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Sample records for chronic hypoxic mouse

  1. Mechanical properties and reactivity of vessels in isolated perfused lungs of chronically hypoxic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, C J; Bee, D; Barer, G R

    1981-11-01

    1. Chronically hypoxic rats kept in 10% (v/v) O2 for 3--6 weeks, were compared with littermate control rats. Pulmonary vascular resistance, measured from the slope of the pressure-flow relationship in isolated lungs perfused with blood of normal packed cell volume was higher in chronically hypoxic than control rats even during normoxia. 2. Chronically hypoxic rats weighed less than control rats but their pulmonary vascular volume, measured with labelled albumin was similar to control rats. This, together with evidence that the number of precapillary vessels is not reduced, does not suggest a large reduction in the vascular bed in chronic hypoxia. 3. A greater vasodilator action of isoprenaline and adenosine in chronically hypoxic than control lungs suggested a higher normoxic vascular tone. This higher tone was not the sole cause of increased resistance in chronically hypoxic lungs, since maximal vasodilatation did not reduce resistance to control levels. The chief cause was probably encroachment of new muscle on the vascular lumen of small vessels. 4. Pulmonary arterial compliance was reduced in chronically hypoxic lungs. 5. Reactivity of vessels to ventilation hypoxia, over a wide range of oxygen tension, to angiotensin II (ANG II) and to adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) was significantly greater in chronically hypoxic than control lungs, but thresholds to these stimuli were not reduced. PMID:7285503

  2. Effect of breviscapine on fractalkine expression in chronic hypoxic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-ju; CHENG De-yun; YANG Li; XIA Xiu-qiong; GUAN Jian

    2006-01-01

    @@ Fractalkine (FKN) is the only known chemokine that fulfils the dual functions of an adhesive molecule and a soluble chemoattractant.1 FKN expression was reported increase in lungs of patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension,2 suggesting that FKN may participate in pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension.Breviscapine is a flavonoid extracted from Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand. Mazz. Breviscapine can prevent the development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension3 but the mechanism is unknown. This study evaluated the role of FKN in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and the effect of breviscapine on FKN in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

  3. The effect of body temperature on the hypoxic fraction in mouse tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General anaesthesia as well as mechanical restraint of animals, which is necessary to allow precise local irradiation of mouse tumours, is associated with a rapid drop in body temperature if no special precautions are taken to prevent it. This drop in body temperature leads to an increased sentitivity of the tumour to normoxic irradiation which, in the reported case, may be due to a decrease in the hypoxic fraction from about 20% to about 4% as a result of decreased oxygen consumption and increased tumour perfusion. (orig.)

  4. Combination of nicotinamide and hyperthermia to eliminate radioresistant chronically and acutely hypoxic tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction among nicotinamide, radiation, and heat was studied in vivo using a C3H mouse mammary carcinoma grown in the feet of CDF1 mice. Response following local tumor treatment was assessed by tumor control and regrowth delay. Nicotinamide (1000 mg/kg i.p.) produced maximal radiosensitization when injected 30 min to 2 h before irradiation [enhancement ratios (ERs), 1.2-1.5]. Radiation damage was also increased by heating tumors (43.5 degrees C for 60 min) 4 h after irradiation (ERs = 1.6-2.6). This combined radiation and heat treatment was enhanced by nicotinamide but the effect depended on the assay procedure, such that although a significant increase was observed with the tumor control assay, only a slight increase was seen using regrowth delay as the end point. The development of moist desquamation in normal feet was used to estimate skin damage after irradiation. Nicotinamide and heat both resulted in a small yet significant increase in skin damage (ERs less than 1.2 and 1.1, respectively). A combined treatment resulted in a greater ER of 1.7, but when compared to the tumor response it still gave a therapeutic gain. A histological fluorescent staining technique was used to assess functional tumor vasculature at two periods in time separated by 20 min. Under normal conditions 7.7% of the vessels in this tumor were functional at one time but not the other. This value was reduced to 2.8% after nicotinamide administration. Since these fluctuations in blood flow can result in acute hypoxia we conclude that while heat eliminates chronically hypoxic tumor cells, nicotinamide probably removes the presence of acute hypoxia

  5. The Effect of Ginkgo Biloba Extract on Hypoxic Fraction of C3H Mouse Fibrosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose : To investigate the effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) on hypoxic cell fraction and metabolic status in fibrosarcoma (FSa II) of C3H mouse. Materials and Methods : Fibrosarcoma (Fsa II), 6mm in diameter, growing in the right hind leg muscle of C3H mouse was used for estimation of hypoxic cell fraction using comparison of TCD50. Radiation was given one hour after administration of GBE (100 mg/Kg, i.p.) with or without priming dose of GBE (100 mg/Kg, i.p.) given 24 hours earlier. Radiation was also given under air breathing condition or clamp hypoxia without GBE as controls. 31P NMR spectroscopy was performed before and one hour after administration of GBE with or without priming dose of GBE. Results : TCD50/120's were 81.7(77.7-86.0) Gy when irradiated under clamped hypoxia, 69.6 (66.8-72.5) Gy under air breathing condition,67.5(64.1-71.1) Gy with a single dose of GBE (100 mg/kg) given one hour before irradiation, and 62.2(59.1-65.5) Gy with two doses of GBE given at 25 hours and one hour before irradiation. The hypoxic cell fractions, estimated from TCD50/120's were 1.6% under air breathing condition, 7.2% after single dose of GBE, and 2.7% after two doses of GBE. Metabolic status of tumor, probably by increasing the blood flow and delivery of oxygen and nutrients, resulting in increased radiosensitivity of tumor

  6. The Effect of Ginkgo Biloba Extract on Hypoxic Fraction of C3H Mouse Fibrosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Yi, Chun Ja; Ha, Sung Whan; Park, Charn Il [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    Purpose : To investigate the effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) on hypoxic cell fraction and metabolic status in fibrosarcoma (FSa II) of C3H mouse. Materials and Methods : Fibrosarcoma (Fsa II), 6mm in diameter, growing in the right hind leg muscle of C3H mouse was used for estimation of hypoxic cell fraction using comparison of TCD{sub 50}. Radiation was given one hour after administration of GBE (100 mg/Kg, i.p.) with or without priming dose of GBE (100 mg/Kg, i.p.) given 24 hours earlier. Radiation was also given under air breathing condition or clamp hypoxia without GBE as controls. {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy was performed before and one hour after administration of GBE with or without priming dose of GBE. Results : TCD{sub 50/120's} were 81.7(77.7-86.0) Gy when irradiated under clamped hypoxia, 69.6 (66.8-72.5) Gy under air breathing condition,67.5(64.1-71.1) Gy with a single dose of GBE (100 mg/kg) given one hour before irradiation, and 62.2(59.1-65.5) Gy with two doses of GBE given at 25 hours and one hour before irradiation. The hypoxic cell fractions, estimated from TCD50/120's were 1.6% under air breathing condition, 7.2% after single dose of GBE, and 2.7% after two doses of GBE. Metabolic status of tumor, probably by increasing the blood flow and delivery of oxygen and nutrients, resulting in increased radiosensitivity of tumor.

  7. The superoxide dismutase mimetic, tempol, blunts right ventricular hypertrophy in chronic hypoxic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmedal, Britt; de Dam, Mette Y; Mulvany, Michael John; Simonsen, Ulf

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a membrane-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic, tempol, added either alone or in combination with the nitric oxide (NO) donor molsidomine, prevents the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in chronic hypoxic rats.Chronic hypobaric hypoxia (10% oxygen) for 2 weeks increased the right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), right ventricle and lung wet weight. Relaxations evoked by acetylcholine (ACh) and the molsidomine metabolite SIN-1 were impaired in isolated proximal, but not distal pulmonary arteries, from chronic hypoxic rats.Treatment with tempol (86 mg kg−1 day−1 in drinking water) normalized RVSP and reduced right ventricular hypertrophy, while systemic blood pressure, lung and liver weights, and blunted ACh relaxation of pulmonary arteries were unchanged.Treatment with molsidomine (15 mg kg−1 day−1 in drinking water) had the same effects as tempol, except that liver weight was reduced, and potassium and U46619-evoked vasoconstrictions in pulmonary arteries were increased. Combining tempol and molsidomine did not have additional effects compared to tempol alone. ACh relaxation in pulmonary arteries was not normalized by these treatments.The media to lumen diameter ratio of the pulmonary arteries was greater for the hypoxic rats compared to the normoxic rats, and was not reversed by treatment with tempol, molsidomine, or the combination of tempol and molsidomine.We conclude that tempol, like molsidomine, is able to correct RVSP and reduce right ventricular weight in the rat hypoxic model. Functional and structural properties of pulmonary small arteries were little affected. The results support the possibility that superoxide dismutase mimetics may be a useful means for the treatment of PH. PMID:14656807

  8. Lung angiotensin converting enzyme activity in chronically hypoxic rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Kay, J M; Keane, P. M.; Suyama, K L; Gauthier, D.

    1985-01-01

    A study was carried out to test the hypothesis that the reduced lung angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity which occurs in chronic hypoxia is related to the development of pulmonary hypertension rather than to hypoxia per se. Right ventricular mean systolic pressure (Prvs, mm Hg) and ACE activity (nmol/mg protein/min) in lung tissue homogenates were measured in seven groups of four rats placed in a hypobaric chamber (380 mm Hg; 51 kPa) for two to 24 days. Identical measurements were ma...

  9. Expression and specific activities of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 in chronic hypoxic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uly A. Nikmah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urea biosynthesis is a very important process in the liver which needs ATP, CO2 and functional mitochondria or aerobic condition. Liver can adapt to hypoxic condition, generally and locally. This study aimed to analyze the effect of chronic hypoxia on liver urea biosynthesis as indicated by the level and specific activity of mRNA of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1, a key enzyme in urea biosynthesis in hypoxic rats.Methods: 20 male Sprague-Dawley rats were placed in hypoxic chamber supplied by a mixture of 10% O2 and 90% N2. Five rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after exposure. Liver homogenates were analyzed for HIF-1 (hypoxia inducible factor-1 by ELISA, CPS1 mRNA by real time RT-PCR and CPS1 enzymatic specific activities by Pierson method. Data were analyzed by ANOVA test and Pearson correlation.Results: The HIF-1 in liver increased significantly, as well as CPS1 mRNA and CPS1 enzymatic activities (p<0.05. There was a strong correlation (r=0.618; p<0.01 between the level of CPS1 mRNA and CPS1 enzymatic activities, moderate correlation between HIF-1 and CPS1 mRNA (r=0.419; p<0.05 but no correlation between HIF-1 and CPS1 enzymatic activities. The study indicated that urea biosynthesis in liver was affected by hypoxia and partially under HIF-1 regulation. The study also found increase of urea and NH3 biosynthesis related to proteolysis as indicated by the decrease of total body weight and liver weight.Conclusion: There was an increase in the expression and specific activities of CPS1 in urea biosynthesis as a result of increasing proteolysis  in chronic hypoxic condition.

  10. Quantitative studies of the vasculature of the carotid body in the chronically hypoxic rat

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, J.A.; Daly, M. B.; Marshall, J. M.; Ead, H. W.; Hennessy, E M

    2000-01-01

    The carotid bodies of rats made chronically hypoxic by breathing 12% O2 in a normobaric chamber (inspired PO2 91 mmHg) were compared with those of controls. Serial 5-µm sections of the organs were examined using an interactive image analysis system. The total volume of the carotid bodies was increased by 64%. The total vascular volume rose by 103% and was likely due to an increase in size of the large vessels (>12 µm lumen diameter) because the small vessel (5-12 µm lumen diameter) volume ...

  11. Effect of L-arginine on renal blood flow in normal subjects and patients with hypoxic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Howes, T. Q.; Keilty, S. E.; Maskrey, V. L.; Deane, C. R.; Baudouin, S. V.; Moxham, J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: L-arginine is the precursor of endothelium derived nitric oxide (NO) and increasing the available substrate may increase the production of NO. This has been shown by local infusion in peripheral vascular beds but there are few studies of the effects during systemic infusion. Renal vasoconstriction is known to be important in the pathogenesis of cor pulmonale in patients with hypoxic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The effects of a systemic infusion of L-arginine on r...

  12. Pressure Load: The Main Factor for Altered Gene Expression in Right Ventricular Hypertrophy in Chronic Hypoxic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Christian D.; Schou, Uffe K.; Jensen, Jens L.; Magnusson, Nils E.; Ørntoft, Torben F.; Kruhøffer, Mogens; Simonsen, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    Background The present study investigated whether changes in gene expression in the right ventricle following pulmonary hypertension can be attributed to hypoxia or pressure loading. Methodology/Principal Findings To distinguish hypoxia from pressure-induced alterations, a group of rats underwent banding of the pulmonary trunk (PTB), sham operation, or the rats were exposed to normoxia or chronic, hypobaric hypoxia. Pressure measurements were performed and the right ventricle was analyzed by Affymetrix GeneChip, and selected genes were confirmed by quantitative PCR and immunoblotting. Right ventricular systolic blood pressure and right ventricle to body weight ratio were elevated in the PTB and the hypoxic rats. Expression of the same 172 genes was altered in the chronic hypoxic and PTB rats. Thus, gene expression of enzymes participating in fatty acid oxidation and the glycerol channel were downregulated. mRNA expression of aquaporin 7 was downregulated, but this was not the case for the protein expression. In contrast, monoamine oxidase A and tissue transglutaminase were upregulated both at gene and protein levels. 11 genes (e.g. insulin-like growth factor binding protein) were upregulated in the PTB experiment and downregulated in the hypoxic experiment, and 3 genes (e.g. c-kit tyrosine kinase) were downregulated in the PTB and upregulated in the hypoxic experiment. Conclusion/Significance Pressure load of the right ventricle induces a marked shift in the gene expression, which in case of the metabolic genes appears compensated at the protein level, while both expression of genes and proteins of importance for myocardial function and remodelling are altered by the increased pressure load of the right ventricle. These findings imply that treatment of pulmonary hypertension should also aim at reducing right ventricular pressure. PMID:21246034

  13. Radiosensitization of mouse L cells by an electron affinic radiosensitizer, Ro-07-0582 under an extremely hypoxic condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present investigation was undertaken with the hope for elucidating the effect of a radiosensitizer on mouse L cells in culture following x-irradiation. Under the aerobic condition, a survival curve of irradiated cells showed a shoulder region with the extrapolation number of 6.4 and mean lethal dose (D0 value) of 126 rad. On the other hand, under the extremely hypoxic condition prepared with nitrogen gas using a stainless steel apparatus, a survival curve was found to show no shoulder region, having extrapolation number of 1.1 and D0 value of 629 rad. Thus, the oxygen enhancement ratio (o. e. r.) was calculated as a factor 5. An electron affinic radiosensitizer, Ro-07-0582 revealed a pronounced sensitizing effect under the extremely hypoxic condition by an enhancement ratio 3.9 at a concentration of 10 mM. The sensitizer reduced D0 value with increasing concentration of the drug. The evidence obtained suggests that Ro-07-0582 acts as oxygen-mimic, although the drug shows no radiosensitizing effect at low concentration and low irradiation doses. (author)

  14. Detection of hypoxic cells in a C3H mouse mammary carcinoma using the comet assay.

    OpenAIRE

    Olive, P. L.; Horsman, M R; C. Grau; Overgaard, J.

    1997-01-01

    The comet assay was used to estimate radiobiological hypoxic fraction across a full range of tumour oxygenations in C3H mammary tumours implanted into the feet of female CDF1 mice. Tumours were either clamped before irradiation or mice were allowed to breath air, 100% oxygen, carbogen or carbon monoxide for 5-35 min before and during exposure to 15 Gy. For the alkaline comet assay, tumours were excised after irradiation and individual tumour cells were analysed for DNA single-strand breaks. H...

  15. 99mTc-MAG3-2-nitroimidazole accumulates in hypoxic tumor in mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: 99mTc-2-nitroimidazole derivatives have been reported to accumulate in hypoxic tissue. We prepared a novel 99mTc-MAG3-2-nitroimidazole and evaluated the feasibility for hypoxia imaging agent. Methods: Bz-MAG3-2-nitroimidazole was synthesized by direct coupling of Bz-MAG3 and 2-nitroimidazole using dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. Bz-MAG3-2-nitroimidazole was labeled with 99mTc in the presence of tartaric acid and SnC12 at 100 degree C for 30 min. And the reaction mixture was purified by C18 Sep-pak cartridge. The labeling efficiency and the radiochemical purity were checked by ITLC-SG/acetonitrile. The tumor was grown in balb/c mice for 8-13 days after the subcutaneous injection of tumor cells, CT-26 (1'107 cell/0.1 ml). Biodistribution study and tumor autoradiography were performed in the xenografted mice after i.v injection of 74 kBq/0.1 ml and 19 MBq/0.1 ml of 99mTc-MAG3-2-nitroimidazole, respectively. Results: The labeling efficiency was 45±20%. Paper electrophoresis confirmed negative charge of 99mTc-MAG3-2-nitroimidazole. The stability of 99mTc-MAG3-2-nitroimidazole was 98% at room temperature for 6 hr, and its protein binding was 53%. The 99mTc-MAG3-2-nitroimidazole exhibited high uptake in the liver, stomach and intestine. The uptake (% ID/g) in the tumor were 0.5±0.1, 0.4±0.0, 0.2±0.1 and 0.1±0.1 at 5, 15, 30 min and 4 hrs, Tumor/muscle ratio were l.4±8.l, 2.2±0.83, 3.0±0.9, and 3.7 (n=2) for 5, 15, 30 min and 4 hrs. The uptake in hypoxic area was found higher than in non-hypoxic area of tumor tissue by autoradiography. Conclusions: We have successfully synthesized 99mTc-MAG3-2-nitroimidazole and found the feasibility for imaging hypoxia. (authors)

  16. Thallium-201: quantitation of right ventricular hypertrophy in chronically hypoxic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprague Dawley rats were divided into two groups. Ten were kept in room air and 10 in hypobaric hypoxia (air at 380 m Hg). After two weeks all were injected intravenously with 50 μCi of 201Tl and sacrificed. The right and left ventricles were separated, weighed, and measured for radioactivity in a gamma well counter. Left and right ventricular mass ratios (MR) correlated with 201Tl radioactivity ratios (TAR) in both control and hypoxic rats: r = 0.962 where MR = 0.863 TAR + 0.27. Myocardial 201Tl uptake reflects and quantitates normal and abnormal ventricular mass, the abnormal mass in this model consisting of right ventricular hypertrophy associated with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension

  17. Effect of chronic undernutrition on body mass and mechanical bone quality under normoxic and altitude hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezon, Christian; Bozzini, Clarisa; Agûero Romero, Alan; Pinto, Patricia; Champin, Graciela; Alippi, Rosa M; Boyer, Patricia; Bozzini, Carlos E

    2016-05-01

    Both undernutrition and hypoxia exert a negative influence on both growth pattern and bone mechanical properties in developing rats. The present study explored the effects of chronic food restriction on both variables in growing rats exposed to simulated high-altitude hypoxia. Male rats (n 80) aged 28 d were divided into normoxic (Nx) and hypoxic (Hx) groups. Hx rats were exposed to hypobaric air (380 mmHg) in decompression chambers. At T0, Nx and Hx rats were subdivided into four equal subgroups: normoxic control and hypoxic controls, and normoxic growth-restricted and hypoxic growth-restricted received 80 % of the amount of food consumed freely by their respective controls for a 4-week period. Half of these animals were studied at the end of this period (T4). The remaining rats in each group continued under the same environmental conditions, but food was offered ad libitum to explore the type of catch-up growth during 8 weeks. Structural bone properties (strength and stiffness) were evaluated in the right femur midshaft by the mechanical three-point bending test; geometric properties (length, cross-sectional area, cortical mass, bending cross-sectional moment of inertia) and intrinsic properties of the bone tissue (elastic modulus) were measured or derived from appropriate equations. Bone mineralisation was assessed by ash measurement of the left femur. These data indicate that the growth-retarded effects of diminished food intake, induced either by food restriction or hypoxia-related inhibition of appetite, generated the formation of corresponding smaller bones in which subnormal structural and geometric properties were observed. However, they seemed to be appropriate to the body mass of the animals and suggest, therefore, that the bones were not osteopenic. When food restriction was imposed in Hx rats, the combined effects of both variables were additive, inducing a further reduction of bone mass and bone load-carrying capacity. In all cases, the mechanical

  18. Heme oxygenase-1 dependant pathway contributes to protection by tetramethylpyrazine against chronic hypoxic injury on medulla oblongata in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yan; Hou, Xuefei; Chen, Li; Zhou, Hua; Gong, Yanju; Dai, Liqun; Zheng, Yu

    2016-02-15

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), one of the active ingredients of the Chinese herb Lingusticum Wallichii (Chuan Xiong) has been proved to protect the medulla oblongata from chronic hypoxia injury. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the protective effects of TMP are associated with the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) dependant pathway in adult rats. The morphological changes of neurons in the hypoglossal nucleus (12N), the nucleus ambiguus (Amb), the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), and the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC) were investigated by Nissl staining; the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured to evaluate the anti-oxidant effect; some apoptosis parameters, Bax mRNA and Bcl-2 mRNA, were tested; and the double immunochemistry staining of active caspase-3/NeuN was performed. Meanwhile, the HO-1 protein expression and heme oxygenase (HO) activity were examined. Tin-protoporphyrin (SnPP), a potent inhibitor of HO, was used to further confirm the effect of HO-1. We found that TMP ameliorated the neuron loss in 12N, Amb and NTS, the decrease in SOD activity and the increase in MDA content, the decrease in Bcl-2 mRNA of medulla oblongata (P<0.05), and the increase in percentage of apoptotic neurons in Amb (P<0.05) induced by chronic hypoxia. Co-administration with SnPP abolished the beneficial effects above of TMP to some extent (P<0.05). Moreover, TMP significantly increased HO activity and HO-1 protein expression, which was most likely enhanced in the neurons (P<0.05), and co-administration of SnPP reduced these up-regulated effects (P<0.05). This study demonstrated that HO-1 dependant pathway may be involved in the protective action of TMP against chronic hypoxic damage on medulla oblongata in the rats. PMID:26810525

  19. Fibroblast growth factor-2 induced by enriched environment enhances angiogenesis and motor function in chronic hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hwa Seo

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of enriched environment (EE on promoting angiogenesis and neurobehavioral function in an animal model of chronic hypoxic-ischemic (HI brain injury. HI brain damage was induced in seven day-old CD-1® mice by unilateral carotid artery ligation and exposure to hypoxia (8% O2 for 90 min. At six weeks of age, the mice were randomly assigned to either EE or standard cages (SC for two months. Rotarod, forelimb-use asymmetry, and grip strength tests were performed to evaluate neurobehavioral function. In order to identify angiogenic growth factors regulated by EE, an array-based multiplex ELISA assay was used to measure the expression in frontal cortex, striatum, and cerebellum. Among the growth factors, the expression of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 was confirmed using western blotting. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA were also evaluated using immunohistochemistry. As a result, mice exposed to EE showed significant improvements in rotarod and ladder walking performances compared to SC controls. The level of FGF-2 was significantly higher in the frontal cortex of EE mice at 8 weeks after treatment in multiplex ELISA and western blot. On the other hand, FGF-2 in the striatum significantly increased at 2 weeks after exposure to EE earlier than in the frontal cortex. Expression of activin A was similarly upregulated as FGF-2 expression pattern. Particularly, all animals treated with FGF-2 neutralizing antibody abolished the beneficial effect of EE on motor performance relative to mice not given anti-FGF-2. Immunohistochemistry showed that densities of α-SMA(+ and PECAM-1(+ cells in frontal cortex, striatum, and hippocampus were significantly increased following EE, suggesting the histological findings exhibit a similar pattern to the upregulation of FGF-2 in the brain. In conclusion, EE enhances endogenous angiogenesis and neurobehavioral functions

  20. Expression and subcellular redistribution of proteinkinase C isoforms in chronically hypoxic rat heart: effects of inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváčková, M.; Neckář, Jan; Nováková, O.; Kolář, František; Musters, R.J.P.; Novák, F.

    Bratislava : Advent- Orion , 2007 - (Pecháňová, O.), s. 53-58 ISBN 978-80-8071-094-1 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/0875 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : chronic hypoxia * heart * proteinkinase C Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  1. Subcellular redistribution of protein kinase c in chronically hypoxic rat heart

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváčková, M.; Neckář, Jan; Nováková, O.; Kolář, František; Musters, R.; Novák, F.

    Elsevier. Roč. 42, č. 6 (2007), S188-S189. ISSN 0022-2828. [World Congress of the ISHR /19./. 22.06.2007-26.06.2007, Bologna] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/0875 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80770509 Keywords : chronic hypoxia * cardioprotection * PKC Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  2. Mitochondrial BKCa channels contribute to protection of cardiomyocytes isolated from chronically hypoxic rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borchert, Gudrun H.; Yang, Ch.; Kolář, František

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 300, č. 2 (2011), H507-H513. ISSN 0363-6135 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/1008; GA AV ČR IAA500110804 Keywords : chronic hypoxia * ventricular myocytes * metabolic inhibition * cell viability * potassium channels Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 3.708, year: 2011

  3. Activity of MnSOD in chronically hypoxic rat heart: effect of N-acetylcysteine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balková, P.; Neckář, Jan; Nováková, O.; Milerová, Marie; Kolář, František; Novák, F.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. S1 (2006), S123-S123. ISSN 1071-5762. [Biennial Congress of the SFRRI /13./. 15.08.2006-19.08.2006, Davos] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : chronic hypoxia * oxidative stress * heart Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  4. KCa3.1 channel downregulation and impaired EDH-type relaxation in pulmonary arteries from chronic hypoxic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroigaard, Christel; Kudryavtseva, Olga; Dalsgaard, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-activated potassium channels of small (K(Ca)2, SK) and intermediate (K(Ca)3.1, IK) conductance are involved in endothelium-dependent relaxation of pulmonary arteries. We hypothesized that the function and expression of K(Ca)2 and K(Ca)3.1 increase as a compensatory mechanism to counteract......-dependent relaxations, which were markedly reduced in arteries from chronically hypoxic rats compared with arteries from normoxic rats. The mRNA levels of K(Ca)2.3 and K(Ca)3.1 were unaltered, whereas K(Ca)2.3 protein expression was upregulated and K(Ca)3.1 protein expression downregulated in pulmonary arteries from.......3 channels. Since impaired EDH-type relaxation was accompanied by K(Ca)3.1 channel protein downregulation, these findings suggest that K(Ca)3.1 channels are important for the maintenance of EDH-type relaxation....

  5. Up-regulation and redistribution of protein kinase C-delta in chronically hypoxic heart

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváčková, M.; Kožichová, K.; Neckář, Jan; Kolář, František; Musters, R.J.P.; Novák, O.; Nováková, O.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 345, 1-2 (2010), s. 271-282. ISSN 0300-8177 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/0875; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Grant ostatní: Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 97908 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : protein kinase C * chronic intermittent hypoxia * heart Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2010

  6. Activity of MnSOD in chronically hypoxic rat heart: Effect of N-acetylcysteine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balková, P.; Nováková, O.; Novák, F.; Neckář, Jan; Milerová, Marie; Kolář, František

    Elsevier. Roč. 40, č. 6 (2006), s. 930-931. ISSN 0022-2828. [Annual Scientific Meeting of the European Section of the International Society for Heart Research /26./. 14.06.2006-17.06.2006, Manchester] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/04/0465 Grant ostatní: GA UK(CZ) 153/2005/B Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : heart * chronic hypoxia * antioxidant enzyme Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  7. Expression and subcellular redistribution of PKC isoforms in chronically hypoxic rat heart

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváčková, M.; Neckář, Jan; Neveliková, L.; Nováková, O.; Kolář, František; Musters, R.J.P.; Novák, F.

    Elsevier. Roč. 40, č. 6 (2006), s. 930-930. ISSN 0022-2828. [Annual Scientific Meeting of the European Section of the International Society for Heart Research /26./. 14.06.2006-17.06.2006, Manchester] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/04/0465 Grant ostatní: GA UK(CZ) 110/2005/C Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : chronic hypoxia * heart * protein kinase C Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  8. Expression profiling reveals novel hypoxic biomarkers in peripheral blood of adult mice exposed to chronic hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matias Mosqueira

    Full Text Available Hypoxia induces a myriad of changes including an increase in hematocrit due to erythropoietin (EPO mediated erythropoiesis. While hypoxia is of importance physiologically and clinically, lacunae exist in our knowledge of the systemic and temporal changes in gene expression occurring in blood during the exposure and recovery from hypoxia. To identify these changes expression profiling was conducted on blood obtained from cohorts of C57Bl-10 wild type mice that were maintained at normoxia (NX, exposed for two weeks to normobaric chronic hypoxia (CH or two weeks of CH followed by two weeks of normoxic recovery (REC. Using stringent bioinformatic cut-offs (0% FDR, 2 fold change cut-off, 230 genes were identified and separated into four distinct temporal categories. Class I contained 1 transcript up-regulated in both CH and REC; Class II contained 202 transcripts up-regulated in CH but down-regulated after REC; Class III contained 9 transcripts down-regulated both in CH and REC; Class IV contained 18 transcripts down-regulated after CH exposure but up-regulated after REC. Profiling was independently validated and extended by analyzing expression levels of selected genes as novel biomarkers from our profile (e.g. spectrin alpha-1, ubiquitin domain family-1 and pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase-1 by performing qPCR at 7 different time points during CH and REC. Our identification and characterization of these genes define transcriptome level changes occurring during chronic hypoxia and normoxic recovery as well as novel blood biomarkers that may be useful in monitoring a variety of physiological and pathological conditions associated with hypoxia.

  9. HIF-VEGF pathways are critical for chronic otitis media in Junbo and Jeff mouse mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Cheeseman

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Otitis media with effusion (OME is the commonest cause of hearing loss in children, yet the underlying genetic pathways and mechanisms involved are incompletely understood. Ventilation of the middle ear with tympanostomy tubes is the commonest surgical procedure in children and the best treatment for chronic OME, but the mechanism by which they work remains uncertain. As hypoxia is a common feature of inflamed microenvironments, moderation of hypoxia may be a significant contributory mechanism. We have investigated the occurrence of hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF mediated responses in Junbo and Jeff mouse mutant models, which develop spontaneous chronic otitis media. We found that Jeff and Junbo mice labeled in vivo with pimonidazole showed cellular hypoxia in inflammatory cells in the bulla lumen, and in Junbo the middle ear mucosa was also hypoxic. The bulla fluid inflammatory cell numbers were greater and the upregulation of inflammatory gene networks were more pronounced in Junbo than Jeff. Hif-1α gene expression was elevated in bulla fluid inflammatory cells, and there was upregulation of its target genes including Vegfa in Junbo and Jeff. We therefore investigated the effects in Junbo of small-molecule inhibitors of VEGFR signaling (PTK787, SU-11248, and BAY 43-9006 and destabilizing HIF by inhibiting its chaperone HSP90 with 17-DMAG. We found that both classes of inhibitor significantly reduced hearing loss and the occurrence of bulla fluid and that VEGFR inhibitors moderated angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in the inflamed middle ear mucosa. The effectiveness of HSP90 and VEGFR signaling inhibitors in suppressing OM in the Junbo model implicates HIF-mediated VEGF as playing a pivotal role in OM pathogenesis. Our analysis of the Junbo and Jeff mutants highlights the role of hypoxia and HIF-mediated pathways, and we conclude that targeting molecules in HIF-VEGF signaling pathways has therapeutic potential in the treatment of

  10. HIF1α is a regulator of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cell development in hypoxic sites of the mouse embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Imanirad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia affects many physiologic processes during early stages of mammalian ontogeny, particularly placental and vascular development. In the adult, the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment plays a role in regulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC function. HSCs are generated from the major vasculature of the embryo, but whether the hypoxic response affects the generation of these HSCs is as yet unknown. Here we examined whether Hypoxia Inducible Factor1-alpha (HIF1α, a key modulator of the response to hypoxia, is essential for HSC development. We found hypoxic cells in embryonic tissues that generate and expand hematopoietic cells (aorta, placenta and fetal liver, and specifically aortic endothelial and hematopoietic cluster cells. A Cre/loxP conditional knockout (cKO approach was taken to delete HIF1α in Vascular Endothelial-Cadherin expressing endothelial cells, the precursors to definitive hematopoietic cells. Functional assays show that HSC and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs are significantly reduced in cKO aorta and placenta. Moreover, decreases in phenotypic aortic hematopoietic cluster cells in cKO embryos indicate that HIF1α is necessary for generation and/or expansion of HPCs and HSCs. cKO adult BM HSCs are also affected under transplantation conditions. Thus, HIF1α is a regulator of HSC generation and function beginning at the earliest embryonic stages.

  11. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) Mouse Model in Translational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cong; Li, Shaoguang

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by increased proliferation of granulocytic cells without the loss of their capability to differentiate. CML is a clonal disease, originated at the level of Hematopoietic Stem Cells with the Philadelphia chromosome resulting from a reciprocal translocation between the chromosomes 9 and 22t(9;22)-(q34;q11). This translocation produces a fusion gene known as BCR-ABL which acquires uncontrolled tyrosine kinase activity, constantly turning on its downstream signaling molecules/pathways, and promoting proliferation of leukemia cell through anti-apoptosis and acquisition of additional mutations. To evaluate the role of each critical downstream signaling molecule of BCR-ABL and test therapeutic drugs in vivo, it is important to use physiological mouse disease models. Here, we describe a mouse model of CML induced by BCR-ABL retrovirus (MSCV-BCR-ABL-GFP; MIG-BCR-ABL) and how to use this model in translational research.Moreover, to expand the application of this retrovirus induced CML model in a lot of conditional knockout mouse strain, we modified this vector to a triple gene coexpression vector in which we can co-express BCR-ABL, GFP, and a third gene which will be tested in different systems. To apply this triple gene system in conditional gene knockout strains, we can validate the CML development in the knockout mice and trace the leukemia cell following the GFP marker. In this protocol, we also describe how we utilize this triple gene system to prove the function of Pten as a tumor suppressor in leukemogenesis. Overall, this triple gene system expands our research spectrum in current conditional gene knockout strains and benefits our CML translational research. PMID:27150093

  12. Effects of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids on myocardial and serum lipids in normoxic and chronically hypoxic rat heart

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balková, P.; Ježková, J.; Hlaváčková, M.; Neckář, Jan; Staňková, B.; Kolář, František; Novák, F.; Nováková, O.

    Praha: IV. interní klinika 1. LF UK Praha, 2008, s. 1-5. ISBN 978-80-254-2834-4. [Atherosklerosa 2008. Praha (CZ), 10.09.2008-12.09.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : heart * chronic hypoxia * lipid diet Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  13. N-acetylcysteine treatment prevents the up-regulation of MnSOD in chronically hypoxic rat hearts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balková, P.; Hlaváčková, M.; Milerová, Marie; Neckář, Jan; Kolář, František; Novák, F.; Nováková, O.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2011), s. 467-474. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/0875; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/1008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : heart * chronic intermittent hypoxia * superoxide dismutase Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.555, year: 2011

  14. A reliable method for intracranial electrode implantation and chronic electrical stimulation in the mouse brain

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey, Melanie; Lang, Min; Gane, Jonathan; Wu, Chiping; Burnham, W McIntyre; Zhang, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Background Electrical stimulation of brain structures has been widely used in rodent models for kindling or modeling deep brain stimulation used clinically. This requires surgical implantation of intracranial electrodes and subsequent chronic stimulation in individual animals for several weeks. Anchoring screws and dental acrylic have long been used to secure implanted intracranial electrodes in rats. However, such an approach is limited when carried out in mouse models as the thin mouse skul...

  15. Evidence of hypoxic tolerance in weak upper airway muscle from young mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, David P; O'Halloran, Ken D

    2016-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease characterised by deficiency in the protein dystrophin. The respiratory system is weakened and patients suffer from sleep disordered breathing and hypoventilation culminating in periods of hypoxaemia. We examined the effects of an acute (6h) hypoxic stress on sternohyoid muscle function (representative pharyngeal dilator). 8 week old male, wild-type (WT; C57BL/10ScSnJ; n=18) and mdx (C57BL/10ScSn-Dmd(mdx)/J; n=16) mice were exposed to sustained hypoxia (FIO2=0.10) or normoxia. Muscle functional properties were examined ex vivo. Additional WT (n=5) and mdx (n=5) sternohyoid muscle was exposed to an anoxic challenge. Sternohyoid dysfunction was observed in mdx mice with significant reductions in force and power. Following exposure to the acute in vivo hypoxic stress, WT sternohyoid muscle showed evidence of functional impairment (reduced force, work and power). Conversely, mdx sternohyoid showed an apparent tolerance to the acute hypoxic stress. This tolerance was not maintained for mdx following a severe hypoxic stress. A dysfunctional upper airway muscle phenotype is present at 8 weeks of age in the mdx mouse, which may have implications for the control of airway patency in DMD. Hypoxic tolerance in mdx respiratory muscle is suggestive of adaptation to chronic hypoxia, which could be present due to respiratory morbidity. We speculate a role for hypoxia in mdx respiratory muscle morbidity. PMID:26691169

  16. Gene expression and phenotypic characterization of mouse heart after chronic constant or intermittent hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Chenhao; Iacobas, Dumitru A.; Zhou, Dan; Chen, Qiaofang; Lai, James K.; Gavrialov, Orit; Haddad, Gabriel G.

    2005-01-01

    Chronic constant hypoxia (CCH), such as in pulmonary diseases or high altitude, and chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), such as in sleep apnea, can lead to major changes in the heart. Molecular mechanisms underlying these cardiac alterations are not well understood. We hypothesized that changes in gene expression could help to delineate such mechanisms. The current study used a neonatal mouse model in CCH or CIH combined with cDNA microarrays to determine changes in gene expression in the CCH...

  17. Nitric oxide availability in deeply hypoxic crucian carp: acute and chronic changes and utilization of ambient nitrite reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Marie N; Gerber, Lucie; Jensen, Frank B

    2016-03-15

    Recent research suggest that anoxia-tolerant fish transfer extracellular nitrite into the tissues, where it is used for nitric oxide (NO) generation, iron-nitrosylation, and S-nitrosation of proteins, as part of the cytoprotective response toward prolonged hypoxia and subsequent reoxygenation. We hypothesized that crucian carp take up ambient nitrite and use it as a source of cellular NO availability during hypoxia. Fish were exposed for 1 day to normoxia (Po2 > 140 mmHg) and deep hypoxia (1 < Po2 < 3 mmHg) at both low (< 0.2 μM) and moderately elevated (10 μM) ambient [nitrite] to decipher NO metabolites in plasma and several tissues. We also compared NO metabolite changes during acute (10 min) and chronic (1 day) exposures to three different O2 levels. Plasma [nitrite] decreased with decreasing [O2], while the cellular concentrations of nitrite and nitros(yl)ated compounds either increased or stayed constant, depending on O2 level and tissue type. Nitrite was notably increased in the heart during deep hypoxia, and the increase was amplified by elevated ambient [nitrite]. Raised nitrite also increased gill [nitrite] and decreased mRNA expression of an inducible nitric oxide synthase-2 gene variant. The data support that ambient nitrite is taken up across the gills to be distributed via the blood to the tissues, particularly the heart, where it assists in cytoprotection and other functions. Cardiac nitrite was not elevated in acutely exposed fish, revealing that the response requires time. NO metabolite levels were higher during acute than chronic exposures, possibly caused by increased swimming activity and stress in acutely exposed fish. PMID:26764058

  18. Resveratrol Neuroprotection in a Chronic Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zoe eFonseca-Kelly; Mayssa eNassrallah; Jorge eUribe; Khan, Reas S.; Kimberly eDine; Mahasweta eDutt; Shindler, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    Resveratrol is a naturally-occurring polyphenol that activates SIRT1, an NAD-dependent deacetylase. SRT501, a pharmaceutical formulation of resveratrol with enhanced systemic absorption, prevents neuronal loss without suppressing inflammation in mice with relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of multiple sclerosis. In contrast, resveratrol has been reported to suppress inflammation in chronic EAE, although neuroprotective effects were not evaluated. The current st...

  19. Chronic ethanol exposure inhibits distraction osteogenesis in a mouse model: Role of the TNF signaling axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is an inflammatory cytokine that modulates osteoblastogenesis. In addition, the demonstrated inhibitory effects of chronic ethanol exposure on direct bone formation in rats are hypothetically mediated by TNF-α signaling. The effects in mice are unreported. Therefore, we hypothesized that in mice (1) administration of a soluble TNF receptor 1 derivative (sTNF-R1) would protect direct bone formation during chronic ethanol exposure, and (2) administration of recombinant mouse TNF-α (rmTNF-α) to ethanol naive mice would inhibit direct bone formation. We utilized a unique model of limb lengthening (distraction osteogenesis, DO) combined with liquid diets to measure chronic ethanol's effects on direct bone formation. Chronic ethanol exposure resulted in increased marrow TNF, IL-1, and CYP 2E1 RNA levels in ethanol-treated vs. control mice, while no significant weight differences were noted. Systemic administration of sTNF-R1 during DO (8.0 mg/kg/2 days) to chronic ethanol-exposed mice resulted in enhanced direct bone formation as measured radiologically and histologically. Systemic rmTNF-α (10 μg/kg/day) administration decreased direct bone formation measures, while no significant weight differences were noted. We conclude that chronic ethanol-associated inhibition of direct bone formation is mediated to a significant extent by the TNF signaling axis in a mouse model

  20. Chronic citalopram administration causes a sustained suppression of serotonin synthesis in the mouse forebrain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Honig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serotonin (5-HT is a neurotransmitter with important roles in the regulation of neurobehavioral processes, particularly those regulating affect in humans. Drugs that potentiate serotonergic neurotransmission by selectively inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin (SSRIs are widely used for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Although the regulation of serotonin synthesis may be an factor in SSRI efficacy, the effect of chronic SSRI administration on 5-HT synthesis is not well understood. Here, we describe effects of chronic administration of the SSRI citalopram (CIT on 5-HT synthesis and content in the mouse forebrain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Citalopram was administered continuously to adult male C57BL/6J mice via osmotic minipump for 2 days, 14 days or 28 days. Plasma citalopram levels were found to be within the clinical range. 5-HT synthesis was assessed using the decarboxylase inhibition method. Citalopram administration caused a suppression of 5-HT synthesis at all time points. CIT treatment also caused a reduction in forebrain 5-HIAA content. Following chronic CIT treatment, forebrain 5-HT stores were more sensitive to the depleting effects of acute decarboxylase inhibition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these results demonstrate that chronic citalopram administration causes a sustained suppression of serotonin synthesis in the mouse forebrain. Furthermore, our results indicate that chronic 5-HT reuptake inhibition renders 5-HT brain stores more sensitive to alterations in serotonin synthesis. These results suggest that the regulation of 5-HT synthesis warrants consideration in efforts to develop novel antidepressant strategies.

  1. The p47phox mouse knock-out model of chronic granulomatous disease

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is caused by a congenital defect in phagocyte reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase production of superoxide and related species. It is characterized by recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and tissue granuloma formation. We have created a mouse model of CGD by targeted disruption of p47phox, one of the genes in which mutations cause human CGD. Identical to the case in human CGD, leukocytes from p47phox-/- mice pr...

  2. Chronic UVR Causes Increased Immunostaining of CD44 and Accumulation of Hyaluronan in Mouse Epidermis

    OpenAIRE

    Siiskonen, Hanna; Törrönen, Kari; Kumlin, Timo; Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku I; Tammi, Raija H.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic intense UV radiation is the main cause of epidermal tumors. Because hyaluronan (HA), a large extracellular polysaccharide, is known to promote malignant growth, hyaluronan expression was studied in a model in which long-term UV radiation (UVR) induces epidermal tumors. Mouse back skin was exposed three times a week for 10.5 months to UVR corresponding to one minimal erythema dose, processed for histology, and stained for hyaluronan and the hyaluronan receptor CD44. This exposure proto...

  3. In the hypoxic central nervous system, endothelial cell proliferation is followed by astrocyte activation, proliferation, and increased expression of the α6β4 integrin and dystroglycan

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Longxuan; Welser, Jennifer V.; Dore-Duffy, Paula; del Zoppo, Gregory J.; LaManna, Joseph C.; Milner, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral hypoxia induces a profound angiogenic response in the central nervous system (CNS). Using a mouse model of chronic cerebral hypoxia, we previously demonstrated that angiogenic vessels in the hypoxic CNS show marked upregulation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibronectin, along with increased expression of its major receptor, α5β1integrin on brain endothelial cells (BEC). As cerebral hypoxia also leads to glial activation, the aim of the current study was to define the temp...

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the striatum of aged chronic mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Patki

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial oxidative stress and dysfunction has been implicated as a possible mechanism for the onset and progression of Parkinson-like neurodegeneration. However, long-term mitochondrial defects in chronic animal neurodegenerative models have not been demonstrated. In this study, we investigated the function of striatal mitochondria 6 weeks after the induction of a chronic 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP mouse model of Parkinson’s disease (MPD. Although severe depression of mitochondrial respiration was observed immediately after acute administrations of MPTP, we failed to detect a significant mitochondrial inhibition in presence of striatal dopamine deficit 6 weeks after the chronic MPD induction in young adult mice. In contrast, when aged mice were chronically treated with MPTP and at 6 weeks post-treatment, these animals suffered an inhibition of the basal (state 4 and ADP-stimulated (state 3 respiration and a fall in ATP level in the striatal mitochondria. The aged chronic MPD also brought about a sustained diminution of striatal anti-oxidant enzyme levels including that of superoxide dismutases and cytochrome c. The mitochondrial deficits in the striatum of aged chronic MPD 6 weeks after treatment were further correlated with significant losses of striatal dopamine, tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine uptake transporter, and with impaired movement when tested on a challenging beam. Our findings suggest that MPTP may trigger the neurodegenerative process by obstructing the mitochondrial function; however, striatal mitochondria in young animals may potentially rejuvenate, whereas mitochondrial dysfunction is sustained in the aged chronic MPD. Therefore, the aged chronic MPD may serve as a suitable investigative model for further elucidating the integral relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegenerative disorder, and for assessing the therapeutic efficacy of mitochondrial protective agents as potential

  5. Neuroprotective effects and mechanisms of exercise in a chronic mouse model of Parkinson’s disease with moderate neurodegeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Yuen-Sum; Patki, Gaurav; Das-Panja, Kaberi; Le, Wei-dong; Ahmad, S. Omar

    2011-01-01

    The protective impact of exercise on neurodegenerative processes has not been confirmed, and the mechanisms underlying the benefit of exercise have not been determined in human Parkinson’s disease or in chronic animal disease models. This research examined the long-term neurological, behavioral, and mechanistic consequences of endurance exercise in experimental chronic parkinsonism. We used a chronic 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced mouse model of Parkinson’s disease with ...

  6. The enduring hypoxic response of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tige R Rustad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A significant body of evidence accumulated over the last century suggests a link between hypoxic microenvironments within the infected host and the latent phase of tuberculosis. Studies to test this correlation have identified the M. tuberculosis initial hypoxic response, controlled by the two-component response regulator DosR. The initial hypoxic response is completely blocked in a dosR deletion mutant. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show here that a dosR deletion mutant enters bacteriostasis in response to in vitro hypoxia with only a relatively mild decrease in viability. In the murine infection model, the phenotype of the mutant was indistinguishable from that of the parent strain. These results suggested that additional genes may be essential for entry into and maintenance of bacteriostasis. Detailed microarray analysis of oxygen starved cultures revealed that DosR regulon induction is transient, with induction of nearly half the genes returning to baseline within 24 hours. In addition, a larger, sustained wave of gene expression follows the DosR-mediated initial hypoxic response. This Enduring Hypoxic Response (EHR consists of 230 genes significantly induced at four and seven days of hypoxia but not at initial time points. These genes include a surprising number of transcriptional regulators that could control the program of bacteriostasis. We found that the EHR is independent of the DosR-mediated initial hypoxic response, as EHR expression is virtually unaltered in the dosR mutant. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest a reassessment of the role of DosR and the initial hypoxic response in MTB physiology. Instead of a primary role in survival of hypoxia induced bacteriostasis, DosR may regulate a response that is largely optional in vitro and in mouse infections. Analysis of the EHR should help elucidate the key regulatory factors and enzymatic machinery exploited by M. tuberculosis for long-term bacteriostasis in

  7. Interleukins in chronic liver disease: lessons learned from experimental mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammerich L

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Linda Hammerich, Frank Tacke Department of Medicine III, University Hospital Aachen, Aachen, Germany Abstract: Interleukins represent a class of immunomodulatory cytokines, small intercellular signaling proteins, that are critically involved in the regulation of immune responses. They are produced in large amounts by various cell types during inflammatory reactions, and the balance of cytokines determines the outcome of an immune response. Therefore, cytokines are regarded as interesting therapeutic targets for the treatment of patients with liver diseases. Mouse models provide a good tool for in vivo studies on cytokine function, as human and mouse cytokines share many homologies. Sophisticated mouse models either mimicking distinct pathological conditions or targeting cytokines and cytokine-signaling pathways in the liver or even in distinct cellular compartments have provided enormous insight into the different functions of interleukins during hepatic inflammation. Interleukins may have pro- as well as anti-inflammatory functions in chronic liver diseases, some interleukins even both, dependent on the inflammatory stimulus, the producing and the responding cell type. IL-17, for example, promotes hepatic fibrogenesis through activation of hepatic stellate cells and facilitates development of liver cancer through recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. IL-22, on the other hand, protects from development of fibrosis or steatohepatitis. IL-12 balances T-helper (Th-1 and Th2 cell responses in infectious disease models. IL-13 and IL-33, two cytokines related to Th2 cells and innate lymphoid cells, promote fibrotic responses in the liver. IL-10 is the prototypic anti-inflammatory interleukin with tissue-protective functions during chronic liver injury and fibrogenesis. Despite its critical role for inducing the acute-phase response in the liver, IL-6 signaling is protective during fibrosis progression, but promotes hepatocellular carcinoma

  8. 46. Micronuclei induced by chronical treatment of SO2 inhalation in mouse bone marrow cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the chronical experiment of treating with sulfur dioxide(SO2) inhalation, Micronuclei(MN) frequencies in the polychromatophilic erythroblasts(PCE) of mouse bone marrow and the frequencies of cells with MN were significantly increased in dose-dependent manner. There is a significant difference between the male and the female animals. The results also showed that SO2 inhibited urethone-induced MN formation, it is a antagonistic joint action to Urethone. These results furtherly confirm that SO2 inhalation is a clastogenetic and genotoxic agent to mammalian cells, and the combination roles of SO2 and other mutagens are complexity.

  9. Hormetic Effect of Chronic Hypergravity in a Mouse Model of Allergic Asthma and Rhinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Tae Young Jang; Ah-Yeoun Jung; Young Hyo Kim

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of chronic hypergravity in a mouse model of allergic asthma and rhinitis. Forty BALB/c mice were divided as: group A (n = 10, control) sensitized and challenged with saline, group B (n = 10, asthma) challenged by intraperitoneal and intranasal ovalbumin (OVA) to induce allergic asthma and rhinitis, and groups C (n = 10, asthma/rotatory control) and D (n = 10, asthma/hypergravity) exposed to 4 weeks of rotation with normogravity (1G) or hypergravity (5G) during ...

  10. Chronic administration of citalopram inhibited El mouse convulsions and decreased monoamine oxidase-A activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Kabuto, Hideaki; Yokoi, Isao; Endo, Atsushi; Takei, Mineo; Kurimoto, Tadashi; Mori, Akitane

    1994-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is thought to play an important role in the seizures of El mice because the seizure threshold of El mice correlates with the 5-HT concentration in the central nervous system. In this study, the anticonvulsant effect of a 5-HT reuptake blocker, citalopram, was evaluated behaviorally and biochemically. El mouse convulsions were inhibited by chronic administration of citalopram (80 mg/kg/day, p.o. for 2 weeks), but were not inhibited by acute administration of citalopram (80 mg/...

  11. Effects of dietary creatine supplementation for 8 weeks on neuromuscular coordination and learning in male albino mouse following neonatal hypoxic ischemic insult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Shahid; Ali, Muhammad; Akbar, Atif; Iqbal, Furhan

    2015-05-01

    Creatine monohydrate (Cr) is a dietary supplement known to improve cognitive functions and has positive therapeutic results under various clinical conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of 2 % Cr supplementation on learning, memory formation, neuromuscular coordination, exploratory and locomotory in male albino mice following hypoxic ischemic insult. At postnatal day, 10 male albino mice pups were subjected to right common carotid artery ligation followed by 8 % hypoxia for 25 min. On postnatal day 20, male mice were separated from the litter and divided into two groups on the basis of special diet supplementation. One group was supplemented with 2 % Cr in diet while the other group was raised on ordinary rodent chow for 8 weeks. Behavioral observations were made during rota rod, open field and Morris water maze test for both treatments. It was observed that supplementation with 2 % Cr for 8 weeks following neonatal brain damage resulted in enhanced muscular strength, neuromuscular coordination and improved body weight. In Morris water maze test, it was observed that Cr supplementation significantly improved mean swimming speed and mice on 2 % Cr diet covered more distance but the spatial memory was not improved significantly following hypoxia ischemia encephalopathy (HIE). Open field parameters and percentage of infarct volume remained unaffected following Cr supplementation. We concluded that 2 % dietary Cr supplementation has a potential to improve the muscle strength and body weight in male albino mice following (HIE) and should be considered for the treatment of neurological ailments. PMID:25511980

  12. In vitro effects of piracetam on the radiosensitivity of hypoxic cells (adaptation of MTT assay to hypoxic conditions)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the adaptation of the MTT assay to hypoxic conditions in order to test the in vitro effect of piracetam on hypoxic cells and particularly on the radiosensitivity of hypoxic cells since this drug has shown clinical effect on acute and chronic hypoxia. The V79 cell line was selected by reference to preliminary hypoxic experiments using clonogenic assay and euoxic experiments using clonogenic and MTT assays. Cell growth and survival in our hypoxic conditions were assessed using MTT assay with an enclosure and special 48-well plates both made of glass. Growth curves on glass plates after 1-hour exposure to nitrogen versus air were comparable, so there is no bias effect due to gas composition. Survival curves using MTT versus reference clonogenic assay were comparable after radiation exposure in eu- and hypoxic conditions, and confirm the validity of our original technique for creating hypoxia. The Oxygen Enhancement Ratio was of about 3 for 1-hour hypoxic exposure. Piracetam gave no cytotoxic effect up to 10 mM of piracetam. Growth curves after continuous drug exposure and 1-hour euoxic versus hypoxic exposure gave no cytotoxic effect up to 10 mM of piracetam. Survival curves after continuous drug exposure to 10 mM of piracetam gave no significant effect on the radiosensitivity of hypoxic V79 cells using MTT or clonogenic assay. (author). 32 refs., 6 figs

  13. PPARα Protein Expression Was Increased by Four Weeks of Intermittent Hypoxic Training via AMPKα2-Dependent Manner in Mouse Skeletal Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Li

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα is critical for muscle endurance due to its role in the regulation of fatty acid oxidation. The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is an energy sensor in cells, but its role in PPARα regulation in vivo remains unknown. In this study, we examined PPARα expression in the skeletal muscle of AMPKα2 overexpression (OE, knockout (KO and wild-type (WT mice after four weeks of exercise under intermittent hypoxia. WT, OE and KO mice were used at 40 mice/strain and randomly subdivided into four subgroups: control (C, running (R, hypoxia (H, and running plus hypoxia (R+H at 10 mice/group. The treadmill running was performed at the speed of 12 m/min, 60 min/day with a slope of 0 degree for four weeks. The hypoxia treatment was performed in daytime with normobaric hypoxia (11.20% oxygen, 8 hours/day. In the R+H group, the treadmill running was conducted in the hypoxic condition. AMPKα2, phosphor-AMPKα (p-AMPKα (Thr172, nuclear PPARα proteins were measured by Western blot and the medium chain acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (MCAD mRNA, the key enzyme for fatty acid oxidation and one of the PPARα target genes, was also measured in skeletal muscles after the interventions. The results showed that nuclear PPARα protein was significantly increased by R+H in WT muscles, the increase was enhanced by 41% (p<0.01 in OE mice, but was reduced by 33% (p<0.01 in KO mice. The MCAD mRNA expression was increased after four weeks of R+H intervention. The change in MCAD mRNA followed a similar trend as that of PPARα protein in OE and KO mice. Our data suggest that the increase in nuclear PPARα protein by four-week exercise training under the intermittent hypoxia was dependent on AMPK activation.

  14. Transcriptomic responses in mouse brain exposed to chronic excess of the neurotransmitter glutamate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal Ranu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increases during aging in extracellular levels of glutamate (Glu, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, may be linked to chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Little is known about the molecular responses of neurons to chronic, moderate increases in Glu levels. Genome-wide gene expression in brain hippocampus was examined in a unique transgenic (Tg mouse model that exhibits moderate Glu hyperactivity throughout the lifespan, the neuronal Glutamate dehydrogenase (Glud1 mouse, and littermate 9 month-old wild type mice. Results Integrated bioinformatic analyses on transcriptomic data were used to identify bio-functions, pathways and gene networks underlying neuronal responses to increased Glu synaptic release. Bio-functions and pathways up-regulated in Tg mice were those associated with oxidative stress, cell injury, inflammation, nervous system development, neuronal growth, and synaptic transmission. Increased gene expression in these functions and pathways indicated apparent compensatory responses offering protection against stress, promoting growth of neuronal processes (neurites and re-establishment of synapses. The transcription of a key gene in the neurite growth network, the kinase Ptk2b, was significantly up-regulated in Tg mice as was the activated (phosphorylated form of the protein. In addition to genes related to neurite growth and synaptic development, those associated with neuronal vesicle trafficking in the Huntington's disease signalling pathway, were also up-regulated. Conclusions This is the first study attempting to define neuronal gene expression patterns in response to chronic, endogenous Glu hyperactivity at brain synapses. The patterns observed were characterized by a combination of responses to stress and stimulation of nerve growth, intracellular transport and recovery.

  15. Chronic brief restraint decreases in vivo binding of benzodiazepine receptor ligand to mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosaddeghi, M; Burke, T F; Moerschbaecher, J M

    1993-01-01

    This study examines the effects of chronic brief restraint on in vivo benzodiazepine (BZD) receptor binding in mouse brain. Three groups of mice were used. Mice in group 1 were neither restrained nor injected (ACUTE control). Mice in group 2 were restrained for 5-6 s by grabbing the back skin and holding the subject upside-down at a 45 degrees angle as if to be injected (CHRONIC SHAM control) for 7 d. Mice in group 3 (CHRONIC SALINE) received daily single intraperitoneal (ip) injections of saline (5 mL/kg) for 7 d. On d 8 BZD receptors were labeled in vivo by administration of 3 microCi [3H]flumazenil (ip). The levels of ligand bound in vivo to cerebral cortex (CX), cerebellum (CB), brain stem (BS), striatum (ST), hippocampus (HP), and hypothalamus (HY) were determined. Results indicated that the level of binding was significantly (p stress produces a decrease in BZD receptor binding sites. PMID:8385464

  16. An optimised mouse model of chronic pancreatitis with a combination of ethanol and cerulein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Abbas; Nikkhoo, Bahram; Mokarizadeh, Aram; Rahmani, Mohammad-Reza; Fakhari, Shohreh; Mohammadi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an intractable and multi-factorial disorder. Developing appropriate animal models is an essential step in pancreatitis research, and the best ones are those which mimic the human disorder both aetiologically and pathophysiologically. The current study presents an optimised protocol for creating a murine model of CP, which mimics the initial steps of chronic pancreatitis in alcohol chronic pancreatitis and compares it with two other mouse models treated with cerulein or ethanol alone. Material and methods Thirty-two male C57BL/6 mice were randomly selected, divided into four groups, and treated intraperitoneally with saline (10 ml/kg, control group), ethanol (3 g/kg; 30% v/v), cerulein (50 µg/kg), or ethanol + cerulein, for six weeks. Histopathological and immunohistochemical assays for chronic pancreatitis index along with real-time PCR assessments for mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines and fibrogenic markers were conducted to verify the CP induction. Results The results indicated that CP index (CPI) was significantly increased in ethanol-cerulein mice compared to the saline, ethanol, and cerulein groups (p < 0.001). Interleukin 1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and myeloperoxidase activity were also significantly greater in both cerulein and ethanol-cerulein groups than in the saline treated animals (p < 0.001). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed enhanced expression of TGF-β and α-SMA in ethanol-cerulein mice compared to the saline group. Conclusions Intraperitoneal (IP) injections of ethanol and cerulein could successfully induce CP in mice. IP injections of ethanol provide higher reproducibility compared to ethanol feeding. The model is simple, non-invasive, reproducible, and time-saving. Since the protocol mimics the initial phases of CP development in alcoholics, it can be used for investigating basic mechanisms and testing

  17. Hormetic Effect of Chronic Hypergravity in a Mouse Model of Allergic Asthma and Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Tae Young; Jung, Ah-Yeoun; Kim, Young Hyo

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of chronic hypergravity in a mouse model of allergic asthma and rhinitis. Forty BALB/c mice were divided as: group A (n = 10, control) sensitized and challenged with saline, group B (n = 10, asthma) challenged by intraperitoneal and intranasal ovalbumin (OVA) to induce allergic asthma and rhinitis, and groups C (n = 10, asthma/rotatory control) and D (n = 10, asthma/hypergravity) exposed to 4 weeks of rotation with normogravity (1G) or hypergravity (5G) during induction of asthma/rhinitis. Group D showed significantly decreased eosinophils, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in their BAL fluid compared with groups B and C (p asthma and rhinitis via regulation of genes involved in antioxidative and proapoptotic pathways. It is possible that we could use hypergravity machinery for treating allergic respiratory disorders. PMID:27251783

  18. Hypoxic cell radiosensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyperbaric oxygen results have demonstrated that there is a problem of hypoxid cells in some types of tumour, and that even small daily fractions with HBO can give improved results. Reasons are given for expecting radiosensitizing drugs to penetrate better than HBO to the hypoxic cells, which exist in tumours exceeding 1 or 2 mm diameter. Preliminary clinical studies have demonstrated significant effects on human tumours of misonidazole and metronidazole. Concentrations of misonidazole have been measured in human tumours which were 40-110% of those in plasma, usually 70-90%. A number of clinical trials are being initiated using misonidazole. Future clinical results of hypoxic cell radiosentizers will clarify further the role of hypoxic cells in causing resistance to radiotherapy. (orig./MG) 891 MG/orig.- 892 RDG

  19. New Mouse Models to Investigate the Efficacy of Drug Combinations in Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hanyang; Woolfson, Adrian; Jiang, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) comprises a simple and effective paradigm for generating new insights into the cellular origin, pathogenesis, and treatment of many types of human cancer. In particular, mouse models of CML have greatly facilitated the understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms and pathogenesis of this disease and have led to the identification of new drug targets that in some cases offer the possibility of functional cure. There are currently three established CML mouse models: the BCR-ABL transgenic model, the BCR-ABL retroviral transduction/transplantation model, and the xenotransplant immunodeficient model. Each has its own unique advantages and disadvantages. Depending on the question of interest, some models may be more appropriate than others. In this chapter, we describe a newly developed xenotransplant mouse model to determine the efficacy of novel therapeutic agents, either alone or in combination. The model facilitates the evaluation of the frequency of leukemic stem cells with long-term leukemia-initiating activity, a critical subcellular population that causes disease relapse and progression, through the utilization of primary CD34(+) CML stem/progenitor cells obtained from CML patients at diagnosis and prior to drug treatment. We have also investigated the effectiveness of new combination treatment strategies designed to prevent the development of leukemia in vivo using BCR-ABL (+) blast crisis cells as a model system. These types of in vivo studies are important for the prediction of individual patient responses to drug therapy, and have the potential to facilitate the design of personalized combination therapy strategies. PMID:27581149

  20. CFTR and sphingolipids mediate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction

    OpenAIRE

    Tabeling, Christoph; Yu, Hanpo; Wang, Liming; Ranke, Hannes; Goldenberg, Neil M.; Zabini, Diana; Noe, Elena; Krauszman, Adrienn; Gutbier, Birgitt; Yin, Jun; Schaefer, Michael,; Arenz, Christoph; Hocke, Andreas C.; Suttorp, Norbert; Proia, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is a physiological mechanism that protects against systemic hypoxemia by redistributing blood flow from poorly to better ventilated areas of the lung, thereby minimizing ventilation-perfusion mismatch. However, in chronic hypoxemia-associated lung disease, HPV contributes to pulmonary hypertension. In this study, we provide novel evidence for a dual role of sphingolipids as important signal mediators in HPV, which critically depends on the presence of ...

  1. Selenoether oxytocin analogues have analgesic properties in a mouse model of chronic abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Aline Dantas; Mobli, Mehdi; Castro, Joel; Harrington, Andrea M; Vetter, Irina; Dekan, Zoltan; Muttenthaler, Markus; Wan, JingJing; Lewis, Richard J; King, Glenn F; Brierley, Stuart M; Alewood, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    Poor oral availability and susceptibility to reduction and protease degradation is a major hurdle in peptide drug development. However, drugable receptors in the gut present an attractive niche for peptide therapeutics. Here we demonstrate, in a mouse model of chronic abdominal pain, that oxytocin receptors are significantly upregulated in nociceptors innervating the colon. Correspondingly, we develop chemical strategies to engineer non-reducible and therefore more stable oxytocin analogues. Chemoselective selenide macrocyclization yields stabilized analogues equipotent to native oxytocin. Ultra-high-field nuclear magnetic resonance structural analysis of native oxytocin and the seleno-oxytocin derivatives reveals that oxytocin has a pre-organized structure in solution, in marked contrast to earlier X-ray crystallography studies. Finally, we show that these seleno-oxytocin analogues potently inhibit colonic nociceptors both in vitro and in vivo in mice with chronic visceral hypersensitivity. Our findings have potentially important implications for clinical use of oxytocin analogues and disulphide-rich peptides in general. PMID:24476666

  2. Behavioural and EEG effects of chronic rapamycin treatment in a mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambiaghi, Marco; Cursi, Marco; Magri, Laura; Castoldi, Valerio; Comi, Giancarlo; Minicucci, Fabio; Galli, Rossella; Leocani, Letizia

    2013-04-01

    Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is a multisystem genetic disorder caused by mutation in either Tsc1 or Tsc2 genes that leads to the hyper activation of the mTOR pathway, a key signalling pathway for synaptic plasticity. TSC is characterized by benign tumors arising in different organs and severe neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as epilepsy, intellectual disability, autism, anxiety and depressive behaviour. Rapamycin is a potent inhibitor of mTOR and its efficacy in treating epilepsy and neurological symptoms remains elusive. In a mouse model in which Tsc1 has been deleted in embryonic telencephalic neural stem cells, we analyzed anxiety- and depression-like behaviour by elevated-plus maze (EPM), open-field test (OFT), forced-swim test (FST) and tail-suspension test (TST), after chronic administration of rapamycin. In addition, spectral analysis of background EEG was performed. Rapamycin-treated mutant mice displayed a reduction in anxiety- and depression-like phenotype, as shown by the EPM/OFT and FST, respectively. These results were inline with EEG power spectra outcomes. The same effects of rapamycin were observed in wild-type mice. Notably, in heterozygous animals we did not observe any EEG and/or behavioural variation after rapamycin treatment. Together these results suggest that both TSC1 deletion and chronic rapamycin treatment might have a role in modulating behaviour and brain activity, and point out to the potential usefulness of background EEG analysis in tracking brain dysfunction in parallel with behavioural testing. PMID:23159330

  3. Hormetic Effect of Chronic Hypergravity in a Mouse Model of Allergic Asthma and Rhinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Tae Young; Jung, Ah-Yeoun; Kim, Young Hyo

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of chronic hypergravity in a mouse model of allergic asthma and rhinitis. Forty BALB/c mice were divided as: group A (n = 10, control) sensitized and challenged with saline, group B (n = 10, asthma) challenged by intraperitoneal and intranasal ovalbumin (OVA) to induce allergic asthma and rhinitis, and groups C (n = 10, asthma/rotatory control) and D (n = 10, asthma/hypergravity) exposed to 4 weeks of rotation with normogravity (1G) or hypergravity (5G) during induction of asthma/rhinitis. Group D showed significantly decreased eosinophils, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in their BAL fluid compared with groups B and C (p < 0.05). In real-time polymerase chain reaction using lung homogenate, the expression of IL-1β was significantly upregulated (p < 0.001) and IL-4 and IL-10 significantly downregulated (p < 0.05) in group D. Infiltration of inflammatory cells into lung parenchyma and turbinate, and the thickness of respiratory epithelium was significantly reduced in group D (p < 0.05). The expression of Bcl-2 and heme oxygenase-1 were significantly downregulated, Bax and extracellular dismutase significantly upregulated in Group D. Therefore, chronic hypergravity could have a hormetic effect for allergic asthma and rhinitis via regulation of genes involved in antioxidative and proapoptotic pathways. It is possible that we could use hypergravity machinery for treating allergic respiratory disorders.

  4. Chronic Exposure to Ambient Levels of Urban Particles Affects Mouse Lung Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauad, Thais; Rivero, Dolores Helena Rodriguez Ferreira; de Oliveira, Regiani Carvalho; de Faria Coimbra Lichtenfels, Ana Julia; Guimarães, Eliane Tigre; de Andre, Paulo Afonso; Kasahara, David Itiro; de Siqueira Bueno, Heloisa Maria; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Chronic exposure to air pollution has been associated with adverse effects on children's lung growth. Objectives: We analyzed the effects of chronic exposure to urban levels of particulate matter (PM) on selected phases of mouse lung development. Methods: The exposure occurred in two open-top chambers (filtered and nonfiltered) placed 20 m from a street with heavy traffic in São Paulo, 24 hours/day for 8 months. There was a significant reduction of the levels of PM2.5 inside the filtered chamber (filtered = 2.9 ± 3.0 μg/m3, nonfiltered = 16.8 ± 8.3 μg/m3; P = 0.001). At this exposure site, vehicular sources are the major components of PM2.5 (PM ≤ 2.5μm). Exposure of the parental generation in the two chambers occurred from the 10th to the 120th days of life. After mating and birth of offspring, a crossover of mothers and pups occurred within the chambers, resulting in four groups of pups: nonexposed, prenatal, postnatal, and pre+postnatal. Offspring were killed at the age of 15 (n = 42) and 90 (n = 35) days; lungs were analyzed by morphometry for surface to volume ratio (as an estimator of alveolization). Pressure–volume curves were performed in the older groups, using a 20-ml plethysmograph. Measurements and Main Results: Mice exposed to PM2.5 pre+postnatally presented a smaller surface to volume ratio when compared with nonexposed animals (P = 0.036). The pre+postnatal group presented reduced inspiratory and expiratory volumes at higher levels of transpulmonary pressure (P = 0.001). There were no differences among prenatal and postnatal exposure and nonexposed animals. Conclusions: Our data provide anatomical and functional support to the concept that chronic exposure to urban PM affects lung growth. PMID:18596224

  5. Pharmacological characterisation of anti-inflammatory compounds in acute and chronic mouse models of cigarette smoke-induced inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mok Joanie

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candidate compounds being developed to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are typically assessed using either acute or chronic mouse smoking models; however, in both systems compounds have almost always been administered prophylactically. Our aim was to determine whether the prophylactic effects of reference anti-inflammatory compounds in acute mouse smoking models reflected their therapeutic effects in (more clinically relevant chronic systems. Methods To do this, we started by examining the type of inflammatory cell infiltrate which occurred after acute (3 days or chronic (12 weeks cigarette smoke exposure (CSE using female, C57BL/6 mice (n = 7-10. To compare the effects of anti-inflammatory compounds in these models, mice were exposed to either 3 days of CSE concomitant with compound dosing or 14 weeks of CSE with dosing beginning after week 12. Budesonide (1 mg kg-1; i.n., q.d., roflumilast (3 mg kg-1; p.o., q.d. and fluvastatin (2 mg kg-1; p.o., b.i.d. were dosed 1 h before (and 5 h after for fluvastatin CSE. These dose levels were selected because they have previously been shown to be efficacious in mouse models of lung inflammation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF leukocyte number was the primary endpoint in both models as this is also a primary endpoint in early clinical studies. Results To start, we confirmed that the inflammatory phenotypes were different after acute (3 days versus chronic (12 weeks CSE. The inflammation in the acute systems was predominantly neutrophilic, while in the more chronic CSE systems BALF neutrophils (PMNs, macrophage and lymphocyte numbers were all increased (p Conclusions These results demonstrate that the acute, prophylactic systems can be used to identify compounds with therapeutic potential, but may not predict a compound's efficacy in chronic smoke exposure models.

