopancretography and foremost endoscopic ultrasonography, which has the highest sensitivity and specificity. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is currently regarded as a method for therapy, not for diagnosis. Less importance is now attached to a functional test. Symptomatic treatment is usually conservative. Abstinence is necessary, easily digestible, but calorie-rich diet with reduced fat. Most patients needed treatment with analgesics. In case of insufficient effect of analgesics is necessary to consider endoscopic therapy or surgery. If the external secretory insufficiency is present are served pancreatic extracts. Diabetic syndrome requires insulin delivery. Generally, chronic pancreatitis is a disease treatable but incurable. Proportion of patients are also dying of pancreatic cancer. (author)

  5. Radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The risk of iatrogenic tumors with radiation therapy is so outweighed by the benefit of cure that estimates of risk have not been considered necessary. However, with the introduction of chemotherapy, combined therapy, and particle radiation therapy, the comparative risks should be examined. In the case of radiation, total dose, fractionation, dose rate, dose distribution, and radiation quality should be considered in the estimation of risk. The biological factors that must be considered include incidence of tumors, latent period, degree of malignancy, and multiplicity of tumors. The risk of radiation induction of tumors is influenced by the genotype, sex, and age of the patient, the tissues that will be exposed, and previous therapy. With chemotherapy the number of cells at risk is usually markedly higher than with radiation therapy. Clearly the problem of the estimation of comparative risks is complex. This paper presents the current views on the comparative risks and the importance of the various factors that influence the estimation of risk

  6. Radiation acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  7. Hawking radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parentani, Renaud; Spindel, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Hawking radiation is the thermal radiation predicted to be spontaneously emitted by black holes. It arises from the steady conversion of quantum vacuum fluctuations into pairs of particles, one of which escaping at infinity while the other is trapped inside the black hole horizon. It is named after the physicist Stephen Hawking who derived its existence in 1974. This radiation reduces the mass of black holes and is therefore also known as black hole evaporation.

  8. Radiation epidemiology: Past and present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boice, J.D. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Major advancements in radiation epidemiology have occurred during the last several years in studies of atomic bomb survivors, patients given medical radiation, and radiation workers, including underground miners. Risks associated with the Chernobyl accident, indoor radon and childhood exposure to I-131 have yet to be elucidated. Situations in the former Soviet Union around Chelyabinsk, a nuclear installation in the southern Urals, and in the Altai, which received radioactive fallout from weapons testing at Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan, have the potential to provide information on the effects of chronic radiation exposure. Since Roentgen's discovery of x-rays just 100 years ago, a tremendous amount of knowledge has been accumulated about human health effects following irradiation. The 1994 UNSCEAR report contains the latest compilation and synthesis of radiation epidemiology. This overview will cover epidemiology from a radiation perspective. The different types of study methodologies will be described, followed by a kaleidoscope coverage of past and present studies; ending with some remaining questions in radiation epidemiology. This should set the stage for future chapters, and stimulate thinking about implications of the new data on radiation cancer risks

  9. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    A NRPB leaflet in the 'At-a-Glance' series explains in a simple but scientifically accurate way what radiation is, the biological effects and the relative sensitivity of different parts of the human body. The leaflet then discusses radiation protection principles, radiation protection in the UK and finally the effectiveness of this radiation protection as judged by a breakdown of the total dose received by an average person in the UK, a heavy consumer of Cumbrian seafood, an average nuclear industry worker and an average person in Cornwall. (UK)

  10. GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin SALTIK

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available According to classical electromagnetic theory, an accelerated charge or system of charges radiates electromagnetic waves. In a radio transmitter antenna charges are accelerated along the antenna and release electromagnetic waves, which is radiated at the velocity of light in the surrounding medium. All of the radio transmitters work on this principle today. In this study an analogy is established between the principles by which accelerated charge systems markes radiation and the accelerated mass system, and the systems cousing gravitational radiation are investigated.

  11. Radiation medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This booklet has been produced by UKAEA and the Marie Curie Memorial Foundation to give some basic information about what radiation is and how it is used in day to day diagnosis and treatment. It will be of interest to people undergoing treatment, their relatives and friends, and anyone who wants to know more about this important area. After a brief historical introduction the booklet explains what radiation is, the natural and man-made sources of radiation, how it is produced and how X-rays are used in medical diagnosis and treatment. The radiation protection measures taken and safety standards followed are mentioned. (author)

  12. Radiation and radiation protection; Strahlung und Strahlenschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomaeus, Melanie (comp.)

    2017-04-15

    The publication of the Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz covers the following issues: (i) Human beings in natural and artificial radiation fields; (ii) ionizing radiation: radioactivity and radiation, radiation exposure and doses; measurement of ionizing radiation, natural radiation sources, artificial radiation sources, ionizing radiation effects on human beings, applied radiation protection, radiation exposure of the German population, radiation doses in comparison; (iii) non-ionizing radiation; low-frequency electric and magnetic fields, high-frequency electromagnetic fields, optical radiation; (iiii) glossary, (iv) units and conversion.

  13. Mind-Body Approaches and Chronic Illness: Status of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Cynthia A.; Pliego, Jessica; Rae, William A.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of children experience chronic health issues that affect their academic and behavioral functioning, as well as psychological well-being. At the same time, psychological stress can exacerbate the chronic illness. The first line of treatment most often is medical (e.g., pharmacology, surgery, radiation). Even when the medical…

  14. Fatal Lemierre's syndrome as a complication of chronic otitis media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    contrast agent and exposure to radiation.[3]. The delay in diagnosis of chronic suppurative otitis media is a significant problem. Tiedt et al.[5] noted a long delay in seeking treatment for chronic middle ear infection, with the mean duration of otorrhoea being >3 years. It is important to have a high index of suspicion as patients ...

  15. Concepts of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This seventh chapter presents the concepts and principles of safety and radiation protection, emergency situations; NORM and TENORM; radiation protection care; radiation protection plan; activities of the radiation protection service; practical rules of radiation protection and the radiation symbol

  16. Radiation myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlit, P.

    1987-01-01

    After a review of the world literature, the case histories of 43 patients with radiation myelopathy are analyzed. In 1 patient there was a radiation injury of the medulla oblongata, in 2, cervical, in 28, thoracic, and in 12, lumbosacral. In the medulla oblongata lesion an alternans syndrome resulted. The patients with cervical and thoracic radiation myelopathies presented with a Brown-Sequard syndrome, a spinalis anterior syndrome or a transversal syndrome with pyramidal and spinothalamic tract involvement as the most prominent signs. For this group the term 'pyramidal-spinothalamic radiation myelopathy' is proposed. In lumbosacral radiation lesions a pure anterior horn syndrome may lead to spinothalamic tract involvement and the development of a cauda conus syndrome. The clinical presentation of these cases suggests that the location of the radiation lesion is most likely the region of the conus medullaris. The most frequent initial symptom was dysesthesia; the patients complained of burning pain or a feeling of coldness. Usually the neurological deficits were progressive, in pyramidal-spinothalamic radiation myelopathy over 12 months in average, in lumbosacral radiation lesions up to 10 years. The latent period between the finish of radiation therapy and the first neurological signs was 8 months (median) in cervical and thoracic myelopathy and 33 months in lumbosacral lesions. For the entire group of 43 patients there was an inverse relationship between the radiation dose (ret) and the latent period. A positive relation could be demonstrated between the age of patients at the time of radiation therapy and the latent period. Patients simultaneously receiving cytostatic drugs presented after a longer latent period than the remaining group. (orig./MG)

  17. Clinical characteristics of subacute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Benrong; Ye Genyao; Huang Shimin

    1991-01-01

    The clinical characteristics, diagnosis and differential diagnosis of subacute radiation sickness are analysed and discussed in this paper on the basis of clinical data from cases in a 137 Cs source accident in Mudanjiang and of a review of the literature. We consider that the subacute radiation sickness is a whole body disease caused by comparatively large dose of continuous or intermittent external irradiation in several weeks or months. it must be differentiated from acute radiation sickness, chronic radiation sickness, idiopathic aplastic anemia and other hematological diseases, such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome

  18. Radiation signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGlynn, S.P.; Varma, M.N.

    1992-01-01

    A new concept for modelling radiation risk is proposed. This concept is based on the proposal that the spectrum of molecular lesions, which we dub ''the radiation signature'', can be used to identify the quality of the causal radiation. If the proposal concerning radiation signatures can be established then, in principle, both prospective and retrospective risk determination can be assessed on an individual basis. A major goal of biophysical modelling is to relate physical events such as ionization, excitation, etc. to the production of radiation carcinogenesis. A description of the physical events is provided by track structure. The track structure is determined by radiation quality, and it can be considered to be the ''physical signature'' of the radiation. Unfortunately, the uniqueness characteristics of this signature are dissipated in biological systems in ∼10 -9 s. Nonetheless, it is our contention that this physical disturbance of the biological system eventuates later, at ∼10 0 s, in molecular lesion spectra which also characterize the causal radiation. (author)

  19. Radiation hematology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zherbin, E.A.; Chukhlovin, A.B.

    1989-01-01

    State-of-the-Art ofl radiation hematology and review of the problems now facing this brauch of radiobiology and nuclear medicine are presented. Distortion of division and maturation of hemopoiesis parent cells is considered as main factor of radiopathology for hematopoetic system. Problems of radiation injury and functional variation of hematopoetic microenvironment cell populations are discussed. 176 figs.; 23 figs.; 18 tabs

  20. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nave, C.; Quinn, P.; Blake, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The paper on Synchrotron Radiation contains the appendix to the Daresbury Annual Report 1987/88. The appendix is mainly devoted to the scientific progress reports on the work at the Synchrotron Radiation Source in 1987/8. The parameters of the Experimental Stations and the index to the Scientific Reports are also included in the appendix. (U.K.)

  1. Radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The Radiation Oncology Division has had as its main objectives both to operate an academic training program and to carry out research on radiation therapy of cancer. Since fiscal year 1975, following a directive from ERDA, increased effort has been given to research. The research activities have been complemented by the training program, which has been oriented toward producing radiation oncologists, giving physicians short-term experience in radiation oncology, and teaching medical students about clinical cancer and its radiation therapy. The purpose of the research effort is to improve present modalities of radiation therapy of cancer. As in previous years, the Division has operated as the Radiation Oncology Program of the Department of Radiological Sciences of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine. It has provided radiation oncology support to patients at the University Hospital and to academic programs of the University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus. The patients, in turn, have provided the clinical basis for the educational and research projects of the Division. Funding has been primarily from PRNC (approx. 40%) and from National Cancer Institute grants channeled through the School of Medicine (approx. 60%). Special inter-institutional relationships with the San Juan Veterans Administration Hospital and the Metropolitan Hospital in San Juan have permitted inclusion of patients from these institutions in the Division's research projects. Medical physics and radiotherapy consultations have been provided to the Radiotherapy Department of the VA Hospital

  2. Background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, D.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of background radiation, whether natural or caused by man's activities, are discussed. The known biological effects of radiation in causing cancers or genetic mutations are explained. The statement that there is a threshold below which there is no risk is examined critically. (U.K.)

  3. Radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endoh, Masaru; Ishida, Yusei; Saeki, Mitsuaki

    1983-01-01

    The frequency of radiation sickness in 1,060 patients treated at our Department was 12.8 percent. It was frequent in patients with brain cancer (12 percent), whole spine cancer (47 percent), uterus cancer (28 percent), lung cancer (22 percent) and esophagus cancer (12 percent). Radiation sickness following X-irradiation was studied in its relation to patient's age, size of radiation fields, dosis and white blood cell count. However, we could not find any definite clinical feature relevant to occurrence. There are many theories published concerning the mechanism of radiation sickness. Clinical experiences have shown that radiation sickness cannot be explained by one theory alone but by several theories such as those based on psychology, stress or histamine. (author)

  4. Radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, L.K.

    1991-01-01

    The book gives accounts of some social and environmental impacts of the developing radiation industries, including the experiences of affected communities and individuals. Its structure is based on a division which has been made between nuclear and non-nuclear radiation sources, because they create distinctly different problems for environmental protection and so for public health policy. The emissions from electronic and electrical installations - the non-nuclear radiations - are dealt with in Part I. Emissions from radioactive substances - the nuclear radiations - are dealt with in Part II. Part III is for readers who want more detailed information about scientific basis of radiation-related biological changes and their associated health effects. 75 refs., 9 tabs., 7 figs., ills

  5. Radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    In this contribution about carcinogenesis induced by ionizing radiation some radiation dose-response relationships are discussed. Curves are shown of the relation between cell survival and resp. low and high LET radiation. The difference between both curves can be ascribed to endogenous repair mechanisms in the cell. The relation between single-gen mutation frequency and the surviving fractions of irradiated cells indicates that these repairing mechanisms are not error free. Some examples of reverse dose-response relationships are presented in which decreasing values of dose-rate (LET) correspond with increasing radiation induced cell transformation. Finally some molecular aspects of radiation carcinogenesis are discussed. (H.W.). 22 refs.; 4 figs

  6. Atypical Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myeloproliferative neoplasms, leukemia , and other conditions . Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Key Points Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a disease ... chance of recovery) and treatment options. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a disease in which too many myelocytes ...

  7. Radiation-induced myelomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuzick, J.

    1981-01-01

    It is well known that radiation can cause myeloid leukemia. However, no excess of chronic lymphocytic leukemia has been observed. Myelomatosis, like chronic lymphocytic leukemia, is a tumor of B lymphocytes. To determine whether this disease has a radiogenic origin, we surveyed all cohorts of persons exposed to radiation for which data on cancer-related mortaility are available. An excess of myeloma was found in most cohorts. However, a striking deficit was found in two groups irradiated intensely for uterine neoplasms (three cases observed, 10.71 expected; P = 0.012). All other groups combined had a highly significant excess (50 observed, 22.21 expected; P = 2 x 10 -7 ). The largest relative risk appeared among persons receiving internal doses of α-particles (14 observed, 3.24 expected; P = 2 x 10 -5 ), but a significant excess (13 observed, 6.33 expected; P = 0.026) was also found in patients receiving only therapeutic or diagnostic γ-rays or x-rays. Most cases occurred 15 to 25 years after exposure

  8. Radiation-induced lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references

  9. Chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, Christopher J; Grammer, Leslie C

    2013-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman with nonallergic rhinitis, asthma, and aspirin intolerance presented with worsening symptoms of nasal congestion, purulent drainage, and anosmia. Nasal polyps were visualized on anterior rhinoscopy, and there was evidence of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) on imaging studies during work-up for another medical condition. Over a 2-year period she had numerous bouts of acute exacerbations of CRS which required multiple courses of antibiotics; however, she was unwilling to undergo surgery to reduce polyp burden. She successfully underwent aspirin desensitization and experienced partial relief of symptoms with daily aspirin ingestion. Nasal obstruction is a common symptom that can result from multiple causes, including mucosal disorders (eg, allergic and nonallergic rhinitis, rhinosinusitis, sarcoid) and structural disorders (eg, nasal septal deviation, tumors, mucoceles). The various causes and work-up for nasal obstruction are discussed with emphasis placed on CRS, which is a prevalent disease characterized by inflammation of the nose and paranasal sinuses for a duration of >12 weeks. The different subtypes of CRS, including CRS with and without nasal polyps, allergic fungal rhinosinusitis, and aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, are discussed along with pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment options. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, J.L.; Glatstein, E.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation oncologist encounters the critically ill immunosuppressed patient in four settings. First, the newly diagnosed cancer patient presents for initial evaluation and treatment, with immunosuppression from the cancer itself, malnutrition, concomitant infectious disease, prior drug or alcohol abuse or other medical problems. Second, the previously treated cancer patient presents with metastatic or recurrent primary cancer causing local symptoms. Immune dysfunction in this setting may be due to prior chemotherapy and/or radiation as well as any of the original factors. Third, the patient previously treated with radiation presents with a life-threatening problem possibly due to complications of prior therapy. In this setting, the radiation oncologist is asked to evaluate the clinical problem and to suggest whether radiation might be causing part or all of the problem and what can be done to treat these sequelae of radiation. Fourth, the patient with a benign diagnosis (not cancer) is seen with a problem potentially emeliorated by radiation (e.g., kidney transplant rejection, preparation for transplant, or intractable rheumatoid arthritis). This chapter reviews these four issues and presents clinical and radiobiologic principles on which recommendations for therapy are based

  11. Beneficial radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.; Feinendegen, E.

    1996-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is harmful and may cause cancer, as is well known. However, again and again, low doses of ionizing radiation, under certain conditions, are said to have beneficial effects on human health and, in particular, may reduce the cancer rate. This effect, which is discussed controversially in the technical and scientific literature, is called 'hormesis'. Studies of possible positive effects of ionizing radiation are becoming increasingly more important in scientific research. The article is an attempt to show, by the model case of cancer, under what conditions such positive health effects can occur, at least in principle, and will also contain rough plausibility assessments of the existence of such conditions. Aspects not covered include other existing or presumed positive biological effects of ionizing radiation, such as acceleration of growth, or general increase in the life expectancy of organisms. Also genetic damage will not be discussed in greater detail, despite the existence of some parallels with cancer, both cases constituting lesions to the genetic material of the cells, in one case, germ cells and, in the case of cancer, somatic cells. Also, acute radiation effect will be excluded which occur only at high radiation doses and, as such, always cause damage which, in therapeutic application to cancer, may again be lifesaving. It should be emphasized that the article is limited to a greatly restricted range of biological effects of ionizing radiation which, consequently, are of limited value for overall assessment. (orig.) [de

  12. Integrative Radiation Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen [New York University School of Medicine, NY (United States)

    2015-02-27

    We plan to study tissue-level mechanisms important to human breast radiation carcinogenesis. We propose that the cell biology of irradiated tissues reveals a coordinated multicellular damage response program in which individual cell contributions are primarily directed towards suppression of carcinogenesis and reestablishment of homeostasis. We identified transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ) as a pivotal signal. Notably, we have discovered that TGFβ suppresses genomic instability by controlling the intrinsic DNA damage response and centrosome integrity. However, TGFβ also mediates disruption of microenvironment interactions, which drive epithelial to mesenchymal transition in irradiated human mammary epithelial cells. This apparent paradox of positive and negative controls by TGFβ is the topic of the present proposal. First, we postulate that these phenotypes manifest differentially following fractionated or chronic exposures; second, that the interactions of multiple cell types in tissues modify the responses evident in this single cell type culture models. The goals are to: 1) study the effect of low dose rate and fractionated radiation exposure in combination with TGFβ on the irradiated phenotype and genomic instability of non-malignant human epithelial cells; and 2) determine whether stromal-epithelial interactions suppress the irradiated phenotype in cell culture and the humanized mammary mouse model. These data will be used to 3) develop a systems biology model that integrates radiation effects across multiple levels of tissue organization and time. Modeling multicellular radiation responses coordinated via extracellular signaling could have a significant impact on the extrapolation of human health risks from high dose to low dose/rate radiation exposure.

