WorldWideScience

Sample records for chronic immune activation

  1. HIV-associated chronic immune activation

    OpenAIRE

    Paiardini, Mirko; Müller-Trutwin, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Systemic chronic immune activation is considered today as the driving force of CD4+ T-cell depletion and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A residual chronic immune activation persists even in HIV-infected patients in which viral replication is successfully inhibited by antiretroviral therapy, with the extent of this residual immune activation being associated with CD4+ T-cell loss. Unfortunately, the causal link between chronic immune activation and CD4+ T-cell loss has not been for...

  2. Lipopolysaccharide Increases Immune Activation and Alters T Cell Homeostasis in SHIVB’WHU Chronically Infected Chinese Rhesus Macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Gao-Hong; Wu, Run-Dong; Zheng, Hong-Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Ming-Xu; Tian, Ren-Rong; Liu, Guang-Ming; Pang, Wei; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation plays a significant role in the disease progression of HIV. Microbial products, especially bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), contribute to immune activation. Increasing evidence indicates that T lymphocyte homeostasis disruptions are associated with immune activation. However, the mechanism by which LPS affects disruption of immune response is still not fully understood. Chronically SHIVB'WHU-infected Chinese rhesus macaques received 50 μg/kg body weight LPS in this study....

  3. Lipopolysaccharide Increases Immune Activation and Alters T Cell Homeostasis in SHIVB'WHU Chronically Infected Chinese Rhesus Macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Gao-Hong Zhang; Run-Dong Wu; Hong-Yi Zheng; Xiao-Liang Zhang; Ming-Xu Zhang; Ren-Rong Tian; Guang-Ming Liu; Wei Pang; Yong-Tang Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation plays a significant role in the disease progression of HIV. Microbial products, especially bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), contribute to immune activation. Increasing evidence indicates that T lymphocyte homeostasis disruptions are associated with immune activation. However, the mechanism by which LPS affects disruption of immune response is still not fully understood. Chronically SHIVB’WHU-infected Chinese rhesus macaques received 50 μg/kg body weight LPS in this study....

  4. Serious Non-AIDS Events: Therapeutic Targets of Immune Activation and Chronic Inflammation in HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Denise C; Sereti, Irini

    2016-04-01

    In the antiretroviral therapy (ART) era, serious non-AIDS events (SNAEs) have become the major causes of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected persons. Early ART initiation has the strongest evidence for reducing SNAEs and mortality. Biomarkers of immune activation, inflammation and coagulopathy do not fully normalize despite virologic suppression and persistent immune activation is an important contributor to SNAEs. A number of strategies aimed to reduce persistent immune activation including ART intensification to reduce residual viremia; treatment of co-infections to reduce chronic antigen stimulation; the use of anti-inflammatory agents, reducing microbial translocation as well as interventions to improve immune recovery through cytokine administration and reducing lymphoid tissue fibrosis, have been investigated. To date, there is little conclusive evidence on which strategies beyond treatment of hepatitis B and C co-infections and reducing cardiovascular risk factors will result in clinical benefits in patients already on ART with viral suppression. The use of statins seems to show early promise and larger clinical trials are underway to confirm their efficacy. At this stage, clinical care of HIV-infected patients should therefore focus on early diagnosis and prompt ART initiation, treatment of active co-infections and the aggressive management of co-morbidities until further data are available. PMID:26915027

  5. Chronic Activation of Innate Immunity Correlates With Poor Prognosis in Cancer Patients Treated With Oncolytic Adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipale, Kristian; Liikanen, Ilkka; Juhila, Juuso; Turkki, Riku; Tähtinen, Siri; Kankainen, Matti; Vassilev, Lotta; Ristimäki, Ari; Koski, Anniina; Kanerva, Anna; Diaconu, Iulia; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Oksanen, Minna; Linder, Nina; Joensuu, Timo; Lundin, Johan; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-02-01

    Despite many clinical trials conducted with oncolytic viruses, the exact tumor-level mechanisms affecting therapeutic efficacy have not been established. Currently there are no biomarkers available that would predict the clinical outcome to any oncolytic virus. To assess the baseline immunological phenotype and find potential prognostic biomarkers, we monitored mRNA expression levels in 31 tumor biopsy or fluid samples from 27 patients treated with oncolytic adenovirus. Additionally, protein expression was studied from 19 biopsies using immunohistochemical staining. We found highly significant changes in several signaling pathways and genes associated with immune responses, such as B-cell receptor signaling (P < 0.001), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) signaling (P < 0.001), and leukocyte extravasation signaling (P < 0.001), in patients surviving a shorter time than their controls. In immunohistochemical analysis, markers CD4 and CD163 were significantly elevated (P = 0.020 and P = 0.016 respectively), in patients with shorter than expected survival. Interestingly, T-cell exhaustion marker TIM-3 was also found to be significantly upregulated (P = 0.006) in patients with poor prognosis. Collectively, these data suggest that activation of several functions of the innate immunity before treatment is associated with inferior survival in patients treated with oncolytic adenovirus. Conversely, lack of chronic innate inflammation at baseline may predict improved treatment outcome, as suggested by good overall prognosis. PMID:26310629

  6. MiRNA-548ah, a Potential Molecule Associated with Transition from Immune Tolerance to Immune Activation of Chronic Hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong-Jing Xing

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aims to identify the differently expressed microRNA (miRNA molecules and target genes of miRNA in the immune tolerance (IT and immune activation (IA stages of chronic hepatitis B (CHB. Methods: miRNA expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs at the IT and IA stages of CHB were screened using miRNA microarrays and authenticated using a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Gene ontology (GO and the Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG were used to analyze the significant functions and pathways of possible target genes of miRNAs. Assays of the gain and loss of function of the miRNAs were performed to verify the target genes in THP-1 cell lines. The luciferase reporter test was used on 293T cells as direct targets. Results: Significantly upregulated miR-548 and miR-4804 were observed in the miRNA microarrays and confirmed by RT-PCR in PBMCs at the IT and IA stages of CHB. GO and KEGG analysis revealed that MiR-548 and miR-4804 could be involved in numerous signaling pathways and protein binding activity. IFNγR1 was predicted as a target gene and validated as the direct gene of MiR-548. Significant negative correlation was found between the miR-548ah and mRNA levels of IFN-γR1 in CHB patients. Conclusions: The abnormal expression profiles of miRNA in PBMCs could be closely associated with immune activation of chronic HBV infection. miR-548, by targeting IFN-γR1, may represent a mechanism that can facilitate viral pathogenesis and help determine new therapeutic molecular targets.

  7. Minocycline attenuates HIV-1 infection and suppresses chronic immune activation in humanized NOD/LtsZ-scidIL-2Rγnull mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Maneesh; Singh, Pratibha; Vaira, Dolores; Amand, Mathieu; Rahmouni, Souad; Moutschen, Michel

    2014-01-01

    More than a quarter of a century of research has established chronic immune activation and dysfunctional T cells as central features of chronic HIV infection and subsequent immunodeficiency. Consequently, the search for a new immunomodulatory therapy that could reduce immune activation and improve T-cell function has been increased. However, the lack of small animal models for in vivo HIV study has hampered progress. In the current study, we have investigated a model of cord blood haematopoietic progenitor cells (CB-HPCs) -transplanted humanized NOD/LtsZ-scidIL-2Rγnull mice in which progression of HIV infection is associated with widespread chronic immune activation and inflammation. Indeed, HIV infection in humanized NSG mice caused up-regulation of several T-cell immune activation markers such as CD38, HLA-DR, CD69 and co-receptor CCR5. T-cell exhaustion markers PD-1 and CTLA-4 were found to be significantly up-regulated on T cells. Moreover, increased plasmatic levels of lipopolysaccharide, sCD14 and interleukin-10 were also observed in infected mice. Treatment with minocycline resulted in a significant decrease of expression of cellular and plasma immune activation markers, inhibition of HIV replication and improved T-cell counts in HIV-infected humanized NSG mice. The study demonstrates that minocycline could be an effective, low-cost adjunctive treatment to regulate chronic immune activation and replication of HIV. PMID:24409837

  8. Mechanistic insights on immunosenescence and chronic immune activation in HIV-tuberculosis co-infection

    OpenAIRE

    Esaki M Shankar; Velu, Vijayakumar; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Larsson, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Immunosenescence is marked by accelerated degradation of host immune responses leading to the onset of opportunistic infections, where senescent T cells show remarkably higher ontogenic defects as compared to healthy T cells. The mechanistic association between T-cell immunosenescence and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression, and functional T-cell responses in HIV-tuberculosis (HIV-TB) co-infection remains to be elaborately discussed. Here, we discussed the association of im...

  9. Minocycline fails to modulate cerebrospinal fluid HIV infection or immune activation in chronic untreated HIV-1 infection: results of a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuchs Dietmar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Minocycline is a tetracycline antibiotic that has been shown to attenuate central nervous system (CNS lentivirus infection, immune activation, and brain injury in model systems. To initiate assessment of minocycline as an adjuvant therapy in human CNS HIV infection, we conducted an open-labelled pilot study of its effects on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and blood biomarkers of infection and immune responses in 7 viremic subjects not taking antiretroviral therapy. Results There were no discernable effects of minocycline on CSF or blood HIV-1 RNA, or biomarkers of immune activation and inflammation including: CSF and blood neopterin, CSF CCL2, CSF white blood cell count, and expression of cell-surface activation markers on CSF and blood T lymphocytes and monocytes. Conclusions This pilot study of biological responses to minocycline suggests little potential for its use as adjunctive antiviral or immunomodulating therapy in chronic untreated HIV infection.

  10. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Action Medical Editor & Editorial Advisory Board Sponsors Sponsorship Opporunities Spread the Word Shop AAP ... Active vs. Passive Page Content Article Body Pediatricians can protect your child by administering not only active immunizations , but sometimes ...

  11. High mobility group box-1 protein inhibits regulatory T cell immune activity in liver failure in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu-WenWang; Hui Chen; Zuo-Jiong Gong

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver failure in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients is a severe, life-threatening condition. Intestinal endotoxemia plays a significant role in the progress to liver failure. High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein is involved in the process of endotoxemia. Regulatory T (Treg) cells maintain immune tolerance and contribute to the immunological hyporesponsiveness against HBV infection. However, the roles of HMGB1 and Treg cells in the pathogenesis of liver failure in CHB patients, and whether HMGB1 affects the immune activity of Treg cells are poorly known at present, and so were explored in this study. METHODS: The levels of HMGB1 expression were detected by ELISA, real-time RT-PCR, and Western blotting, and the percentage of CD4+CD25+CD127low Treg cells among CD4+cells was detected by flow cytometry in liver failure patients with chronic HBV infection, CHB patients, and healthy controls. Then, CD4+CD25+CD127low Treg cells isolated from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from CHB patients were stimulated with HMGB1 at different concentrations or at various intervals. The effect of HMGB1 on the immune activity of Treg cells was assessed by a suppression assay of the allogeneic mixed lymphocyte response. The levels of forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) expression in Treg cells treated with HMGB1 were detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting. RESULTS: A higher level of HMGB1 expression and a lower percentage of Treg cells within the population of CD4+ cells were found in liver failure patients than in CHB patients (82.6±20.1 μg/L vs. 34.2±13.7 μg/L; 4.55±1.34% vs. 9.52± 3.89%, respectively). The immune activity of Treg cells was significantly weakened and the levels of Foxp3 expression were reduced in a dose- or time-dependent manner when Treg cells were stimulated with HMGB1 in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: The high level of HMGB1 and the low percentage of Treg cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of liver failure in patients with chronic HBV infection

  12. Innate immune activation in intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Oliver J; Maloy, Kevin J

    2011-01-01

    Loss of intestinal immune regulation leading to aberrant immune responses to the commensal microbiota are believed to precipitate the chronic inflammation observed in the gastrointestinal tract of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Innate immune receptors that recognize conserved components derived from the microbiota are widely expressed by both epithelial cells and leucocytes of the gastrointestinal tract and play a key role in host protection from infectious pathogens; yet precisely how pathogenic and commensal microbes are distinguished is not understood. Furthermore, aberrant innate immune activation may also drive intestinal pathology, as patients with IBD exhibit extensive infiltration of innate immune cells to the inflamed intestine, and polymorphisms in many innate immunity genes influence susceptibility to IBD. Thus, a balanced interaction between the microbiota and innate immune activation is required to maintain a healthy mutualistic relationship between the microbiota and the host, which when disturbed can result in intestinal inflammation. PMID:21912101

  13. Cesarean Section and Chronic Immune Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sevelsted, Astrid; Stokholm, Jakob; Bønnelykke, Klaus;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Immune diseases such as asthma, allergy, inflammatory bowel disease, and type 1 diabetes have shown a parallel increase in prevalence during recent decades in westernized countries. The rate of cesarean delivery has also increased in this period and has been associated with the...... development of some of these diseases. METHODS: Mature children born by cesarean delivery were analyzed for risk of hospital contact for chronic immune diseases recorded in the Danish national registries in the 35-year period 1977-2012. Two million term children participated in the primary analysis. We...... studied childhood diseases with a suspected relation to a deviant immune-maturation and a debut at young age. The effect of cesarean delivery on childhood disease incidences were estimated by means of confounder-adjusted incidence rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals obtained in Poisson regression...

  14. Cardiac allograft immune activation: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang D

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available David Chang, Jon Kobashigawa Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Heart transplant remains the most durable option for end-stage heart disease. Cardiac allograft immune activation and heart transplant rejection remain among the main complications limiting graft and recipient survival. Mediators of the immune system can cause different forms of rejection post-heart transplant. Types of heart transplant rejection include hyperacute rejection, cellular rejection, antibody-mediated rejection, and chronic rejection. In this review, we will summarize the innate and adaptive immune responses which influence the post-heart transplant recipient. Different forms of rejection and their clinical presentation, detection, and immune monitoring will be discussed. Treatment of heart transplant rejection will be examined. We will discuss potential treatment strategies for preventing rejection post-transplant in immunologically high-risk patients with antibody sensitization. Keywords: heart transplant, innate immunity, adaptive immunity, rejection, immunosuppression

  15. Immune mediators of chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Stephen F; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2014-05-01

    The cause of chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) has yet to be established. Since the late 1980s, cytokine, chemokine, and immunological classification studies using human samples have focused on identifying biomarkers for CPPS, but no diagnostically beneficial biomarkers have been identified, and these studies have done little to deepen our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chronic prostatic pain. Given the large number of men thought to be affected by this condition and the ineffective nature of current treatments, there is a pressing need to elucidate these mechanisms. Prostatitis types IIIa and IIIb are classified according to the presence of pain without concurrent presence of bacteria; however, it is becoming more evident that, although levels of bacteria are not directly associated with levels of pain, the presence of bacteria might act as the initiating factor that drives primary activation of mast-cell-mediated inflammation in the prostate. Mast cell activation is also known to suppress regulatory T cell (Treg) control of self-tolerance and also activate neural sensitization. This combination of established autoimmunity coupled with peripheral and central neural sensitization can result in the development of multiple symptoms, including pelvic pain and bladder irritation. Identifying these mechanisms as central mediators in CPPS offers new insight into the prospective treatment of the disease. PMID:24686526

  16. Chronic spinal cord injury impairs primary antibody responses, but spares existing humoral immunity in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Oropallo, Michael A.; HELD, KATHERINE S.; Goenka, Radhika; Ahmad, Sifat A.; O’Neill, Patrick J.; Steward, Oswald; Lane, Thomas E.; Cancro, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in immune depression. To better understand how injury inhibits humoral immunity, the effects of chronic thoracic SCI on B cell development and immune responses to thymus-independent (TI) type-2 and thymus-dependent (TD) antigens were determined. Mice received complete crush injury or control laminectomy at either thoracic level 3 (T3), which disrupts descending autonomic control of the spleen, or at T9, which conserves most splenic sympathetic activity. Althou...

  17. Persisting Inflammation and Chronic Immune Activation but Intact Cognitive Function in HIV-Infected Patients After Long-Term Treatment With Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karin K; Pedersen, Maria; Gaardbo, Julie C;

    2013-01-01

    Impaired cognitive function in HIV-infected patients has been suggested. Treatment with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) restores CD4⁺ cell counts and suppresses viral replication, but immune activation and inflammation may persist. The aim of the study was to examine if cognitive functi...

  18. Immunization against East Coast fever: Effect of chronic trypanosomiasis on the development of immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two experiments were carried out in which clean cattle, or cattle chronically infected with Trypanosoma congolense, were immunized by the infection and treatment method against East Coast fever (ECF, Theileria parva infection). Chronic trypanosomiasis did not prevent cattle from mounting and effective immunological response to ECF immunization and resisting subsequent lethal challenge. There appeared to be no difference in the level or quality of immunity between clean cattle and trypanosome infected cattle. Thus, T. congolense infection on its own does not appear to provide a constraint to ECF immunization in the field. (author). 17 refs, 2 tabs

  19. The Effect of Licopid and Bifid and Lactic Acid Bacteria Complex on Lysozyme Activity as the Factor of Nonspecific Immune Protection in Chronic Gastric and Duodenal Ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Dugina V.V.; Shirali Rashmi; Lebedeva N.V.; Babayan S.R.; Rudakova G.V.; Khrulyova N.S.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the investigation is to study the effect of Licopid and bifid and lactic acid bacteria complex on Helicobacter pylori eradication and lysozyme activity as the factor of nonspecific immune protection in gastric and duodenal ulcer. Materials and Methods. There were studied 30 patients suffering from Helicobacter associated gastric and duodenal ulcer, lysozyme activity was determined in 8 conditionally healthy individuals. There were used endoscopic, cytomorphological, and imm...

  20. Chronic Schistosome Infection Leads to Modulation of Granuloma Formation and Systemic Immune Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven K. Lundy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Schistosome worms have been infecting humans for millennia, but it is only in the last half century that we have begun to understand the complexities of this inter-relationship. As our sophistication about the inner workings of every aspect of the immune system has increased, it has also become obvious that schistosome infections have broad ranging effects on nearly all of the innate and adaptive immune response mechanisms. Selective pressures on both the worms and their hosts, has no doubt led to co-evolution of protective mechanisms, particularly those that favor granuloma formation around schistosome eggs and immune suppression during chronic infection. The immune modulatory effects that chronic schistosome infection and egg deposition elicit have been intensely studied, not only because of their major implications to public health issues, but also due to the emerging evidence that schistosome infection may protect humans from severe allergies and autoimmunity. Mouse models of schistosome infection have been extremely valuable for studying immune modulation and regulation, and in the discovery of novel aspects of immunity. A progression of immune reactions occurs during granuloma formation ranging from innate inflammation, to activation of each branch of adaptive immune response, and culminating in systemic immune suppression and granuloma fibrosis. Although molecular factors from schistosome eggs have been identified as mediators of immune modulation and suppressive functions of T and B cells, much work is still needed to define the mechanisms of the immune alteration and determine whether therapies for asthma or autoimmunity could be developed from these pathways.

  1. The Effect of Licopid and Bifid and Lactic Acid Bacteria Complex on Lysozyme Activity as the Factor of Nonspecific Immune Protection in Chronic Gastric and Duodenal Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dugina V.V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to study the effect of Licopid and bifid and lactic acid bacteria complex on Helicobacter pylori eradication and lysozyme activity as the factor of nonspecific immune protection in gastric and duodenal ulcer. Materials and Methods. There were studied 30 patients suffering from Helicobacter associated gastric and duodenal ulcer, lysozyme activity was determined in 8 conditionally healthy individuals. There were used endoscopic, cytomorphological, and immunological (polymerase chain reaction, photonephelometric techniques. To study the effect of immunomodulator and probiotic on eradication and nonspecific immune protection, there were determined H. pylori contamination and lysozyme activity of oropharyngeal secretion and gastric juice before and after the treatment. Results. The analysis of biopsy specimens and lysozyme biological tests revealed the use of immunomodulator (Licopid and bifid and lactic acid bacteria complex combined with anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy increases H. pylori eradication and enhances lysozyme activity of saliva and gastric juice compared to data on quadroscheme. Conclusion. The administration of Licopid and bifid and lactic acid bacteria complex can be recommended in complex therapy of patients suffering from Helicobacter associated gastric and duodenal ulcers.

  2. Gut microbiota, immune system and chronic diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena; Hudcovic, Tomáš; Štěpánková, Renata; Klimešová, Klára; Hrnčíř, Tomáš; Kverka, Miloslav; Rossmann, Pavel; Kozáková, Hana; Zákostelská, Zuzana; Funda, David; Kokešová, Alena; Kobayashi, K.

    Praha: Carolinum, 2012. s. 47-47. ISBN 978-80-7395-456-7. [International Nutrition and Diagnostics Conference /12./. 27.08.2012-30.08.2012, Praha] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010737; GA MZd(CZ) NT13483 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : chronic diseases * gut microbiota * anticancer response Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  3. Innate Immune Activation in Intestinal Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Oliver J.; Maloy, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    Loss of intestinal immune regulation leading to aberrant immune responses to the commensal microbiota are believed to precipitate the chronic inflammation observed in the gastrointestinal tract of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Innate immune receptors that recognize conserved components derived from the microbiota are widely expressed by both epithelial cells and leucocytes of the gastrointestinal tract and play a key role in host prot...

  4. The paradox of chronic neuroinflammation, systemic immune suppression, autoimmunity after traumatic chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Jan M; Zhang, Yi; Kopp, Marcel A; Brommer, Benedikt; Popovich, Phillip G

    2014-08-01

    During the transition from acute to chronic stages of recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI), there is an evolving state of immunologic dysfunction that exacerbates the problems associated with the more clinically obvious neurologic deficits. Since injury directly affects cells embedded within the "immune privileged/specialized" milieu of the spinal cord, maladaptive or inefficient responses are likely to occur. Collectively, these responses qualify as part of the continuum of "SCI disease" and are important therapeutic targets to improve neural repair and neurological outcome. Generic immune suppressive therapies have been largely unsuccessful, mostly because inflammation and immunity exert both beneficial (plasticity enhancing) and detrimental (e.g. glia- and neurodegenerative; secondary damage) effects and these functions change over time. Moreover, "compartimentalized" investigations, limited to only intraspinal inflammation and associated cellular or molecular changes in the spinal cord, neglect the reality that the structure and function of the CNS are influenced by systemic immune challenges and that the immune system is 'hardwired' into the nervous system. Here, we consider this interplay during the progression from acute to chronic SCI. Specifically, we survey impaired/non-resolving intraspinal inflammation and the paradox of systemic inflammatory responses in the context of ongoing chronic immune suppression and autoimmunity. The concepts of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) and "neurogenic" spinal cord injury-induced immune depression syndrome (SCI-IDS) are discussed as determinants of impaired "host-defense" and trauma-induced autoimmunity. PMID:25017893

  5. Oral Immune Defense against Chronic Hyperplastic Candidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Musrati, Ahmed S Ali

    2008-01-01

    Candida yeast species are widespread opportunistic microbes, which are usually innocent opportunists unless the systemic or local defense system of the host becomes compromised. When they adhere on a fertile substrate such as moist and warm, protein-rich human mucosal membrane or biomaterial surface, they become activated and start to grow pseudo and real hyphae. Their growth is intricately guided by their ability to detect surface defects (providing secure hiding , thigmotropism) and nutrie...

  6. Immune Cognition and Pathogenic Challenge: Sudden and Chronic Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Rodrick

    2002-01-01

    We continue to study the implications of IR Cohen's theory of immune cognition, in the presence of both sudden and chronic pathogenic challenge, through a mathematical model derived from the Large Deviations Program of applied probability. The analysis makes explicit the linkage between an individual's 'immunocultural condensation' and embedding social or historical structures and processes, in particular power relations between groups. We use methods adapted from the theory of ecosystem...

  7. [Bone marrow stromal damage mediated by immune response activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojinović, J; Kamenov, B; Najman, S; Branković, Lj; Dimitrijević, H

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this work was to estimate influence of activated immune response on hematopoiesis in vitro, using the experimental model of BCG immunized BALB/c mice and in patients with chronic immunoactivation: long-lasting infections, autoimmunity or malignancy. We correlated changes in long term bone marrow cultures (Dexter) and NBT reduction with appearance of anemia in patients and experimental model of immunization by BCG. Increased spontaneous NBT reduction pointed out role of macrophage activation in bone marrow stroma damage. Long-term bone marrow cultures showed reduced number of hematopoietic cells, with predomination of fibroblasts and loss of fat cells. This results correlated with anemia and leucocytosis with stimulated myelopoiesis in peripheral blood. Activation of immune response, or acting of any agent that directly changes extracellular matrix and cellularity of bone marrow, may result in microenviroment bone marrow damage that modify hematopoiesis. PMID:18173180

  8. Injury to Allografts: innate immune pathways to acute and chronic rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An emerging body of evidence suggests that innate immunity, as the first line of host defense against invading pathogens or their components [pathogen-associated molecular patterns, (PAMPs)], plays also a critical role in acute and chronic allograft rejection. Injury to the donor organ induces an inflammatory milieu in the allograft, which appears to be the initial key event for activation of the innate immune system. Injury-induced generation of putative endogenous molecular ligand, in terms of damaged/danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as heat shock proteins, are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs), a family of pattern recognition receptors on cells of innate immunity. Acute allograft injury (e.g. oxidative stress during donor brain-death condition, post-ischemic reperfusion injury in the recipient) includes DAMPs which may interact with, and activate, innate TLR-bearing dendritic cells (DCs) which, in turn, via direct allo-recognition through donor-derived DCs and indirect allo-recogntion through recipient-derived DCs, initiate the recipient's adaptive alloimmune response leading to acute allograft rejection. Chronic injurious events in the allograft (e.g. hypertension, hyperlipidemia, CMV infection, administration of cell-toxic drugs [calcineurin-inhibitors]) induce the generation of DAMPs, which may interact with and activate innate TLR-bearing vascular cells (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells) which, in turn, contribute to the development of atherosclerosis of donor organ vessels (alloatherosclerosis), thus promoting chronic allograft rejection. (author)

  9. The paradox of chronic neuroinflammation, systemic immune suppression and autoimmunity after traumatic chronic spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Schwab, Jan M.; Zhang, Yi; Kopp, Marcel A; Brommer, Benedikt; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2014-01-01

    During the transition from acute to chronic stages of recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI), there is an evolving state of immunologic dysfunction that exacerbates the problems associated with the more clinically obvious neurologic deficits. Since injury directly affects cells embedded within the “immune privileged/specialized” milieu of the spinal cord, maladaptive or inefficient responses are likely to occur. Collectively, these responses qualify as part of the continuum of “SCI disease” ...

  10. Role of IL-7 in immune activation during HIV-1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Sammicheli, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Viral replication, lymphopenia and microbial translocation at the mucosal surfaces lead to a chronic state of immune activation during HIV-1 infection. Chronic immune activation is believed to impact on the functionality of cell types that are not the main target for virus replication, including CD8+T cells, B cells and NK cells. In this thesis two main aspects of the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection were studied: 1) how viral replication and disease progression affect the homeo...

  11. Tim-3: An activation marker and activation limiter of innate immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gencheng eHan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tim-3 was initially identified on activated Th1, Th17, and Tc1 cells and induces T cell death or exhaustion after binding to its ligand, Gal-9. The observed relationship between dysregulated Tim-3 expression on T cells and the progression of many clinical diseases has identified this molecule as an important target for intervention in adaptive immunity. Recent data have shown that it also plays critical roles in regulating the activities of macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells, mast cells, natural killer cells, and endothelial cells. Although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, dysregulation of Tim-3 expression on these innate immune cells leads to an excessive or inhibited inflammatory response and subsequent autoimmune damage or viral or tumor evasion. In this review, we focus on the expression and function of Tim-3 on innate immune cells and discuss 1 how Tim-3 is expressed and regulated on different innate immune cells; 2 how it affects the activity of different innate immune cells; and 3 how dysregulated Tim-3 expression on innate immune cells affects adaptive immunity and disease progression. Tim-3 is involved in the optimal activation of innate immune cells through its varied expression. A better understanding of the physiopathological role of the Tim-3 pathway in innate immunity will shed new light on the pathogenesis of clinical diseases, such as autoimmune diseases, chronic viral infections, and cancer, and suggest new approaches to intervention.

  12. Cardiac allograft immune activation: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Chang D; Kobashigawa J

    2014-01-01

    David Chang, Jon Kobashigawa Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Heart transplant remains the most durable option for end-stage heart disease. Cardiac allograft immune activation and heart transplant rejection remain among the main complications limiting graft and recipient survival. Mediators of the immune system can cause different forms of rejection post-heart transplant. Types of heart transplant rejection include hyperacute rejection, cellular rejection, antibod...

  13. Management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura: targeting insufficient megakaryopoiesis as a novel therapeutic principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Rank

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Andreas Rank, Oliver Weigert, Helmut OstermannMedizinische Klinik III – Grosshadern, Klinikum der Ludwig Maximilians-Universitaet Munich, Munich, GermanyAbstract: Traditionally, anti-platelet autoantibodies accelerating platelet clearance from the peripheral circulation have been recognized as the primary pathopysiological mechanism in chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP. Recently, increasing evidence supports the co-existence of insufficient megakaryopoiesis. Inadequate low thrombopoietin (TPO levels are associated with insufficient proliferation and differentiation of megakaryocytes, decreased proplatelet formation, and subsequent platelet release. Recently two novel activators of TPO receptors have been made available: romiplostim and eltrombopag. In several phase III studies, both agents demonstrated increase of platelet counts in about 80% of chronic ITP patients within 2 to 3 weeks. These agents substantially broaden the therapeutic options for patients with chronic ITP although long-term results are still pending. This review will provide an update on the current conception of underlying mechanisms in ITP and novel, pathophysiologically based treatment options.Keywords: immune thrombocytopenia, romiplostim, eltrombopag, megakaryopoiesis

  14. PATHOGENESIS OF IMMUNE ALTERATIONS AND CORRECTIVE ROLE OF AMLODIPINE IN EXPERIMENTAL CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Osikov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess some mechanisms of changes in immune state, and to evaluate a role of amlodipine, a known calcium channel blocker, as a potential corrective drug in experimental chronic renal failure (CRF. An animal CRF model was produced in rats by a two-stage operative resection of 5/6 of the renal tissue. Amlodipine is used per os at a daily dose of 0.25 mg/kg for 7 days. Flow cytofluorimetric approach was used to discern peripheral blood lymphocytes: CD3+ (mainly, T lymphocytes, CD45RA+ (mainly, B cells, as well as the following cell markers: Annexin 5-FITC+/7-AAD- (early apoptosis, Annexin 5-FITC+/7-AAD+ (late apoptosis and, in part, necrotic cells. Moreover, we have measured serum concentrations of urea, creatinine, phosphate, total calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH, IL-1β, IL-4, interferon-γ, superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase activities. Evaluation of Th1- and Th2-dependent immune response was carried out, respectively, by detection of delayed-type hypersensitivity, and scoring the antibody-forming cells in rat spleen induced by immunization with allogeneic erythrocytes. Primary, secondary and final products of lipid peroxidation were evaluated in lipid extracts from peripheral blood lymphocytes. Changes of immune state in CRF included depression of Th1 and Th2 dependent immune response, reduced number of lymphocytes bearing T and В cell markers, increased IL-1β concentrations in blood, along with decreased amounts of IFNγ and IL-4. Probable pathogenesis of the altered immune state may be associated with increased number of peripheral lymphocytes being at early and late stages of apoptosis/necrosis, elevated blood levels of IL-1β, total calcium, parathyroid hormone, reduced concentrations of IFNγ, and increased contents of primary, secondary and final peroxidation products in peripheral blood lymphocytes, being accompanied by inhibition of the SOD and catalase activity in blood plasma

  15. The Environment-Immune Route to Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specific environmental factors including chemicals, drugs, microbes and both physical and psychological factors can affect the immune system producing dysfunction and, ultimately, an increased risk ofchronic disease. Several different types of immune alterations can result from e...

  16. Chronic infection and the origin of adaptive immune system

    OpenAIRE

    Usharauli, David

    2010-01-01

    It has been speculated that the rise of the adaptive immune system in jawed vertebrates some 400 million years ago gave them a superior protection to detect and defend against pathogens that became more elusive and/or virulent to the host that had only innate immune system. First, this line of thought implies that adaptive immune system was a new, more sophisticated layer of host defense that operated independently of the innate immune system. Second, the natural consequence of this scenario ...

  17. Eltrombopag for management of chronic immune thrombocytopenia (RAISE): a 6-month, randomised, phase 3 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Gregory; Saleh, Mansoor N; Marcher, Claus;

    2011-01-01

    Eltrombopag is an oral thrombopoietin receptor agonist for the treatment of thrombocytopenia. We aimed to compare the response to once daily eltrombopag versus placebo in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia during a 6-month period....

  18. Role of protein tyrosine phosphatases in regulating the immune system: implications for chronic intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalinger, Marianne R; McCole, Declan F; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Current hypothesis suggests that genetic, immunological, and bacterial factors contribute essentially to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Variations within the gene loci encoding protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have been associated with the onset of inflammatory bowel disease. PTPs modulate the activity of their substrates by dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues and are critical for the regulation of fundamental cellular signaling processes. Evidence emerges that expression levels of PTPN2, PTPN11, and PTPN22 are altered in actively inflamed intestinal tissue. PTPN2 seems to be critical for protecting intestinal epithelial barrier function, regulating innate and adaptive immune responses and finally for maintaining intestinal homeostasis. These observations have been confirmed in PTPN2 knockout mice in vivo. Those animals are clearly more susceptible to intestinal and systemic inflammation and feature alterations in innate and adaptive immune responses. PTPN22 controls inflammatory signaling in lymphocytes and mononuclear cells resulting in aberrant cytokine secretion pattern and autophagosome formation. PTPN22 deficiency in vivo results in more severe colitis demonstrating the relevance of PTPN22 for intestinal homeostasis in vivo. Of note, loss of PTPN22 promotes mitogen-activated protein kinase-induced cytokine secretion but limits secretion of nuclear factor κB-associated cytokines and autophagy in mononuclear cells. Loss of PTPN11 is also associated with increased colitis severity in vivo. In summary, dysfunction of those PTPs results in aberrant and uncontrolled immune responses that result in chronic inflammatory conditions. This way, it becomes more and more evident that dysfunction of PTPs displays an important factor in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation, in particular inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25581833

  19. Inflammation, immune activation, and cardiovascular disease in HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nou, Eric; Lo, Janet; Grinspoon, Steven K

    2016-06-19

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in people living with HIV. Several epidemiological studies have shown an increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke compared to uninfected controls. Although traditional risk factors contribute to this increased risk of cardiovascular disease, HIV-specific mechanisms likely also play a role. Systemic inflammation has been linked to cardiovascular disease in several populations suffering from chronic inflammation, including people living with HIV. Although antiretroviral therapy reduces immune activation, levels of inflammatory markers remain elevated compared to uninfected controls. The causes of this sustained immune response are likely multifactorial and incompletely understood. In this review, we summarize the evidence describing the relationship between inflammation and cardiovascular disease and discuss potential anti-inflammatory treatment options for cardiometabolic disease in people living with HIV. PMID:27058351

  20. Shared Immune and Repair Markers During Experimental Toxoplasma Chronic Brain Infection and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasik, Jakub; Schultz, Tracey L; Kluge, Wolfgang; Yolken, Robert H; Bahn, Sabine; Carruthers, Vern B

    2016-03-01

    Chronic neurologic infection with Toxoplasma gondii is relatively common in humans and is one of the strongest known risk factors for schizophrenia. Nevertheless, the exact neuropathological mechanisms linking T gondii infection and schizophrenia remain unclear. Here we utilize a mouse model of chronic T gondii infection to identify protein biomarkers that are altered in serum and brain samples at 2 time points during chronic infection. Furthermore, we compare the identified biomarkers to those differing between "postmortem" brain samples from 35 schizophrenia patients and 33 healthy controls. Our findings suggest that T gondii infection causes substantial and widespread immune activation indicative of neural damage and reactive tissue repair in the animal model that partly overlaps with changes observed in the brains of schizophrenia patients. The overlapping changes include increases in C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interferon gamma (IFNγ), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1). Potential roles of these factors in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and toxoplasmosis are discussed. Identifying a defined set of markers shared within the pathophysiological landscape of these diseases could be a key step towards understanding their specific contributions to pathogenesis. PMID:26392628

  1. Tissue and serum immune response in chronic hepatitis C with mild histological lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AT R-Viso

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The immunopathogenesis of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a matter of great controversy and has been suggested to involve a complex balance between cytokines with pro and anti-inflammatory activity. We investigated the expression of inflammatory cells and cytokines in the liver and serum of 51 chronically HCV infected patients and compared them to data from two sets of normal controls: 51 healthy blood donors and 33 liver biopsies of healthy liver donors. We also assessed the relationship between selected cytokines and cell populations in hepatic compartments and the disease stage. Compared with controls, hepatitis C patients had a greater expression of portal TNF-α, TGF-β and CD4+ and acinar IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-4, as well as a higher serum concentration of IL-2, IL-10 and TGF-β. Significant positive correlations were found between portal CD4+ and TNF-α, portal CD8+ and TGF-β, portal CD45+RO and TNF-α, acinar CD45+RO and IFN-γ and acinar CD57+ and TGF-β. In conclusion, we have shown that (i in this sample of predominantly mild disease, the immune response was associated with a pro-inflammatory response pattern, (ii CD4+ T-lymphocytes played a major role in orchestrating the immune response and (iii these events primarily took place in the portal space.

  2. Infectious Agent and Immune Response Characteristics of Chronic Enterocolitis in Captive Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Sestak, Karol; Merritt, Christopher K.; Borda, Juan; Saylor, Elizabeth; Schwamberger, Shelle R.; Cogswell, Frank; Didier, Elizabeth S; Didier, Peter J.; Plauche, Gail; Bohm, Rudolf P.; Aye, Pyone P.; Alexa, Pavel; Ward, Richard L.; Lackner, Andrew A

    2003-01-01

    Chronic enterocolitis is the leading cause of morbidity in colonies of captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). This study's aim was to identify the common enteric pathogens frequently associated with chronic enterocolitis in normal, immunocompetent rhesus monkeys and to elucidate the influence of this clinical syndrome on the host immune system. We analyzed the fecal specimens from 100 rhesus macaques with or without clinical symptoms of chronic diarrhea. Retrospective analysis revealed an ...

  3. Role of Leptin in the Activation of Immune Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Fernández-Riejos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ that secretes various humoral factors (adipokines, and its shift to production of proinflammatory cytokines in obesity likely contributes to the low-level systemic inflammation that may be present in metabolic syndrome-associated chronic pathologies such as atherosclerosis. Leptin is one of the most important hormones secreted by adipocytes, with a variety of physiological roles related to the control of metabolism and energy homeostasis. One of these functions is the connection between nutritional status and immune competence. The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin has been shown to regulate the immune response, innate and adaptive response, both in normal and pathological conditions. The role of leptin in regulating immune response has been assessed in vitro as well as in clinical studies. It has been shown that conditions of reduced leptin production are associated with increased infection susceptibility. Conversely, immune-mediated disorders such as autoimmune diseases are associated with increased secretion of leptin and production of proinflammatory pathogenic cytokines. Thus, leptin is a mediator of the inflammatory response.

  4. Pulmonary and Systemic Immune Response to Chronic Lunar Dust Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Quiriarte, Heather; Nelman, Mayra; Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.; Sams, Clarence

    2014-01-01

    Background: Due to millennia of meteorite impact with virtually no erosive effects, the surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of ultra-fine, reactive Lunar dust. Very little is known regarding the toxicity of Lunar dust on human physiology. Given the size and electrostatic characteristics of Lunar dust, countermeasures to ensure non-exposure of astronauts will be difficult. To ensure astronaut safety during any future prolonged Lunar missions, it is necessary to establish the effect of chronic pulmonary Lunar dust exposure on all physiological systems. Methods: This study assessed the toxicity of airborne lunar dust exposure in rats on pulmonary and system immune system parameters. Rats were exposed to 0, 20.8, or 60.8 mg/m3 of lunar dust (6h/d; 5d/wk) for up to 13 weeks. Sacrifices occurred after exposure durations of 1day, 7 days, 4 weeks and 13 weeks post-exposure, when both blood and lung lavage fluid were collected for analysis. Lavage and blood assays included leukocyte distribution by flow cytometry, electron/fluorescent microscopy, and cytokine concentration. Cytokine production profiles following mitogenic stimulation were performed on whole blood only. Results: Untreated lavage fluid was comprised primarily of pulmonary macrophages. Lunar dust inhalation resulted in an influx of neutrophils and lymphocytes. Although the percentage of lymphocytes increased, the T cell CD4:CD8 ratio was unchanged. Cytokine analysis of the lavage fluid showed increased levels of IL-1b and TNFa. These alterations generally persisted through the 13 week sampling. Blood analysis showed few systemic effects from the lunar dust inhalation. By week 4, the peripheral granulocyte percentage was elevated in the treated rats. Plasma cytokine levels were unchanged in all treated rats compared to controls. Peripheral blood analysis showed an increased granulocyte percentage and altered cytokine production profiles consisting of increased in IL-1b and IL-6, and decreased IL-2

  5. Effects of N2-laser radiation on the immune system cells of patients with chronic bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provorov, Alexander S.; Kozhevnikova, T. A.; Salmin, Vladimir V.

    2001-05-01

    In spite of various investigations devoted to a problem of chronic bronchitis, many problems concerning both the reasons of the origin of this disease, and the essence of the processes, explicating in the bronchial tubes, especially on early stages of the disease, remain insufficiently studied. It makes it difficult to use an integrated approach to chronic bronchitis, that would reflect the peculiarities of its etiology, pathogenesis, its clinical course and efficiency of the therapy. During the last years the data of the clinical laboratory analysis of chronic bronchitis in connection with its immune therapy have been accumulated. In the literature there is a lot of information about the violation of immune reactions in the organism of patients, methods of the immune therapy, the data of the successful application of the intravenous laser therapy in the treatment of obstructive chronic bronchitis and bronchial asthma. However, there is no research explaining the mechanisms of the laser radiation impact on the immune status of patients suffering from chronic bronchitis. According to this it has become extremely urgent to research the mechanisms of the laser radiation impact on immune competent cells of patients suffering from chronic bronchitis.

  6. Immune dysregulation mediated by the oral microbiome: potential link to chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, C; Kramer, C; Genco, C A

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an inflammatory disorder characterized by the progressive formation of plaque in coronary arteries, termed atherosclerosis. It is a multifactorial disease that is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Although a number of risk factors have been associated with disease progression, the underlying inflammatory mechanisms contributing to atherosclerosis remain to be fully delineated. Within the last decade, the potential role for infection in inflammatory plaque progression has received considerable interest. Microbial pathogens associated with periodontal disease have been of particular interest due to the high levels of bacteremia that are observed after routine dental procedures and every day oral activities, such as tooth brushing. Here, we explore the potential mechanisms that may explain how periodontal pathogens either directly or indirectly elicit immune dysregulation and consequently progressive inflammation manifested as atherosclerosis. Periodontal pathogens have been shown to contribute directly to atherosclerosis by disrupting endothelial cell function, one of the earliest indicators of cardiovascular disease. Oral infection is thought to indirectly induce elevated production of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation. Recently, a number of studies have been conducted focusing on how disruption of the gut microbiome influences the systemic production of proinflammatory cytokines and consequently exacerbation of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. It is clear that the immune mechanisms leading to atherosclerotic plaque progression, by oral infection, are complex. Understanding the immune pathways leading to disease progression is essential for the future development of anti-inflammatory therapies for this chronic disease. PMID:26791914

  7. Breaking peripheral immune tolerance to CNS antigens in neurodegenerative diseases: boosting autoimmunity to fight-off chronic neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michal; Baruch, Kuti

    2014-11-01

    Immune cell infiltration to the brain's territory was considered for decades to reflect a pathological process in which immune cells attack the central nervous system (CNS); such a process is observed in the inflammatory autoimmune disease, multiple sclerosis (MS). As neuroinflammatory processes within the CNS parenchyma are also common to other CNS pathologies, regardless of their etiology, including neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), these pathologies have often been compared to MS, a disease that benefits from immunosuppressive therapy. Yet, over the last decade, it became clear that autoimmunity has a bright side, and that it plays a pivotal role in CNS repair following damage. Specifically, autoimmune T cells were found to facilitate CNS healing processes, such as in the case of sterile mechanical injuries to the brain or the spinal cord, mental stress, or biochemical insults. Even more intriguingly, autoimmune T cells were found to be involved in supporting fundamental processes of brain functional integrity, such as in the maintenance of life-long brain plasticity, including spatial learning and memory, and neurogenesis. Importantly, autoimmune T cells are part of a cellular network which, to operate efficiently and safely, requires tight regulation by other immune cell populations, such as regulatory T cells, which are indispensable for maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. Here, we suggest that dysregulation of the balance between peripheral immune suppression, on one hand, and protective autoimmunity, on the other, is an underlying mechanism in the emergence and progression of the neuroinflammatory response associated with chronic neurodegenerative diseases and brain aging. Mitigating chronic neuroinflammation under these conditions necessitates activation, rather than suppression, of the peripheral immune response directed against self. Accordingly, we propose that

  8. CHARACTERISTICS OF SYSTEMIC AND LOCAL IMMUNITY IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC TONSILLITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolyada T.І

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Palatine tonsils are the most significant cluster of lymphadenoid tissue of throat. Performing a protective function they are very prone to acute and chronic inflammation and thus they are a source of chronic infection in the body. Therefore the problem of chronic tonsillitis (CT requires a serious attention. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is one of the important factors that could significantly complicate the course of chronic tonsillitis. RA is a chronic immune inflammatory disease that progressively affects connective tissue mostly of the peripheral joints and it has a wide range of extra-articular manifestations. The aim of our study was to explore the dynamics of immunologic indicators during the active disease and convalescence in patients with various severity of chronic tonsillitis, including tonsillitis complicated with RA, and to define indicators of local and systemic immunity for further improvement of tactics of immune correction in the complex treatment. Material and methods. 41 patients with various forms of chronic tonsillitis in active period of disease observed during the study. Patients were divided into the following groups: 19 persons with the compensate form of CT, 15 persons with the decompensate form of CT, 9 persons with the decompensate form of CT complicated with RA in remission stage. The control group consisted of 15 apparently healthy persons. Average age of the observed persons was 34.4 ± 0.8 years. Concentrations of serum immunoglobulins sIgA, IgA, IgM, IgG were determined by the method of radial immunodiffusion by Manchini. Levels of Ig Е, IL-4 and IFN – γ in the blood serum of patients were evaluated using ELISA test systems of "Vector-best". The detection of circulating immune complexes (CIC was performed by the method based on a selective precipitation of antigen complexes in 3.5% solution of polyethylene glycol (PEG with subsequent photometric determination of density of the precipitate. In peripheral blood

  9. Neither Primary nor Memory Immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Is Compromised in Mice with Chronic Enteric Helminth Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafi, Wasiulla; Bhatt, Kamlesh; Gause, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Previously we had reported that Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, a helminth with a lung migratory phase, affected host resistance against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection through the induction of alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. Several helminth species do not have an obligatory lung migratory phase but establish chronic infections in the host that include potent immune downregulatory effects, in part mediated through induction of a FoxP3+ T regulatory cell (Treg) response. Treg cells exhibit duality in their functions in host defense against M. tuberculosis infection since their depletion leads to enhanced priming of T cells in the lymph nodes and attendant improved control of M. tuberculosis infection, while their presence in the lung granuloma protects against excessive inflammation. Heligmosomoides polygyrus is a strictly murine enteric nematode that induces a strong FoxP3 Treg response in the host. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether host immunity to M. tuberculosis infection would be modulated in mice with chronic H. polygyrus infection. We report that neither primary nor memory immunity conferred by Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination was affected in mice with chronic enteric helminth infection, despite a systemic increase in FoxP3+ T regulatory cells. The findings indicate that anti-M. tuberculosis immunity is not similarly affected by all helminth species and highlight the need to consider this inequality in human coinfection studies. PMID:25605766

  10. Candesartan ameliorates impaired fear extinction induced by innate immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones, María M; Maldonado, Lizette; Velazquez, Bethzaly; Porter, James T

    2016-02-01

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) tend to show signs of a relatively increased inflammatory state suggesting that activation of the immune system may contribute to the development of PTSD. In the present study, we tested whether activation of the innate immune system can disrupt acquisition or recall of auditory fear extinction using an animal model of PTSD. Male adolescent rats received auditory fear conditioning in context A. The next day, an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg) prior to auditory fear extinction in context B impaired acquisition and recall of extinction. LPS (100 μg/kg) given after extinction training did not impair extinction recall suggesting that LPS did not affect consolidation of extinction. In contrast to cued fear extinction, contextual fear extinction was not affected by prior injection of LPS (100 μg/kg). Although LPS also reduced locomotion, we could dissociate the effects of LPS on extinction and locomotion by using a lower dose of LPS (50 μg/kg) which impaired locomotion without affecting extinction. In addition, 15 h after an injection of 250 μg/kg LPS in adult rats, extinction learning and recall were impaired without affecting locomotion. A sub-chronic treatment with candesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, prevented the LPS-induced impairment of extinction in adult rats. Our results demonstrate that activation of the innate immune system can disrupt auditory fear extinction in adolescent and adult animals. These findings also provide direction for clinical studies of novel treatments that modulate the innate immune system for stress-related disorders like PTSD. PMID:26520214

  11. Vesicles from different Trypanosoma cruzi strains trigger differential innate and chronic immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Paula M.; Ribeiro, Kleber; Silveira, Amanda C. O.; Campos, João H.; Martins-Filho, Olindo A.; Bela, Samantha R.; Campos, Marco A.; Pessoa, Natalia L.; Colli, Walter; Alves, Maria J. M.; Soares, Rodrigo P.; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas Disease, shed extracellular vesicles (EVs) enriched with glycoproteins of the gp85/trans-sialidase (TS) superfamily and other α-galactosyl (α-Gal)-containing glycoconjugates, such as mucins. Here, purified vesicles from T. cruzi strains (Y, Colombiana, CL-14 and YuYu) were quantified according to size, intensity and concentration. Qualitative analysis revealed differences in their protein and α-galactosyl contents. Later, those polymorphisms were evaluated in the modulation of immune responses (innate and in the chronic phase) in C57BL/6 mice. EVs isolated from YuYu and CL-14 strains induced in macrophages higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and nitric oxide via TLR2. In general, no differences were observed in MAPKs activation (p38, JNK and ERK 1/2) after EVs stimulation. In splenic cells derived from chronically infected mice, a different modulation pattern was observed, where Colombiana (followed by Y strain) EVs were more proinflammatory. This modulation was independent of the T. cruzi strain used in the mice infection. To test the functional importance of this modulation, the expression of intracellular cytokines after in vitro exposure was evaluated using EVs from YuYu and Colombiana strains. Both EVs induced cytokine production with the appearance of IL-10 in the chronically infected mice. A high frequency of IL-10 in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes was observed. A mixed profile of cytokine induction was observed in B cells with the production of TNF-α and IL-10. Finally, dendritic cells produced TNF-α after stimulation with EVs. Polymorphisms in the vesicles surface may be determinant in the immunopathologic events not only in the early steps of infection but also in the chronic phase. PMID:26613751

  12. Immune-suppressive activity of punicalagin via inhibition of NFAT activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since T cell activation is central to the development of autoimmune diseases, we screened a natural product library comprising 1400 samples of medicinal herbal extracts, to identify compounds that suppress T cell activity. Punicalagin (PCG) isolated from the fruit of Punica granatum was identified as a potent immune suppressant, based on its inhibitory action on the activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). PCG downregulated the mRNA and soluble protein expression of interleukin-2 from anti-CD3/anti-CD28-stimulated murine splenic CD4+ T cells and suppressed mixed leukocytes reaction (MLR) without exhibiting cytotoxicity to the cells. In vivo, the PCG treatment inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced chronic ear edema in mice and decreased CD3+ T cell infiltration of the inflamed tissue. These results suggest that PCG could be a potential candidate for the therapeutics of various immune pathologies

  13. The effect of physician’s recommendation on seasonal influenza immunization in children with chronic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandolfi Elisabetta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite recommendations by Health Authorities, influenza immunization coverage remains low in children with chronic diseases. Different medical providers involved in the management of children with chronic conditions may affect the pattern of influenza vaccine recommendations and coverage. The likelihood of vaccination by type of provider in children with chronic conditions is poorly understood. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to analyze the pattern and the effect of recommendations for seasonal influenza immunization provided by different physician profiles to families of children with chronic diseases and to measure the frequency of immunization in the study population. Methods We recruited children with chronic diseases aged 6 months–18 years who subsequently presented to specialty clinics for routine follow-up visits, during spring 2009, in three Italian Regions Families of children with chronic diseases were interviewed during routine visits at reference centers through a face-to-face interview. We analyzed the following immunization predictors: having received a recommendation toward influenza immunization by a health provider; child’s sex and age; mothers and fathers’ age; parental education and employment; underlying child’s disease; number of contacts with health providers in the previous year. Influenza immunization coverage was calculated as the proportion of children who received at least one dose of seasonal influenza vaccine in the previous season. We calculated prevalence ratios and we used a generalized linear model with Poisson family, log link and robust error variance to assess the effect of socio-demographic variables, underlying diseases, and recommendations provided by physicians on influenza immunization. Results We enrolled 275 families of children with chronic diseases. Overall influenza coverage was 57.5%, with a low of 25% in children with neurological diseases and a high of 91

  14. Regulation of chronic inflammatory and immune processes by extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Paul D; Dorronsoro, Akaitz; Booker, Cori N

    2016-04-01

    Almost all cell types release extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are derived either from multivesicular bodies or from the plasma membrane. EVs contain a subset of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids from the cell from which they are derived. EV factors, particularly small RNAs such as miRNAs, likely play important roles in cell-to-cell communication both locally and systemically. Most of the functions associated with EVs are in the regulation of immune responses to pathogens and cancer, as well as in regulating autoimmunity. This Review will focus on the different modes of immune regulation, both direct and indirect, by EVs. The therapeutic utility of EVs for the regulation of immune responses will also be discussed. PMID:27035808

  15. BCR-ABL transcript variations in chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients on imatinib first-line: Possible role of the autologous immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Geoffrey D; Lepoutre, Thomas; Nicolini, Franck E; Levy, Doron

    2016-05-01

    Many chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients in chronic phase who respond well to imatinib therapy show fluctuations in their leukemic loads in the long-term. We developed a mathematical model of CML that incorporates the intervention of an autologous immune response. Our results suggest that the patient's immune system plays a crucial role in imatinib therapy in maintaining disease control over time. The observed BCR-ABL/ABL oscillations in such patients provide a signature of the autologous immune response. PMID:27467931

  16. Virological and morphological relationships in the phases of the immune control and reactivation in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Gabdrakhmanov

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate relationships between virological and morphological data in patients with chronic hepatitis B in phase immune control and reactivation.Materials and methods: The study involved 46 patients with chronic hepatitis B, indicators defined were content of surface antigen and hepatitis B virus DNA in the peripheral blood, the level of covalently closed circular HBV DNA in liver tissue and fibrosis stage and histological activity index (METAVIR.Results: The study found a direct correlation between the level of covalently closed circular DNA in liver puncture biopsies (number of copies per cell and quantitative content of HBsAg in serum (r = 0,51, p = 0,03 in patients with chronic hepatitis B in phase immune control. Also in the immune control phase a direct correlation between the HBV DNA and the level of HBsAg in serum (r = 0.79, p = 0.0001 is shown. The level of covalently closed circular HBV DNA in liver puncture biopsy specimens did not differ in patients with chronic hepatitis B in the phase of immune control in the phase of reactivation (1,02 ± 0,01 copies / cell and 1,03 ± 0,03 copies / cell, p = 0.72. The index of histological activity and fibrosis were not correlated with any of the investigated virological indicator.Conclusion: Results of the study emphasized the complexity and ambiguity of the relationships between both virological and morphological indicators in patients with chronic hepatitis B, determined the direction for further study (in particular the assessment of the epigenetic regulation of the synthesis of circular covalently closed DNA, as well as set the stage for improving the principles of dynamic observing the patients with chronic hepatitis B in a phase of immune control.

  17. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors induced immune thrombocytopenia in chronic myeloid leukemia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital F. Barak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The outcome and quality of life of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients has remarkably changed with the treatment of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. Currently, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is considered mainly as a third line salvage therapy in cases of TKIs resistance or intolerance. Here we describe a patient with chronic phase CML who developed both resistance and late occurrence of s severe thrombocytopenia on first and second generation TKIs and eventually underwent HSCT. Although the mechanism of the myelosuppression is not fully understood, we showed for the first time the development of dose dependent platelet antibodies in the presence of TKIs, suggesting the possibility of TKIs induced thrombocytopenia. Our case emphasizes that late development of severe myelosuppression during imatinib treatment is probably an important indication for consideration of early HSCT.

  18. Management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura: targeting insufficient megakaryopoiesis as a novel therapeutic principle

    OpenAIRE

    Rank, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Andreas Rank, Oliver Weigert, Helmut OstermannMedizinische Klinik III – Grosshadern, Klinikum der Ludwig Maximilians-Universitaet Munich, Munich, GermanyAbstract: Traditionally, anti-platelet autoantibodies accelerating platelet clearance from the peripheral circulation have been recognized as the primary pathopysiological mechanism in chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recently, increasing evidence supports the co-existence of insufficient megakaryopoiesis. Inadequate low throm...

  19. Subcutaneous immunoglobulins in the treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leussink, Verena I; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Kieseier, Bernd C; Stettner, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulins represent an established therapy for the treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies, specifically chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathies (CIDPs) as well as multifocal motor neuropathies (MMNs). For the treatment of antibody deficiency syndromes, subcutaneous immunoglobulins (SCIgs) have represented a mainstay for decades. An emerging body of evidence suggests that SCIg might also exhibit clinical efficacy in CIDP and MMN. This article reviews the current evidence for clinical effectiveness, as well as safety of SCIg for the treatment of immune-mediated neuropathies, and addresses remaining open questions in this context. We conclude that despite the need for controlled long-term studies to demonstrate long-term efficacy of SCIg in immune-mediated neuropathies, SCIg may already represent a potential therapeutic alternative for selected patients. PMID:27366241

  20. Impact of Adverse Events Following Immunization in Viet Nam in 2013 on chronic hepatitis B infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi; Wiesen, Eric; Diorditsa, Sergey; Toda, Kohei; Duong, Thi Hong; Nguyen, Lien Huong; Nguyen, Van Cuong; Nguyen, Tran Hien

    2016-02-01

    Adverse Events Following Immunization in Viet Nam in 2013 led to substantial reductions in hepatitis B vaccination coverage (both the birth dose and the three-dose series). In order to estimate the impact of the reduction in vaccination coverage on hepatitis B transmission and future mortality, a widely-used mathematical model was applied to the data from Viet Nam. Using the model, we estimated the number of chronic infections and deaths that are expected to occur in the birth cohort in 2013 and the number of excessive infections and deaths attributable to the drop in immunization coverage in 2013. An excess of 90,137 chronic infections and 17,456 future deaths were estimated to occur in the 2013 birth cohort due to the drop in vaccination coverage. This analysis highlights the importance of maintaining high vaccination coverage and swiftly responding to reported Adverse Events Following Immunization in order to regain consumer confidence in the hepatitis B vaccine. PMID:26055296

  1. Evidence for Protection against Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Chimpanzees by Immunization with Replicating Recombinant Vaccinia Virus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Youn, Jin-Won; Hu, Yu-Wen; Tricoche, Nancy; Pfahler, Wolfram; Shata, Mohamed Tarek; Dreux, Marlene; Cosset, François-Loic; Folgori, Antonella; Lee, Dong-Hun; Brotman, Betsy; Prince, Alfred M.

    2008-01-01

    Given the failures of nonreplicating vaccines against chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, we hypothesized that a replicating viral vector may provide protective immunity. Four chimpanzees were immunized transdermally twice with recombinant vaccinia viruses (rVV) expressing HCV genes. After challenge with 24 50% chimpanzee infective doses of homologous HCV, the two control animals that had received only the parental VV developed chronic HCV infection. All four immunized animals resolved...

  2. Recommandations de vaccination pour les patients atteints de maladie chronique [Immunization guidelines regarding patients with a chronic disease].

    OpenAIRE

    Aubert C.; Vaudaux B.; Bart P.A.; Université de Lausanne

    2010-01-01

    Some chronic diseases--like renal failure, liver insufficiency, chronic lung disease, cardiac involvement, diabetes mellitus, asplenia--present limited defects of the immune system and/or a higher risk of infection; therefore, patients with such pathologies should get selective vaccinations. The efficacy of immunization decreases with disease progression; for this reason, these patients should be immunized as soon as possible. At the beginning of their disease, these patients do not need a sp...

  3. Active "itch fibers" in chronic pruritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, M; Hilliges, M; Schmidt, R; Ørstavik, K; Vahlquist, C; Weidner, C; Handwerker, H O; Torebjörk, H E

    2003-08-26

    An itch-specific neuronal pathway was recently discovered in healthy humans and animals. Here the authors report that activity in this specific pathway coincides with itch under pathophysiologic conditions in a patient with chronic pruritus. Microneurographic recordings from the symptomatic area revealed spontaneous activity in six single C-fiber afferents that had the characteristic features of "itch fibers." Itch may be caused by activity in a specific subpopulation of C-fiber afferents. PMID:12939442

  4. Gastrointestinal Disorders Associated with Common Variable Immune Deficiency (CVID) and Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzzan, Mathieu; Ko, Huaibin M; Mehandru, Saurabh; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    Common variable immune deficiency (CVID) and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) are two of the well-characterized primary immune deficiencies with distinct pathologic defects. While CVID is predominantly a disorder of the adaptive immune system, in CGD, innate immunity is impaired. In both syndromes, the clinical manifestations include an increased susceptibility to infections and a number of non-infectious, inflammatory conditions including systemic autoimmunity, as well as organ-specific pathology. Among the organ-associated disorders, gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations are one of the most intractable. As such, non-infectious inflammatory disorders of the GI tract are clinically challenging as they have protean manifestations, often resembling inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or celiac disease, are notoriously difficult to treat, and hence are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, assessing the pathogenesis and defining appropriate therapeutic approaches for GI disease in patients with CVID and CGD is imperative. PMID:26951230

  5. Intact indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity in human chronic granulomatous disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jürgens, Birgit; Fuchs, Dietmar; Reichenbach, Janine; Heitger, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is characterized by a disability to produce reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) caused by a defect of phagocyte nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. A hyperinflammatory response to immune activation has been reported to contribute to the pathology of CGD. The tryptophan catabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is considered critical for regulating immune responses and suppression of inflammation. IDO is generally believe...

  6. Aberrant innate immune activation following tissue injury impairs pancreatic regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra E Folias

    Full Text Available Normal tissue architecture is disrupted following injury, as resident tissue cells become damaged and immune cells are recruited to the site of injury. While injury and inflammation are critical to tissue remodeling, the inability to resolve this response can lead to the destructive complications of chronic inflammation. In the pancreas, acinar cells of the exocrine compartment respond to injury by transiently adopting characteristics of progenitor cells present during embryonic development. This process of de-differentiation creates a window where a mature and stable cell gains flexibility and is potentially permissive to changes in cellular fate. How de-differentiation can turn an acinar cell into another cell type (such as a pancreatic β-cell, or a cell with cancerous potential (as in cases of deregulated Kras activity is of interest to both the regenerative medicine and cancer communities. While it is known that inflammation and acinar de-differentiation increase following pancreatic injury, it remains unclear which immune cells are involved in this process. We used a combination of genetically modified mice, immunological blockade and cellular characterization to identify the immune cells that impact pancreatic regeneration in an in vivo model of pancreatitis. We identified the innate inflammatory response of macrophages and neutrophils as regulators of pancreatic regeneration. Under normal conditions, mild innate inflammation prompts a transient de-differentiation of acinar cells that readily dissipates to allow normal regeneration. However, non-resolving inflammation developed when elevated pancreatic levels of neutrophils producing interferon-γ increased iNOS levels and the pro-inflammatory response of macrophages. Pancreatic injury improved following in vivo macrophage depletion, iNOS inhibition as well as suppression of iNOS levels in macrophages via interferon-γ blockade, supporting the impairment in regeneration and the

  7. Treatment options for chronic idiopathic (immune) thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, J N

    2000-01-01

    The goal of treatment for idiopathic (immune) thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is to prevent serious bleeding. Traditionally, corticosteroids have been used as first-line therapy followed by splenectomy. Experience with splenectomy over 60 years shows that approximately two thirds of patients achieve normal platelet counts during the initial observation, but that thrombocytopenia often recurs with longer follow-up. We know that long-term use of corticosteroids can lead to significant morbidities; there is no consensus regarding the appropriate timing or indications for splenectomy. To address the Issue of appropriate use of splenectomy, we designed a multicenter clinical trial that will randomize patients to either standard care, involving prednisone followed by splenectomy, or to a novel regimen of limited prednisone treatment followed by WinRho SDF (Nabi, Boca Raton, FL) (anti-D) therapy to maintain the platelet count in a safe range for 1 year. Anti-D can be administered easily in an outpatient setting with few side effects and can provide predictable, transient increases in platelet count. The hypothesis is that prolonged maintenance therapy with a nontoxic regimen may increase the percentage of patients who will experience a spontaneous remission from thrombocytopenia, thereby avoiding an invasive and permanent surgical procedure, splenectomy, and its potentially life-threatening sequelae. PMID:10676922

  8. Evidence of inflammatory immune signaling in chronic fatigue syndrome: A pilot study of gene expression in peripheral blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Suzanne D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic profiling of peripheral blood reveals altered immunity in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS however interpretation remains challenging without immune demographic context. The object of this work is to identify modulation of specific immune functional components and restructuring of co-expression networks characteristic of CFS using the quantitative genomics of peripheral blood. Methods Gene sets were constructed a priori for CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD19+ B cells, CD14+ monocytes and CD16+ neutrophils from published data. A group of 111 women were classified using empiric case definition (U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and unsupervised latent cluster analysis (LCA. Microarray profiles of peripheral blood were analyzed for expression of leukocyte-specific gene sets and characteristic changes in co-expression identified from topological evaluation of linear correlation networks. Results Median expression for a set of 6 genes preferentially up-regulated in CD19+ B cells was significantly lower in CFS (p = 0.01 due mainly to PTPRK and TSPAN3 expression. Although no other gene set was differentially expressed at p Conclusion Dissection of blood microarray profiles points to B cell dysfunction with coordinated immune activation supporting persistent inflammation and antibody-mediated NK cell modulation of T cell activity. This has clinical implications as the CD19+ genes identified could provide robust and biologically meaningful basis for the early detection and unambiguous phenotyping of CFS.

