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Sample records for chronic hypoxic mouse

  1. Effect of breviscapine on fractalkine expression in chronic hypoxic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-ju; CHENG De-yun; YANG Li; XIA Xiu-qiong; GUAN Jian

    2006-01-01

    @@ Fractalkine (FKN) is the only known chemokine that fulfils the dual functions of an adhesive molecule and a soluble chemoattractant.1 FKN expression was reported increase in lungs of patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension,2 suggesting that FKN may participate in pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension.Breviscapine is a flavonoid extracted from Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand. Mazz. Breviscapine can prevent the development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension3 but the mechanism is unknown. This study evaluated the role of FKN in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and the effect of breviscapine on FKN in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

  2. The Effect of Ginkgo Biloba Extract on Hypoxic Fraction of C3H Mouse Fibrosarcoma

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    Cho, Chul Koo; Yi, Chun Ja; Ha, Sung Whan; Park, Charn Il [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    Purpose : To investigate the effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) on hypoxic cell fraction and metabolic status in fibrosarcoma (FSa II) of C3H mouse. Materials and Methods : Fibrosarcoma (Fsa II), 6mm in diameter, growing in the right hind leg muscle of C3H mouse was used for estimation of hypoxic cell fraction using comparison of TCD{sub 50}. Radiation was given one hour after administration of GBE (100 mg/Kg, i.p.) with or without priming dose of GBE (100 mg/Kg, i.p.) given 24 hours earlier. Radiation was also given under air breathing condition or clamp hypoxia without GBE as controls. {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy was performed before and one hour after administration of GBE with or without priming dose of GBE. Results : TCD{sub 50/120's} were 81.7(77.7-86.0) Gy when irradiated under clamped hypoxia, 69.6 (66.8-72.5) Gy under air breathing condition,67.5(64.1-71.1) Gy with a single dose of GBE (100 mg/kg) given one hour before irradiation, and 62.2(59.1-65.5) Gy with two doses of GBE given at 25 hours and one hour before irradiation. The hypoxic cell fractions, estimated from TCD50/120's were 1.6% under air breathing condition, 7.2% after single dose of GBE, and 2.7% after two doses of GBE. Metabolic status of tumor, probably by increasing the blood flow and delivery of oxygen and nutrients, resulting in increased radiosensitivity of tumor.

  3. RELAXANT EFFECTS OF VASOACTIVE INTESTINAL PEPTIDE ON PULMONARY ARTERY IN CHRONICALLY HYPOXIC RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈玉玲; 罗慰慈; 蔡英年

    1996-01-01

    The object of this study is to investigate the effect of VIP on pulmonary artery of chronically hypoxic rats. It was shown that chronic hypoxla depressed significantly pulmnonary artery relaxation induced by VIP as compared with those of control (Pchronic hypoxxia, and chronic hypoxiamay inhibit directly the soluble guanylate cyclase in vascular smooth muscle cells invioved in synthesis of cGMP and thus reduced the sensitivity and reactivity of pulmonary artery to VIP.

  4. General anesthetics inhibit erythropoietin induction under hypoxic conditions in the mouse brain.

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    Tomoharu Tanaka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Erythropoietin (EPO, originally identified as a hematopoietic growth factor produced in the kidney and fetal liver, is also endogenously expressed in the central nervous system (CNS. EPO in the CNS, mainly produced in astrocytes, is induced under hypoxic conditions in a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-dependent manner and plays a dominant role in neuroprotection and neurogenesis. We investigated the effect of general anesthetics on EPO expression in the mouse brain and primary cultured astrocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BALB/c mice were exposed to 10% oxygen with isoflurane at various concentrations (0.10-1.0%. Expression of EPO mRNA in the brain was studied, and the effects of sevoflurane, halothane, nitrous oxide, pentobarbital, ketamine, and propofol were investigated. In addition, expression of HIF-2α protein was studied by immunoblotting. Hypoxia-induced EPO mRNA expression in the brain was significantly suppressed by isoflurane in a concentration-dependent manner. A similar effect was confirmed for all other general anesthetics. Hypoxia-inducible expression of HIF-2α protein was also significantly suppressed with isoflurane. In the experiments using primary cultured astrocytes, isoflurane, pentobarbital, and ketamine suppressed hypoxia-inducible expression of HIF-2α protein and EPO mRNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our results indicate that general anesthetics suppress activation of HIF-2 and inhibit hypoxia-induced EPO upregulation in the mouse brain through a direct effect on astrocytes.

  5. Influence of Ginkgo Biloba extract on beta-secretase in rat hippocampal neuronal cultures following chronic hypoxic and hypoglycemic conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueneng Guan; Fuling Yan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preparation of Ginkgo leaf has been widely used to improve cognitive deficits and dementia, in particular in Alzheimer's disease patients. However, the precise mechanism of action of Ginkgo leaf remains unclear.OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of Ginkgo Biloba extract (Egb761), Ginaton, on β-secretase expression in rat hippocampal neuronal cultures following chronic hypoxic and hypoglycemic conditions.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTNG: Completely by randomized, grouping study. The experiment was performed at the Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Southeast University between August 2006 and August 2007.MATERIALS: A total of 128 Wistar rats aged 24 hours were selected, and hippocampal neurons were harvested for primary cultures.METHODS: On day 7, primary hippocampal neuronal cultures were treated with Egb761 (0, 25, 50, 100, 150, and 200 μ g/mL) under hypoxic/hypoglycemic or hypoglycemic culture conditions for 12, 24, and 36 hours, respectively. Hippocampal neurons cultured in primary culture medium served as control.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cell viability was assayed using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT); fluorescence detection of β-secretase activity was performed; Western Blot was used to measure β -secretase expression.RESULTS: Cell viability under hypoxic/hypoglycemic or hypoglycemic culture conditions was significantly less than control cells (P 25 μ g/mL Egb761 induced greater cell viability (P 0.05). Α -secretase activity was increased after 12 hours in hypoxic/hypoglycemic culture (P 0.05). Β -secretase activity was greater after 12, 24, and 36 hours in hypoxic/hypoglycemic culture conditions, compared with control conditions (P < 0.05). Β-secretase activity was significantly decreased in neurons treated with Egb761 for 12, 24, or 36 hours, compared with the hypoxic/hypoglycemic group (P < 0.05).β-secretase protein expression was significantly up-regulated in neurons cultured in hypoxic/hypoglycemic conditions for

  6. Hypoxic preconditioning involves system Xc- regulation in mouse neural stem cells.

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    Sims, Brian; Clarke, Melinda; Francillion, Ludwig; Kindred, Elijah; Hopkins, Elana Shuford; Sontheimer, Harald

    2012-03-01

    In animals, hypoxic preconditioning has been used as a form of neuroprotection. The exact mechanism involved in neuroprotective hypoxic preconditioning has not been described, yet could be valuable for possible neuroprotective strategies. The overexpression of the cystine-glutamate exchanger, system Xc-, has been demonstrated as being neuroprotective (Shih, Erb et al. 2006). Here, using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrate that C57BL/6 mice exposed to hypoxia showed an increase in system Xc- expression, with the highest level of intensity in the hippocampus. Western Blot analysis also showed an almost 2-fold increase in system Xc- protein in hypoxia-exposed versus control mice. The mRNA for the regulatory subunit of system Xc-, xCT, and the xCT/actin ratio were also increased under hypoxic conditions. Experiments using hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α) siRNA showed a statistically significant decrease in HIF-1α and system Xc- expression. Under hypoxic conditions, system Xc- activity, as determined by cystine uptake, increased 2-fold. Importantly, hypoxic preconditioning was attenuated in neural stem cells by pharmacological inhibition of system Xc- activity with S4-carboxyphenylglycine. These data provide the first evidence of hypoxic regulation of the cystine glutamate exchanger system Xc-.

  7. Ghrelin Administration Increases the Bax/Bcl-2 Gene Expression Ratio in the Heart of Chronic Hypoxic Rats

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    Mohammad Reza Aliparasti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Programmed cell death or apoptosis, is a biochemical procedure that initiates due to some conditions, including hypoxia. Bax and Bcl-2 are among the agents that regulate apoptosis. The amplification of the first one triggers the initiation of apoptosis, and the second one prevents it. Ghrelin is an endogenous peptide that antiapoptosis is its new effect. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of ghrelin on the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Methods: Twenty four wistar rats were divided randomly in three groups; control, hypoxic + saline and hypoxic + ghrelin. Hypoxic animals lived in O2 11% for 2 weeks and received either saline or ghrelin subcutaneously daily. The bax and Bcl-2 gene expression were measured by Real-Time RT-PCR. Results: Chronic hypoxia increased the Bax gene expression significantly compared with normal animals (P = 0.008, but the Bcl-2 was not affected by hypoxia. The Bax/Bcl-2 ratio also amplified significantly (P=0.005. Ghrelin administration significantly increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in the hypoxic animals compared to the hypoxic + saline and normal groups (p=0.042 and P= 0.001, respectively. Conclusion: In the present study, animals’ treatment with ghrelin leads to an increment of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, which indicates a controversy related to cardioprotection of ghrelin.

  8. Ghrelin Administration Increases the Bax/Bcl-2 Gene Expression Ratio in the Heart of Chronic Hypoxic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliparasti, Mohammad Reza; Alipour, Mohammad Reza; Almasi, Shohreh; Feizi, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Programmed cell death or apoptosis, is a biochemical procedure that initiates due to some conditions, including hypoxia. Bax and Bcl-2 are among the agents that regulate apoptosis. The amplification of the first one triggers the initiation of apoptosis, and the second one prevents it. Ghrelin is an endogenous peptide that antiapoptosis is its new effect. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of ghrelin on the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Methods: Twenty four wistar rats were divided randomly in three groups; control, hypoxic + saline and hypoxic + ghrelin. Hypoxic animals lived in O2 11% for 2 weeks and received either saline or ghrelin subcutaneously daily. The bax and Bcl-2 gene expression were measured by Real-Time RT-PCR. Results: Chronic hypoxia increased the Bax gene expression significantly compared with normal animals (P = 0.008), but the Bcl-2 was not affected by hypoxia. The Bax/Bcl-2 ratio also amplified significantly (P=0.005). Ghrelin administration significantly increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in the hypoxic animals compared to the hypoxic + saline and normal groups (p=0.042 and P= 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: In the present study, animals’ treatment with ghrelin leads to an increment of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, which indicates a controversy related to cardioprotection of ghrelin. PMID:26236657

  9. Concordance between hypoxic challenge testing and predictive equations for hypoxic flight assessment in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients prior to air travel

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    Mohie Aldeen Abd Alzaher Khalifa

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: The present study supports on-HCT as a reliable, on-invasive and continuous methods determining the requirement for in-flight O2 are relatively constant. Predictive equations considerably overestimate the need for in-flight O2 compared to hypoxic inhalation test. Predictive equations are cheap, readily available methods of flight assessment, but this study shows poor agreement between their predictions and the measured individual hypoxic responses during HCT.

  10. A Mouse Model of Chronic West Nile Virus Disease

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    Graham, Jessica B.; Swarts, Jessica L.; Wilkins, Courtney; Thomas, Sunil; Green, Richard; Sekine, Aimee; Voss, Kathleen M.; Mooney, Michael; Choonoo, Gabrielle; Miller, Darla R.; Pardo Manuel de Villena, Fernando; Gale, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Infection with West Nile virus (WNV) leads to a range of disease outcomes, including chronic infection, though lack of a robust mouse model of chronic WNV infection has precluded identification of the immune events contributing to persistent infection. Using the Collaborative Cross, a population of recombinant inbred mouse strains with high levels of standing genetic variation, we have identified a mouse model of persistent WNV disease, with persistence of viral loads within the brain. Compared to lines exhibiting no disease or marked disease, the F1 cross CC(032x013)F1 displays a strong immunoregulatory signature upon infection that correlates with restraint of the WNV-directed cytolytic response. We hypothesize that this regulatory T cell response sufficiently restrains the immune response such that a chronic infection can be maintained in the CNS. Use of this new mouse model of chronic neuroinvasive virus will be critical in developing improved strategies to prevent prolonged disease in humans. PMID:27806117

  11. Insight into hypoxic preconditioning and ischemic injury through determination of nPKCε-interacting proteins in mouse brain.

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    Feng, Sujuan; Li, Dongguo; Li, Yun; Yang, Xuan; Han, Song; Li, Junfa

    2013-08-01

    Cerebral hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) provides neuroprotection by intracellular signaling pathways. We previously demonstrated that novel protein kinase Cε (nPKCε) activation participated in cerebral HPC development. In this study, we explore the role of nPKCε in HPC-induced neuroprotection against middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced ischemic injury and identify its possible signaling molecules. A total of 131 adult male BALB/c mice were divided into eight groups: normoxic control (n=9), HPC (n=9), HPC+εV1-2 (n=13), Sham (n=19), HPC+sham (n=6), Ischemia (I, 6h MCAO, n=31), HPC+I (n=25) and HPC+εV1-2+I (n=19). nPKCε specific inhibitor εV1-2 was administered via intracerebroventricular injection. Western blot, 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling were applied to determine nPKCε membrane translocation, infarction volume and programmed cell death (PCD), respectively. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-De) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) were used to identify nPKCε-interacting proteins, followed by bioinformatics analysis of genee ontology (GO) to predict nPKCε-specific signaling pathways. Our results showed that HPC attenuates MCAO-induced brain injuries and stabilized nPKCεmembrane translocation in peri-infarct region, which was abolished by nPKCε-speecific inhibitor εV1-2. Proteomics analysis revealed 8 up- and 3 down-regulated nPKCε-interacting proteins both in cytosolic and particulate fractions of HPC mouse brain. GO analysis predicted 25 significant nPKCε-specific signaling pathways among the 16 identified nPKCε-interacting proteins in brain of HPC mice. This study is the first to report multiple nPKCε-interacting proteins and their signaling pathways in HPC mouse brain, suggesting that nPKCε signaling molecules is responsible for HPC-induced neuroprotection against cerebral ischemic

  12. Fibroblast growth factor-2 induced by enriched environment enhances angiogenesis and motor function in chronic hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

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    Jung Hwa Seo

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of enriched environment (EE on promoting angiogenesis and neurobehavioral function in an animal model of chronic hypoxic-ischemic (HI brain injury. HI brain damage was induced in seven day-old CD-1® mice by unilateral carotid artery ligation and exposure to hypoxia (8% O2 for 90 min. At six weeks of age, the mice were randomly assigned to either EE or standard cages (SC for two months. Rotarod, forelimb-use asymmetry, and grip strength tests were performed to evaluate neurobehavioral function. In order to identify angiogenic growth factors regulated by EE, an array-based multiplex ELISA assay was used to measure the expression in frontal cortex, striatum, and cerebellum. Among the growth factors, the expression of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 was confirmed using western blotting. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA were also evaluated using immunohistochemistry. As a result, mice exposed to EE showed significant improvements in rotarod and ladder walking performances compared to SC controls. The level of FGF-2 was significantly higher in the frontal cortex of EE mice at 8 weeks after treatment in multiplex ELISA and western blot. On the other hand, FGF-2 in the striatum significantly increased at 2 weeks after exposure to EE earlier than in the frontal cortex. Expression of activin A was similarly upregulated as FGF-2 expression pattern. Particularly, all animals treated with FGF-2 neutralizing antibody abolished the beneficial effect of EE on motor performance relative to mice not given anti-FGF-2. Immunohistochemistry showed that densities of α-SMA(+ and PECAM-1(+ cells in frontal cortex, striatum, and hippocampus were significantly increased following EE, suggesting the histological findings exhibit a similar pattern to the upregulation of FGF-2 in the brain. In conclusion, EE enhances endogenous angiogenesis and neurobehavioral functions

  13. Understanding Hypoxic Drive and the Release of Hypoxic Vasoconstriction.

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    Inkrott, Jon C

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the hypoxic drive and release of hypoxic vasoconstriction in the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease population can be somewhat confusing and misunderstood. Furthermore, the hypoxic drive theory is one in which there really is no scientific evidence to support and yet continues to prosper in every aspect of care in regard to the chronic lung patient, from prehospital all the way to intensive care unit and home care therapy. This subject review will hopefully enhance some understanding of what exactly goes on with these patients and the importance of providing oxygen when it is desperately needed.

  14. Expression profiling reveals novel hypoxic biomarkers in peripheral blood of adult mice exposed to chronic hypoxia.

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    Matias Mosqueira

    Full Text Available Hypoxia induces a myriad of changes including an increase in hematocrit due to erythropoietin (EPO mediated erythropoiesis. While hypoxia is of importance physiologically and clinically, lacunae exist in our knowledge of the systemic and temporal changes in gene expression occurring in blood during the exposure and recovery from hypoxia. To identify these changes expression profiling was conducted on blood obtained from cohorts of C57Bl-10 wild type mice that were maintained at normoxia (NX, exposed for two weeks to normobaric chronic hypoxia (CH or two weeks of CH followed by two weeks of normoxic recovery (REC. Using stringent bioinformatic cut-offs (0% FDR, 2 fold change cut-off, 230 genes were identified and separated into four distinct temporal categories. Class I contained 1 transcript up-regulated in both CH and REC; Class II contained 202 transcripts up-regulated in CH but down-regulated after REC; Class III contained 9 transcripts down-regulated both in CH and REC; Class IV contained 18 transcripts down-regulated after CH exposure but up-regulated after REC. Profiling was independently validated and extended by analyzing expression levels of selected genes as novel biomarkers from our profile (e.g. spectrin alpha-1, ubiquitin domain family-1 and pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase-1 by performing qPCR at 7 different time points during CH and REC. Our identification and characterization of these genes define transcriptome level changes occurring during chronic hypoxia and normoxic recovery as well as novel blood biomarkers that may be useful in monitoring a variety of physiological and pathological conditions associated with hypoxia.

  15. HIF-VEGF pathways are critical for chronic otitis media in Junbo and Jeff mouse mutants.

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    Michael T Cheeseman

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Otitis media with effusion (OME is the commonest cause of hearing loss in children, yet the underlying genetic pathways and mechanisms involved are incompletely understood. Ventilation of the middle ear with tympanostomy tubes is the commonest surgical procedure in children and the best treatment for chronic OME, but the mechanism by which they work remains uncertain. As hypoxia is a common feature of inflamed microenvironments, moderation of hypoxia may be a significant contributory mechanism. We have investigated the occurrence of hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF mediated responses in Junbo and Jeff mouse mutant models, which develop spontaneous chronic otitis media. We found that Jeff and Junbo mice labeled in vivo with pimonidazole showed cellular hypoxia in inflammatory cells in the bulla lumen, and in Junbo the middle ear mucosa was also hypoxic. The bulla fluid inflammatory cell numbers were greater and the upregulation of inflammatory gene networks were more pronounced in Junbo than Jeff. Hif-1α gene expression was elevated in bulla fluid inflammatory cells, and there was upregulation of its target genes including Vegfa in Junbo and Jeff. We therefore investigated the effects in Junbo of small-molecule inhibitors of VEGFR signaling (PTK787, SU-11248, and BAY 43-9006 and destabilizing HIF by inhibiting its chaperone HSP90 with 17-DMAG. We found that both classes of inhibitor significantly reduced hearing loss and the occurrence of bulla fluid and that VEGFR inhibitors moderated angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in the inflamed middle ear mucosa. The effectiveness of HSP90 and VEGFR signaling inhibitors in suppressing OM in the Junbo model implicates HIF-mediated VEGF as playing a pivotal role in OM pathogenesis. Our analysis of the Junbo and Jeff mutants highlights the role of hypoxia and HIF-mediated pathways, and we conclude that targeting molecules in HIF-VEGF signaling pathways has therapeutic potential in the treatment of

  16. KCa3.1 channel downregulation and impaired EDH-type relaxation in pulmonary arteries from chronic hypoxic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroigaard, Christel; Kudryavtseva, Olga; Dalsgaard, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats. For functional studies, pulmonary arteries were mounted in microvascular myographs for isometric tension recordings. The K(Ca) channel expression was evaluated by immunoblotting and quantitative PCR. Although ACh induced similar relaxations, the ACh......Calcium-activated potassium channels of small (K(Ca)2, SK) and intermediate (K(Ca)3.1, IK) conductance are involved in endothelium-dependent relaxation of pulmonary arteries. We hypothesized that the function and expression of K(Ca)2 and K(Ca)3.1 increase as a compensatory mechanism to counteract......-induced relaxations were abolished by the combined inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (by L-nitro-arginine, L-NOARG), cyclo-oxygenase (by indomethacin) and soluble guanylate cyclase (by ODQ) in pulmonary arteries from hypoxic rats, whereas 20 ± 6% (n = 8) maximal relaxation in response to ACh persisted in arteries...

  17. Neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of the flavonoid-enriched fraction AF4 in a mouse model of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

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    Paul G W Keddy

    Full Text Available We report here neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of a flavonoid-enriched fraction isolated from the peel of Northern Spy apples (AF4 in a mouse of model of hypoxic-ischemic (HI brain damage. Oral administration of AF4 (50 mg/kg, once daily for 3 days prior to 50 min of HI completely prevented motor performance deficits assessed 14 days later that were associated with marked reductions in neuronal cell loss in the dorsal hippocampus and striatum. Pre-treatment with AF4 (5, 10, 25 or 50 mg/kg, p.o.; once daily for 3 days produced a dose-dependent reduction in HI-induced hippocampal and striatal neuron cell loss, with 25 mg/kg being the lowest dose that achieved maximal neuroprotection. Comparison of the effects of 1, 3 or 7 doses of AF4 (25 mg/kg; p.o. prior to HI revealed that at least 3 doses of AF4 were required before HI to reduce neuronal cell loss in both the dorsal hippocampus and striatum. Quantitative RT-PCR measurements revealed that the neuroprotective effects of AF4 (25 mg/kg; p.o.; once daily for 3 days in the dorsal hippocampus were associated with a suppression of HI-induced increases in the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. AF4 pre-treatment enhanced mRNA levels for pro-survival proteins such as X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis and erythropoietin following HI in the dorsal hippocampus and striatum, respectively. Primary cultures of mouse cortical neurons incubated with AF4 (1 µg/ml, but not the same concentrations of either quercetin or quercetin-3-O-glucose or its metabolites, were resistant to cell death induced by oxygen glucose deprivation. These findings suggest that the inhibition of HI-induced brain injury produced by AF4 likely involves a transcriptional mechanism resulting from the co-operative actions of various phenolics in this fraction which not only reduce the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators but also enhance pro-survival gene signalling.

  18. An optimised mouse model of chronic pancreatitis with a combination of ethanol and cerulein

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    Ahmadi, Abbas; Nikkhoo, Bahram; Mokarizadeh, Aram; Rahmani, Mohammad-Reza; Fakhari, Shohreh; Mohammadi, Mehdi; Jalili, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an intractable and multi-factorial disorder. Developing appropriate animal models is an essential step in pancreatitis research, and the best ones are those which mimic the human disorder both aetiologically and pathophysiologically. The current study presents an optimised protocol for creating a murine model of CP, which mimics the initial steps of chronic pancreatitis in alcohol chronic pancreatitis and compares it with two other mouse models treate...

  19. Nitric oxide availability in deeply hypoxic crucian carp: acute and chronic changes and utilization of ambient nitrite reservoirs.

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    Hansen, Marie N; Gerber, Lucie; Jensen, Frank B

    2016-03-15

    Recent research suggest that anoxia-tolerant fish transfer extracellular nitrite into the tissues, where it is used for nitric oxide (NO) generation, iron-nitrosylation, and S-nitrosation of proteins, as part of the cytoprotective response toward prolonged hypoxia and subsequent reoxygenation. We hypothesized that crucian carp take up ambient nitrite and use it as a source of cellular NO availability during hypoxia. Fish were exposed for 1 day to normoxia (Po2 > 140 mmHg) and deep hypoxia (1 nitric oxide synthase-2 gene variant. The data support that ambient nitrite is taken up across the gills to be distributed via the blood to the tissues, particularly the heart, where it assists in cytoprotection and other functions. Cardiac nitrite was not elevated in acutely exposed fish, revealing that the response requires time. NO metabolite levels were higher during acute than chronic exposures, possibly caused by increased swimming activity and stress in acutely exposed fish.

  20. Brief but chronic increase in allopregnanolone cause accelerated AD pathology differently in two mouse models.

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    Bengtsson, Sara K; Johansson, Maja; Backstrom, Torbjorn; Nitsch, Roger M; Wang, Mingde

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that chronic treatment with allopregnanolone (ALLO) for three months impaired learning function in the Swe/PS1 mouse model. ALLO is a neurosteroid, produced in the CNS and a GABAA receptor agonist. ALLO modulates the general inhibitory system in the CNS by enhancing the effect of GABA. Chronic treatment with other GABAA receptor active compounds, such as benzodiazepines, ethanol and medroxy-progesterone acetate has been associated to cognitive decline and/or increased risk for dementia. In this study, we sufficed with a treatment period of one month for the Swe/PS1 mouse, and included another Alzheimer's disease mouse model; the Swe/Arc model. We found that one month of chronic treatment with elevated ALLO levels within physiological range impaired learning and memory function in the Swe/Arc female and male mice. Male Swe/PS1 mice also showed marginally impaired function, while the female mice did not. Furthermore, the chronic ALLO treatment caused increased levels of soluble Aβ in the Swe/PS1 mouse model while the levels were unchanged in the Swe/Arc model. Therefore, both Swe/Arc and Swe/PS1 mice showed signs of accelerated disease progression. Still, further studies are required to determine the mechanisms behind the cognitive impairment and the increased Aβ-levels caused by mildly elevated ALLO-levels.

  1. A New Mouse Model That Spontaneously Develops Chronic Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis

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    Fransén-Pettersson, Nina; Duarte, Nadia; Nilsson, Julia; Lundholm, Marie; Mayans, Sofia; Larefalk, Åsa; Hannibal, Tine D.; Hansen, Lisbeth; Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Ivars, Fredrik; Cardell, Susanna; Palmqvist, Richard; Rozell, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Here we characterize a new animal model that spontaneously develops chronic inflammation and fibrosis in multiple organs, the non-obese diabetic inflammation and fibrosis (N-IF) mouse. In the liver, the N-IF mouse displays inflammation and fibrosis particularly evident around portal tracts and central veins and accompanied with evidence of abnormal intrahepatic bile ducts. The extensive cellular infiltration consists mainly of macrophages, granulocytes, particularly eosinophils, and mast cells. This inflammatory syndrome is mediated by a transgenic population of natural killer T cells (NKT) induced in an immunodeficient NOD genetic background. The disease is transferrable to immunodeficient recipients, while polyclonal T cells from unaffected syngeneic donors can inhibit the disease phenotype. Because of the fibrotic component, early on-set, spontaneous nature and reproducibility, this novel mouse model provides a unique tool to gain further insight into the underlying mechanisms mediating transformation of chronic inflammation into fibrosis and to evaluate intervention protocols for treating conditions of fibrotic disorders. PMID:27441847

  2. Chronic Hypertension Leads to Neurodegeneration in the TgSwDI Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

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    Kruyer, Anna; Soplop, Nadine; Strickland, Sidney; Norris, Erin H

    2015-07-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies link vascular disorders, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and stroke, with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hypertension, specifically, is an important modifiable risk factor for late-onset AD. To examine the link between midlife hypertension and the onset of AD later in life, we chemically induced chronic hypertension in the TgSwDI mouse model of AD in early adulthood. Hypertension accelerated cognitive deficits in the Barnes maze test (Phypertension induced hippocampal neurodegeneration at an early age in this mouse line (43% reduction in the dorsal subiculum; P<0.05), establishing this as a useful research model of AD with mixed vascular and amyloid pathologies.

  3. Hypoxic challenge test applied to healthy children

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    Kobbernagel, Helene Elgaard; Nielsen, Kim Gjerum; Hanel, Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Commercial aircraft are pressurised to ~2438 m (8000 ft) above sea level that equates breathing 15% oxygen at sea level. A preflight hypoxic challenge test (HCT) is therefore recommended for children with cystic fibrosis or other chronic lung diseases and inflight oxygen is advised if...

  4. A mouse model for pathogen-induced chronic inflammation at local and systemic sites.

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    Papadopoulos, George; Kramer, Carolyn D; Slocum, Connie S; Weinberg, Ellen O; Hua, Ning; Gudino, Cynthia V; Hamilton, James A; Genco, Caroline A

    2014-08-08

    Chronic inflammation is a major driver of pathological tissue damage and a unifying characteristic of many chronic diseases in humans including neoplastic, autoimmune, and chronic inflammatory diseases. Emerging evidence implicates pathogen-induced chronic inflammation in the development and progression of chronic diseases with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Due to the complex and multifactorial etiology of chronic disease, designing experiments for proof of causality and the establishment of mechanistic links is nearly impossible in humans. An advantage of using animal models is that both genetic and environmental factors that may influence the course of a particular disease can be controlled. Thus, designing relevant animal models of infection represents a key step in identifying host and pathogen specific mechanisms that contribute to chronic inflammation. Here we describe a mouse model of pathogen-induced chronic inflammation at local and systemic sites following infection with the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, a bacterium closely associated with human periodontal disease. Oral infection of specific-pathogen free mice induces a local inflammatory response resulting in destruction of tooth supporting alveolar bone, a hallmark of periodontal disease. In an established mouse model of atherosclerosis, infection with P. gingivalis accelerates inflammatory plaque deposition within the aortic sinus and innominate artery, accompanied by activation of the vascular endothelium, an increased immune cell infiltrate, and elevated expression of inflammatory mediators within lesions. We detail methodologies for the assessment of inflammation at local and systemic sites. The use of transgenic mice and defined bacterial mutants makes this model particularly suitable for identifying both host and microbial factors involved in the initiation, progression, and outcome of disease. Additionally, the model can be used to screen for novel therapeutic strategies

  5. Defective tryptophan catabolism underlies inflammation in mouse chronic granulomatous disease.

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    Romani, Luigina; Fallarino, Francesca; De Luca, Antonella; Montagnoli, Claudia; D'Angelo, Carmen; Zelante, Teresa; Vacca, Carmine; Bistoni, Francesco; Fioretti, Maria C; Grohmann, Ursula; Segal, Brahm H; Puccetti, Paolo

    2008-01-10

    Half a century ago, chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) was first described as a disease fatally affecting the ability of children to survive infections. Various milestone discoveries have since been made, from an insufficient ability of patients' leucocytes to kill microbes to the underlying genetic abnormalities. In this inherited disorder, phagocytes lack NADPH oxidase activity and do not generate reactive oxygen species, most notably superoxide anion, causing recurrent bacterial and fungal infections. Patients with CGD also suffer from chronic inflammatory conditions, most prominently granuloma formation in hollow viscera. The precise mechanisms of the increased microbial pathogenicity have been unclear, and more so the reasons for the exaggerated inflammatory response. Here we show that a superoxide-dependent step in tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway is blocked in CGD mice with lethal pulmonary aspergillosis, leading to unrestrained Vgamma1(+) gammadelta T-cell reactivity, dominant production of interleukin (IL)-17, defective regulatory T-cell activity and acute inflammatory lung injury. Although beneficial effects are induced by IL-17 neutralization or gammadelta T-cell contraction, complete cure and reversal of the hyperinflammatory phenotype are achieved by replacement therapy with a natural kynurenine distal to the blockade in the pathway. Effective therapy, which includes co-administration of recombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), restores production of downstream immunoactive metabolites and enables the emergence of regulatory Vgamma4(+) gammadelta and Foxp3(+) alphabeta T cells. Therefore, paradoxically, the lack of reactive oxygen species contributes to the hyperinflammatory phenotype associated with NADPH oxidase deficiencies, through a dysfunctional kynurenine pathway of tryptophan catabolism. Yet, this condition can be reverted by reactivating the pathway downstream of the superoxide-dependent step.

  6. Chronic Toxoplasmosis Modulates the Induction of Contact Hypersensitivity by TNCB in Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaoshou; Ahn, Hye-Jin; Nam, Ho-Woo

    2015-12-01

    Mouse models of chronic toxoplasmosis and atopic dermatitis (AD) were combined to clarify the effect of opportunistic Toxoplasma gondii infection on the development of AD. AD was induced as a chronic contact hypersensitivity (CHS) with repeated challenge of 2,4,6-trinitro-1-chlorobenzene (TNCB) on the dorsal skin of mice. TNCB induced skin thickness increases in both normal and toxoplasmic mice. The changing patterns were different from the sigmoidal which saturated at 20 days in normal mice to the convex saturated at 12 days in toxoplasmic mice with the crossing at 18 days. Compared to normal mice, toxoplasmic mice presented CHS more severely in earlier times and then moderately in later times. These data suggest that host immune modification by T. gondii infection enhances CHS in early times of atopic stimulation but soothes the reaction of CHS in later times in mouse model.

  7. Prevention impact of atorvastatin on rats'chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension%阿托伐他汀预防大鼠慢性低氧性肺动脉高压的观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于凤霞; 杨海燕; 范民忠; 孔令亭

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨阿托伐他汀对大鼠慢性低氧性肺动脉高压的干预作用.方法 采用慢性低氧性肺动脉高压大鼠模型.30只大鼠随机分为常氧组、低氧组和低氧阿托伐他汀干预组.4周后观察肺动脉压及右心肥厚指数,HE染色和电镜观察各组大鼠肺组织病理和超微结构变化.结果 低氧组大鼠平均肺动脉压力、右心肥厚指数高于正常组和阿托伐他汀干预组(P<0.05);光镜显示:4周后低氧组肺细小动脉血管壁平滑肌层明显增生,电镜下内皮细胞向管腔突起,胶原纤维增多,平滑肌细胞增生;而正常组、阿托伐他汀组大鼠肺组织血管壁的改变明显减轻.结论 阿托伐他汀可减轻低氧性肺细小动脉血管平滑肌的增生,减轻血管重构,降低慢性低氧性肺动脉高压大鼠肺动脉压力.%Objective To exporle the effect of atorvastatin on rats ' chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Method Adopting chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension rats modeL Total of 30 rats were randomly divided into 3 groups, they were normal group, hypoxic group and atorvastatin group. Four weeks after treatment, the mean of pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) , right ventricle hypertrophy index of all rats were measured. Observation the lungs tissue pathological and ultra - structure changes by HE and electron microscope. Results The mean pulmonary artery pressure and right ventricle hypertrophy index of hypoxic group were higher than normal group (P <0. 05) and atrovastatin group (P <0. 05) . Light microscope showed that the smooth muscle layer of pulmonary arterioles vessel wall in hypoxic group were hyperplasia. Endotheliocyte was apophysis to lumens, collagen fibers was increase, smooth muscle cell was proliferation, vessel walls' change were light in normal group and arorvastatin group. Conclusions Atorvastatin could reduce the hypoxic pulmonary vascular smooth muscle hyperplasia, lighten vascular remodeling, lower pulmonary arterial

  8. Increased urinary lysophosphatidic acid in mouse with subtotal nephrectomy: potential involvement in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoyan, Koryun; Baïotto, Anna; Dupuy, Aude; Marsal, Dimitri; Denis, Colette; Vinel, Claire; Sicard, Pierre; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Schanstra, Joost P; Klein, Julie; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-12-01

    Increased incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) with consecutive progression to end-stage renal disease represents a significant burden to healthcare systems. Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis (TIF) is a classical hallmark of CKD and is well correlated with the loss of renal function. The bioactive lysophospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), acting through specific G-protein-coupled receptors, was previously shown to be involved in TIF development in a mouse model of unilateral ureteral obstruction. Here, we study the role of LPA in a mouse subjected to subtotal nephrectomy (SNx), a more chronic and progressive model of CKD. Five months after surgical nephron reduction, SNx mice showed massive albuminuria, extensive TIF, and glomerular hypertrophy when compared to sham-operated animals. Urinary and plasma levels of LPA were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. LPA was significantly increased in SNx urine, not in plasma, and was significantly correlated with albuminuria and TIF. Moreover, SNx mice showed significant downregulation in the renal expression of lipid phosphate phosphohydrolases (LPP1, 2, and 3) that might be involved in reduced LPA bioavailability through dephosphorylation. We concluded that SNx increases urinary LPA through a mechanism that could involve co-excretion of plasma LPA with albumin associated with a reduction of its catabolism in the kidney. Because of the previously demonstrated profibrotic activity of LPA, the association of urinary LPA with TIF suggests the potential involvement of LPA in the development of advanced CKD in the SNx mouse model. Targeting LPA metabolism might represent an interesting approach in CKD treatment.

  9. A New Mouse Model That Spontaneously Develops Chronic Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Fransén-Pettersson

    Full Text Available Here we characterize a new animal model that spontaneously develops chronic inflammation and fibrosis in multiple organs, the non-obese diabetic inflammation and fibrosis (N-IF mouse. In the liver, the N-IF mouse displays inflammation and fibrosis particularly evident around portal tracts and central veins and accompanied with evidence of abnormal intrahepatic bile ducts. The extensive cellular infiltration consists mainly of macrophages, granulocytes, particularly eosinophils, and mast cells. This inflammatory syndrome is mediated by a transgenic population of natural killer T cells (NKT induced in an immunodeficient NOD genetic background. The disease is transferrable to immunodeficient recipients, while polyclonal T cells from unaffected syngeneic donors can inhibit the disease phenotype. Because of the fibrotic component, early on-set, spontaneous nature and reproducibility, this novel mouse model provides a unique tool to gain further insight into the underlying mechanisms mediating transformation of chronic inflammation into fibrosis and to evaluate intervention protocols for treating conditions of fibrotic disorders.

  10. The Ketogenic Diet Alters the Hypoxic Response and Affects Expression of Proteins Associated with Angiogenesis, Invasive Potential and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Glioma Model.

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    Eric C Woolf

    Full Text Available The successful treatment of malignant gliomas remains a challenge despite the current standard of care, which consists of surgery, radiation and temozolomide. Advances in the survival of brain cancer patients require the design of new therapeutic approaches that take advantage of common phenotypes such as the altered metabolism found in cancer cells. It has therefore been postulated that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate, adequate protein ketogenic diet (KD may be useful in the treatment of brain tumors. We have demonstrated that the KD enhances survival and potentiates standard therapy in a mouse model of malignant glioma, yet the mechanisms are not fully understood.To explore the effects of the KD on various aspects of tumor growth and progression, we used the immunocompetent, syngeneic GL261-Luc2 mouse model of malignant glioma.Tumors from animals maintained on KD showed reduced expression of the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9, hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha, and decreased activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Additionally, tumors from animals maintained on KD had reduced tumor microvasculature and decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and vimentin. Peritumoral edema was significantly reduced in animals fed the KD and protein analyses showed altered expression of zona occludens-1 and aquaporin-4.The KD directly or indirectly alters the expression of several proteins involved in malignant progression and may be a useful tool for the treatment of gliomas.

  11. 46. Micronuclei induced by chronical treatment of SO2 inhalation in mouse bone marrow cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the chronical experiment of treating with sulfur dioxide(SO2) inhalation, Micronuclei(MN) frequencies in the polychromatophilic erythroblasts(PCE) of mouse bone marrow and the frequencies of cells with MN were significantly increased in dose-dependent manner. There is a significant difference between the male and the female animals. The results also showed that SO2 inhibited urethone-induced MN formation, it is a antagonistic joint action to Urethone. These results furtherly confirm that SO2 inhalation is a clastogenetic and genotoxic agent to mammalian cells, and the combination roles of SO2 and other mutagens are complexity.

  12. 硫化氢对慢性低氧高二氧化碳模型大鼠学习记忆的影响%Hydrogen Sulfide on Rats' Learning Memory Deficit by Induced Chronic Hypoxic Hypercapnia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘银花; 杨汉文; 王小同; 金露; 程英; 祝家群

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To explore the effect of hydrogen sulfide on learning memory deficit in rats induced by chronic hypoxic hypercapnia. Methods: Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats selected by Morris water maze were randomly divided into three groups (8 in each group) : normal control (NC) group,hypoxic hypercapnia + saline solution (HHSS) group, hypoxic hypercapnia + sodium hydrosulfide (HHSH) group. The rats were received the intraperitoneal injecion with sodium hydrosulfide in the HHSH group and saline solution in the HHSS group. At the end of 4th week, all rats were tested by Morris water maze. Then the mPAP was measured by external jugularvein cannula the ratio of the right ventricle (RV) to the left ventricle+septum (LV+S) was calculated, and the hydrogen sulfide concentration in the plasma was measured. Results : ①Compared with the NC group, the value of mPAP and RV/(LV+S) in the HHSS group was higher (p<0. 05) , the level of hydrogen sulfide in the plasma was lower (p<0. 05) , the escape latency to find the platform and swirrming travel distance were longer, times of crossing the plantform were much reduced (p<0. 05) . ②Compared with the HHSS group, the value of mPAP and RV/(LV+S) in the HHSH group was lower (p<0. 05), the level of hydrogen sulfide in the plasma was higher (p<0. 05) , the escape latency and swimming travel distance were reduced (P <0. 05) . Conclusion: Ratslearning and memory deficit exposed to chronic hypoxic hypercapina may be ameliorated by hydrogen sulfide supplementation.%目的:探讨硫化氢对慢性低O2高CO2 模型大鼠学习记忆的影响.方法:经Morris水迷宫训练淘汰后的24只SD大鼠随机分为3组:正常对照(NC)组,低O2高CO 2+生理盐水(HHSS)组,低O2高CO2 +硫氢化钠(HHSH)组.HHSH组和HHSS组每天置常压低O 2高CO2舱内8 h,每周6d,共4周观察,4周后Morris水迷宫检查空间学习记忆变化,测定大鼠肺动脉平均压(mPAP)和右心室壁(RV)/左心室加室间隔(LV+S)比值、血浆

  13. Hypoxic radiosensitization: adored and ignored

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jens

    2007-01-01

    resistance can be eliminated or modified by normobaric or hyperbaric oxygen or by the use of nitroimidazoles as hypoxic radiation sensitizers. More recently, attention has been given to hypoxic cytotoxins, a group of drugs that selectively or preferably destroys cells in a hypoxic environment. An updated...

  14. Computer mouse use predicts acute pain but not prolonged or chronic pain in the neck and shoulder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, JH; Harhoff, M.; Grimstrup, S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Computer use may have an adverse effect on musculoskeletal outcomes. This study assessed the risk of neck and shoulder pain associated with objectively recorded professional computer use. METHODS: A computer programme was used to collect data on mouse and keyboard usage and weekly...... quartile increase in weekly mouse usage time. Mouse and keyboard usage time did not predict the onset of prolonged or chronic pain in the neck or shoulder. Women had higher risks for neck and shoulder pain. Number of keystrokes and mouse clicks, length of the average activity period, and micro-pauses did...... not influence reports of acute or prolonged pain. A few psychosocial factors predicted the risk of prolonged pain. CONCLUSIONS: Most computer workers have no or minor neck and shoulder pain, few experience prolonged pain, and even fewer, chronic neck and shoulder pain. Moreover, there seems...