  13. Radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    Most of the ionizing radiation that people are exposed to in day-to-day activities comes from natural, rather than manmade, sources. The health effects of radiation - both natural and artificial - are relatively well understood and can be effectively minimized through careful safety measures and practices. The IAEA, together with other international and expert organizations, is helping to promote and institute Basic Safety Standards on an international basis to ensure that radiation sources and radioactive materials are managed for both maximum safety and human benefit

  14. Radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Sang Hui

    1991-02-01

    This book deals with radiation physics, which introduces atomic theory and an atomic nucleus of materials, conception of an atom and materials, wave and particle, X ray generation and character, a radioactive element and change law, nature of radioactivity, neutron rays, fission, alpha collapse and beta collage and a neutrino collapse of artificial radioactivity such as collapse of artificial nucleus and artificial radioactivity and radiative capture, interaction with materials like interaction between a charged particle and materials and interaction among X-ray, r-ray and materials, radiation of quantity and unit and a charged particle accelerator.

  15. Synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, C

    1974-01-01

    The production of synchrotron radiation as a by-product of circular high-energy electron (positron) accelerators or storage rings is briefly discussed. A listing of existing or planned synchrotron radiation laboratories is included. The following properties are discussed: spectrum, collimation, polarization, and intensity; a short comparison with other sources (lasers and X-ray tubes) is also given. The remainder of the paper describes the experimental installations at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) and DORIS storage rings, presents a few typical examples out of the fields of atomic, molecular, and solid-state spectroscopy, and finishes with an outlook on the use of synchrotron radiation in molecular biology. (21 refs).

  16. Radiation dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display

  17. Radiating confidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rush, P.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation monitoring systems for operators handling radioactive wastes are described. These include a personnel monitoring system which is suitable for small groups (ie as few as 50) of personnel. The use of microelectronics enable facilities such as automatic personal dose recording with three accumulative registers and automatic reporting of exceeded dose limits. At a controlled entrance the user is identified with a personal identification number. Exit is then also monitored. The use of pocket dosimeters increase the flexibility of this system. In another system a 'rotary man lock' only allows exit from the radiation controlled zone when satisfactory radiation checks have been made. The radiation and security checks available with this system are described. A 'sack monitor' for low level wastes contained in plastic bags is illustrated. (U.K.)

  18. Radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendrinsky, J.

    1987-04-01

    In the beginning of the seventies the two types of radiation sources applied in industrial processes, electron radiation and UV, had been given rather optimistic forecasts. While UV could succeed in the field of panel and film coating, electron radiation curing seems to gain success in quite new fields of manufacturing. The listing of the suggested applications of radiation curing and a comparison of both advantages and disadvantages of this technology are followed by a number of case studies emphasizing the features of these processes and giving some examplary calculations. The data used for the calculations should provide an easy calculation of individual manufacturing costs if special production parameters, investment or energy costs are employed. (Author)

  19. Synchrotron Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asfour, F.I

    2000-01-01

    Synchrotron light is produced by electron accelerators combined with storage rings. This light is generated over a wide spectral region; from infra-red (IR) through the visible and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV), and into the X-ray region. For relativistic electrons (moving nearly with the speed of light), most radiation is concentrated in a small cone with an opening angle of 1/gamma(some 0.1 to 1 milliradian),where gamma is the electron energy in units of rest energy (typically 10 3 -10 4 ). In synchrotron radiation sources (storage rings) highly relativistic electrons are stored to travel along a circular path for many hours. Radiation is caused by transverse acceleration due to magnetic forces(bending magnets). The radiation is emitted in pulses of 10-20 picosecond, separated by some 2 nanosecond or longer separation

  20. Infrared radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, C.E.; Ellis, R.J.; Murray, W.E.; Parr, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    All people are exposed to IR radiation from sunlight, artificial light and radiant heating. Exposures to IR are quantified by irradiance and radiant exposure to characterize biological effects on the skin and cornea. However, near-IR exposure to the retina requires knowledge of the radiance of the IR source. With most IR sources in everyday use the health risks are considered minimal; only in certain high radiant work environments are individuals exposed to excessive levels. The interaction of IR radiation with biological tissues is mainly thermal. IR radiation may augment the biological response to other agents. The major health hazards are thermal injury to the eye and skin, including corneal burns from far-IR, heat stress, and retinal and lenticular injury from near-IR radiation. 59 refs, 13 figs, 2 tabs

  1. Radiation shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, Yasuaki

    1993-01-01

    In the present invention, the thickness of the radiation shields is minimized to save the quantity of shields thereby utilizing spaces in a facility effectively. That is, the radiation shields of the present invention comprise first and second shields forming stepwise gaps. They are disposed between a high dose region and a low dose region. The first and second shields have a feature in that the thickness thereof can be set to a size capable of shielding the gaps in accordance with the strength of the radiation source to be shielded. With such a constitution, the thickness of the shields of the radiation processing facility can be minimized. Accordingly, the quantity of the shields can be greatly saved. Spaces in the facility can be utilized effectively. (I.S.)

  2. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helliwell, J.R.; Walker, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed account of the research work associated with the Synchrotron Radiation Source at Daresbury Laboratory, United Kingdom, in 1984/85, is presented in the Appendix to the Laboratory's Annual Report. (U.K.)

  3. Radiation sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Radiation sickness URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  4. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  5. Radiation sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wykes, J.S.; Adsley, I.

    1981-01-01

    Radiation detectors, suitable for use in industrial environments, eg coal mines are claimed. At least two scintillation crystals are mounted on a resilient support material, preferably silicone rubber. The sensors are both robust and compact. (U.K.)

  6. Radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetz, B.B.; Murphy, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    In medicine, as in other fields of scientific endeavor, the development of advanced and specialized techniques has resulted in increased hazards for employees. However, by possessing both an appreciation of the proper use of factors that regulate radiation exposure around radiology equipment and a knowledge of the biologic effects of radiation, which can include possible genetic and somatic consequences, it is possible to maximize the usefulness of these valuable procedures while minimizing the risk to medical personnel involved with patient care

  7. Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  8. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, D.; Walker, R.P.; Durham, P.J.; Ridley, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The paper on synchrotron radiation is the appendix to the Daresbury (United Kingdom) annual report, 1985/86. The bulk of the volume is made up of the progress reports for the work carried out during the year under review using the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) at Daresbury. The Appendix also contains: the scientific programmes at the the SRS, progress on beamlines, instrumentation and computing developments, and activities connected with accelerator development. (U.K.)

  9. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1976-01-01

    The lecture is divided into five sections. The introduction deals with the physical and radiological terms, quantities and units. Then the basic principles of radiological protection are discussed. In the third section attention is paid to the biological effects of ionizing radiation. The fourth section deals with the objectives of practical radiological protection. Finally the emergency measures are discussed to be taken in radiation accidents. (HP) [de

  10. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poole, M.W.; Lea, K.R.

    1982-01-01

    A report is given on the work involving the Synchrotron Radiation Division of the Daresbury Laboratory during the period January 1981 - March 1982. Development of the source, beamlines and experimental stations is described. Progress reports from individual investigators are presented which reveal the general diversity and interdisciplinary nature of the research which benefits from access to synchrotron radiation and the associated facilities. Information is given on the organisation of the Division and publications written by the staff are listed. (U.K.)

  11. Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos, M.

    2001-01-01

    Major achievements of SCK-CEN's Radiation Protection Department in 2000 are described. The main areas for R and D of the department remain neutron dosimetry and neutron activation analysis, safeguards information handling and non-destructive assay techniques. Further activities include low-level radioactivity measurements in environmental and biological samples and radiation protection research. Finally, achievements in decision strategy research and social sciences in nuclear research are reported

  12. Chronic mucus hypersecretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, L; Thomsen, S F; Sylvan Ingebrigtsen, Truls

    2010-01-01

    Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) is a common condition in patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Little is known about the incidence, prevalence and determinants of CMH in younger individuals.......Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) is a common condition in patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Little is known about the incidence, prevalence and determinants of CMH in younger individuals....

  13. Brain radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer-brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  14. Clinical features of subacute course of radiation disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnyuk V.I.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to show the clinical features of subacute course of subacute course of radiation disease and how they differ from the typical manifestations of acute and chronic radiation syndrome. Material and methods. Materials of the Burnasyan Federal Medical and Biophysical Center Register of acute radiation disease (ARS in the Former USSR and Russia and Materials of a Burnasyan Federal Medical and Biophysical Center database of workers "Mayak" with chronic radiation syndrome (CRS were analyzed. There were selected 22 patients with radiation syndrome due to fractionated or prolonged accidental exposure (the main group of patients. There were formed two subgroups for comparison: patients with a typical marrowy syndrome of acute radiation disease and with chronic radiation syndrome. Statistical analysis of results was made by means of statistical software package Statistica v. 6.1 for Windows (StatSoft Inc., USA and Microsoft Excel 2010. Results. It was found that subacute course of radiation syndrome is possible under radiation exposure with medium dose rate in the range of 0.1-0.3 Gy/day Early symptoms of the disease as a primary reaction symptoms are completely absent. First complaints appeared in the earliest one month after the start of work in adverse conditions, on the average 6 months. In the period of formation there is a pancytopenia in the peripheral blood. Duration of the formation period was also determined. In this case radiation cataracts in patients are not observed. After the termination of radiation exposure hematopoietic recovery is slow, possibly incomplete with a high probability of hemoblastosis development. Conclusions. There has been described the subacute course of radiation disease by analyzing the clinical material of patients with radiation syndrome, there has been analyzed the clinical criteria that distinguish subacute radiation syndrome from acute and chronic.

  15. Chronic pain after hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandsborg, B.; Nikolajsen, L.; Kehlet, H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is a well-known adverse effect of surgery, but the risk of chronic pain after gynaecological surgery is less established. METHOD: This review summarizes studies on chronic pain following hysterectomy. The underlying mechanisms and risk factors for the development of chronic...... post-hysterectomy pain are discussed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Chronic pain is reported by 5-32% of women after hysterectomy. A guideline is proposed for future prospective studies Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  16. Chronic Diarrhea: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Lawrence R; Pardi, Darrell S; Sellin, Joseph H

    2017-02-01

    Chronic diarrhea is a common problem affecting up to 5% of the population at a given time. Patients vary in their definition of diarrhea, citing loose stool consistency, increased frequency, urgency of bowel movements, or incontinence as key symptoms. Physicians have used increased frequency of defecation or increased stool weight as major criteria and distinguish acute diarrhea, often due to self-limited, acute infections, from chronic diarrhea, which has a broader differential diagnosis, by duration of symptoms; 4 weeks is a frequently used cutoff. Symptom clusters and settings can be used to assess the likelihood of particular causes of diarrhea. Irritable bowel syndrome can be distinguished from some other causes of chronic diarrhea by the presence of pain that peaks before defecation, is relieved by defecation, and is associated with changes in stool form or frequency (Rome criteria). Patients with chronic diarrhea usually need some evaluation, but history and physical examination may be sufficient to direct therapy in some. For example, diet, medications, and surgery or radiation therapy can be important causes of chronic diarrhea that can be suspected on the basis of history alone. Testing is indicated when alarm features are present, when there is no obvious cause evident, or the differential diagnosis needs further delineation. Testing of blood and stool, endoscopy, imaging studies, histology, and physiological testing all have roles to play but are not all needed in every patient. Categorizing patients after limited testing may allow more directed testing and more rapid diagnosis. Empiric antidiarrheal therapy can be used to mitigate symptoms in most patients for whom a specific treatment is not available. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Surgical treatment of radiation enteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, M.J.; Frazee, R.C. (Department of General Surgery, Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Temple TX (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Radiation enteritis is a progressive, disease process that causes intestinal fibrosis and obliterative endarteritis, which results in significant morbidity and mortality. The authors' clinical experience involving 20 patients over a 22-year period from 1967 through 1989 who underwent various surgical procedures to alleviate chronic symptoms secondary to radiation enteritis is described. Eight men and 12 women with a mean age of 52 years (24 to 81 years) underwent a total of 27 procedures for complications of radiation enteritis. Radiation therapy was delivered for treatment of gynecologic malignancies (55%), colorectal cancer (20%), prostate malignancies (10%), and others (15%). The mean average dose of radiation delivered was 5,514 rads with a range of 2,613 to 7,000 rads. The interval from radiation treatment to time of surgery averaged 9 years. Operative procedures consisted of 12 resection and primary anastomosis procedures and 15 resections with stoma creation. Formation of a stoma was used in patients with more severe disease. The 30-day operative mortality was 0% and morbidity was 55%. There were no anastomotic leaks or intra-abdominal abscesses. The authors conclude that resection and primary anastomosis can safely be performed in selected patients but that judicious use of stoma formation can avoid major mortality and morbidity associated with surgery in this setting.

  18. Surgical treatment of radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, M.J.; Frazee, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation enteritis is a progressive, disease process that causes intestinal fibrosis and obliterative endarteritis, which results in significant morbidity and mortality. The authors' clinical experience involving 20 patients over a 22-year period from 1967 through 1989 who underwent various surgical procedures to alleviate chronic symptoms secondary to radiation enteritis is described. Eight men and 12 women with a mean age of 52 years (24 to 81 years) underwent a total of 27 procedures for complications of radiation enteritis. Radiation therapy was delivered for treatment of gynecologic malignancies (55%), colorectal cancer (20%), prostate malignancies (10%), and others (15%). The mean average dose of radiation delivered was 5,514 rads with a range of 2,613 to 7,000 rads. The interval from radiation treatment to time of surgery averaged 9 years. Operative procedures consisted of 12 resection and primary anastomosis procedures and 15 resections with stoma creation. Formation of a stoma was used in patients with more severe disease. The 30-day operative mortality was 0% and morbidity was 55%. There were no anastomotic leaks or intra-abdominal abscesses. The authors conclude that resection and primary anastomosis can safely be performed in selected patients but that judicious use of stoma formation can avoid major mortality and morbidity associated with surgery in this setting

  19. Radiation therapy of gastric carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Shogo

    1980-01-01

    A total of 136 cases with gastric cancer was treated with radiation and some anti-cancer drugs. The tumor responded markedly to radiation in 37% of 92 cases, irradiated more than 5000 rad and regressed completely in only 5% of them. Out of them, the permanent cure was achieved in 3% of T2-4 M0 cases. Serious complications, such as hemorrhagic gastritis, massive bleeding, chronic ulcer of the stomach and perforation, were also observed in a few per cent of them. It was suggested that in the treatment of inoperable gastric cancer, the combination treatment of radiation and chemotherapy should be chosen as a valuable therapeutic procedure to get a good palliation. (author)

  20. Ionizing radiation in tumor promotion and progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.

    1990-08-01

    Chronic exposure to beta radiation has been tested as a tumor promoting or progressing agent. The dorsal skins of groups of 25 female SENCAR mice were chemically initiated with a single exposure to DMBA, and chronic exposure to strontium-90/yttrium-90 beta radiation was tested as a stage 1, stage 2 or complete skin tumor promoter. Exposure of initiated mice to 0.5 gray twice a week for 13 weeks produced no papillomas, indicating no action as a complete promoter. Another similar group of animals was chemically promoted through stage 1 (with TPA) followed by 0.5 gray of beta radiation twice a week for 13 weeks. Again no papillomas developed indicating no action of chronic radiation as a stage 2 tumor promoter. The same radiation exposure protocol in another DMBA initiated group receiving both stage 1 and 2 chemical promotion resulted in a decrease in papilloma frequency, compared to the control group receiving no beta irradiation, indicating a tumor preventing effect of radiation at stage 2 promotion, probably by killing initiated cells. Chronic beta radiation was tested three different ways as a stage 1 tumor promoter. When compared to the appropriate control, beta radiation given after initiation as a stage 1 promoter (0.5 gray twice a week for 13 weeks), after initiation and along with a known stage 1 chemical promoter (1.0 gray twice a week for 2 weeks), or prior to initiation as a stage 1 promoter (0.5 gray twice a week for 4 weeks), each time showed a weak (∼ 15% stimulation) but statistically significant (p<0.01) ability to act as a stage 1 promoter. When tested as a tumor progressing agent delivered to pre-existing papillomas, beta radiation (0.5 gray twice a week for 13 weeks) increased carcinoma frequency from 0.52 to 0.68 carcinoma/animal, but this increase was not statistically significant at the 95% confidence level. We conclude that in the addition to the known initiating, progressing and complete carcinogenic action of acute exposures to ionizing

  1. Directional radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, Jonathan L.

    2017-09-12

    Directional radiation detectors and systems, methods, and computer-readable media for using directional radiation detectors to locate a radiation source are provided herein. A directional radiation detector includes a radiation sensor. A radiation attenuator partially surrounds the radiation sensor and defines an aperture through which incident radiation is received by the radiation sensor. The aperture is positioned such that when incident radiation is received directly through the aperture and by the radiation sensor, a source of the incident radiation is located within a solid angle defined by the aperture. The radiation sensor senses at least one of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma particles, or neutrons.