  6. Effects of N-acetylcysteine on the expression and activity of MnSOD in chronically hypoxic and normoxic rat hearts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balková, P.; Neckář, Jan; Milerová, Marie; Novák, F.; Kolář, František; Nováková, O.

    Bratislava : Advent- Orion , 2007 - (Pecháňová, O.), s. 46-56 ISBN 978-80-8071-094-1 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/0875 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : chronic hypoxia * oxidative stress * heart Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  7. Chronic cellular imaging of mouse visual cortex during operant behavior and passive viewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L Andermann

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Nearby neurons in mammalian neocortex demonstrate a great diversity of cell types and connectivity patterns. The importance of this diversity for computation is not understood. While extracellular recording studies in visual cortex have provided a particularly rich description of behavioral modulation of neural activity, new methods are needed to dissect the contribution of specific circuit elements in guiding visual perception. Here, we describe a method for three-dimensional cellular imaging of neural activity in the awake mouse visual cortex during active discrimination and passive viewing of visual stimuli. Head-fixed mice demonstrated robust discrimination for many hundred trials per day after initial task acquisition. To record from multiple neurons during operant behavior with single-trial resolution and minimal artifacts, we built a sensitive microscope for two-photon calcium imaging, capable of rapid tracking of neurons in three dimensions. We demonstrate stable recordings of cellular calcium activity during discrimination behavior across hours, days, and weeks, using both synthetic and genetically-encoded calcium indicators. When combined with molecular and genetic technologies in mice (e.g., cell-type specific transgenic labeling, this approach allows the identification of neuronal classes in vivo. Physiological measurements from distinct classes of neighboring neurons will enrich our understanding of the coordinated roles of diverse elements of cortical microcircuits in guiding sensory perception and perceptual learning. Further, our method provides a high-throughput, chronic in vivo assay of behavioral influences on cellular activity that is applicable to a wide range of mouse models of neurologic disease.

  8. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia induces an exhausted T cell phenotype in the TCL1 transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassner, Franz J; Zaborsky, Nadja; Catakovic, Kemal; Rebhandl, Stefan; Huemer, Michael; Egle, Alexander; Hartmann, Tanja N; Greil, Richard; Geisberger, Roland

    2015-08-01

    Although chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a B cell malignancy, earlier studies have indicated a role of T cells in tumour growth and disease progression. In particular, the functional silencing of antigen-experienced T cells, called T cell exhaustion, has become implicated in immune evasion in CLL. In this study, we tested whether T cell exhaustion is recapitulated in the TCL1(tg) mouse model for CLL. We show that T cells express high levels of the inhibitory exhaustion markers programmed cell death 1 (PDCD1, also termed PD-1) and lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3), whereas CLL cells express high levels of CD274 (also termed PD-ligand 1). In addition, the fraction of exhausted T cells increases with CLL progression. Finally, we demonstrate that exhausted T cells are reinvigorated towards CLL cytotoxicity by inhibition of PDCD1/CD274 interaction in vivo. These results suggest that T cell exhaustion contributes to CLL pathogenesis and that interference with PDCD1/CD274 signalling holds high potential for therapeutic approaches. PMID:25940792

  9. Chronic demyelination in mouse peripheral nerve produced by lysophosphatidyl choline and X-irradiation: ultrastructural observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of X-irradiation on demyelination and remyelination were studied in the peripheral nerve of the mouse. Three days after injection of lysophosphatidyl choline into one sciatic nerve, a 20 Gy dose of X-rays was administered to the hind limb. At survival times ranging from 4 days to 6 months after injection, the nerves were examined by light and electron microscopy. Removal of myelin debris was retarded and remyelination delayed or prevented. The myelin sheaths which did form were thin and the configuration of Schmidt-Lanterman incisures and nodes of Ranvier was abnormal. Some of the chronically demyelinated fibres formed focal node-like complexes; patches of finely granular material coated the inner aspect of the axolemma, the external surface was covered by slender processes of Schwann cell cytoplasm, and an electron-dense lamina was present in the enlarged periaxonal space. Elsewhere demyelinated axons and their ensheathing Schwann cells were separated by gap junctions or transverse bands. These findings indicate that the morphological differentiation of structures thought to be characteristic of nodes of Ranvier can take place in the absence of remyelination. (author)

  10. Complement protein C3 exacerbates prion disease in a mouse model of chronic wasting disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Brady; Ferguson, Adam; Johnson, Theodore; Bender, Heather; Meyerett-Reid, Crystal; Wyckoff, A Christy; Pulford, Bruce; Telling, Glenn C; Zabel, Mark D

    2013-12-01

    Accumulating evidence shows a critical role of the complement system in facilitating attachment of prions to both B cells and follicular dendritic cells and assisting in prion replication. Complement activation intensifies disease in prion-infected animals, and elimination of complement components inhibits prion accumulation, replication and pathogenesis. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a highly infectious prion disease of captive and free-ranging cervid populations that utilizes the complement system for efficient peripheral prion replication and most likely efficient horizontal transmission. Here we show that complete genetic or transient pharmacological depletion of C3 prolongs incubation times and significantly delays splenic accumulation in a CWD transgenic mouse model. Using a semi-quantitative prion amplification scoring system we show that C3 impacts disease progression in the early stages of disease by slowing the rate of prion accumulation and/or replication. The delayed kinetics in prion replication correlate with delayed disease kinetics in mice deficient in C3. Taken together, these data support a critical role of C3 in peripheral CWD prion pathogenesis. PMID:24038599

  11. Restorative effect of endurance exercise on behavioral deficits in the chronic mouse model of Parkinson's disease with severe neurodegeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Lau Yuen-Sum; Kurz Max J; Pothakos Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Animal models of Parkinson's disease have been widely used for investigating the mechanisms of neurodegenerative process and for discovering alternative strategies for treating the disease. Following 10 injections with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP, 25 mg/kg) and probenecid (250 mg/kg) over 5 weeks in mice, we have established and characterized a chronic mouse model of Parkinson's disease (MPD), which displays severe long-term neurological and patholog...

  12. Hepatic transcriptomic and metabolic responses of hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis×Morone chrysops) to acute and chronic hypoxic insult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Benjamin H; Fuller, S Adam; Li, Chao; Green, Bartholomew W; Zhao, Honggang; Rawles, Steven D; Webster, Carl D; Peatman, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis), white bass (Morone chrysops), and their hybrid are an important group of fish prized for recreational angling in the United States, and there and abroad as a high-value farmed fish. Regardless of habitat, it is not uncommon for fish of the genus Morone to encounter and cope with conditions of scarce oxygen availability. Previously, we determined that hybrid striped bass reared under conditions of chronic hypoxia exhibited reduced feed intake, lower lipid and nutrient retention, and poor growth. To better understand the molecular mechanisms governing these phenotypes, in the present study, we examined the transcriptomic profiles of hepatic tissue in hybrid striped bass exposed to chronic hypoxia (90days at 25% oxygen saturation) and acute hypoxia (6h at 25% oxygen saturation). Using high-throughput RNA-seq, we found that over 1400 genes were differentially expressed under disparate oxygen conditions, with the vast majority of transcriptional changes occurring in the acute hypoxia treatment. Gene pathway and bioenergetics analyses revealed hypoxia-mediated perturbation of genes and gene networks related to lipid metabolism, cell death, and changes in hepatic mitochondrial content and cellular respiration. This study offers a more comprehensive view of the temporal and tissue-specific transcriptional changes that occur during hypoxia, and reveals new and shared mechanisms of hypoxia tolerance in teleosts. PMID:26851735

  13. Chronic unpredictable stress decreases expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in mouse ovaries: relationship to oocytes developmental potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Min Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF was originally described in the nervous system but has been shown to be expressed in ovary tissues recently, acting as a paracrine/autocrine regulator required for developments of follicles and oocytes. Although it is generally accepted that chronic stress impairs female reproduction and decreases the expression of BDNF in limbic structures of central nervous system, which contributes to mood disorder. However, it is not known whether chronic stress affects oocytes developments, nor whether it affects expression of BDNF in ovary. METHODS: Mice were randomly assigned into control group, stressed group, BDNF-treated group and BDNF-treated stressed group. The chronic unpredictable mild stress model was used to produce psychosocial stress in mice, and the model was verified by open field test and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis activity. The methods of immunohistochemistry and western blotting were used to detect BDNF protein level and distribution. The number of retrieved oocytes, oocyte maturation, embryo cleavage and the rates of blastocyst formation after parthenogenetic activation were evaluated. RESULTS: Chronic unpredictable stress decreased the BDNF expression in antral follicles, but didn't affect the BDNF expression in primordial, primary and secondary follicles. Chronic unpredictable stress also decreased the number of retrieved oocytes and the rate of blastocyst formation, which was rescued by exogenous BDNF treatment. CONCLUSION: BDNF in mouse ovaries may be related to the decreased number of retrieved oocytes and impaired oocytes developmental potential induced by chronic unpredictable stress.

  14. Chronic methamphetamine treatment reduces the expression of synaptic plasticity genes and changes their DNA methylation status in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Min-Chih; Hsu, Shih-Hsin; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2015-12-10

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive psychostimulant that may cause long-lasting synaptic dysfunction and abnormal gene expression. We aimed to explore the differential expression of synaptic plasticity genes in chronic METH-treated mouse brain. We used the RT(2) Profiler PCR Array and the real-time quantitative PCR to characterize differentially expressed synaptic plasticity genes in the frontal cortex and the hippocampus of chronic METH-treated mice compared with normal saline-treated mice. We further used pyrosequencing to assess DNA methylation changes in the CpG region of the five immediate early genes (IEGs) in chronic METH-treated mouse brain. We detected six downregulated genes in the frontal cortex and the hippocampus of chronic METH-treated mice, including five IEGs (Arc, Egr2, Fos, Klf10, and Nr4a1) and one neuronal receptor gene (Grm1), compared with normal saline-treated group, but only four genes (Arc, Egr2, Fos, and Nr4a1) were confirmed to be different. Furthermore, we found several CpG sites of the Arc and the Fos that had significant changes in DNA methylation status in the frontal cortex of chronic METH-treated mice, while the klf10 and the Nr4a1 that had significant changes in the hippocampus. Our results show that chronic administration of METH may lead to significant downregulation of the IEGs expression in both the frontal cortex and the hippocampus, which may partly account for the molecular mechanism of the action of METH. Furthermore, the changes in DNA methylation status of the IEGs in the brain indicate that an epigenetic mechanism-dependent transcriptional regulation may contribute to METH addiction, which warrants additional study. PMID:26496011

  15. Neuroprotective Effect of Compound Anisodine in a Mouse Model with Chronic Ocular Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Dong Liu; Lan-Lan Chen; Ce-Ying Shen; Li-Bin Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Compound anisodine (CA) is a compound preparation made from hydrobromide anisodine and procaine hydrochloride.The former is an M-choline receptor blocker with the function of regulating the vegetative nervous system,improving microcirculation,and so on.The latter is an antioxidant with the activities ofneuroprotection.This study aimed to investigate the potential neuroprotection of CA,which affects the degeneration of the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in an animal model with chronic ocular hypertension.Methods:Female C57BL/6J mice (n =24) were divided randomly into four groups:Normal control group without any treatment (Group A,n =6);CA control group with feeding the CA solution (Group B,n =6);microbeads (MBs) control group with injecting MB into the anterior chamber (Group C,n =6);CA study group with MB injection and with feeding the CA solution (Group D,n =6).Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured every 3 days after MB injection.At the 21st day,neurons were retrograde-labeled by Fluoro-Gold (FG).Animals were sacrificed on the 27th day.Retinal flat mounts were stained immunohistologically by β-Ⅲ-tubulin.FG-retrograde-labeled RGCs,β-Ⅲ-tubulin-positive RGCs,and β-Ⅲ-tubulin-positive nerve fibers were quantified.Results:Mice of Groups C and D expressed the incidence of consistent IOP elevation,which is above the IOP level of Group A with the normal one.There is no significant difference in IOP between Groups A and B (P > 0.05).On the 27th day,there were distinct loss in stained RGCs and nerve fibers from Groups C and D compared with Group A (all P < 0.00l).The quantity was significantly higher in Group D as compared to Group C (all P < 0.00l) but lower than Group A (all P < 0.001).There was no significant difference in the quantity of RGCs and nerve fibers between Groups A and B (all P > 0.05).Conclusions:These findings suggest that CA plays an importantly neuroprotective role on RGCs in a mouse model with chronic ocular hypertension.

  16. Rate of death of hypoxic cells in multicell spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of death of hypoxic cells was measured in multicell spheroids, which are considered to model in vitro the microenvironments surrounding such cells within solid tumors. Two types of experiments were performed: (1) All of the cells in spheroids were made hypoxic (less than 100 ppM O2) and the total number of viable cells was determined by clonogenic assay at later times up to 7 days. The rate of death of cells appeared biphasic. At least 15% of the cells died within the first 6 hr. The rate of development of histological changes in the spheroids suggested that the innermost cells were most sensitive. The more peripheral layers of cells died much more slowly so that there was still about 5% survival and a significant number of histologically normal cells at 6 days. Changes in the glucose concentration in the medium (from one-third to three times normal) during exposure to hypoxia had little effect on the survival time of these outer cells. (2) The cells in the inner half of spheroids grown in 20% O2 were made hypoxic by equilibrating the growth medium with 5% O2, and the number of resistant hypoxic cells at different times later was determined after a radiation dose of 3500 rad. The number of surviving clonogenic cells after this dose of radiation decreased with a half-time for cell death of 3 hr. These results indicate that the rate of death of hypoxic cells in the central regions of spheroids is much more rapid than has been reported for monolayer cultures, although the resistance of the outer cells is similar to or greater than monolayers. Since spheroids may model the necrosis and other microenvironments near chronically hypoxic cells in tumors, the relatively rapid rate of death of hypoxic cells demonstrated here must be considered in evaluating their contribution to the size of the radiation-resistant hypoxic fraction and possible mechanisms which might contribute to the phenomenon of reoxygenation

  17. Hypoxic radiosensitization: adored and ignored

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jens

    2007-01-01

    resistance can be eliminated or modified by normobaric or hyperbaric oxygen or by the use of nitroimidazoles as hypoxic radiation sensitizers. More recently, attention has been given to hypoxic cytotoxins, a group of drugs that selectively or preferably destroys cells in a hypoxic environment. An updated.......71 to 0.86) for the outcome of locoregional control and with an associated significant overall survival benefit (odds ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.80 to 0.95). No significant influence was found on the incidence of distant metastases or on the risk of radiation-related complications. Ample data exist to...... support a high level of evidence for the benefit of hypoxic modification. However, hypoxic modification still has no impact on general clinical practice. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Sep-10...

  18. The Role of Endogenous Carbon Monoxide in the Hypoxic Vascular Remodeling of Rat Model of Hypoxic Pulmonary Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甄国华; 张珍祥; 徐永健

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-l) gene and production of endogenous carbon monoxide (CO) in the rat lung tissue at different time points of chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and the effect of hemin on the expression of HO-1 gene and pulmonary hypertension. A rat model of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension was recreated by exposure to intermittent normobaric hypoxic environment (10 % O2 ). Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to determine the level of HO-1 mRNA in the rat lung tissue and double wave length spectrophotometry was used to evaluate the quantity of COHb in arterial blood. Cardiac catheterization was employed to measure the right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) and HE staining was performed in dissected lung tissue to observe the pathological changes of the intra-acinar pulmonary arteries (IAPA). It was found that (1) There was a low level of HO-1 mRNA in normal rat lung tissue, but the level of HO-1 mRNA increased by 2-4 times in the lung tissue of hypoxic rats (P<0.01). The quantity of COHb was 2-3 times those of control group (P<0.01or P<0. 05). These were accompanied by the increased of RVSP and the thickened IAPA; (2) Hemin could keep the HO-1 mRNA and COHb in the hypoxic rat lung tissue at a high level, and partially suppressed the increase of rat RVSP, thereby ameliorating the pathological changes of IAPA.In conclusion, the upregulation of the expression of HO-1 gene and production of CO in the rat lung of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension plays a role of inhibition in the development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Hemin has a therapeutic effect on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

  19. 慢性缺氧模型与病证相关性的研究进展%Advances on Correlation between Chronic Hypoxic Animal Models and Diseases and Syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洁琼; 柴程芝; 寇俊萍; 余伯阳

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged or repeated hypoxia can affect the normal oxygen supply for tissues and organs and normal physiological function of the cardiovascular, respiratory and nervous systems. Multi-system injuries bring serious harm to human health. Along with the modern life style and dietary structure change, deficiency of aerobic exercise and the worsening earth pollution and destruction make human in a chronic hypoxic environment imperceptibly. Therefore, it is of importance to pay more attention to the harm of chronic hypoxia and take corresponding prevention measures. Scholars at home and abroad largely explored constructing animal models to simulate different diseases and syndromes through observing macro and micro indications, including performance and physiological or biochemical indexes. And different oxygen cycles and different hypoxia intensities were used. Various animal models of chronic hypoxia have been commonly used to investigate the various physiological or pathological processes of hypoxia-related diseases including obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, pulmonary artery hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disease and Deficiency of both Qi and Yin syndrome, Stagnation of Qi and blood stasis. In this paper, the recent studies on relationship of chronic hypoxia model and the related diseases and syndromes were reviewed. It is inclined to provide some clues not only for selecting reasonable animal models simulating the clinical features of diseases and syndrome but also for evaluating the characters of drug action reasonably.%长期或反复处于缺氧状态,可以影响机体组织器官的正常供氧,使心血管、呼吸和神经等系统功能紊乱,从而诱导机体多系统损伤,严重危害人体健康.随着现代人生活方式以及饮食结构的改变,生活中有氧运动不足再加上地球污染与破坏逐年加剧,人类不知不觉地处在一个慢性缺氧的环境中.因此,了解并重视慢性缺氧对生理功能的

  20. Restorative effect of endurance exercise on behavioral deficits in the chronic mouse model of Parkinson's disease with severe neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Yuen-Sum

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal models of Parkinson's disease have been widely used for investigating the mechanisms of neurodegenerative process and for discovering alternative strategies for treating the disease. Following 10 injections with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP, 25 mg/kg and probenecid (250 mg/kg over 5 weeks in mice, we have established and characterized a chronic mouse model of Parkinson's disease (MPD, which displays severe long-term neurological and pathological defects resembling that of the human Parkinson's disease in the advanced stage. The behavioral manifestations in this chronic mouse model of Parkinson's syndrome remain uninvestigated. The health benefit of exercise in aging and in neurodegenerative disorders including the Parkinson's disease has been implicated; however, clinical and laboratory studies in this area are limited. In this research with the chronic MPD, we first conducted a series of behavioral tests and then investigated the impact of endurance exercise on the identified Parkinsonian behavioral deficits. Results We report here that the severe chronic MPD mice showed significant deficits in their gait pattern consistency and in learning the cued version of the Morris water maze. Their performances on the challenging beam and walking grid were considerably attenuated suggesting the lack of balance and motor coordination. Furthermore, their spontaneous and amphetamine-stimulated locomotor activities in the open field were significantly suppressed. The behavioral deficits in the chronic MPD lasted for at least 8 weeks after MPTP/probenecid treatment. When the chronic MPD mice were exercise-trained on a motorized treadmill 1 week before, 5 weeks during, and 8–12 weeks after MPTP/probenecid treatment, the behavioral deficits in gait pattern, spontaneous ambulatory movement, and balance performance were reversed; whereas neuronal loss and impairment in cognitive skill, motor coordination, and

  1. ENDURANCE EXERCISE PROMOTES CARDIORESPIRATORY REHABILITATION WITHOUT NEURORESTORATION IN THE CHRONIC MOUSE MODEL OF PARKINSONISM WITH SEVERE NEURODEGENERATION

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Jarrah, Muhammed; Pothakos, Konstantinos; Novikova, Lesya; Smirnova, Irina V; Kurz, Max J.; Stehno-Bittel, Lisa; Lau, Yuen-Sum

    2007-01-01

    Physical rehabilitation with endurance exercise for patients with Parkinson's disease has not been well established, although some clinical and laboratory reports suggest that exercise may produce neuroprotective effect and restore dopaminergic and motor functions. In this study, we used a chronic mouse model of Parkinsonism, which was induced by injecting male C57BL/6 mice with 10 doses of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (25 mg/kg) and probenecid (250 mg/kg) over five weeks. Thi...

  2. Hypoxic cell radiosensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since an unsuccessful clinical trial of Misonidazole, many investigations were carried out to find out the useful hypoxic cell radio-sensitizers all over the world. In the USA., Dr. M. Brown synthesized and tested SR-2508 and this drug is now on the phase II-III clinical trials. In the U.K., Dr. J. Adams proposed Ro-08-8799. In Japan, partly supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, a research group was formed and got an agreement to use the same screening system to evaluate newly synthesized drugs. Through this screening system, thousand of drugs were tested. Among these drugs, KU-2285, RK-28, RP-170 and KIH-801(2) showed remarkable sensitizing effects or minor toxicity. Right now, these drugs are on either phase I clinical trial or pre-clinical evaluations. (author)

  3. [Hypoxic lung failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, S; Wiesner, O

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxic lung failure is among the major indications for patients' referral to intensive care units either for surveillance or if necessary therapy. There are a vast number of pathophysiological causes of lung failure and the optimal treatment highly depends on the underlying pathology; therefore, no standard algorithm exists. So-called acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represents a very severe manifestation of hypoxemic lung failure that is of particular relevance for intensivists and is therefore the focus of this review. In addition to fundamental pathophysiology of lung injury, the article also focuses on established and modern treatment strategies. Moreover, we will briefly highlight innovative concepts of ARDS treatment that might become relevant in the future. PMID:27084180

  4. Chronic Fluoxetine Induces the Enlargement of Perforant Path-Granule Cell Synapses in the Mouse Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Yosuke; Ohta, Keisuke; Hasuo, Hiroshi; Shuto, Takahide; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Sotogaku, Naoki; Togo, Akinobu; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Nishi, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    A selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor is the most commonly prescribed antidepressant for the treatment of major depression. However, the mechanisms underlying the actions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are not fully understood. In the dentate gyrus, chronic fluoxetine treatment induces increased excitability of mature granule cells (GCs) as well as neurogenesis. The major input to the dentate gyrus is the perforant path axons (boutons) from the entorhinal cortex (layer II). Through voltage-sensitive dye imaging, we found that the excitatory neurotransmission of the perforant path synapse onto the GCs in the middle molecular layer of the mouse dentate gyrus (perforant path-GC synapse) is enhanced after chronic fluoxetine treatment (15 mg/kg/day, 14 days). Therefore, we further examined whether chronic fluoxetine treatment affects the morphology of the perforant path-GC synapse, using FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy). A three-dimensional reconstruction of dendritic spines revealed the appearance of extremely large-sized spines after chronic fluoxetine treatment. The large-sized spines had a postsynaptic density with a large volume. However, chronic fluoxetine treatment did not affect spine density. The presynaptic boutons that were in contact with the large-sized spines were large in volume, and the volumes of the mitochondria and synaptic vesicles inside the boutons were correlated with the size of the boutons. Thus, the large-sized perforant path-GC synapse induced by chronic fluoxetine treatment contains synaptic components that correlate with the synapse size and that may be involved in enhanced glutamatergic neurotransmission. PMID:26788851

  5. Hypoxic training methods for improving endurance exercise performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob A. Sinex

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Endurance athletic performance is highly related to a number of factors that can be altered through altitude and hypoxic training including increases in erythrocyte volume, maximal aerobic exercise capacity, capillary density, and economy. Physiological adaptations in response to acute and chronic exposure to hypoxic environments are well documented and range from short-term detrimental effects to longer-term adaptations that can improve performance at altitude and in sea-level competitions. Many altitude and hypoxic training protocols have been developed, employing various combinations of living and training at sea-level, low, moderate, and high altitudes and utilizing natural and artificial altitudes, with varying degrees of effectiveness. Several factors have been identified that are associated with individual responses to hypoxic training, and techniques for identifying those athletes most likely to benefit from hypoxic training continue to be investigated. Exposure to sufficiently high altitude (2000–3000 m for more than 12 h/day, while training at lower altitudes, for a minimum of 21 days is recommended. Timing of altitude training related to competition remains under debate, although general recommendations can be considered.

  6. Hypoxic preconditioning in an autohypoxic animal model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Shao; Guo-Wei Lu

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning refers to the exposure of organisms,systems,organs,tissues or cells to moderate hypoxia/ischemia that [Results]in increased resistance to a subsequent episode of severe hypoxia/ischemia.In this article,we review recent research based on a mouse model of repeated exposure to autohypoxia.Pre-exposure markedly increases the tolerance to or protection against hypoxic insult,and preserves the cellular structure of the brain.Furthermore,the hippocampal activity amplitude and frequency of electroencephalogram,latency of cortical somatosensory-evoked potential and spinal somatosensory-evoked potential progressively decrease,while spatial learning and memory improve.In the brain,detrimental neurochemicals such as free radicals are down-regulated,while beneficial ones such as adenosine are upregulated.Also,antihypoxia factor(s) and gene(s) are activated.We propose that the tolerance and protective effects depend on energy conservation and plasticity triggered by exposure to hypoxia via oxygen-sensing transduction pathways and hypoxia-inducible factor-initiated cascades.A potential path for further research is the development of devices and pharmaceuticals acting on antihypoxia factor(s) and gene(s) for the prevention and treatment of hypoxia and related syndromes.

  7. Chronic treatment with the GLP1 analogue liraglutide increases cell proliferation and differentiation into neurons in an AD mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadivel Parthsarathy

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis is a life long process, but the rate of cell proliferation and differentiation decreases with age. In Alzheimer's patients, along with age, the presence of Aβ in the brain inhibits this process by reducing stem cell proliferation and cell differentiation. GLP-1 is a growth factor that has neuroprotective properties. GLP1 receptors are present on neuronal progenitor cells, and the GLP-1 analogue liraglutide has been shown to increase cell proliferation in an Alzheimer's disease (AD mouse model. Here we investigated acute and chronic effects of liraglutide on progenitor cell proliferation, neuroblast differentiation and their subsequent differentiation into neurons in wild type and APP/PS-1 mice at different ages. APP/PS1 and their littermate controls, aged 3, 6, 12, 15 months were injected acutely or chronically with 25 nmol/kg liraglutide. Acute treatment with liraglutide showed an increase in cell proliferation in APP/PS1 mice, but not in controls whereas chronic treatment increased cell proliferation at all ages (BrdU and Ki67 markers. Moreover, numbers of immature neurons (DCX were increased in both acute and chronic treated animals at all ages. Most newly generated cells differentiated into mature neurons (NeuN marker. A significant increase was observed with chronically treated 6, 12, 15 month APP/PS1 and WT groups. These results demonstrate that liraglutide, which is currently on the market as a treatment for type 2 diabetes (Victoza(TM, increases neurogenesis, which may have beneficial effects in neurodegenerative disorders like AD.

  8. L-tyrosine improves neuroendocrine function in a mouse model of chronic stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhihua Wang; Jinghua Li; Zhiming Wang; Lingyan Xue; Yi Zhang; Yingjie Chen; Jun Su; Zhongming Li

    2012-01-01

    Adult BALB/c mice, individually housed, were stimulated with nine different stressors, arranged randomly, for 4 continuous weeks to generate an animal model of chronic stress. In chronically stressed mice, spontaneous locomotor activity was significantly decreased, escape latency in the Morris water maze test was prolonged, serum levels of total thyrotropin and total triiodothyronine were significantly decreased, and dopamine and norepinephrine content in the pallium, hippocampus and hypothalamus were significantly reduced. All of these changes were suppressed, to varying degrees, by L-tyrosine supplementation. These findings indicate that the neuroendocrine network plays an important role in chronic stress, and that L-tyrosine supplementation has therapeutic effects.

  9. Longitudinal study of a mouse model of chronic pulmonary inflammation using breath hold gated micro-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the feasibility of using automatic quantitative analysis of breath hold gated micro-CT images to detect and monitor disease in a mouse model of chronic pulmonary inflammation, and to compare image-based measurements with pulmonary function tests and histomorphometry. Forty-nine A/J mice were used, divided into control and inflammation groups. Chronic inflammation was induced by silica aspiration. Fourteen animals were imaged at baseline, and 4, 14, and 34 weeks after silica aspiration, using micro-CT synchronized with ventilator-induced breath holds. Lung input impedance was measured as well using forced oscillation techniques. Five additional animals from each group were killed after micro-CT for comparison with histomorphometry. At all time points, micro-CT measurements show statistically significant differences between the two groups, while first differences in functional test parameters appear at 14 weeks. Micro-CT measurements correlate well with histomorphometry and discriminate diseased and healthy groups better than functional tests. Longitudinal studies using breath hold gated micro-CT are feasible on the silica-induced model of chronic pulmonary inflammation, and automatic measurements from micro-CT images correlate well with histomorphometry, being more sensitive than functional tests to detect lung damage in this model. (orig.)

  10. L-tyrosine improves neuroendocrine function in a mouse model of chronic stress

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhihua; Li, Jinghua; Wang, Zhiming; Xue, Lingyan; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Yingjie; Su, Jun; Li, Zhongming

    2012-01-01

    Adult BALB/c mice, individually housed, were stimulated with nine different stressors, arranged randomly, for 4 continuous weeks to generate an animal model of chronic stress. In chronically stressed mice, spontaneous locomotor activity was significantly decreased, escape latency in the Morris water maze test was prolonged, serum levels of total thyrotropin and total triiodothyronine were significantly decreased, and dopamine and norepinephrine content in the pallium, hippocampus and hypothal...

  11. The effect of sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, attenuates inflammation and fibrosis in a mouse model of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Han

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by progressive fibrosis, pain and loss of exocrine and endocrine functions. The long-standing chronic pancreatitis and its associated pancreatic fibrosis are the most common pathogenic events involved in human pancreatic carcinogenesis, but the therapeutic strategies to chronic pancreatitis and the chemoprevention of pancreatic carcinogenesis are very limited. Methods We investigated the effect of sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, on inhibition of chronic pancreatitis in a caerulein induced chronic pancreatitis mouse model. Results Sulindac significantly reduced the severity of chronic pancreatitis including the extent of acini loss, inflammatory cell infiltration and stromal fibrosis. The protein expression of phosphorylation of MEK/ERK was inhibited in the chronic pancreatic tissues by sulindac treatment as measured by Western blot assay. The levels of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and MCP-1 were also significantly decreased with sulindac treatment, as well as the expression of TGF-β, PDGF-β, SHH and Gli in the chronic pancreatic tissue detected by qPCR assay and confirmed by western blot assay. The activation of pancreatic satellet cells was also inhibited by sulindac as measured by the activity of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA in the pancreatic tissue of chronic pancreatitis. Conclusions Sulindac is a promising reagent for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis via inhibition of inflammatory cell infiltration and stromal fibrosis, the inhibitory effect of sulindac on chronic pancreatitis may through targeting the activation ERK/MAPK signaling pathway.

  12. Chronic Intake of Japanese Sake Mediates Radiation-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Mouse Liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Nakajima

    Full Text Available Sake is a traditional Japanese alcoholic beverage that is gaining popularity worldwide. Although sake is reported to have beneficial health effects, it is not known whether chronic sake consumption modulates health risks due to radiation exposure or other factors. Here, the effects of chronic administration of sake on radiation-induced metabolic alterations in the livers of mice were evaluated. Sake (junmai-shu was administered daily to female mice (C3H/He for one month, and the mice were exposed to fractionated doses of X-rays (0.75 Gy/day for the last four days of the sake administration period. For comparative analysis, a group of mice were administered 15% (v/v ethanol in water instead of sake. Metabolites in the liver were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry one day following the last exposure to radiation. The metabolite profiles of mice chronically administered sake in combination with radiation showed marked changes in purine, pyrimidine, and glutathione (GSH metabolism, which were only partially altered by radiation or sake administration alone. Notably, the changes in GSH metabolism were not observed in mice treated with radiation following chronic administration of 15% ethanol in water. Changes in several metabolites, including methionine and valine, were induced by radiation alone, but were not detected in the livers of mice who received chronic administration of sake. In addition, the chronic administration of sake increased the level of serum triglycerides, although radiation exposure suppressed this increase. Taken together, the present findings suggest that chronic sake consumption promotes GSH metabolism and anti-oxidative activities in the liver, and thereby may contribute to minimizing the adverse effects associated with radiation.

  13. An autoradiographic analysis of cholinergic receptors in mouse brain after chronic nicotine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative autoradiographic procedures were used to examine the effects of chronic nicotine infusion on the number of central nervous system nicotinic cholinergic receptors. Female DBA mice were implanted with jugular cannulas and infused with saline or various doses of nicotine (0.25, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg/hr) for 10 days. The animals were then sacrificed and the brains were removed and frozen in isopentane. Cryostat sections were collected and prepared for autoradiographic procedures as previously described. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors were labeled with L-[3H]nicotine or alpha-[125I]bungarotoxin; [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate was used to measure muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding. Chronic nicotine infusion increased the number of sites labeled by [3H]nicotine in most brain areas. However, the extent of the increase in binding as well as the dose-response curves for the increase were widely different among brain regions. After the highest treatment dose, binding was increased in 67 of 86 regions measured. Septal and thalamic regions were most resistant to change. Nicotinic binding measured by alpha-[125I]bungarotoxin also increased after chronic treatment, but in a less robust fashion. At the highest treatment dose, only 26 of 80 regions were significantly changes. Muscarinic binding was not altered after chronic nicotine treatment. These data suggest that brain regions are not equivalent in the mechanisms that regulate alterations in nicotinic cholinergic receptor binding after chronic nicotine treatment

  14. Generation of functional neutrophils from a mouse model of X-linked chronic granulomatous disorder using induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayandip Mukherjee

    Full Text Available Murine models of human genetic disorders provide a valuable tool for investigating the scope for application of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC. Here we present a proof-of-concept study to demonstrate generation of iPSC from a mouse model of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD, and their successful differentiation into haematopoietic progenitors of the myeloid lineage. We further demonstrate that additive gene transfer using lentiviral vectors encoding gp91(phox is capable of restoring NADPH-oxidase activity in mature neutrophils derived from X-CGD iPSC. In the longer term, correction of iPSC from human patients with CGD has therapeutic potential not only through generation of transplantable haematopoietic stem cells, but also through production of large numbers of autologous functional neutrophils.

  15. Computer mouse use predicts acute pain but not prolonged or chronic pain in the neck and shoulder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerster, Mette; Grimstrup, S; Lassen, C F; Kryger, A I; Overgaard, E; Hansen, K D; Mikkelsen, S; Andersen, Johan Hviid; Vilstrup, I; Brandt, LP

    2008-01-01

    not influence reports of acute or prolonged pain. A few psychosocial factors predicted the risk of prolonged pain. CONCLUSIONS: Most computer workers have no or minor neck and shoulder pain, few experience prolonged pain, and even fewer, chronic neck and shoulder pain. Moreover, there seems to be no......BACKGROUND: Computer use may have an adverse effect on musculoskeletal outcomes. This study assessed the risk of neck and shoulder pain associated with objectively recorded professional computer use. METHODS: A computer programme was used to collect data on mouse and keyboard usage and weekly...... reports of neck and shoulder pain among 2146 technical assistants. Questionnaires were also completed at baseline and at 12 months. The three outcome measures were: (1) acute pain (measured as weekly pain); (2) prolonged pain (no or minor pain in the neck and shoulder region over four consecutive weeks...

  16. Enhanced Expression of TREK-1 Is Related with Chronic Constriction Injury of Neuropathic Pain Mouse Model in Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyo Jo; Lee, Seung Wook; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Eun-Jin; Kwon, Byeonghun; Kang, Dawon; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Seo, Kwang-Suk

    2016-05-01

    Neuropathic pain is a complex state showing increased pain response with dysfunctional inhibitory neurotransmission. The TREK family, one of the two pore domain K⁺ (K2P) channel subgroups were focused among various mechanisms of neuropathic pain. These channels influence neuronal excitability and are thought to be related in mechano/thermosensation. However, only a little is known about the expression and role of TREK-1 and TREK-2, in neuropathic pain. It is performed to know whether TREK-1 and/ or 2 are positively related in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of a mouse neuropathic pain model, the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Following this purpose, Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses were performed using mouse DRG of CCI model and compared to the sham surgery group. Immunofluorescence staining of isolectin- B4 (IB4) and TREK were performed. Electrophysiological recordings of single channel currents were analyzed to obtain the information about the channel. Interactions with known TREK activators were tested to confirm the expression. While both TREK-1 and TREK-2 mRNA were significantly overexpressed in DRG of CCI mice, only TREK-1 showed significant increase (~9 fold) in western blot analysis. The TREK-1-like channel recorded in DRG neurons of the CCI mouse showed similar current-voltage relationship and conductance to TREK-1. It was easily activated by low pH solution (pH 6.3), negative pressure, and riluzole. Immunofluorescence images showed the expression of TREK-1 was stronger compared to TREK-2 on IB4 positive neurons. These results suggest that modulation of the TREK-1 channel may have beneficial analgesic effects in neuropathic pain patients. PMID:27133259

  17. Perfusion of nonventilated lung: failure of hypoxic vasoconstriction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alveolar hypoxia is a well established cause of regional vasoconstriction such that nonventilated segments are not perfused. The paradoxical situation of retained perfusion of nonventilated lung has seldom been discussed. Three clinical examples are illustrated. In each case coexistent chronic obstructive lung disease may have contributed to this unexpected finding by reducing pulmonary vascular capacity such that blood flow diversion from hypoxic segments was not possible

  18. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyaratnam, Priyadharshanan; Loubani, Mahmoud; Morice, Alyn H

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction is the elegant theory put forward more than six decades ago to explain regional variations in perfusion within the lung in certain animal species in response to localised restrictions in oxygenation. Although considerable progress has been made to describe the phenomenon at the macroscopic level and explain it at the microscopic level, we are far from a universal agreement about the process in humans. This review attempts to highlight some of the important evidence bases of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in humans and the significant gaps in our knowledge that would need bridging. PMID:24024204

  19. Weaver mutant mouse cerebellar granule cells respond normally to chronic depolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Annette; Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Hack, N;

    1997-01-01

    We studied the effects of chronic K(+)-induced membrane depolarization and treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) from weaver mutant mice and non-weaver litter-mates. The weaver mutation is a Gly-to-Ser substitution in a conserved region of the Girk2 G prote...

  20. Fasting reduces liver fibrosis in a mouse model for chronic cholangiopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokolovic, Aleksandar; van Roomen, Cindy P. A. A.; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Scheij, Saskia; Hiralall, Johan K.; Claessen, Nike; Aten, Jan; Elferink, Ronald P. J. Oude; Groen, Albert K.; Sokolovic, Milka

    2013-01-01

    Chronic cholangiopathies often lead to fibrosis, as a result of a perpetuated wound healing response, characterized by increased inflammation and excessive deposition of proteins of the extracellular matrix. Our previous studies have shown that food deprivation suppresses the immune response, which

  1. L-arginine in combination with sildenafil potentiates the attenuation of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hiti, H; Chovanec, M; Melenovský, V; Vajnerová, O; Baňasová, A; Kautzner, J; Herget, J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia induces an increased production of nitric oxide (NO) in pulmonary prealveolar arterioles. Bioavailability of the NO in the pulmonary vessels correlates with concentration of L-arginine as well as activity of phosphodiesterase-5 enzyme (PDE-5). We tested a hypothesis whether a combination of L-arginine and PDE-5 inhibitor sildenafil has an additive effect in reduction of the hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) in rats. Animals were exposed to chronic normobaric hypoxia for 3 weeks. In the AH group, rats were administered L-arginine during chronic hypoxic exposure. In the SH group, rats were administered sildenafil during chronic hypoxic exposure. In the SAH group, rats were treated by the combination of L-arginine as well as sildenafil during exposure to chronic hypoxia. Mean PAP, structural remodeling of peripheral pulmonary arterioles (%DL) and RV/LV+S ratio was significantly decreased in the SAH group compared to hypoxic controls even decreased compared to the AH and the SH groups in first two measured parameters. Plasmatic concentration of cGMP and NOx were significantly lower in the SAH group compared to hypoxic controls. We demonstrate that NO synthase substrate L-arginine and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sildenafil administered in combination are more potent in attenuation of the HPH compared to a treatment by substances given alone. PMID:23869884

  2. Astrocytic adaptation during cerebral angiogenesis follows the new vessel formation induced through chronic hypoxia in adult mouse cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masamoto, Kazuto; Kanno, Iwao

    2014-03-01

    We examined longitudinal changes of the neuro-glia-vascular unit during cerebral angiogenesis induced through chronic hypoxia in the adult mouse cortex. Tie2-GFP mice in which the vascular endothelial cells expressed green fluorescent proteins (GFP) were exposed to chronic hypoxia, while the spatiotemporal developments of the cortical capillary sprouts and the neighboring astrocytic remodeling were characterized with repeated two-photon microscopy. The capillary sprouts appeared at early phases of the hypoxia adaptation (1-2 weeks), while the morphological changes of the astrocytic soma and processes were not detected in this phase. In the later phases of the hypoxia adaptation (> 2 weeks), the capillary sprouts created a new connection with existing capillaries, and its neighboring astrocytes extended their processes to the newly-formed vessels. The findings show that morphological adaptation of the astrocytes follow the capillary development during the hypoxia adaptation, which indicate that the newly-formed vessels provoke cellular interactions with the neighboring astrocytes to strengthen the functional blood-brain barrier.

  3. 慢性间歇低氧对大鼠肝细胞SOCS3表达的影响%The effect of SOCS3 expression on rat liver cells by chronic intermittent hypoxic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任寿安; 康耀文; 蔡月伟

    2014-01-01

    Objective To established chronic intermittent hypoxic (CIH) animal model for investigate the mechanism of insulin resistance caused by CIH.Methods Twenty-four healthy male SD rats were randomly divided into four groups:normal control group (NC group),CIH 2 weeks group (CIH2 group),and CIH 5 weeks group (CIH5 group),with 8 rats in each group.The minimum oxygen concentration was 6%-7% in animal chamber.About 8 hours per day (from 9AM to 5 PM),the experimental lasted for 35 days.The rats in control group were placed in the same animal box without CIH.After the experiment,to measure fasting blood glucose and insulin levels by radioimmunoassay and then according to the homeostasis model of insulin resistance index (HOMA) was calculated.The expressions of SOCS3 protein were detected with immunohistochemical method in rat liver cells.To detect the SOCS3-mRNA gene expression by reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results Compared with the NC group,fasting blood glucose(F =33.582,P <0.05),insulin level (F =35.633,P <0.05) and HOMA-IR (F =49.045,P <0.05) of the CIH2.CIH5 group was higher than other groups (P <0.05).Compared with the NC group,the expression of SOCS3 protein was increased in CIH2 and CHI5 group (F =9.472,P <0.05),but in CIH2 and CIH5 group were no significantly differences (P >0.05).And then the expression of SOCS3-mRNA in CIH5 was higher than CIH2 and CIH5 group (F =8.665,P < 0.05).Pearson correlation analysis showed that HOMA-IR and the expression of SOCS3 protein was negatively correlated (r =-0.759,P <0.001) and was positively correlated with SOCS3-mRNA (r =0.603,P =0.01).Conclusions ①CIH exposure caused fasting blood glucose level and increase insulin level and insulin resistance in rats with CIH.With the intermittent hypoxic exposure time prolonged,the degree of insulin resistance was increased.②CIH leads to increased expression of SOCS3 protein and SOCS3-mRNA gene in rat liver cells with CIH exposure

  4. Deficiency in mouse hyaluronidase 2: a new mechanism of chronic thrombotic microangiopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Onclinx, Cecile; Dogne, Sophie; Jadin, Laurence; Andris, Fabienne; Grandfils, Christian; Jouret, François; Mullier, Francois; Flamion, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan is a major component of the extracellular matrix and glycocalyx. Its main somatic degrading enzymes are the hyaluronidases 1 and 2, none of which is active in the bloodstream. We generated hyaluronidase 2 deficient mice. They suffer from mild chronic anemia and thrombocytopenia, in parallel with a 10-fold increase in plasma hyaluronan concentration. The current study explores the mechanism of these hematological anomalies. The decreased erythrocyte and platelet counts were assigned...

  5. Characterization of a Dexamethasone-Immunosuppressed C57BL/6N Mouse Model for Chronic Cryptosporidiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Edward G.

    1993-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a coccidian protozoan that colonizes epithelial cells lining respiratory and digestive tracts of animals and humans. Cryptosporidiosis is a well-recognized zoonotic disease infecting primarily neonates and immunocompromised hosts, including human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Clinical disease is manifested as a chronic diarrheal illness that is self-limiting in immunocompetent hosts and prolonged and often life-threatening in hosts with compromised immune...

  6. Chronic antioxidant therapy reduces oxidative stress in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Siedlak, Sandra L.; Casadesus, Gemma; Webber, Kate M; Pappolla, Miguel A.; Atwood, Craig S.; Smith, Mark A.; Perry, George

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative modifications are a hallmark of oxidative imbalance in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and prion diseases and their respective animal models. While the causes of oxidative stress are relatively well-documented, the effects of chronically reducing oxidative stress on cognition, pathology and biochemistry require further clarification. To address this, young and aged control and amyloid-β protein precursor-over-expressing mice were fed a diet with added R-alpha...

  7. Chronic amiodarone remodels expression of ion channel transcripts in the mouse heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.LEBOUTER; A.ELHARCHI; C.MARIONNEAU; C.BELLOCQ; A.CHAMBELLAN; K.LEQUANG; JCBELLOCQ; JCCHEVALIER; GLANDE; JJLEGER; FCHARPENTIER; DESCANDE; SDEMOLOMBE

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The basis for the unique effectiveness of chronic amiodarone on cardiac arrhythmias is incompletely understood. The present study investigated the pharmacogenomics profile of amiodarone on genes encoding ion channel subunits. METHODS AND RESULTS: Adult male mice were treated for 6 weeks with vehicle or oral amiodarone at 30,90,or 180 mg·kg-1·d-1, Plasma and myocardial levels of amiodarone and n-desethyl-amiodarone in

  8. Chronic Citalopram Administration Causes a Sustained Suppression of Serotonin Synthesis in the Mouse Forebrain

    OpenAIRE

    Gerard Honig; Jongsma, Minke E.; Marieke C G van der Hart; Tecott, Laurence H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serotonin (5-HT) is a neurotransmitter with important roles in the regulation of neurobehavioral processes, particularly those regulating affect in humans. Drugs that potentiate serotonergic neurotransmission by selectively inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin (SSRIs) are widely used for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Although the regulation of serotonin synthesis may be an factor in SSRI efficacy, the effect of chronic SSRI administration on 5-HT synthesis is not well un...

  9. Altered colonic function and microbiota profile in a mouse model of chronic depression

    OpenAIRE

    Park, A J; Collins, J.; BLENNERHASSETT, P. A.; Ghia, J E; Verdu, E. F.; Bercik, P; COLLINS, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression often coexists with the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) which is characterized by alterations in gut function. There is emerging evidence that the microbial composition (microbiota) of the gut is altered in IBS, but the basis for this is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether the induction of chronic depression results in changes in the colonic function and in its microbial community, and to explore underlying mechanisms. Methods Bilateral olfac...

  10. The development and characterization of two types of chronic responses in irradiated mouse colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypothesis to be tested is that there are two distinct types of chronic responses in irradiated normal tissues, each resulting from damage to different cell populations in the tissue. The first is a sequela of chronic epithelial depletion in which the tissue's integrity cannot be maintained. The other response is due to cell loss in the connective tissue and/or vascular stroma, i.e. a 'primary' chronic response. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis in the murine colon by first, establishing a model of each chronic response and then, by determining whether the responses differed in timing of expression, histology, and expression of specific collagen types. The model of late damage used was colonic obstructions/strictures induced by a single dose of 27 Gy ('consequential' response) and two equal doses of 14.75 Gy (t = 10 days) ('primary' response). 'Consequential' lesions appeared as early as 5 weeks after 27 Gy and were characterized by a deep mucosal ulceration and a thickened fibrotic serosa containing excessive accumulations of collagen types I and III. Both types were commingled in the scar at the base of the ulcer. Fibroblasts were synthesizing pro-collagen types I and III mRNA 10 weeks prior to measurable increases in collagen. A significant decrease in the ratio of collagen types I:III was associated with the 'consequential' response at 4-5 months post-irradiation. The 'primary' response, on the other hand, did not appear until 40 weeks after the split dose even though the total dose delivered was approximately the same as that for the 'consequential' response. The 'primary' response was characterized with an intact mucosa and a thickened fibrotic submucosa which contained excessive amounts of only collagen type I. An increased number of fibroblasts were synthesizing pro-collagen type I mRNA nearly 25 weeks before collage type I levels were increased

  11. Metabolic profiles in serum of mouse after chronic exposure to drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Xuxiang; Li, Aimin; Cheng, Shupei

    2011-08-01

    The toxicity of Nanjing drinking water on mouse (Mus musculus) was detected by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomic method. Three groups of mice were fed with drinking water (produced by Nanjing BHK Water Plant), 3.8 μg/L benzo(a)pyrene as contrast, and clean water as control, respectively, for 90 days. It was observed that the levels of lactate, alanine, and creatinine in the mice fed with drinking water were increased and that of valine was decreased. The mice of drinking water group were successfully separated from control. The total concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phthalates (PAEs), and other organic pollutants in the drinking water were 0.23 μg/L, 4.57 μg/L, and 0.34 μg/L, respectively. In this study, Nanjing drinking water was found to induce distinct perturbations of metabolic profiles on mouse including disorders of glucose-alanine cycle, branched-chain amino acid and energy metabolism, and dysfunction of kidney. This study suggests that metabonomic method is feasible and sensitive to evaluate potential toxic effects of drinking water. PMID:21172972

  12. The influence of chronic nicotine treatment on proteins expressed in the mouse hippocampus and cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Kenji; Otani, Mieko; Takano, Masaoki; Kadoyama, Keiichi; Matsuyama, Shogo

    2016-06-01

    Chronic treatment with nicotine, the primary psychoactive substance in tobacco smoke, affects central nervous system functions, such as synaptic plasticity. Here, to clarify the effects of chronic nicotine treatment on the higher brain functions, proteomic analysis of the hippocampus and cortex of mice treated for 6 months with nicotine was performed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by mass spectrometry. There was significant change in the expression of 16 proteins and one phosphoprotein in the hippocampus (increased tubulin β-5, atp5b, MDH1, cytochrome b-c1 complex subunit 1, Hsc70, dynamin, profilin-2, 4-aminobutyrate aminotransferase, mitochondrial isoform 1 precursor, calpain small subunit 1, and vacuolar adenosine triphosphatase subunit B and decreased γ-actin, α-tubulin isotype M-α-2, putative β-actin, tubulin β-2A, NDUFA10, and G6PD) and 24 proteins and two phosphoproteins in the cortex (increased spectrin α chain, non-erythrocytic 1 isoform 1, tubulin β-5, γ-actin, creatine kinase B-type, LDH-B, secernin-1, UCH-L1, 14-3-3 γ, type II peroxiredoxin 1, PEBP-1, and unnamed protein product and decreased tubulin α-1C, α-internexin, γ-enolase, PDHE1-B, DPYL2, vacuolar adenosine triphosphatase subunit A, vacuolar adenosine triphosphatase subunit B, TCTP, NADH dehydrogenase Fe-S protein 1, protein disulfide-isomerase A3, hnRNP H2, γ-actin, atp5b, and unnamed protein product). Additionally, Western blotting validated the changes in dynamin, Hsc70, MDH1, NDUFA10, α-internexin, tubulin β-5 chain, and secernin-1. Thus, these findings indicate that chronic nicotine treatment changes the expression of proteins and phosphoproteins in the hippocampus and cortex. We propose that effect of smoking on higher brain functions could be mediated by alterations in expression levels of these proteins. PMID:26988295

  13. Thioredoxin-1 protects against neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression in a mouse model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Tanabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are characterized by acute enhancement of airway neutrophilic inflammation under oxidative stress and can be involved in emphysema progression. However, pharmacotherapy against the neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression associated with exacerbation has not been established. Thioredoxin-1 has anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties and it can ameliorate neutrophilic inflammation through anti-chemotactic effects and prevent cigarette smoke (CS-induced emphysema. We aimed to determine whether thioredoxin-1 can suppress neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression in a mouse model of COPD exacerbation and if so, to reveal the underlying mechanisms. RESULTS: Mice were exposed to CS and then challenged with polyinosine-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C], an agonist for virus-induced innate immunity. Airway neutrophilic inflammation, oxidative stress and lung apoptosis were enhanced in smoke-sensitive C57Bl/6, but not in smoke-resistant NZW mice. Exposure to CS and poly(I:C challenge accelerated emphysema progression in C57Bl/6 mice. Thioredoxin-1 suppressed neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression. Poly(I:C caused early neutrophilic inflammation through keratinocyte-derived chemokine and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF release in the lung exposed to CS. Late neutrophilic inflammation was caused by persistent GM-CSF release, which thioredoxin-1 ameliorated. Thioredoxin-1 enhanced pulmonary mRNA expression of MAP kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1, and the suppressive effects of thioredoxin-1 on prolonged GM-CSF release and late neutrophilic inflammation disappeared by inhibiting MKP-1. CONCLUSION: Using a mouse model of COPD exacerbation, we demonstrated that thioredoxin-1 ameliorated neutrophilic inflammation by suppressing GM-CSF release, which prevented emphysema progression. Our findings deepen understanding of the mechanisms

  14. Physical activity: benefit or weakness in metabolic adaptations in a mouse model of chronic food restriction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méquinion, Mathieu; Caron, Emilie; Zgheib, Sara; Stievenard, Aliçia; Zizzari, Philippe; Tolle, Virginie; Cortet, Bernard; Lucas, Stéphanie; Prévot, Vincent; Chauveau, Christophe; Viltart, Odile

    2015-02-01

    In restrictive-type anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, physical activity is usually associated with food restriction, but its physiological consequences remain poorly characterized. In female mice, we evaluated the impact of voluntary physical activity with/without chronic food restriction on metabolic and endocrine parameters that might contribute to AN. In this protocol, FRW mice (i.e., food restriction with running wheel) reached a crucial point of body weight loss (especially fat mass) faster than FR mice (i.e., food restriction only). However, in contrast to FR mice, their body weight stabilized, demonstrating a protective effect of a moderate, regular physical activity. Exercise delayed meal initiation and duration. FRW mice displayed food anticipatory activity compared with FR mice, which was strongly diminished with the prolongation of the protocol. The long-term nature of the protocol enabled assessment of bone parameters similar to those observed in AN patients. Both restricted groups adapted their energy metabolism differentially in the short and long term, with less fat oxidation in FRW mice and a preferential use of glucose to compensate for the chronic energy imbalance. Finally, like restrictive AN patients, FRW mice exhibited low leptin levels, high plasma concentrations of corticosterone and ghrelin, and a disruption of the estrous cycle. In conclusion, our model suggests that physical activity has beneficial effects on the adaptation to the severe condition of food restriction despite the absence of any protective effect on lean and bone mass. PMID:25465889

  15. Influence on the mouse immune system of chronic ingestion of 137Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to determine the possible occurrence of damage to the immune system during the course of chronic ingestion of 137Cs. BALB/C mice were used, with 137Cs intake via drinking water at a concentration of 20 kBq l-1. Adults received 137Cs before mating and offspring were sacrificed at various ages between birth and 20 weeks. Phenotypic analysis of circulating blood cells and thymocytes did not show any significant modification of immune cell populations in animals ingesting 137Cs as compared with control animals, with the exception of a slight increase in Treg percentage at the age of 12 weeks. Functional tests, including proliferative response to mitogens such as phytohaemagglutinin, response to alloantigens in mixed lymphocyte reaction and immunoglobulin response to vaccine antigens such as tetanus toxin and keyhole limpet haemocyanin did not show any significant functional modification of the immune system in 137Cs-ingesting animals as compared with control animals. Overall, our results suggest that chronic ingestion of a low concentration of 137Cs in drinking water in the long term does not have any biologically relevant effect on the immune system.

  16. Influence on the mouse immune system of chronic ingestion of {sup 137}Cs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertho, Jean-Marc; Faure, Marie-Cecile; Louiba, Sonia; Tourlonias, Elie; Stefani, Johanna; Siffert, Baptiste; Paquet, Francois; Dublineau, Isabelle, E-mail: Jean-marc.bertho@irsn.fr [IRSN, Laboratoire de Radiotoxicologie Experimentale, Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the possible occurrence of damage to the immune system during the course of chronic ingestion of {sup 137}Cs. BALB/C mice were used, with {sup 137}Cs intake via drinking water at a concentration of 20 kBq l{sup -1}. Adults received {sup 137}Cs before mating and offspring were sacrificed at various ages between birth and 20 weeks. Phenotypic analysis of circulating blood cells and thymocytes did not show any significant modification of immune cell populations in animals ingesting {sup 137}Cs as compared with control animals, with the exception of a slight increase in Treg percentage at the age of 12 weeks. Functional tests, including proliferative response to mitogens such as phytohaemagglutinin, response to alloantigens in mixed lymphocyte reaction and immunoglobulin response to vaccine antigens such as tetanus toxin and keyhole limpet haemocyanin did not show any significant functional modification of the immune system in {sup 137}Cs-ingesting animals as compared with control animals. Overall, our results suggest that chronic ingestion of a low concentration of {sup 137}Cs in drinking water in the long term does not have any biologically relevant effect on the immune system.

  17. Chronic stress induced cognitive impairment in APP/PS-1 double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing HAN

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To observe the effect of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS on the cognitive function and brain morphological changes in APP/PS-1 mice, one of the genetic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD, and to investigate the possible role of environmental factors in genetic mouse model of AD. Methods  There were 22-week-old wild-type C57BL/6 male mice (control group, N = 15 and APP/PS-1 double transgenic male mice [N = 27: AD group (N = 13 and AD + CUMS group (N = 14] tested in this study. Morris water maze test was used to evaluate spatial learning and memory of the mice. Amyloid deposition in the hippocampus was determined by Congo red staining. The ultrastructure of neurons in hippocampal CA1 region was observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM.  Results  Compared with control group, AD + CUMS group had significantly longer fifth-day escape latency [(33.14 ± 14.37 s vs (21.22 ± 12.16 s; t = -2.701, P = 0.045], and significantly shortened time spent in platform quadrant [(9.74±1.35 s vs (15.02 ± 1.33 s; t = 2.639, P = 0.012] in Morris water maze test. Compared with AD group, the percentage of amyloid plaque area in hippocampal area was increased in AD + CUMS group [(0.59 ± 0.03% vs (0.04 ± 0.03%; t = -2.900, P = 0.005]. The ultrastructure of hippocampal neurons in AD group was slightly damaged: cellular membrane was intact; cell matrix was uniform; intracelluar lipofuscin could be seen; the structure of nucleus and nuclear membrane had no obvious changes; mild fusion of cristae and membrane was seen in mitochondria; Golgi apparatus was partially indistinct; endoplasmic reticulum was mildly expanded. The ultrastructure of hippocampal neurons in AD + CUMS group was obviously damaged, including blurred cell membrane, reduced low-density and high-density granules in cytoplasm, uneven cell matrix, reduced number of organelles, lipofuscin and autophagosome deposition, obvious condensation of chromatin distributing over

  18. Nicotinamide and other benzamide analogs as agents for overcoming hypoxic cell radiation resistance in tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen deficient hypoxic cells, which are resistant to sparsely ionising radiation, have now been identified in most animal and some human solid tumours and will influence the response of those tumours to radiation treatment. This hypoxia can be either chronic, arising from an oxygen diffusion limitation, or acute, resulting from transient stoppages in microregional blood flow. Extensive experimental studies, especially in the last decade, have shown that nicotinamide and structurally related analogs can effectively sensitize murine tumours to both single and fractionated radiation treatments and that they do so in preference to the effects seen in mouse normal tissues. The earliest studies suggested that this enhancement of radiation damage was the result of an inhibition of the repair mechanisms. However, recent studies in mouse tumours have shown that these drugs prevent transient cessations in blood flow, thus inhibiting the development of acute hypoxia. This novel discovery led to the suggestion that the potential role of these agents as radiosensitizers would be when combined with treatments that overcame chronic hypoxia. The combined nicotinamide with hyperthermia proved that the enhancement of radiation damage by both agents together was greater than that seen with each agent alone. Similar results were later seen for nicotinamide combined with a perfluorochemical emulsion, carbogen breathing, and pentoxifylline, and in all these studies the effects in tumours were always greater than those seen in appropriate normal tissues. Of all the analogs, it is nicotinamide itself which has been the most extensively studied as a radiosensitizer in vivo and the one that shows the greatest effect in animal tumours. It is also an agent that has been well established clinically, with daily doses of up to 6 g, associated with a low incidence of side effects. This human dose is equivalent to 100-200 mg/kg in mice and such doses will maximally sensitize murine tumours to

  19. Evaluation of skeletal and cardiac muscle function after chronic administration of thymosin beta-4 in the dystrophin deficient mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Spurney

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta-4 (Tbeta4 is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. We studied the effects of chronic administration of Tbeta4 on the skeletal and cardiac muscle of dystrophin deficient mdx mice, the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Female wild type (C57BL10/ScSnJ and mdx mice, 8-10 weeks old, were treated with 150 microg of Tbeta4 twice a week for 6 months. To promote muscle pathology, mice were exercised for 30 minutes twice a week. Skeletal and cardiac muscle function were assessed via grip strength and high frequency echocardiography. Localization of Tbeta4 and amount of fibrosis were quantified using immunohistochemistry and Gomori's tri-chrome staining, respectively. Mdx mice treated with Tbeta4 showed a significant increase in skeletal muscle regenerating fibers compared to untreated mdx mice. Tbeta4 stained exclusively in the regenerating fibers of mdx mice. Although untreated mdx mice had significantly decreased skeletal muscle strength compared to untreated wild type, there were no significant improvements in mdx mice after treatment. Systolic cardiac function, measured as percent shortening fraction, was decreased in untreated mdx mice compared to untreated wild type and there was no significant difference after treatment in mdx mice. Skeletal and cardiac muscle fibrosis were also significantly increased in untreated mdx mice compared to wild type, but there was no significant improvement in treated mdx mice. In exercised dystrophin deficient mice, chronic administration of Tbeta4 increased the number of regenerating fibers in skeletal muscle and could have a potential role in treatment of skeletal muscle disease in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  20. microRNA regulation of the embryonic hypoxic response in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Pocock, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Layered strategies to combat hypoxia provide flexibility in dynamic oxygen environments. Here we show that multiple miRNAs are required for hypoxic survival responses during C. elegans embryogenesis. Certain miRNAs promote while others antagonize the hypoxic survival response. We found that expression of the mir-35 family is regulated by hypoxia in a HIF-1-independent manner and loss of mir-35-41 weakens hypoxic survival mechanisms in embryos. In addition, correct regulation of the RNA binding protein, SUP-26, a mir-35 family target, is needed for survival in chronic hypoxia. The identification of the full mRNA target repertoire of these miRNAs will reveal the miRNA-regulated network of hypoxic survival mechanisms in C. elegans. PMID:26063315

  1. Aspects regarding the effect of ANTIOXIDANT OPTIMIZER chronic administration on laboratory pregnant mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia-Mihaela UNGUREAN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, modern people is assaulted all over around by a lot of physical and chemical factors, which may constitute a starting point for many diseases such as cancer, inflammation or aging. In this case, plants are used either to prevent disease or, as an alternative to traditional medication. This study consists in the investigation of some aspects of fetal development and immunity on laboratory mice, by administration of a chronic treatment with Antioxidant t\\optimizer, a product produced by JarrowFormulas®. The animals were weighed to be monitored in different moments, after chronic consumption of administered product; fresh blood smears were made with peripheral blood and after staining were examined for evidence of the percentages of figurative leukocyte elements. After mating the females were sacrificed on day 15 of gestation; the embryos were macroscopic examined, weighed and measured. The same parameters were followed for a lot of pups too. From data obtained, it was found that the product does not support an increase in weight for treated females compared to the control group. After exanination of blood smears you can observe a significant increase in the percentage of eosinophils and basophils for treated females and you can observe also a significant decrease in the percentage of lymphocytes. Both embryos and newborns fetuses from the treated group and had a corporal weight, a cranio-caudal size and placenta weight lower than control group. The results do not pleat for a immunostimulatory effect of administered product and show in this case that it's administration during pregestational and gestational period would be contraindicated, also the mention from the prospect. We believe that further investigations are necessary.

  2. Chronic Contractile Dysfunction without Hypertrophy Does Not Provoke a Compensatory Transcriptional Response in Mouse Hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scot J Matkovich

    Full Text Available Diseased myocardium from humans and experimental animal models shows heightened expression and activity of a specific subtype of phospholipase C (PLC, the splice variant PLCβ1b. Previous studies from our group showed that increasing PLCβ1b expression in adult mouse hearts by viral transduction was sufficient to cause sustained contractile dysfunction of rapid onset, which was maintained indefinitely in the absence of other pathological changes in the myocardium. We hypothesized that impaired contractility alone would be sufficient to induce a compensatory transcriptional response. Unbiased, comprehensive mRNA-sequencing was performed on 6 biological replicates of rAAV6-treated blank, PLCβ1b and PLCβ1a (closely related but inactive splice variant hearts 8 weeks after injection, when reduced contractility was manifest in PLCβ1b hearts without evidence of induced hypertrophy. Expression of PLCβ1b resulted in expression changes in only 9 genes at FDR<0.1 when compared with control and these genes appeared unrelated to contractility. Importantly, PLCβ1a caused similar mild expression changes to PLCβ1b, despite a complete lack of effect of this isoform on cardiac contractility. We conclude that contractile depression caused by PLCβ1b activation is largely independent of changes in the transcriptome, and thus that lowered contractility is not sufficient in itself to provoke measurable transcriptomic alterations. In addition, our data stress the importance of a stringent control group to filter out transcriptional changes unrelated to cardiac function.

  3. Chronic Contractile Dysfunction without Hypertrophy Does Not Provoke a Compensatory Transcriptional Response in Mouse Hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkovich, Scot J; Grubb, David R; McMullen, Julie R; Woodcock, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Diseased myocardium from humans and experimental animal models shows heightened expression and activity of a specific subtype of phospholipase C (PLC), the splice variant PLCβ1b. Previous studies from our group showed that increasing PLCβ1b expression in adult mouse hearts by viral transduction was sufficient to cause sustained contractile dysfunction of rapid onset, which was maintained indefinitely in the absence of other pathological changes in the myocardium. We hypothesized that impaired contractility alone would be sufficient to induce a compensatory transcriptional response. Unbiased, comprehensive mRNA-sequencing was performed on 6 biological replicates of rAAV6-treated blank, PLCβ1b and PLCβ1a (closely related but inactive splice variant) hearts 8 weeks after injection, when reduced contractility was manifest in PLCβ1b hearts without evidence of induced hypertrophy. Expression of PLCβ1b resulted in expression changes in only 9 genes at FDRcaused similar mild expression changes to PLCβ1b, despite a complete lack of effect of this isoform on cardiac contractility. We conclude that contractile depression caused by PLCβ1b activation is largely independent of changes in the transcriptome, and thus that lowered contractility is not sufficient in itself to provoke measurable transcriptomic alterations. In addition, our data stress the importance of a stringent control group to filter out transcriptional changes unrelated to cardiac function. PMID:27359099

  4. Perinatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Ming-Chi Lai; San-Nan Yang

    2010-01-01

    Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is an important cause of brain injury in the newborn and can result in long-term devastating consequences. Perinatal hypoxia is a vital cause of long-term neurologic complications varying from mild behavioural deficits to severe seizure, mental retardation, and/or cerebral palsy in the newborn. In the mammalian developing brain, ongoing research into pathophysiological mechanism of neuronal injury and therapeutic strategy after perinatal hypoxia...

  5. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cells Contribute to the Stromal Myofibroblasts in Leukemic NOD/SCID Mouse In Vivo

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    Ryosuke Shirasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported that chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML cells converted into myofibroblasts to create a microenvironment for proliferation of CML cells in vitro. To analyze a biological contribution of CML-derived myofibroblasts in vivo, we observed the characters of leukemic nonobese diabetes/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID mouse. Bone marrow nonadherent mononuclear cells as well as human CD45-positive cells obtained from CML patients were injected to the irradiated NOD/SCID mice. When the chimeric BCR-ABL transcript was demonstrated in blood, human CML cells were detected in NOD/SCID murine bone marrow. And CML-derived myofibroblasts composed with the bone marrow-stroma, which produced significant amounts of human vascular endothelial growth factor A. When the parental CML cells were cultured with myofibroblasts separated from CML cell-engrafted NOD/SCID murine bone marrow, CML cells proliferated significantly. These observations indicate that CML cells make an adequate microenvironment for their own proliferation in vivo.