  15. Renal Impairment with Sublethal Tubular Cell Injury in a Chronic Liver Disease Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Tokiko; Kotani, Hirokazu; Miyao, Masashi; Kawai, Chihiro; Jemail, Leila; Abiru, Hitoshi; Tamaki, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal impairment in chronic liver diseases (CLDs) has been primarily studied in the advanced stages of hepatic injury. Meanwhile, the pathology of renal impairment in the early phase of CLDs is poorly understood, and animal models to elucidate its mechanisms are needed. Thus, we investigated whether an existing mouse model of CLD induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) shows renal impairment in the early phase. Renal injury markers, renal histology (including immunohistochemistry for tubular injury markers and transmission electron microscopy), autophagy, and oxidative stress were studied longitudinally in DDC- and standard diet-fed BALB/c mice. Slight but significant renal dysfunction was evident in DDC-fed mice from the early phase. Meanwhile, histological examinations of the kidneys with routine light microscopy did not show definitive morphological findings, and electron microscopic analyses were required to detect limited injuries such as loss of brush border microvilli and mitochondrial deformities. Limited injuries have been recently designated as sublethal tubular cell injury. As humans with renal impairment, either with or without CLD, often show almost normal tubules, sublethal injury has been of particular interest. In this study, the injuries were associated with mitochondrial aberrations and oxidative stress, a possible mechanism for sublethal injury. Intriguingly, two defense mechanisms were associated with this injury that prevent it from progressing to apparent cell death: autophagy and single-cell extrusion with regeneration. Furthermore, the renal impairment of this model progressed to chronic kidney disease with interstitial fibrosis after long-term DDC feeding. These findings indicated that DDC induces renal impairment with sublethal tubular cell injury from the early phase, leading to chronic kidney disease. Importantly, this CLD mouse model could be useful for studying the pathophysiological mechanisms of

  16. Transcriptomic responses in mouse brain exposed to chronic excess of the neurotransmitter glutamate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal Ranu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increases during aging in extracellular levels of glutamate (Glu, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, may be linked to chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Little is known about the molecular responses of neurons to chronic, moderate increases in Glu levels. Genome-wide gene expression in brain hippocampus was examined in a unique transgenic (Tg mouse model that exhibits moderate Glu hyperactivity throughout the lifespan, the neuronal Glutamate dehydrogenase (Glud1 mouse, and littermate 9 month-old wild type mice. Results Integrated bioinformatic analyses on transcriptomic data were used to identify bio-functions, pathways and gene networks underlying neuronal responses to increased Glu synaptic release. Bio-functions and pathways up-regulated in Tg mice were those associated with oxidative stress, cell injury, inflammation, nervous system development, neuronal growth, and synaptic transmission. Increased gene expression in these functions and pathways indicated apparent compensatory responses offering protection against stress, promoting growth of neuronal processes (neurites and re-establishment of synapses. The transcription of a key gene in the neurite growth network, the kinase Ptk2b, was significantly up-regulated in Tg mice as was the activated (phosphorylated form of the protein. In addition to genes related to neurite growth and synaptic development, those associated with neuronal vesicle trafficking in the Huntington's disease signalling pathway, were also up-regulated. Conclusions This is the first study attempting to define neuronal gene expression patterns in response to chronic, endogenous Glu hyperactivity at brain synapses. The patterns observed were characterized by a combination of responses to stress and stimulation of nerve growth, intracellular transport and recovery.

  17. Renal Impairment with Sublethal Tubular Cell Injury in a Chronic Liver Disease Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokiko Ishida

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of renal impairment in chronic liver diseases (CLDs has been primarily studied in the advanced stages of hepatic injury. Meanwhile, the pathology of renal impairment in the early phase of CLDs is poorly understood, and animal models to elucidate its mechanisms are needed. Thus, we investigated whether an existing mouse model of CLD induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC shows renal impairment in the early phase. Renal injury markers, renal histology (including immunohistochemistry for tubular injury markers and transmission electron microscopy, autophagy, and oxidative stress were studied longitudinally in DDC- and standard diet-fed BALB/c mice. Slight but significant renal dysfunction was evident in DDC-fed mice from the early phase. Meanwhile, histological examinations of the kidneys with routine light microscopy did not show definitive morphological findings, and electron microscopic analyses were required to detect limited injuries such as loss of brush border microvilli and mitochondrial deformities. Limited injuries have been recently designated as sublethal tubular cell injury. As humans with renal impairment, either with or without CLD, often show almost normal tubules, sublethal injury has been of particular interest. In this study, the injuries were associated with mitochondrial aberrations and oxidative stress, a possible mechanism for sublethal injury. Intriguingly, two defense mechanisms were associated with this injury that prevent it from progressing to apparent cell death: autophagy and single-cell extrusion with regeneration. Furthermore, the renal impairment of this model progressed to chronic kidney disease with interstitial fibrosis after long-term DDC feeding. These findings indicated that DDC induces renal impairment with sublethal tubular cell injury from the early phase, leading to chronic kidney disease. Importantly, this CLD mouse model could be useful for studying the

  18. Chronic mild stress damages mitochondrial ultrastructure and function in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yu; Chai, Yi; Ding, Jian-Hua; Sun, Xiu-Lan; Hu, Gang

    2011-01-13

    Increasing evidence implicates mitochondrial failure as a crucial factor in the pathogenesis of mental disorders, such as depression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of exposure to chronic mild stress (CMS), a paradigm developed in the late 1980s as an animal model of depression, on the mitochondrial function and mitochondrial ultrastructure in the mouse brain. The results showed that the CMS regime induced depressive-like symptoms in mice characterized by reduced sucrose preference and body weight. Moreover, CMS exposure was associated with a significant increase in immobility time in the tail suspension test. Exposure to the CMS paradigm inhibited mitochondrial respiration rates and dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential in hippocampus, cortex and hypothalamus of mice. In addition, we found a damaged mitochondrial ultrastructure in brains of mice exposed to CMS. These findings provide evidence for brain mitochondrial dysfunction and ultrastructural damage in a mouse model of depression. Moreover, these findings suggest that mitochondrial malfunction-induced oxidative injury could play a role in stress-related disorders such as depression.

  19. A low protein diet increases the hypoxic tolerance in Drosophila.

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    Paul Vigne

    Full Text Available Dietary restriction is well known to increase the life span of a variety of organisms from yeast to mammals, but the relationships between nutrition and the hypoxic tolerance have not yet been considered. Hypoxia is a major cause of cell death in myocardial infarction and stroke. Here we forced hypoxia-related death by exposing one-day-old male Drosophila to chronic hypoxia (5% O(2 and analysed their survival. Chronic hypoxia reduced the average life span from 33.6 days to 6.3 days when flies were fed on a rich diet. A demographic analysis indicated that chronic hypoxia increased the slope of the mortality trajectory and not the short-term risk of death. Dietary restriction produced by food dilution, by yeast restriction, or by amino acid restriction partially reversed the deleterious action of hypoxia. It increased the life span of hypoxic flies up to seven days, which represented about 25% of the life time of an hypoxic fly. Maximum survival of hypoxic flies required only dietary sucrose, and it was insensitive to drugs such as rapamycin and resveratrol, which increase longevity of normoxic animals. The results thus uncover a new link between protein nutrition, nutrient signalling, and resistance to hypoxic stresses.

  20. Transient and persistent metabolomic changes in plasma following chronic cigarette smoke exposure in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank-Quinn, Charmion I; Mahaffey, Spencer; Justice, Matthew J; Hughes, Grant; Armstrong, Michael; Bowler, Russell P; Reisdorph, Richard; Petrache, Irina; Reisdorph, Nichole

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure is linked to the development of a variety of chronic lung and systemic diseases in susceptible individuals. Metabolomics approaches may aid in defining disease phenotypes, may help predict responses to treatment, and could identify biomarkers of risk for developing disease. Using a mouse model of chronic cigarette smoke exposure sufficient to cause mild emphysema, we investigated whether cigarette smoke induces distinct metabolic profiles and determined their persistence following smoking cessation. Metabolites were extracted from plasma and fractionated based on chemical class using liquid-liquid and solid-phase extraction prior to performing liquid chromatography mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Metabolites were evaluated for statistically significant differences among group means (p-value≤0.05) and fold change ≥1.5). Cigarette smoke exposure was associated with significant differences in amino acid, purine, lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolite levels compared to air exposed animals. Whereas 60% of the metabolite changes were reversible, 40% of metabolites remained persistently altered even following 2 months of smoking cessation, including nicotine metabolites. Validation of metabolite species and translation of these findings to human plasma metabolite signatures induced by cigarette smoking may lead to the discovery of biomarkers or pathogenic pathways of smoking-induced disease.

  1. Transient and persistent metabolomic changes in plasma following chronic cigarette smoke exposure in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmion I Cruickshank-Quinn

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke exposure is linked to the development of a variety of chronic lung and systemic diseases in susceptible individuals. Metabolomics approaches may aid in defining disease phenotypes, may help predict responses to treatment, and could identify biomarkers of risk for developing disease. Using a mouse model of chronic cigarette smoke exposure sufficient to cause mild emphysema, we investigated whether cigarette smoke induces distinct metabolic profiles and determined their persistence following smoking cessation. Metabolites were extracted from plasma and fractionated based on chemical class using liquid-liquid and solid-phase extraction prior to performing liquid chromatography mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Metabolites were evaluated for statistically significant differences among group means (p-value≤0.05 and fold change ≥1.5. Cigarette smoke exposure was associated with significant differences in amino acid, purine, lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolite levels compared to air exposed animals. Whereas 60% of the metabolite changes were reversible, 40% of metabolites remained persistently altered even following 2 months of smoking cessation, including nicotine metabolites. Validation of metabolite species and translation of these findings to human plasma metabolite signatures induced by cigarette smoking may lead to the discovery of biomarkers or pathogenic pathways of smoking-induced disease.

  2. Behavioural and EEG effects of chronic rapamycin treatment in a mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambiaghi, Marco; Cursi, Marco; Magri, Laura; Castoldi, Valerio; Comi, Giancarlo; Minicucci, Fabio; Galli, Rossella; Leocani, Letizia

    2013-04-01

    Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is a multisystem genetic disorder caused by mutation in either Tsc1 or Tsc2 genes that leads to the hyper activation of the mTOR pathway, a key signalling pathway for synaptic plasticity. TSC is characterized by benign tumors arising in different organs and severe neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as epilepsy, intellectual disability, autism, anxiety and depressive behaviour. Rapamycin is a potent inhibitor of mTOR and its efficacy in treating epilepsy and neurological symptoms remains elusive. In a mouse model in which Tsc1 has been deleted in embryonic telencephalic neural stem cells, we analyzed anxiety- and depression-like behaviour by elevated-plus maze (EPM), open-field test (OFT), forced-swim test (FST) and tail-suspension test (TST), after chronic administration of rapamycin. In addition, spectral analysis of background EEG was performed. Rapamycin-treated mutant mice displayed a reduction in anxiety- and depression-like phenotype, as shown by the EPM/OFT and FST, respectively. These results were inline with EEG power spectra outcomes. The same effects of rapamycin were observed in wild-type mice. Notably, in heterozygous animals we did not observe any EEG and/or behavioural variation after rapamycin treatment. Together these results suggest that both TSC1 deletion and chronic rapamycin treatment might have a role in modulating behaviour and brain activity, and point out to the potential usefulness of background EEG analysis in tracking brain dysfunction in parallel with behavioural testing.

  3. Hormetic Effect of Chronic Hypergravity in a Mouse Model of Allergic Asthma and Rhinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Tae Young; Jung, Ah-Yeoun; Kim, Young Hyo

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of chronic hypergravity in a mouse model of allergic asthma and rhinitis. Forty BALB/c mice were divided as: group A (n = 10, control) sensitized and challenged with saline, group B (n = 10, asthma) challenged by intraperitoneal and intranasal ovalbumin (OVA) to induce allergic asthma and rhinitis, and groups C (n = 10, asthma/rotatory control) and D (n = 10, asthma/hypergravity) exposed to 4 weeks of rotation with normogravity (1G) or hypergravity (5G) during induction of asthma/rhinitis. Group D showed significantly decreased eosinophils, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in their BAL fluid compared with groups B and C (p lung homogenate, the expression of IL-1β was significantly upregulated (p lung parenchyma and turbinate, and the thickness of respiratory epithelium was significantly reduced in group D (p < 0.05). The expression of Bcl-2 and heme oxygenase-1 were significantly downregulated, Bax and extracellular dismutase significantly upregulated in Group D. Therefore, chronic hypergravity could have a hormetic effect for allergic asthma and rhinitis via regulation of genes involved in antioxidative and proapoptotic pathways. It is possible that we could use hypergravity machinery for treating allergic respiratory disorders.

  4. Prostatic inflammation induces fibrosis in a mouse model of chronic bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letitia Wong

    Full Text Available Inflammation of the prostate is strongly correlated with development of lower urinary tract symptoms and several studies have implicated prostatic fibrosis in the pathogenesis of bladder outlet obstruction. It has been postulated that inflammation induces prostatic fibrosis but this relationship has never been tested. Here, we characterized the fibrotic response to inflammation in a mouse model of chronic bacterial-induced prostatic inflammation. Transurethral instillation of the uropathogenic E. coli into C3H/HeOuJ male mice induced persistent prostatic inflammation followed by a significant increase in collagen deposition and hydroxyproline content. This fibrotic response to inflammation was accompanied with an increase in collagen synthesis determined by the incorporation of 3H-hydroxyproline and mRNA expression of several collagen remodeling-associated genes, including Col1a1, Col1a2, Col3a1, Mmp2, Mmp9, and Lox. Correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation of inflammation severity with collagen deposition and immunohistochemical staining revealed that CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes were abundant in inflamed prostates at the time point coinciding with increased collagen synthesis. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated an increased percentage of these CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes among collagen type I expressing cells. These data show-for the first time-that chronic prostatic inflammation induces collagen deposition and implicates fibrocytes in the fibrotic process.

  5. Immune System Modifications Induced in a Mouse Model of Chronic Exposure to (90)Sr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synhaeve, Nicholas; Musilli, Stefania; Stefani, Johanna; Nicolas, Nour; Delissen, Olivia; Dublineau, Isabelle; Bertho, Jean-Marc

    2016-03-01

    Strontium 90 ((90)Sr) remains in the environment long after a major nuclear disaster occurs. As a result, populations living on contaminated land are potentially exposed to daily ingesting of low quantities of (90)Sr. The potential long-term health effects of such chronic contamination are unknown. In this study, we used a mouse model to evaluate the effects of (90)Sr ingestion on the immune system, the animals were chronically exposed to (90)Sr in drinking water at a concentration of 20 kBq/l, for a daily ingestion of 80-100 Bq/day. This resulted in a reduced number of CD19(+) B lymphocytes in the bone marrow and spleen in steady-state conditions. In contrast, the results from a vaccine experiment performed as a functional test of the immune system showed that in response to T-dependent antigens, there was a reduction in IgG specific to tetanus toxin (TT), a balanced Th1/Th2 response inducer antigen, but not to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), a strong Th2 response inducer antigen. This was accompanied by a reduction in Th1 cells in the spleen, consistent with the observed reduction in specific IgG concentration. The precise mechanisms by which (90)Sr acts on the immune system remain to be elucidated. However, our results suggest that (90)Sr ingestion may be responsible for some of the reported effects of internal contamination on the immune system in civilian populations exposed to the Chernobyl fallout.

  6. Nociceptive and Inflammatory Mediator Upregulation in a Mouse Model of Chronic Prostatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Erica S.; Xie, Amy; La, Jun-Ho; Gebhart, G.F.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic nonbacterial prostatitis, characterized by genitourinary pain in the pelvic region in the absence of an identifiable cause, is common in adult males. Surprisingly, the sensory innervation of the prostate and mediators that sensitize its innervation have received little attention. We thus characterized a mouse model of chronic prostatitis, focusing on the prostate innervation and how organ inflammation affects gene expression of putative nociceptive markers in prostate afferent somata in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and mediators in the prostate. Retrograde tracing (fast blue, FB) from the prostate revealed that thoracolumbar (TL) and lumbosacral (LS) DRG are the principal sources of somata of prostate afferents. Nociceptive markers (e.g., TRP, TREK and P2X channels) were upregulated in FB-labeled TL and LS somata for up to four weeks after inflaming the prostate (intra-prostate injection of zymosan). Prostatic inflammation was evident histologically, by monocyte infiltration and a significant increase in mast cell tryptase activity 14, 21 and 28 days after zymosan injection. Interleukin-10 and NGF were also significantly upregulated in the prostate throughout the four weeks of inflammation. Open field pain-related behaviors (e.g., rearing) were unchanged in prostate-inflamed mice, suggesting the absence of ongoing nociception, but withdrawal thresholds to lower abdominal pressure were significantly reduced. The increases in IL-10, mast cell tryptase and NGF in the inflamed prostate were cotemporaneous with reduced thresholds to probing of the abdomen and upregulation of nociceptive markers in DRG somata innervating the prostate. The results provide insight and direction for study of mechanisms underlying pain in chronic prostatitis. PMID:25915147

  7. Exercise prevents development of autonomic dysregulation and hyperalgesia in a mouse model of chronic muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Rasmussen, Lynn; Sluka, Kathleen A; Chapleau, Mark W

    2016-02-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) conditions, like fibromyalgia, are associated with widespread pain and alterations in autonomic functions. Regular physical activity prevents the development of CMP and can reduce autonomic dysfunction. We tested if there were alterations in autonomic function of sedentary mice with CMP, and whether exercise reduced the autonomic dysfunction and pain induced by CMP. Chronic musculoskeletal pain was induced by 2 intramuscular injections of pH 5.0 in combination with a single fatiguing exercise task. A running wheel was placed into cages so that the mouse had free access to it for either 5 days or 8 weeks (exercise groups) and these animals were compared to sedentary mice without running wheels. Autonomic function and nociceptive withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle were assessed before and after induction of CMP in exercised and sedentary mice. In sedentary mice, we show decreased baroreflex sensitivity, increased blood pressure variability, decreased heart rate variability, and decreased withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle 24 hours after induction of CMP. There were no sex differences after induction of the CMP in any outcome measure. We further show that both 5 days and 8 weeks of physical activity prevent the development of autonomic dysfunction and decreases in withdrawal threshold induced by CMP. Thus, this study uniquely shows the development of autonomic dysfunction in animals with chronic muscle hyperalgesia, which can be prevented with as little as 5 days of physical activity, and suggest that physical activity may prevent the development of pain and autonomic dysfunction in people with CMP.

  8. Pharmacological characterisation of anti-inflammatory compounds in acute and chronic mouse models of cigarette smoke-induced inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mok Joanie

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candidate compounds being developed to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are typically assessed using either acute or chronic mouse smoking models; however, in both systems compounds have almost always been administered prophylactically. Our aim was to determine whether the prophylactic effects of reference anti-inflammatory compounds in acute mouse smoking models reflected their therapeutic effects in (more clinically relevant chronic systems. Methods To do this, we started by examining the type of inflammatory cell infiltrate which occurred after acute (3 days or chronic (12 weeks cigarette smoke exposure (CSE using female, C57BL/6 mice (n = 7-10. To compare the effects of anti-inflammatory compounds in these models, mice were exposed to either 3 days of CSE concomitant with compound dosing or 14 weeks of CSE with dosing beginning after week 12. Budesonide (1 mg kg-1; i.n., q.d., roflumilast (3 mg kg-1; p.o., q.d. and fluvastatin (2 mg kg-1; p.o., b.i.d. were dosed 1 h before (and 5 h after for fluvastatin CSE. These dose levels were selected because they have previously been shown to be efficacious in mouse models of lung inflammation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF leukocyte number was the primary endpoint in both models as this is also a primary endpoint in early clinical studies. Results To start, we confirmed that the inflammatory phenotypes were different after acute (3 days versus chronic (12 weeks CSE. The inflammation in the acute systems was predominantly neutrophilic, while in the more chronic CSE systems BALF neutrophils (PMNs, macrophage and lymphocyte numbers were all increased (p Conclusions These results demonstrate that the acute, prophylactic systems can be used to identify compounds with therapeutic potential, but may not predict a compound's efficacy in chronic smoke exposure models.

  9. Effect of chronic intermittent hypoxia on theophylline metabolism in mouse liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-yang; ZENG Yi-ming; ZHANG Yi-xiang; WANG Wan-yu; WU Run-hua

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) has been associated with abnormalities in the liver,which is the most important organ for drug metabolism.This study aimed to investigate the effect of CIH on theophylline metabolism in mouse liver.Methods Eight C57BL/6J mice were exposed to CIH for 12 weeks.Eight C57BL/6J mice were exposed to room air as a control group.Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were measured.Liver histology was observed by light and electron microscopy.Total hepatic cytochrome P450 concentration was measured.Hepatocytes were isolated and incubated with 15 mg/ml theophylline for four hours.After incubation,the theophylline concentration in the supernatant was measured and the theophylline metabolism rate was calculated.Results CIH did not affect the serum transaminase levels.Livers from mice exposed to CIH showed hepatocellular edema,and liver cells had fuzzy rough endoplasmic reticulum under the electron microscope.The theophylline metabolism rate was significantly inhibited by CIH compared with controls; (16.60±2.43)% vs.(21.58±4.52)% (P=0.02).The total liver cytochrome P450 concentration in the CIH group was significantly lower than in the control group;(0.83±0.08) vs.(1.13±0.21) mol/mg microsomal protein (P=0.004).Conclusion CIH decreases theophylline metabolism by mouse hepatocytes,which may correlate with the downregulation of cytochrome P450 expression by CIH.

  10. PARP inhibition treatment in a nonconventional experimental mouse model of chronic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffini, Raffaela; Di Paola, Rosanna; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Menegazzi, Marta

    2016-12-01

    Allergic asthma is an immunological disease that occurs as a consequence of aeroallergen exposure. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) in conventional models of asthma-like reaction has emerged as an effective anti-inflammatory and airway remodeling intervention. In a house dust mite (HDM) exposure mouse model, we investigated the impact of PARP inhibition on allergic airway inflammation, sensitization, and remodeling. Mice were intranasally exposed to a HDM extract for 5 days per week for up to 5 weeks. Mice were administered, or not, by PARP inhibitors 3-aminobenzamide (3-ABA) or 5-aminoisoquinolinone (5-AIQ) during the last 2 weeks of HDM treatment. Mice treated with PARP inhibitors after HDM stimulation showed a significant decrease in the number of total cells and eosinophils detectable in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as compared with the HDM-stimulated ones. In vitro HDM-stimulated splenocyte culture produced considerable amounts of the Th2 cytokines that were not affected by treatment with PARP inhibitors. Immunoglobulin levels in the serum were also unchanged. In the lung tissue, collagen deposition was decreased, whereas α-smooth muscle actin thickening was not significantly affected. Moreover, in HDM-stimulated PARP inhibitor-treated groups, we found a downregulation in the activation of signal transducer and activator of trascription-6 (STAT-6) and a significant decrease in the mRNA levels of C-C motif chemokine 11 (CCL11). In this mouse model of chronic asthma PARP inhibition treatment, although it does not affect sensitization, it effectively reduces the allergic airway inflammation and affects the remodeling through a mechanism involving STAT6 and CCL11.

  11. Chronically ischemic mouse skeletal muscle exhibits myopathy in association with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipinos, Iraklis I; Swanson, Stanley A; Zhu, Zhen; Nella, Aikaterini A; Weiss, Dustin J; Gutti, Tanuja L; McComb, Rodney D; Baxter, B Timothy; Lynch, Thomas G; Casale, George P

    2008-07-01

    A myopathy characterized by mitochondrial pathology and oxidative stress is present in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Patients with PAD differ in disease severity, mode of presentation, and presence of comorbid conditions. In this study, we used a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia to isolate and directly investigate the effects of chronic inflow arterial occlusion on skeletal muscle microanatomy, mitochondrial function and expression, and oxidative stress. Hindlimb ischemia was induced by staged ligation/division of the common femoral and iliac arteries in C57BL/6 mice, and muscles were harvested 12 wk later. Muscle microanatomy was examined by bright-field microscopy, and mitochondrial content was determined as citrate synthase activity in muscle homogenates and ATP synthase expression by fluorescence microscopy. Electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I through IV were analyzed individually by respirometry. Oxidative stress was assessed as total protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) adducts and altered expression and activity of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Ischemic muscle exhibited histological features of myopathy and increased mitochondrial content compared with control muscle. Complex-dependent respiration was significantly reduced for ETC complexes I, III, and IV in ischemic muscle. Protein carbonyls, HNE adducts, and MnSOD expression were significantly increased in ischemic muscle. MnSOD activity was not significantly changed, suggesting MnSOD inactivation. Using a mouse model, we have demonstrated for the first time that inflow arterial occlusion alone, i.e., in the absence of other comorbid conditions, causes myopathy with mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress, recapitulating the muscle pathology of PAD patients.

  12. The Role of Endogenous Carbon Monoxide in the Hypoxic Vascular Remodeling of Rat Model of Hypoxic Pulmonary Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甄国华; 张珍祥; 徐永健

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-l) gene and production of endogenous carbon monoxide (CO) in the rat lung tissue at different time points of chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and the effect of hemin on the expression of HO-1 gene and pulmonary hypertension. A rat model of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension was recreated by exposure to intermittent normobaric hypoxic environment (10 % O2 ). Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to determine the level of HO-1 mRNA in the rat lung tissue and double wave length spectrophotometry was used to evaluate the quantity of COHb in arterial blood. Cardiac catheterization was employed to measure the right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) and HE staining was performed in dissected lung tissue to observe the pathological changes of the intra-acinar pulmonary arteries (IAPA). It was found that (1) There was a low level of HO-1 mRNA in normal rat lung tissue, but the level of HO-1 mRNA increased by 2-4 times in the lung tissue of hypoxic rats (P<0.01). The quantity of COHb was 2-3 times those of control group (P<0.01or P<0. 05). These were accompanied by the increased of RVSP and the thickened IAPA; (2) Hemin could keep the HO-1 mRNA and COHb in the hypoxic rat lung tissue at a high level, and partially suppressed the increase of rat RVSP, thereby ameliorating the pathological changes of IAPA.In conclusion, the upregulation of the expression of HO-1 gene and production of CO in the rat lung of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension plays a role of inhibition in the development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Hemin has a therapeutic effect on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

  13. Extracellular nucleotide derivatives protect cardiomyctes against hypoxic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golan, O; Issan, Y; Isak, A

    2011-01-01

    in cardioprotection against hypoxic stress has not been reported. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides and nucleosides in protective effects in cardiomyocytes subjected to hypoxia. METHODS AND RESULTS: Rat cultured cardiomyocytes were treated with various extracellular nucleotides...... and nucleosides, before or during hypoxic stress. The results revealed that GTP or CTP exhibit cardioprotective ability, as revealed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, by propidium iodide (PI) staining, by cell morphology, and by preserved mitochondrial activity. Pretreatment with various P2 antagonists...... (suramin, RB-2, or PPADS) did not abolish the cardioprotective effect of the nucleotides. Moreover, P2Y₂ -/- , P2Y₄ -/-, and P2Y₂ -/-/P2Y₄ -/- receptor knockouts mouse cardiomyocytes were significantly protected against hypoxic stress when treated with UTP. These results indicate that the protective effect...

  14. Chronic maternal morphine alters calbindin D-28k expression pattern in postnatal mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithbaokar, Pratibha; Fiorito, Filomena; Della Morte, Rossella; Maharajan, Veeramani; Costagliola, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The distribution pattern of calbindin (CB)-D28k-expressing neurons results to be altered in several brain regions of chronic morphine exposed adult mice. In this study, the influence of chronic maternal exposure to morphine on the distribution pattern of CB-D28k-expressing neurons in the brain of mouse offspring was investigated. Females of CD-1 mice were daily administered with saline or morphine for 7 days before mating, during the whole gestation period, and until 21 day post-partum. Their offspring were sacrificed on postnatal day 18, and the brains were examined by histology using cresyl violet and by immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal anti-CB-D28k antibody. Histology revealed no significant differences in the distribution pattern and the number of neurons between the offspring forebrain of the control group of mice and the two groups of mice treated with different doses of morphine. However, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the number of CB-D28k-immunoreactive neurons remarkably decreased in the cingulate cortex, in the layers II-IV of the parietal cortex and in all regions of the hippocampus, while it increased in the layers V-VI of the parietal cortex and in the subicular region of the offspring brain of morphine treated mice. Overall, our findings demonstrate that maternal exposure to morphine alters the pattern of CB-D28k-expressing neuron pattern in specific regions of murine developing brain, in a layer- and dose-dependent way, thus suggesting that these alterations might represent a mechanism by which morphine modifies the functional aspects of developing brain.

  15. Effect of Chronic Uremia on the Cell Surface Expression of B7 Family Costimulatory Molecules in an HLA-A2 Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makidon, Paul E; Smith, Douglas M; Groom Ii, Jeffery V; Cao, Zhengyi; Landers, Jeffery J; Baker, James R

    2015-08-01

    Uremia due to chronic kidney disease (CKD) in humans is associated with immune dysfunction, increased susceptibility to infections, immune-activation-associated inflammation, and poor responses to vaccines. The pathophysiologic basis of these immune defects is hypothesized to be associated with a wide range of immunologic abnormalities, including an inability to sufficiently express the B7 family (B7-1, CD80; B7-2, CD86) of T-cell costimulatory molecules. However, testing the hypothesis that a state of chronic uremia contributes to attenuated expression of CD80 or CD86 has been difficult because few animal models faithfully recapitulate the immune defects observed in human CKD patients. We used a humanized mouse in a model of surgically induced renal failure and secondary chronic uremia to evaluate the effect of uremia on the expression of these markers. In a manner that resembles the changes observed in CKD patients, surgically induced CKD in mice resulted in decreased costimulatory CD86 expression compared with that in sham-operated controls. Immunodeficiency was functionally demonstrated in this mouse model by documenting an attenuated immune response to a cholera-toxin-based hepatitis B vaccine. This model will be useful for investigating the mechanisms involved in chronic uremia-associated immunodeficiency, poor response to vaccination, and problems associated with immunization of CKD patients.

  16. Effect of chronic valproic Acid treatment on hepatic gene expression profile in wfs1 knockout mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punapart, Marite; Eltermaa, Mall; Oflijan, Julia; Sütt, Silva; Must, Anne; Kõks, Sulev; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Fernandes, Catherine; Vasar, Eero; Soomets, Ursel; Terasmaa, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a widely used anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizing drug whose use is often associated with drug-induced weight gain. Treatment with VPA has been shown to upregulate Wfs1 expression in vitro. Aim of the present study was to compare the effect of chronic VPA treatment in wild type (WT) and Wfs1 knockout (KO) mice on hepatic gene expression profile. Wild type, Wfs1 heterozygous, and homozygous mice were treated with VPA for three months (300 mg/kg i.p. daily) and gene expression profiles in liver were evaluated using Affymetrix Mouse GeneChip 1.0 ST array. We identified 42 genes affected by Wfs1 genotype, 10 genes regulated by VPA treatment, and 9 genes whose regulation by VPA was dependent on genotype. Among the genes that were regulated differentially by VPA depending on genotype was peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (Ppard), whose expression was upregulated in response to VPA treatment in WT, but not in Wfs1 KO mice. Thus, regulation of Ppard by VPA is dependent on Wfs1 genotype.

  17. Complement protein C3 exacerbates prion disease in a mouse model of chronic wasting disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Brady; Ferguson, Adam; Johnson, Theodore; Bender, Heather; Meyerett-Reid, Crystal; Wyckoff, A Christy; Pulford, Bruce; Telling, Glenn C; Zabel, Mark D

    2013-12-01

    Accumulating evidence shows a critical role of the complement system in facilitating attachment of prions to both B cells and follicular dendritic cells and assisting in prion replication. Complement activation intensifies disease in prion-infected animals, and elimination of complement components inhibits prion accumulation, replication and pathogenesis. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a highly infectious prion disease of captive and free-ranging cervid populations that utilizes the complement system for efficient peripheral prion replication and most likely efficient horizontal transmission. Here we show that complete genetic or transient pharmacological depletion of C3 prolongs incubation times and significantly delays splenic accumulation in a CWD transgenic mouse model. Using a semi-quantitative prion amplification scoring system we show that C3 impacts disease progression in the early stages of disease by slowing the rate of prion accumulation and/or replication. The delayed kinetics in prion replication correlate with delayed disease kinetics in mice deficient in C3. Taken together, these data support a critical role of C3 in peripheral CWD prion pathogenesis.

  18. Chronic morphine administration induces over-expression of aldolase C with reduction of CREB phosphorylation in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hai-Yu; Pu, Xiao-Ping

    2009-05-01

    In recent studies, alterations in the activity and expression of metabolic enzymes, such as those involved in glycolysis, have been detected in morphine-dependent patients and animals. Increasing evidence demonstrates that the hippocampus is an important brain region associated with morphine dependence, but the molecular events occurring in the hippocampus following chronic exposure to morphine are poorly understood. Aldolase C is the brain-specific isoform of fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase which is a glycolytic enzyme catalyzing reactions in the glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and fructose metabolic pathways. Using Western blot and immunofluorescence assays, we found the expression of aldolase C was markedly increased in the mouse hippocampus following chronic morphine treatment. Naloxone pretreatment before morphine administration suppressed withdrawal jumping, weight loss, and overexpression of aldolase C. CREB is a transcription factor regulated through phosphorylation on Ser133, which is known to play a key role in the mechanism of morphine dependence. When detecting the expression of phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB) in the mouse hippocampus using Western blot and immunohistochemistry, we found CREB phosphorylation was clearly decreased following chronic morphine treatment. Interestingly, laser-confocal microscopy showed that overexpression of aldolase C in mouse hippocampal neurons was concomitant with the decreased immunoreactivity of p-CREB. The results suggest potential links between the morphine-induced alteration of aldolase C and the regulation of CREB phosphorylation, a possible mechanism of morphine dependence.

  19. Chronic leucine supplementation improves glycemic control in etiologically distinct mouse models of obesity and diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Jue

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leucine may function as a signaling molecule to regulate metabolism. We have previously shown that dietary leucine supplementation significantly improves glucose and energy metabolism in diet-induced obese mice, suggesting that leucine supplementation could potentially be a useful adjuvant therapy for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Since the underlying cause for obesity and type 2 diabetes is multifold, we further investigated metabolic effects of leucine supplementation in obese/diabetes mouse models with different etiologies, and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. Methods Leucine supplementation was carried out in NONcNZO10/LtJ (RCS10 - a polygenic model predisposed to beta cell failure and type 2 diabetes, and in B6.Cg-Ay/J (Ay - a monogenic model for impaired central melanocortin receptor signaling, obesity, and severe insulin resistance. Mice in the treatment group received the drinking water containing 1.5% leucine for up to 8 months; control mice received the tap water. Body weight, body composition, blood HbA1c levels, and plasma glucose and insulin levels were monitored throughout and/or at the end of the study period. Indirect calorimetry, skeletal muscle gene expression, and adipose tissue inflammation were also assessed in Ay mice. Results Leucine supplementation significantly reduced HbA1c levels throughout the study period in both RCS10 and Ay mice. However, the treatment had no long term effect on body weight or adiposity. The improvement in glycemic control was associated with an increased insulin response to food challenge in RCS10 mice and decreased plasma insulin levels in Ay mice. In leucine-treated Ay mice, energy expenditure was increased by ~10% (p y mice whereas the expression levels of MCP-1 and TNF-alpha and macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue were significantly reduced. Conclusions Chronic leucine supplementation significantly improves glycemic control in multiple mouse models of

  20. Evidence against a stem cell origin of new hepatocytes in a common mouse model of chronic liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Johanna R; Malato, Yann; Gormond, Coralie; Willenbring, Holger

    2014-08-21

    Hepatocytes provide most liver functions, but they can also proliferate and regenerate the liver after injury. However, under some liver injury conditions, particularly chronic liver injury where hepatocyte proliferation is impaired, liver stem cells (LSCs) are thought to replenish lost hepatocytes. Conflicting results have been reported about the identity of LSCs and their contribution to liver regeneration. To address this uncertainty, we followed candidate LSC populations by genetic fate tracing in adult mice with chronic liver injury due to a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented diet. In contrast to previous studies, we failed to detect hepatocytes derived from biliary epithelial cells or mesenchymal liver cells beyond a negligible frequency. In fact, we failed to detect hepatocytes that were not derived from pre-existing hepatocytes. In conclusion, our findings argue against LSCs, or other nonhepatocyte cell types, providing a backup system for hepatocyte regeneration in this common mouse model of chronic liver injury.

  1. Evidence against a Stem Cell Origin of New Hepatocytes in a Common Mouse Model of Chronic Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna R. Schaub

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocytes provide most liver functions, but they can also proliferate and regenerate the liver after injury. However, under some liver injury conditions, particularly chronic liver injury where hepatocyte proliferation is impaired, liver stem cells (LSCs are thought to replenish lost hepatocytes. Conflicting results have been reported about the identity of LSCs and their contribution to liver regeneration. To address this uncertainty, we followed candidate LSC populations by genetic fate tracing in adult mice with chronic liver injury due to a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented diet. In contrast to previous studies, we failed to detect hepatocytes derived from biliary epithelial cells or mesenchymal liver cells beyond a negligible frequency. In fact, we failed to detect hepatocytes that were not derived from pre-existing hepatocytes. In conclusion, our findings argue against LSCs, or other nonhepatocyte cell types, providing a backup system for hepatocyte regeneration in this common mouse model of chronic liver injury.

  2. 慢性缺氧模型与病证相关性的研究进展%Advances on Correlation between Chronic Hypoxic Animal Models and Diseases and Syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洁琼; 柴程芝; 寇俊萍; 余伯阳

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged or repeated hypoxia can affect the normal oxygen supply for tissues and organs and normal physiological function of the cardiovascular, respiratory and nervous systems. Multi-system injuries bring serious harm to human health. Along with the modern life style and dietary structure change, deficiency of aerobic exercise and the worsening earth pollution and destruction make human in a chronic hypoxic environment imperceptibly. Therefore, it is of importance to pay more attention to the harm of chronic hypoxia and take corresponding prevention measures. Scholars at home and abroad largely explored constructing animal models to simulate different diseases and syndromes through observing macro and micro indications, including performance and physiological or biochemical indexes. And different oxygen cycles and different hypoxia intensities were used. Various animal models of chronic hypoxia have been commonly used to investigate the various physiological or pathological processes of hypoxia-related diseases including obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, pulmonary artery hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disease and Deficiency of both Qi and Yin syndrome, Stagnation of Qi and blood stasis. In this paper, the recent studies on relationship of chronic hypoxia model and the related diseases and syndromes were reviewed. It is inclined to provide some clues not only for selecting reasonable animal models simulating the clinical features of diseases and syndrome but also for evaluating the characters of drug action reasonably.%长期或反复处于缺氧状态,可以影响机体组织器官的正常供氧,使心血管、呼吸和神经等系统功能紊乱,从而诱导机体多系统损伤,严重危害人体健康.随着现代人生活方式以及饮食结构的改变,生活中有氧运动不足再加上地球污染与破坏逐年加剧,人类不知不觉地处在一个慢性缺氧的环境中.因此,了解并重视慢性缺氧对生理功能的

  3. Neuroprotective Effect of Compound Anisodine in a Mouse Model with Chronic Ocular Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Dong Liu; Lan-Lan Chen; Ce-Ying Shen; Li-Bin Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Compound anisodine (CA) is a compound preparation made from hydrobromide anisodine and procaine hydrochloride.The former is an M-choline receptor blocker with the function of regulating the vegetative nervous system,improving microcirculation,and so on.The latter is an antioxidant with the activities ofneuroprotection.This study aimed to investigate the potential neuroprotection of CA,which affects the degeneration of the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in an animal model with chronic ocular hypertension.Methods:Female C57BL/6J mice (n =24) were divided randomly into four groups:Normal control group without any treatment (Group A,n =6);CA control group with feeding the CA solution (Group B,n =6);microbeads (MBs) control group with injecting MB into the anterior chamber (Group C,n =6);CA study group with MB injection and with feeding the CA solution (Group D,n =6).Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured every 3 days after MB injection.At the 21st day,neurons were retrograde-labeled by Fluoro-Gold (FG).Animals were sacrificed on the 27th day.Retinal flat mounts were stained immunohistologically by β-Ⅲ-tubulin.FG-retrograde-labeled RGCs,β-Ⅲ-tubulin-positive RGCs,and β-Ⅲ-tubulin-positive nerve fibers were quantified.Results:Mice of Groups C and D expressed the incidence of consistent IOP elevation,which is above the IOP level of Group A with the normal one.There is no significant difference in IOP between Groups A and B (P > 0.05).On the 27th day,there were distinct loss in stained RGCs and nerve fibers from Groups C and D compared with Group A (all P < 0.00l).The quantity was significantly higher in Group D as compared to Group C (all P < 0.00l) but lower than Group A (all P < 0.001).There was no significant difference in the quantity of RGCs and nerve fibers between Groups A and B (all P > 0.05).Conclusions:These findings suggest that CA plays an importantly neuroprotective role on RGCs in a mouse model with chronic ocular hypertension.

  4. Hypoxic Tumor Can be More Responsive to Fractionated Irradiation Combined with SR 4233 (Tirapazamine)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Han [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Brown, J. Martin [Stanford Univ., Stanford (United States)

    1994-02-15

    Hypothesis that hypoxic tumors should be more responsive to the addition of preferential hypoxic cell cytotoxin SR 4233 (tirapazamine) to fractionated irradiation was tested in the mouse SCCVII carcinoma and RIF-1 sarcoma, Model of hypoxic tumor was established using the tumor bed effect; tumors growing in the preirradiated tissue (preirradiated tumors) were more hypoxic than tumors growing in the unirradiated tissue (unirradiated tumors). When the tumors reached a mean volume of 100 mm{sup 3}, both unirradiated and preirradiated tumors were treated with a fractionated course of 6 x 2 Gy in 3 days or 8 x2.5 Gy in 4 days with SR 4233 (0.08m mol/kg/injection) given 30 minutes before each irradiation or without SR 4233. Compared to the unirradiated tumors, hypoxic preirradiated tumors were approximately 5 times more resistant to fractionated irradiation alone but were approximately 5 times more responsive to SR 4233. Addition of SR 4233 potentiated the effect of fractionated irradiation in both unirradiated and preirradiated tumors. Potentiation in the preirradiated tumors was morequal to or greater than that in the unirradiated tumors and seemed to be higher for more fractionated treatment. We confirm the hypothesis in a transplantable mouse tumor. Present results suggest that radioresistance of some hypoxic tumors can be overcome with hypoxic cytotoxin.

  5. Hypoxic training methods for improving endurance exercise performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob A. Sinex

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Endurance athletic performance is highly related to a number of factors that can be altered through altitude and hypoxic training including increases in erythrocyte volume, maximal aerobic exercise capacity, capillary density, and economy. Physiological adaptations in response to acute and chronic exposure to hypoxic environments are well documented and range from short-term detrimental effects to longer-term adaptations that can improve performance at altitude and in sea-level competitions. Many altitude and hypoxic training protocols have been developed, employing various combinations of living and training at sea-level, low, moderate, and high altitudes and utilizing natural and artificial altitudes, with varying degrees of effectiveness. Several factors have been identified that are associated with individual responses to hypoxic training, and techniques for identifying those athletes most likely to benefit from hypoxic training continue to be investigated. Exposure to sufficiently high altitude (2000–3000 m for more than 12 h/day, while training at lower altitudes, for a minimum of 21 days is recommended. Timing of altitude training related to competition remains under debate, although general recommendations can be considered.