  2. Target cells in radiation pneumopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, Klaus Ruediger; Herrmann, Thomas; Kasper, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Radiation pneumopathy is the reaction of the organ lung to radiation effects in various target cells. It starts as an exudative inflammation, with the clinical picture of interstitial pneumonia 6-12 weeks after irradiation, and proceeds to a productive chronic inflammation lasting several months and terminating, as other chronic inflammations do, in scar formation, called lung fibrosis. Lung fibrosis is the common end point after lung damage from a wide range of damaging agents. The pathogenetic process leading to the signs and symptoms of radiation pneumopathy is an integrated response of the complex organization of lung tissue. Clinical and pathologic data in patients do not support the hypothesis that the early inflammatory phase of radiation 'pneumonitis' and late 'radiation fibrosis' are independent pathogenetic processes in the same way as acute radiodermatitis and subcutaneous fibrosis are separate pathologic entities. The target cell population that initiates the pathogenetic process in the lung is not known, and it has been suggested that no single identifiable target exists. The entire process is the result of complex functional alterations in endothelial cells, pneumocytes, macrophages, and other resident and transient cells. No evidence has been found for a role of stem cell sterilization, for impaired transit cell proliferation, or for hypoplasia, which is the hallmark of other acute inflammatory normal tissue damage (i.e., in the mucosa). The radiobiologic concepts developed in cellular radiobiology are not adequate for the quantitative analysis of radiation pneumopathy. A new analytical framework based on structurally defined intercellular interaction by signaling molecules and their activation needs to be developed. This would not be only an abstract radiobiologic paradigm but would be the key to the development of potential therapeutic interventions in irradiated patients

  3. Tidal radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashhoon, B.

    1977-01-01

    The general theory of tides is developed within the framework of Einstein's theory of gravitation. It is based on the concept of Fermi frame and the associated notion of tidal frame along an open curve in spacetime. Following the previous work of the author an approximate scheme for the evaluation of tidal gravitational radiation is presented which is valid for weak gravitational fields. The emission of gravitational radiation from a body in the field of a black hole is discussed, and for some cases of astrophysical interest estimates are given for the contributions of radiation due to center-of-mass motion, purely tidal deformation, and the interference between the center of mass and tidal motions

  4. Ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    After having recalled some fundamental notions and measurement units related to ionizing radiations, this document describes various aspects of natural and occupational exposures: exposure modes and sources, exposure levels, biological effects, health impacts. Then, it presents prevention principles aimed at, in an occupational context of use of radiation sources (nuclear industry excluded), reducing and managing these exposures: risk assessment, implementation of safety from the front end. Some practical cases illustrate the radiation protection approach. The legal and regulatory framework is presented: general notions, worker exposure, measures specific to some worker categories (pregnant and breast feeding women, young workers, temporary workers). A last part describes what is to be done in case of incident or accident (dissemination of radioactive substances from unsealed sources, anomaly occurring when using a generator or a sealed source, post-accident situation)

  5. Ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The law covering ionising radiations in Belgium is summarised under the headings: the outline law of 19 March 1958; the General Regulation for the protection of the population and workers against the danger of ionising radiation (introduction; application; the control of classified establishments; organisation of general protection; importation, transit and distribution of radioactive substances; transport of radioactive substances; nuclear propulsion; ionising radiation in human or veterinary medicine; prohibitions and authorisations; exceptional measures; monitoring of the national territory and of the population as a whole; the approval of experts, organisations and doctors; monitoring; the public company for the management of radioactive waste and fissile materials); the law of 4 August 1955 concerning state security in the field of nuclear energy; civil responsibility; the Interministerial Commission on Nuclear Safety and State Security in the Nuclear Field; the non-proliferation of nuclear arms. (U.K.)

  6. Radiation sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.L.; Geronime, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation sensor and thermocouple, respectively, which can be used for reactor in-core instrumentation. The radiation sensor consists of an inconel conductor wire and rhodium emitter wire, the thermocouple of two intertwined alumel or chromel wires. Both are arranged in the center of a metal tube relative to which they are separated by an insulator made of SiO 2 fibers. This insulator is first introduced as a loose fabric between the radiation sensor and the thermocouple, respectively, and the metal tube and then compacted to a density of 35-73% of pure SiO 2 by drawing the tube. There is no need for soldering or welding. The insulation resistivity at room temperature ist between 10 14 and 10 15 ohms. (ORU) [de

  7. Radiofrequency radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, J.A.; Czerski, P.A.; Stuchly, M.A.; Mild, K.H.; Sheppard, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    High-level radiofrequency radiation is a source of thermal energy that carries all of the known implications of heating for biological systems, including burns, temporary and permanent changes in reproduction, cataracts, and death. In general, no changes in chromosomes, DNA or the reproductive potential of animals exposed to RF radiation have been reported in the absence of significant rises in temperature, though there are limited data on DNA and chromosomal changes at non-thermal levels. Human data are currently limited and do not provide adequate information about the relationship between prolonged low-level RF radiation exposure and increased mortality or morbidity, including cancer incidence. In epidemiological studies and clinical reports of RF effects in man, the problems of quantification are numerous and include uncertainties about ''dose'', health effects, latent periods, dose-response relationships, and interactions with other physical or chemical agents. 228 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Cherenkov radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, P.

    1955-01-01

    When the radioactivity has been discovered, it was observed by researchers that different materials as mineral salts or solutions were emitting a weak light when submitted to radioactivity beams. At the beginning it has been thought that it was fluorescent light. In 1934, Cherenkov, a russian physicist, worked on the luminescence of uranyl salts solutions caused by gamma radiation and observed a very weak light was emitted by pure liquid. After further studies, he concluded that this phenomena was different from fluorescence. Since then, it has been called Cherenkov effect. This blue light emission is produced when charged particles are going through a transparent medium with an upper velocity than light velocity. This can happen only in medium with large refractive index as water or glass. It also presents its different properties discovered afterwards. The different applications of the Cherenkov radiation are discussed as counting techniques for radiation detectors or comic ray detectors. (M.P.)

  9. Radiation control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Akira

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes on how the condition of radiation level in the ring (storage ring) experimentation room changes corresponding to the operating stage of SOR-ring (synchrotron radiation storage ring), and does not describe on the present radiation control in the SOR facility. The operating stage of SOR is divided into the following five: (1) 307 MeV electron injection, (2) 307 MeV electron storage (used for SOR experiments), (3) energy increase from 307 to 380 MeV, (4) 380 MeV electron storage, (5) re-injection and completion of operation. Gamma and X ray levels are shown when electron beam is injected from the electron synchrotron to the SOR-ring. Two main causes of the high level are reported. Spatial dose rate in storing 307 MeV electrons in also illustrated. This is sufficiently lower than that at electron incidence. The measurement of radiation level at the time of energy increase from 307 to 380 MeV has just started. Since the radiation level in 380 MeV storage, measured at the points about 20 cm apart from the electron orbit, showed several mR/h, the level seems to be negligible at the points where experiments are carried out, 1 m away from the measurement points. The radiation level in electron reinjection and completion of operation may be large during a short period (a few Roentgen) like the time of energy increase. Therefore, the beam shall be re-injected or decreased after confirming that all experimenters have retreated into the predetermined place. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  10. Radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report contains an evaluation of data available about the deleterious effects of exposure of people to ionising radiation, assuming that the total exposure is low (low dose) or that exposure to dose takes place gradually (low dose rate). It is a revision of the 1985 Health Council report on 'The scientific foundations for radiation protection policy based on the UNSCEAR-77, -82, and BEIR reports'. The report is also meant to be a reply to a request for advice made by the Minister of Welfare, Public Health and Culture in 1989. Scientific opinion on induction of cancer by radiation has clearly changed since 1988. This is a consequence of new publications of epidemiological studies among survivors of the atomic explosions of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The Committee that has produced the present report has paid much attention to this development. Besides, in the request for advice just mentioned it is asked whether the margins of uncertainty which complicated the quantitative assessment of the radiation risk can be reduced. Consequently the Committee has dealt extensively with the potential errors and uncertainties in available data. Especially these 2 elements - a careful consideration of a recent shift in scientific opinion and a constant attention for the magnitude of potential uncertainties - have had a predominant influence on the content and design of this report. The Committee has tried to answer as fully as possible the complex question how to transform results of scientific research into a well-organised data set on which the government can base its radiation protection policy. The Committee had also compared its evaluation to the recent recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the points of view of the Dutch policy directive 'Dealing with radiation risks'. (author). 111 refs.; 12 tabs

  11. Radiation dermatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shack, R.B.; Lynch, J.B.

    1987-04-01

    Even in this era of modern radiotherapy, injuries associated with the medical and industrial use of radiation devices will continue to pose a difficult problem for the reconstructive surgeon. It must be borne in mind that the single most serious hazard to surgery in irradiated tissue is the lodgement of bacteria in tissue rendered avascular by the radiation and the secondary necrosis from the infection itself. The basic principles of wound management must be augmented by thorough knowledge of the use of well-vascularized muscle and musculocutaneous flap to provide adequate, blood-rich, soft-tissue coverage.

  12. Radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    The radiation physics program is directed toward understanding the basic mechanism by which charged particles lose energy in traversing matter, and presenting this information in a way meaningful to the study of radiation dosimetry and biological damage. Measurements of the absolute cross sections for the ejection of electrons from ionization by fast charged particles, measurements of optical fluorescence from liquid systems, preliminary analyses of electron emission cross sections for proton bombardment of carbon foils, and nonexponential decay of fluorescence in both polar and nonpolar solutions are covered

  13. Radiation toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.; Storer, J.B.; Ullrich, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Extensive studies on both human and experimental animal populations have provided information that allow radiation protection standards to be set with greater confidence than for most if not all other carcinogenic agents. Furthermore, both international and national advisory bodies are continually updating the risk estimates and the standards as new information is available. However, it is clear that models are needed that take into account the multistage nature of carcinogenesis. Studies in both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation carcinogenesis are more valuable to the general problem of elucidating the mechanisms involved in cancer than is indicated by the amount of work or support for this field of research

  14. Radiation toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.; Storer, J.B.; Ullrich, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The extensive studies on both human and experimental animal populations have provided information that allows radiation protection standards to be set with greater confidence than for most if not all other carcinogenic agents. Furthermore, both international and national advisory bodies are continually updating the risk estimates and the standards as new information is available. However, it is clear that we need models that take into account the multistage nature of carcinogenesis. Studies in both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation carcinogenesis are more valuable to the general problem of elucidating the mechanisms involved in cancer than is indicated by the amount of work or support for this field of research

  15. Current treatments for radiation retinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuliari, Gian Paolo; Simpson, E. Rand (Princess Margaret Hospital, Univ. of Toronto, Dept. of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, Toronto (Canada)), e-mail: gpgiuliari@gmail.com; Sadaka, Ama (Schepens Eye Research Inst., Boston, MA (United States)); Hinkle, David M. (Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery Institution, Cambridge, MA (United States))

    2011-01-15

    Background. To review the currently available therapeutic modalities for radiation retinopathy (RR), including newer investigational interventions directed towards specific aspects of the pathophysiology of this refractory complication. Methods. A review of the literature encompassing the pathogenesis of RR and the current therapeutic modalities available was performed. Results. RR is a chronic and progressive condition that results from exposure to any source of radiation. It might be secondary to radiation treatment of intraocular tumors such as choroidal melanomas, retinoblastomas, and choroidal metastasis, or from unavoidable exposure to excessive radiation from the treatment of extraocular tumors like cephalic, nasopharyngeal, orbital, and paranasal malignancies. After the results of the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study, most of the choroidal melanomas are being treated with plaque brachytherapy increasing by that the incidence of this radiation complication. RR has been reported to occur in as many as 60% of eyes treated with plaque radiation, with higher rates associated with larger tumors. Initially, the condition manifests as a radiation vasculopathy clinically seen as microaneurysms and telangiectasis, with posterior development of retinal hard exudates and hemorrhages, macular edema, neovascularization and tractional retinal detachment. Regrettably, the management of these eyes remains limited. Photodynamic therapy, laser photocoagulation, oral pentoxyphylline and hyperbaric oxygen have been attempted as treatment modalities with inconclusive results. Intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor such as bevacizumab, ranibizumab and pegaptanib sodium have been recently used, also with variable results. Discussion. RR is a common vision threatening complication following radiation therapy. The available therapeutic options are limited and show unsatisfactory results. Further large investigative studies are required for developing

  16. Current treatments for radiation retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuliari, Gian Paolo; Simpson, E. Rand; Sadaka, Ama; Hinkle, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Background. To review the currently available therapeutic modalities for radiation retinopathy (RR), including newer investigational interventions directed towards specific aspects of the pathophysiology of this refractory complication. Methods. A review of the literature encompassing the pathogenesis of RR and the current therapeutic modalities available was performed. Results. RR is a chronic and progressive condition that results from exposure to any source of radiation. It might be secondary to radiation treatment of intraocular tumors such as choroidal melanomas, retinoblastomas, and choroidal metastasis, or from unavoidable exposure to excessive radiation from the treatment of extraocular tumors like cephalic, nasopharyngeal, orbital, and paranasal malignancies. After the results of the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study, most of the choroidal melanomas are being treated with plaque brachytherapy increasing by that the incidence of this radiation complication. RR has been reported to occur in as many as 60% of eyes treated with plaque radiation, with higher rates associated with larger tumors. Initially, the condition manifests as a radiation vasculopathy clinically seen as microaneurysms and telangiectasis, with posterior development of retinal hard exudates and hemorrhages, macular edema, neovascularization and tractional retinal detachment. Regrettably, the management of these eyes remains limited. Photodynamic therapy, laser photocoagulation, oral pentoxyphylline and hyperbaric oxygen have been attempted as treatment modalities with inconclusive results. Intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor such as bevacizumab, ranibizumab and pegaptanib sodium have been recently used, also with variable results. Discussion. RR is a common vision threatening complication following radiation therapy. The available therapeutic options are limited and show unsatisfactory results. Further large investigative studies are required for developing

  17. Effects of chronic exposure to 950 MHz ultra-high-frequency electromagnetic radiation on reactive oxygen species metabolism in the right and left cerebral cortex of young rats of different ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado-Filho, Orlando V; Borba, Juliana B; Maraschin, Tatiana; Souza, Larissa M; Henriques, João A P; Moreira, José C F; Saffi, Jenifer

    2015-01-01

    To assess the effect of 950 MHz ultra-high-frequency electromagnetic radiation (UHF-EMR) on biomarkers of oxidative damage to DNA, proteins and lipids in the left cerebral cortex (LCC) and right cerebral cortex (RCC) of neonate and 6-day-old rats. Twelve rats were equally divided into two groups as controls (CR) and exposed (ER), for each age (0 and 6 days). The LCC and RCC were examined in ER and CR after exposure. Radiation exposure lasted 30 min per day for up to 27 days (throughout pregnancy and 6 days postnatal). The specific absorption rate ranged from 1.32-1.14 W/kg. The damage to lipids, proteins and DNA was verified by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, carbonylated proteins (CP) and comets, respectively. The concentration of glucose in the peripheral blood of the rats was measured by the Accu-Chek Active Kit due to increased CP in RCC. In neonates, no modification of the biomarkers tested was detected. On the other hand, there was an increase in the levels of CP in the RCC of the 6-day-old ER. Interestingly, the concentration of blood glucose was decreased in this group. Our results indicate that there is no genotoxicity and oxidative stress in neonates and 6 days rats. However, the RCC had the highest concentration of CP that do not seem to be a consequence of oxidative stress. This study is the first to demonstrate the use of UHF-EMR causes different damage responses to proteins in the LCC and RCC.

  18. Radiation Protection in the Application of Active Detection Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ataxia telangiectasia gene (Hall and Angele, 1999; ICRP, 1998), or individuals with chronic diseases such as hepatitis or smokers (NA/NRC, 2006...studies (if applicable). 37 Records should be maintained in anticipation of future liability from radiation exposure. The accuracy and... Child , NCRP Commentary No. 9 (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, Bethesda, Maryland). 72 NCRP (1998). National Council

  19. Radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This sixth chapter presents the operational principles of the radiation detectors; detection using photographic emulsions; thermoluminescent detectors; gas detectors; scintillation detectors; liquid scintillation detectors; detectors using semiconductor materials; calibration of detectors; Bragg-Gray theory; measurement chain and uncertainties associated to measurements

  20. Radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriah Mod Ali

    2005-01-01

    This chapter covers the basic principle and application of radiation technology. The topic titled specific application discussed briefly the following subtopics: 1) Polymer modification - crosslinking, polymerisation, degradation, grafting; 2) Medical sterilisation; 3) Food irradiation; 4) Environmental protection - waste processing, pollutants treatment

  1. Radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymar A, J.; Medina G, H.

    1988-01-01

    Film is one of the most simple ways to detect radiation although for film as dosimeters a careful attention is required in many aspects, such as emulsion characteristics, film response capacity processing techniques and interpretation of the exposition. Surpassing these factors the film dosimeter is the most reliable

  2. Radiation dosage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finston, Roland

    1986-01-01

    Radiation dosage at Bikini Atoll is the result of current soil contamination, a relic of the nuclear weapons testing program of some 30 years ago. The principal contaminants today and some of their physical properties are listed: cesium-137, strontium-90, plutonium -239, 240 and americium-241. Cobalt-60 contributes less than 1 to the dose and is not considered significant. A resident of the atoll would accumulate radiation dose (rem) in two ways -- by exposure to radiation emanating from the ground and vegetation, and by exposure to radiation released in the spontaneous decay of radionuclides that have entered his body during the ingestion of locally grown foods. The latter process would account for some 90% of the dose; cesium-137 would be responsible for 0 90% of it. Since BARC's method of estimating dosage differs in some respects from that employed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), (Ref.1, LLNL 1982) we are presenting our method in detail. The differences have two sources. First, the numbers used by BARC for the daily ingestion of radionuclides via the diet are higher than LLNL's. Second, BARC's calculation of dose from radionuclide intake utilizes the ICRP system. The net result is that BARC doses are consistently higher than LLNL doses, and in this respect are more conservative

  3. Radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenger, E.L.

    1986-01-01

    It is essential that emergency physicians understand ways to manage patients contaminated by radioactive materials and/or exposed to external radiation sources. Contamination accidents require careful surveys to identify the metabolic pathway of the radionuclides to guide prognosis and treatment. The level of treatment required will depend on careful surveys and meticulous decontamination. There is no specific therapy for the acute radiation syndrome. Prophylactic antibodies are desirable. For severely exposed patients treatment is similar to the supportive care given to patients undergoing organ transplantation. For high-dose extremity injury, no methods have been developed to reverse the fibrosing endarteritis that eventually leads to tissue death so frequently found with this type of injury. Although the Three Mile Island episode of March 1979 created tremendous public concern, there were no radiation injuries. The contamination outside the reactor building and the release of radioiodine were negligible. The accidental fuel element meltdown at Chernobyl, USSR, resulted in many cases of acute radiation syndrome. More than 100,000 people were exposed to high levels of radioactive fallout. The general principles outlined here are applicable to accidents of that degree of severity

  4. Introduction to radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gensicke, F.

    1977-01-01

    The textbook is written with special regard to radiation protection of man. It shall enable the reader to assess the potential radiation risks to living organisms and lead him to an insight into radiation protection measures. The following topics are covered: physical fundamentals of ionizing radiations; physical and chemical fundamentals of biological radiation effects; radiation effects on cells, organs, organ systems, and whole animal organisms focussing on mammals and man; modification of radiation effects; chemical radiation protection; therapy of radiation injuries; radionuclide kinetics; biological radiation effects in connection with radiation hazards and with the limitation of radiation exposure. It is intended for vocational education of medical personnel

  5. Effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Data are reported on the possible mechanism of biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on the human body. The lesioning effect of this radiation resulted in some of the persons in the development of disorders of the function of information and vegetative-regulatory systems determined as a desintegration syndrome. This syndrome is manifested in unspecific neuro-vegetative disorders of the function of most important physiological and homeostatic system of the body leading to weakening of the processes of compensation and adaptation. This condition is characterized by an unspecific radiation syndrome as distinct from acute or chronic radiation disease which is a specific radiation syndrome

  6. Chronic mucus hypersecretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Nepper-Christensen, Steen

    2005-01-01

    To investigate if chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) can be used as a marker of asthma in young adults.......To investigate if chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) can be used as a marker of asthma in young adults....