  6. Metabolomic identification of biochemical changes induced by fluoxetine and imipramine in a chronic mild stress mouse model of depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Jung, Yang-Hee; Jang, Choon-Gon; Chun, Kwang-Hoon; Kwon, Sung Won; Lee, Jeongmi

    2015-03-01

    Metabolomics was applied to a C57BL/6N mouse model of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CMS). Such mice were treated with two antidepressants from different categories: fluoxetine and imipramine. Metabolic profiling of the hippocampus was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis on samples prepared under optimized conditions, followed by principal component analysis, partial least squares-discriminant analysis, and pair-wise orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analyses. Body weight measurement and behavior tests including an open field test and the forced swimming test were completed with the mice as a measure of the phenotypes of depression and antidepressive effects. As a result, 23 metabolites that had been differentially expressed among the control, CMS, and antidepressant-treated groups demonstrated that amino acid metabolism, energy metabolism, adenosine receptors, and neurotransmitters are commonly perturbed by drug treatment. Potential predictive markers for treatment effect were identified: myo-inositol for fluoxetine and lysine and oleic acid for imipramine. Collectively, the current study provides insights into the molecular mechanisms of the antidepressant effects of two widely used medications.

  7. Chronic Pharmacological mGluR5 Inhibition Prevents Cognitive Impairment and Reduces Pathogenesis in an Alzheimer Disease Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Alison; Vasefi, Maryam; Vander Tuin, Cheryl; McQuaid, Robyn J; Anisman, Hymie; Ferguson, Stephen S G

    2016-05-31

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) oligomers contribute to the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease (AD), and metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) has been shown to act as a receptor for both Aβ oligomers and cellular prion proteins. Furthermore, the genetic deletion of mGluR5 in an APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of AD improves cognitive function and reduces Aβ plaques and Aβ oligomer concentrations. Here, we show that chronic administration of the orally bioavailable mGluR5-selective negative allosteric modulator CTEP, which is similar in structure, potency, and selectivity to Basimglurant (RO4917523), which is currently in phase II clinical development for major depressive disorder and fragile X syndrome, reverses cognitive decline in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice and reduces Aβ plaque deposition and soluble Aβ oligomer concentrations in both APPswe/PS1ΔE9 and 3xTg-AD male mice. These findings suggest that CTEP or its analogue Basimglutant might potentially be an effective therapeutic for the treatment of AD patients. PMID:27210751

  8. Chronic Microdose Lithium Treatment Prevented Memory Loss and Neurohistopathological Changes in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marielza Andrade Nunes

    Full Text Available The use of lithium is well established in bipolar disorders and the benefits are being demonstrated in neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, our group showed that treatment with microdose lithium stabilized the cognitive deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD patients. In order to verify the lithium microdose potential in preventing the disease development, the aim of this work was to verify the effects of chronic treatment with microdose lithium given before and after the appearance of symptoms in a mouse model of a disease similar to AD. Transgenic mice (Cg-Tg(PDGFB-APPSwInd20Lms/2J and their non-transgenic litter mate genetic controls were treated with lithium carbonate (0.25mg/Kg/day in drinking water for 16 or 8 months starting at two and ten months of age, respectively [corrected]. Similar groups were treated with water. At the end of treatments, both lithium treated transgenic groups and non-transgenic mice showed no memory disruption, different from what was observed in the water treated transgenic group. Transgenic mice treated with lithium since two months of age showed decreased number of senile plaques, no neuronal loss in cortex and hippocampus and increased BDNF density in cortex, when compared to non-treated transgenic mice. It is suitable to conclude that these data support the use of microdose lithium in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease, once the neurohistopathological characteristics of the disease were modified and the memory of transgenic animals was maintained.

  9. Chronic Microdose Lithium Treatment Prevented Memory Loss and Neurohistopathological Changes in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Marielza Andrade; Schöwe, Natalia Mendes; Monteiro-Silva, Karla Cristina; Baraldi-Tornisielo, Ticiana; Souza, Suzzanna Ingryd Gonçalves; Balthazar, Janaina; Albuquerque, Marilia Silva; Caetano, Ariadiny Lima; Viel, Tania Araujo; Buck, Hudson Sousa

    2015-01-01

    The use of lithium is well established in bipolar disorders and the benefits are being demonstrated in neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, our group showed that treatment with microdose lithium stabilized the cognitive deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. In order to verify the lithium microdose potential in preventing the disease development, the aim of this work was to verify the effects of chronic treatment with microdose lithium given before and after the appearance of symptoms in a mouse model of a disease similar to AD. Transgenic mice (Cg-Tg(PDGFB-APPSwInd)20Lms/2J) and their non-transgenic litter mate genetic controls were treated with lithium carbonate (0.25mg/Kg/day in drinking water) for 16 or 8 months starting at two and ten months of age, respectively [corrected]. Similar groups were treated with water. At the end of treatments, both lithium treated transgenic groups and non-transgenic mice showed no memory disruption, different from what was observed in the water treated transgenic group. Transgenic mice treated with lithium since two months of age showed decreased number of senile plaques, no neuronal loss in cortex and hippocampus and increased BDNF density in cortex, when compared to non-treated transgenic mice. It is suitable to conclude that these data support the use of microdose lithium in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease, once the neurohistopathological characteristics of the disease were modified and the memory of transgenic animals was maintained. PMID:26605788

  10. The mouse as a model for understanding chronic diseases of aging: the histopathologic basis of aging in inbred mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Harrison

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Inbred mice provide a unique tool to study aging populations because of the genetic homogeneity within an inbred strain, their short life span, and the tools for analysis which are available. A large-scale longitudinal and cross-sectional aging study was conducted on 30 inbred strains to determine, using histopathology, the type and diversity of diseases mice develop as they age. These data provide tools that when linked with modern in silico genetic mapping tools, can begin to unravel the complex genetics of many of the common chronic diseases associated with aging in humans and other mammals. In addition, novel disease models were discovered in some strains, such as rhabdomyosarcoma in old A/J mice, to diseases affecting many but not all strains including pseudoxanthoma elasticum, pulmonary adenoma, alopecia areata, and many others. This extensive data set is now available online and provides a useful tool to help better understand strain-specific background diseases that can complicate interpretation of genetically engineered mice and other manipulatable mouse studies that utilize these strains.

  11. Distinct graft-versus-leukemic stem cell effects of early or delayed donor leukocyte infusions in a mouse chronic myeloid leukemia model

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Yi-Fen; Gavrilescu, L Cristina; Betancur, Monica; Lazarides, Katherine; Klingemann, Hans; Van Etten, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Among hematologic neoplasms, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is exquisitely sensitive to graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) because patients relapsing after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (alloHSCT) can be cured by donor leukocyte infusion (DLI); however, the cellular mechanisms and strategies to separate GVL from GVHD are unclear. We used a BCR-ABL1 transduction/transplantation mouse model to study the mechanisms of DLI in MHC-matched, minor histocompatibility antigen–mismatched ...

  12. Role of bile acids, prostaglandins and COX inhibitors in chronic esophagitis in a mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C Poplawski; D Sosnowski; A Szaflarska-Poplawska; J Sarosiek; R McCallum; Z Bartuzi

    2006-01-01

    33 %). In HCl/P/BA/INDO group the esophagitis surface was larger than that in not treated group (33%). In HCL/P group the surface of esophagus with ulceration was significantly larger (10-fold) than that in HCl/P/BA group. The PGE2 concentration was significantly higher in HCl/P group than in HCl/P/BA group.The PGE2 concentration in lower part of esophagus was also significantly higher in middle than those in HCl and HCl/P/BA groups. In upper part of esophagus the PGE2 concentration was significantly higher in HCl/P/BA group than that in group treated with indometacine (46%). We also observed higher PGE2 concentration in middle part of esophagus in HCl/P/BA group than those in group treated with indometacine and in group treated with indometacin and NS-398 (by 52% and 43% respectively).CONCLUSION: Pepsin is the pivotal factor in the development of chronic esophageal injury. Bile acids diminish chronic esophageal injury induced by HCl/P, indicating its potential negative impact on pepsin proteolytic potential,pivotal for mucosal injury in low pH. The role of selective COX inhibitors is still unclear, and needs more investigations. This novel chronic experimental esophagitis is an excellent model for further study on the role of cytokines in genetically modified animals.

  13. Marine Compound Xyloketal B Reduces Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Jiao Xiao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy causes neurodegeneration and brain injury, leading to sensorimotor dysfunction. Xyloketal B is a novel marine compound isolated from a mangrove fungus Xylaria species (no. 2508 with unique antioxidant effects. In this study, we investigated the effects and mechanism of xyloketal B on oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced neuronal cell death in mouse primary cortical culture and on hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal mice in vivo. We found that xyloketal B reduced anoxia-induced neuronal cell death in vitro, as well as infarct volume in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury model in vivo. Furthermore, xyloketal B improved functional behavioral recovery of the animals following hypoxic-ischemic insult. In addition, xyloketal B significantly decreased calcium entry, reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells, reduced the levels of cleaved caspase-3 and Bax proteins, and increased the level of Bcl-2 protein after the hypoxic-ischemic injury. Our findings indicate that xyloketal B is effective in models of hypoxia-ischemia and thus has potential as a treatment for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

  14. The role of polyamines in protein-dependent hypoxic tolerance of Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vigne Paul

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic hypoxia is a major component of ischemic diseases such as stroke or myocardial infarction. Drosophila is more tolerant to hypoxia than most mammalian species. It is considered as a useful model organism to identify new mechanisms of hypoxic tolerance. The hypoxic tolerance of flies has previously been reported to be enhanced by low protein diets. This study analyses the mechanisms involved. Results Feeding adult Drosophila on a yeast diet dramatically reduced their longevities under chronic hypoxic conditions (5% O2. Mean and maximum longevities became close to the values observed for starving flies. The action of dietary yeast was mimicked by a whole casein hydrolysate and by anyone of the 20 natural amino acids that compose proteins. It was mimicked by amino acid intermediates of the urea cycle such as L-citrulline and L-ornithine, and by polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine. α-difluoromethylornithine, a specific inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, partially protected hypoxic flies from amino acid toxicity but not from polyamine toxicity. N1-guanyl-1,7 diaminoheptane, a specific inhibitor of eIF5A hypusination, partially relieved the toxicities of both amino acids and polyamines. Conclusion Dietary amino acids reduced the longevity of chronically hypoxic flies fed on a sucrose diet. Pharmacological evidence suggests that the synthesis of polyamines and the hypusination of eIF5A contributed to the life-shortening effect of dietary amino acids.

  15. Game performance and intermittent hypoxic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinckson, E A; Hamlin, M J; Wood, M R; Hopkins, W G

    2007-08-01

    Live high-train low altitude exposure simulated by hypoxic devices may improve athletic performance. In this study, intermittent normobaric hypoxia was achieved with the GO2altitude hypoxicator to determine its effects on sea level performance in rugby players. Ten players were randomly assigned to two groups. Players in each group received 14 sessions of either hypoxic (10-15% O(2)) or normoxic (21% O(2)) exposure at rest over 14 consecutive days in a single blind fashion. Various performance measures were obtained consecutively in a single testing session pre- and post-exposure. Effects of hypoxic exposure on maximum speed and sprint times were trivial (rugby simulation, hypoxic exposure produced impairments of peak power in two scrums (15%, +/-8%; 9%, +/-7%) and impairments of time in offensive sprints (7%, +/-8%) and tackle sprints (11%, +/-9%). Pending further research, rugby players would be unwise to use normobaric intermittent hypoxic exposure to prepare for games at sea level. PMID:17311807

  16. Antidepressant-like effects of oleoylethanolamide in a mouse model of chronic unpredictable mild stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng; Yu, Hai-Ling; Tian-Lan; Zhang, Feng; Quan, Zhe-Shan

    2015-06-01

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is an endocannabinoid analog that belongs to a family of endogenous acylethanolamides. Increasing evidence suggests that OEA may act as an endogenous neuroprotective factor and participate in the control of mental disorder-related behaviors. In this study, we examined whether OEA is effective against depression and investigated the role of circulating endogenous acylethanolamides during stress. Mice were subjected to 28days of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), and during the last 21days, treated with oral OEA (1.5-6mg/kg) or 6mg/kg fluoxetine. Sucrose preference and open field test activity were used to evaluate depression-like behaviors during CUMS and after OEA treatment. Weights of the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were determined, and the adrenal index was measured. Furthermore, changes in serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), corticosterone (CORT) and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were detected. Our findings indicate that OEA normalized sucrose preferences, locomotion distances, rearing frequencies, prefrontal cortex and hippocampal atrophy, and adrenal indices. In addition, OEA reversed the abnormalities of BDNF and MDA levels and SOD activities in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, as well as changes in serum levels of ACTH, CORT, and T-AOC. The antidepressant effects of OEA may be related to the regulation of BDNF levels in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, antioxidant defenses, and normalizing hyperactivity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA). PMID:25864425

  17. The Enduring Hypoxic Response of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Rustad, Tige R; Harrell, Maria. I.; Liao, Reiling; David R Sherman

    2008-01-01

    Background A significant body of evidence accumulated over the last century suggests a link between hypoxic microenvironments within the infected host and the latent phase of tuberculosis. Studies to test this correlation have identified the M. tuberculosis initial hypoxic response, controlled by the two-component response regulator DosR. The initial hypoxic response is completely blocked in a dosR deletion mutant. Methodology/Principal Findings We show here that a dosR deletion mutant enters...

  18. Development of doxorubicin-induced chronic cardiotoxicity in the B6C3F1 mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serum levels of cardiac troponins serve as biomarkers of myocardial injury. However, troponins are released into the serum only after damage to cardiac tissue has occurred. Here, we report development of a mouse model of doxorubicin (DOX)-induced chronic cardiotoxicity to aid in the identification of predictive biomarkers of early events of cardiac tissue injury. Male B6C3F1 mice were administered intravenous DOX at 3 mg/kg body weight, or an equivalent volume of saline, once a week for 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 weeks, resulting in cumulative DOX doses of 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, and 42 mg/kg, respectively. Mice were sacrificed a week following the last dose. A significant reduction in body weight gain was observed in mice following exposure to a weekly DOX dose for 1 week and longer compared to saline-treated controls. DOX treatment also resulted in declines in red blood cell count, hemoglobin level, and hematocrit compared to saline-treated controls after the 2nd weekly dose until the 8th and 9th doses, followed by a modest recovery. All DOX-treated mice had significant elevations in cardiac troponin T concentrations in plasma compared to saline-treated controls, indicating cardiac tissue injury. Also, a dose-related increase in the severity of cardiac lesions was seen in mice exposed to 24 mg/kg DOX and higher cumulative doses. Mice treated with cumulative DOX doses of 30 mg/kg and higher showed a significant decline in heart rate, suggesting drug-induced cardiac dysfunction. Altogether, these findings demonstrate the development of DOX-induced chronic cardiotoxicity in B6C3F1 mice. -- Highlights: ► 24 mg/kg was a cumulative cardiotoxic dose of doxorubicin in male B6C3F1 mice. ► Doxorubicin-induced hematological toxicity was in association with splenomegaly. ► Doxorubicin induced severe testicular toxicity in B6C3F1 male mice.

  19. Detection of hypoxic cells in murine tumors using the comet assay. Comparison with a conventional radiobiological assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comet (single-cell electrophoresis) assay has been developed as a method for measuring DNA damage in single cells after irradiation. We have developed our own methods and image analysis system for the comet assay to identify hypoxic fractions. In vitro, we tested our system using a cultured tumor cell line (SCCVII). In vivo, we compared the hypoxic fractions detected by this assay with those determined by the in vivo-in vitro clonogenic assay using two rodent tumors (SCCVII/C3H, EMT6/KU/balb/c), which exhibit different types of hypoxia: acute and chronic. In vitro, our method could differentiate hypoxic cells from oxic cells, using the parameter of tail moment. In vivo, there were good correlations between the hypoxic fractions determined by the comet assay and by the clonogenic assay, in SCCVII/C3H (r=0.85) and in EMT6/KU/balb/c (r=0.75) tumors. By comparison of the two methods in chronically hypoxic and acutely hypoxic tumors, we further confirmed that the comet assay is clinically useful for estimating hypoxic fractions of solid tumors. (author)

  20. Neurodegeneration severity can be predicted from early microglia alterations monitored in vivo in a mouse model of chronic glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Bosco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Microglia serve key homeostatic roles, and respond to neuronal perturbation and decline with a high spatiotemporal resolution. The course of all chronic CNS pathologies is thus paralleled by local microgliosis and microglia activation, which begin at early stages of the disease. However, the possibility of using live monitoring of microglia during early disease progression to predict the severity of neurodegeneration has not been explored. Because the retina allows live tracking of fluorescent microglia in their intact niche, here we investigated their early changes in relation to later optic nerve neurodegeneration. To achieve this, we used the DBA/2J mouse model of inherited glaucoma, which develops progressive retinal ganglion cell degeneration of variable severity during aging, and represents a useful model to study pathogenic mechanisms of retinal ganglion cell decline that are similar to those in human glaucoma. We imaged CX3CR1+/GFP microglial cells in vivo at ages ranging from 1 to 5 months by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO and quantified cell density and morphological activation. We detected early microgliosis at the optic nerve head (ONH, where axonopathy first manifests, and could track attenuation of this microgliosis induced by minocycline. We also observed heterogeneous and dynamic patterns of early microglia activation in the retina. When the same animals were aged and analyzed for the severity of optic nerve pathology at 10 months of age, we found a strong correlation with the levels of ONH microgliosis at 3 to 4 months. Our findings indicate that live imaging and monitoring the time course and levels of early retinal microgliosis and microglia activation in glaucoma could serve as indicators of future neurodegeneration severity.

  1. Hypoxic pulmonary vasodilation: a paradigm shift with a hydrogen sulfide mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Kenneth R.; Whitfield, Nathan L.; Bearden, Shawn E.; St. Leger, Judy; Nilson, Erika; Gao, Yan; Madden, Jane A.

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HVC), an intrinsic and assumed ubiquitous response of mammalian pulmonary blood vessels, matches regional ventilation to perfusion via an unknown O2-sensing mechanism. Global pulmonary hypoxia experienced by individuals suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or numerous hypoventilation syndromes, including sleep apnea, often produces maladaptive pulmonary hypertension, but pulmonary hypertension is not observed in diving mammals, where profoun...

  2. Chronic Anatabine Treatment Reduces Alzheimer's Disease (AD-Like Pathology and Improves Socio-Behavioral Deficits in a Transgenic Mouse Model of AD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Verma

    Full Text Available Anatabine is a minor tobacco alkaloid, which is also found in plants of the Solanaceae family and displays a chemical structure similarity with nicotine. We have shown previously that anatabine displays some anti-inflammatory properties and reduces microgliosis and tau phosphorylation in a pure mouse model of tauopathy. We therefore investigated the effects of a chronic oral treatment with anatabine in a transgenic mouse model (Tg PS1/APPswe of Alzheimer's disease (AD which displays pathological Aβ deposits, neuroinflammation and behavioral deficits. In the elevated plus maze, Tg PS1/APPswe mice exhibited hyperactivity and disinhibition compared to wild-type mice. Six and a half months of chronic oral anatabine treatment, suppressed hyperactivity and disinhibition in Tg PS1/APPswe mice compared to Tg PS1/APPswe receiving regular drinking water. Tg PS1/APPswe mice also elicited profound social interaction and social memory deficits, which were both alleviated by the anatabine treatment. We found that anatabine reduces the activation of STAT3 and NFκB in the vicinity of Aβ deposits in Tg PS1/APPswe mice resulting in a reduction of the expression of some of their target genes including Bace1, iNOS and Cox-2. In addition, a significant reduction in microgliosis and pathological deposition of Aβ was observed in the brain of Tg PS1/APPswe mice treated with anatabine. This is the first study to investigate the impact of chronic anatabine treatment on AD-like pathology and behavior in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Overall, our data show that anatabine reduces β-amyloidosis, neuroinflammation and alleviates some behavioral deficits in Tg PS1/APPswe, supporting further exploration of anatabine as a possible disease modifying agent for the treatment of AD.

  3. CHANGES IN THE GLUTATHIONE SYSTEM IN P19 EMBRYONAL CARCINOMA CELLS UNDER HYPOXIC CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Orlov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. According to modern perceptions, tumor growth, along with oxidative stress formation, is accompanied by hypoxia. Nowadays studying the regulation of cellular molecular system functioning by conformational changes in proteins appears to be a topical issue. Research goal was to evaluate the state of the glutathione system and the level of protein glutathionylation in P19 embryonal carcinoma (EC cells under hypoxic conditions.Material and methods. P19 EC cells (mouse embryonal carcinoma cultured under normoxic and hypox-ic conditions served the research material.The concentration of total, oxidized, reduced and protein-bound glutathione, the reduced to oxidized thiol ratio as well as glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activity were determined by spectropho-tometry.Results. Glutathione imbalance was accompanied by a decrease in P19 EC cell redox status under hypox-ic conditions against the backdrop of a rise in protein-bound glutathione.Conclusions. As a result of the conducted study oxidative stress formation was identified when modeling hypoxia in P19 embryonal carcinoma cells. The rise in the concentration of protein-bound glutathione may indicate the role of protein glutathionylation in regulation of P19 cell metabolism and functions un-der hypoxia. 

  4. Impaired Bronchoprotection Is Not Induced by Increased Smooth Muscle Mass in Chronic Treatment In Vivo with Formoterol in Asthmatic Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Luo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Inhaling β2-adrenoceptor agonist is first-line asthma treatment, which is used for both acute relief and prevention of bronchoconstriction. However, chronic use of β-agonists results in impaired bronchoprotection and increasing occurrences of severe asthma exacerbation, even death in clinical practice. The mechanism of β-adrenoceptor hyposensitivity has not been thoroughly elucidated thus far. Bronchial smooth muscle contraction induces airway narrowing and also mediates airway inflammation. Moreover, bronchial smooth muscle mass significantly increases in asthmatics. We aimed to establish an asthmatic model that demonstrated that formoterol induced impaired bronchoprotection and to see whether increased smooth muscle mass played a role in it. Methods: We combined routine allergen challenging (seven weeks with repeated application of formoterol, formoterol plus budesonide or physiological saline in allergen-sensitized BALB/c mouse. The bronchoprotection mediated by β-agonist was measured in five consecutive weeks. Smooth muscle mass was shown by morphometric analysis, and α-actin expression was detected by western blot. Results: The trend of bronchoprotection was wavy in drug interventional groups, which initially increased and then decreased. Chronic treatment with formoterol significantly impaired bronchoprotection. According to the morphometric analysis and α-actin expression, no significant difference was detected in smooth muscle mass in all groups. Conclusion: This experiment successfully established that a chronic asthmatic mouse model, which manifested typical features of asthmatic patients, with chronic use of formoterol, results in a loss of bronchoprotection. No significant difference was detected in smooth muscle mass in all groups, which implied some subcellular signalling changes may be the key points.

  5. Cardiac biomarkers in neonatal hypoxic ischaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweetman, D

    2012-04-01

    Following a perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic insult, term infants commonly develop cardiovascular dysfunction. Troponin-T, troponin-I and brain natriuretic peptide are sensitive indicators of myocardial compromise. The long-term effects of cardiovascular dysfunction on neurodevelopmental outcome following perinatal hypoxic ischaemia remain controversial. Follow-up studies are warranted to ensure optimal cardiac function in adulthood. CONCLUSION: Cardiac biomarkers may improve the diagnosis of myocardial injury, help guide management, estimate mortality risk and may also aid in longterm neurodevelopmental outcome prediction following neonatal hypoxic-ischaemia.

  6. The Functional Study of a Chinese Herbal Compounded Antidepressant Medicine--Jie Yu Chu Fan Capsule on Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Ding

    Full Text Available Jie Yu Chu Fan capsule (JYCF is a new compounded Chinese herbal medicine for the treatment of depression. The present study was designed to explore the antidepressant effects and the possible mechanisms of JYCF by using chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS mouse model and comparing results to that of fluoxetine. Behavioral tests including an open field test, sucrose preference test and forced swim test were performed to evaluate the antidepressant effects of JYCF. The concentrations of monoamine neurotransmitters and metabolic products including norepinephrine (NE, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, dopamine (DA, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA, homovanillic acid (HVA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice were determined by means of high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC. The results show that a successful mouse CUMS model was established through 5 weeks of continuous unpredictable stimulation, as indicated by the significant decrease in sucrose preference and locomotor activity and increase in immobility time in the forced swim test. Chronic treatment of JYCF (1.25, 2.5 and 5 g/kg and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg significantly reversed the CUMS-induced behavioral abnormalities. JYCF (1.25, 2.5 and 5 g/kg significantly increased NE in CUMS mouse prefrontal cortex (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.05 respectively and 5-HT in hippocampus (P < 0.05. In summary, our findings suggest that JYCF exerts comparable antidepressant-like effects to that of fluoxetine in CUMS mice. Besides, the antidepressant-like effect of JYCF is mediated by the increase of monoaminergic transmitters including 5-HT and NE.

  7. Targeting hypoxic tumour cells to overcome metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microenvironment within solid tumours can influence the metastatic dissemination of tumour cells, and recent evidence suggests that poorly oxygenated (hypoxic) cells in primary tumours can also affect the survival and proliferation of metastatic tumour cells in distant organs. Hypoxic tumour cells have been historically targeted during radiation therapy in attempts to improve loco-regional control rates of primary tumours since hypoxic cells are known to be resistant to ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage. There are, therefore, a number of therapeutic strategies to directly target hypoxic cells in primary (and metastatic) tumours, and several compounds are becoming available to functionally inhibit hypoxia-induced proteins that are known to promote metastasis. This mini-review summarizes several established and emerging experimental strategies to target hypoxic cells in primary tumours with potential clinical application to the treatment of patients with tumour metastases or patients at high risk of developing metastatic disease. Targeting hypoxic tumour cells to reduce metastatic disease represents an important advance in the way scientists and clinicians view the influence of tumour hypoxia on therapeutic outcome

  8. Peripheral Nerve Injury Is Associated with Chronic, Reversible Changes in Global DNA Methylation in the Mouse Prefrontal Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Tajerian, Maral; Alvarado, Sebastian; Millecamps, Magali; Vachon, Pascal; Crosby, Cecilia; Bushnell, M. Catherine; Szyf, Moshe; Stone, Laura S.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in brain structure and cortical function are associated with many chronic pain conditions including low back pain and fibromyalgia. The magnitude of these changes correlates with the duration and/or the intensity of chronic pain. Most studies report changes in common areas involved in pain modulation, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC), and pain-related pathological changes in the PFC can be reversed with effective treatment. While the mechanisms underlying these changes are unknow...

  9. Peripheral nerve injury is associated with chronic, reversible changes in global DNA methylation in the mouse prefrontal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maral Tajerian

    Full Text Available Changes in brain structure and cortical function are associated with many chronic pain conditions including low back pain and fibromyalgia. The magnitude of these changes correlates with the duration and/or the intensity of chronic pain. Most studies report changes in common areas involved in pain modulation, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC, and pain-related pathological changes in the PFC can be reversed with effective treatment. While the mechanisms underlying these changes are unknown, they must be dynamically regulated. Epigenetic modulation of gene expression in response to experience and environment is reversible and dynamic. Epigenetic modulation by DNA methylation is associated with abnormal behavior and pathological gene expression in the central nervous system. DNA methylation might also be involved in mediating the pathologies associated with chronic pain in the brain. We therefore tested a whether alterations in DNA methylation are found in the brain long after chronic neuropathic pain is induced in the periphery using the spared nerve injury modal and b whether these injury-associated changes are reversible by interventions that reverse the pathologies associated with chronic pain. Six months following peripheral nerve injury, abnormal sensory thresholds and increased anxiety were accompanied by decreased global methylation in the PFC and the amygdala but not in the visual cortex or the thalamus. Environmental enrichment attenuated nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity and reversed the changes in global PFC methylation. Furthermore, global PFC methylation correlated with mechanical and thermal sensitivity in neuropathic mice. In summary, induction of chronic pain by peripheral nerve injury is associated with epigenetic changes in the brain. These changes are detected long after the original injury, at a long distance from the site of injury and are reversible with environmental manipulation. Changes in brain structure and

  10. Essential Contributions of Serotonin Transporter Inhibition to the Acute and Chronic Actions of Fluoxetine and Citalopram in the SERT Met172 Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nackenoff, Alex G; Moussa-Tooks, Alexandra B; McMeekin, Austin M; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Blakely, Randy D

    2016-06-01

    Depression is a common mental illness and a leading cause of disability. The most widely prescribed antidepressant medications are serotonin (5-HT) selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Although there is much support for 5-HT transporter (SERT) antagonism as a basis of antidepressant efficacy, this evidence is indirect and other targets and mechanisms have been proposed. In order to distinguish SERT-dependent and -independent effects of SSRIs, we developed a knock-in mouse model whereby high-affinity interactions of many antidepressants at SERT have been ablated via knock-in substitution (SERT Met172) without disrupting 5-HT recognition or uptake. Here we utilize the C57BL/6J SERT Met172 model to evaluate SERT dependence for the actions of two widely prescribed SSRIs, fluoxetine and citalopram, in tests sensitive to acute and chronic actions of antidepressants. In the tail suspension and forced swim tests, fluoxetine and citalopram fail to reduce immobility in SERT Met172 mice. In addition, SERT Met172 mice are insensitive to chronic fluoxetine and citalopram administration in the novelty induced hypophagia test (NIH) and fail to exhibit enhanced proliferation or survival of hippocampal stem cells. In both acute and chronic studies, SERT Met172 mice maintained sensitivity to paroxetine, an antidepressant that is unaffected by the Met172 mutation. Together, these studies provide definitive support for an essential role of SERT antagonism in the acute and chronic actions of two commonly used SSRIs in these tests, and reinforce the utility of the SERT Met172 model for isolating SERT/5-HT contributions of drug actions in vivo. PMID:26514584

  11. Colocalization of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor and T type Cav3.2 channel in dorsal root ganglia in chronic inflammatory pain mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Si-Fang; Yu, Xiao-Lu; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Ya-Jun; Sun, Yan-Gang; Liu, Xing-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is a neurotrophic factor and plays important roles in the nervous system. Increasing evidence supports that IGF-1 contributes to pain hypersensitivity through its insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) by activating IGF-1R/Akt or MAPK signaling pathways, whereas T-type Cav3.2 channel can facilitate and amplify pain signals originating from the sensory periphery. A recent study showed that activated IGF-1R can increase T-type Cav3.2 channel currents and further activate the G protein-dependent PKCα pathway to contribute to inflammatory pain sensitivity. However, the colocalization of IGF-1R and Cav3.2 in mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) under chronic inflammatory pain conditions remains elusive. In this study, we investigated changes in the expression of IGF-1R and the Cav3.2 channel, and their colocalization in mouse DRGs in chronic inflammatory pain condition (induced by complete Freund's adjuvant intraplanter injection) using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry approaches to confirm that Cav3.2 channel can mediate pain facilitation following IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling. We found that IGF-1R was expressed extensively in DRG neurons including small-, medium-, and large-sized neurons, whereas Cav3.2 channel was expressed exclusively in small-sized DRG neurons of naive mice. Expression of Cav3.2, but not IGF-1R, and colocalization of Cav3.2 and IGF-1R were increased in lumbar (L)4-L6 primary sensory neurons in DRGs of mice in chronic inflammatory pain. Moreover, the increased colocalization of IGF-1R and Cav3.2 is exclusively localized in small- and medium-sized primary sensory neurons. Our findings provided morphological evidence that T-type Cav3.2 channel, at least partially, mediates the pain facilitation of IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling in chronic inflammatory pain condition. PMID:27213932

  12. Overendocytosis of gold nanoparticles increases autophagy and apoptosis in hypoxic human renal proximal tubular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding F

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fengan Ding,1 Yiping Li,1 Jing Liu,1 Lei Liu,1 Wenmin Yu,1 Zhi Wang,1 Haifeng Ni,2 Bicheng Liu,2 Pingsheng Chen1,2 1School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 2Institute of Nephrology, The Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Background: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs can potentially be used in biomedical fields ranging from therapeutics to diagnostics, and their use will result in increased human exposure. Many studies have demonstrated that GNPs can be deposited in the kidneys, particularly in renal tubular epithelial cells. Chronic hypoxic is inevitable in chronic kidney diseases, and it results in renal tubular epithelial cells that are susceptible to different types of injuries. However, the understanding of the interactions between GNPs and hypoxic renal tubular epithelial cells is still rudimentary. In the present study, we characterized the cytotoxic effects of GNPs in hypoxic renal tubular epithelial cells.Results: Both 5 nm and 13 nm GNPs were synthesized and characterized using various biophysical methods, including transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry. We detected the cytotoxicity of 5 and 13 nm GNPs (0, 1, 25, and 50 nM to human renal proximal tubular cells (HK-2 by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and lactate dehydrogenase release assay, but we just found the toxic effect in the 5 nm GNP-treated cells at 50 nM dose under hypoxic condition. Furthermore, the transmission electron microscopy images revealed that GNPs were either localized in vesicles or free in the lysosomes in 5 nm GNPs-treated HK-2 cells, and the cellular uptake of the GNPs in the hypoxic cells was significantly higher than that in normoxic cells. In normoxic HK-2 cells, 5 nm GNPs (50 nM treatment could cause autophagy and cell survival. However, in hypoxic conditions, the GNP exposure at the same condition led to the

  13. Restoration of Haemoglobin Level Using Hydrodynamic Gene Therapy with Erythropoietin Does Not Alleviate the Disease Progression in an Anaemic Mouse Model for TGFβ1-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lea; Wogensen, Lise; Marcussen, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    expressed in non-haematopoietic tissue and today, Epo is recognised as a cytokine with many pleiotropic effects. We hypothesize that hydrodynamic gene therapy with Epo can restore haemoglobin levels in anaemic transgenic mice and that this will attenuate the extracellular matrix accumulation in the kidneys....... The experiment is conducted by hydrodynamic gene transfer of a plasmid encoding murine Epo in a transgenic mouse model that overexpresses TGF-β1 locally in the kidneys. This model develops anaemia due to chronic kidney disease characterised by thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, deposition...... of mesangial matrix and mild interstitial fibrosis. A group of age matched wildtype littermates are treated accordingly. After a single hydrodynamic administration of plasmid DNA containing murine EPO gene, sustained high haemoglobin levels are observed in both transgenic and wildtype mice from 7...

  14. Chronic hemodynamic unloading regulates the morphologic development of newborn mouse hearts transplanted into the ear of isogeneic adult mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The morphologic development of newborn mouse hearts transplanted into the pinna of the ears of isogeneic adult mice was assessed in comparison to in situ ventricular myocardium of recipients. The grafted hearts became vascularized from the auricular artery at the base of the ear, and although these preparations appeared not to be intrinsically innervated, most of them showed grossly visible pulsatile activity. Since they were not subjected to hemodynamic load due to working against a pressure...

  15. Behavioral Abnormalities in a Mouse Model of Chronic Toxoplasmosis Are Associated with MAG1 Antibody Levels and Cyst Burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianchun; Li, Ye; Prandovszky, Emese; Kannan, Geetha; Viscidi, Raphael P; Pletnikov, Mikhail V; Yolken, Robert H

    2016-04-01

    There is marked variation in the human response to Toxoplasma gondii infection. Epidemiological studies indicate associations between strain virulence and severity of toxoplasmosis. Animal studies on the pathogenic effect of chronic infection focused on relatively avirulent strains (e.g. type II) because they can easily establish latent infections in mice, defined by the presence of bradyzoite-containing cysts. To provide insight into virulent strain-related severity of human toxoplasmosis, we established a chronic model of the virulent type I strain using outbred mice. We found that type I-exposed mice displayed variable outcomes ranging from aborted to severe infections. According to antibody profiles, we found that most of mice generated antibodies against T. gondii organism but varied greatly in the production of antibodies against matrix antigen MAG1. There was a strong correlation between MAG1 antibody level and brain cyst burden in chronically infected mice (r = 0.82, p = 0.0021). We found that mice with high MAG1 antibody level displayed lower weight, behavioral changes, altered levels of gene expression and immune activation. The most striking change in behavior we discovered was a blunted response to amphetamine-trigged locomotor activity. The extent of most changes was directly correlated with levels of MAG1 antibody. These changes were not found in mice with less cyst burden or mice that were acutely but not chronically infected. Our finding highlights the critical role of cyst burden in a range of disease severity during chronic infection, the predictive value of MAG1 antibody level to brain cyst burden and to changes in behavior or other pathology in chronically infected mice. Our finding may have important implications for understanding the heterogeneous effects of T. gondii infections in human. PMID:27124472

  16. Development of a Model of Chronic Kidney Disease in the C57BL/6 Mouse with Properties of Progressive Human CKD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahraa Mohammed-Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a major healthcare problem with increasing prevalence in the population. CKD leads to end stage renal disease and increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. As such, it is important to study the mechanisms underlying CKD progression. To this end, an animal model was developed to allow the testing of new treatment strategies or molecular targets for CKD prevention. Many underlying risk factors result in CKD but the disease itself has common features, including renal interstitial fibrosis, tubular epithelial cell loss through apoptosis, glomerular damage, and renal inflammation. Further, CKD shows differences in prevalence between the genders with premenopausal women being relatively resistant to CKD. We sought to develop and characterize an animal model with these common features of human CKD in the C57BL/6 mouse. Mice of this genetic background have been used to produce transgenic strains that are commercially available. Thus, a CKD model in this strain would allow the testing of the effects of numerous genes on the severity or progression of CKD with minimal cost. This paper describes such a mouse model of CKD utilizing angiotensin II and deoxycorticosterone acetate as inducers.

  17. Relationship of Intracellular Free Ca2+ Concentration and Calcium-activated Chloride Channels of Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells in Rats under Hypoxic Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhao; ZHANG Zhenxiang; XU Yongjian; LI Yaqing; YE Tao

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i)and calcium-activated chloride (Clca) channels of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in rats under acute and chronic hypoxic conditions, acute hypoxia-induced contraction was observed in rat pulmonary artery by using routine blood vascular perfusion in vitro. The fluorescence Ca2+indicator Fura-2/AM was used to observe [Ca2+]i of rat PASMCs under normal and chronic hypoxic condition. The effect of Clca channels on PASMCs proliferation was assessed by MTT assay.The Clca channel blockersniflumic acid (NFA) and indaryloxyacetic acid (IAA-94) exerted inhibitory effects on acute hypoxia-evoked contractions in the pulmonary artery. Under chronic hypoxic condition, [Ca2+ ]i was increased. Under normoxic condition, [Ca2+]i was (123.63±18.98) nmol/L, and in hypoxic condition, [Ca2+]i was (281. 75±16.48) nmol/L (P<0.01). Under normoxic condition, [Ca2+]i showed no significant change and no effect on Clca channels was observed (P>0. 05). Chronic hypoxia increased [Ca2+]i which opened Clca channels. The NFA and IAA-94blocked the channels and decreased [Ca2+]i from (281. 75±16.48) nmol/L to (117.66±15.36)nmol/L (P<0.01). MTT assay showed that under chronic hypoxic condition NFA and IAA-94 decreased the value of absorbency (A value) from 0. 459±0. 058 to 0. 224±0. 025 (P<0.01).Hypoxia increased [Ca2+]i which opened Clca channels and had a positive-feedback in [Ca2+]i. Thismay play an important role in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Under chronic hypoxic condition,Clca channel may play a part in the regulation of proliferation of PASMCs.

  18. A novel mouse model for the study of the inhibitory effects of chronic ethanol exposure on direct bone formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excessive alcohol consumption has been reported to interfere with human bone homeostasis and repair in multiple ways. Previous studies have demonstrated that chronic ethanol exposure in the rat via an intragastric dietary delivery system inhibits direct bone formation during distraction osteogenesis...

  19. Up-regulation of nucleotide excision repair in mouse lung and liver following chronic exposure to aflatoxin B{sub 1} and its dependence on p53 genotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulder, Jeanne E. [Pharmacology and Toxicology Graduate Program, Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen' s University Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Bondy, Genevieve S.; Mehta, Rekha [Toxicology Research Division, 2202D, Bureau of Chemical Safety, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Massey, Thomas E., E-mail: masseyt@queensu.ca [Pharmacology and Toxicology Graduate Program, Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen' s University Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2014-03-01

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) is biotransformed in vivo into an epoxide metabolite that forms DNA adducts that may induce cancer if not repaired. p53 is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the regulation of global nucleotide excision repair (NER). Male heterozygous p53 knockout (B6.129-Trp53{sup tm1Brd}N5, Taconic) and wild-type mice were exposed to 0, 0.2 or 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} for 26 weeks. NER activity was assessed with an in vitro assay, using AFB{sub 1}-epoxide adducted plasmid DNA as a substrate. For wild-type mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua adducts was 124% and 96% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm and 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} respectively, and 224% greater in liver extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05). In heterozygous p53 knockout mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua was only 45% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05), and no effect was observed in lung extracts from mice treated with 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} or in liver extracts from mice treated with either AFB{sub 1} concentration. p53 genotype did not affect basal levels of repair. AFB{sub 1} exposure did not alter repair of AFB{sub 1}-derived formamidopyrimidine adducts in lung or liver extracts of either mouse genotype nor did it affect XPA or XPB protein levels. In summary, chronic exposure to AFB{sub 1} increased NER activity in wild-type mice, and this response was diminished in heterozygous p53 knockout mice, indicating that loss of one allele of p53 limits the ability of NER to be up-regulated in response to DNA damage. - Highlights: • Mice are chronically exposed to low doses of the mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}). • The effects of AFB{sub 1} and p53 status on nucleotide excision repair are investigated. • AFB{sub 1} increases nucleotide excision repair in wild type mouse lung and liver. • This increase is attenuated in p53 heterozygous mouse lung and liver. • Results portray the role of p53 in

  20. Up-regulation of nucleotide excision repair in mouse lung and liver following chronic exposure to aflatoxin B1 and its dependence on p53 genotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is biotransformed in vivo into an epoxide metabolite that forms DNA adducts that may induce cancer if not repaired. p53 is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the regulation of global nucleotide excision repair (NER). Male heterozygous p53 knockout (B6.129-Trp53tm1BrdN5, Taconic) and wild-type mice were exposed to 0, 0.2 or 1.0 ppm AFB1 for 26 weeks. NER activity was assessed with an in vitro assay, using AFB1-epoxide adducted plasmid DNA as a substrate. For wild-type mice, repair of AFB1–N7-Gua adducts was 124% and 96% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm and 1.0 ppm AFB1 respectively, and 224% greater in liver extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB1 (p < 0.05). In heterozygous p53 knockout mice, repair of AFB1–N7-Gua was only 45% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB1 (p < 0.05), and no effect was observed in lung extracts from mice treated with 1.0 ppm AFB1 or in liver extracts from mice treated with either AFB1 concentration. p53 genotype did not affect basal levels of repair. AFB1 exposure did not alter repair of AFB1-derived formamidopyrimidine adducts in lung or liver extracts of either mouse genotype nor did it affect XPA or XPB protein levels. In summary, chronic exposure to AFB1 increased NER activity in wild-type mice, and this response was diminished in heterozygous p53 knockout mice, indicating that loss of one allele of p53 limits the ability of NER to be up-regulated in response to DNA damage. - Highlights: • Mice are chronically exposed to low doses of the mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). • The effects of AFB1 and p53 status on nucleotide excision repair are investigated. • AFB1 increases nucleotide excision repair in wild type mouse lung and liver. • This increase is attenuated in p53 heterozygous mouse lung and liver. • Results portray the role of p53 in nucleotide excision repair after AFB1 exposure

  1. Angiotensin II prevents hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and vascular changes in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiotensin II, a vasoconstrictor, has been previously demonstrated to produce a secondary vasodilatation due to release of prostaglandins. Because of this effect, the authors investigated whether infusion of exogenous angiotensin II via miniosmopumps in rats during a 1-wk exposure to chronic hypobaric hypoxia might prevent pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy, and vascular changes. They instrumented the rats with indwelling cardiovascular catheters and compared the hemodynamic and structural response in animals given angiotensin II, indomethacin in addition to angiotensin II (to block prostaglandin production), or saline with or without indomethacin. They then determine whether angiotensin II infusion also prevents acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. They observed that exogenous angiotensin II infusion abolished the rise in pulmonary artery pressure, the right ventricular hypertrophy, and the vascular changes induced during chronic hypoxia in control saline-infused rats with or without indomethacin. The protective effects of angiotensin II was lost when indomethacin was given to block prostaglandin synthesis. During acute hypoxia, both antiotensin II and prostacyclin infusion similarly prevented the rise in pulmonary artery pressure observed in saline-infused rats and in rats given indomethacin or saralasin in addition to angiotensin II. Thus exogenous angiotensin II infusion prevents chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, associated right ventricular hypertrophy, and vascular changes and blocks acute hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, and this is likely related to its ability to release vasodilator prostaglandins

  2. Chronic levodopa treatment alters expression and function of dopamine D3 receptor in the MPTP/p mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Samantha R; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V

    2015-01-12

    Chronic treatment with levodopa or antipsychotics results in manifestation of side-effects such as dyskinesia which correlates with changes in expression and function of receptors and signaling proteins. Previous studies have suggested a role for the dopamine D3 receptor in Parkinson's disease (PD) and tardive dyskinesia. Yet the expression and signaling function of D3 receptor in these disorders is not well understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that chronic levodopa treatment alters both expression and function of D3 receptors in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine plus probenecid (MPTP/p) mouse model of PD. drd3-EGFP reporter mice were injected biweekly with saline or MPTP and probenecid for a 5-week period. During the last two weeks of the 5-week period, the mice were administered saline or levodopa twice daily. Locomotor activity was measured during the treatment period. D3 receptor expression was determined by western blot analysis. D3 receptor signaling function was determined at tissue and single cell level by measuring the activation of D3 receptor-mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. The drd3-EGFP mice administered MPTP/p exhibited akinesia/bradykinesia. Expression of D3 receptor protein in the dorsal striatum specifically increased in the MPTP/p-treated mice administered levodopa. In the dorsal striatum of levodopa and MPTP/p-treated drd3-EGFP mice, administration of a D3 receptor-selective dose of agonist, PD128907, failed to activate D3 receptor-MAPK signaling. These results suggest that MPTP-induced lesion and chronic levodopa treatment alters D3 receptor expression and function in the dorsal striatum which could contribute to the development of dyskinesias and other motor side-effects. PMID:25445374

  3. Chronic Unpredictable Stress Decreases Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Mouse Ovaries: Relationship to Oocytes Developmental Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Min Wu; Mei-Hong Hu; Xian-Hong Tong; Hui Han; Ni Shen; Ren-Tao Jin; Wei Wang; Gui-Xiang Zhou; Guo-Ping He; Yu-Sheng Liu

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) was originally described in the nervous system but has been shown to be expressed in ovary tissues recently, acting as a paracrine/autocrine regulator required for developments of follicles and oocytes. Although it is generally accepted that chronic stress impairs female reproduction and decreases the expression of BDNF in limbic structures of central nervous system, which contributes to mood disorder. However, it is not known whether chroni...

  4. YAP is up-regulated in the bronchial airway smooth muscle of the chronic asthma mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Jing; Xu, Fei; Yu, Jing Jing; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by leukocytic infiltration and tissue remodeling with structural changes including subepithelial fibrosis and ASM cells proliferation. The Hippo pathway is a key regulatory point involved in cell proliferation, fibroblasts, and smooth muscle cell differentiation. In order to disclose the relation between asthma and the Hippo pathway, expression of the Yes-associated protein (YAP), a key gene in the Hippo pathway, in the bronchial smooth muscle of chronic asthma model (...

  5. HYPOXIC INFLAMMATION, A DEADLY BRIDGE TO MALIGNANT TRANSFORMATION AND A FERTILE SOIL FOR CANCER PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Afrasiabi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interplay of the inflammatory microenvironment with its hypoxic niche and the potential mechanism by which they lead to malignant transformation has long been the subject of great controversy and continues to be an area of great interest today. In our previous studies we have examined this subject by using Gia2 knock out mice as the focus of our research. These mice are well known for their tendency to develop chronic inflammation in the sub mucosa of their gut, with gradual worsening and development of colon adenocarcinoma in most as they age. It has also attracted our attention that they develop a significant increase in the number of hypoxic niches in their sub mucosa, proven by EF5 staining.In contradistinction to MSI-high colon adenocarcinomas, we have also shown that histone deacetylation rather than MLH1 promoter methylation is the main mechanism of MLH1 and MSH2 deactivation in these mice. Here we show that hypoxic niches evolve under massive selective pressure of the inflammatory microenvironment as a protective shield offering survival advantage by the up regulation of NFKb and its downstream pathways, which indeed independent of true hypoxia leads to stabilization of HIF as well, securing a dual mechanism for perpetuation and expansion of hypoxic niches. We incorporated western blot and Luciferase assay of cells exposed to hypoxia+/-inflammatory cytokines to acquire data.

  6. Hypoxic ventilatory drive in dogs during thiopental, ketamine, or pentobarbital anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshman, C A; McCullough, R E; Cohen, P J; Weil, J V

    1975-12-01

    The ventilatory responses to isocapnic hypoxia and hypercapnia were studied in seven chronically tracheostomized dogs awake and during anesthesia with pentobarbital (30 mg/kg, iv), ketamine, or thiopental (10 and 15 mg/kg, respectively, followed by infusion). Isocapnic hypoxic ventilatory drive (HVD) was expressed as the parameter A such that the higher the A, the greater the hypoxic drive. HVD(A) was significantly reduced from 259 +/- 28 (mean +/- SEM) in awake dogs, to 96 +/- 14 after pentobarbital, 161 +/- 27 after thiopental, and 213 +/- 23 after ketamine. Hypercapnic ventilatory drive (HCVD) as measured by S (slope of the VE-PACO2 response curve) was significantly reduced from 1.3 +/- .32 in awake dogs to 0.4 +/- .13 after pentobarbital, 0.5 +/- .12 after thiopental, and 0.6 +/- .11 after ketamine. In addition, hypercapnia-induced augmentation of hypoxic drive was markedly diminished by the two barbiturates but was unaffected by ketamine. Therefore, ketamine at this dose level afforded greater protection during exposure to hypoxia than did barbiturates. (Key words: Ventilation, hypoxic response; Hypoxia, ventilation; Oxygen, ventilatory response; Carbon dioxide, ventilatory response; Anesthetics, intravenous, ketamine; Anesthetics, intravenous, thiopental; Hypnotics, barbiturates, pentobarbital.) PMID:1190538

  7. Sugar-coupled 2-nitroimidazoles: novel in vivo markers for hypoxic tumor tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1-(6-Iodo-60deoxy-β-D-galactopyranosyl)-2-nitroimidazole (IAZG) and 1-(5-iodo-5-deoxy-β-D-arabino-furanosyl)-2-nitroimidazole (IAZA) have been synthesised and labelled with 125I. These compounds were shown to undergo hypoxia-dependant binding with EMT-6 mouse fibrosarcoma cells in vitro with IAZG showing the highest initial binding rate observed so far. Both compounds show selective toxicity toward hypoxic cell in culture. Whole body elimination and biodistribution studies were carried out and indicate general rapid excretion and some selectivity for tumour tissue. IAZG has a maximum tumor to blood ratio of 1.6 at 4 hours while IAZA showed a ratio of 8.7 hours. Both in vitro and in vivo scintigraphic assessment of hypoxic tissue may be possible with these compounds, 21 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  8. Brain mechanisms of hypoxic preconditioning%低氧预适应的脑机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕国蔚; 崔秀玉; 赵兰峰; 安仰原; 高翠英

    2004-01-01

    A concept ot tissue adaptation to hypoxia( i.e. hypoxic preconditioning) was developed and its corresponding animal models were reproduced in 1966s. The methods of model reproduction in rat, rabbit, and mouse in particular and the main results are brifly introduced in this review. The tolerance to hypoxia o{ preconditioned animals is significantly increased. Regular changes in animals' behavior, neurophysiology, respiratory and circulatory physiology, neuromorphology in vivo and {unction of brain and spinal cord in vitro are briefly demonstrated. The protective effects in vivo and in vitro of homogenate extract taken from the brain o{ preconditioned animals, neurochemcals and molecular neurobiolcgical alterations are briefly presented. The essence and significance of tissue adaption to hypoxia/hypoxic preconditioning are discussed in the review in terms of evolution and practical implication.

  9. Performance of an active inspired hypoxic guard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghijselings, Idris E; De Cooman, Sofie; Carette, Rik; Peyton, Philip J; De Wolf, Andre M; Hendrickx, Jan F A

    2016-02-01

    Current hypoxic guards systems fail to maintain the inspired O2 concentration (FIO2) ≥ 21 % across the entire fresh gas flow (FGF) range when a second carrier gas is used (N2O or air). We examined the performance of the Maquet O2 Guard(®), a smart hypoxic guard that increases O2 delivery if an inspired hypoxic mixture is formed. After obtaining IRB approval and informed consent, 12 ASA I-II patients were enrolled. During anesthesia with sevoflurane in O2/air, the O2 Guard(®) was tested by administering O2/air at the following delivered hypoxic guard limits [expressed as (total FGF in L min(-1); FDO2 in %)] for 4 min each: [0.3;67], [0.4;50], [0.6;34], [0.8;25], [1.0;21], [1.2;21], [1.5;21], [2;21], [3;21], and [5;21]. The following data were collected: (1) time from FIO2 = 30 to 20 %; (2) time from FIO2 = 20 % to O2 Guard(®) activation; (3) time from O2 Guard(®) activation to FIO2 = 25 %; (4) FGF and FDO2 used by the O2 Guard. If SpO2 was <90 % for 10 s or longer at any time, the patient was excluded. Three patients were excluded for low SpO2. The incidence of FIO2 < 21 % was 100 % within the 1-2 L min(-1) FGF range. The O2 Guard(®) was activated within 20 s after FIO2 became 20 %, except in one patient where FIO2 oscillated between 20 and 21 %. FDO2 was increased to 60 % and FGF to 1 L min(-1) (the latter only if it was lower than 1 L min(-1) prior to activation of the O2 Guard). FIO2 increased to 25 % within 55 s after O2 Guard activation in all patients. The O2 Guard(®), an active inspired hypoxic guard, rapidly reverses and limits the duration of inspired hypoxic episodes when the delivered hypoxic guard fails to do so. PMID:25757405

  10. [The dynamic detection of cytokins under aplastic anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in the process of impact of hypoxic hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Éralieva, M O

    2012-05-01

    The natural hypoxic hypoxia enhances the synthesis processes and decrease the concentration balance in cytokine rets in patients with depression of hematopoiesis. It is established that the patients with aplastic anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, in contrast with patients with acute leucosis, chronic myelolecosis and erythroid myeloma, have quite high values of IL-2, which can be involved in the organization of full-fledgee response to antigen stimuli. The application of hypoxic hypoxia as an additional method in treatment of aplastic anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura has no side effects and contraindications. PMID:22834158

  11. Identification of a chronic non-neurodegenerative microglia activation state in a mouse model of peroxisomal β-oxidation deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheijden, Simon; Beckers, Lien; Casazza, Andrea; Butovsky, Oleg; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Baes, Myriam

    2015-09-01

    The functional diversity and molecular adaptations of reactive microglia in the chronically inflamed central nervous system (CNS) are poorly understood. We previously showed that mice lacking multifunctional protein 2 (MFP2), a pivotal enzyme in peroxisomal β-oxidation, persistently accumulate reactive myeloid cells in the gray matter of the CNS. Here, we show that the increased numbers of myeloid cells solely derive from the proliferation of resident microglia and not from infiltrating monocytes. We defined the signature of Mfp2(-/-) microglia by gene expression profiling after acute isolation, which was validated by quantitative polymerase reaction (qPCR), immunohistochemical, and flow cytometric analysis. The features of Mfp2(-/-) microglia were compared with those from SOD1(G93A) mice, an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis model. In contrast to the neurodegenerative milieu of SOD1(G93A) spinal cord, neurons were intact in Mfp2(-/-) brain and Mfp2(-/-) microglia lacked signs of phagocytic and neurotoxic activity. The chronically reactive state of Mfp2(-/-) microglia was accompanied by the downregulation of markers that specify the unique microglial signature in homeostatic conditions. In contrast, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and downstream glycolytic and protein translation pathways were induced, indicative of metabolic adaptations. Mfp2(-/-) microglia were immunologically activated but not polarized to a pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotype. A peripheral lipopolysaccharide challenge provoked an exaggerated inflammatory response in Mfp2(-/-) brain, consistent with a primed state. Taken together, we demonstrate that chronic activation of resident microglia does not necessarily lead to phagocytosis nor overt neurotoxicity. PMID:25846981

  12. Effect of topical application of antioxidants and free radical scavengers on protection of hairless mouse skin exposed to chronic doses of ultraviolet B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muizzuddin, N.; Shakoori, A.R. [Univ. of the Punjab, Dept. of Zoology, Cell and Molecular Biology Lab., Lahore (Pakistan); Marenus, K.D. [SUNY at Stonybrook, Stonybrook, NY (United States)

    1998-11-01

    treatment, respectively. Conclusion: Data from these studies suggest that low level chronic exposures to UV can lead to alteration of the skin, like epidermal thickening and appearance of sunburn cells. The data also indicates that a mix of common antioxidants and free radical scavengers are photoprotective against chronic skin damage in the hairless mouse skin model. (au)

  13. Effect of topical application of antioxidants and free radical scavengers on protection of hairless mouse skin exposed to chronic doses of ultraviolet B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    treatment, respectively. Conclusion: Data from these studies suggest that low level chronic exposures to UV can lead to alteration of the skin, like epidermal thickening and appearance of sunburn cells. The data also indicates that a mix of common antioxidants and free radical scavengers are photoprotective against chronic skin damage in the hairless mouse skin model. (au)

  14. Accelerated tau aggregation, apoptosis and neurological dysfunction caused by chronic oral administration of aluminum in a mouse model of tauopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Etsuko; Ishihara, Takeshi; Yokota, Osamu; Nakashima-Yasuda, Hanae; Nagao, Shigeto; Ikeda, Chikako; Naohara, Jun; Terada, Seishi; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2013-11-01

    To clarify whether long-term oral ingestion of aluminum (Al) can increase tau aggregation in mammals, we examined the effects of oral Al administration on tau accumulation, apoptosis in the central nervous system (CNS) and motor function using tau transgenic (Tg) mice that show very slowly progressive tau accumulation. Al-treated tau Tg mice had almost twice as many tau-positive inclusions in the spinal cord as tau Tg mice without Al treatment at 12 months of age, a difference that reached statistical significance, and the development of pretangle-like tau aggregates in the brain was also significantly advanced from 9 months. Al exposure did not induce any tau pathology in wild-type (WT) mice. Apoptosis was observed in the hippocampus in Al-treated tau Tg mice, but was virtually absent in the other experimental groups. Motor function as assessed by the tail suspension test was most severely impaired in Al-treated tau Tg mice. Given our results, chronic oral ingestion of Al may more strongly promote tau aggregation, apoptosis and neurological dysfunction if individuals already had a pathological process causing tau aggregation. These findings may also implicate chronic Al neurotoxicity in humans, who frequently have had mild tau pathology from a young age. PMID:23574527

  15. Combining hypoxic methods for peak performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Gregoire P; Roels, B; Schmitt, L; Woorons, X; Richalet, J P

    2010-01-01

    New methods and devices for pursuing performance enhancement through altitude training were developed in Scandinavia and the USA in the early 1990s. At present, several forms of hypoxic training and/or altitude exposure exist: traditional 'live high-train high' (LHTH), contemporary 'live high-train low' (LHTL), intermittent hypoxic exposure during rest (IHE) and intermittent hypoxic exposure during continuous session (IHT). Although substantial differences exist between these methods of hypoxic training and/or exposure, all have the same goal: to induce an improvement in athletic performance at sea level. They are also used for preparation for competition at altitude and/or for the acclimatization of mountaineers. The underlying mechanisms behind the effects of hypoxic training are widely debated. Although the popular view is that altitude training may lead to an increase in haematological capacity, this may not be the main, or the only, factor involved in the improvement of performance. Other central (such as ventilatory, haemodynamic or neural adaptation) or peripheral (such as muscle buffering capacity or economy) factors play an important role. LHTL was shown to be an efficient method. The optimal altitude for living high has been defined as being 2200-2500 m to provide an optimal erythropoietic effect and up to 3100 m for non-haematological parameters. The optimal duration at altitude appears to be 4 weeks for inducing accelerated erythropoiesis whereas haematological changes since additional benefits have been shown as hypoxic exposure increases beyond 16 h/day. The minimum daily dose for stimulating erythropoiesis seems to be 12 h/day. For non-haematological changes, the implementation of a much shorter duration of exposure seems possible. Athletes could take advantage of IHT, which seems more beneficial than IHE in performance enhancement. The intensity of hypoxic exercise might play a role on adaptations at the molecular level in skeletal muscle tissue

  16. Ischemic preconditioning in chronically hypoxic neonatal rat heart

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ošťádalová, Ivana; Ošťádal, Bohuslav; Jarkovská, D.; Kolář, František

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 4 (2002), s. 561-567. ISSN 0031-3998 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/00/1659; GA MŠk LN00A069 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : neonatal heart * chronix hypoxia * ischemic preconditioning Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.382, year: 2002

  17. Chronic increase of urea leads to carbamylated proteins accumulation in tissues in a mouse model of CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrement, Christine; Gorisse, Laëtitia; Jaisson, Stéphane; Gillery, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Carbamylation is a general process involved in protein molecular ageing due to the nonenzymatic binding of isocyanic acid, mainly generated by urea dissociation, to free amino groups. In vitro experiments and clinical studies have suggested the potential involvement of carbamylated proteins (CPs) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) complications like atherosclerosis, but their metabolic fate in vivo is still unknown. To address this issue, we evaluated protein carbamylation in the plasma and tissues of control and 75% nephrectomised C57BL/6J mice by LC-MS/MS assay of homocitrulline, the major carbamylation-derived product (CDP). A basal level of carbamylation was evidenced under all conditions, showing that carbamylation is a physiological process of protein modification in vivo. CP plasma concentrations increased in nephrectomized vs. control mice over the 20 weeks of the experiment (e.g. 335 ± 43 vs. 167 ± 19 μmol homocitrulline/mol lysine (p<0.001) 20 weeks after nephrectomy). Simultaneously, CP content increased roughly by two-fold in all tissues throughout the experiment. The progressive accumulation of CPs was specifically noted in long-lived extracellular matrix proteins, especially collagen (e.g. 1264 ± 123 vs. 726 ± 99 μmol homocitrulline/mol lysine (p<0.01) in the skin of nephrectomized vs. control mice after 20 weeks of evolution). These results show that chronic increase of urea, as seen in CKD, increases the carbamylation rate of plasma and tissue proteins. These results may be considered in the perspective of the deleterious effects of CPs demonstrated in vitro and of the correlation evidenced recently between plasma CPs and cardiovascular risk or mortality in CKD patients. PMID:24324801

  18. Chronic Exposure to Androgenic-Anabolic Steroids Exacerbates Axonal Injury and Microgliosis in the CHIMERA Mouse Model of Repetitive Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namjoshi, Dhananjay R; Cheng, Wai Hang; Carr, Michael; Martens, Kris M; Zareyan, Shahab; Wilkinson, Anna; McInnes, Kurt A; Cripton, Peter A; Wellington, Cheryl L

    2016-01-01

    Concussion is a serious health concern. Concussion in athletes is of particular interest with respect to the relationship of concussion exposure to risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a neurodegenerative condition associated with altered cognitive and psychiatric functions and profound tauopathy. However, much remains to be learned about factors other than cumulative exposure that could influence concussion pathogenesis. Approximately 20% of CTE cases report a history of substance use including androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS). How acute, chronic, or historical AAS use may affect the vulnerability of the brain to concussion is unknown. We therefore tested whether antecedent AAS exposure in young, male C57Bl/6 mice affects acute behavioral and neuropathological responses to mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) induced with the CHIMERA (Closed Head Impact Model of Engineered Rotational Acceleration) platform. Male C57Bl/6 mice received either vehicle or a cocktail of three AAS (testosterone, nandrolone and 17α-methyltestosterone) from 8-16 weeks of age. At the end of the 7th week of treatment, mice underwent two closed-head TBI or sham procedures spaced 24 h apart using CHIMERA. Post-repetitive TBI (rTBI) behavior was assessed for 7 d followed by tissue collection. AAS treatment induced the expected physiological changes including increased body weight, testicular atrophy, aggression and downregulation of brain 5-HT1B receptor expression. rTBI induced behavioral deficits, widespread axonal injury and white matter microgliosis. While AAS treatment did not worsen post-rTBI behavioral changes, AAS-treated mice exhibited significantly exacerbated axonal injury and microgliosis, indicating that AAS exposure can alter neuronal and innate immune responses to concussive TBI. PMID:26784694

  19. Lactobacillus rhamnosus CCFM1107 treatment ameliorates alcohol-induced liver injury in a mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fengwei; Chi, Feifei; Wang, Gang; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Chen, Yongquan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus CCFM1107 was screened for high antioxidative activity from 55 lactobacilli. The present study attempted to explore the protective properties of L. rhamnosus CCFM1107 in alcoholic liver injury. A mouse model was induced by orally feeding alcohol when simultaneously treated with L. rhamnosus CCFM1107, the drug Hu-Gan- Pian (HGP), L. rhamnosus GG (LGG), and L. plantarum CCFM1112 for 3 months. Biochemical analysis was performed for both serum and liver homogenate. Detailed intestinal flora and histological analyses were also carried out. Our results indicated that the administration of L. rhamnosus CCFM1107 significantly inhibited the increase in the levels of serum aminotransferase and endotoxin, as well as the levels of triglyceride (TG) and cholesterol (CHO) in the serum and in the liver. Glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were elevated while the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) were decreased. The enteric dysbiosis caused by alcohol was restored by increasing the numbers of both lactobacilli and bifidobacteria and decreasing the numbers of both enterococci and enterobacter. Histological analysis confirmed the protective effect of L. rhamnosus CCFM1107. Compared with the other lactobacilli and to the drug Hu-Gan-Pian, there is a high chance that L. rhamnosus CCFM1107 provides protective effects on alcoholic liver injury by reducing oxidative stress and restoring the intestinal flora. PMID:26626356

  20. Effects of Yulangsan polysaccharide on monoamine neurotransmitters, adenylate cyclase activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in a mouse model of depression induced by unpredictable chronic mild stress☆

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Shuang; Huang, Renbin; Lin, Xing; Huang, Jianchun; Huang, Zhongshi; Liu, Huagang

    2012-01-01

    The present study established a mouse model of depression induced by unpredictable chronic mild stress. The model mice were treated with Yulangsan polysaccharide (YLSPS; 150, 300 and 600 mg/kg) for 21 days, and compared with fluoxetine-treated and normal control groups. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, radioimmunity and immunohistochemical staining showed that following treatment with YLSPS (300 and 600 mg/kg), monoamine neurotransmitter levels, prefrontal cortex adenylate cyclase activity ...

  1. Inflammatory responses in hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fudong; McCullough, Louise D.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays a critical role in mediating brain injury induced by neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). The mechanisms underlying inflammatory responses to ischemia may be shared by neonatal and adult brains; however, HIE exhibits a unique inflammation phenotype that results from the immaturity of the neonatal immune system. This review will discuss the current knowledge concerning systemic and local inflammatory responses in the acute and subacute stages of HIE. The key compo...

  2. The grey mouse lemur uses season-dependent fat or protein sparing strategies to face chronic food restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Giroud

    Full Text Available During moderate calorie restriction (CR the heterotherm Microcebus murinus is able to maintain a stable energy balance whatever the season, even if only wintering animals enter into torpor. To understand its energy saving strategies to respond to food shortages, we assessed protein and energy metabolisms associated with wintering torpor expression or summering torpor avoidance. We investigated body composition, whole body protein turnover, and daily energy expenditure (DEE, during a graded (40 and 80% 35-day CR in short-days (winter; SD40 and SD80, respectively and long-days (summer; LD40 and LD80, respectively acclimated animals. LD40 animals showed no change in fat mass (FM but a 12% fat free mass (FFM reduction. Protein balance being positive after CR, the FFM loss was early and rapid. The 25% DEE reduction, in LD40 group was mainly explained by FFM changes. LD80 animals showed a steady body mass loss and were excluded from the CR trial at day 22, reaching a survival-threatened body mass. No data were available for this group. SD40 animals significantly decreased their FM level by 21%, but maintained FFM. Protein sparing was achieved through a 35 and 39% decrease in protein synthesis and catabolism (protein turnover, respectively, overall maintaining nitrogen balance. The 21% reduction in energy requirement was explained by the 30% nitrogen flux drop but also by torpor as DEE FFM-adjusted remained 13% lower compared to ad-libitum. SD80 animals were unable to maintain energy and nitrogen balances, losing both FM and FFM. Thus summering mouse lemurs equilibrate energy balance by a rapid loss of active metabolic mass without using torpor, whereas wintering animals spare protein and energy through increased torpor expression. Both strategies have direct fitness implication: 1 to maintain activities at a lower body size during the mating season and 2 to preserve an optimal wintering muscle mass and function.