  6. Hypoxic preconditioning in an autohypoxic animal model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Shao; Guo-Wei Lu

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning refers to the exposure of organisms,systems,organs,tissues or cells to moderate hypoxia/ischemia that [Results]in increased resistance to a subsequent episode of severe hypoxia/ischemia.In this article,we review recent research based on a mouse model of repeated exposure to autohypoxia.Pre-exposure markedly increases the tolerance to or protection against hypoxic insult,and preserves the cellular structure of the brain.Furthermore,the hippocampal activity amplitude and frequency of electroencephalogram,latency of cortical somatosensory-evoked potential and spinal somatosensory-evoked potential progressively decrease,while spatial learning and memory improve.In the brain,detrimental neurochemicals such as free radicals are down-regulated,while beneficial ones such as adenosine are upregulated.Also,antihypoxia factor(s) and gene(s) are activated.We propose that the tolerance and protective effects depend on energy conservation and plasticity triggered by exposure to hypoxia via oxygen-sensing transduction pathways and hypoxia-inducible factor-initiated cascades.A potential path for further research is the development of devices and pharmaceuticals acting on antihypoxia factor(s) and gene(s) for the prevention and treatment of hypoxia and related syndromes.

  7. Chronic calcium imaging of neurons in the mouse visual cortex using a troponin C-based indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Alexandre Ferrão; Hübener, Mark

    2014-05-01

    This protocol describes the use of the genetically encoded troponin C-based calcium indicator TN-XXL to chronically monitor the functional properties of single neocortical neurons in the mouse visual cortex. A cranial window is implanted over the brain of a mouse expressing TN-XXL in pyramidal neurons of the cerebral cortex. Several days later, the visual cortex is mapped and photographed to facilitate repeated imaging of the same region using two-photon microscopy. Initial two-photon imaging may be done ∼2 wk after the window is implanted. We show the application of this technique for long-term in vivo imaging of stimulus response properties. Beyond providing functional information, long-term imaging of TN-XXL-labeled neurons also enables the simultaneous monitoring of structural properties down to the level of single dendritic spines.

  8. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Hypoxic/Ischemic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengbao Luo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tissue hypoxia/ischemia is a pathological feature of many human disorders including stroke, myocardial infarction, hypoxic/ischemic nephropathy, as well as cancer. In the kidney, the combination of limited oxygen supply to the tissues and high oxygen demand is considered the main reason for the susceptibility of the kidney to hypoxic/ischemic injury. In recent years, increasing evidence has indicated that a reduction in renal oxygen tension/blood supply plays an important role in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, and renal tumorigenesis. However, the underlying signaling mechanisms, whereby hypoxia alters cellular behaviors, remain poorly understood. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs are key signal-transducing enzymes activated by a wide range of extracellular stimuli, including hypoxia/ischemia. There are four major family members of MAPKs: the extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1 and -2 (ERK1/2, the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK, p38 MAPKs, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-5 (ERK5/BMK1. Recent studies, including ours, suggest that these MAPKs are differentially involved in renal responses to hypoxic/ischemic stress. This review will discuss their changes in hypoxic/ischemic pathophysiology with acute kidney injury, chronic kidney diseases and renal carcinoma.

  9. Hypoxic radiosensitization: adored and ignored.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overgaard, Jens

    2007-09-10

    Since observations from the beginning of the last century, it has become well established that solid tumors may contain oxygen-deficient hypoxic areas and that cells in such areas may cause tumors to become radioresistant. Identifying hypoxic cells in human tumors has improved by the help of new imaging and physiologic techniques, and a substantial amount of data indicates the presence of hypoxia in many types of human tumors, although with a considerable heterogeneity among individual tumors. Controlled clinical trials during the last 40 years have indicated that this source of radiation resistance can be eliminated or modified by normobaric or hyperbaric oxygen or by the use of nitroimidazoles as hypoxic radiation sensitizers. More recently, attention has been given to hypoxic cytotoxins, a group of drugs that selectively or preferably destroys cells in a hypoxic environment. An updated systematic review identified 10,108 patients in 86 randomized trials designed to modify tumor hypoxia in patients treated with curative attempted primary radiation therapy alone. Overall modification of tumor hypoxia significantly improved the effect of radiotherapy, with an odds ratio of 0.77 (95% CI, 0.71 to 0.86) for the outcome of locoregional control and with an associated significant overall survival benefit (odds ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.80 to 0.95). No significant influence was found on the incidence of distant metastases or on the risk of radiation-related complications. Ample data exist to support a high level of evidence for the benefit of hypoxic modification. However, hypoxic modification still has no impact on general clinical practice.

  10. Restorative effect of endurance exercise on behavioral deficits in the chronic mouse model of Parkinson's disease with severe neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Yuen-Sum

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal models of Parkinson's disease have been widely used for investigating the mechanisms of neurodegenerative process and for discovering alternative strategies for treating the disease. Following 10 injections with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP, 25 mg/kg and probenecid (250 mg/kg over 5 weeks in mice, we have established and characterized a chronic mouse model of Parkinson's disease (MPD, which displays severe long-term neurological and pathological defects resembling that of the human Parkinson's disease in the advanced stage. The behavioral manifestations in this chronic mouse model of Parkinson's syndrome remain uninvestigated. The health benefit of exercise in aging and in neurodegenerative disorders including the Parkinson's disease has been implicated; however, clinical and laboratory studies in this area are limited. In this research with the chronic MPD, we first conducted a series of behavioral tests and then investigated the impact of endurance exercise on the identified Parkinsonian behavioral deficits. Results We report here that the severe chronic MPD mice showed significant deficits in their gait pattern consistency and in learning the cued version of the Morris water maze. Their performances on the challenging beam and walking grid were considerably attenuated suggesting the lack of balance and motor coordination. Furthermore, their spontaneous and amphetamine-stimulated locomotor activities in the open field were significantly suppressed. The behavioral deficits in the chronic MPD lasted for at least 8 weeks after MPTP/probenecid treatment. When the chronic MPD mice were exercise-trained on a motorized treadmill 1 week before, 5 weeks during, and 8–12 weeks after MPTP/probenecid treatment, the behavioral deficits in gait pattern, spontaneous ambulatory movement, and balance performance were reversed; whereas neuronal loss and impairment in cognitive skill, motor coordination, and

  11. Further development of a model of chronic bone marrow aplasia in the busulphan-treated mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, John A; Sones, William R; Andrews, Charles M; Pilling, Andrew M; Williams, Thomas C; Molyneux, Gemma; Rizzo, Sian; Gordon-Smith, Edward C; Gibson, Frances M

    2006-02-01

    Aplastic anaemia (AA) in man is an often fatal disease characterized by pancytopenia of the peripheral blood and aplasia of the bone marrow. AA is a toxic effect of many drugs and chemicals (e.g. chloramphenicol, azathioprine, phenylbutazone, gold salts, penicillamine and benzene). However, there are no widely used or convenient animal models of drug-induced AA. Recently, we reported a new model of chronic bone marrow aplasia (CBMA = AA) in the busulphan (BU)-treated mouse: eight doses of BU (10.50 mg/kg) were administered to female BALB/c mice over a period of 23 days; CBMA was evident at day 91/112 post-dosing with significantly reduced erythrocytes, platelets, leucocytes and nucleated bone marrow cell counts. However, mortality was high (49.3%). We have now carried out a study to modify the BU-dosing regime to induce CBMA without high mortality, and investigated the patterns of cellular responses in the blood and marrow in the post-dosing period. Mice (n = 64/65) were dosed 10 times with BU at 0 (vehicle control), 8.25, 9.0 and 9.75 mg/kg over 21 days and autopsied at day 1, 23, 42, 71, 84, 106 and 127 post-dosing (n = 7-15); blood and marrow samples were examined. BU induced a predictable bone marrow depression at day 1 post-dosing; at day 23/42 post-dosing, parameters were returning towards normal during a period of recovery. At day 71, 84, 106 and 127 post-dosing, a stabilized, late-stage, nondose-related CBMA was evident in BU-treated mice, with decreased erythrocytes, platelets and marrow cell counts, and increased MCV. At day 127 post-dosing, five BU-treated mice showed evidence of lymphoma. In this study, mortality was low, ranging from 3.1% (8.25 mg/kg BU) to 12.3% (9.75 mg/kg BU). It is concluded that BU at 9.0 mg/kg (or 9.25 mg/kg) is an appropriate dose level to administer (10 times over 21 days) to induce CBMA at approximately day 50-120 post-dosing.

  12. Squamosamide derivative FLZ protected tyrosine hydroxylase function in a chronic MPTP/probenecid mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiu-Qi; Wu, Liang-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Dan

    2015-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor impairments and loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. FLZ (formulated as: N-2-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-ethyl]-2-(2, 5-dimethoxy-phenyl)-3-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenyl)-acrylamide) is a novel synthetic derivative of squamosamide from a Chinese herb and has been proven to protect dopaminergic neurons in subacute PD models. However, whether FLZ has a neuroprotective effect on chronic PD model is still unknown. The present study was designed to verify the neuroprotection of FLZ on chronic PD mouse model induced by MPTP combined with probenecid (MPTP/p). The results showed that treatment of mice with FLZ for 9 weeks significantly improved motor behavior and dopaminergic neuronal function of mice injected with MPTP/p. The beneficial effects of FLZ attributed to the elevation of dopaminergic neuron number, dopamine level, and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity, as well as decrease of α-synuclein (α-Syn) expression, α-Syn phosphorylation, nitration, and aggregation. Moreover, FLZ decreased the interaction between α-Syn and TH, which eventually improved dopaminergic neuronal function. Mechanistic study demonstrated that FLZ increased Akt and mTOR phosphorylation, suggesting that FLZ activated Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and this might be involved in the neuroprotection of FLZ. The present results provided more elaborate in vivo evidences to support the neuroprotective effect of FLZ on dopaminergic neurons of chronic PD mouse model and the potential of FLZ to be developed as new drug to treat PD.

  13. Chronic Fluoxetine Induces the Enlargement of Perforant Path-Granule Cell Synapses in the Mouse Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Yosuke; Ohta, Keisuke; Hasuo, Hiroshi; Shuto, Takahide; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Sotogaku, Naoki; Togo, Akinobu; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Nishi, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    A selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor is the most commonly prescribed antidepressant for the treatment of major depression. However, the mechanisms underlying the actions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are not fully understood. In the dentate gyrus, chronic fluoxetine treatment induces increased excitability of mature granule cells (GCs) as well as neurogenesis. The major input to the dentate gyrus is the perforant path axons (boutons) from the entorhinal cortex (layer II). Through voltage-sensitive dye imaging, we found that the excitatory neurotransmission of the perforant path synapse onto the GCs in the middle molecular layer of the mouse dentate gyrus (perforant path-GC synapse) is enhanced after chronic fluoxetine treatment (15 mg/kg/day, 14 days). Therefore, we further examined whether chronic fluoxetine treatment affects the morphology of the perforant path-GC synapse, using FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy). A three-dimensional reconstruction of dendritic spines revealed the appearance of extremely large-sized spines after chronic fluoxetine treatment. The large-sized spines had a postsynaptic density with a large volume. However, chronic fluoxetine treatment did not affect spine density. The presynaptic boutons that were in contact with the large-sized spines were large in volume, and the volumes of the mitochondria and synaptic vesicles inside the boutons were correlated with the size of the boutons. Thus, the large-sized perforant path-GC synapse induced by chronic fluoxetine treatment contains synaptic components that correlate with the synapse size and that may be involved in enhanced glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  14. Histopathological analysis of Salmonella chronic carriage in the mouse hepatopancreatobiliary system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Gonzalez-Escobedo

    Full Text Available Salmonella Typhi asymptomatic chronic carriage represents a challenge for the diagnosis and prevention of typhoid fever in endemic areas. Such carriers are thought to be reservoirs for further spread of the disease. Gallbladder carriage has been demonstrated to be mediated by biofilm formation on gallstones and by intracellular persistence in the gallbladder epithelium of mice. In addition, both gallstones and chronic carriage have been associated with chronic inflammation and the development of gallbladder carcinoma. However, the pathogenic relationship between typhoid carriage and the development of pre-malignant and/or malignant lesions in the hepatopancreatobiliary system as well as the host-pathogen interactions occurring during chronic carriage remains unclear. In this study, we monitored the histopathological features of chronic carriage up to 1 year post-infection. Chronic cholecystitis and hepatitis ranging from mild to severe were present in infected mice regardless of the presence of gallstones. Biliary epithelial hyperplasia was observed more commonly in the gallbladder of mice with gallstones (uninfected or infected. However, pre-malignant lesions, atypical hyperplasia and metaplasia of the gallbladder and exocrine pancreas, respectively, were only associated with chronic Salmonella carriage. This study has implications regarding the role of Salmonella chronic infection and inflammation in the development of pre-malignant lesions in the epithelium of the gallbladder and pancreas that could lead to oncogenesis.

  15. In vitro effects of piracetam on the radiosensitivity of hypoxic cells (adaptation of MTT assay to hypoxic conditions); Effets in vitro du piracetam sur la radiosensibilite des cellules hypoxiques (adapatation du test au MTT aux conditions d`hypoxie)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gheuens, E.E.O.; Bruijn, E.A. de; Van der Heyden, S.; Van Oosterom, A.T. [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium); Lagarde, P. [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium)]|[Institut Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Pooter, C.M.J. de [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium)]|[Hopital de Middelheim, Anvers (Belgium); Chomy, F. [Institut Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the adaptation of the MTT assay to hypoxic conditions in order to test the in vitro effect of piracetam on hypoxic cells and particularly on the radiosensitivity of hypoxic cells since this drug has shown clinical effect on acute and chronic hypoxia. The V79 cell line was selected by reference to preliminary hypoxic experiments using clonogenic assay and euoxic experiments using clonogenic and MTT assays. Cell growth and survival in our hypoxic conditions were assessed using MTT assay with an enclosure and special 48-well plates both made of glass. Growth curves on glass plates after 1-hour exposure to nitrogen versus air were comparable, so there is no bias effect due to gas composition. Survival curves using MTT versus reference clonogenic assay were comparable after radiation exposure in eu- and hypoxic conditions, and confirm the validity of our original technique for creating hypoxia. The Oxygen Enhancement Ratio was of about 3 for 1-hour hypoxic exposure. Piracetam gave no cytotoxic effect up to 10 mM of piracetam. Growth curves after continuous drug exposure and 1-hour euoxic versus hypoxic exposure gave no cytotoxic effect up to 10 mM of piracetam. Survival curves after continuous drug exposure to 10 mM of piracetam gave no significant effect on the radiosensitivity of hypoxic V79 cells using MTT or clonogenic assay. (author). 32 refs., 6 figs.

  16. L-tyrosine improves neuroendocrine function in a mouse model of chronic stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhihua Wang; Jinghua Li; Zhiming Wang; Lingyan Xue; Yi Zhang; Yingjie Chen; Jun Su; Zhongming Li

    2012-01-01

    Adult BALB/c mice, individually housed, were stimulated with nine different stressors, arranged randomly, for 4 continuous weeks to generate an animal model of chronic stress. In chronically stressed mice, spontaneous locomotor activity was significantly decreased, escape latency in the Morris water maze test was prolonged, serum levels of total thyrotropin and total triiodothyronine were significantly decreased, and dopamine and norepinephrine content in the pallium, hippocampus and hypothalamus were significantly reduced. All of these changes were suppressed, to varying degrees, by L-tyrosine supplementation. These findings indicate that the neuroendocrine network plays an important role in chronic stress, and that L-tyrosine supplementation has therapeutic effects.

  17. Chronic low-dose-rate ionising radiation affects the hippocampal phosphoproteome in the ApoE−/− Alzheimer mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kempf, Stefan; Janik, Dirk; Barjaktarovic, Zarko

    2017-01-01

    Accruing data indicate that radiation-induced consequences resemble pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer´s. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect on hippocampus of chronic low-dose-rate radiation exposure (1 mGy/day or 20 mGy/day) given over 300 days with cumula......Accruing data indicate that radiation-induced consequences resemble pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer´s. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect on hippocampus of chronic low-dose-rate radiation exposure (1 mGy/day or 20 mGy/day) given over 300 days...... with cumulative doses of 0.3 Gy and 6.0 Gy, respectively. ApoE deficient mutant C57Bl/6 mouse was used as an Alzheimer´s model. Using mass spectrometry, a marked alteration in the phosphoproteome was found at both dose rates. The radiation-induced changes in the phosphoproteome were associated with the control...... that several molecular targets induced by chronic low-dose-rate radiation overlap with those of Alzheimer´s pathology. It may suggest that ionising radiation functions as a contributing risk factor to this neurodegenerative disease....

  18. Longitudinal study of a mouse model of chronic pulmonary inflammation using breath hold gated micro-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artaechevarria, Xabier; Perez-Martin, Daniel; Munoz-Barrutia, Arrate; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos [Center for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, Cancer Imaging Laboratory, Oncology Division, Pamplona (Spain); Blanco, David; Biurrun, Gabriel de; Montuenga, Luis M. [Center for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, Biomarkers Laboratory, Pamplona (Spain); Torres, Juan P. de; Zulueta, Javier J. [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Pneumology Department, Pamplona (Spain); Bastarrika, Gorka [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Radiology Department, Pamplona (Spain)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of using automatic quantitative analysis of breath hold gated micro-CT images to detect and monitor disease in a mouse model of chronic pulmonary inflammation, and to compare image-based measurements with pulmonary function tests and histomorphometry. Forty-nine A/J mice were used, divided into control and inflammation groups. Chronic inflammation was induced by silica aspiration. Fourteen animals were imaged at baseline, and 4, 14, and 34 weeks after silica aspiration, using micro-CT synchronized with ventilator-induced breath holds. Lung input impedance was measured as well using forced oscillation techniques. Five additional animals from each group were killed after micro-CT for comparison with histomorphometry. At all time points, micro-CT measurements show statistically significant differences between the two groups, while first differences in functional test parameters appear at 14 weeks. Micro-CT measurements correlate well with histomorphometry and discriminate diseased and healthy groups better than functional tests. Longitudinal studies using breath hold gated micro-CT are feasible on the silica-induced model of chronic pulmonary inflammation, and automatic measurements from micro-CT images correlate well with histomorphometry, being more sensitive than functional tests to detect lung damage in this model. (orig.)

  19. The effect of sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, attenuates inflammation and fibrosis in a mouse model of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Han

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by progressive fibrosis, pain and loss of exocrine and endocrine functions. The long-standing chronic pancreatitis and its associated pancreatic fibrosis are the most common pathogenic events involved in human pancreatic carcinogenesis, but the therapeutic strategies to chronic pancreatitis and the chemoprevention of pancreatic carcinogenesis are very limited. Methods We investigated the effect of sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, on inhibition of chronic pancreatitis in a caerulein induced chronic pancreatitis mouse model. Results Sulindac significantly reduced the severity of chronic pancreatitis including the extent of acini loss, inflammatory cell infiltration and stromal fibrosis. The protein expression of phosphorylation of MEK/ERK was inhibited in the chronic pancreatic tissues by sulindac treatment as measured by Western blot assay. The levels of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and MCP-1 were also significantly decreased with sulindac treatment, as well as the expression of TGF-β, PDGF-β, SHH and Gli in the chronic pancreatic tissue detected by qPCR assay and confirmed by western blot assay. The activation of pancreatic satellet cells was also inhibited by sulindac as measured by the activity of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA in the pancreatic tissue of chronic pancreatitis. Conclusions Sulindac is a promising reagent for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis via inhibition of inflammatory cell infiltration and stromal fibrosis, the inhibitory effect of sulindac on chronic pancreatitis may through targeting the activation ERK/MAPK signaling pathway.

  20. The effects of chronic social defeat stress on mouse self-grooming behavior and its patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denmark, Ashley; Tien, David; Wong, Keith; Chung, Amanda; Cachat, Jonathan; Goodspeed, Jason; Grimes, Chelsea; Elegante, Marco; Suciu, Christopher; Elkhayat, Salem; Bartels, Brett; Jackson, Andrew; Rosenberg, Michael; Chung, Kyung Min; Badani, Hussain; Kadri, Ferdous; Roy, Sudipta; Tan, Julia; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Stewart, Adam; Zapolsky, Ivan; Gilder, Thomas; Kalueff, Allan V

    2010-04-01

    Stress induced by social defeat is a strong modifier of animal anxiety and depression-like phenotypes. Self-grooming is a common rodent behavior, and has an ordered cephalo-caudal progression from licking of the paws to head, body, genitals and tail. Acute stress is known to alter grooming activity levels and disrupt its patterning. Following 15-17 days of chronic social defeat stress, grooming behavior was analyzed in adult male C57BL/6J mice exhibiting either dominant or subordinate behavior. Our study showed that subordinate mice experience higher levels of anxiety and display disorganized patterning of their grooming behaviors, which emerges as a behavioral marker of chronic social stress. These findings indicate that chronic social stress modulates grooming behavior in mice, thus illustrating the importance of grooming phenotypes for neurobehavioral stress research.

  1. Physiological Responses to Two Hypoxic Conditioning Strategies in Healthy Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacaroun, Samarmar; Borowik, Anna; Morrison, Shawnda A.; Baillieul, Sébastien; Flore, Patrice; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Verges, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Hypoxic exposure can be used as a therapeutic tool by inducing various cardiovascular, neuromuscular, and metabolic adaptations. Hypoxic conditioning strategies have been evaluated in patients with chronic diseases using either sustained (SH) or intermittent (IH) hypoxic sessions. Whether hypoxic conditioning via SH or IH may induce different physiological responses remains to be elucidated. Methods: Fourteen healthy active subjects (7 females, age 25 ± 8 years, body mass index 21.5 ± 2.5 kg·m−2) performed two interventions in a single blind, randomized cross-over design, starting with either 3 x SH (48 h apart), or 3 x IH (48 h apart), separated by a 2 week washout period. SH sessions consisted of breathing a gas mixture with reduced inspiratory oxygen fraction (FiO2), continuously adjusted to reach arterial oxygen saturations (SpO2) of 70–80% for 1 h. IH sessions consisted of 5 min with reduced FiO2 (SpO2 = 70–80%), followed by 3-min normoxia, repeated seven times. During the first (S1) and third (S3) sessions of each hypoxic intervention, cardiorespiratory parameters, and muscle and pre-frontal cortex oxygenation (near infrared spectroscopy) were assessed continuously. Results: Minute ventilation increased significantly during IH sessions (+2 ± 2 L·min−1) while heart rate increased during both SH (+11 ± 4 bpm) and IH (+13 ± 5 bpm) sessions. Arterial blood pressure increased during all hypoxic sessions, although baseline normoxic systolic blood pressure was reduced from S1 to S3 in IH only (−8 ± 11 mmHg). Muscle oxygenation decreased significantly during S3 but not S1, for both hypoxic interventions (S3: SH −6 ± 5%, IH −3 ± 4%); pre-frontal oxygenation decreased in S1 and S3, and to a greater extent in SH vs. IH (−13 ± 3% vs. −6 ± 6%). Heart rate variability indices indicated a significantly larger increase in sympathetic activity in SH vs. IH (lower SDNN, PNN50, and RMSSD values in SH). From S1 to S3, further reduction in

  2. Effects of acute and chronic administration of venlafaxine and desipramine on extracellular monoamine levels in the mouse prefrontal cortex and striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Kosuke; Ago, Yukio; Umehara, Masato; Kita, Yuki; Fujita, Kazumi; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Toshio

    2014-04-15

    Prefrontal catecholamine neurotransmission plays a key role in the therapeutic actions of drugs for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have recently shown that serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors and the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor desipramine attenuated horizontal hyperactivity in spontaneously hypertensive rats, an animal model of ADHD, and that these drugs are potential pharmacotherapeutics for ADHD. In this study, we used in vivo microdialysis to study the effects of acute and chronic (once daily for 3 weeks) administration of the serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor venlafaxine and the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor desipramine on noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin levels, and the expression of the neuronal activity marker c-Fos in the mouse prefrontal cortex and striatum. Both acute and chronic venlafaxine administration increased prefrontal noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin levels and striatal noradrenaline and serotonin levels. Both acute and chronic desipramine administration increased prefrontal noradrenaline and dopamine levels and striatal noradrenaline levels, with chronic administration yielding stronger increase. Chronic desipramine did not affect striatal dopamine and serotonin levels. Both acute and chronic venlafaxine administration increased the expression of c-Fos in the prefrontal cortex, whereas chronic, but not acute, desipramine administration increased the expression of c-Fos in the prefrontal cortex. Both acute and chronic venlafaxine administration increased the striatal c-Fos expression to some degree, whereas desipramine administration did not. These results suggest that acute and chronic venlafaxine and chronic desipramine administration maximally activate the prefrontal adrenergic and dopaminergic systems without affecting striatal dopaminergic systems in mice.

  3. Weaver mutant mouse cerebellar granule cells respond normally to chronic depolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Annette; Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Hack, N;

    1997-01-01

    We studied the effects of chronic K(+)-induced membrane depolarization and treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) from weaver mutant mice and non-weaver litter-mates. The weaver mutation is a Gly-to-Ser substitution in a conserved region of the Girk2 G prote...

  4. Chronic ethanol exposure inhibits distraction osteogenesis in a mouse model: role of the TNF signaling axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is an inflammatory cytokine that modulates osteoblastogenesis. In addition, the demonstrated inhibitory effects of chronic ethanol exposure on direct bone formation in rats are hypothetically mediated by TNF-alpha signaling. The effects in mice are unreported....

  5. Marine Compound Xyloketal B Reduces Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Jiao Xiao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy causes neurodegeneration and brain injury, leading to sensorimotor dysfunction. Xyloketal B is a novel marine compound isolated from a mangrove fungus Xylaria species (no. 2508 with unique antioxidant effects. In this study, we investigated the effects and mechanism of xyloketal B on oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced neuronal cell death in mouse primary cortical culture and on hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal mice in vivo. We found that xyloketal B reduced anoxia-induced neuronal cell death in vitro, as well as infarct volume in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury model in vivo. Furthermore, xyloketal B improved functional behavioral recovery of the animals following hypoxic-ischemic insult. In addition, xyloketal B significantly decreased calcium entry, reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells, reduced the levels of cleaved caspase-3 and Bax proteins, and increased the level of Bcl-2 protein after the hypoxic-ischemic injury. Our findings indicate that xyloketal B is effective in models of hypoxia-ischemia and thus has potential as a treatment for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

  6. Influence of chronic ethanol intake on mouse synaptosomal aspartyl aminopeptidase and aminopeptidase A: relationship with oxidative stress indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayas, María Dolores; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; García, María Jesús; Carrera, María Pilar; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel

    2012-08-01

    Aminopeptidase A (APA) and aspartyl aminopeptidase (ASAP) not only act as neuromodulators in the regional brain renin-angiotensin system, but also release N-terminal acidic amino acids (glutamate and aspartate). The hyperexcitability of amino acid neurotransmitters is responsible for several neurodegenerative processes affecting the central nervous system. The purpose of the present work was to study the influence of chronic ethanol intake, a well known neurotoxic compound, on APA and ASAP activity under resting and K(+)-stimulated conditions at the synapse level. APA and ASAP activity were determined against glutamate- and aspartate-β-naphthylamide respectively in mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes and in their incubation supernatant in a Ca(2+)-containing or Ca(2+)-free artificial cerebrospinal fluid. The neurotoxic effects were analyzed by determining free radical generation, peroxidation of membrane lipids and the oxidation of synaptosomal proteins. In addition, the bioenergetic behavior of synaptosomes was analyzed under different experimental protocols. We obtained several modifications in oxidative stress parameters and a preferential inhibitor effect of chronic ethanol intake on APA and ASAP activities. Although previous in vitro studies failed to show signs of neurodegeneration, these in vivo modifications in oxidative stress parameters do not seem to be related to changes in APA and ASAP, invalidating the idea that an excess of free acidic amino acids released by APA and ASAP induces neurodegeneration.

  7. Metabolic profiles in serum of mouse after chronic exposure to drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Xuxiang; Li, Aimin; Cheng, Shupei

    2011-08-01

    The toxicity of Nanjing drinking water on mouse (Mus musculus) was detected by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomic method. Three groups of mice were fed with drinking water (produced by Nanjing BHK Water Plant), 3.8 μg/L benzo(a)pyrene as contrast, and clean water as control, respectively, for 90 days. It was observed that the levels of lactate, alanine, and creatinine in the mice fed with drinking water were increased and that of valine was decreased. The mice of drinking water group were successfully separated from control. The total concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phthalates (PAEs), and other organic pollutants in the drinking water were 0.23 μg/L, 4.57 μg/L, and 0.34 μg/L, respectively. In this study, Nanjing drinking water was found to induce distinct perturbations of metabolic profiles on mouse including disorders of glucose-alanine cycle, branched-chain amino acid and energy metabolism, and dysfunction of kidney. This study suggests that metabonomic method is feasible and sensitive to evaluate potential toxic effects of drinking water.

  8. ATM facilitates mouse gammaherpesvirus reactivation from myeloid cells during chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinski, Joseph M; Darrah, Eric J; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Mboko, Wadzanai P; Mounce, Bryan C; Malherbe, Laurent P; Corbett, John A; Gauld, Stephen B; Tarakanova, Vera L

    2015-09-01

    Gammaherpesviruses are cancer-associated pathogens that establish life-long infection in most adults. Insufficiency of Ataxia-Telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase leads to a poor control of chronic gammaherpesvirus infection via an unknown mechanism that likely involves a suboptimal antiviral response. In contrast to the phenotype in the intact host, ATM facilitates gammaherpesvirus reactivation and replication in vitro. We hypothesized that ATM mediates both pro- and antiviral activities to regulate chronic gammaherpesvirus infection in an immunocompetent host. To test the proposed proviral activity of ATM in vivo, we generated mice with ATM deficiency limited to myeloid cells. Myeloid-specific ATM deficiency attenuated gammaherpesvirus infection during the establishment of viral latency. The results of our study uncover a proviral role of ATM in the context of gammaherpesvirus infection in vivo and support a model where ATM combines pro- and antiviral functions to facilitate both gammaherpesvirus-specific T cell immune response and viral reactivation in vivo.

  9. Chronic amiodarone remodels expression of ion channel transcripts in the mouse heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.LEBOUTER; A.ELHARCHI; C.MARIONNEAU; C.BELLOCQ; A.CHAMBELLAN; K.LEQUANG; JCBELLOCQ; JCCHEVALIER; GLANDE; JJLEGER; FCHARPENTIER; DESCANDE; SDEMOLOMBE

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The basis for the unique effectiveness of chronic amiodarone on cardiac arrhythmias is incompletely understood. The present study investigated the pharmacogenomics profile of amiodarone on genes encoding ion channel subunits. METHODS AND RESULTS: Adult male mice were treated for 6 weeks with vehicle or oral amiodarone at 30,90,or 180 mg·kg-1·d-1, Plasma and myocardial levels of amiodarone and n-desethyl-amiodarone in

  10. Altered colonic function and microbiota profile in a mouse model of chronic depression

    OpenAIRE

    Park, A J; COLLINS, J.; Blennerhassett, P. A.; Ghia, J E; Verdu, E F; Bercik, P; Collins, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression often coexists with the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) which is characterized by alterations in gut function. There is emerging evidence that the microbial composition (microbiota) of the gut is altered in IBS, but the basis for this is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether the induction of chronic depression results in changes in the colonic function and in its microbial community, and to explore underlying mechanisms. Methods Bilateral olfac...

  11. Chronic antidiabetic sulfonylureas in vivo: reversible effects on mouse pancreatic beta-cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Sara Remedi; Nichols, Colin G.

    2008-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. Diabetes is an increasingly common chronic disease characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels. In normal people, blood sugar levels are controlled by the hormone insulin. Insulin is released by β-cells in the pancreas when blood glucose levels rise after eating (glucose is produced by the digestion of food). In fasting people, membrane proteins called ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels keep the β-cell in a “hyperpolarized” state in which they do not s...

  12. Impact of chronic morphine on delta opioid receptor-expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbs, E; Faget, L; Ceredig, R A; Matifas, A; Vonesch, J-L; Kieffer, B L; Massotte, D

    2016-01-28

    Delta opioid (DOP) receptors participate to the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data also identified their implication in spatial memory and drug-context associations pointing to a critical role of hippocampal delta receptors. To better appreciate the impact of repeated drug exposure on their modulatory activity, we used fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta receptor fused at its carboxy-terminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor. We then tested the impact of chronic morphine treatment on the density and distribution of delta receptor-expressing cells in the hippocampus. A decrease in delta receptor-positive cell density was observed in the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus without alteration of the distribution across the different GABAergic populations that mainly express delta receptors. This effect partly persisted after four weeks of morphine abstinence. In addition, we observed increased DOP receptor expression at the cell surface compared to saline-treated animals. In the hippocampus, chronic morphine administration thus induces DOP receptor cellular redistribution and durably decreases delta receptor-expressing cell density. Such modifications are likely to alter hippocampal physiology, and to contribute to long-term cognitive deficits.

  13. Different microRNA profiles in chronic epilepsy versus acute seizure mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmann, Anita; Danis, Benedicte; Andonovic, Lidija; Abnaof, Khalid; van Rikxoort, Marijke; Siegel, Franziska; Mazzuferi, Manuela; Godard, Patrice; Hanon, Etienne; Fröhlich, Holger; Kaminski, Rafal M; Foerch, Patrik; Pfeifer, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    Epilepsy affects around 50 million people worldwide, and in about 65% of patients, the etiology of disease is unknown. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that have been suggested to play a role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy. Here, we compared microRNA expression patterns in the hippocampus using two chronic models of epilepsy characterised by recurrent spontaneous seizures (pilocarpine and self-sustained status epilepticus (SSSE)) and an acute 6-Hz seizure model. The vast majority of microRNAs deregulated in the acute model exhibited increased expression with 146 microRNAs up-regulated within 6 h after a single seizure. In contrast, in the chronic models, the number of up-regulated microRNAs was similar to the number of down-regulated microRNAs. Three microRNAs-miR-142-5p, miR-331-3p and miR-30a-5p-were commonly deregulated in all three models. However, there is a clear overlap of differentially expressed microRNAs within the chronic models with 36 and 15 microRNAs co-regulated at 24 h and at 28 days following status epilepticus, respectively. Pathway analysis revealed that the altered microRNAs are associated with inflammation, innate immunity and cell cycle regulation. Taken together, the identified microRNAs and the pathways they modulate might represent candidates for novel molecular approaches for the treatment of patients with epilepsy.

  14. Thioredoxin-1 protects against neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression in a mouse model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation.

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    Naoya Tanabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are characterized by acute enhancement of airway neutrophilic inflammation under oxidative stress and can be involved in emphysema progression. However, pharmacotherapy against the neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression associated with exacerbation has not been established. Thioredoxin-1 has anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties and it can ameliorate neutrophilic inflammation through anti-chemotactic effects and prevent cigarette smoke (CS-induced emphysema. We aimed to determine whether thioredoxin-1 can suppress neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression in a mouse model of COPD exacerbation and if so, to reveal the underlying mechanisms. RESULTS: Mice were exposed to CS and then challenged with polyinosine-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C], an agonist for virus-induced innate immunity. Airway neutrophilic inflammation, oxidative stress and lung apoptosis were enhanced in smoke-sensitive C57Bl/6, but not in smoke-resistant NZW mice. Exposure to CS and poly(I:C challenge accelerated emphysema progression in C57Bl/6 mice. Thioredoxin-1 suppressed neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression. Poly(I:C caused early neutrophilic inflammation through keratinocyte-derived chemokine and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF release in the lung exposed to CS. Late neutrophilic inflammation was caused by persistent GM-CSF release, which thioredoxin-1 ameliorated. Thioredoxin-1 enhanced pulmonary mRNA expression of MAP kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1, and the suppressive effects of thioredoxin-1 on prolonged GM-CSF release and late neutrophilic inflammation disappeared by inhibiting MKP-1. CONCLUSION: Using a mouse model of COPD exacerbation, we demonstrated that thioredoxin-1 ameliorated neutrophilic inflammation by suppressing GM-CSF release, which prevented emphysema progression. Our findings deepen understanding of the mechanisms

  15. Wnt-responsive cancer stem cells are located close to distorted blood vessels and not in hypoxic regions in a p53-null mouse model of human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadakkan, Tegy J; Landua, John D; Bu, Wen; Wei, Wei; Li, Fuhai; Wong, Stephen T C; Dickinson, Mary E; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Lewis, Michael T; Zhang, Mei

    2014-07-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs, or tumor-initiating cells) may be responsible for tumor formation in many types of cancer, including breast cancer. Using high-resolution imaging techniques, we analyzed the relationship between a Wnt-responsive, CSC-enriched population and the tumor vasculature using p53-null mouse mammary tumors transduced with a lentiviral Wnt signaling reporter. Consistent with their localization in the normal mammary gland, Wnt-responsive cells in tumors were enriched in the basal/myoepithelial population and generally located in close proximity to blood vessels. The Wnt-responsive CSCs did not colocalize with the hypoxia-inducible factor 1α-positive cells in these p53-null basal-like tumors. Average vessel diameter and vessel tortuosity were increased in p53-null mouse tumors, as well as in a human tumor xenograft as compared with the normal mammary gland. The combined strategy of monitoring the fluorescently labeled CSCs and vasculature using high-resolution imaging techniques provides a unique opportunity to study the CSC and its surrounding vasculature.

  16. Puerarin induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in hypoxic human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

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    Chan Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary vascular medial hypertrophy in hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is caused in part by decreased apoptosis in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs. Puerarin, an isoflavone purified from the Chinese medicinal herb kudzu, ameliorates chronic hypoxic PAH in animal models. Here we investigated the effects of puerarin on apoptosis of hypoxic human PASMCs (HPASMCs, and to determine the possible underlying mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HPASMCs were cultured for 24 h in normoxia or hypoxia (5% O₂ conditions with and without puerarin. Cell number and viability were determined with a hemacytometer or a cell counting kit. Apoptosis was detected with a TUNEL test, rhodamine-123 (R-123 fluorescence, a colorimetric assay, western blots, immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR. Hypoxia inhibited mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and promoted HPASMC growth. In contrast, after puerarin (50 µM or more intervention, cell growth was inhibited and apoptosis was observed. Puerarin-induced apoptosis in hypoxic HPASMCs was accompanied by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, caspase-9 activation, and Bcl-2 down-regulation with concurrent Bax up-regulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Puerarin promoted apoptosis in hypoxic HPASMCs by acting on the mitochondria-dependent pathway. These results suggest a new mechanism of puerarin relevant to the management of clinical hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

  17. Puerarin Induces Mitochondria-Dependent Apoptosis in Hypoxic Human Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chan; Chen, Chun; Wang, Zhiyi; Wang, Liangxing; Yang, Lehe; Ding, Minjiao; Ding, Cheng; Sun, Yu; Lin, Quan; Huang, Xiaoying; Du, Xiaohong; Zhao, Xiaowei; Wang, Chuangyi

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary vascular medial hypertrophy in hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is caused in part by decreased apoptosis in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Puerarin, an isoflavone purified from the Chinese medicinal herb kudzu, ameliorates chronic hypoxic PAH in animal models. Here we investigated the effects of puerarin on apoptosis of hypoxic human PASMCs (HPASMCs), and to determine the possible underlying mechanisms. Methodology/Principal Findings HPASMCs were cultured for 24 h in normoxia or hypoxia (5% O2) conditions with and without puerarin. Cell number and viability were determined with a hemacytometer or a cell counting kit. Apoptosis was detected with a TUNEL test, rhodamine-123 (R-123) fluorescence, a colorimetric assay, western blots, immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR. Hypoxia inhibited mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and promoted HPASMC growth. In contrast, after puerarin (50 µM or more) intervention, cell growth was inhibited and apoptosis was observed. Puerarin-induced apoptosis in hypoxic HPASMCs was accompanied by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, caspase-9 activation, and Bcl-2 down-regulation with concurrent Bax up-regulation. Conclusions/Significance Puerarin promoted apoptosis in hypoxic HPASMCs by acting on the mitochondria-dependent pathway. These results suggest a new mechanism of puerarin relevant to the management of clinical hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22457823

  18. Hypoxic radiosensitizers: substituted styryl derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nudelman, A; Falb, E; Odesa, Y; Shmueli-Broide, N

    1994-10-01

    A number of novel styryl epoxides, N-substituted-styryl-ethanolamines, N-mono and N,N'-bis-(2-hydroxyethyl)-cinnamamides--analogues to the known radiosensitizers RSU-1069, pimonidazole and etanidazole--display selective hypoxic radiosensitizing activity. The styryl group, especially when substituted by electron withdrawing groups, was found to be bioisosteric to the nitroimidazolyl functionality. The most active derivative 2-(2'-nitrophenyl)ethen-1-yl-oxirane 8a displayed a sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) of 5 relative to misonidazole.

  19. Behavioral effects of chronic stress in the Fmr1 mouse model for fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire-Mayo, Valerie; Subashi, Enejda; Henkous, Nadia; Beracochea, Daniel; Pietropaolo, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is a pervasive developmental disorder due to a mutation in the FMR1 X-linked gene. Despite its clear genetic cause, the expression of FXS symptoms is known to be modulated by environmental factors, including stress. Furthermore, several studies have shown disturbances in stress regulatory systems in FXS patients and Fmr1 mice. These studies have mostly focused on the hormonal responses to stress, using the acute exposure to a single type of stressor. Hence, little is known about the behavioral effects of stress in FXS, and the importance of the nature of the stressing procedure, especially in the context of a repeated exposure that more closely resembles real life conditions. Here we evaluated the effects of chronic exposure to different types of stress (i.e., either repeated restraint or unpredictable stress) on the behavioral phenotype of adult Fmr1 mice. Our results demonstrated that chronic stress induced deficits in social interaction and working memory only in WT mice and the impact of stress depended on the type of stressors and the specific behavior tested. Our data suggest that the behavioral sensitivity to stress is dramatically reduced in FXS, opening new views on the impact of gene-environment interactions in this pathology.

  20. Influence on the mouse immune system of chronic ingestion of {sup 137}Cs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertho, Jean-Marc; Faure, Marie-Cecile; Louiba, Sonia; Tourlonias, Elie; Stefani, Johanna; Siffert, Baptiste; Paquet, Francois; Dublineau, Isabelle, E-mail: Jean-marc.bertho@irsn.fr [IRSN, Laboratoire de Radiotoxicologie Experimentale, Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the possible occurrence of damage to the immune system during the course of chronic ingestion of {sup 137}Cs. BALB/C mice were used, with {sup 137}Cs intake via drinking water at a concentration of 20 kBq l{sup -1}. Adults received {sup 137}Cs before mating and offspring were sacrificed at various ages between birth and 20 weeks. Phenotypic analysis of circulating blood cells and thymocytes did not show any significant modification of immune cell populations in animals ingesting {sup 137}Cs as compared with control animals, with the exception of a slight increase in Treg percentage at the age of 12 weeks. Functional tests, including proliferative response to mitogens such as phytohaemagglutinin, response to alloantigens in mixed lymphocyte reaction and immunoglobulin response to vaccine antigens such as tetanus toxin and keyhole limpet haemocyanin did not show any significant functional modification of the immune system in {sup 137}Cs-ingesting animals as compared with control animals. Overall, our results suggest that chronic ingestion of a low concentration of {sup 137}Cs in drinking water in the long term does not have any biologically relevant effect on the immune system.