  7. Diet - chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002442.htm Diet - chronic kidney disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... make changes to your diet when you have chronic kidney disease (CKD). These changes may include limiting fluids, eating ...

  8. Chronic tophaceous gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thappa D

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of chronic tophaceous gout, in a 27-year-old female on diuretics for chronic congestive cardiac failure with characteristic histopathological and radiological changes is reported.

  9. People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Goals Ending Chronic Homelessness Share Ending Chronic Homelessness Last updated on August 04, 2017 We can ... the USICH newsletter. We know how to end homelessness. Let's do it, together. Sign up for our ...

  10. Chronic Daily Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chronic migraine or chronic tension-type headache Hemicrania continua These headaches: Affect only one side of your ... development of migraine-like symptoms In addition, hemicrania continua headaches are associated with at least one of ...

  11. Evaluation of Radiation Exposure Pattern and Radiation Absorbed Dose Resulting from Occupational Exposure of Anesthesiologists to Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maghsoudi B.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Little information is available concerning the radiation exposure of anesthesiologists, and no such data have previously been collected in Iran. This prospective study was performed to determine the amount of radiation exposure of anesthesiologists for the purpose of assessing whether or not dangerous levels of radiation exposures were being reached, and to identify factors that correlate with excessive risk. Participants and Methods: The radiation exposure of all anesthesiology residents and the attending of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences during a 3-month period (from June to August 2016 was measured using a film badge with monthly readings. Physicians were divided into two groups: group 1 (the ones assigned to ORs with radiation exposure, and group 2 (the ones assigned to ORs with no or minimal radiation exposure. Results: A total number of 10744 procedures were performed in 3 major university hospitals including 353 cases of pediatric angiography, 251 cases of percutaneous nephrolithotomy, 43 cases of chronic pain palliation and 672 cases of orthopedic surgeries with C-arm application. In all 3 months, there were statistically significant differences in the amount of radiation exposure between the two groups. Conclusion: Anesthesiologists working in the cardiac catheterization laboratory, pain treatment service, orthopedic and urologic ORs are exposed to statistically significantly higher radiation levels compared to their colleagues in other ORs. The radiation exposure to anesthesiologists can rise to high levels; therefore, they should get proper teaching, shielding and periodic evaluations.

  12. Prevention of ionizing radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masashi

    1976-01-01

    In the first age (1895 - 1940), radiation injuries of skin (75% of death caused by RI injury) and chronic radiation injury of heamatopoietic organs (almost remains) appeared in radiologist and people engaged in RI treatment for medical use, and Ra poisoning appeared in workers who treated aluminous paint. As prevention of radiation injuries in this age, measurement of radiation dose, shelter effect and finding of injuries were studied, and internal radiation allowed level was determined. From 1942 to 1960, acute RI injuries due to exposure of large amount of RI by an accident and secondary leukemia appeared to workers of atomic-bomb industries and researcher of atomic energy. U and Pu poisoning accompanied with development of nuclear fuel industry appeared. This expanded industrial hygiene of this age together with epidemiological data of atomic-bomb exposed people. From 1960 onward, it is an age of industry for peaceful use of atomic energy, and manifestation of various kinds of delayed injuries, especially malignant tumor due to RI exposure, is recognized. Labourer has many opportunity to encounter dangerously with pollution and injuries by RI, and regional examination of RI enterprise and countermeasure to decrease exposure dose were mentioned as future theme from a viewpoint of exposure dose of nation. (Kanao, N.)

  13. [Plastic reconstruction of radiation injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, P M; Mett, T R; Henkenberens, C; Radtke, C; Ipaktchi, R

    2017-06-01

    In addition to surgical and drug therapy, radiotherapy (or radiation therapy) is one of the three mainstays of modern oncological therapy regimes. It uses ionizing radiation to control tumors by damaging the DNA of cancerous tissue leading to cellular death. Although advances have been made in recent years resulting in a reduced dosage to the surrounding tissues, radiation injuries and tissue-related side effects cannot be completely avoided. Knowledge of the pathophysiology, treatment modalities and interdisciplinary treatment approaches are essential for effective therapy whilst limiting side effects. Surgery within the irradiated area is technically demanding due to tissue alterations and unpredictable wound healing. The plastic reconstructive surgeon either faces the challenge of delayed wound healing following neoadjuvant radiation or chronic radiation-linked changes following previous radiotherapy, which can also occur after a latency period of many years. Reconstructive interventions can be essential to repair deficits of a functional and/or aesthetic nature in order to maintain a high quality of life for oncology patients. This can also be of benefit to patients in a palliative oncological setting to improve daily functions and quality of life.

  14. Thymic irradiation and chronic myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimaoka, K.; Sokal, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Two cases of Ph positive chronic myelogenous leukemia with a history of thymic irradiation are presented. Both patients received radiation therapy from low voltage x-ray equipment at two to three months of age. Leukemia developed 18 and 22 years later. Presentation, response to antileukemic therapy, and clinical course did not differ from that of other patients with this disease treated in our department

  15. Significance of blood examination in radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Shinobu; Ando, Atsushi; Kojima, Kazuhiko; Kikuta, Yoko.

    1978-01-01

    Blood examination made for the past 3 years revealed that the influences of chronic exposure of extremely small amounts of radiation (an average of 5 mrem/day) on peripheral blood are not detected. However, the blood examination, which is prescribed at least twice a year by law, is for determining whether or not the results of blood examination are within a normal range. Therefore, even though influences of a large amount of radiation are detected, it has little significance as a monitoring of chronic exposure of extremely small amounts of radiation. If the blood examination is used as a monitoring method for detecting exposure, it is important to compare the results with the previous ones in the same individuals. It is also necessary to increase the number of examinations and to study the blood more in detail. However, before that, the standard of the evaluation should be more defined because of its obscurity. The present blood examination is useful in managing the health generally. However, it is not good as a monitoring for chronic exposure of the extremely small amounts of radiation. Therefore, a routine biological method to be able to monitor radiation more precisely, is required. (Namekawa, K.)

  16. Heredity of chronic bronchitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meteran, Howraman; Backer, Vibeke; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Smoking is a major risk factor for lung diseases and lower respiratory symptoms, but since not all smokers develop chronic bronchitis and since chronic bronchitis is also diagnosed in never-smokers, it has been suggested that some individuals are more susceptible to develop chronic br...

  17. CHRONIC CONSTIPATION IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    E.G. Tsymbalova

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses questions of classification, anatomic and physiological peculiarities and pathogenetic aspects of chronic constipations forming in children. The problems of diagnostics of chronic constipation and its treatment with spasmolytics are analyzed.Key words: children, chronic constipation, diagnostics, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2011; 10 (2): 173–179)

  18. Plowshare radiation protection guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, H.M.

    1969-01-01

    The recommendations of the ICRP and the NCRP were developed primarily for occupational radiation exposures. They were later modified and applied to non-occupational exposures of populations. These, with appropriate interpretations, can be used to provide Plowshare radiation protection guidance. Exposures from Plowshare operations will tend to be acute, arising from radionuclides of relatively short half-life, but will have some chronic aspects due to small amounts of long-lived radionuclides generated. In addition, the neutron activation process of Plowshare technology will produce radionuclides not commonly encountered in routine nuclear energy programs. How these radionuclides contribute to personnel exposure is known for only a few situations that may not be representative of Plowshare exposure. Further complications arise from differences in radionuclide deposition and physiological sensitivity among individuals of different ages and states of health in the exposed population. All parameters necessary to evaluate such exposures are not available, even for good quantitative approximations, resulting in the need for interpretive experience. (author)

  19. Risk Factors: Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation of certain wavelengths, called ionizing radiation, has enough energy to damage DNA and cause cancer. Ionizing radiation includes radon, x-rays, gamma rays, and other forms of high-energy radiation.

  20. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... material placed in the body near cancer cells ( internal radiation therapy , also called brachytherapy ). Systemic radiation therapy uses radioactive ... material placed in the body near cancer cells (internal radiation therapy, more commonly called brachytherapy). Systemic radiation therapy uses ...

  1. Chest radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - chest - discharge; Cancer - chest radiation; Lymphoma - chest radiation ... When you have radiation treatment for cancer, your body goes through changes. About 2 weeks after your first treatment: It may be hard ...

  2. Non-ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyrrell, R.M.; Pourzand, C.; Zhong, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    The ultraviolet A (320 - 380 nm) component of sunlight generates an oxidative stress in skin which contributes to both the acute (sunburn) and chronic (aging, skin cancer) effects of sunlight. The damaging effects occur via generation of active oxygen species and will be exacerbated by the presence of catalytically reactive iron so that the observation that UVA radiation causes an immediate release of 'free' iron in human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes via the proteolysis of ferritin is likely to be biologically significant. UVA radiation also breaks down heme-containing proteins in the microsomal membrane to release free heme. The well-characterised activation of heme oxygenase 1 by UVA radiation will lead to breakdown of heme and further release of iron. Overall these interactions generate a strong oxidative stress on cells. Both the basal and UVA-induced levels of labile iron are 2-4 times higher in fibroblasts than keratinocytes and this is consistent with the higher resistance of keratinocytes to UVA-induced necrotic cell death. Modulating cellular iron levels by hemin (to enhance the levels) or iron chelators (to reduce the levels) has the predicted effect on levels of necrotic cell death. Overall these studies further illustrate the potent oxidising nature of UVA radiation. A series of genes activated by UVA radiation including heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), ferritin and superoxide dismutase (SOD) may be involved in protection against the damaging effects of this oxidising carcinogen. HO will act by removing free heme and possibly by promoting the efflux of free iron, ferritin will bind free iron and SOD will remove superoxide anion. The strong response of HO-1 to oxidants in human skin fibroblasts provides a useful molecular model to study this inducible enzyme which appears to play a major role in anti-inflammatory activity in mammals and could play a significant role in preventing atherosclerosis. Several indirect lines of evidence support the role of UVA

  3. Radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collings, E.W.

    1986-01-01

    An important cause of deterioration in superconducting magnets intended for high-energy physics and fusion-reactor applications is radiation damage. The present chapter deals chiefly with the effects of electron, proton, gamma and neutron irradiation on the properties of stabilized Ti-Nb-base composite superconductors. The authors examine the particle-accelerator environment, electron irradiation of Ti-Nb superconductor, proton irradiation of Ti-Nb superconductor and its stabilizer, and deuteron irradiation of Ti-Nb superconductor. A section discussing the fusion reactor environment in general is presented, and the two principal classes of fusion reactor based on the magnetic-confinement concept, namely the tokamak and the mirrormachine are examined. Also discussed is neutron irradiation of Cu/TiNb composite superconductors and critical current density of neutronirradiated Ti-Nb. Finally, radiation damage to stabilizer and insulating materials is described

  4. Radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillies, W.

    1980-01-01

    The radiation detector for measuring e.g. a neutron flux consists of a central emitter, an insulating shell arranged around it, and a tube-shaped collector enclosing both. The emitter itself is composed of a great number of stranded, spiral wires of small diameter giving a defined flexibility to the detector. For emitter material Pt, Rh, V, Co, Ce, Os or Ta may be used. (DG) [de

  5. Radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poplavskij, K.K.; Smorodintseva, G.I.

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of a critical analysis of the available data on causes and consequences of radiation accidents (RA), a classification of RA by severity (five groups of accidents) according to biomedical consequences and categories of exposed personnel is proposed. A RA is defined and its main characteristics are described. Methods of RA prevention are proposed, as is a plan of specific measures to deal with RA in accordance with the proposed classification

  6. Radiation retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wara, W.M.; Irvine, A.R.; Neger, R.E.; Howes, E.L. Jr.; Phillips, T.L.

    1979-01-01

    The records were reviewed of all patients treated with irradiation to the eye at the University of California, San Francisco, between 1960 and 1975. Eight patients were identified who had developed radiation retinopathy 1 to 3 years postrirradiation. Lesions included retinal vascular occlusions, hemorrhages, microaneurysms, exudates, neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachments, and optic atrophy with blindness. Four patients had received less than 5000 rad in 6 weeks to the retina, a dose usually considered within normal tissue tolerance

  7. Radiation shelter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crookes, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    This patent application describes a shelter comprising a cavity for receiving life to be sheltered; a roof for covering at least a portion of said cavity, and at least one aqueous, protective barrier layer adapted to prevent transmission through said roof and into said cavity of at least a portion of radiation in a predetermined spectrum. The cavity walls may be impregnated with an oil suitable for dressing burns. (author)

  8. Space Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corliss, William R.

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses three kinds of space radiation, cosmic rays, Van Allen Belts, and solar plasma. Cosmic rays are penetrating particles that we cannot see, hear or feel, which come from distant stars. Van Allen Belts, named after their discoverer are great belts of protons and electrons that the earth has captured in its magnetic trap. Solar plasma is a gaseous, electrically neutral mixture of positive and negative ions that the sun spews out from convulsed regions on its surface.

  9. Radiation smog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurny, Z.

    1988-01-01

    The principle is described of the production of radiation smog resulting from radioactive emisions. The differences are discussed in the contamination over the territory of Czechoslovakia following the Chernobyl accident. The higher surface contamination of industrial areas recorded after the accident can be explained by electroprecipitation of industrial impurities with the radicals and ions of the radioactive cloud. (E.S.). 3 figs., 16 refs

  10. Radiation pager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, J.L.; Vadnais, K.G.

    1998-01-01

    Methods of interdicting nuclear materials to date have favored the use of large portal detectors at choke points, or hand carried instruments used by trained personnel for conducting spot searches. Although these methods are effective in some instances, it is often impractical to insert choke points at busy traffic areas, and it is not cost effective to maintain a force of skilled operators whose focus is nuclear interdiction. Recent technology developments are causing profound changes in the philosophy and methods employed for interdicting nuclear materials. Breakthrough advances in the miniaturization of detectors and low power electronics have made possible a new class of small gamma-ray radiation detectors, roughly the size of a message pager, with unprecedented sensitivity for their size. These instruments, named Radiation Pagers TM , are ideally suited for use by untrained individual law enforcement personnel and emergency responders in the course of their regular duties. New tactics that utilize a radiation detector worn by every officer are creating a moving curtain of detection with a significantly higher likelihood of locating illicit nuclear contraband. These individual detectors also provide each officer with a high level of confidence that they are not being unknowingly irradiated in the course of their work. (author)

  11. Health consequences of ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalci, D.; Dorter, G.; Guclu, I.

    2004-01-01

    The increasing use of ionizing radiations all over the world induces an ever increasing interest of the professionals as well as of the whole society in health protection and the risk due to these practices. Shortly after its discovery, it was recognized that ionizing radiation can have adverse health effects and knowledge of its detrimental effects has accumulated. The fact that ionizing radiation produces biological damage has been known for many years. The biological effects of ionizing radiation for radiation protection considerations are grouped into two categories: The deterministic and the stochastic ones. Deterministic radiation effects can be clinically diagnosed in the exposed individual and occur when above a certain 'threshold' an appropriately high dose is absorbed in the tissues and organs to cause the death of a large number of cells and consequently to impair tissue or organ functions early after exposure. A clinically observable biological effect (Acute Radiation Syndromes, ARS) that occurs days to months after an acute radiation dose. ARS is a complex of acute injury manifestations that occur after a sufficiently large portion of a person's body is exposed to a high dose of ionizing radiation. Such irradiation initially injures all organs to some extent, but the timing and extent of the injury manifestations depend upon the type, rate, and dose of radiation received. Stochastic radiation effects are the chronic effects of radiation result from relatively low exposure levels delivered over long periods of time. These are sort of effects that might result from occupational exposure, or to the background exposure levels (includes radioactive pollution). Such late effects might be the development of malignant (cancerous) disease and of the hereditary consequences. These effects may be observed many years after the radiation exposure. There is a latent period between the initial radiation exposure and the development of the biological effect. In this

  12. Applications of nuclear radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanagodimath, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear radiations are powerful and non destructive tools in industry, medicine, defence, agriculture and research. In the present lecture, the types of nuclear radiations, radiation sources, detection of radiation, uses of radiation, dangers of nuclear radiation and nuclear energy will be discussed. (author)

  13. Perspective of radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Manwei

    1987-01-01

    The area of the applications of radiation techniques is very wide. This paper only relates to the applications of radiation techniques in industries including radiation chemical industry, radiation processing of foods and environmental protection by radiation, but the nuclear instruments and the instrumentations of radiation are out-side of our study. (author)

  14. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1953-1970: Description of individual studies, data files, codes, and summaries of significant findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahn, D.; Fox, C.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    Between 1953 and 1970, studies on the long-term effects of external x-ray and γ irradiation on inbred and hybrid mouse stocks were carried out at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory. The results of these studies, plus the mating, litter, and pre-experimental stock records, were routinely coded on IBM cards for statistical analysis and record maintenance. Also retained were the survival data from studies performed in the period 1943-1953 at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. The card-image data files have been corrected where necessary and refiled on hard disks for long-term storage and ease of accessibility. In this report, the individual studies and data files are described, and pertinent factors regarding caging, husbandry, radiation procedures, choice of animals, and other logistical details are summarized. Some of the findings are also presented. Descriptions of the different mouse stocks and hybrids are included in an appendix; more than three dozen stocks were involved in these studies. Two other appendices detail the data files in their original card-image format and the numerical codes used to describe the animal's exit from an experiment and, for some studies, any associated pathologic findings. Tabular summaries of sample sizes, dose levels, and other variables are also given to assist investigators in their selection of data for analysis. The archive is open to any investigator with legitimate interests and a willingness to collaborate and acknowledge the source of the data and to recognize appropriate conditions or caveats

  15. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1953-1970: Description of individual studies, data files, codes, and summaries of significant findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grahn, D.; Fox, C.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    Between 1953 and 1970, studies on the long-term effects of external x-ray and {gamma} irradiation on inbred and hybrid mouse stocks were carried out at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory. The results of these studies, plus the mating, litter, and pre-experimental stock records, were routinely coded on IBM cards for statistical analysis and record maintenance. Also retained were the survival data from studies performed in the period 1943-1953 at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. The card-image data files have been corrected where necessary and refiled on hard disks for long-term storage and ease of accessibility. In this report, the individual studies and data files are described, and pertinent factors regarding caging, husbandry, radiation procedures, choice of animals, and other logistical details are summarized. Some of the findings are also presented. Descriptions of the different mouse stocks and hybrids are included in an appendix; more than three dozen stocks were involved in these studies. Two other appendices detail the data files in their original card-image format and the numerical codes used to describe the animal`s exit from an experiment and, for some studies, any associated pathologic findings. Tabular summaries of sample sizes, dose levels, and other variables are also given to assist investigators in their selection of data for analysis. The archive is open to any investigator with legitimate interests and a willingness to collaborate and acknowledge the source of the data and to recognize appropriate conditions or caveats.