  9. The Immune System as a Regulator of Thyroid Hormone Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, John R.

    2006-01-01

    It has been known for decades that the neuroendocrine system can both directly and indirectly influence the developmental and functional activity of the immune system. In contrast, far less is known about the extent to which the immune system collaborates in the regulation of endocrine activity. This is particularly true for immune-endocrine interactions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. Although thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) can be produced by many types of extra-pituitary cell...

  10. Effects of chronic produced water exposure on the expression of some immune-related genes of juvenile Atlantic cod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study assessed the impacts of exposure to processed water produced by offshore oil operators on immune-related genes of juvenile Atlantic cod exposed to processed water for a period of 22 weeks. The study investigated the influence of processed water concentrations on growth parameters; food consumption; plasma cortisol; respiratory burst activity (RB); and mRNA expression. The study showed that the RB of circulating leukocytes was significantly elevated. Significant up-regulation of the mRNA expression of microglobulin, immunoglobulin light chain, and interleukins was observed in some fish. The down-regulation of the interferon stimulated gene was also observed. The study indicated that chronic exposure to significant amounts of processed water causes modulations of the immune system of juvenile Atlantic cod.

  11. Chronic orthostatic and antiorthostatic restraint induce neuroendocrine, immune and neurophysiological disorders in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenmacher, I.; Mekaouche, M.; Maurel, D.; Barbanel, G.; Givalois, L.; Boissin, J.; Malaval, F.; Ixart, G.

    The tail-cast suspension rat model has been developed in ground laboratories interested in space physiology for extensive study of mechanisms causing the pathophysiological syndrome associated with space flights. We used individually-caged male rats to explore the effects of acute and chronic (7d) orthostatic restraint (OR) and head-down anti-orthostatic restraint (AOR) on a series of physiological variables. The acute restraint study showed that (1) the installation of the OR device induced an acute reaction for 2 days, with a substantial rise in ACTH (x2) and CORT (x6), and that (2) the head-down tilt from OR to AOR induced (i) within 10 min and lasting 60 min a 2-fold rise in the intra-cerebro-ventricular pressure (Picv) monitored with an icv telemetric recording system, which receded to normal between 60 and 120 min; and (ii) within 30 min a short-lived 4-fold rise in plasma ACTH and CORT levels. Chronic OR induced (1) the suppression of the diurnal ACTH/CORT rhythm, with increased mean levels, especially for ACTH, (2) a degraded circadian locomotor activity rhythm manifested by a significant reduction in the spectral power of the 24h periodicity and a concomitant emergence of shorter (ultradian) periodicities, (3) an associated, but less pronounced alteration of the diurnal rhythm in body temperature; and (4) a marked increase in baseline plasma levels of IL-1β and an increased reactivity in cytokine release following an E. coli endotoxin (LPS) challenge. AOR induced (1) a similar obliteration of the circadian ACTH/CORT rhythm, (2) the loss of close correlation between ACTH and CORT, (3) a generalized increase in baseline plasma IL-1β levels and (4) more extensive degradation of the arcadian periodicity for both locomotor activity and, to a lesser extent, body temperature, replaced by dominant spectral powers for ultradian periodicities (3 to 10h). In conclusion, both experimental paradigms — but AOR more than OR — caused a blockade of the arcadian

  12. Prostaglandin E and the local immune response in chronic periodontal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The local immune reaction of progressive chronic periodontal disease may be particularly influenced by macrophages and macrophage-derived factors. Among these substances the prostaglandins and lysosomal enzymes may play an important pathogenetic role. Parallel immunohistochemical and radioimmunological studies were done to investigate the relatiships of the immune-competent cells and the inflammatory mediators in gingival tissues. The radioimmunological analysis revealed that prostaglandin E increases markedly in the established gingival lesions. Immunohistochemically prostaglandin E was mainly localized within macrophage-like cells. Cytoplasmic lysozyme could be detected in these cells, too. On the other hand, the B-cell response is the prominent feature in established chronic periodontal disease. However, there is apparently a disturbed B-cell reaction as indicated by the irregular IgG-subclass pattern and by the production of mainly monomeric IgA. The possible interactions of macrophages and especially B-cells via prostaglandin E-mediated mechanisms are discussed. (author)

  13. Cytokine expression profiles of immune imbalance in post-mononucleosis chronic fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broderick Gordon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS has been known to follow Epstein-Bar virus (EBV and other systemic infections; our objective was to describe differences in immune activation in post-infective CFS (PI-CFS patients and recovered controls. We studied 301 adolescents prospectively over 24 months following the diagnosis of monospot-positive infectious mononucleosis (IM. We found an incidence of CFS at 6, 12 and 24 months of 13%, 7% and 4% respectively. Methods Using chemiluminescent imaging we measured the concentrations of IL-1a, 1b, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12 (p70, 13, 15, 17 and 23, IFN-γ, TNF-α and TNF-β in duplicate plasma samples available in bio-bank from 9 PI-CFS subjects and 12 recovered controls at 24 months post-infection. Results Standard comparative analysis indicated significant differences in IL-8 and 23 across subject groups. In constructing a linear classification model IL-6, 8 and 23 were selected by two different statistical approaches as discriminating features, with IL-1a, IL-2 and IFN-γ also selected in one model or the other. This supported an assignment accuracy of better than 80% at a confidence level of 0.95 into PI-CFS versus recovered controls. Conclusion These results suggest that co-expression patterns in as few as 5 cytokines associated with Th17 function may hold promise as a tool for the diagnosis of post-infectious CFS.

  14. Moving towards a new era in the management of chronic immune thrombocytopenia

    OpenAIRE

    Wadenvik, Hans; Olsson, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease in which a low concentration of plasma thrombopoietin (TPO) contributes to the thrombocytopenia. Functional thrombopoietin deficiency in response to thrombocytopenia is central to the pathophysiology of chronic ITP. Decreased platelet production in ITP patients has been described only in recent years, however. Following the development of TPO-mimetics, it has become clear that the augmentation of thrombo...

  15. STATUS OF THE IMMUNITY OF PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC STAPHYLOCOCCUS’S PHARYNGITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ognivenko E.V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Immunomodulatory and immunostimulatory drugs present the greatest interest in treating such patients and the rehabilitation of their immune system. Today, a wide clinical application has Polioksidonium (Petrovax Pharm, which has a wide range of influence on the immune system. There are studies proving the effectiveness of Polioksidonium treatment of inflammatory diseases of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses, chronic inflammatory process in pharyngeal plexus. Material and methods. We observed 62 patients on chronic staphylococcus’s pharyngitis in age from 21 to 45 years, who were treated in the communal health institution "Kharkiv city hospital № 6". The first group (basic group amounted to 32 patients, together with anti-inflammatory therapy (topical Decatilen 1 tablet 3 times daily for 7 days, physiotherapy for 5 days, was obtained Polioksidonium (12 mg every 24 hours per os for 10 days. The second group (control group consisted of 30 patients who received similar therapy without Polioksidonium. Clinical, microbiological, immunological studies were performed before the treatment, at 7 and 30 days after the end of the therapy. As indicators of standards the results of 30 healthy individuals were used. Immunological studies included the determination of the phagocytic activity of neutrophils, their biocidity, opsonizing properties serum titers of antibodies to the causative infectious agents, concentrations of the major classes of immunoglobulins in saliva and serum. Results and discussion. Before the treatment the patients showed complaints to pain and irritation in a throat, feeling of a foreign matter in a throat, dry cough and low-grade fever. Microbiological examination of oropharyngeal secretions ChFh patients revealed a 34 % S. pneumonia, at 24 % - S.aureus. Microbial associations were sown in 45 % of the cases. Immunological studies have shown that patients with chronic staphylococcus’s pharyngitis of increasing concentrations

  16. Gut immune dysfunction through impaired innate pattern recognition receptor expression and gut microbiota dysbiosis in chronic SIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavan, T W; Gaulke, C A; Santos Rocha, C; Sankaran-Walters, S; Hirao, L A; Raffatellu, M; Jiang, G; Bäumler, A J; Goulart, L R; Dandekar, S

    2016-05-01

    HIV targets the gut mucosa early in infection, causing immune and epithelial barrier dysfunction and disease progression. However, gut mucosal sensing and innate immune signaling through mucosal pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) during HIV infection and disease progression are not well defined. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaque model of AIDS, we found a robust increase in PRRs and inflammatory cytokine gene expression during the acute SIV infection in both peripheral blood and gut mucosa, coinciding with viral replication. PRR expression remained elevated in peripheral blood following the transition to chronic SIV infection. In contrast, massive dampening of PRR expression was detected in the gut mucosa, despite the presence of detectable viral loads. Exceptionally, expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR8 was downmodulated and diverged from expression patterns for most other TLRs in the gut. Decreased mucosal PRR expression was associated with increased abundance of several pathogenic bacterial taxa, including Pasteurellaceae members, Aggregatibacter and Actinobacillus, and Mycoplasmataceae family. Early antiretroviral therapy led to viral suppression but only partial maintenance of gut PRRs and cytokine gene expression. In summary, SIV infection dampens mucosal innate immunity through PRR dysregulation and may promote immune activation, gut microbiota changes, and ineffective viral clearance. PMID:26376368

  17. Chronic Schistosoma japonicum infection reduces immune response to vaccine against hepatitis B in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatitis B and schistosomiasis are most prevalent in Africa and Asia, and co-infections of both are frequent in these areas. The immunomodulation reported to be induced by schistosome infections might restrict immune control of hepatitis B virus (HBV leading to more severe viral infection. Vaccination is the most effective measure to control and prevent HBV infection, but there is evidence for a reduced immune response to the vaccine in patients with chronic schistosomiasis japonica. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper, we demonstrate in a mouse model that a chronic Schistosoma japonicum infection can inhibit the immune response to hepatitis B vaccine (HBV vaccine and lead to lower production of anti-HBs antibodies, interferon-γ (IFN-γ and interleukin-2 (IL-2. After deworming with Praziquantel (PZQ, the level of anti-HBs antibodies gradually increased and the Th2-biased profile slowly tapered. At 16 weeks after deworming, the levels of anti-HBs antibodies and Th1/Th2 cytokines returned to the normal levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that the preexisting Th2-dominated immune profile in the host infected with the parasite may down-regulate levels of anti-HBs antibodies and Th1 cytokines. To improve the efficacy of HBV vaccination in schistosome infected humans it may be valuable to treat them with praziquantel (PZQ some time prior to HBV vaccination.

  18. Influence on the mouse immune system of chronic ingestion of 137Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to determine the possible occurrence of damage to the immune system during the course of chronic ingestion of 137Cs. BALB/C mice were used, with 137Cs intake via drinking water at a concentration of 20 kBq l-1. Adults received 137Cs before mating and offspring were sacrificed at various ages between birth and 20 weeks. Phenotypic analysis of circulating blood cells and thymocytes did not show any significant modification of immune cell populations in animals ingesting 137Cs as compared with control animals, with the exception of a slight increase in Treg percentage at the age of 12 weeks. Functional tests, including proliferative response to mitogens such as phytohaemagglutinin, response to alloantigens in mixed lymphocyte reaction and immunoglobulin response to vaccine antigens such as tetanus toxin and keyhole limpet haemocyanin did not show any significant functional modification of the immune system in 137Cs-ingesting animals as compared with control animals. Overall, our results suggest that chronic ingestion of a low concentration of 137Cs in drinking water in the long term does not have any biologically relevant effect on the immune system.

  19. Influence on the mouse immune system of chronic ingestion of {sup 137}Cs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertho, Jean-Marc; Faure, Marie-Cecile; Louiba, Sonia; Tourlonias, Elie; Stefani, Johanna; Siffert, Baptiste; Paquet, Francois; Dublineau, Isabelle, E-mail: Jean-marc.bertho@irsn.fr [IRSN, Laboratoire de Radiotoxicologie Experimentale, Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the possible occurrence of damage to the immune system during the course of chronic ingestion of {sup 137}Cs. BALB/C mice were used, with {sup 137}Cs intake via drinking water at a concentration of 20 kBq l{sup -1}. Adults received {sup 137}Cs before mating and offspring were sacrificed at various ages between birth and 20 weeks. Phenotypic analysis of circulating blood cells and thymocytes did not show any significant modification of immune cell populations in animals ingesting {sup 137}Cs as compared with control animals, with the exception of a slight increase in Treg percentage at the age of 12 weeks. Functional tests, including proliferative response to mitogens such as phytohaemagglutinin, response to alloantigens in mixed lymphocyte reaction and immunoglobulin response to vaccine antigens such as tetanus toxin and keyhole limpet haemocyanin did not show any significant functional modification of the immune system in {sup 137}Cs-ingesting animals as compared with control animals. Overall, our results suggest that chronic ingestion of a low concentration of {sup 137}Cs in drinking water in the long term does not have any biologically relevant effect on the immune system.

  20. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Managing Activities and Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Managing Activities and Exercise ... activities. Top of Page Related Links Disability and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Print page View page in: Español (Spanish) ...

  1. A mathematical model of immune activation with a unified self-nonself concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahamoddin eKhailaie

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive immune system reacts against pathogenic nonself, whereas it normally remains tolerant to self. The initiation of an immune response requires a critical antigen(Ag-stimulation and a critical number of Ag-specific T cells. Autoreactive T cells are not completely deleted by thymic selection and partially present in the periphery of healthy individuals that respond in certain physiological conditions. A number of experimental and theoretical models are based on the concept that structural differences discriminate self from nonself. In this article, we establish a mathematical model for immune activation in which self and nonself are not distinguished. The model considers the dynamic interplay of conventional T cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs and IL-2 molecules and shows that the renewal rate ratio of resting Tregs to naive T cells as well as the proliferation rate of activated T cells determine the probability of immune stimulation. The actual initiation of an immune response, however, relies on the absolute renewal rate of naive T cells. This result suggests that thymic selection reduces the probability of autoimmunity by increasing the Ag-stimulation threshold of self reaction which is established by selection of a low number of low-avidity autoreactive T cells balanced with a proper number of Tregs. The stability analysis of the ordinary differential equation model reveals three different possible immune reactions depending on critical levels of Ag-stimulation: A subcritical stimulation, a threshold stimulation inducing a proper immune response, and an overcritical stimulation leading to chronic co-existence of Ag and immune activity. The model exhibits oscillatory solutions in the case of persistent but moderate Ag-stimulation, while the system returns to the homeostatic state upon Ag clearance. In this unifying concept, self and nonself appear as a result of shifted Ag-stimulation thresholds which delineate these three regimes of

  2. Activation and Regulation of DNA-Driven Immune Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Paludan, Søren R

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system provides early defense against infections and also plays a key role in monitoring alterations of homeostasis in the body. DNA is highly immunostimulatory, and recent advances in this field have led to the identification of the innate immune sensors responsible for the recognition of DNA as well as the downstream pathways that are activated. Moreover, information on how cells regulate DNA-driven immune responses to avoid excessive inflammation is now emerging. Finally,...

  3. Gastrointestinal inflammation and associated immune activation in schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Severance, Emily G.; Alaedini, Armin; Yang, Shuojia; Halling, Meredith; Gressitt, Kristin L.; Stallings, Cassie R.; Origoni, Andrea E.; Vaughan, Crystal; Khushalani, Sunil; Leweke, F. Markus; Dickerson, Faith B.; Yolken, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Immune factors are implicated in normal brain development and in brain disorder pathogenesis. Pathogen infection and food antigen penetration across gastrointestinal barriers are means by which environmental factors might affect immune-related neurodevelopment. Here, we test if gastrointestinal inflammation is associated with schizophrenia and therefore, might contribute to bloodstream entry of potentially neurotropic milk and gluten exorphins and/or immune activation by food antigens. IgG an...

  4. Renal infarction and immune-mediated glomerulonephritis in sheep (Ovis aries) chronically implanted with indwelling catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Varada P; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Marini, Robert P; Holcombe, Hilda; Rogers, Arlin B; Fox, James G

    2006-07-01

    Microbial infections are common sequelae in humans and animals implanted with long-term intravascular catheters. Understanding the pathophysiology of infectious morbidity is critical to improving quality of care in catheterized subjects. Here, we describe findings in 6 clinically healthy, male sheep implanted with indwelling aortic or cardiac catheters for 6 to 10 mo. We isolated multiple bacterial species including Serratia spp., Enterobacter agglomerans, Eschericia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, and K. pneumoniae in aerobic cultures from catheter tips. Although sheep were clinically asymptomatic, 1 or both kidneys from all animals contained wedge-shaped infarcts of varying size and number. Microscopic examination revealed (a) marked fibrosis with mild inflammatory cell infiltrate consistent with chronic foreign body reaction around catheters; (b) moderate to severe, diffuse, subacute to chronic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and mild, multifocal chronic interstitial nephritis; and (c) mesangial immune-complex deposition as demonstrated by direct immunofluorescence technique. The finding of bacterial colonization of catheters together with chronic glomerulonephritis and immune-complex deposits in kidneys in clinically asymptomatic sheep underscores the need for close microbiologic monitoring of catheter implants and assessment of kidney function in animals instrumented for long-term vascular access. PMID:16884173

  5. Refractory chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horino, Satoshi; Rikiishi, Takeshi; Niizuma, Hidetaka; Abe, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yuko; Onuma, Masaei; Hoshi, Yoshiyuki; Sasahara, Yoji; Yoshinari, Miyako; Kazama, Takuro; Hayashi, Yutaka; Kumaki, Satoru; Tsuchiya, Shigeru

    2009-11-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) has been associated with several hematologic malignancies such as Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but it is rare in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Here, we report a 7-year-old girl with chronic ITP during early intensive phase of chemotherapy for ALL. She underwent splenectomy because thrombocytopenia had persisted even after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), steroids, vincristine, rituximab, and anti-D antibody. After splenectomy, her platelet count had recovered, and maintenance therapy could be resumed with a support of IVIG. To our knowledge, this is the first child case of chronic ITP during chemotherapy for ALL and splenectomy was effective in this patient. PMID:19816666

  6. The Lung Microbiome, Immunity, and the Pathogenesis of Chronic Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, David N; Dickson, Robert P; Moore, Bethany B

    2016-06-15

    The development of culture-independent techniques for microbiological analysis has uncovered the previously unappreciated complexity of the bacterial microbiome at various anatomic sites. The microbiome of the lung has relatively less bacterial biomass when compared with the lower gastrointestinal tract yet displays considerable diversity. The composition of the lung microbiome is determined by elimination, immigration, and relative growth within its communities. Chronic lung disease alters these factors. Many forms of chronic lung disease demonstrate exacerbations that drive disease progression and are poorly understood. Mounting evidence supports ways in which microbiota dysbiosis can influence host defense and immunity, and in turn may contribute to disease exacerbations. Thus, the key to understanding the pathogenesis of chronic lung disease may reside in deciphering the complex interactions between the host, pathogen, and resident microbiota during stable disease and exacerbations. In this brief review we discuss new insights into these labyrinthine relationships. PMID:27260767

  7. Features of microbiocenosis of gingival tissues and local immunity in patients with chronic and exacerbated generalized catarrhal gingivitis course.

    OpenAIRE

    Shostenko AA.

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the results of comparative study of features of microbiocenosis of gingival tissues and local immunity in 42 patients with chronic and exacerbated generalized catarrhal gingivitis. It was found that patients with an acute course of generalized catarrhal gingivitis have more significant differences in local humoral immunity indices as compared with a group of patients with chronic manifestation of the disease, characterized by a large decrease in sIgA and IgM levels and, to ...

  8. Retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy: an extrahepatic feature of chronic active hepatitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hayek, T.; Markel, A.; Goldfeld, M.; Ben-Arie, Y.; Brook, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    We report a patient with chronic active hepatitis in whom one of the initial findings was retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy, detected by abdominal ultrasound examination. Extrahepatic presenting findings of chronic active hepatitis may include arthritis, urticaria, pleurisy and pericarditis, while abdominal lymphadenopathy has been only rarely described. Chronic active hepatitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of abdominal lymphadenopathy.

  9. HIV-Nef and ADAM17-Containing Plasma Extracellular Vesicles Induce and Correlate with Immune Pathogenesis in Chronic HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hyun; Schierer, Stephan; Blume, Katja; Dindorf, Jochen; Wittki, Sebastian; Xiang, Wei; Ostalecki, Christian; Koliha, Nina; Wild, Stefan; Schuler, Gerold; Fackler, Oliver T.; Saksela, Kalle; Harrer, Thomas; Baur, Andreas S.

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) efficiently suppresses HIV replication but immune activation and low CD4 T cell counts often persist. The underlying mechanism of this ART-resistant pathogenesis is not clear. We observed that levels of plasma extracellular vesicles (pEV) are strongly elevated in HIV infection and do not decline during ART. Surprisingly, these vesicles contained the viral accessory proteins Nef and Vpu, which are assumed to be not expressed under efficient ART, as well as pro-inflammatory effectors, including activated ADAM17. HIV pEV were characterized by the presence of activated αvβ3 and absence of CD81 and Tsg101. Correlating with immune activation, peripheral monocytes ingested large amounts of pEV, giving rise to an increased population of CD1c+ CD14+ cells that secreted inflammatory cytokines. Importantly, the pro-inflammatory content, particularly ADAM17 activity, correlated with low T cell counts. Preliminary evidence suggested that HIV pEV derived from peripheral mononuclear cells and from an unknown myeloid cell population. In summary we propose an important role of pro-inflammatory pEV in chronic HIV infection due to ongoing viral Nef activity.

  10. Retrospective analysis of rituximab therapy and splenectomy in childhood chronic and refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Yilmaz; Karapinar, Tuba H; Oymak, Yesim; Toret, Ersin; Demirag, Bengu; Ince, Dilek; Ozcan, Esin; Moueminoglou, Nergial; Koker, Sultan A; Vergin, Canan

    2016-06-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) results from accelerated platelet destruction mediated by autoantibodies to platelet glycoproteins. Some patients with chronic ITP are refractory to all therapies [steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), anti-D and immunosuppresive drugs] and have chronic low platelet counts and episodic bleeding. We retrospectively evaluated the efficacy and safety of rituximab treatment and splenectomy in paediatric patients diagnosed with chronic and refractory ITP who were unresponsive to steroids, IVIG, cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. Records of patients with chronic and refractory ITP in 459 patients with primary ITP who were followed up in our hospital from January 2005 to December 2014 were reviewed. Fifteen of patients received rituximab and/or applied splenectomy. Fifteen chronic ITP patients (10 boys, five girls) with a mean age of 10 years were enrolled in the study. Two of these patients were suffering from Evans syndrome. The median time since diagnosis of ITP was 10 years. The median follow-up duration after starting Rituximab and splenectomy were 13 and 9.5 months, respectively.None of the seven patients who were treated with rituximab achieved a response. A splenectomy was performed in six of the seven patients who had been treated with rituximab. Complete and partial responses were achieved in 67 and 33% of the patients, respectively. We evaluated the clinical characteristics and responses of chronic ITP patients who did not receive rituximab therapy and underwent a splenectomy. The success rate was 100% in the eight patients with chronic and refractory ITP. Rituximab therapy might not be beneficial for some children with severe chronic ITP who are refractory to standard agents. A splenectomy might be useful and preferable to rituximab. PMID:26656905

  11. Expression of immunoregulatory cytokines during acute and chronic middle ear immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikhazi, P; Ryan, A F

    1995-06-01

    In both patients and experimental animals, immunoglobulin G (IgG) has been found to dominate acute otitis media with effusion (OME), whereas IgA tends to be present in chronic but not in acute OME. To determine whether local immunoregulation could account for this difference, the expression of cytokines associated with the production of different antibody isotypes was investigated in experimental acute and chronic OME. Mice were systemically immunized and then challenged transtympanically, once to produce an acute OME or once per week for 6 weeks to produce chronic OME. Hybridization with molecular probes for cytokine genes showed that cells producing interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-4, but not IL-5, were present during acute OME. In chronic OME, IL-2-positive (IL-2+) and IL-4+ cells were less prevalent, but IL-5+ cells were numerous. These finding support a model by which locally produced IL-2 and IL-4 augment IgG production in acute OME, whereas, IL-5 contributes to increased IgA production in chronic OME. PMID:7769948

  12. HMGB1 enhances immune suppression by facilitating the differentiation and suppressive activity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Katherine; Sinha, Pratima; Horn, Lucas A.; Clements, Virginia K.; Yang, Huan; Li, Jianhua; Tracey, Kevin J.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation often precedes malignant transformation and later drives tumor progression. Likewise, subversion of the immune system plays a role in tumor progression, with tumoral immune escape now well recognized as a crucial hallmark of cancer. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are elevated in most individuals with cancer, where their accumulation and suppressive activity are driven by inflammation. Thus, MDSC may define an element of the pathogenic inflammatory processes that ...

  13. Immunity-based security architecture for active switch

    OpenAIRE

    Jingsong, Pan

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes one kind of active network security technique which combined artificial immune intrusion detection system (IDS) and firewall, it can omni-directional carry on protection to the computers and networks.

  14. Clinical use of enteral immune nutrition in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-cheng ZHANG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the use of enteral immune nutrition preparation in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD, regard its efficacy in improving nutritional status, and its influence on immunity and the status of acute inflammatory reaction of the patients. Methods Sixty-two AECOPD patients requiring mechanical ventilation in ICU of our hospital were randomly divided into two groups: immune nutrition group [study group, n=32, receiving Ruineng (a product of Huarui Pharmaceutical Ltd., which contained essential fatty acids, Omega-3 fatty acids, and energy 1.3 kcal/ml] and conventional nutrition group (control group, n=30, receiving the hospital self-made homogenized diet with 1.2 kal/ml. Patients in the two groups took enteral nutrition of equal calorie, and it was given by nasointestinal tube. On the day of admission and the 14th and 18th after admission, venous blood was obtained for the determination of serum albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, C reactive protein (CRP, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and interleukin-6 (IL-6. At the same time upper arm muscle circumference (MAMC was measured at the bed side. The 14-day off-respirator rate and mechanical ventilation time within 28 days were compared between the two groups. Results The 14-day off-respirator rate was higher in study group than in control group (P0.05. Conclusions Compared with homogenized diet, immune enteral nutrition could better improve the nutritional status and immune function, lower the acute inflammatory response level, increase the success rate of early off-respirator in AECOPD patients, therefore, enteral immune nutrition preparation is a better nutrition support solution for AECOPD. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.05.17

  15. Ascorbic acid: its role in immune system and chronic inflammation diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorice, Angela; Guerriero, Eliana; Capone, Francesca; Colonna, Giovanni; Castello, Giuseppe; Costantini, Susan

    2014-05-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA), also known as vitamin C, was initially identified as the factor preventing the scurvy disease, and became very popular for its antioxidant properties. It is an important co-substrate of a large class of enzymes, and regulates gene expression by interacting with important transcription factors. AA is important in all stressful conditions that are linked to inflammatory processes and involve immunity. It has been known for decades that the persistence of an inflammatory stimulus is responsible for the onset of many diseases. AA is essential to stimulate the immune system by increasing the strength and protection of the organism. Therefore, its immunostimulant, antinflammatory, antiviral and antibacterial roles are well known, we have summarized its main functions in different types of diseases related to the immune system and chronic inflammation. We can conclude that AA, due to its effects and diversity of regulated pathways, is suitable for use in various fields of medicine including immunology, toxicology, radiobiology and others. AA is not preferable to be used as an isolated mode of treatment, but it can be co-applied as an adjuvant to regulate immunity, gene expression and other important physiological processes. However, we propose that future studies will take into consideration the research of new combinations of antioxidant natural substances and drugs. PMID:24766384

  16. Innate immune modulation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: moving closer toward vitamin D therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heulens, Nele; Korf, Hannelie; Janssens, Wim

    2015-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common respiratory diseases and a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Disturbed innate immune processes characterize the pathogenesis of COPD. Vitamin D deficiency is very common in COPD patients and has been associated with disease severity. Interestingly, mechanistic evidence from animal and in vitro studies has demonstrated important innate immunomodulatory functions of vitamin D, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and antimicrobial functions. This review discusses in detail how the innate immunomodulatory functions of vitamin D may have therapeutic potential in COPD patients. The remaining challenges associated with vitamin D therapy in COPD patients are also discussed. PMID:25755208

  17. Quantitative evaluation of integrated neuroendocrine and immune responses to chronic stress in rats male

    OpenAIRE

    Polovynko, Іlona S; Zajats, Lyubomyr М; Zukow, Walery; Yanchij, Roman I; Popovych, Іgor L

    2016-01-01

    Polovynko Іlona S, Zajats Lyubomyr М, Zukow Walery, Yanchij Roman I, Popovych Іgor L. Quantitative evaluation of integrated neuroendocrine and immune responses to chronic stress in rats male. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2016;6(8):154-166. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.60023 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/3745       The journal has had 7 points in Ministry of Science and Higher Education parametric evalua...

  18. Experimentally-induced immune activation in natural hosts of SIV induces significant increases in viral replication and CD4+ T cell depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Ruy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Chronically SIVagm-infected African green monkeys (AGMs) have a remarkably stable non-pathogenic disease course, with levels of immune activation in chronic SIVagm infection similar to those observed in uninfected monkeys and stable viral loads (VLs) for long periods of time. In vivo administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or an IL-2/diphtheria toxin fusion protein (Ontak) to chronically SIVagm-infected AGMs triggered increases in immune activation and subsequently of viral replication and depletion of intestinal CD4{sup +} T cells. Our study indicates that circulating microbial products can increase viral replication by inducing immune activation and increasing the number of viral target cells, thus demonstrating that immune activation and T cell prolifeation are key factors in AIDS pathogenesis.

  19. The neurological significance of abnormal natural killer cell activity in chronic toxigenic mold exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyanwu, Ebere; Campbell, Andrew W; Jones, Joseph; Ehiri, John E; Akpan, Akpan I

    2003-11-13

    Toxigenic mold activities produce metabolites that are either broad-spectrum antibiotics or mycotoxins that are cytotoxic. Indoor environmental exposure to these toxigenic molds leads to adverse health conditions with the main outcome measure of frequent neuroimmunologic and behavioral consequences. One of the immune system disorders found in patients presenting with toxigenic mold exposure is an abnormal natural killer cell activity. This paper presents an overview of the neurological significance of abnormal natural killer cell (NKC) activity in chronic toxigenic mold exposure. A comprehensive review of the literature was carried out to evaluate and assess the conditions under which the immune system could be dysfunctionally interfered with leading to abnormal NKC activity and the involvement of mycotoxins in these processes. The functions, mechanism, the factors that influence NKC activities, and the roles of mycotoxins in NKCs were cited wherever necessary. The major presentations are headache, general debilitating pains, nose bleeding, fevers with body temperatures up to 40 degrees C (104 degrees F), cough, memory loss, depression, mood swings, sleep disturbances, anxiety, chronic fatigue, vertigo/dizziness, and in some cases, seizures. Although sleep is commonly considered a restorative process that is important for the proper functioning of the immune system, it could be disturbed by mycotoxins. Most likely, mycotoxins exert some rigorous effects on the circadian rhythmic processes resulting in sleep deprivation to which an acute and transient increase in NKC activity is observed. Depression, psychological stress, tissue injuries, malignancies, carcinogenesis, chronic fatigue syndrome, and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis could be induced at very low physiological concentrations by mycotoxin-induced NKC activity. In the light of this review, it is concluded that chronic exposures to toxigenic mold could lead to abnormal NKC activity with a wide range

  20. The Neurological Significance of Abnormal Natural Killer Cell Activity in Chronic Toxigenic Mold Exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebere Anyanwu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxigenic mold activities produce metabolites that are either broad-spectrum antibiotics or mycotoxins that are cytotoxic. Indoor environmental exposure to these toxigenic molds leads to adverse health conditions with the main outcome measure of frequent neuroimmunologic and behavioral consequences. One of the immune system disorders found in patients presenting with toxigenic mold exposure is an abnormal natural killer cell activity. This paper presents an overview of the neurological significance of abnormal natural killer cell (NKC activity in chronic toxigenic mold exposure. A comprehensive review of the literature was carried out to evaluate and assess the conditions under which the immune system could be dysfunctionally interfered with leading to abnormal NKC activity and the involvement of mycotoxins in these processes. The functions, mechanism, the factors that influence NKC activities, and the roles of mycotoxins in NKCs were cited wherever necessary. The major presentations are headache, general debilitating pains, nose bleeding, fevers with body temperatures up to 40�C (104�F, cough, memory loss, depression, mood swings, sleep disturbances, anxiety, chronic fatigue, vertigo/dizziness, and in some cases, seizures. Although sleep is commonly considered a restorative process that is important for the proper functioning of the immune system, it could be disturbed by mycotoxins. Most likely, mycotoxins exert some rigorous effects on the circadian rhythmic processes resulting in sleep deprivation to which an acute and transient increase in NKC activity is observed. Depression, psychological stress, tissue injuries, malignancies, carcinogenesis, chronic fatigue syndrome, and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis could be induced at very low physiological concentrations by mycotoxin-induced NKC activity. In the light of this review, it is concluded that chronic exposures to toxigenic mold could lead to abnormal NKC activity with a wide

  1. Neurocortical electrical activity tomography in chronic schizophrenics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veiga Heloisa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional imaging of brain electrical activity was performed in 25 chronic medicated schizophrenics and 40 controls, analyzing the classical frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, and beta of 19-channel EEG during resting state to identify brain regions with deviant activity of different functional significances, using LORETA (Low Resolution Tomography and SPM99 (Statistical Parametric Mapping. Patients differed from controls due to an excess of slow activity comprising delta + theta frequency bands (inhibitory pattern located at the right middle frontal gyrus, right inferior frontal gyrus, and right insula, as well as at the bilateral anterior cingulum with a left preponderance. The high temporal resolution of EEG enables the specification of the deviations not only as an excess or a deficit of brain electrical activity, but also as inhibitory (delta, theta, normal (alpha, and excitatory (beta activities. These deviations point out to an impaired functional brain state consisting of inhibited frontal and prefrontal areas that may result in inadequate treatment of externally or internally generated information.

  2. Gene expression in brain and liver produced by three different regimens of alcohol consumption in mice: comparison with immune activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Osterndorff-Kahanek

    Full Text Available Chronically available alcohol escalates drinking in mice and a single injection of the immune activator lipopolysaccharide can mimic this effect and result in a persistent increase in alcohol consumption. We hypothesized that chronic alcohol drinking and lipopolysaccharide injections will produce some similar molecular changes that play a role in regulation of alcohol intake. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of chronic alcohol consumption or lipopolysaccharide insult by gene expression profiling in prefrontal cortex and liver of C57BL/6J mice. We identified similar patterns of transcriptional changes among four groups of animals, three consuming alcohol (vs water in different consumption tests and one injected with lipopolysaccharide (vs. vehicle. The three tests of alcohol consumption are the continuous chronic two bottle choice (Chronic, two bottle choice available every other day (Chronic Intermittent and limited access to one bottle of ethanol (Drinking in the Dark. Gene expression changes were more numerous and marked in liver than in prefrontal cortex for the alcohol treatments and similar in the two tissues for lipopolysaccharide. Many of the changes were unique to each treatment, but there was significant overlap in prefrontal cortex for Chronic-Chronic Intermittent and for Chronic Intermittent-lipopolysaccharide and in liver all pairs showed overlap. In silico cell-type analysis indicated that lipopolysaccharide had strongest effects on brain microglia and liver Kupffer cells. Pathway analysis detected a prefrontal cortex-based dopamine-related (PPP1R1B, DRD1, DRD2, FOSB, PDNY network that was highly over-represented in the Chronic Intermittent group, with several genes from the network being also regulated in the Chronic and lipopolysaccharide (but not Drinking in the Dark groups. Liver showed a CYP and GST centered metabolic network shared in part by all four treatments. We demonstrate common consequences of chronic alcohol

  3. Activation of the reward system boosts innate and adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shaanan, Tamar L; Azulay-Debby, Hilla; Dubovik, Tania; Starosvetsky, Elina; Korin, Ben; Schiller, Maya; Green, Nathaniel L; Admon, Yasmin; Hakim, Fahed; Shen-Orr, Shai S; Rolls, Asya

    2016-08-01

    Positive expectations contribute to the clinical benefits of the placebo effect. Such positive expectations are mediated by the brain's reward system; however, it remains unknown whether and how reward system activation affects the body's physiology and, specifically, immunity. Here we show that activation of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a key component of the reward system, strengthens immunological host defense. We used 'designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs' (DREADDs) to directly activate dopaminergic neurons in the mouse VTA and characterized the subsequent immune response after exposure to bacteria (Escherichia coli), using time-of-flight mass cytometry (CyTOF) and functional assays. We found an increase in innate and adaptive immune responses that were manifested by enhanced antibacterial activity of monocytes and macrophages, reduced in vivo bacterial load and a heightened T cell response in the mouse model of delayed-type hypersensitivity. By chemically ablating the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), we showed that the reward system's effects on immunity are, at least partly, mediated by the SNS. Thus, our findings establish a causal relationship between the activity of the VTA and the immune response to bacterial infection. PMID:27376577

  4. Influence of Physical Activity and Nutrition on Obesity-Related Immune Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jung Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Research examining immune function during obesity suggests that excessive adiposity is linked to impaired immune responses leading to pathology. The deleterious effects of obesity on immunity have been associated with the systemic proinflammatory profile generated by the secretory molecules derived from adipose cells. These include inflammatory peptides, such as TNF-α, CRP, and IL-6. Consequently, obesity is now characterized as a state of chronic low-grade systemic inflammation, a condition considerably linked to the development of comorbidity. Given the critical role of adipose tissue in the inflammatory process, especially in obese individuals, it becomes an important clinical objective to identify lifestyle factors that may affect the obesity-immune system relationship. For instance, stress, physical activity, and nutrition have each shown to be a significant lifestyle factor influencing the inflammatory profile associated with the state of obesity. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to comprehensively evaluate the impact of lifestyle factors, in particular psychological stress, physical activity, and nutrition, on obesity-related immune function with specific focus on inflammation.

  5. Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Disruption of Innate Immunity in Chronic Heavy Ethanol Consuming Female Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureshchandra, Suhas; Rais, Maham; Stull, Cara; Grant, Kathleen; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that heavy ethanol consumption interferes with the immune system and inflammatory processes, resulting in increased risk for infectious and chronic diseases. However, these processes have yet to be systematically studied in a dose and sex-dependent manner. In this study, we investigated the impact of chronic heavy ethanol consumption on gene expression using RNA-seq in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from female rhesus macaques with daily consumption of 4% ethanol available 22hr/day for 12 months resulting in average ethanol consumption of 4.3 g/kg/day (considered heavy drinking). Differential gene expression analysis was performed using edgeR and gene enrichment analysis using MetaCore™. We identified 1106 differentially expressed genes, meeting the criterion of ≥ two-fold change and p-value ≤ 0.05 in expression (445 up- and 661 down-regulated). Pathway analysis of the 879 genes with characterized identifiers showed that the most enriched gene ontology processes were “response to wounding”, “blood coagulation”, “immune system process”, and “regulation of signaling”. Changes in gene expression were seen despite the lack of differences in the frequency of any major immune cell subtype between ethanol and controls, suggesting that heavy ethanol consumption modulates gene expression at the cellular level rather than altering the distribution of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Collectively, these observations provide mechanisms to explain the higher incidence of infection, delay in wound healing, and increase in cardiovascular disease seen in subjects with Alcohol use disorder. PMID:27427759

  6. [The role of immune complexes in chronic liver diseases and their dynamics during treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakhontova, O I; Dudanova, O P

    1992-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases are marked by a well-defined relationship between the intensity of the cytolytic syndrome and the level of circulating immune complexes (CIC). The highest damaging action on hepatocytes is produced by medium-sized CIC because of their penetrating and complement fixing effects. The level of thrombocytopenia and, to a less measure, of leukopenia also depends on the concentration and size of CIC in CAH and liver cirrhosis (LC), which may provide indirect evidence of the lytic action of CIC on hepatocytes, leading in turn to the impairment of microcirculation and aggravation of hepatocyte hypoxia. The data obtained attest to the role CIC of varying size play in the pathogenesis of CAH and LC. The changes in the properties of immune complexes induced by the derangement of cellular membranes also influence the course of immune responses, favouring an increase of antibody formation. As a result of an appreciable suppression of antibody and medium-sized CIC formation enhancing the cytolytic syndrome, the preference during glucocorticoid treatment should be given to the use of the medium doses of prednisolone which ensure less intensity and less duration of cytolysis as compared to the application of large drug doses. PMID:1509358

  7. Influence of a chronic 90Sr contamination by ingestion on the hematopoietic, immune and bone systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strontium 90 (90Sr) is a radionuclide of anthropogenic origin released in large quantities in the environment as a result of nuclear atmospheric tests or accidents at nuclear facilities. 90Sr persists on a long-term basis in the environment, leading to chronic contamination by ingestion of populations living on contaminated territories. The induction of bone tumours associated with the fixation of 90Sr has been widely described. However, the occurrence of non-cancer effects is much less known. We used a mouse model with chronic contamination by ingestion of water containing 20 kBq/l of 90Sr. A bio-kinetic study confirmed the accumulation of 90Sr in the bones, with an increased rate of accumulation during bone growth. This accumulation was higher in the bones of females than in males. The whole-body absorbed doses ranged from 0.33 ± 0.06 mGy (birth) to 10.6 ± 0.1 mGy (20 weeks). The absorbed dose for the skeleton was up to 55 mGy. Ingestion of 90Sr induced a change in the expression of genes inducing an imbalance in favour of bone resorption, but without effect on bone morphology. No significant effect was observed for the hematopoietic system. On the other hand, minor modifications were observed for the immune system. To evaluate the functionality of the immune system, a vaccination test with TT and KLH antigens was used. Results showed in contaminated animals a significant decrease in the production of specific immunoglobulins, changes in the Th1/Th2 balance in the spleen and a disrupted B lymphocyte differentiation. These results improve the understanding of some of the noncancerous consequences of chronic exposure at low dose of radionuclides with a long half-life, which can be accidentally released. (author)

  8. Influence of a chronic 90Sr contamination by ingestion on the hematopoietic, immune and bone systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strontium 90 (90Sr) is a radionuclide of anthropogenic origin released in large quantities in the environment as a result of nuclear atmospheric tests or accidents at nuclear facilities. 90Sr persists on a long-term basis in the environment, leading to chronic contamination by ingestion of populations living on contaminated territories. The induction of bone tumours associated with the fixation of 90Sr has been widely described. However, the occurrence of non-cancer effects is much less known. We used a mouse model with chronic contamination by ingestion of water containing 20 kBq/l of 90Sr. A biokinetic study confirmed the accumulation of 90Sr in the bones, with an increased rate of accumulation during bone growth. This accumulation was higher in the bones of females than in males. The whole-body absorbed doses ranged from 0.33 ± 0.06 mGy (birth) to 10.6 ± 0.1 mGy (20 weeks). The absorbed dose for the skeleton was up to 55 mGy. Ingestion of 90Sr induced a change in the expression of genes inducing an imbalance in favour of bone resorption, but without effect on bone morphology. No significant effect was observed for the hematopoietic system. On the other hand, minor modifications were observed for the immune system. To evaluate the functionality of the immune system, a vaccination test with TT and KLH antigens was used. Results showed in contaminated animals a significant decrease in the production of specific immunoglobulins, changes in the Th1/Th2 balance in the spleen and a disrupted B lymphocyte differentiation. These results improve the understanding of some of the non-cancerous consequences of chronic exposure at low dose of radionuclides with a long half-life, which can be accidentally released. (author)

  9. [Subpopulations and phagocytic activity of monocytes in chronic gastroduodenitis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, E V; Malanicheva, T G; Denisova, S N

    2013-01-01

    There was conducted a study of the phagocytic activity, immunophenotype and peripheral blood monocytes by flow cytometry in children with chronic gastroduodenitis associated with Helicobacter pylori, as well as the association of Helicobacter pylori with fungi of the genus Candida and markers of secondary immune deficiency. The differential changes in the structure of circulating profile of monocytes were revealed, that indicate the pathogenetic significance of these disorders in chronic gastroduodenitis with H. pylori etiology, as well as at association of Helicobacter pylori with fungi of the genus Candida. Violations of the phagocytic activity of monocytes in chronic gastroduodenitis in children are associated with depression of different stages of phagocytosis--capture functions, mobilization, killing, intracellular biocidity. A severe depression in phagocytic activity of monocytes occurs in CGD associated with Hp and fungi of the genus Candida. PMID:24501955

  10. Chronic alcohol consumption enhances iNKT cell maturation and activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcohol consumption exhibits diverse effects on different types of immune cells. NKT cells are a unique T cell population and play important immunoregulatory roles in different types of immune responses. The effects of chronic alcohol consumption on NKT cells remain to be elucidated. Using a mouse model of chronic alcohol consumption, we found that alcohol increases the percentage of NKT cells, especially iNKT cells in the thymus and liver, but not in the spleen or blood. Alcohol consumption decreases the percentage of NK1.1− iNKT cells in the total iNKT cell population in all of the tissues and organs examined. In the thymus, alcohol consumption increases the number of NK1.1+CD44hi mature iNKT cells but does not alter the number of NK1.1− immature iNKT cells. A BrdU incorporation assay shows that alcohol consumption increases the proliferation of thymic NK1.1− iNKT cells, especially the NK1.1−CD44lo Stage I iNKT cells. The percentage of NKG2A+ iNKT cells increases in all of the tissues and organs examined; whereas CXCR3+ iNKT cells only increases in the thymus of alcohol-consuming mice. Chronic alcohol consumption increases the percentage of IFN-γ-producing iNKT cells and increases the blood concentration of IFN-γ and IL-12 after in vivo α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) stimulation. Consistent with the increased cytokine production, the in vivo activation of iNKT cells also enhances the activation of dendritic cells (DC) and NK, B, and T cells in the alcohol-consuming mice. Taken together the data indicate that chronic alcohol consumption enhances iNKT cell maturation and activation, which favors the Th1 immune response. - Highlights: • Chronic alcohol consumption increases iNKT cells in the thymus and liver • Chronic alcohol consumption enhances thymic Stage I iNKT cell proliferation • Chronic alcohol consumption enhances iNKT cell maturation in thymus and periphery • Chronic alcohol consumption induces Th1 immune response upon iNKT cell in vivo

  11. Chronic alcohol consumption enhances iNKT cell maturation and activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hui, E-mail: hzhang@wsu.edu; Zhang, Faya; Zhu, Zhaohui; Luong, Dung; Meadows, Gary G.

    2015-01-15

    Alcohol consumption exhibits diverse effects on different types of immune cells. NKT cells are a unique T cell population and play important immunoregulatory roles in different types of immune responses. The effects of chronic alcohol consumption on NKT cells remain to be elucidated. Using a mouse model of chronic alcohol consumption, we found that alcohol increases the percentage of NKT cells, especially iNKT cells in the thymus and liver, but not in the spleen or blood. Alcohol consumption decreases the percentage of NK1.1{sup −} iNKT cells in the total iNKT cell population in all of the tissues and organs examined. In the thymus, alcohol consumption increases the number of NK1.1{sup +}CD44{sup hi} mature iNKT cells but does not alter the number of NK1.1{sup −} immature iNKT cells. A BrdU incorporation assay shows that alcohol consumption increases the proliferation of thymic NK1.1{sup −} iNKT cells, especially the NK1.1{sup −}CD44{sup lo} Stage I iNKT cells. The percentage of NKG2A{sup +} iNKT cells increases in all of the tissues and organs examined; whereas CXCR3{sup +} iNKT cells only increases in the thymus of alcohol-consuming mice. Chronic alcohol consumption increases the percentage of IFN-γ-producing iNKT cells and increases the blood concentration of IFN-γ and IL-12 after in vivo α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) stimulation. Consistent with the increased cytokine production, the in vivo activation of iNKT cells also enhances the activation of dendritic cells (DC) and NK, B, and T cells in the alcohol-consuming mice. Taken together the data indicate that chronic alcohol consumption enhances iNKT cell maturation and activation, which favors the Th1 immune response. - Highlights: • Chronic alcohol consumption increases iNKT cells in the thymus and liver • Chronic alcohol consumption enhances thymic Stage I iNKT cell proliferation • Chronic alcohol consumption enhances iNKT cell maturation in thymus and periphery • Chronic alcohol

  12. Nonreplicating, Cyst-Defective Type II Toxoplasma gondii Vaccine Strains Stimulate Protective Immunity against Acute and Chronic Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Live attenuated vaccine strains, such as type I nonreplicating uracil auxotroph mutants, are highly effective in eliciting lifelong immunity to virulent acute infection by Toxoplasma gondii. However, it is currently unknown whether vaccine-elicited immunity can provide protection against acute infection and also prevent chronic infection. To address this problem, we developed nonreverting, nonreplicating, live attenuated uracil auxotroph vaccine strains in the type II Δku80 genetic background...

  13. Hepatitis B virus/human immunodeficiency virus coinfection:interaction among human immunodeficiency virus infection,chronic hepatitis B virus infection, and host immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yi-jia; WANG Huan-ling; LI Tai-sheng

    2012-01-01

    Objective This review discusses progress in the studies of hepatitis B virus (HBV)/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection and focuses on the interaction among HIV infection,chronic HBV infection,and host immunity.Data sources Data and studies published mainly from 2008 to 2011 were selected using PubMed.Study selection Original articles and critical reviews concerning HBV/HIV coinfection and HBV and HIV pathogenesis were selected.Results HIV may accelerate HBV progression by lowering CD4 count,weakening HBV-specific immunity,“enriching”HBV mutants,causing immune activation,etc.On the other hand,HBV may enhance HIV replication by activating HIV long terminal repeat (LTR) with X protein (HBX) and cause immune activation in synergy with HIV.Paradoxically,HBV may also inhibit HIV dissemination via dendritic cells.Conclusions The interaction among HIV,HBV,and host immunity remains poorly understood.Further research is warranted to elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms and to translate these mechanisms into clinical practice.

  14. Characterization of the innate immune response to chronic aspiration in a novel rodent model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Shu S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although chronic aspiration has been associated with several pulmonary diseases, the inflammatory response has not been characterized. A novel rodent model of chronic aspiration was therefore developed in order to investigate the resulting innate immune response in the lung. Methods Gastric fluid or normal saline was instilled into the left lung of rats (n = 48 weekly for 4, 8, 12, or 16 weeks (n = 6 each group. Thereafter, bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were collected and cellular phenotypes and cytokine concentrations of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, GM-CSF, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and TGF-beta were determined. Results Following the administration of gastric fluid but not normal saline, histologic specimens exhibited prominent evidence of giant cells, fibrosis, lymphocytic bronchiolitis, and obliterative bronchiolitis. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens from the left (treated lungs exhibited consistently higher macrophages and T cells with an increased CD4:CD8 T cell ratio after treatment with gastric fluid compared to normal saline. The concentrations of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-2, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta were increased in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens following gastric fluid aspiration compared to normal saline. Conclusion This represents the first description of the pulmonary inflammatory response that results from chronic aspiration. Repetitive aspiration events can initiate an inflammatory response consisting of macrophages and T cells that is associated with increased TGF-beta, TNF-alpha, IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-2 and fibrosis in the lung. Combined with the observation of gastric fluid-induced lymphocyitic bronchiolitis and obliterative bronchiolitis, these findings further support an association between chronic aspiration and pulmonary diseases, such as obliterative bronchiolitis, pulmonary fibrosis, and asthma.

  15. Epidemic spreading and immunization in node-activity networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingchu; Chen, Shufang

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we study the epidemic spreading in node-activity networks, where an individual participates in social networks with a certain rate h. There are two cases for h: the state-independent case and the state-dependent case. We investigate the epidemic threshold as a function of h compared to the static network. Our results suggest the epidemic threshold cannot be exactly predicted by using the analysis approach in the static network. In addition, we further propose a local information-based immunization protocol on node-activity networks. Simulation analysis shows that the immunization can not only eliminate the infectious disease, but also change the epidemic threshold via increasing the immunization parameter.

  16. Effects of chronic whole-body gamma irradiation on cell mediated immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test has been used to estimate the effects of chronic, whole-body, gamma irradiation in the dog. At lower dose levels, 0.07 and 0.33 R/day to cumulative dose of about 50 and 250 R, there was no change in cell mediated immunity. Dogs at high dose levels were affected. Dogs which succumbed to aplastic anemia at high doses had reduced immunological responses. Dogs which survived these high doses showed a temporary depression. When aplastic anemia was initially noted, there was a differential response to PHA and Con-A stimulation. The response to the former mitogen was profoundly reduced, but Con-A stimulated cells were unaffected, indicative of the development of radioresistant cell lines. As the dogs progressed toward aplastic anemia, all T lympocytes were negatively affected

  17. Innate immune recognition and activation during HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsen Carsten S

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The pathogenesis of HIV infection, and in particular the development of immunodeficiency, remains incompletely understood. Whichever intricate molecular mechanisms are at play between HIV and the host, it is evident that the organism is incapable of restricting and eradicating the invading pathogen. Both innate and adaptive immune responses are raised, but they appear to be insufficient or too late to eliminate the virus. Moreover, the picture is complicated by the fact that the very same cells and responses aimed at eliminating the virus seem to play deleterious roles by driving ongoing immune activation and progressive immunodeficiency. Whereas much knowledge exists on the role of adaptive immunity during HIV infection, it has only recently been appreciated that the innate immune response also plays an important part in HIV pathogenesis. In this review, we present current knowledge on innate immune recognition and activation during HIV infection based on studies in cell culture, non-human primates, and HIV-infected individuals, and discuss the implications for the understanding of HIV immunopathogenesis.

  18. Immune-Checkpoint Blockade and Active Immunotherapy for Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Brian J. [Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Brain Tumor Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Pollack, Ian F. [Brain Tumor Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Okada, Hideho, E-mail: okadah@upmc.edu [Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Brain Tumor Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has made tremendous progress, including promising results in patients with malignant gliomas. Nonetheless, the immunological microenvironment of the brain and tumors arising therein is still believed to be suboptimal for sufficient antitumor immune responses for a variety of reasons, including the operation of “immune-checkpoint” mechanisms. While these mechanisms prevent autoimmunity in physiological conditions, malignant tumors, including brain tumors, actively employ these mechanisms to evade from immunological attacks. Development of agents designed to unblock these checkpoint steps is currently one of the most active areas of cancer research. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the field of brain tumor immunology with particular foci in the area of immune-checkpoint mechanisms and development of active immunotherapy strategies. In the last decade, a number of specific monoclonal antibodies designed to block immune-checkpoint mechanisms have been developed and show efficacy in other cancers, such as melanoma. On the other hand, active immunotherapy approaches, such as vaccines, have shown encouraging outcomes. We believe that development of effective immunotherapy approaches should ultimately integrate those checkpoint-blockade agents to enhance the efficacy of therapeutic approaches. With these agents available, it is going to be quite an exciting time in the field. The eventual success of immunotherapies for brain tumors will be dependent upon not only an in-depth understanding of immunology behind the brain and brain tumors, but also collaboration and teamwork for the development of novel trials that address multiple layers of immunological challenges in gliomas.

  19. Maternal Immune Activation Disrupts Dopamine System in the Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchicchi, Antonio; Lecca, Salvatore; Melis, Miriam; De Felice, Marta; Cadeddu, Francesca; Frau, Roberto; Muntoni, Anna Lisa; Fadda, Paola; Devoto, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Background: In utero exposure to maternal viral infections is associated with a higher incidence of psychiatric disorders with a supposed neurodevelopmental origin, including schizophrenia. Hence, immune response factors exert a negative impact on brain maturation that predisposes the offspring to the emergence of pathological phenotypes later in life. Although ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons and their target regions play essential roles in the pathophysiology of psychoses, it remains to be fully elucidated how dopamine activity and functionality are disrupted in maternal immune activation models of schizophrenia. Methods: Here, we used an immune-mediated neurodevelopmental disruption model based on prenatal administration of the polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid in rats, which mimics a viral infection and recapitulates behavioral abnormalities relevant to psychiatric disorders in the offspring. Extracellular dopamine levels were measured by brain microdialysis in both the nucleus accumbens shell and the medial prefrontal cortex, whereas dopamine neurons in ventral tegmental area were studied by in vivo electrophysiology. Results: Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid-treated animals, at adulthood, displayed deficits in sensorimotor gating, memory, and social interaction and increased baseline extracellular dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens, but not in the prefrontal cortex. In polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid rats, dopamine neurons showed reduced spontaneously firing rate and population activity. Conclusions: These results confirm that maternal immune activation severely impairs dopamine system and that the polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid model can be considered a proper animal model of a psychiatric condition that fulfills a multidimensional set of validity criteria predictive of a human pathology. PMID:26819283

  20. Immune-Checkpoint Blockade and Active Immunotherapy for Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Ahn

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy has made tremendous progress, including promising results in patients with malignant gliomas. Nonetheless, the immunological microenvironment of the brain and tumors arising therein is still believed to be suboptimal for sufficient antitumor immune responses for a variety of reasons, including the operation of “immune-checkpoint” mechanisms. While these mechanisms prevent autoimmunity in physiological conditions, malignant tumors, including brain tumors, actively employ these mechanisms to evade from immunological attacks. Development of agents designed to unblock these checkpoint steps is currently one of the most active areas of cancer research. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the field of brain tumor immunology with particular foci in the area of immune-checkpoint mechanisms and development of active immunotherapy strategies. In the last decade, a number of specific monoclonal antibodies designed to block immune-checkpoint mechanisms have been developed and show efficacy in other cancers, such as melanoma. On the other hand, active immunotherapy approaches, such as vaccines, have shown encouraging outcomes. We believe that development of effective immunotherapy approaches should ultimately integrate those checkpoint-blockade agents to enhance the efficacy of therapeutic approaches. With these agents available, it is going to be quite an exciting time in the field. The eventual success of immunotherapies for brain tumors will be dependent upon not only an in-depth understanding of immunology behind the brain and brain tumors, but also collaboration and teamwork for the development of novel trials that address multiple layers of immunological challenges in gliomas.

  1. Cellular immune activity biomarker neopterin is associated hyperlipidemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chuang, Shu-Chun; Boeing, Heiner; Vollset, Stein Emil; Midttun, Øivind; Ueland, Per Magne; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Lajous, Martin; Fagherazzi, Guy; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Kaaks, Rudolf; Küehn, Tilman; Pischon, Tobias; Drogan, Dagmar; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Quirós, J Ramón; Agudo, Antonio; Molina-Montes, Esther; Dorronsoro, Miren; Huerta, José María; Barricarte, Aurelio; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Travis, Ruth C; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Masala, Giovanna; Agnoli, Claudia; Tumino, Rosario; Mattiello, Amalia; Peeters, Petra H; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Palmqvist, Richard; Ljuslinder, Ingrid; Gunter, Marc; Lu, Yunxia; Cross, Amanda J; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Aleksandrova, Krasimira

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased serum neopterin had been described in older age two decades ago. Neopterin is a biomarker of systemic adaptive immune activation that could be potentially implicated in metabolic syndrome (MetS). Measurements of waist circumference, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein...

  2. Immune-Checkpoint Blockade and Active Immunotherapy for Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer immunotherapy has made tremendous progress, including promising results in patients with malignant gliomas. Nonetheless, the immunological microenvironment of the brain and tumors arising therein is still believed to be suboptimal for sufficient antitumor immune responses for a variety of reasons, including the operation of “immune-checkpoint” mechanisms. While these mechanisms prevent autoimmunity in physiological conditions, malignant tumors, including brain tumors, actively employ these mechanisms to evade from immunological attacks. Development of agents designed to unblock these checkpoint steps is currently one of the most active areas of cancer research. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the field of brain tumor immunology with particular foci in the area of immune-checkpoint mechanisms and development of active immunotherapy strategies. In the last decade, a number of specific monoclonal antibodies designed to block immune-checkpoint mechanisms have been developed and show efficacy in other cancers, such as melanoma. On the other hand, active immunotherapy approaches, such as vaccines, have shown encouraging outcomes. We believe that development of effective immunotherapy approaches should ultimately integrate those checkpoint-blockade agents to enhance the efficacy of therapeutic approaches. With these agents available, it is going to be quite an exciting time in the field. The eventual success of immunotherapies for brain tumors will be dependent upon not only an in-depth understanding of immunology behind the brain and brain tumors, but also collaboration and teamwork for the development of novel trials that address multiple layers of immunological challenges in gliomas

  3. The Immune Protective Effect of the Mediterranean Diet against Chronic Low-grade Inflammatory Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Casas, Rosa; Sacanella, Emilio; Estruch, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Dietary patterns high in refined starches, sugar, and saturated and trans-fatty acids, poor in natural antioxidants and fiber from fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and poor in omega-3 fatty acids may cause an activation of the innate immune system, most likely by excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines associated with a reduced production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. The Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) is a nutritional model inspired by the traditional dietary pattern of some o...

  4. Exercise Improves Immune Function, Antidepressive Response, and Sleep Quality in Patients with Chronic Primary Insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Soares Passos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of moderate aerobic exercise training on sleep, depression, cortisol, and markers of immune function in patients with chronic primary insomnia. Twenty-one sedentary participants (16 women aged 44.7 ± 9 years with chronic primary insomnia completed a 4-month intervention of moderate aerobic exercise. Compared with baseline, polysomnographic data showed improvements following exercise training. Also observed were reductions in depression symptoms and plasma cortisol. Immunologic assays revealed a significant increase in plasma apolipoprotein A (140.9 ± 22 to 151.2 ± 22 mg/dL and decreases in CD4 (915.6 ± 361 to 789.6 ± 310 mm3 and CD8 (532.4 ± 259 to 435.7 ± 204 mm3. Decreases in cortisol were significantly correlated with increases in total sleep time (r=-0.51 and REM sleep (r=-0.52. In summary, long-term moderate aerobic exercise training improved sleep, reduced depression and cortisol, and promoted significant changes in immunologic variables.

  5. Superior Immune Response to Protein-Conjugate versus Free Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dransfield, Mark T.; Nahm, Moon H.; Han, MeiLan K.; Harnden, Sarah; Criner, Gerard J.; Fernando J Martinez; Scanlon, Paul D.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Washko, George R.; Connett, John E.; Anthonisen, Nicholas R.; Bailey, William C.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Debate exists about the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of antibodies produced by the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The 7-valent diphtheria-conjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PCV7) induces a more robust immune response than PPSV23 in healthy elderly adults.

  6. Photodynamic therapy for cancer and activation of immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Pawel; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT for cancer due to the acute inflammatory response, exposure and presentation of tumor-specific antigens, and induction of heat-shock proteins and other danger signals. Nevertheless effective, powerful tumor-specific immune response in both animal models and also in patients treated with PDT for cancer, is the exception rather than the rule. Research in our laboratory and also in others is geared towards identifying reasons for this sub-optimal immune response and discovering ways of maximizing it. Reasons why the immune response after PDT is less than optimal include the fact that tumor-antigens are considered to be self-like and poorly immunogenic, the tumor-mediated induction of CD4+CD25+foxP3+ regulatory T-cells (T-regs), that are able to inhibit both the priming and the effector phases of the cytotoxic CD8 T-cell anti-tumor response and the defects in dendritic cell maturation, activation and antigen-presentation that may also occur. Alternatively-activated macrophages (M2) have also been implicated. Strategies to overcome these immune escape mechanisms employed by different tumors include combination regimens using PDT and immunostimulating treatments such as products obtained from pathogenic microorganisms against which mammals have evolved recognition systems such as PAMPs and toll-like receptors (TLR). This paper will cover the use of CpG oligonucleotides (a TLR9 agonist found in bacterial DNA) to reverse dendritic cell dysfunction and methods to remove the immune suppressor effects of T-regs that are under active study.

  7. Immune response is required for the control of in vivo translocation and chronic toxicity of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiuli; Zhao, Yunli; Fang, Jianpeng; Wang, Dayong

    2014-05-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) shows great promise as a nanomaterial for medical applications; however, the mechanism for its long-term adverse effects is still largely unclear. Here, we show that chronic GO exposure not only caused damage on the function of both primary and secondary targeted organs but also induced severe accumulation of pathogenic microbial food (OP50) in the intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans, a non-mammalian alternative toxicity assay system. GO accumulated in the intestine could be largely co-localized with OP50 and induced decreased immune response of animals. In contrast, feeding with UV-treated OP50 suppressed GO toxicity and accumulation in the intestine and maintained the relatively normal immune response of animals. The severe accumulation of OP50 in the intestine might be partially due to the damage by GO on the development and function of AVL and DVB neurons controlling defecation behavior. Reduction of chronic GO toxicity by PEG surface modification largely resulted from the inhibition of OP50 accumulation in the intestine and the maintenance of normal immune response. Our results highlight the key role of innate immunity in regulating in vivo chronic GO toxicity, which will be helpful for our understanding of the interactions between nanomaterials and biological systems during the long-term development of animals.Graphene oxide (GO) shows great promise as a nanomaterial for medical applications; however, the mechanism for its long-term adverse effects is still largely unclear. Here, we show that chronic GO exposure not only caused damage on the function of both primary and secondary targeted organs but also induced severe accumulation of pathogenic microbial food (OP50) in the intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans, a non-mammalian alternative toxicity assay system. GO accumulated in the intestine could be largely co-localized with OP50 and induced decreased immune response of animals. In contrast, feeding with UV-treated OP50 suppressed GO

  8. Comparative activities of milk components in reversing chronic colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwar, J R; Kanwar, R K; Stathopoulos, S; Haggarty, N W; MacGibbon, A K H; Palmano, K P; Roy, K; Rowan, A; Krissansen, G W

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a poorly understood chronic immune disorder for which there is no medical cure. Milk and colostrum are rich sources of bioactives with immunomodulatory properties. Here we compared the therapeutic effects of oral delivery of bovine milk-derived iron-saturated lactoferrin (Fe-bLF), angiogenin, osteopontin (OPN), colostrum whey protein, Modulen IBD (Nestle Healthsciences, Rhodes, Australia), and cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)-enriched milk fat in a mouse model of dextran sulfate-induced colitis. The CLA-enriched milk fat significantly increased mouse body weights after 24d of treatment, reduced epithelium damage, and downregulated the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and nitrous oxide. Modulen IBD most effectively decreased the clinical score at d 12, and Modulen IBD and OPN most effectively lowered the inflammatory score. Myeloperoxidase activity that denotes neutrophil infiltration was significantly lower in mice fed Modulen IBD, OPN, angiogenin, and Fe-bLF. A significant decrease in the numbers of T cells, natural killer cells, dendritic cells, and a significant decrease in cytokine expression were observed in mice fed the treatment diets compared with dextran sulfate administered mice. The Fe-bLF, CLA-enriched milk fat, and Modulen IBD inhibited intestinal angiogenesis. In summary, each of the milk components attenuated IBD in mice, but with differing effectiveness against specific disease parameters. PMID:26805965

  9. Heightened Immune Activation in Fetuses with Gastroschisis May Be Blocked by Targeting IL-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frascoli, Michela; Jeanty, Cerine; Fleck, Shannon; Moradi, Patriss W; Keating, Sheila; Mattis, Aras N; Tang, Qizhi; MacKenzie, Tippi C

    2016-06-15

    The development of the fetal immune system during pregnancy is a well-orchestrated process with important consequences for fetal and neonatal health, but prenatal factors that affect immune activation are poorly understood. We hypothesized that chronic fetal inflammation may lead to alterations in development of the fetal immune system. To test this hypothesis, we examined neonates with gastroschisis, a congenital abdominal wall defect that leads to exposure of the fetal intestines to amniotic fluid, with resultant intestinal inflammation. We determined that patients with gastroschisis show high systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines such as eotaxin, as well as earlier activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) effector and memory T cells in the cord blood compared with controls. Additionally, increased numbers of T cells and eosinophils infiltrate the serosa and mucosa of the inflamed intestines. Using a mouse model of gastroschisis, we observed higher numbers of eosinophils and both type 2 and type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2 and ILC3), specifically in the portion of organs exposed to the amniotic fluid. Given the role of IL-5 produced by ILC2 in regulating eosinophil development and survival, we determined that maternal or fetal administration of the anti-IL-5 neutralizing Ab, or a depleting Ab against ILCs, can both effectively reduce intestinal eosinophilia. Thus, a congenital anomaly causing chronic inflammation can alter the composition of circulating and tissue-resident fetal immune cells. Given the high rate of prenatal and neonatal complications in these patients, such changes have clinical significance and might become targets for fetal therapy. PMID:27183609

  10. Regular physical activity prevents development of chronic pain and activation of central neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Sluka, Kathleen A; O'Donnell, James M.; DANIELSON, JESSICA; Rasmussen, Lynn A.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is a significant health problem and is associated with increases in pain during acute physical activity. Regular physical activity is protective against many chronic diseases; however, it is unknown if it plays a role in development of chronic pain. The current study induced physical activity by placing running wheels in home cages of mice for 5 days or 8 wk and compared these to sedentary mice without running wheels in their home cages. Chronic muscle pain was in...