  1. Chronic stress induced cognitive impairment in APP/PS-1 double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

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    Bing HAN

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To observe the effect of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS on the cognitive function and brain morphological changes in APP/PS-1 mice, one of the genetic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD, and to investigate the possible role of environmental factors in genetic mouse model of AD. Methods  There were 22-week-old wild-type C57BL/6 male mice (control group, N = 15 and APP/PS-1 double transgenic male mice [N = 27: AD group (N = 13 and AD + CUMS group (N = 14] tested in this study. Morris water maze test was used to evaluate spatial learning and memory of the mice. Amyloid deposition in the hippocampus was determined by Congo red staining. The ultrastructure of neurons in hippocampal CA1 region was observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM.  Results  Compared with control group, AD + CUMS group had significantly longer fifth-day escape latency [(33.14 ± 14.37 s vs (21.22 ± 12.16 s; t = -2.701, P = 0.045], and significantly shortened time spent in platform quadrant [(9.74±1.35 s vs (15.02 ± 1.33 s; t = 2.639, P = 0.012] in Morris water maze test. Compared with AD group, the percentage of amyloid plaque area in hippocampal area was increased in AD + CUMS group [(0.59 ± 0.03% vs (0.04 ± 0.03%; t = -2.900, P = 0.005]. The ultrastructure of hippocampal neurons in AD group was slightly damaged: cellular membrane was intact; cell matrix was uniform; intracelluar lipofuscin could be seen; the structure of nucleus and nuclear membrane had no obvious changes; mild fusion of cristae and membrane was seen in mitochondria; Golgi apparatus was partially indistinct; endoplasmic reticulum was mildly expanded. The ultrastructure of hippocampal neurons in AD + CUMS group was obviously damaged, including blurred cell membrane, reduced low-density and high-density granules in cytoplasm, uneven cell matrix, reduced number of organelles, lipofuscin and autophagosome deposition, obvious condensation of chromatin distributing over

  2. Chronic tempol prevents hypertension, proteinuria, and poor feto-placental outcomes in BPH/5 mouse model of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Darren S; Weydert, Christine J; Lazartigues, Eric; Kutschke, William J; Kienzle, Martha F; Leach, Jenny E; Sharma, Jennifer A; Sharma, Ram V; Davisson, Robin L

    2008-04-01

    Recently we described a mouse model, BPH/5, that spontaneously develops the hallmark clinical features of preeclampsia. BPH/5 exhibit impaired placentation before the onset of hypertension and proteinuria, supporting a causal role for the placenta in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Here we tested the hypothesis that an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) early in pregnancy results in placental abnormalities leading to the maternal symptoms of preeclampsia. We further hypothesized that chronic antioxidant therapy would ameliorate both feto-placental abnormalities and maternal symptoms. ROS levels measured by dihydroethidium revealed significant increases in oxidative stress in BPH/5 placentas at midgestation compared with C57 controls. This increase in ROS was correlated with reduced expression and activity of cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase in early and midgestation BPH/5 placentas. These abnormalities in placental oxidant factors occurred before the onset of maternal symptoms, suggesting a possible causal link between increased ROS and maternal and feto-placental pathology in this model. In support of this, chronic treatment of BPH/5 with the superoxide dismutase-mimetic Tempol throughout gestation significantly improved fetal growth and survival. Furthermore, Tempol ameliorated pregnancy-induced increases in blood pressure and proteinuria in BPH/5 mothers. We confirmed that Tempol radical was present in plasma, and it normalized ROS levels in all placental zones in BPH/5. These data for the first time demonstrate an important causative role for increased ROS in the placenta in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia in a model that spontaneously develops the disease. The results also strongly suggest the potential utility of antioxidant therapy in treating preeclampsia.

  3. Evaluation of skeletal and cardiac muscle function after chronic administration of thymosin beta-4 in the dystrophin deficient mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Spurney

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta-4 (Tbeta4 is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. We studied the effects of chronic administration of Tbeta4 on the skeletal and cardiac muscle of dystrophin deficient mdx mice, the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Female wild type (C57BL10/ScSnJ and mdx mice, 8-10 weeks old, were treated with 150 microg of Tbeta4 twice a week for 6 months. To promote muscle pathology, mice were exercised for 30 minutes twice a week. Skeletal and cardiac muscle function were assessed via grip strength and high frequency echocardiography. Localization of Tbeta4 and amount of fibrosis were quantified using immunohistochemistry and Gomori's tri-chrome staining, respectively. Mdx mice treated with Tbeta4 showed a significant increase in skeletal muscle regenerating fibers compared to untreated mdx mice. Tbeta4 stained exclusively in the regenerating fibers of mdx mice. Although untreated mdx mice had significantly decreased skeletal muscle strength compared to untreated wild type, there were no significant improvements in mdx mice after treatment. Systolic cardiac function, measured as percent shortening fraction, was decreased in untreated mdx mice compared to untreated wild type and there was no significant difference after treatment in mdx mice. Skeletal and cardiac muscle fibrosis were also significantly increased in untreated mdx mice compared to wild type, but there was no significant improvement in treated mdx mice. In exercised dystrophin deficient mice, chronic administration of Tbeta4 increased the number of regenerating fibers in skeletal muscle and could have a potential role in treatment of skeletal muscle disease in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  4. Chronic intermittent hypoxia causes hepatitis in a mouse model of diet-induced fatty liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savransky, Vladimir; Bevans, Shannon; Nanayakkara, Ashika; Li, Jianguo; Smith, Philip L; Torbenson, Michael S; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2007-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) causes chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) during sleep. OSA is associated with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in obese individuals and may contribute to progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease from steatosis to NASH. The purpose of this study was to examine whether CIH induces inflammatory changes in the liver in mice with diet-induced hepatic steatosis. C57BL/6J mice (n = 8) on a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet were exposed to CIH for 6 mo and were compared with mice on the same diet exposed to intermittent air (control; n = 8). CIH caused liver injury with an increase in serum ALT (461 +/- 58 U/l vs. 103 +/- 16 U/l in the control group; P diet.

  5. Immunoendocrine interactions during chronic cysticercosis determine male mouse feminization: role of IL-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Montor, J; Baig, S; Mitchell, R; Deway, K; Hallal-Calleros, C; Damian, R T

    2001-10-15

    Taenia crassiceps cysticercosis results in an impressive feminization in male mice during chronic infection, characterized by increased serum estradiol levels 100 times their normal values, while those of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are decreased by 85 and 95% respectively. Concomitantly, the levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and IL-6 are increased 70 and 90 times their normal values in the infected male mice. Since a specific Th1/Th2 shift of the immune response has been previously reported during the chronic infection, and this shift may be associated with the feminization process, we proposed that this shift is induced by immunoendocrine interactions during the disease, and this gives way to a change in the initial resistance to the infection in the male mice, which become as susceptible as female mice. To confirm this hypothesis, we depleted immune system activity in two different ways: total body irradiation and neonatal thymectomy. Our results show that when immune system activity is depleted using either strategy, the male mice do not feminize, and the levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and IL-6 are inhibited. Depletion of IL-6 using IL-6(-/-) knockout mice does not produce the feminization process stated above, while restitution of the IL-6(-/-) knockout, irradiated, and thymectomized mice with murine recombinant IL-6 restores the feminization process. Expression of the IL-6 gene was found only in the testes and spleen of infected animals. Our results illustrate the importance of immunoendocrine interactions during a parasitic disease and show a possible new mechanism of parasite establishment in an initially resistant host.

  6. Comparison of in vivo efficacy of hypoxic cytotoxin tirapazamine and hypoxic cell radiosensitizer KU-2285 in combination with single and fractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Toru; Shibamoto, Yuta; Sasai, Keisuke; Oya, Natsuo; Murata, Rumi; Takagi, Takehisa; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Chest Disease Research Inst.; Abe, Mitsuyuki

    1996-01-01

    Development of strategies to eradicate radioresistant hypoxic cells would be of great benefit for clinical radiotherapy. In the present study, the in vivo effects of promising hypoxic cytotoxin, tirapazamine (3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-di-N-oxide), were examined in comparison with those of KU-2285, one of the best hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, in combination with both single and fractionated irradiation. The tumor response was assessed by the standard in vivo-in vitro clonogenic assay using SCCVII tumors in C3H mice and EMT-6/KU tumors in Balb/c mice with different characteristics of tumor hypoxia. With single-dose irradiation (18 Gy), both tirapazamine and KU-2285 showed significant enhancement of cell killing in a dose-dependent manner, but tirapazamine was more effective for SCCVII tumors with acutely hypoxic cells, while KU-2285 was more effective for EMT-6/KU tumors predominantly with chronically hypoxic cells. In fractionated irradiation regimens (4 fractions of 5 Gy at 12 h intervals), tirapazamine showed more marked combined effects at 10 and 20 mg/kg than KU-2285 at 100-200 mg/kg in both SCCVII and EMT-6/KU tumors. We concluded that the effectiveness of KU-2285 and tirapazamine was correlated with the nature of tumor hypoxia with single-dose irradiation, whereas tirapazamine appeared more potent than KU-2285 with fractionated irradiation. These findings suggest the potential usefulness of tirapazamine in clinical fractionated radiotherapy. (author).

  7. Biodistribution of (137)Cs in a mouse model of chronic contamination by ingestion and effects on the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertho, Jean-Marc; Louiba, Sonia; Faure, Marie-Cécile; Tourlonias, Elie; Stefani, Johanna; Siffert, Baptiste; Paquet, François; Dublineau, Isabelle

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this work was to define the possible occurrence of hematological changes during the course of a chronic ingestion of (137)Cs. A mouse model was used, with ingestion through drinking water with a cesium concentration of 20 kBq l(-1). Ingestion started in parent animals before mating, and (137)Cs intake and its effect on the hematopoietic system was studied in offspring at various ages between birth and 20 weeks. (137)Cs content was measured in various organs, indicating that (137)Cs was distributed throughout the organism including lympho-hematopoietic organs, i.e., femurs, spleen and thymus. However, we did not observe any effect on the hematopoietic system, whatever the parameter used. In fact, blood cell counts, mononuclear cell counts and progenitor frequency in bone marrow and spleen, and Flt3-ligand, Erythropoietin, G-CSF and SDF-1 concentration in plasma remained unchanged when compared to control animals. Moreover, phenotypic analysis did not show any change in the proportions of bone marrow cell populations. These results indicate that, although (137)Cs was found in all organs implicated in the hematopoietic system, this did not induce any changes in bone marrow function.

  8. The importance of surface immunoglobulin, mouse rosettes, and CD5 in the immunophenotyping of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and reactive lymphocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batata, A; Shen, B

    1991-07-15

    Peripheral blood from 167 B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) and 119 reactive lymphocytosis (RLC) patients were analyzed to evaluate the immunophenotypic diagnostic value of mouse rosettes (M-rosette), and weak expression of monoclonal surface immunoglobulin (SIg). In B-CLL, 145 cases were M-rosette+ (86.83%), 135 surface immunoglobulin (SIg)+ (80.84%), and 117 M-rosette+ SIg+ (70.06%). Of 32 SIg- cases, 28 were M-rosette+; and of 22 M-rosette-cases, 18 were SIg+. By combining results of the two assays and accepting positivity of either one or both as sufficient for diagnosis, B-CLL was diagnosed in 163 cases (97.60%). CD5 was performed in 49 cases of the 167 with paired data for SIg and M-rosettes. By combining the results of the three assays and accepting positivity of any two or all three as sufficient for diagnosis, all 49 cases (100%) were diagnosed. Correlation analysis showed no significant association between M-rosette, SIg, and CD5 expression. The results demonstrate the independent expression of the three markers, and their complementary role in immunophenotyping B-CLL. In RLC, all 119 cases were T-lineage and SIg-, and 115 were M-rosette-, indicating the role of the two markers in differentiating B-CLL from RLC. Three of the four M-rosette+ T-RLC were subsequently diagnosed as B-CLL, suggesting the necessity of follow-up of such cases.

  9. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cells Contribute to the Stromal Myofibroblasts in Leukemic NOD/SCID Mouse In Vivo

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    Ryosuke Shirasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported that chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML cells converted into myofibroblasts to create a microenvironment for proliferation of CML cells in vitro. To analyze a biological contribution of CML-derived myofibroblasts in vivo, we observed the characters of leukemic nonobese diabetes/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID mouse. Bone marrow nonadherent mononuclear cells as well as human CD45-positive cells obtained from CML patients were injected to the irradiated NOD/SCID mice. When the chimeric BCR-ABL transcript was demonstrated in blood, human CML cells were detected in NOD/SCID murine bone marrow. And CML-derived myofibroblasts composed with the bone marrow-stroma, which produced significant amounts of human vascular endothelial growth factor A. When the parental CML cells were cultured with myofibroblasts separated from CML cell-engrafted NOD/SCID murine bone marrow, CML cells proliferated significantly. These observations indicate that CML cells make an adequate microenvironment for their own proliferation in vivo.

  10. Metabolomic identification of biochemical changes induced by fluoxetine and imipramine in a chronic mild stress mouse model of depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Jung, Yang-Hee; Jang, Choon-Gon; Chun, Kwang-Hoon; Kwon, Sung Won; Lee, Jeongmi

    2015-03-01

    Metabolomics was applied to a C57BL/6N mouse model of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CMS). Such mice were treated with two antidepressants from different categories: fluoxetine and imipramine. Metabolic profiling of the hippocampus was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis on samples prepared under optimized conditions, followed by principal component analysis, partial least squares-discriminant analysis, and pair-wise orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analyses. Body weight measurement and behavior tests including an open field test and the forced swimming test were completed with the mice as a measure of the phenotypes of depression and antidepressive effects. As a result, 23 metabolites that had been differentially expressed among the control, CMS, and antidepressant-treated groups demonstrated that amino acid metabolism, energy metabolism, adenosine receptors, and neurotransmitters are commonly perturbed by drug treatment. Potential predictive markers for treatment effect were identified: myo-inositol for fluoxetine and lysine and oleic acid for imipramine. Collectively, the current study provides insights into the molecular mechanisms of the antidepressant effects of two widely used medications.

  11. Chronic Microdose Lithium Treatment Prevented Memory Loss and Neurohistopathological Changes in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

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    Marielza Andrade Nunes

    Full Text Available The use of lithium is well established in bipolar disorders and the benefits are being demonstrated in neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, our group showed that treatment with microdose lithium stabilized the cognitive deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD patients. In order to verify the lithium microdose potential in preventing the disease development, the aim of this work was to verify the effects of chronic treatment with microdose lithium given before and after the appearance of symptoms in a mouse model of a disease similar to AD. Transgenic mice (Cg-Tg(PDGFB-APPSwInd20Lms/2J and their non-transgenic litter mate genetic controls were treated with lithium carbonate (0.25mg/Kg/day in drinking water for 16 or 8 months starting at two and ten months of age, respectively [corrected]. Similar groups were treated with water. At the end of treatments, both lithium treated transgenic groups and non-transgenic mice showed no memory disruption, different from what was observed in the water treated transgenic group. Transgenic mice treated with lithium since two months of age showed decreased number of senile plaques, no neuronal loss in cortex and hippocampus and increased BDNF density in cortex, when compared to non-treated transgenic mice. It is suitable to conclude that these data support the use of microdose lithium in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease, once the neurohistopathological characteristics of the disease were modified and the memory of transgenic animals was maintained.

  12. The mouse as a model for understanding chronic diseases of aging: the histopathologic basis of aging in inbred mice

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    David Harrison

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Inbred mice provide a unique tool to study aging populations because of the genetic homogeneity within an inbred strain, their short life span, and the tools for analysis which are available. A large-scale longitudinal and cross-sectional aging study was conducted on 30 inbred strains to determine, using histopathology, the type and diversity of diseases mice develop as they age. These data provide tools that when linked with modern in silico genetic mapping tools, can begin to unravel the complex genetics of many of the common chronic diseases associated with aging in humans and other mammals. In addition, novel disease models were discovered in some strains, such as rhabdomyosarcoma in old A/J mice, to diseases affecting many but not all strains including pseudoxanthoma elasticum, pulmonary adenoma, alopecia areata, and many others. This extensive data set is now available online and provides a useful tool to help better understand strain-specific background diseases that can complicate interpretation of genetically engineered mice and other manipulatable mouse studies that utilize these strains.

  13. Role of bile acids, prostaglandins and COX inhibitors in chronic esophagitis in a mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C Poplawski; D Sosnowski; A Szaflarska-Poplawska; J Sarosiek; R McCallum; Z Bartuzi

    2006-01-01

    33 %). In HCl/P/BA/INDO group the esophagitis surface was larger than that in not treated group (33%). In HCL/P group the surface of esophagus with ulceration was significantly larger (10-fold) than that in HCl/P/BA group. The PGE2 concentration was significantly higher in HCl/P group than in HCl/P/BA group.The PGE2 concentration in lower part of esophagus was also significantly higher in middle than those in HCl and HCl/P/BA groups. In upper part of esophagus the PGE2 concentration was significantly higher in HCl/P/BA group than that in group treated with indometacine (46%). We also observed higher PGE2 concentration in middle part of esophagus in HCl/P/BA group than those in group treated with indometacine and in group treated with indometacin and NS-398 (by 52% and 43% respectively).CONCLUSION: Pepsin is the pivotal factor in the development of chronic esophageal injury. Bile acids diminish chronic esophageal injury induced by HCl/P, indicating its potential negative impact on pepsin proteolytic potential,pivotal for mucosal injury in low pH. The role of selective COX inhibitors is still unclear, and needs more investigations. This novel chronic experimental esophagitis is an excellent model for further study on the role of cytokines in genetically modified animals.

  14. Chronic antidiabetic sulfonylureas in vivo: reversible effects on mouse pancreatic beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sara Remedi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic beta-cell ATP-sensitive potassium (K ATP channels are critical links between nutrient metabolism and insulin secretion. In humans, reduced or absent beta-cell K ATP channel activity resulting from loss-of-function K ATP mutations induces insulin hypersecretion. Mice with reduced K ATP channel activity also demonstrate hyperinsulinism, but mice with complete loss of K ATP channels (K ATP knockout mice show an unexpected insulin undersecretory phenotype. Therefore we have proposed an "inverse U" hypothesis to explain the response to enhanced excitability, in which excessive hyperexcitability drives beta-cells to insulin secretory failure without cell death. Many patients with type 2 diabetes treated with antidiabetic sulfonylureas (which inhibit K ATP activity and thereby enhance insulin secretion show long-term insulin secretory failure, which we further suggest might reflect a similar progression. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To test the above hypotheses, and to mechanistically investigate the consequences of prolonged hyperexcitability in vivo, we used a novel approach of implanting mice with slow-release sulfonylurea (glibenclamide pellets, to chronically inhibit beta-cell K ATP channels. Glibenclamide-implanted wild-type mice became progressively and consistently diabetic, with significantly (p < 0.05 reduced insulin secretion in response to glucose. After 1 wk of treatment, these mice were as glucose intolerant as adult K ATP knockout mice, and reduction of secretory capacity in freshly isolated islets from implanted animals was as significant (p < 0.05 as those from K ATP knockout animals. However, secretory capacity was fully restored in islets from sulfonylurea-treated mice within hours of drug washout and in vivo within 1 mo after glibenclamide treatment was terminated. Pancreatic immunostaining showed normal islet size and alpha-/beta-cell distribution within the islet, and TUNEL staining showed no evidence of apoptosis

  15. Chronic Antidiabetic Sulfonylureas In Vivo: Reversible Effects on Mouse Pancreatic β-Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remedi, Maria Sara; Nichols, Colin G

    2008-01-01

    Background Pancreatic β-cell ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are critical links between nutrient metabolism and insulin secretion. In humans, reduced or absent β-cell KATP channel activity resulting from loss-of-function KATP mutations induces insulin hypersecretion. Mice with reduced KATP channel activity also demonstrate hyperinsulinism, but mice with complete loss of KATP channels (KATP knockout mice) show an unexpected insulin undersecretory phenotype. Therefore we have proposed an “inverse U” hypothesis to explain the response to enhanced excitability, in which excessive hyperexcitability drives β-cells to insulin secretory failure without cell death. Many patients with type 2 diabetes treated with antidiabetic sulfonylureas (which inhibit KATP activity and thereby enhance insulin secretion) show long-term insulin secretory failure, which we further suggest might reflect a similar progression. Methods and Findings To test the above hypotheses, and to mechanistically investigate the consequences of prolonged hyperexcitability in vivo, we used a novel approach of implanting mice with slow-release sulfonylurea (glibenclamide) pellets, to chronically inhibit β-cell KATP channels. Glibenclamide-implanted wild-type mice became progressively and consistently diabetic, with significantly (p < 0.05) reduced insulin secretion in response to glucose. After 1 wk of treatment, these mice were as glucose intolerant as adult KATP knockout mice, and reduction of secretory capacity in freshly isolated islets from implanted animals was as significant (p < 0.05) as those from KATP knockout animals. However, secretory capacity was fully restored in islets from sulfonylurea-treated mice within hours of drug washout and in vivo within 1 mo after glibenclamide treatment was terminated. Pancreatic immunostaining showed normal islet size and α-/β-cell distribution within the islet, and TUNEL staining showed no evidence of apoptosis. Conclusions These results

  16. Complement activation and expression during chronic relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the Biozzi ABH mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaglia, V; Jackson, S J; Hughes, T R; Neal, J W; Baker, D; Morgan, B P

    2015-06-01

    Chronic relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (crEAE) in mice recapitulates many of the clinical and histopathological features of human multiple sclerosis (MS), making it a preferred model for the disease. In both, adaptive immunity and anti-myelin T cells responses are thought to be important, while in MS a role for innate immunity and complement has emerged. Here we sought to test whether complement is activated in crEAE and important for disease. Disease was induced in Biozzi ABH mice that were terminated at different stages of the disease to assess complement activation and local complement expression in the central nervous system. Complement activation products were abundant in all spinal cord areas examined in acute disease during relapse and in the progressive phase, but were absent in early disease remission, despite significant residual clinical disease. Local expression of C1q and C3 was increased at all stages of disease, while C9 expression was increased only in acute disease; expression of the complement regulators CD55, complement receptor 1-related gene/protein y (Crry) and CD59a was reduced at all stages of the disease compared to naive controls. These data show that complement is activated in the central nervous system in the model and suggest that it is a suitable candidate for exploring whether anti-complement agents might be of benefit in MS.

  17. Chronic inflammation, lymphangiogenesis, and effect of an anti-VEGFR therapy in a mouse model and in human patients with aspiration pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihei, Mayumi; Okazaki, Tatsuma; Ebihara, Satoru; Kobayashi, Makoto; Niu, Kaijun; Gui, Peijun; Tamai, Tokiwa; Nukiwa, Toshihiro; Yamaya, Mutsuo; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Ebihara, Takae; Ichinose, Masakazu

    2015-03-01

    Chronic inflammation induces lymphangiogenesis and blood vessel remodelling. Since aged pneumonia patients often have repeated episodes of aspiration pneumonia, the pathogenesis may involve chronic inflammation. For lymphangiogenesis, VEGFR-3 and its ligand VEGF-C are key factors. No previous studies have examined chronic inflammation or vascular changes in aspiration pneumonia or its mouse models. In lung inflammation, little is known about the effect of blocking VEGFR-3 on lung lymphangiogenesis and, moreover, its effect on the disease condition. This study aimed to establish a mouse model of aspiration pneumonia, examine the presence of chronic inflammation and vascular changes in the model and in patients, and evaluate the effect of inhibiting VEGFR-3 on the lymphangiogenesis and disease condition in this model. To induce aspiration pneumonia, we repeated inoculation of pepsin at low pH and LPS into mice for 21-28 days, durations in which bronchioalveolar lavage and plasma leakage in the lung suggested the presence of exaggerated inflammation. Conventional and immunohistochemical analysis of tracheal whole mounts suggested the presence of chronic inflammation, lymphangiogenesis, and blood vessel remodelling in the model. Quantitative RT-PCR of the trachea and lung suggested the involvement of lymphangiogenic factor VEGF-C, VEGFR-3, and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In the lung, the aspiration model showed the presence of chronic inflammation and exaggerated lymphangiogenesis. Treatment with the VEGFR inhibitor axitinib or the VEGFR-3 specific inhibitor SAR131675 impaired lymphangiogenesis in the lung and improved oxygen saturation in the aspiration model. Since the lung is the main site of aspiration pneumonia, the changes were intensive in the lung and mild in the trachea. Human lung samples also showed the presence of chronic inflammation and exaggerated lymphangiogenesis, suggesting the relevance of the model to the disease. These results suggest lymphatics in

  18. Persistent at-level thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia accompany chronic neuronal and astrocyte activation in superficial dorsal horn following mouse cervical contusion spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jaime L; Hala, Tamara J; Putatunda, Rajarshi; Sannie, Daniel; Lepore, Angelo C

    2014-01-01

    In humans, sensory abnormalities, including neuropathic pain, often result from traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). SCI can induce cellular changes in the CNS, termed central sensitization, that alter excitability of spinal cord neurons, including those in the dorsal horn involved in pain transmission. Persistently elevated levels of neuronal activity, glial activation, and glutamatergic transmission are thought to contribute to the hyperexcitability of these dorsal horn neurons, which can lead to maladaptive circuitry, aberrant pain processing and, ultimately, chronic neuropathic pain. Here we present a mouse model of SCI-induced neuropathic pain that exhibits a persistent pain phenotype accompanied by chronic neuronal hyperexcitability and glial activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn. We generated a unilateral cervical contusion injury at the C5 or C6 level of the adult mouse spinal cord. Following injury, an increase in the number of neurons expressing ΔFosB (a marker of chronic neuronal activation), persistent astrocyte activation and proliferation (as measured by GFAP and Ki67 expression), and a decrease in the expression of the astrocyte glutamate transporter GLT1 are observed in the ipsilateral superficial dorsal horn of cervical spinal cord. These changes have previously been associated with neuronal hyperexcitability and may contribute to altered pain transmission and chronic neuropathic pain. In our model, they are accompanied by robust at-level hyperaglesia in the ipsilateral forepaw and allodynia in both forepaws that are evident within two weeks following injury and persist for at least six weeks. Furthermore, the pain phenotype occurs in the absence of alterations in forelimb grip strength, suggesting that it represents sensory and not motor abnormalities. Given the importance of transgenic mouse technology, this clinically-relevant model provides a resource that can be used to study the molecular mechanisms contributing to neuropathic pain

  19. Gold namoprtices enhance anti-tumor effect of radiotherapy to hypoxic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Jae Won; Keum, Ki Chang; Koom, Woong Sub [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Ui Seok; Koh, Won Gun [Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Hypoxia can impair the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). Therefore, a new strategy is necessary for enhancing the response to RT. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of nanoparticles and RT is effective in eliminating the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) consisting of a silica core with a gold shell were used. CT26 colon cancer mouse model was developed to study whether the combination of RT and GNPs reduced hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) was used as a hypoxia marker. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining were conducted to evaluate cell death. Hypoxic tumor cells had an impaired response to RT. GNPs combined with RT enhanced anti-tumor effect in hypoxic tumor compared with RT alone. The combination of GNPs and RT decreased tumor cell viability compare to RT alone in vitro. Under hypoxia, tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed a higher response than that shown by tumors treated with RT alone. When a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger was added, the enhanced antitumor effect of GNPs + RT was diminished. In the present study, hypoxic tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed favorable responses, which might be attributable to the ROS production induced by GNPs + RT. Taken together, GNPs combined with RT seems to be potential modality for enhancing the response to RT in hypoxic tumors.

  20. Effects of chronic restraint-induced stress on radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in mouse splenocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsube, Takanori; Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Varès, Guillaume; Kawagoshi, Taiki; Shiomi, Naoko; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Liu, Qiang; Morita, Akinori; Nakajima, Tetsuo; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2017-01-01

    Both ionizing radiation (IR) and psychological stress (PS) cause detrimental effects on humans. A recent study showed that chronic restraint-induced PS (CRIPS) diminished the functions of Trp53 and enhanced radiocarcinogenesis in Trp53-heterozygous (Trp53(+/-)) mice. These findings had a marked impact on the academic field as well as the general public, particularly among residents living in areas radioactively contaminated by nuclear accidents. In an attempt to elucidate the modifying effects of CRIPS on radiation-induced health consequences in Trp53 wild-type (Trp53(+/+)) animals, investigations involving multidisciplinary analyses were performed. We herein demonstrated that CRIPS induced changes in the frequency of IR-induced chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in splenocytes. Five-week-old male Trp53(+/+) C57BL/6J mice were restrained for 6h per day for 28 consecutive days, and total body irradiation (TBI) at a dose of 4Gy was performed on the 8th day. Metaphase chromosome spreads prepared from splenocytes at the end of the 28-day restraint regimen were painted with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for chromosomes 1, 2, and 3. The results obtained showed that CRIPS alone did not induce CAs, while TBI caused significant increases in CAs, mostly translocations. Translocations appeared at a lower frequency in mice exposed to TBI plus CRIPS than in those exposed to TBI alone. No significant differences were observed in the frequencies of the other types of CAs (insertions, dicentrics, and fragments) visualized with FISH between these experimental groups (TBI+CRIPS vs. TBI). These results suggest that CRIPS does not appear to synergize with the clastogenicity of IR.

  1. Cardiac biomarkers in neonatal hypoxic ischaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweetman, D

    2012-04-01

    Following a perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic insult, term infants commonly develop cardiovascular dysfunction. Troponin-T, troponin-I and brain natriuretic peptide are sensitive indicators of myocardial compromise. The long-term effects of cardiovascular dysfunction on neurodevelopmental outcome following perinatal hypoxic ischaemia remain controversial. Follow-up studies are warranted to ensure optimal cardiac function in adulthood. CONCLUSION: Cardiac biomarkers may improve the diagnosis of myocardial injury, help guide management, estimate mortality risk and may also aid in longterm neurodevelopmental outcome prediction following neonatal hypoxic-ischaemia.

  2. Development of doxorubicin-induced chronic cardiotoxicity in the B6C3F{sub 1} mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Varsha G., E-mail: varsha.desai@fda.hhs.gov [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Herman, Eugene H. [Division of Drug Safety Research, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States); Moland, Carrie L.; Branham, William S. [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Lewis, Sherry M. [Office of Scientific Coordination, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Davis, Kelly J. [Toxicologic Pathology Associates, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); George, Nysia I. [Division Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Lee, Taewon [Department of Information and Mathematics, Korea University, Jochiwon, Chungnam 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Kerr, Susan [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Little Rock, AR 72211 (United States); Fuscoe, James C. [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Serum levels of cardiac troponins serve as biomarkers of myocardial injury. However, troponins are released into the serum only after damage to cardiac tissue has occurred. Here, we report development of a mouse model of doxorubicin (DOX)-induced chronic cardiotoxicity to aid in the identification of predictive biomarkers of early events of cardiac tissue injury. Male B6C3F{sub 1} mice were administered intravenous DOX at 3 mg/kg body weight, or an equivalent volume of saline, once a week for 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 weeks, resulting in cumulative DOX doses of 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, and 42 mg/kg, respectively. Mice were sacrificed a week following the last dose. A significant reduction in body weight gain was observed in mice following exposure to a weekly DOX dose for 1 week and longer compared to saline-treated controls. DOX treatment also resulted in declines in red blood cell count, hemoglobin level, and hematocrit compared to saline-treated controls after the 2nd weekly dose until the 8th and 9th doses, followed by a modest recovery. All DOX-treated mice had significant elevations in cardiac troponin T concentrations in plasma compared to saline-treated controls, indicating cardiac tissue injury. Also, a dose-related increase in the severity of cardiac lesions was seen in mice exposed to 24 mg/kg DOX and higher cumulative doses. Mice treated with cumulative DOX doses of 30 mg/kg and higher showed a significant decline in heart rate, suggesting drug-induced cardiac dysfunction. Altogether, these findings demonstrate the development of DOX-induced chronic cardiotoxicity in B6C3F{sub 1} mice. -- Highlights: ► 24 mg/kg was a cumulative cardiotoxic dose of doxorubicin in male B6C3F{sub 1} mice. ► Doxorubicin-induced hematological toxicity was in association with splenomegaly. ► Doxorubicin induced severe testicular toxicity in B6C3F{sub 1} male mice.

  3. Chronic alterations in growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I signaling lead to changes in mouse tendon structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, R H; Clausen, N M; Schjerling, P; Larsen, J O; Martinussen, T; List, E O; Kopchick, J J; Kjaer, M; Heinemeier, K M

    2014-02-01

    The growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (GH/IGF-I) axis is an important stimulator of collagen synthesis in connective tissue, but the effect of chronically altered GH/IGF-I levels on connective tissue of the muscle-tendon unit is not known. We studied three groups of mice; 1) giant transgenic mice that expressed bovine GH (bGH) and had high circulating levels of GH and IGF-I, 2) dwarf mice with a disrupted GH receptor gene (GHR-/-) leading to GH resistance and low circulating IGF-I, and 3) a wild-type control group (CTRL). We measured the ultra-structure, collagen content and mRNA expression (targets: GAPDH, RPLP0, IGF-IEa, IGF-IR, COL1A1, COL3A1, TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, versican, scleraxis, tenascin C, fibronectin, fibromodulin, decorin) in the Achilles tendon, and the mRNA expression was also measured in calf muscle (same targets as tendon plus IGF-IEb, IGF-IEc). We found that GHR-/- mice had significantly lower collagen fibril volume fraction in Achilles tendon, as well as decreased mRNA expression of IGF-I isoforms and collagen types I and III in muscle compared to CTRL. In contrast, the mRNA expression of IGF-I isoforms and collagens in bGH mice was generally high in both tendon and muscle compared to CTRL. Mean collagen fibril diameter was significantly decreased with both high and low GH/IGF-I signaling, but the GHR-/- mouse tendons were most severely affected with a total loss of the normal bimodal diameter distribution. In conclusion, chronic manipulation of the GH/IGF-I axis influenced both morphology and mRNA levels of selected genes in the muscle-tendon unit of mice. Whereas only moderate structural changes were observed with up-regulation of GH/IGF-I axis, disruption of the GH receptor had pronounced effects upon tendon ultra-structure.

  4. Alterations in Cytosolic and Mitochondrial [U-13C]Glucose Metabolism in a Chronic Epilepsy Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Temporal lobe epilepsy is a common form of adult epilepsy and shows high resistance to treatment. Increasing evidence has suggested that metabolic dysfunction contributes to the development of seizures, with previous studies indicating impairments in brain glucose metabolism. Here we aim to elucidate which pathways involved in glucose metabolism are impaired, by tracing the hippocampal metabolism of injected [U-13C]glucose (i.p.) during the chronic stage of the pilocarpine-status epilepticus mouse model of epilepsy. The enrichment of 13C in the intermediates of glycolysis and the TCA cycle were quantified in hippocampal extracts using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectroscopy, along with the measurement of the activities of enzymes in each pathway. We show that there is reduced incorporation of 13C in the intermediates of glycolysis, with the percentage enrichment of all downstream intermediates being highly correlated with those of glucose 6-phosphate. Furthermore, the activities of all enzymes in this pathway including hexokinase and phosphofructokinase were unaltered, suggesting that glucose uptake is reduced in this model without further impairments in glycolysis itself. The key findings were 33% and 55% losses in the activities of pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, respectively, along with reduced 13C enrichment in TCA cycle intermediates. This lower 13C enrichment is best explained in part by the reduced enrichment in glycolytic intermediates, whereas the reduction of key TCA cycle enzyme activity indicates that TCA cycling is also impaired in the hippocampal formation. Together, these data suggest that multitarget approaches may be necessary to restore metabolism in the epileptic brain.

  5. Neurodegeneration severity can be predicted from early microglia alterations monitored in vivo in a mouse model of chronic glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Bosco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Microglia serve key homeostatic roles, and respond to neuronal perturbation and decline with a high spatiotemporal resolution. The course of all chronic CNS pathologies is thus paralleled by local microgliosis and microglia activation, which begin at early stages of the disease. However, the possibility of using live monitoring of microglia during early disease progression to predict the severity of neurodegeneration has not been explored. Because the retina allows live tracking of fluorescent microglia in their intact niche, here we investigated their early changes in relation to later optic nerve neurodegeneration. To achieve this, we used the DBA/2J mouse model of inherited glaucoma, which develops progressive retinal ganglion cell degeneration of variable severity during aging, and represents a useful model to study pathogenic mechanisms of retinal ganglion cell decline that are similar to those in human glaucoma. We imaged CX3CR1+/GFP microglial cells in vivo at ages ranging from 1 to 5 months by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO and quantified cell density and morphological activation. We detected early microgliosis at the optic nerve head (ONH, where axonopathy first manifests, and could track attenuation of this microgliosis induced by minocycline. We also observed heterogeneous and dynamic patterns of early microglia activation in the retina. When the same animals were aged and analyzed for the severity of optic nerve pathology at 10 months of age, we found a strong correlation with the levels of ONH microgliosis at 3 to 4 months. Our findings indicate that live imaging and monitoring the time course and levels of early retinal microgliosis and microglia activation in glaucoma could serve as indicators of future neurodegeneration severity.

  6. Mercury accumulation and its distribution to metallothionein in mouse brain after sub-chronic pulse exposure to mercury vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasutake, A. [Biochemistry Section, National Institute for Minamata Disease, Minamata, Kumamoto 867-0008 (Japan); Sawada, M.; Shimada, A. [Department of Veterinary Pathology, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyamacho, Minami, Tottori 680-0945 (Japan); Satoh, M. [Department of Hygienics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 5-6-1 Mitahora-higashi, Gifu 502-8585 (Japan); Tohyama, C. [Environmental Health Sciences Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan)

    2004-09-01

    Previously we found that exposure to mercury vapor effectively induced metallothionein (MT) biosynthesis in rat brain. Although the induction of not only MT-I/II but also MT-III was evident, the induction rate of the latter was much lower than that of the former. The brain of an MT-null mouse lacks MT-I/II, but has MT-III. Here we examined the effects of sub-chronic pulse exposure to mercury vapor on the brain MT in MT-null mice and their wild type controls. MT-null and wild type mice were preliminarily exposed to mercury vapor for 2 weeks at 0.1 mg Hg/m{sup 3} for 1 h/day for 3 days a week, and then exposed for 11 weeks at 4.1 mg Hg/m{sup 3} for 30 min/day for 3 days a week. This exposure caused no toxic signs such as abnormal behavior or loss of body weight gain in the mice of either strain throughout the experimental period. Twenty-four hours after the termination of the exposure, mice were sacrificed and brain samples were subjected to mercury analysis, MT assay, and pathological examination. The MT-null mice showed lower accumulation of mercury in the brain than the wild type mice. Mercury exposure resulted in a 70% increase of brain MT in the wild type mice, which was mostly accounted for by the increase in MT-I/II. On the other hand, the brain MT in the MT-null mice increased by 19%, suggesting less reactivity of the MT-III gene to mercury vapor. Although histochemical examination revealed silver-mercury grains in the cytoplasm of nerve cells and glial cells throughout the brains of both strains, no significant difference was observed between the two strains. (orig.)

  7. 慢性贫血因素对女性患者全麻诱导气管插管时无通气安全时限的影响%Effect of chronic anemia on duration of non-hypoxic apnea during tracheal intubation after induction of general anesthesia in female patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿桂启; 刘海恋; 黄绍强

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of chronic anemia on duration of non-hypoxic apnea during tracheal intubation after induction of general anesthesia in female patients.Methods Seventy-five ASA physical status Ⅰ or Ⅱ patients,aged 20-40 yr,of Mallampati class Ⅰ or Ⅱ,with body mass index < 25 kg/m2,were enrolled in the study.According to the test results of hemoglobin (Hb),the patients were allocated into 3 groups (n =25 each):Hb > 110 g/L group (group A),Hb 90-110 g/L group (group B),and 70 g/L < Hb < 90 g/L group (group C).Each patient inhaled 100% oxygen through a mask with oxygen flow of 8 L/min and 3 min later anesthesia was induced with general anesthesia.Assisted ventilation was not performed during induction.After tracheal intubation,artificial ventilation was performed with pure oxygen when SpO2 decreased to 90%.The time from beginning of apnea to SpO2 of 90% (duration of non-hypoxic apnea),and the minimum SpO2 and the maximum PET CO2 during the period of observation were recorded.Immediately before oxygen inhalation via a mask,immediately after beginning of apnea,and at the time for SpO2 decreasing to 90%,arterial blood samples were taken from 10 patients randomly chosen from each group for blood gas analysis.Results Compared with group A,the duration of non-hypoxic apnea was significantly shortened,and no significant change was found in the minimum SpO2 in B and C groups,and the maximum PET CO2 and PaCO2 while SpO2 decreasing to 90% were decreased in group C.Compared with group B,the duration of non-hypoxic apnea was signifi.cantly shortened,PaCO2 while SpO2 decreasing to 90% was decreased,and no significant change was found in the minimum SpO2 and the maximum PET CO2 in group C.Conclusion Mild and moderate chronic anemia shortens the duration of non-hypoxic apnoea to about 6.0 and 3.5 min,respectively,during tracheal intubation after induction of general anesthesia in female patients.%目的 评价慢性贫血因素对女性

  8. D-Ala2-GIP-glu-PAL is neuroprotective in a chronic Parkinson's disease mouse model and increases BNDF expression while reducing neuroinflammation and lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanwei; Liu, WeiZhen; Li, Lin; Hölscher, Christian

    2017-02-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD). Therefore, treatment to improve insulin resistance in T2DM may be useful for PD patients. Glucose dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is a member of the incretin hormone family that can promote insulin release and improve insulin resistance. Several GIP analogues have been developed as potential treatments for T2DM. We had shown previously that D-Ala2-GIP-glu-PAL, a novel long-acting GIP analogue, can play a neuroprotective role in the PD mouse model induced by acute MPTP injection. The drug reduced damage to the dopaminergic neurons and increased CREB-mediated Bcl-2 expression to prevent apoptosis and reduced chronic inflammation in the brain. In the present study, we further tested the effects of chronic treatment by D-Ala2-GIP-glu-PAL in a chronic PD mouse model induced by MPTP (25mg/kg ip.) combination with probenecid (250mg/kg ip.) injection for 5 weeks. The results demonstrated that chronic treatment with D-Ala2-GIP-glu-PAL inhibits MPTP -induced Parkinsonism-like motor disorders in mice, and that the drug prevents dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Moreover, D-Ala2-GIP-glu-PAL also inhibited the increased levels of expression of α-synuclein in the SNpc and striatum induced by MPTP. Furthermore, drug treatment reduced chronic neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, and increased the expression of BDNF. These findings show that GIP signaling is neuroprotective and holds promise as a novel treatment of PD.

  9. Chronic infection drives expression of the inhibitory receptor CD200R, and its ligand CD200, by mouse and human CD4 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Caserta

    Full Text Available Certain parasites have evolved to evade the immune response and establish chronic infections that may persist for many years. T cell responses in these conditions become muted despite ongoing infection. Upregulation of surface receptors with inhibitory properties provides an immune cell-intrinsic mechanism that, under conditions of chronic infection, regulates immune responses and limits cellular activation and associated pathology. The negative regulator, CD200 receptor, and its ligand, CD200, have been shown to regulate macrophage activation and reduce pathology following infection. We show that CD4 T cells also increase expression of inhibitory CD200 receptors (CD200R in response to chronic infection. CD200R was upregulated on murine effector T cells in response to infection with bacterial, Salmonella enterica, or helminth, Schistosoma mansoni, pathogens that respectively drive predominant Th1- or Th2-responses. In vitro chronic and prolonged stimuli were required for the sustained upregulation of CD200R, and its expression coincided with loss of multifunctional potential in T effector cells during infection. Importantly, we show an association between IL-4 production and CD200R expression on T effector cells from humans infected with Schistosoma haematobium that correlated effectively with egg burden and, thus infection intensity. Our results indicate a role of CD200R:CD200 in T cell responses to helminths which has diagnostic and prognostic relevance as a marker of infection for chronic schistosomiasis in mouse and man.