  16. Chronic granulomatous disease associated with chronic glomerulonephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frifelt, J J; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Valerius, Niels Henrik

    1985-01-01

    A boy with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) developed glomerulonephritis at the age of 12 years. The glomerulonephritis progressed to terminal uraemia at age 15 when maintenance haemodialysis was started. The clinical course was complicated by pulmonary aspergillosis and Pseudomonas septicaemia...

  17. Ultraviolet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    UVR can be classified into UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C regions. A long period of UVR deficiency may have a harmful effect on the human body. The best known manifestation of UVR deficiency is the development of vitamin D deficiency and rickets in children because of a disturbance in the phosphorus and calcium metabolism. The acute effects of UVR on the eyes consist of the development of photokeratitis and photoconjunctivitis. Acute effects on the skin consist of solar erythema sunburn. Chronic effects on the eye consist of the development of pterygium and squamous cell cancer of the conjunctiva and perhaps cataracts. Chronic skin changes due to UVR consist of aging and the induction of premalignant changes and malignant skin tumours. Criteria for occupational exposure levels in work places have been proposed. It must be recognized that significant nonoccupational exposure to UVR occurs from exposure to sunlight. Thus, exposure limits for the general population are difficult to recommend. Finally, the document describes existing protection and control measures such as the containment of UVR sources, and methods for personal protection including the use of sunscreen preparations, clothing, transparent material for eye and skin protection, and behavioural modifications.

  18. Haemopoietic cell renewal in radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliedner, T. M.; Nothdurft, W.; Tibken, B.; Hofer, E.; Weiss, M.; Kindler, H.

    1994-10-01

    Space flight activities are inevitably associated with a chronic exposure of astronauts to a complex mixture of ionising radiation. Although no acute radiation consequences are to be expected as a rule, the possibility of Solar Particle Events (SPE) associated with relatively high doses of radiation (1 or more Gray) cannot be excluded. It is the responsibility of physicians in charge of the health of astronauts to evaluate before, during and after space flight activities the functional status of haemopoietic cell renewal. Chronic low level exposure of dogs indicate that daily gamma-exposure doses below about 2 cGy are tolerated for several years as far as blood cell concentrations are concerned. However, the stem cell pool may be severely affected. The maintenance of sufficient blood cell counts is possible only through increased cell production to compensate for the radiation inflicted excess cell loss. This behaviour of haemopoietic cell renewal during chronic low level exposure can be simulated by bioengineering models of granulocytopoiesis. It is possible to define a ``turbulence region'' for cell loss rates, below which an prolonged adaptation to increased radiation fields can be expected to be tolerated. On the basis of these experimental results, it is recommended to develop new biological indicators to monitor haemopoietic cell renewal at the level of the stem cell pool using blood stem cells in addition to the determination of cytokine concentrations in the serum (and other novel approaches). To prepare for unexpected haemopoietic effects during prolonged space missions, research should be increased to modify the radiation sensitivity of haemopoietic stem cells (for instance by the application of certain regulatory molecules). In addition, a ``blood stem cell bank'' might be established for the autologous storage of stem cells and for use in space activities keeping them in a radiation protected container.

  19. Radiation danger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gergely, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    The author is a journalist and has written the book 4 weeks after the Chernobyl accident because 'the experts have failed in informing on the consequences of Chernobyl in a way to keep the insecurity in the population within tolerable limits'. It is aimed at the interested layman. First the events as seen through the Austria media and the measures taken by the authorities during the 4 weeks are reviewed. In the rest of the books there is elementary information on some aspects of radioactivity, reactors and radiation limits although 'the connection between radioactivity and health is very complex'. (G.Q.)

  20. Factors modifying the response of large animals to low-intensity radiation exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, N. P.; Still, E. T.

    1972-01-01

    In assessing the biological response to space radiation, two of the most important modifying factors are dose protraction and dose distribution to the body. Studies are reported in which sheep and swine were used to compare the hematology and lethality response resulting from radiation exposure encountered in a variety of forms, including acute (high dose-rate), chronic (low dose-rate), combinations of acute and chronic, and whether received as a continuous or as fractionated exposure. While sheep and swine are basically similar in response to acute radiation, their sensitivity to chronic irradiation is markedly different. Sheep remain relatively sensitive as the radiation exposure is protracted while swine are more resistant and capable of surviving extremely large doses of chronic irradiation. This response to chronic irradiation correlated well with changes in radiosensitivity and recovery following an acute, sublethal exposure.

  1. Radiation risks and radiation protection at CRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation exposure is an occupational hazard at CRNL. The predicted health effects of low levels of radiation are described and compared with other hazards of living. Data related to the health of radiation workers are also considered. Special attention is given to the expected effects of radiation on the unborn child. Measures taken to protect CRNL employees against undue occupational exposure to radiation are noted

  2. Ergonomic varicocele ligation: Laparoscopic intracorporeal knot-tying

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If you would like more information about how to print, save, and work with PDFs, Highwire Press provides a helpful Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs. Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader. To download the PDF, click the Download link ...

  3. Ergonomic varicocele ligation: Laparoscopic intracorporeal knot-tying

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All patients were diagnosed through physical examination and color Doppler ultrasound, which measured the diameter of spermatic veins and retrograde flow in spermatic veins after the Valsalva maneuver. Results The mean operative time was 35± 8 min. There was no intraoperative complication, and all patients had ...

  4. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattison, P.; Quinn, P.

    1990-01-01

    This report details the activities in synchrotron radiation and related areas at Daresbury Laboratory during 1989/90. The number and scope of the scientific reports submitted by external users and in-house staff is a reflection of the large amount of scheduled beamtime and high operating efficiency achieved at the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) during the past year. Over 4000 hours of user beam were available, equivalent to about 80% of the total scheduled time. Many of the reports collected here illustrate the increasing technical complexity of the experiments now being carried out at Daresbury. Provision of the appropriate technical and scientific infrastructure and support is a continuing challenge. The development of the Materials Science Laboratory together with the existing Biological Support Laboratory will extend the range of experiments which can be carried out on the SRS. This will particularly facilitate work in which the sample must be prepared or characterised immediately before or during an experiment. The year 1989/90 has also seen a substantial upgrade of several stations, especially in the area of x-ray optics. Many of the advantages of the High Brightness Lattice can only be exploited effectively with the use of focusing optics. As the performance of these stations improves, the range of experiments which are feasible on the SRS will be extended significantly. (author)

  5. Radiation technology science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jae Gwan

    1988-02-01

    This book deals with radiation technology and introduces various contents. It includes concept of radiation, fundamental physics, atom, electromagnetic radiation, electricity and magnetism, electromagnetism, interaction between X-rays and matter, process of latent image, intensifying screen, quality of radiography, special X-ray equipment, mammography, summary of computer, X-ray emission, nuclear magnetic resonance, grounded theory of radiation biology, initial effect of radiation, late effect of radiation, health physics, radiation protection, ultrasonic diagnosis.

  6. Chronic paraprosthesis infection after allohernioplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalish Yu.I.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays allohernioplasty is widespread around the world, However, it is accompanied with acute and chronic inflammation developing around the prothesis. In such a situation it is very important to decide either delete or save the mesh. We observed 11 patients with skin-prosthetic fistulas existing for 1-6 years. Sanation and irradiation of the fistula with ultraviolet nitrogen laser having a bactericide effect. (Pn - 2,5-5 mWt; t= 2 min; W- 1,5-3 J/sm2 was carried out, 10 patients underwent operation. In two cases there was done partial excision of the prosthesis within the integrated parts. In 8 of 10 patients complete removal of the prothesis with a wide dissection of infected tissues was performed. 4 patients underwent realloprosthesing. For irradiation of the operation wound carbon dioxide laser (wave of the length 10.6 µm, the power of radiation 25W, the exposure of 1 sm2, wound surface – within 1 sec was used in all patients during the operation. In 9 of 10 operated patients with chronic infection around the prosthesis recovery occurred 6 months after reimplantation, in 1 case a new fistula was formed.

  7. Obsessive-compulsive disorder; chronic versus non-chronic symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, H.A.; van Oppen, P.C.; van Megen, H.J.; Eikelenboom, M.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Understanding chronicity in OCD is hampered by contradictory findings arising from dissimilar definitions of chronic OCD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the magnitude of chronicity in OCD and to examine if chronic OCD is critically different from non-chronic OCD, using a

  8. Radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Summaries of research projects conducted during 1978 and 1979 are presented. The overall thrust of the research is aimed at understanding the effects of radiation on organisms. Specific subject areas include: the effects of heavy-particle beam nuclear interactions in tissue on dosimetry; tracer studies with radioactive fragments of heavy-ion beams; the effects of heavy/ions on human kidney cells and Chinese hamster cells; the response of a rhabdomyosarcoma tumor system in rats to heavy-ion beams; the use of heavy charged particles in radiotherapy of human cancer; heavy-ion radiography; the biological effects of high magnetic fields; central nervous system neurotoxicity; and biophysical studies on cell membranes

  9. RADIATION DOSIMETER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkwell, W.R. Jr.; Adams, G.D. Jr.

    1960-05-10

    An improvement was made in the determination of amounts of ionizing radiation, particularly low-energy beta particles of less than 1000 rad total dose by means of fluid-phase dosimeter employing a stabilized-- sensitized ferrous-ferric colorimetric system in a sulphuric acid medium. The improvement in the dosimeter consists of adding to the ferrous-ferric system in concentrations of 10/sub -2/ to 10/sup -4/M an organic compound having one or more carboxylic or equivalent groups, such compounds being capable of chelating or complexing the iron ions in the solution. Suitable sensitizing and stabilizing agents are benzoic, phthalic, salicylic, malonic, lactic, maleic, oxalic, citric, succinic, phenolic tartaric, acetic, and adipic acid, as well as other compounds which are added to the solution alone or in certain combinations. As in conventional fluid-phase dosimeters, the absorbed dosage is correlated with a corresponding change in optical density at particular wavelengths of the solution.

  10. Radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenot, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of radiation accidents over a 50 year period shows that simple cases, where the initiating events were immediately recognised, the source identified and under control, the medical input confined to current handling, were exceptional. In many cases, the accidents were only diagnosed when some injuries presented by the victims suggested the radiological nature of the cause. After large-scale accidents, the situation becomes more complicated, either because of management or medical problems, or both. The review of selected accidents which resulted in severe consequences shows that most of them could have been avoided; lack of regulations, contempt for rules, human failure and insufficient training have been identified as frequent initiating parameters. In addition, the situation was worsened because of unpreparedness, insufficient planning, unadapted resources, and underestimation of psychosociological aspects. (author)

  11. Hepatitis virus infection and chronic liver disease among atomic-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Cologne, John; Akahoshi, Masazumi [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Kusumi, Shizuyo [Institute of Radiation Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Association, Tokyo (Japan); Kodama, Kazunori; Yoshizawa, Hiroshi [Hiroshima University School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    Hepatitis C and B virus (HCV, HBV) infection plays a crucial role in the etiology of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, which have been reported to increase with radiation dose among the atomic bomb survivors. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether radiation exposure altered the prevalence of hepatitis virus infection or accelerated the progress toward chronic hepatitis after hepatitis virus infection. Levels of serum antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV), HBs antigen (HBsAg), and anti-HBs antibody (anti-HBs) were measured for 6,121 participants in the Adult Health Study of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. No relationship was found between anti-HCV prevalence and radiation dose, after adjusting for age, sex, city, history of blood transfusion, acupuncture, and family history, but prevalence of anti-HCV was significantly lower overall among the radiation-exposed people (relative prevalence 0.84, p=0.022) compared to people with estimated radiation dose 0 Gy. No significant interaction was found between any of the above mentioned risk factors and radiation dose. People with anti-HCV positive had 13 times higher prevalence of chronic liver disease than those without anti-HCV. However, the radiation dose response for chronic liver disease among anti-HCV positive survivors may be greater than that among anti-HCV negative survivors (slope ratio 20), but the difference was marginally significant (p=0.097). Prevalence of HBsAg increased with whole-body kerma. However, no trend with radiation dose was found in the anti-HBs prevalence. In the background, prevalence of chronic liver disease in people with HBsAg-positive was approximately three times higher that in those without HBsAg. No difference in slope of the dose was found among HBsAg positive and negative individuals (slope: HBsAg positive 0.91/Gy, HBsAg negative 0.11/Gy, difference p=0.66). In conclusion, no dose-response relationship was found between

  12. Hepatitis virus infection and chronic liver disease among atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Cologne, John; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Kusumi, Shizuyo; Kodama, Kazunori; Yoshizawa, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    Hepatitis C and B virus (HCV, HBV) infection plays a crucial role in the etiology of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, which have been reported to increase with radiation dose among the atomic bomb survivors. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether radiation exposure altered the prevalence of hepatitis virus infection or accelerated the progress toward chronic hepatitis after hepatitis virus infection. Levels of serum antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV), HBs antigen (HBsAg), and anti-HBs antibody (anti-HBs) were measured for 6,121 participants in the Adult Health Study of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. No relationship was found between anti-HCV prevalence and radiation dose, after adjusting for age, sex, city, history of blood transfusion, acupuncture, and family history, but prevalence of anti-HCV was significantly lower overall among the radiation-exposed people (relative prevalence 0.84, p=0.022) compared to people with estimated radiation dose 0 Gy. No significant interaction was found between any of the above mentioned risk factors and radiation dose. People with anti-HCV positive had 13 times higher prevalence of chronic liver disease than those without anti-HCV. However, the radiation dose response for chronic liver disease among anti-HCV positive survivors may be greater than that among anti-HCV negative survivors (slope ratio 20), but the difference was marginally significant (p=0.097). Prevalence of HBsAg increased with whole-body kerma. However, no trend with radiation dose was found in the anti-HBs prevalence. In the background, prevalence of chronic liver disease in people with HBsAg-positive was approximately three times higher that in those without HBsAg. No difference in slope of the dose was found among HBsAg positive and negative individuals (slope: HBsAg positive 0.91/Gy, HBsAg negative 0.11/Gy, difference p=0.66). In conclusion, no dose-response relationship was found between

  13. Environmental radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The types of ionizing radiations from the atomic nucleus are explained, such as the beams alpha, beta and gamma. The definitions of spectrometry and nuclear traces have been included.The study presents two researches realized in Costa Rica on the radioactive nuclear and artificial elements in the environment. The first shown is the analysis of coastal sediments where explains which are radioactive artificial isotopes and the pollution that occurs in food, coastal sediments, fertilizers, the soil, the water and the air. Within the analysis techniques are the gamma spectrometry, alpha spectrometry and nuclear strokes. Among the conclusions of this initial investigation is shown that at Punta Leona descendants of Uranium and Thorium present lower concentrations in relation to the gulf and its variations are not important. In the following study the radon gas is analyzed in the human environment where is determined that it is the second generator that causes cancer in lungs after the tobacco. This work indicates that the doses come from natural and artificial sources of radiation for the public are a whole of 2.7 mSv/year, information provided by the UNSCEAR, 2000. The radon gas is inert and radioactive of atomic number 86, includes 23 isotopes and 3 natural isotopes. The radon is everywhere, as are houses and buildings, in Costa Rica it is located in old homes with little ventilation. It describes the equipment used for the detection of radon gas in the environment. Within the conclusions radon gas is concentrated in confined spaces which can be harmful to health. It is determined that enough ventilation in places of high concentrations of radon is important. Finally it is recommended to monitor the sites where can be detected high concentrations of radon and that they have important influx of people [es

  14. Effect of mobile phone radiation on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Kouchaki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Scientific interest in potential mobile phone impact on human brain and performance has significantly increased in recent years. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of mobile phone radiation on seizure threshold in mice. Materials and methods:BALB/c male mice were randomly divided into three groups: control, acute, and chronic mobile phone radiation for 30, 60, and 90 min with frequency 900 to 950 MHz and pulse of 217 Hz. The chronic group received 30 days of radiation, while the acute group received only once. The intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazole (5 mg/ml was used to induce seizure signs. Results:  Although acute mobile radiation did not change seizure threshold, chronic radiation decreased the clonic and tonic seizure thresholds significantly. Conclusion: Our data suggests that thecontinued and prolonged contact with the mobile phone radiation might increase the risk of seizure attacks and should be limited.