  3. Detection of hypoxic cells with the 2-nitroimidazole, EF5, correlates with early redox changes in rat brain after perinatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, M; Evans, S M; Sharp, F R; Koch, C J; Lord, E M; Ferriero, D M

    1999-01-01

    The hypoxia-dependent activation of nitroheterocyclic drugs by cellular nitroreductases leads to the formation of intracellular adducts between the drugs and cellular macromolecules. Because this covalent binding is maximal in the absence of oxygen, detection of bound adducts provides an assay for estimating the degree of cellular hypoxia in vivo. Using a pentafluorintated derivative of etanidazole called EF5, we studied the distribution of EF5 adducts in seven-day-old rats subjected to different treatments which decrease the level of oxygen in the brain. EF5 solution was administered intraperitoneally 30 min prior to each treatment. The effect of acute and chronic hypoxia on EF5 adduct formation (binding) was studied in the brain of newborn rats exposed to global hypoxia (8% O2 for 30, 90 or 150 min) and in the brain of chronically hypoxic rat pups with congenital cardiac defects (Wistar Kyoto). The effect of combined hypoxia-ischemia was investigated in rat pups subjected to right carotid coagulation and concurrent exposure to 8% O2 for 30, 90 or 150 min. Brains were frozen immediately at the end of each treatment. Using a Cy3-conjugated monoclonal mouse antibody (ELK3-51) raised against EF5 adducts, hypoxic cells within brain regions were visualized by fluorescence immunocytochemistry. Brains from controls or vehicle-injected animals showed no EF5 binding. Notably, brains from animals which were chronically hypoxemic as a result of congenital cardiac defects also showed no EF5 binding. A short exposure (30 min) to hypoxia or to combined hypoxia-ischemia resulted in increased background stain and few scattered cells with low-intensity immunostaining. Acute hypoxia exposure of at least 90-150 min, which in this age animal does not result in frank cellular damage, produced patchy areas of low- to moderate-intensity fluorescence scattered throughout the brain. In contrast, 90-150 min of hypoxia-ischemia was associated with intense immunofluorescence in the

  4. Differential Features between Chronic Skin Inflammatory Diseases Revealed in Skin-Humanized Psoriasis and Atopic Dermatitis Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero, Marta; Guerrero-Aspizua, Sara; Illera, Nuria; Galvez, Victoria; Navarro, Manuel; García-García, Francisco; Dopazo, Joaquin; Jorcano, Jose Luis; Larcher, Fernando; del Rio, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis and atopic dermatitis are chronic and relapsing inflammatory diseases of the skin affecting a large number of patients worldwide. Psoriasis is characterized by a T helper type 1 and/or T helper type 17 immunological response, whereas acute atopic dermatitis lesions exhibit T helper type 2-dominant inflammation. Current single gene and signaling pathways-based models of inflammatory skin diseases are incomplete. Previous work allowed us to model psoriasis in skin-humanized mice through proper combinations of inflammatory cell components and disruption of barrier function. Herein, we describe and characterize an animal model for atopic dermatitis using similar bioengineered-based approaches, by intradermal injection of human T helper type 2 lymphocytes in regenerated human skin after partial removal of stratum corneum. In this work, we have extensively compared this model with the previous and an improved version of the psoriasis model, in which T helper type 1 and/or T helper type 17 lymphocytes replace exogenous cytokines. Comparative expression analyses revealed marked differences in specific epidermal proliferation and differentiation markers and immune-related molecules, including antimicrobial peptides. Likewise, the composition of the dermal inflammatory infiltrate presented important differences. The availability of accurate and reliable animal models for these diseases will contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis and provide valuable tools for drug development and testing. PMID:26763433

  5. YAP is up-regulated in the bronchial airway smooth muscle of the chronic asthma mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Xu, Fei; Yu, Jing Jing; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by leukocytic infiltration and tissue remodeling with structural changes including subepithelial fibrosis and ASM cells proliferation. The Hippo pathway is a key regulatory point involved in cell proliferation, fibroblasts, and smooth muscle cell differentiation. In order to disclose the relation between asthma and the Hippo pathway, expression of the Yes-associated protein (YAP), a key gene in the Hippo pathway, in the bronchial smooth muscle of chronic asthma model (CAM) was studied. 40 mice were randomly divided into control (wide type) and experimental group to construct CAM using chicken ovalbumin (OVA). Pathological changes of the lung tissues were observed in the CAM mice compared with the control using HE staining method. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to detect if YAP protein is expressed in the lung tissues. The pathological changes of the CAM group showed that a large number of inflammatory cells infiltration including mainly lymphocytes and a small amount of eosinophilic, with the presence of certain airway smooth muscle hyperplasia, was observed in comparison with the control. IHC results showed that the YAP protein was significantly increased compared with the control groups (P bronchial airway tissues of the CAM mice, and could be used as an indicator for asthma. PMID:26617833

  6. Production of mouse monoclonal antibodies for the analysis of idiotypes in serum of patients with chronic lymphatic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rie, M A; van Heemstra, D J; Huijgens, P C; Zeijlemaker, W P; Out, T A; Melief, C J; von dem Borne, A E

    1988-01-01

    In this report a simple procedure for the production of murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) against the idiotype of malignant B cells is described. Mice were immunized with lymphoid cells from patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL). After fusion of the spleen cells, hybridoma supernatants were screened for anti-idiotypic MoAb in ELISA with immunoglobulins obtained from tumour-cell lysates, xenohybridomas and patients' sera. The anti-idiotypic MoAb were used to study tumour cells and serum immunoglobulins (Ig) from four different patients with B-CLL. It was found that the serum IgM and IgD in one patient shared the same idiotype. Evidence is presented that IgG-secreting cell populations are not restricted to lambda-Ig-light chain-expressing B-CLL cells. With the help of anti-idiotype MoAb accurate measurements of total and idiotype-positive serum immunoglobulin levels during chemotherapy were possible. PMID:3257881

  7. Therapeutic and space radiation exposure of mouse brain causes impaired DNA repair response and premature senescence by chronic oxidant production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Rodriguez, Olga C; Winters, Thomas A; Fornace, Albert J; Albanese, Chris; Datta, Kamal

    2013-08-01

    Despite recent epidemiological evidences linking radiation exposure and a number of human ailments including cancer, mechanistic understanding of how radiation inflicts long-term changes in cerebral cortex, which regulates important neuronal functions, remains obscure. The current study dissects molecular events relevant to pathology in cerebral cortex of 6 to 8 weeks old female C57BL/6J mice two and twelve months after exposure to a γ radiation dose (2 Gy) commonly employed in fractionated radiotherapy. For a comparative study, effects of 1.6 Gy heavy ion 56Fe radiation on cerebral cortex were also investigated, which has implications for space exploration. Radiation exposure was associated with increased chronic oxidative stress, oxidative DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, and apoptosis. These results when considered with decreased cortical thickness, activation of cell-cycle arrest pathway, and inhibition of DNA double strand break repair factors led us to conclude to our knowledge for the first time that radiation caused aging-like pathology in cerebral cortical cells and changes after heavy ion radiation were more pronounced than γ radiation. PMID:23928451

  8. Chronic hyperglycemia induced via the heterozygous knockout of Pdx1 worsens neuropathological lesion in an Alzheimer mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chuang; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Jia-Yi; Ding, Chen; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Chai, Rui; Wang, Xu; Wang, Zhan-You

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence has indicated that dysregulated glucose metabolism links Alzheimer's disease (AD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) via glucose metabolic products. Nevertheless, because of the lack of appropriate animal models, whether chronic hyperglycemia worsens AD pathologies in vivo remains to be confirmed. Here, we crossed diabetic mice (Pdx1(+/-) mice) with Alzheimer mice (APP/PS1 transgenic mice) to generate Pdx1(+/-)/APP/PS1. We identified robust increases in tau phosphorylation, the loss of the synaptic spine protein, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and plaque formation associated with increased microglial and astrocyte activation proliferation, which lead to exacerbated memory and cognition deficits. More importantly, we also observed increased glucose intolerance accompanied by Pdx1 reduction, the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and the activation of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) signaling pathways during AD progression; these changes are thought to contribute to the processing of Aβ precursor proteins and result in increased Aβ generation and decreased Aβ degradation. Protein glycation, increased oxidative stress and inflammation via hyperglycemia are the primary mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of AD. These results indicate the pathological relationship between these diseases and provide novel insights suggesting that glycemic control may be beneficial for decreasing the incidence of AD in diabetic patients and delaying AD progression. PMID:27406855

  9. Promoter hypomethylation and expression is conserved in mouse chronic lymphocytic leukemia induced by decreased or inactivated Dnmt3a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Staci L.; Upchurch, G. Michael; Opavska, Jana; Klinkebiel, David; Hlady, Ryan A.; Suresh, Abhinav; Pirruccello, Samuel J.; Shukla, Vipul; Lu, Runqing; Costinean, Stefan; Rizzino, Angie; Karpf, Adam R.; Joshi, Shantaram; Swanson, Patrick; Opavsky, Rene

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA methyltransferase 3a (DNMT3A) catalyzes the formation of 5-methyl-cytosine in mammalian genomic DNA and it is frequently mutated in human hematologic malignancies. Bi-allelic loss of Dnmt3a in mice results in leukemia and lymphoma, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Here we investigate whether mono-allelic loss of Dnmt3a is sufficient to induce disease. We show that by 16 months of age, 65% of Dnmt3a+/− mice develop a CLL-like disease and 15% of mice develop non-malignant myeloproliferation. Genome-wide methylation analysis reveals that reduced Dnmt3a levels induce promoter hypomethylation at similar loci in Dnmt3a+/− and Dnmt3aΔ/Δ CLL, suggesting that promoters are particularly sensitive to Dnmt3a levels. Gene-expression analysis identified 26 hypomethylated and over-expressed genes common to both Dnmt3a+/− and Dnmt3aΔ/Δ CLL as putative oncogenic drivers. Our data provide evidence that Dnmt3a is a haplo-insufficient tumor suppressor in CLL and highlights the importance of deregulated molecular events in disease pathogenesis. PMID:27134162

  10. Chronic hyperglycemia induced via the heterozygous knockout of Pdx1 worsens neuropathological lesion in an Alzheimer mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chuang; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Jia-Yi; Ding, Chen; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Chai, Rui; Wang, Xu; Wang, Zhan-You

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence has indicated that dysregulated glucose metabolism links Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) via glucose metabolic products. Nevertheless, because of the lack of appropriate animal models, whether chronic hyperglycemia worsens AD pathologies in vivo remains to be confirmed. Here, we crossed diabetic mice (Pdx1+/− mice) with Alzheimer mice (APP/PS1 transgenic mice) to generate Pdx1+/−/APP/PS1. We identified robust increases in tau phosphorylation, the loss of the synaptic spine protein, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and plaque formation associated with increased microglial and astrocyte activation proliferation, which lead to exacerbated memory and cognition deficits. More importantly, we also observed increased glucose intolerance accompanied by Pdx1 reduction, the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and the activation of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) signaling pathways during AD progression; these changes are thought to contribute to the processing of Aβ precursor proteins and result in increased Aβ generation and decreased Aβ degradation. Protein glycation, increased oxidative stress and inflammation via hyperglycemia are the primary mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of AD. These results indicate the pathological relationship between these diseases and provide novel insights suggesting that glycemic control may be beneficial for decreasing the incidence of AD in diabetic patients and delaying AD progression. PMID:27406855

  11. Transcriptomic changes in human renal proximal tubular cells revealed under hypoxic conditions by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenmin; Li, Yiping; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Lei; Liu, Jing; Ding, Fengan; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Cheng, Zhengyuan; Chen, Pingsheng; Dou, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Chronic hypoxia often occurs among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Renal proximal tubular cells may be the primary target of a hypoxic insult. However, the underlying transcriptional mechanisms remain undefined. In this study, we revealed the global changes in gene expression in HK‑2 human renal proximal tubular cells under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. We analyzed the transcriptome of HK‑2 cells exposed to hypoxia for 24 h using RNA sequencing. A total of 279 differentially expressed genes was examined, as these genes could potentially explain the differences in HK‑2 cells between hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Moreover, 17 genes were validated by qPCR, and the results were highly concordant with the RNA seqencing results. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analyses were performed to better understand the functions of these differentially expressed genes. The upregulated genes appeared to be significantly enriched in the pathyway of extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interaction, and in paticular, the pathway of renal cell carcinoma was upregulated under hypoxic conditions. The downregulated genes were enriched in the signaling pathway related to antigen processing and presentation; however, the pathway of glutathione metabolism was downregulated. Our analysis revealed numerous novel transcripts and alternative splicing events. Simultaneously, we also identified a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms, which will be a rich resource for future marker development. On the whole, our data indicate that transcriptome analysis provides valuable information for a more in depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms in CKD and renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27432315

  12. Protection of Cardiomyocytes from Ischemic/Hypoxic Cell Death via Drbp1 and pMe2GlyDH in Cardio-specific ARC Transgenic Mice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Jong-Ok; Nah, Jihoon; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Chang, Jae-Woong; Song, Young-Wha; Yang, Dong-Kwon; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung; Chae, Soo-Wan; Hwang, Seung-Yong; Kim, Seung-Jun; Kim, Hyo-Joon; Cho, Chunghee; Oh, Chang-Gyu; Park, Woo Jin; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2008-01-01

    The ischemic death of cardiomyocytes is associated in heart disease and heart failure. However, the molecular mechanism underlying ischemic cell death is not well defined. To examine the function of apoptosis repressor with a caspase recruitment domain (ARC) in the ischemic/hypoxic damage of cardiomyocytes, we generated cardio-specific ARC transgenic mice using a mouse α-myosin heavy chain promoter. Compared with the control, the hearts of ARC transgenic mice showed a 3-fold overexpression of ARC. Langendoff preparation showed that the hearts isolated from ARC transgenic mice exhibited improved recovery of contractile performance during reperfusion. The cardiomyocytes cultured from neonatal ARC transgenic mice were significantly resistant to hypoxic cell death. Furthermore, the ARC C-terminal calcium-binding domain was as potent to protect cardiomyocytes from hypoxic cell death as ARC. Genome-wide RNA expression profiling uncovered a list of genes whose expression was changed (>2-fold) in ARC transgenic mice. Among them, expressional regulation of developmentally regulated RNA-binding protein 1 (Drbp1) or the dimethylglycine dehydrogenase precursor (pMe2GlyDH) affected hypoxic death of cardiomyocytes. These results suggest that ARC may protect cardiomyocytes from hypoxic cell death by regulating its downstream, Drbp1 and pMe2GlyDH, shedding new insights into the protection of heart from hypoxic damages. PMID:18782777

  13. Effects of Chronic Sleep Restriction during Early Adolescence on the Adult Pattern of Connectivity of Mouse Secondary Motor Cortex123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeh, Yazan N.; Bernard, Amy; de Vivo, Luisa; Honjoh, Sakiko; Mihalas, Stefan; Ng, Lydia; Koch, Christof

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cortical circuits mature in stages, from early synaptogenesis and synaptic pruning to late synaptic refinement, resulting in the adult anatomical connection matrix. Because the mature matrix is largely fixed, genetic or environmental factors interfering with its establishment can have irreversible effects. Sleep disruption is rarely considered among those factors, and previous studies have focused on very young animals and the acute effects of sleep deprivation on neuronal morphology and cortical plasticity. Adolescence is a sensitive time for brain remodeling, yet whether chronic sleep restriction (CSR) during adolescence has long-term effects on brain connectivity remains unclear. We used viral-mediated axonal labeling and serial two-photon tomography to measure brain-wide projections from secondary motor cortex (MOs), a high-order area with diffuse projections. For each MOs target, we calculated the projection fraction, a combined measure of passing fibers and axonal terminals normalized for the size of each target. We found no homogeneous differences in MOs projection fraction between mice subjected to 5 days of CSR during early adolescence (P25–P30, ≥50% decrease in daily sleep, n=14) and siblings that slept undisturbed (n=14). Machine learning algorithms, however, classified animals at significantly above chance levels, indicating that differences between the two groups exist, but are subtle and heterogeneous. Thus, sleep disruption in early adolescence may affect adult brain connectivity. However, because our method relies on a global measure of projection density and was not previously used to measure connectivity changes due to behavioral manipulations, definitive conclusions on the long-term structural effects of early CSR require additional experiments. PMID:27351022

  14. Effects of Chronic Sleep Restriction during Early Adolescence on the Adult Pattern of Connectivity of Mouse Secondary Motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeh, Yazan N; Rodriguez, Alexander V; Bellesi, Michele; Bernard, Amy; de Vivo, Luisa; Funk, Chadd M; Harris, Julie; Honjoh, Sakiko; Mihalas, Stefan; Ng, Lydia; Koch, Christof; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Cortical circuits mature in stages, from early synaptogenesis and synaptic pruning to late synaptic refinement, resulting in the adult anatomical connection matrix. Because the mature matrix is largely fixed, genetic or environmental factors interfering with its establishment can have irreversible effects. Sleep disruption is rarely considered among those factors, and previous studies have focused on very young animals and the acute effects of sleep deprivation on neuronal morphology and cortical plasticity. Adolescence is a sensitive time for brain remodeling, yet whether chronic sleep restriction (CSR) during adolescence has long-term effects on brain connectivity remains unclear. We used viral-mediated axonal labeling and serial two-photon tomography to measure brain-wide projections from secondary motor cortex (MOs), a high-order area with diffuse projections. For each MOs target, we calculated the projection fraction, a combined measure of passing fibers and axonal terminals normalized for the size of each target. We found no homogeneous differences in MOs projection fraction between mice subjected to 5 days of CSR during early adolescence (P25-P30, ≥ 50% decrease in daily sleep, n=14) and siblings that slept undisturbed (n=14). Machine learning algorithms, however, classified animals at significantly above chance levels, indicating that differences between the two groups exist, but are subtle and heterogeneous. Thus, sleep disruption in early adolescence may affect adult brain connectivity. However, because our method relies on a global measure of projection density and was not previously used to measure connectivity changes due to behavioral manipulations, definitive conclusions on the long-term structural effects of early CSR require additional experiments. PMID:27351022

  15. Endogenous endothelium-derived relaxing factor opposes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and supports blood flow to hypoxic alveoli in anesthetized rabbits.

    OpenAIRE

    Sprague, R. S.; Thiemermann, C; Vane, J R

    1992-01-01

    Agents that inhibit nitric oxide synthesis augment hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. In an animal model of unilateral alveolar hypoxia, we investigated the hypothesis that endogenous endothelium-derived relaxing factor/nitric oxide opposes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and supports blood flow to hypoxic alveoli, resulting in a reduction in arterial oxygen tension (PO2). In pentobarbital-anesthetized rabbits, unilateral alveolar hypoxia was produced by ventilation of one lung with 100% ...

  16. BL-7010 demonstrates specific binding to gliadin and reduces gluten-associated pathology in a chronic mouse model of gliadin sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin L McCarville

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an autoimmune disorder in individuals that carry DQ2 or DQ8 MHC class II haplotypes, triggered by the ingestion of gluten. There is no current treatment other than a gluten-free diet (GFD. We have previously shown that the BL-7010 copolymer poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-styrene sulfonate (P(HEMA-co-SS binds with higher efficiency to gliadin than to other proteins present in the small intestine, ameliorating gliadin-induced pathology in the HLA-HCD4/DQ8 model of gluten sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of two batches of BL-7010 to interact with gliadin, essential vitamins and digestive enzymes not previously tested, and to assess the ability of the copolymer to reduce gluten-associated pathology using the NOD-DQ8 mouse model, which exhibits more significant small intestinal damage when challenged with gluten than HCD4/DQ8 mice. In addition, the safety and systemic exposure of BL-7010 was evaluated in vivo (in rats and in vitro (genetic toxicity studies. In vitro binding data showed that BL-7010 interacted with high affinity with gliadin and that BL-7010 had no interaction with the tested vitamins and digestive enzymes. BL-7010 was effective at preventing gluten-induced decreases in villus-to-crypt ratios, intraepithelial lymphocytosis and alterations in paracellular permeability and putative anion transporter-1 mRNA expression in the small intestine. In rats, BL-7010 was well-tolerated and safe following 14 days of daily repeated administration of 3000 mg/kg. BL-7010 did not exhibit any mutagenic effect in the genetic toxicity studies. Using complementary animal models and chronic gluten exposure the results demonstrate that administration of BL-7010 is effective and safe and that it is able to decrease pathology associated with gliadin sensitization warranting the progression to Phase I trials in humans.

  17. Mouse chronic social stress increases blood and brain kynurenine pathway activity and fear behaviour: Both effects are reversed by inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertig, René; Azzinnari, Damiano; Bergamini, Giorgio; Cathomas, Flurin; Sigrist, Hannes; Seifritz, Erich; Vavassori, Stefano; Luippold, Andreas; Hengerer, Bastian; Ceci, Angelo; Pryce, Christopher R

    2016-05-01

    Psychosocial stress is a major risk factor for mood and anxiety disorders, in which excessive reactivity to aversive events/stimuli is a major psychopathology. In terms of pathophysiology, immune-inflammation is an important candidate, including high blood and brain levels of metabolites belonging to the kynurenine pathway. Animal models are needed to study causality between psychosocial stress, immune-inflammation and hyper-reactivity to aversive stimuli. The present mouse study investigated effects of psychosocial stress as chronic social defeat (CSD) versus control-handling (CON) on: Pavlovian tone-shock fear conditioning, activation of the kynurenine pathway, and efficacy of a specific inhibitor (IDOInh) of the tryptophan-kynurenine catabolising enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1), in reversing CSD effects on the kynurenine pathway and fear. CSD led to excessive fear learning and memory, whilst repeated oral escitalopram (antidepressant and anxiolytic) reversed excessive fear memory, indicating predictive validity of the model. CSD led to higher blood levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, kynurenine (KYN), 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) and kynurenic acid, and higher KYN and 3-HK in amygdala and hippocampus. CSD was without effect on IDO1 gene or protein expression in spleen, ileum and liver, whilst increasing liver TDO2 gene expression. Nonetheless, oral IDOInh reduced blood and brain levels of KYN and 3-HK in CSD mice to CON levels, and we therefore infer that CSD increases IDO1 activity by increasing its post-translational activation. Furthermore, repeated oral IDOInh reversed excessive fear memory in CSD mice to CON levels. IDOInh reversal of CSD-induced hyper-activity in the kynurenine pathway and fear system contributes significantly to the evidence for a causal pathway between psychosocial stress, immune-inflammation and the excessive fearfulness that is a major psychopathology in stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26724575

  18. Study of intratumoral administration of hypoxic radiosensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relations between the radiosensitizing effect of the hypoxic radiosensitizer, RP-170, and its intratumoral concentration when injected intratumoral-intratumorally or intraperitoneally, was studied in Lewis lung carcinoma. Intratumoral injection of 400 mg/kg of RP-170 5 min before irradiation had a greater radiosensitizing effect on subcutaneous tumors than intraperitoneal injection 30 min before irradiation. In intramuscular tumors, the effect of the drug injected intraperitoneally 30 min before irradiation was larger than that injected intratumorally 5 min before irradiation, and the same as that of RP-170 injected intratumorally 30 min before irradiation. Intratumoral concentration of the drug injected intratumorally had higher mean values with larger deviation than that injected intraperitoneally. The drug concentration in tumors was only 0.5% of the dose administered 10 min after intratumoral injection and the concentrations 10 min and 30 min after injection were not different. The sensitizing effect on post-irradiated tumors was not so much different from that on non-irradiated tumors for either route of administration, even though the drug concentrations in the tumors were much different. Although epinephrine reduced the radiation effect when injected intratumorally, it inhibited the efflux of intratumorally injected sensitizer from the tumors, so the sensitizing effect with epinephrine was the same as that without. Thus, between its radiosensitizing effect and intratumoral concentration were poorly correlated. This indicates that other factors, such as blood supply, presence of hypoxic cells, and diffusion of the drug in tumors, are related to the radiosensitizing effect. Limited diffusion and easy efflux of drugs injected intratumorally are discussed. We conclude that intratumoral injection of hypoxic radiosensitizer is useful for some tumors, especially tumors with low blood flow. (author)

  19. Acute Hypoxic Test in Patients with Prediabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatylo, Valerii B; Serebrovska, Tatiana V; Gavalko, Anna V; Egorov, Egor; Korkushko, Oleg V

    2016-06-01

    Shatylo, Valerii B., Tetiana V. Serebrovska, Anna V. Gavalko, Egor Egorov, and Oleg V. Korkushko. Acute hypoxic test in patients with prediabetes. High Alt Med Biol. 17:101-107, 2016.-Prediabetes is a state of impaired carbohydrate metabolism when not all of the symptoms required to label a person as diabetic are present, but blood glucose is higher than in healthy subjects. Recent evidence suggests that intermittent hypoxia training (IHT) might provide a cost-effective strategy for improving metabolic functioning. One of the most important aspects of the successful IHT application is individualized approach to hypoxic dose and regimen prescription. To establish the relationships between indices of carbohydrate metabolism and individual resistance to hypoxia, the acute hypoxic test (AHT, breathing gas mixture with 12% O2 during 20 minutes) was performed in 33 healthy volunteers (mean age, 63.0, range, 44-76; fasting plasma glucose (FPG) less than 5.6 mmol/L and 2 hours postoral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) glycemia less than 7.8 mmol/L) and 30 patients with impaired glucose metabolism (mean age, 65.5, range, 44-75; FPG from 5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L and 2 hours post-OGTT glycemia from 7.8 to 11 mmol/L). Negative correlation was found between the SaO2 level at 20th minute AHT and FPG (r = -0.83; p recovery time and less effective functioning of respiratory and cardiovascular systems were also registered in patients with prediabetes showing that their cardiovascular resilience is impaired compared to normoglycemic controls. These patterns of relationship must be considered when assigning the individual modes of IHT. PMID:27213550

  20. Dendritic cell reprogramming by the hypoxic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Maria Carla; Varesio, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells central to the orchestration of innate and acquired immunity and the maintenance of self-tolerance. The local microenvironment contributes to the regulation of DC development and functions, and deregulated DC responses may result in amplification of inflammation, loss of tolerance, or establishment of immune escape mechanisms. DC generation from monocytic precursors recruited at sites of inflammation, tissue damage, or neoplasia occurs under condition of low partial oxygen pressure (pO(2), hypoxia). We reviewed the literature addressing the phenotypic and functional changes triggered by hypoxia in monocyte-derived immature (i) and mature (m) DCs. The discussion will revolve around in vitro studies of gene expression profile, which give a comprehensive representation of the complexity of response of these cells to low pO(2). The gene expression pattern of hypoxic DC will be discussed to address the question of the relationship with a specific maturation stage. We will summarize data relative to the regulation of the chemotactic network, which points to a role for hypoxia in promoting a migratory phenotype in iDCs and a highly proinflammatory state in mDCs. Current knowledge of the strict regulatory control exerted by hypoxia on the expression of immune-related cell surface receptors will also be addressed, with a particular focus on a newly identified marker of hypoxic DCs endowed with proinflammatory properties. Furthermore, we discuss the literature on the transcription mechanisms underlying hypoxia-regulated gene expression in DCs, which support a major role for the HIF/HRE pathway. Finally, recent advances shedding light on the in vivo influence of the local hypoxic microenvironment on DCs infiltrating the inflamed joints of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients are outlined. PMID:22901977

  1. Germination under Extreme Hypobaric and Hypoxic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hirofumi

    Is the agriculture on Mars without a pressured greenhouse dome possible? In order to inves-tigate a possibility of plant cultivation for the space agriculture on Mars, germination rate for six species of plant, Jute, Chrysanthemum, Komatsuna, Cucumber, Okra, and Eggplant under extreme hypobaric and hypoxic condition was measured. Oxygen partial pressure was 1kPa which was equal to 1/100 of normal earth atmosphere. Seeds of Jute and Cucumber were able to germinate in six species. In the case of Jute, germination rate under the oxygen partial pressure of 1kPa was very high, 70

  2. Gene expression changes after hypoxic preconditioning in rat hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Chen; Jiang-Feng Qiu; Zhi-Qi Zhang; Hai-Feng Luo; Joan Rosello-Catafau; Zhi-Yong Wu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxic preconditioning can protect hepatocytes against hypoxic injury, but its mechanism has not been elucidated. The aim of this study was to proifle gene expression patterns involved in hypoxic preconditioning and probable mechanism at the level of gene expression. METHODS: Hepatocytes were divided into 2 groups:control group and hypoxic preconditioning group. Biotin-labeled cRNA from the control group and the hypoxic preconditioning group was hybridized by oligonucleotide microarray. Genes that were signiifcantly associated with hypoxic preconditioning were ifltered, and validated at the level of transcript expression. RESULTS: Forty-three genes with signiifcantly altered expression patterns were discovered and most of them had not been previously reported. Among these genes, genes encoding superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2)and interleukin 10 (IL-10) in the hypoxic preconditioning group were conifrmed to be up-regulated with real-time quantitative PCR. CONCLUSIONS:Many cytokines are involved in hypoxic preconditioning and protect hepatocytes from hypoxia-reoxygenation injury, and the increase of oxygen free-radical scavengers and anti-inlfammatory factors may play a key role in this phenomenon. Diverse signal pathways are probably involved.

  3. Hypoxic cell turnover in different solid tumor lines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ljungkvist, A.; Bussink, J.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Rijken, P.F.J.W.; Begg, A.C.; Raleigh, J.A.; Kogel, A.J. van der

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Most solid tumors contain hypoxic cells, and the amount of tumor hypoxia has been shown to have a negative impact on the outcome of radiotherapy. The efficacy of combined modality treatments depends both on the sequence and timing of the treatments. Hypoxic cell turnover in tumors may be im

  4. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (153). Severe hypoxic ischaemic brain injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Chua, Wynne; Lim, Boon Keat; Lim, Tchoyoson Choie Cheio

    2014-01-01

    A 58-year-old Indian woman presented with asystole after an episode of haemetemesis, with a patient downtime of 20 mins. After initial resuscitation efforts, computed tomography of the brain, obtained to evaluate neurological injury, demonstrated evidence of severe hypoxic ischaemic brain injury. The imaging features of hypoxic ischaemic brain injury and the potential pitfalls with regard to image interpretation are herein discussed.

  5. Biomarkers of Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy in Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha V. Douglas-Escobar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As neonatal intensive care has evolved, the focus has shifted from improving mortality alone to an effort to improve both mortality and morbidity. The most frequent source of neonatal brain injury occurs as a result of hypoxic-ischemic injury. Hypoxic-ischemic injury occurs in about 2 of 1,000 full-term infants and severe injured infants will have lifetime disabilities and neurodevelopmental delays. Most recently, remarkable efforts toward neuroprotection have been started with the advent of therapeutic hypothermia and a key step in the evolution of neonatal neuroprotection is the discovery of biomarkers that enable the clinician-scientist to screen infants for brain injury, monitor progression of disease, identify injured brain regions, and assess efficacy of neuroprotective clinical trials. Lastly, biomarkers offer great hope identifying when an injury occurred shedding light on the potential pathophysiology and the most effective therapy. In this article, we will review biomarkers of HIE including S100b, neuron specific enolase, umbilical cord IL-6, CK-BB, GFAP, myelin basic protein, UCHL-1, and pNF-H. We hope to contribute to the awareness, validation and clinical use of established as well as novel neonatal brain injury biomarkers.

  6. Early cerebral hemodynamic, metabolic and histological changes in hypoxic-ischemic fetal lambs during postnatal life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eRey-Santano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The hemodynamic, metabolic and biochemical changes produce during transition from fetal to neonatal life could be aggravated if asphyctic event occur during fetal life. The aim of the study was to examine the regional cerebral blood flow (RCBF, histological changes, and cerebral brain metabolism in preterm lambs, and to analyze the role of oxidative stress for the first hours of postnatal life following severe fetal asphyxia. 18 chronically instrumented fetal lambs were assigned to: hypoxic-ischemic group, following fetal asphyxia animals were delivered and maintained on intermittent-positive-pressure-ventilation for 3 hours, and non-injured animals that were managed similarly to the previous group and used as control group. During hypoxic-ischemic insult, injured group developed acidosis, hypoxia, hypercapnia, latacidaemia and tachycardia in comparison to control group, without hypotension. Intermittent-positive-pressure-ventilation transiently improved gas exchange and cardiovascular parameters. After HI injury and during ventilation-support, the increased RCBF in inner zones was maintained for hypoxic-ischemic group, but cortical flow did not exhibit differences compared to the control group. Also, the increase of TUNEL positive cells (apoptosis and antioxidant enzymes, and decrease of ATP reserves was significantly higher in the brain regions where the RCBF were not increased.In conclusion, early metabolic, histological and hemodynamic changes involved in brain damage have been intensively investigated and reported in premature asphyctic lambs for the first 3 hours of postnatal life. Those changes have been described in human neonates, so our model could be useful to test the security and the effectiveness of different neuroprotective or ventilatory strategies when are applied in the first hours after fetal hypoxic-ischemic injury.

  7. Effects of Yulangsan polysaccharide on monoamine neurotransmitters, adenylate cyclase activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in a mouse model of depression induced by unpredictable chronic mild stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang Liang; Renbin Huang; Xing Lin; Jianchun Huang; Zhongshi Huang; Huagang Liu

    2012-01-01

    The present study established a mouse model of depression induced by unpredictable chronic mild stress. The model mice were treated with Yulangsan polysaccharide (YLSPS; 150, 300 and 600 mg/kg) for 21 days, and compared with fluoxetine-treated and normal control groups. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, radioimmunity and immunohistochemical staining showed that following treatment with YLSPS (300 and 600 mg/kg), monoamine neurotransmitter levels, prefrontal cortex adenylate cyclase activity and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression were significantly elevated, and depression-like behaviors were improved. Open-field and novelty-suppressed feeding tests showed that mouse activity levels were increased and feeding latency was shortened following treatment. Our results indicate that YLSPS inhibits depression by upregulating monoamine neurotransmitters, prefrontal cortex adenylate cyclase activity and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression.

  8. Hypoxic guard systems do not prevent rapid hypoxic inspired mixture formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cooman, Sofie; Schollaert, Caroline; Hendrickx, Jan F A; Peyton, Philip J; Van Zundert, Tom; De Wolf, Andre M

    2015-08-01

    Because a case report and theoretical mass balances suggested that hypoxic guard systems may not prevent the formation of hypoxic inspired mixtures (FIO2 ≤ 21 %) over the clinically used fresh gas flow (FGF) range, we measured FIO2 over a wide range of hypoxic guard limits for O2/N2O and O2/air mixtures. After IRB approval, 16 ASA I-II patients received sevoflurane in either O2/N2O (n = 8) or O2/air (n = 8) using a Zeus(®) anesthesia machine in the conventional mode. After using an 8 L/min FGF with FDO2 = 25% for 10 min, the following hypoxic guard limits were tested for 4 min each, expressed as [total FGF in L/min; FDO2 in %]: [0.3;85], [0.4;65], [0.5;50], [0.7;36], [0.85;30], [1.0;25], [1.25;25], [1.5;25], [2;25], [3;25], [5;25], and [8;25]. In between these [FGF;FDO2] combinations, 8 L/min FGF with 25% O2 was used for 4 min to return to the same baseline FIO2 (25%) before the start of the next combination. This sequence was studied once in each patient receiving O2/air (n = 8), but twice in each patient who received O2/N2O (n = 8) to examine the effect of decreasing N2O uptake over time, resulting in three groups: early O2/N2O, late O2/N2O, and O2/air group. The [FGF;FDO2]-FIO2 relationship was examined. The overall [FGF;FDO2]-FIO2 relationship in the three groups was similar. In all 1, 1.25, and 1.5 L/min FGF groups, FIO2 decreased below 21% in all but one patient; this occurred within 1 min in at least one patient. In the 0.7 L/min O2/air group and the 3 L/min late O2/N2O and O2/air groups, FIO2 decreased below 21% in one patient. Current hypoxic guard systems do not reliably prevent a hypoxic FIO2 with O2/N2O and O2/air mixtures, particularly between 0.7 and 3 L/min. PMID:25270987

  9. Hepatocytes Determine the Hypoxic Microenvironment and Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Production of Nitric Oxide That Targets Mitochondrial Respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether host hepatocytes may reverse hypoxic radioresistance through nitric oxide (NO)-induced oxygen sparing, in a model relevant to colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Hepatocytes and a panel of CRC cells were incubated in a tissue-mimetic coculture system with diffusion-limited oxygenation, and oxygen levels were monitored by an oxygen-sensing fluorescence probe. To activate endogenous NO production, cocultures were exposed to a cytokine mixture, and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was analyzed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and NO/nitrite production. The mitochondrial targets of NO were examined by enzymatic activity. To assess hypoxic radioresponse, cocultures were irradiated and reseeded for colonies. Results: Resting hepatocytes consumed 10-40 times more oxygen than mouse CT26 and human DLD-1, HT29, HCT116, and SW480 CRC cells, and thus seemed to be the major effectors of hypoxic conditioning. As a result, hepatocytes caused uniform radioprotection of tumor cells at a 1:1 ratio. Conversely, NO-producing hepatocytes radiosensitized all CRC cell lines more than 1.5-fold, similar to the effect of selective mitochondrial inhibitors. The radiosensitizing effect was associated with a respiratory self-arrest of hepatocytes at the level of aconitase and complex II, which resulted in profound reoxygenation of tumor cells through oxygen sparing. Nitric oxide–producing hepatocytes were at least 10 times more active than NO-producing macrophages to reverse hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Conclusions: Hepatocytes were the major determinants of the hypoxic microenvironment and radioresponse of CRC cells in our model of metabolic hypoxia. We provide evidence that reoxygenation and radiosensitization of hypoxic CRC cells can be achieved through oxygen sparing induced by endogenous NO production in host hepatocytes

  10. Placenta growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor B expression in the hypoxic lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLoughlin Paul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic alveolar hypoxia, due to residence at high altitude or chronic obstructive lung diseases, leads to pulmonary hypertension, which may be further complicated by right heart failure, increasing morbidity and mortality. In the non-diseased lung, angiogenesis occurs in chronic hypoxia and may act in a protective, adaptive manner. To date, little is known about the behaviour of individual vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF family ligands in hypoxia-induced pulmonary angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of placenta growth factor (PlGF and VEGFB during the development of hypoxic pulmonary angiogenesis and their functional effects on the pulmonary endothelium. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to conditions of normoxia (21% O2 or hypoxia (10% O2 for 1-21 days. Stereological analysis of vascular structure, real-time PCR analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA, VEGFB, placenta growth factor (PlGF, VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, immunohistochemistry and western blots were completed. The effects of VEGF ligands on human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells were determined using a wound-healing assay. Results Typical vascular remodelling and angiogenesis were observed in the hypoxic lung. PlGF and VEGFB mRNA expression were significantly increased in the hypoxic lung. Immunohistochemical analysis showed reduced expression of VEGFB protein in hypoxia although PlGF protein was unchanged. The expression of VEGFA mRNA and protein was unchanged. In vitro PlGF at high concentration mimicked the wound-healing actions of VEGFA on pulmonary microvascular endothelial monolayers. Low concentrations of PlGF potentiated the wound-healing actions of VEGFA while higher concentrations of PlGF were without this effect. VEGFB inhibited the wound-healing actions of VEGFA while VEGFB and PlGF together were mutually antagonistic. Conclusions VEGFB and PlGF can either inhibit or

  11. Placenta growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor B expression in the hypoxic lung

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sands, Michelle

    2011-01-25

    Abstract Background Chronic alveolar hypoxia, due to residence at high altitude or chronic obstructive lung diseases, leads to pulmonary hypertension, which may be further complicated by right heart failure, increasing morbidity and mortality. In the non-diseased lung, angiogenesis occurs in chronic hypoxia and may act in a protective, adaptive manner. To date, little is known about the behaviour of individual vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family ligands in hypoxia-induced pulmonary angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of placenta growth factor (PlGF) and VEGFB during the development of hypoxic pulmonary angiogenesis and their functional effects on the pulmonary endothelium. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to conditions of normoxia (21% O2) or hypoxia (10% O2) for 1-21 days. Stereological analysis of vascular structure, real-time PCR analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), VEGFB, placenta growth factor (PlGF), VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1) and VEGFR2, immunohistochemistry and western blots were completed. The effects of VEGF ligands on human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells were determined using a wound-healing assay. Results Typical vascular remodelling and angiogenesis were observed in the hypoxic lung. PlGF and VEGFB mRNA expression were significantly increased in the hypoxic lung. Immunohistochemical analysis showed reduced expression of VEGFB protein in hypoxia although PlGF protein was unchanged. The expression of VEGFA mRNA and protein was unchanged. In vitro PlGF at high concentration mimicked the wound-healing actions of VEGFA on pulmonary microvascular endothelial monolayers. Low concentrations of PlGF potentiated the wound-healing actions of VEGFA while higher concentrations of PlGF were without this effect. VEGFB inhibited the wound-healing actions of VEGFA while VEGFB and PlGF together were mutually antagonistic. Conclusions VEGFB and PlGF can either inhibit or potentiate the

  12. Heart rate response to hypoxic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, C; Møller, P; Kanstrup, I L;

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the effects of dopamine D(2)-receptor blockade on the early decrease in maximal heart rate at high altitude (4559 m). We also attempted to clarify the time-dependent component of this reduction and the extent to which it is reversed by oxygen breathing. Twelve subjects performed...... breathing completely reversed the decrease in maximal heart rate to values not different from those at sea level. In conclusion, dopamine D(2)-receptor blockade with domperidone demonstrates that hypoxic exercise in humans activates D(2)-receptors, resulting in a decrease in circulating levels...... progressively decreased the maximal heart rate from day 1 and onwards; also, hypoxia by itself increased plasma noradrenaline levels after maximal exercise. Domperidone further increased maximal noradrenaline concentrations, but had no effect on maximal heart rate. On each study day at altitude, oxygen...

  13. Investigation of the modifying effects of vitamin A and hypoxic cell sensitizers in radiation carcinogenesis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of vitamin A (retinyl acetate) and three hypoxic cell sensitizers (metronidazole, misonidazole and desmethylmisonidazole) on lung tumor development in strain A mice exposed to radiation was assessed. In experiments involving vitamin A, two groups of mice were fed a low vitamin A diet (< 100 IU/100g diet) while the two other groups were fed a high vitamin A diet (800 IU/100 g diet). After two weeks one group maintained on the high vitamin A diet and one group maintained on the low vitamin A diet were given an acute dose of 500 rad of gamma radiation to the thoracic region. Mice were killed, their lungs were removed and the number of surface adenomas were counted. There was a significant increase in the number of mice bearing lung tumors and the mean number of lung tumors per mouse in the irradiated group maintained on the high vitamin A diet at 40 weeks post irradiation as compared to the irradiated group maintained on a low vitamin A diet. In the other experiment two dose levels of the hypoxic cell sensitizers, 0.2 mg/g and 0.6 mg/g, were used either alone or in combination with 900 rad of gamma radiation in a fractionated dose schedule of twice a week for three weeks. In the groups of mice which received hypoxic cell sensitizers only, the prevalence and the mean number of lung tumors per mouse were somewhat increased in the higher dose group (0.6 mg/g) of misonidazole but was not significantly different from the control animals in the other two sensitizer groups. The combination of hypoxic cell sensitizer and radiation did not show any significant enhancement of lung tumor response when compared with the group which received radiation only. The dose of radiation used in this study significantly enhanced lung tumor formation in mice when compared with the control group

  14. Hypoxic sensitizers: radiobiological studies at the cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nitroimidazoles have been found to selectively sensitize hypoxic cells to the effects of irradiation. The latest in this family of drugs is RO-07-0582, which is able to mimic 80 percent of the oxygen effect at a concentration of 5 mM by modifying the sensitivity of hypoxic cells to single doses of gamma rays; however, it is not a substitution for oxygen in promoting the repair of sublethal radiation damage between split doses. Studies show that it is a powerful cytotoxic agent as well and selectively operates against hypoxic cells. (auth)

  15. Optimization of tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours by radiation dose redistribution: a modelling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumour hypoxia is a known cause of clinical resistance to radiation therapy. The purpose of this work was to model the effects on tumour control probability (TCP) of selectively boosting the dose to hypoxic regions in a tumour, while keeping the mean tumour dose constant. A tumour model with a continuous oxygen distribution, incorporating pO2 histograms published for head and neck patients, was developed. Temporal and spatial variations in the oxygen distribution, non-uniform cell density and cell proliferation during treatment were included in the tumour modelling. Non-uniform dose prescriptions were made based on a segmentation of the tumours into four compartments. The main findings were: (1) Dose redistribution considerably improved TCP for all tumours. (2) The effect on TCP depended on the degree of reoxygenation during treatment, with a maximum relative increase in TCP for tumours with poor or no reoxygenation. (3) Acute hypoxia reduced TCP moderately, while underdosing chronic hypoxic cells gave large reductions in TCP. (4) Restricted dose redistribution still gave a substantial increase in TCP as compared to uniform dose boosts. In conclusion, redistributing dose according to tumour oxygenation status might increase TCP when the tumour response to radiotherapy is limited by chronic hypoxia. This could potentially improve treatment outcome in a subpopulation of patients who respond poorly to conventional radiotherapy

  16. PI3K/Akt contributes to increased expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in macrophages exposed to hypoxic stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Young; Jeong, Eunshil; Joung, Sun Myung [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joo Young, E-mail: joolee@catholic.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon 420-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxic stress-induced TLR4 expression is mediated by PI3K/Akt in macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PI3K/Akt regulated HIF-1 activation leading to TLR4 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was not involved in TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulforaphane suppressed hypoxia-mediated TLR4 expression by inhibiting PI3K/Akt. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play critical roles in triggering immune and inflammatory responses by detecting invading microbial pathogens and endogenous danger signals. Increased expression of TLR4 is implicated in aggravated inflammatory symptoms in ischemic tissue injury and chronic diseases. Results from our previous study showed that TLR4 expression was upregulated by hypoxic stress mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) at a transcriptional level in macrophages. In this study, we further investigated the upstream signaling pathway that contributed to the increase of TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress. Either treatment with pharmacological inhibitors of PI3K and Akt or knockdown of Akt expression by siRNA blocked the increase of TLR4 mRNA and protein levels in macrophages exposed to hypoxia and CoCl{sub 2}. Phosphorylation of Akt by hypoxic stress preceded nuclear accumulation of HIF-1{alpha}. A PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) attenuated CoCl{sub 2}-induced nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activation of HIF-1{alpha}. In addition, HIF-1{alpha}-mediated upregulation of TLR4 expression was blocked by LY294002. Furthermore, sulforaphane suppressed hypoxia- and CoCl{sub 2}-induced upregulation of TLR4 mRNA and protein by inhibiting PI3K/Akt activation and the subsequent nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activation of HIF-1{alpha}. However, p38 was not involved in HIF-1{alpha} activation and TLR4 expression induced by hypoxic stress in macrophages. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PI3K

  17. PI3K/Akt contributes to increased expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in macrophages exposed to hypoxic stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Hypoxic stress-induced TLR4 expression is mediated by PI3K/Akt in macrophages. ► PI3K/Akt regulated HIF-1 activation leading to TLR4 expression. ► p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was not involved in TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress. ► Sulforaphane suppressed hypoxia-mediated TLR4 expression by inhibiting PI3K/Akt. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play critical roles in triggering immune and inflammatory responses by detecting invading microbial pathogens and endogenous danger signals. Increased expression of TLR4 is implicated in aggravated inflammatory symptoms in ischemic tissue injury and chronic diseases. Results from our previous study showed that TLR4 expression was upregulated by hypoxic stress mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) at a transcriptional level in macrophages. In this study, we further investigated the upstream signaling pathway that contributed to the increase of TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress. Either treatment with pharmacological inhibitors of PI3K and Akt or knockdown of Akt expression by siRNA blocked the increase of TLR4 mRNA and protein levels in macrophages exposed to hypoxia and CoCl2. Phosphorylation of Akt by hypoxic stress preceded nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α. A PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) attenuated CoCl2-induced nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activation of HIF-1α. In addition, HIF-1α-mediated upregulation of TLR4 expression was blocked by LY294002. Furthermore, sulforaphane suppressed hypoxia- and CoCl2-induced upregulation of TLR4 mRNA and protein by inhibiting PI3K/Akt activation and the subsequent nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activation of HIF-1α. However, p38 was not involved in HIF-1α activation and TLR4 expression induced by hypoxic stress in macrophages. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PI3K/Akt contributes to hypoxic stress-induced TLR4 expression at least partly through the regulation of HIF-1 activation. These reveal a novel mechanism

  18. Classical transient receptor potential channel 6 (TRPC6) is essential for hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and alveolar gas exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissmann, Norbert; Dietrich, Alexander; Fuchs, Beate; Kalwa, Hermann; Ay, Mahmut; Dumitrascu, Rio; Olschewski, Andrea; Storch, Ursula; Mederos y Schnitzler, Michael; Ghofrani, Hossein Ardeschir; Schermuly, Ralph Theo; Pinkenburg, Olaf; Seeger, Werner; Grimminger, Friedrich; Gudermann, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Regional alveolar hypoxia causes local vasoconstriction in the lung, shifting blood flow from hypoxic to normoxic areas, thereby maintaining gas exchange. This mechanism is known as hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). Disturbances in HPV can cause life-threatening hypoxemia whereas chronic hypoxia triggers lung vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension. The signaling cascade of this vitally important mechanism is still unresolved. Using transient receptor potential channel 6 (TRPC6)-deficient mice, we show that this channel is a key regulator of acute HPV as this regulatory mechanism was absent in TRPC6−/− mice whereas the pulmonary vasoconstrictor response to the thromboxane mimetic U46619 was unchanged. Accordingly, induction of regional hypoventilation resulted in severe arterial hypoxemia in TRPC6−/− but not in WT mice. This effect was mirrored by a lack of hypoxia-induced cation influx and currents in smooth-muscle cells from precapillary pulmonary arteries (PASMC) of TRPC6−/− mice. In both WT and TRPC6−/− PASMC hypoxia caused diacylglycerol (DAG) accumulation. DAG seems to exert its action via TRPC6, as DAG kinase inhibition provoked a cation influx only in WT but not in TRPC6−/− PASMC. Notably, chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension was independent of TRPC6 activity. We conclude that TRPC6 plays a unique and indispensable role in acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Manipulation of TRPC6 function may thus offer a therapeutic strategy for the control of pulmonary hemodynamics and gas exchange. PMID:17142322

  19. Neuroprotective effects of volume-regulated anion channel blocker DCPIB on neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ammar ALIBRAHIM; Li-yan ZHAO; Christine You-jin BAE; Andrew BARSZCZYK; Christopher LF SUN; Guan-lei WANG; Hong-shuo SUN

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the role of swelling-induced activation of volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs) in a neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury model using the selective VRAC blocker 4-(2-butyl-6,7-dichloro-2-cyclopentyl-indan-1-on5-yl) oxobutyric acid (DCPIB).Methods:Cerebral hypoxic-ischemic injury was induced in 7-day-old mouse pups with Rice-Vannucci method.Prior to the onset of ischemia,the animals were ip administered DCPIB (10 mg/kg).The animals were sacrificed 24 h afterwards,coronal sections of the brains were cut and the areas of infarct were examined using TTC staining and an image-analysis system.Cultured PC12 cells were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 4 h.The cellular viability was assessed using Cell Counting Kit 8.Intracellular chloride concentration [Clˉ]i was measured using 6-methoxy-N-ethylquinolinium iodide.Results:DCPIB-treated mice showed a significant reduction in hemispheric corrected infarct volume (26.65%+2.23%) compared to that in vehicle-treated mice (45.52%+1.45%,P<O.O01).DCPIB-treated mice also showed better functional recovery as they were more active than vehicle-treated mice at 4 and 24 h post injury.In cultured PC12 cells,DCPIB (10 μmol/L) significantly reduced OGD-induced cell death.Moreover,DCPIB (20 μmol/L) blocked hypotonic-induced decrease in [Clˉ]i in PC12 cells of both control and OGD groups.Conclusion:The results further support the pathophysiological role of VRACs in ischemic brain injury,and suggest DCPIB as a potential,easily administrable agent targeting VRACs in the context of perinatal and neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

  20. Gold nanoparticle cellular uptake, toxicity and radiosensitisation in hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are novel agents that have been shown to cause radiosensitisation in vitro and in vivo. Tumour hypoxia is associated with radiation resistance and reduced survival in cancer patients. The interaction of GNPs with cells in hypoxia is explored. Materials and methods: GNP uptake, localization, toxicity and radiosensitisation were assessed in vitro under oxic and hypoxic conditions. Results: GNP cellular uptake was significantly lower under hypoxic than oxic conditions. A significant reduction in cell proliferation in hypoxic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exposed to GNPs was observed. In these cells significant radiosensitisation occurred in normoxia and moderate hypoxia. However, in near anoxia no significant sensitisation occurred. Conclusions: GNP uptake occurred in hypoxic conditions, causing radiosensitisation in moderate, but not extreme hypoxia in a breast cancer cell line. These findings may be important for the development of GNPs for cancer therapy

  1. Ageing, chronic alcohol consumption and folate are determinants of genomic DNA methylation, p16 promoter methylation and the expression of p16 in the mouse colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder age and chronic alcohol consumption are important risk factors for the development of colon cancer. Each factor can alter genomic and gene-specific DNA methylation. This study examined the effects of aging and chronic alcohol consumption on genomic and p16-specific methylation, and p16 express...

  2. Hypoxic enhancement of exosome release by breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Hamish W

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exosomes are nanovesicles secreted by tumour cells which have roles in paracrine signalling during tumour progression, including tumour-stromal interactions, activation of proliferative pathways and bestowing immunosuppression. Hypoxia is an important feature of solid tumours which promotes tumour progression, angiogenesis and metastasis, potentially through exosome-mediated signalling. Methods Breast cancer cell lines were cultured under either moderate (1% O2 or severe (0.1% O2 hypoxia. Exosomes were isolated from conditioned media and quantitated by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA and immunoblotting for the exosomal protein CD63 in order to assess the impact of hypoxia on exosome release. Hypoxic exosome fractions were assayed for miR-210 by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and normalised to exogenous and endogenous control genes. Statistical significance was determined using the Student T test with a P value of  Results Exposure of three different breast cancer cell lines to moderate (1% O2 and severe (0.1% O2 hypoxia resulted in significant increases in the number of exosomes present in the conditioned media as determined by NTA and CD63 immunoblotting. Activation of hypoxic signalling by dimethyloxalylglycine, a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF hydroxylase inhibitor, resulted in significant increase in exosome release. Transfection of cells with HIF-1α siRNA prior to hypoxic exposure prevented the enhancement of exosome release by hypoxia. The hypoxically regulated miR-210 was identified to be present at elevated levels in hypoxic exosome fractions. Conclusions These data provide evidence that hypoxia promotes the release of exosomes by breast cancer cells, and that this hypoxic response may be mediated by HIF-1α. Given an emerging role for tumour cell-derived exosomes in tumour progression, this has significant implications for understanding the hypoxic tumour phenotype, whereby hypoxic

  3. Marine Natural Products as Inhibitors of Hypoxic Signaling in Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2009-01-01

    Marine natural products have become a major source of new chemical entities in the discovery of potential anticancer agents that potently suppress various antitumor molecular targets. As a consequence of insufficient vascularization, hypoxic regions form within rapidly growing solid tumor masses. Specific alterations of gene expression in these hypoxic tumor cells help facilitate the survival and metastatic spread of solid tumors. The transcriptional response to cellular hypoxia is primarily ...

  4. Hypoxic enhancement of exosome release by breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exosomes are nanovesicles secreted by tumour cells which have roles in paracrine signalling during tumour progression, including tumour-stromal interactions, activation of proliferative pathways and bestowing immunosuppression. Hypoxia is an important feature of solid tumours which promotes tumour progression, angiogenesis and metastasis, potentially through exosome-mediated signalling. Breast cancer cell lines were cultured under either moderate (1% O2) or severe (0.1% O2) hypoxia. Exosomes were isolated from conditioned media and quantitated by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and immunoblotting for the exosomal protein CD63 in order to assess the impact of hypoxia on exosome release. Hypoxic exosome fractions were assayed for miR-210 by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and normalised to exogenous and endogenous control genes. Statistical significance was determined using the Student T test with a P value of < 0.05 considered significant. Exposure of three different breast cancer cell lines to moderate (1% O2) and severe (0.1% O2) hypoxia resulted in significant increases in the number of exosomes present in the conditioned media as determined by NTA and CD63 immunoblotting. Activation of hypoxic signalling by dimethyloxalylglycine, a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) hydroxylase inhibitor, resulted in significant increase in exosome release. Transfection of cells with HIF-1α siRNA prior to hypoxic exposure prevented the enhancement of exosome release by hypoxia. The hypoxically regulated miR-210 was identified to be present at elevated levels in hypoxic exosome fractions. These data provide evidence that hypoxia promotes the release of exosomes by breast cancer cells, and that this hypoxic response may be mediated by HIF-1α. Given an emerging role for tumour cell-derived exosomes in tumour progression, this has significant implications for understanding the hypoxic tumour phenotype, whereby hypoxic cancer cells may release more

  5. Erythropoietin and hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, EE; Bonifacio, SL; Glass, HC; Juul, SE; Chang, T.; Mayock, DE; Durand, DJ; Song, D.; Barkovich, AJ; Ballard, RA; Wu, YW

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Background Erythropoietin is neuroprotective in animal models of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. We previously reported a phase I safety and pharmacokinetic study of erythropoietin in neonates. This article presents the neurodevelopmental follow-up of infants who were enrolled in the phase I clinical trial. Methods We enrolled 24 newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in a dose-escalation study. Patients received up to six doses of er...

  6. Liposomal doxorubicin improves radiotherapy response in hypoxic prostate cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor vasculature frequently fails to supply sufficient levels of oxygen to tumor tissue resulting in radioresistant hypoxic tumors. To improve therapeutic outcome radiotherapy (RT) may be combined with cytotoxic agents. In this study we have investigated the combination of RT with the cytotoxic agent doxorubicin (DXR) encapsulated in pegylated liposomes (PL-DXR). The PL-DXR formulation Caelyx® was administered to male mice bearing human, androgen-sensitive CWR22 prostate carcinoma xenografts in a dose of 3.5 mg DXR/kg, in combination with RT (2 Gy/day × 5 days) performed under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Hypoxic RT was achieved by experimentally inducing tumor hypoxia by clamping the tumor-bearing leg five minutes prior to and during RT. Treatment response evaluation consisted of tumor volume measurements and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) with subsequent pharmacokinetic analysis using the Brix model. Imaging was performed pre-treatment (baseline) and 8 days later. Further, hypoxic fractions were determined by pimonidazole immunohistochemistry of excised tumor tissue. As expected, the therapeutic effect of RT was significantly less effective under hypoxic than normoxic conditions. However, concomitant administration of PL-DXR significantly improved the therapeutic outcome following RT in hypoxic tumors. Further, the pharmacokinetic DCE MRI parameters and hypoxic fractions suggest PL-DXR to induce growth-inhibitory effects without interfering with tumor vascular functions. We found that DXR encapsulated in liposomes improved the therapeutic effect of RT under hypoxic conditions without affecting vascular functions. Thus, we propose that for cytotoxic agents affecting tumor vascular functions liposomes may be a promising drug delivery technology for use in chemoradiotherapy

  7. Chronic administration of an HDAC inhibitor treats both neurological and systemic Niemann-Pick type C disease in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Suhail; Getz, Michelle; Haldar, Kasturi

    2016-02-17

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are approved for treating rare cancers and are of interest as potential therapies for neurodegenerative disorders. We evaluated a triple combination formulation (TCF) comprising the pan-HDACi vorinostat, the caging agent 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPBCD), and polyethylene glycol (PEG) for treating a mouse model (the Npc1(nmf164) mouse) of Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease, a difficult-to-treat cerebellar disorder. Vorinostat alone showed activity in cultured primary cells derived from Npc1(nmf164) mice but did not improve animal survival. However, low-dose, once-weekly intraperitoneal injections of the TCF containing vorinostat increased histone acetylation in the mouse brain, preserved neurites and Purkinje cells, delayed symptoms of neurodegeneration, and extended mouse life span from 4 to almost 9 months. We demonstrate that the TCF boosted the ability of HDACi to cross the blood-brain barrier and was not toxic even when used long term. Further, the TCF enabled dose reduction, which has been a major challenge in HDACi therapy. TCF simultaneously treats neurodegenerative and systemic symptoms of Niemann-Pick type C disease in a mouse model. PMID:26888431

  8. Therapeutic attack of hypoxic cells of solid tumors: presidential address.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorelli, A C

    1988-02-15

    Hypoxic cells of solid tumors are relatively resistant to therapeutic assault. Studies have demonstrated that oxygen-deficient tumor cells exist in an environment conducive to reductive reactions making hypoxic cells particularly sensitive to bioreductive alkylating agents. Mitomycin C, the prototype bioreductive alkylating agent available for clinical use, is capable of preferentially killing oxygen-deficient cells both in vitro and in vivo. This phenomenon is at least in part the result of differences in the uptake and metabolism of mitomycin C by hypoxic and oxygenated tumor cells, with the ultimate critical lesion being the cross-linking of DNA by the mitomycin antibiotic. The combination of mitomycin C with X-irradiation, to attack hypoxic and oxygenated tumor cell populations, respectively, has led to enhanced antitumor effects in mice bearing solid tumor implants and in patients with cancer of the head and neck. More efficacious kill of hypoxic tumor cells may be possible by the use of dicoumarol in combination with mitomycin or by the use of the related antibiotic porfiromycin. The findings support the use of an agent with specificity for hypoxic tumor cells in potentially curative regimens for solid tumors. PMID:3123053

  9. Thalamic mediation of hypoxic respiratory depression in lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koos, Brian J; Rajaee, Arezoo; Ibe, Basil; Guerra, Catalina; Kruger, Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    Immaturity of respiratory controllers in preterm infants dispose to recurrent apnea and oxygen deprivation. Accompanying reductions in brain oxygen tensions evoke respiratory depression, potentially exacerbating hypoxemia. Central respiratory depression during moderate hypoxia is revealed in the ventilatory decline following initial augmentation. This study determined whether the thalamic parafascicular nuclear (Pf) complex involved in adult nociception and sensorimotor regulation (Bentivoglio M, Balerecia G, Kruger L.Prog Brain Res87: 53-80, 1991) also becomes a postnatal controller of hypoxic ventilatory decline. Respiratory responses to moderate isocapnic hypoxia were studied in conscious lambs. Hypoxic ventilatory decline was compared with peak augmentation. Pf and/or adjacent thalamic structures were destroyed by the neuron-specific toxin ibotenic acid (IB). IB lesions involving the thalamic Pf abolished hypoxic ventilatory decline. Lesions of adjacent thalamic nuclei that spared Pf and control injections of vehicle failed to blunt hypoxic respiratory depression. Our findings reveal that the thalamic Pf region is a critical controller of hypoxic ventilatory depression and thus a key target for exploring molecular concomitants of forebrain pathways regulating hypoxic ventilatory depression in early development. PMID:26818057

  10. Pulmonary hypoxic vasoconstriction: how strong? How fast?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, D. W.; Klocke, R. A.; Farhi, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a minimally invasive technique for studying regional blood flow in conscious sheep, bypassing the complications of open-chest surgery, flow probes and tracer infusion. We quantitate regional perfusion continuously on the basis of regional clearance of methane (methane is produced in the sheep rumen, enters the circulation and is eliminated nearly completely (greater than 95%) in the lung). Tracheal intubation with a dual-lumen catheter isolates the gas exchange of the right apical lobe (RAL; less than 15% of the lung) from that of the remainder of the lung, which serves as a control (CL). We measure RAL and CL methane elimination by entraining expirates in constant flows, sampled continuously for methane. Results obtained with this technique and from regional oxygen uptake are in excellent agreement. We have found that hypoxic vasoconstriction is far more potent and stable during eucapnic hypoxia than during hypocapnic hypoxia. The time course of the vasoconstriction suggests that many of the data in the literature may have been obtained prior to steady state.

  11. Regulation of angiogenin expression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition by HIF-1α signaling in hypoxic retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kairan; Luo, Chenqi; Zhang, Xiaobo; Ye, Panpan; Zhang, Yidong; He, Jiliang; Yao, Ke

    2016-09-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is a major cause of vision loss in many retinal diseases. Hypoxia is determined to be a key inducer of CNV and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is an important transcription factor. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the synthesis of proangiogenic cytokines make great contributions to the development of CNV. In the present study, the role of HIF-1α signaling in the regulation of angiogenin (ANG) expression and EMT in hypoxic retinal pigment epithelial cells was investigated. A significant elevation expression of ANG expression level in a mouse model of laser-induced CNV was demonstrated. In a hypoxic model of ARPE-19, an increased expression level of ANG and induction of EMT accompanied with stabilization and nucleus translocation of HIF-1α. Blockage of HIF-1α signaling resulted in inhibition of high expression of ANG and EMT features. The direct interaction between HIF-1α and ANG promoter region was identified by ChIP-qPCR. The association of RNase 4 mRNA level with HIF-1α signaling was also clarified in APRE-19. Moreover, the exogenous ANG translocated into the nucleus, enhanced 45S rRNA transcription, promoted cell proliferation and tube formation in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, the hypoxic conditions regulate the expression of ANG and EMT via an activation of HIF-1α signaling. It provides molecular evidence for potential therapy strategies of treating CNV. PMID:27259982

  12. KLF5 mediates vascular remodeling via HIF-1α in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaochen; He, Yuanzhou; Xu, Yongjian; Huang, Xiaomin; Liu, Jin; Xie, Min; Liu, Xiansheng

    2016-02-15

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is characterized by active vasoconstriction and profound vascular remodeling. KLF5, a zinc-finger transcription factor, is involved in the excessive proliferation and apoptotic resistance phenotype associated with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. However, the molecular mechanisms of KLF5-mediated pathogenesis of HPH are largely undefined. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to normoxia or hypoxia (10% O2) for 4 wk. Hypoxic rats developed pulmonary arterial remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy with significantly increased right ventricular systolic pressure. The levels of KLF5 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were upregulated in distal pulmonary arterial smooth muscle from hypoxic rats. The knockdown of KLF5 via short-hairpin RNA attenuated chronic hypoxia-induced hemodynamic and histological changes in rats. The silencing of either KLF5 or HIF-1α prevented hypoxia-induced (5%) proliferation and migration and promoted apoptosis in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. KLF5 was immunoprecipitated with HIF-1α under hypoxia and acted as an upstream regulator of HIF-1α. The cell cycle regulators cyclin B1 and cyclin D1 and apoptosis-related proteins including bax, bcl-2, survivin, caspase-3, and caspase-9, were involved in the regulation of KLF5/HIF-1α-mediated cell survival. This study demonstrated that KLF5 plays a crucial role in hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling in an HIF-1α-dependent manner and provided a better understanding of the pathogenesis of HPH. PMID:26702149

  13. δ-Tocotrienol treatment is more effective against hypoxic tumor cells than normoxic cells: potential implications for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Akira; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2015-08-01

    Tocotrienols, unsaturated forms of vitamin E, inhibit the proliferation of a variety of cancer cells and suppress angiogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying those effects on cancer cell growth remain unclear especially under hypoxic conditions. In this study, we demonstrated that δ-tocotrienol (δ-T3) could be used as a novel anticancer agent against human colorectal adenocarcinoma (DLD-1) cells under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. δ-T3 inhibited the growth of DLD-1 cells in a dose-dependent fashion by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. This effect was more potent under hypoxic than normoxic conditions. The anticancer effect of δ-T3 was achieved by its up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (p21 and p27), the activation of caspases and the suppression of phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) at Thr(308) and Ser(473). In in vivo studies, oral administration of rice bran tocotrienol (RBT3, mainly γ-T3) (10 mg/mouse/day) significantly inhibited tumor growth in nude mice. In tumor analyses, RBT3 activated p21, p27, caspase-3 and caspase-9 and decreased Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, immunostaining revealed that RBT3 decreased the number of cells positive for CD31/platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 in microvessels in the tumor. Taken together, these data suggest that tocotrienols are potent antitumor agents capable of inducing apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis under both hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Tocotrienols could have significant therapeutic potential in the clinical treatment of tumors. PMID:25979648

  14. Tracking hypoxic signaling within encapsulated cell aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiles, Matthew L; Sahai, Suchit; Blanchette, James O

    2011-01-01

    , is therefore reduced and limited by diffusion. This reduced oxygen availability may especially impact β-cells whose insulin secretory function is highly dependent on oxygen. Capsule composition and geometry will also impact diffusion rates and lengths for oxygen. Therefore, we also describe a technique for identifying hypoxic cells within our PEG capsules. Infection of the cells with a recombinant adenovirus allows for a fluorescent signal to be produced when intracellular hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathways are activated. As HIFs are the primary regulators of the transcriptional response to hypoxia, they represent an ideal target marker for detection of hypoxic signaling. This approach allows for easy and rapid detection of hypoxic cells. Briefly, the adenovirus has the sequence for a red fluorescent protein (Ds Red DR from Clontech) under the control of a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) trimer. Stabilization of HIF-1 by low oxygen conditions will drive transcription of the fluorescent protein (Figure 1). Additional details on the construction of this virus have been published previously. The virus is stored in 10% glycerol at -80° C as many 150 μL aliquots in 1.5 mL centrifuge tubes at a concentration of 3.4 x 10(10) pfu/mL. Previous studies in our lab have shown that MIN6 cells encapsulated as aggregates maintain their viability throughout 4 weeks of culture in 20% oxygen. MIN6 aggregates cultured at 2 or 1% oxygen showed both signs of necrotic cells (still about 85-90% viable) by staining with ethidium bromide as well as morphological changes relative to cells in 20% oxygen. The smooth spherical shape of the aggregates displayed at 20% was lost and aggregates appeared more like disorganized groups of cells. While the low oxygen stress does not cause a pronounced drop in viability, it is clearly impacting MIN6 aggregation and function as measured by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Western blot analysis of encapsulated cells in 20% and 1% oxygen also

  15. The effect of PCO2 on hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, W H; Kay, J C; Fisher, J A

    1981-09-01

    Lung areas with a low V/Q ratio cause hypoxaemia. The low alveolar oxygen concentration may cause local hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) which reduces perfusion, raises the V/Q ratio, and hence reduces the tendency to a low PaO2. By changing PCO2, the HPV response can be altered. We examined this relationship in anaesthetized dogs by using a tracheal divider to separate hypoxic (nitrogen ventilated) from oxygenated (100 per cent oxygen ventilated) lung. Relative perfusion was assessed from total 133Xe exhaled from each lung area after intravenous infusions. When PaCO2 was changed by changing ventilation, we found that an increasing PaCO2 increased HPV and also PaO2. At a PaCO2 of 3.3 kPa, HPV was abolished and PaO2 fell. We also changed PaCO2 by altering PICO2 to one or both lung areas while ventilation remained constant throughout the experiment. Again as PaCO2 increased, HPV and PaCO2 increased. When PaCO2 fell and end tidal carbon dioxide in the hypoxic lung (PETCO2) remained elevated by maintaining PICO2 in the hypoxic lung and removing CO2 from the oxygenated lung) HPV was maintained. Thus it is the alveolar concentration of CO2 in the hypoxic lung which is important in modifying HPV. We conclude that in this model a low PETCO2 (3.3 kPa) in hypoxic lung will reduce HPV, and will result in more severe hypoxaemia. This may have relevance in both anaesthetized and intensive care unit patients when a higher PaO2 may be obtained by increasing hypoxic lung PETCO2. The effect of PETCO2 on PaO2 will be influenced by other variables, but when hypoventilated or hypoxic exist, increasing PETCO2 may reinforce hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and thus may increase PaO2. PMID:6793220

  16. Preliminary study on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in neonates with diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in neonates with diffusion-weighted MR imaging, and to explore the value and limitation of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) compared with conventional magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Conventional magnetic resonance T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and DWI (b=700 s/mm2) were performed in 36 neonates with HIE (average age, 8.44 days; range, 3 hours to 22 days), and the cortex and subcortical white matter, deep white matter, basal ganglia and thalamus, cerebral ventricle, and extra-cerebral interspace etc were observed. Results: Signal abnormalities were shown on DWI with hypoxic-ischemic insults, which included diffuse brain damage (19.4%, 7/36): extensive high signals in the regional cortex, subcortical and deep white matter; localized brain damage: high signals along lateral ventricular wall and triangular part (27.8%, 10/36 ), and punctate high signals in the frontal deep white matter (5.6%, 2/36). On T1WI, the incidence of the corresponding changes were 16.7% (6/36), 36.1% (13/36), and 30.6%(11/36), respectively. Hemorrhagic lesions demonstrated high signals on T1WI and no signals on DWI. Conclusion: DWI was applicable for acute HIE, and T1WI was suitable for subacute and chronic HIE. (authors)

  17. NLP-1: a DNA intercalating hypoxic cell radiosensitizer and cytotoxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 2-nitroimidazole linked phenanthridine, NLP-1 (5-[3-(2-nitro-1-imidazoyl)-propyl]-phenanthridinium bromide), was synthesized with the rationale of targeting the nitroimidazole to DNA via the phenanthridine ring. The drug is soluble in aqueous solution (greater than 25 mM) and stable at room temperature. It binds to DNA with a binding constant 1/30 that of ethidium bromide. At a concentration of 0.5 mM, NLP-1 is 8 times more toxic to hypoxic than aerobic cells at 37 degrees C. This concentration is 40 times less than the concentration of misonidazole, a non-intercalating 2-nitroimidazole, required for the same degree of hypoxic cell toxicity. The toxicity of NLP-1 is reduced at least 10-fold at 0 degrees C. Its ability to radiosensitize hypoxic cells is similar to misonidazole at 0 degrees C. Thus the putative targeting of the 2-nitroimidazole, NLP-1, to DNA, via its phenanthridine group, enhances its hypoxic toxicity, but not its radiosensitizing ability under the present test conditions. NLP-1 represents a lead compound for intercalating 2-nitroimidazoles with selective toxicity for hypoxic cells

  18. Upregulation of acid-sensing ion channel 1 protein expression by chronic administration of cocaine in the mouse striatum in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guo-Chi; Mao, Li-Min; WANG, John Q.; Chu, Xiang-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are ligand-gated cation channels activated by a drop in extracellular pH. They are enriched in the mammalian brain with a high synaptic density. Accumulating evidence suggests that ASIC1 contributes to synaptic activity related to learning/memory and fear conditioning, and also plays critical roles in neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we explored the effect of the psychostimulant, cocaine, on protein expression of ASICs in the mouse forebrain in vivo...