  11. Regulation of intestinal immune responses through TLR activation: implications for pro- and prebiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander eDe Kivit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal mucosa is constantly facing a high load of antigens including bacterial antigens derived from the microbiota and food. Despite this, the immune cells present in the gastrointestinal tract do not initiate a pro-inflammatory immune response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are pattern recognition receptors expressed by various cells in the gastrointestinal tract, including intestinal epithelial cells (IEC and resident immune cells in the lamina propria. Many diseases, including chronic intestinal inflammation (e.g. inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, allergic gastroenteritis (e.g. eosinophilic gastroenteritis and allergic IBS and infections are nowadays associated with a deregulated microbiota. The microbiota may directly interact with TLR. In addition, differences in intestinal TLR expression in health and disease may suggest that TLR play an essential role in disease pathogenesis and may be novel targets for therapy. TLR signaling in the gut is involved in either maintaining intestinal homeostasis or the induction of an inflammatory response. This mini review provides an overview of the current knowledge regarding the contribution of intestinal epithelial TLR signaling in both tolerance induction or promoting intestinal inflammation, with a focus on food allergy. We will also highlight a potential role of the microbiota in regulating gut immune responses, especially through TLR activation.

  12. Regulation of Intestinal Immune Responses through TLR Activation: Implications for Pro- and Prebiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kivit, Sander; Tobin, Mary C; Forsyth, Christopher B; Keshavarzian, Ali; Landay, Alan L

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa is constantly facing a high load of antigens including bacterial antigens derived from the microbiota and food. Despite this, the immune cells present in the gastrointestinal tract do not initiate a pro-inflammatory immune response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors expressed by various cells in the gastrointestinal tract, including intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and resident immune cells in the lamina propria. Many diseases, including chronic intestinal inflammation (e.g., inflammatory bowel disease), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), allergic gastroenteritis (e.g., eosinophilic gastroenteritis and allergic IBS), and infections are nowadays associated with a deregulated microbiota. The microbiota may directly interact with TLR. In addition, differences in intestinal TLR expression in health and disease may suggest that TLRs play an essential role in disease pathogenesis and may be novel targets for therapy. TLR signaling in the gut is involved in either maintaining intestinal homeostasis or the induction of an inflammatory response. This mini review provides an overview of the current knowledge regarding the contribution of intestinal epithelial TLR signaling in both tolerance induction or promoting intestinal inflammation, with a focus on food allergy. We will also highlight a potential role of the microbiota in regulating gut immune responses, especially through TLR activation. PMID:24600450

  13. Toxoplasma gondii actively inhibits neuronal function in chronically infected mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Haroon

    Full Text Available Upon infection with the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, fast replicating tachyzoites infect a broad spectrum of host cells including neurons. Under the pressure of the immune response, tachyzoites convert into slow-replicating bradyzoites, which persist as cysts in neurons. Currently, it is unclear whether T. gondii alters the functional activity of neurons, which may contribute to altered behaviour of T. gondii-infected mice and men. In the present study we demonstrate that upon oral infection with T. gondii cysts, chronically infected BALB/c mice lost over time their natural fear against cat urine which was paralleled by the persistence of the parasite in brain regions affecting behaviour and odor perception. Detailed immunohistochemistry showed that in infected neurons not only parasitic cysts but also the host cell cytoplasm and some axons stained positive for Toxoplasma antigen suggesting that parasitic proteins might directly interfere with neuronal function. In fact, in vitro live cell calcium (Ca(2+ imaging studies revealed that tachyzoites actively manipulated Ca(2+ signalling upon glutamate stimulation leading either to hyper- or hypo-responsive neurons. Experiments with the endoplasmatic reticulum Ca(2+ uptake inhibitor thapsigargin indicate that tachyzoites deplete Ca(2+ stores in the endoplasmatic reticulum. Furthermore in vivo studies revealed that the activity-dependent uptake of the potassium analogue thallium was reduced in cyst harbouring neurons indicating their functional impairment. The percentage of non-functional neurons increased over time In conclusion, both bradyzoites and tachyzoites functionally silence infected neurons, which may significantly contribute to the altered behaviour of the host.

  14. Controversial issues regarding the roles of IL-10 and IFN-γ in active/inactive chronic hepatitis B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hossein; Khorramdelazad; Gholamhossein; Hassanshahi; Mohammad; Kazemi; Arababadi

    2014-01-01

    According to the important roles played by cytokines in induction of appropriate immune responses against hepatitis B virus(HBV),Dimitropoulou et al have examined the important cytokines in their patients.They showed that the serum levels of interleukin 10(IL-10)and interferon-γ(IFN-γ)were decreased in patients with HBeAg-negative chronic active hepatitis B compared with the inactive hepatitis B virus carriers(Dimitropoulou et al 2013).The controversy can be considered regarding the decreased serum levels of IFN-γin the HBeAg-negative chronic active hepatitis B patients.They concluded that subsequent to decreased expression of IFN-γ,the process of HBV proliferation led to liver diseases.Previous studies stated that HBV is not directly cytopathic for the infected hepatocytes and immune responses are the main reason for destruction of hepatocytes(Chisari et al,2010).Scientists believe that immune responses against HBV are stronger in active forms of chronic HBV infected patients than inactive forms(Zhang et al,2012).Therefore,the findings from Dimitropoulou et al may deserve further attention and discussion.Additionally,downregulation of IL-10 inchronically active hepatitis B infected patients has also confirmed our claim.IL-10 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine and its expression is increased in inactive forms in order to downregulate immune responses(Arababadi et al,2012).Thus,based on the results from Dimitropoulou et al,it can be concluded that increased immune responses in chronically active hepatitis B infected patients are related to declined expression of IL-10 and interestingly IFN-γis not involved in induction of immune responses in these patients.

  15. High physical activity in young children suggests positive effects by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, E; Ludvigsson, J; Huus, K; Faresjö, M

    2016-04-01

    Physical activity in children is associated with several positive health outcomes such as decreased cardiovascular risk factors, improved lung function, enhanced motor skill development, healthier body composition, and also improved defense against inflammatory diseases. We examined how high physical activity vs a sedentary lifestyle in young children influences the immune response with focus on autoimmunity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, collected from 55 5-year-old children with either high physical activity (n = 14), average physical activity (n = 27), or low physical activity (n = 14), from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort, were stimulated with antigens (tetanus toxoid and beta-lactoglobulin) and autoantigens (GAD65 , insulin, HSP60, and IA-2). Immune markers (cytokines and chemokines), C-peptide and proinsulin were analyzed. Children with high physical activity showed decreased immune activity toward the autoantigens GAD65 (IL-5, P < 0.05), HSP60 and IA-2 (IL-10, P < 0.05) and also low spontaneous pro-inflammatory immune activity (IL-6, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and CCL2 (P < 0.05)) compared with children with an average or low physical activity. High physical activity in young children seems to have positive effects on the immune system by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity. PMID:25892449

  16. The potential immune modulatory effect of chronic bisphenol A exposure on gene regulation in male medaka (Oryzias latipes) liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wenhui; Shen, Yang; Pan, Chenyuan; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Minghong; Yang, Ming; Wang, Ke-Jian

    2016-08-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a well-known estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) ubiquitously present in various environmental media. The present study aims to identify the responsive genes in male fish chronically exposed to low concentrations of BPA at the transcription level. We screened genes from a suppression subtractive hybridization library constructed from male medaka (Oryzias latipes) livers after 60-d exposure to 10μg/L BPA under the condition at which changes of hepatic antioxidant parameters have been previously reported. The identified genes were predicted to be involved in multiple biological processes including antioxidant physiology, endocrine system, detoxification, notably associated with the immune response processes. With real time PCR analysis, the immune-associated genes including hepcidin-like precursor, complement component and factors, MHC class I, alpha-2-macroglobulin and novel immune-type receptor 6 isoform were significantly up-regulated in a nonmonotonic dose response pattern in livers upon exposure to different concentrations of BPA (0.1, 1, 10, 100, 1000μg/L). Our results demonstrated a negative impact on gene regulation in fish chronically exposed to relatively low and environmentally relevant concentrations of BPA, and suggested the potential immune modulatory effect of chronic EDC exposure on fish. The immunotoxicity of BPA and other EDCs should be much concerned for the health of human beings and other vertebrates exposed to it. PMID:27104808

  17. Jungle Honey Enhances Immune Function and Antitumor Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Fukuda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jungle honey (JH is collected from timber and blossom by wild honey bees that live in the tropical forest of Nigeria. JH is used as a traditional medicine for colds, skin inflammation and burn wounds as well as general health care. However, the effects of JH on immune functions are not clearly known. Therefore, we investigated the effects of JH on immune functions and antitumor activity in mice. Female C57BL/6 mice were injected with JH (1 mg/mouse/day, seven times intra-peritoneal. After seven injections, peritoneal cells (PC were obtained. Antitumor activity was assessed by growth of Lewis Lung Carcinoma/2 (LL/2 cells. PC numbers were increased in JH-injected mice compared to control mice. In Dot Plot analysis by FACS, a new cell population appeared in JH-injected mice. The percent of Gr-1 surface antigen and the intensity of Gr-1 antigen expression of PC were increased in JH-injected mice. The new cell population was neutrophils. JH possessed chemotactic activity for neutrophils. Tumor incidence and weight were decreased in JH-injected mice. The ratio of reactive oxygen species (ROS producing cells was increased in JH-injected mice. The effective component in JH was fractionized by gel filtration using HPLC and had an approximate molecular weight (MW of 261. These results suggest that neutrophils induced by JH possess potent antitumor activity mediated by ROS and the effective immune component of JH is substrate of MW 261.

  18. Spontaneous Immunity Against the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase ROR1 in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hojjat-Farsangi

    Full Text Available ROR1 is a receptor tyrosine kinase expressed in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and several other malignancies but absent in most adult normal tissues. ROR1 is considered an onco-fetal antigen. In the present study we analysed spontaneous humoral and cellular immunity against ROR1 in CLL patients.Antibodies against ROR1 were analysed in 23 patients and 20 healthy donors by ELISA and Western blot. Purified serum IgG from patients was tested for cytotoxicity against CLL cells using the MTT viability assay. A cellular immune response against ROR1 derived HLA-A2 restricted 9 aa and 16 aa long peptides were analysed using peptide loaded dendritic cells co-cultured with autologous T cells from CLL patients (n = 9 and healthy donors (n = 6. IFN-γ, IL-5 and IL-17A-secreting T cells were assessed by ELISPOT and a proliferative response using a H3-thymidine incorporation assay.The majority of CLL patients had antibodies against ROR1. Significantly higher titers of anti-ROR1 antibodies were noted in patients with non-progressive as compared to progressive disease. The extracellular membrane-close ROR1 KNG domain seemed to be an immunodominant epitope. Ten patients with high titers of anti-ROR1 binding antibodies were tested for cytotoxicity. Five of those had cytotoxic anti-ROR1 antibodies against CLL cells. ROR1-specific IFN-γ and IL-17A producing T cells could be detected in CLL patients, preferentially in non-progressive as compared to patients with progressive disease (p<0.05.ROR1 seemed to spontaneously induce a humoral as well as a T cell response in CLL patients. The data support the notion that ROR1 might be a specific neo-antigen and may serve as a target for immunotherapy.

  19. Structure-Dependent Immune Modulatory Activity of Protegrin-1 Analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu M. Zughaier

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Protegrins are porcine antimicrobial peptides (AMPs that belong to the cathelicidin family of host defense peptides. Protegrin-1 (PG-1, the most investigated member of the protegrin family, is an arginine-rich peptide consisting of 18 amino acid residues, its main chain adopting a β-hairpin structure that is linked by two disulfide bridges. We report on the immune modulatory activity of PG-1 and its analogs in neutralizing bacterial endotoxin and capsular polysaccharides, consequently inhibiting inflammatory mediators’ release from macrophages. We demonstrate that the β-hairpin structure motif stabilized with at least one disulfide bridge is a prerequisite for the immune modulatory activity of this type of AMP.

  20. Physical Activity Recommendations in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, Jorine E.; Boezen, H. Marike; Zuidema, Menno J.; de Greef, Mathieu H. G.; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Boezen, Hendrika

    2014-01-01

    Background: Physical activity recommendations are hardly studied in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and specifically recommendations that are individualized to a patient's aerobic fitness level are not studied. Objectives: To compare individualized (relative) and nonindiv

  1. HIV-induced immune activation - pathogenesis and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stellbrink HJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This manuscript is communicated by the German AIDS Society (DAIG http://www.daignet.de. It summarizes a series of presentations and discussions during a workshop on immune activation due to HIV infection. The workshop was held on November 22nd 2008 in Hamburg, Germany. It was organized by the ICH Hamburg under the auspices of the German AIDS Society (DAIG e.V..

  2. Preconscious Control of Stereotype Activation Through Chronic Egalitarian Goals

    OpenAIRE

    Moskowitz, Gordon B.; Gollwitzer, Peter M.; Wasel, Wolfgang; Schaal, Bernd

    1999-01-01

    This research shows stereotype activation is controlled by chronic egalitarian goals. In the first 2 studies it was found that the stereotype of women is equally available to individuals with and without chronic goals, and the discriminant validity of the concept of egalitarian goals was established. In the next 2 experiments, differences in stereotype activation as a function of this individual difference were found. In Study 3, participants read attributes following stereotypical primes. Fa...

  3. A murine model for study of anticryptococcal activity mediated by cytotoxic immune cells: Role in immunization and human vaccine strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsić-Arsenijević Valentina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available NK and T cells play a pivotal role in host defense to Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans fungus which affects especially hosts with impaired cell mediated immunity. The vaccine against cryptococcosus is not developed yet, thus we established an animal BALB/c mice model to analyze anticryprococcal activity of immune cells. We detected that non-stimulated spleen mononuclear cells (MNC from non-immunized mice have the capacity to exhibit anticriptococcal activity on the incapsulated C. neoformans strain (ATCC 34873 and this activity can be enhanced by non-adherent cells (NAC. In order to obtained antigen-specific anticryprococcal activity, MNC and NAC were stimulated in vitro with corpuscular (Ag1 or soluble (Ag2 C. neoformans antigen prepared from the acapsular strain Cap67 (ATCC 52817. In vitro stimulation of immune cells with both C. neoformans antigens enhanced the anticryptococcal activity of MNC and NAC. NAC fraction expressed the highest anticryptococcal activity, also in the presence and in the absence of accessory cells (AC. The highest anticryptococcal activity of effector cells was detected after immunization of mice with the same C. neoformans antigens and after additional stimulation of immune cells in vitro with the some antigens. These data demonstrated that growth inhibition of C. neoformans mediated by mice effector cells can be enhanced with corpuscular, as well as soluble antigens. Thus designin an animal model which is simple and reproducible and can be used for further studies and development of immunization strategies against human cryptococcosis.

  4. Is Tc-99m Sulfur Colloid Scintigraphy Necessary in Chronic Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura Before Splenectomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilçe HT et al.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common reasons for elective splenectomy on adults ischronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura. It is characterized by thrombocyte destruction in spleen, so, management of splenectomy is the gold standard. However if there is remnant spleen tissue postoperatively it cause to going on thrombocytopenia. The principal reason of remnant spleen tissue is accessory spleen. So it is important to detect this tissue pre or postoperatively. Thirty years old, male patient underwent splenectomy four years ago because of chronic immunethrombocytopenic purpura. When thrombocytopenia recurrence occurredabdominal ultrasonography was performed and there was no abnormal sign. Then, Tc–99 m Sulfur Colloid Spleen Scintigraphy was performed and spleen tissue was detected in left hypochondriac region. Tc-99mSulfur Colloid Spleen Scintigraphy is one of the imaging method for accessory spleen. Especially if it is performed preoperatively the surgeon can be careful during the operation and at the same time detected accessory spleen was removed and recurrence can be prevented.

  5. Influence of Physical Activity and Nutrition on Obesity-Related Immune Function

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Jung Huang; Zourdos, Michael C.; Edward Jo; Ormsbee, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Research examining immune function during obesity suggests that excessive adiposity is linked to impaired immune responses leading to pathology. The deleterious effects of obesity on immunity have been associated with the systemic proinflammatory profile generated by the secretory molecules derived from adipose cells. These include inflammatory peptides, such as TNF- α , CRP, and IL-6. Consequently, obesity is now characterized as a state of chronic low-grade systemic inflammation, a conditio...

  6. Natural Products as Tools for Defining How Cellular Metabolism Influences Cellular Immune and Inflammatory Function during Chronic Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica S. Lovelace

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic viral infections like those caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV cause disease that establishes an ongoing state of chronic inflammation. While there have been tremendous improvements towards curing HCV with directly acting antiviral agents (DAA and keeping HIV viral loads below detection with antiretroviral therapy (ART, there is still a need to control inflammation in these diseases. Recent studies indicate that many natural products like curcumin, resveratrol and silymarin alter cellular metabolism and signal transduction pathways via enzymes such as adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR, and these pathways directly influence cellular inflammatory status (such as NF-κB and immune function. Natural products represent a vast toolkit to dissect and define how cellular metabolism controls cellular immune and inflammatory function.

  7. An altered intestinal mucosal microbiome in HIV-1 infection is associated with mucosal and systemic immune activation and endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, S M; Lee, E J; Kotter, C V; Austin, G L; Dong, Z; Hecht, D K; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, D M; Landay, A L; Robertson, C E; Frank, D N; Wilson, C C

    2014-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection disrupts the intestinal immune system, leading to microbial translocation and systemic immune activation. We investigated the impact of HIV-1 infection on the intestinal microbiome and its association with mucosal T-cell and dendritic cell (DC) frequency and activation, as well as with levels of systemic T-cell activation, inflammation, and microbial translocation. Bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing was performed on colon biopsies and fecal samples from subjects with chronic, untreated HIV-1 infection and uninfected control subjects. Colon biopsies of HIV-1-infected subjects had increased abundances of Proteobacteria and decreased abundances of Firmicutes compared with uninfected donors. Furthermore at the genus level, a significant increase in Prevotella and decrease in Bacteroides was observed in HIV-1-infected subjects, indicating a disruption in the Bacteroidetes bacterial community structure. This HIV-1-associated increase in Prevotella abundance was associated with increased numbers of activated colonic T cells and myeloid DCs. Principal coordinates analysis demonstrated an HIV-1-related change in the microbiome that was associated with increased mucosal cellular immune activation, microbial translocation, and blood T-cell activation. These observations suggest that an important relationship exists between altered mucosal bacterial communities and intestinal inflammation during chronic HIV-1 infection. PMID:24399150

  8. Serologic markers of effective tumor immunity against chronic lymphocytic leukemia include non-mutated B cell antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Marina, Ovidiu; Hainz, Ursula; Biernacki, Melinda A.; Zhang, Wandi; Cai, Ann; Duke-Cohan, Jonathan S.; Liu, Fenglong; Brusic, Vladimir; Neuberg, Donna; Kutok, Jeffery L.; Alyea, Edwin P.; Canning, Christine M.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Ritz, Jerome; Wu, Catherine J.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who relapse after allogeneic transplant may achieve durable remission following donor lymphocytes infusion (DLI), demonstrating the potency of donor-derived immunity in eradicating tumor. We sought to elucidate the antigenic basis of the effective graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) responses associated with DLI for the treatment of CLL by analyzing the specificity of plasma antibody responses developing in two DLI-treated patients who achieved long-te...

  9. Chronic Heat Stress Induces Immune Response, Oxidative Stress Response, and Apoptosis of Finishing Pig Liver: A Proteomic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanjun; Hao, Yue; Li, Jielei; Bao, Weiguang; Li, Gan; Gao, Yanli; Gu, Xianhong

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress (HS) negatively affects human health, animal welfare, and livestock production. We analyzed the hepatic proteomes of finishing pigs subjected to chronic heat stress (HS), thermal neutral (TN), and restricted feed intake conditions, identifying differences between direct and indirect (via reduced feed intake) HS. Twenty-four castrated male pigs were randomly allocated to three treatments for three weeks: (1) thermal neutral (TN) (22 °C) with ad libitum feeding; (2) chronic HS (30 °C) with ad libitum feeding; and (3) TN, pair-fed to HS intake (PF). Hepatic proteome analysis was conducted using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Both HS and PF significantly reduced liver weight (p proteins were differentially abundant when comparing HS with TN (37), PF with TN (29), and HS with PF (16). These proteins are involved in heat shock response and immune defense, oxidative stress response, cellular apoptosis, metabolism, signal transduction, and cytoskeleton. We also observed increased abundance of proteins and enzymes associated with heat shock response and immune defense, reduced the redox state, enhanced multiple antioxidant abilities, and increased apoptosis in HS liver. Heat-load, independent of reduced feed intake, induced an innate immune response, while food restriction caused stress and cellular apoptosis. Our results provide novel insights into the effects of chronic HS on liver. PMID:27187351

  10. Asthma as a chronic disease of the innate and adaptive immune systems responding to viruses and allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, Michael J

    2012-08-01

    Research on the pathogenesis of asthma has traditionally concentrated on environmental stimuli, genetic susceptibilities, adaptive immune responses, and end-organ alterations (particularly in airway mucous cells and smooth muscle) as critical steps leading to disease. The focus of this cascade has been the response to allergic stimuli. An alternative scheme suggests that respiratory viruses and the consequent response of the innate immune system also drives the development of asthma as well as related inflammatory diseases. This conceptual shift raises the possibility that sentinel cells such as airway epithelial cells, DCs, NKT cells, innate lymphoid cells, and macrophages also represent critical components of asthma pathogenesis as well as new targets for therapeutic discovery. A particular challenge will be to understand and balance the innate as well as the adaptive immune responses to defend the host against acute infection as well as chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:22850884

  11. Nonreplicating, cyst-defective type II Toxoplasma gondii vaccine strains stimulate protective immunity against acute and chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J

    2015-05-01

    Live attenuated vaccine strains, such as type I nonreplicating uracil auxotroph mutants, are highly effective in eliciting lifelong immunity to virulent acute infection by Toxoplasma gondii. However, it is currently unknown whether vaccine-elicited immunity can provide protection against acute infection and also prevent chronic infection. To address this problem, we developed nonreverting, nonreplicating, live attenuated uracil auxotroph vaccine strains in the type II Δku80 genetic background by targeting the deletion of the orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) and uridine phosphorylase (UP) genes. Deletion of OMPDC induced a severe uracil auxotrophy with loss of replication, loss of virulence in mice, and loss of the ability to develop cysts and chronic infection. Vaccination of mice using type II Δku80 Δompdc mutants stimulated a fully protective CD8(+) T cell-dependent immunity that prevented acute infection by type I and type II strains of T. gondii, and this vaccination also severely reduced or prevented cyst formation after type II challenge infection. Nonreverting, nonreplicating, and non-cyst-forming Δompdc mutants provide new tools to examine protective immune responses elicited by vaccination with a live attenuated type II vaccine. PMID:25776745

  12. Cinobufagin Modulates Human Innate Immune Responses and Triggers Antibacterial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shanshan; Spelmink, Laura; Codemo, Mario; Subramanian, Karthik; Pütsep, Katrin; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Olliver, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The traditional Chinese medicine Chan-Su is widely used for treatment of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, but also as a remedy for infections such as furunculosis, tonsillitis and acute pharyngitis. The clinical use of Chan-Su suggests that it has anti-infective effects, however, the mechanism of action is incompletely understood. In particular, the effect on the human immune system is poorly defined. Here, we describe previously unrecognized immunomodulatory activities of cinobufagin (CBG), a major bioactive component of Chan-Su. Using human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), we show that LPS-induced maturation and production of a number of cytokines was potently inhibited by CBG, which also had a pro-apoptotic effect, associated with activation of caspase-3. Interestingly, CBG triggered caspase-1 activation and significantly enhanced IL-1β production in LPS-stimulated cells. Finally, we demonstrate that CBG upregulates gene expression of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) hBD-2 and hBD-3 in DCs, and induces secretion of HNP1-3 and hCAP-18/LL-37 from neutrophils, potentiating neutrophil antibacterial activity. Taken together, our data indicate that CBG modulates the inflammatory phenotype of DCs in response to LPS, and triggers an antibacterial innate immune response, thus proposing possible mechanisms for the clinical effects of Chan-Su in anti-infective therapy. PMID:27529866

  13. Mononeuropathy Multiplex in a Patient with Chronic Active Hepatitis B

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Tai Seung; Lee, Seung Han; Park, Man Seok; Choi, Kang Ho; Kim, Joon Tae; Choi, Seong Min; Kim, Byeong Chae; Kim, Myeong Kyu; Cho, Ki Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Background Mononeuropathy multiplex is a rare complication during the course of chronic hepatitis B, despite various neuropathies following acute hepatitis B having been reported previously. Case Report A 30-year-old man presented with sensorimotor symptoms in multiple peripheral nerves. The serological tests for hepatitis were consistent with chronic active hepatitis B. After treatment with oral prednisone combined with an antiviral agent, the sensory and motor symptoms improved and hepatiti...

  14. Coincident helminth infection modulates systemic inflammation and immune activation in active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parakkal Jovvian George

    Full Text Available Helminth infections are known to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses in active and latent tuberculosis (TB. However, the role of helminth infections in modulating responses associated with inflammation and immune activation (reflecting disease activity and/or severity in TB is not known.We measured markers of inflammation and immune activation in active pulmonary TB individuals (ATB with co-incidental Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss infection. These included systemic levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases and their endogenous inhibitors and immune activation markers. As a control, we measured the systemic levels of the same molecules in TB-uninfected individuals (NTB with or without Ss infection.Our data confirm that ATB is associated with elevated levels of the various measured molecules when compared to those seen in NTB. Our data also reveal that co-incident Ss infection in ATB individuals is associated with significantly decreased circulating levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases as well as the systemic immune activation markers, sCD14 and sCD163. These changes are specific to ATB since they are absent in NTB individuals with Ss infection.Our data therefore reveal a profound effect of Ss infection on the markers associated with TB disease activity and severity and indicate that co-incidental helminth infections might dampen the severity of TB disease.

  15. Antibody responses to vaccination and immune function in patients with haematological malignancies - studies in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia autologous stem cell recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Velden, A.M.T. van der

    2007-01-01

    This thesis concerns the antibody responses to vaccination and immune function of patients with several forms of haematological diseases. Antibody responses in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and in autologous stem cell transplant recipients were studied. In the autologous stem cell transplantation (aSCT) group, immune reconstitution after aSCT was analysed in detail during 15 months following transplantation. The first part of the thesis concerns patients with chronic lymph...

  16. Systemic and local immune responses against Helicobacter pylori urease in patients with chronic gastritis: distinct IgA and IgG productive sites

    OpenAIRE

    Futagami, S; Takahashi, H.; Norose, Y; Kobayashi, M.

    1998-01-01

    Background—Helicobacter pylori urease is a major target for immune responses among various bacterial components in H pylori infected patients. 
Aims—To analyse the relation between systemic and local humoral immune responses to H pylori urease and grades of chronic gastritis. 
Patients—Seventy five patients with chronic gastritis associated with H pylori infection were classified into three groups (grade I, superficial gastritis; II, atrophic gastritis, quiescent; or III,...

  17. Long-Term Immunity to Lethal Acute or Chronic Type II Toxoplasma gondii Infection Is Effectively Induced in Genetically Susceptible C57BL/6 Mice by Immunization with an Attenuated Type I Vaccine Strain▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigley, Jason P.; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.

    2009-01-01

    C57BL/6 (B6) mice are genetically highly susceptible to chronic type II Toxoplasma gondii infections that invariably cause lethal toxoplasmic encephalitis. We examined the ability of an attenuated type I vaccine strain to elicit long-term immunity to lethal acute or chronic type II infections in susceptible B6 mice. Mice immunized with the type I cps1-1 vaccine strain were not susceptible to a lethal (100-cyst) challenge with the type II strain ME49. Immunized mice challenged with 10 ME49 cysts exhibited significant reductions in brain cyst and parasite burdens compared to naive mice, regardless of the route of challenge infection. Remarkably, cps1-1 strain-immunized B6 mice chronically infected with ME49 survived for at least 12 months without succumbing to the chronic infection. Potent immunity to type II challenge infections persisted for at least 10 months after vaccination. While the cps1-1 strain-elicited immunity did not prevent the establishment of a chronic infection or clear established brain cysts, cps1-1 strain-elicited CD8+ immune T cells significantly inhibited recrudescence of brain cysts during chronic ME49 infection. In addition, we show that uracil starvation of the cps1-1 strain induces early markers of bradyzoite differentiation. Collectively, these results suggest that more effective immune control of chronic type II infection in the genetically susceptible B6 background is established by vaccination with the nonreplicating type I uracil auxotroph cps1-1 strain. PMID:19797073

  18. Long-term immunity to lethal acute or chronic type II Toxoplasma gondii infection is effectively induced in genetically susceptible C57BL/6 mice by immunization with an attenuated type I vaccine strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigley, Jason P; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J

    2009-12-01

    C57BL/6 (B6) mice are genetically highly susceptible to chronic type II Toxoplasma gondii infections that invariably cause lethal toxoplasmic encephalitis. We examined the ability of an attenuated type I vaccine strain to elicit long-term immunity to lethal acute or chronic type II infections in susceptible B6 mice. Mice immunized with the type I cps1-1 vaccine strain were not susceptible to a lethal (100-cyst) challenge with the type II strain ME49. Immunized mice challenged with 10 ME49 cysts exhibited significant reductions in brain cyst and parasite burdens compared to naive mice, regardless of the route of challenge infection. Remarkably, cps1-1 strain-immunized B6 mice chronically infected with ME49 survived for at least 12 months without succumbing to the chronic infection. Potent immunity to type II challenge infections persisted for at least 10 months after vaccination. While the cps1-1 strain-elicited immunity did not prevent the establishment of a chronic infection or clear established brain cysts, cps1-1 strain-elicited CD8(+) immune T cells significantly inhibited recrudescence of brain cysts during chronic ME49 infection. In addition, we show that uracil starvation of the cps1-1 strain induces early markers of bradyzoite differentiation. Collectively, these results suggest that more effective immune control of chronic type II infection in the genetically susceptible B6 background is established by vaccination with the nonreplicating type I uracil auxotroph cps1-1 strain. PMID:19797073

  19. Long-Term Immunity to Lethal Acute or Chronic Type II Toxoplasma gondii Infection Is Effectively Induced in Genetically Susceptible C57BL/6 Mice by Immunization with an Attenuated Type I Vaccine Strain▿

    OpenAIRE

    Gigley, Jason P.; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.

    2009-01-01

    C57BL/6 (B6) mice are genetically highly susceptible to chronic type II Toxoplasma gondii infections that invariably cause lethal toxoplasmic encephalitis. We examined the ability of an attenuated type I vaccine strain to elicit long-term immunity to lethal acute or chronic type II infections in susceptible B6 mice. Mice immunized with the type I cps1-1 vaccine strain were not susceptible to a lethal (100-cyst) challenge with the type II strain ME49. Immunized mice challenged with 10 ME49 cys...

  20. Activation of pulmonary and lymph node dendritic cells during chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damlund, Dina Silke Malling; Christophersen, Lars; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Alhede, Morten; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2016-06-01

    The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients acquire chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, resulting in increased mortality and morbidity. The chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection is characterized by bacteria growing in biofilm surrounded by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). However, the infection is not eradicated and the inflammatory response leads to gradual degradation of the lung tissue. In CF patients, a Th2-dominated adaptive immune response with a pronounced antibody response is correlated with poorer outcome. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in bridging the innate immune system with the adaptive immune response. Once activated, the DCs deliver a set of signals to uncommitted T cells that induce development, such as expansion of regulatory T cells and polarization of Th1, Th2 or Th17 subsets. In this study, we characterized DCs in lungs and regional lymph nodes in BALB/c mice infected using intratracheal installation of P. aeruginosa embedded in seaweed alginate in the lungs. A significantly elevated concentration of DCs was detected earlier in the lungs than in the regional lymph nodes. To evaluate whether the chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection leads to activation of DCs, costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 were analyzed. During infection, the DCs showed significant elevation of CD80 and CD86 expression in both the lungs and the regional lymph nodes. Interestingly, the percentage of CD86-positive cells was significantly higher than the percentage of CD80-positive cells in the lymph nodes. In addition, cytokine production from Lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-stimulated DCs was analyzed demonstrating elevated production of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-12. However, production of IL-12 was suppressed earlier than IL-6 and IL-10. These results support that DCs are involved in skewing of the Th1/Th2 balance in CF and may be a possible treatment target. PMID:27009697

  1. A human type 5 adenovirus-based Trypanosoma cruzi therapeutic vaccine re-programs immune response and reverses chronic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Resende Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease (CD, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is a prototypical neglected tropical disease. Specific immunity promotes acute phase survival. Nevertheless, one-third of CD patients develop chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC associated with parasite persistence and immunological unbalance. Currently, the therapeutic management of patients only mitigates CCC symptoms. Therefore, a vaccine arises as an alternative to stimulate protective immunity and thereby prevent, delay progression and even reverse CCC. We examined this hypothesis by vaccinating mice with replication-defective human Type 5 recombinant adenoviruses (rAd carrying sequences of amastigote surface protein-2 (rAdASP2 and trans-sialidase (rAdTS T. cruzi antigens. For prophylactic vaccination, naïve C57BL/6 mice were immunized with rAdASP2+rAdTS (rAdVax using a homologous prime/boost protocol before challenge with the Colombian strain. For therapeutic vaccination, rAdVax administration was initiated at 120 days post-infection (dpi, when mice were afflicted by CCC. Mice were analyzed for electrical abnormalities, immune response and cardiac parasitism and tissue damage. Prophylactic immunization with rAdVax induced antibodies and H-2Kb-restricted cytotoxic and interferon (IFNγ-producing CD8+ T-cells, reduced acute heart parasitism and electrical abnormalities in the chronic phase. Therapeutic vaccination increased survival and reduced electrical abnormalities after the prime (analysis at 160 dpi and the boost (analysis at 180 and 230 dpi. Post-therapy mice exhibited less heart injury and electrical abnormalities compared with pre-therapy mice. rAdVax therapeutic vaccination preserved specific IFNγ-mediated immunity but reduced the response to polyclonal stimuli (anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28, CD107a+ CD8+ T-cell frequency and plasma nitric oxide (NO levels. Moreover, therapeutic rAdVax reshaped immunity in the heart tissue as reduced the number of perforin+ cells

  2. Active immunization therapies for Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Achim; Tierney, Lanay; Mandler, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Vaccination is increasingly being investigated as a potential treatment for synucleinopathies, a group of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and dementia with Lewy bodies associated with α-synuclein pathology. All lack a causal therapy. Development of novel, disease-altering treatment strategies is urgently needed. Vaccination has positioned itself as a prime strategy for addressing these diseases because it is broadly applicable, requires infrequent administration, and maintains low production costs for treating a large population or as a preventive measure. Current evidence points to a causal role of misfolded α-synuclein in the development and progression of synucleinopathies. In the past decade, significant progress in active immunization against α-synuclein has been shown both in preclinical animal models and in early clinical development. In this review, we describe the state-of-the-art in active immunization approaches to synucleinopathies, with a focus on advances in Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple-system atrophy (MSA). We first review preclinical animal models, highlighting their progress in translation to the clinical setting. We then discuss current clinical applications, stressing different approaches taken to address α-synuclein pathology. Finally, we address challenges, trends, and future perspectives of current vaccination programs. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26260853

  3. Stress-induced enhancement of leukocyte trafficking into sites of surgery or immune activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Kavitha; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.

    2005-04-01

    Effective immunoprotection requires rapid recruitment of leukocytes into sites of surgery, wounding, infection, or vaccination. In contrast to immunosuppressive chronic stressors, short-term acute stressors have immunoenhancing effects. Here, we quantify leukocyte infiltration within a surgical sponge to elucidate the kinetics, magnitude, subpopulation, and chemoattractant specificity of an acute stress-induced increase in leukocyte trafficking to a site of immune activation. Mice acutely stressed before sponge implantation showed 200-300% higher neutrophil, macrophage, natural killer cell, and T cell infiltration than did nonstressed animals. We also quantified the effects of acute stress on lymphotactin- (LTN; a predominantly lymphocyte-specific chemokine), and TNF-- (a proinflammatory cytokine) stimulated leukocyte infiltration. An additional stress-induced increase in infiltration was observed for neutrophils, in response to TNF-, macrophages, in response to TNF- and LTN, and natural killer cells and T cells in response to LTN. These results show that acute stress initially increases trafficking of all major leukocyte subpopulations to a site of immune activation. Tissue damage-, antigen-, or pathogen-driven chemoattractants subsequently determine which subpopulations are recruited more vigorously. Such stress-induced increases in leukocyte trafficking may enhance immunoprotection during surgery, vaccination, or infection, but may also exacerbate immunopathology during inflammatory (cardiovascular disease or gingivitis) or autoimmune (psoriasis, arthritis, or multiple sclerosis) diseases. chemokine | psychophysiological stress | surgical sponge | wound healing | lymphotactin

  4. Ustekinumab in chronic immune-mediated diseases: a review of long term safety and patient improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toussirot E

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Éric Toussirot,1–4 Fabrice Michel,5 Matthieu Béreau,6 Delphine Binda1,7 1Clinical Investigation Center – Biotherapy CBT-506, University Hospital of Besançon, Besançon, France; 2Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital of Besançon, Besançon, France; 3Department of Therapeutics, University of Franche-Comté, Besançon, France; 4Equipe d'Acceuil 4266 Pathogens and Inflammation, Structure Fédérative de Recherche–Fédération de Recherche 4234, University of Franche-Comté, Besançon, France; 5Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University Hospital of Besançon, Besançon, France; 6Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Besançon, Besançon, France; 7Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale Unité Mixte de Recherche 1098, Blood Transfusion Center, Besançon, France Abstract: Ustekinumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody targeting the common p40 subunit shared by interleukin (IL-12 and IL-23. Ustekinumab prevents the interaction of IL-12 and IL-23 with their cell surface receptors, and thus blocks T helper (Th-1 IL-12 and Th-17 IL-23 inflammatory pathways. Ustekinumab has been evaluated in the treatment of various chronic immune-mediated diseases including, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, Crohn's disease, and multiple sclerosis. It led to a rapid and durable improvement in psoriasis area and severity index in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis. Ustekinumab also improved joint symptoms of psoriatic arthritis. Results in Crohn's disease were more mitigated, albeit with a symptomatic improvement in patients refractory to tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors. Ustekinumab did not reduce the number of magnetic resonance imaging brain lesions in multiple sclerosis. The most common adverse events to have been observed during clinical trials are mild in intensity, and include respiratory tract infections, nasopharyngitis, headaches, and injection site reactions. A pooled analysis of

  5. Controversial issues regarding the roles of IL-10 and IFN-γ in active/inactive chronic hepatitis B

    OpenAIRE

    Khorramdelazad, Hossein; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi

    2014-01-01

    According to the important roles played by cytokines in induction of appropriate immune responses against hepatitis B virus (HBV), Dimitropoulou et al have examined the important cytokines in their patients. They showed that the serum levels of interleukin 10 (IL-10) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) were decreased in patients with HBeAg-negative chronic active hepatitis B compared with the inactive hepatitis B virus carriers (Dimitropoulou et al 2013). The controversy can be considered regarding the ...

  6. GITR Activation Positively Regulates Immune Responses against Toxoplasma gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Frederico R. C.; Mota, Caroline M.; Santiago, Fernanda M.; Silva, Murilo V.; Ferreira, Marcela D.; Fonseca, Denise M.; Silva, João S.; Mineo, José R.; Mineo, Tiago W. P.

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread parasite responsible for causing clinical diseases especially in pregnant and immunosuppressed individuals. Glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor (GITR), which is also known as TNFRS18 and belongs to the TNF receptor superfamily, is found to be expressed in various cell types of the immune system and provides an important costimulatory signal for T cells and myeloid cells. However, the precise role of this receptor in the context of T. gondii infection remains elusive. Therefore, the current study investigated the role of GITR activation in the immunoregulation mechanisms induced during the experimental infection of mice with T. gondii. Our data show that T. gondii infection slightly upregulates GITR expression in Treg cells and B cells, but the most robust increment in expression was observed in macrophages and dendritic cells. Interestingly, mice infected and treated with an agonistic antibody anti-GITR (DTA-1) presented a robust increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine production at preferential sites of parasite replication, which was associated with the decrease in latent brain parasitism of mice under treatment with DTA-1. Several in vivo and in vitro analysis were performed to identify the cellular mechanisms involved in GITR activation upon infection, however no clear alterations were detected in the phenotype/function of macrophages, Tregs and B cells under treatment with DTA-1. Therefore, GITR appears as a potential target for intervention during infection by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, even though further studies are still necessary to better characterize the immune response triggered by GITR activation during T. gondii infection. PMID:27027302

  7. Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008254 Prokaryotic expression and immunogenicity of Fba,a novel fibronectin-binding protein of group A streptococcus.MA Cuiqing(马翠柳),et al.Dept Immunol,Basic Med Coll,Hebei Med Univ,Shijiazhuang 050017.Chin J Infect Dis 2008;26(3):146-150.Objective To express the novel fibronectin-binding protein Fba ofgroupAstreptococcus(GAS)and analyze its immunogenicity,so to evaluate the immune responses to GAS infection.Methods fbagene was amplified by

  8. Down modulation of MHC surface molecules on B cells by suppressive immune complexes obtained from chronic intestinal schistosomiasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, S A; Gollob, K J; Correa-Oliveira, R; Goes, A M

    1998-06-01

    Granulomatous inflammation around parasite eggs is the prominent lesion in human schistosomiasis. Studies have suggested the involvement of a series of suppressive mechanisms in the control of this reaction, such as macrophages, cytokines, idiotypic interactions and immune complexes (IC). The studies examine the role of IC obtained from chronic intestinal schistosomiasis patients (ISP) in the reactivity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The results have shown that these immune complexes are able to suppress cell reactivity by inducing an increase in the production of soluble mediators such as prostaglandins and IL-10. To gain a better understanding of how this suppression occurs the present study examines the phenotypic pattern of PBMC after immune complex treatment in cell proliferation assays. These data show that cultures including immune complex present a higher percentage of B lymphocytes in which a lower expression of a MHC-class II gene product, HLA-DR was detected. This altered expression of the HLA-DR molecule on B lymphocytes after IC treatment suggests a novel mechanism for the suppression observed, that is, IC might decrease the antigen-presenting function of B lymphocytes. PMID:9698100

  9. Diagnosis of chronic active hepatitis in a miniature schnauzer

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrix, Alana D.

    2004-01-01

    A 12-year-old male castrated miniature schnauzer was presented with a history of abdominal distension. Serum biochemical analysis and abdominal ultrasonography indicated hepatic disease. A wedge biopsy provided a diagnosis of chronic active hepatitis. A therapeutic regime was initiated to improve the quality of life and slow the progression of this disease is described.

  10. Role of lymphatic vessels in tumor immunity: passive conduits or active participants?

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Amanda W.; Swartz, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Research in lymphatic biology and cancer immunology may soon intersect as emerging evidence implicates the lymphatics in the progression of chronic inflammation and autoimmunity as well as in tumor metastasis and immune escape. Like the blood vasculature, the lymphatic system comprises a highly dynamic conduit system that regulates fluid homeostasis, antigen transport and immune cell trafficking, which all play important roles in the progression and resolution of inflammation, autoimmune dise...

  11. Immunity booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The immunity booster is, according to its patent description, microbiologically pure water with an D/(D+H) isotopic concentration of 100 ppm, with physical-chemical characteristics similar to those of distilled water. It is obtained by sterilization of a mixture of deuterium depleted water, with a 25 ppm isotopic concentration, with distilled water in a volume ratio of 4:6. Unlike natural immunity boosters (bacterial agents as Bacillus Chalmette-Guerin, Corynebacterium parvum; lipopolysaccharides; human immunoglobulin) or synthetical products (levamysol; isoprinosyne with immunostimulating action), which cause hypersensitivity and shocks, thrill, fever, sickness and the immunity complex disease, the water of 100 ppm D/(D + H) isotopic concentration is a toxicity free product. The testing for immune reaction of the immunity booster led to the following results: - an increase of cell action capacity in the first immunity shielding stage (macrophages), as evidenced by stimulation of a number of essential characterizing parameters, as well as of the phagocytosis capacity, bactericide capacity, and opsonic capacity of serum; - an increase of the number of leucocyte particularly of the granulocyte in peripheral blood, produced especially when medullar toxic agents like caryolysine are used; - it hinders the effect of lowering the number of erythrocytes in peripheral blood produced by experimentally induced chronic inflammation; - an increase of nonspecific immunity defence capacity against specific bacterial aggression of both Gram-positive bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae558) and of the Gram-negative ones (Klebsiella pneumoniae 507); - an increase of immunity - stimulating activity (proinflamatory), like that of levamisole as evidenced by the test of stimulation of experimentally induced inflammation by means of carrageenan. The following advantages of the immunity booster are stressed: - it is toxicity free and side effect free; - can be orally administrated as food

  12. INVOLVEMENT OF PEPTIDOGLYCAN RECOGNITION PROTEIN L6 IN ACTIVATION OF IMMUNE DEFICIENCY PATHWAY IN THE IMMUNE RESPONSIVE SILKWORM CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromitsu; Sagisaka, Aki

    2016-06-01

    The immune deficiency (Imd) signaling pathway is activated by Gram-negative bacteria for producing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In Drosophila melanogaster, the activation of this pathway is initiated by the recognition of Gram-negative bacteria by peptidoglycan (PGN) recognition proteins (PGRPs), PGRP-LC and PGRP-LE. In this study, we found that the Imd pathway is involved in enhancing the promoter activity of AMP gene in response to Gram-negative bacteria or diaminopimelic (DAP) type PGNs derived from Gram-negative bacteria in an immune responsive silkworm cell line, Bm-NIAS-aff3. Using gene knockdown experiments, we further demonstrated that silkworm PGRP L6 (BmPGRP-L6) is involved in the activation of E. coli or E. coli-PGN mediated AMP promoter activation. Domain analysis revealed that BmPGRP-L6 contained a conserved PGRP domain, transmembrane domain, and RIP homotypic interaction motif like motif but lacked signal peptide sequences. BmPGRP-L6 overexpression enhances AMP promoter activity through the Imd pathway. BmPGRP-L6 binds to DAP-type PGNs, although it also binds to lysine-type PGNs that activate another immune signal pathway, the Toll pathway in Drosophila. These results indicate that BmPGRP-L6 is a key PGRP for activating the Imd pathway in immune responsive silkworm cells. PMID:26991439

  13. Vaccinations in adults with chronic inflammatory joint disease: Immunization schedule and recommendations for patients taking synthetic or biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Jacques; Czitrom, Séverine Guillaume; Mallick, Auriane; Sellam, Jérémie; Sibilia, Jean

    2016-03-01

    The risk of infection associated with autoimmune diseases is further increased by the use of biotherapies. Recommendations to minimize this risk include administering the full complement of vaccines on the standard immunization schedule, as well as the pneumococcal and influenza vaccines. Adults with chronic inflammatory joint disease (IJD) may receive a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, as well as a live attenuated vaccine against recurrent herpes zoster, recently licensed by European regulatory authorities. Live attenuated vaccines can be given only after an interval without immunosuppressant and/or glucocorticoid therapy. The effectiveness of vaccines, as assessed based on titers of protective antibodies, varies across vaccine types and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Thus, methotrexate and rituximab are usually associated with decreased vaccine responses. The risks associated with vaccines are often considerably exaggerated by the media, which serve lobbies opposed to immunizations and make some patients reluctant to accept immunizations. Increasing immunization coverage may diminish the risk of treatment-related infections. A physician visit dedicated specifically to detecting comorbidities in patients with chronic IJD may result in improved immunization coverage. In this review, we discuss immunizations for adults with chronic IJD based on the treatments used, as well as immunization coverage. Many questions remain unanswered and warrant investigation by studies coordinated by the French networks IREIVAC (Innovative clinical research network in vaccinology) and IMIDIATE (Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Disease Alliance for Translational and Clinical Research). PMID:26453106

  14. 99th Dahlem conference on infection, inflammation and chronic inflammatory disorders: innate immune responses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze-Lefert, P

    2010-04-01

    Plants rely exclusively upon mechanisms of innate immunity. Current concepts of the plant innate immune system are based largely on two forms of immunity that engage distinct classes of immune receptors. These receptors enable the recognition of non-self structures that are either conserved between members of a microbial class or specific to individual strains of a microbe. One type of receptor comprises membrane-resident pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that detect widely conserved microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) on the cell surface. A second type of mainly intracellular immune sensors, designated resistance (R) proteins, recognizes either the structure or function of strain-specific pathogen effectors that are delivered inside host cells. Phytopathogenic microorganisms have evolved a repertoire of effectors, some of which are delivered into plant cells to sabotage MAMP-triggered immune responses. Plants appear to have also evolved receptors that sense cellular injury by the release and perception of endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). It is possible that the integration of MAMP and DAMP responses is critical to mount robust MAMP-triggered immunity. This signal integration might help to explain why plants are colonized in nature by remarkably diverse and seemingly asymptomatic microbial communities. PMID:20415853

  15. Immune activation in HIV-infected aging women on antiretrovirals--implications for age-associated comorbidities: a cross-sectional pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L Alcaide

    Full Text Available Persistent immune activation and microbial translocation associated with HIV infection likely place HIV-infected aging women at high risk of developing chronic age-related diseases. We investigated immune activation and microbial translocation in HIV-infected aging women in the post-menopausal ages.Twenty-seven post-menopausal women with HIV infection receiving antiretroviral treatment with documented viral suppression and 15 HIV-negative age-matched controls were enrolled. Levels of immune activation markers (T cell immune phenotype, sCD25, sCD14, sCD163, microbial translocation (LPS and biomarkers of cardiovascular disease and impaired cognitive function (sVCAM-1, sICAM-1 and CXCL10 were evaluated.T cell activation and exhaustion, monocyte/macrophage activation, and microbial translocation were significantly higher in HIV-infected women when compared to uninfected controls. Microbial translocation correlated with T cell and monocyte/macrophage activation. Biomarkers of cardiovascular disease and impaired cognition were elevated in women with HIV infection and correlated with immune activation.HIV-infected antiretroviral-treated aging women who achieved viral suppression are in a generalized status of immune activation and therefore are at an increased risk of age-associated end-organ diseases compared to uninfected age-matched controls.

  16. Evaluation of the Immunity Activity of Glycyrrhizin in AR Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Guo Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated effect of glycyrrhizin on immunity function in allergic rhinitis (AR mice. The AR mice model were induced by dripping ovalbumin in physiological saline (2 mg mL−1, 10 μL into the bilateral nasal cavities using a micropipette. After the AR model was induced, mice were randomly divided into six groups: the normal control, model, lycopene 20 mg kg−1 (as positive control drug group, and glycyrrhizin 10, 20, 30 mg kg−1 groups. After the sensitization day 14, lycopene (20 mg/kg BW and glycyrrhizin (10, 20 and 30 mg/kg BW were given orally for 20 days once a day. Mice in the normal control and model groups were given saline orally once a day for 20 days. Results showed that glycyrrhizin treatment could dose-dependently significantly reduce blood immunoglobulin E (IgE, interleukin-4 (IL-4, interleukin-5 (IL-5, interleukin-6 (IL-6, nitrous oxide (NO, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α levels and nitrous oxide synthase (NOS activity and enhance blood immunoglobulin A (IgA, immunoglobulin G (IgG, immunoglobulin M (IgM, interleukin-2 (IL-2 and interleukin-12 (IL-12 levels in AR mice. Furthermore, glycyrrhizin treatment could dose-dependently significantly enhance acetylcholinesterase (AchE activity and reduce substance P (SP level in peripheral blood and nasal mucosa of AR mice. We conclude that glycyrrhizin can improve immunity function in AR mice, suggesting a potential drug for the prevention and therapy of AR.

  17. A Compositional Look at the Human Gastrointestinal Microbiome and Immune Activation Parameters in HIV Infected Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Mutlu, Ece A.; Keshavarzian, Ali; Losurdo, John; Swanson, Garth; Siewe, Basile; Forsyth, Christopher; French, Audrey; DeMarais, Patricia; Sun, Yan; Koenig, Lars; Cox, Stephen; Engen, Phillip; Chakradeo, Prachi; Abbasi, Rawan; Gorenz, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Author Summary Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection related illness progresses despite the control of the virus itself by medications that stop the replication of the virus. This happens because the immune system gets activated. While the causes for such activation of the immune system are not exactly known, immune activation in HIV infection may be occurring as a result of bacteria or their products in the digestive tract. This study looks at the types of bacteria that reside in the ...

  18. Gluten and chronic diseases: Inflammatory activity of gluten

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tlaskalová, Helena; Štěpánková, Renata; Tučková, Ludmila; Palová-Jelínková, Lenka; Kozáková, Hana; Hudcovic, Tomáš; Sánchez, Daniel; Frolová, Lenka; Cinová, Jana; Pecharová, Barbara

    Herborn: Herborn Litterae, 2007, s. 25-36. ISBN 3-923022-31-X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/05/2245; GA ČR GA303/04/0849; GA ČR GA303/06/0974; GA ČR(CZ) GA303/05/2249; GA ČR GD310/03/H147; GA AV ČR IAA5020210; GA AV ČR IAA5020205; GA AV ČR IAA5020101; GA AV ČR 1QS500200572; GA MZe 1B53002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : gluten * chronic diseases * immune system Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  19. Activation of nuclear factor-kappaB in dogs with chronic enteropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckschander, Nicole; Hall, Jean A; Gaschen, Frédéric; Forster, Ursula; Wenzlow, Nanny; Hermann, Pascal; Allenspach, Karin; Dobbelaere, Dirk; Burgener, Iwan A; Welle, Monika

    2010-02-15

    Homeostasis in the intestinal microenvironment between the immune system and luminal antigens appears disturbed in chronic enteropathies. Pro-inflammatory cytokines likely play a role in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. Several inflammatory and immunoregulatory genes have associated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) binding sites, which allow NF-kappaB to regulate gene transcription. The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) the occurrence of NF-kappaB activation during mucosal inflammation in situ, (2) the mucosal distribution pattern of cells expressing activated NF-kappaB within treatment groups, and (3) the effect of specific therapy on NF-kappaB activation. Dogs with chronic enteropathy were studied (n=26) and compared with 13 healthy dogs. Ten dogs had food responsive disease (FRD) and 16 had inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). NF-kappaB activation was detected in duodenal mucosal biopsies using a mouse monoclonal antibody (MAB 3026) that selectively binds the nuclear localization sequence of activated NF-kappaB. To identify macrophages, biopsies were stained using the MAC 387 antibody. Macrophages in the lamina propria double-stained for MAC 387 and NF-kappaB were quantitated; epithelial cell expression of activated NF-kappaB was determined semi-quantitatively. Results showed that more macrophages positive for activated NF-kappaB were present in lamina propria of dogs with chronic enteropathy compared to control dogs (pepithelial cells were observed in FRD dogs compared to IBD dogs (pepithelial cells staining positive for activated NF-kappaB decreased (pregulation follows successful therapy. PMID:19740552

  20. Histological, Immunohistochemical and clinical study of HEPATIC immune response in CHRONIC hepatitis C

    OpenAIRE

    Aboushady MA, Algyoushy AF, Elbaz TZ, Saleh SA and Ewees IE

    2004-01-01

    The factors that determine persistence or clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are poorly understood. Information in this area may lead to better understanding of the immune response against HCV infection. Such understanding can support the goal of development of a broad based cellular and humoral immune response to HCV which may be important for eradication of infection. In the present study, needle biopsy specimens from hepatitis C virus infected patients were prepared for histolo...

  1. Lymphatic System: An Active Pathway for Immune Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Shan; von der Weid, Pierre-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels are well known to participate in the immune response by providing the structural and functional support for the delivery of antigens and antigen presenting cells to draining lymph nodes. Recent advances have improved our understanding of how the lymphatic system works and how it participates to the development of immune responses. New findings suggest that the lymphatic system may control the ultimate immune response through a number of ways which include guiding antigen/den...

  2. Network Signatures of IgG Immune Repertoires in Hepatitis B Associated Chronic Infection and Vaccination Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ya-Hui; Kuan, Hui-Chung; Hsieh, T. C.; Ma, K. H.; Yang, Chung-Hsiang; Hsu, Wei-Bin; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Chao, Anne; Liu, Hong-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    The repertoire of IgG antibody responses to infection and vaccination varies depending on the characteristics of the immunogen and the ability of the host to mount a protective immune response. Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are marked by persistent infection and immune tolerance to vaccination. This disease offers a unique opportunity to discover key repertoire signatures during infection and in response to vaccination. Complementarity determining region 3 of an antibody heavy chain (CDR-H3) has a major impact on the antigenic specificity of an antibody. We used next-generation sequencing to characterize the CDR-H3 sequences in paired siblings of 4 families in which only one member of each pair had chronic HBV infection. Blood samples were obtained before and 2 weeks after HBV vaccination. The analysis revealed a huge network of sequence-related CDR-H3 clones found almost exclusively among carriers. In contrast, vaccination induced significant increases of CDR-H3 cluster diversities among siblings without hepatitis B. Several vaccination-associated clone clusters were identified. Similar findings of vaccination-associated clone networks were observed in healthy adults receiving HBV boosters. These strategies can be used to identify signatures of other infectious diseases and accelerate discoveries of antibody sequences with important biomedical implications. PMID:27222149

  3. New advances in the treatment of adult chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura: role of thrombopoietin receptor-stimulating agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ara Metjian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Ara Metjian1, Charles S Abrams21Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Decades of basic science and clinical research have led to an increased understanding of the pathophysiology of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP, the processes underlying thrombopoiesis, and the treatment of chronic ITP. Now, new agents are available to treat ITP in a nonimmunosuppressive fashion. Lessons learned from the clinical trials of recombinant human thrombopoietin (TPO have led to the development of a novel class of compounds: nonimmunogenic agonists of the thrombopoietin receptor. Representing the first nonimmunosuppressive agents to treat chronic refractory ITP in decades, medications such as romiplostim and eltrombopag were recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. These new agents offer physicians a new tool for treating difficult cases of ITP in their medical armamentarium. Additional TPO mimetics are also being developed that show promise in vitro, and await future development.Keywords: thrombocytopenia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, eltrombopag, romiplostim, thrombopoietin, thrombopoietin receptor

  4. Network Signatures of IgG Immune Repertoires in Hepatitis B Associated Chronic Infection and Vaccination Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ya-Hui; Kuan, Hui-Chung; Hsieh, T C; Ma, K H; Yang, Chung-Hsiang; Hsu, Wei-Bin; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Chao, Anne; Liu, Hong-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    The repertoire of IgG antibody responses to infection and vaccination varies depending on the characteristics of the immunogen and the ability of the host to mount a protective immune response. Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are marked by persistent infection and immune tolerance to vaccination. This disease offers a unique opportunity to discover key repertoire signatures during infection and in response to vaccination. Complementarity determining region 3 of an antibody heavy chain (CDR-H3) has a major impact on the antigenic specificity of an antibody. We used next-generation sequencing to characterize the CDR-H3 sequences in paired siblings of 4 families in which only one member of each pair had chronic HBV infection. Blood samples were obtained before and 2 weeks after HBV vaccination. The analysis revealed a huge network of sequence-related CDR-H3 clones found almost exclusively among carriers. In contrast, vaccination induced significant increases of CDR-H3 cluster diversities among siblings without hepatitis B. Several vaccination-associated clone clusters were identified. Similar findings of vaccination-associated clone networks were observed in healthy adults receiving HBV boosters. These strategies can be used to identify signatures of other infectious diseases and accelerate discoveries of antibody sequences with important biomedical implications. PMID:27222149

  5. Histological, Immunohistochemical and clinical study of HEPATIC immune response in CHRONIC hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboushady MA, Algyoushy AF, Elbaz TZ, Saleh SA and Ewees IE

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The factors that determine persistence or clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection are poorly understood. Information in this area may lead to better understanding of the immune response against HCV infection. Such understanding can support the goal of development of a broad based cellular and humoral immune response to HCV which may be important for eradication of infection. In the present study, needle biopsy specimens from hepatitis C virus infected patients were prepared for histological, histopathological and immunohistochemical studies. Patient history, full clinical examination and biochemical investigations were recorded. Primary and secondary lymphoid follicles were evident in ABOUT 50% of the biopsies. Because CD4(+ T- helper (T-h lymphocytes provide help for humoral immunity, these cells were demonstrated in the liver biopsies by immunohistochemical methods. Positive fluorescence representing CD3(+/CD4(+ T-h was vigorous in liver residing lymph follicles. To test the possibility of T-h proliferation due to autoimmune reaction, the serum of patients was tested for the presence of antimitochondrial, antismooth muscle and antinuclear antibodies by immunohistochemical method. Analysis of the results eliminated the autoimmune response leaving the possibility of antiviral response. Histological examination indicated bile duct injury in areas occupied by secondary follicles. This may indicate that viral core proteins, with antigenic properties that elucidate immune response, may reach the portal area, in which the follicles are formed, via the bile canaliculi to the bile duct where antigen antibody complex is phagocytosed leading to bile duct injury. Unlike the case of patients who did not show follicles in their liver biopsy, those showing secondary follicles did not show liver cirrhosis or high grade fibrosis suggesting immune protection. Moreover, the incidence of secondary follicles in females was higher than males suggesting sex

  6. Adaptive immune defects against glycoantigens in chronic granulomatous disease via dysregulated nitric oxide production

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Colleen J.; Cobb, Brian A

    2011-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency defined by mutations in the NADPH oxidase complex leading to reduced superoxide production, increased susceptibility to infection, chronic inflammation, and recurring abscess and granuloma formation. Here, we found that CGD mice were hyperresponsive to abscess-inducing T-cell-dependent carbohydrate antigens (glycoantigens) due to a ten-fold increase in NO production within APCs, which is known to be necessary for glycoantigen p...

  7. Epithelium, Inflammation, and Immunity in the Upper Airways of Humans: Studies in Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    OpenAIRE

    Schleimer, Robert P.; Kato, Atsushi; Peters, Anju; Conley, David; Kim, Jean; Liu, Mark C.; Harris, Kathleen E.; Douglas A. Kuperman; Chandra, Rakesh; Favoreto, Silvio; Avila, Pedro C; Grammer, Leslie C.; Kern, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss recent findings made during studies of the upper airways and sinuses of people with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) in the context of the literature. CRS is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting nearly 30 million Americans and is generally resistant to therapy with antibiotics and glucocorticoids (Meltzer EO and coworkers, J Allergy Clin Immunol 2004;114:155–212). We have formed a collaboration that consists of otolaryngologists, allergists, and basic...

  8. Neuropathogenesis of Chikungunya infection: astrogliosis and innate immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Fiona M; Lee, Kim M; Chiu, Kevin B; Purcell, Olivia M; Didier, Peter J; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Weaver, Scott C; Roy, Chad J; MacLean, Andrew G

    2016-04-01

    Chikungunya, "that which bends up" in the Makonde dialect, is an emerging global health threat, with increasing incidence of neurological complications. Until 2013, Chikungunya infection had been largely restricted to East Africa and the Indian Ocean, with cases within the USA reported to be from foreign travel. However, in 2014, over 1 million suspected cases were reported in the Americas, and a recently infected human could serve as an unwitting reservoir for the virus resulting in an epidemic in the continental USA. Chikungunya infection is increasingly being associated with neurological sequelae. In this study, we sought to understand the role of astrocytes in the neuropathogenesis of Chikungunya infection. Even after virus has been cleared form the circulation, astrocytes were activated with regard to TLR2 expression. In addition, white matter astrocytes were hypertrophic, with increased arbor volume in gray matter astrocytes. Combined, these would alter the number and distribution of synapses that each astrocyte would be capable of forming. These results provide the first evidence that Chikungunya infection induces morphometric and innate immune activation of astrocytes in vivo. Perturbed glia-neuron signaling could be a major driving factor in the development of Chikungunya-associated neuropathology. PMID:26419894

  9. Evaluation of humoral immune function in patients with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saeid Rahiminejad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Coincidence of autoimmune diseases such as immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP with  immunodeficiencies has  been  reported  previously in  patients  who  suffered  from primary antibody deficiency (PAD. But there is no original study on immunological profiles of ITP patients to find out their probable immune deficiency.In this case-control study, ITP patients’ humoral immunity was investigated for diagnosis of PAD in comparison with normal population. To evaluate the humoral immune system against polysaccharide antigens, patients’ serum immunoglobulin levels were measured and a 23-valent pneumococcal  capsular polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23 was administrated  to evaluate the antibody response to vaccination.In  this  study, 14 out  of  36 patients  (39% were diagnosed with antibody mediated immune deficiency including 2 patients (5.5% with immunoglobulin class deficiency and 4 (11% with IgG subclass deficiency. The remaining patients suffered from specific antibody deficiency. The most frequent deficiency in ITP patients was specific antibody deficiency.Therefore, immunological survey on ITP patients may be important especially for those who have undergone splenectomy.