  10. Clinical observation of cytidine disodium triphosphate combined with mouse nerve growth factor in treatment of neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy%三磷酸胞苷二钠联合鼠神经生长因子治疗新生儿缺氧缺血性脑病的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁玉红; 闫俊梅; 闫静

    2015-01-01

    hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.Methods Patients (80 cases) with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in Department of Neonatology of Xuzhou Maternity and Child Health Hospital from January 2013 to January 2014 were randomly divided into control and treatment groups, and each group had 40 cases. The patients in control group were imadministered with Mouse Nerve Growth Factor for injection 6 h after birth on the basis of foundation treatment, 30μg/time, once daily. The patients in treatment group were ivadministered with Cytidine Disodium Triphosphate for injection on the basis of control group, 100 mg/time added into 5% glucose injection 30 mL, once daily. Children with moderate were treated for 14 d, and children with severe were treated for 21 d. After treatment, the efficacy was evaluated, and symptoms and signs improved time, NBNA scores, and CDCC test results in two groups were compared.Results After treatment, the efficacies in the control and treatment groups were 72.5% and 92.5%, respectively, and there were differences between two groups (P < 0.05). After treatment, consciousness disturbance recovery time, seizures stop time, primitive reflex normal time, and muscle tension normal time in the treatment group were shorter than those in the control group, and there were differences between two groups (P < 0.05). After treatment, behavior ability score, passive muscle tension score, general assessment score and total score in two groups were significantly increased, and active muscle tension score and primitive reflex score in the treatment group were significantly increased, and the difference was statistically significant in the same group (P < 0.05). These observational indexes in the treatment group were better than those in the control group, withsignificant difference between two groups (P < 0.05). After birth of 6 and 12 months, MDI and PDI in treatment group were higher than those in the control group, with significant difference between two groups (P < 0

  11. Chronic Anatabine Treatment Reduces Alzheimer's Disease (AD-Like Pathology and Improves Socio-Behavioral Deficits in a Transgenic Mouse Model of AD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Verma

    Full Text Available Anatabine is a minor tobacco alkaloid, which is also found in plants of the Solanaceae family and displays a chemical structure similarity with nicotine. We have shown previously that anatabine displays some anti-inflammatory properties and reduces microgliosis and tau phosphorylation in a pure mouse model of tauopathy. We therefore investigated the effects of a chronic oral treatment with anatabine in a transgenic mouse model (Tg PS1/APPswe of Alzheimer's disease (AD which displays pathological Aβ deposits, neuroinflammation and behavioral deficits. In the elevated plus maze, Tg PS1/APPswe mice exhibited hyperactivity and disinhibition compared to wild-type mice. Six and a half months of chronic oral anatabine treatment, suppressed hyperactivity and disinhibition in Tg PS1/APPswe mice compared to Tg PS1/APPswe receiving regular drinking water. Tg PS1/APPswe mice also elicited profound social interaction and social memory deficits, which were both alleviated by the anatabine treatment. We found that anatabine reduces the activation of STAT3 and NFκB in the vicinity of Aβ deposits in Tg PS1/APPswe mice resulting in a reduction of the expression of some of their target genes including Bace1, iNOS and Cox-2. In addition, a significant reduction in microgliosis and pathological deposition of Aβ was observed in the brain of Tg PS1/APPswe mice treated with anatabine. This is the first study to investigate the impact of chronic anatabine treatment on AD-like pathology and behavior in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Overall, our data show that anatabine reduces β-amyloidosis, neuroinflammation and alleviates some behavioral deficits in Tg PS1/APPswe, supporting further exploration of anatabine as a possible disease modifying agent for the treatment of AD.

  12. Overcoming the hypoxic barrier to radiation therapy with anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettegowda, Chetan; Dang, Long H; Abrams, Ross; Huso, David L; Dillehay, Larry; Cheong, Ian; Agrawal, Nishant; Borzillary, Scott; McCaffery, J Michael; Watson, E Latice; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Bunz, Fred; Baidoo, Kwamena; Pomper, Martin G; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2003-12-09

    The low level of oxygenation within tumors is a major cause of radiation treatment failures. We theorized that anaerobic bacteria that can selectively destroy the hypoxic regions of tumors would enhance the effects of radiation. To test this hypothesis, we used spores of Clostridium novyi-NT to treat transplanted tumors in mice. The bacteria were found to markedly improve the efficacy of radiotherapy in several of the mouse models tested. Enhancement was noted with external beam radiation derived from a Cs-137 source, systemic radioimmunotherapy with an I-131-conjugated monoclonal antibody, and a previously undescribed form of experimental brachytherapy using plaques loaded with I-125 seeds. C. novyi-NT spores added little toxicity to the radiotherapeutic regimens, and the combination resulted in long-term remissions in a significant fraction of animals.

  13. Impaired Bronchoprotection Is Not Induced by Increased Smooth Muscle Mass in Chronic Treatment In Vivo with Formoterol in Asthmatic Mouse Model

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    W Luo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Inhaling β2-adrenoceptor agonist is first-line asthma treatment, which is used for both acute relief and prevention of bronchoconstriction. However, chronic use of β-agonists results in impaired bronchoprotection and increasing occurrences of severe asthma exacerbation, even death in clinical practice. The mechanism of β-adrenoceptor hyposensitivity has not been thoroughly elucidated thus far. Bronchial smooth muscle contraction induces airway narrowing and also mediates airway inflammation. Moreover, bronchial smooth muscle mass significantly increases in asthmatics. We aimed to establish an asthmatic model that demonstrated that formoterol induced impaired bronchoprotection and to see whether increased smooth muscle mass played a role in it. Methods: We combined routine allergen challenging (seven weeks with repeated application of formoterol, formoterol plus budesonide or physiological saline in allergen-sensitized BALB/c mouse. The bronchoprotection mediated by β-agonist was measured in five consecutive weeks. Smooth muscle mass was shown by morphometric analysis, and α-actin expression was detected by western blot. Results: The trend of bronchoprotection was wavy in drug interventional groups, which initially increased and then decreased. Chronic treatment with formoterol significantly impaired bronchoprotection. According to the morphometric analysis and α-actin expression, no significant difference was detected in smooth muscle mass in all groups. Conclusion: This experiment successfully established that a chronic asthmatic mouse model, which manifested typical features of asthmatic patients, with chronic use of formoterol, results in a loss of bronchoprotection. No significant difference was detected in smooth muscle mass in all groups, which implied some subcellular signalling changes may be the key points.

  14. Chemoreceptor stimulation and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in conscious dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitzky, M G

    1979-07-01

    Dogs with electromagnetic flow probes implanted on their left (QL) and main (QT) pulmonary arteries, catheters in their left atria and external jugular veins, and chronic tracheostomies were trained to accept Carlens dual-lumen endotracheal tubes into their tracheostomies, thus allowing separate ventilation of the two lungs. Swan-Ganz catheters were inserted through the jugular vein catheters. Pneumotachographs measured air flow to each lung. During bilateral ventilation with room air or O2, QL was about 36% of QT. When the left lung was ventilated with N2 while the right remained on O2, PAO2 was above 90 mmHg and QL fell to about 25% of QT. When the left lung was ventilated with N2 and the right with room air, PAO2 fell below 40 mm Hg and QL increased to control levels. This increase in perfusion of the hypoxic lung during systemic hypoxemia was not seen in dogs after surgical deafferentation of the systemic arterial chemoreceptors, indicating that stimulation of the arterial chemoreceptors may interfere with the hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

  15. Chronic ethanol intake modifies pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activity in mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes under resting and K+ -stimulated conditions: role of calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayas, María Dolores; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; García-López, María Jesús; Carrera, María Pilar; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel

    2008-07-04

    Pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase (Pcp) is an omega peptidase that removes pyroglutamyl N-terminal residues of peptides such as thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH), which is one of the neuropeptides that has been localized into many areas of the brain and acts as an endogenous neuromodulator of several parameters related to ethanol (EtOH) consumption. In this study, we analysed the effects of chronic EtOH intake on Pcp activity on mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes and their corresponding supernatant under basal and K+ -stimulated conditions, in presence and absence of calcium (Ca2+) to know the regulation of Pcp on TRH. In basal conditions, chronic EtOH intake significantly decreased synaptosomes Pcp activity but only in absence of Ca2+. However, supernatant Pcp activity is also decreased in presence and absence of calcium. Under K+-stimulated conditions, chronic EtOH intake decreased synaptosomes Pcp activity but only in absence of Ca2+, whereas supernatant Pcp activity was significantly decreased only in presence of Ca2+. The general inhibitory effect of chronic EtOH intake on Pcp activity suggests an inhibition of TRH metabolism and an enhancement of TRH neurotransmitter/neuromodulator functions, which could be related to putative processes of tolerance to EtOH in which TRH has been involved. Our data may also indicate that active peptides and their degrading peptidases are released together to the synaptic cleft to regulate the neurotransmitter/neuromodulator functions of these peptides, through a Ca2+ -dependent mechanism.

  16. Overendocytosis of gold nanoparticles increases autophagy and apoptosis in hypoxic human renal proximal tubular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding F

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fengan Ding,1 Yiping Li,1 Jing Liu,1 Lei Liu,1 Wenmin Yu,1 Zhi Wang,1 Haifeng Ni,2 Bicheng Liu,2 Pingsheng Chen1,2 1School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 2Institute of Nephrology, The Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Background: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs can potentially be used in biomedical fields ranging from therapeutics to diagnostics, and their use will result in increased human exposure. Many studies have demonstrated that GNPs can be deposited in the kidneys, particularly in renal tubular epithelial cells. Chronic hypoxic is inevitable in chronic kidney diseases, and it results in renal tubular epithelial cells that are susceptible to different types of injuries. However, the understanding of the interactions between GNPs and hypoxic renal tubular epithelial cells is still rudimentary. In the present study, we characterized the cytotoxic effects of GNPs in hypoxic renal tubular epithelial cells.Results: Both 5 nm and 13 nm GNPs were synthesized and characterized using various biophysical methods, including transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry. We detected the cytotoxicity of 5 and 13 nm GNPs (0, 1, 25, and 50 nM to human renal proximal tubular cells (HK-2 by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and lactate dehydrogenase release assay, but we just found the toxic effect in the 5 nm GNP-treated cells at 50 nM dose under hypoxic condition. Furthermore, the transmission electron microscopy images revealed that GNPs were either localized in vesicles or free in the lysosomes in 5 nm GNPs-treated HK-2 cells, and the cellular uptake of the GNPs in the hypoxic cells was significantly higher than that in normoxic cells. In normoxic HK-2 cells, 5 nm GNPs (50 nM treatment could cause autophagy and cell survival. However, in hypoxic conditions, the GNP exposure at the same condition led to the

  17. Early onset of hypersynchronous network activity and expression of a marker of chronic seizures in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

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    Charlotte Bezzina

    Full Text Available Cortical and hippocampal hypersynchrony of neuronal networks seems to be an early event in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Many mouse models of the disease also present neuronal network hypersynchrony, as evidenced by higher susceptibility to pharmacologically-induced seizures, electroencephalographic seizures accompanied by spontaneous interictal spikes and expression of markers of chronic seizures such as neuropeptide Y ectopic expression in mossy fibers. This network hypersynchrony is thought to contribute to memory deficits, but whether it precedes the onset of memory deficits or not in mouse models remains unknown. The earliest memory impairments in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease have been observed at 3 months of age. We thus assessed network hypersynchrony in Tg2576 and non-transgenic male mice at 1.5, 3 and 6 months of age. As soon as 1.5 months of age, Tg2576 mice presented higher seizure susceptibility to systemic injection of a GABAA receptor antagonist. They also displayed spontaneous interictal spikes on EEG recordings. Some Tg2576 mice presented hippocampal ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y which incidence seems to increase with age among the Tg2576 population. Our data reveal that network hypersynchrony appears very early in Tg2576 mice, before any demonstrated memory impairments.

  18. Early Onset of Hypersynchronous Network Activity and Expression of a Marker of Chronic Seizures in the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzina, Charlotte; Verret, Laure; Juan, Cécile; Remaud, Jessica; Halley, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Cortical and hippocampal hypersynchrony of neuronal networks seems to be an early event in Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis. Many mouse models of the disease also present neuronal network hypersynchrony, as evidenced by higher susceptibility to pharmacologically-induced seizures, electroencephalographic seizures accompanied by spontaneous interictal spikes and expression of markers of chronic seizures such as neuropeptide Y ectopic expression in mossy fibers. This network hypersynchrony is thought to contribute to memory deficits, but whether it precedes the onset of memory deficits or not in mouse models remains unknown. The earliest memory impairments in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease have been observed at 3 months of age. We thus assessed network hypersynchrony in Tg2576 and non-transgenic male mice at 1.5, 3 and 6 months of age. As soon as 1.5 months of age, Tg2576 mice presented higher seizure susceptibility to systemic injection of a GABAA receptor antagonist. They also displayed spontaneous interictal spikes on EEG recordings. Some Tg2576 mice presented hippocampal ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y which incidence seems to increase with age among the Tg2576 population. Our data reveal that network hypersynchrony appears very early in Tg2576 mice, before any demonstrated memory impairments. PMID:25768013

  19. [STRESS AND INFARCT LIMITING EFFECTS OF EARLY HYPOXIC PRECONDITIONING].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishmanov, Yu B; Maslov, L N; Sementsov, A S; Naryzhnaya, N V; Tsibulnikov, S Yu

    2015-09-01

    It was established that early hypoxic preconditioning is an adaptive state different from eustress and distress. Hypoxic preconditioning has the cross effects, increasing the tolerance of the heart to ischemia-reperfusion and providing antiulcerogenic effect during immobilization stress.

  20. Chronic GluN2B antagonism disrupts behavior in wild-type mice without protecting against synapse loss or memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Jesse E; Meilandt, William J; Gogineni, Alvin; Reynen, Paul; Herrington, James; Weimer, Robby M; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Zhou, Qiang

    2014-06-11

    Extensive evidence implicates GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2B-NMDARs) in excitotoxic-insult-induced neurodegeneration and amyloid β (Aβ)-induced synaptic dysfunction. Therefore, inhibiting GluN2B-NMDARs would appear to be a potential therapeutic strategy to provide neuroprotection and improve cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there are no reports of long-term in vivo treatment of AD mouse models with GluN2B antagonists. We used piperidine18 (Pip18), a potent and selective GluN2B-NMDAR antagonist with favorable pharmacokinetic properties, for long-term dosing in AD mouse models. Reduced freezing behavior in Tg2576 mice during fear conditioning was partially reversed after subchronic (17 d) Pip18 treatment. However, analysis of freezing behavior in different contexts indicated that this increased freezing likely involves elevated anxiety or excessive memory generalization in both nontransgenic (NTG) and Tg2576 mice. In PS2APP mice chronically fed with medicated food containing Pip18 for 4 months, spatial learning and memory deficits were not rescued, plaque-associated spine loss was not affected, and synaptic function was not altered. At the same time, altered open field activity consistent with increased anxiety and degraded performance in an active avoidance task were observed in NTG after chronic treatment. These results indicate that long-term treatment with a GluN2B-NMDAR antagonist does not provide a disease-modifying benefit and could cause cognitive liabilities rather than symptomatic benefit in AD mouse models. Therefore, these results challenge the expectation of the therapeutic potential for GluN2B-NMDAR antagonists in AD.

  1. The Functional Study of a Chinese Herbal Compounded Antidepressant Medicine--Jie Yu Chu Fan Capsule on Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Ding

    Full Text Available Jie Yu Chu Fan capsule (JYCF is a new compounded Chinese herbal medicine for the treatment of depression. The present study was designed to explore the antidepressant effects and the possible mechanisms of JYCF by using chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS mouse model and comparing results to that of fluoxetine. Behavioral tests including an open field test, sucrose preference test and forced swim test were performed to evaluate the antidepressant effects of JYCF. The concentrations of monoamine neurotransmitters and metabolic products including norepinephrine (NE, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, dopamine (DA, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA, homovanillic acid (HVA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice were determined by means of high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC. The results show that a successful mouse CUMS model was established through 5 weeks of continuous unpredictable stimulation, as indicated by the significant decrease in sucrose preference and locomotor activity and increase in immobility time in the forced swim test. Chronic treatment of JYCF (1.25, 2.5 and 5 g/kg and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg significantly reversed the CUMS-induced behavioral abnormalities. JYCF (1.25, 2.5 and 5 g/kg significantly increased NE in CUMS mouse prefrontal cortex (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.05 respectively and 5-HT in hippocampus (P < 0.05. In summary, our findings suggest that JYCF exerts comparable antidepressant-like effects to that of fluoxetine in CUMS mice. Besides, the antidepressant-like effect of JYCF is mediated by the increase of monoaminergic transmitters including 5-HT and NE.

  2. In Vivo Acute on Chronic Ethanol Effects in Liver: A Mouse Model Exhibiting Exacerbated Injury, Altered Metabolic and Epigenetic Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Shivendra D; Aroor, Annayya R; Restrepo, Ricardo; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2015-11-20

    Chronic alcoholics who also binge drink (i.e., acute on chronic) are prone to an exacerbated liver injury but its mechanism is not understood. We therefore investigated the in vivo effects of chronic and binge ethanol ingestion and compared to chronic ethanol followed by three repeat binge ethanol on the liver of male C57/BL6 mice fed ethanol in liquid diet (4%) for four weeks followed by binge ethanol (intragastric administration, 3.5 g/kg body weight, three doses, 12h apart). Chronic followed by binge ethanol exacerbated fat accumulation, necrosis, decrease in hepatic SAM and SAM:SAH ratio, increase in adenosine levels, and elevated CYP2E1 levels. Histone H3 lysine acetylation (H3AcK9), dually modified phosphoacetylated histone H3 (H3AcK9/PS10), and phosphorylated H2AX increased after binge whereas phosphorylation of histone H3 ser 10 (H3S10) and H3 ser 28 (H3S28) increased after chronic ethanol-binge. Histone H3 lysine 4 and 9 dimethylation increased with a marked dimethylation in H3K9 in chronic ethanol binge group. Trimethylated histone H3 levels did not change. Nuclear levels of histone acetyl transferase GCN5 and histone deacetylase HDAC3 were elevated whereas phospho-CREB decreased in a distinctive manner. Taken together, acute on chronic ethanol ingestion caused amplification of liver injury and elicited characteristic profiles of histone modifications, metabolic alterations, and changes in nuclear protein levels. These findings demonstrate that chronic ethanol exposure renders liver more susceptible to repeat acute/binge ethanol induced acceleration of alcoholic liver disease.

  3. Important role of PLC-γ1 in hypoxic increase in intracellular calcium in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vishal R; Song, Tengyao; Joseph, Leroy; Mei, Lin; Zheng, Yun-Min; Wang, Yong-Xiao

    2013-02-01

    An increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) induces hypoxic cellular responses in the lungs; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We report, for the first time, that acute hypoxia significantly enhances phospholipase C (PLC) activity in mouse resistance pulmonary arteries (PAs), but not in mesenteric arteries. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining reveal the expression of PLC-γ1 protein in PAs and PASMCs, respectively. The activity of PLC-γ1 is also augmented in PASMCs following hypoxia. Lentiviral shRNA-mediated gene knockdown of mitochondrial complex III Rieske iron-sulfur protein (RISP) to inhibit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production prevents hypoxia from increasing PLC-γ1 activity in PASMCs. Myxothiazol, a mitochondrial complex III inhibitor, reduces the hypoxic response as well. The PLC inhibitor U73122, but not its inactive analog U73433, attenuates the hypoxic vasoconstriction in PAs and hypoxic increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in PASMCs. PLC-γ1 knockdown suppresses its protein expression and the hypoxic increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Hypoxia remarkably increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) production, which is blocked by U73122. The IP(3) receptor (IP(3)R) antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) or xestospongin-C inhibits the hypoxic increase in [Ca(2+)](i). PLC-γ1 knockdown or U73122 reduces H(2)O(2)-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in PASMCs and contraction in PAs. 2-APB and xestospongin-C produce similar inhibitory effects. In conclusion, our findings provide novel evidence that hypoxia activates PLC-γ1 by increasing RISP-dependent mitochondrial ROS production in the complex III, which causes IP(3) production, IP(3)R opening, and Ca(2+) release, playing an important role in hypoxic Ca(2+) and contractile responses in PASMCs.

  4. Lysyl oxidase mediates hypoxic control of metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erler, Janine Terra; Giaccia, Amato J

    2006-01-01

    Hypoxic cancer cells pose a great challenge to the oncologist because they are especially aggressive, metastatic, and resistant to therapy. Recently, we showed that elevation of the extracellular matrix protein lysyl oxidase (LOX) correlates with metastatic disease and is essential for hypoxia...

  5. Brain mechanisms of hypoxic preconditioning%低氧预适应的脑机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕国蔚; 崔秀玉; 赵兰峰; 安仰原; 高翠英

    2004-01-01

    A concept ot tissue adaptation to hypoxia( i.e. hypoxic preconditioning) was developed and its corresponding animal models were reproduced in 1966s. The methods of model reproduction in rat, rabbit, and mouse in particular and the main results are brifly introduced in this review. The tolerance to hypoxia o{ preconditioned animals is significantly increased. Regular changes in animals' behavior, neurophysiology, respiratory and circulatory physiology, neuromorphology in vivo and {unction of brain and spinal cord in vitro are briefly demonstrated. The protective effects in vivo and in vitro of homogenate extract taken from the brain o{ preconditioned animals, neurochemcals and molecular neurobiolcgical alterations are briefly presented. The essence and significance of tissue adaption to hypoxia/hypoxic preconditioning are discussed in the review in terms of evolution and practical implication.

  6. Analgesia induced by the epigenetic drug, L-acetylcarnitine, outlasts the end of treatment in mouse models of chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notartomaso, Serena; Mascio, Giada; Bernabucci, Matteo; Zappulla, Cristina; Scarselli, Pamela; Cannella, Milena; Imbriglio, Tiziana; Gradini, Roberto; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Bruno, Valeria; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2017-01-01

    Background L-acetylcarnitine, a drug marketed for the treatment of chronic pain, causes analgesia by epigenetically up-regulating type-2 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2) receptors in the spinal cord. Because the epigenetic mechanisms are typically long-lasting, we hypothesized that analgesia could outlast the duration of L-acetylcarnitine treatment in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Results A seven-day treatment with L-acetylcarnitine (100 mg/kg, once a day, i.p.) produced an antiallodynic effect in the complete Freund adjuvant mouse model of chronic inflammatory pain. L-Acetylcarnitine-induced analgesia persisted for at least 14 days after drug withdrawal. In contrast, the analgesic effect of pregabalin, amitryptiline, ceftriaxone, and N-acetylcysteine disappeared seven days after drug withdrawal. L-acetylcarnitine treatment enhanced mGlu2/3 receptor protein levels in the dorsal region of the spinal cord. This effect also persisted for two weeks after drug withdrawal and was associated with increased levels of acetylated histone H3 bound to the Grm2 gene promoter in the dorsal root ganglia. A long-lasting analgesic effect of L-acetylcarnitine was also observed in mice subjected to chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. In these animals, a 14-day treatment with pregabalin, amitryptiline, tramadol, or L-acetylcarnitine produced a significant antiallodynic effect, with pregabalin displaying the greatest efficacy. In mice treated with pregabalin, tramadol or L-acetylcarnitine the analgesic effect was still visible 15 days after the end of drug treatment. However, only in mice treated with L-acetylcarnitine analgesia persisted 37 days after drug withdrawal. This effect was associated with an increase in mGlu2/3 receptor protein levels in the dorsal horns of the spinal cord. Conclusions Our findings suggest that L-acetylcarnitine has the unique property to cause a long-lasting analgesic effect that might reduce relapses in patients suffering from

  7. Essential Contributions of Serotonin Transporter Inhibition to the Acute and Chronic Actions of Fluoxetine and Citalopram in the SERT Met172 Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nackenoff, Alex G; Moussa-Tooks, Alexandra B; McMeekin, Austin M; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Blakely, Randy D

    2016-06-01

    Depression is a common mental illness and a leading cause of disability. The most widely prescribed antidepressant medications are serotonin (5-HT) selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Although there is much support for 5-HT transporter (SERT) antagonism as a basis of antidepressant efficacy, this evidence is indirect and other targets and mechanisms have been proposed. In order to distinguish SERT-dependent and -independent effects of SSRIs, we developed a knock-in mouse model whereby high-affinity interactions of many antidepressants at SERT have been ablated via knock-in substitution (SERT Met172) without disrupting 5-HT recognition or uptake. Here we utilize the C57BL/6J SERT Met172 model to evaluate SERT dependence for the actions of two widely prescribed SSRIs, fluoxetine and citalopram, in tests sensitive to acute and chronic actions of antidepressants. In the tail suspension and forced swim tests, fluoxetine and citalopram fail to reduce immobility in SERT Met172 mice. In addition, SERT Met172 mice are insensitive to chronic fluoxetine and citalopram administration in the novelty induced hypophagia test (NIH) and fail to exhibit enhanced proliferation or survival of hippocampal stem cells. In both acute and chronic studies, SERT Met172 mice maintained sensitivity to paroxetine, an antidepressant that is unaffected by the Met172 mutation. Together, these studies provide definitive support for an essential role of SERT antagonism in the acute and chronic actions of two commonly used SSRIs in these tests, and reinforce the utility of the SERT Met172 model for isolating SERT/5-HT contributions of drug actions in vivo.

  8. Restoration of Haemoglobin Level Using Hydrodynamic Gene Therapy with Erythropoietin Does Not Alleviate the Disease Progression in an Anaemic Mouse Model for TGFβ1-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lea Hougaard; Wogensen, Lise; Marcussen, N.

    2015-01-01

    expressed in non-haematopoietic tissue and today, Epo is recognised as a cytokine with many pleiotropic effects. We hypothesize that hydrodynamic gene therapy with Epo can restore haemoglobin levels in anaemic transgenic mice and that this will attenuate the extracellular matrix accumulation in the kidneys....... The experiment is conducted by hydrodynamic gene transfer of a plasmid encoding murine Epo in a transgenic mouse model that overexpresses TGF-β1 locally in the kidneys. This model develops anaemia due to chronic kidney disease characterised by thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, deposition...... of mesangial matrix and mild interstitial fibrosis. A group of age matched wildtype littermates are treated accordingly. After a single hydrodynamic administration of plasmid DNA containing murine EPO gene, sustained high haemoglobin levels are observed in both transgenic and wildtype mice from 7.5 ± 0.6 mmol...

  9. Sub-Chronic Neuropathological and Biochemical Changes in Mouse Visual System after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Radouil Tzekov; Clint Dawson; Megan Orlando; Benoit Mouzon; Jon Reed; James Evans; Gogce Crynen; Michael Mullan; Fiona Crawford

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (r-mTBI) results in neuropathological and biochemical consequences in the human visual system. Using a recently developed mouse model of r-mTBI, with control mice receiving repetitive anesthesia alone (r-sham) we assessed the effects on the retina and optic nerve using histology, immunohistochemistry, proteomic and lipidomic analyses at 3 weeks post injury. Retina tissue was used to determine retinal ganglion cell (RGC) number, while optic nerve tissue w...

  10. miR-181b as a therapeutic agent for chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the Eµ-TCL1 mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresin, Antonella; Callegari, Elisa; D'Abundo, Lucilla; Cattani, Caterina; Bassi, Cristian; Zagatti, Barbara; Narducci, M Grazia; Caprini, Elisabetta; Pekarsky, Yuri; Croce, Carlo M; Sabbioni, Silvia; Russo, Giandomenico; Negrini, Massimo

    2015-08-14

    The involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) pathogenesis suggests the possibility of anti-CLL therapeutic approaches based on miRNAs. Here, we used the Eµ-TCL1 transgenic mouse model, which reproduces leukemia with a similar course and distinct immunophenotype as human B-CLL, to test miR-181b as a therapeutic agent.In vitro enforced expression of miR-181b mimics induced significant apoptotic effects in human B-cell lines (RAJI, EHEB), as well as in mouse Eµ-TCL1 leukemic splenocytes. Molecular analyses revealed that miR-181b not only affected the expression of TCL1, Bcl2 and Mcl1 anti-apoptotic proteins, but also reduced the levels of Akt and phospho-Erk1/2. Notably, a siRNA anti-TCL1 could similarly down-modulate TCL1, but exhibited a reduced or absent activity in other relevant proteins, as well as a reduced effect on cell apoptosis and viability. In vivo studies demonstrated the capability of miR-181b to reduce leukemic cell expansion and to increase survival of treated mice.These data indicate that miR-181b exerts a broad range of actions, affecting proliferative, survival and apoptotic pathways, both in mice and human cells, and can potentially be used to reduce expansion of B-CLL leukemic cells.

  11. Behavioral Abnormalities in a Mouse Model of Chronic Toxoplasmosis Are Associated with MAG1 Antibody Levels and Cyst Burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianchun; Li, Ye; Prandovszky, Emese; Kannan, Geetha; Viscidi, Raphael P; Pletnikov, Mikhail V; Yolken, Robert H

    2016-04-01

    There is marked variation in the human response to Toxoplasma gondii infection. Epidemiological studies indicate associations between strain virulence and severity of toxoplasmosis. Animal studies on the pathogenic effect of chronic infection focused on relatively avirulent strains (e.g. type II) because they can easily establish latent infections in mice, defined by the presence of bradyzoite-containing cysts. To provide insight into virulent strain-related severity of human toxoplasmosis, we established a chronic model of the virulent type I strain using outbred mice. We found that type I-exposed mice displayed variable outcomes ranging from aborted to severe infections. According to antibody profiles, we found that most of mice generated antibodies against T. gondii organism but varied greatly in the production of antibodies against matrix antigen MAG1. There was a strong correlation between MAG1 antibody level and brain cyst burden in chronically infected mice (r = 0.82, p = 0.0021). We found that mice with high MAG1 antibody level displayed lower weight, behavioral changes, altered levels of gene expression and immune activation. The most striking change in behavior we discovered was a blunted response to amphetamine-trigged locomotor activity. The extent of most changes was directly correlated with levels of MAG1 antibody. These changes were not found in mice with less cyst burden or mice that were acutely but not chronically infected. Our finding highlights the critical role of cyst burden in a range of disease severity during chronic infection, the predictive value of MAG1 antibody level to brain cyst burden and to changes in behavior or other pathology in chronically infected mice. Our finding may have important implications for understanding the heterogeneous effects of T. gondii infections in human.

  12. Interleukin-33 drives activation of alveolar macrophages and airway inflammation in a mouse model of acute exacerbation of chronic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, Melissa M; Shadie, Alexander M; Flesher, Rylie P; Nikiforova, Valentina; Garthwaite, Linda; Tedla, Nicodemus; Herbert, Cristan; Kumar, Rakesh K

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of interleukin-33 (IL-33) in airway inflammation in an experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, which reproduces many of the features of the human disease. Systemically sensitized female BALB/c mice were challenged with a low mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks to induce chronic asthmatic inflammation and then received a single moderate-level challenge to trigger acute airway inflammation simulating an asthmatic exacerbation. The inflammatory response and expression of cytokines and activation markers by alveolar macrophages (AM) were assessed, as was the effect of pretreatment with a neutralizing antibody to IL-33. Compared to chronically challenged mice, AM from an acute exacerbation exhibited significantly enhanced expression of markers of alternative activation, together with enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and of cell surface proteins associated with antigen presentation. In parallel, there was markedly increased expression of both mRNA and immunoreactivity for IL-33 in the airways. Neutralization of IL-33 significantly decreased both airway inflammation and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines by AM. Collectively, these data indicate that in this model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, IL-33 drives activation of AM and has an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation.

  13. A novel mouse model for the study of the inhibitory effects of chronic ethanol exposure on direct bone formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excessive alcohol consumption has been reported to interfere with human bone homeostasis and repair in multiple ways. Previous studies have demonstrated that chronic ethanol exposure in the rat via an intragastric dietary delivery system inhibits direct bone formation during distraction osteogenesis...

  14. Interleukin-33 Drives Activation of Alveolar Macrophages and Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M. Bunting

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of interleukin-33 (IL-33 in airway inflammation in an experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, which reproduces many of the features of the human disease. Systemically sensitized female BALB/c mice were challenged with a low mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks to induce chronic asthmatic inflammation and then received a single moderate-level challenge to trigger acute airway inflammation simulating an asthmatic exacerbation. The inflammatory response and expression of cytokines and activation markers by alveolar macrophages (AM were assessed, as was the effect of pretreatment with a neutralizing antibody to IL-33. Compared to chronically challenged mice, AM from an acute exacerbation exhibited significantly enhanced expression of markers of alternative activation, together with enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and of cell surface proteins associated with antigen presentation. In parallel, there was markedly increased expression of both mRNA and immunoreactivity for IL-33 in the airways. Neutralization of IL-33 significantly decreased both airway inflammation and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines by AM. Collectively, these data indicate that in this model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, IL-33 drives activation of AM and has an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation.

  15. Up-regulation of nucleotide excision repair in mouse lung and liver following chronic exposure to aflatoxin B{sub 1} and its dependence on p53 genotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulder, Jeanne E. [Pharmacology and Toxicology Graduate Program, Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen' s University Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Bondy, Genevieve S.; Mehta, Rekha [Toxicology Research Division, 2202D, Bureau of Chemical Safety, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Massey, Thomas E., E-mail: masseyt@queensu.ca [Pharmacology and Toxicology Graduate Program, Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen' s University Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2014-03-01

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) is biotransformed in vivo into an epoxide metabolite that forms DNA adducts that may induce cancer if not repaired. p53 is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the regulation of global nucleotide excision repair (NER). Male heterozygous p53 knockout (B6.129-Trp53{sup tm1Brd}N5, Taconic) and wild-type mice were exposed to 0, 0.2 or 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} for 26 weeks. NER activity was assessed with an in vitro assay, using AFB{sub 1}-epoxide adducted plasmid DNA as a substrate. For wild-type mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua adducts was 124% and 96% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm and 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} respectively, and 224% greater in liver extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05). In heterozygous p53 knockout mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua was only 45% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05), and no effect was observed in lung extracts from mice treated with 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} or in liver extracts from mice treated with either AFB{sub 1} concentration. p53 genotype did not affect basal levels of repair. AFB{sub 1} exposure did not alter repair of AFB{sub 1}-derived formamidopyrimidine adducts in lung or liver extracts of either mouse genotype nor did it affect XPA or XPB protein levels. In summary, chronic exposure to AFB{sub 1} increased NER activity in wild-type mice, and this response was diminished in heterozygous p53 knockout mice, indicating that loss of one allele of p53 limits the ability of NER to be up-regulated in response to DNA damage. - Highlights: • Mice are chronically exposed to low doses of the mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}). • The effects of AFB{sub 1} and p53 status on nucleotide excision repair are investigated. • AFB{sub 1} increases nucleotide excision repair in wild type mouse lung and liver. • This increase is attenuated in p53 heterozygous mouse lung and liver. • Results portray the role of p53 in

  16. Differential protein expression in substantia nigra induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine in a mouse model of chronic Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenbin Tu; Furong Xu; Guoguang Peng

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To date, a complete protein expression profile of the midbrain substantia nigra in a mouse model of chronic Parkinson's disease, induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), does not exist. In addition, there are no reports of analysis of differential protein expression.OBJECTIVE: To separate and evaluate MPTP-induced differential protein expression through the use of proteomics in the substantia nigra of a mouse model of chronic Parkinson's disease.DESIGN: Randomized controlled animal study.SETTING: Department of Neurology, the First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University.MATERIALS: Sixteen 8-10-week old, healthy, male, C57BL mice, weighing 20-25g, and of clean grade, were provided by the Experimental Animal Center of Chongqing Medical University. The experimental animals were disposed according to ethical criteria. MPTP was provided by Sigma Company, USA; Pdquest 2D image analysis software and gelatum/irradiance image analysis system (ChemiDoc XRS) by Bio-Rad, USA; and Voyager DE-PROMALDI-TOF-MS mass spectroscopy analyzer by ABI Company, USA.METHODS: This study was performed in Chongqing Neurological Laboratory between November 2006 and July 2007. Mice were randomly divided into model and control groups, with 8 mice in each group. Mice in the model group were Received a subcutaneous injection of MPTP (25mg/kg), twice a week, for five successive weeks, to establish a chronic Parkinson's disease model. Mice in the control group 收稿日期 the same volume of a subcutaneous saline injection at the same time points. Mice were sacrificed by anesthesia to rapidly obtain the midbrain for protein separation of the substantia nigra.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) 2-ED handbook (Bio-Rad Company) was referenced for two-dimensional electrophoresis. (2) PDQUEST8.0 analytical electrophoresis pattern was adopted to evaluate differential protein expression. (3) Peptide mass finger print map and data were retrieved on http

  17. Chronic copper exposure exacerbates both amyloid and tau pathology and selectively dysregulates cdk5 in a mouse model of AD

    OpenAIRE

    Kitazawa, Masashi; Cheng, David; Frank M LaFerla

    2009-01-01

    Excess copper exposure is thought to be linked to the development of Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathology. However, the mechanism by which copper affects the central nervous system remains unclear. To investigate the effect of chronic copper exposure on both beta-amyloid and tau pathologies, we treated young triple transgenic (3xTg-AD) mice with 250 ppm copper-containing water for the period of 3 or 9 months. Copper exposure resulted in altered APP processing; increased accumulation of the a...

  18. Renal PET-imaging with 11C-metformin in a transgenic mouse model for chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Lea; Jensen, Jonas Brorson; Wogensen, Lise; Munk, Ole Lajord; Jessen, Niels; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Jakobsen, Steen

    2016-01-01

    Background Organic cation transporters (OCTs) in the renal proximal tubule are important for the excretion of both exo- and endogenous compounds, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) alter the expression of OCT. Metformin is a well-known substrate for OCT, and recently, we demonstrated that positron emission tomography (PET) with 11C-labelled metformin (11C-metformin) is a promising approach to evaluate the function of OCT. The aim of this study is therefore to examine renal pharmacokinetics of 1...

  19. MRI characterization of structural mouse brain changes in response to chronic exposure to the glufosinate ammonium herbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meme, Sandra; Calas, André-Guilhem; Montécot, Céline; Richard, Oliver; Gautier, Hélène; Gefflaut, Thierry; Doan, Bich Thuy; Même, William; Pichon, Jacques; Beloeil, Jean-Claude

    2009-10-01

    Glufosinate ammonium (GLA) is the active component of herbicides widely used in agriculture, truck farming, or public domains. GLA acts by inhibiting the plant glutamine synthetase (GlnS). It also inhibits mammalian GlnS in vitro and ex vivo. In the central nervous system this enzyme is exclusively localized in glial cells. Whereas acute neurotoxic effects of GLA are well documented, long-term effects during chronic exposure at low doses remain largely undisclosed. In the present work, C57BL/6J mice were treated intraperitoneally with 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg of GLA three times a week during 10 weeks. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments were performed at high field (9.4 T) and the images were analyzed with four texture analysis (TA) methods. TA highlighted structural changes in seven brain structures after chronic GLA treatments. Changes are dose dependent and can be seen at a dose as low as 2.5 mg/kg for two areas, namely hippocampus and somatosensorial cortex. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in the same seven brain structures and GlnS activity in the hippocampus and cortex areas were also studied. The number of GFAP-positive cells is modified in six out of the seven areas examined. GlnS activity was significantly increased in the hippocampus but not in the cortex. These results indicate some kind of suffering at the cerebral level after chronic GLA treatment. Changes in TA were compared with the modification of the number of GFAP-positive astrocytes in the studied brain areas after GLA treatment. We show that the noninvasive MRI-TA is a sensitive method and we suggest that it would be a very helpful tool that can efficiently contribute to the detection of cerebral alterations in vivo during chronic exposure to xenobiotics.

  20. Action of SNAIL1 in Cardiac Myofibroblasts Is Important for Cardiac Fibrosis following Hypoxic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Hirak; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic injury to the heart results in cardiac fibrosis that leads to cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. SNAIL1 is a zinc finger transcription factor implicated in fibrosis following organ injury and cancer. To determine if the action of SNAIL1 contributed to cardiac fibrosis following hypoxic injury, we used an endogenous SNAIL1 bioluminescence reporter mice, and SNAIL1 knockout mouse models. Here we report that SNAIL1 expression is upregulated in the infarcted heart, especially in the myofibroblasts. Utilizing primary cardiac fibroblasts in ex vivo cultures we find that pro-fibrotic factors and collagen I increase SNAIL1 protein level. SNAIL1 is required in cardiac fibroblasts for the adoption of myofibroblast fate, collagen I expression and expression of fibrosis-related genes. Taken together this data suggests that SNAIL1 expression is induced in the cardiac fibroblasts after hypoxic injury and contributes to myofibroblast phenotype and a fibrotic scar formation. Resultant collagen deposition in the scar can maintain elevated SNAIL1 expression in the myofibroblasts and help propagate fibrosis. PMID:27706205

  1. Chronic mild stress and imipramine treatment elicit opposite changes in behavior and in gene expression in the mouse prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erburu, M; Cajaleon, L; Guruceaga, E; Venzala, E; Muñoz-Cobo, I; Beltrán, E; Puerta, E; Tordera, R M

    2015-08-01

    Many studies suggest that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is a target limbic region for stress response because a dysfunction here is linked to anhedonia, a decrease in reactivity to rewards, and to anxiety. It is suggested that stress-induced persistent molecular changes in this brain region could bring some light on the mechanisms perpetuating depressive episodes. In order to address this issue, here we have studied the long-term PFC gene expression pattern and behavioral effects induced by a chronic mild stress (CMS) model and antidepressant treatment in mice. CMS was applied to mice for six weeks and imipramine (10mg/kg, i.p.) or saline treatment was administered for five weeks starting from the third week of CMS. Mice were sacrificed one month after CMS and following two weeks after the discontinuation of drug treatment and the PFC was dissected and prepared for gene (mRNA) and protein expression studies. Using the same experimental design, a separate group of mice was tested for anhedonia, recognition memory, social interaction and anxiety. CMS induced a long-term altered gene expression profile in the PFC that was partially reverted by imipramine. Specifically, the circadian rhythm signaling pathway and functions such as gene expression, cell proliferation, survival and apoptosis as well as neurological and psychiatric disorders were affected. Of these, some changes of the circadian rhythm pathway (Hdac5, Per1, and Per2) were validated by RT-PCR and western-blot. Moreover, CMS induced long-lasting anhedonia that was reverted by imipramine treatment. Impaired memory, decreased social interaction and anxiety behavior were also induced by chronic stress. We have identified in the PFC molecular targets oppositely regulated by CMS and imipramine that could be relevant for chronic depression and antidepressant action. Among these, a possible candidate for further investigation could be the circadian rhythm pathway.