  19. Phosphorescence monitoring of hypoxic microenvironment in solid-tumors to evaluate chemotherapeutic effects using the hypoxia-sensitive iridium (III coordination compound.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Zeng

    Full Text Available To utilize phosphorescence to monitor hypoxic microenvironment in solid-tumors and investigate cancer chemotherapeutic effects in vivo.A hypoxia-sensitive probe named BTP was used to monitor hypoxic microenvironment in solid-tumors. The low-dose metronomic treatment with cisplatin was used in anti-angiogenetic chemotherapeutic programs. The phosphorescence properties of BTP were detected by a spectrofluorometer. BTP cytotoxicity utilized cell necrosis and apoptosis, which were evaluated by trypan blue dye exclusion and Hoechst33342 plus propidium iodide assays. Tumor-bearing mouse models of colon adenocarcinoma were used for tumor imaging in vivo. Monitoring of the hypoxic microenvironment in tumors was performed with a Maestro 2 fluorescence imaging system. Tumor tissues in each group were harvested regularly and treated with pathological hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining to confirm imaging results.BTP did not feature obvious cytotoxicity for cells, and tumor growth in low-dose metronomic cisplatin treated mice was significantly inhibited by chemotherapy. Hypoxic levels significantly increased due to cisplatin, as proven by the expression level of related proteins. Phosphorescence intensity in the tumors of mice in the cisplatin group was stronger and showed higher contrast than that in tumors of saline treated mice.We develop a useful phosphorescence method to evaluate the chemotherapeutic effects of cisplatin. The proposed method shows potential as a phosphorescence imaging approach for evaluating chemotherapeutic effects in vivo, especially anti-angiogenesis.

  20. Pervasive and opposing effects of Unpredictable Chronic Mild Stress (UCMS) on hippocampal gene expression in BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J mouse strains

    OpenAIRE

    Malki, Karim; Mineur, Yann S.; Tosto, Maria Grazia; Campbell, James; Karia, Priya; Jumabhoy, Irfan; Sluyter, Frans; Crusio, Wim E.; Schalkwyk, Leonard C

    2015-01-01

    Background BALB/cJ is a strain susceptible to stress and extremely susceptible to a defective hedonic impact in response to chronic stressors. The strain offers much promise as an animal model for the study of stress related disorders. We present a comparative hippocampal gene expression study on the effects of unpredictable chronic mild stress on BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J mice. Affymetrix MOE 430 was used to measure hippocampal gene expression from 16 animals of two different strains (BALB/cJ and...

  1. Exercise-induced oxidative stress and hypoxic exercise recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballmann, Christopher; McGinnis, Graham; Peters, Bridget; Slivka, Dustin; Cuddy, John; Hailes, Walter; Dumke, Charles; Ruby, Brent; Quindry, John

    2014-04-01

    Hypoxia due to altitude diminishes performance and alters exercise oxidative stress responses. While oxidative stress and exercise are well studied, the independent impact of hypoxia on exercise recovery remains unknown. Accordingly, we investigated hypoxic recovery effects on post-exercise oxidative stress. Physically active males (n = 12) performed normoxic cycle ergometer exercise consisting of ten high:low intensity intervals, 20 min at moderate intensity, and 6 h recovery at 975 m (normoxic) or simulated 5,000 m (hypoxic chamber) in a randomized counter-balanced cross-over design. Oxygen saturation was monitored via finger pulse oximetry. Blood plasma obtained pre- (Pre), post- (Post), 2 h post- (2Hr), 4 h post- (4Hr), and 6 h (6Hr) post-exercise was assayed for Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP), Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), Lipid Hydroperoxides (LOOH), and Protein Carbonyls (PC). Biopsies from the vastus lateralis obtained Pre and 6Hr were analyzed by real-time PCR quantify expression of Heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), Superoxide Dismutase 2 (SOD2), and Nuclear factor (euthyroid-derived2)-like factor (NFE2L2). PCs were not altered between trials, but a time effect (13 % Post-2Hr increase, p = 0.044) indicated exercise-induced blood oxidative stress. Plasma LOOH revealed only a time effect (p = 0.041), including a 120 % Post-4Hr increase. TEAC values were elevated in normoxic recovery versus hypoxic recovery. FRAP values were higher 6Hr (p = 0.045) in normoxic versus hypoxic recovery. Exercise elevated gene expression of NFE2L2 (20 % increase, p = 0.001) and SOD2 (42 % increase, p = 0.003), but hypoxic recovery abolished this response. Data indicate that recovery in a hypoxic environment, independent of exercise, may alter exercise adaptations to oxidative stress and metabolism. PMID:24384982

  2. Radiosensitization of hypoxic cells treated with some imidazole derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive investigations to seek more effective and less toxic radiosensitizers to hypoxic cells than misonidazole were carried out. It has been considered that the neurotoxicity of misonidazole was mainly due to the nitro substituent which is bounded to the imidazole ring. Instead of the nitro group, many types of sulfur group were introduced to the imidazole ring. Usually the radiosensitizing ability of the compound is supposed to be related to the electron affinity. Therefore, as an indicator of the electron affinity, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of these compounds was determined by the MO calculation using the CNDO/2 method. The LUMO level of these compounds was almost the same as that of misonidazole. Expecting good radiosensitizing effect of these compounds, the radiation enhancement ratio to the hypoxic cells was tested in vitro. To get the hypoxic cells in vitro, HeLa S3 cells were flushed by 95% N2 + 5% CO2 gas in minimum essential medium. The oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) was measured at about 3 in this system. Unfortunately, the sulfur compounds have no radiosensitization to the hypoxic cells. Since the radiosensitizing ability seemed not directly to be related to the electron affinity and the radiosensitizing effect of misonidazole must be mainly due to the nitro substituent, certain dinitroimidazole derivatives (e.g. 2.4-dinitroimidazole-1-ethanol) were further studied for the screening test. It was found that this compound had a radiosensitizing effect on the hypoxic cells about ten times greater than misonidazole. The cytotoxicity of this compound was also investigated in our hypoxic system and it was found to have twice as much as misonidazole. Further investigation of this compound is necessary to apply animal experiments and clinical use. (author)

  3. Improvement of post-hypoxic action myoclonus with levetiracetam add-on therapy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božić Ksenija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic post-anoxic myoclonus, also known as Lance-Adams syndrome, may develop following hypoxic brain injury, and is resistant to pharmacological therapy. Case report. The patient we presented developed post-anoxic action myoclonus with severe, completely incapacitating myoclonic jerks. Myoclonus did not respond to the treatment with commonly used agents, i.e. valproate and clonazepam alone or in combination. Improvement of the action myoclonus was observed only after adding levetiracetam. Conclusion. Although Lance-Adams syndrome may not be fully curable at this point, levetiracetam appears to be a promising agent that can significantly improve functional level and overall quality of life of patients with this disorder.

  4. 3-nitro triazole as a hypoxic cell sensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For radiosensitization a compound showing minimal neurotoxicity would be advantageous since it could be used at higher concentrations. Towards this end the triazole (1-methyl-3-nitro-1,2,4 triazole 3-NTR) was developed. Preliminary test of 3-NTR is reported here. The data show that 3-NTR is a very efficient radiosensitizer, specific for hypoxic cells, needing approximately one-half the concentration of misonidazole to obtain an equal enhancement ratio. Furthermore, 3-NTR at the highest dose tested, exhibited no significant toxicity towards either aerated or hypoxic cells. 10 references, 3 figures

  5. Homogentisate 1-2-Dioxygenase Downregulation in the Chronic Persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Australian Epidemic Strain-1 in the CF Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmer, Christopher J; Wynn, Matthew; Pinto, Rachel; Cordwell, Stuart; Rose, Barbara R; Harbour, Colin; Triccas, James A; Manos, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Some Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains including Australian Epidemic Strain-1 (AES-1 or AUS-01) cause persistent chronic infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, with greater morbidity and mortality. Factors conferring persistence are largely unknown. Previously we analysed the transcriptomes of AES-1 grown in Luria broth, nematode growth medium for Caenorhabditis elegans assay (both aerobic) and artificial sputum medium (mainly hypoxic). Transcriptional comparisons included chronic AES-1 strains against PAO1 and acute AES-1 (AES-1R) against its chronic isogen (AES-1M), isolated 10.5 years apart from a CF patient and not eradicated in the meantime. Prominent amongst genes downregulated in AES-1M in all comparisons was homogentisate-1-2-dioxygenase (hmgA); an oxygen-dependent gene known to be mutationally deactivated in many chronic infection strains of P. aeruginosa. To investigate if hmgA downregulation and deactivation gave similar virulence persistence profiles, a hmgA mutant made in UCBPP-PA14 utilising RedS-recombinase and AES-1M were assessed in the C. elegans virulence assay, and the C57BL/6 mouse for pulmonary colonisation and TNF-α response. In C. elegans, hmgA deactivation resulted in significantly increased PA14 virulence while hmgA downregulation reduced AES-1M virulence. AES-1M was significantly more persistent in mouse lung and showed a significant increase in TNF-α (p<0.0001), sustained even with no detectable bacteria. PA14ΔhmgA did not show increased TNF-α. This study suggests that hmgA may have a role in P. aeruginosa persistence in chronic infection and the results provide a starting point for clarifying the role of hmgA in chronic AES-1. PMID:26252386

  6. Notch Activation of Ca(2+) Signaling in the Development of Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction and Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kimberly A; Voiriot, Guillaume; Tang, Haiyang; Fraidenburg, Dustin R; Song, Shanshan; Yamamura, Hisao; Yamamura, Aya; Guo, Qiang; Wan, Jun; Pohl, Nicole M; Tauseef, Mohammad; Bodmer, Rolf; Ocorr, Karen; Thistlethwaite, Patricia A; Haddad, Gabriel G; Powell, Frank L; Makino, Ayako; Mehta, Dolly; Yuan, Jason X-J

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an important physiological response that optimizes the ventilation/perfusion ratio. Chronic hypoxia causes vascular remodeling, which is central to the pathogenesis of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH). We have previously shown that Notch3 is up-regulated in HPH and that activation of Notch signaling enhances store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), an important mechanism that contributes to pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation and contraction. Here, we investigate the role of Notch signaling in HPV and hypoxia-induced enhancement of SOCE. We examined SOCE in human PASMCs exposed to hypoxia and pulmonary arterial pressure in mice using the isolated perfused/ventilated lung method. Wild-type and canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) 6(-/-) mice were exposed to chronic hypoxia to induce HPH. Inhibition of Notch signaling with a γ-secretase inhibitor attenuates hypoxia-enhanced SOCE in PASMCs and hypoxia-induced increase in pulmonary arterial pressure. Our results demonstrate that hypoxia activates Notch signaling and up-regulates TRPC6 channels. Additionally, treatment with a Notch ligand can mimic hypoxic responses. Finally, inhibition of TRPC6, either pharmacologically or genetically, attenuates HPV, hypoxia-enhanced SOCE, and the development of HPH. These results demonstrate that hypoxia-induced activation of Notch signaling mediates HPV and the development of HPH via functional activation and up-regulation of TRPC6 channels. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration and PASMC proliferation is critical to elucidation of the pathogenesis of HPH. Targeting Notch regulation of TRPC6 will be beneficial in the development of novel therapies for pulmonary hypertension associated with hypoxia. PMID:25569851

  7. Chronic consumption of a western diet induces robust glial activation in aging mice and in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, Leah C.; Harder, Jeffrey M.; Ileana Soto; de Vries, Wilhelmine N.; Simon W M John; Gareth R Howell

    2016-01-01

    Studies have assessed individual components of a western diet, but no study has assessed the long-term, cumulative effects of a western diet on aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Therefore, we have formulated the first western-style diet that mimics the fat, carbohydrate, protein, vitamin and mineral levels of western diets. This diet was fed to aging C57BL/6J (B6) mice to identify phenotypes that may increase susceptibility to AD, and to APP/PS1 mice, a mouse model of AD, to determine the e...

  8. Satellite-based empirical models linking river plume dynamics with hypoxic area andvolume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satellite-based empirical models explaining hypoxic area and volume variation were developed for the seasonally hypoxic (O2 < 2 mg L−1) northern Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Mississippi River. Annual variations in midsummer hypoxic area and ...

  9. Pharmacokinetics of hypoxic cell radiosensitizers: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comparative pharmacokinetics of various nitroimidazole radiosensitizers in different species are reviewed. Radiosensitization is dependent upon the tumor concentration at the time of radiotherapy, whereas host toxicity, including peripheral neuropathy, appears to be related to the tissue exposure or area under the curve (AUC). Nitroimidazoles penetrate lipoid membranes by passive diffusion, the rate increasing with lipophilicity. Derivatives more hydrophilic than misonidazole penetrate nervous tissues comparatively slowly. They are eliminated mainly by renal clearance. Most plasma data for intravenous radiosensitizers can be described by a two-compartment open model. But in the mouse, the kinetics of misonidazole are dose dependent with increasing apparent t1/2 and AUC at higher doses due to saturable Michaelis-Menten kinetics for metabolism

  10. Impact of exercise on mitochondrial transcription factor expression and damage in the striatum of a chronic mouse model of Parkinson’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Patki, Gaurav; Lau, Yuen-Sum

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson’s disease remains unknown, although many genetic and environmental factors are suggested as likely causes. Neuronal oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been implicated as possible triggers for the onset and progression of Parkinson’s neurodegeneration. We have recently shown that long-term treadmill exercise prevented neurological, mitochondrial and locomotor deficits in a chronic 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropy...

  11. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant promotes intestinal barrier function, balances Treg and TH17 cells and ameliorates hepatic injury in a mouse model of chronic-binge alcohol feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui-Cong; Xu, Lan-Man; Du, Shan-Jie; Huang, Si-Si; Wu, He; Dong, Jia-Jia; Huang, Jian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Feng, Wen-Ke; Chen, Yong-Ping

    2016-01-22

    Impaired intestinal barrier function plays a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic injury, and the subsequent excessive absorbed endotoxin and bacterial translocation activate the immune response that aggravates the liver injury. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant (LGG-s) has been suggested to improve intestinal barrier function and alleviate the liver injury induced by chronic and binge alcohol consumption, but the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. In this study, chronic-binge alcohol fed model was used to determine the effects of LGG-s on the prevention of alcoholic liver disease in C57BL/6 mice and investigate underlying mechanisms. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli diet containing 5% alcohol for 10 days, and one dose of alcohol was gavaged on Day 11. In one group, LGG-s was supplemented along with alcohol. Control mice were fed isocaloric diet. Nine hours later the mice were sacrificed for analysis. Chronic-binge alcohol exposure induced an elevation in liver enzymes, steatosis and morphology changes, while LGG-s supplementation attenuated these changes. Treatment with LGG-s significantly improved intestinal barrier function reflected by increased mRNA expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and villus-crypt histology in ileum, and decreased Escherichia coli (E. coli) protein level in liver. Importantly, flow cytometry analysis showed that alcohol reduced Treg cell population while increased TH17 cell population as well as IL-17 secretion, which was reversed by LGG-s administration. In conclusion, our findings indicate that LGG-s is effective in preventing chronic-binge alcohol exposure-induced liver injury and shed a light on the importance of the balance of Treg and TH17 cells in the role of LGG-s application. PMID:26617183

  12. TNFα mediates stress-induced depression by upregulating indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in a mouse model of unpredictable chronic mild stress

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yu-Ning; Peng, Yun-Li; Lei-Liu,; Wu, Teng-Yun; Zhang, Yi; Lian, Yong-Jie; Yang, Yuan-Yuan; Kelley, Keith W.; Jiang, Chun-Lei; Wang, Yun-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Depression is often preceded by exposure to stressful life events. Chronic stress causes perturbations in the immune system, and up-regulates production of proinflammatory cytokines, which has been proposed to be associated with the pathogenesis of clinical depression. However, the potential mechanisms by which stress-induced proinflammatory cytokines lead to the development of depression are not well understood. Here, we sought to screen the main proinflammatory cytokines and the potential m...

  13. Human neural stem cells differentiate and promote locomotor recovery in an early chronic spinal cord injury NOD-scid mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desirée L Salazar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI results in partial or complete paralysis and is characterized by a loss of neurons and oligodendrocytes, axonal injury, and demyelination/dysmyelination of spared axons. Approximately 1,250,000 individuals have chronic SCI in the U.S.; therefore treatment in the chronic stages is highly clinically relevant. Human neural stem cells (hCNS-SCns were prospectively isolated based on fluorescence-activated cell sorting for a CD133(+ and CD24(-/lo population from fetal brain, grown as neurospheres, and lineage restricted to generate neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. hCNS-SCns have recently been transplanted sub-acutely following spinal cord injury and found to promote improved locomotor recovery. We tested the ability of hCNS-SCns transplanted 30 days post SCI to survive, differentiate, migrate, and promote improved locomotor recovery. METHODS AND FINDINGS: hCNS-SCns were transplanted into immunodeficient NOD-scid mice 30 days post spinal cord contusion injury. hCNS-SCns transplanted mice demonstrated significantly improved locomotor recovery compared to vehicle controls using open field locomotor testing and CatWalk gait analysis. Transplanted hCNS-SCns exhibited long-term engraftment, migration, limited proliferation, and differentiation predominantly to oligodendrocytes and neurons. Astrocytic differentiation was rare and mice did not exhibit mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, differentiated hCNS-SCns integrated with the host as demonstrated by co-localization of human cytoplasm with discrete staining for the paranodal marker contactin-associated protein. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that hCNS-SCns are capable of surviving, differentiating, and promoting improved locomotor recovery when transplanted into an early chronic injury microenvironment. These data suggest that hCNS-SCns transplantation has efficacy in an early chronic SCI setting and thus expands the "window of opportunity" for

  14. Chronic Pancreatitis and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Prevent Impact of Chemotherapy with Gemcitabine in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard F. Knoop

    2014-06-01

    CONCLUSION: We could demonstrate for the first time that an improvement in median overall survival with gemcitabine is significantly abolished by a persistent mild chronic pancreatitis and a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In particular, the inflammation biomarkers C-reactive protein, IL-6, and IL-1α could indicate the prognostic benefit of gemcitabine chemotherapy and should now be tested in prospective patient-controlled trials.

  15. Larger adaptive response of 5-HT1A autoreceptors to chronic fluoxetine in a mouse model of depression than in healthy mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.FROGER; E.PALAZZO; T.RENOIR; M.MELFORT; N.BARDEN; M.HAMON; L.LANFUMEY

    2004-01-01

    Vulnerability to major depressive disorders, in particular depression, is often associated with both hypoactivity of the central serotoninergic (5-HT) system and hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Extensive studies in normal healthy rodents showed that chronic treatment with SSRI antidepressants produced a marked functional desensitization of somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors, and this adaptive change has been claimed to play a key role in the therapeutic action of

  16. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  17. Perinatal Hypoxic-Ischemic brain injury; MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To characterize the MR findings of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and to assess the value of the MR imaging. SE T1-, T2-weighted, and IR brain MR images of 44 infants and children with the past history of perinatal hypoxic insults were reviewed. Abnormal brain MR findings of 8 patients with birth history of prematurity and 36 patients with birth history of full-term/posterm including 7 with severe anoxic insult history, were compared in regard to the location and the character of the lesions. MRI demonstrated the followings; (1)abnormal signal intensity lesions of subcortical and/or deep cerebral white matter, cortex, and deep gray matter, (2)atrophy of the cerebral white matter, cortex and corpus callosum, with/without ventriculomegaly, and (3)delay in myelination. Periventricular and deep white matter lesions were demonstrated in the prematurity, the deep white matter lesions and/ or subcortical white matter lesions in the term/post-term, and deep gray matter lesions in the 7 patients with severe anoxic insults history. MR imaging was useful in the diagnosis of the hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, and the white and gray matter lesions were correlated with the time of the injury and the severity of hypoxic insult

  18. Excess post hypoxic oxygen consumption in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plambech, M.; Deurs, Mikael van; Steffensen, J.F.; Tirsgaard, B.; Behrens, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Atlantic cod Gadus morhua experienced oxygen deficit (DO2 ) when exposed to oxygen levels below their critical level (c. 73% of pcrit) and subsequent excess post-hypoxic oxygen consumption (CEPHO) upon return to normoxic conditions, indicative of an oxygen debt. The mean±s.e. CEPHO:DO2 was 6...

  19. MODULATION OF HYPOXIC PULMONARY VASOCONSTRICTION BY ERYTHROCYTIC NITRIC OXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractAmerican Heart Association 2001Modulation of Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction by Erythrocytic NOMcMahon TJ1, Gow AJ1, Huang YCT4, Stamler JS1,2,3Departments of Medicine1 and Biochemistry2, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute3, Duke University Med...

  20. Adaptation of iron requirement to hypoxic conditions at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassmann, Max; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2015-12-15

    Adequate acclimatization time to enable adjustment to hypoxic conditions is one of the most important aspects for mountaineers ascending to high altitude. Accordingly, most reviews emphasize mechanisms that cope with reduced oxygen supply. However, during sojourns to high altitude adjustment to elevated iron demand is equally critical. Thus in this review we focus on the interaction between oxygen and iron homeostasis. We review the role of iron 1) in the oxygen sensing process and erythropoietin (Epo) synthesis, 2) in gene expression control mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor-2 (HIF-2), and 3) as an oxygen carrier in hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochromes. The blood hormone Epo that is abundantly expressed by the kidney under hypoxic conditions stimulates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow, a process requiring high iron levels. To ensure that sufficient iron is provided, Epo-controlled erythroferrone that is expressed in erythroid precursor cells acts in the liver to reduce expression of the iron hormone hepcidin. Consequently, suppression of hepcidin allows for elevated iron release from storage organs and enhanced absorption of dietary iron by enterocytes. As recently observed in sojourners at high altitude, however, iron uptake may be hampered by reduced appetite and gastrointestinal bleeding. Reduced iron availability, as observed in a hypoxic mountaineer, enhances hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and may contribute to other hypoxia-related diseases. Overall, adequate systemic iron availability is an important prerequisite to adjust to high-altitude hypoxia and may have additional implications for disease-related hypoxic conditions. PMID:26183475

  1. Hypoxic-Ischemic-Encephalopathy Studied by EEG and Mr Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2011-01-01

    Amplitude-integrated EEG (a-EEG) time course during the first 24 hrs of life was related to brain metabolism changes detected by proton MR spectroscopy (H-MRS) at 7-10 days of post-natal life in non-cooled term newborns with hypoxic-ischemic-encephalopathy (HIE).

  2. Chemotherapeutic attack of hypoxic tumor cells by the bioreductive alkylating agent mitomycin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, S R; Heimbrook, D C; Fracasso, P M; Rockwell, S; Sligar, S G; Sartorelli, A C

    1985-01-01

    Since the cure of solid tumors is limited by the presence of cells with low oxygen contents, we have approached the development of treatment regimens and of new drugs for these tumors by investigating agents which are preferentially bioactivated under hypoxia. Major emphasis has been directed at studying the mode of action of the mitomycin antibiotics, as bioreductive alkylating agents. Using primarily the EMT6 mouse mammary carcinoma as a solid tumor model, we have found that mitomycin C and porfiromycin are preferentially toxic to cells with low oxygen contents. The mitomycin analog BMY-25282 is more toxic to hypoxic cells than are mitomycin C and porfiromycin; however, unlike these antibiotics, BMY-25282 is preferentially toxic to well-oxygenated cells. With these three mitomycins, we have observed a correlation between cytotoxicity to hypoxic cells, the rate of generation of reactive products, and the redox potentials of the drugs. Investigations of the enzymes in EMT6 cells that could possibly activate mitomycin C have revealed that cytochrome P-450 and xanthine oxidase are not present in measurable quantities and therefore are not responsible for activation of mitomycin C. Activities representative of NADPH-cytochrome c reductase and DT-diaphorase are present in these neoplastic cells. Comparison of these enzymatic activities in EMT6, CHO, and V79 cells with the rate of generation of reactive products under hypoxia shows a direct correlation between these two parameters, but there is no quantitative correlation between these two parameters and the amount of cytotoxicity. Use of purified NADPH-cytochrome c reductase and inhibitors of this enzyme demonstrated that NADPH-cytochrome c reductase can activate mitomycin C, but that it is probably not the only enzyme participating in this bioactivation in EMT6 cells. The DT-diaphorase inhibitor dicoumarol was employed to show that this enzyme is not involved in the activation of mitomycin C to a cytotoxic agent

  3. Body weight considerations in the B6C3F1 mouse and the use of dietary control to standardize background tumor incidence in chronic bioassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In B6C3F1 mice, the rate of body growth influences susceptibility to liver neoplasia and large variations in body weight can complicate the interpretation of bioassay data. The relationship between body weight and liver tumor incidence was calculated for historical control populations of male and female ad libitum-fed mice (approx. 2750 and 2300 animals, respectively) and in populations of male and female mice which had been subjected to forced body weight reduction due to either dietary restriction or exposure to noncarcinogenic chemicals (approx. 1600 and 1700, respectively). Resulting tumor risk data were then used to construct idealized weight curves for male and female B6C3F1 mice; these curves predict a terminal background liver tumor incidence of 15-20%. Use of dietary control to manipulate body growth of male B6C3F1 mice to fit the idealized weight curve was evaluated in a 2-year bioassay of chloral hydrate. Cohorts of mice were successfully maintained at weights approximating their idealized target weights throughout the study. These mice exhibited less body weight variation than their ad libitum-fed counterparts (e.g., standard deviations of body weight were 1.4 and 3.4 g for respective control groups at 36 weeks). Historical control body weight and tumor risk data from the two male mouse populations were utilized to predict background liver tumor rates for each experimental group of the chloral hydrate study. The predicted background tumor rates closely matched the observed rates for both the dietary controlled and ad libitum-fed chloral hydrate control groups when each mouse was evaluated according to either its weekly food consumption or its weekly change in body weight

  4. Neuroendocrine and cardiac metabolic dysfunction and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in adipose tissue and pancreas following chronic spinal cord injury in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Nash

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available CVD (cardiovascular disease represents a leading cause of mortality in chronic SCI (spinal cord injury. Several component risk factors are observed in SCI; however, the underlying mechanisms that contribute to these risks have not been defined. Central and peripheral chronic inflammation is associated with metabolic dysfunction and CVD, including adipokine regulation of neuroendocrine and cardiac function and inflammatory processes initiated by the innate immune response. We use female C57 Bl/6 mice to examine neuroendocrine, cardiac, adipose and pancreatic signaling related to inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in response to experimentally induced chronic SCI. Using immuno-histochemical, -precipitation, and -blotting analysis, we show decreased POMC (proopiomelanocortin and increased NPY (neuropeptide-Y expression in the hypothalamic ARC (arcuate nucleus and PVN (paraventricular nucleus, 1-month post-SCI. Long-form leptin receptor (Ob-Rb, JAK2 (Janus kinase/STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/p38 and RhoA/ROCK (Rho-associated kinase signaling is significantly increased in the heart tissue post-SCI, and we observe the formation and activation of the NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 inflammasome in VAT (visceral adipose tissue and pancreas post-SCI. These data demonstrate neuroendocrine signaling peptide alterations, associated with central inflammation and metabolic dysfunction post-SCI, and provide evidence for the peripheral activation of signaling mechanisms involved in cardiac, VAT and pancreatic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction post-SCI. Further understanding of biological mechanisms contributing to SCI-related inflammatory processes and metabolic dysfunction associated with CVD pathology may help to direct therapeutic and rehabilitation countermeasures.

  5. Chronic Ultraviolet B Irradiation Causes Loss of Hyaluronic Acid from Mouse Dermis Because of Down-Regulation of Hyaluronic Acid Synthases

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Guang; Freudenberger, Till; Zipper, Petra; Melchior, Ariane; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Rabausch, Berit; de Groot, Jens; Twarock, Sören; Hanenberg, Helmut; Homey, Bernhard; Krutmann, Jean; Reifenberger, Julia; Fischer, Jens W.

    2007-01-01

    Remodeling of the dermal extracellular matrix occurs during photoaging. Here, the effect of repetitive UVB irradiation on dermal hyaluronic acid (HA) was examined. C57/BL6 mice were chronically (182 days) irradiated with UVB, and consecutive skin biopsies were collected during the irradiation period and afterward (300 and 400 days of age). UVB caused marked loss of HA from the papillary dermis and down-regulation of HA synthase 1 (HAS1), HAS2, and HAS3 mRNA expression. In contrast, hyaluronid...

  6. Effects of eslicarbazepine acetate on acute and chronic latrunculin A-induced seizures and extracellular amino acid levels in the mouse hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Sierra-Paredes, Germán; Loureiro, Ana I; Wright, Lyndon C; Sierra-Marcuño, Germán; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2014-01-01

    Background Latrunculin A microperfusion of the hippocampus induces acute epileptic seizures and long-term biochemical changes leading to spontaneous seizures. This study tested the effect of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), a novel antiepileptic drug, on latrunculin A-induced acute and chronic seizures, and changes in brain amino acid extracellular levels. Hippocampi of Swiss mice were continuously perfused with a latrunculin A solution (4 μM, 1 μl/min, 7 h/day) with continuous EEG and videotap...

  7. Real-Time Bioluminescence Imaging of Nitroreductase in Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ping; Zhang, Huateng; Deng, Quankun; Liu, Wei; Yang, Linghui; Li, Guobo; Chen, Guo; Du, Lupei; Ke, Bowen; Li, Minyong

    2016-06-01

    Nitroreductase (NTR) is an endogenous reductase overexpressed in hypoxic tumors; however, its precise detection in living cells and animals remains a considerable challenge. Herein, we developed three reaction-based probes and a related bioluminescence assay for the real-time NTR detection. The high sensitivity and selectivity of probe 3, combined with its remarkable potential of bioluminescence imaging, affords a valuable approach for in vivo imaging of NTR in a tumor model mouse. PMID:27197544

  8. Experimental studies of VEGF-C gene for the treatment of chronic obstructive lymphedema in mouse tail model%VEGF-C局部注射治疗阻塞性淋巴水肿的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡学庆; 蒋朝华; 刘宁飞

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the therapeutic effect of vascular endothelial growth factor C(VEGF-C)gene for chronic obstructive lymphedema in mouse tail model which may provide a new treatment for lymphedema.Methods RT-PCR and immunoabsorption were applied to detect VEGF-C gene expression in fibroblasts and secretion of VEGF-C protein in COS7 cells respectively after pCDNA3.1(+)VEGF-C transfection.A mouse tail model of chronic obstructive lymphedema was created.Then the pcDNA3.1-VEGF-C plasmid was injected into the tail.The effect of modulating lymphangiogenesis was observed. Results Compared with control group,overexpression of VEGF-C enhanced lymphangiogenesis in vivo and mouse tail skin suffering chronic obstructive lymphedema was improved by VEGF-C gene significantly.Conclusions VEGF-C can improve the lymphedema through enhancing lymphangiogenesis.%目的 研究血管内皮生长因子C(VEGF-C)局部注射对治疗小鼠尾部阻塞性淋巴水肿的作用,探讨治疗淋巴水肿的新方法.方法 应用RT-PCR、免疫荧光和Western Blot方法检测重组pcDNA3.1-VEGF-C质粒在成纤维细胞和COS细胞中表达和蛋白分泌情况;通过手术方法建立小鼠尾部慢性阻塞性淋巴水肿模型;pCDNA3.1-VEGF-C质粒尾部注射,测量鼠尾直径、鼠尾淋巴管显影、组织学检测及LYVE-1免疫组织化学淋巴管计数,结果进行t检验的统计学分析.结果 重组pcDNA3.1-VEGF-C质粒所携带的目的基因人VEGF-C能够在细胞中表达,而且还能够分泌到细胞外;成功建立了小鼠尾部慢性阻塞性淋巴水肿模型;VEGF-C局部注射后,鼠尾直径变小、淋巴管的数目增多,与对照组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 VEGF-C转基因通过促进淋巴管的再生可以缓解淋巴水肿.

  9. [Establishment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronic infection mouse model by in vivo transduction with a recombinant adeno-associated virus 8 carrying 1. 3 copies of HBV genome (rAAN8-1. 3HBV)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Yan; Yu, Chi-Jie; Wang, Gang; Tian, Wen-Hong; Lu, Yue; Zhang, Feng-Wei; Wang, Wen; Wang, Yue; Tan, Wen-Jie; Wu, Xiao-Bing

    2010-11-01

    In this report, we developed a HBV infection model in C57BL/6 mouse line by in vivo injection of a recombinant adeno-associated virus 8 vector carrying 1. 3 copies of HBV genome (ayw subtype) (rAAV8-1. 3HBV). We firstly prepared and purified the rAAV8-1. 3HBV and then injected it into three C57BL/6 mice with the dose of 2 x 10e11vg, respectively. HBsAg and HBeAg were assayed in sera collected at different time points post injection. Ten weeks post injection, the three mice were sacrificed and blood and liver tissue were taken for assay. Copies of HBV DNA were detected by real time PCR and the way of HBV DNA replication was identified by PCR. Subsequently, detection of HBV antigen by immunohistochemistry and pathology analysis of liver tissue of mice were performed. The results suggested that expression of HBsAg and HBeAg lasted for at least 10 weeks in mice sera. Among mice injected with rAAV8-1. 3HBV, HBsAg levels were showed an 'increasing-decreasing-increasing' pattern (the lowest level at the 4th week post injection), while HBeAg levels were kept high and relatively stable. HBV DNA copies were 4.2 x 10(3), 3.6 x 10(3), 2.5 x 10(3) copies/mL in sera and 8.0 x 10(6), 5.7 x 10(6), 2.6 x 10(6) copies/g in hepatic tissues of three mice, respectively. We found that the linear 1. 3HBV DNA in the rAAV8-1. 3HBV could self form into circular HBV genome and replicate in livers of HBV transfected mice. HBsAg and HBcAg were both positive in liver tissue of mice injected with rAAV8-1. 3HBV and no obvious pathological characters were found in liver of mice injected with rAAV8-1. 3HBV. In conclusion, we successfully developed a HBV chronic infection model in C57BL/6 mouse line by in vivo transduction with the recombinant virus rAAV8-1. 3HBV, in which HBV genes could be continuously expressed and replicated over 10 weeks, and paved a way for further characterization of the human chronic hepatitis B virus infection and evaluation of vaccine and anti-HBV agents. PMID:21344744

  10. Accumulation of Regulatory T Cells and Chronic Inflammation in the Middle Ear in a Mouse Model of Chronic Otitis Media with Effusion Induced by Combined Eustachian Tube Blockage and Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Takashi; Kodama, Satoru; Kawano, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is associated with chronic otitis media (COM). In this study, we generated a murine model of COM by using eustachian tube (ET) obstruction and NTHi (10(7) CFU) inoculation into the tympanic bulla, and we investigated the relationship between regulatory T cells (Treg) and chronic inflammation in the middle ear. Middle ear effusions (MEEs) and middle ear mucosae (MEM) were collected at days 3 and 14 and at 1 and 2 months after inoculation. Untreated mice served as controls. MEEs were used for bacterial counts and to measure the concentrations of cytokines. MEM were collected for histological evaluation and flow cytometric analysis. Inflammation of the MEM was prolonged throughout this study, and the incidence of NTHi culture-positive MEE was 38% at 2 months after inoculation. The levels of interleukin-1β (IL-β), tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-10, and transforming growth factor β were increased in the middle ear for up to 2 months after inoculation. CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) Treg accumulated in the middle ear, and the percentage of Treg in the MEM increased for up to 2 months after inoculation. Treg depletion induced a 99.9% reduction of bacterial counts in MEEs and also significantly reduced the ratio of NTHi culture-positive MEE. The levels of these cytokines were also reduced in MEEs. In summary, we developed a murine model of COM, and our findings indicate that Treg confer infectious tolerance to NTHi in the middle ear. PMID:26553466

  11. The Genetic Basis of Chronic Mountain Sickness

    OpenAIRE

    Ronen, Roy; Zhou, Dan; Bafna, Vineet; Haddad, Gabriel G.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) is a disease that affects many high-altitude dwellers, particularly in the Andean Mountains in South America. The hallmark symptom of CMS is polycythemia, which causes increased risk of pulmonary hypertension and stroke (among other symptoms). A prevailing hypothesis in high-altitude medicine is that CMS results from a population-specific “maladaptation” to the hypoxic conditions at high altitude. In contrast, the prevalence of CMS is very low in other high-alt...

  12. Neurobehavioral impairments, generation of oxidative stress and release of pro-apoptotic factors after chronic exposure to sulphur mustard in mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent global events have focused attention on the potential threat of international and domestic chemical terrorism, as well as the possibility of chemical warfare proliferation. Sulphur mustard (SM) is one of the potent chemical warfare agents (CWA), which initiates a cascade of events that converge on the redox mechanisms common to brain injury. The present study was designed to examine the effects of chronic SM exposure on neurobehavioral impairments, mitochondrial oxidative stress in male Swiss Albino mice and its role in inducing apoptotic neuronal cell death. The animals were divided into four groups (control, low, medium and high dose) of 5 animals each. Exposure to SM was given percutaneously daily for 12 weeks. The results demonstrated impairment in neurobehavioral indices viz. rota rod, passive avoidance and water maze tests in a dose dependent manner. There was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content whereas, decrease in the activity of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase suggesting impaired antioxidant defense system. Immunoblotting of cytochrome c, Bcl-2, Bax and activation of caspase-3 suggest induction of apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. Finally, increased p53 expression suggests that it may target the mitochondrial pathway for inducing apoptosis in response to DNA damage signals. In conclusion, chronic SM exposure may have the potential to generate oxidative stress which may trigger the release of cytochrome c as well as caspase-3 activation in neurons leading to cell death by apoptosis in a dose dependent manner which may in the end be responsible for the disruption of cognitive functions in mice.

  13. Chronic Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infections that cause chronic diarrhea be prevented? Chronic Diarrhea What is chronic diarrhea? Diarrhea that lasts for more than 2-4 ... represent a life-threatening illness. What causes chronic diarrhea? Chronic diarrhea has many different causes; these causes ...

  14. Intranasal administration of aTf protects and repairs the neonatal white matter after a cerebral hypoxic-ischemic event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardia Clausi, Mariano; Paez, Pablo M; Campagnoni, Anthony T; Pasquini, Laura A; Pasquini, Juana M

    2012-10-01

    Our previous studies showed that the intracerebral injection of apotransferrin (aTf) attenuates white matter damage and accelerates the remyelination process in a neonatal rat model of cerebral hypoxia-ischemia (HI) injury. However, the intracerebral injection of aTf might not be practical for clinical treatments. Therefore, the development of less invasive techniques capable of delivering aTf to the central nervous system would clearly aid in its effective clinical use. In this work, we have determined whether intranasal (iN) administration of human aTf provides neuroprotection to the neonatal mouse brain following a cerebral hypoxic-ischemic event. Apotransferrin was infused into the naris of neonatal mice and the HI insult was induced by right common carotid artery ligation followed by exposure to low oxygen concentration. Our results showed that aTf was successfully delivered into the neonatal HI brain and detected in the olfactory bulb, forebrain and posterior brain 30 min after inhalation. This treatment successfully reduced white matter damage, neuronal loss and astrogliosis in different brain regions and enhanced the proliferation and survival of oligodendroglial progenitor cells (OPCs) in the subventricular zone and corpus callosum (CC). Additionally, using an in vitro hypoxic model, we demonstrated that aTf prevents oligodendrocyte progenitor cell death by promoting their differentiation. In summary, these data suggest that iN administration of aTf has the potential to be used for clinical treatment to protect myelin and to induce remyelination in demyelinating hypoxic-ischemic events in the neonatal brain. PMID:22736466

  15. Κ-opioid receptor stimulation improves endothelial function in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wu

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the effect of κ-opioid receptor stimulation with U50,488H on endothelial function and underlying mechanism in rats with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH. Chronic hypoxia-induced HPH was simulated by exposing the rats to 10% oxygen for 2 wk. After hypoxia, mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP, right ventricular pressure (RVP and right ventricular hypertrophy index (RVHI were measured. Relaxation of pulmonary artery in response to acetylcholine (ACh was determined. Expression and activity of endothelial nitric oxide (NO synthase (eNOS and inducible NO synthase (iNOS with NO production, total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC, gp91(phox expression and nitrotyrosine content were measured. The effect of U50,488H administration during chronic hypoxia was investigated. Administration of U50,488H significantly decreased mPAP and right ventricular hypertrophy as evidenced by reduction in RVP and RVHI. These effects were mediated by κ-opioid receptor. In the meantime, treatment with U50,488H significantly improved endothelial function as evidenced by enhanced relaxation in response to ACh. Moreover, U50,488H resulted in a significant increase in eNOS phosphorylation, NO content in serum, and T-AOC in pulmonary artery of HPH rats. In addition, the activity of eNOS was enhanced, but the activity of iNOS was attenuated in the pulmonary artery of chronic hypoxic rats treated with U50,488H. On the other hand, U50,488H markedly blunted HPH-induced elevation of gp91(phox expression and nitrotyrosine content in pulmonary artery, and these effects were blocked by nor-BNI, a selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist. These data suggest that κ-opioid receptor stimulation with U50,488H improves endothelial function in rats with HPH. The mechanism of action might be attributed to the preservation of eNOS activity, enhancement of eNOS phosphorylation, downregulation of iNOS activity and its antioxidative/nitrative effect.

  16. The express of PTP-1 B and IRS-1 in liver cells of rats during chronic intermittent hypoxic%PTP-1B 及 IRS-1在慢性间歇低氧大鼠肝细胞中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵勇; 任寿安; 蔡月伟

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨慢性间歇低氧(CIH)对大鼠肝细胞蛋白酪氨酸磷酸酶-1B(protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B,PTP-1B)及胰岛素受体底物-1(insulin receptor substrate-1,IRS-1)蛋白表达量的影响及其导致胰岛素抵抗发生的可能机制。方法选取健康雄性 SD 大鼠24只,按随机数字表法分为正常对照组(NC 组)、慢性间歇低氧4周组(CIH4组)、慢性间歇低氧8周组(CIH8组),每组8只。NC 组无间歇低氧暴露正常饲养,CIH4组及 CIH8组于上午9时至下午5时放入间歇低氧仓暴露于间歇低氧环境中,舱内最低氧浓度为6%~7%。分别于第4周及第8周检测大鼠空腹血糖及空腹胰岛素水平,用稳态模型胰岛素抵抗指数(HOMA-IR)以及胰岛素敏感指数(insulin sensitive index,ISI)评价胰岛素抵抗, SABC 法免疫组织化学试剂盒检测 CIH 大鼠肝细胞 PTP-1B 及 IRS-1蛋白表达,以平均灰度值表示PTP-1B 及 IRS-1的蛋白表达量,并做统计学分析。结果与 NC 组比较,CIH4组及 CIH8组空腹血糖、空腹胰岛素及 HOMA-IR 升高,ISI 降低,差异有统计学意义(P <0.05),且 CIH8组更为显著;与 NC 组相比较,CIH4组及 CIH8组 PTP-1B 蛋白表达增加,IRS-1蛋白表达减少,差异有统计学意义(P <0.05),Pearson 相关分析显示,HOMA-IR 与 PTP-1B 平均灰度值呈负相关、与 IRS-1平均灰度值呈正相关;ISI 与 PTP-1B 平均灰度值呈正相关、与 IRS-1平均灰度值呈负相关。结论①CIH 暴露使大鼠空腹血糖及胰岛素水平升高且发生胰岛素抵抗,随着 CIH 暴露时间的延长,胰岛素抵抗程度加重。②CIH 导致大鼠肝细胞 PTP-1B 蛋白表达增加,IRS-1蛋白表达减少,PTP-1B 及 IRS-1可能共同参与了 CIH 大鼠胰岛素抵抗的发生发展。%Objective To investigate the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia on the expression of PTP-1B and IRS-1 and the possible mechanism of insulin resistance caused by chronic intermittent hypoxia.Methods According to the

  17. Language in Children with Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Chenia; Carneiro, Luciana; Vernier, Luíza; Cesa, Carla; Guardiola, Ana; Vidor, Deisi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (NHIE) is a common neurologic injury, and it may compromise the child's language and cognition. Understanding the process of language acquisition becomes possible with concise knowledge about children's global development. Objective The aim of this study was to observe if language acquisition and development are impaired in children with NHIE. Methods Seventy children with NHIE from 1 to 24 months old were analyzed in a Pediatric Neurology...

  18. Hypoxic Preconditioning Alleviates Ethanol Neurotoxicity: the Involvement of Autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Haiping; Bower, Kimberly A.; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Xu, Mei; Luo, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is a neuroteratogen and neurodegeneration is the most devastating consequence of developmental exposure to ethanol. A sublethal preconditioning has been proposed as a neuroprotective strategy against several central nervous system (CNS) neurodegenerative diseases. We have recently demonstrated that autophagy is a protective response to alleviate ethanol toxicity. A modest hypoxic preconditioning (1% oxygen) did not cause neurotoxicity but induced autophagy (Tzeng et al., 2010). We the...

  19. Long-term neurodevelopmental outcome with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Anna; Ritter, Susanne; Brotschi, Barbara; Werner, Helen; Caflisch, Jon; Martin, Ernst; Latal, Beatrice

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the long-term neurodevelopmental outcome for children after hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) without major disability, and to examine neonatal injury patterns detected on cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to later deficits. STUDY DESIGN: Prospectively enrolled children with HIE and neonatal cerebral MRI data (n = 68) were examined at a mean age of 11.2 years (range, 8.2-15.7 years). Eleven children had a major disability (ie, cerebral palsy or...

  20. Frequency of hypoxic events in patients on a mechanical ventilator

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmood, Nader A; Chaudry, Fawad A.; Azam, Hamad; Ali, M. Imran; Khan, M. Anees

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mechanical ventilation is an important tool in the management of respiratory failure in the critically ill patient. Although mechanical ventilation can be a life-saving intervention, it is also known to carry several side-effects and risks. Adequate oxygenation is one of the primary goals of mechanical ventilation. However, while on mechanical ventilation, patients frequently experience hypoxic events resulting from various causes, which need to be properly evaluated and treated. ...

  1. Hypoxic neuropathy versus diabetic neuropathy : an electrophysiological study in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Gispen, W. H.; Hendriksen, P.H.; Oey, P. L.; Wieneke, G.H.; Huffelen, A.C. van

    1992-01-01

    In the experimental rat model of diabetes a slowing of nerve conduction velocity and a resistance to ischemic conduction failure have been found as an indication of polyneuropathy. The same electrophysiological abnormalities have been demonstrated in a model in which healthy rats are kept under hypoxic conditions (10% O2) for a 10-week period. Two factors are held responsible for the development of diabetic polyneuropathy: metabolic deterioration and hypoxia. However, until now the relative r...

  2. Anti hypoxic and antioxidant activity of Hibiscus esculentus seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimzadeh, M. A.; Nabavi, S. F.; Nabavi, S. M.; Eslami, B.

    2010-07-01

    The anti hypoxic and antioxidant activities of Hibiscus esculentus seeds were investigated employing eight in vitro assay systems. Anti hypoxic activity was investigated in two models, haemic and circulatory. The effects were pronounced in both models of hypoxia. The anti hypoxic effects were dose-dependent. The results indicated that the extracts have a protective effect against hypoxia induced lethality in mice. The extracts showed antioxidant activity in some models. IC{sub 5}0 for DPPH radical-scavenging activity was 234 {+-} 8.9 {mu}g ml{sup 1}. The extracts showed weak nitric oxide-scavenging activity between 0.1 and 1.6 mg ml{sup -}1. The extracts showed weak Fe{sup 2}+ chelating ability. IC{sub 5}0 were 150 {+-} 13 {mu}g ml{sup -}1. The extracts also exhibited low antioxidant activity in the linoleic acid model but were capable of scavenging hydrogen peroxide in a concentration dependent manner. The total amount of phenolic compounds in each extract was determined as gallic acid equivalents and total flavonoid contents were calculated as quercetin equivalents from a calibration curve. Pharmacological effects may be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of phenols and flavonoids in the extracts. (Author) 40 refs.

  3. Low-dose radiation suppresses Pokemon expression under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Whan; Yu, Kweon; Shin, Kee-Sun; Kwon, Kisang; Hwang, Tae-Sik; Kwon, O-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Our previous data demonstrated that CoCl2-induced hypoxia controls endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated and other intracellular factors. One of them, the transcription factor Pokemon, was differentially regulated by low-dose radiation (LDR). There are limited data regarding how this transcription factor is involved in expression of the unfolded protein response (UPR) under hypoxic conditions. The purpose of this study was to obtain clues on how Pokemon is involved in the UPR. Pokemon was selected as a differentially expressed gene under hypoxic conditions; however, its regulation was clearly repressed by LDR. It was also demonstrated that both expression of ER chaperones and ER stress sensors were affected by hypoxic conditions, and the same results were obtained when cells in which Pokemon was up- or down-regulated were used. The current state of UPR and LDR research associated with the Pokemon pathway offers an important opportunity to understand the oncogenesis, senescence, and differentiation of cells, as well as to facilitate introduction of new therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:24772825

  4. Transcriptome analysis of severe hypoxic stress during development in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.G. Woods

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia causes critical cellular injury both in early human development and in adulthood, leading to cerebral palsy, stroke, and myocardial infarction. Interestingly, a remarkable phenomenon known as hypoxic preconditioning arises when a brief hypoxia exposure protects target organs against subsequent, severe hypoxia. Although hypoxic preconditioning has been demonstrated in several model organisms and tissues including the heart and brain, its molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Accordingly, we used embryonic and larval zebrafish to develop a novel vertebrate model for hypoxic preconditioning, and used this model to identify conserved hypoxia-regulated transcripts for further functional study as published in Manchenkov et al. (2015 in G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics. In this Brief article, we provide extensive annotation for the most strongly hypoxia-regulated genes in zebrafish, including their human orthologs, and describe in detail the methods used to identify, filter, and annotate hypoxia-regulated transcripts for downstream functional and bioinformatic assays using the source data provided in Gene Expression Omnibus Accession GSE68473.

  5. Effect of Hypoxic Preconditioning on Stress Reaction in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naryzhnaya, N V; Maslov, L N; Vychuzhanova, E A; Sementsov, A S; Podoksyonov, Yu K; Portnichenko, A G; Lishmanov, Yu B

    2015-08-01

    In rats, immobilization stress (24 h) induced involution of the thymus and spleen, adrenal hypertrophy, and pronounced elevation (by 67%) of serum cortisol in comparison with intact animals; the mean number of stomach ulcers in rats subjected to stress was 6.9. Hypoxic preconditioning consisting of 6 sessions of 10-min hypoxia (8% O2) followed by 10-min reoxygenation with atmospheric air induced adrenal hypertrophy and spleen involution, but did not change blood cortisol level; no stomach ulcers were found in preconditioned rats. In rats subjected to both hypoxic preconditioning and immobilization, the weights of the thymus, adrenal glands, and spleen, as well as cortisol level did not differ from the corresponding parameters in rats subjected to immobilization stress alone. The number of stomach ulcers in experimental rats was 1.5-fold lower than in the stress-control ones. Thus, hypoxic preconditioning exerts a pronounced preventive anti-ulcer effect during immobilization, but it does not affect other indices of the stress reaction. PMID:26385407

  6. NKG2D mediates NK cell hyperresponsiveness and influenza-induced pathologies in a mouse model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortham, Brian W; Eppert, Bryan L; Motz, Greg T; Flury, Jennifer L; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Hoebe, Kasper; Panos, Ralph J; Maxfield, Melissa; Glasser, Stephan W; Senft, Albert P; Raulet, David H; Borchers, Michael T

    2012-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by peribronchial and perivascular inflammation and largely irreversible airflow obstruction. Acute disease exacerbations, due frequently to viral infections, lead to enhanced disease symptoms and contribute to long-term progression of COPD pathology. Previously, we demonstrated that NK cells from cigarette smoke (CS)-exposed mice exhibit enhanced effector functions in response to stimulating cytokines or TLR ligands. In this article, we show that the activating receptor NKG2D is a key mediator for CS-stimulated NK cell hyperresponsiveness, because CS-exposed NKG2D-deficient mice (Klrk1(-/-)) did not exhibit enhanced effector functions as assessed by cytokine responsiveness. NK cell cytotoxicity against MHC class I-deficient targets was not affected in a COPD model. However, NK cells from CS-exposed mice exhibit greater cytotoxic activity toward cells that express the NKG2D ligand RAET1ε. We also demonstrate that NKG2D-deficient mice exhibit diminished airway damage and reduced inflammation in a model of viral COPD exacerbation, which do not affect viral clearance. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of NKG2D(+) NK cells into CS-exposed, influenza-infected NKG2D-deficient mice recapitulated the phenotypes observed in CS-exposed, influenza-infected wild-type mice. Our findings indicate that NKG2D stimulation during long-term CS exposure is a central pathway in the development of NK cell hyperresponsiveness and influenza-mediated exacerbations of COPD. PMID:22467655

  7. Hypothalamic Proteomic Analysis Reveals Dysregulation of Glutamate Balance and Energy Metabolism in a Mouse Model of Chronic Mild Stress-Induced Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Chenglong; Shi, Haiyang; Zhou, Chanjuan; Zhu, Dan; Zhao, Mingjun; Wang, Ziye; Yang, Yongtao; Chen, Jin; Liao, Li; Tang, Jianyong; Wu, You; Zhou, Jian; Cheng, Ke; Xie, Peng

    2016-09-01

    Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity is observed in many patients suffering from depression. However, the mechanism underlying the dysfunction of the HPA axis is not well understood. Moreover, dysfunction of the hypothalamus, the key brain region of the HPA axis, has not been well-explored. The aim of our study was to examine possible alterations in hypothalamus protein expression in a model of depression using proteomic analysis. In order to achieve this aim, mice were exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), as the paradigm results in hyperactivity of the HPA axis. Differential protein expression between the hypothalamic proteomes of CUMS and control mice was then assessed through two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-tandem mass spectrometry. Thirty-seven proteins with a threshold of a 1.5-fold change and a p value ≤0.05 were identified as being differentially expressed between CUMS and control mice, and were quantified for bioinformatics analysis. Glycometabolism, citrate cycle (TCA cycle) and oxidation respiratory chain were found to have changed significantly. Glial fibrillary acidic protein and glutamine synthetase were further validated by Western Blot. Our results demonstrated that CUMS mice exhibited a dramatic protein change both in glutamate metabolism and energy mobilization, which may shed some light on the role of the hypothalamus in the pathology of stress-induced depression. PMID:27230881

  8. Array-CGH analysis of mouse malignant lymphomas. Effects of chronic exposure to low-dose-rate γ-radiation on tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported that mice that were chronically irradiated with γ-rays at low dose rates had significantly shorter life spans than unirradiated controls. The major cause of this life-shortening is considered to be the earlier onset and/or the faster progression of malignant lymphomas in the irradiated groups. In this study, chromosomal aberrations in a total of 54 malignant lymphomas from mice irradiated with a dose rate of 21 mGy/day and nonirradiated mice were precisely compared by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis. Array-CGH profiles showed that about two-thirds of the tumors had aneuploidy genotypes, in which numeric aberrations of chromosomes 12, 14, 15, 16, and X were observed frequently in the unirradiated group while that of chromosome 15 predominated in the irradiated group. In addition, copy-number alterations were frequently identified on partial chromosomal regions harboring the following oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes: c-myc, N-myc, notch-1, notch-2, hes-1, akt-1, akt-2, akt-3, bcl-6, bcl-10, bcl-11a, bcl-11b, pim-2, BCoR, XIAP, rhoE, p16INK4a, p15INK4b, p73, p27Kip1, RB, and pten. If aberrations extending across whole-chromosomal and partial-chromsomal regions are counted together, gains on chromosomes 3, 12, 13, 14, 16 and X can be associated preferentially with the unirradiated group, whereas gains on chromosome 15, along with losses on chromosomes 4 and 14, were detected more frequently in the irradiated group. These observations offer insights into how low-dose-rate irradiation caused the earlier onset and/or the faster progression of tumors, as well as into the molecular pathogenesis of murine lymphomas. (author)

  9. A new model of an arteriovenous fistula in chronic kidney disease in the mouse: beneficial effects of upregulated heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Lu; Grande, Joseph P; Hillestad, Matthew L; Croatt, Anthony J; Barry, Michael A; Katusic, Zvonimir S; Nath, Karl A

    2016-03-15

    The arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is the preferred hemodialysis vascular access, but it is complicated by high failure rates and attendant morbidity. This study provides the first description of a murine AVF model that recapitulates two salient features of hemodialysis AVFs, namely, anastomosis of end-vein to side-artery to create the AVF and the presence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD reduced AVF blood flow, observed as early as 3 days after AVF creation, and increased neointimal hyperplasia, venous wall thickness, thrombus formation, and vasculopathic gene expression in the AVF. These adverse effects of CKD could not be ascribed to preexisting alterations in blood pressure or vascular reactivity in this CKD model. In addition to vasculopathic genes, CKD induced potentially vasoprotective genes in the AVF such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and HO-2. To determine whether prior HO-1 upregulation may protect in this model, we upregulated HO-1 by adeno-associated viral gene delivery, achieving marked venous induction of the HO-1 protein and HO activity. Such HO-1 upregulation improved AVF blood flow and decreased venous wall thickness in the AVF. Finally, we demonstrate that the administration of carbon monoxide, a product of HO, acutely increased AVF blood flow. This study thus demonstrates: 1) the feasibility of a clinically relevant murine AVF model created in the presence of CKD and involving an end-vein to side-artery anastomosis; 2) the exacerbatory effect of CKD on clinically relevant features of this model; and 3) the beneficial effects in this model conferred by HO-1 upregulation by adeno-associated viral gene delivery. PMID:26672617

  10. Mouse adhalin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, L; Vachon, P H; Kuang, W;

    1997-01-01

    analyze the biological roles of adhalin, we cloned the mouse adhalin cDNA, raised peptide-specific antibodies to its cytoplasmic domain, and examined its expression and localization in vivo and in vitro. The mouse adhalin sequence was 80% identical to that of human, rabbit, and hamster. Adhalin was...... specifically expressed in striated muscle cells and their immediate precursors, and absent in many other cell types. Adhalin expression in embryonic mouse muscle was coincident with primary myogenesis. Its expression was found to be up-regulated at mRNA and protein levels during myogenic differentiation in...

  11. Hypoxic cell sensitizers and heavy charged particle beams may play complementary roles in killing hypoxic tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of growth delay data of a rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumor system with and without misonidazole and irradiated with spread-peak heavy-ion radiation yields two conclusions that bear on the relative efficacy of the two modes of treatment and imply a complementary role of the two modes which enhances the effects of either given separately. For both carbon and neon ion peak radiation given in four fractions, RBE values for tumor growth delay are significantly greater than the enhancement ratio for an x ray plus misonidazole fractionation scheme. When misonidazole is given in conjunction with the heavy ion beam irradiations, an increased growth delay is seen, greater than when either heavy ions or misonidazole plus x rays are given separately. The interpretation is that heavy ion beams reach and kill hypoxic cells not penetrated by the misonidazole, and some hypoxic cells not killed by the high LET component receive low LET damage which is made lethal by the drug. Thus, the net hypoxic cell killing is enhanced by the high LET beams and in a complementary way by the combination of the drug and the low LET portion of the radiation

  12. Pulmonary administration of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to the lungs induces alveolar regeneration in a mouse model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Michiko; Hirokawa, Mai; Abe, Kaori; Kumagai, Harumi; Yamashita, Chikamasa

    2016-07-10

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive respiratory disease with several causes, including smoking, and no curative therapeutic agent is available, particularly for destructive alveolar lesions. In this study, we investigated the differentiation-inducing effect on undifferentiated lung cells (Calu-6) and the alveolar regenerative effect of the active vitamin 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 (VD3) with the ultimate goal of developing a novel curative drug for COPD. First, the differentiation-inducing effect of VD3 on Calu-6 cells was evaluated. Treatment with VD3 increased the proportions of type I alveolar epithelial (AT-I) and type II alveolar epithelial (AT-II) cells constituting alveoli in a concentration- and treatment time-dependent manner, demonstrating the potent differentiation-inducing activity of VD3 on Calu-6 cells. We thus administered VD3 topically to the mice lung using a previously developed intrapulmonary administration via self-inhalation method. To evaluate the alveolus-repairing effect of VD3, we administered VD3 intrapulmonarily to elastase-induced COPD model mice and computed the mean distance between the alveolar walls as an index of the extent of alveolar injury. Results showed significant decreases in the alveolar wall distance in groups of mice that received 0.01, 0.1, and 1μg/kg of intrapulmonary VD3, revealing excellent alveolus-regenerating effect of VD3. Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of VD3 on improving respiratory function using a respiratory function analyzer. Lung elasticity and respiratory competence [forced expiratory volume (FEV) 1 s %] are reduced in COPD, reflecting advanced emphysematous changes. In elastase-induced COPD model mice, although lung elasticity and respiratory competence were reduced, VD3 administered intrapulmonarily twice weekly for 2weeks recovered tissue elastance and forced expiratory volume in 0.05s to the forced vital capacity, which are indicators of lung elasticity and respiratory

  13. microRNA regulation of the embryonic hypoxic response in Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Pocock, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Layered strategies to combat hypoxia provide flexibility in dynamic oxygen environments. Here we show that multiple miRNAs are required for hypoxic survival responses during C. elegans embryogenesis. Certain miRNAs promote while others antagonize the hypoxic survival response. We found that expression of the mir-35 family is regulated by hypoxia in a HIF-1-independent manner and loss of mir-35–41 weakens hypoxic survival mechanisms in embryos. In addition, correct regulation of the RNA bindin...

  14. Is 18F-FDG a surrogate tracer to measure tumor hypoxia? Comparison with the hypoxic tracer 14C-EF3 in animal tumor models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has been reported as a surrogate tracer to measure tumor hypoxia with positron emission tomography (PET). The hypothesis is that there is an increased uptake of FDG under hypoxic conditions secondary to enhanced glycolysis, compensating the hypoxia-induced loss of cellular energy production. Several studies have already addressed this issue, some with conflicting results. This study aimed to compare the tracers 14C-EF3 and 18F-FDG to detect hypoxia in mouse tumor models. Materials and methods: C3H, tumor-bearing mice (FSAII and SCCVII tumors) were injected iv with 14C-EF3, and 1 h later with 18F-FDG. Using a specifically designed immobilization device with fiducial markers, PET (Mosaic (registered) , Philips) images were acquired 1 h after the FDG injection. After imaging, the device containing mouse was frozen, transversally sliced and imaged with autoradiography (AR) (FLA-5100, Fujifilm) to obtain high resolution images of the 18F-FDG distribution within the tumor area. After a 48-h delay allowing for 18F decay a second AR was performed to image 14C-EF3 distribution. AR images were aligned to reconstruct the full 3D tumor volume, and were compared with the PET images. Image segmentation with threshold-based methods was applied on both AR and PET images to derive various tracer activity volumes. The matching index DSI (dice similarity index) was then computed. The comparison was performed under normoxic (ambient air, FSAII: n = 4, SCCVII, n = 5) and under hypoxic conditions (10% O2 breathing, SCCVII: n = 4). Results: On AR, under both ambient air and hypoxic conditions, there was a decreasing similarity between 14C-EF3 and FDG with higher activity sub-volumes. Under normoxic conditions, when comparing the 10% of tumor voxels with the highest 18F-FDG or 14C-EF3 activity, a DSI of 0.24 and 0.20 was found for FSAII and SCCVII, respectively. Under hypoxic conditions, a DSI of 0.36 was observed for SCCVII tumors. When comparing

  15. Experimental study on central nervous toxicity of 'misonidazole' a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Misonidazole', a radiosensitizer for hypoxic cells is expected to be applied to the treatment of malignant tumors, but its side effect becomes a subject of study, because its effective dose is close to its lethal dose. The auther performed experiments with mice on the central nervous toxicity, which is the most lethal of the side effects of Misonidazole, with the following results; 1. The abrupt death seen after the administration of a large dose of Misonidazole was attributable to the central nervous toxicity. LD50 for d.d. strain mouse was 1.55 mg per body weight g. 2. The used mice always developed convulsion before death. But the administration of anticonvulsant failed to free them from death. 3. Autopsy findings were such abnormal ones as the degeneration and exfoliation of nerve cells and diapedetic focus. After sacrifice, however, no findings indicative of disturbance of central nerve could be detected. 4. Misonidazole, even in a small divided dose, left intracerebral retention, though slightly, indicating that its accumulation in the brain would be increased with increase in the dose. 5. The disturbance of central nerve was not exacerbated by the whole brain irradiation with Misonidazole. (author)

  16. Sirtuin 6 protects the heart from hypoxic damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksin-Matveev, Anna; Kanfi, Yariv [The Mina and Everard Goodman, Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel); Hochhauser, Edith [The Laboratory of the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Rabin Medical Center, Petach Tikva (Israel); Isak, Ahuva; Cohen, Haim Y. [The Mina and Everard Goodman, Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel); Shainberg, Asher, E-mail: asher.shainberg@gmail.com [The Mina and Everard Goodman, Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) is a protein associated with prolonged life expectancy. We investigated whether life extension is associated with cardioprotection against hypoxia. The proposed study is to develop approaches to reduce hypoxic damage through the use of the sirtuin pathway and to elucidate the mechanism involved. For that purpose we subjected cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice (TG) with over-expression of SIRT6, to hypoxic stress in cell cultures. We hypothesized that cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice subjected to prolonged hypoxia may release survival factors or fewer damage markers to protect them from hypoxic stress compared with wild type (WT) mice. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) released to the medium and propidium iodide (PI) binding, were markedly decreased following hypoxia in TG cardiomyocytes. The protective mechanism of SIRT6 over-expression includes the activation of pAMPKα pathway, the increased protein level of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2), the inhibition of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), the decrease of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the reduction in the protein level of phospho-protein kinase B (pAkt) during hypoxia. Together, all these processes impede the necrosis/apoptosis pathways leading to the improved survival of cardiomyocytes following hypoxia, which might explain life extension. - Highlights: • Sirtuin 6 is a protein associated with prolonged life expectancy. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 protects cardiocytes from hypoxia and oxidative stress. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 activates the pAMPKα pathway and the Bcl2 expression. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 decreases ROS formation and pAkt level during hypoxia. • These pathways protect cardiocytes from hypoxia and might explain lifespan extension.

  17. Risk factor for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine underlying risk factors in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. All neonates (153) with the diagnosis of Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE) were included in the study. Controls (187) were selected from admissions on the same day. Possible risk factors such as maternal age, parity, antenatal monitoring, place of delivery, prolonged second stage of labour, type of delivery, type of attendant at delivery and the gestational age were noted and compared. Sixty one (39.9%) mothers of asphyxiated babies reported no antenatal visits compared to 24.1% in the control group (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.2; p=0.002). Only 6.5% of cases were born in government hospitals (teaching and district) in comparison to 20.9% of controls (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.9-7.6; p=0.001). In 28.1% of cases, mothers had history of prolonged 2nd stage of labour in comparison to 5.9% of controls (OR 6.3, 95% CI 3.3-11.9; p<0.001). Fifty five cases (35.9%) were delivered by unskilled birth attendants compared to 28 (14.9%) controls (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.9-5.3; p<0.001). No significant difference was found in maternal age, maternal parity, gestational age and the mode of delivery between the two groups. Delivery by unskilled birth attendant, prolonged second stage of labour, birth in a non-government hospital setup and absence of antenatal care were significant risk factors for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in neonates. Improvement in antenatal and intrapartum care may be helpful in decreasing the frequency of this problem. (author)

  18. Sirtuin 6 protects the heart from hypoxic damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) is a protein associated with prolonged life expectancy. We investigated whether life extension is associated with cardioprotection against hypoxia. The proposed study is to develop approaches to reduce hypoxic damage through the use of the sirtuin pathway and to elucidate the mechanism involved. For that purpose we subjected cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice (TG) with over-expression of SIRT6, to hypoxic stress in cell cultures. We hypothesized that cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice subjected to prolonged hypoxia may release survival factors or fewer damage markers to protect them from hypoxic stress compared with wild type (WT) mice. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) released to the medium and propidium iodide (PI) binding, were markedly decreased following hypoxia in TG cardiomyocytes. The protective mechanism of SIRT6 over-expression includes the activation of pAMPKα pathway, the increased protein level of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2), the inhibition of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), the decrease of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the reduction in the protein level of phospho-protein kinase B (pAkt) during hypoxia. Together, all these processes impede the necrosis/apoptosis pathways leading to the improved survival of cardiomyocytes following hypoxia, which might explain life extension. - Highlights: • Sirtuin 6 is a protein associated with prolonged life expectancy. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 protects cardiocytes from hypoxia and oxidative stress. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 activates the pAMPKα pathway and the Bcl2 expression. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 decreases ROS formation and pAkt level during hypoxia. • These pathways protect cardiocytes from hypoxia and might explain lifespan extension

  19. Hypoxic regulation of the NKG2D ligand, H60

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth Ravindran

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxia in the context of cancer has been well studied as it has been shown that tumors that are in hypoxic conditions tend to become malignant or metastatic. There is evidence that hypoxia is able to modulate tumor immunogenicity, however this phenomenon has not been well characterized. Here, we look at the effects of hypoxia on tumor immunogenicity from the perspective of NK cell recognition. We find that hypoxia decreases the expression of the NKG2D ligand, H60 post-transcriptionally but n...

  20. Dull Brains, Mountaineers, and Mosso: Hypoxic Words from on High.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankford, Harvey V

    2015-12-01

    Dull and hypoxic brains have been a frequent subject in the medical and mountaineering literature. Deterioration of cognitive and other neurological function occurs at high altitude, with or without high altitude cerebral edema. This historical essay explores a 2014 first-ever English translation of cerebral blood flow studies by nineteenth century physiologist Angelo Mosso. Some of the medical history and physiology of brain function is discussed, but much of the style focuses on quotations from the writings of mountaineers and mountaineering physicians to provide color commentary about dull brains at high altitude. PMID:26356476

  1. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 in hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction

    OpenAIRE

    Ichinose, Fumito; Ullrich, Roman; Sapirstein, Adam; Jones, Rosemary C; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Serhan, Charles N.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Zapol, Warren M.