  15. Effect of mobile phone radiation on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouchaki, Ebrahim; Motaghedifard, Morteza; Banafshe, Hamid Reza

    2016-07-01

    Scientific interest in potential mobile phone impact on human brain and performance has significantly increased in recent years. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of mobile phone radiation on seizure threshold in mice. BALB/c male mice were randomly divided into three groups: control, acute, and chronic mobile phone radiation for 30, 60, and 90 min with frequency 900 to 950 MHz and pulse of 217 Hz. The chronic group received 30 days of radiation, while the acute group received only once. The intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazole (5 mg/ml) was used to induce seizure signs. Although acute mobile radiation did not change seizure threshold, chronic radiation decreased the clonic and tonic seizure thresholds significantly. Our data suggests that the continued and prolonged contact with the mobile phone radiation might increase the risk of seizure attacks and should be limited.

  16. Influence of radiation and non-radiation factors on pancreatic cancer incidence among Mayak PA workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuntova, G.V.; Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Belyaeva, Z.D. [Southern Ural Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk (Russian Federation); Syrchikov, V.A.; Grigoryeva, E.S. [Mayak Production Association (Mayak PA), Ozyorsk (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    The finding of this nested case-control study suggests that high levels of 239 Pu incorporation (239 Pu body burden > 3.7), alcohol abuse and smoking were associated with increasing the risk of pancreatic cancer among Mayak PA workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation. The contribution of non radiation factors (alcohol abuse and smoking) to pancreatic tumor incidence is greater (AR=51%) than 239 Pu incorporation kBq; AR = 7%). No significant effect of external gamma rays ({<=} 6.8 Gy), prior exposure to chemical agents, or chronic digestive diseases was found on the incidence of pancreatic tumor. Evaluation of the absorbed alpha-radiation pancreatic dose will permit to make more exact the 239 Pu risk estimation in the further extended study.

  17. Effects of ionizing radiation on plants and animals at levels implied by current radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The 1977 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection stated that the commission believes that if man is adequately protected from radiation, other organisms are also likely to be sufficiently protected. The present report examines this statement by considering the effects of ionizing radiation on animals and plants in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The conclusions are that chronic dose rates of IMGy.d -1 or less are unlikely to cause measurable deleterious effects in terrestrial populations, and that in the aquatic environment limiting chronic dose rates to 10MGy.d -1 to the maximally exposed individuals would provide adequate protection for the population. Thus specific radiation protection standards for non-human organisms are not needed. 193 refs, 2 figs, 7 tabs

  18. Influence of radiation and non-radiation factors on pancreatic cancer incidence among Mayak PA workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuntova, G.V.; Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Belyaeva, Z.D.; Syrchikov, V.A.; Grigoryeva, E.S.

    2006-01-01

    The finding of this nested case-control study suggests that high levels of 239 Pu incorporation (239 Pu body burden > 3.7), alcohol abuse and smoking were associated with increasing the risk of pancreatic cancer among Mayak PA workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation. The contribution of non radiation factors (alcohol abuse and smoking) to pancreatic tumor incidence is greater (AR=51%) than 239 Pu incorporation kBq; AR = 7%). No significant effect of external gamma rays (≤ 6.8 Gy), prior exposure to chemical agents, or chronic digestive diseases was found on the incidence of pancreatic tumor. Evaluation of the absorbed alpha-radiation pancreatic dose will permit to make more exact the 239 Pu risk estimation in the further extended study

  19. Liver late effects of ionizing radiation; Effets tardifs des radiations sur le foie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mornex, F.; Ramuz, O. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lyon-Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France); Gerard, F. [Laboratoire Marcel-Merieux, 69 - Lyon (France); Van Houtte, P. [Institut Bordet, Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-12-01

    Until recently, the liver was classified as a radioresistant organ, although it is in fact highly radiosensitive. The realization that the whole liver could be treated safety only with low doses of radiation led to the conclusion that radiation therapy had an extremely limited role in the treatment of intrahepatic malignancies. A resurgence of interest has been observed with the advent of conformal radiotherapy and the introduction of bone marrow transplantation with total body irradiation. The radiation-induced liver disease, often called radiation hepatitis, is a syndrome characterized by the development of anicteric ascites, approximately 2 weeks to 4 months after hepatic irradiation. Immediate tolerance is generally surprisingly good, and the subacute radiation injury is followed by a complete asymptomatic healing, although the late lesions may be associated with signs of chronic radiation hepatitis. Radiation hepatitis must be distinguished from chemo-radiation-induced-hepatitis occurring in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation and total body irradiation. Both syndromes demonstrate the same pathological lesion: veno-occlusive disease. The main treatment for radiation hepatitis is diuretics, although soma advocate steroids for severe cases. (authors)

  20. Radiation chemistry comes before radiation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Peter; Wardman, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This article seeks to illustrate some contributions of radiation chemistry to radiobiology and related science, and to draw attention to examples where radiation chemistry is central to our knowledge of specific aspects. Radiation chemistry is a mature branch of radiation science which is continually evolving and finding wider applications. This is particularly apparent in the study of the roles of free radicals in biology generally, and radiation biology specifically. The chemical viewpoint helps unite the spatial and temporal insight coming from radiation physics with the diversity of biological responses. While historically, the main application of radiation chemistry of relevance to radiation biology has been investigations of the free-radical processes leading to radiation-induced DNA damage and its chemical characterization, two features of radiation chemistry point to its wider importance. First, its emphasis on quantification and characterization at the molecular level helps provide links between DNA damage, biochemical repair processes, and mutagenicity and radiosensitivity. Second, its central pillar of chemical kinetics aids understanding of the roles of 'reactive oxygen species' in cell signalling and diverse biological effects more generally, and application of radiation chemistry in the development of drugs to enhance radiotherapy and as hypoxia-specific cytotoxins or diagnostic agents. The illustrations of the broader applications of radiation chemistry in this article focus on their relevance to radiation biology and demonstrate the importance of synergy in the radiation sciences. The past contributions of radiation chemistry to radiation biology are evident, but there remains considerable potential to help advance future biological understanding using the knowledge and techniques of radiation chemistry.

  1. Chronic fatigue syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic fatigue syndrome. Committee for Science and Education, Medical. Association of South Africa. Objective. ... Synonyms. Major controversy surrounds the name of the syndrome. In medical circles the preferred term is chronic fatigue .... urine tests using dipsticks. The above investigations should only be pursued when.

  2. Battling Chronic Absenteeism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauer, Kim

    2016-01-01

    While the principal of a New York elementary school (P.S. 48) took on chronic absenteeism from 2011 to 2013, a research team at the Center for New York City Affairs followed her efforts. The school drove down chronic absenteeism almost 10 percentage points. School staff routinely touched base with students, outside "success mentors"…

  3. Anemia of chronic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000565.htm Anemia of chronic disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... body tissues. There are many types of anemia. Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is anemia that is found in people ...

  4. Nuclear radiation in warfare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotblat, J.

    1986-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introduction; digest of nuclear weaponry (characteristics of nuclear weapons; effects of nuclear weapons other than ionizing radiation (fire-ball, fall-out, thermal radiation, blast wave, electromagnetic pulse); the nuclear arms race; war scenarios; biological effects of radiations on man (radiation doses; natural sources of radiation; acute effects of radiation; long-term somatic effects; genetic effects; factors affecting the biological response to radiation; internal exposure; synergistic effects; protection against radiation effects); radiations from nuclear explosions (initial radiation; fall-out; effects of fall-out on animal and plant life; contamination of water and food supplies by fall-out); radiation casualties in a nuclear war; effectiveness of civil defence; other warlike uses of radiation (attacks on civilian nuclear power installations; radiological warfare; terrorist activities); conclusion. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Nuclear radiation in warfare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotblat, J.

    1981-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introduction; digest of nuclear weaponry (characteristics of nuclear weapons; effects of nuclear weapons other than ionizing radiation (fire-ball, fall-out, thermal radiation, blast wave, electromagnetic pulse); the nuclear arms race; war scenarios); biological effects of radiations on man (radiation doses; natural sources of radiation; acute effects of radiation; long-term somatic effects; genetic effects; factors affecting the biological response to radiation; internal exposure; synergistic effects; protection against radiation effects); radiations from nuclear explosions (initial radiation; fall-out; effects of fall-out on animal and plant life; contamination of water and food supplies by fall-out); radiation casualties in a nuclear war; effectiveness of civil defence; other warlike uses of radiation (attacks on civilian nuclear power installations; radiological warfare; terrorist activities); conclusion. (U.K.)

  6. Radiation therapy -- skin care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000735.htm Radiation therapy - skin care To use the sharing features on ... should treat your skin with care while receiving radiation therapy. Causes External radiation therapy uses high-powered x- ...

  7. Breast radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - breast - discharge ... away around 4 to 6 weeks after the radiation treatment is over. You may notice changes in ... breast looks or feels (if you are getting radiation after a lumpectomy). These changes include: Soreness or ...

  8. Black-Body Radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Black-body radiation; thermal radiation; heat; electromagnetic radiation; Stefan's Law; Stefan–Boltzmann Law; Wien's Law; Rayleigh–Jeans Law; black-body spectrum; ultraviolet catastrophe; zero point energy; photon.

  9. Chronic gastritis - an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varbanova, Mariya; Frauenschläger, Katrin; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the main aetiologic factor for chronic gastritis worldwide. The degree of inflammation and the evolution of this form of chronic gastritis can vary largely depending on bacterial virulence factors, host susceptibility factors and environmental conditions. Autoimmune gastritis is another cause of chronic inflammation in the stomach, which can occur in all age groups. This disease presents typically with vitamin B12 deficiency and pernicious anaemia. The presence of anti-parietal cell antibodies is highly specific for the diagnosis. The role of H. pylori as a trigger for autoimmune gastritis remains uncertain. Other rare conditions for chronic gastritis are chronic inflammatory conditions such as Crohn's disease or on the background of lymphocytic or collagenous gastroenteropathies. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Testing for Chronic Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, M

    Chronic diarrhea is a frequently encountered symptom in clinical practice. The etiologies for chronic diarrhea are diverse and broad with varying clinical implications. A useful method of categorizing chronic diarrhea to guide a diagnostic work-up is a pathophysiology-based framework. Chronic diarrhea may be categorized as malabsorptive, secretory, osmotic, and inflammatory or motility related. Frequently, overlap between categories may exist for any given diarrhea etiology and diagnostic testing must occur with an understanding of the differential diagnosis. Investigations to achieve a diagnosis for chronic diarrhea range from screening blood and stool tests to more directed testing such as diagnostic imaging, and endoscopic and histological evaluation. The pathophysiology-based framework proposed in this chapter will allow the clinician to select screening tests followed by targeted tests to minimize cost and complications to the patient, while providing a highly effective method to achieve an accurate diagnosis. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Applying radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallozzi, P.J.; Epstein, H.M.; Jung, R.G.; Applebaum, D.C.; Fairand, B.P.; Gallagher, W.J.; Uecker, R.L.; Muckerheide, M.C.

    1979-01-01

    The invention discloses a method and apparatus for applying radiation by producing X-rays of a selected spectrum and intensity and directing them to a desired location. Radiant energy is directed from a laser onto a target to produce such X-rays at the target, which is so positioned adjacent to the desired location as to emit the X-rays toward the desired location; or such X-rays are produced in a region away from the desired location, and are channeled to the desired location. The radiant energy directing means may be shaped (as with bends; adjustable, if desired) to circumvent any obstruction between the laser and the target. Similarly, the X-ray channeling means may be shaped (as with fixed or adjustable bends) to circumvent any obstruction between the region where the X-rays are produced and the desired location. For producing a radiograph in a living organism the X-rays are provided in a short pulse to avoid any blurring of the radiograph from movement of or in the organism. For altering tissue in a living organism the selected spectrum and intensity are such as to affect substantially the tissue in a preselected volume without injuring nearby tissue. Typically, the selected spectrum comprises the range of about 0.1 to 100 keV, and the intensity is selected to provide about 100 to 1000 rads at the desired location. The X-rays may be produced by stimulated emission thereof, typically in a single direction

  12. Radiating water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, J.; Harle, N.; Heijkers, H.; Schoene, S.

    1987-04-01

    From a nuclear power plant in operation radioactivity is continuously effusing into the environment, through the chimney, cooling waters and the loss of solid waste. In this account attention is concentrated on tritium which enters, in the form of gas and tritiated water from nuclear power plants under 'normal' operation, the aquatic environment and which, because it can not be purified from the water and because its effluences in surface waters are larger than those of other radioactive waste products, forms the largest threat for the drinking-water supply. In ch. 1 the health risks of tritium are outlined. In particular the genetic risks are insufficiently known until now. In ch. 2 the amount of tritium effluences are estimated, which appears to be many times higher than was generally accepted until now. What does this imply for the Dutch surface waters? In ch. 3 the question of the source term is discussed and in ch. 4 the source term is translated into the effects upon the aquatic environment and especially upon the drinking-water supply. In ch. 5 advisements for policies are formulated. The policy of the Dutch government until now is viewed and nuclear power is judged on the base of three starting points of radiation policy. Therein the demands are included which are inevitable in order to protect the Dutch aquatic environment from a too large radioactivity burden. 91 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 table

  13. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddon, E.A.; Reid, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Work at the Daresbury SRS has of necessity been interrupted this year (1991/92) due to the incorporation of Wiggler II. However, considerable beamtime was awarded before the shutdown and the major part of this appendix is concerned with the progress reports of the research undertaken then. The reports have been organised under the following broad headings: Molecular Science (19 papers), Surface and Materials Science (169 papers), Biological Science (85 papers), Instrumental and Technique Developments (13 papers) and Accelerator Physics (3 papers). It is hoped that in time the number of contributions on accelerator physics will grow to reflect the in-house activity on, for example, accelerator improvement and design. The research reports are preceded by the Annual Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Facilities Committee, which outlines the research highlights identified by that Committee (also included are details of the current membership of the SRFC and the chairmen of the Beamtime Allocation Panels). Following the reports are the specifications for the beamlines and stations. This year Section 3 contains 289 reports (nearly 100 more than last year) and the number of publications, generated by scientists and engineers who have used or are associated with Daresbury Laboratory facilities, has topped 500 for the first time. (author)

  14. Radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Misao; Sagawa, Hiroshi; Kakimoto, Akira.

    1996-01-01

    Drains of laundry, shower and hand-washing in a nuclear power plant are collected in a cleaning water drain tank and sent to a cleaning water drain evaporation device. The liquid is highly condensed and burnt here. Evaporated water is sent to a cleaning water drain monitor tank and discharged out of the system. A sample taking port and a monitoring branched pipe are disposed upstream of the cleaning water monitor tank. A pH meter and an electroconductivity meter are connected to a branched pipe of the evaporated water, and the outputs therefrom are sent to an alarm device. The alarm device generates an alarm when the output of the pH meter is greater than a determined first appropriate value within a range from 9.5 to 10.0 and the output of the electroconductive meter is also greater than a predetermined second appropriate value within a range from 10 to 20μS/cm. A highly reliable radiation monitor with low cost and without erroneous alarm can thus be obtained. (I.N.)

  15. Effect of chronic irradiation combined with other damaging factors on some morphological systems of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomareva, T.V.; Merkushev, G.N.; Pil'shchuk, E.M.; Bikkulov, R.I.

    1978-01-01

    A model experiment on mice is carried out to study morphofunctional changes that occur in mammals chronically exposed to radiation in doses close to those in occupational exposures of a man. Mice have been exposed to gamma-radiation at dose rates of 6, 16, 40, 120, and 300 mr/day from the time of birth onward throughout lifetime. It is concluded that, where a chronic purulent infection is present, chronic irradiation at the above dose rates, with the exception of 6 mr/day, accelerates the onset of irreversible pathologic changes, in particular of amyloidosis, in immunocompetent organs

  16. Foundations of radiation physics and radiation protection. 5. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieger, Hanno

    2017-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Types of radiation and radiation fields, the atomic structure, radioactive decays, decay law, natural and artificial radioactivity, interactions of ionizing photon radiation, attenuation of neutral-particle beams, interactions of neutron radiation, interactions of charged particles, ionization and energy transfer, radiation doses, radiation protection phantoms, foundations of the radiation biology of cells, effects and risks of ionizing radiation, radiation expositions of men with ionizing radiation, radiation protection law, practical radiation protection against ionizing radiations, radiation eposures in medical radiology. (HSI)

  17. The Chronic Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Iben M; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Beedholm, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    behavior to be the main factors influencing susceptibility to chronic diseases. We argue that this discursive construction naturalizes a division between people who can actively manage responsible self-care and those who cannot. Such discourses may serve the interests of those patients who are already......This article reports on the results of a Fairclough-inspired critical discourse analysis aiming to clarify how chronically ill patients are presented in contemporary Danish chronic care policies. Drawing on Fairclough’s three-dimensional framework for analyzing discourse, and using Dean’s concepts...

  18. Chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carlos Ac; Gimenez, Andréa; Kuranishi, Lilian; Storrer, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HSP) is a common interstitial lung disease resulting from inhalation of a large variety of antigens by susceptible individuals. The disease is best classified as acute and chronic. Chronic HSP can be fibrosing or not. Fibrotic HSP has a large differential diagnosis and has a worse prognosis. The most common etiologies for HSP are reviewed. Diagnostic criteria are proposed for both chronic forms based on exposure, lung auscultation, lung function tests, HRCT findings, bronchoalveolar lavage, and biopsies. Treatment options are limited, but lung transplantation results in greater survival in comparison to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Randomized trials with new antifibrotic agents are necessary.