  2. Identification of a chronic non-neurodegenerative microglia activation state in a mouse model of peroxisomal β-oxidation deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheijden, Simon; Beckers, Lien; Casazza, Andrea; Butovsky, Oleg; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Baes, Myriam

    2015-09-01

    The functional diversity and molecular adaptations of reactive microglia in the chronically inflamed central nervous system (CNS) are poorly understood. We previously showed that mice lacking multifunctional protein 2 (MFP2), a pivotal enzyme in peroxisomal β-oxidation, persistently accumulate reactive myeloid cells in the gray matter of the CNS. Here, we show that the increased numbers of myeloid cells solely derive from the proliferation of resident microglia and not from infiltrating monocytes. We defined the signature of Mfp2(-/-) microglia by gene expression profiling after acute isolation, which was validated by quantitative polymerase reaction (qPCR), immunohistochemical, and flow cytometric analysis. The features of Mfp2(-/-) microglia were compared with those from SOD1(G93A) mice, an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis model. In contrast to the neurodegenerative milieu of SOD1(G93A) spinal cord, neurons were intact in Mfp2(-/-) brain and Mfp2(-/-) microglia lacked signs of phagocytic and neurotoxic activity. The chronically reactive state of Mfp2(-/-) microglia was accompanied by the downregulation of markers that specify the unique microglial signature in homeostatic conditions. In contrast, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and downstream glycolytic and protein translation pathways were induced, indicative of metabolic adaptations. Mfp2(-/-) microglia were immunologically activated but not polarized to a pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotype. A peripheral lipopolysaccharide challenge provoked an exaggerated inflammatory response in Mfp2(-/-) brain, consistent with a primed state. Taken together, we demonstrate that chronic activation of resident microglia does not necessarily lead to phagocytosis nor overt neurotoxicity.

  3. Acute and chronic plasma metabolomic and liver transcriptomic stress effects in a mouse model with features of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Aarti; D'Arpa, Peter; Donohue, Duncan E; Muhie, Seid; Chakraborty, Nabarun; Luke, Brian T; Grapov, Dmitry; Carroll, Erica E; Meyerhoff, James L; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti

    2015-01-01

    Acute responses to intense stressors can give rise to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD diagnostic criteria include trauma exposure history and self-reported symptoms. Individuals who meet PTSD diagnostic criteria often meet criteria for additional psychiatric diagnoses. Biomarkers promise to contribute to reliable phenotypes of PTSD and comorbidities by linking biological system alterations to behavioral symptoms. Here we have analyzed unbiased plasma metabolomics and other stress effects in a mouse model with behavioral features of PTSD. In this model, C57BL/6 mice are repeatedly exposed to a trained aggressor mouse (albino SJL) using a modified, resident-intruder, social defeat paradigm. Our recent studies using this model found that aggressor-exposed mice exhibited acute stress effects including changed behaviors, body weight gain, increased body temperature, as well as inflammatory and fibrotic histopathologies and transcriptomic changes of heart tissue. Some of these acute stress effects persisted, reminiscent of PTSD. Here we report elevated proteins in plasma that function in inflammation and responses to oxidative stress and damaged tissue at 24 hrs post-stressor. Additionally at this acute time point, transcriptomic analysis indicated liver inflammation. The unbiased metabolomics analysis showed altered metabolites in plasma at 24 hrs that only partially normalized toward control levels after stress-withdrawal for 1.5 or 4 wks. In particular, gut-derived metabolites were altered at 24 hrs post-stressor and remained altered up to 4 wks after stress-withdrawal. Also at the 4 wk time point, hyperlipidemia and suppressed metabolites of amino acids and carbohydrates in plasma coincided with transcriptomic indicators of altered liver metabolism (activated xenobiotic and lipid metabolism). Collectively, these system-wide sequelae to repeated intense stress suggest that the simultaneous perturbed functioning of multiple organ systems (e.g., brain, heart

  4. Impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis and its partial reversal by chronic treatment of fluoxetine in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godavarthi, Swetha K; Dey, Parthanarayan; Sharma, Ankit; Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2015-09-04

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe cognitive and motor deficits, caused by the loss of function of maternally inherited Ube3a. Ube3a-maternal deficient mice (AS model mice) recapitulate many essential features of AS, but how the deficiency of Ube3a lead to such behavioural abnormalities is poorly understood. Here we have demonstrated significant impairment of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice brain. Although, the number of BrdU and Ki67-positive cell in the hippocampal DG region was nearly equal at early postnatal days among wild type and AS mice, they were significantly reduced in adult AS mice compared to wild type controls. Reduced number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in this region of AS mice further indicated impaired neurogenesis. Unaltered BrdU and Ki67-positive cells number in the sub ventricular zone of adult AS mice brain along with the absence of imprinted expression of Ube3a in the neural progenitor cell suggesting that Ube3a may not be directly linked with altered neurogenesis. Finally, we show that the impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in these mice can be partially rescued by the chronic treatment of antidepressant fluoxetine. These results suggest that the chronic stress may lead to reduced hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice and that impaired neurogenesis could contribute to cognitive disturbances observed in these mice.

  5. Antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of zerumbone on a mouse model of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulazmi, Nurul Atiqah; Gopalsamy, Banulata; Farouk, Ahmad Akira Omar; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan; Bharatham, B Hemabarathy; Perimal, Enoch Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic condition that is difficult to be treated. Current therapies available are either ineffective or non-specific thus requiring newer treatment approaches. In this study, we investigated the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of zerumbone, a bioactive sesquiterpene from Zingiber zerumbet in chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain animal model. Our findings showed that single and repeated dose of intra-peritoneal administration of zerumbone (5, 10, 50, 100 mg/kg) significantly attenuated the CCI-induced neuropathic pain when evaluated using the electronic von Frey anesthesiometer, cold plate, Randall-Selitto analgesiometer and the Hargreaves plantar test. Zerumbone significantly alleviated tactile and cold allodynia as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Our findings are in comparison to the positive control drugs thatused gabapentin (20 mg/kgi.p.) and morphine (1 mg/kgi.p.). Together, these results showed that the systemic administration of zerumbone produced marked antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects in the CCI-induced neuropathic pain in mice and may serve as a potential lead compound for further analysis.

  6. Enhanced hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzi, M D; Alimento, M; Berti, M; Fiorentini, C; Galli, C; Tamborini, G

    1989-02-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction may be enhanced in systemic hypertension. The hypothesis took origin from the following two considerations: alveolar hypoxia constricts the pulmonary vessels by enhancing the Ca2+ penetration across sarcolemma of the smooth muscle cells and systemic high blood pressure is associated with an elevation of tone and reactivity of the lung vessels, which seems to depend on an excessive cytosol free Ca2+ concentration due to alterations in sodium handling and in the Na+-Ca2+ exchange system. These considerations suggest the possibility that the disorders in the biochemistry of smooth muscle contraction in hypertension facilitate the rise of cytosol Ca2+ concentration during alveolar hypoxia, thus resulting in a potentiation of the vasoconstrictor properties of this stimulus. In 43 hypertensive and 17 normotensive men, pulmonary arteriolar resistance has been evaluated during air respiration and after 15 minutes of breathing 17%, 15%, and 12% oxygen in nitrogen. Curves relating changes in pulmonary arteriolar resistance to oxygen breathing contents had similar configuration in the two populations but in hypertension were steeper and significantly shifted to the left, reflecting a lower threshold and an enhanced reactivity. This pattern was not related to differences in severity of the hypoxic stimulus, plasma catecholamine concentration, or hypocapnia and respiratory alkalosis induced by hypoxia and probably was not mediated through alpha-receptor activation. Calcium channel blockade with nifedipine was able to almost abolish both the normotensive and the hypertensive pulmonary vasoconstriction reaction. These findings support the hypothesis that hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction may be enhanced in systemic hypertension.

  7. Tracking Hypoxic Signaling in Encapsulated Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Suchit; McFarland, Rachel; Skiles, Mathew L.; Sullivan, Denise; Williams, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen is not only a nutrient but also an important signaling molecule whose concentration can influence the fate of stem cells. This study details the development of a marker of hypoxic signaling for use with encapsulated cells. Testing of the marker was performed with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in two-dimensional (2D) and 3D culture conditions in varied oxygen environments. The cells were genetically modified with our hypoxia marker, which produces a red fluorescent protein (DsRed-DR), under the control of a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) trimer. For 3D culture, ADSCs were encapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol)–based hydrogels. The hypoxia marker (termed HRE DsRed-DR) is built on a recombinant adenovirus and ADSCs infected with the marker will display red fluorescence when hypoxic signaling is active. This marker was not designed to measure local oxygen concentration but rather to show how a cell perceives its local oxygen concentration. ADSCs cultured in both 2D and 3D were exposed to 20% or 1% oxygen environments for 96 h. In 2D at 20% O2, the marker signal was not observed during the study period. In 1% O2, the fluorescent signal was first observed at 24 h, with maximum prevalence observed at 96 h as 59%±3% cells expressed the marker. In 3D, the signal was observed in both 1% and 20% O2. The onset of signal in 1% O2 was observed at 4 h, reaching maximum prevalence at 96 h with 76%±4% cells expressing the marker. Interestingly, hypoxic signal was also observed in 20% O2, with 13%±3% cells showing positive marker signal after 96 h. The transcription factor subunit hypoxia inducible factor-1α was tracked in these cells over the same time period by immunostaining and western blot analysis. Immunostaining results in 2D correlated well with our marker at 72 h and 96 h, but 3D results did not correlate well. The western blotting results in 2D and 3D correlated well with the fluorescent marker. The HRE DsRed-DR virus can be used to track

  8. Restoration of Haemoglobin Level Using Hydrodynamic Gene Therapy with Erythropoietin Does Not Alleviate the Disease Progression in an Anaemic Mouse Model for TGFβ1-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Pedersen

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin, Epo, is a 30.4 kDa glycoprotein hormone produced primarily by the fetal liver and the adult kidney. Epo exerts its haematopoietic effects by stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of erythrocytes with subsequent improved tissue oxygenation. Epo receptors are furthermore expressed in non-haematopoietic tissue and today, Epo is recognised as a cytokine with many pleiotropic effects. We hypothesize that hydrodynamic gene therapy with Epo can restore haemoglobin levels in anaemic transgenic mice and that this will attenuate the extracellular matrix accumulation in the kidneys. The experiment is conducted by hydrodynamic gene transfer of a plasmid encoding murine Epo in a transgenic mouse model that overexpresses TGF-β1 locally in the kidneys. This model develops anaemia due to chronic kidney disease characterised by thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, deposition of mesangial matrix and mild interstitial fibrosis. A group of age matched wildtype littermates are treated accordingly. After a single hydrodynamic administration of plasmid DNA containing murine EPO gene, sustained high haemoglobin levels are observed in both transgenic and wildtype mice from 7.5 ± 0.6 mmol/L to 9.4 ± 1.2 mmol/L and 10.7 ± 0.3 mmol/L to 15.5 ± 0.5 mmol/L, respectively. We did not observe any effects in the thickness of glomerular or tubular basement membrane, on the expression of different collagen types in the kidneys or in kidney function after prolonged treatment with Epo. Thus, Epo treatment in this model of chronic kidney disease normalises haemoglobin levels but has no effect on kidney fibrosis or function.

  9. Chronic exposure to aluminum and melatonin through the diet: neurobehavioral effects in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paolo, Celeste; Reverte, Ingrid; Colomina, Maria Teresa; Domingo, José L; Gómez, Mercedes

    2014-07-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a known neurotoxic element involved in the etiology of some serious neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease (AD). Antioxidants like melatonin might protect neurons against the damage produced in AD. The APPSWE (Tg2576) transgenic mouse is one of the most used animal models developed to mimic AD damage. In the present study, wild type and Tg2576 mice were orally exposed during 14 months to Al, melatonin, and citric acid, as well as to all possible combinations between them. At 17 months of age, mice were evaluated for behavior using the open-field test and the Morris water maze. Transgenic animals exposed to melatonin only and to Al plus citric acid plus melatonin showed a good acquisition. No effects on acquisition in the Morris water maze were observed in wild type mice. With respect to the retention of the task, only melatonin wild type animals, and Al plus citric acid plus melatonin transgenic mice showed retention during the acquisition. Control wild type animals and Al plus citric acid plus melatonin transgenic mice showed good long term retention. Melatonin improved learning and spatial memory in Al-exposed transgenic mice.

  10. Antidepressant-like effects of Sanyuansan in the mouse forced swim test, tail suspension test, and chronic mild stress model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shuo; You, Zi-Li; Zhao, Qiu-Ying; Peng, Cheng; He, Gang; Gou, Xiao-Jun; Lin, Bin

    2015-12-01

    Natural products have been widely reported as effective therapeutic alternatives for treatment of depression. Sanyuansan is a compound recipe composed of ginseng total saponins, fish oil, and valeriana. The aims of this study were to validate whether Sanyuansan has antidepressant-like effects through acute behavioral tests including the forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), locomotor activity test, and chronic mild stress (CMS) mice model of depression. C57BL/6 mice were given oral administration of 30 mg/kg imipramine, Sanyuansan, and saline, respectively. The acute behavioral tests including the TST, FST, and locomotor activity test were done after the administration of drugs for consecutively three times (24 hours, 1 hour, and 0.5 hour prior to the tests). Furthermore, the sucrose preference and the serum corticosterone level of mice in the CMS model were examined. Sanyuansan only at 900 mg/kg markedly reduced immobility time in the TST compared with the saline-treated group of mice. Sanyuansan at doses of 225 mg/kg, 450 mg/kg, and 900 mg/kg significantly reduced immobility time of mice in the FST. Sanyuansan reversed the CMS-induced anhedonia and hyperactivation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. In addition, our results showed that neither imipramine nor Sanyuansan at any dosage increased spontaneous motor activity. These results suggested that Sanyuansan induced significant antidepressant-like effects in mice in both acute and chronic animal models, which seemed unlikely to be attributed to an increase in locomotor activities of mice, and had no sedative-like effects.

  11. Chronic Exposure to Androgenic-Anabolic Steroids Exacerbates Axonal Injury and Microgliosis in the CHIMERA Mouse Model of Repetitive Concussion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay R Namjoshi

    Full Text Available Concussion is a serious health concern. Concussion in athletes is of particular interest with respect to the relationship of concussion exposure to risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE, a neurodegenerative condition associated with altered cognitive and psychiatric functions and profound tauopathy. However, much remains to be learned about factors other than cumulative exposure that could influence concussion pathogenesis. Approximately 20% of CTE cases report a history of substance use including androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS. How acute, chronic, or historical AAS use may affect the vulnerability of the brain to concussion is unknown. We therefore tested whether antecedent AAS exposure in young, male C57Bl/6 mice affects acute behavioral and neuropathological responses to mild traumatic brain injury (TBI induced with the CHIMERA (Closed Head Impact Model of Engineered Rotational Acceleration platform. Male C57Bl/6 mice received either vehicle or a cocktail of three AAS (testosterone, nandrolone and 17α-methyltestosterone from 8-16 weeks of age. At the end of the 7th week of treatment, mice underwent two closed-head TBI or sham procedures spaced 24 h apart using CHIMERA. Post-repetitive TBI (rTBI behavior was assessed for 7 d followed by tissue collection. AAS treatment induced the expected physiological changes including increased body weight, testicular atrophy, aggression and downregulation of brain 5-HT1B receptor expression. rTBI induced behavioral deficits, widespread axonal injury and white matter microgliosis. While AAS treatment did not worsen post-rTBI behavioral changes, AAS-treated mice exhibited significantly exacerbated axonal injury and microgliosis, indicating that AAS exposure can alter neuronal and innate immune responses to concussive TBI.

  12. Gene expression changes after hypoxic preconditioning in rat hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Chen; Jiang-Feng Qiu; Zhi-Qi Zhang; Hai-Feng Luo; Joan Rosello-Catafau; Zhi-Yong Wu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxic preconditioning can protect hepatocytes against hypoxic injury, but its mechanism has not been elucidated. The aim of this study was to proifle gene expression patterns involved in hypoxic preconditioning and probable mechanism at the level of gene expression. METHODS: Hepatocytes were divided into 2 groups:control group and hypoxic preconditioning group. Biotin-labeled cRNA from the control group and the hypoxic preconditioning group was hybridized by oligonucleotide microarray. Genes that were signiifcantly associated with hypoxic preconditioning were ifltered, and validated at the level of transcript expression. RESULTS: Forty-three genes with signiifcantly altered expression patterns were discovered and most of them had not been previously reported. Among these genes, genes encoding superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2)and interleukin 10 (IL-10) in the hypoxic preconditioning group were conifrmed to be up-regulated with real-time quantitative PCR. CONCLUSIONS:Many cytokines are involved in hypoxic preconditioning and protect hepatocytes from hypoxia-reoxygenation injury, and the increase of oxygen free-radical scavengers and anti-inlfammatory factors may play a key role in this phenomenon. Diverse signal pathways are probably involved.

  13. Lack of behavioral and cognitive effects of chronic ethosuximide and gabapentin treatment in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, V; García, S; Martínez, P; Corrales, A; Flórez, J; Rueda, N; Sharma, A; Martínez-Cué, C

    2012-09-18

    The Ts65Dn (TS) mouse model of Down syndrome (DS) displays a number of behavioral, neuromorphological and neurochemical phenotypes of the syndrome. Altered GABAergic transmission appears to contribute to the mechanisms responsible for the cognitive impairments in TS mice. Increased functional expression of the trisomic gene encoding an inwardly rectifying potassium channel, subfamily J, member 6 (KCNJ6) has been reported in DS and TS mice, along with the consequent impairment in GAB Aergic function. Partial display of DS phenotypes in mice harboring a single trisomy of Kcnj6 provides compelling evidence for a functional role of increased channel expression in some of the abnormal neurological phenotypes found in DS. Notably, the antiepileptic drug (AED) ethosuximide (ETH), but not other AEDs such as gabapentin (GAB), is known to inhibit KCNJ6 channels in mice. Here, we report the effect of chronic ETH and GAB on the behavioral and cognitive phenotypes of TS and disomic control (CO) mice. Neither drug significantly affected sensorimotor abilities, motor coordination or spontaneous activity in TS and CO mice. Also, ETH and GAB did not induce anxiety in the open field or plus maze tests, did not alter performance in the Morris water maze, and did not affect cued - or context - fear conditioning. Our results thus suggest that KCNJ6 may not be a promising drug target candidate in DS. As a corollary, they also show that long-term use of ETH and GAB is devoid of adverse behavioral and cognitive effects.

  14. Transplantation of Donor-Origin Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Thymic Epithelial Progenitors Prevents the Development of Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rong; Liu, Yalan; Su, Min; Song, Yinhong; Rood, Debra; Lai, Laijun

    2016-08-02

    : Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potentially curative therapy for many malignant and nonmalignant diseases. However, chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) remains a significant cause of late morbidity and mortality after allogeneic HSCT. cGVHD often manifests as autoimmune syndrome. Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) play a critical role in supporting negative selection and regulatory T-cell (Treg) generation. Studies have shown that damage in TECs is sufficient to induce cGVHD. We have previously reported that mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) can be selectively induced to generate thymic epithelial progenitors (TEPs) in vitro. When transplanted in vivo, mESC-TEPs further develop into TECs that support T-cell development. We show here that transplantation of donor-origin mESC-TEPs into cGVHD recipients induces immune tolerance to both donor and host antigens and prevents the development of cGVHD. This is associated with more TECs and Tregs. Our results suggest that embryonic stem cell-derived TEPs may offer a new tool to control cGVHD.

  15. Sub-Chronic Neuropathological and Biochemical Changes in Mouse Visual System after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radouil Tzekov

    Full Text Available Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (r-mTBI results in neuropathological and biochemical consequences in the human visual system. Using a recently developed mouse model of r-mTBI, with control mice receiving repetitive anesthesia alone (r-sham we assessed the effects on the retina and optic nerve using histology, immunohistochemistry, proteomic and lipidomic analyses at 3 weeks post injury. Retina tissue was used to determine retinal ganglion cell (RGC number, while optic nerve tissue was examined for cellularity, myelin content, protein and lipid changes. Increased cellularity and areas of demyelination were clearly detectable in optic nerves in r-mTBI, but not in r-sham. These changes were accompanied by a ~25% decrease in the total number of Brn3a-positive RGCs. Proteomic analysis of the optic nerves demonstrated various changes consistent with a negative effect of r-mTBI on major cellular processes like depolymerization of microtubules, disassembly of filaments and loss of neurons, manifested by decrease of several proteins, including neurofilaments (NEFH, NEFM, NEFL, tubulin (TUBB2A, TUBA4A, microtubule-associated proteins (MAP1A, MAP1B, collagen (COL6A1, COL6A3 and increased expression of other proteins, including heat shock proteins (HSP90B1, HSPB1, APOE and cathepsin D. Lipidomic analysis showed quantitative changes in a number of phospholipid species, including a significant increase in the total amount of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC, including the molecular species 16:0, a known demyelinating agent. The overall amount of some ether phospholipids, like ether LPC, ether phosphatidylcholine and ether lysophosphatidylethanolamine were also increased, while the majority of individual molecular species of ester phospholipids, like phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, were decreased. Results from the biochemical analysis correlate well with changes detected by histological and immunohistochemical methods and indicate the

  16. Sub-Chronic Neuropathological and Biochemical Changes in Mouse Visual System after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzekov, Radouil; Dawson, Clint; Orlando, Megan; Mouzon, Benoit; Reed, Jon; Evans, James; Crynen, Gogce; Mullan, Michael; Crawford, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (r-mTBI) results in neuropathological and biochemical consequences in the human visual system. Using a recently developed mouse model of r-mTBI, with control mice receiving repetitive anesthesia alone (r-sham) we assessed the effects on the retina and optic nerve using histology, immunohistochemistry, proteomic and lipidomic analyses at 3 weeks post injury. Retina tissue was used to determine retinal ganglion cell (RGC) number, while optic nerve tissue was examined for cellularity, myelin content, protein and lipid changes. Increased cellularity and areas of demyelination were clearly detectable in optic nerves in r-mTBI, but not in r-sham. These changes were accompanied by a ~25% decrease in the total number of Brn3a-positive RGCs. Proteomic analysis of the optic nerves demonstrated various changes consistent with a negative effect of r-mTBI on major cellular processes like depolymerization of microtubules, disassembly of filaments and loss of neurons, manifested by decrease of several proteins, including neurofilaments (NEFH, NEFM, NEFL), tubulin (TUBB2A, TUBA4A), microtubule-associated proteins (MAP1A, MAP1B), collagen (COL6A1, COL6A3) and increased expression of other proteins, including heat shock proteins (HSP90B1, HSPB1), APOE and cathepsin D. Lipidomic analysis showed quantitative changes in a number of phospholipid species, including a significant increase in the total amount of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), including the molecular species 16:0, a known demyelinating agent. The overall amount of some ether phospholipids, like ether LPC, ether phosphatidylcholine and ether lysophosphatidylethanolamine were also increased, while the majority of individual molecular species of ester phospholipids, like phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, were decreased. Results from the biochemical analysis correlate well with changes detected by histological and immunohistochemical methods and indicate the involvement of

  17. The grey mouse lemur uses season-dependent fat or protein sparing strategies to face chronic food restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Giroud

    Full Text Available During moderate calorie restriction (CR the heterotherm Microcebus murinus is able to maintain a stable energy balance whatever the season, even if only wintering animals enter into torpor. To understand its energy saving strategies to respond to food shortages, we assessed protein and energy metabolisms associated with wintering torpor expression or summering torpor avoidance. We investigated body composition, whole body protein turnover, and daily energy expenditure (DEE, during a graded (40 and 80% 35-day CR in short-days (winter; SD40 and SD80, respectively and long-days (summer; LD40 and LD80, respectively acclimated animals. LD40 animals showed no change in fat mass (FM but a 12% fat free mass (FFM reduction. Protein balance being positive after CR, the FFM loss was early and rapid. The 25% DEE reduction, in LD40 group was mainly explained by FFM changes. LD80 animals showed a steady body mass loss and were excluded from the CR trial at day 22, reaching a survival-threatened body mass. No data were available for this group. SD40 animals significantly decreased their FM level by 21%, but maintained FFM. Protein sparing was achieved through a 35 and 39% decrease in protein synthesis and catabolism (protein turnover, respectively, overall maintaining nitrogen balance. The 21% reduction in energy requirement was explained by the 30% nitrogen flux drop but also by torpor as DEE FFM-adjusted remained 13% lower compared to ad-libitum. SD80 animals were unable to maintain energy and nitrogen balances, losing both FM and FFM. Thus summering mouse lemurs equilibrate energy balance by a rapid loss of active metabolic mass without using torpor, whereas wintering animals spare protein and energy through increased torpor expression. Both strategies have direct fitness implication: 1 to maintain activities at a lower body size during the mating season and 2 to preserve an optimal wintering muscle mass and function.

  18. Biomarkers of Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy in Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha V. Douglas-Escobar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As neonatal intensive care has evolved, the focus has shifted from improving mortality alone to an effort to improve both mortality and morbidity. The most frequent source of neonatal brain injury occurs as a result of hypoxic-ischemic injury. Hypoxic-ischemic injury occurs in about 2 of 1,000 full-term infants and severe injured infants will have lifetime disabilities and neurodevelopmental delays. Most recently, remarkable efforts toward neuroprotection have been started with the advent of therapeutic hypothermia and a key step in the evolution of neonatal neuroprotection is the discovery of biomarkers that enable the clinician-scientist to screen infants for brain injury, monitor progression of disease, identify injured brain regions, and assess efficacy of neuroprotective clinical trials. Lastly, biomarkers offer great hope identifying when an injury occurred shedding light on the potential pathophysiology and the most effective therapy. In this article, we will review biomarkers of HIE including S100b, neuron specific enolase, umbilical cord IL-6, CK-BB, GFAP, myelin basic protein, UCHL-1, and pNF-H. We hope to contribute to the awareness, validation and clinical use of established as well as novel neonatal brain injury biomarkers.

  19. Early cerebral hemodynamic, metabolic and histological changes in hypoxic-ischemic fetal lambs during postnatal life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eRey-Santano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The hemodynamic, metabolic and biochemical changes produce during transition from fetal to neonatal life could be aggravated if asphyctic event occur during fetal life. The aim of the study was to examine the regional cerebral blood flow (RCBF, histological changes, and cerebral brain metabolism in preterm lambs, and to analyze the role of oxidative stress for the first hours of postnatal life following severe fetal asphyxia. 18 chronically instrumented fetal lambs were assigned to: hypoxic-ischemic group, following fetal asphyxia animals were delivered and maintained on intermittent-positive-pressure-ventilation for 3 hours, and non-injured animals that were managed similarly to the previous group and used as control group. During hypoxic-ischemic insult, injured group developed acidosis, hypoxia, hypercapnia, latacidaemia and tachycardia in comparison to control group, without hypotension. Intermittent-positive-pressure-ventilation transiently improved gas exchange and cardiovascular parameters. After HI injury and during ventilation-support, the increased RCBF in inner zones was maintained for hypoxic-ischemic group, but cortical flow did not exhibit differences compared to the control group. Also, the increase of TUNEL positive cells (apoptosis and antioxidant enzymes, and decrease of ATP reserves was significantly higher in the brain regions where the RCBF were not increased.In conclusion, early metabolic, histological and hemodynamic changes involved in brain damage have been intensively investigated and reported in premature asphyctic lambs for the first 3 hours of postnatal life. Those changes have been described in human neonates, so our model could be useful to test the security and the effectiveness of different neuroprotective or ventilatory strategies when are applied in the first hours after fetal hypoxic-ischemic injury.

  20. Neurophysiological Mechanisms of Fatigue Résistance during Repeated Sprints in Hot and Hypoxic Environments: Application to Team Sports

    OpenAIRE

    Brocherie, Franck

    2016-01-01

    In team sports, characterising fatigue is complex, with the underlying processes (e.g., metabolic energy supply, intramuscular accumulation of metabolic by-products, hyperthermia, dehydration) developing as match proceeds to ultimately manifest as a decline in physical performance. Using acute and chronic manipulations of environmental stress (i.e., heat or hypoxia) and unique tools (i.e., instrumented sprint treadmill, 45-m long hypoxic marquee), the main intention of this work was to better...

  1. Chronic hypoxia in pregnancy affects thymus development in Balb/c mouse offspring via IL2 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Xiuwen; Li, Lingjun; Sun, Miao; Gao, Qingqing; Zhang, Pengjie; Tang, Jiaqi; He, Yu; Zhu, Di; Xu, Zhice

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia during pregnancy can adversely affect development. This study, addressed the impact of prenatal hypoxia on thymus development in the rodent offspring. Pregnant Balb/c mice were exposed to hypoxia or normoxia during pregnancy, and the thymuses of their offspring were tested. Chronic hypoxia during pregnancy resulted in significantly decreased fetal body weight, with an increased thymus-to-body weight ratio. Histological analysis revealed a smaller cortical zone in the thymus of the offspring exposed to hypoxia. A reduction in the cortical T lymphocyte population corresponded to increased mRNA abundance of caspase 3 (Casp3) and decreased expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 (Mki67). Differences in T lymphocyte sub-populations in the thymus further indicate that thymus development in offspring was retarded or stagnated by prenatal hypoxia. The abundance of IL2 and its receptor was reduced in the thymus following prenatal hypoxia. This was accompanied by an increase in thymus HIF1A and IKKβ and a decrease in phosphorylated NFKB, MAP2K1, and MAPK1/3 compared to control pregnancies. Together, these results implicate deficiencies in IL2-mediated signaling as one source of prenatal-hypoxia-impaired thymus development.

  2. The antifibrotic drug pirfenidone promotes pulmonary cavitation and drug resistance in a mouse model of chronic tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahidjo, Bintou A.; Maiga, Mariama C.; Ihms, Elizabeth A.; Maiga, Mamoudou; Ordonez, Alvaro A.; Cheung, Laurene S.; Beck, Sarah; Andrade, Bruno B.; Jain, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Pirfenidone is a recently approved antifibrotic drug for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Because tuberculosis (TB) is characterized by granulomatous inflammation in conjunction with parenchymal destruction and replacement fibrosis, we sought to determine whether the addition of pirfenidone as an adjunctive, host-directed therapy provides a beneficial effect during antimicrobial treatment of TB. We hypothesized that pirfenidone’s antiinflammatory and antifibrotic properties would reduce inflammatory lung damage and increase antimicrobial drug penetration in granulomas to accelerate treatment response. The effectiveness of adjunctive pirfenidone during TB drug therapy was evaluated using a murine model of chronic TB. Mice treated with standard therapy 2HRZ/4HR (H, isoniazid; R, rifampin; and Z, pyrazinamide) were compared with 2 alternative regimens containing pirfenidone (Pf) (2HRZPf/4HRPf and 2HRZPf/4HR). Contrary to our hypothesis, adjunctive pirfenidone use leads to reduced bacterial clearance and increased relapse rates. This treatment failure is closely associated with the emergence of isoniazid monoresistant bacilli, increased cavitation, and significant lung pathology. While antifibrotic agents may eventually be used as part of adjunctive host-directed therapy of TB, this study clearly demonstrates that caution must be exercised. Moreover, as pirfenidone becomes more widely used in clinical practice, increased patient monitoring would be required in endemic TB settings. PMID:27699232

  3. Hypoxic regulation of lactate dehydrogenase A. Interaction between hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and cAMP response elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, J D; Ebert, B L; Ratcliffe, P J

    1995-09-08

    The oxygen-regulated control system responsible for the induction of erythropoietin (Epo) by hypoxia is present in most (if not all) cells and operates on other genes, including those involved in energy metabolism. To understand the organization of cis-acting sequences that are responsible for oxygen-regulated gene expression, we have studied the 5' flanking region of the mouse gene encoding the hypoxically inducible enzyme lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH). Deletional and mutational analysis of the function of mouse LDH-reporter fusion gene constructs in transient transfection assays defined three domains, between -41 and -84 base pairs upstream of the transcription initiation site, which were crucial for oxygen-regulated expression. The most important of these, although not capable of driving hypoxic induction in isolation, had the consensus of a hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) site, and cross-competed for the binding of HIF-1 with functionally active Epo and phosphoglycerate kinase-1 sequences. The second domain was positioned close to the HIF-1 site, in an analogous position to one of the critical regions in the Epo 3' hypoxic enhancer. The third domain had the motif of a cAMP response element (CRE). Activation of cAMP by forskolin had no effect on the level of LDH mRNA in normoxia, but produced a magnified response to hypoxia that was dependent upon the integrity of the CRE, indicating an interaction between inducible factors binding the HIF-1 and CRE sites.

  4. Utrophin A is essential in mediating the functional adaptations of mdx mouse muscle following chronic AMPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rewashdy, Hasanen; Ljubicic, Vladimir; Lin, Wei; Renaud, Jean-Marc; Jasmin, Bernard J

    2015-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by the absence of dystrophin along muscle fibers. An attractive therapeutic avenue for DMD consists in the upregulation of utrophin A, a protein with high sequence identity and functional redundancy with dystrophin. Recent work has shown that pharmacological interventions that induce a muscle fiber shift toward a slower, more oxidative phenotype with increased expression of utrophin A confer morphological and functional improvements in mdx mice. Whether such improvements result from the increased expression of utrophin A per se or are linked to other beneficial adaptations associated with the slow, oxidative phenotype remain to be established. To address this central issue, we capitalized on the use of double knockout (dKO) mice, which are mdx mice also deficient in utrophin. We first compared expression of signaling molecules and markers of the slow, oxidative phenotype in muscles of mdx versus dKO mice and found that both strains exhibit similar phenotypes. Chronic activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase with 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide riboside (AICAR) resulted in expression of a slower, more oxidative phenotype in both mdx and dKO mice. In mdx mice, this fiber type shift was accompanied by clear functional improvements that included reductions in central nucleation, IgM sarcoplasmic penetration and sarcolemmal damage resulting from eccentric contractions, as well as in increased grip strength. These important morphological and functional adaptations were not seen in AICAR-treated dKO mice. Our findings show the central role of utrophin A in mediating the functional benefits associated with expression of a slower, more oxidative phenotype in dystrophic animals.

  5. Endocrine and physiological changes in response to chronic corticosterone: a potential model of the metabolic syndrome in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatsoreos, Ilia N; Bhagat, Sarah M; Bowles, Nicole P; Weil, Zachary M; Pfaff, Donald W; McEwen, Bruce S

    2010-05-01

    Numerous clinical and experimental studies have linked stress to changes in risk factors associated with the development of physiological syndromes, including metabolic disorders. How different mediators of the stress response, such as corticosterone (CORT), influence these changes in risk remains unclear. Although CORT has beneficial short-term effects, long-term CORT exposure can result in damage to the physiological systems it protects acutely. Disruption of this important physiologic signal is observed in numerous disparate disorders, ranging from depression to Cushing's syndrome. Thus, understanding the effects of chronic high CORT on metabolism and physiology is of key importance. We explored the effects of 4-wk exposure to CORT dissolved in the drinking water on the physiology and behavior of male mice. We used this approach as a noninvasive way of altering plasma CORT levels while retaining some integrity in the diurnal rhythm present in normal animals. This approach has advantages over methods involving constant CORT pellets, CORT injections, or adrenalectomy. We found that high doses of CORT (100 microg/ml) result in rapid and dramatic increases in weight gain, increased adiposity, elevated plasma leptin, insulin and triglyceride levels, hyperphagia, and decreased home-cage locomotion. A lower dose of CORT (25 microg/ml) resulted in an intermediate phenotype in some of these measures but had no effect on others. We propose that the physiological changes observed in the high-CORT animals approximate changes observed in individuals suffering from the metabolic syndrome, and that they potentially serve as a model for hypercortisolemia and stress-related obesity.

  6. Lack of hepcidin ameliorates anemia and improves growth in an adenine-induced mouse model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akchurin, Oleh; Sureshbabu, Angara; Doty, Steve B; Zhu, Yuan-Shan; Patino, Edwin; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Choi, Mary E; Boskey, Adele; Rivella, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Growth delay is common in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD), often associated with poor quality of life. The role of anemia in uremic growth delay is poorly understood. Here we describe an induction of uremic growth retardation by a 0.2% adenine diet in wild-type (WT) and hepcidin gene (Hamp) knockout (KO) mice, compared with their respective littermates fed a regular diet. Experiments were started at weaning (3 wk). After 8 wk, blood was collected and mice were euthanized. Adenine-fed WT mice developed CKD (blood urea nitrogen 82.8 ± 11.6 mg/dl and creatinine 0.57 ± 0.07 mg/dl) and were 2.1 cm shorter compared with WT controls. WT adenine-fed mice were anemic and had low serum iron, elevated Hamp, and elevated IL6 and TNF-α. WT adenine-fed mice had advanced mineral bone disease (serum phosphorus 16.9 ± 3.1 mg/dl and FGF23 204.0 ± 115.0 ng/ml) with loss of cortical and trabecular bone volume seen on microcomputed tomography. Hamp disruption rescued the anemia phenotype resulting in improved growth rate in mice with CKD, thus providing direct experimental evidence of the relationship between Hamp pathway and growth impairment in CKD. Hamp disruption ameliorated CKD-induced growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor 1 axis derangements and growth plate alterations. Disruption of Hamp did not mitigate the development of uremia, inflammation, and mineral and bone disease in this model. Taken together, these results indicate that an adenine diet can be successfully used to study growth in mice with CKD. Hepcidin appears to be related to pathways of growth retardation in CKD suggesting that investigation of hepcidin-lowering therapies in juvenile CKD is warranted.

  7. Effects of Chronic Sleep Restriction during Early Adolescence on the Adult Pattern of Connectivity of Mouse Secondary Motor Cortex123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeh, Yazan N.; Bernard, Amy; de Vivo, Luisa; Honjoh, Sakiko; Mihalas, Stefan; Ng, Lydia; Koch, Christof

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cortical circuits mature in stages, from early synaptogenesis and synaptic pruning to late synaptic refinement, resulting in the adult anatomical connection matrix. Because the mature matrix is largely fixed, genetic or environmental factors interfering with its establishment can have irreversible effects. Sleep disruption is rarely considered among those factors, and previous studies have focused on very young animals and the acute effects of sleep deprivation on neuronal morphology and cortical plasticity. Adolescence is a sensitive time for brain remodeling, yet whether chronic sleep restriction (CSR) during adolescence has long-term effects on brain connectivity remains unclear. We used viral-mediated axonal labeling and serial two-photon tomography to measure brain-wide projections from secondary motor cortex (MOs), a high-order area with diffuse projections. For each MOs target, we calculated the projection fraction, a combined measure of passing fibers and axonal terminals normalized for the size of each target. We found no homogeneous differences in MOs projection fraction between mice subjected to 5 days of CSR during early adolescence (P25–P30, ≥50% decrease in daily sleep, n=14) and siblings that slept undisturbed (n=14). Machine learning algorithms, however, classified animals at significantly above chance levels, indicating that differences between the two groups exist, but are subtle and heterogeneous. Thus, sleep disruption in early adolescence may affect adult brain connectivity. However, because our method relies on a global measure of projection density and was not previously used to measure connectivity changes due to behavioral manipulations, definitive conclusions on the long-term structural effects of early CSR require additional experiments. PMID:27351022

  8. A Molecular and Whole Body Insight of the Mechanisms Surrounding Glucose Disposal and Insulin Resistance with Hypoxic Treatment in Skeletal Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Although the mechanisms are largely unidentified, the chronic or intermittent hypoxic patterns occurring with respiratory diseases, such as chronic pulmonary disease or obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obesity, are commonly associated with glucose intolerance. Indeed, hypoxia has been widely implicated in the development of insulin resistance either via the direct action on insulin receptor substrate (IRS) and protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) or indirectly through adipose tissue expansion and syst...

  9. Targeting hypoxic response for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolicchi, Elisa; Gemignani, Federica; Krstic-Demonacos, Marija; Dedhar, Shoukat; Mutti, Luciano; Landi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic tumor microenvironment (HTM) is considered to promote metabolic changes, oncogene activation and epithelial mesenchymal transition, and resistance to chemo- and radio-therapy, all of which are hallmarks of aggressive tumor behavior. Cancer cells within the HTM acquire phenotypic properties that allow them to overcome the lack of energy and nutrients supply within this niche. These phenotypic properties include activation of genes regulating glycolysis, glucose transport, acidosis regulators, angiogenesis, all of which are orchestrated through the activation of the transcription factor, HIF1A, which is an independent marker of poor prognosis. Moreover, during the adaptation to a HTM cancer cells undergo deep changes in mitochondrial functions such as “Warburg effect” and the “reverse Warburg effect”. This review aims to provide an overview of the characteristics of the HTM, with particular focus on novel therapeutic strategies currently in clinical trials, targeting the adaptive response to hypoxia of cancer cells. PMID:26859576

  10. The hypoxic tumour microenvironment and metastatic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subarsky, Patrick; Hill, Richard P

    2003-01-01

    The microenvironment of solid tumours contains regions of poor oxygenation and high acidity. Growing evidence from clinical and experimental studies points to a fundamental role for hypoxia in metastatic progression. Prolonged hypoxia increases genomic instability, genomic heterogeneity, and may act as a selective pressure for tumour cell variants. Hypoxia can also act in an epigenetic fashion, altering the expression of genes. Hypoxia-induced changes in gene expression alter non-specific stress responses, anaerobic metabolism, angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and cell-cell contacts. Experimental studies have demonstrated that inhibition of proteins involved in these processes can modify metastasis formation, suggesting a causal role in metastatic progression. Recent advances in high-throughput screening techniques have allowed identification of many hypoxia-induced genes that are involved in the processes associated with metastasis. Here we review the epigenetic control of gene expression by the hypoxic microenvironment and its potential contribution to metastatic progression.

  11. Heart rate response to hypoxic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, C; Møller, P; Kanstrup, I L

    2001-01-01

    two consecutive maximal exercise tests, without and with oxygen supplementation respectively, at sea level and after 1, 3 and 5 days at altitude. On each study day, domperidone (30 mg; n=6) or no medication (n=6) was given 1 h before the first exercise session. Compared with sea level, hypoxia...... progressively decreased the maximal heart rate from day 1 and onwards; also, hypoxia by itself increased plasma noradrenaline levels after maximal exercise. Domperidone further increased maximal noradrenaline concentrations, but had no effect on maximal heart rate. On each study day at altitude, oxygen...... breathing completely reversed the decrease in maximal heart rate to values not different from those at sea level. In conclusion, dopamine D(2)-receptor blockade with domperidone demonstrates that hypoxic exercise in humans activates D(2)-receptors, resulting in a decrease in circulating levels...

  12. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction: physiology and anesthetic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, Andrew B; Slinger, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) represents a fundamental difference between the pulmonary and systemic circulations. HPV is active in utero, reducing pulmonary blood flow, and in adults helps to match regional ventilation and perfusion although it has little effect in healthy lungs. Many factors affect HPV including pH or PCO2, cardiac output, and several drugs, including antihypertensives. In patients with lung pathology and any patient having one-lung ventilation, HPV contributes to maintaining oxygenation, so anesthesiologists should be aware of the effects of anesthesia on this protective reflex. Intravenous anesthetic drugs have little effect on HPV, but it is attenuated by inhaled anesthetics, although less so with newer agents. The reflex is biphasic, and once the second phase becomes active after about an hour of hypoxia, this pulmonary vasoconstriction takes hours to reverse when normoxia returns. This has significant clinical implications for repeated periods of one-lung ventilation.