  10. Multiple immune factors are involved in controlling acute and chronic chikungunya virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Suan Poo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent epidemic of the arthritogenic alphavirus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV has prompted a quest to understand the correlates of protection against virus and disease in order to inform development of new interventions. Herein we highlight the propensity of CHIKV infections to persist long term, both as persistent, steady-state, viraemias in multiple B cell deficient mouse strains, and as persistent RNA (including negative-strand RNA in wild-type mice. The knockout mouse studies provided evidence for a role for T cells (but not NK cells in viraemia suppression, and confirmed the role of T cells in arthritis promotion, with vaccine-induced T cells also shown to be arthritogenic in the absence of antibody responses. However, MHC class II-restricted T cells were not required for production of anti-viral IgG2c responses post CHIKV infection. The anti-viral cytokines, TNF and IFNγ, were persistently elevated in persistently infected B and T cell deficient mice, with adoptive transfer of anti-CHIKV antibodies unable to clear permanently the viraemia from these, or B cell deficient, mice. The NOD background increased viraemia and promoted arthritis, with B, T and NK deficient NOD mice showing high-levels of persistent viraemia and ultimately succumbing to encephalitic disease. In wild-type mice persistent CHIKV RNA and negative strand RNA (detected for up to 100 days post infection was associated with persistence of cellular infiltrates, CHIKV antigen and stimulation of IFNα/β and T cell responses. These studies highlight that, secondary to antibodies, several factors are involved in virus control, and suggest that chronic arthritic disease is a consequence of persistent, replicating and transcriptionally active CHIKV RNA.

  11. Multiple immune factors are involved in controlling acute and chronic chikungunya virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poo, Yee Suan; Rudd, Penny A; Gardner, Joy; Wilson, Jane A C; Larcher, Thibaut; Colle, Marie-Anne; Le, Thuy T; Nakaya, Helder I; Warrilow, David; Allcock, Richard; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Schroder, Wayne A; Khromykh, Alexander A; Lopez, José A; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    The recent epidemic of the arthritogenic alphavirus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has prompted a quest to understand the correlates of protection against virus and disease in order to inform development of new interventions. Herein we highlight the propensity of CHIKV infections to persist long term, both as persistent, steady-state, viraemias in multiple B cell deficient mouse strains, and as persistent RNA (including negative-strand RNA) in wild-type mice. The knockout mouse studies provided evidence for a role for T cells (but not NK cells) in viraemia suppression, and confirmed the role of T cells in arthritis promotion, with vaccine-induced T cells also shown to be arthritogenic in the absence of antibody responses. However, MHC class II-restricted T cells were not required for production of anti-viral IgG2c responses post CHIKV infection. The anti-viral cytokines, TNF and IFNγ, were persistently elevated in persistently infected B and T cell deficient mice, with adoptive transfer of anti-CHIKV antibodies unable to clear permanently the viraemia from these, or B cell deficient, mice. The NOD background increased viraemia and promoted arthritis, with B, T and NK deficient NOD mice showing high-levels of persistent viraemia and ultimately succumbing to encephalitic disease. In wild-type mice persistent CHIKV RNA and negative strand RNA (detected for up to 100 days post infection) was associated with persistence of cellular infiltrates, CHIKV antigen and stimulation of IFNα/β and T cell responses. These studies highlight that, secondary to antibodies, several factors are involved in virus control, and suggest that chronic arthritic disease is a consequence of persistent, replicating and transcriptionally active CHIKV RNA. PMID:25474568

  12. A serum microRNA signature is associated with the immune control of chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizia Rossana Brunetto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The virus/host interplay mediates liver pathology in chronic HBV infection. MiRNAs play a pivotal role in virus/host interactions and are detected in both serum and HBsAg-particles, but studies of their dynamics during chronic infection and antiviral therapy are missing. We studied serum miRNAs during different phases of chronic HBV infection and antiviral treatment. METHODS: MiRNAs were profiled by miRCURY-LNA-Universal-RT-miRNA-PCR (Exiqon-A/S and qPCR-panels-I/II-739-miRNA-assays and single-RT-q-PCRs. Two cohorts of well-characterized HBsAg-carriers were studied (median follow-up 34-52 months: a training-panel (141 sera and HBsAg-particles (32 samples from 61 HBsAg-carriers and b validation-panel (136 sera from 84 carriers. RESULTS: Thirty-one miRNAs were differentially expressed in inactive-carriers (IC and chronic-hepatitis-B (CHB with the largest difference for miR-122-5p, miR-99a-5p and miR-192-5p (liver-specific-miRNAs, over-expressed in both sera and HBsAg-particles of CHB (ANOVA/U-test p-values: 8.3 Log10 IU/mL, ρ = -0.732, p<0.001 and HBsAg (3.40, 0.11/5.49 Log10 IU/mL, ρ = -0.883, p<0.001. At multivariate analysis HBV-DNA (p = 0.002, HBsAg (p<0.001 and infection-phase (p<0.001, but not ALT (p = 0.360 correlated with MiR-B-Index. In SVR to Peg-IFN/NUCs MiR-B-Index improved during-therapy and post-treatment reaching IC-like values (5.32, -1.65/10.91 vs 6.68, 0.54/9.53, p = 0.324 beckoning sustained HBV-immune-control earlier than HBsAg-decline. CONCLUSIONS: Serum miRNA profile change dynamically during the different phases of chronic HBV infection. We identified a miRNA signature associated with both natural-occurring and therapy-induced immune control of HBV infection. The MiR-B-Index might be a useful biomarker for the early identification of the sustained switch from CHB to inactive HBV-infection in patients treated with antivirals.

  13. Immune adjuvant activity of the olive, soybean and corn oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Marinho da Silva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last half of the century, a large amount of substances has been used as immune adjuvant. The immune adjuvant effect of olive, soybean and corn oils in Swiss mice immunized with ovalbumin (OVA plus aluminum hydroxide or emulsified in Marcol, soybean, olive or corn oils was evaluated through the OVA-specific antibodies determined by ELISA and Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis. In this work the comparison of the intensity of the immune response was established by the Bayesian analysis. The adjuvant effect of the vegetable oils was shown to be more effective than aluminium hydroxide. Regarding to OVA-specific IgE synthesis, olive oil had the slowest adjuvant effect of the three vegetable oils. Accordingly, olive oil was the most convenient among the vegetable oils to be used as immune adjuvant, since it stimulated a higher production of OVA-specific Ig and lower levels of anti-OVA IgE.

  14. Serum arylesterase and paraoxonase activity in patients with chronic hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suleyman Sirri Kilic; Suleyman Aydin; Nermin Kilic; Fazilet Erman; Suna Aydin; (I)lhami Celik

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between serum paraoxonase (PON1), AST, ALT, GGT, and arylesterase (AE) activity alterations and the degree of liver damage in patients with chronic hepatitis.METHODS: We studied 34 chronic hepatitis patients and 32 control subjects, aged between 35 and 65 years,in the Department of Infection and Clinical Microbiology at the Firat University School of Medicine. Blood samples were collected from subjects between 8:00 and 10:00 a.m. following a 12-h fast. Baseline and salt-stimulated PON1 activities were measured by the hydrolysis of paraoxon. Phenyl acetate was used as the substrate and formed phenol was measured spectrophotometrically at 270 nm after the addition of a 10-fold diluted serum sample in AE activity measurements.RESULTS: The results of this investigation revealed that the levels of AE activity decreased from 132±52 to 94±36 (29%), baseline PON1 activity from 452±112 to 164±67 (64%), salt-stimulated PON1 activity from 746±394 to 294±220 (61%), HDL from 58.4±5.1 to 47.2±5.6(20%), triglyceride from 133±51.2 to 86±34.0 (35%),while a slight increase in the level of LDL (from 163±54.1 to 177.3±56.0; 9%) and significant increases in the levels of AST (from 29±9.3 to 98±44), ALP (from 57.2±13.1 to 91±38.1), ALT (from 27.9±3.32 to 89±19.1), GGT (from 24.3±2.10 to 94±48.2), total bilirubin (from 0.74±0.02 to 1.36±0.06; 84%) and direct bilirubin (from 0.18±0.01 to 0.42±0.04; 133%) were detected.However, the levels of albumin, total protein, cholesterol,and uric acid were almost the same in chronic hepatitis and the control subjects.CONCLUSION: Low PON1 and AE activity may contribute to the increased liver dysfunction in chronic hepatitis patients by reducing the ability of HDL to retard LDL oxidation and might be clinically useful for monitoring the disease of chronic hepatitis.

  15. Effect of chronic, low-level whole-body irradiation on canine immune status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A whole blood lectin-induced lymphocyte stimulation test using Con-A and PHA was used to assess the cell-mediated immune status of 52 beagle dogs over a period of 16 months. These dogs included 38 controls 4 exposed to 0.06 R/d, 3 to 0.3 R/d, 4 to 1.0 R/d, and 3 to 2.0 R/d. The data indicated the presence of seasonal variation in immunity with a peak in July and a trough in January

  16. The Split Virus Influenza Vaccine rapidly activates immune cells through Fcγ receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, William E; Huang, Huang; Wei, Yu-Ling; Davis, Kara L; Leipold, Michael D; Bendall, Sean C; Kidd, Brian A; Dekker, Cornelia L; Maecker, Holden T; Chien, Yueh-Hsiu; Davis, Mark M

    2014-10-14

    Seasonal influenza vaccination is one of the most common medical procedures and yet the extent to which it activates the immune system beyond inducing antibody production is not well understood. In the United States, the most prevalent formulations of the vaccine consist of degraded or "split" viral particles distributed without any adjuvants. Based on previous reports we sought to determine whether the split influenza vaccine activates innate immune receptors-specifically Toll-like receptors. High-dimensional proteomic profiling of human whole-blood using Cytometry by Time-of-Flight (CyTOF) was used to compare signaling pathway activation and cytokine production between the split influenza vaccine and a prototypical TLR response ex vivo. This analysis revealed that the split vaccine rapidly and potently activates multiple immune cell types but yields a proteomic signature quite distinct from TLR activation. Importantly, vaccine induced activity was dependent upon the presence of human sera indicating that a serum factor was necessary for vaccine-dependent immune activation. We found this serum factor to be human antibodies specific for influenza proteins and therefore immediate immune activation by the split vaccine is immune-complex dependent. These studies demonstrate that influenza virus "splitting" inactivates any potential adjuvants endogenous to influenza, such as RNA, but in previously exposed individuals can elicit a potent immune response by facilitating the rapid formation of immune complexes. PMID:25203448

  17. Two separate mechanisms of enforced viral replication balance innate and adaptive immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaabani, Namir; Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Zhou, Fan; Tur, Rita Ferrer; Häussinger, Dieter; Recher, Mike; Tumanov, Alexei V; Hardt, Cornelia; Pinschewer, Daniel; Christen, Urs; Lang, Philipp A; Honke, Nadine; Lang, Karl S

    2016-02-01

    The induction of innate and adaptive immunity is essential for controlling viral infections. Limited or overwhelming innate immunity can negatively impair the adaptive immune response. Therefore, balancing innate immunity separately from activating the adaptive immune response would result in a better antiviral immune response. Recently, we demonstrated that Usp18-dependent replication of virus in secondary lymphatic organs contributes to activation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. Whether specific mechanisms can balance innate and adaptive immunity separately remains unknown. In this study, using lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and replication-deficient single-cycle LCMV vectors, we found that viral replication of the initial inoculum is essential for activating virus-specific CD8(+) T cells. In contrast, extracellular distribution of virus along the splenic conduits is necessary for inducing systemic levels of type I interferon (IFN-I). Although enforced virus replication is driven primarily by Usp18, B cell-derived lymphotoxin beta contributes to the extracellular distribution of virus along the splenic conduits. Therefore, lymphotoxin beta regulates IFN-I induction independently of CD8(+) T-cell activity. We found that two separate mechanisms act together in the spleen to guarantee amplification of virus during infection, thereby balancing the activation of the innate and adaptive immune system. PMID:26553386

  18. Chronic hyperammonemia induces tonic activation of NMDA receptors in cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElMlili, Nisrin; Boix, Jordi; Ahabrach, Hanan; Rodrigo, Regina; Errami, Mohammed; Felipo, Vicente

    2010-02-01

    Reduced function of the glutamate--nitric oxide (NO)--cGMP pathway is responsible for some cognitive alterations in rats with hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy. Hyperammonemia impairs the pathway in cerebellum by increasing neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) phosphorylation in Ser847 by calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), reducing nNOS activity, and by reducing nNOS amount in synaptic membranes, which reduces its activation following NMDA receptors activation. The reason for increased CaMKII activity in hyperammonemia remains unknown. We hypothesized that it would be as a result of increased tonic activation of NMDA receptors. The aims of this work were to assess: (i) whether tonic NMDA activation receptors is increased in cerebellum in chronic hyperammonemia in vivo; and (ii) whether this tonic activation is responsible for increased CaMKII activity and reduced activity of nNOS and of the glutamate--NO--cGMP pathway. Blocking NMDA receptors with MK-801 increases cGMP and NO metabolites in cerebellum in vivo and in slices from hyperammonemic rats. This is because of reduced phosphorylation and activity of CaMKII, leading to normalization of nNOS phosphorylation and activity. MK-801 also increases nNOS in synaptic membranes and reduces it in cytosol. This indicates that hyperammonemia increases tonic activation of NMDA receptors leading to reduced activity of nNOS and of the glutamate--NO--cGMP pathway. PMID:20002515

  19. Lung angiotensin converting enzyme activity in chronically hypoxic rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Kay, J M; Keane, P. M.; Suyama, K L; Gauthier, D.

    1985-01-01

    A study was carried out to test the hypothesis that the reduced lung angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity which occurs in chronic hypoxia is related to the development of pulmonary hypertension rather than to hypoxia per se. Right ventricular mean systolic pressure (Prvs, mm Hg) and ACE activity (nmol/mg protein/min) in lung tissue homogenates were measured in seven groups of four rats placed in a hypobaric chamber (380 mm Hg; 51 kPa) for two to 24 days. Identical measurements were ma...

  20. Shared immune and repair markers during experimental toxoplasma chronic brain infection and schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Tomasik (Jakub); T.L. Schultz (Tracey L.); W. Kluge (Wolfgang); R.H. Yolken (Robert H.); S. Bahn (Sabine); V.B. Carruthers (Vern B.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractChronic neurologic infection with Toxoplasma gondii is relatively common in humans and is one of the strongest known risk factors for schizophrenia. Nevertheless, the exact neuropathological mechanisms linking T gondii infection and schizophrenia remain unclear. Here we utilize a mouse m

  1. Chronic Stress, Depression and Immunity in Spouses of Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Jane S. Blake; Sephton, Sandra E.; Kimerling, Rachel; Butler, Lisa; Bernstein, Aaron S.; Spiegel, David

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to examine how the chronicity of stress affects psychological stress-responses, depressive symptoms, and "in vivo" immunocompetence in spouses of women with metastatic breast cancer. Methods: Participants were 34 spouses of breast cancer patients. Their wives had been living with a diagnosis of recurrence…

  2. Pronounced susceptibility to infection by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in mice chronically exposed to lead correlates with a shift to Th2-type immune responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persistent exposure to inorganic lead (Pb) is known to adversely affect the immune system. In the present study, we assessed the effect of chronic Pb exposure on susceptibility to infection by the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Mice were exposed to 10 mM Pb-acetate in drinking water for ∼ 16 weeks, resulting in a significant level of Pb in the blood (106.2 ± 8.9 μg/dl). Pb exposure rendered mice susceptible to Salmonella infection, manifested by increased bacterial burden in target organs and heightened mortality. Flow cytometric analysis of the splenic cellular composition in normal and Pb-exposed mice revealed no gross alteration in the ratios of B and T lymphocytes or myeloid cells. Similarly, the capacity of B and T cells to upregulate the expression of activation antigens in response to mitogenic or inflammatory stimuli was not hindered by Pb exposure. Analysis of the ability of ex vivo-cultured splenocytes to secrete cytokines demonstrated a marked reduction in IFN-γ and IL-12p40 production associated with Pb exposure. In contrast, secretion of IL-4 by splenocytes of Pb-treated mice was 3- to 3.6-fold higher than in normal mice. The increased capacity to produce IL-4 correlated with a shift in the in vivo anti-Salmonella antibody response from the protective IgG2a isotype to the Th2-induced IgG1 isotype. We conclude that chronic exposure to high levels of Pb results in a state of immunodeficiency which is not due to an overt cytotoxic or immunosuppressive mechanism, but rather is largely caused by a shift in immune responsiveness to Th2-type reactions

  3. Immune activation by casein dietary antigens in bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severance, E.G.; Dupont, D.; Dickerson, F.B.; Stallings, C.R.; Origoni, A.E.; Krivogorsky, B.; Yang, S.; Haasnoot, W.; Yolken, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Inflammation and other immune processes are increasingly linked to psychiatric diseases. Antigenic triggers specific to bipolar disorder are not yet defined. We tested whether antibodies to bovine milk caseins were associated with bipolar disorder, and whether patients recognized differe

  4. Interactions between the immune and nervous systems in pain

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Ke; Dubner, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Immune cells and glia interact with neurons to alter pain sensitivity and to mediate the transition from acute to chronic pain. In response to injury, resident immune cells are activated and blood-borne immune cells are recruited to the site of injury. Immune cells not only contribute to immune protection but also initiate the sensitization of peripheral nociceptors. Through the synthesis and release of inflammatory mediators and interactions with neurotransmitters and their receptors, the im...

  5. Defects in host immune function in tree frogs with chronic chytridiomycosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Young

    Full Text Available The amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd has caused mass mortality leading to population declines and extinctions in many frog species worldwide. The lack of host resistance may be due to fungal immunosuppressive effects that have been observed when Bd is incubated with cultured lymphocytes, but whether in vivo host immunosuppression occurs is unknown. We used a broad range of hematologic and protein electrophoresis biomarkers, along with various functional tests, to assess immune competence in common green (Litoria caerulea and white-lipped (L. infrafrenata tree frogs experimentally infected with Bd. Compared with uninfected frogs, Bd infection in L. caerulea caused a reduction in immunoglobulin and splenic lymphocyte responses to antigenic stimulation with sheep red blood cells, along with decreased white blood cell and serum protein concentrations, indicating possible impaired immune response capability of Bd-infected frogs. This is the first in vivo study suggesting that infection with Bd causes multiple defects in systemic host immune function, and this may contribute to disease development in susceptible host species. Although L. infrafrenata failed to maintain Bd infection after exposure, white blood cell and serum globulin concentrations were lower in recovered frogs compared with unexposed frogs, but antigen-specific serum and splenic antibody, and splenic cellular, responses were similar in both recovered and unexposed frogs. This may indicate potential systemic costs associated with infection clearance and/or redirection of host resources towards more effective mechanisms to overcome infection. No clear mechanism for resistance was identified in L. infrafrenata, suggesting that localized and/or innate immune defense mechanisms may be important factors involved in disease resistance in this species.

  6. Immune Responses of Specific-Pathogen-Free Mice to Chronic Helicobacter pylori (Strain SS1) Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrero, Richard L.; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Huerre, Michel; Labigne, Agnès

    1998-01-01

    A model permitting the establishment of persistent Helicobacter pylori infection in mice was recently described. To evaluate murine immune responses to H. pylori infection, specific-pathogen-free Swiss mice (n = 50) were intragastrically inoculated with 1.2 × 107 CFU of a mouse-adapted H. pylori isolate (strain SS1). Control animals (n = 10) received sterile broth medium alone. Animals were sacrificed at various times, from 3 days to 16 weeks postinoculation (p.i.). Quantitative culture of ga...

  7. The role of microbiota in immunity development and chronic diseases: Gnotobiology as a too

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena; Štěpánková, Renata; Kozáková, Hana; Hudcovic, Tomáš; Rossmann, Pavel; Hrnčíř, Tomáš; Kverka, Miloslav; Zákostelská, Zuzana; Klimešová, Klára; Schwarzer, Martin; Kokešová, Alena; Šrůtková, Dagmar; Kobayashi, K.; Eden, W.

    Košice: Pamida International, Ltd, 2013. s. 44. ISBN 978-80-89589-07-4. [SOMED 2013. 24.09.2013-26.09.2013, Košice] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/1252; GA ČR GAP303/12/0535; GA MZd(CZ) NT13483 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : immune system

  8. The Case for Increased Physical Activity in Chronic Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, R J

    2016-06-01

    Regular physical activity reduces the risk of colon cancer, but there is little information on the merits of such activity in the prevention and management of chronic inflammatory bowel disease (CIBD). The present systematic review thus documents current levels of habitual physical activity and aerobic and muscular function in CIBD, and examines the safety, practicality and efficacy of exercise programmes in countering the disease process, correcting functional deficits and enhancing quality of life. A systematic search of the Ovid/Medline database from January 1996 to May 2015 linked the terms physical activity/motor activity/physical fitness/physical training/physical education/training/exercise/exercise therapy with Crohn's disease/colitis/ulcerative colitis/inflammatory bowel disease, supplementing this information by a scanning of reference lists and personal files.12 of 16 published studies show a low level of habitual physical activity in CIBD, with sub-normal values for aerobic power, lean tissue mass and muscular strength. 3 of 4 studies suggest physical activity may reduce the risk of developing IBD, and 11 interventions all note that exercise programmes are well tolerated with some decreases of disease activity, and functional gains leading to an increased health-related quality of life. Moreover, programme compliance rates compare favourably with those seen in the treatment of other chronic conditions. More information on mechanisms is needed, but regular moderate aerobic and/or resistance exercise improves the health status of patients with CIBD both by modulating immune function and by improving physical function. A regular exercise programme should thus become an important component in the management of CIBD. PMID:27116344

  9. Intracranial hemorrhage in acute and chronic childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura over a ten-year period: an Egyptian multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elalfy, Mohsen; Elbarbary, Nancy; Khaddah, Normine; Abdelwahab, Magy; El Rashidy, Farida; Hassab, Hoda; Al-Tonbary, Youssef

    2010-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is a rare but major cause of death in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The authors reviewed data of 1,840 patient with ITP, from 5 pediatric hematology centers in Egypt from 1997 to 2007, to study the incidence and risk factors of ICH. Ten cases of ICH were identified with a median age at presentation of 7.5 years; 4 patients had acute ITP, 2 persistent and 4 chronic. The platelet count was late referral to a specialized center. Our results suggest that treatment does not prevent ICH and that it can occur at any time during the course of the disease. Delayed referral can be considered a risk factor for unfavorable outcome of ICH, highlighting the importance of teaching sessions for patients and their parents to minimize subsequent morbidity and mortality of ICH in children with ITP. PMID:19955713

  10. Retroviral sequences related to human T-lymphotropic virus type II in patients with chronic fatigue immune dysfunction syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic fatigue immune dysfunction syndrome (CFIDS) is a recently recognized illness characterized by debilitating fatigue as well as immunological and neurological abnormalities. Once thought to be caused by Epstein-Barr virus, it is now thought to have a different but unknown etiology. The authors evaluted 30 adult and pediatric CFIDS patients from six eastern states for the presence of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) types I and II by Western immunoblotting, polymerase chain reaction, and in situ hybridization of blood samples. The majority of patients were positive for HTLV antibodies by Western blotting and for HTLV-II gag sequences by polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. Twenty nonexposure healthy controls were negative in all assays. These data support an association between an HTLV-II-like virus and CFIDS

  11. Revised Household-Based Microplanning in Polio Supplemental Immunization Activities in Kano State, Nigeria. 2013–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali, Emmanuel; Mkanda, Pascal; Banda, Richard; Korir, Charles; Bawa, Samuel; Warigon, Charity; Abdullahi, Suleiman; Abba, Bashir; Isiaka, Ayodeji; Yahualashet, Yared G.; Touray, Kebba; Chevez, Ana; Tegegne, Sisay G.; Nsubuga, Peter; Etsano, Andrew; Shuaib, Faisal; Vaz, Rui G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Remarkable progress had been made since the launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative in 1988. However endemic wild poliovirus transmission in Nigeria, Pakistan, and Afghanistan remains an issue of international concern. Poor microplanning has been identified as a major contributor to the high numbers of chronically missed children. Methods. We assessed the contribution of the revised household-based microplanning process implemented in Kano State from September 2013 to April 2014 to the outcomes of subsequent polio supplemental immunization activities using used preselected planning and outcome indicators. Results. There was a 38% increase in the number of settlements enumerated, a 30% reduction in the number of target households, and a 54% reduction in target children. The reported number of children vaccinated and the doses of oral polio vaccine used during subsequent polio supplemental immunization activities showed a decline. Postvaccination lot quality assurance sampling and chronically missed settlement reports also showed a progressive reduction in the number of children and settlements missed. Conclusions. We observed improvement in Kano State's performance based on the selected postcampaign performance evaluation indicators and reliability of baseline demographic estimates after the revised household-based microplanning exercise. PMID:26908755

  12. Downregulation of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells may underlie enhanced Th1 immunity caused by immunization with activated autologous T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Cao; Dangsheng Li; Ningli Li; Li Wang; Fang Du; Huiming Sheng; Yan Zhang; Juanjuan Wu; Baihua Shen; Tianwei Shen; Jingwu Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play important roles in immune system homeostasis, and may also be involved in tumor immunotolerance by suppressing Thl immune response which is involved in anti-tumor immunity. We have previously reported that immunization with attenuated activated autologous T cells leads to enhanced anti-tumor immunity and upregulated Thl responses in vivo. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here we show that Treg function was significantly downregulated in mice that received immunization of attenuated activated autologous T cells. We found that Foxp3 expression decreased in CD4+CD25+ T cells from the immunized mice. Moreover, CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg obtained from immunized mice exhibited diminished immunosuppression ability compared to those from naive mice. Further analysis showed that the serum of immunized mice contains a high level of anti-CD25 antibody (about 30 ng/ml,/K0.01 vs controls). Consistent with a role of anti-CD25 response in the down-regulation of Treg, adoptive transfer of serum from immunized mice to naive mice led to a significant decrease in Treg population and function in recipient mice. The triggering of anti-CD25 response in immunized mice can be explained by the fact that CD25 was induced to a high level in the ConA activated autologous T cells used for immunization. Our results demonstrate for the first time that immunization with attenuated activated autologous T cells evokes anti-CD25 antibody production, which leads to impeded CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg expansion and function in vivo. We suggest that dampened Treg function likely contributes to enhanced Thl response in immunized mice and is at least part of the mechanism underlying the boosted anti-tumor immunity.

  13. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy With Diabetes Mellitus Is Responsive To Intravenous Immune Globulin; Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Koca, Süleyman Serdar; YOLDAŞ, Tahir K.; ÖZKAN, Yusuf; GÜNAY, İzzettin; DÖNDER, Emir

    2006-01-01

    Chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is a disease which has different treatment modality like immunomodulatory method and have good response to treatment than the other peripheral neuropathy. We have established a patient with CIDP female 68 years old and had a type 2 diabetes mellitus diagnosis for 16 years. She treated with intravenous immunoglobuline (0.5 mg/kg/day) for five days and four weeks intervals at six months. This case has showed that the autoimmune neuropathy should keep ...

  14. Peptide vaccination induces profound changes in the immune system in patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schmitt

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Although the immune status of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL patients is mostly characterized by immunosuppression, there is an accumulation of in vivo (graft-versus-leukemia effect and in vitro (spontaneous remissions after infections data that indicates that CLL might be effectively targeted by T-cell based immunotherapy. Recently, we characterized receptor for hyaluronic acid mediated motility (RHAMM as a preferential target for immunotherapy of CLL. We also completed a RHAMM-derived peptide vaccination phase I/II clinical trial in CLL. Here, we present a detailed immunological analysis of six CLL patients vaccinated with HLA-A2 restricted RHAMM-derived epitope R3 (ILSLELMKL. Beside effective induction of R3-specific cytotoxic T-cells, peptide vaccination caused profound changes in different T-cell subsets as well as cytokines. We present longitudinal analyses of Th17, CD8+CD103+, CD8+CD137+ and IL-17 producing CD8+ T cells (CD8+IL- -17+ as well as important cytokines involved in regulation of immune response such as TGF-β, IL-10, IL-2 and TNF throughout the peptide vaccination period. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011, Vol. 49, No. 1, 161–167

  15. Effects of the Intelligent-Turtle Massage on the Physical Symptoms and Immune Functions in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ji-hong; CHAI Tie-qu; LIN Guo-hua; LUO Lin

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of the intelligent-turtle massage on the physical symptoms and immune functions in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Methods: 182 cases of CFS were randomly divided into an experimental group of 91 cases treated by the intelligent-turtle massage,and a control group of 91 cases treated with the conventional massage method. After 2 courses of treatment,the therapeutic effects were statistically analyzed with the accumulated score for the improved clinical symptoms; and the changes of IgA,IgM and IgG were compared in 96 cases. Results: There was a significant difference between the two groups in the accumulated scores for improvement of the symptoms (P<0.05). A remarkable difference was found in the therapeutic effect. And there was a significant difference in the IgA,IgM and IgG levels between the two groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: The intelligent-turtle massage is an effective therapy for relieving the physical symptoms of CFS,and it may show certain effects on the immune functions.

  16. Deletion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor inhibits murine oral carcinogenesis: Potential role for chronic pro-inflammatory immune mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oghumu, Steve; Knobloch, Thomas J; Terrazas, Cesar; Varikuti, Sanjay; Ahn-Jarvis, Jennifer; Bollinger, Claire E; Iwenofu, Hans; Weghorst, Christopher M; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2016-09-15

    Oral cancer kills about 1 person every hour each day in the United States and is the sixth most prevalent cancer worldwide. The pro-inflammatory cytokine 'macrophage migration inhibitory factor' (MIF) has been shown to be expressed in oral cancer patients, yet its precise role in oral carcinogenesis is not clear. In this study, we examined the impact of global Mif deletion on the cellular and molecular process occurring during oral carcinogenesis using a well-established mouse model of oral cancer with the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). C57BL/6 Wild-type (WT) and Mif knock-out mice were administered with 4NQO in drinking water for 16 weeks, then regular drinking water for 8 weeks. Mif knock-out mice displayed fewer oral tumor incidence and multiplicity, accompanied by a significant reduction in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines Il-1β, Tnf-α, chemokines Cxcl1, Cxcl6 and Ccl3 and other molecular biomarkers of oral carcinogenesis Mmp1 and Ptgs2. Further, systemic accumulation of myeloid-derived tumor promoting immune cells was inhibited in Mif knock-out mice. Our results demonstrate that genetic Mif deletion reduces the incidence and severity of oral carcinogenesis, by inhibiting the expression of chronic pro-inflammatory immune mediators. Thus, targeting MIF is a promising strategy for the prevention or therapy of oral cancer. PMID:27164411

  17. Immune-enhancing activity of extracellular polysaccharides isolated from Rhizopus nigricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhidan; Kong, Mengli; Zhang, Pengying; Sun, Qingjie; Chen, Kaoshan

    2016-09-01

    Extracellular polysaccharides (EPS1-1) was extracted from fermentation liquor of Rhizopus nigricans and evaluated its immune-enhancing activities in vitro and in vivo. Results suggested that the proliferation of lymphocyte was stimulated after treated with EPS1-1. Moreover, the activities of macrophages were enhanced by increasing the activities of phagocytosis and acid phosphatase, the production of NO and the mRNA levels of IL-2, TNF-α and iNOS. Furthermore, EPS1-1 could significantly boost the immunity of normal and immunosuppressed mice, which included the increase of loaded swimming time, footpad swelling, organ index and the secretion of IL-2 and TNF-α in serum, thus suggesting that EPS1-1 could improve the body immunity through cellular immunity and humoral immunity. These findings provided further insights into the potential use of EPS1-1 as immunopotentiator or new function food. PMID:27185145

  18. Intravenous immune globulin (10% caprylate-chromatography purified) for the treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (ICE study): a randomised placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.C. Hughes (Richard); P. Donofrio (Peter); V. Bril (Vera); M.C. Dalakas (Marinos); C. Deng (Chunqin); K. Hanna (Kim); H.P. Hartung; N. Latov (Norman); I.S.J. Merkies (Ingemar); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Short-term studies suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin might reduce disability caused by chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) but long-term effects have not been shown. We aimed to establish whether 10% caprylate-chromatography purified immune

  19. Induction of oxidative burst response in human neutrophils by immune complexes made in vitro of lipopolysaccharide and hyperimmune serum from chronically infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, G; Fomsgaard, Anette; Jensen, E T;

    1993-01-01

    Purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was used as an antigen for immune complex (IC) formation in vitro together with hyperimmune sera from chronically P. aeruginosa-infected patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). P. aeruginosa LPS by itself did not induce an oxidative burst ...

  20. FOXP3+Helios+ Regulatory T Cells, Immune Activation, and Advancing Disease in HIV-Infected Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaitan, Alka; Kravietz, Adam; Mwamzuka, Mussa; Marshed, Fatma; Ilmet, Tiina; Said, Swalehe; Ahmed, Aabid; Borkowsky, William; Unutmaz, Derya

    2016-08-15

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are functionally suppressive CD4 T cells, critical for establishing peripheral tolerance and controlling inflammatory responses. Previous reports of Tregs during chronic HIV disease have conflicting results with higher or lower levels compared with controls. Identifying true Tregs with suppressive activity proves challenging during HIV infection, as traditional Treg markers, CD25 and FOXP3, may transiently upregulate expression as a result of immune activation (IA). Helios is an Ikaros family transcription factor that marks natural Tregs with suppressive activity and does not upregulate expression after activation. Coexpression of FOXP3 and Helios has been suggested as a highly specific marker of "bona fide" Tregs. We evaluated Treg subsets by FOXP3 coexpressed with either CD25 or Helios and their association with HIV disease progression in perinatally infected HIV-positive children. Identifying Tregs by FOXP3 coexpression with Helios rather than CD25 revealed markedly higher Treg frequencies, particularly in HIV+ children. Regardless of antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected children had a selective expansion of memory FOXP3+Helios+ Tregs. The rise in memory Tregs correlated with declining HIV clinical status, indicated by falling CD4 percentages and CD4:CD8 ratios and increasing HIV plasma viremia and IA. In addition, untreated HIV+ children exhibited an imbalance between the levels of Tregs and activated T cells. Finally, memory Tregs expressed IA markers CD38 and Ki67 and exhaustion marker, PD-1, that tightly correlated with a similar phenotype in memory CD4 T cells. Overall, HIV-infected children had significant disruptions of memory Tregs that associated with advancing HIV disease. PMID:27003495

  1. Stress response and humoral immune system alterations related to chronic hypergravity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéguinou, Nathan; Bojados, Mickaël; Jamon, Marc; Derradji, Hanane; Baatout, Sarah; Tschirhart, Eric; Frippiat, Jean-Pol; Legrand-Frossi, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Spaceflights are known to induce stress and immune dysregulation. Centrifugation, as hindlimb unloading, is a good ground based-model to simulate altered gravity which occurs during space missions. The aim of this study was to investigate the consequences of a long-term exposure to different levels of hypergravity on the stress response and the humoral immunity in a mouse model. For this purpose, adult C57Bl/6J male mice were subjected for 21 days either to control conditions or to 2G or 3G acceleration gravity forces. Corticosterone level and anxiety behavior revealed a stress response which was associated with a decrease of body weight, after 21-day of centrifugation at 3G but not at 2G. Spleen lymphocyte lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responsiveness was diminished by 40% in the 2G group only, whereas a decrease was noted when cells were stimulated with concanavalin A for both 2G and 3G groups (about 25% and 20%, respectively) compared to controls. Pro-inflammatory chemokines (MCP-1 and IP-10) and Th1 cytokines (IFNγ and IL2) were slightly decreased in the 2G group and strongly decreased in the 3G mouse group. Regarding Th2 cytokines (IL4, IL5) no further significant modification was observed, whereas the immunosuppressive cytokine IL10 was slightly increased in the 3G mice. Finally, serum IgG concentration was twice higher whereas IgA concentration was slightly increased (about 30%) and IgM were unchanged in 2G mice compared to controls. No difference was observed in the 3G group with these isotypes. Consequently, functional immune dysregulations and stress responses were dependent of the gravity level. PMID:21724335

  2. Basophil Activation Test with Food Additives in Chronic Urticaria Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Min-Gyu; Song, Woo-Jung; Park, Han-Ki; Lim, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Su-Jung; Lee, Suh-Young; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2014-01-01

    The role of food additives in chronic urticaria (CU) is still under investigation. In this study, we aimed to explore the association between food additives and CU by using the basophil activation test (BAT). The BAT using 15 common food additives was performed for 15 patients with CU who had a history of recurrent urticarial aggravation following intake of various foods without a definite food-specific IgE. Of the 15 patients studied, two (13.3%) showed positive BAT results for one of the te...

  3. A Novel Polysaccharide in Insects Activates the Innate Immune System in Mouse Macrophage RAW264 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi Ohta; Atsushi Ido; Kie Kusano; Chiemi Miura; Takeshi Miura

    2014-01-01

    A novel water-soluble polysaccharide was identified in the pupae of the melon fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae) as a molecule that activates the mammalian innate immune response. We attempted to purify this innate immune activator using nitric oxide (NO) production in mouse RAW264 macrophages as an indicator of immunostimulatory activity. A novel acidic polysaccharide was identified, which we named "dipterose", with a molecular weight of 1.01 × 10(6) and comprising nine monosaccharides. Dipterose w...

  4. Synthesis of TP3 Fragment via One Pot Strategy and Its Immune Regulatory Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-feng; CHEN Jie; SHAN Hui-jie; LI Wei

    2005-01-01

    We have modified the previously described one-pot peptide synthesis method. The modified method has been successfully applied to the synthesis of TP3. Furthermore, the immune regulatory activity of TP3 has been characterized. The results show that the modified one-pot method can be used to synthesize the biological active peptide with the advantages of low cost and high productivity. Moreover, TP3 has a higher immune regulatory activity than TP5.

  5. Immune challenge affects basal metabolic activity in wintering great tits.

    OpenAIRE

    Ots, I.; Kerimov, A. B.; Ivankina, E. V.; Ilyina, T. A.; Hõrak, P.

    2001-01-01

    The costs of exploiting an organism's immune function are expected to form the basis of many life-history trade-offs. However, there has been debate about whether such costs can be paid in energetic and nutritional terms. We addressed this question in a study of wintering, free-living, male great tits by injecting them with a novel, non-pathogenic antigen (sheep red blood cells) and measuring the changes in their basal metabolic rates and various condition indices subsequent to immune challen...

  6. Gender differences in the immune system activities of sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizza, Vincenzo; Vazzana, Mirella; Schillaci, Domenico; Russo, Debora; Giaramita, Francesca Tiziana; Parrinello, Nicolò

    2013-03-01

    In the immune system of vertebrates, gender-specific differences in individual immune competence are well known. In general, females possess more powerful immune response than males. In invertebrates, the situation is much less clear. For this purpose we have chosen to study the immune response of the two sexes of the echinoderm Paracentrotus lividus in pre- and post-spawning phases. The coelomic fluid from the echinoderms contains several coelomocyte types and molecules involved in innate immune defenses. In this article we report that the degree of immune responses in the P. lividus differs according to sex in both pre- and post-spawning phases. We found in all tests that females were more active than males. The results indicate that females possess a significant higher number of immunocytes consisting of phagocytes and uncolored spherulocytes. Since the immunological activity is mainly based on immunocytes, it was not surprising that females possessed the highest values of cytotoxicity and hemolysis activity and showed a greater ability to uptake neutral red and phagocyte yeasts cells, while the average number of ingested particles per active phagocyte was not significantly different. Furthermore, agglutinating activity was more evident in the coelomocyte lysate and coelomic fluid of females than in those of males. Finally we found that the acidic extract of female gonads possessed greater antimicrobial activity than that of male gonads. These results make it very likely that gender differences in the immune response are not restricted to vertebrates; rather, they are a general evolutionary phenomenon. PMID:23220062

  7. Immune re-activation by cell-free fetal DNA in healthy pregnancies re-purposed to target tumors: novel check-point inhibition in cancer therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ann Lieser Enninga

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of the immune system in cancer progression has become increasingly evident over the past decade. Chronic inflammation in the promotion of tumorigenesis is well established, and cancer-associated tolerance/immune evasion has long been appreciated. Recent developments of immunotherapies targeting cancer-associated inflammation and immune tolerance such as cancer vaccines, cell therapies, neutralizing antibodies, and immune checkpoint inhibitors, have shown promising clinical results. However, despite significant therapeutic advances, most patients diagnosed with metastatic cancer still succumb to their malignancy. Treatments are often toxic, and the financial burden of novel therapies is significant. Thus, new methods for utilizing similar biological systems to compare complex biological processes can give us new hypotheses for combating cancer. One such approach is comparing trophoblastic growth and regulation to tumor invasion and immune escape. Novel concepts regarding immune activation in pregnancy, especially reactivation of the immune system at labor through toll like receptor engagement by fetal derived DNA, may be applicable to cancer immunotherapy. This review summarizes mechanisms of inflammation in cancer, current immunotherapies used in the clinic, and suggestions for looking beyond oncology for novel methods to reverse cancer-associated tolerance and immunologic exhaustion utilizing mechanisms encountered in normal human pregnancy.

  8. Within-host co-evolution of chronic viruses and the adaptive immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourmohammad, Armita

    We normally think of evolution occurring in a population of organisms, in response to their external environment. Rapid evolution of cellular populations also occurs within our bodies, as the adaptive immune system works to eliminate infection. Some pathogens, such as HIV, are able to persist in a host for extended periods of time, during which they also evolve to evade the immune response. In this talk I will introduce an analytical framework for the rapid co-evolution of B-cell and viral populations, based on the molecular interactions between them. Since the co-evolution of antibodies and viruses is perpetually out of equilibrium, I will show how to quantify the amount of adaptation in each of the two populations by analysis of their co-evolutionary history. I will discuss the consequences of competition between lineages of antibodies, and characterize the fate of a given lineage dependent on the state of the antibody and viral populations. In particular, I will discuss the conditions for emergence of highly potent broadly neutralizing antibodies, which are now recognized as critical for designing an effective vaccine against HIV.

  9. Hepatitis B Virus Infection—Current Concepts of Chronicity and Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas, Girish N.; Blum, Hubert E.

    1984-01-01

    Among the three types of viral hepatitis agents—A, B and non-A, non-B—the hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been best characterized by immunologic and recombinant DNA technologies. The indefinite persistence of hepatitis B virus infection in 85% to 90% of perinatally infected infants and in about 10% of those infected later in life accounts for a worldwide epidemiologic reservoir of more than 200 million carriers who are at a high risk for the development of δ-infection, chronic liver disease and h...

  10. Interferon Type I Driven Immune Activation in Generalized Autoimmune Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Brkić (Zana)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes research performed on several generalized autoimmune diseases with the main focus on primary Sjögren’s syndrome. Interferon type I has been implicated in the pathogenesis of these diseases and will be introduced in this chapter together with other important immune f

  11. Active or passive immunization in unexplained recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ole B; Nielsen, Henriette Svarre; Pedersen, Bjorn

    2004-01-01

    carried out as Cochrane reviews have concluded than none of the different forms of immunotherapy has proved effective in the total RM population. However, the included trials have generally been small and very heterogenous with respect to the clinical histories of patients and the immunization protocols...

  12. CIP2A Promotes T-Cell Activation and Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvrljevic, Anna; Khan, Mohd Moin; Treise, Irina; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Au-Yeung, Byron; Sittig, Eleonora; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Chen, Yiling; Oeder, Sebastian; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Horsch, Marion; Aittokallio, Tero; Busch, Dirk H.; Ollert, Markus W.; Neff, Frauke; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Chen, Zhi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The oncoprotein Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is overexpressed in most malignancies and is an obvious candidate target protein for future cancer therapies. However, the physiological importance of CIP2A-mediated PP2A inhibition is largely unknown. As PP2A regulates immune responses, we investigated the role of CIP2A in normal immune system development and during immune response in vivo. We show that CIP2A-deficient mice (CIP2AHOZ) present a normal immune system development and function in unchallenged conditions. However when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes, CIP2AHOZ mice display an impaired adaptive immune response that is combined with decreased frequency of both CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ effector T-cells. Importantly, the cell autonomous effect of CIP2A deficiency for T-cell activation was confirmed. Induction of CIP2A expression during T-cell activation was dependent on Zap70 activity. Thus, we reveal CIP2A as a hitherto unrecognized mediator of T-cell activation during adaptive immune response. These results also reveal CIP2AHOZ as a possible novel mouse model for studying the role of PP2A activity in immune regulation. On the other hand, the results also indicate that CIP2A targeting cancer therapies would not cause serious immunological side-effects. PMID:27100879

  13. Radionuclide activity and the immune system functioning in residents of radiation contaminated areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Sokolenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to assess the relation of radioactive contamination degree to immune system functioning, in the absence or presence of additional potential immunosuppressants. To achieve the objective, during the period of 1995–2015 we examined 250 people, students of Cherkasy State University, who lived in the areas of enhanced radiation monitoring before. Also we evaluated the additional impact of the emotional stress caused by examinations on examined students. Indicators of cellular immunity were determined by immunophenotyping and dyeing using Romanowsky-Giemsa method. The level of immunoglobulins in blood serum was determined by radial immunodiffusion (Mancini method. The level of cortisol in blood serum was determined by immunoenzyme method. We have found that in absence of the emotional stress among residents of the areas contaminated with radionuclides, cortisol level remained at the upper limit of homeostatic norm. There is an average positive correlation between the activity of radionuclides in the territories of residence and the level of cortisol. There are marked average positive correlations between the activity of radionuclides and the level of neutrophils, and low positive correlations with the levels of IgG and IgM in blood serum. Average negative correlations between the activity of radionuclides and the following parameters are also observed: absolute and relative number of functionally mature T-lymphocytes with phenotype CD3+, absolute and relative number of their helper subpopulation CD4+, absolute and relative number of natural killer cells with phenotype CD16+; and strong negative correlations with immunoregulatory index CD4+/CD8+. Cortisol level shows the similar correlation with the same parameters, but correlation coefficient is lower. Under conditions of additional stress, caused by emotional load during the examinations, cortisol level significantly increases. This enhanced previously discovered

  14. Immune response to bacteria induces dissemination of Ras-activated Drosophila hindgut cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bangi, Erdem; Pitsouli, Chrysoula; Rahme, Laurence G.; Cagan, Ross; Apidianakis, Yiorgos

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila hindgut cells exposed to bacterial infection activate the innate immune response. Concomitant expression of the Ras1V12 oncogene leads to extracellular matrix degradation, basal cell invasion and dissemination in the body cavity.

  15. [Autoimmune hepatitis and membranous glomerulonephritis under immune therapy in chronic hepatitis C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparoupa, Maria; Huy Ho, Ngoc Ahn; Schuppert, Frank

    2016-05-01

    A 63-year-old patient is evaluated for an unclear weight loss with general malaise and fatigue for several months. Serological examination reveales the first diagnosis of a hepatitis-C-virus-genotype-1b-infection with an initial viral load of 980 000 IU / ml. The duration of the infection is suggested to be more than 6 months. Because of the initially elevated anti-nuclear-antibodies (ANA) the diagnosis of an autoimmune hepatitis needs to be excluded. All other liver related autoantibodies and the immunoglobulins (Ig) IgG, IgA and IgM are normal. A liver biopsy is conducted. After a short test with non-pegylated interferon (IFN) liver enzymes remain stable and treatment with pegylated IFN-alfa-2a and ribavirin (RBV) is initiated. The patient is a "rapid viral responder" and his viral load is found under the detection limit within 4 weeks under therapy. On the 16th week, liver enzymes increase rapidly. ANA's and IgG-immunoglobulins are positive. A second lever biopsy does not confirm the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis and the treatment is continued under careful observation of all relevant liver parameters. 21 weeks after the initiation of the treatment, massive peripheral edema, hypoproteinemia and proteinuria are observed. The renal biopsy reveales membranous glomerulonephritis. Because of the preserved renal function, no acute immunosuppression is initiated and the treatment gets completed after overall 24 weeks. Liver and renal parameters return quickly back to normal after treatment discharge. This is the first report of a combined autoimmune reaction with development of autoimmune hepatitis and glomerulonephritis under INF and RBV antiviral therapy for a chronic hepatitis-C-infection. The occurrence of autoimmune manifestations should especially be considered in genetically susceptible individuals or those with positive autoimmunity markers. The initiation of INF for the treatment of chronic hepatitis-C-infection has to be critically evaluated since

  16. Late prenatal immune activation causes hippocampal deficits in the absence of persistent inflammation across aging

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanoli, Sandra; Notter, Tina; Richetto, Juliet; Labouesse, Marie A.; Vuillermot, Stéphanie; Riva, Marco A; Meyer, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Background Prenatal exposure to infection and/or inflammation is increasingly recognized to play an important role in neurodevelopmental brain disorders. It has recently been postulated that prenatal immune activation, especially when occurring during late gestational stages, may also induce pathological brain aging via sustained effects on systemic and central inflammation. Here, we tested this hypothesis using an established mouse model of exposure to viral-like immune activation in late pr...

  17. Activation of the Maternal Immune System During Pregnancy Alters Behavioral Development of Rhesus Monkey Offspring

    OpenAIRE

    Bauman, Melissa D.; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Smith, Stephen E. P.; Bregere, Catherine; Amaral, David G.; Patterson, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Maternal infection during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia and autism in the offspring. Supporting this correlation, experimentally activating the maternal immune system during pregnancy in rodents produces offspring with abnormal brain and behavioral development. We have developed a nonhuman primate model to bridge the gap between clinical populations and rodent models of maternal immune activation (MIA). Methods: A modified form of the ...

  18. Systemic Immune Activation Leads to Neuroinflammation and Sickness Behavior in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Biesmans; Meert, Theo F.; Jan A. Bouwknecht; Acton, Paul D.; Nima Davoodi; Patrick De Haes; Jacobine Kuijlaars; Xavier Langlois; Liam J. R. Matthews; Luc Ver Donck; Niels Hellings; Rony Nuydens

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates an association between clinical depression and altered immune function. Systemic administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is commonly used to study inflammation-associated behavioral changes in rodents. In these experiments, we tested the hypothesis that peripheral immune activation leads to neuroinflammation and depressive-like behavior in mice. We report that systemic administration of LPS induced astrocyte activation in transgenic GFAP-luc mice an...

  19. The Split Virus Influenza Vaccine rapidly activates immune cells through Fcγ Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    O’Gorman, William E.; Huang, Huang; Wei, Yu-Ling; Davis, Kara L.; Leipold, Michael D.; Bendall, Sean C.; Kidd, Brian A.; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Maecker, Holden T.; Chien, Yueh-hsiu; Davis, Mark M.

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal influenza vaccination is one of the most common medical procedures and yet the extent to which it activates the immune system beyond inducing antibody production is not well understood. In the United States, the most prevalent formulations of the vaccine consist of degraded or “split” viral particles distributed without any adjuvants. Based on previous reports we sought to determine whether the split influenza vaccine activates innate immune receptors—specifically Toll-like receptors...

  20. Innate Immune Activity Conditions the Effect of Regulatory Variants upon Monocyte Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Fairfax, B. P.; Humburg, P.; Makino, S.; Naranbhai, V; Wong, D.; Lau, E; Jostins, L; Plant, K.; Andrews, R; McGee, C.; Knight, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    To systematically investigate the impact of immune stimulation upon regulatory variant activity, we exposed primary monocytes from 432 healthy Europeans to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or differing durations of lipopolysaccharide and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). More than half of cis-eQTLs identified, involving hundreds of genes and associated pathways, are detected specifically in stimulated monocytes. Induced innate immune activity reveals multiple master regulatory trans-eQTL...

  1. Danger signals activating the immune response after trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanie Hirsiger; Hans-Peter Simmen; Werner, Clément M. L.; Wanner, Guido A; Daniel Rittirsch

    2012-01-01

    Sterile injury can cause a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) that resembles the host response during sepsis. The inflammatory response following trauma comprises various systems of the human body which are cross-linked with each other within a highly complex network of inflammation. Endogenous danger signals (danger-associated molecular patterns; DAMPs; alarmins) as well as exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) play a crucial role in the initiation of the immun...

  2. Immune and hormonal activity in adults suffering from depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.O.V. Nunes

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available An association between depression and altered immune and hormonal systems has been suggested by the results of many studies. In the present study we carried out immune and hormonal measurements in 40 non-medicated, ambulatory adult patients with depression determined by CID-10 criteria and compared with 34 healthy nondepressed subjects. The severity of the condition was determined with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Of 40 depressed patients, 31 had very severe and 9 severe or moderate depression, 29 (72.5% were females and 11 (27.5% were males (2.6:1 ratio. The results revealed a significant reduction of albumin and elevation of alpha-1, alpha-2 and ß-globulins, and soluble IL-2 receptor in patients with depression compared to the values obtained for nondepressed subjects (P<0.05. The decrease lymphocyte proliferation in response to a mitogen was significantly lower in severely or moderately depressed patients when compared to control (P<0.05. These data confirm the immunological disturbance of acute phase proteins and cellular immune response in patients with depression. Other results may be explained by a variety of interacting factors such as number of patients, age, sex, and the nature, severity and/or duration of depression. Thus, the data obtained should be interpreted with caution and the precise clinical relevance of these findings requires further investigation.

  3. Maternal immune activation increases seizure susceptibility in juvenile rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ping; Zhang, Xin-Ting; Li, Jun; Yu, Lin; Wang, Ji-Wen; Lei, Ge-Fei; Sun, Ruo-Peng; Li, Bao-Min

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological data suggest a relationship between maternal infection and a high incidence of childhood epilepsy in offspring. However, there is little experimental evidence that links maternal infection with later seizure susceptibility in juvenile offspring. Here, we asked whether maternal immune challenge during pregnancy can alter seizure susceptibility and seizure-associated brain damage in adolescence. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or normal saline (NS) on gestational days 15 and 16. At postnatal day 21, seizure susceptibility to kainic acid (KA) was evaluated in male offspring. Four groups were studied, including normal control (NS-NS), prenatal infection (LPS-NS), juvenile seizure (NS-KA), and "two-hit" (LPS-KA) groups. Our results demonstrated that maternal LPS exposure caused long-term reactive astrogliosis and increased seizure susceptibility in juvenile rat offspring. Compared to the juvenile seizure group, animals in the "two-hit" group showed exaggerated astrogliosis, followed by worsened spatial learning ability in adulthood. In addition, prenatal immune challenge alone led to spatial learning impairment in offspring but had no effect on anxiety. These data suggest that prenatal immune challenge causes a long-term increase in juvenile seizure susceptibility and exacerbates seizure-induced brain injury, possibly by priming astroglia. PMID:25982885

  4. Lactic acid bacteria activating innate immunity improve survival in bacterial infection model of silkworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Satoshi; Ono, Yasuo; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been thought to be helpful for human heath in the gut as probiotics. It recently was noted that activity of LAB stimulating immune systems is important. Innate immune systems are conserved in mammals and insects. Silkworm has innate immunity in response to microbes. Microbe-associated molecular pattern (ex. peptidoglycan and β-glucan) induces a muscle contraction of silkworm larva. In this study, we established an efficient method to isolate lactic acid bacteria derived from natural products. We selected a highly active LAB to activate the innate immunity in silkworm by using the silkworm muscle contraction assay, as well. The assay revealed that Lactococcus lactis 11/19-B1 was highly active on the stimulation of the innate immunity in silkworm. L. lactis 11/19-B1 solely fermented milk with casamino acid and glucose. This strain would be a starter strain to make yogurt. Compared to commercially available yogurt LAB, L. lactis 11/19-B1 has higher activity on silkworm contraction. Silkworm normally ingested an artificial diet mixed with L. lactis 11/19-B1 or a yogurt fermented with L. lactis 11/19-B1. Interestingly, silkworms that ingested the LAB showed tolerance against the pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These data suggest that Lactococcus lactis 11/19-B1 would be expected to be useful for making yogurt and probiotics to activate innate immunity. PMID:26971556

  5. Latent and Active Tuberculosis Infection Increase Immune Activation in Individuals Co-Infected with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuri A. Sullivan

    2015-04-01

    Significance: Latent tuberculosis, which affects an estimated 1/3 of the world's population, has long been thought to be a relatively benign, quiescent state of M. tuberculosis infection. While HIV co-infection is known to exacerbate M. tuberculosis infection and increase the risk of developing active TB, little is known about the potential effect of latent TB infection on HIV disease. This study shows that HIV-infected individuals with both active and latent TB have elevated levels of inflammation and immune activation, biomarkers of HIV disease progression and elevated risk of mortality. These results suggest that, in the context of HIV, latent TB infection may be associated with increased risk of progression to AIDS and mortality.

  6. Idelalisib given front-line for treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia causes frequent immune-mediated hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampson, Benjamin L; Kasar, Siddha N; Matos, Tiago R; Morgan, Elizabeth A; Rassenti, Laura; Davids, Matthew S; Fisher, David C; Freedman, Arnold S; Jacobson, Caron A; Armand, Philippe; Abramson, Jeremy S; Arnason, Jon E; Kipps, Thomas J; Fein, Joshua; Fernandes, Stacey; Hanna, John; Ritz, Jerome; Kim, Haesook T; Brown, Jennifer R

    2016-07-14

    Idelalisib is a small-molecule inhibitor of PI3Kδ with demonstrated efficacy for the treatment of relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To evaluate idelalisib as front-line therapy, we enrolled 24 subjects in a phase 2 study consisting of 2 months of idelalisib monotherapy followed by 6 months of combination therapy with idelalisib and the anti-CD20 antibody ofatumumab. After a median follow-up period of 14.7 months, hepatotoxicity was found to be a frequent and often severe adverse event. A total of 19 subjects (79%) experienced either grade ≥1 ALT or AST elevation during the study, and 13 subjects (54%) experienced grade ≥3 transaminitis. The median time to development of transaminitis was 28 days, occurring before ofatumumab introduction. Younger age and mutated immunoglobulin heavy chain status were significant risk factors for the development of hepatotoxicity. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that this hepatotoxicity was immune mediated. A lymphocytic infiltrate was seen on liver biopsy specimens taken from 2 subjects with transaminitis, and levels of the proinflammatory cytokines CCL-3 and CCL-4 were higher in subjects experiencing hepatotoxicity. All cases of transaminitis resolved either by holding the drug, initiating immunosuppressants, or both, and rates of recurrent toxicity were lower in patients taking steroids when idelalisib was reinitiated. A decrease in peripheral blood regulatory T cells was seen in patients experiencing toxicity on therapy, which is consistent with an immune-mediated mechanism. These results suggest that caution should be taken as drugs within this class are developed for CLL, particularly in younger patients who have not received prior disease-specific therapy. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT02135133. PMID:27247136

  7. The assessment of antibody response following immunization with polysaccharide vaccine in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghamohammadi A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: An increased risk for invasive infections with encapsulated bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae has been described in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD or in those on dialysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibody response to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine in CKD patients. "n"nMethods : Sixty-six patients with CKD and 40 healthy individuals were vaccinated with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. The serum antibody response (IgG and IgG2 to the Pneumovax antigens was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA prior to and four weeks after vaccination."n"nResults : Out of 66 vaccinated patients with CKD, 14 were found to be hyporesponsive to the vaccine (Group 1. Patients with normal specific antibody response were regarded as respondents and were assigned to Group 2 (n=52. The mean post-vaccination IgG titer to the pneumococcal antigens in Group 1 was significantly lower than those in Group 2 (P=0.012 for IgG and P=0.02 for IgG2. The increased anti-pneumococcal IgG titer was significantly lower in patients in Group 1 versus Group 2 (P=0.001 or the healthy control group (P=0.005. During the follow-up period of patients, patients in Group 1 developed

  8. Th17/IL-17A might play a protective role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Hus

    Full Text Available Th17 cells, a recently discovered subset of T helper cells that secrete IL-17A, can affect the inflammation process autoimmune and cancer diseases development. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of Th17 cells and IL17A in biology of CLL. The study group included 294 untreated CLL patients in different clinical stages. Here, we show that higher Th17 and IL-17A values were associated with less advanced clinical stage of CLL. Th17 cells' percentages in PB were lower in patients who died due to CLL during follow-up due to CLL (as compared to surviving patients and in patients responding to first-line therapy with fludarabine-based regimens (as compared to non-responders. IL-17A inversely correlated with the time from CLL diagnosis to the start of therapy and was lower in patients who required treatment during follow-up. Th-17 and IL-17A values were lower in patients with adverse prognostic factors (17p and 11q deletion, CD38 and ZAP-70 expression. CLL patients with detectable IL-17A mRNA in T cells were in Rai Stage 0 and negative for both ZAP-70 and CD38 expression. Th17 percentages positively correlated with iNKT and adversely with Treg cells. The results of this study suggest that Th17 may play a beneficial role in CLL immunity.

  9. Long-term treatment with romiplostim in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia: safety and efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Kuter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Romiplostim was effective, safe, and well-tolerated over 6–12 months of continuous treatment in Phase 3 trials in patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP. This report describes up to 5 years of weekly treatment with romiplostim in 292 adult ITP patients in a long-term, single-arm, open-label study. Outcome measures included adverse events (including bleeding, thrombosis, malignancy, and reticulin / fibrosis, platelet response (platelet count >50 × 109 per litre, and the proportion of patients requiring rescue treatments. Treatment – related serious adverse events were infrequent and did not increase with longer treatment. No new classes of adverse events emerged. Thrombotic events occurred in 6.5 % of patients and were not associated with platelet count. Median platelet counts of 50–200 × 109 per litre were maintainedwith stable doses of romiplostim (mean 5–8 μg / kg; generally self-administered at home throughout the study. A platelet response was achieved at least once by 95 % of patients, with a platelet response maintained by all patients on a median 92 % of study visits. There was a low rate of bleeding and infrequent need for rescue treatments. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that romiplostim was safe and welltolerated over 614 patient-years of exposure in ITP patients, and that efficacy was maintained with stable dosing for up to 5 years of continuous treatment.

  10. Overcoming the Influence of Chronic Pain on Older Patients' Difficulty with Recommended Self-Management Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krein, Sarah L.; Heisler, Michele; Piette, John D.; Butchart, Amy; Kerr, Eve A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Many older patients with common chronic conditions also experience chronic pain. We examined how chronic pain affects patients' difficulty with recommended self-management activities and the potential intervening role of self-efficacy (the level of confidence in one's own ability to perform a specific task). Design and Methods: We…

  11. Serum Immune Proteins in Moderate and Severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, Sharni Lee; Brenu, Ekua Weba; Johnston, Samantha; Nguyen, Thao; Huth, Teilah; Ramos, Sandra; Staines, Donald; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya

    2015-01-01

    Immunological dysregulation is present in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME), with recent studies also highlighting the importance of examining symptom severity. This research addressed this relationship between CFS/ME severity subgroups, assessing serum immunoglobulins and serum cytokines in severe and moderate CFS/ME patients. Participants included healthy controls (n= 22), moderately (n = 22) and severely (n=19) affected CFS/ME patients. The 1994 Fukuda Criteria defined CFS/ME and severity scales confirmed mobile and housebound CFS/ME patients as moderate and severe respectively. IL-1β was significantly reduced in severe compared with moderate CFS/ME patients. IL-6 was significantly decreased in moderate CFS/ME patients compared with healthy controls and severe CFS/ME patients. RANTES was significantly increased in moderate CFS/ME patients compared to severe CFS/ME patients. Serum IL-7 and IL-8 were significantly higher in the severe CFS/ME group compared with healthy controls and moderate CFS/ME patients. IFN-γ was significantly increased in severe CFS/ME patients compared with moderately affected patients. This was the first study to show cytokine variation in moderate and severe CFS/ME patients, with significant differences shown between CFS/ME symptom severity groups. This research suggests that distinguishing severity subgroups in CFS/ME research settings may allow for a more stringent analysis of the heterogeneous and otherwise inconsistent illness. PMID:26516304

  12. A long-lasting protective immunity against chronic toxoplasmosis in mice induced by recombinant rhoptry proteins encapsulated in poly (lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Zhang, Nian-Zhang; Wang, Meng; Dong, Hu; Feng, Sheng-Yong; Guo, Hui-Chen; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-11-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection in humans and animals is a worldwide zoonosis. Prevention and control of toxoplasmosis based on vaccination is one of the promising strategies. In the present study, recombinant T. gondii rhoptry proteins 38 and 18 (TgROP38 and TgROP18) were encapsulated into poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) (1:1), respectively, to obtain the stable water-in-oil-in-water double emulsion. Female Kunming mice were then immunized with the protein vaccines twice at a 2-week interval. Eight weeks after the second immunization, 10 mice from each group were challenged with T. gondii PRU strain (genotype II). The entrapment rates of PLG-rROP38 and PLG-rROP18 ranged from 65.5 to 77.7% and 58.1 to 72.3%, respectively. Immunization of mice with rROP38 and rROP18 proteins encapsulated into PLG microparticles elicited strongly humoral and cell-mediated responses against T. gondii, associated with relatively high levels of total IgG, IgG2a isotype, and IFN-γ, as well as the mixed Th1/Th2 immunity responses. Immunization with various protein vaccines induced significant reduction of the brain cysts after chronic infection with the T. gondii PRU strain, and the most effective protection was achieved in the PLG-rROP38-rROP18-immunized mice, with a cyst reduction of 81.3%. The findings of the present study indicated that recombinant rhoptry antigens encapsulated in PLG could maintain the protein immunogenicity in an extended period and elicit effective protection against chronic T. gondii infection, which has implications for the development of long-lasting vaccines against chronic toxoplasmosis in animals. PMID:26243574

  13. Chronic active thrombotic microangiopathy in native and transplanted kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping L; Prichard, Jeffery W; Lin, Fan; Shultz, Michael F; Malek, Sayeed K; Shaw, John H; Hartle, James E

    2006-01-01

    We report 2 complicated cases of thrombotic microangiopathy with chronic features and active components. The first case was a 36-yr-old woman with positive anti-DNA antibody and possible lupus cerebritis, who developed thrombotic microangiopathy secondary to a series of syndromes, including preeclampsia and anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome. Renal biopsy revealed no evidence of lupus nephritis and her renal function returned to normal 1 week after the biopsy. The second case was a 46-yr-old man who developed thrombotic microangiopathy of unknown etiology, which led to end-stage renal disease within 6 mo. The patient received a living related-donor transplant, but thrombotic microangiopathy recurred in the donor kidney only 40 days after the renal transplantation. PMID:16951274

  14. Virus-specific immune response in HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B: relationship with clinical profile and HBsAg serum levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Loggi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AIMS: The immune impairment characterizing chronic hepatitis B (cHBV infection is thought to be the consequence of persistent exposure to viral antigens. However, the immune correlates of different clinical stages of cHBV and their relation with different levels of HBsAg have not been investigated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between HBV-specific T cells response and the degree of in vivo HBV control and HBsAg serum levels in HBeAg-HBeAb+ cHBV. METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 42 patients with different clinical profiles (treatment-suppressed, inactive carriers and active hepatitis of cHBV, 6 patients with resolved HBV infection and 10 HBV-uninfected individuals were tested with overlapping peptides spanning the entire HBV proteome. The frequency and magnitude of HBV-specific T cell responses was assessed by IFNγ ELISPOT assay. Serum HBsAg was quantified with a chemiluminescent immunoassay. RESULTS: The total breadth and magnitude of HBV-specific T cell responses did not differ significantly between the four groups. However, inactive carriers targeted preferentially the core region. In untreated patients, the breadth of the anti-core specific T cell response was inversely correlated with serum HBsAg concentrations as well as HBV-DNA and ALT levels and was significantly different in patients with HBsAg levels either above or below 1000 IU/mL. The same inverse association between anti-core T cell response and HBsAg levels was found in treated patients. CONCLUSIONS: Different clinical outcomes of cHBV infection are associated with the magnitude, breadth and specificity of the HBV-specific T cell response. Especially, robust anti-core T cell responses were found in the presence of reduced HBsAg serum levels, suggesting that core-specific T cell responses can mediate a protective effect on HBV control.