  19. Chronic neutrophilic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredeweg, Arthur; Burch, Micah; Krause, John R

    2018-01-01

    Chronic neutrophilic leukemia is a rare myeloproliferative disorder characterized by a sustained peripheral blood neutrophilia, absence of the BCR/ABL oncoprotein, bone marrow hypercellularity with less than 5% myeloblasts and normal neutrophil maturation, and no dysplasia. This leukemia has been associated with mutations in the colony-stimulating factor 3 receptor (CSF3R) that may activate this receptor, leading to the proliferation of neutrophils that are the hallmark of chronic neutrophilic leukemia. We present a case of chronic neutrophilic leukemia and discuss the criteria for diagnosis and the significance of mutations found in this leukemia.

  20. Working safely with ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    A small leaflet provides information on working safely with ionizing radiation. Topics covered include the types of radiation, radiological units, external radiation, contamination and internal radiation, methods of protection form radiation, radiation monitors, protective clothing for contamination, personal dosemeters, radiation dose limits for classified workers and finally the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985. (UK)

  1. Radiation-Induced Heart Disease: Pathologic Abnormalities and Putative Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil K Taunk

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a common diagnosis in women. Breast radiation has become a critical in managing patients who receive breast conserving surgery, or have certain high-risk features after mastectomy. Most patients have an excellent prognosis, therefore understanding the late effects of radiation to the chest is important. Radiation induced heart disease (RIHD comprises a spectrum of cardiac pathology including myocardial fibrosis and cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease, valvular disease, pericardial disease, and arrhythmias. Tissue fibrosis is a common mediator in RIHD. Multiple pathways converge with both acute and chronic cellular, molecular, and genetic changes to result in fibrosis. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of cardiac disease related to radiation therapy to the chest. Our understanding of these mechanisms has improved substantially, but much work remains to further refine radiation delivery techniques and develop therapeutics to battle late effects of radiation.

  2. The ultrastructure and etiology of chronic radiotherapy damage in human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudolph, R.; Arganese, T.; Woodward, M.

    1982-01-01

    Ulcerated and nonulcerated skin from 5 patients with chronic radiation skin damage was examined using electron microscopy. Noticeable fibroblast disorganization was seen, with swollen and degenerating mitochondria, multiple vacuoles, and dilated irregular rough endoplasmic reticulum. Unusual crystalline inclusions were seen in some fibroblasts. In the ulcerated skin, contractile fibroblasts (myofibroblasts) were seen in 2 of 4 specimens. Stroma showed dense collagen and prominent elastosis. The microvasculature in the radiation-damaged tissue showed occasional lumen occlusion and vacuolization of endothelial cells, without consistent abnormality. These data suggest that permanent damage to fibroblasts or fibroblast stem cells may play an important role in chronic radiation skin ulceration

  3. Late appearance of chronic pericardial disease in patients treated by radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applefeld, M.M.; Cole, J.F.; Pollock, S.H.; Sutton, F.J.; Slawson, R.G.; Singleton, R.T.; Wiernik, P.H.

    1981-01-01

    Radiation-induced chronic pericardial disease was recognized in nine patients 53 to 124 months (mean, 88 months) after radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. Depending on whether abnormal cardiac hemodynamics occurred before or after a fluid challenge, patients were considered to have either constrictive pericarditis (Group I) or occult constrictive pericarditis (Group II). There were no differences between these groups in various radiotherapy data, the use of chemotherapy, or the interval after treatment when the diagnosis of chronic pericardial disease was made. There were no consistent noninvasive variables to support the diagnosis of radiation-induced chronic pericardial disease before cardiac catheterization. Four patients underwent pericardiectomy. Two of the four operated patients had an excellent surgical result; a third patient died 4 months postoperatively of drug-induced granulocytopenia; the fourth patient has persistent visceral constrictive pericarditis 18 months after surgery. Speculation over the causes of radiation-induced chronic pericardial disease is made and our recommendations for its treatment given

  4. Ionizing radiation in hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This booklet is concerned with radiation safety of radiologist and other hospital personnel. Part 1 deals with properties of radiation in general (especially of ionizing radiation). In part 2, different applications of radiation in hospitals are discussed. Part 3 indicates what to do to make improvements to not totally safe situations in hospitals. (Auth./G.J.P.)

  5. CHERENKOV RADIATION DETECTOR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    1981-03-01

    Mar 1, 1981 ... the number of quanta emitted per unit radiation length of radiator in frequency and + d. RAR. = The radiation length of beta particles for laboratory energies in aluminum (in g cm-2). XC. = The critical distance in the radiator. ηo. = The absolute quantum efficiency of photo cathode at peak of the response ...

  6. Detection of Terahertz Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system for detecting terahertz radiation, a camera device, and a method for detecting terahertz radiation.......The present invention relates to a system for detecting terahertz radiation, a camera device, and a method for detecting terahertz radiation....

  7. Radiation protection to firemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, E.S. de.

    1985-01-01

    The basic Knowledge about ionizing radiation oriented for firemen, are presented. The mainly damage and effects caused by radiation exposure as well as the method of radiation protection are described in simple words. The action to be taken in case of fire involving radiation such as vehicles transporting radioactive materials are emphasized. (author)

  8. Gravitation radiation observations

    OpenAIRE

    Glass, E. N.

    2017-01-01

    The notion of gravitational radiation begins with electromagnetic radiation. In 1887 Heinrich Hertz, working in one room, generated and received electromagnetic radiation. Maxwell's equations describe the electromagnetic field. The quanta of electromagnetic radiation are spin 1 photons. They are fundamental to atomic physics and quantum electrodynamics.

  9. Efficacy of Six Weeks Infrared Radiation Therapy on Chronic Low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    obtained before the study commenced, while individual patient's informed consent was duly obtained before their participation. Infrared therapy was applied to subjects' low back region in prone lying, after being tested for thermal sensation using test tubes containing cold and warm water respectively. The patients' low back.

  10. Mechanisms of Retinal Damage from Chronic Laser Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    Some terms were peculiar to specific retinal cell types or even to specific intensity levels of exposure. These realizations led to the formulation of a...may be endangered if both phototherapy and supplemental oxygen is administered. In discussing the type and location of histological damage seen in the...monkey retina, one must address what is primary and what is secon- dary. Work with functional measures had led us to evaluate the histologi- cal

  11. Chronic Conditions Chartbook

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Chronic Conditions among Medicare Beneficiaries is a chartbook prepared by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and created to provide an overview of...

  12. Chronic Beryllium Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2001, 177-220. Balkissoon RC, Newman LS. Beryllium cooper alloy (2%) causes chronic beryllium disease . J Occup ... Newman LA, Mroz M, Campbell PA. Screening blood test identifies subclinical beryllium disease. J Occup Med 1989; ...

  13. Neurobiology of chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschiano, F; D'Amico, D; Schieroni, F; Bussone, G

    2003-05-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) is an important problem for clinicians. It is frequent in tertiary care structures, although at present there is no clear consensus about definitions and operational criteria. In fact, CDH is a group of headache disorders that includes chronic migraine (CM). CDH usually evolves from an episodic headache form, which was migraine in most cases. Several psychopathological factors (e.g. psychiatric comorbidity, personality traits or stressful life events) and some somatic disorders (e.g. like arterial hypertension, allergic condition, sleep disturbances) are frequent in CM patients. Caffeine consumption, alcohol overuse and medication overuse (abortive drugs for migraine) could favour chronicity. The possible role of these factors remains poorly understood. Prospective studies and research about the pathophysiology of chronic pain will lead to a better understanding of CM.

  14. Chronic Diarrhea in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stool tests, blood tests, hydrogen breath tests, and fasting tests. Treatment How doctors treat chronic diarrhea in ... The digestive system is made up of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract-also called the digestive tract-and ...

  15. Chronic Condition Data Warehouse

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Chronic Condition Data Warehouse (CCW) provides researchers with Medicare and Medicaid beneficiary, claims, and assessment data linked by beneficiary across...

  16. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chronic pain there may be no apparent physical injury or illness to explain it. The physician and ... expected period of healing for an illness or injury. You can experience pain even if you are ...

  17. Employees with Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the work-site and an accessible entrance Install automatic door openers Provide an accessible route of travel ... resources manager had chronic pain due to a car accident. The individual was having difficulty getting to ...

  18. Low back pain - chronic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007422.htm Low back pain - chronic To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Low back pain refers to pain that you feel in your ...

  19. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common in people with a family history of thyroid disease. In very rare cases, the disease may be ... syndrome - Hashimoto; PGA II - Hashimoto Images Endocrine glands Thyroid enlargement - scintiscan Hashimoto's disease (chronic thyroiditis) Thyroid gland References Amino N, Lazarus ...

  20. Chronic Conditions Dashboard

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Chronic Conditions Dashboard presents statistical views of information on the prevalence, utilization and Medicare spending for Medicare beneficiaries with...

  1. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Easy bleeding Feeling run-down or tired Fever Losing weight without trying Loss of appetite Pain or fullness below the ribs on the left side Pale skin Sweating excessively during sleep (night sweats) When to see a doctor Chronic ...

  2. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learned Going to the ER Communication Tools Pain Management Programs Videos Resources FAQs Glossary Surveys Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments The Art of Pain Management Partners for Understanding Pain Pain Awareness Toolkits September ...

  3. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... there’s a broken bone. With chronic pain there may be no apparent physical injury or illness to ... re looking in the wrong place, but we may be looking in the wrong time. And what ...

  4. Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged and ... don't have any symptoms until their kidney disease is very advanced. Blood and urine tests are ...

  5. Chronic Miliary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Bajaj

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient with chronic miliary tuberculosis is being reported. The patient had miliary mottling of the lung, tubercular lymphadenitis, cervicitis and disseminated lupus vulgaris of skin lesions.

  6. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... acute pain and both naturally expect that some cause will be found, and when it’s found, it ... pain even in the absence of an apparent cause. But chronic pain has a physiological or neurological ...

  7. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surveys Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments The Art of Pain Management Partners for Understanding Pain Pain ... The physician and the patient are accustomed to deal with acute pain and both naturally expect that ...

  8. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surveys Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments The Art of Pain Management Partners for Understanding Pain Pain ... web site was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Medtronic Foundation and Purdue Pharma. Medtronic ...

  9. Chronic inflammatory demyelinative polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Said, Gérard; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinative polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired polyneuropathy presumably of immunological origin. It is characterized by a progressive or a relapsing course with predominant motor deficit. The diagnosis rests on the association of non-length-dependent predominantly motor ...

  10. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the pain will go away. Part of the problem with chronic pain is that when we start ... is that the presence of a severe pain problem which exists for some period of time can ...

  11. The Rapalogue, CCI-779, improves salivary gland function following radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Morgan-Bathke

    Full Text Available The standard of care for head and neck cancer typically includes surgical resection of the tumor followed by targeted head and neck radiation. However depending on tumor location and stage, some cases may not require surgical resection while others may be treated with chemoradiation. Unfortunately, these radiation treatments cause chronic negative side effects for patients. These side effects are associated with damage to surrounding normal salivary gland tissue and include xerostomia, changes in taste and malnutrition. The underlying mechanisms of chronic radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction are unknown, however, in rodent models persistently elevated proliferation is correlated with reduced stimulated salivary flow. The rapalogue, CCI-779, has been used in other cell systems to induce autophagy and reduce proliferation, therefore the aim of this study was to determine if CCI-779 could be utilized to ameliorate chronic radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction. Four to six week old Atg5f/f; Aqp5-Cre, Atg5+/+; Aqp5-Cre and FVB mice were treated with targeted head and neck radiation. FVB mice were treated with CCI-779, chloroquine, or DMSO post-radiation. Stimulated salivary flow rates were determined and parotid and submandibular salivary gland tissues were collected for analyses. Mice with a defect in autophagy, via a conditional knockout of Atg5 in the salivary glands, display increased compensatory proliferation in the acinar cell compartment and hypertrophy at 24-72 hours following radiation. FVB mice treated with post-therapy CCI-779 have significant improvements in salivary gland physiology as determined by stimulated salivary flow rates, proliferation indices and amylase production and secretion. Consequently, post-radiation use of CCI-779 allows for improvement of salivary gland function and reestablishment of glandular homeostasis. As CCI-779 is already FDA approved for other uses, it could have a secondary use to alleviate

  12. Radiation treatment of foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luther, T.; Huebner, G.

    1990-10-01

    In addition to fundamental demands on radiation and safety engineering of irradiation facilities, the necessity arises to optimize irradiation conditions by using facilities to capacity and thus reducing irradiation costs. The following subjects are dealt with in detail: rehabilitation of a pilot plant for radiation treatment of onions; examination of radiation resistance of components and equipment parts of food irradiation facilities; chemical dosimetry; relative measurement of the intensity of radioactive sources; thermo- and chemiluminescence to prove irradiation of foodstuffs; radiation induced sprout inhibition of potatoes; laboratory tests of delayed maturation of tomatoes; radiation treatment of strawberries; radiation treatment of forage; radiation induced sprout inhibition of acid-treated onions; radiation treatment of starch and potatoe products; radiation treatment of cosmetics; the universal radiation source UNI 88/26 for gamma irradiation facilities; microbiological aspects of food irradiation, and introduction of chicken irradiation on an industrial scale. (BBR) [de

  13. Chemical and radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugo, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    The paper is a discussion of radiation injuries and the treatment thereof. Radiation injuries are mainly caused as a result of nuclear leaks or nuclear bomb explosions. Such an explosion is usually accompanied by a light flash, noise, heat radiation and nuclear radiation which can all caurse various types of injuries. The general effect of radioactive radiation is discussed. The seriousness of the situation where the whole body was exposed to nuclear radiation, depends on the total radiation dose received and varies from person to person. The progress of radiation sickness is described. Mention is also made of long term radiation effects. The emergency treatment of the injured before specialised aid is available, is discussed. The primary aim of treatment is to save life and to prevent further injuries and complications. Injured people must be removed as far as possible from the point of maximum radiation. Attention must also be given to decontamination

  14. Radiation protection forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, W.

    2010-01-01

    The National Director of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority and Radiation Protection of Uruguay in the first forum for radiation protection set out the following themes: activity of regulatory body, radiation safety, physical security, safeguards, legal framework, committed substantive program, use of radiation, risks and benefits, major sources of radiation, the national regulatory framework, national inventory of sources, inspections, licensing, import and export of sources control , radioactive transport, materials safety, agreements, information and teaching, radiological emergencies and prompt response.

  15. Preparative radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drawe, H.

    1978-01-01

    Preparative synthesis of compounds with the aid of radiation chemistry is increasingly used in laboratories as well as on a technical scale. A large number of new compounds has been produced with the methods of radiation chemistry. With the increasing number of available radiation sources, also the number of synthesis metods in radiation chemistry has increased. This paper can only briefly mention the many possible ways of synthesis in radiation chemistry. (orig./HK) [de

  16. Radiation protection instrument 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The Radiation Protection Instrument, 1993 (Legislative Instrument 1559) prescribes the powers and functions of the Radiation Protection Board established under the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission by the Atomic Energy Commission (Amendment) Law, 1993 (P.N.D.C. Law 308). Also included in the Legislative Instrument are schedules on control and use of ionising radiation and radiation sources as well as procedures for notification, licensing and inspection of ionising radiation facilities. (EAA)

  17. Neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyagu, A.I.; Loganovsky, K.N.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare bioelectrical activity of the brain in remote period of acute radiation sickness (ARS), chronic and prenatal irradiation as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. Registration of computerized 19-channel EEG, visual and somato-sensory evoked potentials have been carried out for 70 patients who had a verified ARS, 100 Chernobyl disaster survivors, who have been working in the Chernobyl exclusion zone since 1986-87 during 5 and more years, 50 prenatally irradiated children, and relevant controls. The relative risks of neurophysiological abnormalities are 4.5 for the ARS-patients, 3.6 for the chronically irradiated persons and 3.7 for the prenatally irradiated children. The data obtained testify to possibility of radiation-induced neurophysiological abnormalities in examined Chernobyl accident survivors which seems to be non-stochastic effects of ionizing radiation. For all examined irradiated patients it was typically an increasing of δ- and β- powers of EEG, particularly, in the frontal lobe shifted to the left fronto-temporal region, but spectral power of both θ- and α-range was significantly depressed. Aforesaid signs together with data of evoked potentials reflect the structural and functional abnormalities of limbic system and the left hemisphere as the first revealed neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects. (author)

  18. Radiation-enhanced cytotoxicity of misonidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korbelik, M.; Palcic, B.; Skarsgard, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on the toxicity of misonidazole to hypoxic mammalian cells was examined. Cell toxicity response (log surviving fraction vs time of exposure to misonidazole in hypoxia) can be approximated by a biphasic curve: an initial period of approximately zero-slope shoulder, followed by exponential decrease in survival. Radiation reduced the zero-slope shoulder of toxicity response in a dose-dependent manner and at a given dose, the shoulder totally disappeared. The slope of the exponential region of the toxic response was unaffected. The same final survival level was achieved regardless of the sequence in which radiation and mixonidazole exposure were applied to cells; in fact, there was no detectable repair of that radiation-induced damage which interacts with misonidazole toxicity (up to 24 hr). A mechanism for this interaction is proposed. Clinical implications are considered assuming that similar interaction between the two modalities takes place in vivo. Since the shoulder of toxic responses is eliminated at high radiation doses, repeated administration of radiation and misonidazole could lead to additional kill of chronically and acutely hypoxic cells, if indeed both types are present in human tumors

  19. Neurobiological toxicity of radiation in hippocampus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Yeong Hoon; Kim, Joong Sun [Research center, Dongnam institute of radiological and Medical Sciences (DIRAMS), Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Ho; Moon, Chang Jong [College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Ionizing radiation affects multiple organs, which differ in their apparent response. Nevertheless, the adult brain is less vulnerable to radiation than other radiosensitive organs. Clinically, patients receive partial large-field or whole-brain irradiation for cancer treatment yearly, long-term survivors increases, and thus, radiation induced side effects, including cognitive impairment, will become a major health problem. Although the most commonly reported noxious effects of irradiation occur via damage to DNA and consequent disruption of protein synthesis, there are also specific effects on biochemical pathways that have indirect effects on DNA transcription. The hippocampus dependent memory dysfunction is consistent with the changes in neurogenesis after 1 and 3 dyas after irradiation. At 30 and 90 days following irradiation, mice displayed significant depression-like behaviors. Hippocampal dysfunction during the chronic phase following cranial irradiation may be associated with decreases in the neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity related signals, concomitant with microglial reduction in the hippocampus.