    2002-01-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) releases arachidonic acid (AA) from phospholipids in cell membranes. To assess the role of cPLA2 in hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV), we measured the increase in left lung pulmonary vascular resistance (LPVR) before and during hypoxia produced by left main stem bronchus occlusion (LMBO) in mice with and without a targeted deletion of the PLA2g4a gene that encodes cPLA2α. LMBO increased LPVR in cPLA2α+/+ mice but not in cPLA2α–/– mice. cPLA2α+/+ mice ...

  2. The G. L. Brown Prize Lecture. Hypoxic regulation of ion channel function and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peers, Chris

    2002-07-01

    Acute hypoxia regulates the activity of specific ion channels in a rapid and reversible manner. Such effects underlie appropriate cellular responses to hypoxia which are designed to initiate cardiorespiratory reflexes and contribute importantly to other tissue responses, all of which are designed to improve tissue O2 supply. These responses include excitation of chemoreceptors as well as pulmonary vasoconstriction and systemic vasodilatation. However, such responses may also contribute to the adverse responses to hypoxia, such as excitotoxicity in the central nervous system. Whilst numerous ion channel types are known to be modulated by acute hypoxia, the nature of the O2 sensor in most tissues remains to be identified. Prolonged (chronic) hypoxia regulates functional expression of ion channels, and so remodels excitability of various cell types. Whilst this may contribute to adaptive responses such as high-altitude acclimatization, such altered channel expression may also contribute to the onset of pathological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. Indeed, evidence is emerging that production of pathological peptides associated with Alzheimer's disease is increased during prolonged hypoxia. Such effects may account for the known increased incidence of this disease in patients who have previously endured hypoxic episodes, such as congestive heart failure and stroke. Identification of the mechanisms coupling hypoxia to the increased production of these peptides is likely to be of therapeutic benefit. PMID:12392105

  3. Studies on cerebral protection of digoxin against hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kaiwei; Tan, Danfeng; He, Miao; Guo, Dandan; Huang, Juan; Wang, Xia; Liu, Chentao; Zheng, Xiangrong

    2016-08-17

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) is a major cause of neonatal acute deaths and chronic nervous system damage. Our present study was designed to investigate the possible neuroprotective effect of digoxin-induced pharmacological preconditioning after hypoxia-ischemia and underlying mechanisms. Neonatal rats were assigned randomly to control, HIBD, or HIBD+digoxin groups. Pharmacological preconditioning was induced by administration of digoxin 72 h before inducing HIBD by carotid occlusion+hypoxia. Behavioral assays, and neuropathological and apoptotic assessments were performed to examine the effects; the expression of Na/K ATPase was also assessed. Rats in the HIBD group showed deficiencies on the T-maze, radial water maze, and postural reflex tests, whereas the HIBD+digoxin group showed significant improvements on all behavioral tests. The rats treated with digoxin showed recovery of pathological conditions, increased number of neural cells and proliferative cells, and decreased number of apoptotic cells. Meanwhile, an increased expression level of Na/K ATPase was observed after digoxin preconditioning treatment. The preconditioning treatment of digoxin contributed toward an improved functional recovery and exerted a marked neuroprotective effect including promotion of cell proliferation and reduction of apoptosis after HIBD, and the neuroprotective action was likely associated with increased expression of Na/K ATPase. PMID:27362436

  4. Excess post-hypoxic oxygen consumption is independent from lactate accumulation in two cyprinid fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genz, J.; Jyde, M.B.; Svendsen, Jon Christian;

    2013-01-01

    Carassius carassius responds to hypoxic conditions by conversion of lactate into ethanol, which is excreted over the gills. However, a closely related species, Cyprinus carpio, does not possess the ability to produce ethanol and would be expected to accumulate lactate during hypoxic exposure. Whi...

  5. Correlation between drug uptake and selective toxicity of porfiromycin to hypoxic EMT6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, S R; Rockwell, S; Sartorelli, A C

    1987-11-01

    Mitomycin C and its methylated analogue porfiromycin (Por) have significant potential as adjuncts to regimens presently used for treating solid tumors because of their preferential toxicity to cells existing in an hypoxic environment. An understanding of the factors producing the differential activity of these drugs under aerobic and hypoxic conditions would facilitate the development of new agents of this class. Previous studies have focused on the enzymes that reductively activate the mitomycins and on the interaction of these drugs with DNA; none of these studies has fully explained the differences in cytotoxicity observed under hypoxic and aerobic conditions. The present investigation demonstrates that the rate of Por uptake is directly correlated with cytotoxicity under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions. Uptake of Por into hypoxic cells is more rapid than into aerobic cells at equal drug concentrations. Hypoxic cells also accumulate drug in concentrations well in excess of those in the extracellular medium; this is apparently a reflection of drug sequestration in these cells. This sequestration of Por, which affects the rate and extent of uptake in hypoxic cells, does not take place in aerobic cells. The failure of aerobic cells to sequester drug is evidenced by the very rapid efflux of Por from these cells upon removal of extracellular Por and by the fact that aerobic cells attain a state of equilibrium between the intracellular and extracellular drug concentrations. The findings demonstrate that differences in the uptake and retention of Por are associated with the preferential toxicity of Por to hypoxic cells. PMID:3664473

  6. Evaluation of 80 Term Neonates with Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selahattin Katar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to review the etiology, clinical - laboratory features and mortality rate of term 80 neonates with perinatal asphyxia admitted to our neonatal unit between January 2005-April 2006. The sex distribution was 24 (%30 female and 56 (% 70 male. The mean gestational age was 38.6±1.3 weeks and weight 3156±561 gram. Of the patients % 46.25 were delivered with a cesarean section and % 53.75 with spontaneous vaginal delivery. The etiologic factors for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy were % 31.25 force delivery, meconium aspiration, and % 66.25 preeclampsia, eclampsia and diabetic mother’s infant. The distribution of patients according to HIE statging system (Sarnat&Sarnat were as follows: 33 patients (% 41.25 in stage 1, 20 (% 25 in stage 2 and 27 (% 33.75 in stage 3. Seizures were observed in % 33.75 of patients. The mean duration of hospital stay was 10.6±7.7 days for the surviving patients and 4.2±3.4 days for patients who died. Except from central nervous system, liver and kidney were the most involved organs.Perinatal asphyxia remains to be leading cause of neonatal mortality. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is a common newborn problem and cause important mortality and morbidity where low-social –cultural –education conditions with in regions.

  7. RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS FOR IMAGING OF HYPOXIC TUMORS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya Prasad Meher

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiopharmaceuticals are drugs containing a radionuclide and are used routinely in nuclear medicine for the diagnosis and therapy of various diseases. The mechanism of localization of the radiopharmaceutical in different organs provides the clue for designing of the agent meant for a specific organ or pathway. Various agent like F-18, Cu-64/67, I-123, and Tc-99m are used as imaging of hypoxic tumors. Of these, F-18-fluoromisonidazole and I-123-iodoazomycin arabinoside (IAZA have been most widely studied clinically. Non-nitro-containing bioreductive complexes, such as the Cu-60/62/64 thiosemicarbazone ATSM and Tc-99m butylene amineoxime (BnAO or HL91, have also been evaluated. In particular, I-123-IAZA and Cu-60-ATSM have shown correlation with response to radiotherapy in preliminary clinical studies. However, more preclinical studies comparing imaging with validated invasive methods and clinical studies with outcome measures are required. Nuclear medicine is poised to play an important role in optimizing the therapy of patients with hypoxic tumors. The present review is concern with the various radiopharmaceuticals used for imaging of hypoxia.

  8. Plasticity in the Neonatal Brain following Hypoxic-Ischaemic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eridan Rocha-Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischaemic damage to the developing brain is a leading cause of child death, with high mortality and morbidity, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and cognitive disabilities. The developmental stage of the brain and the severity of the insult influence the selective regional vulnerability and the subsequent clinical manifestations. The increased susceptibility to hypoxia-ischaemia (HI of periventricular white matter in preterm infants predisposes the immature brain to motor, cognitive, and sensory deficits, with cognitive impairment associated with earlier gestational age. In term infants HI causes selective damage to sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem. Even though the immature brain is more malleable to external stimuli compared to the adult one, a hypoxic-ischaemic event to the neonate interrupts the shaping of central motor pathways and can affect normal developmental plasticity through altering neurotransmission, changes in cellular signalling, neural connectivity and function, wrong targeted innervation, and interruption of developmental apoptosis. Models of neonatal HI demonstrate three morphologically different types of cell death, that is, apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy, which crosstalk and can exist as a continuum in the same cell. In the present review we discuss the mechanisms of HI injury to the immature brain and the way they affect plasticity.

  9. Plasticity in the Neonatal Brain following Hypoxic-Ischaemic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Hristova, Mariya

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischaemic damage to the developing brain is a leading cause of child death, with high mortality and morbidity, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and cognitive disabilities. The developmental stage of the brain and the severity of the insult influence the selective regional vulnerability and the subsequent clinical manifestations. The increased susceptibility to hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) of periventricular white matter in preterm infants predisposes the immature brain to motor, cognitive, and sensory deficits, with cognitive impairment associated with earlier gestational age. In term infants HI causes selective damage to sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem. Even though the immature brain is more malleable to external stimuli compared to the adult one, a hypoxic-ischaemic event to the neonate interrupts the shaping of central motor pathways and can affect normal developmental plasticity through altering neurotransmission, changes in cellular signalling, neural connectivity and function, wrong targeted innervation, and interruption of developmental apoptosis. Models of neonatal HI demonstrate three morphologically different types of cell death, that is, apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy, which crosstalk and can exist as a continuum in the same cell. In the present review we discuss the mechanisms of HI injury to the immature brain and the way they affect plasticity. PMID:27047695

  10. Harnessing hypoxic adaptation to prevent, treat, and repair stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratan, Rajiv R; Siddiq, Ambreena; Smirnova, Natalya; Karpisheva, Ksenia; Haskew-Layton, Renee; McConoughey, Stephen; Langley, Brett; Estevez, Alvaro; Huerta, Patricio T; Volpe, Bruce; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K; Gazaryan, Irina; Cho, Sunghee; Fink, Matthew; LaManna, Joseph

    2007-12-01

    The brain demands oxygen and glucose to fulfill its roles as the master regulator of body functions as diverse as bladder control and creative thinking. Chemical and electrical transmission in the nervous system is rapidly disrupted in stroke as a result of hypoxia and hypoglycemia. Despite being highly evolved in its architecture, the human brain appears to utilize phylogenetically conserved homeostatic strategies to combat hypoxia and ischemia. Specifically, several converging lines of inquiry have demonstrated that the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1-1) mediates the activation of a large cassette of genes involved in adaptation to hypoxia in surviving neurons after stroke. Accordingly, pharmacological or molecular approaches that engage hypoxic adaptation at the point of one of its sensors (e.g., inhibition of HIF prolyl 4 hydroxylases) leads to profound sparing of brain tissue and enhanced recovery of function. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms that could subserve protective and restorative effects of augmenting hypoxic adaptation in the brain. The strategy appears to involve HIF-dependent and HIF-independent pathways and more than 70 genes and proteins activated transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally that can act at cellular, local, and system levels to compensate for oxygen insufficiency. The breadth and depth of this homeostatic program offers a hopeful alternative to the current pessimism towards stroke therapeutics. PMID:18043901

  11. Hypoxic stress inhibits multiple aspects of the potato tuber wound response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers subjected to wounding under hypoxic stress do not synthesize RNA species that are induced in response to wounding in aerobic conditions. Further, wound-response proteins fail to be synthesized when wounded tubers are transferred to hypoxic conditions although messenger RNAs which encode them persist for many hours after transfer. Hypoxic stress also prevents the incorporation of [3H]thymidine by wounded tubers that occurs in aerobic conditions. In contrast, hypoxic tubers accumulate and translate transcripts of genes whose products are involved in anaerobic metabolism whether or not they are wounded. Both the hypoxic response and the aerobic wound response preclude the synthesis of proteins encoded by messenger RNAs which accumulated during the tuberization process and which can be translated in vitro. Finally, wounding elicits the degradation of a subset of these tuberization-associated transcripts. These data indicate a complex and precise regulation of gene expression at several levels of macromolecular synthesis

  12. The City Mouse and the Country Mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Once two mice (老鼠) were good friends. One lived in the city, the other lived in the country (乡村). After many years, the city mouse came to see the country mouse. The country mouse took him to his house in a field. He gave him the nicest food that he could find. The city mouse said,

  13. Genotoxic studies on hypoxic radiosensitizer AK2123 in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AK2123, a nitro compound, 3 nitro 1-2-4 triazole is one of the potent hypoxic sensitizers developed by Kyoto University Group in Japan. This compound has undergone clinical trials as an adjuvant agent in radiotherapy of cancer in a number of centres all over the world including India. Initial results are promising and significant improvement in tumour control and tumour cure has been reported from India, Peru, Ukraine and Khazakstan. A variety of tumours, such as cervical cancers, head and neck cancers, GI tract cancers and mammary tumours, have shown improved response to radiation in the presence of AK2123. Efficacy of AK2123 to sensitize tumours to the toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents has also been demonstrated

  14. Nitric oxide metabolites in goldfish under normoxic and hypoxic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marie N.; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOS enzymes), regulates multiple physiological functions in animals. NO exerts its effects by binding to iron (Fe) of heme groups (exemplified by the activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase) and by S-nitrosylation of proteins – and it is...... metabolized to nitrite and nitrate. Nitrite is used as a marker for NOS activity but it is also a NO donor that can be activated by various cellular proteins under hypoxic conditions. Here, we report the first systematic study of NO metabolites (nitrite, nitrate, S-nitroso, N-nitroso and Fe-nitrosyl compounds...... hypoxia levels was assessed from metabolic and respiratory variables. In normoxic goldfish, the concentrations of NO metabolites in plasma and tissues were comparable with values reported in mammals, indicative of similar NOS activity. Exposure to hypoxia [at PO2 (partial pressure of O2) values close to...

  15. Mouse lymphotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivers, G; Braungart, D; Leonard, E J

    1976-07-01

    The addition of PHA to C3H mouse spleen cells in tissue culture led to the production of lymphotoxin (LT). Cytotoxicity was assayed by addition of the culture fluids to syngeneic target cells labeled with tritiated thymidine; after an incubation period of 72 hr the amount of radioactivity released into the supernatant was measured. The LT activity in unfractionated culture fluids survived lyophilization, remained unchanged for many weeks at 4 degrees C, and progressively decreased on heating at 56 degrees C for periods from 1 to 9 hr. Based on the G-200 Sephadex distribution coefficients for several preparations, the m.w. of mouse lymphotoxin was about 41,000 daltons. Lymphotoxin from three different spleen cell production runs was recovered from isoelectric focusing columns in sharply focused peaks, the pH of which ranged from 4.4 to 4.8. PMID:1084362

  16. Oxygen supply maps for hypoxic microenvironment visualization in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Niels J.; Schüffler, Peter J.; Zhong, Qing; Falkner, Florian; Rechsteiner, Markus; Rüschoff, Jan H.; Fankhauser, Christian; Drach, Matthias; Largo, Remo; Tremp, Mathias; Poyet, Cedric; Sulser, Tullio; Kristiansen, Glen; Moch, Holger; Buhmann, Joachim; Müntener, Michael; Wild, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intratumoral hypoxia plays an important role with regard to tumor biology and susceptibility to radio- and chemotherapy. For further investigation of hypoxia-related changes, areas of certain hypoxia must be reliably detected within cancer tissues. Pimonidazole, a 2-nitroimindazole, accumulates in hypoxic tissue and can be easily visualized using immunohistochemistry. Materials and Methods: To improve detection of highly hypoxic versus normoxic areas in prostate cancer, immunoreactivity of pimonidazole and a combination of known hypoxia-related proteins was used to create computational oxygen supply maps of prostate cancer. Pimonidazole was intravenously administered before radical prostatectomy in n = 15 patients, using the da Vinci robot-assisted surgical system. Prostatectomy specimens were immediately transferred into buffered formaldehyde, fixed overnight, and completely embedded in paraffin. Pimonidazole accumulation and hypoxia-related protein expression were visualized by immunohistochemistry. Oxygen supply maps were created using the normalized information from pimonidazole and hypoxia-related proteins. Results: Based on pimonidazole staining and other hypoxia.related proteins (osteopontin, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha, and glucose transporter member 1) oxygen supply maps in prostate cancer were created. Overall, oxygen supply maps consisting of information from all hypoxia-related proteins showed high correlation and mutual information to the golden standard of pimonidazole. Here, we describe an improved computer-based ex vivo model for an accurate detection of oxygen supply in human prostate cancer tissue. Conclusions: This platform can be used for precise colocalization of novel candidate hypoxia-related proteins in a representative number of prostate cancer cases, and improve issues of single marker correlations. Furthermore, this study provides a source for further in situ tests and biochemical investigations PMID:26955501

  17. Overcoming Hypoxic-Resistance of Tumor Cells to TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis through Melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Jin Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A solid tumor is often exposed to hypoxic or anoxic conditions; thus, tumor cell responses to hypoxia are important for tumor progression as well as tumor therapy. Our previous studies indicated that tumor cells are resistant to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL-induced cell apoptosis under hypoxic conditions. Melatonin inhibits cell proliferation in many cancer types and induces apoptosis in some particular cancer types. Here, we examined the effects of melatonin on hypoxic resistant cells against TRAIL-induced apoptosis and the possible mechanisms of melatonin in the hypoxic response. Melatonin treatment increased TRAIL-induced A549 cell death under hypoxic conditions, although hypoxia inhibited TRAIL-mediated cell apoptosis. In a mechanistic study, hypoxia inducible factor-1α and prolyl-hydroxylase 2 proteins, which increase following exposure to hypoxia, were dose-dependently down-regulated by melatonin treatment. Melatonin also blocked the hypoxic responses that reduced pro-apoptotic proteins and increased anti-apoptotic proteins including Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Furthermore, melatonin treatment reduced TRAIL resistance by regulating the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and Bax translocation. Our results first demonstrated that melatonin treatment induces apoptosis in TRAIL-resistant hypoxic tumor cells by diminishing the anti-apoptotic signals mediated by hypoxia and also suggest that melatonin could be a tumor therapeutic tool by combining with other apoptotic ligands including TRAIL, particularly in solid tumor cells exposed to hypoxia.

  18. Hypoxic stress-induced changes in ribosomes of maize seedling roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypoxic stress response of Zea mays L. seedling roots involves regulation of gene expression at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. We investigated the effect of hypoxia on the translational machinery of seedling roots. The levels of monoribosomes and ribosomal subunits increased dramatically within 1 hour of stress. Prolonged hypoxia resulted in continued accumulation of nontranslating ribosomes, as well as increased levels of small polyribosomes. The return of seedlings to normal aerobic conditions resulted in recovery of normal polyribosome levels. Comparison of ribosomal proteins from control and hypoxic roots revealed differences in quantity and electrophoretic mobility. In vivo labeling of roots with [35S]methionine revealed variations in newly synthesized ribosomal proteins. In vivo labeling of roots with [32P]orthophosphate revealed a major reduction in the phosphorylation of a 31 kilodalton ribosomal protein in hypoxic stressed roots. In vitro phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins by endogenous kinases was used to probe for differences in ribosome structure and composition. The patterns of in vitro kinased phosphoproteins of ribosomes from control and hypoxic roots were not identical. Variation in phosphoproteins of polyribosomes from control and hypoxic roots, as well as among polyribosomes from hypoxic roots were observed. These results indicate that modification of the translational machinery occurs in response to hypoxic stress

  19. Diffusion-weighted MRI and proton MR spectroscopy in adult hypoxic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The clinical and imaging assessment of patients with severe hypoxic brain injury is difficult, especially in the first few days after the insult. Proton spectroscopy has shown promise in the assessment of neonatal hypoxic brain injury, but there has been little experience with it in adults with such injury. The high sensitivity of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for early stroke suggests that it may be more sensitive to hypoxic injury than conventional sequences. Patients with documented acute hypoxic episodes (cardiac arrest, hanging, measured severe arterial hypotension) and clinical evidence of hypoxic brain injury were included. MRI was not performed until sedation had been ceased for at least 24 hours. In addition to conventional T2-weighted and FLAIR imaging, six patients underwent DWI. A further ten patients underwent conventional imaging plus DWI and proton spectroscopy (PRESS TE 135, 2 x 2 x 2 cm voxel in parasagittal occipital cortex antero-inferiorly). Three of these patients were examined twice because of ongoing radiological and clinical uncertainty. In acute hypoxic insults, a negative diffusion-weighted study does not exclude significant brain injury. Proton spectroscopy is more sensitive to hypoxic brain injury, at least from 48 hours post-ictus, and may provide an index of severity. The findings suggest that acute hypoxia can trigger ongoing neuronal loss (over at least a week) without evidence of macroscopic infarction. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  20. A scenario and forecast model for Gulf of Mexico hypoxic area and volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavia, Donald; Evans, Mary Anne; Obenour, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    For almost three decades, the relative size of the hypoxic region on the Louisiana-Texas continental shelf has drawn scientific and policy attention. During that time, both simple and complex models have been used to explore hypoxia dynamics and to provide management guidance relating the size of the hypoxic zone to key drivers. Throughout much of that development, analyses had to accommodate an apparent change in hypoxic sensitivity to loads and often cull observations due to anomalous meteorological conditions. Here, we describe an adaptation of our earlier, simple biophysical model, calibrated to revised hypoxic area estimates and new hypoxic volume estimates through Bayesian estimation. This application eliminates the need to cull observations and provides revised hypoxic extent estimates with uncertainties, corresponding to different nutrient loading reduction scenarios. We compare guidance from this model application, suggesting an approximately 62% nutrient loading reduction is required to reduce Gulf hypoxia to the Action Plan goal of 5,000 km2, to that of previous applications. In addition, we describe for the first time, the corresponding response of hypoxic volume. We also analyze model results to test for increasing system sensitivity to hypoxia formation, but find no strong evidence of such change.

  1. Development of an ultrasound sensitive oxygen carrier for oxygen delivery to hypoxic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, John R; Albala, Lorenzo; Kramer, Michael R; Daroshefski, Nick; Brown, David; Liu, Ji-Bin; Stanczak, Maria; O'Kane, Patrick; Forsberg, Flemming; Wheatley, Margaret A

    2015-01-15

    Radiation therapy is frequently used in the treatment of malignancies, but tumors are often more resistant than the surrounding normal tissue to radiation effects, because the tumor microenvironment is hypoxic. This manuscript details the fabrication and characterization of an ultrasound-sensitive, injectable oxygen microbubble platform (SE61O2) for overcoming tumor hypoxia. SE61O2 was fabricated by first sonicating a mixture of Span 60 and water-soluble vitamin E purged with perfluorocarbon gas. SE61O2 microbubbles were separated from the foam by flotation, then freeze dried under vacuum to remove all perfluorocarbon, and reconstituted with oxygen. Visually, SE61O2 microbubbles were smooth, spherical, with an average diameter of 3.1 μm and were reconstituted to a concentration of 6.5 E7 microbubbles/ml. Oxygen-filled SE61O2 provides 16.9 ± 1.0 dB of enhancement at a dose of 880 μl/l (5.7 E7 microbubbles/l) with a half-life under insonation of approximately 15 min. In in vitro release experiments, 2 ml of SE61O2 (1.3 E8 microbubbles) triggered with ultrasound was found to elevate oxygen partial pressures of 100ml of degassed saline 13.8 mmHg more than untriggered bubbles and 20.6 mmHg more than ultrasound triggered nitrogen-filled bubbles. In preliminary in vivo delivery experiments, triggered SE61O2 resulted in a 30.4 mmHg and 27.4 mmHg increase in oxygen partial pressures in two breast tumor mouse xenografts. PMID:25448552

  2. Renal compensation to chronic hypoxic hypercapnia: downregulation of pendrin and adaptation of the proximal tubule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Seigneux, Sophie; Malte, Hans; Dimke, Henrik;

    2007-01-01

    The molecular basis for the renal compensation to respiratory acidosis and specifically the role of pendrin in this condition are unclear. Therefore, we studied the adaptation of the proximal tubule and the collecting duct to respiratory acidosis. Male Wistar-Hannover rats were exposed to either ...

  3. Role of NO/cGMP signaling pathway in cardiac ischemic tolerance of chronically hypoxic rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alánová, Petra; Kolář, František; Ošťádal, Bohuslav; Neckář, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 5 (2015), s. 783-787. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-10267S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1162 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : hypoxia * cardioprotection * nitric oxide * molsidomine * sildenafil Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  4. Involvement of SIRT1 in hypoxic down-regulation of c-Myc and β-catenin and hypoxic preconditioning effect of polyphenols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SIRT1 has been found to function as a Class III deacetylase that affects the acetylation status of histones and other important cellular nonhistone proteins involved in various cellular pathways including stress responses and apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the role of SIRT1 signaling in the hypoxic down-regulations of c-Myc and β-catenin and hypoxic preconditioning effect of the red wine polyphenols such as piceatannol, myricetin, quercetin and resveratrol. We found that the expression of SIRT1 was significantly increased in hypoxia-exposed or hypoxic preconditioned HepG2 cells, which was closely associated with the up-regulation of HIF-1α and down-regulation of c-Myc and β-catenin expression via deacetylation of these proteins. In addition, blockade of SIRT1 activation using siRNA or amurensin G, a new potent SIRT1 inhibitor, abolished hypoxia-induced HIF-1α expression but increased c-Myc and β-catenin expression. SIRT1 was also found to stabilize HIF-1α protein and destabilize c-Myc, β-catenin and PHD2 under hypoxia. We also found that myricetin, quercetin, piceatannol and resveratrol up-regulated HIF-1α and down-regulated c-Myc, PHD2 and β-catenin expressions via SIRT1 activation, in a manner that mimics hypoxic preconditioning. This study provides new insights of the molecular mechanisms of hypoxic preconditioning and suggests that polyphenolic SIRT1 activators could be used to mimic hypoxic/ischemic preconditioning. -- Graphical abstract: Polyphenols mimicked hypoxic preconditioning by up-regulating HIF-1α and SIRT1 and down-regulating c-Myc, PHD2, and β-catenin. HepG2 cells were pretreated with the indicated doses of myricetin (MYR; A), quercetin (QUR; B), or piceatannol (PIC; C) for 4 h and then exposed to hypoxia for 4 h. Levels of HIF-1α, SIRT1, c-Myc, β-catenin, and PHD2 were determined by western blot analysis. The data are representative of three individual experiments. Highlights: ► SIRT1 expression is increased in hypoxia

  5. Involvement of SIRT1 in hypoxic down-regulation of c-Myc and β-catenin and hypoxic preconditioning effect of polyphenols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Kyung-Soo [Department of Biochemistry, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Research Center for Ischemic Tissue regeneration, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jun-Ik [Department of Biochemistry, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi-Ju; Kim, Hak-Bong; Lee, Jae-Won [Department of Biochemistry, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Research Center for Ischemic Tissue regeneration, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Dao, Trong Tuan; Oh, Won Keun [BK21 Project Team, College of Pharmacy, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chi-Dug, E-mail: kcdshbw@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun-Hee, E-mail: ksh7738@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Research Center for Ischemic Tissue regeneration, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-01

    SIRT1 has been found to function as a Class III deacetylase that affects the acetylation status of histones and other important cellular nonhistone proteins involved in various cellular pathways including stress responses and apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the role of SIRT1 signaling in the hypoxic down-regulations of c-Myc and β-catenin and hypoxic preconditioning effect of the red wine polyphenols such as piceatannol, myricetin, quercetin and resveratrol. We found that the expression of SIRT1 was significantly increased in hypoxia-exposed or hypoxic preconditioned HepG2 cells, which was closely associated with the up-regulation of HIF-1α and down-regulation of c-Myc and β-catenin expression via deacetylation of these proteins. In addition, blockade of SIRT1 activation using siRNA or amurensin G, a new potent SIRT1 inhibitor, abolished hypoxia-induced HIF-1α expression but increased c-Myc and β-catenin expression. SIRT1 was also found to stabilize HIF-1α protein and destabilize c-Myc, β-catenin and PHD2 under hypoxia. We also found that myricetin, quercetin, piceatannol and resveratrol up-regulated HIF-1α and down-regulated c-Myc, PHD2 and β-catenin expressions via SIRT1 activation, in a manner that mimics hypoxic preconditioning. This study provides new insights of the molecular mechanisms of hypoxic preconditioning and suggests that polyphenolic SIRT1 activators could be used to mimic hypoxic/ischemic preconditioning. -- Graphical abstract: Polyphenols mimicked hypoxic preconditioning by up-regulating HIF-1α and SIRT1 and down-regulating c-Myc, PHD2, and β-catenin. HepG2 cells were pretreated with the indicated doses of myricetin (MYR; A), quercetin (QUR; B), or piceatannol (PIC; C) for 4 h and then exposed to hypoxia for 4 h. Levels of HIF-1α, SIRT1, c-Myc, β-catenin, and PHD2 were determined by western blot analysis. The data are representative of three individual experiments. Highlights: ► SIRT1 expression is increased in hypoxia

  6. Induction of controlled hypoxic pregnancy in large mammalian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain, Kirsty L; Allison, Beth J; Niu, Youguo; Cross, Christine M; Itani, Nozomi; Kane, Andrew D; Herrera, Emilio A; Giussani, Dino A

    2015-12-01

    Progress in the study of pregnancy complicated by chronic hypoxia in large mammals has been held back by the inability to measure long-term significant reductions in fetal oxygenation at values similar to those measured in human pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. Here, we introduce a technique for physiological research able to maintain chronically instrumented maternal and fetal sheep for prolonged periods of gestation under significant and controlled isolated chronic hypoxia beyond levels that can be achieved by habitable high altitude. This model of chronic hypoxia permits measurement of materno-fetal blood gases as the challenge is actually occurring. Chronic hypoxia of this magnitude and duration using this model recapitulates the significant asymmetric growth restriction, the pronounced cardiomyopathy, and the loss of endothelial function measured in offspring of high-risk pregnancy in humans, opening a new window of therapeutic research. PMID:26660546

  7. The adaptive response of mouse tumours to anaemia and retransfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exchange transfusion methods have been developed to alter the haematocrit of tumour-bearing mice. The effects of anaemia and its correction by blood transfusion on the radiosensitivity of two mouse tumours (SCCVII/St and RIF-1) were studied using excision, in vivo/in vitro assay. Acute reduction in haematocrit caused a high degree of radioresistance equivalent to an increase in the hypoxic fractions by factors of 10 (SCCVII/St) and 30 (RIF-1). As the duration of anaemia was prolonged, radioresistance was lost until within about 6 h normal radiosensitivity was observed even though the anaemia persisted. The restoration of the normal haematocrit by red blood cell transfusion after 24 h of anaemia caused increased radiosensitivity equivalent to a reduction in the hypoxic fraction by factors of 5 (SCCVII/St) and 10 (RIF-1), but again the effect was transient and normal radiosensitivity re-established within 24-48 h of retransfusion. Measurements of 14C misonidazole (MISO) binding to RIF-1 tumours after these procedures indicated changes in the number of hypoxic cells which were qualitatively almost identical to those using the cell survival endpoint, leading to the belief that changes in oxygenation were reponsible for the altered radiosensitivity. (author)

  8. Use of perampanel in one case of super-refractory hypoxic myoclonic status: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estevo Santamarina

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This case shows the potential utility of PER as a therapeutic option in super-refractory hypoxic status and even its potential use before other aggressive alternatives considering their greater morbidity.

  9. Hypoxic training for swimmer's combined team preparation of the law university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balamutova N.M.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The matters of the hypoxic training for highly qualified swimmers as extra means of improving level for sports achievements were considered. A method of artificial hypoxic training that increase indexes of cardiorespiratory system of tested people was developed. Twelve students from the university swimming combined team took part in the experiment. In the experiment were used pedagogical testing methods, biochemistry analysis of blood, cardiorespiratory indexes rating, methods of mathematical statistics. It was determined that offered methodology of hypoxic training allows to reach higher sports achievements. It is set that the use of irregular hypoxic influences is considerably modified dependence a «dose is an effect» in regard to loadings of anaerobic alactic influence

  10. Hypoxic fraction determinations with the BA1112 rat sarcoma: variation within and among assay techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the hypoxic fraction in the same tumor system by different assay techniques often gives incompatible results. The hypoxic fraction of the BA1112 sarcoma has been measured by three assay techniques: tumor control and growth delay assays in which the tumors remain in situ after irradiation, and paired survival curve assays in which the tumors are excised after irradiation. The assays were done with and without anesthesia on tumors growing in two different subcutaneous sites. Interpretation of the results was complicated by disagreements between the growth delay and tumor control assays, and by disparities between replicate determinations. The discrepancies among assays are caused almost entirely by variations in the response of the artifically hypoxic tumors, rather than variations in the response of aerobic tumors. These results indicate that assumptions commonly made when measuring hypoxic fractions may not be valid

  11. Intramucosal–arterial PCO 2 gap fails to reflect intestinal dysoxia in hypoxic hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Dubin, Arnaldo; Murias, Gastón; Estenssoro, Elisa; Canales, Héctor; Badie, Julio; Pozo, Mario; Sottile, Juan P; Barán, Marcelo; Pálizas, Fernando; Laporte, Mercedes

    2002-01-01

    Introduction An elevation in intramucosal–arterial PCO 2 gradient (ΔPCO 2) could be determined either by tissue hypoxia or by reduced blood flow. Our hypothesis was that in hypoxic hypoxia with preserved blood flow, ΔPCO 2 should not be altered. Methods In 17 anesthetized and mechanically ventilated sheep, oxygen delivery was reduced by decreasing flow (ischemic hypoxia, IH) or arterial oxygen saturation (hypoxic hypoxia, HH), or no intervention was made (sham). In the IH group (n = 6), blood...

  12. Heterogeneous vascular responses to hypoxic forearm exercise in young and older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Limberg, Jacqueline K.; Evans, Trent D.; Pegelow, David F.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Sebranek, Joshua J.; Proctor, Lester T.; Schrage, William G.

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to assess age-related differences in compensatory hypoxic vasodilation during moderate-to-high dynamic exercise at absolute workloads. We hypothesized healthy older adults (n = 12, 61 ± 1 years) would exhibit impaired hypoxic vasodilation at a moderate absolute workload, and this effect would be exaggerated at a higher workload when compared to young adults (n = 17, 27 ± 2 years). Forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured with Doppler ultrasound. Dynamic forearm exercise (20 contractions...

  13. Acute dietary nitrate supplementation enhances compensatory vasodilation during hypoxic exercise in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Casey, Darren P.; Treichler, David P; Ganger, Charles T.; Schneider, Aaron C.; Ueda, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that aging reduces the compensatory vasodilator response during hypoxic exercise due to blunted nitric oxide (NO) signaling. Recent evidence suggests that NO bioavailability can be augmented by dietary nitrate through the nitrate-nitrite pathway. Thus we tested the hypothesis that acute dietary nitrate supplementation increases the compensatory vasodilator response to hypoxic exercise, particularly in older adults. Thirteen young (25 ± 1 yr) and 12 older (64 ± ...

  14. Remote post-conditioning reduces hypoxic damage early after experimental stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasseldam, Henrik; Hansen-Schwartz, Jacob; Munkholm, Nina; Hou, Jack; Johansen, Flemming F

    2013-01-01

    Given that reliable markers for early ischemic brain damage are lacking, we set out to test whether pimonidazole can be used as a reliable tool in the quantification of hypoxic insults, at early time points following experimental stroke.......Given that reliable markers for early ischemic brain damage are lacking, we set out to test whether pimonidazole can be used as a reliable tool in the quantification of hypoxic insults, at early time points following experimental stroke....

  15. Environmental enrichment promotes neural remodeling in newborn rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuanjun Liu; Yankui Guo; Yalu Li; Zhenying Yang

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and treatment with early environmental enrichment intervention on development of newborn rats, as evaluated by light and electron microscopy and morphometry. Early intervention with environmental enrichment intelligence training attenuated brain edema and neuronal injury, promoted neuronal repair, and increased neuronal plasticity in the frontal lobe cortex of the newborn rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  16. Early blood glucose profile and neurodevelopmental outcome at two years in neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Dempsey Eugene M; Boylan Geraldine B; Murray Deirdre M; Nadeem Montasser; Ryan Cornelius A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background To examine the blood glucose profile and the relationship between blood glucose levels and neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Methods Blood glucose values within 72 hours of birth were collected from 52 term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Hypoglycaemia [ 150 mg/dL (8.3 mmol/L)] were correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months of age. Results Four fifths ...

  17. Nitrite Regulates Hypoxic Vasodilation via Myoglobin–Dependent Nitric Oxide Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totzeck, Matthias; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B.; Luedike, Peter; Berenbrink, Michael; Klare, Johann P.; Steinhoff, Heinz-Juergen; Semmler, Dominik; Shiva, Sruti; Williams, Daryl; Kipar, Anja; Gladwin, Mark T.; Schrader, Juergen; Kelm, Malte; Cossins, Andrew R.; Rassaf, Tienush

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypoxic vasodilation is a physiological response to low oxygen (O2) tension that increases blood supply to match metabolic demands. While this response has been characterized for more than 100 years, the underlying hypoxic sensing and effector signaling mechanisms remain uncertain. We have shown that deoxygenated myoglobin (deoxyMb) in the heart can reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO˙) and thereby contribute to cardiomyocyte NO˙ signaling during ischemia. Based on recent observations that Mb is expressed in the vasculature of hypoxia-tolerant fish, we hypothesized that endogenous nitrite may contribute to physiological hypoxic vasodilation via reactions with vascular Mb to form NO˙. Methods and Results We here show that Mb is expressed in vascular smooth muscle and contributes significantly to nitrite-dependent hypoxic vasodilation in vivo and ex vivo. The generation of NO˙ from nitrite reduction by deoxyMb activates canonical soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling pathways. In vivo and ex vivo vasodilation responses, the reduction of nitrite to NO˙ and the subsequent signal transduction mechanisms were all significantly impaired in mice without myoglobin (Mb−/−). Hypoxic vasodilation studies in Mb, endothelial and inducible NO synthase knockout models (eNOS−/−, iNOS−/−) suggest that only Mb contributes to systemic hypoxic vasodilatory responses in mice. Conclusions Endogenous nitrite is a physiological effector of hypoxic vasodilation. Its reduction to NO˙ via the heme globin Mb enhances blood flow and matches O2 supply to increased metabolic demands under hypoxic conditions. PMID:22685116

  18. The Principles of Protective Effects Formation Using Different Hypoxic Preconditioning Modes

    OpenAIRE

    E.I. Murach; E.I. Erlykina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to study molecular mechanisms of adaptive reactions formation using short- and long-term hypoxic preconditioning modes. Materials and Methods. We carried out experiments on white outbred male rats. The animals underwent hypoxic preconditioning by 4- and 28-time hypobaric training within 60 min a day in altitude chamber at 310 mm Hg. Hypoxia tolerance test was performed by simulating severe hypobaric hypoxia in preconditioned animals exposed to atmosphere a...

  19. Hypoxic preconditioning: effect, mechanism and clinical implication (Part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guo-wei; Shao, Guo

    2014-11-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) refers to exposure of organisms, systems, organs, tissues or cells to moderate hypoxia/ischemia that is able to result in a resistance to subsequent severe hypoxia/ischemia in tissues and cells. The effects exerted by HPC are well documented. The original local in situ (LiHPC) is now broadened to remote ectopic organs-tissues (ReHPC) and extended crossly to cross pluripotential HPC(CpHPC) induced by a variety of stresses other than hypoxia/ischemia, including cancer, for example. We developed a unique animal model of repetitive autohypoxia in adult mice, and studied systematically on the effects and mechanisms of HPC on the model in our laboratory since the early 1960s. The tolerances to hypoxia and protection from injury increased significantly in this model. The adult mice behave like hypoxia-intolerant mammalian newborns and hypoxia-tolerant adult animals during their exposure to repetitive autohypoxia. The overall energy supply and demand decreased, the microorganization of the brain maintained and the spacial learning and memory ability improved but not impaired, the detrimental neurochemicals such as free radicals down-regulated and the beneficial neurochemicals such as adenosine(ADO) and antihypoxic gene(s)/factor(s) (AHGs/AHFs) up-regulated. Accordingly, we hypothesize that mechanisms for the tolerance/protective effects of HPC are fundamentally depending on energy saving and brain plasticity in particular. It is thought that these two major mechanisms are triggered by exposure to hypoxia/ischemia via oxygen sensing-transduction pathways and HIF-1 initiation cascades. We suggest that HPC is an intrinsic mechanism developed in biological evolution and is a novel potential strategy for fighting against hypoxia-ischemia and other stresses. Motivation of endogenous antihypoxic potential, activation of oxygen sensing--signal transduction systems and supplement of exogenous antihypoxic substances as well as development of HPC

  20. Hemoglobin Effects on Nitric Oxide Mediated Hypoxic Vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Zimei; Cooper, Chris E

    2016-01-01

    The brain responds to hypoxia with an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, such an increase is generally believed to start only after the oxygen tension decreases to a certain threshold level. Although many mechanisms (different vasodilator and different generation and metabolism mechanisms of the vasodilator) have been proposed at the molecular level, none of them has gained universal acceptance. Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to play a central role in the regulation of oxygen supply since it is a vasodilator whose production and metabolism are both oxygen dependent. We have used a computational model that simulates blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the brain (BRAINSIGNALS) to test mechanism by which NO may elucidate hypoxic vasodilation. The first model proposed that NO was produced by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and metabolized by the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CCO). NO production declined with decreasing oxygen concentration given that oxygen is a substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS). However, this was balanced by NO metabolism by CCO, which also declined with decreasing oxygen concentration. However, the NOS effect was dominant; the resulting model profiles of hypoxic vasodilation only approximated the experimental curves when an unfeasibly low K m for oxygen for NOS was input into the model. We therefore modified the model such that NO generation was via the nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin instead of NOS, whilst keeping the metabolism of NO by CCO the same. NO production increased with decreasing oxygen concentration, leading to an improved reproduction of the experimental CBF versus PaO2 curve. However, the threshold phenomenon was not perfectly reproduced. In this present work, we incorporated a wider variety of oxygen dependent and independent NO production and removal mechanisms. We found that the addition of NO removal via oxidation to nitrate mediated by oxyhemoglobin resulted in the

  1. Opposing actions of chronic stress and chronic nicotine on striatal function in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Salas, Ramiro; De Biasi, Mariella

    2008-01-01

    Stress is a major risk factor in drug addiction development and relapse. Virtually all drugs of abuse act by increasing extracellular dopamine levels in the striatum. To gain an understanding of the interaction between stress and drug exposure, we studied the effects of concomitant chronic nicotine and chronic stress exposure on mouse striatal dopamine levels.

  2. Interaction between endogenous nitric oxide and carbon monoxide in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the interaction between nitric oxygenase (NOS)/ nitric oxide (NO) and heme oxygenase (HO)/ carbon monoxide (CO) system in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. On a rat model of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, the pulmonary artery pressure was measured, and NO formation and expression of NOS in pulmonary tissues were examined after treatment with ZnPP-IX, an HO-1 inhibitor. The pulmonary artery pressure, CO formation and expression of HO-1 in pulmonary tissues were examined after treatment with L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. We found that pulmonary hypertension developed after 2-week hypoxia, while the concentration of NO in the pulmonary tissue homogenates and the expression of NOS in intrapulmonary artery endothelial cells decreased markedly. ZnPP-IX worsened pulmonary hypertension of hypoxic rats. However, it increased endogenous production of NO and the expression of NOS obviously. The concentration of CO in the pulmonary tissue homogenates and the expression of HO-1 in intrapulmonary artery smooth muscle cells increased markedly with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. L-NAME worsened pulmonary hypertension of hypoxic rats, but inhibited CO formation and HO-1 expression (P < 0.01). The results of this study suggested that endogenous NOS/NO and HO/CO systems might interact with each other and therefore play an important regulating role in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

  3. Evaluation of nitroimidazole hypoxic cell radiosensitizers in a human tumor cell line high in intracellular glutathione

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five nitroimidazole hypoxic cell radiosensitizers were evaluated in a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (A549) whose GSH level was 8-fold higher than Chinese hamster V79 cells. One millimolar concentrations of Misonidazole (MISO), SR-2508, RSU-1164, RSU-1172, and Ro-03-8799 sensitized hypoxic A549 cells to radiation, with Ro-03-8799 giving the highest sensitizer enhancement ration (SER) (2.3). However, MISO, SR-2508 and Ro-03-8799 were less effective in this cell line than in V79 cells, presumably due to higher GSH content of the A549 cells. Increased hypoxic radiosensitization was seen with 0.1 mM Ro-03-8799 after GSH depletion by BSO as compared to 0.1 mM Ro-03-8799 alone (SER-1.8 vs 1.3). The combination of GSH depletion and 0.1 mM Ro-03-8799 was considerably more toxic than 0.1 mM or 1.0 mM Ro-03-8799 alone. This sensitivity was much greater than has been observed for SR-2508. These data show that Ro-03-8799 was the most efficient hypoxic cell radiosensitizer in a human tumor cell line considerably higher in GSH than the rodent cell lines often used in hypoxic radiosensitization studies. Thus, Ro-03-8799 may be a more effective hypoxic cell sensitizer in human tumors that are high in GSH

  4. Quantification of structural changes in the corpus callosumin children with profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivaros, Stavros M. [Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Academic Unit of Paediatric Radiology, Royal Manchester Children' s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Centre for Imaging Sciences, Institute of Population Health, Manchester (United Kingdom); Radon, Mark R. [The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neuroradiology, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mileva, Reneta; Gledson, Ann; Keane, John A. [University of Manchester, School of Computer Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); Connolly, Daniel J.A.; Batty, Ruth [Sheffield Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neuroradiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Cowell, Patricia E. [University of Sheffield, Department of Human Communication Sciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hoggard, Nigel; Griffiths, Paul D. [University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Wright, Neville B.; Tang, Vivian [Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Academic Unit of Paediatric Radiology, Royal Manchester Children' s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    Birth-related acute profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury has specific patterns of damage including the paracentral lobules. To test the hypothesis that there is anatomically coherent regional volume loss of the corpus callosum as a result of this hemispheric abnormality. Study subjects included 13 children with proven acute profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and 13 children with developmental delay but no brain abnormalities. A computerised system divided the corpus callosum into 100 segments, measuring each width. Principal component analysis grouped the widths into contiguous anatomical regions. We conducted analysis of variance of corpus callosum widths as well as support vector machine stratification into patient groups. There was statistically significant narrowing of the mid-posterior body and genu of the corpus callosum in children with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. Support vector machine analysis yielded over 95% accuracy in patient group stratification using the corpus callosum centile widths. Focal volume loss is seen in the corpus callosum of children with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury secondary to loss of commissural fibres arising in the paracentral lobules. Support vector machine stratification into the hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury group or the control group on the basis of corpus callosum width is highly accurate and points towards rapid clinical translation of this technique as a potential biomarker of hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. (orig.)

  5. Sickle erythrocytes target cytotoxics to hypoxic tumor microvessels and potentiate a tumoricidal response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Terman

    Full Text Available Resistance of hypoxic solid tumor niches to chemotherapy and radiotherapy remains a major scientific challenge that calls for conceptually new approaches. Here we exploit a hitherto unrecognized ability of sickled erythrocytes (SSRBCs but not normal RBCs (NLRBCs to selectively target hypoxic tumor vascular microenviroment and induce diffuse vaso-occlusion. Within minutes after injection SSRBCs, but not NLRBCs, home and adhere to hypoxic 4T1 tumor vasculature with hemoglobin saturation levels at or below 10% that are distributed over 70% of the tumor space. The bound SSRBCs thereupon form microaggregates that obstruct/occlude up to 88% of tumor microvessels. Importantly, SSRBCs, but not normal RBCs, combined with exogenous prooxidant zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP induce a potent tumoricidal response via a mutual potentiating mechanism. In a clonogenic tumor cell survival assay, SSRBC surrogate hemin, along with H(2O(2 and ZnPP demonstrate a similar mutual potentiation and tumoricidal effect. In contrast to existing treatments directed only to the hypoxic tumor cell, the present approach targets the hypoxic tumor vascular environment and induces injury to both tumor microvessels and tumor cells using intrinsic SSRBC-derived oxidants and locally generated ROS. Thus, the SSRBC appears to be a potent new tool for treatment of hypoxic solid tumors, which are notable for their resistance to existing cancer treatments.

  6. Quantification of structural changes in the corpus callosumin children with profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birth-related acute profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury has specific patterns of damage including the paracentral lobules. To test the hypothesis that there is anatomically coherent regional volume loss of the corpus callosum as a result of this hemispheric abnormality. Study subjects included 13 children with proven acute profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and 13 children with developmental delay but no brain abnormalities. A computerised system divided the corpus callosum into 100 segments, measuring each width. Principal component analysis grouped the widths into contiguous anatomical regions. We conducted analysis of variance of corpus callosum widths as well as support vector machine stratification into patient groups. There was statistically significant narrowing of the mid-posterior body and genu of the corpus callosum in children with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. Support vector machine analysis yielded over 95% accuracy in patient group stratification using the corpus callosum centile widths. Focal volume loss is seen in the corpus callosum of children with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury secondary to loss of commissural fibres arising in the paracentral lobules. Support vector machine stratification into the hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury group or the control group on the basis of corpus callosum width is highly accurate and points towards rapid clinical translation of this technique as a potential biomarker of hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. (orig.)

  7. Archaeal enrichment in the hypoxic zone in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Lauren E; Thrash, J Cameron; deRada, Sergio; Rabalais, Nancy N; Mason, Olivia U

    2015-10-01

    Areas of low oxygen have spread exponentially over the past 40 years, and are cited as a key stressor on coastal ecosystems. The world's second largest coastal hypoxic (≤ 2 mg of O2 l(-1)) zone occurs annually in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The net effect of hypoxia is the diversion of energy flow away from higher trophic levels to microorganisms. This energy shunt is consequential to the overall productivity of hypoxic water masses and the ecosystem as a whole. In this study, water column samples were collected at 39 sites in the nGOM, 21 of which were hypoxic. Analysis of the microbial community along a hypoxic to oxic dissolved oxygen gradient revealed that the relative abundance (iTag) of Thaumarchaeota species 16S rRNA genes (> 40% of the microbial community in some hypoxic samples), the absolute abundance (quantitative polymerase chain reaction; qPCR) of Thaumarchaeota 16S rRNA genes and archaeal ammonia-monooxygenase gene copy number (qPCR) were significantly higher in hypoxic samples. Spatial interpolation of the microbial and chemical data revealed a continuous, shelfwide band of low dissolved oxygen waters that were dominated by Thaumarchaeota (and Euryarchaeota), amoA genes and high concentrations of phosphate in the nGOM, thus implicating physicochemical forcing on microbial abundance. PMID:25818237

  8. HIF-1α siRNA Leads to Apoptosis of Pancreatic Cancer Cells under Hypoxic Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuangui Chen; Jianqiu Chen; Jinjin Sun

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the role of hypoxic inducible factor-1α(HIF-1α) in the proliferation and apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells under hypoxic conditions.METHODS A cassette encoding small interference RNA (siRNA)targeting HIF-1α mediated by recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) was constructed, giving rAAV-siHIF, rAAV-siHIF or rAAV- hrGFP was transfected into exponentially growing MiaPaCa2 cells under hypoxic conditions. Then, the expression of HIF-1αmRNA and protein, the proliferation and apoptosis of MiaPaCa2 cells were examined, using real-time PCR, Western Blot, MTT and TUNEL, respectively.RESULTS Under hypoxic conditions, rAAV-siHIF inhibited the expression of HIF-1α mRNA and protein in MiaPaCa2 cells. At the same time, rAAV-siHIF decreased MiaPaCa2 cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. However, rAAV-hrGFP had no effect on the expression of HIF-1α as well as the proliferation and apoptosis of MiaPaCa2 cells under hypoxic conditions.CONCLUSION Under hypoxic conditions, HIF-1α plays a key role in the proliferation of MiaPaCa2 cells, and inhibition of HIF-1α expression can lead to MiaPaCa2 cell apoptosis.

  9. Using the endocannabinoid system as a neuroprotective strategy in perinatal hypoxic- ischemic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lara-Celador, I.; Go(n)i-de-Cerio, F.; Antonia Alvarez; Enrique Hilario

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important causes of brain injury in the neonatal period is a perinatal hypoxic- ischemic event. This devastating condition can lead to long-term neurological deficits or even death. After hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, a variety of specific cellular mechanisms are set in motion, triggering cell damage and finally producing cell death. Effective therapeutic treatments against this phenomenon are still unavailable because of complex molecular mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. After a thorough understanding of the mechanism underlying neural plasticity following hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, various neuroprotective therapies have been developed for alleviating brain injury and improving long-term outcomes. Among them, the endocannabinoid system emerges as a natural system of neuroprotection. The endocannabinoid system modulates a wide range of physiological processes in mammals and has demonstrated neuroprotective effects in different paradigms of acute brain injury, acting as a natural neuroprotectant. The aim of this review is to study the use of different therapies to induce long-term therapeutic effects after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, and analyze the important role of the endocannabinoid system as a new neuroprotective strategy against perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

  10. Interaction of the hypoxic cell sensitizer Ro-07-0582 and hyperthermia on EMT6 tumour cells in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypoxic cell radiosensitizer Ro-07-0582 has been demonstrated to be cytotoxic to EMT6 mouse tumour cells in vitro when combined with hyperthermia at 42.50C. Oxic cells show little response to 1h exposure at a drug concentration of up to 8mM and a temperature of 42.50C, whereas cells made hypoxic are much more sensitive to the combined treatment. At 430C for 1h there is some cell killing as a result of the hyperthermia alone. The slight cytotoxicity of 14mM of the drug on oxic cells at this temperature is very considerably increased under conditions of hypoxia. Detailed data are presented of this temperature and drug dose dependence. A similar in vivo hyperthermic enhancement of the cytotoxicity of Ro-07-0582 has been demonstrated on the EMT6 tumour in anaesthetized air breathing Balb/C mice. The possible clinical significance of these observations is discussed. (author)

  11. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. PMID:26063174

  12. Hypoxic cell sensitizers and heavy charged-particle radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stationary-phase populations of Chinese hamster V-79 cells were irradiated with 250 kV X-rays and the Bragg peaks (spread to a width of 4 cm) of energetic He-, C-, Ne-, and A-ion beams produced at the 184-inch cyclotron and BEVALAC ar Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Survival curves were generated with each radiation for cells suspended in air-saturated and nitrogen-saturated medium with and without sensitizer present. The oxygen enhancement ratios (OERs) measured for X-rays with 1 mM metronidazole and 0.5 nM misonidazole were 2.0 and 1.6 respectively. The OERs without sensitizer for He-,C-, Ne-, and A-ion Bragg peaks were 2.4, 1.7, 1.6 and 1.4 respectively. For each type of radiation tested the presence of hypoxic-cell sensitizers resulted in an additional reduction in the measured OERs, indicating that these drugs should be of benefit in the radiotherapy planned with these and other high LET radiations. (author)

  13. The research of melatonin in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To elucidate the function of melatonin in the pathogenesis and the prognosis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and provide the pathophysiology basis for therapying HIE with melatonin. Methods: The level of plasma melatonin of twenty normal term infants and twenty modest HIE and twenty middle-severity HIE in their acute phase and recovery phase were assayed respectively with radioimmunoassay (RIA). Then compare the difference of the melatonin level among these neonates. Results: (1) For modest HIE, the melatonin level was higher than that in the normal in the acute phase and there was no difference to the normal in the recovery phase. (2) There was no difference between the melatonin level in middle-severity HIE in the acute phase and that in the normal, but in the recovery phase it was higher than that in the normal. (3) For modest HIE, the melatonin level in acute phase was higher than that in the recovery phase, but for middle-severity HIE, it was adverse. (4) In the acute phase, the level in modest HIE was higher than that in the middle-severity HIE, but on the contrary in the recovery phase. Conclusion: Melatonin have protection action on HIE. The prognosis of modest HIE neonates with rising melatonin level in the acute phase is better than that with lower melatonin level of middle-severity HIE. (authors)

  14. Ceftriaxone attenuates hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perinatal brain injury is the leading cause of subsequent neurological disability in both term and preterm baby. Glutamate excitotoxicity is one of the major factors involved in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. Glutamate transporter GLT1, expressed mainly in mature astrocytes, is the major glutamate transporter in the brain. HIE induced excessive glutamate release which is not reuptaked by immature astrocytes may induce neuronal damage. Compounds, such as ceftriaxone, that enhance the expression of GLT1 may exert neuroprotective effect in HIE. Methods We used a neonatal rat model of HIE by unilateral ligation of carotid artery and subsequent exposure to 8% oxygen for 2 hrs on postnatal day 7 (P7 rats. Neonatal rats were administered three dosages of an antibiotic, ceftriaxone, 48 hrs prior to experimental HIE. Neurobehavioral tests of treated rats were assessed. Brain sections from P14 rats were examined with Nissl and immunohistochemical stain, and TUNEL assay. GLT1 protein expression was evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Results Pre-treatment with 200 mg/kg ceftriaxone significantly reduced the brain injury scores and apoptotic cells in the hippocampus, restored myelination in the external capsule of P14 rats, and improved the hypoxia-ischemia induced learning and memory deficit of P23-24 rats. GLT1 expression was observed in the cortical neurons of ceftriaxone treated rats. Conclusion These results suggest that pre-treatment of infants at risk for HIE with ceftriaxone may reduce subsequent brain injury.

  15. Natural Compounds Regulate Glycolysis in Hypoxic Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Li Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the early twentieth century, Otto Heinrich Warburg described an elevated rate of glycolysis occurring in cancer cells, even in the presence of atmospheric oxygen (the Warburg effect. Recently it became a therapeutically interesting strategy and is considered as an emerging hallmark of cancer. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 is one of the key transcription factors that play major roles in tumor glycolysis and could directly trigger Warburg effect. Thus, how to inhibit HIF-1-depended Warburg effect to assist the cancer therapy is becoming a hot issue in cancer research. In fact, HIF-1 upregulates the glucose transporters (GLUT and induces the expression of glycolytic enzymes, such as hexokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase. So small molecules of natural origin used as GLUT, hexokinase, or pyruvate kinase isoform M2 inhibitors could represent a major challenge in the field of cancer treatment. These compounds aim to suppress tumor hypoxia induced glycolysis process to suppress the cell energy metabolism or enhance the susceptibility of tumor cells to radio- and chemotherapy. In this review, we highlight the role of natural compounds in regulating tumor glycolysis, with a main focus on the glycolysis under hypoxic tumor microenvironment.

  16. Neuroprotective Therapies after Perinatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Hilario

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic (HI brain injury is one of the main causes of disabilities in term-born infants. It is the result of a deprivation of oxygen and glucose in the neural tissue. As one of the most important causes of brain damage in the newborn period, the neonatal HI event is a devastating condition that can lead to long-term neurological deficits or even death. The pattern of this injury occurs in two phases, the first one is a primary energy failure related to the HI event and the second phase is an energy failure that takes place some hours later. Injuries that occur in response to these events are often manifested as severe cognitive and motor disturbances over time. Due to difficulties regarding the early diagnosis and treatment of HI injury, there is an increasing need to find effective therapies as new opportunities for the reduction of brain damage and its long term effects. Some of these therapies are focused on prevention of the production of reactive oxygen species, anti-inflammatory effects, anti-apoptotic interventions and in a later stage, the stimulation of neurotrophic properties in the neonatal brain which could be targeted to promote neuronal and oligodendrocyte regeneration.

  17. Testing of new hypoxic cell sensitizers in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We tested five agents as potential sensitizers of hypoxic cells in vivo in mammary tumors in C3H mice in comparison with misonidazole. The LD/sub 50/2/ for desmethylmisonidazole was 2.7 mg/g body wt, compared to 1.3 for misonidazole. It was as effective in reducing the TCD50 of MDAH-MCa-4 as were equitoxic doses of misonidazole. the LD/sub 50/2/ of SR-2508 was 3.3 mg/g and was as effective a sensitizer as misonidazole. Ro 07-0741 was more toxic, with an LD/sub 50/2/ of 0.6 mg/g, but was as effective as misonidazole at equitoxic doses. NP-1 was also more toxic than misonidazole (LA/sub 50/2/ = 04 mg/g) but was a less effective sensitizer. Rotenone, which causes sensitization by inhibiting cellular respiration, thus increasing the diffusion distance of oxygen, was extremely toxic (LD/sub 50/2/ - 0.003 mg/g), and systemic respiratory inhibition and the radioprotective effects of the dimethyl sulfoxide used to dissolve it rendered it totally ineffective as a sensitizer in vivo

  18. Chronic Bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Chronic bronchitis is one type ...

  19. Chronic gastritis

    OpenAIRE

    Sipponen, Pentti; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Prevalence of chronic gastritis has markedly declined in developed populations during the past decades. However, chronic gastritis is still one of the most common serious pandemic infections with such severe killing sequelae as peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. Globally, on average, even more than half of people may have a chronic gastritis at present. Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood is the main cause of chronic gastritis, which microbial origin is the key for the understand...

  20. Selective Intracellular Delivery of Recombinant Arginine Deiminase (ADI) Using pH-Sensitive Cell Penetrating Peptides To Overcome ADI Resistance in Hypoxic Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Tzyy-Harn; Chen, Yun-Ru; Chen, Szu-Ying; Shen, Wei-Chiang; Ann, David K; Zaro, Jennica L; Shen, Li-Jiuan

    2016-01-01

    Arginine depletion strategies, such as pegylated recombinant arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20), offer a promising anticancer treatment. Many tumor cells have suppressed expression of a key enzyme, argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1), which converts citrulline to arginine. These tumor cells become arginine auxotrophic, as they can no longer synthesize endogenous arginine intracellularly from citrulline, and are therefore sensitive to arginine depletion therapy. However, since ADI-PEG20 only depletes extracellular arginine due to low internalization, ASS1-expressing cells are not susceptible to treatment since they can synthesize arginine intracellularly. Recent studies have found that several factors influence ASS1 expression. In this study, we evaluated the effect of hypoxia, frequently encountered in many solid tumors, on ASS1 expression and its relationship to ADI-resistance in human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. It was found that MDA-MB-231 cells developed ADI resistance in hypoxic conditions with increased ASS1 expression. To restore ADI sensitivity as well as achieve tumor-selective delivery under hypoxia, we constructed a pH-sensitive cell penetrating peptide (CPP)-based delivery system to carry ADI inside cells to deplete both intra- and extracellular arginine. The delivery system was designed to activate the CPP-mediated internalization only at the mildly acidic pH (6.5-7) associated with the microenvironment of hypoxic tumors, thus achieving better selectivity toward tumor cells. The pH sensitivity of the CPP HBHAc was controlled by recombinant fusion to a histidine-glutamine (HE) oligopeptide, generating HBHAc-HE-ADI. The tumor distribution of HBHAc-HE-ADI was comparable to ADI-PEG20 in a mouse xenograft model of human breast cancer cells in vivo. In addition, HBHAc-HE-ADI showed increased in vitro cellular uptake in cells incubated in a mildly acidic pH (hypoxic conditions) compared to normal pH (normoxic conditions), which correlated with p

  1. Chronic prostatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, Bradley A.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Le, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and usually occurs without positive bacterial cultures from prostatic secretions (known as chronic abacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome, CP/CPPS). Bacterial infection can result from urinary tract instrumentation, but the cause and natural history of CP/CPPS are unknown.

  2. Adenosine receptors mediate the hypoxic ventilatory response but not the hypoxic metabolic response in the naked mole rat during acute hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamenter, Matthew E; Dzal, Yvonne A; Milsom, William K

    2015-02-01

    Naked mole rats are the most hypoxia-tolerant mammals identified; however, the mechanisms underlying this tolerance are poorly understood. Using whole-animal plethysmography and open-flow respirometry, we examined the hypoxic metabolic response (HMR), hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and hypoxic thermal response in awake, freely behaving naked mole rats exposed to 7% O₂ for 1 h. Metabolic rate and ventilation each reversibly decreased 70% in hypoxia (from 39.6 ± 2.9 to 12.1 ± 0.3 ml O₂ min(-1) kg(-1), and 1412 ± 244 to 417 ± 62 ml min(-1) kg(-1), respectively; p tolerant to hypoxia, and in some cases hypoxia was lethal following AMP injection. We conclude that in naked mole rats (i) hypoxia tolerance is partially dependent on profound hypoxic metabolic and ventilatory responses, which are equal in magnitude but occur independently of thermal changes in hypoxia, and (ii) adenosine receptors mediate the HVR but not the HMR. PMID:25520355

  3. Influence of hyperbaric oxygen on the differentiation of hypoxic/ischemic brain-derived neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengrong Peng; Sue Wang; Pingtian Xiao

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been previously shown that hyperbaric oxygen may promote proliferation of neural stem cells and reduce death of endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs).OBJECTIVE: To explore the effects of hyperbaric oxygen on the differentiation of hypoxic/ischemic brain-derived NSCs into neuron-like cells and compare with high-concentration oxygen and high pressure.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An in vitro contrast study, performed at Laboratory of Neurology,Central South University between January and May 2006.MATERIALS: A hyperbaric oxygen chamber (YLC 0.5/1A) was provided by Wuhan Shipping Design Research Institute; mouse anti-rat microtubute-associated protein 2 monoclonal antibody by Jingmei Company, Beijing; mouse anti-rat glial fibrillary acidic protein monoclonal antibody by Neo Markers,USA; mouse anti-rat galactocerebroside monoclonal antibody by Santa Cruz Biotechnology Inc.,USA; and goat anti-mouse fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled secondary antibody by Wuhan Boster Bioengineering Co., Ltd., China.METHODS: Brain-derived NSCs isolated from brain tissues of neonatal Sprague Dawiey rats werecloned and passaged, and assigned into five groups: normal control, model, high-concentration oxygen, high pressure, and hyperbaric oxygen groups. Cells in the four groups, excluding the normal control group, were incubated in serum-containing DMEM/F12 culture medium. Hypoxic/ischemic models of NSCs were established in an incubator comprising 93% N2, 5% CO2, and 2% O2.Thereafter, cells were continuously cultured as follows: compressed air (0.2 MPa, 1 hour, once a day)in the high pressure group, compressed air+a minimum of 80% O2 in the hyperbaric oxygen group,and a minimum of 80% O2 in the high-concentration oxygen group. Cells in the normal control and model groups were cultured as normal.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: At day 7 after culture, glial fibrillary acidic protein,microtubule-associated protein 2, and galactocerebroside immunofluorescence staining were examined to

  4. Differential regulation of pro- and antiapoptotic proteins in fish adipocytes during hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekambaram, Padmini; Parasuraman, Parimala; Jayachandran, Tharani

    2016-06-01

    Worldwide, the frequencies and magnitudes of hypoxic events in estuarine waters have increased considerably over the past two decades. Fish populations are suitable indicators for the assessment of quality of aquatic ecosystems and often comprise a variety of adaptation systems by triggering oxidants, antioxidants and hypoxia-responsive signaling proteins. Signaling pathway may lead to cell survival or cell death which is fine-tuned by both positive and negative factors, which includes hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α), heat-shock protein-70 (HSP70), phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (p-JNK1/2) and apoptosis signal-regulating kinase-1 (ASK1). In the present study, we attempt to determine stress-mediated signaling changes and molecular mechanism behind the cell survival by comparing adipocytes of fish from field hypoxic condition and laboratory-induced hypoxic condition (in vitro hypoxia). Comparison of field and laboratory studies in fish adipocytes showed differential expression of HIF1α, HSP70, p-JNK1/2 and ASK1 with altered oxidants and antioxidants. Further, the results also suggest that in vitro hypoxic conditions mimic field hypoxic conditions. Trends of hypoxia response were same in in vitro hypoxia of control adipocytes as in Ennore estuary, and hypoxia response was more pronounced in the test adipocytes under in vitro hypoxic condition. Results of the present work suggest that hypoxia is the major crusade of water pollutants affecting fish by differential regulation of pro- and antiapoptotic proteins probably through HSP70. This may play a vital role by providing cytoprotection in pollutant-induced stressed fish adipocytes substantiated by the in vitro hypoxic studies. PMID:26744268

  5. Initial studies of hypoxic radioprotection by deoxygenated dextran-hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial studies were performed to examine the potential of perfused dextran-hemoglobin to protect pig skin or mouse bone marrow cells against radiation damage. Some protection was indicated in both systems. In the pig skin a protection factor of 1.5 was observed for moist desquamation, and 2.0 for necrosis. These results suggest the possibility of using blood substitutes to induce tissue hypoxia for therapeutic purposes

  6. Heme oxygenase-1-dependent central cardiorespiratory adaptations to chronic hypoxia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderram, Jagadeeshan; Semmlow, John; Thakker-Varia, Smita; Bhaumik, Mantu; Hoang-Le, Oanh; Neubauer, Judith A

    2009-08-01

    Adaptations to chronic hypoxia (CH) could reflect cellular changes within the cardiorespiratory regions of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the C1 region, and the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC). Previous studies have shown that the hypoxic chemosensitivity of these regions are heme oxygenase (HO) dependent and that CH induces HO-1. To determine the time course of HO-1 induction within these regions and explore its relevance to the respiratory and sympathetic responses during CH, the expression of HO-1 mRNA and protein in the RVLM and measures of respiration, sigh frequency, and sympathetic activity (spectral analysis of heart rate) were examined during 10 days of CH. Respiratory and sympathetic responses to acute hypoxia were obtained in chronically instrumented awake wild-type (WT) and HO-1 null mice. After 4 days of CH, there was a significant induction of HO-1 within the C1 region and pre-BötC. WT mice acclimated to CH by increasing peak diaphragm EMG after 10 days of CH but had no change in the respiratory response to acute hypoxia. There were no significant differences between WT and HO-1 null mice. In WT mice, hypoxic sigh frequency and hypoxic sensitivity of sympathetic activity initially declined before returning toward baseline after 5 days of CH, correlating with the induction of HO-1. In contrast, HO-1 null mice had a persistent decline in hypoxic sigh frequency and hypoxic sensitivity of sympathetic activity. We conclude that induction of HO-1 in these RVLM cardiorespiratory regions may be important for the hypoxic sensitivity of sighs and sympathetic activity during CH. PMID:19458275

  7. Fit for high altitude: are hypoxic challenge tests useful?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthys Heinrich

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Altitude travel results in acute variations of barometric pressure, which induce different degrees of hypoxia, changing the gas contents in body tissues and cavities. Non ventilated air containing cavities may induce barotraumas of the lung (pneumothorax, sinuses and middle ear, with pain, vertigo and hearing loss. Commercial air planes keep their cabin pressure at an equivalent altitude of about 2,500 m. This leads to an increased respiratory drive which may also result in symptoms of emotional hyperventilation. In patients with preexisting respiratory pathology due to lung, cardiovascular, pleural, thoracic neuromuscular or obesity-related diseases (i.e. obstructive sleep apnea an additional hypoxic stress may induce respiratory pump and/or heart failure. Clinical pre-altitude assessment must be disease-specific and it includes spirometry, pulsoximetry, ECG, pulmonary and systemic hypertension assessment. In patients with abnormal values we need, in addition, measurements of hemoglobin, pH, base excess, PaO2, and PaCO2 to evaluate whether O2- and CO2-transport is sufficient. Instead of the hypoxia altitude simulation test (HAST, which is not without danger for patients with respiratory insufficiency, we prefer primarily a hyperoxic challenge. The supplementation of normobaric O2 gives us information on the acute reversibility of the arterial hypoxemia and the reduction of ventilation and pulmonary hypertension, as well as about the efficiency of the additional O2-flow needed during altitude exposure. For difficult judgements the performance of the test in a hypobaric chamber with and without supplemental O2-breathing remains the gold standard. The increasing numbers of drugs to treat acute pulmonary hypertension due to altitude exposure (acetazolamide, dexamethasone, nifedipine, sildenafil or to other etiologies (anticoagulants, prostanoids, phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists including mechanical aids to

  8. Chronic THC intake modifies fundamental cerebellar functions

    OpenAIRE

    Stella, Nephi

    2013-01-01

    Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal bioactive component in the Cannabis plant, is truly a captivating drug. Acute and chronic THC intake produces a spectrum of biological effects ranging from transient psychotropic effects to prolonged medicinal benefits, many of which have been fostered for centuries by our society. In the July 2013 issue of the JCI, Cutando et al. combined mouse genetics with classic mouse behavioral analysis to deepen our understanding of the...