  15. Maternal stress, nutrition and physical activity: Impact on immune function, CNS development and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Teixeira, Antônio L; Silverman, Marni N

    2015-08-18

    Evidence suggests that maternal and fetal immune dysfunction may impact fetal brain development and could play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders, although the definitive pathophysiological mechanisms are still not completely understood. Stress, malnutrition and physical inactivity are three maternal behavioral lifestyle factors that can influence immune and central nervous system (CNS) functions in both the mother and fetus, and may therefore, increase risk for neurodevelopmental/psychiatric disorders. First, we will briefly review some aspects of maternal-fetal immune system interactions and development of immune tolerance. Second, we will discuss the bidirectional communication between the immune system and CNS and the pathways by which immune dysfunction could contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders. Third, we will discuss the effects of prenatal stress and malnutrition (over and undernutrition) on perinatal programming of the CNS and immune system, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. Finally, we will discuss the beneficial impact of physical fitness during pregnancy on the maternal-fetal unit and infant and how regular physical activity and exercise can be an effective buffer against stress- and inflammatory-related disorders. Although regular physical activity has been shown to promote neuroplasticity and an anti-inflammatory state in the adult, there is a paucity of studies evaluating its impact on CNS and immune function during pregnancy. Implementing stress reduction, proper nutrition and ample physical activity during pregnancy and the childbearing period may be an efficient strategy to counteract the impact of maternal stress and malnutrition/obesity on the developing fetus. Such behavioral interventions could have an impact on early development of the CNS and immune system and contribute to the prevention of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Further research is needed to elucidate this relationship and the underlying

  16. Characterization of Peripheral Immune Cell Subsets in Patients with Acute and Chronic Cerebrovascular Disease: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kraft

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Immune cells (IC play a crucial role in murine stroke pathophysiology. However, data are limited on the role of these cells in ischemic stroke in humans. We therefore aimed to characterize and compare peripheral IC subsets in patients with acute ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack (AIS/TIA, chronic cerebrovascular disease (CCD and healthy volunteers (HV. We conducted a case-control study of patients with AIS/TIA (n = 116 or CCD (n = 117, and HV (n = 104 who were enrolled at the University Hospital Würzburg from 2010 to 2013. We determined the expression and quantity of IC subsets in the three study groups and performed correlation analyses with demographic and clinical parameters. The quantity of several IC subsets differed between the AIS/TIA, CCD, and HV groups. Several clinical and demographic variables independently predicted the quantity of IC subsets in patients with AIS/TIA. No significant changes in the quantity of IC subsets occurred within the first three days after AIS/TIA. Overall, these findings strengthen the evidence for a pathophysiologic role of IC in human ischemic stroke and the potential use of IC-based biomarkers for the prediction of stroke risk. A comprehensive description of IC kinetics is crucial to enable the design of targeted treatment strategies.

  17. Adenosine can thwart antitumor immune responses elicited by radiotherapy. Therapeutic strategies alleviating protumor ADO activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By studying the bioenergetic status we could show that the development of tumor hypoxia is accompanied, apart from myriad other biologically relevant effects, by a substantial accumulation of adenosine (ADO). ADO has been shown to act as a strong immunosuppressive agent in tumors by modulating the innate and adaptive immune system. In contrast to ADO, standard radiotherapy (RT) can either stimulate or abrogate antitumor immune responses. Herein, we present ADO-mediated mechanisms that may thwart antitumor immune responses elicited by RT. An overview of the generation, accumulation, and ADO-related multifaceted inhibition of immune functions, contrasted with the antitumor immune effects of RT, is provided. Upon hypoxic stress, cancer cells release ATP into the extracellular space where nucleotides are converted into ADO by hypoxia-sensitive, membrane-bound ectoenzymes (CD39/CD73). ADO actions are mediated upon binding to surface receptors, mainly A2A receptors on tumor and immune cells. Receptor activation leads to a broad spectrum of strong immunosuppressive properties facilitating tumor escape from immune control. Mechanisms include (1) impaired activity of CD4 + T and CD8 + T, NK cells and dendritic cells (DC), decreased production of immuno-stimulatory lymphokines, and (2) activation of Treg cells, expansion of MDSCs, promotion of M2 macrophages, and increased activity of major immunosuppressive cytokines. In addition, ADO can directly stimulate tumor proliferation and angiogenesis. ADO mechanisms described can thwart antitumor immune responses elicited by RT. Therapeutic strategies alleviating tumor-promoting activities of ADO include respiratory hyperoxia or mild hyperthermia, inhibition of CD39/CD73 ectoenzymes or blockade of A2A receptors, and inhibition of ATP-release channels or ADO transporters. (orig.)

  18. 5-Azacytidine Promotes an Inhibitory T-Cell Phenotype and Impairs Immune Mediated Antileukemic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Stübig; Anita Badbaran; Tim Luetkens; York Hildebrandt; Djordje Atanackovic; Binder, Thomas M. C.; Boris Fehse; Nicolaus Kröger

    2014-01-01

    Demethylating agent, 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza), has been shown to be active in treatment of myeloid malignancies. 5-Aza enhances anticancer immunity, by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens. However, the impact of 5-Aza immune responses remains poorly understood. Here, T-cell mediated tumor immunity effects of 5-Aza, are investigated in vitro and in vivo. T-cells from healthy donors were treated with 5-Aza and analyzed by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry for changes in gene expression and...

  19. Tumor-derived vaccines containing CD200 inhibit immune activation: implications for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhengming; Ampudia-Mesias, Elisabet; Shaver, Rob; Horbinski, Craig M; Moertel, Christopher L; Olin, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    There are over 400 ongoing clinical trials using tumor-derived vaccines. This approach is especially attractive for many types of brain tumors, including glioblastoma, yet so far the clinical response is highly variable. One contributor to poor response is CD200, which acts as a checkpoint blockade, inducing immune tolerance. We demonstrate that, in response to vaccination, glioma-derived CD200 suppresses the anti-tumor immune response. In contrast, a CD200 peptide inhibitor that activates antigen-presenting cells overcomes immune tolerance. The addition of the CD200 inhibitor significantly increased leukocyte infiltration into the vaccine site, cytokine and chemokine production, and cytolytic activity. Our data therefore suggest that CD200 suppresses the immune system's response to vaccines, and that blocking CD200 could improve the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27485078

  20. EFFECTS OF GC-MACROPHAGE ACTIVATING FACTOR IN HUMAN NEURONS; IMPLICATIONS FOR TREATMENT OF CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney Smith

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS is a debilitating disease of multifactorial aetiology characterized by immune system dysfunction, widespread inflammation, multisystemic neuropathology and persistent pain. Given the central role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of the syndrome, we studied the effects of a potent modulator of the immune system in in vitro and in vivo models that could help clarifying its role and indications in ME/CFS treatment. To this end, we studied the effects of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (also designated as Gc-Macrophage Activating Factor or (GcMAF on human neuronal cells (SH-SY5Y and on the persistent pain induced by osteoarticular damage in rats. GcMAF at pM concentration increased neuronal cell viability and metabolism through increased mitochondrial enzyme activity. These effects were accompanied by cAMP formation and by morphological changes that were representative of neuronal differentiation. We hypothesize that these effects are to be ascribed to the interconnection between the GcMAF and Vitamin D Receptor (VDR signalling pathways. The results presented here confirm at the experimental level the therapeutic effects of GcMAF in ME/CFS and elucidate the mechanisms of action through which GcMAF might be responsible for such therapeutic effects.

  1. In vivo activation of a T helper 2-driven innate immune response in lung fibrosis induced by multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jie; Ma, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary exposure to certain forms of carbon nanotubes (CNT) induces fibrosing lesions in the lungs that manifest an acute inflammation followed by chronic interstitial fibrosis. The mechanism of CNT-induced fibrogenesis is largely unknown. The biphasic development with drastically distinct pathologic manifestations suggests a junction of acute-to-chronic transition. Here we analyzed the molecular pathways and regulators underlying the pathologic development of CNT-induced lung fibrosis. Mice were exposed to multi-walled CNT (MWCNT; XNRI MWNT-7, Mitsui; 40 μg) by pharyngeal aspiration for 7 days along with vehicle and carbonaceous controls. Genome-wide microarray analyses of the lungs identified a range of differentially expressed genes that potentially function in the acute-to-chronic transition through pathways involving immune and inflammatory regulation, responses to stress and extracellular stimuli, and cell migration and adhesion. In particular, a T helper 2 (Th2)-driven innate immune response was significantly enriched. We then demonstrated that MWCNT induced the expression of Th2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, and a panel of signature downstream genes, such as Il4i1, Chia, and Ccl11/Eotaxin, time dependently. Induction of Th2 cytokines took place in CD4+ T lymphocytes indicating activation of Th2 cells. Furthermore, induction involved activation of a Th2 cell-specific signaling pathway through phosphorylation of STAT6 and up-regulation of GATA-3 to mediate the transcription of Th2 target genes. Our study uncovers activation of a Th2-driven immune/inflammatory response during pulmonary fibrosis development induced by MWCNT. The findings provide novel insights into the molecular events that control the transition from an acute inflammatory response to chronic fibrosis through Th2 functions in CNT-exposed lungs. PMID:27106021

  2. Active Immunization in the United States: Developments over the Past Decade

    OpenAIRE

    Dennehy, Penelope H.

    2001-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified immunization as the most important public health advance of the 20th century. The purpose of this article is to review the changes that have taken place in active immunization in the United States over the past decade. Since 1990, new vaccines have become available to prevent five infectious diseases: varicella, rotavirus, hepatitis A, Lyme disease, and Japanese encephalitis virus infection. Improved vaccines have been developed to...

  3. Gender-Dependent Effects of Maternal Immune Activation on the Behavior of Mouse Offspring

    OpenAIRE

    Xuan, Ingrid C. Y.; Hampson, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by two core symptoms; impaired social interactions and communication, and ritualistic or repetitive behaviors. Both epidemiological and biochemical evidence suggests that a subpopulation of autistics may be linked to immune perturbations that occurred during fetal development. These findings have given rise to an animal model, called the "maternal immune activation" model, whereby the offspring from female rodents who we...

  4. Aberrant neural synchrony in the maternal immune activation model: Using translatable measures to explore targeted interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Desiree Dickerson; David Bilkey

    2013-01-01

    Maternal exposure to infection occurring mid-gestation produces a three-fold increase in the risk of schizophrenia in the offspring. The critical initiating factor appears to be the maternal immune activation (MIA) that follows infection. This process can be induced in rodents by exposure of pregnant dams to the viral mimic Poly I:C, which triggers an immune response that results in structural, functional, behavioral, and electrophysiological phenotypes in the adult offspring that model thos...

  5. Controlling measles using supplemental immunization activities: A mathematical model to inform optimal policy

    OpenAIRE

    Verguet, Stéphane; Johri, Mira; Morris, Shaun K.; Gauvreau, Cindy L.; Jha, Prabhat; Jit, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background The Measles & Rubella Initiative, a broad consortium of global health agencies, has provided support to measles-burdened countries, focusing on sustaining high coverage of routine immunization of children and supplementing it with a second dose opportunity for measles vaccine through supplemental immunization activities (SIAs). We estimate optimal scheduling of SIAs in countries with the highest measles burden. Methods We develop an age-stratified dynamic compartmental model of mea...

  6. Loss of CARD9-mediated innate activation attenuates severe influenza pneumonia without compromising host viral immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Takayuki Uematsu; Ei’ichi Iizasa; Noritada Kobayashi; Hiroki Yoshida; Hiromitsu Hara

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection is a common cause of severe viral pneumonia associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which is difficult to control with general immunosuppressive therapy including corticosteroids due to the unfavorable effect on viral replication. Studies have suggested that the excessive activation of the innate immunity by IFV is responsible for severe pathologies. In this study, we focused on CARD9, a signaling adaptor known to regulate innate immune acti...

  7. Reversal of Refractory Ulcerative Colitis and Severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms Arising from Immune Disturbance in an HLADR/DQ Genetically Susceptible Individual with Multiple Biotoxin Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Shelly R.; Gibson Gunn, G.; Mueller, Francis W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Ulcerative colitis and chronic fatigue syndrome Symptoms: Colitis • profound fatigue • multi-joint pain • cognitive impairment • corneal keratitis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: VIP replacement therapy Specialty: Family Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Patients with multisymptom chronic conditions, such as refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), present diagnostic and management challenges for clinicians, as well as the opportunity to recognize and treat emerging disease entities. In the current case we report reversal of co-existing RUC and CFS symptoms arising from biotoxin exposures in a genetically susceptible individual. Case Report: A 25-year-old previously healthy male with new-onset refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) tested negative for autoimmune disease biomarkers. However, urine mycotoxin panel testing was positive for trichothecene group and air filter testing from the patient’s water-damaged rental house identified the toxic mold Stachybotrys chartarum. HLA-DR/DQ testing revealed a multisusceptible haplotype for development of chronic inflammation, and serum chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) biomarker testing was positive for highly elevated TGF-beta and a clinically undetectable level of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Following elimination of biotoxin exposures, VIP replacement therapy, dental extractions, and implementation of a mind body intervention-relaxation response (MBI-RR) program, the patient’s symptoms resolved. He is off medications, back to work, and resuming normal exercise. Conclusions: This constellation of RUC and CFS symptoms in an HLA-DR/DQ genetically susceptible individual with biotoxin exposures is consistent with the recently described CIRS disease pathophysiology. Chronic immune disturbance (turbatio immuno) can be identified with clinically available CIRS biomarkers and

  8. Danger Signals Activating the Immune Response after Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Hirsiger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sterile injury can cause a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS that resembles the host response during sepsis. The inflammatory response following trauma comprises various systems of the human body which are cross-linked with each other within a highly complex network of inflammation. Endogenous danger signals (danger-associated molecular patterns; DAMPs; alarmins as well as exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs play a crucial role in the initiation of the immune response. With popularization of the “danger theory,” numerous DAMPs and PAMPs and their corresponding pathogen-recognition receptors have been identified. In this paper, we highlight the role of the DAMPs high-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1, interleukin-1α (IL-1α, and interleukin-33 (IL-33 as unique dual-function mediators as well as mitochondrial danger signals released upon cellular trauma and necrosis.

  9. Chronic pain management in the active-duty military

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, David; Cohen, Steven P.

    2012-06-01

    As in the general population, chronic pain is a prevalent and burdensome affliction in active-duty military personnel. Painful conditions in military members can be categorized broadly in terms of whether they arise directly from combat injuries (gunshot, fragmentation wound, blast impact) or whether they result from non-combat injuries (sprains, herniated discs, motor vehicle accidents). Both combat-related and non-combat-related causes of pain can further be classified as either acute or chronic. Here we discuss the state of pain management as it relates to the military population in both deployed and non-deployed settings. The term non-battle injury (NBI) is commonly used to refer to those conditions not directly associated with the combat actions of war. In the history of warfare, NBI have far outstripped battle-related injuries in terms not only of morbidity, but also mortality. It was not until improvements in health care and field medicine were applied in World War I that battle-related deaths finally outnumbered those attributed to disease and pestilence. However, NBI have been the leading cause of morbidity and hospital admission in every major conflict since the Korean War. Pain remains a leading cause of presentation to military medical facilities, both in and out of theater. The absence of pain services is associated with a low return-to-duty rate among the deployed population. The most common pain complaints involve the low-back and neck, and studies have suggested that earlier treatment is associated with more significant improvement and a higher return to duty rate. It is recognized that military medicine is often at the forefront of medical innovation, and that many fields of medicine have reaped benefit from the conduct of war.

  10. [Changes in various parameters of the mouse immune status subjected to chronic social conflict].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griazeva, N I; Shurlygina, A V; Verbitskaia, L V; Mel'nikova, E V; Kudriavtseva, N N; Trufakin, V A

    1999-08-01

    Recurrent experience of a social confrontation was shown to increase the per cent of cleavage nucleus neutrophiles in both mice-participants, activation of the lymphocyte dehydrogenase, and reduction of number of the CDA+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes. Dynamic character of changes in the metabolism parameters and the number of lymphocytes is obviously dependent on duration of the confrontations in mice. PMID:10643596

  11. The role for protein tyrosine phosphatases in regulating the immune system: implications for chronic intestinal inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Spalinger, Marianne R.; MCCOLE, DECLAN F.; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Current hypothesis suggests that genetic, immunological and bacterial factors contribute essentially to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Variations within the gene loci encoding protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have been associated with the onset of IBD. PTPs modulate the activity of their substrates by dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues and are critical for the regulation of fundamental cellular signalling processes.Evidence emerges that expression levels of PTPN...

  12. Role of protein tyrosine phosphatases in regulating the immune system: implications for chronic intestinal inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Spalinger, Marianne R.; MCCOLE, DECLAN F.; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Current hypothesis suggests that genetic, immunological, and bacterial factors contribute essentially to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Variations within the gene loci encoding protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have been associated with the onset of inflammatory bowel disease. PTPs modulate the activity of their substrates by dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues and are critical for the regulation of fundamental cellular signaling processes. Evidence emerges that express...

  13. Intravenous immune globulin (10% caprylate-chromatography purified) for the treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (ICE study): a randomised placebo-controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Richard; Donofrio, Peter; Bril, Vera; Dalakas, Marinos; Deng, Chunqin; Hanna, Kim; Hartung, H. P.; Latov, Norman; Merkies, Ingemar; Doorn, Pieter

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Short-term studies suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin might reduce disability caused by chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) but long-term effects have not been shown. We aimed to establish whether 10% caprylate-chromatography purified immune globulin intravenous (IGIV-C) has short-term and long-term benefit in patients with CIDP. Methods: 117 patients with CIDP who met specific neurophysiological inflammatory neuropathy cause and treat...

  14. Biological limits to reduction in rates of coronary heart disease: a punctuated equilibrium approach to immune cognition, chronic inflammation, and pathogenic social hierarchy

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Rodrick; Wallace, Deborah; Robert G Wallace

    2002-01-01

    On both empirical and theoretical grounds we find that a particular form of social hierarchy, here characterized as 'pathogenic', can, from the earliest phases of life, exert a formal analog to evolutionary selection pressure, literally writing a permanent image of itself upon immune function as chronic vascular inflammation and its consequences. The staged nature of resulting disease emerges 'naturally' as an analog to punctuated equilibrium in evolutionary theory. Exposure differs accordi...

  15. The Impact of Membrane Lipid Composition on Macrophage Activation in the Immune Defense against Rhodococcus equi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Schumann

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional fatty acids are known to have an impact on membrane lipid composition of body cells, including cells of the immune system, thus providing a link between dietary fatty acid uptake, inflammation and immunity. In this study we reveal the significance of macrophage membrane lipid composition on gene expression and cytokine synthesis thereby highlighting signal transduction processes, macrophage activation as well as macrophage defense mechanisms. Using RAW264.7 macrophages as a model system, we identified polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA of both the n-3 and the n-6 family to down-regulate the synthesis of: (i the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α; (ii the co-stimulatory molecule CD86; as well as (iii the antimicrobial polypeptide lysozyme. The action of the fatty acids partially depended on the activation status of the macrophages. It is particularly important to note that the anti-inflammatory action of the PUFA could also be seen in case of infection of RAW264.7 with viable microorganisms of the genera R. equi and P. aeruginosa. In summary, our data provide strong evidence that PUFA from both the n-3 and the n-6 family down-regulate inflammation processes in context of chronic infections caused by persistent pathogens.

  16. Serum bactericidal activity as indicator of innate immunity in pacu Piaractus mesopotamicus (Holmberg, 1887

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D. Biller-Takahashi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The immune system of teleost fish has mechanisms responsible for the defense against bacteria through protective proteins in several tissues. The protein action can be evaluated by serum bactericidal activity and this is an important tool to analyze the immune system. Pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus, is one of the most important fish in national aquaculture. However there is a lack of studies on its immune responses. In order to standardize and assess the accuracy of the serum bactericidal activity assay, fish were briefly challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila and sampled one week after the challenge. The bacterial infection increased the concentration of protective proteins, resulting in a decrease of colony-forming unit values expressed as well as an enhanced serum bactericidal activity. The protocol showed a reliable assay, appropriate to determine the serum bactericidal activity of pacu in the present experimental conditions.

  17. Early interfaced neural activity from chronic amputated nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshitija Garde

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive inflammation, currently limit their long-term use. Here we demonstrate that enticement of peripheral nerve regeneration through a non-obstructive multi-electrode array, after either acute or chronic nerve amputation, offers a viable alternative to obtain early neural recordings and to enhance long-term interfacing of nerve activity. Non restrictive electrode arrays placed in the path of regenerating nerve fibers allowed the recording of action potentials as early as 8 days post-implantation with high signal-to-noise ratio, as long as 3 months in some animals, and with minimal inflammation at the nerve tissue-metal electrode interface. Our findings suggest that regenerative on-dependent multi-electrode arrays of open design allow the early and stable interfacing of neural activity from amputated peripheral nerves and might contribute towards conveying full neural control and sensory feedback to users of robotic prosthetic devices. .

  18. Diaphragm activation during exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinderby, C; Spahija, J; Beck, J; Kaminski, D; Yan, S; Comtois, N; Sliwinski, P

    2001-06-01

    Although it has been postulated that central inhibition of respiratory drive may prevent development of diaphragm fatigue in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) during exercise, this premise has not been validated. We evaluated diaphragm electrical activation (EAdi) relative to maximum in 10 patients with moderately severe COPD at rest and during incremental exhaustive bicycle exercise. Flow was measured with a pneumotachograph and volume by integration of flow. EAdi and transdiaphragmatic pressures (Pdi) were measured using an esophageal catheter. End-expiratory lung volume (EELV) was assessed by inspiratory capacity (IC) maneuvers, and maximal voluntary EAdi was obtained during these maneuvers. Minute ventilation (V E) was 12.2 +/- 1.9 L/min (mean +/- SD) at rest, and increased progressively (p < 0.001) to 31.0 +/- 7.8 L/min at end-exercise. EELV increased during exercise (p < 0.001) causing end-inspiratory lung volume to attain 97 +/- 3% of TLC at end-exercise. Pdi at rest was 9.4 +/- 3.2 cm H(2)O and increased during the first two thirds of exercise (p < 0.001) to plateau at about 13 cm H(2)O. EAdi was 24 +/- 6% of voluntary maximal at rest and increased progressively during exercise (p < 0.001) to reach 81 +/- 7% at end-exercise. In conclusion, dynamic hyperinflation during exhaustive exercise in patients with COPD reduces diaphragm pressure-generating capacity, promoting high levels of diaphragm activation. PMID:11401887

  19. Chronic rhinosinusitis pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Whitney W; Lee, Robert J; Schleimer, Robert P; Cohen, Noam A

    2015-12-01

    There are a variety of medical conditions associated with chronic sinonasal inflammation, including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and cystic fibrosis. In particular, CRS can be divided into 2 major subgroups based on whether nasal polyps are present or absent. Unfortunately, clinical treatment strategies for patients with chronic sinonasal inflammation are limited, in part because the underlying mechanisms contributing to disease pathology are heterogeneous and not entirely known. It is hypothesized that alterations in mucociliary clearance, abnormalities in the sinonasal epithelial cell barrier, and tissue remodeling all contribute to the chronic inflammatory and tissue-deforming processes characteristic of CRS. Additionally, the host innate and adaptive immune responses are also significantly activated and might be involved in pathogenesis. Recent advancements in the understanding of CRS pathogenesis are highlighted in this review, with special focus placed on the roles of epithelial cells and the host immune response in patients with cystic fibrosis, CRS without nasal polyps, or CRS with nasal polyps. PMID:26654193

  20. CD8+ T cell activation predominate early immune responses to hypercholesterolemia in Apoe-/- mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björkbacka Harry

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well established that adaptive immune responses induced by hypercholesterolemia play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, but the pathways involved remain to be fully characterized. In the present study we assessed immune responses to hypercholesterolemia induced by feeding Apoe-/- mice a high-fat diet for 4 or 8 weeks. Results The primary immune response in lymph nodes draining the aortic root was an increased expression of interferon (IFN-γ in CD8+CD28+ T cells, while an activation of IFN-γ expression in CD4+ T cells was observed only after 8 weeks of high-fat diet. Contrarily, spleen CD4+ T cells responded with a higher expression of IL-10. Spleen CD8+ T cells expressed both IFN-γ and IL-10 and showed enhanced proliferation when exposed to Concanavalin A. Plasma levels of IgG and IgM against oxidized LDL did not change, but the level of apolipoprotein B/IgM immune complexes was increased. Conclusion Hypercholesterolemia leads to unopposed activation of Th1 immune responses in lymph nodes draining atherosclerotic lesions, whereas Th1 activation in the spleen is balanced by a concomitant activation of Th2 cells. The activation of CD8+ T cells implies that hypercholesterolemia is associated with formation of cell autoantigens.

  1. Evaluation of National Immunization Day (NID Activities Under Intensified Pulse Polio Immunization Program (IPPI Feb 2012 in Central Gujarat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Rana, Sanju Gajjar, Rashmi Sharma, Anish Sinha, Brinda Chudasama, Pradeep Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been more than 1 year since the last case of wild polio virus occurred in the country and we are at the final phase of polio eradication. It needs to enhance/ sustain all activities of polio eradication. This study was carried out to critically evaluate the various activities undertaken and make the suggestions for improvement during the National Immunization Day (NID of February 2012 under Intensified Pulse Polio Immunization Program (IPPI in urban/ rural areas of Ahmedabad, Kheda and Gandhinagar districts of Central Gujarat. Methodology: External evaluators after a training cum orientation program undertook the evaluation of NID (Feb 2012 in 3 districts of Central Gujarat in identified 20 booths through assessing booth based vaccination and undertaking surveys of house to house activities and at migratory/ transit/ street sites. Results: (a Booth based activities: Most booths were accessible and had supply of logistics (IEC materials, stationeries, vaccines, cold chain equipments, marker pens. Understaffing and last minute replacement with untrained staff and non participation of community or nongovernmental organizations (NGOs were some of the issues. (b House to house visits: External monitors could detect 7 missed sites with 63 unvaccinated children while the in house health supervisors could not detect any site. False P detection rates were also high for external monitors (5.3% than in house supervisors (1.3%. (c Migratory sites: Visit to 118 migratory sites yielded even more children as not vaccinated (16.8%. 21 transit sites showed the inadequacies of program where almost one third of children could not be checked for the vaccination. (d Street surveys: Street surveys done after completion of NID (Based on finger markings alone found 12.7% children as not vaccinated. Conclusions: Present communication aims to explore the problematic issues in achieving vaccination coverage, capacity building of team members and

  2. Chronic Ingestion of Coal Fly-Ash Contaminated Prey and Its Effects on Health and Immune Parameters in Juvenile American Alligators (Alligator mississippiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, John W; Hamilton, Matthew T; Metts, Brian S; Glenn, Travis C; Tuberville, Tracey D

    2016-10-01

    Coal-burning power plants supply approximately 37 % of the electricity in the United States. However, incomplete combustion produces ash wastes enriched with toxic trace elements that have historically been disposed of in aquatic basins. Organisms inhabiting such habitats may accumulate these trace elements; however, studies investigating the effects on biota have been primarily restricted to shorter-lived, lower-trophic organisms. The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), a long-lived, top-trophic carnivore, has been observed inhabiting these basins, yet the health or immune effects of chronic exposure and possible accumulation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated how chronic dietary ingestion of prey contaminated with coal combustion wastes (CCWs) for 25 months, and subsequent accumulation of trace elements present in CCWs, affected juvenile alligator immune function and health. Alligators were assigned to one of four dietary-treatment groups including controls and those fed prey contaminated with CCWs for one, two, or three times a week. However, no effect of Dietary Treatment (p > 0.05) was observed on any immune parameter or hematological or plasma analyte we tested. Our results suggest that neither exposure to nor accumulation of low doses of CCWs had a negative effect on certain aspects of the immune and hematological system. However, future studies are required to elucidate this further. PMID:27475646

  3. Induction of novel CD8+ T-cell responses during chronic untreated HIV-1 infection by immunization with subdominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloverpris, Henrik; Karlsson, Ingrid; Bonde, Jesper;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To investigate the potential to induce additional cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) immunity during chronic HIV-1 infection. DESIGN:: We selected infrequently targeted or subdominant but conserved HLA-A*0201-binding epitopes in Gag, Pol, Env, Vpu and Vif. These relatively immune silent epi...... lead to stronger and more durable cellular responses to selected epitopes with the potential to control viral replication and prevent disease in HIV-1-infected individuals.......OBJECTIVE:: To investigate the potential to induce additional cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) immunity during chronic HIV-1 infection. DESIGN:: We selected infrequently targeted or subdominant but conserved HLA-A*0201-binding epitopes in Gag, Pol, Env, Vpu and Vif. These relatively immune silent...... epitopes were modified as anchor-optimized peptides to improve immunogenicity and delivered on autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). METHODS:: Twelve treatment-naïve HLA-A*0201 HIV-1-infected Danish individuals received 1 x 10 MDDCs subcutaneously (s.c.) (weeks 0, 2, 4 and 8), pulsed with...

  4. The levels of IL-17A and of the cytokines involved in Th17 cell commitment are increased in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Andreia Maria Camargos; Souza, Cláudia; Rocha, Gifone Aguiar; de Melo, Fabrício Freire; Clementino, Nelma Cristina Diogo; Marino, Marília Campos Abreu; Bozzi, Adriana; Silva, Maria Luiza; Martins Filho, Olindo Assis; Queiroz, Dulciene Maria Magalhães

    2011-01-01

    Th17 cells have been associated with immune-mediated diseases in humans but it has still not been determined whether they play a role in immune thrombocytopenia. We evaluated representative cytokines of the Th17, Th1, Th2 and Treg cell commitment in the serum of patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia, as well as the cell source of IL-17A. Higher levels of IL-17A and Th17-related cytokines, and an increased percentage of IL-17A producing CD4+ and neutrophils were observed in patients. The levels of cytokines involved in Th1 cell commitment IFN-γ, IL-2, IL12-p70 and the percentages of Th1 cells were also increased, but IL-4 was not detected. Although the concentrations of IL-10 were higher, the levels of TGF-β were similar in both groups. In conclusion, our results point to a putative role for Th-17 cells/IL-17A cytokine in the pathogenesis of chronic immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:21972211

  5. Chronic Restraint Stress Promotes Immune Suppression through Toll-like Receptor 4-Mediated Phosphoinositide 3-kinase Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Miao, JunYing; Hanley, Gregory; Stuart, Charles; Sun, Xiuli; Chen, Tingting; Yin, Deling

    2008-01-01

    Stress, either psychological or physical, can have a dramatic impact on the immune system. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a pivotal role in the induction of innate and adaptive immune response. We have reported that stress modulates the immune response in a TLR4-dependent manner. However, the mechanisms underlying TLR4-mediated signaling in stress modulation of immune system have not been identified. Here, we demonstrate an essential role for the TLR4-mediated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K...

  6. Inflammatory and Immune Response Genes Polymorphisms are Associated with Susceptibility to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Tatars Population from Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korytina, Gulnaz Faritovna; Akhmadishina, L Z; Kochetova, O V; Aznabaeva, Y G; Zagidullin, Sh Z; Victorova, T V

    2016-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex chronic inflammatory disease of the respiratory system affecting primarily distal respiratory pathways and lung parenchyma. This work was designed as a case-control study aimed at investigating the association of COPD with polymorphisms in inflammatory and immune response genes (JAK1, JAK3, STAT1, STAT3, NFKB1, IL17A, ADIPOQ, ADIPOR1, etc.) in Tatar population from Russia. Ten SNPs (rs310216, rs3212780, rs12693591, rs2293152, rs28362491, rs4711998, rs1974226, rs1501299, rs266729, and rs12733285) were genotyped by the real-time polymerase chain reaction (TaqMan assays) in a case-control study (425 COPD patients and 457 in the control group, from Ufa, Russia). Logistic regression was used to detect the association of SNPs in different models. Linear regression analyses were performed to estimate the relationship between SNPs and lung function parameters and pack-years. In Tatar population, significant associations of JAK1 (rs310216) (P = 0.0002, OR 1.70 in additive model), JAK3 (rs3212780) (P = 0.001, OR 1.61 in dominant model), and IL17A (rs1974226) (P = 0.0037, OR 2.31 in recessive model) with COPD were revealed. The disease risk was higher in carriers of insertion allele of NFKB1 (rs28362491) (P = 0.045, OR 1.22). We found a significant gene-by-environment interaction of smoking status and IL17A (rs1974226) (P interact = 0.016), JAK3 (rs3212780) (P interact = 0.031), ADIPOQ (rs266729) (P interact = 0.013), and ADIPOR1 (rs12733285) (P interact = 0.018). The relationship between the rs4711998, rs1974226, rs310216, rs3212780, rs28362491, and smoking pack-years was found (P = 0.045, P = 0.004, P = 0.0005, P = 0.021, and P = 0.042). A significant genotype-dependent variation of forced vital capacity was observed for NFKB1 (rs28362491) (P = 0.017), ADIPOR1 (rs12733285) (P = 0.043), and STAT1 (rs12693591) (P = 0.048). The genotypes of STAT1 (rs12693591) (P = 0.013) and JAK1 (rs

  7. Alternations of cellular immunity in the patients with chronic hepatitis B after the interventional administration of thymosin and Huangqi via the portal vein catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate feasibility administration of thymosin and Huangqi through the portal vein catheterization. And an assessment of the effects of the interventional therapy on the cellular immunity in the patients with chronic hepatitis B. Methods: Thymosin and Huangqi solution were given via portal vein catheterization in eight cases of chronic hepatitis B with hepatic carcinoma. The CD3, CD3+CD8+, CD3+CD4+, and NK cell level of peripheral blood were analyzed by flow cytometry pre- and post-operatively. Results: The level of CD3 was pre-operative 665.63 ± 434.80/μlvs post-operative 1326.50 ± 551.09/μl; CD3+CD8+ was 275.63 ± 205.78/μl vs 513.50 ± 231.00/μl; CD3+CD4+ was 515.88 ± 329.75 μl vs 981.75 ± 478.54/μl; and NK was 130.86 ± 176.58/μl vs 303.43 ± 190.90/μl, respectively. There were significance difference between pre-operative and post-operative data. Conclusion: The administration of thymosin and Huangqi via the portal vein catheterization is an effective and safe therapy to improve cellular immunity in patients with chronic hepatitis B, and potentially is a new treatment of chronic hepatitis B. Study of larger sample is expected. (authors)

  8. Increased activity correlates with reduced ability to mount immune defenses to endotoxin in zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Patricia C; Springthorpe, Dwight; Bentley, George E

    2014-10-01

    When suffering from infection, animals experience behavioral and physiological alterations that potentiate the immune system's ability to fight pathogens. The behavioral component of this response, termed "sickness behavior," is characterized by an overall reduction in physical activity. A growing number of reports demonstrate substantial flexibility in these sickness behaviors, which can be partially overcome in response to mates, intruders and parental duties. Since it is hypothesized that adopting sickness behaviors frees energetic resources for mounting an immune response, we tested whether diminished immune responses coincided with reduced sickness behaviors by housing male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) in social conditions that alter their behavioral response to an endotoxin. To facilitate our data collection, we developed and built a miniaturized sensor capable of detecting changes in dorsoventral acceleration and categorizing them as different behaviors when attached to the finches. We found that the immune defenses (quantified as haptoglobin-like activity, ability to change body temperature and bacterial killing capacity) increased as a function of increased time spent resting. The findings indicate that when animals are sick attenuation of sickness behaviors may exact costs, such as reduced immune function. The extent of these costs depends on how relevant the affected components of immunity are for fighting a specific infection. PMID:24888267

  9. Immunization with Dendritic Cells Pulsed ex vivo with Recombinant Chlamydial Protease-Like Activity Factor Induces Protective Immunity Against Genital Chlamydia muridarum Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard eArulanandam

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We have shown that immunization with soluble recombinant (r chlamydial protease-like activity factor (rCPAF and a T helper (Th 1 type adjuvant can induce significantly enhanced bacterial clearance and protection against Chlamydia–induced pathological sequelae in the genital tract. In this study, we investigated the use of bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs pulsed ex vivo with rCPAF+CpG in an adoptive subcutaneous immunization for the ability to induce protective immunity against genital chlamydial infection. We found that BMDCs pulsed with rCPAF+CpG efficiently up-regulated the expression of activation markers CD86, CD80, CD40 and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II, and secreted interleukin-12, but not IL-10 and IL-4. Mice adoptively immunized with rCPAF+CpG-pulsed BMDCs or UV-EB+CpG-pulsed BMDCs produced elevated levels of antigen-specific IFN- and enhanced IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies. Moreover, mice immunized with rCPAF+CpG-pulsed BMDCs or UV-EB+CpG-pulsed BMDCs exhibited significantly reduced genital Chlamydia shedding, accelerated resolution of infection, and reduced oviduct pathology when compared to infected mock-immunized animals. These results suggest that adoptive subcutaneous immunization with ex vivo rCPAF-pulsed BMDCs is an effective approach, comparable to that induced by UV-EB-BMDCs, for inducing robust anti-Chlamydia immunity.

  10. Maternal immune activation by LPS selectively alters specific gene expression profiles of interneuron migration and oxidative stress in the fetus without triggering a fetal immune response

    OpenAIRE

    Oskvig, Devon B.; Elkahloun, Abdel G.; Johnson, Kory R.; Phillips, Terry M.; Herkenham, Miles

    2012-01-01

    Maternal immune activation (MIA) is a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia and autism. Infections during pregnancy activate the mother’s immune system and alter the fetal environment, with consequential effects on CNS function and behavior in the offspring, but the cellular and molecular links between infection-induced altered fetal development and risk for neuropsychiatric disorders are unknown. We investigated the immunological, molecular, and behavioral effects of MIA in the of...

  11. Vaginal immunization to elicit primary T-cell activation and dissemination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pettini

    Full Text Available Primary T-cell activation at mucosal sites is of utmost importance for the development of vaccination strategies. T-cell priming after vaginal immunization, with ovalbumin and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide adjuvant as model vaccine formulation, was studied in vivo in hormone-synchronized mice and compared to the one induced by the nasal route. Twenty-four hours after both vaginal or nasal immunization, antigen-loaded dendritic cells were detected within the respective draining lymph nodes. Vaginal immunization elicited a strong recruitment of antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells into draining lymph nodes that was more rapid than the one observed following nasal immunization. T-cell clonal expansion was first detected in iliac lymph nodes, draining the genital tract, and proliferated T cells disseminated towards distal lymph nodes and spleen similarly to what observed following nasal immunization. T cells were indeed activated by the antigen encounter and acquired homing molecules essential to disseminate towards distal lymphoid organs as confirmed by the modulation of CD45RB, CD69, CD44 and CD62L marker expression. A multi-type Galton Watson branching process, previously used for in vitro analysis of T-cell proliferation, was applied to model in vivo CFSE proliferation data in draining lymph nodes 57 hours following immunization, in order to calculate the probabilistic decision of a cell to enter in division, rest in quiescence or migrate/die. The modelling analysis indicated that the probability of a cell to proliferate was higher following vaginal than nasal immunization. All together these data show that vaginal immunization, despite the absence of an organized mucosal associated inductive site in the genital tract, is very efficient in priming antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells and inducing their dissemination from draining lymph nodes towards distal lymphoid organs.

  12. Chronic Gastrointestinal Nematode Infection Mutes Immune Responses to Mycobacterial Infection Distal to the Gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obieglo, Katja; Feng, Xiaogang; Bollampalli, Vishnu Priya; Dellacasa-Lindberg, Isabel; Classon, Cajsa; Österblad, Markus; Helmby, Helena; Hewitson, James P; Maizels, Rick M; Gigliotti Rothfuchs, Antonio; Nylén, Susanne

    2016-03-01

    Helminth infections have been suggested to impair the development and outcome of Th1 responses to vaccines and intracellular microorganisms. However, there are limited data regarding the ability of intestinal nematodes to modulate Th1 responses at sites distal to the gut. In this study, we have investigated the effect of the intestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri on Th1 responses to Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). We found that H. polygyrus infection localized to the gut can mute BCG-specific CD4(+) T cell priming in both the spleen and skin-draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, H. polygyrus infection reduced the magnitude of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to PPD in the skin. Consequently, H. polygyrus-infected mice challenged with BCG had a higher mycobacterial load in the liver compared with worm-free mice. The excretory-secretory product from H. polygyrus (HES) was found to dampen IFN-γ production by mycobacteria-specific CD4(+) T cells. This inhibition was dependent on the TGF-βR signaling activity of HES, suggesting that TGF-β signaling plays a role in the impaired Th1 responses observed coinfection with worms. Similar to results with mycobacteria, H. polygyrus-infected mice displayed an increase in skin parasite load upon secondary infection with Leishmania major as well as a reduction in DTH responses to Leishmania Ag. We show that a nematode confined to the gut can mute T cell responses to mycobacteria and impair control of secondary infections distal to the gut. The ability of intestinal helminths to reduce DTH responses may have clinical implications for the use of skin test-based diagnosis of microbial infections. PMID:26819205

  13. EFFECTS OF GC-MACROPHAGE ACTIVATING FACTOR IN HUMAN NEURONS; IMPLICATIONS FOR TREATMENT OF CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Rodney Smith; Lynda Thyer; Emma Ward; Elisabetta Meacci; Branca, Jacopo J. V.; Gabriele Morucci; Massimo Gulisano; Marco Ruggiero; Alessandra Pacini; Ferdinando Paternostro; Di Cesare Mannelli Lorenzo; David J. Noakes; Stefania Pacini

    2013-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a debilitating disease of multifactorial aetiology characterized by immune system dysfunction, widespread inflammation, multisystemic neuropathology and persistent pain. Given the central role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of the syndrome, we studied the effects of a potent modulator of the immune system in in vitro and in vivo models that could help clarifying its role and indications in ME/CFS treatment. To this end, ...

  14. Nerve growth factor: a neurotrophin with activity on cells of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloe, L; Simone, M D; Properzi, F

    Numerous studies published in the last two decades provide evidence that nerve growth factor (NGF), a polypeptide originally discovered because of its neurotrophic activity, acts on a variety of cells of the immune system, including mast cells, eosinophils, and B and T lymphocytes. NGF has been shown to increase during inflammatory responses, autoimmune disorders, parasitic infections, and allergic diseases. Moreover, stress, which is characterized also by activation of a variety of immune cells, causes a significant increase in basal plasma NGF levels. Recently published studies reveal that hematopoietic progenitor cells seem to be able to produce and/or respond to NGF. We report these data and discuss the hypothesis of the possible implication of NGF on the functional activities of immune cells. PMID:10383121

  15. Reversal of Refractory Ulcerative Colitis and Severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms Arising from Immune Disturbance in an HLA-DR/DQ Genetically Susceptible Individual with Multiple Biotoxin Exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Shelly R; Gunn, G Gibson; Mueller, Francis W

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with multisymptom chronic conditions, such as refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), present diagnostic and management challenges for clinicians, as well as the opportunity to recognize and treat emerging disease entities. In the current case we report reversal of co-existing RUC and CFS symptoms arising from biotoxin exposures in a genetically susceptible individual. CASE REPORT A 25-year-old previously healthy male with new-onset refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) tested negative for autoimmune disease biomarkers. However, urine mycotoxin panel testing was positive for trichothecene group and air filter testing from the patient's water-damaged rental house identified the toxic mold Stachybotrys chartarum. HLA-DR/DQ testing revealed a multisusceptible haplotype for development of chronic inflammation, and serum chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) biomarker testing was positive for highly elevated TGF-beta and a clinically undetectable level of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Following elimination of biotoxin exposures, VIP replacement therapy, dental extractions, and implementation of a mind body intervention-relaxation response (MBI-RR) program, the patient's symptoms resolved. He is off medications, back to work, and resuming normal exercise. CONCLUSIONS This constellation of RUC and CFS symptoms in an HLA-DR/DQ genetically susceptible individual with biotoxin exposures is consistent with the recently described CIRS disease pathophysiology. Chronic immune disturbance (turbatio immuno) can be identified with clinically available CIRS biomarkers and may represent a treatable underlying disease etiology in a subset of genetically susceptible patients with RUC, CFS, and other immune disorders. PMID:27165859

  16. Increasing the immune activity of exosomes: the effect of miRNA-depleted exosome proteins on activating dendritic cell/cytokine-induced killer cells against pancreatic cancer* #

    OpenAIRE

    Que, Ri-sheng; Lin, Cheng; Ding, Guo-ping; WU, ZHENG-RONG; Cao, Li-ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tumor-derived exosomes were considered to be potential candidates for tumor vaccines because they are abundant in immune-regulating proteins, whereas tumor exosomal miRNAs may induce immune tolerance, thereby having an opposite immune function. Objective: This study was designed to separate exosomal protein and depleted exosomal microRNAs (miRNAs), increasing the immune activity of exosomes for activating dendritic cell/cytokine-induced killer cells (DC/CIKs) against pancreatic ca...

  17. Induction of immune tolerance to FIX by intramuscular AAV gene transfer is independent of the activation status of dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bharadwaj, Arpita S; Kelly, Meagan; Kim, Dongsoo; Chao, Hengjun

    2010-01-01

    The nature of viral vectors is suggested to be a significant contributor to undesirable immune responses subsequent to gene transfer. Such viral vectors, recognized as danger signals by the host immune system, activate dendritic cells (DCs), causing unwanted antivector and/or transgene product immunity. We recently reported efficient induction of immune tolerance to coagulation factor IX (FIX) by direct intramuscular injection of adeno-associated virus (AAV)–FIX. AAV vectors are nonpathogenic...

  18. Phenoloxidase activity in the infraorder Isoptera: unraveling life-history correlates of immune investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengaus, Rebeca B.; Reichheld, Jennifer L.

    2016-02-01

    Within the area of ecological immunology, the quantification of phenoloxidase (PO) activity has been used as a proxy for estimating immune investment. Because termites have unique life-history traits and significant inter-specific differences exist regarding their nesting and foraging habits, comparative studies on PO activity can shed light on the general principles influencing immune investment against the backdrop of sociality, reproductive potential, and gender. We quantified PO activity across four termite species ranging from the phylogenetically basal to the most derived, each with their particular nesting/foraging strategies. Our data indicate that PO activity varies across species, with soil-dwelling termites exhibiting significantly higher PO levels than the above-ground wood nester species which in turn have higher PO levels than arboreal species. Moreover, our comparative approach suggests that pathogenic risks can override reproductive potential as a more important driver of immune investment. No gender-based differences in PO activities were recorded. Although termite PO activity levels vary in accordance with a priori predictions made from life-history theory, our data indicate that nesting and foraging strategies (and their resulting pathogenic pressures) can supersede reproductive potential and other life-history traits in influencing investment in PO. Termites, within the eusocial insects, provide a unique perspective for inferring how different ecological pressures may have influenced immune function in general and their levels of PO activity, in particular.

  19. IgE epitope proximity determines immune complex shape and effector cell activation capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieras, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Roux, Kenneth H.; Dutta, Moumita; Khodoun, Marat; Zafred, Domen; Cabauatan, Clarissa R.; Lupinek, Christian; Weber, Milena; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Keller, Walter; Finkelman, Fred D.; Valenta, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background IgE-allergen complexes induce mast cell and basophil activation and thus immediate allergic inflammation. They are also important for IgE-facilitated allergen presentation to T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Objective To investigate whether the proximity of IgE binding sites on an allergen affects immune complex shape and subsequent effector cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Methods We constructed artificial allergens by grafting IgE epitopes in different numbers and proximity onto a scaffold protein. The shape of immune complexes formed between artificial allergens and the corresponding IgE was studied by negative-stain electron microscopy. Allergenic activity was determined using basophil activation assays. Mice were primed with IgE, followed by injection of artificial allergens to evaluate their in vivo allergenic activity. Severity of systemic anaphylaxis was measured by changes in body temperature. Results We could demonstrate simultaneous binding of 4 IgE antibodies in close vicinity to each other. The proximity of IgE binding sites on allergens influenced the shape of the resulting immune complexes and the magnitude of effector cell activation and in vivo inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the proximity of IgE epitopes on an allergen affects its allergenic activity. We thus identified a novel mechanism by which IgE-allergen complexes regulate allergic inflammation. This mechanism should be important for allergy and other immune complex–mediated diseases. PMID:26684291

  20. Early infections by myxoma virus of young rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) protected by maternal antibodies activate their immune system and enhance herd immunity in wild populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchandeau, Stéphane; Pontier, Dominique; Guitton, Jean-Sébastien; Letty, Jérôme; Fouchet, David; Aubineau, Jacky; Berger, Francis; Léonard, Yves; Roobrouck, Alain; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Peralta, Brigitte; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    The role of maternal antibodies is to protect newborns against acute early infection by pathogens. This can be achieved either by preventing any infection or by allowing attenuated infections associated with activation of the immune system, the two strategies being based on different cost/benefit ratios. We carried out an epidemiological survey of myxomatosis, which is a highly lethal infectious disease, in two distant wild populations of rabbits to describe the epidemiological pattern of the disease. Detection of specific IgM and IgG enabled us to describe the pattern of immunity. We show that maternal immunity attenuates early infection of juveniles and enables activation of their immune system. This mechanism associated with steady circulation of the myxoma virus in both populations, which induces frequent reinfections of immune rabbits, leads to the maintenance of high immunity levels within populations. Thus, myxomatosis has a low impact, with most infections being asymptomatic. This work shows that infection of young rabbits protected by maternal antibodies induces attenuated disease and activates their immune system. This may play a major role in reducing the impact of a highly lethal disease when ecological conditions enable permanent circulation of the pathogen. PMID:24589193

  1. Clusters of activated microglia in normal-appearing white matter show signs of innate immune activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Horssen Jack

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In brain tissues from multiple sclerosis (MS patients, clusters of activated HLA-DR-expressing microglia, also referred to as preactive lesions, are located throughout the normal-appearing white matter. The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the frequency, distribution and cellular architecture of preactive lesions using a large cohort of well-characterized MS brain samples. Methods Here, we document the frequency of preactive lesions and their association with distinct white matter lesions in a cohort of 21 MS patients. Immunohistochemistry was used to gain further insight into the cellular and molecular composition of preactive lesions. Results Preactive lesions were observed in a majority of MS patients (67% irrespective of disease duration, gender or subtype of disease. Microglial clusters were predominantly observed in the vicinity of active demyelinating lesions and are not associated with T cell infiltrates, axonal alterations, activated astrocytes or blood–brain barrier disruption. Microglia in preactive lesions consistently express interleukin-10 and TNF-α, but not interleukin-4, whereas matrix metalloproteases-2 and −9 are virtually absent in microglial nodules. Interestingly, key subunits of the free-radical-generating enzyme NADPH oxidase-2 were abundantly expressed in microglial clusters. Conclusions The high frequency of preactive lesions suggests that it is unlikely that most of them will progress into full-blown demyelinating lesions. Preactive lesions are not associated with blood–brain barrier disruption, suggesting that an intrinsic trigger of innate immune activation, rather than extrinsic factors crossing a damaged blood–brain barrier, induces the formation of clusters of activated microglia.

  2. Transcriptional dysregulation of inflammatory/immune pathways after active vaccination against Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsingh, Arlene I; Manley, Kevin; Rong, Yinghui; Reilly, Andrew; Messer, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Immunotherapy, both active and passive, is increasingly recognized as a powerful approach to a wide range of diseases, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Huntington's disease (HD), an autosomal dominant disorder triggered by misfolding of huntingtin (HTT) protein with an expanded polyglutamine tract, could also benefit from this approach. Individuals can be identified genetically at the earliest stages of disease, and there may be particular benefits to a therapy that can target peripheral tissues in addition to brain. In this active vaccination study, we first examined safety and immunogenicity for a broad series of peptide, protein and DNA plasmid immunization protocols, using fragment (R6/1), and knock-in (zQ175) models. No safety issues were found. The strongest and most uniform immune response was to a combination of three non-overlapping HTT Exon1 coded peptides, conjugated to KLH, delivered with alum adjuvant. An N586-82Q plasmid, delivered via gene gun, also showed ELISA responses, mainly in the zQ175 strain, but with more variability, and less robust responses in HD compared with wild-type controls. Transcriptome profiling of spleens from the triple peptide-immunized cohort showed substantial HD-specific differences including differential activation of genes associated with innate immune responses, absence of negative feedback control of gene expression by regulators, a temporal dysregulation of innate immune responses and transcriptional repression of genes associated with memory T cell responses. These studies highlight critical issues for immunotherapy and HD disease management in general. PMID:26307082

  3. MALT1 Protease Activity Is Required for Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong W Yu

    Full Text Available CARMA-BCL10-MALT1 signalosomes play important roles in antigen receptor signaling and other pathways. Previous studies have suggested that as part of this complex, MALT1 functions as both a scaffolding protein to activate NF-κB through recruitment of ubiquitin ligases, and as a protease to cleave and inactivate downstream inhibitory signaling proteins. However, our understanding of the relative importance of these two distinct MALT1 activities has been hampered by a lack of selective MALT1 protease inhibitors with suitable pharmacologic properties. To fully investigate the role of MALT1 protease activity, we generated mice homozygous for a protease-dead mutation in MALT1. We found that some, but not all, MALT1 functions in immune cells were dependent upon its protease activity. Protease-dead mice had defects in the generation of splenic marginal zone and peritoneal B1 B cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells displayed decreased T cell receptor-stimulated proliferation and IL-2 production while B cell receptor-stimulated proliferation was partially dependent on protease activity. In dendritic cells, stimulation of cytokine production through the Dectin-1, Dectin-2, and Mincle C-type lectin receptors was also found to be partially dependent upon protease activity. In vivo, protease-dead mice had reduced basal immunoglobulin levels, and showed defective responses to immunization with T-dependent and T-independent antigens. Surprisingly, despite these decreased responses, MALT1 protease-dead mice, but not MALT1 null mice, developed mixed inflammatory cell infiltrates in multiple organs, suggesting MALT1 protease activity plays a role in immune homeostasis. These findings highlight the importance of MALT1 protease activity in multiple immune cell types, and in integrating immune responses in vivo.

  4. Immune activation in multiple sclerosis and interferon-beta therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krakauer, Martin

    2007-01-01

    inflammation or secondary lymphatic organs. Chemokine receptors are differentially expressed in T cells in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, indicating their role for in T-cell-recruitment to the CNS. Interferon (IFN)-beta is a first-line treatment for MS. The mechanism of action is unclear, but probably includes...... changes in lymphocyte activation, cytokine secretion, and trafficking. The aim of the studies was to shed more light on T-cell immunology in MS and IFN-beta treatment, as well as identifying putative biomarkers of treatment response and/or disease activity. In one study we identified a Th-cell subset of...

  5. Wolbachia Do Not Induce Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Immune Pathway Activation in Aedes albopictus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C. Molloy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aedes albopictus is a major vector of dengue (DENV and chikungunya (CHIKV viruses, causing millions of infections annually. It naturally carries, at high frequency, the intracellular inherited bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia strains wAlbA and wAlbB; transinfection with the higher-density Wolbachia strain wMel from Drosophila melanogaster led to transmission blocking of both arboviruses. The hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced immune activation plays a role in arbovirus inhibition in this species was examined. In contrast to previous observations in Ae. aegypti, elevation of ROS levels was not observed in either cell lines or mosquito lines carrying the wild-type Wolbachia or higher-density Drosophila Wolbachia strains. There was also no upregulation of genes controlling innate immune pathways or with antioxidant/ROS-producing functions. These data suggest that ROS-mediated immune activation is not an important component of the viral transmission-blocking phenotype in this species.

  6. Innate immune activity conditions the effect of regulatory variants upon monocyte gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfax, Benjamin P; Humburg, Peter; Makino, Seiko; Naranbhai, Vivek; Wong, Daniel; Lau, Evelyn; Jostins, Luke; Plant, Katharine; Andrews, Robert; McGee, Chris; Knight, Julian C

    2014-03-01

    To systematically investigate the impact of immune stimulation upon regulatory variant activity, we exposed primary monocytes from 432 healthy Europeans to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or differing durations of lipopolysaccharide and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). More than half of cis-eQTLs identified, involving hundreds of genes and associated pathways, are detected specifically in stimulated monocytes. Induced innate immune activity reveals multiple master regulatory trans-eQTLs including the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), coding variants altering enzyme and receptor function, an IFN-β cytokine network showing temporal specificity, and an interferon regulatory factor 2 (IRF2) transcription factor-modulated network. Induced eQTL are significantly enriched for genome-wide association study loci, identifying context-specific associations to putative causal genes including CARD9, ATM, and IRF8. Thus, applying pathophysiologically relevant immune stimuli assists resolution of functional genetic variants. PMID:24604202

  7. AgNORs, PCNA and Histologic Activity Index in Chronic Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    , Koray CEYHAN

    1999-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis is a clinical and pathological syndrome, which has several causes and it is characterized by varying degrees of hepatocellular necrosis and inflammation. Several systems have been proposed to evaluate the diagnosis, grading and staging of chronic hepatitis. A histologic activity index (HAI) has been developed which generates a numerical score for liver biopsy specimens obtained from patients with chronic hepatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation betwee...

  8. Soluble thrombomodulin reduces inflammation and prevents microalbuminuria induced by chronic endothelial activation in transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Rajashekhar, Gangaraju; Gupta, Akanksha; Marin, Abby; Friedrich, Jessica; Willuweit, Antje; Berg, David T.; Cramer, Martin S.; Sandusky, George E.; Sutton, Timothy A.; Basile, David P.; Grinnell, Brian W.; Clauss, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease pathogenesis involves both tubular and vascular injuries. Despite abundant investigations to identify the risk factors, the involvement of chronic endothelial dysfunction in developing nephropathies is insufficiently explored. Previously, soluble thrombomodulin (sTM), a cofactor in the activation of protein C, has been shown to protect endothelial function in models of acute kidney injury. In this study, the role for sTM in treating chronic kidney disease was explored b...

  9. Prenatal immune activation causes hippocampal synaptic deficits in the absence of overt microglia anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanoli, Sandra; Weber-Stadlbauer, Ulrike; Schedlowski, Manfred; Meyer, Urs; Engler, Harald

    2016-07-01

    Prenatal exposure to infectious or inflammatory insults can increase the risk of developing neuropsychiatric disorder in later life, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autism. These brain disorders are also characterized by pre- and postsynaptic deficits. Using a well-established mouse model of maternal exposure to the viral mimetic polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid [poly(I:C)], we examined whether prenatal immune activation might cause synaptic deficits in the hippocampal formation of pubescent and adult offspring. Based on the widely appreciated role of microglia in synaptic pruning, we further explored possible associations between synaptic deficits and microglia anomalies in offspring of poly(I:C)-exposed and control mothers. We found that prenatal immune activation induced an adult onset of presynaptic hippocampal deficits (as evaluated by synaptophysin and bassoon density). The early-life insult further caused postsynaptic hippocampal deficits in pubescence (as evaluated by PSD95 and SynGAP density), some of which persisted into adulthood. In contrast, prenatal immune activation did not change microglia (or astrocyte) density, nor did it alter their activation phenotypes. The prenatal manipulation did also not cause signs of persistent systemic inflammation. Despite the absence of overt glial anomalies or systemic inflammation, adult offspring exposed to prenatal immune activation displayed increased hippocampal IL-1β levels. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that age-dependent synaptic deficits and abnormal pro-inflammatory cytokine expression can occur during postnatal brain maturation in the absence of microglial anomalies or systemic inflammation. PMID:26408796

  10. Residual NADPH Oxidase Activity and Isolated Lung Involvement in X-Linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J. Gutierrez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is characterized by inherited immune defects resulting from mutations in the NADPH oxidase complex genes. The X-linked type of CGD is caused by defects in the CYBB gene that encodes gp91-phox, a fundamental component of the NADPH oxidase complex. This mutation originates the most common and severe form of CGD, which typically has absence of NADPH oxidase function and aggressive multisystemic infections. We present the case of a 9-year-old child with a rare CYBB mutation that preserves some NADPH oxidase activity, resulting in an atypical mild form of X-linked CGD with isolated lung involvement. Although the clinical picture and partially preserved oxidase function suggested an autosomal recessive form of CGD, genetic testing demonstrated a mutation in the exon 3 of CYBB gene (c.252 G>A, p.Ala84Ala, an uncommon X-linked CGD variant that affects splicing. Atypical presentation and diagnostic difficulties are discussed. This case highlights that the diagnosis of mild forms of X-linked CGD caused by rare CYBB mutations and partially preserved NADPH function should be considered early in the evaluation of atypical and recurrent lung infections.

  11. Innate immune-stimulating and immune genes up-regulating activities of three types of alginate from Sargassum siliquosum in Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudiati, Ervia; Isnansetyo, Alim; Murwantoko; Ayuningtyas; Triyanto; Handayani, Christina Retna

    2016-07-01

    The Total Haemocyte Count (THC), phenoloxidase (PO), Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) activity, Phagocytic Activity/Index and Total Protein Plasma (TPP) were examined after feeding the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei with diets supplemented with three different types of alginates (acid, calcium and sodium alginates). Immune-related genes expression was evaluated by quantitative Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR). Results indicated that the immune parameters directly increased according to the doses of alginates and time. The 2.0 g kg(-1) of acid and sodium alginate treatments were gave better results. Four immune-related genes expression i.e. LGBP, Toll, Lectin, proPO were up regulated. It is therefore concluded that the supplementation of alginate of Sargassum siliquosum on the diet of L. vannamei enhanced the innate immunity as well as the expression of immune-related genes. It is the first report on the simultaneous evaluation of three alginate types to enhance innate immune parameters and immune-related genes expression in L. vannamei. PMID:26993614

  12. Short Communication: Immune Activation Is Present in HIV-1-Exposed Seronegative Individuals and Is Independent of Microbial Translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulle, Irma; Biasin, Mara; Gnudi, Federica; Rainone, Veronica; Ibba, Salomè Valentina; Caputo, Sergio Lo; Mazzotta, Francesco; Trabattoni, Daria; Clerici, Mario

    2016-02-01

    Analyses of immune activation in HIV-exposed seronegative individuals (HESN) yielded discrepant results. To clarify this issue we performed an extensive investigation of immune parameters in HESN and, in particular, we analyzed in these individuals the possible presence of microbial translocation, the most widely accepted reason driving immune activation in HIV-infected patients. Results showed that immune activation, a skewing of T lymphocyte maturation, and increased responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) characterize the HESN phenotype; this is not driven by alterations of the gastrointestinal barrier and microbial translocation. The activation state seen in HESN may influence the induction of stronger adaptive antiviral immune responses and may represent a virus exposure-induced innate immune protective phenotype against HIV. PMID:26414485

  13. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression. PMID:26700461

  14. The Activation and Suppression of Plant Innate Immunity by Parasitic Nematodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goverse, A.; Smant, G.

    2014-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes engage in prolonged and intimate relationships with their host plants, often involving complex alterations in host cell morphology and function. It is puzzling how nematodes can achieve this, seemingly without activating the innate immune system of their hosts. Secretions r

  15. The immune theory of psychiatric diseases : a key role for activated microglia and circulating monocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, Wouter; Gibney, Sinead M.; Drexhage, Roosmarijn C.; Pont-Lezica, Lorena; Doorduin, Janine; Klein, Hans C.; Steiner, Johann; Connor, Thomas J.; Harkin, Andrew; Versnel, Marjan A.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes a key role for mononuclear phagocytes in the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders. There is accumulating evidence for activation of microglia (histopathology and PET scans) and circulating monocytes (enhanced gene expression of immune genes, an overproduction of monocyte

  16. The immune theory of psychiatric diseases: A key role for activated microglia and circulating monocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Beumer (Wouter); S.M. Gibney (Sinead); R.C. Drexhage (Roos); L. Pont-Lezica (Lorena); J. Doorduin (Janine); H.C. Klein (Hans); J. Steiner (Johann); L. Connor; A. Harkin (Andrew); M.A. Versnel (Marjan); H.A. Drexhage (Hemmo)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis review describes a key role for mononuclear phagocytes in the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders. There is accumulating evidence for activation of microglia (histopathology and PET scans) and circulating monocytes (enhanced gene expression of immune genes, an overproduction

  17. Scavenging iron: a novel mechanism of plant immunity activation by microbial siderophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Rigault, Martine; Riache, Nassima; Joseph, Delphine; Desmaële, Didier; Mouille, Grégory; Boutet, Stéphanie; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Thomine, Sébastien; Expert, Dominique; Dellagi, Alia

    2014-04-01

    Siderophores are specific ferric iron chelators synthesized by virtually all microorganisms in response to iron deficiency. We have previously shown that they promote infection by the phytopathogenic enterobacteria Dickeya dadantii and Erwinia amylovora. Siderophores also have the ability to activate plant immunity. We have used complete Arabidopsis transcriptome microarrays to investigate the global transcriptional modifications in roots and leaves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants after leaf treatment with the siderophore deferrioxamine (DFO). Physiological relevance of these transcriptional modifications was validated experimentally. Immunity and heavy-metal homeostasis were the major processes affected by DFO. These two physiological responses could be activated by a synthetic iron chelator ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid, indicating that siderophores eliciting activities rely on their strong iron-chelating capacity. DFO was able to protect Arabidopsis against the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Siderophore treatment caused local modifications of iron distribution in leaf cells visible by ferrocyanide and diaminobenzidine-H₂O₂ staining. Metal quantifications showed that DFO causes a transient iron and zinc uptake at the root level, which is presumably mediated by the metal transporter iron regulated transporter1 (IRT1). Defense gene expression and callose deposition in response to DFO were compromised in an irt1 mutant. Consistently, plant susceptibility to D. dadantii was increased in the irt1 mutant. Our work shows that iron scavenging is a unique mechanism of immunity activation in plants. It highlights the strong relationship between heavy-metal homeostasis and immunity. PMID:24501001

  18. Adaptive and innate immune reactions regulating mast cell activation: from receptor-mediated signaling to responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tkaczyk, Christine; Jensen, Bettina M; Iwaki, Shoko; Gilfillan, Alasdair M

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we have described studies that have demonstrated that mast cells can be activated as a consequence of adaptive and innate immune reactions and that these responses can be modified by ligands for other receptors expressed on the surface of mast cells. These various stimuli differe...