  20. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrova, Y.E.; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of γ-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure 137 Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed

  1. Neurobiological toxicity of radiation in hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Yeong Hoon; Kim, Joong Sun; Kim, Sung Ho; Moon, Chang Jong

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation affects multiple organs, which differ in their apparent response. Nevertheless, the adult brain is less vulnerable to radiation than other radiosensitive organs. Clinically, patients receive partial large-field or whole-brain irradiation for cancer treatment yearly, long-term survivors increases, and thus, radiation induced side effects, including cognitive impairment, will become a major health problem. Although the most commonly reported noxious effects of irradiation occur via damage to DNA and consequent disruption of protein synthesis, there are also specific effects on biochemical pathways that have indirect effects on DNA transcription. The hippocampus dependent memory dysfunction is consistent with the changes in neurogenesis after 1 and 3 dyas after irradiation. At 30 and 90 days following irradiation, mice displayed significant depression-like behaviors. Hippocampal dysfunction during the chronic phase following cranial irradiation may be associated with decreases in the neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity related signals, concomitant with microglial reduction in the hippocampus

  2. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1991-05-01

    Research at the Radiological Research Laboratory is a blend of physics, chemistry, and biology, involving research at the basic level with the admixture of a small proportion of pragmatic or applied research in support of radiation protection and/or radiotherapy. Current research topics include: oncogenic transformation assays, mutation studies involving interactions between radiation and environmental contaminants, isolation, characterization and sequencing of a human repair gene, characterization of a dominant transforming gene found in C3H 10T1/2 cells, characterize ab initio the interaction of DNA and radiation, refine estimates of the radiation quality factor Q, a new mechanistic model of oncogenesis showing the role of long-term low dose medium LET radiation, and time dependent modeling of radiation induced chromosome damage and subsequent repair or misrepair

  3. Radiation versus radiation: nuclear energy in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.; Anderer, J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper seeks to provide a proper perspective on radiation exposures from nuclear energy. Instead of comparing these exposures with other pollutants, natural and man-made, it assesses the radiation doses that result from the human environment and from the entire fuel cycle associated with nuclear generated electricity. It explores radiation versus radiation, not only in terms of absolute levels but, more importantly, of the enormous variability characterizing many radiation sources. The quantitative findings and their implications are meant to contribute to a balanced understanding of the radiological impact of nuclear energy, and so to help to bridge the information gap that is perceived to exist on this issue. The 1988 Unscear report and its seven scientific annexes provide an authoritative and dispassionate factual basis for examining radiation levels from all sources, natural and man-made. It is the main source for this paper. (author)

  4. From radiation chemistry to radiation engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballantine, D.S.

    1976-01-01

    During the past 25 years there has been a steady recognition that radiation in the form of electrons or gamma rays can offer positive advantages as a processing technology. Underlying this process industry, and largely responsible for its success, are significant contributions from the field of basic and applied radiation chemistry. In this paper it is attempted to relate fundamental radiation chemistry studies directly to the practical engineering applications

  5. Staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimova, N.U.; Malisheva, E.Yu.; Shosafarova, Sh.G.

    2010-01-01

    Present article is devoted to staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics. Data on staff radiation exposure obtained during 2005-2008 years was analyzed. It was found that average individual doses of staff of various occupations in Dushanbe city for 2008 year are at 0.29-2.16 mSv range. They are higher than the average health indicators but lower than maximum permissible dose. It was defined that paramedical personnel receives the highest doses among the various categories of staff.

  6. Health effects of radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasimova, K; Azizova, F; Mehdieva, K.

    2012-01-01

    Full text : A summary of the nature of radiactive contamination would be incomplete without some mention of the human health effects relatied to radioactivity and radioactive materials. Several excellent reviews at the variety of levels of detail have been written and should be consulted by the reader. Internal exposures of alpha and beta particles are important for ingested and inhaled radionuclides. Dosimetry models are used to estimate the dose from internally deposited radioactive particles. As mentioned above weighting parameters that take into account the radiation type, the biological half-life and the tissue or organ at risk are used to convert the physically absorbed dose in units of gray (or red) to the biologically significant committed equivalent dose and effective dose, measured in units of Sv (or rem). There is considerable controversy over the shape of the dose-response curve at the chronic low dose levels important for enviromental contamination. Proposed models include linear models, non-linear models and threshold models. Because risks at low dose must be extrapolated from available date at high doses, the shape of the dose-response curve has important implications for the environmental regulations used to protect the general public. The health effect of radiation damage depends on a combination of events of on the cellular, tissue and systemic levels. These lead to mutations and cellular of the irradiated parent cell. The dose level at which significant damage occurs depends on the cell type. Cells that reproduce rapidily, such as those found in bone marrow or the gastrointestinal tract, will be more sensitive to radiation than those that are longer lived, such as striated muscle or nerve cells. The effects of high radiation doses on an organ depends on the various cell types it contains

  7. Gene expression profiles in radiation workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fachin, Ana Lucia; Mello, Stephano Spano; Sandrin-Garcia, Paula; Junta, Cristina Moraes; Passos, Geraldo Aleixo da Silva; Sakamoto-Hojo, Elza Tiemi; Ghilardi-Netto, Thomaz; Donadi, Eduardo Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) imposes risks to human health and the environment. IR at low doses and low dose rates has the potency to initiate carcinogenesis. Genotoxic environmental agents such as IR trigger a cascade of signal transduction pathways for cellular protection. In this study, using cDNA microarray technique, we monitored the gene expression profiles in lymphocytes derived from radiation-exposed individuals (radiation workers). Physical dosimetry records on these patients indicated that the absorbed dose ranged from 0.696 to 39.088 mSv. Gene expression analysis revealed statistically significant transcriptional changes in a total of 78 genes (21 up-regulated and 57 down-regulated) involved in several biological processes such as ubiquitin cycle (UHRF2 and PIAS1), DNA repair (LIG3, XPA, ERCC5, RAD52, DCLRE1C), cell cycle regulation/proliferation (RHOA, CABLES2, TGFB2, IL16), and stress response (GSTP1, PPP2R5A, DUSP22). Some of the genes that showed altered expression profiles in this study can be used as biomarkers for monitoring the chronic low level exposure in humans. Additionally, alterations in gene expression patterns observed in chronically exposed radiation workers reinforces the need for defining the effective radiation dose that causes immediate genetic damage as well as the long-term effects on genomic instability, including cancer. (author)

  8. Radiation-induced late effects in two affected individuals of the Lilo radiation accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherthan, Harry; Abend, Michael; Müller, Kerstin; Beinke, Christina; Braselmann, Herbert; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Köhn, Frank M; Pillekamp, Hans; Schiener, Ralf; Das, Oliver; Peter, Ralf U; Herzog, Gerhard; Tzschach, Andreas; Dörr, Harald D; Fliedner, Theodor M; Meineke, Viktor

    2007-05-01

    Radiation exposure leads to a risk for long-term deterministic and stochastic late effects. Two individuals exposed to protracted photon radiation in the radiological accident at the Lilo Military site in Georgia in 1997 received follow-up treatment and resection of several chronic radiation ulcers in the Bundeswehr Hospital Ulm, Germany, in 2003. Multi-parameter analysis revealed that spermatogenetic arrest and serum hormone levels in both patients had recovered compared to the status in 1997. However, we observed a persistence of altered T-cell ratios, increased ICAM1 and beta1-integrin expression, and aberrant bone marrow cells and lymphocytes with significantly increased translocations 6 years after the accident. This investigation thus identified altered end points still detectable years after the accident that suggest persistent genomic damage as well as epigenetic effects in these individuals, which may be associated with an elevated risk for the development of further late effects. Our observations further suggest the development of a chronic radiation syndrome and indicate follow-up parameters in radiation victims.

  9. The role of radiation therapy in the multidisciplinary treatment of patients with malignant tumors. Radiation pathological stand point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niibe, Hideo

    1998-01-01

    Estimations suggest that about 60% of all cancer patients will require some form of radiation therapy during their lifetime. Although 40 to 50% of cancer patients in Europe and the United States receive radiation therapy, only about 20% of patients with cancer in Japan undergo such treatment. This is largely due to the lack of understanding of the role of radiation therapy by many medical personnel in Japan, as well as to ''''radiation allergy'''' among many of the general population in Japan, a country that has been undergone atomic bombing. From our perspective as specialists in radiation therapy, the chronic shortage of radiation oncologist also poses a serious problem. Although there are approximately 700 hospitals throughout Japan where radiation therapy is available, no more than half this number of medical facilities have a full-time radiation oncologist. Perhaps the reason for this is that radiation therapy is perceived as unnecessary in Japan. However, it is absolutely essential. In our experience, the 5-year relative survival rate of patients with malignant tumors who have undergone radiation therapy in our clinic is 65 percent. Thus, radiation therapy has proven very useful in the treatment of malignant tumors. Moreover, better estimates of prognosis of cancer patients treated with radiation therapy are becoming possible. This article discusses the role of radiation therapy, from a radiation pathological perspective, in a multidisciplinary approach to treatment of cancer patients. I also emphasize the critical importance of training radiation oncologists who can function as part of multidisciplinary teams that care for patients with malignant tumors. (author). 50 refs

  10. Argon plasma coagulation and hyperbaric oxygen therapy in chronic radiation proctopathy, effectiveness and impact on tissue toxicity Argón plasma y oxígeno hiperbárico para el control de la rectorragia crónica secundaria a la proctopatía por radiación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio César Álvaro-Villegas

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: chronic radiation proctopathy (CRP is associated with recurrent rectal bleeding and transfusional requirements. Argon plasma coagulation (APC and hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HOT have been shown to be effective in the control of CRP. No prospective comparisons have been reported between these treatments. Aim: the aim was to evaluate the effectiveness, safety and impact on tissue toxicity of APC compared to HOT in patients with CRP. Material and methods: a prospective study for evaluating treatment response was conducted. Patients with cervical cancer and CRP with rectal bleeding were recruited. They had not received previous treatment. Collected data included: demographics, previous radiation dosage, duration and severity of rectal bleeding. Hemoglobin, transfusional requirements, and tissue toxicity (SOMA LENT questionnaire at baseline and at 1, 2, and 3 months follow up were recorded. Results: thirty-one patients were included, 14 in the APC group and 17 in the HOT group. No response was noted in 13 and 18% of patients in the APC and HOT group respectively (p = NS. At the 1 and 2 months follow-up, the APC group showed a significantly better response in terms of transfusional requirements (0.6 vs. 3.4 and 0.7 vs. 2.5 and tissue toxicity score (5.3 vs. 8.6 and 3.8 vs. 7.248. After 3 months, both groups showed further improvement in all parameters without significant differences between them. Conclusions: APC and HOT were effective, safe and decreased the tissue toxicity scores in patients with CRP. However, response rate was higher and faster in the APC group.Introducción: la proctopatía por radiación (PPR se asocia con rectorragía recurrente y requerimientos de trasfusiones. La coagulación con argón plasma (APC y la terapia con oxígeno hiperbárico (HOT han sido efectivas en el control de la PPR. No hay estudios prospectivos comparativos entre ambas técnicas. Objetivo: el objetivo del estudio es evaluar la efectividad

  11. Guideline Implementation: Radiation Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fencl, Jennifer L

    2015-12-01

    Because radiologic technology is used in a variety of perioperative procedures and settings, it is essential for perioperative RNs to be knowledgeable of the risks related to radiation and the ways to adequately protect patients and health care providers from unintended radiation exposure. The updated AORN "Guideline for radiation safety" provides guidance on preventing injury from ionizing radiation exposure during therapeutic, diagnostic, and interventional procedures. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel practice radiation safety. The key points address the requirements for an organization's radiation safety program, measures used to keep radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable, proper handling and testing of radiation protection devices, and considerations for protecting employees and patients who are pregnant and who will be exposed to radiation. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. Copyright © 2015 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. New Finnish radiation law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niittyla, A.

    1992-01-01

    The new Finnish Radiation Act will enter into force on 1.1.1992. The Act aims to protect man's health against the harmful effects of radiation. The Act applies to the utilization of ionising radiation and natural radiation as well as non-ionising radiation. It emphasises the fact that a licensed organization or entrepreneur carrying out a practice which causes radiation exposure is responsible for the safety of the activity. The organization or entrepreneur in question is also obliged to take care of radioactive waste. The provisions of the Radiation Act which apply to monitoring of worker exposure are also applied to the use of nuclear energy. Activities involving the use of radiation and the use of nuclear energy are regulated by one authority, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety. (author)

  13. Histomorphologic change of radiation pneumonitis in rat lungs: captopril reduces rat lung injury induced by irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee [College of Medicine, Keimhyung Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-01

    alone group. It is concluded that the effect of captopril in the rat lungs after radiation was considered to be due to its effect on inhibition of mast cells and reduction of collagen deposition, and captopril may be protect in lung damage after radiation. We observed expression of TNF-{alpha} and TGF-{beta} increased at the early phase after radiation and expression of TGF-{beta} increased in proportion to increase of radiation dose at the chronic phase after radiation. This results will contribute to future investigation in reduction mechanism of captopril in lung damage after radiation.

  14. Autoantibodies in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Marner, B; Pedersen, N T

    1985-01-01

    In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane, and reti......In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane......, and reticulin, and the IgG- and IgA-type pancreas-specific antibodies against islet cells, acinus cells, and ductal cells (DA) were estimated blindly. In 23 of the patients chronic pancreatitis was verified, whereas chronic pancreatitis was rejected in 37 patients (control group). IgG and IgA were found...... in significantly higher concentrations in the patients with chronic pancreatitis than in the control group but within the normal range. ANA and DA occurred very frequently in both groups but with no statistical difference. Other autoantibodies only occurred sporadically. The findings of this study do not support...

  15. Chronic daily headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayyaz Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Daily Headache is a descriptive term that includes disorders with headaches on more days than not and affects 4% of the general population. The condition has a debilitating effect on individuals and society through direct cost to healthcare and indirectly to the economy in general. To successfully manage chronic daily headache syndromes it is important to exclude secondary causes with comprehensive history and relevant investigations; identify risk factors that predict its development and recognise its sub-types to appropriately manage the condition. Chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache and medication overuse headache accounts for the vast majority of chronic daily headaches. The scope of this article is to review the primary headache disorders. Secondary headaches are not discussed except medication overuse headache that often accompanies primary headache disorders. The article critically reviews the literature on the current understanding of daily headache disorders focusing in particular on recent developments in the treatment of frequent headaches.

  16. Environmental radiation and exposure to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    Compared to 1977 the exposure to radiation of the population of the Federal Republic of Germany from both natural and artificial radiation sources has not greatly charged. The amin part of exposure to natural radiation is caused by environmental radiation and by the absorption of naturally radioactive substances into the body. Artificial exposure to radiation of the population is essentially caused by the use of ionizing rays and radioactive substances in medicine. When radioactive materials are released from nuclear facilities the exposure to radiation of the population is only very slightly increased. The real exposure to radiation of individual people can even in the worst affected places, have been at most fractions of a millirem. The exposure to radiation in the worst afected places in the area of a hard-coal power station is higher than that coming from a nuclear power station of the same capacity. The summation of all contributions to the exposure of radiation by nuclear facilities to the population led in 1978 in the Federal Republic of Germany to a genetically significant dose of clearly less than 1 millerem per year. The medium-ranged exposure to radiation by external radiation effects through professional work was in 1978 at 80 millirems. No difference to 1977. The contribution of radionuclide from the fallout coming from nuclear-weapon tests and which has been deposited in the soil, to the whole-body dose for 1978 applies the same as the genetically significant dose of the population with less than 1 millirem. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Radiation effects on polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clough, R.L.; Shalaby, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    This book covers polymer radiation effects to be available in more than a decade. This volume reviews the fundamental chemistry and physics of polymer-radiation interaction and examines recent progress in most major areas of the field. Its 38 chapters, cover: fundamentals of polymer radiation chemistry; technological applications of radiation to polymers (including radiation processing; radiation curing; sterilization; cross-linking, polymerization, grafting, x-ray resists, and others); and degradation of stabilization of irradiated polymers (including nuclear plants, scintillation detectors for particle physics, and others)

  18. Introduction to radiation hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, Ch.J.

    1978-08-01

    This document is to introduce personnel who come into contact with any radiological activities to different aspects of radiation hygiene. The basic theory of radiation physics is given and units and dose equivalents are discussed. The biological effects of ionizing radiations are described and risk analysis is introduced. The various sources of radiation to which the population is exposed are outlined. Saftey standards and legislation regarding radiation hygiene are described and the various methods and instruments for measuring radiation are given. Dosimetry and safety precautions and measures are finally discussed. (C.F.)

  19. Radiation protection in Bolivia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda Cuadros, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation protection in Bolivia has gone through a number of stages. Initially, in the 1970s, the focus was mainly on the analysis of environmental sources resulting from the nuclear tests carried out by France in the Pacific Ocean. Subsequently, the focus switched somewhat to radiation protection in connection with the mining of uranium and in the area of public health. During the third stage, radiation protection in other areas became important as the use of radiation sources was introduced. Finally, during the present -- fourth -- stage, radiation protection regulations are being introduced and mechanisms for the control of radiation sources are being established. (author)

  20. Radiation Control Regulation 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This Regulation (No. 434-1993) was made in pursuance of the Radiation Control Act 1990 and replaces the Active Substances Regulations 1959 repealed by the Act. It entered into force on 1 September 1993. The Regulation specifies that the technical radiation protection definitions have the same meaning as in the 1990 recommendations. The Regulation provides for the licensing of persons to use radioactive substances and radiation apparatus. It prescribes activities which may only be carried out by an accredited radiation expert and regulates the use of radiation apparatus and radioactive substances as well as the disposal and transport of radiation apparatus and radioactive substances. (NEA)