  13. Placenta growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor B expression in the hypoxic lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLoughlin Paul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic alveolar hypoxia, due to residence at high altitude or chronic obstructive lung diseases, leads to pulmonary hypertension, which may be further complicated by right heart failure, increasing morbidity and mortality. In the non-diseased lung, angiogenesis occurs in chronic hypoxia and may act in a protective, adaptive manner. To date, little is known about the behaviour of individual vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF family ligands in hypoxia-induced pulmonary angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of placenta growth factor (PlGF and VEGFB during the development of hypoxic pulmonary angiogenesis and their functional effects on the pulmonary endothelium. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to conditions of normoxia (21% O2 or hypoxia (10% O2 for 1-21 days. Stereological analysis of vascular structure, real-time PCR analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA, VEGFB, placenta growth factor (PlGF, VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, immunohistochemistry and western blots were completed. The effects of VEGF ligands on human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells were determined using a wound-healing assay. Results Typical vascular remodelling and angiogenesis were observed in the hypoxic lung. PlGF and VEGFB mRNA expression were significantly increased in the hypoxic lung. Immunohistochemical analysis showed reduced expression of VEGFB protein in hypoxia although PlGF protein was unchanged. The expression of VEGFA mRNA and protein was unchanged. In vitro PlGF at high concentration mimicked the wound-healing actions of VEGFA on pulmonary microvascular endothelial monolayers. Low concentrations of PlGF potentiated the wound-healing actions of VEGFA while higher concentrations of PlGF were without this effect. VEGFB inhibited the wound-healing actions of VEGFA while VEGFB and PlGF together were mutually antagonistic. Conclusions VEGFB and PlGF can either inhibit or

  14. Placenta growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor B expression in the hypoxic lung

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sands, Michelle

    2011-01-25

    Abstract Background Chronic alveolar hypoxia, due to residence at high altitude or chronic obstructive lung diseases, leads to pulmonary hypertension, which may be further complicated by right heart failure, increasing morbidity and mortality. In the non-diseased lung, angiogenesis occurs in chronic hypoxia and may act in a protective, adaptive manner. To date, little is known about the behaviour of individual vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family ligands in hypoxia-induced pulmonary angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of placenta growth factor (PlGF) and VEGFB during the development of hypoxic pulmonary angiogenesis and their functional effects on the pulmonary endothelium. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to conditions of normoxia (21% O2) or hypoxia (10% O2) for 1-21 days. Stereological analysis of vascular structure, real-time PCR analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), VEGFB, placenta growth factor (PlGF), VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1) and VEGFR2, immunohistochemistry and western blots were completed. The effects of VEGF ligands on human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells were determined using a wound-healing assay. Results Typical vascular remodelling and angiogenesis were observed in the hypoxic lung. PlGF and VEGFB mRNA expression were significantly increased in the hypoxic lung. Immunohistochemical analysis showed reduced expression of VEGFB protein in hypoxia although PlGF protein was unchanged. The expression of VEGFA mRNA and protein was unchanged. In vitro PlGF at high concentration mimicked the wound-healing actions of VEGFA on pulmonary microvascular endothelial monolayers. Low concentrations of PlGF potentiated the wound-healing actions of VEGFA while higher concentrations of PlGF were without this effect. VEGFB inhibited the wound-healing actions of VEGFA while VEGFB and PlGF together were mutually antagonistic. Conclusions VEGFB and PlGF can either inhibit or potentiate the

  15. LET-painting increases tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassler, Niels; Toftegaard, Jakob; Lühr, Armin; Sørensen, Brita Singers; Scifoni, Emanuele; Krämer, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver; Mortensen, Lise Saksø; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B

    2014-01-01

    LET-painting was suggested as a method to overcome tumour hypoxia. In vitro experiments have demonstrated a well-established relationship between the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and linear energy transfer (LET), where OER approaches unity for high-LET values. However, high-LET radiation also increases the risk for side effects in normal tissue. LET-painting attempts to restrict high-LET radiation to compartments that are found to be hypoxic, while applying lower LET radiation to normoxic tissues. Methods. Carbon-12 and oxygen-16 ion treatment plans with four fields and with homogeneous dose in the target volume, are applied on an oropharyngeal cancer case with an identified hypoxic entity within the tumour. The target dose is optimised to achieve a tumour control probability (TCP) of 95% when assuming a fully normoxic tissue. Using the same primary particle energy fluence needed for this plan, TCP is recalculated for three cases assuming hypoxia: first, redistributing LET to match the hypoxic structure (LET-painting). Second, plans are recalculated for varying hypoxic tumour volume in order to investigate the threshold volume where TCP can be established. Finally, a slight dose boost (5-20%) is additionally allowed in the hypoxic subvolume to assess its impact on TCP. Results. LET-painting with carbon-12 ions can only achieve tumour control for hypoxic subvolumes smaller than 0.5 cm(3). Using oxygen-16 ions, tumour control can be achieved for tumours with hypoxic subvolumes of up to 1 or 2 cm(3). Tumour control can be achieved for tumours with even larger hypoxic subvolumes, if a slight dose boost is allowed in combination with LET-painting. Conclusion. Our findings clearly indicate that a substantial increase in tumour control can be achieved when applying the LET-painting concept using oxygen-16 ions on hypoxic tumours, ideally with a slight dose boost.

  16. Field study of cyclic hypoxic effects on gene expression in grass shrimp hepatopancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiandao; Brouwer, Marius

    2013-12-01

    Grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, are widely used for ecological and toxicological research. They commonly experience cyclic hypoxia in their natural habitats. The response of grass shrimp to laboratory-controlled cyclic hypoxia has been studied in detail, but little is known about how field acclimatized grass shrimp regulate the gene expression and response to cyclic hypoxia. In this study we examined morphometric parameters, relative fecundity and gene expression of grass shrimp collected from two areas in Weeks Bay (Mobile, Alabama). One is a traditionally normoxic location (WBM), and the other is a traditionally cyclic hypoxic location (WC). In the week preceding grass shrimp collection dissolved oxygen (DO) at the field sites was measured continuously. DO was shrimp were significantly greater than weight and length of WC shrimp. WBM shrimp had more eggs than WC shrimp, but the difference was not significant. Shrimp from WC had a significant higher number of parasites than those from WBM. A cDNA microarray was utilized to investigate the changes in gene expression in grass shrimp hepatopancreas. Five genes, previously identified as hypoxia/cyclic hypoxia-responsive genes in laboratory exposure studies, were significantly up-regulated in WC shrimp relative to WBM. A total of 5 genes were significantly down-regulated in the field study. Only one of those genes, vitellogenin, has been previously found in chronic and cyclic hypoxic studies. Up and down-regulation of 7 selected genes was confirmed by qPCR. The overall pattern of gene expression in wild shrimp from cyclic DO sites in Weeks Bay showed only weak correlations with gene expression in shrimp from chronic and cyclic hypoxic laboratory studies. It appears therefore that transcriptome profiles of laboratory acclimated animals are of limited utility for understanding responses in field acclimatized animals that are exposed to a broader array of environmental variables.

  17. Role of tachykinin 1 and 4 gene-derived neuropeptides and the neurokinin 1 receptor in adjuvant-induced chronic arthritis of the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Borbély

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Substance P, encoded by the Tac1 gene, is involved in neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia via neurokinin 1 (NK1 receptor activation. Its non-neuronal counterpart, hemokinin-1, which is derived from the Tac4 gene, is also a potent NK1 agonist. Although hemokinin-1 has been described as a tachykinin of distinct origin and function compared to SP, its role in inflammatory and pain processes has not yet been elucidated in such detail. In this study, we analysed the involvement of tachykinins derived from the Tac1 and Tac4 genes, as well as the NK1 receptor in chronic arthritis of the mouse. METHODS: Complete Freund's Adjuvant was injected intraplantarly and into the tail of Tac1(-/-, Tac4(-/-, Tacr1(-/- (NK1 receptor deficient and Tac1(-/-/Tac4(-/- mice. Paw volume was measured by plethysmometry and mechanosensitivity using dynamic plantar aesthesiometry over a time period of 21 days. Semiquantitative histopathological scoring and ELISA measurement of IL-1β concentrations of the tibiotarsal joints were performed. RESULTS: Mechanical hyperalgesia was significantly reduced from day 11 in Tac4(-/- and Tacr1(-/- animals, while paw swelling was not altered in any strain. Inflammatory histopathological alterations (synovial swelling, leukocyte infiltration, cartilage destruction, bone damage and IL-1β concentration in the joint homogenates were significantly smaller in Tac4(-/- and Tac1(-/-/Tac4(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS: Hemokinin-1, but not substance P increases inflammation and hyperalgesia in the late phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis. While NK1 receptors mediate its antihyperalgesic actions, the involvement of another receptor in histopathological changes and IL-1β production is suggested.

  18. Chronic active hepatitis induced by Helicobacter hepaticus in the A/JCr mouse is associated with a Th1 cell-mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whary, M T; Morgan, T J; Dangler, C A; Gaudes, K J; Taylor, N S; Fox, J G

    1998-07-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus infection in A/JCr mice results in chronic active hepatitis characterized by perivascular, periportal, and parenchymal infiltrates of mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells. This study examined the development of hepatitis and the immune response of A/JCr mice to H. hepaticus infection. The humoral and cell-mediated T helper immune response was profiled by measuring the postinfection (p.i.) antibody response in serum, feces, and bile and by the production of cytokines and proliferative responses by splenic mononuclear cells to H. hepaticus antigens. Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) and systemic IgG2a antibody developed by 4 weeks p.i. and persisted through 12 months. Splenocytes from infected mice proliferated and produced more gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) than interleukin-4 (IL-4) or IL-5 when cultured with H. hepaticus outer membrane proteins. The predominantly IgG2a antibody response in serum and the in vitro production of IFN-gamma in excess of IL-4 or IL-5 are consistent with a Th1 immune response reported in humans and mice infected with Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter felis, respectively. Mice infected with H. hepaticus developed progressively severe perivascular, periportal, and hepatic parenchymal lesions consisting of lymphohistiocytic and plasmacytic cellular infiltrates. In addition, transmural typhlitis was observed at 12 months p.i. The characterization of a cell-mediated Th1 immune response to H. hepaticus infection in the A/JCr mouse should prove valuable as a model for experimental regimens which manipulate the host response to Helicobacter.

  19. PI3K/Akt contributes to increased expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in macrophages exposed to hypoxic stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Young; Jeong, Eunshil; Joung, Sun Myung [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joo Young, E-mail: joolee@catholic.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon 420-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxic stress-induced TLR4 expression is mediated by PI3K/Akt in macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PI3K/Akt regulated HIF-1 activation leading to TLR4 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was not involved in TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulforaphane suppressed hypoxia-mediated TLR4 expression by inhibiting PI3K/Akt. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play critical roles in triggering immune and inflammatory responses by detecting invading microbial pathogens and endogenous danger signals. Increased expression of TLR4 is implicated in aggravated inflammatory symptoms in ischemic tissue injury and chronic diseases. Results from our previous study showed that TLR4 expression was upregulated by hypoxic stress mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) at a transcriptional level in macrophages. In this study, we further investigated the upstream signaling pathway that contributed to the increase of TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress. Either treatment with pharmacological inhibitors of PI3K and Akt or knockdown of Akt expression by siRNA blocked the increase of TLR4 mRNA and protein levels in macrophages exposed to hypoxia and CoCl{sub 2}. Phosphorylation of Akt by hypoxic stress preceded nuclear accumulation of HIF-1{alpha}. A PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) attenuated CoCl{sub 2}-induced nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activation of HIF-1{alpha}. In addition, HIF-1{alpha}-mediated upregulation of TLR4 expression was blocked by LY294002. Furthermore, sulforaphane suppressed hypoxia- and CoCl{sub 2}-induced upregulation of TLR4 mRNA and protein by inhibiting PI3K/Akt activation and the subsequent nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activation of HIF-1{alpha}. However, p38 was not involved in HIF-1{alpha} activation and TLR4 expression induced by hypoxic stress in macrophages. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PI3K

  20. Small Molecule Inhibition of microRNA-210 Reprograms an Oncogenic Hypoxic Circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costales, Matthew G; Haga, Christopher L; Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Phinney, Donald G; Disney, Matthew D

    2017-03-08

    A hypoxic state is critical to the metastatic and invasive characteristics of cancer. Numerous pathways play critical roles in cancer maintenance, many of which include noncoding RNAs such as microRNA (miR)-210 that regulates hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). Herein, we describe the identification of a small molecule named Targapremir-210 that binds to the Dicer site of the miR-210 hairpin precursor. This interaction inhibits production of the mature miRNA, derepresses glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1-like enzyme (GPD1L), a hypoxia-associated protein negatively regulated by miR-210, decreases HIF-1α, and triggers apoptosis of triple negative breast cancer cells only under hypoxic conditions. Further, Targapremir-210 inhibits tumorigenesis in a mouse xenograft model of hypoxic triple negative breast cancer. Many factors govern molecular recognition of biological targets by small molecules. For protein, chemoproteomics and activity-based protein profiling are invaluable tools to study small molecule target engagement and selectivity in cells. Such approaches are lacking for RNA, leaving a void in the understanding of its druggability. We applied Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull Down (Chem-CLIP) to study the cellular selectivity and the on- and off-targets of Targapremir-210. Targapremir-210 selectively recognizes the miR-210 precursor and can differentially recognize RNAs in cells that have the same target motif but have different expression levels, revealing this important feature for selectively drugging RNAs for the first time. These studies show that small molecules can be rapidly designed to selectively target RNAs and affect cellular responses to environmental conditions, resulting in favorable benefits against cancer. Further, they help define rules for identifying druggable targets in the transcriptome.

  1. Neuroprotective effects of volume-regulated anion channel blocker DCPIB on neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ammar ALIBRAHIM; Li-yan ZHAO; Christine You-jin BAE; Andrew BARSZCZYK; Christopher LF SUN; Guan-lei WANG; Hong-shuo SUN

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the role of swelling-induced activation of volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs) in a neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury model using the selective VRAC blocker 4-(2-butyl-6,7-dichloro-2-cyclopentyl-indan-1-on5-yl) oxobutyric acid (DCPIB).Methods:Cerebral hypoxic-ischemic injury was induced in 7-day-old mouse pups with Rice-Vannucci method.Prior to the onset of ischemia,the animals were ip administered DCPIB (10 mg/kg).The animals were sacrificed 24 h afterwards,coronal sections of the brains were cut and the areas of infarct were examined using TTC staining and an image-analysis system.Cultured PC12 cells were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 4 h.The cellular viability was assessed using Cell Counting Kit 8.Intracellular chloride concentration [Clˉ]i was measured using 6-methoxy-N-ethylquinolinium iodide.Results:DCPIB-treated mice showed a significant reduction in hemispheric corrected infarct volume (26.65%+2.23%) compared to that in vehicle-treated mice (45.52%+1.45%,P<O.O01).DCPIB-treated mice also showed better functional recovery as they were more active than vehicle-treated mice at 4 and 24 h post injury.In cultured PC12 cells,DCPIB (10 μmol/L) significantly reduced OGD-induced cell death.Moreover,DCPIB (20 μmol/L) blocked hypotonic-induced decrease in [Clˉ]i in PC12 cells of both control and OGD groups.Conclusion:The results further support the pathophysiological role of VRACs in ischemic brain injury,and suggest DCPIB as a potential,easily administrable agent targeting VRACs in the context of perinatal and neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

  2. Body Function of Rowers before and after Hypoxic Pre-conditioning and Chronic Sub-Altitude Training%低氧预适应结合长时间亚高原训练前后男子赛艇运动员身体机能分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王刚; 高炳宏; 高欢

    2013-01-01

    目的:分析低氧预适应结合亚高原训练前后男子赛艇运动员身体机能状态的变化.方法:16名优秀男子赛艇运动员为对象,先进行10天HiLo低氧训练,模拟海拔高度为1200~1500 m.再于海拔1500 m进行8周亚高原训练.分别于低氧训练前和亚高原训练前、中、后不同时段测定分析运动员身体机能状态,测试指标包括:氧转运系统指标(Hb、RBC)、内分泌系统指标(T、C、T/C、EPO)、免疫系统指标(WBC、IgA、IgM、IgG)以及CK和BU.结果:与低氧训练前相比,1)EPO在低氧训练后和高原训练第3天出现两个峰值,升高幅度分别为26.27%和26.60%(P<0.01).Hb在低氧后显著下降(P<0.01),高原训练第3天,第1、3、7周,下高原后第2、3周显著升高(P<0.05或P<0.01);2)白细胞在实验期间升高(P<0.01),IgA和IgG无显著变化(P>0.05),IgM在低氧训练后、高原训练第3周、下高原后第2周(P<0.01,P<0.05,P<0.05)显著升高;3)低氧训练后血清睾酮下降(P>0.05),高原训练第3天显著升高(P<0.05),血清皮质醇在高原训练第3周(P<0.01)、第5周(P<0.05)显著下降,T/C在高原训练第3天和第3、5周显著升高(P<0.05).结论:低氧预适应干预加快了运动员高原适应;10天低氧预适应结合8周亚高原训练对运动员机能状态产生良好影响,运动员未出现过度疲劳,血液载氧能力提高,免疫能力未见大幅下降.%Purpose To explore the effect of the hypoxic pre-conditioning before sub-altitude training on the body function of rowers.Methods 16 male rowers were selected to complete 10-day training at simulated altitude of 1200 m to 1500 m,followed by 8-week sub-altitude training at the altitude of 1500 m.The levels of EPO,HB,WBC,IgA,IgG and IgM,and serum testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) were tested before hypoxic pre-conditioning and at the different periods of sub-altitude training.Results As compared with before hypoxia,(1)The peak EPO values appeared

  3. A case of hypoxic encephalopathy with delayed exacerbation

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Takeshi Hayashi, Kimihiko HattoriDepartment of Neurology, Fuji Heavy Industries Health Insurance Corporation, Ota General Hospital, Ota, Gunma, JapanAbstract: Most patients contract hypoxic encephalopathy after suffering a cardiac arrest. They usually endure severe neurological sequelae and the temporal profile of the disease progression remains unclear. This case study shows how the effects of hypoxic encephalopathy continue to progress for several years after the initial event. Up to eight ...

  4. Hypoxic enhancement of exosome release by breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Hamish W

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exosomes are nanovesicles secreted by tumour cells which have roles in paracrine signalling during tumour progression, including tumour-stromal interactions, activation of proliferative pathways and bestowing immunosuppression. Hypoxia is an important feature of solid tumours which promotes tumour progression, angiogenesis and metastasis, potentially through exosome-mediated signalling. Methods Breast cancer cell lines were cultured under either moderate (1% O2 or severe (0.1% O2 hypoxia. Exosomes were isolated from conditioned media and quantitated by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA and immunoblotting for the exosomal protein CD63 in order to assess the impact of hypoxia on exosome release. Hypoxic exosome fractions were assayed for miR-210 by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and normalised to exogenous and endogenous control genes. Statistical significance was determined using the Student T test with a P value of  Results Exposure of three different breast cancer cell lines to moderate (1% O2 and severe (0.1% O2 hypoxia resulted in significant increases in the number of exosomes present in the conditioned media as determined by NTA and CD63 immunoblotting. Activation of hypoxic signalling by dimethyloxalylglycine, a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF hydroxylase inhibitor, resulted in significant increase in exosome release. Transfection of cells with HIF-1α siRNA prior to hypoxic exposure prevented the enhancement of exosome release by hypoxia. The hypoxically regulated miR-210 was identified to be present at elevated levels in hypoxic exosome fractions. Conclusions These data provide evidence that hypoxia promotes the release of exosomes by breast cancer cells, and that this hypoxic response may be mediated by HIF-1α. Given an emerging role for tumour cell-derived exosomes in tumour progression, this has significant implications for understanding the hypoxic tumour phenotype, whereby hypoxic

  5. Eeffects of Coptis Chinensis on vasoconstrictive activity of isolated thoracic aorta of normoxic and chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxic rats%黄连对正常氧和慢性间歇性低压低氧大鼠离体胸主动脉收缩活动的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 宋士军; 刘威兰; 李连连; 赵卫丽; 张翼

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of Coptis Chinensis on vasoconstrictive activity of isolated thoracic aorta rings of normoxic and chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxic(CIHH) rats, and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Young male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into normoxic group and QHH group: the former were not given any special treatment; the latter were exposed to hypoxia in a hypobaric chamber simulating 5000 m altitude (PB = 404 mmHg, PO2= 84 mmHg, 11.1% O2), 6 hours daily for 28 days. The isolated thoracic aorta rings of rats were prepared and perfused in thermostat, and the effects of Coptis on vasoconstrictive activity of aorta rings were recorded, the mechanisms were investigated simultaneouly. Results: Coptis Chinensis significantly decreased NE and KCl-induced vaso-constriction of normoxic and QHH rats' isolated aortic rings, but the inhibitive effects had no obvious discrepancy between the two groups. The contractive amplitude had no marked change after the removal of endothelium. When calculated by Logit Loglinear analysis, IC50 of NE and KCl-induced contractive amplitude in normoxic group were respectively 2.99 g/L and 6.14 g/L, while they were 3.45 g/L and 5.81 g/L in CIHH group. The inhibitive effect of Coptis on vasoconstrictive activity of both groups could be partly decreased by Glibenclamide and nitro-L-arginine methyl ester; Indomethacin suppressed the effect on normoxic group as well. Also Coptis significantly inhibited NE-induced both intra-cellular and extracellular calciumion-depended vasoconstriction. Conclusion: Coptis Chinensis obviously relaxes isolated thoracic aorta rings of normoxic and CIHH rats, but the effects are endothelium-independent and have no marked discrepancy between the two groups. The mechanisms of the effects may be related to the opening of ATP-sensitive K+ channel, raise of nitric oxide concentration in both groups, and the increasing of PGI2 in normoxic group. Besides, Coptis may

  6. Thalamic mediation of hypoxic respiratory depression in lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koos, Brian J; Rajaee, Arezoo; Ibe, Basil; Guerra, Catalina; Kruger, Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    Immaturity of respiratory controllers in preterm infants dispose to recurrent apnea and oxygen deprivation. Accompanying reductions in brain oxygen tensions evoke respiratory depression, potentially exacerbating hypoxemia. Central respiratory depression during moderate hypoxia is revealed in the ventilatory decline following initial augmentation. This study determined whether the thalamic parafascicular nuclear (Pf) complex involved in adult nociception and sensorimotor regulation (Bentivoglio M, Balerecia G, Kruger L. Prog Brain Res 87: 53-80, 1991) also becomes a postnatal controller of hypoxic ventilatory decline. Respiratory responses to moderate isocapnic hypoxia were studied in conscious lambs. Hypoxic ventilatory decline was compared with peak augmentation. Pf and/or adjacent thalamic structures were destroyed by the neuron-specific toxin ibotenic acid (IB). IB lesions involving the thalamic Pf abolished hypoxic ventilatory decline. Lesions of adjacent thalamic nuclei that spared Pf and control injections of vehicle failed to blunt hypoxic respiratory depression. Our findings reveal that the thalamic Pf region is a critical controller of hypoxic ventilatory depression and thus a key target for exploring molecular concomitants of forebrain pathways regulating hypoxic ventilatory depression in early development.

  7. Effects of Yulangsan polysaccharide on monoamine neurotransmitters, adenylate cyclase activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in a mouse model of depression induced by unpredictable chronic mild stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang Liang; Renbin Huang; Xing Lin; Jianchun Huang; Zhongshi Huang; Huagang Liu

    2012-01-01

    The present study established a mouse model of depression induced by unpredictable chronic mild stress. The model mice were treated with Yulangsan polysaccharide (YLSPS; 150, 300 and 600 mg/kg) for 21 days, and compared with fluoxetine-treated and normal control groups. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, radioimmunity and immunohistochemical staining showed that following treatment with YLSPS (300 and 600 mg/kg), monoamine neurotransmitter levels, prefrontal cortex adenylate cyclase activity and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression were significantly elevated, and depression-like behaviors were improved. Open-field and novelty-suppressed feeding tests showed that mouse activity levels were increased and feeding latency was shortened following treatment. Our results indicate that YLSPS inhibits depression by upregulating monoamine neurotransmitters, prefrontal cortex adenylate cyclase activity and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression.

  8. Hypoxic induction of caspase-11/caspase-1/interleukin-1beta in brain microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Gon; Lee, Heasuk; Son, Eunyung; Kwon, Oh-Young; Park, Jae-Yong; Park, Jae-Hoon; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Choi, Wan Sung; Suk, Kyoungho

    2003-06-10

    Caspase-11 is an inducible protease that plays an important role in both inflammation and apoptosis. Inflammatory stimuli induce and activate caspase-11, which is required for the activation of caspase-1 or interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) converting enzyme (ICE). Caspase-1 in turn mediates the maturation of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1beta, which is one of the crucial mediators of neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. Here, we report that hypoxic exposure of cultured brain microglia (BV-2 mouse microglia cells and rat primary microglial cultures) induces expression and activation of caspase-11, which is accompanied by activation of caspase-1 and secretion of mature IL-1beta and IL-18. Hypoxic induction of caspase-11 was observed in both mRNA and protein levels, and was mediated through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Transient global ischemia in rats also induced caspase-11 expression and IL-1beta production in hippocampus supporting our in vitro findings. Caspase-11-expressing cells in hippocampus were morphologically identified as microglia. Taken together, our results indicate that hypoxia induces a sequential event-caspase-11 induction, caspase-1 activation, and IL-1beta release-in brain microglia, and point out the importance of initial caspase-11 induction in hypoxia-induced inflammatory activation of microglia.

  9. Hypoxic Hepatitis: A Review and Clinical Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Najeff; Chen, Po-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypoxic hepatitis (HH), also known as ischemic hepatitis or shock liver, is characterized by a massive, rapid rise in serum aminotransferases resulting from reduced oxygen delivery to the liver. The most common predisposing condition is cardiac failure, followed by circulatory failure as occurs in septic shock and respiratory failure. HH does, however, occur in the absence of a documented hypotensive event or shock state in 50% of patients. In intensive care units, the incidence of HH is near 2.5%, but has been reported as high as 10% in some studies. The pathophysiology is multifactorial, but often involves hepatic congestion from right heart failure along with reduced hepatic blood flow, total body hypoxemia, reduced oxygen uptake by hepatocytes or reperfusion injury following ischemia. The diagnosis is primarily clinical, and typically does not require liver biopsy. The definitive treatment of HH involves correction of the underlying disease state, but successful management includes monitoring for the potential complications such as hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, hyperammonemia and hepatopulmonary syndrome. Prognosis of HH remains poor, especially for cases in which there was a delay in diagnosis. The in-hospital mortality rate is >50%, and the most frequent cause of death is the predisposing condition and not the liver injury itself. PMID:27777895

  10. Vitreous Mediators in Retinal Hypoxic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto dell'Omo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The causes of retinal hypoxia are many and varied. Under hypoxic conditions, a variety of soluble factors are secreted into the vitreous cavity including growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines. Cytokines, which usually serve as signals between neighboring cells, are involved in essentially every important biological process, including cell proliferation, inflammation, immunity, migration, fibrosis, tissue repair, and angiogenesis. Cytokines and chemokines are multifunctional mediators that can direct the recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation, promote the process, enhance immune responses, and promote stem cell survival, development, and homeostasis. The modern particle-based flow cytometric analysis is more direct, stable and sensitive than the colorimetric readout of the conventional ELISA but, similar to ELISA, is influenced by vitreous hemorrhage, disruption of the blood-retina barrier, and high serum levels of a specific protein. Finding patterns in the expression of inflammatory cytokines specific to a particular disease can substantially contribute to the understanding of its basic mechanism and to the development of a targeted therapy.

  11. Mass Law Predicts Hyperbolic Hypoxic Ventilatory Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severinghaus, John W.

    The hyperbolic hypoxic ventilatory response vs PaO2, HVRp, is interpreted as relecting a mass hyperbolic relationship of cytochrome PcO2 to cytochrome potential Ec, offset 32 torr by the constant diffusion gradient between arterial blood and cytochrome in CB at its constant metabolic rate dot VO_2 . Ec is taken to be a linear function of redox reduction and CB ventilatory drive. As Ec rises in hypoxia, the absolute potentials of each step in the citric acid cycle rises equally while the potential drop across each step remains constant because flux rate remains constant. A hypothetic HVRs ( dot VE vs SaO2) response curve computed from these assumptions is strikingly non linear. A hypothetic HVRp calculated from an assumed linear HVRs cannot be fit to the observed hyperbolic increase of ventilation in response to isocapnic hypoxia at PO2 less than 40 torr. The incompatibility of these results suggest that in future studies HVRs will not be found to be linear, especially below 80% SaO2 and HVRp will fail to be accurately hyperbolic.

  12. Pulmonary hypoxic vasoconstriction: how strong? How fast?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, D. W.; Klocke, R. A.; Farhi, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a minimally invasive technique for studying regional blood flow in conscious sheep, bypassing the complications of open-chest surgery, flow probes and tracer infusion. We quantitate regional perfusion continuously on the basis of regional clearance of methane (methane is produced in the sheep rumen, enters the circulation and is eliminated nearly completely (greater than 95%) in the lung). Tracheal intubation with a dual-lumen catheter isolates the gas exchange of the right apical lobe (RAL; less than 15% of the lung) from that of the remainder of the lung, which serves as a control (CL). We measure RAL and CL methane elimination by entraining expirates in constant flows, sampled continuously for methane. Results obtained with this technique and from regional oxygen uptake are in excellent agreement. We have found that hypoxic vasoconstriction is far more potent and stable during eucapnic hypoxia than during hypocapnic hypoxia. The time course of the vasoconstriction suggests that many of the data in the literature may have been obtained prior to steady state.

  13. Emodin prevents hypoxic-ischemic neuronal injury Involvement of the activin A pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongliang Guo; Xiaoran Shen; Ye Xu; Junliang Yuan; Dongming Zhao; Wenli Hu

    2013-01-01

    Emodin, an extract of dried rhizomes and the root of the Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, can protect neurons from hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. This study aimed to verify the underlying mechanism. After PC12 cells had differentiated into neuron-like cells under the induction of mouse nerve growth factor, cells were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation and treated with emodin. Results showed that the viability of neuron-like cells cultured under an ischemia-hypoxia environment decreased, while the expression of activin A and caspase-3 in cells increased. Emodin raised the survival rate of oxygen-glucose deprived neuron-like cells, increased activin A expression, and decreased caspase-3 expression. Experimental findings indicate that emodin can inhibit neuronal apoptosis and alleviate the injury of nerve cells after oxygen-glucose deprivation through the activin A pathway.

  14. Advancing hypoxic training in team sports: from intermittent hypoxic training to repeated sprint training in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiss, Raphaël; Girard, Olivier; Millet, Grégoire P

    2013-12-01

    Over the past two decades, intermittent hypoxic training (IHT), that is, a method where athletes live at or near sea level but train under hypoxic conditions, has gained unprecedented popularity. By adding the stress of hypoxia during 'aerobic' or 'anaerobic' interval training, it is believed that IHT would potentiate greater performance improvements compared to similar training at sea level. A thorough analysis of studies including IHT, however, leads to strikingly poor benefits for sea-level performance improvement, compared to the same training method performed in normoxia. Despite the positive molecular adaptations observed after various IHT modalities, the characteristics of optimal training stimulus in hypoxia are still unclear and their functional translation in terms of whole-body performance enhancement is minimal. To overcome some of the inherent limitations of IHT (lower training stimulus due to hypoxia), recent studies have successfully investigated a new training method based on the repetition of short (training in hypoxia (RSH). The aims of the present review are therefore threefold: first, to summarise the main mechanisms for interval training and repeated sprint training in normoxia. Second, to critically analyse the results of the studies involving high-intensity exercises performed in hypoxia for sea-level performance enhancement by differentiating IHT and RSH. Third, to discuss the potential mechanisms underpinning the effectiveness of those methods, and their inherent limitations, along with the new research avenues surrounding this topic.

  15. A model to simulate the oxygen distribution in hypoxic tumors for different vascular architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza, Ignacio [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Department of Physics, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 7820436 (Chile); Peschke, Peter [Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Karger, Christian P. [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: As hypoxic cells are more resistant to photon radiation, it is desirable to obtain information about the oxygen distribution in tumors prior to the radiation treatment. Noninvasive techniques are currently not able to provide reliable oxygenation maps with sufficient spatial resolution; therefore mathematical models may help to simulate microvascular architectures and the resulting oxygen distributions in the surrounding tissue. Here, the authors present a new computer model, which uses the vascular fraction of tumor voxels, in principle measurable noninvasively in vivo, as input parameter for simulating realistic PO2 histograms in tumors, assuming certain 3D vascular architectures.Methods: Oxygen distributions were calculated by solving a reaction-diffusion equation in a reference volume using the particle strength exchange method. Different types of vessel architectures as well as different degrees of vascular heterogeneities are considered. Two types of acute hypoxia (ischemic and hypoxemic) occurring additionally to diffusion-limited (chronic) hypoxia were implemented as well.Results: No statistically significant differences were observed when comparing 2D- and 3D-vessel architectures (p > 0.79 in all cases) and highly heterogeneously distributed linear vessels show good agreement, when comparing with published experimental intervessel distance distributions and PO2 histograms. It could be shown that, if information about additional acute hypoxia is available, its contribution to the hypoxic fraction (HF) can be simulated as well. Increases of 128% and 168% in the HF were obtained when representative cases of ischemic and hypoxemic acute hypoxia, respectively, were considered in the simulations.Conclusions: The presented model is able to simulate realistic microscopic oxygen distributions in tumors assuming reasonable vessel architectures and using the vascular fraction as macroscopic input parameter. The model may be used to generate PO2 histograms

  16. Hypoxic preconditioning improves survival of cardiac progenitor cells: role of stromal cell derived factor-1α-CXCR4 axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengdi Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs have been shown to be suitable in stem cell therapy for resurrecting damaged myocardium, but poor retention of transplanted cells in the ischemic myocardium causes ineffective cell therapy. Hypoxic preconditioning of cells can increase the expression of CXCR4 and pro-survival genes to promote better cell survival; however, it is unknown whether hypoxia preconditioning will influence the survival and retention of CPCs via the SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis. METHODS AND RESULTS: CPCs were isolated from adult mouse hearts and purified by magnetic activated cell sorting using c-kit magnetic beads. These cells were cultured at various times in either normoxic or hypoxic conditions, and cell survival was analyzed using flow cytometry and the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α, CXCR4, phosphorylated Akt and Bcl-2 were measured by Western blot. Results showed that the expression of pro-survival genes significantly increased after hypoxia treatment, especially in cells cultured in hypoxic conditions for six hours. Upon completion of hypoxia preconditioning from c-kit+ CPCs for six hours, the anti-apoptosis, migration and cardiac repair potential were evaluated. Results showed a significant enhancement in anti-apoptosis and migration in vitro, and better survival and cardiac function after being transplanted into acute myocardial infarction (MI mice in vivo. The beneficial effects induced by hypoxia preconditioning of c-kit+ CPCs could largely be blocked by the addition of CXCR4 selective antagonist AMD3100. CONCLUSIONS: Hypoxic preconditioning may improve the survival and retention of c-kit+ CPCs in the ischemic heart tissue through activating the SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis and the downstream anti-apoptosis pathway. Strategies targeting this aspect may enhance the effectiveness of cell-based cardiac regenerative therapy.

  17. Thiopental inhibits global protein synthesis by repression of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 and protects from hypoxic neuronal cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian I Schwer

    Full Text Available Ischemic and traumatic brain injury is associated with increased risk for death and disability. The inhibition of penumbral tissue damage has been recognized as a target for therapeutic intervention, because cellular injury evolves progressively upon ATP-depletion and loss of ion homeostasis. In patients, thiopental is used to treat refractory intracranial hypertension by reducing intracranial pressure and cerebral metabolic demands; however, therapeutic benefits of thiopental-treatment are controversially discussed. In the present study we identified fundamental neuroprotective molecular mechanisms mediated by thiopental. Here we show that thiopental inhibits global protein synthesis, which preserves the intracellular energy metabolite content in oxygen-deprived human neuronal SK-N-SH cells or primary mouse cortical neurons and thus ameliorates hypoxic cell damage. Sensitivity to hypoxic damage was restored by pharmacologic repression of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase. Translational inhibition was mediated by calcium influx, activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase, and inhibitory phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2. Our results explain the reduction of cerebral metabolic demands during thiopental treatment. Cycloheximide also protected neurons from hypoxic cell death, indicating that translational inhibitors may generally reduce secondary brain injury. In conclusion our study demonstrates that therapeutic inhibition of global protein synthesis protects neurons from hypoxic damage by preserving energy balance in oxygen-deprived cells. Molecular evidence for thiopental-mediated neuroprotection favours a positive clinical evaluation of barbiturate treatment. The chemical structure of thiopental could represent a pharmacologically relevant scaffold for the development of new organ-protective compounds to ameliorate tissue damage when oxygen availability is limited.

  18. Tracking Hypoxic Signaling within Encapsulated Cell Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiles, Matthew L.; Sahai, Suchit; Blanchette, James O.

    2011-01-01

    nutrients, notably oxygen, is therefore reduced and limited by diffusion. This reduced oxygen availability may especially impact β-cells whose insulin secretory function is highly dependent on oxygen11-13. Capsule composition and geometry will also impact diffusion rates and lengths for oxygen. Therefore, we also describe a technique for identifying hypoxic cells within our PEG capsules. Infection of the cells with a recombinant adenovirus allows for a fluorescent signal to be produced when intracellular hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathways are activated14. As HIFs are the primary regulators of the transcriptional response to hypoxia, they represent an ideal target marker for detection of hypoxic signaling15. This approach allows for easy and rapid detection of hypoxic cells. Briefly, the adenovirus has the sequence for a red fluorescent protein (Ds Red DR from Clontech) under the control of a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) trimer. Stabilization of HIF-1 by low oxygen conditions will drive transcription of the fluorescent protein (Figure 1). Additional details on the construction of this virus have been published previously15. The virus is stored in 10% glycerol at -80° C as many 150 μL aliquots in 1.5 mL centrifuge tubes at a concentration of 3.4 x 1010 pfu/mL. Previous studies in our lab have shown that MIN6 cells encapsulated as aggregates maintain their viability throughout 4 weeks of culture in 20% oxygen. MIN6 aggregates cultured at 2 or 1% oxygen showed both signs of necrotic cells (still about 85-90% viable) by staining with ethidium bromide as well as morphological changes relative to cells in 20% oxygen. The smooth spherical shape of the aggregates displayed at 20% was lost and aggregates appeared more like disorganized groups of cells. While the low oxygen stress does not cause a pronounced drop in viability, it is clearly impacting MIN6 aggregation and function as measured by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion15. Western blot analysis of encapsulated

  19. Tracking hypoxic signaling within encapsulated cell aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiles, Matthew L; Sahai, Suchit; Blanchette, James O

    2011-12-16

    , is therefore reduced and limited by diffusion. This reduced oxygen availability may especially impact β-cells whose insulin secretory function is highly dependent on oxygen. Capsule composition and geometry will also impact diffusion rates and lengths for oxygen. Therefore, we also describe a technique for identifying hypoxic cells within our PEG capsules. Infection of the cells with a recombinant adenovirus allows for a fluorescent signal to be produced when intracellular hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathways are activated. As HIFs are the primary regulators of the transcriptional response to hypoxia, they represent an ideal target marker for detection of hypoxic signaling. This approach allows for easy and rapid detection of hypoxic cells. Briefly, the adenovirus has the sequence for a red fluorescent protein (Ds Red DR from Clontech) under the control of a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) trimer. Stabilization of HIF-1 by low oxygen conditions will drive transcription of the fluorescent protein (Figure 1). Additional details on the construction of this virus have been published previously. The virus is stored in 10% glycerol at -80° C as many 150 μL aliquots in 1.5 mL centrifuge tubes at a concentration of 3.4 x 10(10) pfu/mL. Previous studies in our lab have shown that MIN6 cells encapsulated as aggregates maintain their viability throughout 4 weeks of culture in 20% oxygen. MIN6 aggregates cultured at 2 or 1% oxygen showed both signs of necrotic cells (still about 85-90% viable) by staining with ethidium bromide as well as morphological changes relative to cells in 20% oxygen. The smooth spherical shape of the aggregates displayed at 20% was lost and aggregates appeared more like disorganized groups of cells. While the low oxygen stress does not cause a pronounced drop in viability, it is clearly impacting MIN6 aggregation and function as measured by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Western blot analysis of encapsulated cells in 20% and 1% oxygen also

  20. NLP-1: a DNA intercalating hypoxic cell radiosensitizer and cytotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panicucci, R.; Heal, R.; Laderoute, K.; Cowan, D.; McClelland, R.A.; Rauth, A.M.

    1989-04-01

    The 2-nitroimidazole linked phenanthridine, NLP-1 (5-(3-(2-nitro-1-imidazoyl)-propyl)-phenanthridinium bromide), was synthesized with the rationale of targeting the nitroimidazole to DNA via the phenanthridine ring. The drug is soluble in aqueous solution (greater than 25 mM) and stable at room temperature. It binds to DNA with a binding constant 1/30 that of ethidium bromide. At a concentration of 0.5 mM, NLP-1 is 8 times more toxic to hypoxic than aerobic cells at 37 degrees C. This concentration is 40 times less than the concentration of misonidazole, a non-intercalating 2-nitroimidazole, required for the same degree of hypoxic cell toxicity. The toxicity of NLP-1 is reduced at least 10-fold at 0 degrees C. Its ability to radiosensitize hypoxic cells is similar to misonidazole at 0 degrees C. Thus the putative targeting of the 2-nitroimidazole, NLP-1, to DNA, via its phenanthridine group, enhances its hypoxic toxicity, but not its radiosensitizing ability under the present test conditions. NLP-1 represents a lead compound for intercalating 2-nitroimidazoles with selective toxicity for hypoxic cells.

  1. CT and MR in non-neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: radiological findings with pathophysiological correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Leonardo Guilhermino; Portela, Luiz Antonio Pezzi [Hospital Alemao Oswaldo Cruz and Hospital do Coracao, Diagnostic Imaging Division, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rovira, Alex [University Hospital Vall d' Hebron, MR Unit, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Costa Leite, Claudia da [Clinics Hospital of the University of Sao Paulo, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lucato, Leandro Tavares [Hospital Alemao Oswaldo Cruz and Hospital do Coracao, Diagnostic Imaging Division, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Clinics Hospital of the University of Sao Paulo, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-11-15

    Non-neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is a clinical condition often related to cardiopulmonary arrest that demands critical management and treatment decisions. Management depends mainly on the degree of neurological impairment and prognostic considerations. Computed tomography (CT) is often used to exclude associated or mimicking pathology. If any, only nonspecific signs such as cerebral edema, sulci effacement, and decreased gray matter (GM)/white matter (WM) differentiation are evident. Pseudosubarachnoid hemorrhage, a GM/WM attenuation ratio <1.18, and inverted GM attenuation are associated with a poor prognosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is more sensitive than CT in assessing brain damage in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Some MR findings have similarities to those seen pathologically, based on spatial distribution and time scale, such as lesions distributed in watershed regions and selective injury to GM structures. In the acute phase, lesions are better depicted using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) because of the presence of cytotoxic edema, which, on T2-weighted images, only become apparent later in the early subacute phase. In the late subacute phase, postanoxic leukoencephalopathy and contrast enhancement could be observed. In the chronic phase, atrophic changes predominate over tissue signal changes. MR can be useful for estimating prognosis when other tests are inconclusive. Some findings, such as the extent of lesions on DWI and presence of a lactate peak and depleted N-acetyl aspartate peak on MR spectroscopy, seem to have prognostic value. (orig.)