  9. Detection of hypoxic fractions in murine tumors by comet assay: Comparison with other techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alkaline comet assay was used to detect the hypoxic fractions of murine tumors. A total of four tumor types were tested using needle aspiration biopsies taken immediately after a radiation dose of 15 Gy. Initial studies confirmed that the normalized tail moment, a parameter reflecting single-strand DNA breaks induced by the radiation, was linearly related to radiation dose. Further, it was shown that for a mixed population (1:1) of cells irradiated under air-breathing or hypoxic conditions, the histogram of normal tail moment values obtained from analyzing 400 cells in the population had a double peak which, when fitted with two Gaussian distributions, gave a good estimate of the proportion of the two subpopulations. For the four tumor types, the means of the calculated hypoxic fractions from four or five individual tumors were 0.15 ± 0.04 for B16F1, 0.08 ± 0.04 for KHT-LP1, 0.17 ± 0.04 for RIF-1 and 0.04 ± 0.01 for SCCVII. Analysis of variance showed that the hypoxic fraction in KHT-LP1 tumors is significantly lower than those of the other three tumors (P = 0.026) but that there is no significant difference in hypoxic fraction between B16F1, RIF-1 and SCCVII tumors (P = 0.574). Results from multiple samples taken from each of five RIF-1 tumors showed that the intertumor heterogeneity of hypoxic fractions was greater than that within the same tumor. The mean hypoxic fraction obtained using the comet assay for the four tumor types was compared with the hypoxic fraction determined by the clonogenic assay, or median pO2 values, or [3H]misonidazole binding in the same tumor types. The values of hypoxic fraction obtained with the comet assay were two to four times lower than those measured by the paired survival method. Preliminary results obtained with a dose of 5 Gy were consistent with those obtained using 15 Gy. These results suggest the further development of the comet assay for clinical studies. 21 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Selective enhancement of hypoxic cell killing by tempol-regulated suicide gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagiya, Go; Ogawa, Ryohei; Choudhuri, Rajani; Cook, John A; Hatashita, Masanori; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Koda, Kana; Yamashita, Kei; Kubo, Makoto; Kawakami, Fumitaka; Mitchell, James B

    2015-08-01

    The presence of hypoxic regions within solid tumors is caused by an imbalance between cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Such regions may facilitate the onset of recurrence after radiation therapy and chemotherapy, as hypoxic cells show resistance to these treatments. We found that tempol, a nitroxide, strongly induces the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, particularly under conditions of hypoxia. We, therefore, evaluated whether tempol enhances the gene expression via HIF-1α, potentially leading to various applications for cancer gene therapy targeting hypoxic cells. Consequently, following treatment with tempol under hypoxia, the luciferase (Luc) activity in the cells transfected with the plasmid containing the luc gene with the oxygen-dependent degradation domain and a promoter composed of hypoxia-responsive elements increased up to approximately 10-fold compared to that observed in cells treated identically with the exception of tempol. The plasmid constructed by replacing the luc gene with the fcy::fur fusion gene as a suicide gene, strongly induced the accumulation of the Fcy::Fur fusion protein, only when incubated in the presence of the hypoxic mimic CoCl2 and tempol. The transfected cells were successfully killed with the addition of 5-fluorocytosine to the cell culture according to the fcy::fur fusion gene expression. As similar but lesser enhancement of the Luc activity was also observed in solid tumor tissues in nude mice, this strategy may be applied for hypoxic cancer eradication. PMID:26034980

  11. Acute effect of tetrandrine pulmonary targeting microspheres on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程德云; 陈文彬; 莫晓能

    2002-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of tetrandrine (Tet) pulmonary targeting microspheres on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and evaluate its selective action on pulmonary circulation. Methods Twenty rats were exposed to hypoxic conditions for 3 weeks. Ten rats were used as normoxic controls. We administered Tet pulmonary targeting microspheres to 10 hypoxic rats and Tet aqueous solution to 10 hypoxic rats and the 10 control rats. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) was measured by a right cardiac catheterization, and mean systemic blood pressure (mSBP) was measured by left femoral catheterization. Results Rats exposed to hypoxia developed pulmonary hypertension. The decrease in mPAP in rats treated with Tet pulmonary targeting microspheres was significantly greater than that in rats receiving Tet aqueous solution (P<0.05), and the effects were longer with Tet pulmonary targeting microspheres. Moreover, Tet pulmonary targeting microspheres, unlike Tet aqueous solution, did not decrease mSBP. Conclusion Tet pulmonary targeting microspheres were more effective than Tet aqueous solution in treating hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and acted selectively on the pulmonary circulation.

  12. Options for managing hypoxic blackwater events in river systems: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Janice L; Baldwin, Darren S; Whitworth, Kerry L

    2013-01-15

    Blackwater events are characterised by a high concentration of dissolved organic carbon in the water column. They occur naturally in lowland rivers with forested floodplains and bring a variety of benefits to both aquatic and floodplain biota. However, particularly when accompanied by high temperatures, respiration of the organic carbon may cause blackwater to become hypoxic. This may lead to a range of lethal and sub-lethal effects on the aquatic biota. We review the current scientific knowledge concerning the management of blackwater and hypoxia, and examine how this knowledge may be applied to the management of hypoxic blackwater events in lowland river systems. A range of management options, which aim to either prevent the development of hypoxic blackwater or to reintroduce oxygen into deoxygenated waters, are reported. Mitigation options that may be applicable to lowland river systems include manipulating the season and magnitude of floods in regulated rivers, increasing roughness in flow paths, establishing oxygenated refugia for aquatic biota and introducing hydraulic structures that promote turbulence and re-aeration. With climatic changes trending towards a scenario where extreme events leading to the development of hypoxic blackwater are more probable, it is now vital to validate and optimise management options on local and regional scales and work towards closing knowledge gaps. With judicious management of regulated rivers, it is possible to minimise the impacts of hypoxic flows while preserving the benefits brought to floodplain and river ecosystems by seasonal flooding and carbon exchange. PMID:23137913

  13. Posttranscriptional control of the hypoxic response by RNA-binding proteins and microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam eGorospe

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian gene expression patterns change profoundly in response to low oxygen levels. These changes in gene expression programs are strongly influenced by post-transcriptional mechanisms mediated by mRNA-binding factors: RNA-binding proteins (RBPs and microRNAs (miRNAs. Here, we review the RBPs and miRNAs that modulate mRNA turnover and translation in response to hypoxic challenge. RBPs such as HuR (human antigen R, PTB (polypyrimidine tract-binding protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs, tristetraprolin, nucleolin, iron-response element binding proteins (IRPs, and cytoplasmic polyadenylation-element-binding proteins (CPEBs, selectively bind to numerous hypoxia-regulated transcripts and play a major role in establishing hypoxic gene expression patterns. MiRNAs including miR-210, miR-373, and miR-21 associate with hypoxia-regulated transcripts and further modulate the levels of the encoded proteins to implement the hypoxic gene expression profile. We discuss the potent regulation of hypoxic gene expression by RBPs and miRNAs and their integrated actions in the cellular hypoxic response.

  14. 玻璃苣醇提物对慢性抑郁模型小鼠脑组织中神经递质的影响%Effects of the ethanol extractive of Borago officinalis on neurotransmitter in the brain tissue of mouse model of chronic depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刚宏林; 何志一; 刘相辉; 马跃

    2012-01-01

    目的:通过建立慢性应激小鼠抑郁模型,观察玻璃苣对慢性应激抑郁模型小鼠脑内5-羟色胺、去甲肾上腺素(NE)、多巴胺3种单胺类神经递质的影响,初步探讨玻璃苣对抑郁模型小鼠的影响及其作用机制.方法:利用孤养和长期不可预见性温和应激(CUMS)建立慢性应激小鼠抑郁模型,采用酶联免疫吸附测定法(ELISA)测定慢性应激抑郁模型小鼠脑内单胺类神经递质的变化.结果:模型组小鼠脑内5-羟色胺、NE、多巴胺含量明显低于正常组;与模型组相比,玻璃苣醇提物高、中剂量组小鼠脑内5-羟色胺、NE、多巴胺的含量均有升高,且差异有统计学意义.玻璃苣醇提物低剂量组小鼠脑内5-羟色胺、NE、多巴胺的含量也有升高趋势,但差异无统计学意义.结论:玻璃苣能够提高慢性应激抑郁模型小鼠脑内单胺类神经递质(5-羟色胺、NE、多巴胺)的含量,玻璃苣对小鼠脑内神经递质的作用可能是其对抑郁模型小鼠产生影响的可能机制.%Objective; The effects of the extractive of Borago officinalis on norepinephrine (NE) ,dopa-mine and 5-hydroxytryptamine(5-HT)in mouse model of depression with chronic stress were investigated after establishing of chronic stress mouse models of depression ; and to discuss its prevention and cure effects and their possible mechanisms. Methods; Established chronic stress mouse models of depression by using singly housed and long-trem unpredictable mild stress ( CUMS) ; and to determine the change of brain mono-amine neurotransmitters of chronic stress depression model mice by using enzyme -linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results; The monoamine neurotransmitters (5-HT,NE, dopamine) contents in model mice were significantly less than normal group. The high, medium group of ethanol extractive from Borago offici-nalis all could increase the contents of 5-HT,NE,dopamine of mice with chronic stress depression ;and the low group of

  15. [A comparison of a neuroprotective effects of hypoxic postconditioning and cerebrolysin in the experimental model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybnikova, E A; Vorob'ev, M G; Pivina, S G; Samoĭlov, M O

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic postconditioning using episodes of mild hypobaric hypoxia is a new neuroprotective technique. We compared the neuroprotective efficacy of hypoxic postconditioning and cerebrolysin in a model of posthypoxic pathology in rats. Animals that survived the severe hypoxia (180 Torr, 3 h) were exposed to hypoxic postconditioning or received cerebrolysin. Postconditioning prevented the injury and loss of hippocampal (fields CA1, CA4) and neocortical neurons whereas cerebrolysin was protective only for CA4 and the neocortex. Besides that, postconditioning, unlike cerebrolysin, led to the complete functional rehabilitation from the severe hypoxia by normalizing the level of anxiety and the pituitary-adrenal axis activity. The findings demonstrate that the elaborated postconditioning technique might provide useful tool for therapy of posthypoxic pathology and stroke. PMID:23528584

  16. Blood immunological parameters upon hypoxic-ischemic injuries of central nervous system in newborns and infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulomjan Khalimbetov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies interrelation between immune system condition and circulating concentrations of neuropeptides and neuron-specific enolase (NSE upon perinatal pathology in newborns and infants. Reactivity of cytokine and interleukin links of immune systems was found varying in newborns and infants with CNS hypoxic-ischemic pathology, accompanied by psychomotor retardation, a psycho-speech disorder, emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD and paroxysmal syndrome. At admission irrespectively of a syndrome type in the patients with CNS hypoxic-ischemic pathology, as compared with the patients in the control group, circulating TNF-α and IL-1 were found increased by 3.4-4.1 and 6.4-7.9 times, respectively. Release of S100 protein and NSE seems to be the underlying mechanism for enhancement of synthesis and/or release of TNF-α and IL-1 into circulation of patients with CNS hypoxic-ischemic pathology.

  17. Effects of minocycline on learning and memory of mice following ischemic-hypoxic cerebral injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongling Fan; Yuanyin Zheng; Lijuan Xu; Zhichao Zhong; Shining Cai; Shuling Zhang; Quanzhong Chang

    2012-01-01

    An ischemic-hypoxic animal model was established using right common carotid artery occlusions and inhalation of low concentrations of oxygen in mice. At 10 days after the ischemic-hypoxic injuries, saline-treated mice exhibited significantly prolonged escape latencies in water-maze tests and significantly shorter memory latencies and more mistakes in step-down tests. In contrast, mice treated with 5 mg/kg minocycline exhibited significant reversals of each of these effects compared with the saline-treated control mice. Moreover, we found that minocycline can relieve brain water content and morphological changes in mice following ischemic-hypoxic cerebral injuries. Accordingly, our findings indicate that minocycline provides some protections against the deleterious effects of these injuries in mice.

  18. Effects of posture on blood flow diversion by hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, S. M.; Domino, K. B.; Hlastala, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    We used differential excretion of sulphur hexafluoride from the left and right lung to measure blood flow diversion by hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) in the prone and supine positions in dogs (n = 9). Gas exchange was assessed using the multiple inert gas elimination technique. Blood flow diversion from the hypoxic (3% oxygen) left lung was mean 70.7 (SD 11.2)% in the supine compared with 57.0 (12.1)% in the prone position (P perfusion to low VA/Q regions (P ventilation to high VA/Q regions (P < 0.05). We conclude that flow diversion by hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction is greater in the supine position. This effect could contribute to the variable response in gas exchange with positioning in patients with ARDS.

  19. Immunocytochemical labelling of aerobic and hypoxic mammalian cells using a platinated derivative of EF5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, J; Adomat, H; Farrell, N; King, P; Koch, C; Lord, E; Palcic, B; Poulin, N; Sangulin, J; Skov, K

    1996-07-01

    The monoclonal antibody ELK3-51 was previously developed to detect adducts of the 2-nitroimidazole EF5. Direct immunofluorescence was used to detect adducts of EF5 or of a platinated derivative cis-[PtCl2(NH3)EF5] in SCCVII cells treated under aerobic or hypoxic conditions. Fluorescence measurements of these cells using both image and flow cytometric methods were compared, giving similar profiles. Platination significantly decreased immunofluorescence levels (approximately 4-fold less than EF5) after 3 h in hypoxia, but also increased levels after exposure in air (approximately 1.5 x) such that the hypoxic ratio decreased from approximately 50 to approximately 13. Platinated EF5 also showed significantly greater cytotoxicity than its parent in both aerobic and hypoxic cells. These results are consistent with targeting of EF5 to DNA, which was confirmed qualitatively by confocal microscopy. PMID:8763880

  20. The radiation response of cells recovering after chronic hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were performed to study the influence of hypoxic pretreatment on the radiation response of A431 human squamous carcinoma cells. Reaeration for 10 min after chronic hypoxia (greater than 2 h) was found to enhance the radiosensitivity of A431 cells, and the maximal effect was seen for those cells reaerated after 12 h of hypoxia. The radiosensitivity enhancement for reaerated cells after 12 h of hypoxia was maximized by 5 min after the return to aerobic conditions and reached the control level by 12 h of reaeration. This enhanced radiosensitive state was characterized by a reduced shoulder region and increased slope of the radiation dose-response curve for cells in both the exponential and plateau phases of growth. There was a slight increase in the number of G1 and decrease in the number of S and G2 + M cells for both exponential- and plateau-phase cultures following 12 h hypoxic treatment. Although growth inhibition induced by 12 h of hypoxia was seen for cells in the exponential phase, there was no cell number change in the plateau-phase culture after hypoxia. Plating efficiency (PE) of cells in both growth phases was reduced by 30% after hypoxia. Furthermore, in the exponential-phase culture, the extent of reduction in PE after hypoxia was similar among cells in different phases of the cell cycle. Although S-phase cells in exponentially growing cultures were relatively more resistant to radiation than G1 and G2 + M cells, the cell age-response pattern was the same whether the cells had been aerobic or hypoxic before reaeration and irradiation. Furthermore, the enhancement ratio associated with reaeration after 12 h of hypoxia for these three subpopulations of cells was 1.3. Our results indicate that the increase in radiosensitivity due to reaeration after chronic hypoxia is unlikely to be related to the changes of cell cycle stage and growth phase during hypoxic treatment

  1. Chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwedt, Todd J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic migraine is a disabling neurologic condition that affects 2% of the general population. Patients with chronic migraine have headaches on at least 15 days a month, with at least eight days a month on which their headaches and associated symptoms meet diagnostic criteria for migraine. Chronic migraine places an enormous burden on patients owing to frequent headaches; hypersensitivity to visual, auditory, and olfactory stimuli; nausea; and vomiting. It also affects society through direct and indirect medical costs. Chronic migraine typically develops after a slow increase in headache frequency over months to years. Several factors are associated with an increased risk of transforming to chronic migraine. The diagnosis requires a carefully performed patient interview and neurologic examination, sometimes combined with additional diagnostic tests, to differentiate chronic migraine from secondary headache disorders and other primary chronic headaches of long duration. Treatment takes a multifaceted approach that may include risk factor modification, avoidance of migraine triggers, drug and non-drug based prophylaxis, and abortive migraine treatment, the frequency of which is limited to avoid drug overuse. This article provides an overview of current knowledge regarding chronic migraine, including epidemiology, risk factors for its development, pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, and guidelines. The future of chronic migraine treatment and research is also discussed. PMID:24662044

  2. Options for Managing Hypoxic Blackwater in River Systems: Case Studies and Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, Kerry L.; Kerr, Janice L.; Mosley, Luke M.; Conallin, John; Hardwick, Lorraine; Baldwin, Darren S.

    2013-10-01

    Hypoxic blackwater events occur when large amounts of organic material are leached into a water body (e.g., during floodplain inundation) and rapid metabolism of this carbon depletes oxygen from the water column, often with catastrophic effects on the aquatic environment. River regulation may have increased the frequency and severity of hypoxic blackwater events in lowland river systems, necessitating management intervention to mitigate the impacts of these events on aquatic biota. We examine the effectiveness of a range of mitigation interventions that have been used during large-scale hypoxic blackwater events in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia and that may be applicable in other environments at risk from hypoxic blackwater. Strategies for hypoxia mitigation include: delivery of dilution flows; enhancement of physical re-aeration rates by increasing surface turbulence; and diversion of blackwater into shallow off-channel storages. We show that the impact of dilution water delivery is determined by relative volumes and water quality and can be predicted using simple models. At the dilution water inflow point, localized oxygenated plumes may also act as refuges. Physical re-aeration strategies generally result in only a small increase in dissolved oxygen but may be beneficial for local refuge protection. Dilution and natural re-aeration processes in large, shallow lake systems can be sufficient to compensate for hypoxic inflows and water processed in off-channel lakes may be able to be returned to the river channel as dilution flows. We provide a set of predictive models (as electronic supplementary material) for estimation of the re-aeration potential of intervention activities and a framework to guide the adaptive management of future hypoxic blackwater events.

  3. pH-responsive hybrid quantum dots for targeting hypoxic tumor siRNA delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, HongYan; Zhang, ShengYu; Ling, Yong; Meng, GuoLiang; Yang, Yu; Zhang, Wei

    2015-12-28

    Hypoxia is a characteristic of cancer and plays a key role in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and resistance to cancer therapies. SiRNA treatment is effective against hypoxic tumors by gene silencing. However, siRNA delivery to the hypoxic regions of solid tumors still presents a challenge due to the distance from blood vessels and the increased presence of efflux transporters. Therefore, tumor therapies would be improved through the immediate development of an effective siRNA delivery system to hypoxic regions. To this end, we synthesized a system to deliver HIF-1α siRNA into hypoxic tumor cells. The system consists of a functional shell composed of 2-deoxyglucose (DG)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) connected with the compound of lipoic acid, lysine and 9-poly-d-arginine (LA-Lys-9R) by a hydrazone bond and a core of CdTe quantum dots (QDs). The molecular structure of DG-PEG-LA-Lys-9R was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The multifunctional CdTe QDs measured approximately 200 nm and showed excellent biocompatibility, perfect siRNA binding capability and enhanced hypoxic tumor targeting. Importantly, the system described here is pH-responsive with a hydrazone bond; therefore, it avoids GLUT1 receptor-mediated endocytic recycling, resulting in irreversible delivery of the siRNA. We used Western blots to confirm the superior gene silencing efficiency induced by the DG-PEG-LA-Lys-9R with hydrazone modified CdTe QDs. Here, we demonstrate high efficacy of the siRNA tumor delivery system using in vitro and in vivo experiments. In addition, these studies demonstrate that pH-responsive hybrid quantum dots show improved antitumor efficacy with decreased organ toxicity, indicating a promising siRNA delivery system for hypoxic cancer therapy. PMID:26590349

  4. Study of capillary network directionality and irrigation of hypoxic tissue in an angiogenesis lattice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moglia, Belén; Guisoni, Nara; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2013-12-01

    To shed light on the understanding of the angiogenesis process, we study a simplified lattice model for the capillary network formation between an existing blood vessel and an initially hypoxic tissue. We consider that the cells of the tissue surface can release growth factors that will diffuse, leading to the formation of new capillaries that ultimately arrive at the tissue. Additionally, we consider the local production of growth factors by the growing capillary network. We also propose the existence of an inhibition mechanism at the hypoxic surface, i.e., a fixed number of neighboring sites of an already irrigated site of the hypoxic tissue stop releasing growth factors due to the arrival of nutrients. Particularly, the goal of this work is to study the effect of the release of local growth factors and the inhibition mechanism on properties such as the directionality of the growing network and the irrigation of the hypoxic tissue. Therefore we propose the quantification of these two relevant features for angiogenesis modeling. We establish a relationship between the model behavior without the release of local growth factors in the presence of the inhibition mechanism and a normal angiogenesis process. In this situation, the model gives a directional capillary network and a good irrigation of the hypoxic tissue. On the other hand, for a large number of released local growth factors in the absence of the inhibition mechanism, the model could be appropriate for the description of tumor angiogenesis. In this case, the model provides a rather small directionality for the growing structure, with a worse degree of irrigation of the hypoxic tissue, as well as a more tortuous capillary network with many closed branches and loops.

  5. The Immune-Metabolic Basis of Effector Memory CD4+ T Cell Function under Hypoxic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimeloe, Sarah; Mehling, Matthias; Frick, Corina; Loeliger, Jordan; Bantug, Glenn R; Sauder, Ursula; Fischer, Marco; Belle, Réka; Develioglu, Leyla; Tay, Savaş; Langenkamp, Anja; Hess, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Effector memory (EM) CD4(+) T cells recirculate between normoxic blood and hypoxic tissues to screen for cognate Ag. How mitochondria of these cells, shuttling between normoxia and hypoxia, maintain bioenergetic efficiency and stably uphold antiapoptotic features is unknown. In this study, we found that human EM CD4(+) T cells had greater spare respiratory capacity (SRC) than did naive counterparts, which was immediately accessed under hypoxia. Consequently, hypoxic EM cells maintained ATP levels, survived and migrated better than did hypoxic naive cells, and hypoxia did not impair their capacity to produce IFN-γ. EM CD4(+) T cells also had more abundant cytosolic GAPDH and increased glycolytic reserve. In contrast to SRC, glycolytic reserve was not tapped under hypoxic conditions, and, under hypoxia, glucose metabolism contributed similarly to ATP production in naive and EM cells. However, both under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, glucose was critical for EM CD4(+) T cell survival. Mechanistically, in the absence of glycolysis, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) of EM cells declined and intrinsic apoptosis was triggered. Restoring pyruvate levels, the end product of glycolysis, preserved ΔΨm and prevented apoptosis. Furthermore, reconstitution of reactive oxygen species (ROS), whose production depends on ΔΨm, also rescued viability, whereas scavenging mitochondrial ROS exacerbated apoptosis. Rapid access of SRC in hypoxia, linked with built-in, oxygen-resistant glycolytic reserve that functionally insulates ΔΨm and mitochondrial ROS production from oxygen tension changes, provides an immune-metabolic basis supporting survival, migration, and function of EM CD4(+) T cells in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. PMID:26621861

  6. Effects of Salvia miltiorrhiza extracts on rat hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, heme oxygenase-1 and nitric oxide synthase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈颖; 阮英茆; 李莉; 褚雁; 徐新林; 王清峙; 周晓梅

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM) extracts on the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in small pulmonary arteries (SPAs) of rats with chronic hypoxia. Methods After two weeks of hypoxia, rats were treated with diltiazem, then small, medium, and large doses of SM extracts. The lungs were tested for the expression and distribution of HO-1, endothelial NOS (eNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) by using immunohistochemistry and Western blot method. Results Median and large doses of SM extracts significantly reduced hypoxia-induced media thickening in the SPA (similar with diltiazem), recovered repaired ultrastructure injury, decreased HO-1 and iNOS levels, and increased eNOS expression in the SPA. Conclusions Median and large doses of SM extracts play significant roles in inhibiting structural remodeling in rats with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. These effects might attribute to the suppression of HO-1 and iNOS, and the promotion of eNOS expression under the conditions of hypoxia.

  7. Prolonged hypoxic culture and trypsinization increase the pro-angiogenic potential of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe Grøndahl; Frøbert, Ole; Pilgaard, Linda;

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), including adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC), is a promising option in the treatment of vascular disease. Short-term hypoxic culture of MSC augments secretion of anti-apoptotic and angiogenic cytokines. We hypothesized that prolonged hypoxic...

  8. Influence of Prostaglandin Synthesis Inhibitors on Pulmonary Vasodilatory Effects of Hydralazine in Dogs with Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin, Lewis J.; Lazar, Jeffrey D.

    1981-01-01

    To determine whether hydralazine, a systemic vasodilator, exerted a similar effect on the pulmonary circulation, we studied the circulatory changes in dogs during three interventions: (a) the control state during room air ventilation; (b) during continuous hypoxic ventilation with 10% oxygen, and maintaining continuous hypoxic ventilation; and (c) after 1 mg/kg hydralazine intravenously.

  9. Absence of GAPDH regulation in tumor-cells of different origin under hypoxic conditions in – vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anacker Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression studies related to cancer diagnosis and treatment are important. In order to conduct such experiment accurately, absolutely reliable housekeeping genes are essential to normalize cancer related gene expression. The most important characteristics of such genes are their presence in all cells and their expression levels remain relatively constant under different experimental conditions. However, no single gene of this group of genes manifests always stable expression levels under all experimental conditions. Incorrect choice of housekeeping genes leads to interpretation errors of experimental results including evaluation and quantification of pathological gene expression. Here, we examined (a the degree of GAPDH expression regulation in Hep-1-6 mouse hepatoma and Hep-3-B and HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines as well as in human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A-549 in addition to both HT-29, and HCT-116 colon cancer cell lines, under hypoxic conditions in vitro in comparison to other housekeeping genes like β-actin, serving as experimental loading controls, (b the potential use of GAPDH as a target for tumor therapeutic approaches was comparatively examined in vitro on both protein and mRNA level, by western blot and semi quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. Findings No hypoxia-induced regulatory effect on GAPDH expression was observed in the cell lines studied in vitro that were; Hep-1-6 mouse hepatoma and Hep-3-B and HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines, Human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A-549, both colon cancer cell lines HT-29, and HCT-116. Conclusion As it is the case for human hepatocellular carcinoma, mouse hepatoma, human colon cancer, and human lung adenocarcinoma, GAPDH represents an optimal choice of a housekeeping gene and/(or loading control to determine the expression of hypoxia induced genes in tumors of different origin. The results confirm our

  10. Sex-dependent regulation of hypoxic ventilation in mice and humans is mediated by erythropoietin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliz, Jorge; Thomsen, Jonas Juhl; Soulage, Christophe;

    2009-01-01

    Acclimatization to hypoxic exposure relies on an elevated ventilation and erythropoietic activity. We recently proposed that erythropoietin (Epo) links both responses: apart from red blood cell production, cerebral and plasma Epo interact with the central and peripheral respiratory centers. Knowing...... that women cope better than men with reduced oxygen supply (as observed at high altitude), we analyzed the hypoxic ventilatory response in Epo-overexpressing transgenic male and female mice with high Epo levels in brain and plasma (Tg6) or in wild-type animals injected with recombinant human Epo (rh...

  11. Effects of posture on blood flow diversion by hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, S. M.; Domino, K. B.; Hlastala, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    We used differential excretion of sulphur hexafluoride from the left and right lung to measure blood flow diversion by hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) in the prone and supine positions in dogs (n = 9). Gas exchange was assessed using the multiple inert gas elimination technique. Blood flow diversion from the hypoxic (3% oxygen) left lung was mean 70.7 (SD 11.2)% in the supine compared with 57.0 (12.1)% in the prone position (P vasoconstriction is greater in the supine position. This effect could contribute to the variable response in gas exchange with positioning in patients with ARDS.

  12. Cerebral volumetric changes induced by prolonged hypoxic exposure and whole-body exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Rupp, Thomas; Jubeau, Marc; Lamalle, Laurent; Warnking, Jan M.; Guillaume Y Millet; Wuyam, Bernard; Esteve, François; Levy, Patrick; Krainik, Alexandre; Verges, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    The present study assessed the isolated and synergetic effects of hypoxic exposure and prolonged exercise on cerebral volume and subedema and symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS). Twelve healthy males performed three semirandomized blinded 11-hour sessions with (1) an inspiratory oxygen fraction (FiO2) of 12% and 4-hour cycling, (2) FiO2=21% and 4-hour cycling, and (3) FiO2=8.5% to 12% at rest (matching arterial oxygen saturation measured during the first hypoxic session). Volumetric, ap...

  13. Chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyneuropathy - chronic inflammatory; CIDP; Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy ... of the body equally. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is the most common chronic neuropathy caused by ...

  14. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M; Froeling, Fieke EM

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas owing to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects 3–9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  15. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M; Kadaba, Raghu

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas due to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects between 3 and 9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  16. IMD-4690, a Novel Specific Inhibitor for Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1, Reduces Allergic Airway Remodeling in a Mouse Model of Chronic Asthma via Regulating Angiogenesis and Remodeling-Related Mediators

    OpenAIRE

    Tezuka, Toshifumi; Ogawa, Hirohisa; AZUMA, MASAHIKO; GOTO, HISATSUGU; Uehara, Hisanori; Aono, Yoshinori; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Yoichi; Fujikawa, Tomoyuki; Itai, Akiko; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is the principal inhibitor of plasminogen activators, and is responsible for the degradation of fibrin and extracellular matrix. IMD-4690 is a newly synthesized inhibitor for PAI-1, whereas the effect on allergic airway inflammation and remodeling is still unclear. We examined the in vivo effects by using a chronic allergen exposure model of bronchial asthma in mice. The model was generated by an immune challenge for 8 weeks with house dust mite antigen...

  17. The Prevalence and Phenotype of Activated Microglia/Macrophages within the Spinal Cord of the Hyperostotic Mouse (twy/twy) Changes in Response to Chronic Progressive Spinal Cord Compression: Implications for Human Cervical Compressive Myelopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Hirai, Takayuki; Uchida, Kenzo; Nakajima, Hideaki; Guerrero, Alexander Rodriguez; Takeura, Naoto; Watanabe, Shuji; Sugita, Daisuke; Yoshida, Ai; Johnson, William E B; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical compressive myelopathy, e.g. due to spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament is a common cause of spinal cord dysfunction. Although human pathological studies have reported neuronal loss and demyelination in the chronically compressed spinal cord, little is known about the mechanisms involved. In particular, the neuroinflammatory processes that are thought to underlie the condition are poorly understood. The present study assessed the localized pr...

  18. Normobaric oxygen as a sensitizer of hypoxic tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of experiments have been performed to determine the relative radiosensitivities of a mouse mammary tumor (CA NT) irradiated in 100% normobaric oxygen or in air, using clinically relevant dose-fractionation schedules. The results demonstrate that normobaric oxygen is a potent radiosensitizer, its effect being more marked with smaller size fractions. Enhancement ratios (ER) of 1.23 to 1.45 were obtained. By contrast, no significant benefit was seen with single doses (ER = 1.05 +/- 0.14). The degree of radiosensitization with oxygen, in these fractionated regimens, is greater than that reported for the chemical radiosensitizer, misonidazole. It therefore seems appropriate to re-examine the clinical potential of normobaric oxygen and to consider how the conditions of normobaric radiotherapy achieved in the laboratory can be translated to man

  19. Changes in the activity levels of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase in rats subjected to hypoxic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, P.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Kumria, M. M. L.; Singh, S. N.; Patil, S. K. B.; Rangnathan, S.; Sridharan, K.

    Exposure to high altitude causes loss of body mass and alterations in metabolic processes, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The present study was conducted to elucidate the role of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase under conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia. Four groups, each consisting of 12 male albino rats (Wistar strain), were exposed to a simulated altitude of 7620 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h per day for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Blood haemoglobin, blood glucose, protein levels in the liver, muscle and plasma, glycogen content, and glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and glycogen synthetase activities in liver and muscle were determined in all groups of exposed and in a group of unexposed animals. Food intake and changes in body mass were also monitored. There was a significant reduction in body mass (28-30%) in hypoxia-exposed groups as compared to controls, with a corresponding decrease in food intake. There was rise in blood haemoglobin and plasma protein in response to acclimatisation. Over a three-fold increase in liver glycogen content was observed following 1 day of hypoxic exposure (4.76+/-0.78 mg.g-1 wet tissue in normal unexposed rats; 15.82+/-2.30 mg.g-1 wet tissue in rats exposed to hypoxia for 1 day). This returned to normal in later stages of exposure. However, there was no change in glycogen synthetase activity except for a decrease in the 21-days hypoxia-exposed group. There was a slight increase in muscle glycogen content in the 1-day exposed group which declined significantly by 56.5, 50.6 and 42% following 7, 14, and 21 days of exposure, respectively. Muscle glycogen synthetase activity was also decreased following 21 days of exposure. There was an increase in glutaminase activity in the liver and muscle in the 7-, 14- and 21-day exposed groups. Glutamine synthetase activity was higher in the liver in 7- and 14-day exposed groups; this returned to normal following 21 days of exposure

  20. Induction and repair of DNA-DSB induced by heavy ions under hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied three different end points such as induction of double strand breaks (DSB), unrejoined DSB and cell killing after irradiation with heavy ions (approximately 13-440 keV/μm) in cultured mammalian cells under oxic and hypoxic conditions. DSB were detected by the static field gel electrophoresis assay. The RBE for induction of DSB under oxic condition decreased with increasing linear energy transfer (LET), but that under hypoxic increased. On the other hand, the relative biological effectiveness (RBEs) for unrejoined DSB under both conditions increased with increasing LET, reaching a maximum RBE at around 200 keV/μm; this coincide with the LET-RBE spectra for cell killing. SCCVII cells were transplanted into the hind legs of C3H mice. The tumors were irradiated with carbon ions at the distal position of spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) (∼80 keV/μm), either hypoxic or oxic. In addition, single-cell suspensions prepared by enzymatically digesting tumors were irradiated under oxic in vitro. The oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) using non-clamped tumors was 1.56, while that using single-cell suspensions was 1.94. We find that an acute hypoxic inducible radioresistance exists in tumor irradiated with high LET carbon ions. (author)

  1. Expression of Clock genes in the pineal glands of newborn rats with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Sun; Xing Feng; Xin Ding; Li Bao; Yongfu Li; Jun He; Meifang Jin

    2012-01-01

    Clock genes are involved in circadian rhythm regulation,and surviving newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy may present with sleep-wake cycle reversal.This study aimed to determine the expression of the clock genes Clock and Bmall,in the pineal gland of rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.Results showed that levels of Clock mRNA were not significantly changed within 48 hours after cerebral hypoxia and ischemia.Expression levels of CLOCK and BMAL1 protein were significantly higher after 48 hours.The levels of Bmall mRNA reached a peak at 36 hours,but were significantly reduced at 48 hours.Experimental findings indicate that Clock and Bmall genes were indeed expressed in the pineal glands of neonatal rats.At the initial stage (within 36 hours) of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage,only slight changes in the expression levels of these two genes were detected,followed by significant changes at 36 48 hours.These changes may be associated with circadian rhythm disorder induced by hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  2. Temporal Rac1 - HIF-1 crosstalk modulates hypoxic survival of aged neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güntert, Tanja; Gassmann, Max; Ogunshola, Omolara O

    2016-07-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are frequently associated with hypoxic conditions. During hypoxia the neuronal cytoskeleton is rapidly reorganized and such abnormalities are directly linked to adverse outcomes. Besides their roles as master regulators of the cytoskeleton, the Rho GTPases are also involved in cellular processes stimulated by hypoxic stress. We investigated the contribution of Rac1-mediated signaling to hypoxic responses of mature neurons using primary cortical cells cultured for 17 days in vitro. We show Rac1 is both upregulated and activated during hypoxia. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1, but not RhoA, completely abrogated hypoxic HIF-1α stabilization and expression of the HIF-1 targets VEGF and GLUT1. Furthermore activity of JNK and GSK3β were also highly dependent on Rac1 activity and biphasic effects were observed after 6 and 24h of exposure. Notably, inhibition of either pathway suppressed HIF-1α accumulation. Although inhibition of Rac1 did not affect neuronal viability during acute exposure cell death was strongly induced after 24h revealing a time-dependent effect of Rac1 signaling on survival. Thus hypoxia-activated Rac1 is critical for neuronal HIF-1α stabilization and survival during oxygen deprivation via integration of complex signaling cascades. PMID:27018294

  3. [Hypoxic brain injuries notified to the Danish Patient Insurance Association during 1992-2004. Secondary publication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock, J.; Christoffersen, J.K.; Hedegaard, M.;

    2008-01-01

    suffered major handicaps, primarily cerebral palsy. In 69 of the cases, misinterpretation of or late action in response to an abnormal cardiotocography caused the hypoxic brain injuries. All injuries could potentially have been avoided using established obstetric practice Udgivelsesdato: 2008/9/1...

  4. Hypoxic remodelling of Ca{sup 2+} stores does not alter human cardiac myofibroblast invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riches, K.; Hettiarachchi, N.T.; Porter, K.E. [Leeds Institute for Genetics, Health and Therapeutics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Peers, C., E-mail: c.s.peers@leeds.ac.uk [Leeds Institute for Genetics, Health and Therapeutics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Bradykinin promotes migration and proliferation of myofibroblasts. {yields} Such activity is Ca{sup 2+}-dependent and occurs under hypoxic conditions. {yields} Hypoxia increased myofibroblast Ca{sup 2+} stores but not influx evoked by bradykinin. {yields} Myofibroblast migration and proliferation was unaffected by hypoxia. -- Abstract: Cardiac fibroblasts are the most abundant cell type in the heart, and play a key role in the maintenance and repair of the myocardium following damage such as myocardial infarction by transforming into a cardiac myofibroblast (CMF) phenotype. Repair occurs through controlled proliferation and migration, which are Ca{sup 2+} dependent processes, and often requires the cells to operate within a hypoxic environment. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce infarct size through the promotion of bradykinin (BK) stability. Although CMF express BK receptors, their activity under the reduced O{sub 2} conditions that occur following infarct are entirely unexplored. Using Fura-2 microfluorimetry on primary human CMF, we found that hypoxia significantly increased the mobilisation of Ca{sup 2+} from intracellular stores in response to BK whilst capacitative Ca{sup 2+} entry (CCE) remained unchanged. The enhanced store mobilisation was due to a striking increase in CMF intracellular Ca{sup 2+}-store content under hypoxic conditions. However, BK-induced CMF migration or proliferation was not affected following hypoxic exposure, suggesting that Ca{sup 2+} influx rather than mobilisation is of primary importance in CMF migration and proliferation.

  5. Microbial respiration and extracellular enzyme activity in sediments from the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study explores the relationship between sediment chemistry (TC, TN, TP) and microbial respiration (DHA) and extracellular enzyme activity (EEA) across the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) hypoxic zone. TC, TN, and TP were all positively correlated with each other (r=0.19-0.68). DHA was ...

  6. Hypoxic preconditioning induces neuroprotective stanniocalcin-1 in brain via IL-6 signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westberg, Johan A; Serlachius, Martina; Lankila, Petri;

    2007-01-01

    mRNA levels in brains of wild-type and IL-6 deficient mice. Furthermore, we monitored the Stc-1 response in brains of wild-type and transgenic mice, overexpressing IL-6 in the astroglia, before and after induced brain injury. RESULTS: Hypoxic preconditioning induced an upregulated expression of Stc...

  7. Acute hypoxic exercise does not alter post-exercise iron metabolism in moderately trained endurance athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govus, A.D.; Abbiss, C.R.; Garvican-Lewis, L.A.; Swinkels, D.W.; Laarakkers, C.M.; Gore, C.J.; Peeling, P.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study measured the influence of acute hypoxic exercise on Interleukin-6 (IL-6), hepcidin, and iron biomarkers in athletes. METHODS: In a repeated measures design, 13 moderately trained endurance athletes performed 5 x 4 min intervals at 90 % of their peak oxygen consumption velocity (v

  8. Impact of hypoxic versus normoxic training on physical fitness and vasculature in diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, T.H.A.; Nyakayiru, J.; Houben, J.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise training improves physical fitness, insulin resistance, and endothelial function in type 2 diabetes. Hypoxia may further optimize these beneficial effects. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of hypoxic versus normoxic exercise training on physical fitness, endothel

  9. Expression of Monocarboxylate Transporter Isoforms in Rat Skeletal Muscle Under Hypoxic Preconditioning and Endurance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Saurabh; Shukla, Dhananjay; Bansal, Anju

    2016-03-01

    Previously, we have reported the regulation of monocarboxylate transporters (MCT)1 and MCT4 by physiological stimuli such as hypoxia and exercise. In the present study, we have evaluated the effect of hypoxic preconditioning and training on expression of different MCT isoforms in muscles. We found the increased mRNA expression of MCT1, MCT11, and MCT12 after hypoxic preconditioning with cobalt chloride and training. However, the expression of other MCT isoforms increased marginally or even reduced after hypoxic preconditioning. Only the protein expression of MCT1 increased after hypoxia preconditioning. MCT2 protein expression increased after training only and MCT4 protein expression decreased both in preconditioning and hypoxic training. Furthermore, we found decreased plasma lactate level during hypoxia preconditioning (0.74-fold), exercise (0.78-fold), and hypoxia preconditioning along with exercise (0.67-fold), which indicates increased lactate uptake by skeletal muscle. The protein-protein interactions with hypoxia inducible factor-1 and MCT isoforms were also evaluated, but no interaction was found. In conclusion, we say that almost all MCTs are expressed in red gastrocnemius muscle at the mRNA level and their expression is regulated differently under hypoxia preconditioning and exercise condition. PMID:26716978

  10. Association of NOS3 gene variants and clinical contributors of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmanić Šamija, R. [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Primorac, D. [School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia); Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Osijek, Osijek (Croatia); Eberly College of Science, Penn State University, University Park, PA (United States); St. Catherine Speciality Hospital, Zabok (Croatia); Rešić, B. [School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia); Pavlov, V. [Department of Neonatology, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Čapkun, V. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Punda, H. [School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia); Lozić, B. [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Zemunik, T. [Department of Medical Biology, School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia)

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association of different clinical contributors of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy with NOS3 gene polymorphisms. A total of 110 children with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and 128 control children were selected for this study. Association of gender, gestational age, birth weight, Apgar score, cranial ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings with genotypic data of six haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms and the most commonly investigated rs1800779 and rs2070744 polymorphisms was analyzed. The TGT haplotype of rs1800783, rs1800779, and rs2070744 polymorphisms was associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Children with the TGT haplotype were infants below 32 weeks of gestation and they had the most severe brain damage. Increased incidence of the TT genotype of the NOS3 rs1808593 SNP was found in the group of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy patients with medium and severe brain damage. The probability of brain damage was twice as high in children with the TT genotype than in children with the TG genotype of the same polymorphism. Furthermore, the T allele of the same polymorphism was twice as frequent in children with lower Apgar scores. This study strongly suggests associations of NOS3 gene polymorphism with intensity of brain damage and severity of the clinical picture in affected children.

  11. Time Domains of the Hypoxic Ventilatory Response and Their Molecular Basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamenter, Mathhew E; Powell, Frank L

    2016-01-01

    Ventilatory responses to hypoxia vary widely depending on the pattern and length of hypoxic exposure. Acute, prolonged, or intermittent hypoxic episodes can increase or decrease breathing for seconds to years, both during the hypoxic stimulus, and also after its removal. These myriad effects are the result of a complicated web of molecular interactions that underlie plasticity in the respiratory control reflex circuits and ultimately control the physiology of breathing in hypoxia. Since the time domains of the physiological hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) were identified, considerable research effort has gone toward elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms that mediate these varied responses. This research has begun to describe complicated and plastic interactions in the relay circuits between the peripheral chemoreceptors and the ventilatory control circuits within the central nervous system. Intriguingly, many of these molecular pathways seem to share key components between the different time domains, suggesting that varied physiological HVRs are the result of specific modifications to overlapping pathways. This review highlights what has been discovered regarding the cell and molecular level control of the time domains of the HVR, and highlights key areas where further research is required. Understanding the molecular control of ventilation in hypoxia has important implications for basic physiology and is emerging as an important component of several clinical fields. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1345-1385, 2016. PMID:27347896

  12. Cerebral and muscle deoxygenation, hypoxic ventilatory chemosensitivity and cerebrovascular responsiveness during incremental exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, Juha E; Paterson, Donald H; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Delorey, Darren S; Dumanoir, Gregory R; Petrella, Robert J; Kowalchuk, John M

    2009-10-31

    To examine if cerebral (frontal cortex) and skeletal muscle (m. vastus lateralis) deoxygenation and cerebral blood flow velocity (V(mean)) in the middle cerebral artery differentiated between normoxic and hypoxic (end-tidal P(O)(2) 71 mmHg) conditions, and if they were associated with hypoxic ventilatory chemosensitivity and cerebrovascular responsiveness, 8 men performed incremental cycling trials (30W/min ramp) under normoxic (T1-N) and hypoxic (T1-H) conditions until volitional fatigue, or until arterial O2 saturation decreased below 80%. The tests were repeated (T2-N; T2-H) on another day with supplemental O2 (Sup-O2) at the end of exercise. The V(mean) response was similar in normoxia and hypoxia. In hypoxia compared to normoxia, cerebral deoxygenation ( upward arrow deoxyhemoglobin concentration (Delta[HHb]) and downward arrow tissue oxygenation index (TOI)) was greater at a given work rate. A strong hypoxic ventilatory chemosensitivity was associated with a rapid reduction of cerebral TOI (r=0.94, PMuscle deoxygenation was similar in normoxia and hypoxia suggesting greater muscle blood flow in hypoxia compared to normoxia and thus the existence of control features that match muscle perfusion and O2 delivery tightly with O2 demand during exercise. Sup-O2 reduced both cerebral and muscle deoxygenation, at least transiently. PMID:19729079

  13. EEG and MR Spectroscopy in Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy in Term Newborns

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2010-01-01

    Researchers from the University of Bologna, Italy, studied the relation of amplitude integrated EEG findings in the first 24 hrs of life to brain metabolic changes, detected by proton MR spectroscopy (H-MRS) at 7-10 days of life, in 32 term newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE).

  14. Increased betulinic acid induced cytotoxicity and radiosensitivity in glioma cells under hypoxic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paschke Reinhard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Betulinic acid (BA is a novel antineoplastic agent under evaluation for tumor therapy. Because of the selective cytotoxic effects of BA in tumor cells (including gliomas, the combination of this agent with conservative therapies (such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy may be useful. Previously, the combination of BA with irradiation under hypoxic conditions had never been studied. Methods In this study, the effects of 3 to 30 μM BA on cytotoxicity, migration, the protein expression of PARP, survivin and HIF-1α, as well as radiosensitivity under normoxic and hypoxic conditions were analyzed in the human malignant glioma cell lines U251MG and U343MG. Cytotoxicity and radiosensitivity were analyzed with clonogenic survival assays, migration was analyzed with Boyden chamber assays (or scratch assays and protein expression was examined with Western blot analyses. Results Under normoxic conditions, a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 of 23 μM was observed in U251MG cells and 24 μM was observed in U343MG cells. Under hypoxic conditions, 10 μM or 15 μM of BA showed a significantly increased cytotoxicity in U251MG cells (p = 0.004 and p = 0.01, respectively and U343MG cells (p Conclusion Our results suggest that BA is capable of improving the effects of tumor therapy in human malignant glioma cells, particularly under hypoxic conditions. Further investigations are necessary to characterize its potential as a radiosensitizer.

  15. Gaze beats mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateo, Julio C.; San Agustin, Javier; Hansen, John Paulin

    2008-01-01

    Facial EMG for selection is fast, easy and, combined with gaze pointing, it can provide completely hands-free interaction. In this pilot study, 5 participants performed a simple point-and-select task using mouse or gaze for pointing and a mouse button or a facial-EMG switch for selection. Gaze...... pointing was faster than mouse pointing, while maintaining a similar error rate. EMG and mouse-button selection had a comparable performance. From analyses of completion time, throughput and error rates, we concluded that the combination of gaze and facial EMG holds potential for outperforming the mouse....

  16. Increased betulinic acid induced cytotoxicity and radiosensitivity in glioma cells under hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betulinic acid (BA) is a novel antineoplastic agent under evaluation for tumor therapy. Because of the selective cytotoxic effects of BA in tumor cells (including gliomas), the combination of this agent with conservative therapies (such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy) may be useful. Previously, the combination of BA with irradiation under hypoxic conditions had never been studied. In this study, the effects of 3 to 30 μM BA on cytotoxicity, migration, the protein expression of PARP, survivin and HIF-1α, as well as radiosensitivity under normoxic and hypoxic conditions were analyzed in the human malignant glioma cell lines U251MG and U343MG. Cytotoxicity and radiosensitivity were analyzed with clonogenic survival assays, migration was analyzed with Boyden chamber assays (or scratch assays) and protein expression was examined with Western blot analyses. Under normoxic conditions, a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 23 μM was observed in U251MG cells and 24 μM was observed in U343MG cells. Under hypoxic conditions, 10 μM or 15 μM of BA showed a significantly increased cytotoxicity in U251MG cells (p = 0.004 and p = 0.01, respectively) and U343MG cells (p < 0.05 and p = 0.01, respectively). The combination of BA with radiotherapy resulted in an additive effect in the U343MG cell line under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Weak radiation enhancement was observed in U251MG cell line after treatment with BA under normoxic conditions. Furthermore, under hypoxic conditions, the incubation with BA resulted in increased radiation enhancement. The enhancement factor, at an irradiation dose of 15 Gy after treatment with 10 or 15 μM BA, was 2.20 (p = 0.02) and 4.50 (p = 0.03), respectively. Incubation with BA led to decreased cell migration, cleavage of PARP and decreased expression levels of survivin in both cell lines. Additionally, BA treatment resulted in a reduction of HIF-1α protein under hypoxic conditions. Our results suggest that BA is capable of

  17. Non-endothelial endothelin counteracts hypoxic vasodilation in porcine large coronary arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fröbert Ole

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The systemic vascular response to hypoxia is vasodilation. However, reports suggest that the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 (ET-1 is released from the vasculature during hypoxia. ET-1 is reported to augment superoxide anion generation and may counteract nitric oxide (NO vasodilation. Moreover, ET-1 was proposed to contribute to increased vascular resistance in heart failure by increasing the production of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA. We investigated the role of ET-1, the NO pathway, the potassium channels and radical oxygen species in hypoxia-induced vasodilation of large coronary arteries. Results In prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α, 10 μM-contracted segments with endothelium, gradual lowering of oxygen tension from 95 to 1% O2 resulted in vasodilation. The vasodilation to O2 lowering was rightward shifted in segments without endothelium at all O2 concentrations except at 1% O2. The endothelin receptor antagonist SB217242 (10 μM markedly increased hypoxic dilation despite the free tissue ET-1 concentration in the arterial wall was unchanged in 1% O2 versus 95% O2. Exogenous ET-1 reversed hypoxic dilation in segments with and without endothelium, and the hypoxic arteries showed an increased sensitivity towards ET-1 compared to the normoxic controls. Without affecting basal NO, hypoxia increased NO concentration in PGF2α-contracted arteries, and an NO synthase inhibitor, L-NOARG,(300 μM, NG-nitro-L-Arginine reduced hypoxic vasodilation. NO-induced vasodilation was reduced in endothelin-contracted preparations. Arterial wall ADMA concentrations were unchanged by hypoxia. Blocking of potassium channels with TEA (tetraethylammounium chloride(10 μM inhibited vasodilation to O2 lowering as well as to NO. The superoxide scavenger tiron (10 μM and the putative NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (10 μM leftward shifted concentration-response curves for O2 lowering without changing vasodilation to 1% O2. PEG (polyethylene

  18. Chimeric elk/mouse prion proteins in transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Tamguney, G; Giles, K; Oehler, A.; Johnson, NL; DeArmond, SJ; Prusiner, SB

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer and elk is a highly communicable neurodegenerative disorder caused by prions. Investigations of CWD are hampered by slow bioassays in transgenic (Tg) mice. Towards the development of Tg mice that will be more susceptible to CWD prions, we created a series of chimeric elk/mouse transgenes that encode the N terminus of elk PrP (ElkPrP) up to residue Y168 and the C terminus of mouse PrP (MoPrP) beyond residue 169 (mouse numbering), designated Elk3M(SNIVVK). ...

  19. Cytosine Deaminase/5-Fluorocytosine Exposure Induces Bystander and Radiosensitization Effects in Hypoxic Glioblastoma Cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) is limited by therapeutic ratio; therefore, successful therapy must be specifically cytotoxic to cancer cells. Hypoxic cells are ubiquitous in GBM, and resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, and, thus, are logical targets for gene therapy. In this study, we investigated whether cytosine deaminase (CD)/5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) enzyme/prodrug treatment induced a bystander effect (BE) and/or radiosensitization in hypoxic GBM cells. Methods and Materials: We stably transfected cells with a gene construct consisting of the SV40 minimal promoter, nine copies of a hypoxia-responsive element, and the yeast CD gene. During hypoxia, a hypoxia-responsive element regulates expression of the CD gene and facilitates the conversion of 5-FC to 5-fluorouracil, a highly toxic antimetabolite. We used colony-forming efficiency (CFE) and immunofluorescence assays to assess for BE in co-cultures of CD-expressing clone cells and parent, pNeo- or green fluorescent protein-stably transfected GBM cells. We also investigated the radiosensitivity of CD clone cells treated with 5-FC under hypoxic conditions, and we used flow cytometry to investigate treatment-induced cell cycle changes. Results: Both a large BE and radiosensitization occurred in GBM cells under hypoxic conditions. The magnitude of the BE depended on the number of transfected cells producing CD, the functionality of the CD, the administered concentration of 5-FC, and the sensitivity of cell type to 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: Hypoxia-inducible CD/5-FC therapy in combination with radiation therapy shows both a pronounced BE and a radiosensitizing effect under hypoxic conditions

  20. Effect of hypoxic irradiation following hyperbaric oxygen therapy on mice implanted with Lewis lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the effect of hypoxic irradiation following hyperbaric oxygen therapy on murine tumor tissue and normal tissue. Methods: C57BL/6 mice implanted with Lewis lung cancer were divided into five groups: the irradiation group, the hypoxic irradiation group (LO), the hyperbaric oxygen irradiation group (HBO), the hyperbaric oxygen plus hypoxic irradiation group (HBO + LO) and the control group. The experiment was started when the transplanted tumor reached 1.0-2.0 cm. A dose of 20 Gy 6 MeV electron beam of DT was used for irradiation. Two and half atmosphere pressure of hyperbaric oxygen was given for 100 minutes during therapy and a mixture of 10.5% oxygen and 89.5%N2 was provided for hypoxic irradiation. ECT γ images were taken 120 minutes after 99mTc-HL91 injection. Results: (1) The mean murine tumor growth rate in both HBO group and HBO + LO group delayed significantly than that in other groups. (2) The survival times of both LO group and HBO +LO group were significantly longer than those of other groups. These two groups showed almost the same effect in protecting normal tissues and prolonging lives. (3) The imaging agent radioactivity ratio of tumor to contralateral (TPA) tissues in both HBO and HBO +LO groups decreased significantly than that in other groups. And no difference in the therapeutic effect was found in these two groups. Conclusion: The hypoxic irradiation following hyperbaric oxygen therapy might achieve a radiation-enhancing effect on tumor cells and a protective effect on normal tissues

  1. Scintigraphic imaging of focal hypoxic tissue: development and clinical applications of 123 I-IAZA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affected tissues in a number of diseases, including cancer, stroke, cardiac infarction and diabetes, develop focal tissue hypoxia during their progression. Tbe presence of hypoxic tissue may make the disease refractory to therapy, as in the case of solid tumor therapy using low LET ionizing radiation. In other pathologies, the detection of viable but hypoxic tissues may serve as a prodromal indicator of developing disease (e.g. diabetes), or as a prognostic indicator for management of the disease (e.g. stroke). Over the past two decades a number of hypoxia radio imaging agents have been developed and tested clinically. Of these, 18 F-Fm iso and 123 I - IAZA are the most widely used radiotracers for PET and SPECT/planar imaging, respectively. IAZA and Fm iso are a 2-nitroimidazoles that chemically bind to subcellular components of viable hypoxic tissues. They sensitize hypoxic tumor to the killing effects of ionizing radiation via mechanisms that mimic the radiosensitizing effects of oxygen, and are therefore called oxygen mimetic. The oxygen mimetic effect is attributable in large part to the covalent binding of reductively-activated nitroimidazole intermediates to critical cellular macromolecules. Nitroimidazoles labelled with gamma-emitting radionuclides (e.g. 18 F-Fm iso and 123 I -IAZA) have been used as scintigraphic markers of tumour hypoxia, based on the need to identify radioresistant hypoxic tumour cells as part of the radiotherapy planning process. Broader interest in non-invasive, imaging-based identification of focal hypoxia in a number of diseases has extended hypoxia studies to include peripheral vascular disease associated with diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, stroke, myocardial ischaemia, brain trauma and oxidative stress. In this review, the current status of hypoxia-selective studies with 123 I - IAZA, an experimental diagnostic radiopharmaceutical, is reviewed with respect to its pre-clinical development and clinical applications. (author)

  2. Chronic cholecystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... foods may relieve symptoms in people. However, the benefit of a low-fat diet has not been proven. Alternative Names Cholecystitis - chronic Images Cholecystitis, CT scan Cholecystitis, cholangiogram Cholecystolithiasis Gallstones, cholangiogram Cholecystogram References Wang ...

  3. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who have chronic pain may also have low self-esteem, depression, and anger. Causes & Risk Factors What causes ... as stretching and strengthening activities) and low-impact exercise (such as walking, swimming, or biking) can help ...

  4. Chronic Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... School Lunch Lines FDA Cracks Down on Antibacterial Soaps Health Tip: Schedule a Back-to-School Dental ... the Professional Version Meningitis Introduction to Meningitis Acute Bacterial Meningitis Viral Meningitis Noninfectious Meningitis Recurrent Meningitis Chronic ...

  5. Chronic Pericarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sugar Control Helps Fight Diabetic Eye Disease Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety? ALL NEWS > Resources First ... weeks after heart surgery) and is considered subacute. Causes Usually, the cause of chronic effusive pericarditis is ...

  6. Dormancy of Cancer Cells with Suppression of AKT Activity Contributes to Survival in Chronic Hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroko Endo; Hiroaki Okuyama; Masayuki Ohue; Masahiro Inoue

    2014-01-01

    A hypoxic microenvironment in tumors has been recognized as a cause of malignancy or resistance to various cancer therapies. In contrast to recent progress in understanding the acute response of cancer cells to hypoxia, the characteristics of tumor cells in chronic hypoxia remain elusive. We have identified a pancreatic cancer cell line, AsPC-1, that is exceptionally able to survive for weeks under 1% oxygen conditions while most tested cancer cell lines die after only some days under these c...

  7. Chronic hypoxia inhibits MMP-2 activation and cellular invasion in human cardiac myofibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Riches, Kirsten; Morley, Michael E.; Turner, Neil A; O'Regan, David J; Ball, Stephen G; Peers, Chris; Porter, Karen E

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac myofibroblasts are pivotal to adaptive remodelling after myocardial infarction (MI). These normally quiescent cells invade and proliferate as a wound healing response, facilitated by activation of matrix metalloproteinases, particularly MMP-2. Following MI these reparative events occur under chronically hypoxic conditions yet the mechanisms by which hypoxia might modulate MMP-2 activation and cardiac myofibroblast invasion have not been investigated. Human cardiac myofibroblasts cultu...

  8. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Is Essential for Survival in Chronic Hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Borger, Darrell R.; Gavrilescu, L. Cristina; Bucur, Maria C.; Ivan, Mircea; DeCaprio, James A.

    2008-01-01

    This study was undertaken to interrogate cancer cell survival during long-term hypoxic stress. Two systems with relevance to carcinogenesis were employed: fully transformed BJ cells, and a renal carcinoma cell line (786-0). The dynamic of AMPK activity was consistent with a prosurvival role during chronic hypoxia. This was further supported by the effects of AMPK agonists and antagonists (AICAR and Compound C). Expression of a dominant-negative AMPK alpha resulted in decreased ATP level, and ...

  9. 55th Bowditch Lecture: Effects of chronic hypoxia on the pulmonary circulation: Role of HIF-1

    OpenAIRE

    Shimoda, Larissa A.

    2012-01-01

    When exposed to chronic hypoxia (CH), the pulmonary circulation responds with enhanced contraction and vascular remodeling, resulting in elevated pulmonary arterial pressures. Our work has identified CH-induced alterations in the expression and activity of several ion channels and transporters in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle that contribute to the development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and uncovered a critical role for the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) in ...

  10. Nitric oxide availability in deeply hypoxic crucian carp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marie Niemann; Gerber, Lucie; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2016-01-01

    order to decipher NO metabolites in plasma and several tissues. We also compared NO metabolite changes during acute (10 min) and chronic (1 day) exposures to three different O2 levels. Plasma [nitrite] decreased with decreasing [O2], while the cellular concentrations of nitrite and nitros......Recent research suggest that anoxia-tolerant fish transfer extracellular nitrite into the tissues, where it is used for nitric oxide (NO) generation, iron-nitrosylation and S-nitrosation of proteins as part of the cytoprotective response towards prolonged oxygen lack and subsequent re...... nitric oxide synthase-2 gene variant. The data support that ambient nitrite is taken up across the gills to be distributed via the blood to tissues, particularly the heart, where it assists in cytoprotection and other functions. Cardiac nitrite was not elevated in acutely exposed fish, revealing that the...

  11. Astrocyte-derived proinflammatory cytokines induce hypomyelination in the periventricular white matter in the hypoxic neonatal brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyu Deng

    Full Text Available Hypoxic exposure in the perinatal period causes periventricular white matter damage (PWMD, a condition associated with myelination abnormalities. Under hypoxic conditions, glial cells were activated and released a large number of inflammatory mediators in the PWM in neonatal brain, which may result in oligodendrocyte (OL loss and axonal injury. This study aims to determine if astrocytes are activated and generate proinflammatory cytokines that may be coupled with the oligodendroglial loss and hypomyelination observed in hypoxic PWMD. Twenty-four 1-day-old Wistar rats were exposed to hypoxia for 2 h. The rats were then allowed to recover under normoxic conditions for 7 or 28 days before being killed. Another group of 24 rats kept outside the chamber was used as age-matched controls. Upregulated expression of TNF-α and IL-1β was observed in astrocytes in the PWM of P7 hypoxic rats by double immunofluorescence, western blotting and real time RT-PCR. This was linked to apoptosis and enhanced expression of TNF-R1 and IL-1R1 in APC(+ OLs. PLP expression was decreased significantly in the PWM of P28d hypoxic rats. The proportion of myelinated axons was markedly reduced by electron microscopy (EM and the average g-ratios were higher in P28d hypoxic rats. Upregulated expression of TNF-α and IL-1β in primary cultured astrocytes as well as their corresponding receptors in primary culture APC(+ oligodendrocytes were detected under hypoxic conditions. Our results suggest that following a hypoxic insult, astrocytes in the PWM of neonatal rats produce inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β, which induce apoptosis of OLs via their corresponding receptors associated with them. This results in hypomyelination in the PWM of hypoxic rats.

  12. Hypoxic stress up-regulates Kir2.1 expression and facilitates cell proliferation in brain capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Hideto; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hisao; Asai, Kiyofumi; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is mainly composed of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs), astrocytes and pericytes. Brain ischemia causes hypoxic encephalopathy and damages BBB. However, it remains still unclear how hypoxia affects BCECs. In the present study, t-BBEC117 cells, an immortalized bovine brain endothelial cell line, were cultured under hypoxic conditions at 4-5% oxygen for 72 h. This hypoxic stress caused hyperpolarization of resting membrane potential. Patch-clamp recordings revealed a marked increase in Ba(2+)-sensitive inward rectifier K(+) current in t-BBEC117 cells after hypoxic culture. Western blot and real-time PCR analyses showed that Kir2.1 expression was significantly up-regulated at protein level but not at mRNA level after the hypoxic culture. Ca(2+) imaging study revealed that the hypoxic stress enhanced store-operated Ca(2+) (SOC) entry, which was significantly reduced in the presence of 100 μM Ba(2+). On the other hand, the expression of SOC channels such as Orai1, Orai2, and transient receptor potential channels was not affected by hypoxic stress. MTT assay showed that the hypoxic stress significantly enhanced t-BBEC117 cell proliferation, which was inhibited by approximately 60% in the presence of 100 μM Ba(2+). We first show here that moderate cellular stress by cultivation under hypoxic conditions hyperpolarizes membrane potential via the up-regulation of functional Kir2.1 expression and presumably enhances Ca(2+) entry, resulting in the facilitation of BCEC proliferation. These findings suggest potential roles of Kir2.1 expression in functional changes of BCECs in BBB following ischemia. PMID:27235552

  13. Towards a mouse model of depression: a psychoneuroendocrine approach

    OpenAIRE

    Dalm, Sergiu

    2012-01-01

    Chronic stress is considered a vulnerability factor for depression. A key symptom is anhedonia; a reduced response to positive stimuli. Drugs are effective for only 20-40% of the patients and new drugs are urgently needed. The objective of the research was to develop a mouse model of depression that would express anhedonia, induced by chronic stress. Mice were repeatedly exposed to the non-physical presence of a rat. Alterations in stress system activity were measured. Anhedonia was assessed ...

  14. Dinitrobenzamide mustard prodrugs - hypoxic cytotoxins and dual substrates for E.coli nitroreductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conditional replicating adenoviral vectors (CRAds) have received considerable attention as therapeutic tools in combination with radiotherapy. Viral distribution and micro-regional geometry are likely to be important issues in the treatment of human solid tumours with gene therapy, particularly following intravenous virus administration. The use of CRAds that are 'armed' with enzyme/prodrug systems may overcome some of the perceived limitations; CRAds can redistribute and self-amplify in a cytolytic fashion whilst prodrug metabolites may elicit a local bystander effect. Either or both of these cytotoxic properties could have favourable interactions with radiotherapy (IR). Nevertheless, they may be insufficient to avoid pockets of vector-naive tumour cells beyond the diffusion limits of cytotoxic prodrug metabolites, such as when perivascular seeding occurs. Under such circumstances hypoxic tumour cells may represent the least accessible compartment for vector transfection; the same tumour subpopulation that is likely to be radioresistant. E.coli nitroreductase (NTR) can bioactivate dinitrobenzamide mustards (DNBMs) and is a promising enzyme/prodrug system for 'arming' CRAds. Notably DNMBs can also be activated by endogenous human reductases under low oxygen conditions providing an opportunity to identify dual hypoxic cytotoxins/NTR substrates that may circumvent some of the geometry issues and provide complementarity with IR. To identify a prodrug for NTR that is also active as a hypoxic cytotoxin in vivo. From a set of 164 DNB prodrugs, 19 with favourable activity in vitro against a panel of four NTR-expressing cancer cells were selected and screened for activity as hypoxic cytotoxins in vitro. Measured E17 values ranged from -444 to -366 mV. Seven DNBMs possessed acceptable hypoxic selectivity against the human NSCLC cell line A549WT or clones engineered to overexpress either a human single-electron reductase, cytochrome P450 reductase (A549P450R), or oxic

  15. Chronic hypoxia induces the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in wild-type and APPswe-PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Rojas-Abalos, Macarena; Abbott, Ana C.; Moya, Esteban A.; Iturriaga, Rodrigo; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia modulates proliferation and differentiation of cultured embryonic and adult stem cells, an effect that includes β-catenin, a key component of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Here we studied the effect of mild hypoxia on the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in the hippocampus of adult mice in vivo. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α) was analyzed as a molecular control of the physiological hypoxic response. Exposure to chronic hypoxia (10% oxygen for 6–72 h) stimulated the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Because the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a positive modulator of adult neurogenesis, we evaluated whether chronic hypoxia was able to stimulate neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Results indicate that hypoxia increased cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult wild-type mice as determined by Ki67 staining, Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and double labeling with doublecortin (DCX). Chronic hypoxia also induced neurogenesis in a double transgenic APPswe-PS1ΔE9 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), which shows decreased levels of neurogenesis in the SGZ. Our results show for the first time that exposure to hypoxia in vivo can induce the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade in the hippocampus, suggesting that mild hypoxia may have a therapeutic value in neurodegenerative disorders associated with altered Wnt signaling in the brain and also in pathological conditions in which hippocampal neurogenesis is impaired. PMID:24574965

  16. A voxel-based multiscale model to simulate the radiation response of hypoxic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza, I., E-mail: iespinoza@fis.puc.cl [Institute of Physics, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 7820436, Chile and Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Peschke, P. [Clinical Cooperation Unit Molecular Radiooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Karger, C. P. [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumors to irradiation prior to the treatment. This is especially important for hypoxic tumors, which are known to be highly radioresistant. Mathematical modeling based on the dose distribution, biological parameters, and medical images may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. Methods: A voxel-based multiscale tumor response model for simulating the radiation response of hypoxic tumors was developed. It considers viable and dead tumor cells, capillary and normal cells, as well as the most relevant biological processes such as (i) proliferation of tumor cells, (ii) hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, (iii) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor growth, (iv) oxygen-dependent cell survival after irradiation, (v) resorption of dead cells, and (vi) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor shrinkage. Oxygenation is described on a microscopic scale using a previously published tumor oxygenation model, which calculates the oxygen distribution for each voxel using the vascular fraction as the most important input parameter. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model, the dependence of the oxygen distribution on tumor growth and radiation-induced shrinkage is investigated. In addition, the impact of three different reoxygenation processes is compared and tumor control probability (TCP) curves for a squamous cells carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSSC) are simulated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Results: The model describes the spatiotemporal behavior of the tumor on three different scales: (i) on the macroscopic scale, it describes tumor growth and shrinkage during radiation treatment, (ii) on a mesoscopic scale, it provides the cell density and vascular fraction for each voxel, and (iii) on the microscopic scale, the oxygen distribution may be obtained in terms of oxygen histograms. With increasing tumor size, the simulated tumors develop a hypoxic core. Within the

  17. Chronic anaemia, hyperbaric oxygen and tumour radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormack, M.; Nias, A.H.W.; Smith, Eileen (Saint Thomas' Hospital, London (UK). Richard Dimbleby Research Lab.)