  19. A plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 inhibitor reduces airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun H; Eren, Mesut; Vaughan, Douglas E; Schleimer, Robert P; Cho, Seong H

    2012-06-01

    We previously reported that plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 deficiency prevents collagen deposition in the airways of ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged mice. In this study, we explored the therapeutic utility of blocking PAI-1 in preventing airway remodeling, using a specific PAI-1 inhibitor, tiplaxtinin. C57BL/6J mice were immunized with intraperitoneal injections of OVA on Days 0, 3, and 6. Starting on Day 11, mice were challenged with phosphate-buffered saline or OVA by nebulization three times per week for 4 weeks. Tiplaxtinin was mixed with chow and administered orally from 1 day before the phosphate-buffered saline or OVA challenge. Lung tissues were harvested after challenge and characterized histologically for infiltrating inflammatory cells, mucus-secreting goblet cells, and collagen deposition. Airway hyperresponsiveness was measured using whole-body plethysmography. Tiplaxtinin treatment significantly decreased levels of PAI-1 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, which indicates successful blockage of PAI-1 activity in the airways. The number of infiltrated inflammatory cells was reduced by tiplaxtinin treatment in the lungs of the OVA-challenged mice. Furthermore, oral administration of tiplaxtinin significantly attenuated the degree of goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition in the airways of the OVA-challenged mice, and methacholine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness was effectively reduced by tiplaxtinin in these animals. This study supports our previous findings that PAI-1 promotes airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma, and suggests that PAI-1 may be a novel target of treatment of airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:22323366

  20. Activated Conventional T-Cells Are Present in Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Lesions Despite the Presence of Immune Suppressive Cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quispel, Willemijn T; Stegehuis-Kamp, Janine A; Santos, Susy J; Egeler, R Maarten; van Halteren, Astrid G S

    2015-10-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) lesions are characterized by neoplastic CD1a(+)/Langerin(+) histiocytes (LCH-cells) and display many features of chronic inflammation. Cancer cells can escape immune-surveillance through intra-tumoral secretion of immune-suppressive cytokines. We therefore studied by immunohistochemistry the local cytokine milieu and phenotypic characteristics of T-cells and LCH-cells present in LCH lesions collected from 25 therapy naïve patients. LCH biopsies predominantly expressed interleukin-10 (IL-10) (10/25), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) (9/25), or both cytokines (6/25). The absolute number of CD3(+)T-cells and the CD3(+)FOXP3(-) conventional cell (T-CONV) versus the CD3(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T-cell (T-REG) was comparable for each suppressive cytokine profile (5:1). IL-10-expressing lesions contained, however, a higher proportion of T-CONV expressing the activation markers CD25 98% (38%-100%) and inducible costimulatory molecule (ICOS) 86% (47%-100%) than lesions wherein solely TGF-β was detected (CD25(+) 20% (6%-54%); ICOS(+) 29% (7%-51%)). Virtually all T-REG expressed CD25 and ICOS in IL-10 lesions, whereas TGF-β(+) lesions contained a lower proportion of ICOS(+) T-REG (P=0.05). IL-10(+) lesions contained more LCH-cells expressing high intensity of ICOS ligand (ICOSL) compared with TGF-β(+) lesions (P=0.03). ICOS expression by lesion-infiltrating T-CONV and T-REG positively correlated to the extent of ICOSL expression by LCH-cells (P=0.004). Our study points out that the combined detection of interlesional IL-10 and ICOSL expression by LCH-cells is associated with the highest prevalence of activated T-CONV. Immune profiling of LCH-affected tissues obtained at the time of diagnosis may set the stage for the development of new types of therapies, which aim at local boosting of immune cells that recognize and eliminate neoplastic LCH-cells. PMID:26381039

  1. Therapeutic Targets for Neurodevelopmental Disorders Emerging from Animal Models with Perinatal Immune Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ibi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing epidemiological evidence indicates that perinatal infection with various viral pathogens enhances the risk for several psychiatric disorders. The pathophysiological significance of astrocyte interactions with neurons and/or gut microbiomes has been reported in neurodevelopmental disorders triggered by pre- and postnatal immune insults. Recent studies with the maternal immune activation or neonatal polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid models of neurodevelopmental disorders have identified various candidate molecules that could be responsible for brain dysfunction. Here, we review the functions of several candidate molecules in neurodevelopment and brain function and discuss their potential as therapeutic targets for psychiatric disorders.

  2. Effects of Repeated Complement Activation Associated with Chronic Treatment of Cynomolgus Monkeys with 2'-O-Methoxyethyl Modified Antisense Oligonucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lijiang; Engelhardt, Jeffrey A; Hung, Gene; Yee, Jenna; Kikkawa, Rie; Matson, John; Tayefeh, Bryan; Machemer, Todd; Giclas, Patricia C; Henry, Scott P

    2016-08-01

    The effects of repeated complement activation in cynomolgus monkeys after chronic antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) treatment were evaluated by using ISIS 104838, a representative 2'-O-methoxyethyl (2'-MOE) modified ASO. The treatment was up to 9 months with a total weekly dose of 30 mg/kg, given either as daily [4.3 mg/kg/day, subcutaneous (s.c.) injection] or once weekly [30 mg/kg, either as s.c. injection or 30-min intravenous (i.v.) infusion]. Acute elevations of complement split products (Bb and C3a) and a transient decrease in C3 occurred after the first dose and were drug plasma concentration dependent. However, with repeated complement activation after chronic ASO treatment, there were progressive increases in basal (predose) levels of Bb and C3a, and a sustained C3 reduction in all treated groups. There was also a progressive increase in C3d-bound circulating immune complex (CIC) that was considered secondary to the C3 depletion. Evidence of vascular inflammation was observed, mostly in the liver, kidney, and heart, and correlated with severe C3 depletion and increases in plasma IgG and IgM. Vascular inflammation was accompanied by increased C3 and IgM immunereactivity in the affected vasculatures and endothelial activation markers in serum. In summary, repeated complement activations in monkeys lead to a sustained decrease in circulating C3 over time. The concomitantly increased inflammatory signals and decreased CIC clearance due to impairment of complement function may lead to vascular inflammation after chronic ASO treatment in monkeys. However, based on the known sensitivity of monkeys to ASO-induced complement activation, these findings have limited relevance to humans. PMID:27140858

  3. Development of CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides for effective activation of rabbit TLR9 mediated immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Hsien Chuang

    Full Text Available CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN are potent immune stimuli being developed for use as adjuvants in different species. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 is the cellular receptor for CpG-ODN in mammalian cells. The CpG-ODN with 18-24 deoxynucleotides that are in current use for human and mouse cells, however, have low activity with rabbit TLR9. Using a cell-based activation assay, we developed a type of CpG-ODN containing a GACGTT or AACGTT motif in 12 phosphorothioate-modified deoxynucleotides with potent stimulatory activity for rabbit TLR9. The developed CpG-ODN have higher activities than other developed CpG-ODN in eliciting antigen-nonspecific immune responses in rabbit splenocytes. When mixed with an NJ85 peptide derived from rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus, they had potent activities to boost an antigen-specific T cell activation and antibody production in rabbits. Compared to Freund's adjuvant, the developed CpG-ODN are capable of boosting a potent and less toxic antibody response. The results of this study suggest that both the choice of CpG-motif and its length are important factors for CpG-ODN to effectively activate rabbit TLR9 mediated immune responses.

  4. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outcome of HIV infection has improved since the widespread availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Some patients, however, develop a clinical and radiological deterioration following initiation of HAART due to either the unmasking of occult subclinical infection or an enhanced inflammatory response to a treated infection. This phenomenon is believed to result from the restored ability to mount an immune response and is termed immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) or immune reconstitution disease. IRIS is widely reported in the literature in adult patients, most commonly associated with mycobacterial infections. There is, however, a paucity of data documenting the radiological findings of IRIS in children. Radiologists need to be aware of this entity. As a diagnosis of exclusion it is essential that the radiological findings be assessed in the context of the clinical presentation. This article reviews the common clinical and radiological manifestations of IRIS in HIV-infected children. (orig.)

  5. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilborn, Tracy [Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Cape Town (South Africa); Zampoli, Marco [Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Pulmonology, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2009-06-15

    The outcome of HIV infection has improved since the widespread availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Some patients, however, develop a clinical and radiological deterioration following initiation of HAART due to either the unmasking of occult subclinical infection or an enhanced inflammatory response to a treated infection. This phenomenon is believed to result from the restored ability to mount an immune response and is termed immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) or immune reconstitution disease. IRIS is widely reported in the literature in adult patients, most commonly associated with mycobacterial infections. There is, however, a paucity of data documenting the radiological findings of IRIS in children. Radiologists need to be aware of this entity. As a diagnosis of exclusion it is essential that the radiological findings be assessed in the context of the clinical presentation. This article reviews the common clinical and radiological manifestations of IRIS in HIV-infected children. (orig.)

  6. Gender-dependent effects of maternal immune activation on the behavior of mouse offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid C Y Xuan

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders are neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by two core symptoms; impaired social interactions and communication, and ritualistic or repetitive behaviors. Both epidemiological and biochemical evidence suggests that a subpopulation of autistics may be linked to immune perturbations that occurred during fetal development. These findings have given rise to an animal model, called the "maternal immune activation" model, whereby the offspring from female rodents who were subjected to an immune stimulus during early or mid-pregnancy are studied. Here, C57BL/6 mouse dams were treated mid-gestation with saline, lipopolysaccharide (LPS to mimic a bacterial infection, or polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (Poly IC to mimic a viral infection. Autism-associated behaviors were examined in the adult offspring of the treated dams. Behavioral tests were conducted to assess motor activity, exploration in a novel environment, sociability, and repetitive behaviors, and data analyses were carried independently on male and female mice. We observed a main treatment effect whereby male offspring from Poly IC-treated dams showed reduced motor activity. In the marble burying test of repetitive behavior, male offspring but not female offspring from both LPS and Poly IC-treated mothers showed increased marble burying. Our findings indicate that offspring from mothers subjected to immune stimulation during gestation show a gender-specific increase in stereotyped repetitive behavior.

  7. Activation of NOD receptors by Neisseria gonorrhoeae modulates the innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogiorgos, Nikolaos; Mekasha, Samrawit; Yang, Yibin; Kelliher, Michelle A; Ingalls, Robin R

    2014-05-01

    NOD1 and NOD2 are members of the NOD-like receptor family of cytosolic pattern recognition receptors that recognize specific fragments of the bacterial cell wall component peptidoglycan. Neisseria species are unique amongst Gram-negative bacteria in that they turn over large amounts of peptidoglycan during growth. We examined the ability of NOD1 and NOD2 to recognize Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and determined the role of NOD-dependent signaling in regulating the immune response to gonococcal infection. Gonococci, as well as conditioned medium from mid-logarithmic phase grown bacteria, were capable of activating both human NOD1 and NOD2, as well as mouse NOD2, leading to the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB and polyubiquitination of the adaptor receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase 2. We identified a number of cytokines and chemokines that were differentially expressed in wild type versus NOD2-deficient macrophages in response to gonococcal infection. Moreover, NOD2 signaling up-regulated complement pathway components and cytosolic nucleic acid sensors, suggesting a broad impact of NOD activation on innate immunity. Thus, NOD1 and NOD2 are important intracellular regulators of the immune response to infection with N. gonorrhoeae. Given the intracellular lifestyle of this pathogen, we believe these cytosolic receptors may provide a key innate immune defense mechanism for the host during gonococcal infection. PMID:23884094

  8. Inducible factors with antimicrobial activity after immune challenge in the haemolymph of Red Palm Weevil (Insecta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastore, Maristella; Binda Rossetti, Simona; Giovannardi, Stefano; Scarì, Giorgio; Brivio, Maurizio F

    2015-05-01

    Insects are capable of innate immune responses elicited after microbial infection. In this process, the receptor-mediated recognition of foreign bodies and the subsequent activation of immunocompetent cells lead to the synthesis ex novo of a peptide pool with antimicrobial activity. We investigated the inducible immune response of a coleopteran, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, challenged with both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. After immunization, we evaluated the presence of antimicrobial peptides using either biochemical analyses or microbiological techniques. The antimicrobial properties of the newly synthesized protein pool, detectable in haemolymph fractions of low molecular mass, showed strong antibacterial activity against various bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas sp. OX1, Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus). In addition to the preliminary study of the mechanism of action of the pool of antimicrobial peptides, we also investigated its effects on bacterial cell walls by means of fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The data suggest that the main effects seem to be directed at destabilizing and damaging the bacterial wall. This study provides data that help us to understand some aspects of the inducible innate immunity in a system model that lacks anticipatory responses. However, the weevil has finely tuned its defensive strategies to counteract effectively microbial infection. PMID:25114180

  9. Rejuvenating activity of salidroside (SDS): dietary intake of SDS enhances the immune response of aged rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Linlin; YUAN, JIANGSHUI; Zhang, Shicui

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that immune response decreases with aging. Salidroside (SDS), an antioxidant component isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine roseroot Rhodiola rosea, has been demonstrated to possess potent anti-aging and health-promoting activities. However, the mechanism underlying these activities is poorly understood. In this study, we clearly demonstrated that (1) dietary intake of SDS induced a considerable increase in total T cells (CD3+) and T helper cells (CD4+) in aged (21 ...

  10. Inorganic nanoparticles and the immune system: detection, selective activation and tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastús, Neus G.; Sánchez-Tilló, Ester; Pujals, Silvia; Comenge, Joan; Giralt, Ernest; Celada, Antonio; Lloberas, Jorge; Puntes, Victor F.

    2012-03-01

    The immune system is the responsible for body integrity and prevention of external invasion. On one side, nanoparticles are no triggers that the immune system is prepared to detect, on the other side it is known that foreign bodies, not only bacteria, viruses and parasites, but also inorganic matter, can cause various pathologies such as silicosis, asbestosis or inflammatory reactions. Therefore, nanoparticles entering the body, after interaction with proteins, will be either recognized as self-agents or detected by the immune system, encompassing immunostimulation or immunosuppression responses. The nature of these interactions seems to be dictated not specially by the composition of the material but by modifications of NP coating (composition, surface charge and structure). Herein, we explore the use of gold nanoparticles as substrates to carry multifunctional ligands to manipulate the immune system in a controlled manner, from undetection to immunostimulation. Murine bone marrow macrophages can be activated with artificial nanometric objects consisting of a gold nanoparticle functionalized with peptides. In the presence of some conjugates, macrophage proliferation was stopped and pro-inflammatory cytokines were induced. The biochemical type of response depended on the type of conjugated peptide and was correlated with the degree of ordering in the peptide coating. These findings help to illustrate the basic requirements involved in medical NP conjugate design to either activate the immune system or hide from it, in order to reach their targets before being removed by phagocytes. Additionally, it opens up the possibility to modulate the immune response in order to suppress unwanted responses resulting from autoimmunity, or allergy or to stimulate protective responses against pathogens.

  11. Macrophage TCF-4 co-activates p65 to potentiate chronic inflammation and insulin resistance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xia; Hou, Along; Wang, Rui; Liu, Da; Xiang, Wei; Xie, Qingyun; Zhang, Bo; Gan, Lixia; Zheng, Wei; Miao, Hongming

    2016-07-01

    Transcription factor 4 (TCF-4) was recently identified as a candidate gene for the cause of type 2 diabetes, although the mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrated that the TCF-4 transgene in macrophages aggravated high-fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance and chronic inflammation, characterized by the elevation of proinflammatory cytokines in the blood, liver and white adipose tissue, as well as a proinflammatory profile of immune cells in visceral fats in mice. Mechanistically, TCF-4 functioned as a co-activator of p65 to amplify the saturated free fatty acid (FFA)-stimulated promoter activity, mRNA transcription and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in primary macrophages. Blockage of p65 with a specific interfering RNA or inhibitor could prevent TCF-4-enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines in FFA/lipopolysaccharide-treated primary macrophages. The p65 inhibitor could abolish macrophage TCF-4 transgene-aggravated systemic inflammation, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in HFD-treated mice. In addition, we demonstrated that the mRNA expression of TCF-4 in the peripheral blood monocytes from humans was positively correlated to the levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumour necrosis factor α, IL-6 and fasting plasma glucose. In summary, we identified TCF-4 as a co-activator of p65 in the potentiation of proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and aggravation of HFD-induced chronic inflammation and insulin resistance in mice. PMID:27129186

  12. Experimental chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in rats. Non-specific stimulation with LPS reduces lethality as efficiently as specific immunization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, K H; Hougen, H P; Høiby, N;

    1995-01-01

    In a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis, we investigated the possibility of preventing chronic lung inflammation or decreasing the progression of the infection. We compared the lethality, pathology, bacterial clearance, and immunogenicity after...... stimulation of the non-specific defence mechanisms by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or P. aeruginosa sonicate, or the acquired specific immune response by vaccination with the same bacterial antigens. One day prior to challenge with P. aeruginosa embedded in alginate beads, rats were stimulated...... with either E. coli LPS or P. aeruginosa sonicate. Four and two weeks prior to challenge other rats were vaccinated with either E. coli LPS or P. aeruginosa sonicate. Controls did not receive any stimulation or vaccination. The lethality after challenge was lower in rats stimulated with E. coli LPS (p...

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus-like particles activate multiple types of immune cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rapid spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) worldwide makes it a high priority to develop an effective vaccine. Since live attenuated or inactivated HIV is not likely to be approved as a vaccine due to safety concerns, HIV virus like particles (VLPs) offer an attractive alternative because they are safe due to the lack of a viral genome. Although HIV VLPs have been shown to induce humoral and cellular immune responses, it is important to understand the mechanisms by which they induce such responses and to improve their immunogenicity. We generated HIV VLPs, and VLPs containing Flt3 ligand (FL), a dendritic cell growth factor, to target VLPs to dendritic cells, and investigated the roles of these VLPs in the initiation of adaptive immune responses in vitro and in vivo. We found that HIV-1 VLPs induced maturation of dendritic cells and monocyte/macrophage populations in vitro and in vivo, with enhanced expression of maturation markers and cytokines. Dendritic cells pulsed with VLPs induced activation of splenocytes resulting in increased production of cytokines. VLPs containing FL were found to increase dendritic cells and monocyte/macrophage populations in the spleen when administered to mice. Administration of VLPs induced acute activation of multiple types of cells including T and B cells as indicated by enhanced expression of the early activation marker CD69 and down-regulation of the homing receptor CD62L. VLPs containing FL were an effective form of antigen in activating immune cells via dendritic cells, and immunization with HIV VLPs containing FL resulted in enhanced T helper type 2-like immune responses

  14. Maternal immune activation evoked by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid does not evoke microglial cell activation in the embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke eSmolders

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have indicated that inflammation during pregnancy increases the risk for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders in the offspring. Morphological brain abnormalities combined with deviations in the inflammatory status of the brain can be observed in patients of both autism and schizophrenia. It was shown that acute infection can induce changes in maternal cytokine levels which in turn are suggested to affect fetal brain development and increase the risk on the development of neuropsychiatric disorders in the offspring. Animal models of maternal immune activation reproduce the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. In this study the poly (I:C model was used to mimic viral immune activation in pregnant mice in order to assess the activation status of fetal microglia in these developmental disorders. Because microglia are the resident immune cells of the brain they were expected to be activated due to the inflammatory stimulus.Microglial cell density and activation level in the fetal cortex and hippocampus were determined. Despite the presence of a systemic inflammation in the pregnant mice, there was no significant difference in fetal microglial cell density or immunohistochemically determined activation level between the control and inflammation group. These data indicate that activation of the fetal microglial cells is not likely to be responsible for the inflammation induced deficits in the offspring in this model.

  15. Autoinflammatory bone disorders with special focus on chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO)

    OpenAIRE

    Hedrich, Christian M.; Hofmann, Sigrun R.; Pablik, Jessica; Morbach, Henner; Girschick, Hermann J.

    2016-01-01

    Sterile bone inflammation is the hallmark of autoinflammatory bone disorders, including chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (CNO) with its most severe form chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO). Autoinflammatory osteopathies are the result of a dysregulated innate immune system, resulting in immune cell infiltration of the bone and subsequent osteoclast differentiation and activation. Interestingly, autoinflammatory bone disorders are associated with inflammation of the skin and/or...

  16. Hepatitis B virus replication in acute glomerulonephritis with chronic active hepatitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cadrobbi, P; Bortolotti, F; Zacchello, G.; Rinaldi, R; Armigliato, M; Realdi, G

    1985-01-01

    A 3 year old boy who had chronic active hepatitis type B with features of ongoing liver damage and active virus replication, developed acute membranous glomerulonephritis two years after the clinical onset of liver disease, when both hepatitis B e antigen and antibody were detectable in serum. After withdrawal of short term steroid treatment and resolution of hepatitis B virus replication, both glomerulonephritis and chronic hepatitis went into remission. Some months later hepatitis B surface...

  17. Effects of Active Mastication on Chronic Stress-Induced Bone Loss in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Azuma, Kagaku; Furuzawa, Manabu; Fujiwara, Shu; YAMADA, Kumiko; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2015-01-01

    Chronic psychologic stress increases corticosterone levels, which decreases bone density. Active mastication or chewing attenuates stress-induced increases in corticosterone. We evaluated whether active mastication attenuates chronic stress-induced bone loss in mice. Male C57BL/6 (B6) mice were randomly divided into control, stress, and stress/chewing groups. Stress was induced by placing mice in a ventilated restraint tube (60 min, 2x/day, 4 weeks). The stress/chewing group was given a woode...

  18. Randomised trial of mycophenolate mofetil versus azathioprine for treatment of chronic active Crohn's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Neurath, M; Wanitschke, R; Peters, M.; Krummenauer, F; zum, B; Schlaak, J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the alimentary tract. Azathioprine is an effective agent in the management of chronic active Crohn's disease leading to long term remission of disease activity. Such treatment leads to limited efficacy or side effects in a small subset of patients. 
AIMS—To compare efficacy and side effects of treatment with azathioprine plus corticosteroids versus mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) plus corticosteroids in patients wit...

  19. Maternal immune activation affects litter success, size and neuroendocrine responses related to behavior in adult offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Susannah S; Chester, Emily M; Demas, Gregory E

    2013-07-01

    It is increasingly evident that influences other than genetics can contribute to offspring phenotype. In particular, maternal influences are an important contributing factor to offspring survival, development, physiology and behavior. Common environmental pathogens such as viral or bacterial microorganisms can induce maternal immune responses, which have the potential to alter the prenatal environment via multiple independent pathways. The effects of maternal immune activation on endocrine responses and behavior are less well studied and provide the basis for the current study. Our approach in the current study was two-pronged: 1) quantify sickness responses during pregnancy in adult female hamsters experiencing varying severity of immune responsiveness (i.e., differing doses of lipopolysaccharide [LPS]), and 2) assess the effects of maternal immune activation on offspring development, immunocompetence, hormone profiles, and social behavior during adulthood. Pregnancy success decreased with increasing doses of LPS, and litter size was reduced in LPS dams that managed to successfully reproduce. Unexpectedly, pregnant females treated with LPS showed a hypothermic response in addition to the more typical anorexic and body mass changes associated with sickness. Significant endocrine changes related to behavior were observed in the offspring of LPS-treated dams; these effects were apparent in adulthood. Specifically, offspring from LPS treated dams showed significantly greater cortisol responses to stressful resident-intruder encounters compared with offspring from control dams. Post-behavior cortisol was elevated in male LPS offspring relative to the offspring of control dams, and was positively correlated with the frequency of bites during agonistic interactions, and cortisol levels in both sexes were related to defensive behaviors, suggesting that changes in hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis responsiveness may play a regulatory role in the observed behavioral

  20. Immune activity, body condition and human-associated environmental impacts in a wild marine mammal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick M Brock

    Full Text Available Within individuals, immunity may compete with other life history traits for resources, such as energy and protein, and the damage caused by immunopathology can sometimes outweigh the protective benefits that immune responses confer. However, our understanding of the costs of immunity in the wild and how they relate to the myriad energetic demands on free-ranging organisms is limited. The endangered Galapagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki is threatened simultaneously by disease from domestic animals and rapid changes in food availability driven by unpredictable environmental variation. We made use of this unique ecology to investigate the relationship between changes in immune activity and changes in body condition. We found that during the first three months of life, changes in antibody concentration were negatively correlated with changes in mass per unit length, skinfold thickness and serum albumin concentration, but only in a sea lion colony exposed to anthropogenic environmental impacts. It has previously been shown that changes in antibody concentration during early Galapagos sea lion development were higher in a colony exposed to anthropogenic environmental impacts than in a control colony. This study allows for the possibility that these relatively large changes in antibody concentration are associated with negative impacts on fitness through an effect on body condition. Our findings suggest that energy availability and the degree of plasticity in immune investment may influence disease risk in natural populations synergistically, through a trade-off between investment in immunity and resistance to starvation. The relative benefits of such investments may change quickly and unpredictably, which allows for the possibility that individuals fine-tune their investment strategies in response to changes in environmental conditions. In addition, our results suggest that anthropogenic environmental impacts may impose subtle energetic costs on

  1. Asthma as a chronic disease of the innate and adaptive immune systems responding to viruses and allergens

    OpenAIRE

    Holtzman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Research on the pathogenesis of asthma has traditionally concentrated on environmental stimuli, genetic susceptibilities, adaptive immune responses, and end-organ alterations (particularly in airway mucous cells and smooth muscle) as critical steps leading to disease. The focus of this cascade has been the response to allergic stimuli. An alternative scheme suggests that respiratory viruses and the consequent response of the innate immune system also drives the development of asthma as well a...

  2. Effect of supplement with lactic-acid producing bacteria on fatigue and physical activity in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evengård Birgitta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Disturbances in intestinal microbial ecology and in the immune system of the host have been implicated as a part of the pathogenesis in chronic fatigue syndrome. Probiotic lactic acid producing bacteria have been shown to prevent and alleviate gastrointestinal disturbances and to normalize the cytokine profile which might be of an advantage for patients suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei F19, Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFB 1748 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 on fatigue and physical activity in CFS patients. Fifteen patients fulfilling the criteria set by international researchers in the field at the US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention in 1994 for chronic fatigue syndrome, were included in the study. The patients had high fatigue severity scores and high disability scores. During the first two weeks baseline observations without treatment were assessed, succeeded by four weeks of intake of a probiotic product and a four-week follow-up period. The fatigue, health and physical activity was assessed by the use of the Visual Analogue Scales and the SF-12 Health Survey. Faecal samples were collected and the normal microflora was analysed. Neurocognitive functions improved during the study period while there were no significant changes in fatigue and physical activity scores. No major changes occurred in the gastrointestinal microflora. At the end of the study 6 of 15 patients reported that they had improved according to the assessment described. The findings in this study that improvement of health is possible to achieve should encourage further studies with interventions with probiotics in patients with CFS.

  3. Active Immunity Induced by Passive IgG Post-Exposure Protection against Ricin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Chen Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic antibodies can confer an instant protection against biothreat agents when administered. In this study, intact IgG and F(ab’2 from goat anti-ricin hyperimmune sera were compared for the protection against lethal ricin mediated intoxication. Similar ricin-binding affinities and neutralizing activities in vitro were observed between IgG and F(ab’2 when compared at the same molar concentration. In a murine ricin intoxication model, both IgG and F(ab’2 could rescue 100% of the mice by one dose (3 nmol administration of antibodies 1 hour after 5 × LD50 ricin challenge. Nine days later, when the rescued mice received a second ricin challenge (5 × LD50, only the IgG-treated mice survived; the F(ab’2-treated mice did not. The experimental design excluded the possibility of residual goat IgG responsible for the protection against the second ricin challenge. Results confirmed that the active immunity against ricin in mice was induced quickly following the passive delivery of a single dose of goat IgG post-exposure. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the induced active immunity against ricin in mice lasted at least 5 months. Therefore, passive IgG therapy not only provides immediate protection to the victim after ricin exposure, but also elicits an active immunity against ricin that subsequently results in long term protection.

  4. Bacterial Riboswitches and Ribozymes Potently Activate the Human Innate Immune Sensor PKR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Chelsea M; Anmangandla, Ananya; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2016-04-15

    The innate immune system provides the first line of defense against pathogens through the recognition of nonspecific patterns in RNA to protect the cell in a generalized way. The human RNA-activated protein kinase, PKR, is a dsRNA binding protein and an essential sensor in the innate immune response, which recognizes viral and bacterial pathogens through their RNAs. Upon activation via RNA-dependent autophosphorylation, PKR phosphorylates the eukaryotic initiation factor eIF2α, leading to termination of translation. PKR has a well-characterized role in recognizing viral RNA, where it binds long stretches of double-stranded RNA nonsequence specifically to promote activation; however, the mechanism by which bacterial RNA activates PKR and the mode by which self RNA avoids activating PKR are unknown. We characterized activation of PKR by three functional bacterial RNAs with pseudoknots and extensive tertiary structure: the cyclic di-GMP riboswitch, the glmS riboswitch-ribozyme, and the twister ribozyme, two of which are ligand-activated. These RNAs were found to activate PKR with comparable potency to long dsRNA. Enzymatic structure mapping in the absence and presence of PKR reveals a clear PKR footprint and provides a structural basis for how these bacterial RNAs activate PKR. In the case of the cyclic di-GMP riboswitch and the glmS riboswitch-ribozyme, PKR appears to dimerize on the peripheral double-stranded regions of the native RNA tertiary structure. Overall, these results provide new insights into how PKR acts as an innate immune signaling protein for the presence of bacteria and suggest a reason for the apparent absence of protein-free riboswitches and ribozymes in the human genome. PMID:27011290

  5. The Effect of Ozone- and Bacteriophage Treatment on Systemic and Tissue Immunity in Patients of Chronic Inflammatory Diseases of Uterine Adnexa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra D`Mello R.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research is to study the possibilities of ozone- and bacteriophage treatment (OBPT in correction of endotoxicosis and immunological disorders in patients of chronic inflammatory diseases of uterine adnexa (CIDUA. Materials and Methods. There have been examined 100 patients with CIDUA, 50 of them have received OBPT, and 50 — traditional treatment. Some parameters of systemic and tissue immunity have been studied. Results and Discussion. The analysis of dynamics of clinical and immune values against the background of the two methods of treatment has revealed that the response to provocation of inflammatory process complication by administration of saturating ozone concentration (5000 mkg/l and Prodigiosan is the increase of intoxication, CIC, IL-6. Henceforth, the compared methods of treatment have showed significant difference. So, OBPT has caused the normalization of the changed acute-phase values, immunological parameters including local ones. The patients’ follow-up within a year has revealed lower recurrence rate of CIDUA complications after OBPT. It makes it possible to consider the method of ozone- and bacteriophage treatment to be pathogenetically reasonable component of complex treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases of uterine adnexa.

  6. Active specific immunotherapy using the immune reaction of a low-dose irradiated tumor tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Active specific immunotherapy using the immune reaction of a low-dose irradiated tumor tissue was studied on the transplanted MM46 tumor of female C3H/He mice after radiotherapy. MM46 tumor cells were inoculated into the right hind paws of mice. On the 5th day, irradiation with the dose irradiated tumor tissue (2000 rad on the fifth day), were injected into the left hind paws of the tumor-bearing mice. Effectiveness of this active specific immunotherapy against tumor was evaluated by the regression of tumor and survival rate of mice. Tumor was markedly regressed and survival rate was significantly increased by the active specific immunitherapy

  7. ACTIVATION MECHANISMS OF GUT-ASSOCIATED LYMPHOID TISSUE UNDER CHRONIC SOCIAL STRESS CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Kamyshnyi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress-induced immune disregulation is a risk factor of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, but, so far, the mechanisms for this effect are not fully known. Expression levels of specific mRNAs were assessed in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT from Wistar rats subjected to chronic social stress (CSS. Gene expression was evaluated for NR3C1, Adrβ2, as well as IL-1β, IL-17α pro-inflammatory cytokines, and Nlrp, an inflammasome gene. Under the CSS conditions, we have shown altered distribution of RORγt +, FoxP3+, LMP2+, XBP1+ lymphocytes in GALT.The experiments were carried out with female Wistar rats aged 5–6 months. Specific mRNA expression for the target genes was determined by means of real-time PCR performed in a CFX96™ thermocycler («BioRadLaboratories, Inc»,USA. Relative levels of a target gene expression were quantified by the ΔΔCt method, being compared with rat GAPDH reference gene expression. Statistical analysis was performed with available «BioRad СFX Manager 3.1» software. Specific monoclonal rat antibodes were used for detection of immunopositive lymphocytes by means of indirect immunofluorescence technique.CSS development leads to decreased levels of mRNA expression for Nr3c1 and Adrβ2-genes in the GALT cells, being accompanied with unidirectional changes, i.e., increased transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNAs (IL-1β, IL-17α and Nlrp3-inflammasome genes. These changes are accompanied by decreased FoxP3+/RORγt + cell ratio and predominant Th17 differentiation accompanied by suppressor failure. In addition, CSS development was characterized by unidirectional tendency for increasing total number of LMP2+ lymphocytes and reduced ХВР1+ cell population density in lymphoid structures of rat ileum.The events observed in GALT cell populations under CSS conditions are opposing classical paradigm of the stress response. The CSS-associated effects do not promote immunosuppression, however, are able to cause

  8. The activation and suppression of plant innate immunity by parasitic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goverse, Aska; Smant, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes engage in prolonged and intimate relationships with their host plants, often involving complex alterations in host cell morphology and function. It is puzzling how nematodes can achieve this, seemingly without activating the innate immune system of their hosts. Secretions released by infective juvenile nematodes are thought to be crucial for host invasion, for nematode migration inside plants, and for feeding on host cells. In the past, much of the research focused on the manipulation of developmental pathways in host plants by plant-parasitic nematodes. However, recent findings demonstrate that plant-parasitic nematodes also deliver effectors into the apoplast and cytoplasm of host cells to suppress plant defense responses. In this review, we describe the current insights in the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the activation and suppression of host innate immunity by plant-parasitic nematodes along seven critical evolutionary and developmental transitions in plant parasitism. PMID:24906126

  9. TFEB and TFE3 cooperate in the regulation of the innate immune response in activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Nunzia; Brady, Owen A; Diab, Heba I; Martina, José A; Sun, Lu; Huynh, Tuong; Lim, Jeong-A; Zare, Hossein; Raben, Nina; Ballabio, Andrea; Puertollano, Rosa

    2016-08-01

    The activation of transcription factors is critical to ensure an effective defense against pathogens. In this study we identify a critical and complementary role of the transcription factors TFEB and TFE3 in innate immune response. By using a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation, CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome-editing technology, and in vivo models, we determined that TFEB and TFE3 collaborate with each other in activated macrophages and microglia to promote efficient autophagy induction, increased lysosomal biogenesis, and transcriptional upregulation of numerous proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, secretion of key mediators of the inflammatory response (CSF2, IL1B, IL2, and IL27), macrophage differentiation (CSF1), and macrophage infiltration and migration to sites of inflammation (CCL2) was significantly reduced in TFEB and TFE3 deficient cells. These new insights provide us with a deeper understanding of the transcriptional regulation of the innate immune response. PMID:27171064

  10. Improved Chemotherapeutic Activity by Morus alba Fruits through Immune Response of Toll-Like Receptor 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yoon Chang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Morus alba L. fruits have long been used in traditional medicine by many cultures. Their medicinal attributes include cardiovascular, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective and immunomodulatory actions. However, their mechanism of macrophage activation and anti-cancer effects remain unclear. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms of immune stimulation and improved chemotherapeutic effect of M. alba L. fruit extract (MFE. MFE stimulated the production of cytokines, nitric oxide (NO and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and tumoricidal properties of macrophages. MFE activated macrophages through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKinase and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB signaling pathways downstream from toll-like receptor (TLR 4. MFE was shown to exhibit cytotoxicity of CT26 cells via the activated macrophages, even though MFE did not directly affect CT26 cells. In a xenograft mouse model, MFE significantly enhanced anti-cancer activity combined with 5-fluorouracil and markedly promoted splenocyte proliferation, natural killer (NK cell activity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL activity and IFN-γ production. Immunoglobulin G (IgG antibody levels were significantly increased. These results indicate the indirect anti-cancer activity of MFE through improved immune response mediated by TLR4 signaling. M. alba L. fruit extract might be a potential anti-tumor immunomodulatory candidate chemotherapy agent.

  11. Altered biomarkers of mucosal immunity and reduced vaginal Lactobacillus concentrations in sexually active female adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Pellett Madan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genital secretions collected from adult women exhibit in vitro activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV and Escherichia coli (E. coli, but prior studies have not investigated this endogenous antimicrobial activity or its mediators in adolescent females. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Anti-HSV and anti-E.coli activity were quantified from cervicovaginal lavage (CVL specimens collected from 20 sexually active adolescent females (15-18 years. Soluble immune mediators that may influence this activity were measured in CVL, and concentrations of Lactobacillus jensenii and crispatus were quantified by PCR from vaginal swabs. Results for adolescents were compared to those obtained from 54 healthy, premenopausal adult women. Relative to specimens collected from adults, CVL collected from adolescent subjects had significantly reduced activity against E. coli and diminished concentrations of protein, IgG, and IgA but significantly increased anti-HSV activity and concentrations of interleukin (IL-1α, IL-6 and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Vaginal swabs collected from adolescent subjects had comparable concentrations of L. crispatus but significantly reduced concentrations of L. jensenii, relative to adult swabs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Biomarkers of genital mucosal innate immunity may differ substantially between sexually active adolescents and adult women. These findings warrant further study and may have significant implications for prevention of sexually transmitted infections in adolescent females.

  12. 慢性肾脏病及透析患儿的疫苗接种%Immunization in children with chronic renal diseases and undergoing dialysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘小荣; 姚开虎; 杨永弘

    2013-01-01

    Most children patients with chronic kidney disease show immune disorders and defects of immune functionality.There are significant increases in various pathogen infections,especially streptococcus pneumonia,hepatitis B virus,and influenza virus.Streptococcus pneumonia is the most common cause of bacterial pneumonia and otitis media worldwide,and the main pathogens of bacterial meningitis as well.Children treated by hemodialysis are in high risk circumstance susceptible to hepatitis B virus.Influenza is a highly contagious disease with extremely strong dissemination capability.The organizations of U.S.Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP),and Kidney Disease:Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) specifically recommends 3 vaccines,namely,hepatitis B virus,influenza virus (inactivated),and pneumococcal vaccine for patients with chronic kidney disease and chronic dialysis.Vaccination is a specific preventive and an effective protective measure for patients of chronic kidney disease and undergoing dialysis.%慢性肾脏病患儿大多存在免疫紊乱及免疫功能缺陷.各种病原菌的感染率明显增高,尤其容易感染肺炎链球菌、HBV及流感病毒.在全球范围内,肺炎链球菌是细菌性肺炎和中耳炎的最常见病原,是细菌性脑膜炎的主要病原菌.血液透析的患儿更是HBV易感染的高危人群.流感是具有高度传染性及极其广泛的传播性疾病.美国免疫实践指南咨询委员会(ACIP)及改善全球肾脏病预后(KDIGO)特别推荐慢性肾脏病及慢性透析的患者接种的3种疫苗是HBV疫苗、灭活流感病毒疫苗及肺炎链球菌疫苗.接种疫苗是特异性的预防措施,可对慢性肾脏病及透析患者提供有效的预防保护.

  13. Adenosine can thwart antitumor immune responses elicited by radiotherapy. Therapeutic strategies alleviating protumor ADO activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaupel, Peter [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Multhoff, Gabriele [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute for innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Experimental Immune Biology, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    By studying the bioenergetic status we could show that the development of tumor hypoxia is accompanied, apart from myriad other biologically relevant effects, by a substantial accumulation of adenosine (ADO). ADO has been shown to act as a strong immunosuppressive agent in tumors by modulating the innate and adaptive immune system. In contrast to ADO, standard radiotherapy (RT) can either stimulate or abrogate antitumor immune responses. Herein, we present ADO-mediated mechanisms that may thwart antitumor immune responses elicited by RT. An overview of the generation, accumulation, and ADO-related multifaceted inhibition of immune functions, contrasted with the antitumor immune effects of RT, is provided. Upon hypoxic stress, cancer cells release ATP into the extracellular space where nucleotides are converted into ADO by hypoxia-sensitive, membrane-bound ectoenzymes (CD39/CD73). ADO actions are mediated upon binding to surface receptors, mainly A2A receptors on tumor and immune cells. Receptor activation leads to a broad spectrum of strong immunosuppressive properties facilitating tumor escape from immune control. Mechanisms include (1) impaired activity of CD4 + T and CD8 + T, NK cells and dendritic cells (DC), decreased production of immuno-stimulatory lymphokines, and (2) activation of Treg cells, expansion of MDSCs, promotion of M2 macrophages, and increased activity of major immunosuppressive cytokines. In addition, ADO can directly stimulate tumor proliferation and angiogenesis. ADO mechanisms described can thwart antitumor immune responses elicited by RT. Therapeutic strategies alleviating tumor-promoting activities of ADO include respiratory hyperoxia or mild hyperthermia, inhibition of CD39/CD73 ectoenzymes or blockade of A2A receptors, and inhibition of ATP-release channels or ADO transporters. (orig.) [German] Untersuchungen des bioenergetischen Status ergaben, dass Tumorhypoxie neben vielen anderen bedeutsamen biologischen Effekten zu einem starken

  14. Mechanisms of innate immune activation by gluten peptide p31-43 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Romina E; Gomez Castro, María Florencia; Carasi, Paula; McCarville, Justin L; Jury, Jennifer; Mowat, Allan M; Verdu, Elena F; Chirdo, Fernando G

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Innate immunity contributes to the pathogenesis of CD, but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. Although previous in vitro work suggests that gliadin peptide p31-43 acts as an innate immune trigger, the underlying pathways are unclear and have not been explored in vivo. Here we show that intraluminal delivery of p31-43 induces morphological changes in the small intestinal mucosa of normal mice consistent with those seen in CD, including increased cell death and expression of inflammatory mediators. The effects of p31-43 were dependent on MyD88 and type I IFNs, but not Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), and were enhanced by coadministration of the TLR3 agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid. Together, these results indicate that gliadin peptide p31-43 activates the innate immune pathways in vivo, such as IFN-dependent inflammation, relevant to CD. Our findings also suggest a common mechanism for the potential interaction between dietary gluten and viral infections in the pathogenesis of CD. PMID:27151946

  15. 5-Azacytidine Promotes an Inhibitory T-Cell Phenotype and Impairs Immune Mediated Antileukemic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Stübig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Demethylating agent, 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza, has been shown to be active in treatment of myeloid malignancies. 5-Aza enhances anticancer immunity, by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens. However, the impact of 5-Aza immune responses remains poorly understood. Here, T-cell mediated tumor immunity effects of 5-Aza, are investigated in vitro and in vivo. T-cells from healthy donors were treated with 5-Aza and analyzed by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry for changes in gene expression and phenotype. Functionality was assessed by a tumor lysis assay. Peripheral blood from patients treated with 5-Aza after alloSCT was monitored for changes in T-cell subpopulations. 5-Aza treatment resulted in a decrease in CD8+ T-cells, whereas CD4+ T-cells increased. Furthermore, numbers of IFN-γ+ T-helper 1 cells (Th1 were reduced, while Treg-cells showed substantial increase. Additionally, CD8+ T-cells exhibited limited killing capacity against leukemic target cells. In vivo data confirm the increase of Treg compartment, while CD8+ T-effector cell numbers were reduced. 5-Aza treatment results in a shift from cytotoxic to regulatory T-cells with a functional phenotype and a major reduction in proinflammatory Th1-cells, indicating a strong inhibition of tumor-specific T-cell immunity by 5-Aza.

  16. 5-Azacytidine Promotes an Inhibitory T-Cell Phenotype and Impairs Immune Mediated Antileukemic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stübig, Thomas; Luetkens, Tim; Hildebrandt, York; Atanackovic, Djordje; Binder, Thomas M. C.; Fehse, Boris; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2014-01-01

    Demethylating agent, 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza), has been shown to be active in treatment of myeloid malignancies. 5-Aza enhances anticancer immunity, by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens. However, the impact of 5-Aza immune responses remains poorly understood. Here, T-cell mediated tumor immunity effects of 5-Aza, are investigated in vitro and in vivo. T-cells from healthy donors were treated with 5-Aza and analyzed by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry for changes in gene expression and phenotype. Functionality was assessed by a tumor lysis assay. Peripheral blood from patients treated with 5-Aza after alloSCT was monitored for changes in T-cell subpopulations. 5-Aza treatment resulted in a decrease in CD8+ T-cells, whereas CD4+ T-cells increased. Furthermore, numbers of IFN-γ+ T-helper 1 cells (Th1) were reduced, while Treg-cells showed substantial increase. Additionally, CD8+ T-cells exhibited limited killing capacity against leukemic target cells. In vivo data confirm the increase of Treg compartment, while CD8+ T-effector cell numbers were reduced. 5-Aza treatment results in a shift from cytotoxic to regulatory T-cells with a functional phenotype and a major reduction in proinflammatory Th1-cells, indicating a strong inhibition of tumor-specific T-cell immunity by 5-Aza. PMID:24757283

  17. 5-azacytidine promotes an inhibitory T-cell phenotype and impairs immune mediated antileukemic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stübig, Thomas; Badbaran, Anita; Luetkens, Tim; Hildebrandt, York; Atanackovic, Djordje; Binder, Thomas M C; Fehse, Boris; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2014-01-01

    Demethylating agent, 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza), has been shown to be active in treatment of myeloid malignancies. 5-Aza enhances anticancer immunity, by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens. However, the impact of 5-Aza immune responses remains poorly understood. Here, T-cell mediated tumor immunity effects of 5-Aza, are investigated in vitro and in vivo. T-cells from healthy donors were treated with 5-Aza and analyzed by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry for changes in gene expression and phenotype. Functionality was assessed by a tumor lysis assay. Peripheral blood from patients treated with 5-Aza after alloSCT was monitored for changes in T-cell subpopulations. 5-Aza treatment resulted in a decrease in CD8+ T-cells, whereas CD4+ T-cells increased. Furthermore, numbers of IFN-γ + T-helper 1 cells (Th1) were reduced, while Treg-cells showed substantial increase. Additionally, CD8+ T-cells exhibited limited killing capacity against leukemic target cells. In vivo data confirm the increase of Treg compartment, while CD8+ T-effector cell numbers were reduced. 5-Aza treatment results in a shift from cytotoxic to regulatory T-cells with a functional phenotype and a major reduction in proinflammatory Th1-cells, indicating a strong inhibition of tumor-specific T-cell immunity by 5-Aza. PMID:24757283

  18. Combined active and passive immunization enhances the efficacy of immunotherapy against nicotine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiko, Samuel A; Harris, Andrew C; Keyler, Daniel E; Lesage, Mark G; Zhang, Yan; Pentel, Paul R

    2008-06-01

    Vaccination against nicotine reduces the behavioral effects of nicotine in rats, and it is under clinical evaluation as a treatment for tobacco addiction. Efficacy is limited by the need for high serum nicotine-specific antibody (NicAb) levels, and currently available nicotine vaccines do not uniformly generate the required NicAb levels. Passive immunization with a nicotine-specific monoclonal antibody (Nic311) has also shown efficacy in rats. The principal aim of this study was to determine whether the combined use of vaccination and passive immunization would produce greater effects than vaccination alone on nicotine pharmacokinetics and locomotor sensitization (LMS) to nicotine. Rats were treated with vaccination alone, Nic311 alone, both, or neither, and then they were administered 10 daily injections of 0.3 mg/kg nicotine s.c. Treatment with Nic311 or vaccination alone increased the binding of nicotine in serum, reduced the unbound serum nicotine concentration and nicotine distribution to brain, and attenuated the development of LMS. Combined use of vaccination and passive immunization produced higher total serum NicAb levels, greater changes in nicotine pharmacokinetics, and a greater attenuation of LMS than either treatment alone. The total serum NicAb concentration was significantly correlated with brain nicotine levels and locomotor activity. These data indicate that providing higher serum NicAb concentrations improves the efficacy of immunotherapy against nicotine and that supplementing vaccination with passive immunization is a potential strategy to accomplish this. PMID:18305013

  19. Coagulation Factor X Activates Innate Immunity to Human Species C Adenovirus

    OpenAIRE

    Doronin, Konstantin; Flatt, Justin W.; Di Paolo, Nelson C; Khare, Reeti; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Acchione, Mauro; Sumida, John P.; Ohto, Umeharu; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Akashi-Takamura, Sachiko; Miyake, Kensuke; MacDonald, James W.; Bammler, Theo K.; Beyer, Richard P.; Farin, Frederico M

    2012-01-01

    Although coagulation factors play a role in host defense for “living fossils” such as horseshoe crabs, the role of the coagulation system in immunity in higher organisms remains unclear. We modeled the interface of human species C adenovirus (HAdv) interaction with coagulation factor X (FX) and introduced a mutation that abrogated formation of the HAdv-FX complex. In vivo genome-wide transcriptional profiling revealed that FX-binding–ablated virus failed to activate a distinct network of nucl...

  20. Stress Proteins and Initiation of Immune Response: Chaperokine activity of Hsp72

    OpenAIRE

    Asea, Alexzander

    2005-01-01

    From its original description as solely an intracellular molecular chaperone, heat shock proteins have now been shown to function as initiators of the host's immune response. Although the exact mechanism by which intracellular heat shock proteins leave cells is still incompletely understood, recent work from several labs suggest that heat shock proteins are released by both passive (necrotic) and active (physiological) mechanisms. Binding to specific surface receptors is a prerequisite for th...

  1. Improved Chemotherapeutic Activity by Morus alba Fruits through Immune Response of Toll-Like Receptor 4

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Yoon Chang; Seon Beom Kim; Mi Kyeong Lee; Hyun Park; Sung Yeon Kim

    2015-01-01

    Morus alba L. fruits have long been used in traditional medicine by many cultures. Their medicinal attributes include cardiovascular, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective and immunomodulatory actions. However, their mechanism of macrophage activation and anti-cancer effects remain unclear. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms of immune stimulation and improved chemotherapeutic effect of M. alba L. fruit extract (MFE). MFE stimulated the production of cytokines, nitric oxide (...

  2. Enzyme activity demonstrates multiple pathways of innate immunity in Indo-Pacific anthozoans

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, C. V.; Bythell, J. C.; Willis, B. L.

    2012-01-01

    Coral reefs are threatened by increasing levels of coral disease and the functional loss of obligate algal symbionts (bleaching). Levels of immunity relate directly to susceptibility to these threats; however, our understanding of fundamental aspects of coral immunology is lacking. We show that three melanin-synthesis pathway components (mono-phenoloxidase, ortho-diphenoloxidase (tyrosinase-type pathway) and para-diphenoloxidase (laccase-type pathway)) are present in both their active (phenol...

  3. Kinetics of rabies antibodies as a strategy for canine active immunization

    OpenAIRE

    Babboni, Selene Daniela; da Costa, Hení Falcão; MARTORELLI, Luzia Fátima Alves; KATAOKA, Ana Paula de Arruda Geraldes; Victoria, Cassiano; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Modolo, José Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Background Rabies, a zoonosis found throughout the globe, is caused by a virus of the Lyssavirus genus. The disease is transmitted to humans through the inoculation of the virus present in the saliva of infected mammals. Since its prognosis is usually fatal for humans, nationwide public campaigns to vaccinate dogs and cats against rabies aim to break the epidemiological link between the virus and its reservoirs in Brazil. Findings During 12 months we evaluated the active immunity of dogs firs...

  4. Chronic Heat Stress Inhibits Immune Responses to H5N1 Vaccination through Regulating CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic heat stress (CHS is known to have negative impacts on the immune responses in animals and increases their susceptibility to infections including the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1. However, the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs in CHS immunosuppression remains largely undefined. In this study, we demonstrated a novel mechanism by which CHS suppressed both Th1 and Th2 immune responses and dramatically decreased the protective efficacy of the formalin-inactivated H5N1 vaccine against H5N1 influenza virus infection. This suppression was found to be associated with the induced generation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs and the increased secretions of IL-10 and TGF-β in CD4+ T cells. Adoptive transfer of the induced Tregs also suppressed the protective efficacy of formalin-inactivated H5N1 virus immunization. Collectively, this study identifies a novel mechanism of CHS immunosuppression mediated by regulating CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs.

  5. Activation of cell-mediated immunity by Morinda citrifolia fruit extract and its constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kazuya; Abe, Yumi; Futamura-Masudaa, Megumi; Uwaya, Akemi; Isami, Fumiyuki; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2014-04-01

    Morinda citrifolia, commonly known as noni, is a traditional natural medicine in French Polynesia and Hawaii. Functional foods derived from M. citrifolia fruit have been marketed to help prevent diseases and promote good health. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of M. citrifolia fruit on cell-mediated immunity. In the picryl chloride-induced contact dermatitis test, M. citrifolia fruit extract (Noni-ext) inhibited the suppression of cell-mediated immunity by immunosuppressive substances isolated from freeze-dried ascites of Ehrlich carcinoma-bearing mice (EC-sup). In addition, Noni-ext inhibited reduction of IL-2 production in EC-sup-treated mice and activated natural killer cells in normal mice. These results suggest that Noni-ext has multiple effects on the recovery of cell-mediated immunity. Furthermore, we investigated the active principles of Noni-ext and identified an iridoid glycoside, deacetylasperulosidic acid. Oral administration of deacetylasperulosidic acid inhibited the reduction of ear swelling, and also cancelled the suppression of IL-2 production along with the activation of natural killer cells in the same manner as that of Noni-ext. PMID:24868850

  6. The immune response in Drosophila: pattern of cecropin expression and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samakovlis, C; Kimbrell, D A; Kylsten, P; Engström, A; Hultmark, D

    1990-09-01

    Cecropins are antibacterial peptides, induced in Drosophila as part of the humoral immune response to a bacterial invasion. We have used the cloned Drosophila cecropin genes CecA1, A2 and B as probes to study the developmental and tissue specific regulation of this response. The genes are strongly expressed in fat body and hemocytes after injection of bacteria, the CecA genes being much more active than CecB in the fat body. All parts of the fat body and 5-10% of the hemocytes are involved in this response. CecA1 and A2 are most active in larvae and adults; CecB is preferentially active in early pupae. A small peak of constitutive cecropin expression in early pupae appears to be caused by bacteria in the food. Cecropin A, the common product of the CecA1 and A2 genes, was identified in the hemolymph of immunized flies at a concentration of 25-50 microM, enough to kill all tested bacteria except Serratia, a Drosophila pathogen. A useful in vitro system to study the immune response has been found in Schneider's line 2 cells which respond to lipopolysaccharide and laminarin by cecropin expression. PMID:2390977

  7. Influence of immune activation and inflammatory response on cardiovascular risk associated with the human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beltrán LM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Luis M Beltrán,1 Alfonso Rubio-Navarro,2 Juan Manuel Amaro-Villalobos,2 Jesús Egido,2–4 Juan García-Puig,1 Juan Antonio Moreno21Metabolic-Vascular Unit, Fundación IdiPAZ-Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain; 2Vascular, Renal, and Diabetes Research Lab, IIS-Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Madrid, Spain; 3Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Diabetes y Enfermedades Metabólicas Asociadas (CIBERDEM, Madrid, Spain; 4Fundación Renal Iñigo Alvarez de Toledo-Instituto Reina Sofía de Investigaciones Nefrológicas (FRIAT-IRSIN, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV have an increased cardiovascular risk. Although initially this increased risk was attributed to metabolic alterations associated with antiretroviral treatment, in recent years, the attention has been focused on the HIV disease itself. Inflammation, immune system activation, and endothelial dysfunction facilitated by HIV infection have been identified as key factors in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. In this review, we describe the epidemiology and pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in patients with HIV infection and summarize the latest knowledge on the relationship between traditional and novel inflammatory, immune activation, and endothelial dysfunction biomarkers on the cardiovascular risk associated with HIV infection.Keywords: HIV, cardiovascular disease, immune activation, inflammation, antiretroviral therapy

  8. A case control study of premorbid and currently reported physical activity levels in chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchwald Dedra

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome typically report high levels of physical activity before becoming ill. Few studies have examined premorbid and current activity levels in chronically fatigued patients. Methods In a case-control study, 33 patients with chronic, unexplained, disabling fatigue attending a university-based clinic specializing in fatigue were compared to 33 healthy, age- and sex-matched controls. Patients rated their activity levels before their illness and currently, using scales designed for this purpose. Controls reported their level of activity of 2 years previously and currently. Chi-square analyses, Student's t tests, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used in pair matched analyses. Results Compared to healthy controls, patients with chronic, unexplained fatigue rated themselves as more active before their illness (p ≤ 0.001 and less active currently (p ≤ 0.001. The patients also reported they currently stood or walked less than the controls (median [inter-quartile range] = 4 2345 versus 9 [7.5–12] hours, p ≤ 0.001, and spent more time reclining (median [inter-quartile range] = 12 10111213141516 versus 8 [8–9.5] hours, p ≤ 0.001. These differences remained significant for the subset of patients who met strict criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia. Conclusion Patients with chronic, unexplained, disabling fatigue reported being more active before becoming ill than healthy controls. This finding could be explained by greater premorbid activity levels that could predispose to illness, or by an overestimation of previous activity. Either possibility could influence patients' perceptions of their current activity levels and their judgments of recovery. Perceived activity should be addressed as part of management of the illness.

  9. Identification of surface antigens of schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni recognized by antibodies from mice immunized by chronic infection and by exposure to highly irradiated cercariae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, A.J.; James, S.L.; Sher, A.

    1983-08-01

    Surface components of mechanically transformed schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni were labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination. After solubilization with Triton X-100, antigens were identified by immunoprecipitation. Serum from chronically infected Swiss mice reproducibly precipitated seven major polypeptides with approximate molecular weights (X 10/sup 3/) of 94, 68, 45, 40 to 32, 22, and 16. The antigens of molecular weights (X 10/sup 3/) of 94, 40 to 32, 22, and 16 were shown to be exposed on the parasite surface by interaction of the antibodies with intact labeled schistosomula. Sera from several strains of infected inbred mice precipitated the same polypeptides. The antibodies produced during chronic infection were found to be stimulated by adult worms since sera from 6-week-infected animals precipitated none of the surface antigens, and the pattern produced by precipitation with antibodies from a mouse infected with male worms only was indistinguishable from the pattern obtained with sera from mice with bisexual infections. Antibodies from mice immunized with highly irradiated cercariae reproducibly precipitated major polypeptides of approximately (X 10/sup 3/) 94, 68, 45, 32, 22, 19, and 15 daltons. The antigens of (X 10/sup 3/) 94, 43, 32, 22, and 15 daltons were shown to be exposed on the parasite surface by interaction of the antibodies with intact labeled schistosomula. The 15 X 10(3)-dalton surface protein was recognized by sera from vaccinated, but not chronically infected, mice, suggesting that it represents a stage-specific immunogen present on schistosomula but not on adult worms. Sera from two inbred strains of mice which develop different degrees of immunity recognized the same antigens.

  10. Identification of surface antigens of schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni recognized by antibodies from mice immunized by chronic infection and by exposure to highly irradiated cercariae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface components of mechanically transformed schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni were labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination. After solubilization with Triton X-100, antigens were identified by immunoprecipitation. Serum from chronically infected Swiss mice reproducibly precipitated seven major polypeptides with approximate molecular weights (X 103] of 94, 68, 45, 40 to 32, 22, and 16. The antigens of molecular weights (X 103] of 94, 40 to 32, 22, and 16 were shown to be exposed on the parasite surface by interaction of the antibodies with intact labeled schistosomula. Sera from several strains of infected inbred mice precipitated the same polypeptides. The antibodies produced during chronic infection were found to be stimulated by adult worms since sera from 6-week-infected animals precipitated none of the surface antigens, and the pattern produced by precipitation with antibodies from a mouse infected with male worms only was indistinguishable from the pattern obtained with sera from mice with bisexual infections. Antibodies from mice immunized with highly irradiated cercariae reproducibly precipitated major polypeptides of approximately (X 103] 94, 68, 45, 32, 22, 19, and 15 daltons. The antigens of (X 103] 94, 43, 32, 22, and 15 daltons were shown to be exposed on the parasite surface by interaction of the antibodies with intact labeled schistosomula. The 15 X 10(3)-dalton surface protein was recognized by sera from vaccinated, but not chronically infected, mice, suggesting that it represents a stage-specific immunogen present on schistosomula but not on adult worms. Sera from two inbred strains of mice which develop different degrees of immunity recognized the same antigens

  11. Differential effects of passive immunization with nicotine-specific antibodies on the acute and chronic distribution of nicotine to brain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentel, P R; Dufek, M B; Roiko, S A; Lesage, M G; Keyler, D E

    2006-05-01

    Vaccination against nicotine blocks or attenuates nicotine-related behaviors relevant to addiction in rats. Passive immunization with nicotine-specific antibodies is an alternative to vaccination with the potential advantages of allowing control of antibody dose and affinity. In the current study, the effects of two antibodies on the distribution of nicotine to brain were evaluated during chronic nicotine administration in rats; the monoclonal antibody Nic311 (K(d) = 60 nM) and nicotine-specific antiserum (K(d) = 1.6 nM). Nicotine was administered via repeated i.v. bolus doses over 2 days and antibody was administered during the first day. Neither antibody appreciably reduced the chronic accumulation of nicotine in brain, despite high protein binding of nicotine in serum (98.9%) and a 73% reduction in the unbound serum nicotine concentration with the highest Nic311 dose. However, both antibodies substantially reduced the early distribution of nicotine to brain 5 min after a dose. The higher affinity antibody was no more effective than Nic311. The highest Nic311 dose produced serum antibody levels 10 times higher than those reported with vaccination. The efficacy of Nic311 was dose-related, with the highest dose producing a 76% decrease in the early distribution of nicotine to brain. These findings, along with previous data, suggest that the primary effect of passive immunization is to slow, rather than prevent, the distribution of nicotine to brain. In the setting of chronic nicotine dosing, antibodies with a moderate affinity for nicotine produced substantial effects on the early distribution of nicotine to brain and were as effective as higher affinity antibodies. PMID:16407464

  12. Obesity leptin and the immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padiotis. K.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of obesity in developed and developing countries raises a major health concern due to the fact that obesity and nutrition are associated with impaired immune responses. Overconsumption of nutrients alters several functions of the immune defence mechanisms leading to severe infection and chronic diseases. The hormone leptin, known to regulate energy balance has been proved to activate several components of signalling pathways having thus immunoregulatory activity. The aim of this paper is to present the connections between obesity, immune system mechanisms and the role of the adipocyte hormone leptin

  13. Inflammatory transcription factors as activation markers and functional readouts in immune-to-brain communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Immune-to-brain communication pathways involve humoral mediators, including cytokines, central modulation by neuronal afferents and immune cell trafficking to the brain. During systemic inflammation these pathways contribute to mediating brain-controlled sickness symptoms including fever. Experimentally, activation of these signaling pathways can be mimicked and studied when injecting animals with pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPS). One central component of the brain inflammatory response, which leads, for example, to fever induction, is transcriptional activation of brain cells via cytokines and PAMPS. We and others have studied the spatiotemporal activation and the physiological significance of transcription factors for the induction of inflammation within the brain and the manifestation of fever. Evidence has revealed a role of nuclear factor (NF)κB in the initiation, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 in the maintenance and NF-interleukin (IL)6 in the maintenance or even termination of brain-inflammation and fever. Moreover, psychological stressors, such as exposure to a novel environment, leads to increased body core temperature and genomic NF-IL6-activation, suggesting a potential use of NF-IL6-immunohistochemistry as a multimodal brain cell activation marker and a role for NF-IL6 for differential brain activity. In addition, the nutritional status, as reflected by circulating levels of the cytokine-like hormone leptin, influence immune-to-brain communication and age-dependent changes in LPS-induced fever. Overall, transcription factors remain therapeutically important targets for the treatment of brain-inflammation and fever induction during infectious/non-infectious inflammatory and psychological stress. However, the exact physiological role and significance of these transcription factors requires to be further investigated. PMID:26348582

  14. IMD-4690, a Novel Specific Inhibitor for Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1, Reduces Allergic Airway Remodeling in a Mouse Model of Chronic Asthma via Regulating Angiogenesis and Remodeling-Related Mediators

    OpenAIRE

    Tezuka, Toshifumi; Ogawa, Hirohisa; AZUMA, MASAHIKO; GOTO, HISATSUGU; Uehara, Hisanori; Aono, Yoshinori; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Yoichi; Fujikawa, Tomoyuki; Itai, Akiko; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is the principal inhibitor of plasminogen activators, and is responsible for the degradation of fibrin and extracellular matrix. IMD-4690 is a newly synthesized inhibitor for PAI-1, whereas the effect on allergic airway inflammation and remodeling is still unclear. We examined the in vivo effects by using a chronic allergen exposure model of bronchial asthma in mice. The model was generated by an immune challenge for 8 weeks with house dust mite antigen...

  15. Residual NADPH Oxidase Activity and Isolated Lung Involvement in X-Linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez, Maria J.; McSherry, George D.; Ishmael, Faoud T.; Horwitz, Alexandra A.; Gustavo Nino

    2012-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is characterized by inherited immune defects resulting from mutations in the NADPH oxidase complex genes. The X-linked type of CGD is caused by defects in the CYBB gene that encodes gp91-phox, a fundamental component of the NADPH oxidase complex. This mutation originates the most common and severe form of CGD, which typically has absence of NADPH oxidase function and aggressive multisystemic infections. We present the case of a 9-year-old child with a rare ...