    1990-10-01

    The present study examined the relationship between anaemia and tumour response to radiation given in air or HPO in C{sub 3}H mice transplanted with a mammary adenocarcinoma using a growth delay assay to assess radiation response. Radiation studies with these anaemic mice demonstrated that the tumour radiosensitivity was decreased when treatment was given in air. HPO was successful in overcoming the increased radioresistance associated with anaemia. This result suggested that tumours grown in anaemic mice have a higher hypoxic fraction than those grown in control mice. Changes in host physiology with chronic anaemia may contribute to the benefit seen with HPO but such alterations per se may be inadequate to maintain tumour oxygenation when treatment is given in air. (author).

  18. Bidirectional signalling between EphA2 and ephrinA1 increases tubular cell attachment, laminin secretion and modulates erythropoietin expression after renal hypoxic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Stéphane; Rudloff, Stefan; Koenig, Katrin Franziska; Karthik, Swapna; Hoogewijs, David; Huynh-Do, Uyen

    2016-08-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in hospitalized patients and has a poor prognosis, the severity of AKI being linked to progression to chronic kidney disease. This stresses the need to search for protective mechanisms during the acute phase. We investigated kidney repair after hypoxic injury using a rat model of renal artery branch ligation, which led to an oxygen gradient vertical to the corticomedullary axis. Three distinct zones were observed: tubular necrosis, infarction border zone and preserved normal tissue. EphA2 is a receptor tyrosine kinase with pivotal roles in cell architecture, migration and survival, upon juxtacrine contact with its membrane-bound ligand EphrinA1. Following hypoxia, EphA2 was up-regulated in cortical and medullary tubular cells, while EphrinA1 was up-regulated in interstitial cells adjacent to peritubular capillaries. Moreover, erythropoietin (EPO) messenger RNA (mRNA) was strongly expressed in the border zone of infarcted kidney within the first 6 h. To gain more insight into the biological impact of EphA2 and EphrinA1 up-regulation, we activated the signalling pathways in vitro using recombinant EphrinA1/Fc or EphA2/Fc proteins. Stimulation of EphA2 forward signalling in the proximal tubular cell line HK2 increased cell attachment and laminin secretion at the baso-lateral side. Conversely, activation of reverse signalling through EphrinA1 expressed by Hep3B cells promoted EPO production at both the transcriptional and protein level. Strikingly, in co-culture experiments, juxtacrine contact between EphA2 expressing MDCK and EphrinA1 expressing Hep3B was sufficient to induce a significant up-regulation of EPO mRNA production in the latter cells, even in the absence of hypoxic conditions. The synergistic effects of EphA2 and hypoxia led to a 15-20-fold increase of EPO expression. Collectively, our results suggest an important role of EphA2/EphrinA1 signalling in kidney repair after hypoxic injury through stimulation of (i) tubular

  19. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE)

    OpenAIRE

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Guig?? Serra, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Adams, Leslie B.

    2012-01-01

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  20. 32P uptake and transport to shoots in Pinus serotina seedlings under aerobic and hypoxic growth conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the effects of long-term hypoxic growth conditions on net uptake and transport of P to shoots of pond pine (Pinus serotina Michx.), a moderately flood-tolerant southern pine. Seedlings were grown under aerobic or hypoxic solution conditions for 4-5 weeks in continuously flowing solution culture containing 100 muM P. Short- and long-term P-32 experiments were then conducted with intact seedlings to determine rates of P-32 influx, efflux and net transport to the shoot. Shoot fresh weight/root fresh weight ratios were significantly higher under hypoxic growth conditions, reflecting the larger reduction in root growth than shoot growth, despite extensive aerechyma formation in roots. Estimates for the unidirectional influx of P-32 in aerobic and hypoxic seedlings were 1.43 and 3.20 mumol P (g(FW) root)-1 h-1, respectively. However, P-32 accumulation between the two treatments became similar within 8 h, suggesting that efflux was also higher in seedlings from the hypoxic treatment. Indeed, in a separate experiment, hypoxic growth conditions increased efflux by over 60%. Transport of P-32 to shoots was significantly reduced under hypoxic growth conditions. despite higher root P concentrations and lower shoot P concentrations. After 48 h, P-32 accumulation in roots was similar between the two treatments, yet total accumulation of seedling P-32 decreased by 31% under the hypoxic treatment, largely because of reduced transport of P-32 to the shoot. The lower accumulation of P-32 by shoots of seedlings in the hypoxic treatment may be the result of a direct inhibition on the transport process in O2-deficient tissues, but could also reflect a slower turnover or labeling of the pool available for transport. Indeed, the percentage of total P-32 in roots present in the soluble P(i) (or transportable form of P) was about 33% lower in seedlings from the hypoxic treatment, probably reflecting increased assimilation into organic compounds as well as chelation with iron

  1. The prevalence and phenotype of activated microglia/macrophages within the spinal cord of the hyperostotic mouse (twy/twy changes in response to chronic progressive spinal cord compression: implications for human cervical compressive myelopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Hirai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cervical compressive myelopathy, e.g. due to spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament is a common cause of spinal cord dysfunction. Although human pathological studies have reported neuronal loss and demyelination in the chronically compressed spinal cord, little is known about the mechanisms involved. In particular, the neuroinflammatory processes that are thought to underlie the condition are poorly understood. The present study assessed the localized prevalence of activated M1 and M2 microglia/macrophages in twy/twy mice that develop spontaneous cervical spinal cord compression, as a model of human disease. METHODS: Inflammatory cells and cytokines were assessed in compressed lesions of the spinal cords in 12-, 18- and 24-weeks old twy/twy mice by immunohistochemical, immunoblot and flow cytometric analysis. Computed tomography and standard histology confirmed a progressive spinal cord compression through the spontaneously development of an impinging calcified mass. RESULTS: The prevalence of CD11b-positive cells, in the compressed spinal cord increased over time with a concurrent decrease in neurons. The CD11b-positive cell population was initially formed of arginase-1- and CD206-positive M2 microglia/macrophages, which later shifted towards iNOS- and CD16/32-positive M1 microglia/macrophages. There was a transient increase in levels of T helper 2 (Th2 cytokines at 18 weeks, whereas levels of Th1 cytokines as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, nerve growth factor (NGF and macrophage antigen (Mac-2 progressively increased. CONCLUSIONS: Spinal cord compression was associated with a temporal M2 microglia/macrophage response, which may act as a possible repair or neuroprotective mechanism. However, the persistence of the neural insult also associated with persistent expression of Th1 cytokines and increased prevalence of activated M1 microglia/macrophages, which may lead to neuronal loss and

  2. Quantifying circulating hypoxia-induced RNA transcripts in maternal blood to determine in utero fetal hypoxic status

    OpenAIRE

    Whitehead, Clare; Teh, Wan Tinn; Walker, Susan P.; Leung, Cheryl; Mendis, Sonali; Larmour, Luke; Tong, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypoxia in utero can lead to stillbirth and severe perinatal injury. While current prenatal tests can identify fetuses that are hypoxic, none can determine the severity of hypoxia/acidemia. We hypothesized a hypoxic/acidemic fetus would up-regulate and release hypoxia-induced mRNA from the fetoplacental unit into the maternal circulation, where they can be sampled and quantified. Furthermore, we hypothesized the abundance of hypoxia induced mRNA in the maternal circulation would co...

  3. Deficient activation by a human cell strain leads to mitomycin resistance under aerobic but not hypoxic conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, R S; Paterson, M. C.; Rauth, A. M.

    1989-01-01

    Two non-transformed human skin fibroblast strains, GM38 and 3437T, were found to be more sensitive to the bioreductive alkylating agents mitomycin C (MMC) and porfiromycin (PM) under hypoxic compared to aerobic conditions. One of these strains, 3437T, was 6-7 times more resistant to these agents under aerobic exposure conditions, but was identical in sensitivity to the normal strain, GM38, under hypoxic conditions. Aerobic 3437T cells demonstrated no increased resistance to cisplatin compared...

  4. Allopurinol’s effect on caspase-3 and caspase-8 activity in hypoxic-ischemic newborn rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kenan Özcan; Mehmet Satar; Necmiye Canacankatan; Erdal Taşkın; Kenan Dağlıoğlu

    2013-01-01

    Aim: During reperfusion period of hypoxia-ischemia, cyclooxygenase and xanthine oxidase pathways are induced. A xanthine oxidase inhibitor, allopurinol has been shown to be neuroprotective in hypoxic- ischemic encephalopathy. Caspase-8 and caspase-3 have a key role in neuronal apoptosis. We aimed to test repeated doses of allopurinol’s effect on caspase-3 and caspase-8 activities in newborn rats with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Material and Method: Seven days old newborn rats were taken ...

  5. Notch-1 Signaling Regulates Microglia Activation via NF-κB Pathway after Hypoxic Exposure In Vivo and In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Linli; Kan, Enci Mary; Kaur, Charanjit; Dheen, S Thameem; Hao, Aijun; Lu, Jia; Ling, Eng-Ang

    2013-01-01

    Neuroinflammation mediated by the activated microglia is suggested to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of hypoxic brain injury; however, the underlying mechanism of microglia activation remains unclear. Here, we show that the canonical Notch signaling orchestrates microglia activation after hypoxic exposure which is closely associated with multiple pathological situations of the brain. Notch-1 and Delta-1 expression in primary microglia and BV-2 microglial cells was significantly eleva...

  6. The use of drugs which deplete intracellular glutathione in hypoxic cell radiosensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diethylmaleate (DEM) is a thiol-biding reagent with specificity toward glutathione. Treatment of chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in vitro with 2 x 10-4 M DEM for one hour results in a decrease in glutathione content to less than 5% of control, without cytotoxicity. This treatment results in dose-modifying sensitization to radiation under hypoxic conditions, with no effect on the shoulder of the radiation survival curve. No effect on the radiation sensitivity of oxygenated cells was seen. DEM pretreatment enhances the radiosensitization of hypoxic cells by misonidazole, as well. Similar results were obtained in vivo with EMT6 tumors in BALB/c mice. Analysis of DNA damage by the alkaline elution assay indicates that DEM enhances radiation-induced single-strand breaks, but does not significantly affect repair, while diamide and N-ethylmaleimide inhibit repair, in addition to enhancing radiation-induced single-strand breaks

  7. Glutathione depletion, radiosensitization, and misonidazole potentiation in hypoxic Chinese hamster ovary cells by buthionine sulfoximine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) inhibits the synthesis of glutathione (GSH), the major nonprotein sulfhydryl (NPSH) present in most mammalian cells. BSO exposures used in these experiments were not cytotoxic with the one exception that 2.0 mM BSO/24 hr reduced cell viability to approx.50%. However, alterations in either the cell doubling time(s) or the cell age density distribution(s) were not observed with the BSO exposures used to determine its radiosensitizing effect. BSO significantly radiosensitized hypoxic, but not aerobic, CHO cells when the GSH and NPSH concentrations were reduced to <10 and 20% of control, respectively, and maximum radiosensitivity was even achieved with μM concentrations of BSO. Furthermore, BSO exposure also enhanced the radiosensitizing effect of various concentrations of misonidazole on hypoxic CHO cells

  8. Leucoencefalopatía hipóxica tardía Delayed Hypoxic Leukoencephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Sartori

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available La Leucoencefalopatía Hipóxica Tardía (LHT es una enfermedad desmielinizante de infrecuente presentación. Se produce como consecuencia de un fenómeno de hipoxia-anoxia y aparece días o semanas más tarde.Los síntomas y cambios imagenológicos remiten casi totalmente y tienen un buen pronóstico En este reporte se ilustra el caso de una joven que desarrolló LHT luego de sufrir un paro cardiorrespiratorio.Delayed Hypoxic Leukoencephalopathy (DHL is a rare demyelinating disease. This condition occurs days or weeks after a hypoxic-anoxic injury. Symptoms and imaging changes almost fully resolve, with a good prognosis. We report the case of a young woman who developed DHL after a cardiopulmonary arrest.

  9. Learning-Memory Function and Swimming Capability of Rat and Ergonomic Evaluation Under Hypoxic Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Ding-yu; DAI Rong-ji; LI Bo; MAO Jian; GENG Li-na; DENG Yu-lin

    2009-01-01

    Effects of hypoxia on learning-memory function and swimming capability of rat were studied and the ergonomics under hypoxic condition was also evaluated from the biological point of view. Three modes of hypoxia were designed and plots of oxygen concentration versus time for each group in hypoxic environment were produced. Results showed that the effects of hypoxia on learning-memory function and swimming capability were related with the time and strength of hypoxia. It had nothing to do with the individual difference of rat models. 10% O2 long-term intermittent anamorphosis hypoxia could improve the swimming capability of rat model significantly. Stimulating with proper level of hypoxia, carbon dioxide could improve ergonomics in airtight hypoxia environment. Under hypoxia condition, from the ergonomic point of view, 6% O2 is the important threshold and might belong in critical region.

  10. Cytotoxicity and DNA crosslinks produced by mitomycin analogs in aerobic and hypoxic EMT6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, S R; Loomis, R; DiGiovanna, M P; Pritsos, C A; Rockwell, S; Sartorelli, A C

    1991-01-01

    Several mitomycin antibiotics were evaluated for their capacities to kill EMT6 tumor cells and to produce DNA crosslinks under conditions of oxygenation and hypoxia. The agents examined included mitomycin C, porfiromycin, and the 7-aminomethyl dithioacetal derivative of mitomycin C (BMY-43324), all of which caused greater kill of hypoxic cells than of their oxygenated counterparts; the N,N'-dimethylaminomethylene derivative of mitomycin C (BMY-25282), which was considerably more cytotoxic under oxygenated conditions than in hypoxia; and the N,N'-dimethylaminomethylene derivative of porfiromycin (BL-6783), which was equal in its toxicity to hypoxic and oxygenated cells. All of these agents produced DNA crosslinks in EMT6 cells, as measured by alkaline elution. The number of crosslinks required to produce a given amount of cell kill was similar, regardless of the mitomycin employed or the degree of oxygenation, suggesting that the crosslinking of DNA was a major lesion in the cytodestructive action of the mitomycins. PMID:1760250

  11. The importance of glucose metabolism in the hypoxic cytotoxicity of Misonidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors are investigating the mechanism of inhibition of glucose metabolism and its role in the hypoxic cytotoxicity of Misonidazole (Miso). Preincubation of hypoxic exponential EMT6/Ro cells with Miso and 5.5 mM glucose containing media caused a time-dependent inhibition of both glucose consumption and lactate formation. This inhibition began after 90 min, 45 min, and 15 min preincubation with 1mM, 2.5mM, and 5mM Miso respectively. The inhibition closely correlated with the kinetics and extent of decreased viability of these cells as measured by dye exclusion and colony forming efficiency. Miso does not inhibit glucose transport in these phloretin-sensitive cells. Transport was measured by the uptake of 3-0-methyl-D-glucose, a non-metabolized glucose analog. The initial rate was determined to be the same (1.66 +- 0.18 nmoles cell/second at 250C)

  12. Lethal or protective effects of prolonged treatment with hypoxic cell sensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AK-2123 [N-(2-methoxyethyl)-2-(3-nitro-1-triazolyl)acetamide] is a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer which is currently being tested in several oncology clinics and which has a lower toxicity than misonidazole (MISO) in vivo. The positive experiences reported recently certainly warrant further clinical evaluations. The experimental observations reported so far need further experimental studies to clarify the sensitization mechanism, especially as recent intratumoral strategies used in the clinical administration of the sensitizers can result in a large local concentration of the drug that may persist for a prolonged period of time between and after radiation exposures. Model experiments in vitro using V79 cells were performed with AK-2123 under these conditions. Misonidazole (MISO) and metronidazole (METRO), well known hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, were used for comparison of the effects. Clonogenic survival and induction and repair of DNA damage were used as end-points

  13. Uptake and excretion of organochlorine pesticides by Nereis virens under normoxic and hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The marine polychaete worm, Nereis virens, is resistant to organochlorine pesticides. When exposed to each of five pesticides (endosulfan, chlordane, endrin, dieldrin, and DDT) in concentrations ranging from 0.03 mg/L (DDT) to 22.0 mg/L (chlordane), only endosulfan and chlordane killed Nereis. In comparison, the same compounds were much more toxic to another marine invertebrate, Crangon septemspinosa. The authors wondered if the resistance of N. virens to organochlorines was related to their response to hypoxia. N. virens is a sediment dweller often found in intertidal regions and consequently may experience periods of severe oxygen deprivation; varying degrees of hypoxia can initiate a switch to anaerobic energy metabolism. When N. virens encounter hypoxic conditions, they can also exhibit a compensatory ventilation response. In the present study, the authors measured the bioaccumulation of endosulfan, dieldrin, and DDT by N. virens under normoxic and hypoxic conditions

  14. Towards a mouse model of depression : a psychoneuroendocrine approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalm, Sergiu

    2012-01-01

    Chronic stress is considered a vulnerability factor for depression. A key symptom is anhedonia; a reduced response to positive stimuli. Drugs are effective for only 20-40% of the patients and new drugs are urgently needed. The objective of the research was to develop a mouse model of depression that

  15. NOD mouse model for Sjogren's syndrome: lack of longitudinal stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.M. Lodde; F. Mineshiba; M.R. Kok; J. Wang; C. Zheng; M. Schmidt; A.P. Cotrim; M. Kriete; P.P. Tak; B.J. Baum

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is not only a widely used model for diabetes mellitus type I, but also for the chronic autoimmune disease Sjogren's syndrome (SS), mainly affecting salivary and lacrimal glands. We studied the efficacy of local recombinant serotype 2 adeno-associated vi

  16. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... a protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin can develop emphysema. Other risk factors for COPD are: Exposure to ...

  18. Adenosine receptors in the immature brain : with special reference to their role in hypoxic ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Ådén, Ulrika

    2001-01-01

    Although the newborn brain tolerates a much longer period of oxygen deprivation and ischemia than does the adult brain, perinatal hypoxic ischemia probably is an important cause of neurological dysfunction, cerebral palsy and epilepsy later in life. Hence it is important to investigate the mechanisms that modulate the extent of perinatal ischernic brain damage. There is good evidence that endogenous adenosine acts as a neuroprotective agent in models of ischemia in the m...

  19. Central nervous system hypoxic-ischemic injuries in newborns and infants: Initiation of membrane destructive process

    OpenAIRE

    Gulomjan Khalimbetov

    2012-01-01

    Comparison of S100 protein and MDA concentrations in blood of newborns and infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy demonstrated difference in the parameters by a type of cerebral ischemic syndrome. Follow-up study of serum S100 protein concentrations demonstrated absence of normalization in the parameter in patients with psychomotor retardation and paroxysmal syndrome, no normalization of MDA level found in examinees with emotional and behavioral disorders and psychomotor retardation.

  20. Dynamic hypoxic zones in Lake Erie compress fish habitat, altering vulnerability to fishing gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Richard T.; Knight, Carey T.; Farmer, Troy M.; Gorman, Ann Marie; Collingsworth, Paris D.; Warren, Glenn J.; Kocovsky, Patrick M.; Conroy, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal degradation of aquatic habitats from hypoxia occurs in numerous freshwater and coastal marine systems and can result in direct mortality or displacement of fish. Yet, fishery landings from these systems are frequently unresponsive to changes in the severity and extent of hypoxia, and population-scale effects have been difficult to measure except in extreme hypoxic conditions with hypoxia-sensitive species. We investigated fine-scale temporal and spatial variability in dissolved oxygen in Lake Erie as it related to fish distribution and catch efficiencies of both active (bottom trawls) and passive (trap nets) fishing gears. Temperature and dissolved oxygen loggers placed near the edge of the hypolimnion exhibited much higher than expected variability. Hypoxic episodes of variable durations were frequently punctuated by periods of normoxia, consistent with high-frequency internal waves. High-resolution interpolations of water quality and hydroacoustic surveys suggest that fish habitat is compressed during hypoxic episodes, resulting in higher fish densities near the edges of hypoxia. At fixed locations with passive commercial fishing gear, catches with the highest values occurred when bottom waters were hypoxic for intermediate proportions of time. Proximity to hypoxia explained significant variation in bottom trawl catches, with higher catch rates near the edge of hypoxia. These results emphasize how hypoxia may elevate catch rates in various types of fishing gears, leading to a lack of association between indices of hypoxia and fishery landings. Increased catch rates of fish at the edges of hypoxia have important implications for stock assessment models that assume catchability is spatially homogeneous.

  1. TGF-β2 is involved in the preservation of the chondrocyte phenotype under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, R; Timur, U T; Edip, S; Haak, E; Wruck, C; Weinans, H; Jahr, H

    2015-03-01

    Culturing chondrocytes under oxygen tension closely resembling their in vivo environment has been shown to have positive effects on matrix synthesis. In redifferentiation of expanded chondrocytes, hypoxia increased collagen type II expression. However, the mechanism by which hypoxia enhances redifferentiation is still unknown. We employed novel bioreactor technology to investigate the role of TGF-β, a growth factor heavily implicated in matrix production, in chondrocytes under hypoxia. Dedifferentiated chondrocytes in alginate were cultured for 48h under hypoxic (1% pO2) or normoxic (20%) conditions, using specialized bioreactor technology. Hypoxia induced gene expression (GDF1-, PHD3, HAS2, VEGF, COX2), chondrocyte markers (SOX9, COL2, COL1, AGC1 and MMP13), as well as components of the TGF-β signaling pathway (TGF-β isoforms, receptors, and downstream effectors) were analyzed by qPCR after 48h. In addition, protein expression of COL2 and TGF-β2 were evaluated. To further elucidate the involvement of the TGF-β2, we used siRNA and ALK5 inhibition. Hypoxic culture showed robust upregulation of hypoxic markers as well as upregulation of SOX9 and COL2 expression. Of all TGF-β isoforms, only TGF-β2 was upregulated under hypoxia on both gene and protein level. In addition, both type I receptors (ALK1 and ALK5) were upregulated under hypoxia, but type II and III receptors were not. TGF-β2 downregulation via siRNA abrogated the hypoxia-induced COL2 expression, as did ALK5 inhibition, giving a strong indication that this pathway is involved in chondrocyte redifferentiation under low oxygen tension. Hypoxic culture is a common approach for cartilage tissue engineering, but its underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we show that increased TGF-β2 signaling through ALK5 plays a role in hypoxia-induced redifferentiation of chondrocytes. PMID:25621374

  2. Flow-mediated dilation in the inactive limb following acute hypoxic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Keisho; Yamashita, Shin; Iwamoto, Erika; Ishida, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of acute aerobic exercise performed under hypoxic conditions on flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in the inactive limb. Seven males participated in the study. The subjects performed two submaximal leg cycling on a semirecumbent ergometer at the same relative intensity (60% peak oxygen uptake) in normoxia [inspired oxygen fraction (FIO2) = 0·21] and hypoxia (FIO2 = 0·12-0·13) for 30 min. The brachial artery diameter and blood velocity during exercise were measured via ultrasound, and the antegrade and retrograde shear rates were calculated. Before and 5, 30 and 60 min after exercise, brachial artery FMD was measured in normoxia. FMD was estimated as the percentage increase in peak diameter from the baseline diameter at prior occlusion (%FMD) and as the controlling changes in baseline diameter (the corrected-%FMD). No difference in antegrade shear rate during exercise was detected between the normoxic and hypoxic conditions, whereas the retrograde shear rate was larger during hypoxic exercise. The %FMD decreased significantly at 5 min after exercise in both normoxia and hypoxia, and it returned to pre-exercise levels within 60 min of recovery. Significant decreases in FMD at 5 min after exercise had disappeared when the baseline diameter was controlled using an analysis of covariance (the corrected-%FMD). No significant differences were observed between the normoxic and hypoxic trials in the %FMD and corrected-%FMD following exercise. These results suggest that hypoxia has no impact on endothelial function in the inactive limb following acute aerobic exercise. PMID:25257848

  3. Long Lasting Local and Systemic Inflammation after Cerebral Hypoxic ischemia in Newborn Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Max Winerdal; Malin Elisabeth Winerdal; Johan Kinn; Vijay Urmaliya; Ola Winqvist; Ulrika Adén

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxic ischemia (HI) is an important cause of neonatal brain injury and subsequent inflammation affects neurological outcome. In this study we performed investigations of systemic and local activation states of inflammatory cells from innate and adaptive immunity at different time points after neonatal HI brain injury in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a multiplex flow cytometry based method combined with immunohistochemistry to investigate cellular immune resp...

  4. Radioprotective effect of gas hypoxic mixture (GHM-10) with repeated irradiation of human and rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas hypoxic mixture (GHM-10) decreased sionificantly the occurrence and duration of radioepidermitis after local therapeutic fractionated irradiation of wistar rat skin with a cumulative dose of 66 Gy. In patients subjected to radiation therapy and protected with GHM-10 erythema and epidermitis developed at a much hioher cumulative dose than in the controls. With erythema dose modifying coefficient was 1.38+-0.06

  5. Early blood glucose profile and neurodevelopmental outcome at two years in neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nadeem, Montasser

    2011-02-04

    Abstract Background To examine the blood glucose profile and the relationship between blood glucose levels and neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Methods Blood glucose values within 72 hours of birth were collected from 52 term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Hypoglycaemia [< 46.8 mg\\/dL (2.6 mmol\\/L)] and hyperglycaemia [> 150 mg\\/dL (8.3 mmol\\/L)] were correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months of age. Results Four fifths of the 468 blood samples were in the normoglycaemic range (392\\/468:83.8%). Of the remaining 76 samples, 51.3% were in the hypoglycaemic range and (48.7%) were hyperglycaemic. A quarter of the hypoglycaemic samples (28.2%:11\\/39) and a third of the hyperglycaemic samples (32.4%:12\\/37) were recorded within the first 30 minutes of life. Mean (SD) blood glucose values did not differ between infants with normal and abnormal outcomes [4.89(2.28) mmol\\/L and 5.02(2.35) mmol\\/L, p value = 0.15] respectively. In term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, early hypoglycaemia (between 0-6 hours of life) was associated with adverse outcome at 24 months of age [OR = 5.8, CI = 1.04-32)]. On multivariate analysis to adjust for grade of HIE this association was not statistically significant. Late hypoglycaemia (6-72 hours of life) was not associated with abnormal outcome [OR = 0.22, CI (0.04-1.14)]. The occurrence of hyperglycaemia was not associated with adverse outcome. Conclusion During the first 72 hours of life, blood glucose profile in infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy varies widely despite a management protocol. Early hypoglycaemia (0-6 hours of life) was associated with severe HIE, and thereby; adverse outcome.

  6. Early blood glucose profile and neurodevelopmental outcome at two years in neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nadeem, Montasser

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: To examine the blood glucose profile and the relationship between blood glucose levels and neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. METHODS: Blood glucose values within 72 hours of birth were collected from 52 term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Hypoglycaemia [< 46.8 mg\\/dL (2.6 mmol\\/L)] and hyperglycaemia [> 150 mg\\/dL (8.3 mmol\\/L)] were correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months of age. RESULTS: Four fifths of the 468 blood samples were in the normoglycaemic range (392\\/468:83.8%). Of the remaining 76 samples, 51.3% were in the hypoglycaemic range and (48.7%) were hyperglycaemic. A quarter of the hypoglycaemic samples (28.2%:11\\/39) and a third of the hyperglycaemic samples (32.4%:12\\/37) were recorded within the first 30 minutes of life. Mean (SD) blood glucose values did not differ between infants with normal and abnormal outcomes [4.89(2.28) mmol\\/L and 5.02(2.35) mmol\\/L, p value = 0.15] respectively. In term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, early hypoglycaemia (between 0-6 hours of life) was associated with adverse outcome at 24 months of age [OR = 5.8, CI = 1.04-32)]. On multivariate analysis to adjust for grade of HIE this association was not statistically significant. Late hypoglycaemia (6-72 hours of life) was not associated with abnormal outcome [OR = 0.22, CI (0.04-1.14)]. The occurrence of hyperglycaemia was not associated with adverse outcome. CONCLUSION: During the first 72 hours of life, blood glucose profile in infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy varies widely despite a management protocol. Early hypoglycaemia (0-6 hours of life) was associated with severe HIE, and thereby; adverse outcome.

  7. Tissue remodeling of rat pulmonary arteries in recovery from hypoxic hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhuangjie; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Zong Lai; Gregersen, Hans; Fung, Yuan-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    The reversibility of tissue remodeling is of general interest to medicine. Pulmonary arterial tissue remodeling during hypertension induced by hypoxic breathing is well known, but little has been said about the recovery of the arterial wall when the blood pressure is lowered again. We hypothesize that tissue recovery is a function of the oxygen concentration, blood pressure, location on the vascular tree, and time. We measured the changes of blood pressure, vessel lumen, vessel wall thickness...

  8. Immunocytochemical labelling of aerobic and hypoxic mammalian cells using a platinated derivative of EF5.

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, J.; Adomat, H.; Farrell, N; King, P.; Koch, C.; Lord, E.; Palcic, B.; Poulin, N; Sangulin, J.; Skov, K.

    1996-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody ELK3-51 was previously developed to detect adducts of the 2-nitroimidazole EF5. Direct immunofluorescence was used to detect adducts of EF5 or of a platinated derivative cis-[PtCl2(NH3)EF5] in SCCVII cells treated under aerobic or hypoxic conditions. Fluorescence measurements of these cells using both image and flow cytometric methods were compared, giving similar profiles. Platination significantly decreased immunofluorescence levels (approximately 4-fold less than EF...

  9. Ultrasonic Estimation of Mechanical Properties of Pulmonary Arterial Wall Under Normoxic and Hypoxic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Kendall R.; Mukdadi, Osama M.

    2005-04-01

    Secondary pediatric pulmonary hypertension is a disease that could benefit from improved ultrasonic diagnostic techniques. We perform high-frequency in vitro ultrasound measurements (25 MHz to 100 MHz) on fresh and fixed pulmonary arterial walls excised from normoxic and hypoxic Long-Evans rat models. Estimates of the elastic stiffness coefficients are determined from measurements of the speed of sound. Preliminary results indicate that hypoxia leads to up to increase of 20 % in stiffening of the pulmonary arterial wall.

  10. Effects of normoxic and hypoxic exercise regimens on monocyte-mediated thrombin generation in sedentary men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jong-Shyan; Chang, Ya-Lun; Chen, Yi-Ching; Tsai, Hsing-Hua; Fu, Tieh-Cheng

    2015-08-01

    Exercise and hypoxia paradoxically modulate vascular thrombotic risks. The shedding of procoagulant-rich microparticles from monocytes may accelerate the pathogenesis of atherothrombosis. The present study explores the manner in which normoxic and hypoxic exercise regimens affect procoagulant monocyte-derived microparticle (MDMP) formation and monocyte-promoted thrombin generation (TG). Forty sedentary healthy males were randomized to perform either normoxic (NET; 21% O2, n=20) or hypoxic (HET; 15% O2, n=20) exercise training (60% VO(2max)) for 30 min/day, 5 days/week for 5 weeks. At rest and immediately after HET (100 W under 12% O2 for 30 min), the MDMP characteristics and dynamic TG were measured by flow cytometry and thrombinography respectively. The results demonstrated that acute 12% O2 exercise (i) increased the release of coagulant factor V (FV)/FVIII-rich, phosphatidylserine (PS)-exposed and tissue factor (TF)-expressed microparticles from monocytes, (ii) enhanced the peak height and rate of TG in monocyte-rich plasma (MRP) and (iii) elevated concentrations of norepinephrine/epinephrine, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in plasma. Following the 5-week intervention, HET exhibited higher enhancements of peak work-rate and cardiopulmonary fitness than NET did. Moreover, both NET and HET decreased the FV/FVIII-rich, PS-exposed and TF-expressed MDMP counts and the peak height and rate of TG in MRP following the HET. However, HET elicited more suppression for the HE (hypoxic exercise)-enhanced procoagulant MDMP formation and dynamic TG in MPR and catecholamine/peroxide/pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in plasma than NET. Hence, we conclude that HET is superior to NET for enhancing aerobic capacity. Furthermore, HET effectively suppresses procoagulant MDMP formation and monocyte-mediated TG under severe hypoxic stress, compared with NET. PMID:25826125

  11. Slow breathing and hypoxic challenge: cardiorespiratory consequences and their central neural substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo D Critchley

    Full Text Available Controlled slow breathing (at 6/min, a rate frequently adopted during yoga practice can benefit cardiovascular function, including responses to hypoxia. We tested the neural substrates of cardiorespiratory control in humans during volitional controlled breathing and hypoxic challenge using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Twenty healthy volunteers were scanned during paced (slow and normal rate breathing and during spontaneous breathing of normoxic and hypoxic (13% inspired O2 air. Cardiovascular and respiratory measures were acquired concurrently, including beat-to-beat blood pressure from a subset of participants (N = 7. Slow breathing was associated with increased tidal ventilatory volume. Induced hypoxia raised heart rate and suppressed heart rate variability. Within the brain, slow breathing activated dorsal pons, periaqueductal grey matter, cerebellum, hypothalamus, thalamus and lateral and anterior insular cortices. Blocks of hypoxia activated mid pons, bilateral amygdalae, anterior insular and occipitotemporal cortices. Interaction between slow breathing and hypoxia was expressed in ventral striatal and frontal polar activity. Across conditions, within brainstem, dorsal medullary and pontine activity correlated with tidal volume and inversely with heart rate. Activity in rostroventral medulla correlated with beat-to-beat blood pressure and heart rate variability. Widespread insula and striatal activity tracked decreases in heart rate, while subregions of insular cortex correlated with momentary increases in tidal volume. Our findings define slow breathing effects on central and cardiovascular responses to hypoxic challenge. They highlight the recruitment of discrete brainstem nuclei to cardiorespiratory control, and the engagement of corticostriatal circuitry in support of physiological responses that accompany breathing regulation during hypoxic challenge.

  12. Clusterin and chemotherapy sensitivity under normoxic and graded hypoxic conditions in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kevans, David

    2012-06-01

    In vitro studies have shown that clusterin modulates treatment sensitivity in a number of human cancers; however, the interaction between clusterin expression and hypoxia in controlling treatment response in CRC has not previously been examined. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of clusterin overexpression in CRC cells on sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin and FOLFOX treatment under normoxic and graded hypoxic conditions.

  13. Reactive Nitrogen Species in Mitochondria and Their Implications in Plant Energy Status and Hypoxic Stress Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Kapuganti Jagadis; Abir U Igamberdiev

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic and anoxic conditions result in the energy crisis that leads to cell damage. Since mitochondria are the primary organelles for energy production, the support of these organelles in a functional state is an important task during oxygen deprivation. Plant mitochondria adapted the strategy to survive under hypoxia by keeping electron transport operative even without oxygen via the use of nitrite as a terminal electrons acceptor. The process of nitrite reduction to nitric oxide (NO) in th...

  14. A proteomic view of Caenorhabditis elegans caused by short-term hypoxic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yonghong

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is both sensitive and tolerant to hypoxic stress, particularly when the evolutionarily conserved hypoxia response pathway HIF-1/EGL-9/VHL is involved. Hypoxia-induced changes in the expression of a number of genes have been analyzed using whole genome microarrays in C. elegans, but the changes at the protein level in response to hypoxic stress still remain unclear. Results Here, we utilized a quantitative proteomic approach to evaluate changes in the expression patterns of proteins during the early response to hypoxia in C. elegans. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE was used to compare the proteomic maps of wild type C. elegans strain N2 under a 4-h hypoxia treatment (0.2% oxygen and under normoxia (control. A subsequent analysis by MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS revealed nineteen protein spots that were differentially expressed. Nine of the protein spots were significantly upregulated, and ten were downregulated upon hypoxic stress. Three of the upregulated proteins were involved in cytoskeletal function (LEV-11, MLC-1, ACT-4, while another three upregulated (ATP-2, ATP-5, VHA-8 were ATP synthases functionally related to energy metabolism. Four ribosomal proteins (RPL-7, RPL-8, RPL-21, RPS-8 were downregulated, indicating a decrease in the level of protein translation upon hypoxic stress. The overexpression of tropomyosin (LEV-11 was further validated by Western blot. In addition, the mutant strain of lev-11(x12 also showed a hypoxia-sensitive phenotype in subsequent analyses, confirming the proteomic findings. Conclusions Taken together, our data suggest that altered protein expression, structural protein remodeling, and the reduction of translation might play important roles in the early response to oxygen deprivation in C. elegans, and this information will help broaden our knowledge on the mechanism of hypoxia response.

  15. Role of Notch Signaling in the Maintenance of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Under Hypoxic Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    MORIYAMA, Hiroyuki; Moriyama, Mariko; Isshi, Haruki; Ishihara, Shin; Okura, Hanayuki; Ichinose, Akihiro; Ozawa, Toshiyuki; Matsuyama, Akifumi; Hayakawa, Takao

    2014-01-01

    Human adipose tissue-derived multilineage progenitor cells (hADMPCs) are attractive for cell therapy and tissue engineering because of their multipotency and ease of isolation without serial ethical issues. However, their limited in vitro lifespan in culture systems hinders their therapeutic application. Some somatic stem cells, including hADMPCs, are known to be localized in hypoxic regions; thus, hypoxia may be beneficial for ex vivo culture of these stem cells. These cells exhibit a high l...

  16. Exercise Training during Normobaric Hypoxic Confinement Does Not Alter Hormonal Appetite Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Debevec, Tadej; Elizabeth J Simpson; MacDonald, Ian A; Eiken, Ola; Igor B Mekjavic

    2014-01-01

    Background Both exposure to hypoxia and exercise training have the potential to modulate appetite and induce beneficial metabolic adaptations. The purpose of this study was to determine whether daily moderate exercise training performed during a 10-day exposure to normobaric hypoxia alters hormonal appetite regulation and augments metabolic health. Methods Fourteen healthy, male participants underwent a 10-day hypoxic confinement at ∼4000 m simulated altitude (FIO2 = 0.139±0.003%) either comb...

  17. Sexually dimorphic outcomes and inflammatory responses in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Mirza, Mehwish A; Ritzel, Rodney; Xu, Yan; McCullough, Louise D.; Liu, Fudong

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is an important cause of motor and cognitive impairment in children. Clinically, male infants are more vulnerable to ischemic insults and suffer more long-term deficits than females; however, the mechanisms underlying this sex difference remain elusive. Inflammatory processes initiated by microglial activation are fundamental in the pathophysiology of ischemia. Recent studies report a sexual dimorphism in microglia numbers and expressi...

  18. Chronic Treatment with a Water-Soluble Extract from the Culture Medium of Ganoderma lucidum Mycelia Prevents Apoptosis and Necroptosis in Hypoxia/Ischemia-Induced Injury of Type 2 Diabetic Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiyan Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been known to increase systemic oxidative stress by chronic hyperglycemia and visceral obesity and aggravate cerebral ischemic injury. On the basis of our previous study regarding a water-soluble extract from the culture medium of Ganoderma lucidum mycelia (designed as MAK, which exerts antioxidative and neuroprotective effects, the present study was conducted to evaluate the preventive effects of MAK on apoptosis and necroptosis (a programmed necrosis induced by hypoxia/ischemia (H/I in type 2 diabetic KKAy mice. H/I was induced by a combination of unilateral common carotid artery ligation with hypoxia (8% O2 for 20 min and subsequent reoxygenation. Pretreatment with MAK (1 g/kg, p.o. for a week significantly reduced H/I-induced neurological deficits and brain infarction volume assessed at 24 h of reoxygenation. Histochemical analysis showed that MAK significantly suppressed superoxide production, neuronal cell death, and vacuolation in the ischemic penumbra, which was accompanied by a decrease in the numbers of TUNEL- or cleaved caspase-3-positive cells. Furthermore, MAK decreased the expression of receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 mRNA and protein, a key molecule for necroptosis. These results suggest that MAK confers resistance to apoptotic and necroptotic cell death and relieves H/I-induced cerebral ischemic injury in type 2 diabetic mice.

  19. Chronic Treatment with a Water-Soluble Extract from the Culture Medium of Ganoderma lucidum Mycelia Prevents Apoptosis and Necroptosis in Hypoxia/Ischemia-Induced Injury of Type 2 Diabetic Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Meiyan; Okazaki, Mari; Iwata, Naohiro; Asano, Satoshi; Kamiuchi, Shinya; Matsuzaki, Hirokazu; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Miyano, Yoshiyuki; Iizuka, Hiroshi; Hibino, Yasuhide

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been known to increase systemic oxidative stress by chronic hyperglycemia and visceral obesity and aggravate cerebral ischemic injury. On the basis of our previous study regarding a water-soluble extract from the culture medium of Ganoderma lucidum mycelia (designed as MAK), which exerts antioxidative and neuroprotective effects, the present study was conducted to evaluate the preventive effects of MAK on apoptosis and necroptosis (a programmed necrosis) induced by hypoxia/ischemia (H/I) in type 2 diabetic KKAy mice. H/I was induced by a combination of unilateral common carotid artery ligation with hypoxia (8% O2 for 20 min) and subsequent reoxygenation. Pretreatment with MAK (1 g/kg, p.o.) for a week significantly reduced H/I-induced neurological deficits and brain infarction volume assessed at 24 h of reoxygenation. Histochemical analysis showed that MAK significantly suppressed superoxide production, neuronal cell death, and vacuolation in the ischemic penumbra, which was accompanied by a decrease in the numbers of TUNEL- or cleaved caspase-3-positive cells. Furthermore, MAK decreased the expression of receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 mRNA and protein, a key molecule for necroptosis. These results suggest that MAK confers resistance to apoptotic and necroptotic cell death and relieves H/I-induced cerebral ischemic injury in type 2 diabetic mice. PMID:25945116

  20. IMD-4690, a novel specific inhibitor for plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, reduces allergic airway remodeling in a mouse model of chronic asthma via regulating angiogenesis and remodeling-related mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, Toshifumi; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Azuma, Masahiko; Goto, Hisatsugu; Uehara, Hisanori; Aono, Yoshinori; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Yoichi; Fujikawa, Tomoyuki; Itai, Akiko; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is the principal inhibitor of plasminogen activators, and is responsible for the degradation of fibrin and extracellular matrix. IMD-4690 is a newly synthesized inhibitor for PAI-1, whereas the effect on allergic airway inflammation and remodeling is still unclear. We examined the in vivo effects by using a chronic allergen exposure model of bronchial asthma in mice. The model was generated by an immune challenge for 8 weeks with house dust mite antigen, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp). IMD-4690 was intraperitoneally administered during the challenge. Lung histopathology, hyperresponsiveness and the concentrations of mediators in lung homogenates were analyzed. The amount of active PAI-1 in the lungs was increased in mice treated with Dp. Administration with IMD-4690 reduced an active/total PAI-1 ratio. IMD-4690 also reduced the number of bronchial eosinophils in accordance with the decreased expressions of Th2 cytokines in the lung homogenates. Airway remodeling was inhibited by reducing subepithelial collagen deposition, smooth muscle hypertrophy, and angiogenesis. The effects of IMD-4690 were partly mediated by the regulation of TGF-β, HGF and matrix metalloproteinase. These results suggest that PAI-1 plays crucial roles in airway inflammation and remodeling, and IMD-4690, a specific PAI-1 inhibitor, may have therapeutic potential for patients with refractory asthma due to airway remodeling. PMID:25785861

  1. IMD-4690, a novel specific inhibitor for plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, reduces allergic airway remodeling in a mouse model of chronic asthma via regulating angiogenesis and remodeling-related mediators.

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    Toshifumi Tezuka

    Full Text Available Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1 is the principal inhibitor of plasminogen activators, and is responsible for the degradation of fibrin and extracellular matrix. IMD-4690 is a newly synthesized inhibitor for PAI-1, whereas the effect on allergic airway inflammation and remodeling is still unclear. We examined the in vivo effects by using a chronic allergen exposure model of bronchial asthma in mice. The model was generated by an immune challenge for 8 weeks with house dust mite antigen, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp. IMD-4690 was intraperitoneally administered during the challenge. Lung histopathology, hyperresponsiveness and the concentrations of mediators in lung homogenates were analyzed. The amount of active PAI-1 in the lungs was increased in mice treated with Dp. Administration with IMD-4690 reduced an active/total PAI-1 ratio. IMD-4690 also reduced the number of bronchial eosinophils in accordance with the decreased expressions of Th2 cytokines in the lung homogenates. Airway remodeling was inhibited by reducing subepithelial collagen deposition, smooth muscle hypertrophy, and angiogenesis. The effects of IMD-4690 were partly mediated by the regulation of TGF-β, HGF and matrix metalloproteinase. These results suggest that PAI-1 plays crucial roles in airway inflammation and remodeling, and IMD-4690, a specific PAI-1 inhibitor, may have therapeutic potential for patients with refractory asthma due to airway remodeling.

  2. Mutual regulation between SIAH2 and DYRK2 controls hypoxic and genotoxic signaling pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Moisés Pérez; Carmen García-Limones; Inés Zapico; Anabel Marina; M. Lienhard Schmitz; Eduardo Mu(n)oz; Marco A. Calzado

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin E3 ligase SIAH2 is an important regulator of the hypoxic response as it leads to the ubiquitin/proteasomal degradation of prolyl hydroxylases such as PHD3,which in turn increases the stability of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α.In the present study,we identify the serine/threonine kinase DYRK2 as SIAH2 interaction partner that phosphorylates SIAH2 at five residues (Ser16,Thr26,Ser28,Ser68,and Thr119).Phosphomimetic and phospho-mutant forms of SIAH2 exhibit different subcellular localizations and consequently change in PHD3 degrading activity.Accordingly,phosphorylated SIAH2 is more active than the wild-type E3 ligase and shows an increased ability to trigger the HIF-1α-mediated transcriptional response and angiogenesis.We also found that SIAH2 knockdown increases DYRK2 stability,whereas SIAH2 expression facilitates DYRK2 polyubiquitination and degradation.Hypoxic conditions cause a SIAH2-dependent DYRK2 polyubiquitination and degradation which ultimately also results in an impaired SIAH2 phosphorylation.Similarly,DYRK2-mediated phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 is impaired under hypoxic conditions,suggesting a molecular mechanism underlying chemotherapy resistance in solid tumors.

  3. Post-hypoxic recovery of respiratory rhythm generation is gender dependent.

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    Alfredo J Garcia

    Full Text Available The preBötzinger complex (preBötC is a critical neuronal network for the generation of breathing. Lesioning the preBötC abolishes respiration, while when isolated in vitro, the preBötC continues to generate respiratory rhythmic activity. Although several factors influence rhythmogenesis from this network, little is known about how gender may affect preBötC function. This study examines the influence of gender on respiratory activity and in vitro rhythmogenesis from the preBötC. Recordings of respiratory activity from neonatal mice (P10-13 show that sustained post-hypoxic depression occurs with greater frequency in males compared to females. Moreover, extracellular population recordings from the preBötC in neonatal brainstem slices (P10-13 reveal that the time to the first inspiratory burst following reoxygenation (TTFB is significantly delayed in male rhythmogenesis when compared to the female rhythms. Altering activity of ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP with either the agonist, diazoxide, or the antagonist, tolbutamide, eliminates differences in TTFB. By contrast, glucose supplementation improves post-hypoxic recovery of female but not male rhythmogenesis. We conclude that post-hypoxic recovery of respiration is gender dependent, which is, in part, centrally manifested at the level of the preBötC. Moreover, these findings provide potential insight into the basis of increased male vulnerability in a variety of conditions such as Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS.

  4. Neuroprotective actions of taurine on hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Yun; Ma, Peng-Sheng; Wu, Wei; Zhou, Ru; Hao, Yin-Ju; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Li, Yu-Xiang; Yu, Jian-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Taurine is an abundant amino acid in the nervous system, which has been proved to possess antioxidation, osmoregulation and membrane stabilization. Previously it has been demonstrated that taurine exerts ischemic brain injury protective effect. This study was designed to investigate whether the protective effect of taurine has the possibility to be applied to treat neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. Seven-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with left carotid artery ligation followed by exposure to 8% oxygen to generate the experimental group. The cerebral damage area was measured after taurine post-treatment with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining, Hematoxyline-Eosin (HE) staining and Nissl staining. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), myeloperoxtidase (MPO), ATP and Lactic Acid productions were assayed with ipsilateral hemisphere homogenates. Western-blot and immunofluorescence assay were processed to detect the expressions of AIF, Cyt C, Bax, Bcl-2 in brain. We found that taurine significantly reduced brain infarct volume and ameliorated morphological injury obviously reversed the changes of SOD, MDA, GSH-Px, T-AOC, ATP, MPO, and Lactic Acid levels. Compared with hypoxic-ischemic group, it showed marked reduction of AIF, Cyt C and Bax expressions and increase of Bcl-2 after post-treatment. We conclude that taurine possesses an efficacious neuroprotective effect after cerebral hypoxic-ischemic damage in neonatal rats. PMID:27345710

  5. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-bo Li; Yan Wang; Ji-ping Tang; Di Chen; Sha-li Wang

    2015-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1 is the major pharmacologically active component of ginseng, and is reported to have various therapeutic actions. To determine whether it induces the differentiation of neural stem cells, and whether neural stem cell transplantation after induction has therapeutic effects on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, we cultured neural stem cells in 10–80 μM ginsenoside Rg1. Immunohistochemistry revealed that of the concentrations tested, 20 mM ginsenoside Rg1 had the greatest differentiation-inducing effect and was the concentration used for subsequent exper-iments. Whole-cell patch clamp showed that neural stem cells induced by 20 μM ginsenoside Rg1 were more mature than non-induced cells. We then established neonatal rat models of hypox-ic-ischemic encephalopathy using the suture method, and ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells were transplantedvia intracerebroventricular injection. These tests conifrmed that neural stem cells induced by ginsenoside had fewer pathological lesions and had a signiifcantly better behavioral capacity than model rats that received saline. Transplanted neural stem cells expressed neuron-speciifc enolase, and were mainly distributed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The present data suggest that ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells can promote the partial recovery of complicated brain functions in models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  6. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-bo Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside Rg1 is the major pharmacologically active component of ginseng, and is reported to have various therapeutic actions. To determine whether it induces the differentiation of neural stem cells, and whether neural stem cell transplantation after induction has therapeutic effects on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, we cultured neural stem cells in 10-80 µM ginsenoside Rg1. Immunohistochemistry revealed that of the concentrations tested, 20 mM ginsenoside Rg1 had the greatest differentiation-inducing effect and was the concentration used for subsequent experiments. Whole-cell patch clamp showed that neural stem cells induced by 20 µM ginsenoside Rg1 were more mature than non-induced cells. We then established neonatal rat models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy using the suture method, and ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells were transplanted via intracerebroventricular injection. These tests confirmed that neural stem cells induced by ginsenoside had fewer pathological lesions and had a significantly better behavioral capacity than model rats that received saline. Transplanted neural stem cells expressed neuron-specific enolase, and were mainly distributed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The present data suggest that ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells can promote the partial recovery of complicated brain functions in models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  7. Effect of etanidazole-loaded nanoparticles on radiosensitization of hypoxic tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To prepare active and controlled etanidazole-loaded nanoparticles and to determine the ability to radiosensitize hypoxie human breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7) and human carcinoma cervices cells (HeLa). Methods: The poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide)(PLGA) nanoparticles containing etanidazole were prepared by w/o/w emulsification-solvent evaporation method. The drug loading efficiency, the encapsulation efficiency (EE) and the release profile in vitro were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The morphology of the etanidazole-loaded nanoparticles was investigated by transmission electron microscope. The size distribution of nanoparticles was determined by laser diffraction analyzer. Cell viability was measured by the ability of single cell to form colonies in vitro. Results: The prepared nanoparticles were spherical in shape with sizes between 90 and 190 nm. The drug loading efficiency and EE was 1.66% and 18.02%, respectively. The drug release pattern was biphasic with a fast release rate followed by a slow one. Co- culture of hypoxic MCF-7 and HeLa cells with etanidazole-loaded nanoparticles and free etanidazole demonstrated that released etanidazole effectively sensitized hypoxic tumor cells to irradiation. Compared with free etanidazole, radiosensitization of etanidazole-loaded nanoparticles was more significant. Conclusions: It is demonstrated that etanidazole can be effectively released from a biodegradable PLGA nanoparticle delivery system while maintaining potent radiosensitizing ability for hypoxic tumor cells. (authors)

  8. Compensatory vasodilatation during hypoxic exercise: mechanisms responsible for matching oxygen supply to demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Darren P; Joyner, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia can have profound influences on the circulation. In humans, acute exposure to moderate hypoxia has been demonstrated to result in vasodilatation in the coronary, cerebral, splanchnic and skeletal muscle vascular beds. The combination of submaximal exercise and hypoxia produces a ‘compensatory’ vasodilatation and augmented blood flow in contracting skeletal muscles relative to the same level of exercise under normoxic conditions. This augmented vasodilatation exceeds that predicted by a simple sum of the individual dilator responses to hypoxia alone and normoxic exercise. Additionally, this enhanced hypoxic exercise hyperaemia is proportional to the hypoxia-induced fall in arterial oxygen (O2) content, thus preserving muscle O2 delivery and ensuring it is matched to demand. Several vasodilator pathways have been proposed and examined as likely regulators of skeletal muscle blood flow in response to changes in arterial O2 content. The purpose of this review is to put into context the present evidence regarding mechanisms responsible for the compensatory vasodilatation observed during hypoxic exercise in humans. Along these lines, this review will highlight the interactions between various local metabolic and endothelial derived substances that influence vascular tone during hypoxic exercise. PMID:22988134

  9. Preferential kill of hypoxic EMT6 mammary tumor cells by the bioreductive alkylating agent porfiromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorelli, A C; Belcourt, M F; Hodnick, W F; Keyes, S R; Pritsos, C A; Rockwell, S

    1995-01-01

    Hypoxic cells in solid tumors represent a therapeutically resistant population that limits the curability of many solid tumors by irradiation and by most chemotherapeutic agents. The oxygen deficit, however, creates an environment conducive to reductive processes; this results in a major exploitable difference between normal and neoplastic tissues. The mitomycin antibiotics can be reductively activated by a number of oxidoreductases, in a process required for the production of their therapeutic effects. Preferential activation of these drugs under hypoxia and greater toxicity to oxygen-deficient cells than to their oxygenated counterparts are obtained in most instances. The demonstration that mitomycin C and porfiromycin, used to kill the hypoxic fraction, in combination with irradiation, to eradicate the oxygenated portion of the tumor, produced enhanced cytodestructive effects on solid tumors in animals has led to the clinical evaluation of the mitomycins in combination with radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. The findings from these clinical trials have demonstrated the value of directing a concerted therapeutic attack on the hypoxic fraction of solid tumors as an approach toward enhancing the curability of localized neoplasms by irradiation. PMID:7572339

  10. Periostin Promotes Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation following Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury.

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    Si-Min Ma

    Full Text Available Neural stem cell (NSC proliferation and differentiation are required to replace neurons damaged or lost after hypoxic-ischemic events and recover brain function. Periostin (POSTN, a novel matricellular protein, plays pivotal roles in the survival, migration, and regeneration of various cell types, but its function in NSCs of neonatal rodent brain is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of POSTN in NSCs following hypoxia-ischemia (HI. We found that POSTN mRNA levels significantly increased in differentiating NSCs. The proliferation and differentiation of NSCs in the hippocampus is compromised in POSTN knockout mice. Moreover, NSC proliferation and differentiation into neurons and astrocytes significantly increased in cultured NSCs treated with recombinant POSTN. Consistently, injection of POSTN into neonatal hypoxic-ischemic rat brains stimulated NSC proliferation and differentiation in the subventricular and subgranular zones after 7 and 14 days of brain injury. Lastly, POSTN treatment significantly improved the spatial learning deficits of rats subjected to HI. These results suggest that POSTN significantly enhances NSC proliferation and differentiation after HI, and provides new insights into therapeutic strategies for the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  11. Radiosensitization and hypoxic cell toxicity of NLA-1 and NLA-2, two new bioreductive compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulou, M.V.; Epperly, M.W.; Shields, D.S. (Pittsburgh Cancer Institute PA (USA)); Bloomer, W.D.

    1992-04-01

    Two new bioreductive compounds, 9-(3-(2-nitro-1-imidazolyl)propylamino)acridine hydrochloride (NLA-1) and 9-(2-(2-nitro-1-imidazolyl)ethylamino)acridine hydrochloride (NLA-2), have been prepared. They feature an acridine ring to intercalate with DNA, a 2-nitroimidazole ring as the radiosensitizing moiety and an amino functionality for increased DNA-binding and hydrophilicity. Time concentration dependent cytotoxicity as well as radiosensitization efficacy of the two compounds under hypoxic or aerobic conditions were determined in vitro using V-79 cells and an MTT colorimetric or clonogenic assay. The isosensitization point (ISP), defined as that drug concentration which results in the same survival decrement upon exposure of hypoxic of oxygenated cells to a given radiation dose, has been determined for both compounds at 7.5 Gy and the values are significantly lower than the ISPs of 5-(3-(2-nitro-1-imidazolyl)propyl)phenanthridinium bromide, 2-(2-nitro-1-imidazolyl)ethylamine or misonidazole (MISO). NLA-1 and NLA-2 are potent hypoxic cytotoxins and on a concentration basis, more potent than MISO as radiosensitizers in vitro. The sensitization enhancement ratios were significantly increased when 1 h drug preincubation under hypoxia at 37degC was applied, before irradiation at room temperature. (author).

  12. Zooplankton variation in relation to hydrology in an enclosed hypoxic bay (Amvrakikos Gulf, Greece

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    G. KEHAYIAS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the temporal and spatial variation of the zooplankton community of a hypoxic coastal embayment (Amvrakikos Gulf, western Greece in relation to hydrological characteristics during an annual cycle. The main hydrological feature was the prolonged water stratification, which determined hypoxic conditions in the deeper layers that became anoxic close to the bottom in September, while vertical mixing occurred for a very short period (October-November. The total zooplankton abundance fluctuated between 44.6 and 159.7 ind l-1. Fourteen groups were recorded, among which copepods dominated accounting on average for 86.4 %. Most of the groups presented higher abundance values in winter and spring when increased chlorophyll-α concentrations were found. Oxygen depletion affects the vertical distribution of most zooplankton groups and the vertical habitat partitioning between copepod orders and their ontogenetic stages. Several taxa were recorded even in the deep, anoxic layers, but only the polychaete larvae increased in abundance with depth. Calanoids, appendicularians and bivalve larvae presented eastward decrease of abundance in the deepest layers following the same pattern of oxygen decrease. Notwithstanding hypoxic conditions in its deepest layers, Amvrakikos Gulf was accounted for a mesotrophic ecosystem, with the nutrient concentration being lower than in the past. Several biotic elements indicate that the gulf is in a transitional phase towards a better quality state and these results reinforce the need for consistent monitoring of this ecosystem.

  13. Thioperamide treats neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy by postsynaptic H1 receptors*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feiyong Jia; Lin Du; Yunpeng Hao; Shicheng Liu; Ning Li; Huiyi Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Thioperamide, a selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, can increase histamine content in the brain, improve brain edema, and exert a neuroprotective effect. This study aimed to examine the mechanism of action of thioperamide during brain edema in a rat model of neonatal hypoxic- is-chemic encephalopathy. Our results showed that thioperamide significantly decreased brain water content and malondialdehyde levels, while significantly increased histamine levels and superoxide dismutase activity in the hippocampus. This evidence demonstrates that thioperamide could pre-vent oxidative damage and attenuate brain edema fol owing neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encepha-lopathy. We further observed that changes in the above indexes occurred after combined treatment of thioperamide with the H1 receptor antagonist, pyrilamine, and the H2 receptor antagonist, ci-metidine. Experimental findings indicated that pyrilamine reversed the effects of thioperamide;however, cimetidine had no significant influence on the effects of thioperamide. Our present findings suggest that thioperamide can increase brain histamine content and attenuate brain edema and oxidative damage by acting in combination with postsynaptic H1 receptors in a rat model of neo-natal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  14. Blood carbon dioxide levels and adverse outcome in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nadeem, Montasser

    2012-01-31

    We investigated pCO(2) patterns and the relationship between pCO(2) levels and neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Blood gases during the first 72 hours of life were collected from 52 infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Moderate hypocapnia (pCO(2) <3.3 kPa), severe hypocapnia (pCO(2) <2.6 kPa), and hypercapnia (pCO(2) >6.6 kPa) were correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months. Normocapnia was documented in 416\\/551 (75.5%) of samples and was present during the entire 72 hours in only 6 out of 52 infants. Mean (standard deviation) pCO(2) values did not differ between infants with normal and abnormal outcomes: 5.43 (2.4) and 5.41 (2.03), respectively. There was no significant association between moderate hypocapnia, severe hypocapnia, or hypercapnia and adverse outcome (odds ratio [OR] = 1.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.49 to 6.89; OR = 3.16, CI = 0.14 to 28.45; and OR = 1.07, CI = 0.24 to 5.45, respectively). In conclusion, only one in nine newborns had normocapnia throughout the first 72 hours. Severe hypocapnia was rare and occurred only in ventilated babies. Hypercapnia and hypocapnia in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy during the first 72 hours of life were not associated with adverse outcome.

  15. ZEB1 Promotes Invasion in Human Fetal Neural Stem Cells and Hypoxic Glioma Neurospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlert, Ulf D; Suwala, Abigail K; Raabe, Eric H; Siebzehnrubl, Florian A; Suarez, Maria J; Orr, Brent A; Bar, Eli E; Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw; Eberhart, Charles G

    2015-11-01

    Diffuse spread through brain parenchyma and the presence of hypoxic foci rimmed by neoplastic cells are two cardinal features of glioblastoma, and low oxygen is thought to drive movement of malignant gliomas in the core of the lesions. Transcription factors associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) have been linked to this invasion, and we found that hypoxia increased in vitro invasion up to fourfold in glioblastoma neurosphere lines and induced the expression of ZEB1. Immunohistochemical assessment of 295 surgical specimens consisting of various types of pediatric and adult brain cancers showed that ZEB1 expression was significantly higher in infiltrative lesions than less invasive tumors such as pilocytic astrocytoma and ependymoma. ZEB1 protein was also present in human fetal periventricular stem and progenitor cells and ZEB1 inhibition impaired migration of in vitro propagated human neural stem cells. The induction of ZEB1 protein in hypoxic glioblastoma neurospheres could be partially blocked by the HIF1alpha inhibitor digoxin. Targeting ZEB1 blocked hypoxia-augmented invasion of glioblastoma cells in addition to slowing them in normoxia. These data support the role for ZEB1 in invasive and high-grade brain tumors and suggest its key role in promoting invasion in the hypoxic tumor core as well as in the periphery. PMID:25521330

  16. Clinic-like animal model for causal-pathogenetical investigations of hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex nature of the pathogenesis in hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries equires the combined determination of the dynamics of main factors in these disturbing processes. The application of suitable methods for registration of such pathogenetic processes is shown in an adequate animal model for simulating the early hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries. That the radioactive labelled microsphere technique is suitable to comprehend quantitively the dynamics of the intracerebral redistribution of the circulating blood due to hypoxia/hypercapnia by simultaneous-multiple measuring of the regional cerebral blood flow. Therefore, at the first time an inadequate hypoxic-induced blood flow increase was shown in large parts of the forebrain in intrauterine growth retarded newborn piglets. For estimation of the regional cerebral glucose utilization in newborn piglets, the 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography is introduced. The measurements were carried out on a stationary high-density avalanche chamber (HIDAC) camera and yielded the fundamental application of this camera model for PET investigations also in the newborn brain due to the very good spatial resolution. (orig.)

  17. Reactive nitrogen species in mitochondria and their implications in plant energy status and hypoxic stress tolerance

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    Kapuganti Jagadis Gupta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic and anoxic conditions result in the energy crisis that leads to cell damage. Since mitochondria are the primary organelles for energy production, the support of these organelles in a functional state is an important task during oxygen deprivation. Plant mitochondria adapted the strategy to survive under hypoxia by keeping electron transport operative even without oxygen via the use of nitrite as a terminal electrons acceptor. The process of nitrite reduction to nitric oxide (NO in the mitochondrial electron transport chain recycles NADH and leads to a limited rate of ATP production. The produced ATP alongside with the ATP generated by fermentation supports the processes of transcription and translation required for hypoxic survival and recovery of plants. Non-symbiotic hemoglobins (called phytoglobins in plants scavenge NO and thus contribute to regeneration of NAD+ and nitrate required for the operation of anaerobic energy metabolism. This overall operation represents an important strategy of biochemical adaptation that results in the improvement of energy status and thereby in protection of plants in the conditions of hypoxic stress.

  18. Hypoxic regulation of cytoglobin and neuroglobin expression in human normal and tumor tissues

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    Emara Marwan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytoglobin (Cygb and neuroglobin (Ngb are recently identified globin molecules that are expressed in vertebrate tissues. Upregulation of Cygb and Ngb under hypoxic and/or ischemic conditions in vitro and in vivo increases cell survival, suggesting possible protective roles through prevention of oxidative damage. We have previously shown that Ngb is expressed in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM cell lines, and that expression of its transcript and protein can be significantly increased after exposure to physiologically relevant levels of hypoxia. In this study, we extended this work to determine whether Cygb is also expressed in GBM cells, and whether its expression is enhanced under hypoxic conditions. We also compared Cygb and Ngb expression in human primary tumor specimens, including brain tumors, as well as in human normal tissues. Immunoreactivity of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX, a hypoxia-inducible metalloenzyme that catalyzes the hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate, was used as an endogenous marker of hypoxia. Results Cygb transcript and protein were expressed in human GBM cells, and this expression was significantly increased in most cells following 48 h incubation under hypoxia. We also showed that Cygb and Ngb are expressed in both normal tissues and human primary cancers, including GBM. Among normal tissues, Cygb and Ngb expression was restricted to distinct cell types and was especially prominent in ductal cells. Additionally, certain normal organs (e.g. stomach fundus, small bowel showed distinct regional co-localization of Ngb, Cygb and CA IX. In most tumors, Ngb immunoreactivity was significantly greater than that of Cygb. In keeping with previous in vitro results, tumor regions that were positively stained for CA IX were also positive for Ngb and Cygb, suggesting that hypoxic upregulation of Ngb and Cygb also occurs in vivo. Conclusions Our finding of hypoxic up-regulation of Cygb/Ngb in GBM cell lines and human

  19. Hypoxic conditions induce a cancer-like phenotype in human breast epithelial cells.

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    Marica Vaapil

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Solid tumors are less oxygenated than their tissue of origin. Low intra-tumor oxygen levels are associated with worse outcome, increased metastatic potential and immature phenotype in breast cancer. We have reported that tumor hypoxia correlates to low differentiation status in breast cancer. Less is known about effects of hypoxia on non-malignant cells. Here we address whether hypoxia influences the differentiation stage of non-malignant breast epithelial cells and potentially have bearing on early stages of tumorigenesis. METHODS: Normal human primary breast epithelial cells and immortalized non-malignant mammary epithelial MCF-10A cells were grown in a three-dimensional overlay culture on laminin-rich extracellular matrix for up to 21 days at normoxic or hypoxic conditions. Acinar morphogenesis and expression of markers of epithelial differentiation and cell polarization were analyzed by immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, qPCR and immunoblot. RESULTS: In large ductal carcinoma in situ patient-specimens, we find that epithelial cells with high HIF-1α levels and multiple cell layers away from the vasculature are immature compared to well-oxygenated cells. We show that hypoxic conditions impaired acinar morphogenesis of primary and immortalized breast epithelial cells grown ex vivo on laminin-rich matrix. Normoxic cultures formed polarized acini-like spheres with the anticipated distribution of marker proteins associated with mammary epithelial polarization e.g. α6-integrin, laminin 5 and Human Milk Fat Globule/MUC1. At hypoxia, cells were not polarized and the sub-cellular distribution pattern of the marker proteins rather resembled that reported in vivo in breast cancer. The hypoxic cells remained in a mitotic state, whereas proliferation ceased with acinar morphogenesis at normoxia. We found induced expression of the differentiation repressor ID1 in the undifferentiated hypoxic MCF-10A cell structures. Acinar

  20. GLUT1 gene is a potential hypoxic marker in colorectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor hypoxia is an important factor related to tumor resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This study investigated molecules synthesized in colorectal cancer cells during hypoxia to explore the possibility of developing molecular probes capable of detecting cell death and/or the efficiency of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. At first, we incubated two human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines SW480 (UICC stage II) and SW620 (UICC stage III) cells in hypoxic (≤2% O2, 93% N2, and 5% CO2) and normoxic conditions (20% O2, 75% N2, and 5% CO2) for 24 h and 48 h. The relative expression ratio of GLUT1 mRNA in hypoxic conditions was analyzed by RT-PCR. Ten cancerous tissues collected from human colorectal cancer patients were examined. HIF-1α and HIF-2α levels were measured to indicate the degree of hypoxia, and gene expression under hypoxic conditions was determined. As a comparison, HIF-1α, HIF-2α, and GLUT1 levels were measured in the peripheral blood of 100 CRC patients. Hypoxia-induced lactate was found to be elevated 3.24- to 3.36-fold in SW480 cells, and 3.06- to 3.17-fold in SW620 cells. The increased relative expression ratio of GLUT1 mRNA, under hypoxic conditions was higher in SW620 cells (1.39- to 1.72-fold elevation) than in SW480 cells (1.24- to 1.66-fold elevation). HIF-1α and HIF-2α levels were elevated and GLUT1 genes were significantly overexpressed in CRC tissue specimens. The elevated ratio of GLUT1 was higher in stage III and IV CRC tissue specimens than in the stage I and II (2.97–4.73 versus 1.44–2.11). GLUT1 mRNA was also increased in the peripheral blood of stage II and III CRC patients as compared to stage I patients, suggesting that GLUT1 may serve as a hypoxic indicator in CRC patients. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that GLUT1 has the potential to be employed as a molecular marker to indicate the degree of hypoxia experienced by tumors circulating in the blood of cancer patients