  16. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Activation by Roflumilast Contributes to Therapeutic Benefit in Chronic Bronchitis

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, James A.; Raju, S. Vamsee; Tang, Li Ping; McNicholas, Carmel M.; Li, Yao; Courville, Clifford A.; Farris, Roopan F.; Coricor, George E.; Smoot, Lisa H.; Mazur, Marina M.; Dransfield, Mark T; Bolger, Graeme B.; Rowe, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking causes acquired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction and is associated with delayed mucociliary clearance and chronic bronchitis. Roflumilast is a clinically approved phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor that improves lung function in patients with chronic bronchitis. We hypothesized that its therapeutic benefit was related in part to activation of CFTR. Primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells, Calu-3, and T84 monolayers were exposed to whol...

  17. Electrical neurostimulation for chronic pain: on selective relay of sensory neural activities in myelinated nerve fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Sacré, Pierre; Sarma, Sridevi V.; Guan, Yun; Anderson, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain affects about 100 million adults in the US. Despite their great need, neuropharmacology and neurostimulation therapies for chronic pain have been associated with suboptimal efficacy and limited long-term success, as their mechanisms of action are unclear. Yet current computational models of pain transmission suffer from several limitations. In particular, dorsal column models do not include the fundamental underlying sensory activity traveling in these nerve fibers. We developed ...

  18. Influenza hemagglutination inhibiting activity in respiratory mucus from horses with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorders (heaves syndrome).

    OpenAIRE

    Thorsen, J; Willoughby, R A; McDonell, W; Valli, V. E.; Viel, L; Bignell, W

    1983-01-01

    Samples of mucus from the lower trachea were collected from 53 horses with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and from 24 clinically normal horses. Serum samples were collected from 35 of the horses with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and from the 24 normal horses. Samples were tested for inhibition of hemagglutination by influenza A equine 1 and 2 viruses. There were high levels of hemagglutination inhibiting activity against influenza A equine 1 in mucus samples from horses with c...

  19. Protective effect of carnosine after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion possibly through suppressing astrocyte activation

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Jing; Chen, Jihui; Bo, Shuhong; Lu, Xiaotong; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) induced by chronic hypoperfusion is a common cause of vascular dementia. The aim of this study was to determine whether the protective effect of carnosine on white matter lesion after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion through suppressing astrocyte activation. Methods: Adult male mice (C57BL/6 strain) were subjected to permanent occlusion of the right unilateral common carotid arteries (rUCCAO) and treated with carnosine or histidine. Open field ...

  20. Immune Disorder HSCT Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-09

    Immune Deficiency Disorders:; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Hyper-IgM; DiGeorge Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immune Deficiency; Immune Dysregulatory Disorder:; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; IPEX; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  1. Immune-Relevant and Antioxidant Activities of Vitellogenin and Yolk Proteins in Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen; Zhang, Shicui

    2015-10-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg), the major egg yolk precursor protein, is traditionally thought to provide protein- and lipid-rich nutrients for developing embryos and larvae. However, the roles of Vtg as well as its derived yolk proteins lipovitellin (Lv) and phosvitin (Pv) extend beyond nutritional functions. Accumulating data have demonstrated that Vtg, Lv and Pv participate in host innate immune defense with multifaceted functions. They can all act as multivalent pattern recognition receptors capable of identifying invading microbes. Vtg and Pv can also act as immune effectors capable of killing bacteria and virus. Moreover, Vtg and Lv are shown to possess phagocytosis-promoting activity as opsonins. In addition to these immune-relevant functions, Vtg and Pv are found to have antioxidant activity, which is able to protect the host from oxidant stress. These non-nutritional functions clearly deepen our understanding of the physiological roles of the molecules, and at the same time, provide a sound basis for potential application of the molecules in human health. PMID:26506386

  2. Immune-Relevant and Antioxidant Activities of Vitellogenin and Yolk Proteins in Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Sun

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitellogenin (Vtg, the major egg yolk precursor protein, is traditionally thought to provide protein- and lipid-rich nutrients for developing embryos and larvae. However, the roles of Vtg as well as its derived yolk proteins lipovitellin (Lv and phosvitin (Pv extend beyond nutritional functions. Accumulating data have demonstrated that Vtg, Lv and Pv participate in host innate immune defense with multifaceted functions. They can all act as multivalent pattern recognition receptors capable of identifying invading microbes. Vtg and Pv can also act as immune effectors capable of killing bacteria and virus. Moreover, Vtg and Lv are shown to possess phagocytosis-promoting activity as opsonins. In addition to these immune-relevant functions, Vtg and Pv are found to have antioxidant activity, which is able to protect the host from oxidant stress. These non-nutritional functions clearly deepen our understanding of the physiological roles of the molecules, and at the same time, provide a sound basis for potential application of the molecules in human health.

  3. Effect of extrusion processing on immune activation properties of hazelnut protein in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Tina; Para, Radhakrishna; Gonipeta, Babu; Reitmeyer, Mike; He, Yingli; Srkalovic, Ines; Ng, Perry K W; Gangur, Venu

    2016-09-01

    Although food processing can alter food allergenicity, the impact of extrusion processing on in vivo hazelnut allergenicity is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that extrusion processing will alter the immune activation properties of hazelnut protein (HNP) in mice. Soluble extrusion-processed HNP (EHNP) was prepared and evaluated for immune response using an established transdermal sensitization mouse model. Mice were sensitized with identical amounts of EHNP versus raw HNP. After confirming systemic IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a antibody responses, oral hypersensitivity reaction was quantified by hypothermia shock response (HSR). Mechanism was studied by measuring mucosal mast cell (MMC) degranulation. Compared to raw HNP, the EHNP elicited slower but similar IgE antibody (Ab) response, lower IgG1 but higher IgG2a Ab response. The EHNP exhibited significantly lower oral HSR as well as MMC degranulation capacity. These results demonstrate that the extrusion technology can be used to produce soluble HNP with altered immune activation properties. PMID:27251648

  4. Haptoglobin activates innate immunity to enhance acute transplant rejection in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hua; Song, Yang; Colangelo, Christopher M.; Wu, Terence; Bruce, Can; Scabia, Gaia; Galan, Anjela; Maffei, Margherita; Goldstein, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Immune tolerance to transplanted organs is impaired when the innate immune system is activated in response to the tissue necrosis that occurs during harvesting and implantation procedures. A key molecule in this immune pathway is the intracellular TLR signal adaptor known as myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88). After transplantation, MyD88 induces DC maturation as well as the production of inflammatory mediators, such as IL-6 and TNF-α. However, upstream activators of MyD88 function in response to transplantation have not been identified. Here, we show that haptoglobin, an acute phase protein, is an initiator of this MyD88-dependent inflammatory process in a mouse model of skin transplantation. Necrotic lysates from transplanted skin elicited higher inflammatory responses in DCs than did nontransplanted lysates, suggesting DC-mediated responses are triggered by factors released during transplantation. Analysis of transplanted lysates identified haptoglobin as one of the proteins upregulated during transplantation. Expression of donor haptoglobin enhanced the onset of acute skin transplant rejection, whereas haptoglobin-deficient skin grafts showed delayed acute rejection and antidonor T cell priming in a MyD88-dependent graft rejection model. Thus, our results show that haptoglobin release following skin necrosis contributes to accelerated transplant rejection, with potential implications for the development of localized immunosuppressive therapies. PMID:22156194

  5. Active immunization against vasoactive intestinal polypeptide decreases neuronal recruitment and inhibits reproduction in zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vistoropsky, Yulia; Heiblum, Rachel; Smorodinsky, Nechama-Ina; Barnea, Anat

    2016-08-15

    Neurogenesis and neuronal recruitment occur in adult brains of many vertebrates, and the hypothesis is that these phenomena contribute to the brain plasticity that enables organisms to adjust to environmental changes. In mammals, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is known to have many neuroprotective properties, but in the avian brain, although widely distributed, its role in neuronal recruitment is not yet understood. In the present study we actively immunized adult zebra finches against VIP conjugated to KLH and compared neuronal recruitment in their brains, with brains of control birds, which were immunized against KLH. We looked at two forebrain regions: the nidopallium caudale (NC), which plays a role in vocal communication, and the hippocampus (HC), which is involved in the processing of spatial information. Our data demonstrate that active immunization against VIP reduces neuronal recruitment, inhibits reproduction, and induces molting, with no change in plasma prolactin levels. Thus, our observations suggest that VIP has a direct positive role in neuronal recruitment and reproduction in birds. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2516-2528, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26801210

  6. Selenylation modification can enhance immune-enhancing activity of Chuanminshen violaceum polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haibo, Feng; Fan, Jing; Bo, Hongquan; Tian, Xi; Bao, He; Wang, Xiaohua

    2016-11-20

    Chuanminshen violaceum polysaccharides (CVPS) were extracted, purified and selenizingly modified. The modification has been achieved by using the HNO3- Na2SeO3 method, and selenizing Chuanminshen violaceum polysaccharides (sCVPS) were evaluated for their physicochemical properties and their potential as adjuvant to modulate cellular and humoral immune responses to hepatitis B subunit vaccine in a mouse model. Our results demonstrated that sCVPS significantly promoted splenocytes proliferation and the production of IL-4 and IFN-γ in vitro. In vivo experiments showed that sCVPS significantly increased the rHBsAg-specific IgG level, IgG subclass (IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b) antibody titers, T cells proliferation, levels of IL-4, IL-2, and IFN-γ in CD4 (+)T cells and the level of IFN-γ in CD8(+)T cells. Furthermore, sCVPS increased the activity of natural killer cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, thus increasing both cellular and humoral immune responses in vivo. The present data suggest that selenylation of CVPS can significantly improve their immune-enhancing activity both in vitro and in vivo, thus representing a powerful adjuvant for vaccine design. PMID:27561500

  7. Loss of CARD9-mediated innate activation attenuates severe influenza pneumonia without compromising host viral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Takayuki; Iizasa, Ei'ichi; Kobayashi, Noritada; Yoshida, Hiroki; Hara, Hiromitsu

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection is a common cause of severe viral pneumonia associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which is difficult to control with general immunosuppressive therapy including corticosteroids due to the unfavorable effect on viral replication. Studies have suggested that the excessive activation of the innate immunity by IFV is responsible for severe pathologies. In this study, we focused on CARD9, a signaling adaptor known to regulate innate immune activation through multiple innate sensor proteins, and investigated its role in anti-IFV defense and lung pathogenesis in a mouse model recapitulating severe influenza pneumonia with ARDS. We found that influenza pneumonia was dramatically attenuated in Card9-deficient mice, which showed improved mortality with reduced inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the infected lungs. However, viral clearance, type-I interferon production, and the development of anti-viral B and T cell immunity were not compromised by CARD9 deficiency. Syk or CARD9-deficient DCs but not macrophages showed impaired cytokine but not type-I interferon production in response to IFV in vitro, indicating a possible role for the Syk-CARD9 pathway in DCs in excessive inflammation of IFV-infected lungs. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is an ideal therapeutic target for severe influenza pneumonia without affecting viral clearance. PMID:26627732

  8. Identifying risk factors of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in AIDS patients receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo He

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome typically occurs within days after patients undergo highly active anti-retroviral therapy and is a big hurdle for effective treatment of AIDS patients. In this study, we monitored immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurrence in 238 AIDS patients treated with highly active anti-retroviral therapy. Among them, immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurred in 47 cases (19.7%. Immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome patients had significantly higher rate of opportunistic infection (p < 0.001 and persistently lower CD4+ cell count (p < 0.001 compared to the non-immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome patients. In contrast, no significant differences in HIV RNA loads were observed between the immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome group and non-immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome group. These data suggest that a history of opportunistic infection and CD4+ cell counts at baseline may function as risk factors for immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurrence in AIDS patients as well as potential prognostic markers. These findings will improve the management of AIDS with highly active anti-retroviral therapy.

  9. Stimulation of TLR7 with Gardiquimod Enhances Protection and Activation of Immune Cells from γ-Irradiation Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy for cancer patients is based on the radiation-induced cell death, but high dose of radiation is able to cause break of immune system. Thus, protection of immune cells from radiation damage is required to enhance the efficiency and reduce the harmful side effects during cancer radiotherapy. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important not only in initiating innate immunity against microbial infection, but also inducing Th1-mediated immunity with producing cytokines and chemokines. Cell stimulation via TLRs leads to downstream activation of NF-kB and other transcription factors. Consequently, several genes encoding mediators and effector molecules of the innate as well as the adaptive immune response are transcribed. There are several previous findings that activated immune cells via TLR9 inducing pathways are resistant to chemical or radiation exposure. But it is not clear that the other TLRs also have the same abilities to protect immune cells against cellular damages including γ-irradiation. This research was performed to evaluate protective effect of immune cells from γ-irradiation through TLR-7 activation pathway

  10. [Seroconversion and immune response after anti-HBV vaccination in patients on chronic hemodialysis: comparison of two vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, Pasquale; Di Lullo, Luca; Iannacci, Giuseppe Roberto; Cecilia, Annalisa; Galderisi, Cristina; Gorini, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    ESRD patients on hemodialysis (HD) have a high risk of HBV infections. Primary prevention through vaccination is a first choice to reduce the morbidity from HBV. Prevention can be accomplished by two types of vaccines. The aim of this study was to evaluate the serological response to HBV vaccination in a population of HD patients who were randomized to Fendrix or Engerix B according to common administration protocols. Ninety-two HD patients were randomized to Fendrix or Engerix B immunization protocols. Patients in the Fendrix arm received four intramuscular administrations of 20 micron g, while patients in the Engerix arm received three intramuscular administrations of 40 micron g with an optional booster dose at two months from the last administration in nonresponders. The seroconversion rates were higher in the Fendrix group than the Engerix group, with faster responses, higher titers and longer duration of immune memory. Fendrix seems to be more effective than the older vaccine, Engerix, especially in patients at high infection risk like those making up our study population. Other crucial factors for good outcomes in patient immunization were biological and dialysis age. This underlines the importance of early immunization protocols such as already discussed by many nephrologists. PMID:22028266

  11. Persistent virus infection despite chronic cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activation in gamma interferon-deficient mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, C; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Wodarz, D;

    2000-01-01

    The role of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in the permanent control of infection with a noncytopathic virus was studied by comparing immune responses in wild-type and IFN-gamma-deficient (IFN-gamma -/-) mice infected with a slowly invasive strain of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV Armstrong......). While wild-type mice rapidly cleared the infection, IFN-gamma -/- mice became chronically infected. Virus persistence in the latter mice did not reflect failure to generate cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) effectors, as an unimpaired primary CTL response was observed. Furthermore, while ex vivo CTL activity...

  12. Active Immunization with Extracellular Vesicles Derived from Staphylococcus aureus Effectively Protects against Staphylococcal Lung Infections, Mainly via Th1 Cell-Mediated Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seng Jin Choi

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogenic bacterium that causes various infectious diseases. Extracellular vesicles (EVs released from S. aureus contain bacterial proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. These EVs can induce immune responses leading to similar symptoms as during staphylococcal infection condition and have the potential as vaccination agent. Here, we show that active immunization (vaccination with S. aureus-derived EVs induce adaptive immunity of antibody and T cell responses. In addition, these EVs have the vaccine adjuvant ability to induce protective immunity such as the up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules and the expression of T cell polarizing cytokines in antigen-presenting cells. Moreover, vaccination with S. aureus EVs conferred protection against lethality induced by airway challenge with lethal dose of S. aureus and also pneumonia induced by the administration of sub-lethal dose of S. aureus. These protective effects were also found in mice that were adoptively transferred with splenic T cells isolated from S. aureus EV-immunized mice, but not in serum transferred mice. Furthermore, this protective effect of S. aureus EVs was significantly reduced by the absence of interferon-gamma, but not by the absence of interleukin-17. Together, the study herein suggests that S. aureus EVs are a novel vaccine candidate against S. aureus infections, mainly via Th1 cellular response.

  13. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Pathway: Role in Immune Evasion by Trypanosomatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Silva, Mercedes; Diniz, Flavia F; Gomes, Gabriela N; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi are the causative agents of leishmaniasis and Chagas disease, respectively, two neglected tropical diseases that affect about 25 million people worldwide. These parasites belong to the family Trypanosomatidae, and are both obligate intracellular parasites that manipulate host signaling pathways and the innate immune system to establish infection. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are serine and threonine protein kinases that are highly conserved in eukaryotes, and are involved in signal transduction pathways that modulate physiological and pathophysiological cell responses. This mini-review highlights existing knowledge concerning the mechanisms that Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi have evolved to target the host's MAPK signaling pathways and highjack the immune response, and, in this manner, promote parasite maintenance in the host. PMID:26941717

  14. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in association with HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis: Views over hidden possibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon Suniti; Lloyd Charmaine AC; Sekar Ramalingam; Balakrishnan Pachamuthu; Murugavel Kailapuri G; Vignesh Ramachandran; Shankar Esaki; Kumarasamy Nagalingeswaran

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Gut immune components are severely compromised among persons with AIDS, which allows increased translocation of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) into the systemic circulation. These microbial LPS are reportedly increased in chronically HIV-infected individuals and findings have correlated convincingly with measures of immune activation. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is an adverse consequence of the restoration of pathogen-specific immune responses in a subset ...

  15. Immune dysfunction in cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sipeki Nóra; Antal-Szalmás Péter (1968-) (laboratóriumi szakorvos, laboratóriumi hematológus és immunológus, klinikai farmakológus szakorvos); Lakatos Péter László; Papp Mária (1975-) (belgyógyász, gasztroenterológus)

    2014-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune dysfunction, also referred to as cirrhosis-associated immune dysfunction syndrome, is a major component of cirrhosis, and plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of both the acute and chronic worsening of liver function. During the evolution of the disease, acute decompensation events associated with organ failure(s), so-called acute-on chronic liver failure, and chronic decompensation with progression of liver fibrosis and also development of disease specific comp...

  16. Preliminary analysis of immune activation in early onset type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia D. Rempel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. First Nations and other Aboriginal children are disproportionately affected by cardiometabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes (T2D. In T2D, the disruption of insulin signalling can be driven by pro-inflammatory immunity. Pro-inflammatory responses can be fueled by toll-like receptors (TLR on immune cells such as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, a white blood cell population. TLR4 can bind to lipids from bacteria and food sources activating PBMC to produce cytokines tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-1β. These cytokines can interfere with insulin signalling. Here, we seek to understand how TLR4 activation may be involved in early onset T2D. We hypothesized that immune cells from youth with T2D (n=8 would be more reactive upon TLR4 stimulation relative to cells from age and body mass index (BMI-matched controls without T2D (n=8. Methods. Serum samples were assayed for adipokines (adiponectin and leptin, as well as cytokines. Freshly isolated PBMC were examined for immune reactivity upon culture with TLR4 ligands bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 2 and 0.2 ng/ml and the fatty acid palmitate (200 µM. Culture supernatants were evaluated for the amount of TNF-α and IL-1β produced by PBMC. Results. Youth with T2D displayed lower median serum adiponectin levels compared to controls (395 vs. 904 ng/ml, p<0.05. PBMC isolated from youth with and without T2D produced similar levels of TNF-α and IL-1β after exposure to the higher LPS concentration. However, at the low LPS dose the T2D cohort exhibited enhanced IL-1β synthesis relative to the control cohort. Additionally, exposure to palmitate resulted in greater IL-1β synthesis in PBMCs isolated from youth with T2D versus controls (p<0.05. These differences in cytokine production corresponded to greater monocyte activation in the T2D cohort. Conclusion. These preliminary results suggest that cellular immune responses are exaggerated in T2D, particularly

  17. Involvement of immune system in enhanced tumor rejection in mice by chronic low dose-rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the previous study, I found that low dose-rate radiation, under certain irradiation conditions, enhanced the rejective response against tumor cells in irradiated C57BL/6N mice. To elucidate the involvement of immune system, I studied the rejective response against taking tumor cells in C57BL/6 mice and scid mice. The C57BL/6N mice have normal immune system, but the scid mice lack a functional immune system. The rejective response was analyzed by applying methods of TD50 assay. TD50 is the abbreviation for tumor dose 50 and indicates the number of cells required for successful transplantation to 50% of injected sites in the recipient animals. I transplanted the tumor cells prepared from a Methylcholanthrene-induced tumor (fibrosarcoma) in mice. The increase in the TD50 value suggests an enhancement of the rejective response against taking tumor cells. The TD50 in non-irradiated scid mice was smaller than that of non-irradiated C57BL/6N mice and the values were 7.6 x 102 and 1.01 x 104, respectively. Furthermore, the TD50 value in C57BL/6N mice irradiated with 250 mGy increased to 3.5 x 104. On the other hand, that in scid mice irradiated with the same total dose remained at low level and did riot change. These results suggest that the increase in TD50 value in mice by irradiation with 250 mGy needs normal immune system. The immune system is stimulated by transplantated tumor cells and induced the enhancement of the rejective response against taking tumor cells. (author)

  18. CXCL9 Is Important for Recruiting Immune T Cells into the Brain and Inducing an Accumulation of the T Cells to the Areas of Tachyzoite Proliferation to Prevent Reactivation of Chronic Cerebral Infection with Toxoplasma gondii

    OpenAIRE

    Ochiai, Eri; Sa, Qila; Brogli, Morgan; Kudo, Tomoya; Wang, Xisheng; Dubey, Jitender P; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    T cells are required to maintain the latency of chronic infection with Toxoplasma gondii in the brain. Here, we examined the role of non–glutamic acid-leucine-arginine CXC chemokine CXCL9 for T-cell recruitment to prevent reactivation of infection with T. gondii. Severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice were infected and treated with sulfadiazine to establish a chronic infection. Immune T cells from infected wild-type mice were transferred into the SCID mice in combination with treatment w...

  19. Complement Activation Pathways: A Bridge between Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses in Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Wills-Karp, Marsha

    2007-01-01

    Although it is widely accepted that allergic asthma is driven by T helper type 2 (Th2)-polarized immune responses to innocuous environmental allergens, the mechanisms driving these aberrant immune responses remain elusive. Recent recognition of the importance of innate immune pathways in regulating adaptive immune responses have fueled investigation into the role of innate immune pathways in the pathogenesis of asthma. The phylogenetically ancient innate immune system, the complement system, ...

  20. PPARγ activation normalizes resolution of acute sterile inflammation in murine chronic granulomatous disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez-Boyanapalli, Ruby; Frasch, S. Courtney; Riches, David W.H.; Vandivier, R. William; Henson, Peter M.; Bratton, Donna L.

    2010-01-01

    Absence of a functional nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase predisposes chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients to infection, and also to unexplained, exaggerated inflammation. The impaired recognition and removal (efferocytosis) of apoptotic neutrophils by CGD macrophages may contribute to this effect. We hypothesized that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) activation during CGD inflammation is deficient, leading to altered macrophage programmin...

  1. Cervico-mandibular muscle activity in females with chronic cervical pain

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, T; Parker, R.; Burgess, T.

    2013-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms behind pain in chroniccervical musculoskeletal conditions (MSC) in office workers remainunclear. Chronic cervical pain has established links with temporomandibular(TM) disorders. Yet there is no current published evidence to reportwhether individuals with cervical dysfunction exhibit altered masseterand cervical extensor (CE) muscle activity. Objective: To explore CE andmasseter surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity and teeth clenchinghabits in females with c...

  2. Physical and Psychosocial Factors Associated With Physical Activity in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, Jorine E.; Boezen, H. Marike; de Greef, Mathieu H.; ten Hacken, Nick H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess physical activity and sitting time in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to investigate which physical and psychosocial factors are associated with physical activity and sitting time. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Patients were recruited at

  3. Leisure Time Physical Activity and Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease: Preliminary findings from the MDRD study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. In the general population, physical activity is associated with reduced mortality. We examined physical activity status in CKD patients and its relation to all-cause mortality. The Modified...

  4. Anti-Tumor and Immune Enhancing Activities of Rice Bran Gramisterol on Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsuda Somintara

    Full Text Available Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML is a cancer of the blood that most commonly affects human adults. The specific cause of AML is unclear, but it induces abnormality of white blood cells that grow rapidly and accumulate in bone marrow interfering with the production and functions of the normal blood cells. AML patients face poor prognosis and low quality of life during chemotherapy or transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells due to the progressive impairment of their immune system. The goal of this study is to find natural products that have the potential to delay growth or eliminate the abnormal leukemic cells but cause less harmful effect to the body's immune system.The unsaponified fraction of Riceberry rice bran (RBDS and the main pure compound, gramisterol, were studied for cytotoxicity and biological activities in WEHI-3 cells and in the leukemic mouse model induced by transplantation of WEHI-3 cells intraperitoneally. In the in vitro assay, RBDS and gramisterol exerted sub-G1 phase cell cycle arrest with a potent induction of apoptosis. Both of them effectively decreased cell cycle controlling proteins (cyclin D1 and cyclin E, suppressed cellular DNA synthesis and mitotic division, and reduced anti-apoptosis Bcl-2 protein, but increased apoptotic proteins (p53 and Bax and activated caspase-3 enzyme in the intrinsic cell death stimulation pathway. In leukemic mice, daily feeding of RBDS significantly increased the amount of immune function-related cells including CD3+, CD19+, and CD11b+, and elevated the serum levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, and IL-12β cytokines, but suppressed IL-10 level. At the tumor sites, CD11b+ cells were polarized and became active phagocytotic cells. Treatment of mice normal immune cells with gramisterol alone or a combination of gramisterol with cytokines released from RBDS-treated leukemic mice splenocytes culture synergistically increased pSTAT1 transcriptional factor that up-regulated the genes controlling

  5. The PROactive instruments to measure physical activity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gimeno Santos, Elena, 1980-; Serra Pons, Ignasi; Basaga??a Flores, Xavier; Garc??a Aymerich, Judith; PROactive consortium

    2015-01-01

    No current patient-centred instrument captures all dimensions of physical activity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our objective was item reduction and initial validation of two instruments to measure physical activity in COPD.Physical activity was assessed in a 6-week, randomised, two-way cross-over, multicentre study using PROactive draft questionnaires (daily and clinical visit versions) and two activity monitors. Item reduction followed an iterative process including clas...

  6. Patient-centered activity monitoring in the self-management of chronic health conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Chiauzzi, Emil; Rodarte, Carlos; DasMahapatra, Pronabesh

    2015-01-01

    Background As activity tracking devices become smaller, cheaper, and more consumer-accessible, they will be used more extensively across a wide variety of contexts. The expansion of activity tracking and personal data collection offers the potential for patient engagement in the management of chronic diseases. Consumer wearable devices for activity tracking have shown promise in post-surgery recovery in cardiac patients, pulmonary rehabilitation, and activity counseling in diabetic patients, ...

  7. Ant sperm storage organs do not have phenoloxidase constitutive immune activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila, Francisco; Chérasse, Sarah; Boomsma, Jacobus J; Aron, Serge

    2015-07-01

    The prophenoloxidase system (proPO-AS) is a primordial constituent of insect innate immunity. Its broad action spectrum, rapid response time, and cytotoxic by-products induced by phenoloxidase (PO) production contribute to the effective clearing of invading pathogens. However, such immune reactions may not be optimal for insect organs that evolved to have mutualistic interactions with non-self-cells. Ant queens are long-lived, but only mate early in adult life and store the sperm in a specialized organ, the spermatheca. They never re-mate so their life-time reproductive success is ultimately sperm-limited, which maintains strong selection for high sperm viability before and after storage. The proPO-AS may therefore be inappropriate for the selective clearing of sexually transmitted infections, as it might also target sperm cells that cannot be replaced. We measured PO enzymatic activity in the sperm storage organs of three ant species before and after mating. Our data show that no PO is produced in the sperm storage organs, relative to other somatic tissues as controls, and that these negative results are not due to non-detection in small volumes as non-immune-relevant catalase activity in single spermatheca fluid samples of both virgin and mated queens was significant. The lack of PO activity in sperm storage organs across three different ant species may represent an evolutionarily conserved adaptation to life-long sperm storage by ant queens. We expect that PO activity will be similarly suppressed in queen spermathecae of other eusocial Hymenoptera (bees and wasps) and, more generally, of insect females that store sperm for long periods. PMID:25911976

  8. Active chinese mistletoe lectin-55 enhances colon cancer surveillance through regulating innate and adaptive immune responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Hui Ma; Wei-Zhi Cheng; Fang Gong; An-Lun Ma; Qi-Wen Yu; Ji-Ying Zhang; Chao-Ying Hu; Xue-Hua Chen; Dong-Qing Zhang

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the potential role of Active Chinese mistletoe lectin-55 (ACML-55) in tumor immune surveillance.METHODS:In this study,an experimental model was established by hypodermic inoculating the colon cancer cell line CT26 (5×105 cells) into BALB/c mice.The experimental treatment was orally administered with ACML-55 or PBS,followed by the inoculation of colon cancer cell line CT26.Intracellular cytokine staining was used to detect IFN-y production by tumor antigen specific CD8+ T cells.FACS analysis was employed to profile composition and activation of CD4+,CD8+,γδ T and NK cells.RESULTS:Our results showed,compared to PBS treated mice,ACML-55 treatment significantly delayed colon cancer development in colon cancer-bearing Balb/c mice in vivo.Treatment with ACML-55 enhanced both Ag specific activation and proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells,and increased the number of tumor Ag specific CD8+ T cells,it was more important to increase the frequency of tumor Ag specific IFN-γ producing-CD8+ T cells.Interestingly,ACML-55 treatment also showed increased cell number of NK,and γδT cells,indicating the role of ACML-55 in activation of innate lymphooltes.CONCLUSION:Our results demonstrate that ACML-55therapy can enhance function in immune surveillance in colon cancer-bearing mice through regulating both innate and adaptive immune responses.

  9. EFFECTS OF INTERFERON THERAPY UPON IMMUNE MARKER PROFILE AND ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY IN PERIPHERAL BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES OF PATIENTS WITH RENAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Kurtasova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have observed forty-four patients with metastatic renal cancer before and after interferon therapy. Immune markers of of peripheral blood lymphocytes were determined by flow cytometry. Activity of NAD (P-dependent dehydrogenase in blood lymphocytes was studied by means of bioluminescence technique. Changes of immune marker profiles and enzymatic activities of peripheral blood lymphocytes were found in patients with renal cancer after a course of interferon therapy.

  10. Nrf2 activation as a future target of therapy for chronic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rame Taha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation integrally related to oxidative stress has been increasingly recognized as a contributing factor in various chronic diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases, pulmonary diseases, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular diseases as well as premature aging. Thus, inhibiting this vicious circle has the potential to delay, prevent progression, and treat those diseases. However, adverse effects of current anti-inflammatory drugs and the failure of exogenous antioxidant encourage scientists to develop new therapeutic alternatives. The nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 is the transcription factor that is responsible for the expression of antioxidant response element (ARE-regulated genes and have been described as having many therapeutic effects. In this review, we have discussed the role of oxidative stress in various chronic diseases. Furthermore, we have also explored various novel ways to activate Nrf2 either directly or indirectly, which may have therapeutic potential in attenuating oxidative stress, inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction that contributes to chronic diseases

  11. Induction of systemic lupus erythematosus syndrome in BALB/c mice by immunization with active chromatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong LI; Yun-yi ZHANG; Ya-nan SUN; Xi-yi HUANG; Yong-feng JIA; Duan LI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To establish an animal model for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like syndrome in mice. METHODS:BALB/c mice were immunized with active chromatin isolated from ConA-actived syngeneic spleno-lymphocytes.Plasma samples of mice were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for the presence of IgG anti-dsDNA, -ssDNA, and anti-histone antibodies. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in serum was measured by ELISA. Spleno-lymphocyte proliferation assays and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in supernatants were tested respectively. Proteinuria was measured. Kidneys were examined by direct immunohistochemical method and light microscopy. RESULTS: Anti-ds DNA, ssDNA, and histone antibodies were induced in active chromatin-immunized mice, the proliferation response of splenocytes to ConA and LPS were reduced, levels of interferon-γ in supernatants and TNF-α in serum were lowered. Lupus nephritis was assessed by the presence of Ig deposits,glomerular pathology and proteinuria. CONCLUSION: The active chromatin-induced SLE-like mouse model was similar to idiopathic SLE in human.

  12. The lipopolysaccharide-activated innate immune response network of the horseshoe crab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kawabata

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary stimulation of the horseshoe crab innate immune system by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS activates a network of responses to ensure host defense against invading pathogens. Granular hemocytes selectively respond to LPS via a G protein-dependent exocytic pathway that critically depends on the proteolytic activity of the LPS-responsive coagulation factor C. In response to stimulation by LPS, the hemocyte secretes transglutaminase (TGase and several kinds of defense molecules, such as coagulation factors, lectins, antimicrobial peptides, and protein substrates for TGase. LPS-induced hemocyte exocytosis is enhanced by a feedback mechanism in which the antimicrobial peptide tachyplesin serves as an endogenous mediator. The coagulation cascade triggered by LPS or β-1,3-D-glucans results in the formation of coagulin fibrils that are subsequently stabilized by TGase-dependent cross-linking. A cuticle-derived chitin-binding protein additionally forms a TGase-stabilized mesh at sites of injury. Invading pathogens are agglutinated by both hemocyte- and plasma-derived lectins. In addition, the proclotting enzyme and tachyplesin functionally convert hemocyanin to phenoloxidase. In the plasma, coagulation factor C acts an LPS-sensitive complement C3 convertase on the surface of Gram-negative bacteria. In this manner, LPS-induced hemocyte exocytosis leads not only to coagulation but also activates a sophisticated innate immune response network that coordinately effects pathogen recognition, prophenoloxidase activation, pathogen clearance, and TGase-dependent wound healing

  13. Apolipoprotein E isoform-dependent dendritic recovery of hippocampal neurons following activation of innate immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maezawa Izumi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Innate immune activation, including a role for cluster of differentiation 14/toll-like receptor 4 co-receptors (CD14/TLR-4 co-receptors, has been implicated in paracrine damage to neurons in several neurodegenerative diseases that also display stratification of risk or clinical outcome with the common alleles of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE: APOE2, APOE3, and APOE4. Previously, we have shown that specific stimulation of CD14/TLR-4 with lipopolysaccharide (LPS leads to greatest innate immune response by primary microglial cultures from targeted replacement (TR APOE4 mice and greatest p38MAPK-dependent paracrine damage to neurons in mixed primary cultures and hippocampal slice cultures derived from TR APOE4 mice. In contrast, TR APOE2 astrocytes had the highest NF-kappaB activity and no neurotoxicity. Here we tested the hypothesis that direct activation of CD14/TLR-4 in vivo would yield different amounts of paracrine damage to hippocampal sector CA1 pyramidal neurons in TR APOE mice. Methods We measured in vivo changes in dendrite length in hippocampal CA1 neurons using Golgi staining and determined hippocampal apoE levels by Western blot. Neurite outgrowth of cultured primary neurons in response to astrocyte conditioned medium was assessed by measuring neuron length and branch number. Results Our results showed that TR APOE4 mice had slightly but significantly shorter dendrites at 6 weeks of age. Following exposure to intracerebroventricular LPS, there was comparable loss of dendrite length at 24 hr among the three TR APOE mice. Recovery of dendrite length over the next 48 hr was greater in TR APOE2 than TR APOE3 mice, while TR APOE4 mice had failure of dendrite regeneration. Cell culture experiments indicated that the enhanced neurotrophic effect of TR APOE2 was LDL related protein-dependent. Conclusion The data indicate that the environment within TR APOE2 mouse hippocampus was most supportive of dendrite regeneration

  14. Toxicity and immunomodulatory activity of liposomal vectors formulated with cationic lipids toward immune effector cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filion, M C; Phillips, N C

    1997-10-23

    Liposomal vectors formulated with cationic lipids (cationic liposomes) and fusogenic dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) have potential for modulating the immune system by delivering gene or antisense oligonucleotide inside immune cells. The toxicity and the immunoadjuvant activity of cationic liposomes containing nucleic acids toward immune effector cells has not been investigated in detail. In this report, we have evaluated the toxicity of liposomes formulated with various cationic lipids towards murine macrophages and T lymphocytes and the human monocyte-like U937 cell line. The effect of these cationic liposomes on the synthesis of two immunomodulators produced by activated macrophages, nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), has also been determined. We have found that liposomes formulated from DOPE and cationic lipids based on diacyltrimethylammonium propane (dioleoyl-, dimyristoyl-, dipalmitoyl-, disteroyl-: DOTAP, DMTAP, DPTAP, DSTAP) or dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDAB) are highly toxic in vitro toward phagocytic cells (macrophages and U937 cells), but not towards non-phagocytic T lymphocytes. The rank order of toxicity was DOPE/DDAB > DOPE/DOTAP > DOPE/DMTAP > DOPE/DPTAP > DOPE/DSTAP. The ED50's for macrophage toxicity were 1000 nmol/ml for DOPE/DSTAP. The incorporation of DNA (antisense oligonucleotide or plasmid vector) into the cationic liposomes marginally reduced their toxicity towards macrophages. Although toxicity was observed with cationic lipids alone, it was clearly enhanced by the presence of DOPE. The replacement of DOPE by dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) significantly reduced liposome toxicity towards macrophages, and the presence of dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine-PEG2000 (DPPE-PEG2000: 10 mol%) in the liposomes completely abolished this toxicity. Cationic liposomes, irrespective of their DNA content, downregulated NO and TNF-alpha synthesis by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-activated

  15. Hepatitis C virus core, NS3, NS4B and NS5A are the major immunogenic proteins in humoral immunity in chronic HCV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lappalainen Maija

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The viral genome of hepatitis C virus constitutes a 9.6-kb single-stranded positive-sense RNA which encodes altogether 11 viral proteins. In order to study the humoral immune responses against different HCV proteins in patients suffering from chronic HCV infection, we produced three structural (core, E1 and E2 and six nonstructural proteins (NS2, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, NS5A and NS5B in Sf9 insect cells by using the baculovirus expression system. Results The recombinant HCV core, E1, E2, NS2, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, NS5A and NS5B proteins were purified and used in Western blot analysis to determine antibody responses against individual HCV protein in 68 HCV RNA and antibody positive human sera that were obtained from patients suffering from genotype 1, 2, 3 or 4 infection. These sera were also analysed with INNO-LIA Score test for HCV antibodies against core, NS3, NS4AB and NS5A, and the results were similar to the ones obtained by Western blot method. Based on our Western blot analyses we found that the major immunogenic HCV antigens were the core, NS4B, NS3 and NS5A proteins which were recognized in 97%, 86%, 68% and 53% of patient sera, respectively. There were no major genotype specific differences in antibody responses to individual HCV proteins. A common feature within the studied sera was that all except two sera recognized the core protein in high titers, whereas none of the sera recognized NS2 protein and only three sera (from genotype 3 recognised NS5B. Conclusion The data shows significant variation in the specificity in humoral immunity in chronic HCV patients.

  16. Effects of Risperidone and Paliperidone Pretreatment on Locomotor Response Following Prenatal Immune Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richtand, Neil M.; Ahlbrand, Rebecca; Horn, Paul; Stanford, Kevin; Bronson, Stefanie L.; McNamara, Robert K.

    2011-01-01

    Aim Limited data are available regarding pharmacological characteristics of effective interventions for psychosis prevention. Enrollment challenges in psychosis prevention trials impede screening diverse interventions for efficacy. Relevant animal models could help circumvent this barrier. We previously described prevention with risperidone of abnormal behavior following neonatal hippocampal lesion. We aimed to extend those findings evaluating risperidone and paliperidone following prenatal immune activation, a developmental model of a schizophrenia risk factor. We evaluated a later developmental time point to determine persistent effects of drug treatment. Methods Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with poly I:C or saline on gestational day 14. Offspring of poly I:C and saline treated dams received risperidone (0.45 mg/kg/d), paliperidone (0.05 mg/kg/d), or vehicle from postnatal days 35 to 70. Locomotor responses to novelty, saline injection, and amphetamine (1 and 5 mg/kg) were determined at three months, i.e., 21 days following antipsychotic discontinuation. Results Risperidone and paliperidone had persistent effects on behavioral response to amphetamine (1 mg/kg) at 3 months, ameliorating the impact of prenatal immune activation on offspring of poly I:C-treated dams. Risperidone, but not paliperidone, also exerted persistent effects in offspring of saline-treated dams on locomotor response to saline and amphetamine (5 mg/kg) injection. Conclusions Risperidone and paliperidone pretreatment of poly I:C offspring during peri-pubertal development stabilized response to amphetamine exposure persisting into early adulthood. Prenatal immune activation provides a model for evaluating effects of an environmental risk factor for schizophrenia, and has potential utility for identifying pharmacological approaches to early intervention. PMID:21440257

  17. Cellular immune responses and phagocytic activity of fishes exposed to pollution of volcano mud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risjani, Yenny; Yunianta; Couteau, Jerome; Minier, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Since May 29, 2006, a mud volcano in the Brantas Delta of the Sidoarjo district has emitted mud that has inundated nearby villages. Pollution in this area has been implicated in detrimental effects on fish health. In fishes, leukocyte and phagocytic cells play a vital role in body defenses. We report for the first time the effect of "LUSI" volcano mud on the immune systems of fish in the Brantas Delta. The aim of this study was to find biomarkers to allow the evaluation of the effects of volcanic mud and anthropogenic pollution on fish health in the Brantas Delta. The study took places at the Brantas Delta, which was polluted by volcano mud, and at reference sites in Karangkates and Pasuruan. Leukocyte numbers were determined using a Neubauer hemocytometer and a light microscope. Differential leukocyte counts were determined using blood smears stained with May Grunwald-Giemsa, providing neutrophil, lymphocyte and monocyte counts. Macrophages were taken from fish kidney, and their phagocytic activity was measured. In vitro analyses revealed that leukocyte and differential leukocyte counts (DLC) were higher in Channa striata and Chanos chanos caught from the polluted area. Macrophage numbers were higher in Oreochromis mossambicus than in the other species, indicating that this species is more sensitive to pollution. In areas close to volcanic mud eruption, all specimens had lower phagocytic activity. Our results show that immune cells were changed and phagocytic activity was reduced in the polluted area indicating cytotoxicity and alteration of the innate immune system in fishes exposed to LUSI volcano mud and anthropogenic pollution. PMID:24631200

  18. Chronic granulomatous disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGD; Fatal granulomatosis of childhood; Chronic granulomatous disease of childhood; Progressive septic granulomatosis ... In chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), immune system cells called ... some types of bacteria and fungi. This disorder leads to long- ...

  19. Insulin resistance, selfish brain, and selfish immune system: an evolutionarily positively selected program used in chronic inflammatory diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Straub, Rainer H

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a general phenomenon of many physiological states, disease states, and diseases. IR has been described in diabetes mellitus, obesity, infection, sepsis, trauma, painful states such as postoperative pain and migraine, schizophrenia, major depression, chronic mental stress, and others. In arthritis, abnormalities of glucose homeostasis were described in 1920; and in 1950 combined glucose and insulin tests unmistakably demonstrated IR. The phenomenon is now described i...

  20. Immune receptor signaling: from ubiquitination to NF-κB activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Cong Sun

    2012-01-01

    The immune system functions as a dynamic and sophisticated network that ensures efficient response to foreign antigens and tolerance to self-tissues.1 The function of the immune system relies on signal transduction that connects immune cells to the extracellular environment and mediates communication among the different types of immune cells.

  1. MRI grading method for active and chronic spinal changes in spondyloarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, K.B. [Department of Radiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus Sygehus (Denmark); Jurik, A.G., E-mail: anne.jurik@aarhus.rm.d [Department of Radiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus Sygehus (Denmark)

    2010-01-15

    Aim: To describe a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) grading method for both active and chronic spondyloarthritis (SpA) changes in the spine, to test its validity, and compare chronic MRI scores with findings obtained by radiography. Material and methods: A total of 91 patients (41 males; 50 females) with back pain fulfilling the European Spondylarthropathy Study Group (ESSG) criteria for SpA were examined using MRI and radiography of the spine. The mean age was 36.7 years (range 16-51 years) and symptom duration was between 3 and 27 years. The MRI images were assessed for signs of disease activity (bone marrow oedema at the vertebral plates and costo-vertebral joints) and chronic structural changes [syndesmophytes/vertebral fusion, erosion, and fatty marrow deposition (FMD)]. The interobserver agreement was analysed based on 37 examinations. Radiographs were assessed for the presence of shiny corners, vertebral squaring, syndesmophytes/fusion, and erosion. Results: The interobserver agreement for the assessed MRI abnormalities was acceptable, with kappa values between 0.62 and 0.77. A total of 56 patients had SpA-related spinal abnormalities as depicted using MRI. The total chronic MRI score was not significantly related to the radiographic score, mainly because syndesmophytes were difficult to detect by MRI and FMD was only visualized by MRI. However, FMD was significantly related to the total radiographic score and vertebral squaring. Conclusion: The described MRI grading method was reliable for assessing both disease activity and chronic changes. MRI is promising for estimating chronic changes, but cervical radiography may still be needed. FMD seems to be an important sign of chronicity.

  2. The immune response in Drosophila: pattern of cecropin expression and biological activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Samakovlis, C; Kimbrell, D A; Kylsten, P; Engström, A.; Hultmark, D

    1990-01-01

    Cecropins are antibacterial peptides, induced in Drosophila as part of the humoral immune response to a bacterial invasion. We have used the cloned Drosophila cecropin genes CecA1, A2 and B as probes to study the developmental and tissue specific regulation of this response. The genes are strongly expressed in fat body and hemocytes after injection of bacteria, the CecA genes being much more active than CecB in the fat body. All parts of the fat body and 5-10% of the hemocytes are involved in...

  3. Immune Activation, Viral Gene Product Expression and Neurotoxicity in the HIV-1 Transgenic Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Royal, Walter; Zhang, Li; Guo, Ming; Jones, Odell; Davis, Harry; Bryant, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    The HIV-1 transgenic (TG) rat has been shown to be a useful model of nervous system disease that occurs in human HIV-1 infection. Studies were, therefore, performed to examine characteristics of the immune response in the periphery and brain of the animals and expression of factors in the nervous system that might be associated with neurotoxicity. Activated splenocytes from wild-type (WT) and TG rats were stimulated with either CD3/CD28 or with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and examined for prolif...

  4. Keratinocytes under Fire of Proinflammatory Cytokines: Bona Fide Innate Immune Cells Involved in the Physiopathology of Chronic Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François-Xavier Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous homeostasis and defenses are maintained by permanent cross-talk among particular epidermal keratinocytes and immune cells residing or recruited in the skin, through the production of cytokines. If required, a coordinated inflammatory response is triggered, relayed by specific cytokines. Due to numerous reasons, troubles in the resolution of this phenomenon could generate a cytokine-mediated vicious circle, promoting skin chronic inflammation, the most common being atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. In this paper, we discuss the biological effects of cytokine on keratinocytes, more particularly on specific or shared cytokines involved in atopic dermatitis or psoriasis. We report and discuss monolayer or 3D in vitro models of keratinocytes stimulated by specific sets of cytokines to mimic atopic dermatitis or psoriasis. IL-22, TNFa, IL-4, and IL-13 combination is able to mimic an “atopic dermatitis like” state. In psoriasis lesions, over expression of IL-17 is observed whereas IL-4 and IL-13 were not detected; the replacement of IL-4 and IL-13 by IL-17 from this mix is able to mimic in vitro a “psoriasis like” status on keratinocytes. We conclude that specific cytokine environment deregulation plays a central role on skin morphology and innate immunity, moving towards specific pathologies and opening the way to new therapeutic strategies.

  5. Veltuzumab, an anti-CD20 mAb for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Cannon; Castillo, Jorge

    2009-04-01

    Veltuzumab is a humanized, second-generation anti-CD20 mAb currently under development by Immunomedics Inc for the potential treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Licensee Nycomed is developing veltuzumab for the potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Veltuzumab contains 90 to 95% human antibody sequences with identical antigen framework regions to epratuzumab (a humanized anti-CD22 mAb) and similar antigen-binding determinants to rituximab (chimeric, anti-CD20 mAb and the first-line treatment of aggressive and indolent NHL). In vitro studies have demonstrated that veltuzumab has enhanced binding avidities and a stronger effect on complement-dependent cytotoxicity compared with rituximab in selected cell lines. In dose-finding phase I/II clinical trials in patients with low-grade NHL, intravenous veltuzumab demonstrated a substantial rate of complete responses in concurrence with shorter and more tolerable infusions compared with rituximab. Currently there has been no evidence of an immune response to repeated administrations, and no serious adverse events related to veltuzumab treatment in patients with NHL. Veltuzumab is undergoing clinical trials using a low-dose subcutaneous formulation in patients with NHL, CLL and ITP. Prospective, randomized clinical trials are needed to clarify the role veltuzumab will play in a market where the therapy of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is dominated by rituximab. PMID:19330725

  6. Transcriptomics: A Step behind the Comprehension of the Polygenic Influence on Oxidative Stress, Immune Deregulation, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Granata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is an increasing and global health problem with a great economic burden for healthcare system. Therefore to slow down the progression of this condition is a main objective in nephrology. It has been extensively reported that microinflammation, immune system deregulation, and oxidative stress contribute to CKD progression. Additionally, dialysis worsens this clinical condition because of the contact of blood with bioincompatible dialytic devices. Numerous studies have shown the close link between immune system impairment and CKD but most have been performed using classical biomolecular strategies. These methodologies are limited in their ability to discover new elements and enable measuring the simultaneous influence of multiple factors. The “omics” techniques could overcome these gaps. For example, transcriptomics has revealed that mitochondria and inflammasome have a role in pathogenesis of CKD and are pivotal elements in the cellular alterations leading to systemic complications. We believe that a larger employment of this technique, together with other “omics” methodologies, could help clinicians to obtain new pathogenetic insights, novel diagnostic biomarkers, and therapeutic targets. Finally, transcriptomics could allow clinicians to personalize therapeutic strategies according to individual genetic background (nutrigenomic and pharmacogenomic. In this review, we analyzed the available transcriptomic studies involving CKD patients.

  7. Antitumor and immune regulation activities of the extracts of some Chinese marine invertebrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lixin; FAN Xiao; HAN Lijun

    2005-01-01

    Extracts of 21 marine invertebrates belonging to Coelenterata, Mollusca, Annelida, Bryozoa,Echiura, Arthropoda, Echinodermata and Urochordata were screened for the studies on their antitumor and immune regulation activities. Antitumor activity was determined by MTT method and immune regulation activity was studied using T- and B-lymphocytes in mice spleen in vitro. It was found that the n-butanol part of Asterina pectinifera, the acetic ether part of Tubuaria marina, 95% ethanol extract of Acanthochiton rubrolineatus have a high inhibition rate of 96.7%, 63.9% and 50.5% respectively on tumor cell line HL-60 at the concentration of 0.063 mg/ml. The inhibition rate of the acetic ether part of Tubuaria marina on the tumor cell line A-549 is 65.4 % at concentration of 0.063 mg/mL. The 95% ethanol extract of Meretrix meretrix has so outstanding promoting effect on T-lymphocyfes that their multiplication increases 25% when the sample concentration is only 1 μg/ml. On B-lymphocytes, the 95% extract of Rapana venosa, at concentration of 100μg/ml, has a promotion percentage of 60%. On the other hand, under the condition of no cytotoxic effect, the 95% ethanol extracts of Acanthochiton rubrolineatus and Cellana toreum can reach 92% inhibition rate on T lymphocyte at concentration of 100 μg/ml, while the inhibition rate on B lymphocyte of the 95% extract of Acanthochiton rubrolineatus reaches 92% at the same concentration.

  8. T-cell activation is an immune correlate of risk in BCG vaccinated infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Helen A; Snowden, Margaret A; Landry, Bernard; Rida, Wasima; Satti, Iman; Harris, Stephanie A; Matsumiya, Magali; Tanner, Rachel; O'Shea, Matthew K; Dheenadhayalan, Veerabadran; Bogardus, Leah; Stockdale, Lisa; Marsay, Leanne; Chomka, Agnieszka; Harrington-Kandt, Rachel; Manjaly-Thomas, Zita-Rose; Naranbhai, Vivek; Stylianou, Elena; Darboe, Fatoumatta; Penn-Nicholson, Adam; Nemes, Elisa; Hatheril, Mark; Hussey, Gregory; Mahomed, Hassan; Tameris, Michele; McClain, J Bruce; Evans, Thomas G; Hanekom, Willem A; Scriba, Thomas J; McShane, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines to protect against tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed. We performed a case-control analysis to identify immune correlates of TB disease risk in Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) immunized infants from the MVA85A efficacy trial. Among 53 TB case infants and 205 matched controls, the frequency of activated HLA-DR(+) CD4(+) T cells associates with increased TB disease risk (OR=1.828, 95% CI=1.25-2.68, P=0.002, FDR=0.04, conditional logistic regression). In an independent study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected adolescents, activated HLA-DR(+) CD4(+) T cells also associate with increased TB disease risk (OR=1.387, 95% CI=1.068-1.801, P=0.014, conditional logistic regression). In infants, BCG-specific T cells secreting IFN-γ associate with reduced risk of TB (OR=0.502, 95% CI=0.29-0.86, P=0.013, FDR=0.14). The causes and impact of T-cell activation on disease risk should be considered when designing and testing TB vaccine candidates for these populations. PMID:27068708

  9. Modification of lily polysaccharide by selenylation and the immune-enhancing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ranran; Chen, Jin; Yue, Chanjuan; Li, Xiuping; Liu, Jie; Gao, Zhenzhen; Liu, Cui; Lu, Yu; Wang, Deyun; Li, Hongquan; Hu, Yuanliang

    2016-05-20

    Lily polysaccharide (LP) was extracted, purified and selenizingly modified by HNO3-Na2SeO3 method according to L9(3(4)) orthogonal design. Nine selenizing LPs, sLP1-sLP9, were obtained and their immune-enhancing activities were compared taking unmodified LP as control. The results in vitro test showed that sLP6 presented the strongest activity in promoting lymphocytes proliferation in single and synergetic with PHA, and the relative expression level of IL-2, IL-6 and IFN-γ mRNA of chicken peripheral lymphocytes. The results in vivo test showed that sLP6 could promote lymphocytes proliferation and enhance the serum antibody titers and serum IL-2, IL-6, IFN-γ contents more significantly than LP in chickens vaccinated with Newcastle Disease (ND) vaccine. These results indicate that polysaccharide selenizing can significantly enhance the immune-enhancing activity of LP and the optimal modification conditions are 400mg of Na2SeO3 per 500mg of LP, the reaction temperature of 70 °C and the reaction time of 6h. PMID:26917376

  10. Uncaria tomentosa increases growth and immune activity in Oreochromis niloticus challenged with Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunis-Aguinaga, Jefferson; Claudiano, Gustavo S; Marcusso, Paulo F; Manrique, Wilson Gómez; de Moraes, Julieta R Engrácia; de Moraes, Flávio R; Fernandes, João B K

    2015-11-01

    Cat's claw (Uncaria tomentosa) is an Amazon herb using in native cultures in Peru. In mammals, it has been described several effects of this herb. However, this is the first report of its use on the diet of fish. The aim of this study was to determinate the effect of this plant on the growth and immune activity in Oreochromis niloticus. Nile tilapia (81.3 ± 4.5 g) were distributed into 5 groups and supplemented with 0 (non-supplement fish), 75, 150, 300, and 450 mg of U. tomentosa.kg(-1) of diet for a period of 28 days. Fish were inoculated in the swim bladder with inactivated Streptococcus agalactiae and samples were taken at 6, 24, and 48 h post inoculation (HPI). Dose dependent increases were noted in some of the evaluated times of thrombocytes and white blood cells counts (WBC) in blood and exudate, burst respiratory activity, lysozyme activity, melanomacrophage centers count (MMCs), villi length, IgM by immunohistochemistry in splenic tissue, and unexpectedly on growth parameters. However, dietary supplementation of this herb did not affect red blood cells count (RBC), hemoglobin, and there were no observed histological lesions in gills, intestine, spleen, and liver. The current results demonstrate for the first time that U. tomentosa can stimulate fish immunity and improve growth performance in Nile tilapia. PMID:26434713

  11. Management of chronic immune thrombocytopenia in children and adolescents: lessons from an Austrian national cross-sectional study of 81 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipurzynski, J; Fahrner, B; Kerbl, R; Crazzolara, R; Jones, N; Ebetsberger, G; Jauk, B; Strenger, V; Wohlmuther, B; Schwinger, W; Lackner, H; Urban, C; Holter, W; Minkov, M; Kager, L; Benesch, M; Seidel, M G

    2016-04-01

    Chronic immune thrombocytopenia (cITP) is often associated with an underlying predisposition towards autoimmunity, recognition of which is relevant to guide treatment. International recommendations on diagnostic steps and therapeutic measures of cITP in childhood exist. However, due to the low prevalence (1-2/100,000) and a variation of availability of immunological and hematological tests and treatments across pediatric units, we postulated that these guidelines are not uniformly adhered to and that immune dysregulation syndromes remained undiscovered. To delineate the current management of children and adolescents with cITP in Austria, we performed a nationwide cross-sectional study. Between 2011 and 2014, 81 children with cITP were seen at seven centers (median age 8.75 years; range 1-17; female:male ratio 47:34) at 641 visits during 180 patient years after diagnosis of cITP (>12 months ITP duration). Additional diagnoses were noted, most frequently immune or autoimmune disorders, hematologic diseases, or infections (in 37.3%, including Evans syndrome, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Fanconi anemia), or other symptoms like bi- or pancytopenia (n=9), lymphoproliferation or granulomatous inflammation (n = 3). Both decision to treat as well as choice of treatment varied: smaller centers tended to observe more frequently, larger centers applied a pattern of treatment modalities that appeared to depend less on bleeding tendency than on center policy. More than 50% of therapeutic interventions occurred in bleedings scores ≤2 (of 5), suggesting a strong psychosocial intention to treat. Platelet increment upon 479 therapeutic interventions of eight types was evaluated, with multiple treatment approaches being pursued sequentially in refractory patients. These data confirm the hypothesis of heterogeneous diagnostic and therapeutic management of cITP in Austrian children and corroborate the need for (1) a precise panel of

  12. Effect of nutritional status on human paraoxonase-1 activity in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sztanek Ferenc (1982-) (orvos); Seres Ildikó (1954-) (biokémikus); Harangi Mariann (1974-) (belgyógyász, endokrinológus); Lőcsey Lajos (1946-2013) (belgyógyász, nephrológus); Koncsos Péter (1982-) (belgyógyász); Paragh György (1953-) (belgyógyász, kardiológus, endokrinológus, lipidológus, sürgősségi orvostani szakorvos, belgyógyászati angiológiai minősített orvos)

    2012-01-01

    Background and methods: The association between nutritional status, antioxidant human paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity and low grade inflammation in hemodialized (HD) patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine PON1 paraoxonase and lactonase activities, ADMA, adiponectin and leptin concentrations, and to clarify the relationship between paraoxonase activity and a set of cardiovascular risk factors in malnourished, normal weight and obese HD patie...

  13. Combined effect of the environmental factors as ionizing radiation and a chronic iodine deficiency on the thyroid gland and the immune condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Semipalatinsk Test Site was the primary testing venue for the Soviet Union's nuclear weapons. It is located on the steppe in northeast Kazakhstan. The tragic situation of the Semipalatinsk region is an acute and chronic radiation, repeated in big and small doses and a total absence of territorial decontamination, created unique conditions for study of the long term influence of the radiation doses on the health of the population. The Semipalatinsk region of the Republic of Kazakhstan belongs also to an area of moderate and pronounced iodine deficiency. The purpose of the research is to study the prevalence of a thyroid gland pathology and the condition of a cytokine immune link that is likely to be influenced by a combine effect of ionizing radiation and a chronic iodine deficiency. 1100 people passed through the investigation and it appears that 56, 75% of them had a thyroid pathology. Thyroid gland functional condition analysis (TSH, FT3, FT4 a-TG, a-TPO) has shown the prevalence of a subclinical hypothyroidism (33%). 28, 8% resulted in the presence of antibodies to thyroglobulin and the thyroid peroxides, whereas in the areas located further to the nuclear range, the percentage was only 13, 0%

  14. Combined effect of the environmental factors as ionizing radiation and a chronic iodine deficiency on the thyroid gland and the immune condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danyarova, L. [Department of Endocrynology, Research Institute of Cardiology and Internal Medicine, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2012-07-01

    The Semipalatinsk Test Site was the primary testing venue for the Soviet Union's nuclear weapons. It is located on the steppe in northeast Kazakhstan. The tragic situation of the Semipalatinsk region is an acute and chronic radiation, repeated in big and small doses and a total absence of territorial decontamination, created unique conditions for study of the long term influence of the radiation doses on the health of the population. The Semipalatinsk region of the Republic of Kazakhstan belongs also to an area of moderate and pronounced iodine deficiency. The purpose of the research is to study the prevalence of a thyroid gland pathology and the condition of a cytokine immune link that is likely to be influenced by a combine effect of ionizing radiation and a chronic iodine deficiency. 1100 people passed through the investigation and it appears that 56, 75% of them had a thyroid pathology. Thyroid gland functional condition analysis (TSH, FT3, FT4 a-TG, a-TPO) has shown the prevalence of a subclinical hypothyroidism (33%). 28, 8% resulted in the presence of antibodies to thyroglobulin and the thyroid peroxides, whereas in the areas located further to the nuclear range, the percentage was only 13, 0%

  15. Prenatal immune activation alters hippocampal place cell firing characteristics in adult animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Amy R; Bilkey, David K

    2015-08-01

    Prenatal maternal immune activation (MIA) is a risk factor for several developmental neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Adults with these disorders display alterations in memory function that may result from changes in the structure and function of the hippocampus. In the present study we use an animal model to investigate the effect that a transient prenatal maternal immune activation episode has on the spatially-modulated firing activity of hippocampal neurons in adult animals. MIA was induced in pregnant rat dams with a single injection of the synthetic cytokine inducer polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) on gestational day 15. Control dams were given a saline equivalent. Firing activity and local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded from the CA1 region of the adult male offspring of these dams as they moved freely in an open arena. Most neurons displayed characteristic spatially-modulated 'place cell' firing activity and while there was no between-group difference in mean firing rate between groups, place cells had smaller place fields in MIA-exposed animals when compared to control-group cells. Cells recorded in MIA-group animals also displayed an altered firing-phase synchrony relationship to simultaneously recorded LFPs. When the floor of the arena was rotated, the place fields of MIA-group cells were more likely to shift in the same direction as the floor rotation, suggesting that local cues may have been more salient for these animals. In contrast, place fields in control group cells were more likely to shift firing position to novel spatial locations suggesting an altered response to contextual cues. These findings show that a single MIA intervention is sufficient to change several important characteristics of hippocampal place cell activity in adult offspring. These changes could contribute to the memory dysfunction that is associated with MIA, by altering the encoding of spatial context and by

  16. Early infections by myxoma virus of young rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) protected by maternal antibodies activate their immune system and enhance herd immunity in wild populations

    OpenAIRE

    Letty, Jerome; Fouchet, David; Aubineau, Jacky; Berger, Francis; Leonard, Yves; Roobrouck, Alain; Gelfi, Jacqueline; PERALTA, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    The role of maternal antibodies is to protect newborns against acute early infection by pathogens. This can be achieved either by preventing any infection or by allowing attenuated infections associated with activation of the immune system, the two strategies being based on different cost/benefit ratios. We carried out an epidemiological survey of myxomatosis, which is a highly lethal infectious disease, in two distant wild populations of rabbits to describe the epidemiological pattern of the...

  17. Heightened free radical activity in blacks with chronic pancreatitis at Johannesburg, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gut, A; Shiel, N; Kay, P M; Segal, I; Braganza, J M

    1994-10-31

    Four indices of free radical activity were measured in fasting serum/plasma samples from 14 consecutive blacks with clinically quiescent chronic pancreatitis and 15 outwardly healthy hospital personnel at Soweto, the township near Johannesburg in South Africa. The patients had higher serum levels than did controls of lipid isomerisation (P radical activity is thus a common denominator in chronic pancreatitis irrespective of geography, or putative aetiological factors whether alcoholism or idiopathic, since that ratio was approximately 95:5 at Johannesburg and 50:50 at Manchester. The further finding of subclinical oxidative stress in Sowetan controls and the endemic nature of chronic pancreatitis in that area supports the hypothesis that oxidative stress may be involved in its pathogenesis. PMID:7834869

  18. Global endometrial transcriptomic profiling: transient immune activation precedes tissue proliferation and repair in healthy beef cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foley Cathriona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All cows experience bacterial contamination and tissue injury in the uterus postpartum, instigating a local inflammatory immune response. However mechanisms that control inflammation and achieve a physiologically functioning endometrium, while avoiding disease in the postpartum cow are not succinctly defined. This study aimed to identify novel candidate genes indicative of inflammation resolution during involution in healthy beef cows. Previous histological analysis of the endometrium revealed elevated inflammation 15 days postpartum (DPP which was significantly decreased by 30 DPP. The current study generated a genome-wide transcriptomic profile of endometrial biopsies from these cows at both time points using mRNA-Seq. The pathway analysis tool GoSeq identified KEGG pathways enriched by significantly differentially expressed genes at both time points. Novel candidate genes associated with inflammatory resolution were subsequently validated in additional postpartum animals using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. Results mRNA-Seq revealed 1,107 significantly differentially expressed genes, 73 of which were increased 15 DPP and 1,034 were increased 30 DPP. Early postpartum, enriched immune pathways (adjusted P P SAA1/2, GATA2, IGF1, SHC2, and SERPINA14 genes were significantly elevated 30 DPP and are functionally associated with tissue repair and the restoration of uterine homeostasis postpartum. Conclusions The results of this study reveal an early activation of the immune response which undergoes a temporal functional change toward tissue proliferation and regeneration during endometrial involution in healthy postpartum cows. These molecular changes mirror the activation and resolution of endometrial inflammation during involution previously classified by the degree of neutrophil infiltration. SAA1/2, GATA2, IGF1, SHC2, and SERPINA14 genes may become potential markers for resolution of endometrial inflammation in

  19. HLA-G in human early pregnancy: Control of uterine immune cell activation and likely

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Le Bouteiller

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite a number of controversies, the functional importance of human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G in early human pregnancy is now sustained by a large amount of sound data. Membrane-bound and soluble HLA-G isoforms, either as β2-microglobulin-free or -associated as monomers or dimers, are expressed by different trophoblast subpopulations, the only fetal-derived cells that are directly in contact with maternal cells (maternal-fetal interfaces. Trophoblast HLA-G is the specific ligand of multiple cellular receptors present in maternal immune and non-immune cells, including CD8, leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor (LILR B1, LILRB2, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR 2DL4, and possibly CD160. Trophoblast HLA-G specific engagement of these cellular receptors triggers either inhibitory or activating signals in decidual CD8 + T cells, CD4 + T cells, natural killer (NK cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, or endothelial cells. Such HLA-G-receptor specific interactions first contribute to limit potentially harmful maternal anti-paternal immune response by impairment of decidual NK cell cytotoxicity, inhibition of CD4 + and CD8 + T-cell and B-cell proliferation, and induction of apoptosis of activated CD8 + T cells. Second, these HLA-G specific interactions contribute to stimulate placental development through secretion of angiogenic factors by decidual NK cells and macrophages, and to provide a protective effect for the outcome of pregnancy by the secretion of interleukin (IL-4 by decidual trophoblast antigen-specific CD4 + T cells.

  20. Molecular characteristics of Illicium verum extractives to activate acquired immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wanxi; Lin, Zhi; Wang, Lansheng; Chang, Junbo; Gu, Fangliang; Zhu, Xiangwei

    2016-05-01

    Illicium verum, whose extractives can activate the demic acquired immune response, is an expensive medicinal plant. However, the rich extractives in I. verum biomass were seriously wasted for the inefficient extraction and separation processes. In order to further utilize the biomedical resources for the good acquired immune response, the four extractives were obtained by SJYB extraction, and then the immunology moleculars of SJYB extractives were identified and analyzed by GC-MS. The result showed that the first-stage extractives contained 108 components including anethole (40.27%), 4-methoxy-benzaldehyde (4.25%), etc.; the second-stage extractives had 5 components including anethole (84.82%), 2-hydroxy-2-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-n-methyl-acetamide (7.11%), etc.; the third-stage extractives contained one component namely anethole (100%); and the fourth-stage extractives contained 5 components including cyclohexyl-benzene (64.64%), 1-(1-methylethenyl)-3-(1-methylethyl)-benzene (17.17%), etc. The SJYB extractives of I. verum biomass had a main retention time between 10 and 20 min what's more, the SJYB extractives contained many biomedical moleculars, such as anethole, eucalyptol, [1S-(1α,4aα,10aβ)]-1,2,3,4,4a,9,10,10a-octahydro-1,4a-dimethyl-7-(1-methylethyl)-1-phenanthrenecarboxylic acid, stigmast-4-en-3-one, γ-sitosterol, and so on. So the functional analytical results suggested that the SJYB extractives of I. verum had a function in activating the acquired immune response and a huge potential in biomedicine. PMID:27081359

  1. Complement activation, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance and chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, M.; Kistorp, C.; Hansen, T.K.;

    2010-01-01

    CRP), endothelial activation (soluble E-selectin, sEsel)), endothelial damage/dysfunction (von Willebrand factor, vWf) and insulin resistance (IR) and prognosis in CHF remains unknown. Design. We investigated the association(s) between plasma sMAC, hsCRP, sEsel, vWf and IR (assessed by homeostatic model assessment...

  2. High immune activation and abnormal expression of cytokines contribute to death of SHIV89.6-infected Chinese rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ren-Rong; Zhang, Ming-Xu; Zhang, Lin-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Zheng, Hong-Yi; Zhu, Lin; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Gao-Hong; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2015-08-01

    Chinese rhesus macaques (CRMs) are ideal experimental animals for studying the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and for vaccine research. SHIV89.6 has been reported to be an attenuated virus because, in most cases, SHIV89.6 infection only causes limited alteration of immune cells and tissues, and it has been used commonly for vaccine research. After two serial passages in vivo, SHIV (SHIV-89.6P) induces CD4 lymphopenia and an AIDS-like disease with wasting and opportunistic infections. However, the pathogenic ability of SHIV89.6 is not well understood. In this study, we found that 6 of 14 SHIV89.6-infected CRMs died within 127 weeks after infection. We found especially high immune activation, low IFN-α expression, and distinctive cytokine expression profiles in the infected and dead (ID) group of monkeys, while there was only few change in the CD4(+) T counts and distribution of T cell subsets in the ID group monkeys. Also, there was a similar dynamic of viral load between infected and surviving (IS) and ID group monkeys. Furthermore, we found various correlations among immune activation, IFN-α expression, and frequencies of cytokine-secreting cells. These results suggest that SHIV89.6 infections have pathogenic potential in CRMs and that high immune activation and abnormal expression of cytokines contribute to death of SHIV89.6-infected CRMs. This also implies that high immune activation may be relevant to dysfunction of immune cells. It is proposed that high immune activation and dysfunction of immune cells may be good predictors for disease progression and markers for therapy. PMID:26036562

  3. The Neurological Significance of Abnormal Natural Killer Cell Activity in Chronic Toxigenic Mold Exposures

    OpenAIRE

    Ebere Anyanwu; Campbell, Andrew W.; Joseph Jones; Ehiri, John E; Akpan I. Akpan

    2003-01-01

    Toxigenic mold activities produce metabolites that are either broad-spectrum antibiotics or mycotoxins that are cytotoxic. Indoor environmental exposure to these toxigenic molds leads to adverse health conditions with the main outcome measure of frequent neuroimmunologic and behavioral consequences. One of the immune system disorders found in patients presenting with toxigenic mold exposure is an abnormal natural killer cell activity. This paper presents an overview of the neurological signif...

  4. Genetic variability in chronic irradiated plant populations - Polymorphism and activity of antioxidant enzymes in chronic irradiated plant populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The gene pool of natural population is constantly changing in order to provide the greatest fitness at this time. Ability of population to adapt to changing environmental conditions depends on genetic polymorphism of traits which are operates by selection. Chronic stress exposure can change amount or structure intra-population variability. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the relationships between genetic polymorphism and stress factors, such as radiation exposure. This studies my assist in the development of new bio-indication methods. Materials and methods: Studying sites: Bryansk region is the most contaminated region of Russia as a result of Chernobyl accident. The initial activity by 137Cs on this territory reached 1 MBq/m2 above surface. Our study conducted in several districts of Bryansk region, which are characterized the most dose rate. Experimental sites similar to climate characteristics, stand of trees is homogeneous, pine trees take up a significant part of phytocenosis. Heavy metals content in soils and cones be within background. Dose rates vary from 0.14 to 130 mGy/year. Object: Pinus sylvestris L.,the dominant tree species in North European and Asian boreal forests. Scots pine has a long maturation period (18-20 month), which means that significant DNA damage may accumulate in the undifferentiated stem cells, even at low doses (or dose rates) during exposure to low concentrations of contaminants Isozyme analysis: We evaluated isozyme polymorphism of three antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase, glutatione reductase and glutatione peroxidase. Analysis of enzymes activities: We chose key enzymes of antioxidant system for this experiment: superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase. Results and conclusions: We estimated frequency of each allele in reference and experimental populations. based It was showed that frequency of rare alleles increase in chronic irradiated populations, i.e. increase the sampling variance. We used

  5. Genetic variability in chronic irradiated plant populations - Polymorphism and activity of antioxidant enzymes in chronic irradiated plant populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkova, Polina Y.; Geras' kin, Stanislav A. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, 249030, Obninsk, Kievskoe shosse 109 km (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: The gene pool of natural population is constantly changing in order to provide the greatest fitness at this time. Ability of population to adapt to changing environmental conditions depends on genetic polymorphism of traits which are operates by selection. Chronic stress exposure can change amount or structure intra-population variability. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the relationships between genetic polymorphism and stress factors, such as radiation exposure. This studies my assist in the development of new bio-indication methods. Materials and methods: Studying sites: Bryansk region is the most contaminated region of Russia as a result of Chernobyl accident. The initial activity by {sup 137}Cs on this territory reached 1 MBq/m{sup 2} above surface. Our study conducted in several districts of Bryansk region, which are characterized the most dose rate. Experimental sites similar to climate characteristics, stand of trees is homogeneous, pine trees take up a significant part of phytocenosis. Heavy metals content in soils and cones be within background. Dose rates vary from 0.14 to 130 mGy/year. Object: Pinus sylvestris L.,the dominant tree species in North European and Asian boreal forests. Scots pine has a long maturation period (18-20 month), which means that significant DNA damage may accumulate in the undifferentiated stem cells, even at low doses (or dose rates) during exposure to low concentrations of contaminants Isozyme analysis: We evaluated isozyme polymorphism of three antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase, glutatione reductase and glutatione peroxidase. Analysis of enzymes activities: We chose key enzymes of antioxidant system for this experiment: superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase. Results and conclusions: We estimated frequency of each allele in reference and experimental populations. based It was showed that frequency of rare alleles increase in chronic irradiated populations, i.e. increase the sampling variance

  6. Chronic hyperammonemia alters the circadian rhythms of corticosteroid hormone levels and of motor activity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahabrach, Hanan; Piedrafita, Blanca; Ayad, Abdelmalik; El Mlili, Nisrin; Errami, Mohammed; Felipo, Vicente; Llansola, Marta

    2010-05-15

    Patients with liver cirrhosis may present hepatic encephalopathy with a wide range of neurological disturbances and alterations in sleep quality and in the sleep-wake circadian rhythm. Hyperammonemia is a main contributor to the neurological alterations in hepatic encephalopathy. We have assessed, in an animal model of chronic hyperammonemia without liver failure, the effects of hyperammonemia per se on the circadian rhythms of motor activity, temperature, and plasma levels of adrenal corticosteroid hormones. Chronic hyperammonemia alters the circadian rhythms of locomotor activity and of cortisol and corticosterone levels in blood. Different types of motor activity are affected differentially. Hyperammonemia significantly alters the rhythm of spontaneous ambulatory activity, reducing strongly ambulatory counts and slightly average velocity during the night (the active phase) but not during the day, resulting in altered circadian rhythms. In contrast, hyperammonemia did not affect wheel running at all, indicating that it affects spontaneous but not voluntary activity. Vertical activity was affected only very slightly, indicating that hyperammonemia does not induce anxiety. Hyperammonemia abolished completely the circadian rhythm of corticosteroid hormones in plasma, completely eliminating the peaks of cortisol and corticosterone present in control rats at the start of the dark period. The data reported show that chronic hyperammonemia, similar to that present in patients with liver cirrhosis, alters the circadian rhythms of corticosteroid hormones and of motor activity. This suggests that hyperammonemia would be a relevant contributor to the alterations in corticosteroid hormones and in circadian rhythms in patients with liver cirrhosis. PMID:19998493

  7. IgG1 Fc N-glycan galactosylation as a biomarker for immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Sanne E; Selman, Maurice H J; Adegnika, Ayola A; Amoah, Abena S; van Riet, Elly; Kruize, Yvonne C M; Raynes, John G; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Boakye, Daniel; von Mutius, Erika; Knulst, André C; Genuneit, Jon; Cooper, Philip J; Hokke, Cornelis H; Wuhrer, Manfred; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) Fc N-glycosylation affects antibody-mediated effector functions and varies with inflammation rooted in both communicable and non-communicable diseases. Worldwide, communicable and non-communicable diseases tend to segregate geographically. Therefore, we studied whether IgG Fc N-glycosylation varies in populations with different environmental exposures in different parts of the world. IgG Fc N-glycosylation was analysed in serum/plasma of 700 school-age children from different communities of Gabon, Ghana, Ecuador, the Netherlands and Germany. IgG1 galactosylation levels were generally higher in more affluent countries and in more urban communities. High IgG1 galactosylation levels correlated with low total IgE levels, low C-reactive protein levels and low prevalence of parasitic infections. Linear mixed modelling showed that only positivity for parasitic infections was a significant predictor of reduced IgG1 galactosylation levels. That IgG1 galactosylation is a predictor of immune activation is supported by the observation that asthmatic children seemed to have reduced IgG1 galactosylation levels as well. This indicates that IgG1 galactosylation levels could be used as a biomarker for immune activation of populations, providing a valuable tool for studies examining the epidemiological transition from communicable to non-communicable diseases. PMID:27306703

  8. Studying the effects of training sessions during a day on immune system factors in active females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZINAT EBRAHIMI

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For the reason comparison of repeat of sessions of bout during a day on selected of immune system factors of active woman, numbers 30 active students (with mean of 23.1±0.75 years old were selected as available sampling and the exercise test performed (Bruce protocol until reaching to exhaustion. These tests were performed at 8:00 Am for the first experimental group and two times (in 8:00 Am and 4:00 Pm for the second experimental group. Three stage sampling were taken (1h before start and exactly after exhaustive exercise bouts for the first experimental group& 1h before start and exactly after second exhaustive exercise bouts for the second experimental group in Am and Pm. The results of Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA with repeated measure and bonferroni test showed: there were a significant difference in two experimental group (Am and Pm between mean of the number of leukocyte (p≤0.00, monocyte (p≤0.03 and platelet (p≤0.01. Also, there were no any significant difference in blood neutrophil (p>0.08, lymphocyte (p>0.08, and eosinophil (p>0.44 between experimental group (p>0.080. In general, it seems that proceeding of repeated exhaustive exercise on a day lead tochanges in some immune system parameters.

  9. Activation of innate immunity to reduce lung metastases in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Julie L; Nowak, A; Lee, T D G

    2010-05-01

    Breast cancer continues to be one of the leading causes of cancer death in women. Mortality is primarily due to the development of metastases. Although therapies exist, they lack efficacy in preventing metastatic growth. As a result, novel agents are being investigated. In particular, treatments that target the immune system are being examined as potential anti-neoplastic agents. Cordyceps sinensis (Cs) is a fungus that has been used for over 2,000 years in China as a treatment for a variety of conditions including neoplasms. The available evidence suggests that efficacy of Cs as an anti-neoplastic therapeutic agent is related to a role as an activator of innate immune responses. The objectives of this study were: to investigate the ability of Cs to activate macrophages to produce factors that will induce protective responses against tumour growth; to study the ability of Cs to reduce primary tumour growth in vivo; and to examine the ability of Cs to reduce lung metastasis growth in vivo. We found that oral Cs does not reduce primary tumour growth but can reduce lung metastasis occurrence in a surgical excision model of metastatic mammary carcinoma. The evidence we have shown to date suggests that the reduction in metastases growth may be due to the effects of macrophage-derived factors on tumour cell cycle. PMID:19956948

  10. Systemic Immune Activation Leads to Neuroinflammation and Sickness Behavior in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Biesmans

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Substantial evidence indicates an association between clinical depression and altered immune function. Systemic administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS is commonly used to study inflammation-associated behavioral changes in rodents. In these experiments, we tested the hypothesis that peripheral immune activation leads to neuroinflammation and depressive-like behavior in mice. We report that systemic administration of LPS induced astrocyte activation in transgenic GFAP-luc mice and increased immunoreactivity against the microglial marker ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 in the dentate gyrus of wild-type mice. Furthermore, LPS treatment caused a strong but transient increase in cytokine levels in the serum and brain. In addition to studying LPS-induced neuroinflammation, we tested whether sickness could be separated from depressive-like behavior by evaluating LPS-treated mice in a panel of behavioral paradigms. Our behavioral data indicate that systemic LPS administration caused sickness and mild depressive-like behavior. However, due to the overlapping time course and mild effects on depression-related behavior per se, it was not possible to separate sickness from depressive-like behavior in the present rodent model.

  11. Maternal immune activation differentially impacts mature and adult-born hippocampal neurons in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi; van Praag, Henriette

    2015-03-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with deficits in the hippocampus, a brain area important for learning and memory. The dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus develops both before and after birth. To study the relative contribution of mature and adult-born DG granule cells to disease etiology, we compared both cell populations in a mouse model of psychiatric illness resulting from maternal immune activation. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (PolyIC, 5mg/kg) or saline was given on gestation day 15 to pregnant female C57Bl/6 mice. Male offspring (n=105), was administered systemic bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU, 50mg/kg) (n=52) or intracerebral retroviral injection into the DG (n=53), to label dividing cells at one month of age. Two months later behavioral tests were performed to evaluate disease phenotype. Immunohistochemistry and whole-cell patch clamping were used to assess morphological and physiological characteristics of DG cells. Three-month-old PolyIC exposed male offspring exhibited deficient pre-pulse inhibition, spatial maze performance and motor coordination, as well as increased depression-like behavior. Histological analysis showed reduced DG volume and parvalbumin positive interneuron number. Both mature and new hippocampal neurons showed modifications in intrinsic properties such as increased input resistance and lower current threshold, and decreased action potential number. Reduced GABAergic inhibitory transmission was observed only in mature DG neurons. Differential impairments in mature DG cells and adult-born new neurons may have implications for behavioral deficits associated with maternal immune activation. PMID:25449671

  12. Maternal aggression persists following lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Zachary M; Bowers, Stephanie L; Dow, Eliot R; Nelson, Randy J

    2006-04-15

    Lactating females direct aggressive behaviors towards intruders presumably to reduce the likelihood of infanticide of their pups. Infected animals display a constellation of responses that include lethargy, anorexia, and decreased social interactions. This suite of responses is referred to as sickness behavior, and is putatively part of an adaptive strategy to aid the organism in recovery from infection. Previous work has suggested that animals can suppress the behavioral symptoms of sickness in order to engage in adaptive behaviors. To test whether adaptive nest defense is affected by illness, dams received a peripheral injection of either saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS [50, 400, or 1000 microg/kg]), a non-replicating component of bacterial cell walls that activates the immune system. Simulated infection with LPS reduced body mass and food intake in dams and interfered with litter growth in a dose-dependent manner. Generally, nest defense was unaffected by LPS; the proportion of dams displaying maternal aggression against a male intruder, as well as the latency and duration of aggressive encounters were only suppressed at the highest LPS dose tested. Further, LPS treatment also altered non-agonistic behavior during the aggression test as indicated by reduced social investigation of the intruder and an increased time spent immobile during the session. LPS administration also significantly increased serum corticosterone concentrations in lactating females. These findings suggest that maternal aggression is not suppressed by LPS-evoked immune activation at doses that attenuate other aspects of maternal and social behavior. PMID:16490223

  13. IgG1 Fc N-glycan galactosylation as a biomarker for immune activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Sanne E.; Selman, Maurice H. J.; Adegnika, Ayola A.; Amoah, Abena S.; van Riet, Elly; Kruize, Yvonne C. M.; Raynes, John G.; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Boakye, Daniel; von Mutius, Erika; Knulst, André C.; Genuneit, Jon; Cooper, Philip J.; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Wuhrer, Manfred; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) Fc N-glycosylation affects antibody-mediated effector functions and varies with inflammation rooted in both communicable and non-communicable diseases. Worldwide, communicable and non-communicable diseases tend to segregate geographically. Therefore, we studied whether IgG Fc N-glycosylation varies in populations with different environmental exposures in different parts of the world. IgG Fc N-glycosylation was analysed in serum/plasma of 700 school-age children from different communities of Gabon, Ghana, Ecuador, the Netherlands and Germany. IgG1 galactosylation levels were generally higher in more affluent countries and in more urban communities. High IgG1 galactosylation levels correlated with low total IgE levels, low C-reactive protein levels and low prevalence of parasitic infections. Linear mixed modelling showed that only positivity for parasitic infections was a significant predictor of reduced IgG1 galactosylation levels. That IgG1 galactosylation is a predictor of immune activation is supported by the observation that asthmatic children seemed to have reduced IgG1 galactosylation levels as well. This indicates that IgG1 galactosylation levels could be used as a biomarker for immune activation of populations, providing a valuable tool for studies examining the epidemiological transition from communicable to non-communicable diseases. PMID:27306703

  14. Involvement of Activating NK Cell Receptors and Their Modulation in Pathogen Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Marras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are endowed with cell-structure-sensing receptors providing inhibitory protection from self-destruction (inhibitory NK receptors, iNKRs, including killer inhibitory receptors and other molecules and rapid triggering potential leading to functional cell activation by Toll-like receptors (TLRs, cytokine receptors, and activating NK cell receptors including natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs, i.e., NKp46, NKp46, and NKp44. NCR and NKG2D recognize ligands on infected cells which may be endogenous or may directly bind to some structures derived from invading pathogens. In this paper, we address the known direct or indirect interactions between activating receptors and pathogens and their expression during chronic HIV and HCV infections.

  15. B-Cell Activating Factor (BAFF) is elevated in Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Matharu, Kabir; Zarember, Kol A.; Marciano, Beatriz E.; Kuhns, Douglas B; Spalding, Christine; Garofalo, Mary; DiMaggio, Thomas; Estwick, Tyra; Huang, Chiung-yu; Fink, Danielle; Priel, Debra L.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Holland, Steven M.; Malech, Harry L.; Gallin, John I.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is an inherited defect in superoxide production leading to life-threatening infections, granulomas, and, possibly, abnormal immunoglobulin concentrations. We investigated whether factors controlling antibody production, such as B-cell activating factor (BAFF), were altered in CGD. CGD subjects had significantly increased mean (2.3-fold, p

  16. Giant cell arteritis associated with chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Giardina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis is an inflammatory vasculopathy that preferentially affects medium-sized and large arteries. A viral cause has been suspected but not confirmed in polymyalgia rheumatica and giant-cell arteritis. We report the case of a 81-year-old female who suffered from chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection and developed giant cell temporal arteritis.

  17. Muscle activation during selected strength exercises in women with chronic neck muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Kjaer, Michael; Andersen, Christoffer H;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Muscle-specific strength training has previously been shown to be effective in the rehabilitation of chronic neck muscle pain in women. The aim of this study was to determine the level of activation of the neck and shoulder muscles using surface electromyography (EMG) duri...

  18. Muscle activation during selected strength exercises in women with chronic neck muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L.L.; Kjaer, M.; Andersen, C.H.;

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Muscle-specific strength training has previously been shown to be effective in the rehabilitation of chronic neck muscle pain in women. The aim of this stud), was to determine the level of activation of the neck and shoulder muscles using surface electromyography (EMG) (lu...

  19. Chronic Enhancement of CREB Activity in the Hippocampus Interferes with the Retrieval of Spatial Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viosca, Jose; Malleret, Gael; Bourtchouladze, Rusiko; Benito, Eva; Vronskava, Svetlana; Kandel, Eric R.; Barco, Angel

    2009-01-01

    The activation of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)-dependent gene expression is thought to be critical for the formation of different types of long-term memory. To explore the consequences of chronic enhancement of CREB function on spatial memory in mammals, we examined spatial navigation in bitransgenic mice that express in a…

  20. Daily physical activities of patients with chronic pain or fatigue versus asymptomatic controls : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weering, van Marit; Vollenbroek-Hutten, M.M.R.; Kotte, E.M.; Hermens, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To gain an insight into the daily physical activity levels of patients with chronic pain or fatigue compared with asymptomatic controls. Data sources: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Picarta, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, reference tracking and a manual search of relevant journals.

  1. Functional activity of sphingomyelin cycle in rat liver in chronic toxic hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrov, V Yu; Kuzmenko, D I; Burov, P G; Novitsky, S V

    2008-12-01

    Activities of sphingomyelinase and ceramidase decreased in the liver in chronic toxic hepatitis and the balance between the levels of proapoptotic ceramide and antiapoptotic sphyngosine-1-phosphate shifts towards the latter substance. Pronounced changes in the qualitative and quantitative composition of fatty acids in the sphingomyelin cycle effector molecules were revealed. PMID:19513367

  2. eHealth to stimulate physical activity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vorrink, S.N.W.

    2016-01-01

    Persons with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) demonstrate reduced physical activity (PA) levels compared to healthy age-matched controls. Regular PA is associated with positive health outcomes. Inactivity leads to deconditioning, which leads to increased symptoms and a further reduction

  3. Efficacy and tolerability of different brands of intravenous immunoglobulin in the maintenance treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallia, Francesca; Balducci, Claudia; Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is effective in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). Not all brands of IVIg are however licensed for these neuropathies. We reviewed six patients with CIDP and seven with MMN treated with maintenance therapy with IVIg from 2009 to 2013. In all patients, we measured the Medical Research Council (MRC) and Overall Neuropathy Limitation Scale (ONLS) scores before each infusion, registered the monthly dose and brand of IVIg, and recorded adverse events. Patients were treated for 25-60 months (mean 49 months) alternating different brands of IVIg including IgVena, Gammagard, Kiovig, and Flebogamma. Minor and transient side effects were equally observed with each brand. No difference in the MRC or ONLS scores was observed in relation to the brand of IVIg used. Chronic maintenance treatment with IVIg in patients with MMN and CIDP was not associated with a different tolerability or efficacy despite the use of different brands of IVIg. PMID:26817673

  4. The Impact of Membrane Lipid Composition on Macrophage Activation in the Immune Defense against Rhodococcus equi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Schumann; Herbert Fuhrmann; Stephanie Adolph; Axel Schoeniger

    2011-01-01

    Nutritional fatty acids are known to have an impact on membrane lipid composition of body cells, including cells of the immune system, thus providing a link between dietary fatty acid uptake, inflammation and immunity. In this study we reveal the significance of macrophage membrane lipid composition on gene expression and cytokine synthesis thereby highlighting signal transduction processes, macrophage activation as well as macrophage defense mechanisms. Using RAW264.7 macrophages as a model ...

  5. A Viral Vectored Prime-Boost Immunization Regime Targeting the Malaria Pfs25 Antigen Induces Transmission-Blocking Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Anna L.; Blagborough, Andrew M.; Sumi Biswas; Yimin Wu; Hill, Adrian V.; Sinden, Robert E.; Draper, Simon J

    2011-01-01

    The ookinete surface protein Pfs25 is a macrogamete-to-ookinete/ookinete stage antigen of Plasmodium falciparum, capable of exerting high-level anti-malarial transmission-blocking activity following immunization with recombinant protein-in-adjuvant formulations. Here, this antigen was expressed in recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63), human adenovirus serotype 5 (AdHu5) and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) viral vectored vaccines. Two immunizations were administered to mice in a ...

  6. Platelet-Activating Factor Is Crucial in Psoralen and Ultraviolet A-Induced Immune Suppression, Inflammation, and Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Peter; Nghiem, Dat X.; Walterscheid, Jeffrey P.; Byrne, Scott; Matsumura, Yumi; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Bucana, Cora; Ananthaswamy, Honnavara N.; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2006-01-01

    Psoralen plus UVA (PUVA) is used as a very effective treatment modality for various diseases, including psoriasis and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. PUVA-induced immune suppression and/or apoptosis are thought to be responsible for the therapeutic action. However, the molecular mechanisms by which PUVA acts are not well understood. We have previously identified platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent phospholipid mediator, as a crucial substance triggering ultraviolet B radiation-induced immun...

  7. Analysis of immune responses against a wide range of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kassa, D.; Ran, L.; Geberemeskel, W.; Tebeje, M; Alemu, A.; Selase, A.; Tegbaru, B.; Franken, K. L. M. C.; Friggen, A. H.; van Meijgaarden, K. E.; Ottenhoff, T. H. M.; Wolday, D.; Messele, T.; van Baarle, D.

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing host immune responses to molecular targets of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is essential to develop effective immunodiagnostics and better vaccines. We investigated the immune response against a large series of M. tuberculosis antigens, including 5 classical and 64 nonclassical (39 DosR regulon-encoded, 4 resuscitation-promoting factor [RPF], and 21 reactivation-associated) antigens in active-pulmonary-tuberculosis (TB) patients. Whole blood from TB patients (n = 34) was stimulate...

  8. Immune responses to improving welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghman, L R

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between animal welfare and the immune status of an animal has a complex nature. Indeed, the intuitive notion that "increased vigilance of the immune system is by definition better" because it is expected to better keep the animal healthy, does not hold up under scrutiny. This is mostly due to the fact that the immune system consists of 2 distinct branches, the innate and the adaptive immune system. While they are intimately intertwined and synergistic in the living organism, they are profoundly different in their costs, both in terms of performance and wellbeing. In contrast to the adaptive immune system, the action of the innate immune system has a high metabolic cost as well as undesirable behavioral consequences. When a pathogen breaches the first line of defense (often a mucosal barrier), that organism's molecular signature is recognized by resident macrophages. The macrophages respond by releasing a cocktail of pro-inflammatory cytokines (including interleukin-1 and -6) that signal the brain via multiple pathways (humoral as well as neural) of the ongoing peripheral innate immune response. The behavioral response to the release of proinflammatory cytokines, known as "sickness behavior," includes nearly all the behavioral aspects that are symptomatic for clinical depression in humans. Hence, undesired innate immune activity, such as chronic inflammation, needs to be avoided by the industry. From an immunological standpoint, one of the most pressing poultry industry needs is the refinement of our current veterinary vaccine arsenal. The response to a vaccine, especially to a live attenuated vaccine, is often a combination of innate and adaptive immune activities, and the desired immunogenicity comes at the price of high reactogenicity. The morbidity, albeit limited and transient, caused by live vaccines against respiratory diseases and coccidiosis are good examples. Thankfully, the advent of various post-genomics technologies, such as DNA

  9. Induced prion protein controls immune-activated retroviruses in the mouse spleen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Lötscher

    Full Text Available The prion protein (PrP is crucially involved in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE, but neither its exact role in disease nor its physiological function are known. Here we show for mice, using histological, immunochemical and PCR-based methods, that stimulation of innate resistance was followed by appearance of numerous endogenous retroviruses and ensuing PrP up-regulation in germinal centers of the spleen. Subsequently, the activated retroviruses disappeared in a PrP-dependent manner. Our results reveal the regular involvement of endogenous retroviruses in murine immune responses and provide evidence for an essential function of PrP in the control of the retroviral activity. The interaction between PrP and ubiquitous endogenous retroviruses may allow new interpretations of TSE pathophysiology and explain the evolutionary conservation of PrP.

  10. Immune Activation, Immunosenescence, and Osteoprotegerin as Markers of Endothelial Dysfunction in Subclinical HIV-Associated Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra D’Abramo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-infected patients have a significantly greater risk of cardiovascular disease. Several markers including osteoprotegerin have been shown to be involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. We investigated the relationship between T-cell phenotype, osteoprotegerin, and atherosclerosis evaluated by carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT in 94 HIV+ patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy with Framingham score <10%. As for the control group, 24 HIV-negative subjects were enrolled. c-IMT was assessed by ultrasound. CD4+/CD8+ T-cell activation (CD38+ HLADR+ and senescence (CD57+ CD28− were measured by flow cytometry. IL-6 and OPG levels were measured by ELISA kit. c-IMT was higher in HIV+ than in controls. Among HIV+ patients, 44.7% had pathological c-IMT (≥0.9 mm. CD8+ T-cell activation and senescence and OPG plasma levels were higher in HIV+ patients than in controls. Subjects with pathological c-IMT exhibited higher CD8+ immune activation and immunosenescence and OPG levels than subjects with normal c-IMT. Multivariate analysis showed that age, CD8+ CD38+ HLADR+, and CD8+ CD28− CD57+ were independently associated with pathological c-IMT. Several factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in HIV patients. Immune activation and immunosenescence of CD8+ T cell together with OPG plasma levels might be associated with the development and progression of early atherosclerosis, even in the case of viral suppression.

  11. Physical activity recommendations for children with specific chronic health conditions: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis, hemophilia, asthma and cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Philpott, J; Houghton, K.; Luke, A

    2010-01-01

    As a group, children with a chronic disease or disability are less active than their healthy peers. There are many reasons for suboptimal physical activity, including biological, psychological and social factors. Furthermore, the lack of specific guidelines for ‘safe’ physical activity participation poses a barrier to increasing activity. Physical activity provides significant general health benefits and may improve disease outcomes. Each child with a chronic illness should be evaluated by an...

  12. Total-body irradiation with high-LET particles: acute and chronic effects on the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridley, Daila S.; Pecaut, Michael J.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Although the immune system is highly susceptible to radiation-induced damage, consequences of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation remain unclear. This study evaluated the effects of 0.1 gray (Gy), 0.5 Gy, and 2.0 Gy iron ion (56Fe(26)) radiation on lymphoid cells and organs of C57BL/6 mice on days 4 and 113 after whole body exposure; a group irradiated with 2.0 Gy silicon ions (28Si) was euthanized on day 113. On day 4 after 56Fe irradiation, dose-dependent decreases were noted in spleen and thymus masses and all major leukocyte populations in blood and spleen. The CD19(+) B lymphocytes were most radiosensitive and NK1.1(+) natural killer (NK) cells were most resistant. CD3(+) T cells were moderately radiosensitive and a greater loss of CD3(+)/CD8(+) T(C) cells than CD3(+)/CD4(+) T(H) cells was noted. Basal DNA synthesis was elevated on day 4, but response to mitogens and secretion of interleukin-2 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were unaffected. Signs of anemia were noted. By day 113, high B cell numbers and low T(C) cell and monocyte percents were found in the 2.0 Gy 56Fe group; the 2.0 Gy 2)Si mice had low NK cells, decreased basal DNA synthesis, and a somewhat increased response to two mitogens. Collectively, the data show that lymphoid cells and tissues are markedly affected by high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation at relatively low doses, that some aberrations persist long after exposure, and that different consequences may be induced by various densely ionizing particles. Thus simultaneous exposure to multiple radiation sources could lead to a broader spectrum of immune dysfunction than currently anticipated.

  13. Chronic hypoxia inhibits MMP-2 activation and cellular invasion in human cardiac myofibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Riches, Kirsten; Morley, Michael E.; Turner, Neil A; O'Regan, David J; Ball, Stephen G; Peers, Chris; Porter, Karen E

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac myofibroblasts are pivotal to adaptive remodelling after myocardial infarction (MI). These normally quiescent cells invade and proliferate as a wound healing response, facilitated by activation of matrix metalloproteinases, particularly MMP-2. Following MI these reparative events occur under chronically hypoxic conditions yet the mechanisms by which hypoxia might modulate MMP-2 activation and cardiac myofibroblast invasion have not been investigated. Human cardiac myofibroblasts cultu...

  14. Change in trunk muscle activities with prone bridge exercise in patients with chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Yong-Soo; Park, Seol; Kweon, Mi-Gyong; Park, Ji-Won

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of three different bridge exercises on internal oblique, external oblique, transverse abdominis, and erector spinae activities. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five subjects with chronic low back pain participated in this study. The training outcome was evaluated with three different testing methods: supine bridge exercise, supine bridge on Swiss ball exercise, and prone bridge exercise. The activities of the transverse abdominis, inter...

  15. Enhanced activation of RVLM-projecting PVN neurons in rats with chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Bo; Zheng, Hong; Patel, Kaushik P.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that there is increased activation of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF); however, it is not clear if the preautonomic neurons within the PVN are specifically overactive. Also, it is not known if these neurons have altered responses to baroreceptor or osmotic challenges. Experiments were conducted in rats with CHF (6–8 wk after coronary artery ligation). Spontaneously active neurons were recorded in the PVN, of which 36% ...

  16. Psychoneuroimmunology: Potential Relevance to Chronic Orofacial Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Schleifer, Steven J.; Marbach, Joseph; Keller, Steven E.

    1990-01-01

    Studies undertaken over the past ten years have demonstrated that stress and depression can induce immune alterations, including decreased numbers of immunocompetent cells and impaired lymphocyte and natural killer cell activity. Factors such as age and severity of symptomatology influence these effects. The substantial stress and depression associated with chronic pain syndromes and the evidence for opioid involvement in immunomodulation suggest that immune system changes may occur in some p...

  17. Transient activation of mucosal effector immune responses by resident intestinal bacteria in normal hosts is regulated by interleukin-10 signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cong; Sartor, R Balfour; Huang, Kehe; Tonkonogy, Susan L

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a key regulator of mucosal homeostasis. In the current study we investigated the early events after monoassociating germ-free (GF) wild-type (WT) mice with an Escherichia coli strain that we isolated previously from the caecal contents of a normal mouse housed under specific pathogen-free conditions. Our results show that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secreted by mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells from both IL-10 deficient mice and WT mice, stimulated ex vivo with E. coli lysate, was dramatically higher at day 4 after monoassociation compared with IFN-γ secreted by cells from GF mice without E. coli colonization. Production of IFN-γ rapidly and progressively declined after colonization of WT but not IL-10-deficient mice. The E. coli lysate-stimulated WT MLN cells also produced IL-10 that peaked at day 4 and subsequently declined, but not as precipitously as IFN-γ. WT cells that express CD4, CD8 and NKp46 produced IFN-γ; WT CD4-positive cells and B cells produced IL-10. Recombinant IL-10 added to E. coli-stimulated MLN cell cultures inhibited IFN-γ secretion in a dose-dependent fashion. MLN cells from WT mice treated in vivo with neutralizing anti-IL-10 receptor antibody produced more IFN-γ compared with MLN cells from isotype control antibody-treated mice. These findings show that a resident E. coli that induces chronic colitis in monoassociated IL-10-deficient mice rapidly but transiently activates the effector immune system in normal hosts, in parallel with induction of protective IL-10 produced by B cells and CD4(+) cells that subsequently suppresses this response to mediate mucosal homeostasis. PMID:27147411

  18. Human HLA-G+ extravillous trophoblasts: Immune-activating cells that interact with decidual leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilburgs, Tamara; Crespo, Ângela C; van der Zwan, Anita; Rybalov, Basya; Raj, Towfique; Stranger, Barbara; Gardner, Lucy; Moffett, Ashley; Strominger, Jack L

    2015-06-01

    Invading human leukocyte antigen-G+ (HLA-G+) extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) are rare cells that are believed to play a key role in the prevention of a maternal immune attack on foreign fetal tissues. Here highly purified HLA-G+ EVT and HLA-G- villous trophoblasts (VT) were isolated. Culture on fibronectin that EVT encounter on invading the uterus increased HLA-G, EGF-Receptor-2, and LIF-Receptor expression on EVT, presumably representing a further differentiation state. Microarray and functional gene set enrichment analysis revealed a striking immune-activating potential for EVT that was absent in VT. Cocultures of HLA-G+ EVT with sample matched decidual natural killer cells (dNK), macrophages, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were established. Interaction of EVT with CD4+ T cells resulted in increased numbers of CD4+CD25(HI)FOXP3+CD45RA+ resting regulatory T cells (Treg) and increased the expression level of the Treg-specific transcription factor FOXP3 in these cells. However, EVT did not enhance cytokine secretion in dNK, whereas stimulation of dNK with mitogens or classical natural killer targets confirmed the distinct cytokine secretion profiles of dNK and peripheral blood NK cells (pNK). EVT are specialized cells involved in maternal-fetal tolerance, the properties of which are not imitated by HLA-G-expressing surrogate cell lines. PMID:26015573

  19. Regulatory T cells suppress systemic and mucosal immune activation to control intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izcue, Ana; Coombes, Janine L; Powrie, Fiona

    2006-08-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the main interface where the body encounters exogenous antigens. It is crucial that the local response here is tightly regulated to avoid an immune reaction against dietary antigens and commensal flora while still mounting an efficient defense against pathogens. Faults in establishing intestinal tolerance can lead to disease, inducing local and often also systemic inflammation. Studies in human as well as in animal models suggest a role for regulatory T cells (Tregs) in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Transfer of Tregs can not only prevent the development of colitis in animal models but also cure established disease, acting both systemically and at the site of inflammation. In this review, we discuss the major regulatory pathways, including transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), and their role in Treg-mediated control of systemic and mucosal responses. In addition, we give an overview of the known mechanisms of lymphocyte migration to the intestine and discuss how CD103 expression can influence the balance between regulatory and effector T cells. Further understanding of the factors that control the activity of Tregs in different immune compartments may facilitate the design of strategies to target regulation in a tissue-specific way. PMID:16903919

  20. Dietary docosahexaenoic acid alleviates autistic-like behaviors resulting from maternal immune activation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Michael J; Mucha, Brittany; Denheyer, Heather; Atkinson, Devon; Schanz, Norman; Vassiliou, Evros; Benno, Robert H

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of autism spectrum disorders over the last several decades has risen at an alarming rate. Factors such as broadened clinical definitions and increased parental age only partially account for this precipitous increase, suggesting that recent changes in environmental factors may also be responsible. One such factor could be the dramatic decrease in consumption of anti-inflammatory dietary omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) relative to the amount of pro-inflammatory omega-6 (n-6) PUFAs and saturated fats in the Western diet. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the principle n-3 PUFA found in neural tissue and is important for optimal brain development, especially during late gestation when DHA rapidly and preferentially accumulates in the brain. In this study, we tested whether supplementation of a low n-3 PUFA diet with DHA throughout development could improve measures related to autism in a mouse model of maternal immune activation. We found that dietary DHA protected offspring from the deleterious effects of gestational exposure to the viral mimetic polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid on behavioral measures of autism and subsequent adulthood immune system reactivity. These data suggest that elevated dietary levels of DHA, especially during pregnancy and nursing, may help protect normal neurodevelopment from the potentially adverse consequences of environmental insults like maternal infection. PMID:26703213

  1. Asparagine endopeptidase controls anti-influenza virus immune responses through TLR7 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Maschalidi

    Full Text Available Intracellular Toll-like receptors (TLRs expressed by dendritic cells recognize nucleic acids derived from pathogens and play an important role in the immune responses against the influenza virus (IAV, a single-stranded RNA sensed by different receptors including TLR7. However, the importance of TLR7 processing in the development of anti-viral immune responses is not known. Here we report that asparagine endopeptidase (AEP deficient mice are unable to generate a strong anti-IAV response, as demonstrated by reduced inflammation, cross presentation of cell-associated antigens and priming of CD8(+ T cells following TLR7-dependent pulmonary infection induced by IAV. Moreover, AEP deficient lung epithelial- or myeloid-cells exhibit impaired TLR7 signaling due to defective processing of this receptor. Indeed, TLR7 requires a proteolytic cleavage by AEP to generate a C-terminal fragment competent for signaling. Thus, AEP activity is critical for TLR7 processing, opening new possibilities for the treatment of influenza and TLR7-dependent inflammatory diseases.

  2. Asparagine endopeptidase controls anti-influenza virus immune responses through TLR7 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschalidi, Sophia; Hässler, Signe; Blanc, Fany; Sepulveda, Fernando E; Tohme, Mira; Chignard, Michel; van Endert, Peter; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Descamps, Delphyne; Manoury, Bénédicte

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular Toll-like receptors (TLRs) expressed by dendritic cells recognize nucleic acids derived from pathogens and play an important role in the immune responses against the influenza virus (IAV), a single-stranded RNA sensed by different receptors including TLR7. However, the importance of TLR7 processing in the development of anti-viral immune responses is not known. Here we report that asparagine endopeptidase (AEP) deficient mice are unable to generate a strong anti-IAV response, as demonstrated by reduced inflammation, cross presentation of cell-associated antigens and priming of CD8(+) T cells following TLR7-dependent pulmonary infection induced by IAV. Moreover, AEP deficient lung epithelial- or myeloid-cells exhibit impaired TLR7 signaling due to defective processing of this receptor. Indeed, TLR7 requires a proteolytic cleavage by AEP to generate a C-terminal fragment competent for signaling. Thus, AEP activity is critical for TLR7 processing, opening new possibilities for the treatment of influenza and TLR7-dependent inflammatory diseases. PMID:22916010

  3. Digital quantification of gene expression in sequential breast cancer biopsies reveals activation of an immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinath M Jeselsohn

    Full Text Available Advancements in molecular biology have unveiled multiple breast cancer promoting pathways and potential therapeutic targets. Large randomized clinical trials remain the ultimate means of validating therapeutic efficacy, but they require large cohorts of patients and are lengthy and costly. A useful approach is to conduct a window of opportunity study in which patients are exposed to a drug pre-surgically during the interval between the core needle biopsy and the definitive surgery. These are non-therapeutic studies and the end point is not clinical or pathological response but rather evaluation of molecular changes in the tumor specimens that can predict response. However, since the end points of the non-therapeutic studies are biologic, it is critical to first define the biologic changes that occur in the absence of treatment. In this study, we compared the molecular profiles of breast cancer tumors at the time of the diagnostic biopsy versus the definitive surgery in the absence of any intervention using the Nanostring nCounter platform. We found that while the majority of the transcripts did not vary between the two biopsies, there was evidence of activation of immune related genes in response to the first biopsy and further investigations of the immune changes after a biopsy in early breast cancer seem warranted.

  4. Community Immunity (Herd Immunity)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area ​Community Immunity ("Herd" ... population is immunized, protecting most community members. The principle of community immunity applies to control of a ...

  5. Structurally well-defined macrophage activating factor derived from vitamin D3-binding protein has a potent adjuvant activity for immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R

    1998-06-01

    Freund's adjuvant produced severe inflammation that augments development of antibodies. Thus, mixed administration of antigens with adjuvant was not required as long as inflammation was induced in the hosts. Since macrophage activation for phagocytosis and antigen processing is the first step of antibody development, inflammation-primed macrophage activation plays a major role in immune development. Therefore, macrophage activating factor should act as an adjuvant for immunization. The inflammation-primed macrophage activation process is the major macrophage activating cascade that requires participation of serum vitamin D3-binding protein (DBP; human DBP is known as Gc protein) and glycosidases of B and T lymphocytes. Stepwise incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase efficiently generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (designated GcMAF) we have ever encountered. Administration of GcMAF (20 or 100 pg/mouse) resulted in stimulation of the progenitor cells for extensive mitogenesis and activation of macrophages. Administration of GcMAF (100 pg/mouse) along with immunization of mice with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) produced a large number of anti-SRBC antibody secreting splenic cells in 2-4 days. Thus, GcMAF has a potent adjuvant activity for immunization. Although malignant tumours are poorly immunogenic, 4 days after GcMAF-primed immunization of mice with heat-killed Ehrlich ascites tumour cells, the ascites tumour was no longer transplantable in these mice. PMID:9682967

  6. Blocking TLR7- and TLR9-mediated IFN-α production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells does not diminish immune activation in early SIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamuda Kader

    Full Text Available Persistent production of type I interferon (IFN by activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC is a leading model to explain chronic immune activation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection but direct evidence for this is lacking. We used a dual antagonist of Toll-like receptor (TLR 7 and TLR9 to selectively inhibit responses of pDC but not other mononuclear phagocytes to viral RNA prior to and for 8 weeks following pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infection of rhesus macaques. We show that pDC are major but not exclusive producers of IFN-α that rapidly become unresponsive to virus stimulation following SIV infection, whereas myeloid DC gain the capacity to produce IFN-α, albeit at low levels. pDC mediate a marked but transient IFN-α response in lymph nodes during the acute phase that is blocked by administration of TLR7 and TLR9 antagonist without impacting pDC recruitment. TLR7 and TLR9 blockade did not impact virus load or the acute IFN-α response in plasma and had minimal effect on expression of IFN-stimulated genes in both blood and lymph node. TLR7 and TLR9 blockade did not prevent activation of memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in blood or lymph node but led to significant increases in proliferation of both subsets in blood following SIV infection. Our findings reveal that virus-mediated activation of pDC through TLR7 and TLR9 contributes to substantial but transient IFN-α production following pathogenic SIV infection. However, the data indicate that pDC activation and IFN-α production are unlikely to be major factors in driving immune activation in early infection. Based on these findings therapeutic strategies aimed at blocking pDC function and IFN-α production may not reduce HIV-associated immunopathology.

  7. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Activation by Roflumilast Contributes to Therapeutic Benefit in Chronic Bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, James A.; Raju, S. Vamsee; Tang, Li Ping; McNicholas, Carmel M.; Li, Yao; Courville, Clifford A.; Farris, Roopan F.; Coricor, George E.; Smoot, Lisa H.; Mazur, Marina M.; Dransfield, Mark T.; Bolger, Graeme B.

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking causes acquired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction and is associated with delayed mucociliary clearance and chronic bronchitis. Roflumilast is a clinically approved phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor that improves lung function in patients with chronic bronchitis. We hypothesized that its therapeutic benefit was related in part to activation of CFTR. Primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells, Calu-3, and T84 monolayers were exposed to whole cigarette smoke (WCS) or air with or without roflumilast treatment. CFTR-dependent ion transport was measured in modified Ussing chambers. Airway surface liquid (ASL) was determined by confocal microscopy. Intestinal fluid secretion of ligated murine intestine was monitored ex vivo. Roflumilast activated CFTR-dependent anion transport in normal HBE cells with a half maximal effective concentration of 2.9 nM. Roflumilast partially restored CFTR activity in WCS-exposed HBE cells (5.3 ± 1.1 μA/cm2 vs. 1.2 ± 0.2 μA/cm2 [control]; P < 0.05) and was additive with ivacaftor, a specific CFTR potentiator approved for the treatment of CF. Roflumilast improved the depleted ASL depth of HBE monolayers exposed to WCS (9.0 ± 3.1 μm vs. 5.6 ± 2.0 μm [control]; P < 0.05), achieving 79% of that observed in air controls. CFTR activation by roflumilast also induced CFTR-dependent fluid secretion in murine intestine, increasing the wet:dry ratio and the diameter of ligated murine segments. Roflumilast activates CFTR-mediated anion transport in airway and intestinal epithelia via a cyclic adenosine monophosphate–dependent pathway and partially reverses the deleterious effects of WCS, resulting in augmented ASL depth. Roflumilast may benefit patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with chronic bronchitis by activating CFTR, which may also underlie noninfectious diarrhea caused by roflumilast. PMID:24106801

  8. Cortical activation following chronic passive implantation of a wide-field suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Joel; Fallon, James B.; Nayagam, David A. X.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Luu, Chi D.; Allen, Penelope J.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Williams, Chris E.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. The research goal is to develop a wide-field retinal stimulating array for prosthetic vision. This study aimed at evaluating the efficacy of a suprachoroidal electrode array in evoking visual cortex activity after long term implantation. Approach. A planar silicone based electrode array (8 mm × 19 mm) was implanted into the suprachoroidal space in cats (ntotal = 10). It consisted of 20 platinum stimulating electrodes (600 μm diameter) and a trans-scleral cable terminated in a subcutaneous connector. Three months after implantation (nchronic = 6), or immediately after implantation (nacute = 4), an electrophysiological study was performed. Electrode total impedance was measured from voltage transients using 500 μs, 1 mA pulses. Electrically evoked potentials (EEPs) and multi-unit activity were recorded from the visual cortex in response to monopolar retinal stimulation. Dynamic range and cortical activation spread were calculated from the multi-unit recordings. Main results. The mean electrode total impedance in vivo following 3 months was 12.5 ± 0.3 kΩ. EEPs were recorded for 98% of the electrodes. The median evoked potential threshold was 150 nC (charge density 53 μC cm-2). The lowest stimulation thresholds were found proximal to the area centralis. Mean thresholds from multiunit activity were lower for chronic (181 ± 14 nC) compared to acute (322 ± 20 nC) electrodes (P < 0.001), but there was no difference in dynamic range or cortical activation spread. Significance. Suprachoroidal stimulation threshold was lower in chronic than acute implantation and was within safe charge limits for platinum. Electrode-tissue impedance following chronic implantation was higher, indicating the need for sufficient compliance voltage (e.g. 12.8 V for mean impedance, threshold and dynamic range). The wide-field suprachoroidal array reliably activated the retina after chronic implantation.

  9. Spätzle-Processing Enzyme-independent Activation of the Toll Pathway in Drosophila Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto-Hino, Miki; Goto, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    The Toll pathway regulates innate immunity in insects and vertebrates. The Drosophila Toll receptor is activated by a processed form of a ligand, Spätzle. Spätzle-processing enzyme (SPE) is the only enzyme identified to date that functions in converting Spätzle to an active form during the immune response. In the present study, Toll activation induced by immune challenge was almost suppressed in spätzle mutant larvae and adults, whereas it was present in SPE mutant larvae challenged with Micrococcus luteus and adults challenged with Bacillus subtilis. Our data suggest that an unidentified protease besides SPE processes Spätzle under conditions of microbial challenge. PMID:26843333

  10. Occupational performance in daily life activities of subjects hospitalized because of chronic malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Machado Pinto

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available : Introduction: Malnutrition is configured as a health condition that causes deficits in occupational performance. Objective: To establish a correlation between nutritional status and occupational performance in activities of daily life (ADLs according to the desnutrition state level. Methodology: A descriptive, exploratory, cross-sectional evaluation of 50 patients diagnosed with chronic malnutrition admitted to a University Hospital in Curitiba, Parana state. We used the Functional Independence Measure (FIM and a semi-structured questionnaire in which the subjects named the three main performance limiting reasons. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to identify the existence of differences between at least two groups in the analysis, while the test of Multiple Comparisons was used to determine which pairs of groups showed statistically significant differences at 95% significance level (p ≤ 0.05. Results: We assessed 28 (56% female and 22 (44% male patients with mean age of 50.16 (±16.74 for one year. Out of these, 19 (38% presented mild chronic malnutrition, 16 (32% showed moderate chronic malnutrition, and 14 (28% presented severe chronic malnutrition. We identified changes particularly in activities evaluated in the use of motor FIM, with relevant alterations of dependence level for the states of moderate to severe malnutrition. Patients’ complaints were in agreement with those pointed by the literature as symptoms of malnutrition. Conclusion: This study confirms the correlation between deterioration in nutritional status and high dependence level upon ADLs.

  11. T cell immune response is correlated with fibrosis and inflammatory activity in hepatitis B cirrhotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie-Ting Tang; Jing-Yuan Fang; Wei-Qi Gu; En-Lin Li

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To explore the relationship among interferon-γ (IFN-γ) activity, fibrogenesis, T cell immune responses and hepatic inflammatory activity.METHODS: Peripheral blood samples from a total of 43 hepatitis B cirrhotic patients (LC) and 19 healthy controls (NC) were collected to measure their serum levels of IFN-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2), soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and three serological markers of fibrosis including hyaluronic acid (HA), procollagen type Ⅲ peptide (PⅢP), and type Ⅳ collagen were measured using a double antibody sandwich ELISA. Also,serum total bilirubin (TB) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were measured by routine measures.RESULTS: The concentrations of serological markers of fibrosis in patients with active cirrhosis (ALC) were significantly higher than those in stationary liver cirrhosis (SLC) or NC groups. The levels of serological markers in HBeAg-positive patients were significantly higher than those in HBeAg-negative patients. In SLC and ALC patients, a negative linear correlation was found between IFN-γ levels and the serological markers of fibrosis. IFN-γ and IL-2 levels in the ALC group were significantly higher than those in the SLC and NC groups, but the statistical difference was not significant between the latter two. In contrast, IL-10 levels in the SLC group were significantly higher than that in the NC group, but no significant difference was found between SLC and ALC groups. The sIL-2R level was elevated gradually in all these groups,and the differences were significant. Positive linear correlations were seen between IFN-γ activity and ALT levels (r = 0.339, P < 0.05), and IL-2 activity and TB levels (r = 0.517, P < 0.05). sIL-2R expression was positively correlated with both ALT and TB levels (r = 0.324, 0.455,P < 0.05), whereas there was no statistically significant correlation between IL-10 expression and serum ALT and TB levels (r = -0.102, -0.093, P > 0.05). Finally

  12. Identification of Brucella abortus virulence proteins that modulate the host immune response

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yufei; Chen, Zeliang; Qiu, Yefeng; Ke, Yuehua; Xu, Jie; Yuan, Xitong; Li, Xianbo; Fu, Simei; Cui, Mingquan; Xie, Yongfei; Du, Xinying; Wang, Zhoujia; Huang, Liuyu

    2012-01-01

    Brucellosis is an important zoonotic disease of almost worldwide distribution. One significant immune phenomenon of this disease is the ability of the pathogen to hide and survive in the host, establishing long lasting chronic infections. Brucella was found to have the ability to actively modulate the host immune response in order to establish chronic infections, but the mechanism by which the pathogen achieves this remains largely unknown. In our screening for protective antigens of Brucella...

  13. Chronic pneumonia in calves after experimental infection with Mycoplasma bovis strain 1067: Characterization of lung pathology, persistence of variable surface protein antigens and local immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermeyer Kathrin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma bovis is associated with pneumonia in calves characterized by the development of chronic caseonecrotic lesions with the agent persisting within the lesion. The purposes of this study were to characterize the morphology of lung lesions, examine the presence of M. bovis variable surface protein (Vsp antigens and study the local immune responses in calves after infection with M. bovis strain 1067. Methods Lung tissue samples from eight calves euthanased three weeks after experimental infection with M. bovis were examined by bacteriology and pathology. Lung lesions were evaluated by immunohistochemical (IHC staining for wide spectrum cytokeratin and for M. bovis Vsp antigens and pMB67 antigen. IHC identification and quantitative evaluation of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and immunoglobulin (IgG1, IgG2, IgM, IgA-containing plasma cells was performed. Additionally, expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC class II was studied by IHC. Results Suppurative pneumonic lesions were found in all calves. In two calves with caseonecrotic pneumonia, necrotic foci were surrounded by epithelial cells resembling bronchial or bronchiolar epithelium. In all calves, M. bovis Vsp antigens were constantly present in the cytoplasm of macrophages and were also present extracellularly at the periphery of necrotic foci. There was a considerable increase in numbers of IgG1- and IgG2-positive plasma cells among which IgG1-containing plasma cells clearly predominated. Statistical evaluation of the numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, however, did not reveal statistically significant differences between inoculated and control calves. In M. bovis infected calves, hyperplasia of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT was characterized by strong MHC class II expression of lymphoid cells, but only few of the macrophages demarcating the caseonecrotic foci were positive for MHC class II. Conclusions The results from this study show

  14. Improved prognostic classification of breast cancer defined by antagonistic activation patterns of immune response pathway modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elucidating the activation pattern of molecular pathways across a given tumour type is a key challenge necessary for understanding the heterogeneity in clinical response and for developing novel more effective therapies. Gene expression signatures of molecular pathway activation derived from perturbation experiments in model systems as well as structural models of molecular interactions ('model signatures') constitute an important resource for estimating corresponding activation levels in tumours. However, relatively few strategies for estimating pathway activity from such model signatures exist and only few studies have used activation patterns of pathways to refine molecular classifications of cancer. Here we propose a novel network-based method for estimating pathway activation in tumours from model signatures. We find that although the pathway networks inferred from cancer expression data are highly consistent with the prior information contained in the model signatures, that they also exhibit a highly modular structure and that estimation of pathway activity is dependent on this modular structure. We apply our methodology to a panel of 438 estrogen receptor negative (ER-) and 785 estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers to infer activation patterns of important cancer related molecular pathways. We show that in ER negative basal and HER2+ breast cancer, gene expression modules reflecting T-cell helper-1 (Th1) and T-cell helper-2 (Th2) mediated immune responses play antagonistic roles as major risk factors for distant metastasis. Using Boolean interaction Cox-regression models to identify non-linear pathway combinations associated with clinical outcome, we show that simultaneous high activation of Th1 and low activation of a TGF-beta pathway module defines a subtype of particularly good prognosis and that this classification provides a better prognostic model than those based on the individual pathways. In ER+ breast cancer, we find that

  15. Aberrant Inflammasome Activation Characterizes Tuberculosis-Associated Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hong Yien; Yong, Yean Kong; Shankar, Esaki M; Paukovics, Geza; Ellegård, Rada; Larsson, Marie; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; French, Martyn A; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2016-05-15

    Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) complicates combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in up to 25% of patients with HIV/TB coinfection. Monocytes and IL-18, a signature cytokine of inflammasome activation, are implicated in TB-IRIS pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated inflammasome activation both pre- and post-cART in TB-IRIS patients. HIV/TB patients exhibited higher proportions of monocytes expressing activated caspase-1 (casp1) pre-cART, compared with HIV patients without TB, and patients who developed TB-IRIS exhibited the greatest increase in casp1 expression. CD64(+) monocytes were a marker of increased casp1 expression. Furthermore, IL-1β, another marker of inflammasome activation, was also elevated during TB-IRIS. TB-IRIS patients also exhibited greater upregulation of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome mRNA, compared with controls. Analysis of plasma mitochondrial DNA levels showed that TB-IRIS patients experienced greater cell death, especially pre-cART. Plasma NO levels were lower both pre- and post-cART in TB-IRIS patients, providing evidence of inadequate inflammasome regulation. Plasma IL-18 levels pre-cART correlated inversely with NO levels but positively with monocyte casp1 expression and mitochondrial DNA levels, and expression of IL-18Rα on CD4(+) T cells and NK cells was higher in TB-IRIS patients, providing evidence that IL-18 is a marker of inflammasome activation. We propose that inflammasome activation in monocytes/macrophages of HIV/TB patients increases with ineffective T cell-dependent activation of monocytes/macrophages, priming them for an excessive inflammatory response after cART is commenced, which is greatest in patients with TB-IRIS. PMID:27076678

  16. Beneficial Effect of Brewers' Yeast Extract on Daily Activity in a Murine Model of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Takahashi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of Brewers' yeast extract (BYE on daily activity in a mouse model of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. CFS was induced by repeated injection of Brucella abortus (BA antigen every 2 weeks. BYE was orally administered to mice in a dose of 2 g per kg per day for 2 weeks before injecting BA and for 4 weeks thereafter. We evaluated daily running activity in mice receiving BYE as compared with that in untreated mice. Weekly variation of body weight (BW and survival in both groups was monitored during the observation period. Spleen weight (SW, SW/BW ratio, percent splenic follicular area and expression levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ and interleukin-10 (IL-10 mRNA in spleen were determined in both groups at the time of sacrifice. The daily activity during 2 weeks after the second BA injection was significantly higher in the treated group than in the control. There was no difference in BW between both groups through the experimental course. Two mice in the control died 2 and 7 days after the second injection, whereas no mice in the treated group died. Significantly decreased SW and SW/BW ratio were observed in the treated mice together with elevation of splenic follicular area. There were suppressed IFN-γ and IL-10 mRNA levels in spleens from the treated mice. Our results suggest that BYE might have a protective effect on the marked reduction in activity following repeated BA injection via normalization of host immune responses.

  17. [Adapted Physical Activity for patients with chronic diseases in a therapeutic community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouricha, Rémy; Thöni, Gilles; Raffard, Laurence; Cochet, Laurence; Saucourt, Vincent; Tirode, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    The French therapeutic communities ("Appartements de Coordination Therapeutique (ACT)") are mostly members of the "National Federation of Accommodation for HIV+ and other chronic diseases. They provide accommodation for people living with chronic conditions (HIV hepatitis, cancers...) and in a situation of high psychosocial frailty. As a result of their coordinated multidisciplinary intervention, these structures provide the required support to access health care and facilitate social inclusion. They are designed to provide an appropriate response to people with cumulative medical and social conditions (chronic diseases, precariousness, addictions and other comorbidities). Our innovative local experiment integrates Adapted Physical Activities (APA) into the global medical and social follow-up, in line with the patient's individual health care project. The characteristics of each APA project (nature of the activities proposed, intensity, duration, frequency, individual vs. team activity and accompanying methods) are defined on an individual basis, according to the user's motivations and inputs from the support team (medical, psychological and social coordination). The follow-up ensured by our APA professionals allows the residents to participate in a regular and attractive physical activity and could contribute to their social inclusion. The multidisciplinary approach proposed by ACTs determines the beneficial effects observed in such vulnerable patients. PMID:26168635

  18. Neuroimmune interactions in itch: Do chronic itch, chronic pain, and chronic cough share similar mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ru-Rong

    2015-12-01

    Itch and pain are closely related but also clearly distinct sensations. Pain is known to suppress itch, while analgesics such as morphine can provoke itch. However, in pathological and chronic conditions, pain and itch also have similarities. Dysfunction of the nervous system, as manifested by neural plastic changes in primary sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system (peripheral sensitization) and spinal cord and brain stem neurons in the central nervous system (central sensitization) will result in chronic pain and itch. Importantly, these diseases also result from immune dysfunction, since inflammatory mediators can directly activate or sensitize nociceptive and pruriceptive neurons in the peripheral and central nervous system, leading to pain and itch hypersensitivity. In this mini-review, I discuss the roles of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) ion channel, and Nav1.7 sodium channel in regulating itch and inflammation, with special emphasis of neuronal TLR signaling and the interaction of TLR7 and TRPA1. Chronic pain and chronic itch are debilitating diseases and dramatically impact the life quality of patients. Targeting TLRs for the control of inflammation, neuroinflammation (inflammation restricted in the nervous system), and hyperexcitability of nociceptors and pruriceptors will lead to new therapeutics for the relief of chronic pain and chronic itch. Finally, given the shared mechanisms among chronic cough, chronic pain, and chronic itch and the demonstrated efficacy of the neuropathic pain drug gabapentin in treating chronic cough, novel therapeutics targeting TRPA1, Nav1.7, and TLRs may also help to alleviate refractory cough via modulating neuron-immune interaction. PMID:26351759

  19. Paradoxical reactions under TNF-α blocking agents and other biological agents given for chronic immune-mediated diseases: an analytical and comprehensive overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussirot, Éric; Aubin, François

    2016-01-01

    Paradoxical adverse events (PAEs) have been reported during biological treatment for chronic immune-mediated diseases. PAEs are defined as the occurrence during biological agent therapy of a pathological condition that usually responds to this class of drug. A wide range of PAEs have been reported including dermatological, intestinal and ophthalmic conditions, mainly with antitumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) agents. True PAEs include psoriasis, Crohn's disease and hidradenitis suppurativa. Other PAEs may be qualified as borderline and include uveitis, scleritis, sarcoidosis and other granulomatous diseases (granuloma annulare, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis), vasculitis, vitiligo and alopecia areata. Proposed hypotheses to explain these PAEs include an imbalance in cytokine production, the differential immunological properties between the monoclonal antibodies and TNF-α soluble receptor, an unopposed type I interferon production and a shift towards a Th1/Th2 profile. Data from registries suggest that the risk for paradoxical psoriasis is low and non-significant. We discuss management of these PAEs, which depends on the type and severity of the adverse events, pre-existing treated conditions and the possibility of alternative therapeutic options for the underlying disease. Paradoxical adverse events are not restricted to anti-TNF-α agents and close surveillance of new available biological drugs (anti-interleukin-17/23, anti-integrin) is warranted in order to detect the occurrence of new or as yet undescribed events. PMID:27493788

  20. Immune-enhancing activities of low molecular weight β-glucan depolymerized by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    β-glucans are structural cell wall polymers of many microorganisms and cereals which possess immunomodulatory properties and have been used in the food, cosmetic and medical industry. In our previous study, β-glucan was depolymerized by gamma irradiation and leads to improve the solubility and viscosity. This study was carried out to evaluate the functional properties, mainly immune-enhancing activities of low molecular weight β-glucan fragmented by gamma irradiation. The results showed that RAW 264.7 macrophage cell stimulation activities of irradiated β-glucan were higher than that of non-irradiated β-glucan. In addition, the oral administration of gamma-irradiated β-glucan significantly increased the proliferation and cytokine (IFN-γ and IL-2) release of spleen and Peyer's patch cells compared with non-irradiated β-glucan. In conclusion, gamma irradiation could be used as an effective method for the production of depolymerized β-glucan improved functional property such as immunomodulatory activity.