  2. Effect of high-frequency positive-pressure ventilation on halothane ablation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S M; Chapleau, M; Cairo, J; Levitzky, M G

    1985-08-01

    High-frequency positive-pressure ventilation (HFPPV) was compared to intermittent positive-pressure ventilation (IPPV) during unilateral atelectasis with and without halothane anesthesia. Dogs with electromagnetic flow probes chronically implanted on their main (Qt) and left (Ql) pulmonary arteries were ventilated via Carlen's dual-lumen endotracheal tubes. In eight closed-chest dogs, about 43% of the cardiac output perfused the left lung during bilateral ventilation by either a Harvard animal respirator (IPPV) or a Health-dyne model 300 high-frequency ventilator (HFPPV). Unilateral atelectasis decreased blood flow (Ql/Qt) to that lung. Ql/Qt was 19 +/- 1% with HFPPV during left-lung atelectasis and right-lung ventilation, compared to 32 +/- 1% with unilateral IPPV. This suggests that HFPPV permits stronger hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Addition of 1% halothane increased blood flow to the atelectatic left lung during unilateral ventilation with IPPV but not with HFPPV. This suggests that halothane decreases the effects of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction during conventional ventilation but not during HFPPV.

  3. Long-Term Overexpression of Hsp70 Does Not Protect against Cardiac Dysfunction and Adverse Remodeling in a MURC Transgenic Mouse Model with Chronic Heart Failure and Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Bianca C; Sapra, Geeta; Patterson, Natalie L; Cemerlang, Nelly; Kiriazis, Helen; Ueyama, Tomomi; Febbraio, Mark A; McMullen, Julie R

    2015-01-01

    Previous animal studies had shown that increasing heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) using a transgenic, gene therapy or pharmacological approach provided cardiac protection in models of acute cardiac stress. Furthermore, clinical studies had reported associations between Hsp70 levels and protection against atrial fibrillation (AF). AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia presenting in cardiology clinics and is associated with increased rates of heart failure and stroke. Improved therapies for AF and heart failure are urgently required. Despite promising observations in animal studies which targeted Hsp70, we recently reported that increasing Hsp70 was unable to attenuate cardiac dysfunction and pathology in a mouse model which develops heart failure and intermittent AF. Given our somewhat unexpected finding and the extensive literature suggesting Hsp70 provides cardiac protection, it was considered important to assess whether Hsp70 could provide protection in another mouse model of heart failure and AF. The aim of the current study was to determine whether increasing Hsp70 could attenuate adverse cardiac remodeling, cardiac dysfunction and episodes of arrhythmia in a mouse model of heart failure and AF due to overexpression of Muscle-Restricted Coiled-Coil (MURC). Cardiac function and pathology were assessed in mice at approximately 12 months of age. We report here, that chronic overexpression of Hsp70 was unable to provide protection against cardiac dysfunction, conduction abnormalities, fibrosis or characteristic molecular markers of the failing heart. In summary, elevated Hsp70 may provide protection in acute cardiac stress settings, but appears insufficient to protect the heart under chronic cardiac disease conditions.

  4. Enhanced non-eupneic breathing following hypoxic, hypercapnic or hypoxic-hypercapnic gas challenges in conscious mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getsy, Paulina M; Davis, Jesse; Coffee, Gregory A; May, Walter J; Palmer, Lisa A; Strohl, Kingman P; Lewis, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    C57BL6 mice display non-eupneic breathing and spontaneous apneas during wakefulness and sleep as well as markedly disordered breathing following cessation of a hypoxic challenge. We examined whether (1) C57BL6 mice display marked non-eupneic breathing following hypercapnic or hypoxic-hypercapnic challenges, and (2) compared the post-hypoxia changes in non-eupneic breathing of C57BL6 mice to those of B6AF1 (57BL6 dam × A/J sire) and Swiss-Webster mice, which display different ventilatory responses than C57BL6 mice. C57BL6 mice displayed marked increases in respiratory frequency and non-eupneic breathing upon return to room-air after hypoxic (10% O2, 90% N2), hypercapnic (5% CO2, 21% O2 and 74% N2) and hypoxic-hypercapnic (10% O2, 5% CO2 and 85% N2) challenges. B6AF1 mice displayed less tachypnea and reduced non-eupneic breathing post-hypoxia, whereas Swiss-Webster mice displayed robust tachypnea with minimal increases in non-eupneic breathing post-hypoxia. These studies demonstrate that non-eupneic breathing increases after physiologically-relevant hypoxic-hypercapnic challenge in C57BL6 mice and suggest that further studies with these and B6AF1 and Swiss-Webster mice will help define the genetics of non-eupneic breathing.

  5. Aging and chronic alcohol consumption are determinants of p16 gene expression, genomic DNA methylation and p16 promoter methylation in the mouse colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder age and chronic alcohol consumption are important risk factors for the development of colon cancer. Each factor can alter genomic and gene-specific DNA methylation. This study examined the effects of aging and chronic alcohol consumption on genomic and p16-specific methylation, and p16 express...

  6. Ageing, chronic alcohol consumption and folate are determinants of genomic DNA methylation, p16 promoter methylation and the expression of p16 in the mouse colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder age and chronic alcohol consumption are important risk factors for the development of colon cancer. Each factor can alter genomic and gene-specific DNA methylation. This study examined the effects of aging and chronic alcohol consumption on genomic and p16-specific methylation, and p16 express...

  7. Chronic administration of an HDAC inhibitor treats both neurological and systemic Niemann-Pick type C disease in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Suhail; Getz, Michelle; Haldar, Kasturi

    2016-02-17

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are approved for treating rare cancers and are of interest as potential therapies for neurodegenerative disorders. We evaluated a triple combination formulation (TCF) comprising the pan-HDACi vorinostat, the caging agent 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPBCD), and polyethylene glycol (PEG) for treating a mouse model (the Npc1(nmf164) mouse) of Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease, a difficult-to-treat cerebellar disorder. Vorinostat alone showed activity in cultured primary cells derived from Npc1(nmf164) mice but did not improve animal survival. However, low-dose, once-weekly intraperitoneal injections of the TCF containing vorinostat increased histone acetylation in the mouse brain, preserved neurites and Purkinje cells, delayed symptoms of neurodegeneration, and extended mouse life span from 4 to almost 9 months. We demonstrate that the TCF boosted the ability of HDACi to cross the blood-brain barrier and was not toxic even when used long term. Further, the TCF enabled dose reduction, which has been a major challenge in HDACi therapy. TCF simultaneously treats neurodegenerative and systemic symptoms of Niemann-Pick type C disease in a mouse model.

  8. Microbial mineralization of dichloroethene and vinyl chloride under hypoxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.; Chapelle, Francis H.

    2011-01-01

    Mineralization of 14C-radiolabled vinyl chloride ([1,2-14C] VC) and cis-dichloroethene ([1,2-14C] cis-DCE) under hypoxic (initial dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations about 0.1 mg/L) and nominally anoxic (DO minimum detection limit = 0.01 mg/L) was examined in chloroethene-exposed sediments from two groundwater and two surface water sites. The results show significant VC and dichloroethene (DCE) mineralization under hypoxic conditions. All the sample treatments exhibited pseudo-first-order kinetics for DCE and VC mineralization over an extended range of substrate concentrations. First-order rates for VC mineralization were approximately 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher in hypoxic groundwater sediment treatments and at least three times higher in hypoxic surface water sediment treatments than in the respective anoxic treatments. For VC, oxygen-linked processes accounted for 65 to 85% of mineralization at DO concentrations below 0.1 mg/L, and 14CO2 was the only degradation product observed in VC treatments under hypoxic conditions. Because the lower detection limit for DO concentrations measured in the field is typically 0.1 to 0.5 mg/L, these results indicate that oxygen-linked VC and DCE biodegradation can be significant under field conditions that appear anoxic. Furthermore, because rates of VC mineralization exceeded rates of DCE mineralization under hypoxic conditions, DCE accumulation without concomitant accumulation of VC may not be evidence of a DCE degradative “stall” in chloroethene plumes. Significantly, mineralization of VC above the level that could reasonably be attributed to residual DO contamination was also observed in several nominally anoxic (DO minimum detection limit = 0.01 mg/L) microcosm treatments.

  9. Effect of the sphingosine kinase 1 selective inhibitor, PF-543 on arterial and cardiac remodelling in a hypoxic model of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRitchie, Neil; Volpert, Giora; Al Washih, Mohammed; Watson, David G; Futerman, Anthony H; Kennedy, Simon; Pyne, Susan; Pyne, Nigel J

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the expression of sphingosine kinase 1, the enzyme that catalyses formation of the bioactive lipid, sphingosine 1-phosphate, is increased in lungs from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. In addition, Sk1(-/-) mice are protected from hypoxic-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension. Therefore, we assessed the effect of the sphingosine kinase 1 selective inhibitor, PF-543 and a sphingosine kinase 1/ceramide synthase inhibitor, RB-005 on pulmonary and cardiac remodelling in a mouse hypoxic model of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Administration of the potent sphingosine kinase 1 inhibitor, PF-543 in a mouse hypoxic model of pulmonary hypertension had no effect on vascular remodelling but reduced right ventricular hypertrophy. The latter was associated with a significant reduction in cardiomyocyte death. The protection involves a reduction in the expression of p53 (that promotes cardiomyocyte death) and an increase in the expression of anti-oxidant nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf-2). In contrast, RB-005 lacked effects on right ventricular hypertrophy, suggesting that sphingosine kinase 1 inhibition might be nullified by concurrent inhibition of ceramide synthase. Therefore, our findings with PF-543 suggest an important role for sphingosine kinase 1 in the development of hypertrophy in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  10. [Mechanism of protective effects of tumor necrosis factor receptor associated protein 1 on hypoxic cardiomyocytes of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, F; Zhang, D X; Ma, S Y; Huang, Y S

    2016-12-20

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of protective effects of tumor necrosis factor receptor associated protein 1 (TRAP1) on hypoxic cardiomyocytes of rats. Methods: Primary cultured cardiomyocytes were obtained from neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats (aged 1 to 3 days) and then used in the following experiments. (1) Cells were divided into group TRAP1 and control group according to the random number table (the same grouping method below), and then the total protein of cells was extracted. Total protein of cells in group TRAP1 was added with mouse anti-rat TRAP1 monoclonal antibody, while that in control group was added with the same type of IgG from mouse. Co-immunoprecipitation and protein mass spectrography analysis were used to determine the possible proteins interacted with TRAP1. (2) Cells were divided into normoxia blank control group (NBC), normoxia+ TRAP1 interference control group (NTIC), normoxia+ TRAP1 interference group (NTI), normoxia+ TRAP1 over-expression control group (NTOC), and normoxia+ TRAP1 over-expression group (NTO), with 1 well in each group. Cells in group NBC were routinely cultured, while cells in the latter four groups were respectively added with TRAP1 RNA interference empty virus vector, TRAP1 RNA interference adenovirus vector, TRAP1 over-expression empty virus vector, and TRAP1 over-expression adenovirus vector. Another batch of cells were divided into group NBC, hypoxic blank control group (HBC), hypoxic+ TRAP1 interference control group (HTIC), hypoxic+ TRAP1 interference group (HTI), hypoxic+ TRAP1 over-expression control group (HTOC), and hypoxic+ TRAP1 over-expression group (HTO), with 1 well in each group. Cells in hypoxic groups were under hypoxic condition for 6 hours after being treated as those in the corresponding normoxia groups, respectively. The mRNA expression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit Ⅱ (COXⅡ) of cells in each group was detected by real time fluorescent quantitive reverse transcription polymerase chain

  11. Satellite-based empirical models linking river plume dynamics with hypoxic area andvolume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satellite-based empirical models explaining hypoxic area and volume variation were developed for the seasonally hypoxic (O2 < 2 mg L−1) northern Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Mississippi River. Annual variations in midsummer hypoxic area and ...

  12. Anti-hyperalgesic effect of a benzilidine-cyclohexanone analogue on a mouse model of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain: Participation of the κ-opioid receptor and KATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming-Tatt, Lee; Khalivulla, Shaik Ibrahim; Akhtar, Muhammad Nadeem; Lajis, Nordin; Perimal, Enoch Kumar; Akira, Ahmad; Ali, Daud Israf; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan

    2013-12-01

    The present study investigated the analgesic effect of a novel synthetic cyclohexanone derivative, 2,6-bis-4-(hydroxyl-3-methoxybenzilidine)-cyclohexanone or BHMC in a mouse model of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain. It was demonstrated that intraperitoneal administration of BHMC (0.03, 0.1, 0.3 and 1.0mg/kg) exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in mice, when evaluated using Randall-Selitto mechanical analgesiometer. It was also demonstrated that pretreatment of naloxone (non-selective opioid receptor blocker), nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI, selective κ-opioid receptor blocker), but not β-funaltrexamine (β-FN, selective μ-opioid receptor blocker) and naltrindole hydrochloride (NTI, selective δ-opioid receptor blocker), reversed the anti-nociceptive effect of BHMC. In addition, the analgesic effect of BHMC was also reverted by pretreatment of 1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, soluble guanosyl cyclase blocker) and glibenclamide (ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker) but not Nω-nitro-l-arginine (l-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase blocker). Taken together, the present study demonstrated that the systemic administration of BHMC attenuated chronic constriction, injury-induced neuropathic pain. We also suggested that the possible mechanisms include κ-opioid receptor activation and nitric oxide-independent cyclic guanosine monophosphate activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channel opening.

  13. [5-HT1A/5-HT7 receptor interplay: Chronic activation of 5-HT7 receptors decreases the functional activity of 5-HT1A receptor and its сontent in the mouse brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondaurova, E M; Bazovkina, D V; Naumenko, V S

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin receptors 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 are involved in the development of various psychopathologies. Some data indicate that there is an interplay between 5-HT1A 5-HT7 receptors that could be implicated in the regulation of their function. This work analyzed the effects of chronic 5-HT7 activation on the functional activity of 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptors, on the corresponding protein levels, and on the expression of genes encoding 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptors in the mouse brain. Chronic administration of the 5-HT7 selective agonist LP44 (20.5 nmol, i.c.v., 14 days) produced considerable desensitization of both 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptors. In LP44-treated mice, the hypothermic responses mediated by both 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptors were attenuated. Moreover, the levels of 5-HT1A receptor protein in the midbrain and the frontal cortex of LP44-treated mice were significantly decreased. However, the brain levels of 5-HT7 receptor protein did not differ between LP44-treated and control mice. Chronic LP44 treatment did not alter the expression of the 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptor genes in all investigated brain structure. These data suggest that 5-HT7 receptors participate in the posttranscriptional regulation of the 5-HT1A receptors functioning.

  14. Determination of the Chronic Mammalian Toxicological Effects of TNT (twenty-Four Month Chronic Toxicity/Carcinogenicity Study of Trinitrotoluene (TNT) in the B6C3F1 Hybrid Mouse). Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    negative results. Serum antibody titer was determined for the following diseases: GD-VII virus , K virus , Mouse Adenovirus, Sendal virus , Reovirus 3...Pneumonia virus of mice, Lyrphocytic Chorlomeningitis, Polyoma vIrus , MInute vIrus of mice, Mouse Hepatitis and Ectomella. These antibody titers were...0I0 w l o N C I -I--a))CO-o 0)-000 ) ~ -~ -OWNOON 3 iN N. NN -N N -CN---.N(- N C V(NNNN NN (N- ( NCV (\\(N ( IN C () N ( N D C0 C N N -N N - - -I))( N U

  15. Patterns of neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, Linda S. de [University Medical Centre, Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Centre, Department of Neonatology, KE 04.123.1, P.O. Box 85090, Utrecht (Netherlands); Groenendaal, Floris [University Medical Centre, Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-06-15

    Enormous progress has been made in assessing the neonatal brain, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this review, we will describe the use of MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in detecting different patterns of brain injury in (full-term) human neonates following hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and indicate the relevance of these findings in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome. (orig.)

  16. Chemoreceptor stimulation interferes with regional hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapleau, M W; Wilson, L B; Gregory, T J; Levitzky, M G

    1988-02-01

    Hypoxemia interferes with the diversion of blood flow away from hypoxic regions of the lung, possibly through activation of the arterial chemoreceptor reflex. The purpose of this study was to determine if selective stimulation of carotid chemoreceptors reduces the diversion of flow (hypoxic vasoconstriction) when normal systemic oxygen levels are present. Chloralose anesthetized dogs were paralyzed and each lung was separately ventilated via a dual-lumen endobronchial tube. Left pulmonary artery (QL) and main pulmonary artery (QT) blood flows were measured with electromagnetic flow probes. Chemoreceptors were stimulated by perfusion of the carotid sinuses with hypoxic, hypercapnic blood. QL/QT averaged 46 +/- 4, 29 +/- 2, and 36 +/- 4% during bilateral O2 ventilation (control), left lung N2 ventilation, and left lung N2 plus chemoreceptor stimulation in dogs treated with the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor meclofenamate. After vagotomy, QL/QT averaged 45 +/- 4, 27 +/- 3, and 28 +/- 2% during the same conditions. QL/QT decreased significantly from control (P less than 0.05) during left lung N2 alone but did not decrease during left lung N2 plus chemoreceptor stimulation in dogs with intact vagi. In contrast, QL/QT decreased significantly both before and during chemoreceptor stimulation in vagotomized dogs. The same responses were observed in dogs not treated with meclofenamate. These results indicate that selective stimulation of arterial chemoreceptors can interfere with regional hypoxic vasoconstriction and suggest that the vagus nerves may mediate this effect.

  17. Perinatal Hypoxic-Ischemic brain injury; MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Woo; Seo, Chang Hye [Inje University Pusan Paik Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-09-15

    To characterize the MR findings of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and to assess the value of the MR imaging. SE T1-, T2-weighted, and IR brain MR images of 44 infants and children with the past history of perinatal hypoxic insults were reviewed. Abnormal brain MR findings of 8 patients with birth history of prematurity and 36 patients with birth history of full-term/posterm including 7 with severe anoxic insult history, were compared in regard to the location and the character of the lesions. MRI demonstrated the followings; (1)abnormal signal intensity lesions of subcortical and/or deep cerebral white matter, cortex, and deep gray matter, (2)atrophy of the cerebral white matter, cortex and corpus callosum, with/without ventriculomegaly, and (3)delay in myelination. Periventricular and deep white matter lesions were demonstrated in the prematurity, the deep white matter lesions and/ or subcortical white matter lesions in the term/post-term, and deep gray matter lesions in the 7 patients with severe anoxic insults history. MR imaging was useful in the diagnosis of the hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, and the white and gray matter lesions were correlated with the time of the injury and the severity of hypoxic insult.

  18. Effects of regional phentolamine on hypoxic vasodilatation in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrod, C J; Minson, C T; Joyner, M J; Halliwill, J R

    2001-12-01

    1. Limb vascular beds exhibit a graded dilatation in response to hypoxia despite increased sympathetic vasoconstrictor nerve activity. We investigated the extent to which sympathetic vasoconstriction can mask hypoxic vasodilatation and assessed the relative contributions of beta-adrenergic and nitric oxide (NO) pathways to hypoxic vasodilatation. 2. We measured forearm blood flow responses (plethysmography) to isocapnic hypoxia (arterial saturation approximately 85%) in eight healthy men and women (18-26 years) after selective alpha-adrenergic blockade (phentolamine) of one forearm. Subsequently, we measured hypoxic responses after combined alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockade (phentolamine and propranolol) and after combined alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockade coupled with NO synthase inhibition (N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, L-NMMA). 3. Hypoxia increased forearm vascular conductance by 49.0 +/- 13.5% after phentolamine (compared to +16.8 +/- 7.0% in the control arm without phentolamine, P < 0.05). After addition of propranolol, the forearm vascular conductance response to hypoxia was reduced by approximately 50%, but dilatation was still present (+24.7 +/- 7.0%, P < 0.05 vs. normoxia). When L-NMMA was added, there was no further reduction in the forearm vascular conductance response to hypoxia (+28.2 +/- 4.0%, P < 0.05 vs. normoxia). 4. Thus, selective regional alpha-adrenergic blockade unmasked a greater hypoxic vasodilatation than occurs in the presence of functional sympathetic nervous system responses to hypoxia. Furthermore, approximately half of the hypoxic vasodilatation in the forearm appears to be mediated by beta-adrenergic receptor-mediated pathways. Finally, since considerable dilatation persists in the presence of both beta-adrenergic blockade and NO synthase inhibition, it is likely that an additional vasodilator mechanism is activated by hypoxia in humans.

  19. Effect of acutely and chronically administered venlafaxine on the anticonvulsant action of classical antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, Kinga K; Gołyska, Dorota; Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2011-11-16

    The influence of acute and chronic treatments with intraperitoneal venlafaxine, a selective serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, on the anticonvulsant activity of selected antiepileptic drugs was studied in the maximal electroshock test in mice. Venlafaxine (12.5 and 25mg/kg), given either acutely or chronically, significantly increased the electroconvulsive threshold. Moreover, both acute and chronic venlafaxine, applied at the highest subprotective dose of 6.25mg/kg, enhanced the anticonvulsant effect of valproate, without affecting the protective action of carbamazepine, phenobarbital and phenytoin. The antidepressant did not affect brain concentration of valproate, indicating that the interaction between the two drugs seems pharmacodynamic in nature. Despite the lack of effect on the antielectroshock action of the remaining antiepileptics, acute venlafaxine increased the brain concentration of phenobarbital, while chronic venlafaxine reduced the brain level of phenytoin. In terms of adverse effects, acute/chronic venlafaxine and antiepileptic drugs alone, as well as their combinations, did not produce significant motor or long-term memory deficits in mice. Summing up, it seems that venlafaxine may be considered as a safe drug for the clinical use in patients with epilepsy and depressive disorders.

  20. A non-invasive approach to monitor chronic lymphocytic leukemia engraftment in a xenograft mouse model using ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide-magnetic resonance imaging (USPIO-MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdora, Francesca; Cutrona, Giovanna; Matis, Serena; Morabito, Fortunato; Massucco, Carlotta; Emionite, Laura; Boccardo, Simona; Basso, Luca; Recchia, Anna Grazia; Salvi, Sandra; Rosa, Francesca; Gentile, Massimo; Ravina, Marco; Pace, Daniele; Castronovo, Angela; Cilli, Michele; Truini, Mauro; Calabrese, Massimo; Neri, Antonino; Neumaier, Carlo Emanuele; Fais, Franco; Baio, Gabriella; Ferrarini, Manlio

    2016-11-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most prevalent leukemia among adults. Despite its indolent nature, CLL remains an incurable disease. Herein we aimed to monitor CLL disease engraftment and, progression/regression in a xenograft CLL mouse model using ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide-magnetic resonance imaging (USPIO-MRI). Spleen contrast enhancement, quantified as percentage change in signal intensity upon USPIO administration, demonstrated a difference due to a reduced USPIO uptake, in the spleens of mice injected with CLL cells (NSG-CLL, n=71) compared to controls (NSG-CTR, n=17). These differences were statistically significant both after 2 and 4weeks from CLL cells injection. In addition comparison of mice treated with rituximab with untreated controls for changes in spleen iron uptake confirmed that it is possible to monitor treatment efficacy in this mouse model of CLL using USPIO-enhanced MRI. Further applications could include the preclinical in vivo monitoring of new therapies and the clinical evaluation of CLL patients.

  1. Homogentisate 1-2-Dioxygenase Downregulation in the Chronic Persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Australian Epidemic Strain-1 in the CF Lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Harmer

    Full Text Available Some Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains including Australian Epidemic Strain-1 (AES-1 or AUS-01 cause persistent chronic infection in cystic fibrosis (CF patients, with greater morbidity and mortality. Factors conferring persistence are largely unknown. Previously we analysed the transcriptomes of AES-1 grown in Luria broth, nematode growth medium for Caenorhabditis elegans assay (both aerobic and artificial sputum medium (mainly hypoxic. Transcriptional comparisons included chronic AES-1 strains against PAO1 and acute AES-1 (AES-1R against its chronic isogen (AES-1M, isolated 10.5 years apart from a CF patient and not eradicated in the meantime. Prominent amongst genes downregulated in AES-1M in all comparisons was homogentisate-1-2-dioxygenase (hmgA; an oxygen-dependent gene known to be mutationally deactivated in many chronic infection strains of P. aeruginosa. To investigate if hmgA downregulation and deactivation gave similar virulence persistence profiles, a hmgA mutant made in UCBPP-PA14 utilising RedS-recombinase and AES-1M were assessed in the C. elegans virulence assay, and the C57BL/6 mouse for pulmonary colonisation and TNF-α response. In C. elegans, hmgA deactivation resulted in significantly increased PA14 virulence while hmgA downregulation reduced AES-1M virulence. AES-1M was significantly more persistent in mouse lung and showed a significant increase in TNF-α (p<0.0001, sustained even with no detectable bacteria. PA14ΔhmgA did not show increased TNF-α. This study suggests that hmgA may have a role in P. aeruginosa persistence in chronic infection and the results provide a starting point for clarifying the role of hmgA in chronic AES-1.

  2. Real-Time Bioluminescence Imaging of Nitroreductase in Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ping; Zhang, Huateng; Deng, Quankun; Liu, Wei; Yang, Linghui; Li, Guobo; Chen, Guo; Du, Lupei; Ke, Bowen; Li, Minyong

    2016-06-01

    Nitroreductase (NTR) is an endogenous reductase overexpressed in hypoxic tumors; however, its precise detection in living cells and animals remains a considerable challenge. Herein, we developed three reaction-based probes and a related bioluminescence assay for the real-time NTR detection. The high sensitivity and selectivity of probe 3, combined with its remarkable potential of bioluminescence imaging, affords a valuable approach for in vivo imaging of NTR in a tumor model mouse.

  3. Bead-size directed distribution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa results in distinct inflammatory response in a mouse model of chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, L J; Trøstrup, H; Damlund, Dina Silke Malling;

    2012-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is characterized by biofilms, tolerant to antibiotics and host responses. Instead, immune responses contribute to the tissue damage. However, this may depend on localization of infection in the upper conductive or in t...

  4. Topical application of a platelet activating factor receptor agonist suppresses phorbol ester-induced acute and chronic inflammation and has cancer chemopreventive activity in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Ravi P; Rezania, Samin; Ocana, Jesus A; DaSilva-Arnold, Sonia C; Bradish, Joshua R; Richey, Justin D; Warren, Simon J; Rashid, Badri; Travers, Jeffrey B; Konger, Raymond L

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has long been associated with acute edema and inflammatory responses. PAF acts by binding to a specific G-protein coupled receptor (PAF-R, Ptafr). However, the role of chronic PAF-R activation on sustained inflammatory responses has been largely ignored. We recently demonstrated that mice lacking the PAF-R (Ptafr-/- mice) exhibit increased cutaneous tumorigenesis in response to a two-stage chemical carcinogenesis protocol. Ptafr-/- mice also exhibited increased chronic inflammation in response to phorbol ester application. In this present study, we demonstrate that topical application of the non-hydrolysable PAF mimetic (carbamoyl-PAF (CPAF)), exerts a potent, dose-dependent, and short-lived edema response in WT mice, but not Ptafr -/- mice or mice deficient in c-Kit (c-KitW-sh/W-sh mice). Using an ear inflammation model, co-administration of topical CPAF treatment resulted in a paradoxical decrease in both acute ear thickness changes associated with a single PMA application, as well as the sustained inflammation associated with chronic repetitive PMA applications. Moreover, mice treated topically with CPAF also exhibited a significant reduction in chemical carcinogenesis. The ability of CPAF to suppress acute and chronic inflammatory changes in response to PMA application(s) was PAF-R dependent, as CPAF had no effect on basal or PMA-induced inflammation in Ptafr-/- mice. Moreover, c-Kit appears to be necessary for the anti-inflammatory effects of CPAF, as CPAF had no observable effect in c-KitW-sh/W-sh mice. These data provide additional evidence that PAF-R activation exerts complex immunomodulatory effects in a model of chronic inflammation that is relevant to neoplastic development.

  5. Kidney EPO expression during chronic hypoxia in aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benderro, Girriso F; LaManna, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    In order to maintain normal cellular function, mammalian tissue oxygen concentrations must be tightly regulated within a narrow physiological range. The hormone erythropoietin (EPO) is essential for maintenance of tissue oxygen supply by stimulating red blood cell production and promoting their survival. In this study we compared the effects of 290 Torr atmospheric pressure on the kidney EPO protein levels in young (4-month-old) and aged (24-month-old) C57BL/6 mice. The mice were sacrificed after being anesthetized, and kidney samples were collected and processed by Western blot analysis. Relatively low basal expression of EPO during normoxia in young mice showed significant upregulation in hypoxia and stayed upregulated throughout the hypoxic period (threefold compared to normoxic control), showing a slight decline toward the third week. Whereas, a relatively higher normoxic basal EPO protein level in aged mice did not show significant increase until seventh day of hypoxia, but showed significant upregulation in prolonged hypoxia. Hence, we confirmed that there is a progressively increased accumulation of EPO during chronic hypoxia in young and aged mouse kidney, and the EPO upregulation during hypoxia showed a similarity with the pattern of increase in hematocrit, which we have reported previously.

  6. Popularity of hypoxic training methods for endurance-based professional and amateur athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Herms, J; Julià-Sánchez, S; Hamlin, M J; Corbi, F; Pagès, T; Viscor, G

    2015-05-01

    Scientific debate continues into whether hypoxic training has any performance benefit for athletes, and although this type of training seems popular, to our knowledge little empirical evidence on its popularity with endurance-based athletes exists. To quantify the usage of hypoxic training in endurance-based athletes we asked 203 athletes (amateur = 108, professional = 95) to complete a 17-question survey during 2013-2014 season. Compared to amateurs, professional athletes were 4.5 times (3.0-6.8, odds ratio, 95% confidence limits) more likely to undertake hypoxic training. Live-high train-low was the most popular hypoxic training protocol for athletes (52% professional and 80% amateur) with live-high train-high also used (38% professional, 20% amateur). Compared to amateurs, professional athletes tended to use evidence-based hypoxic training methods, seek advice on hypoxic training from reliable sources and were generally more realistic about the potential performance gains as a result of hypoxic training. Almost one third (25-30%) of all athletes suffered illness during their hypoxic training. Compared to amateurs, professional athletes are more likely to undertake hypoxic training and tend to follow current scientific guidelines. Attenuation of the ill effects that occur during hypoxic training may be accomplished if athletes give more attention to monitoring stress and training levels.

  7. Lung mast cells and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in cats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, L.F.; Tucker, A.; Munroe, M.L.; Reeves, J.T.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt was made to reduce or eliminate lung mast cells in order to determine the involvement of mast cells in hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Anesthetized cats were exposed to acute hypoxia (10% O/sub 2/) 20 to 24 h after no pretreatment, after total lung irradiation (3,000 r), after intravenous nitrogen mustard, or after combined lung irradiation and nitrogen mustard. None of the treatments reduced total or perivascular lung mast cell density, or reduced the pulmonary vasoconstrictor response to hypoxia. However, an inverse relationship between lung mast cell density and the pulmonary pressor response to hypoxia was observed. These results suggest that the presence of more lung mast cells may oppose hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

  8. Effect of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension%低氧性肺动脉高压中低氧性肺血管收缩的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盖祥云; 林鹏程; 何彦峰; 才让南加

    2016-01-01

    高海拔低氧环境下,持续发生的低氧性肺血管收缩(hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction,HPV)能够诱导低氧性肺动脉高压(hypoxic pulmonary hypertension,HPH)的发生和发展。HPV是机体对低氧环境的一种生理反射机制,是肺组织特有的生理现象。但是在高原低氧环境下,HPV的持续发生会促进肺血管重构,导致右心室肥厚,从而加重肺泡缺氧的程度,造成缺氧的恶性循环,进而导致肺水肿、肺心病等重度高原病的发生。HPH早期出现HPV,慢性期形成难以逆转的低氧性肺血管重塑。因此,明确HPV的发生机制以及其在HPH中的作用,能够为高原病的防治提供靶点和思路;HPV发生时,及时、有效的治疗也能够为重度高原病的预防奠定基础。但是目前的研究,尚未能对HPV的发生机制和其在HPH中扮演的角色做一个清晰、全面的阐明。该文将对近年HPH中HPV的相关研究做一综述,旨在为该领域内的研究者以及HPH的临床治疗方面提供参考。%Sustained hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV ) as experienced at high altitude can lead to hypoxic pulmonary hypertension(HPH).HPV,a special physiological phenomenon of lung,is the physiological reflex of organism in hypoxic envi-ronment.However,in high altitude hypoxic environment,the sustained HPV can lead to pulmonary vascular remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy,at the same time,the degree of hypoxia in alveoli can be aggravated.Vicious circle of hypoxia is formed,further causing the severe high altitude sickness such as pulmonary edema and pulmonary heart disease.HPV appears in preliminary of HPH,but in the chronic phase,irreversible hy-poxic pulmonary vascular remodeling forms.Therefore,studying the mechanism of HPV and the effect of HPV in HPH can pro-vide targets and ideas for the prevention and treatment of high al-titude sickness. Additionally, in preliminary stage of HPV, prompt treatment

  9. Excess post hypoxic oxygen consumption in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plambech, M.; Deurs, Mikael van; Steffensen, J.F.;

    2013-01-01

    Atlantic cod Gadus morhua experienced oxygen deficit (DO2 ) when exposed to oxygen levels below their critical level (c. 73% of pcrit) and subsequent excess post-hypoxic oxygen consumption (CEPHO) upon return to normoxic conditions, indicative of an oxygen debt. The mean±s.e. CEPHO:DO2 was 6·9±1·......·9±1·5, suggesting that resorting to anaerobic energy production in severe hypoxia is energetically expensive...

  10. Neonatal seizures and therapeutic hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal seizures are associated with morbidity and mortality. Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is the most common cause of seizures in newborns. Neonatal animal models suggest that therapeutic hypothermia can reduce seizures and epileptiform activity in the setting of hypoxia-ischemia, however data from human studies have conflicting results. In this research highlight, we will discuss the findings of our recent study that demonstrated a decreased seizure burden in term newborns with mo...

  11. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant promotes intestinal barrier function, balances Treg and TH17 cells and ameliorates hepatic injury in a mouse model of chronic-binge alcohol feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui-Cong; Xu, Lan-Man; Du, Shan-Jie; Huang, Si-Si; Wu, He; Dong, Jia-Jia; Huang, Jian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Feng, Wen-Ke; Chen, Yong-Ping

    2016-01-22

    Impaired intestinal barrier function plays a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic injury, and the subsequent excessive absorbed endotoxin and bacterial translocation activate the immune response that aggravates the liver injury. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant (LGG-s) has been suggested to improve intestinal barrier function and alleviate the liver injury induced by chronic and binge alcohol consumption, but the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. In this study, chronic-binge alcohol fed model was used to determine the effects of LGG-s on the prevention of alcoholic liver disease in C57BL/6 mice and investigate underlying mechanisms. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli diet containing 5% alcohol for 10 days, and one dose of alcohol was gavaged on Day 11. In one group, LGG-s was supplemented along with alcohol. Control mice were fed isocaloric diet. Nine hours later the mice were sacrificed for analysis. Chronic-binge alcohol exposure induced an elevation in liver enzymes, steatosis and morphology changes, while LGG-s supplementation attenuated these changes. Treatment with LGG-s significantly improved intestinal barrier function reflected by increased mRNA expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and villus-crypt histology in ileum, and decreased Escherichia coli (E. coli) protein level in liver. Importantly, flow cytometry analysis showed that alcohol reduced Treg cell population while increased TH17 cell population as well as IL-17 secretion, which was reversed by LGG-s administration. In conclusion, our findings indicate that LGG-s is effective in preventing chronic-binge alcohol exposure-induced liver injury and shed a light on the importance of the balance of Treg and TH17 cells in the role of LGG-s application.

  12. Larger adaptive response of 5-HT1A autoreceptors to chronic fluoxetine in a mouse model of depression than in healthy mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.FROGER; E.PALAZZO; T.RENOIR; M.MELFORT; N.BARDEN; M.HAMON; L.LANFUMEY

    2004-01-01

    Vulnerability to major depressive disorders, in particular depression, is often associated with both hypoactivity of the central serotoninergic (5-HT) system and hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Extensive studies in normal healthy rodents showed that chronic treatment with SSRI antidepressants produced a marked functional desensitization of somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors, and this adaptive change has been claimed to play a key role in the therapeutic action of

  13. Human neural stem cells differentiate and promote locomotor recovery in an early chronic spinal cord injury NOD-scid mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desirée L Salazar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI results in partial or complete paralysis and is characterized by a loss of neurons and oligodendrocytes, axonal injury, and demyelination/dysmyelination of spared axons. Approximately 1,250,000 individuals have chronic SCI in the U.S.; therefore treatment in the chronic stages is highly clinically relevant. Human neural stem cells (hCNS-SCns were prospectively isolated based on fluorescence-activated cell sorting for a CD133(+ and CD24(-/lo population from fetal brain, grown as neurospheres, and lineage restricted to generate neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. hCNS-SCns have recently been transplanted sub-acutely following spinal cord injury and found to promote improved locomotor recovery. We tested the ability of hCNS-SCns transplanted 30 days post SCI to survive, differentiate, migrate, and promote improved locomotor recovery. METHODS AND FINDINGS: hCNS-SCns were transplanted into immunodeficient NOD-scid mice 30 days post spinal cord contusion injury. hCNS-SCns transplanted mice demonstrated significantly improved locomotor recovery compared to vehicle controls using open field locomotor testing and CatWalk gait analysis. Transplanted hCNS-SCns exhibited long-term engraftment, migration, limited proliferation, and differentiation predominantly to oligodendrocytes and neurons. Astrocytic differentiation was rare and mice did not exhibit mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, differentiated hCNS-SCns integrated with the host as demonstrated by co-localization of human cytoplasm with discrete staining for the paranodal marker contactin-associated protein. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that hCNS-SCns are capable of surviving, differentiating, and promoting improved locomotor recovery when transplanted into an early chronic injury microenvironment. These data suggest that hCNS-SCns transplantation has efficacy in an early chronic SCI setting and thus expands the "window of opportunity" for

  14. Epigenetic regulation of hypoxic sensing disrupts cardiorespiratory homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanduri, Jayasri; Makarenko, Vladislav; Reddy, Vaddi Damodara; Yuan, Guoxiang; Pawar, Anita; Wang, Ning; Khan, Shakil A; Zhang, Xin; Kinsman, Brian; Peng, Ying-Jie; Kumar, Ganesh K; Fox, Aaron P; Godley, Lucy A; Semenza, Gregg L; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2012-02-14

    Recurrent apnea with intermittent hypoxia is a major clinical problem in preterm infants. Recent studies, although limited, showed that adults who were born preterm exhibit increased incidence of sleep-disordered breathing and hypertension, suggesting that apnea of prematurity predisposes to autonomic dysfunction in adulthood. Here, we demonstrate that adult rats that were exposed to intermittent hypoxia as neonates exhibit exaggerated responses to hypoxia by the carotid body and adrenal chromaffin cells, which regulate cardio-respiratory function, resulting in irregular breathing with apneas and hypertension. The enhanced hypoxic sensitivity was associated with elevated oxidative stress, decreased expression of genes encoding antioxidant enzymes, and increased expression of pro-oxidant enzymes. Decreased expression of the Sod2 gene, which encodes the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 2, was associated with DNA hypermethylation of a single CpG dinucleotide close to the transcription start site. Treating neonatal rats with decitabine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation, during intermittent hypoxia exposure prevented oxidative stress, enhanced hypoxic sensitivity, and autonomic dysfunction. These findings implicate a hitherto uncharacterized role for DNA methylation in mediating neonatal programming of hypoxic sensitivity and the ensuing autonomic dysfunction in adulthood.

  15. Anti hypoxic and antioxidant activity of Hibiscus esculentus seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimzadeh, M. A.; Nabavi, S. F.; Nabavi, S. M.; Eslami, B.

    2010-07-01

    The anti hypoxic and antioxidant activities of Hibiscus esculentus seeds were investigated employing eight in vitro assay systems. Anti hypoxic activity was investigated in two models, haemic and circulatory. The effects were pronounced in both models of hypoxia. The anti hypoxic effects were dose-dependent. The results indicated that the extracts have a protective effect against hypoxia induced lethality in mice. The extracts showed antioxidant activity in some models. IC{sub 5}0 for DPPH radical-scavenging activity was 234 {+-} 8.9 {mu}g ml{sup 1}. The extracts showed weak nitric oxide-scavenging activity between 0.1 and 1.6 mg ml{sup -}1. The extracts showed weak Fe{sup 2}+ chelating ability. IC{sub 5}0 were 150 {+-} 13 {mu}g ml{sup -}1. The extracts also exhibited low antioxidant activity in the linoleic acid model but were capable of scavenging hydrogen peroxide in a concentration dependent manner. The total amount of phenolic compounds in each extract was determined as gallic acid equivalents and total flavonoid contents were calculated as quercetin equivalents from a calibration curve. Pharmacological effects may be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of phenols and flavonoids in the extracts. (Author) 40 refs.

  16. Transcriptome analysis of severe hypoxic stress during development in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.G. Woods

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia causes critical cellular injury both in early human development and in adulthood, leading to cerebral palsy, stroke, and myocardial infarction. Interestingly, a remarkable phenomenon known as hypoxic preconditioning arises when a brief hypoxia exposure protects target organs against subsequent, severe hypoxia. Although hypoxic preconditioning has been demonstrated in several model organisms and tissues including the heart and brain, its molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Accordingly, we used embryonic and larval zebrafish to develop a novel vertebrate model for hypoxic preconditioning, and used this model to identify conserved hypoxia-regulated transcripts for further functional study as published in Manchenkov et al. (2015 in G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics. In this Brief article, we provide extensive annotation for the most strongly hypoxia-regulated genes in zebrafish, including their human orthologs, and describe in detail the methods used to identify, filter, and annotate hypoxia-regulated transcripts for downstream functional and bioinformatic assays using the source data provided in Gene Expression Omnibus Accession GSE68473.

  17. Hypoxic-Ischemic Neonatal Encephalopathy: Animal Experiments for Neuroprotective Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sameshima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy and ensuing brain damage is still an important problem in modern perinatal medicine. In this paper, we would like to share some of the results of our recent studies on neuroprotective therapies in animal experiments, as well as some literature reviews. From the basic animal studies, we have now obtained some possible candidates for therapeutic measures against hypoxic-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy. For example, they are hypothermia, rehabilitation, free radical scavenger, neurotrophic factors and growth factors, steroid, calcium channel blocker, vagal stimulation, some anti apoptotic agents, pre- and post conditioning, antioxidants, cell therapy with stem cells, modulators of K(+-ATP channels, and so on. Whether combination of these therapies may be more beneficial than any single therapy needs to be clarified. Hypoxia-ischemia is a complicated condition, in which the cause, severity, and time-course are different in each case. Likewise, each fetus has its own inherent potentials such as adaptation, preconditioning-tolerance, and intolerance. Therefore, further extensive studies are required to establish an individualized strategy for neuroprotection against perinatal hypoxic-ischemic insult.

  18. Neuropsychological outcomes of pediatric burn patients who sustained hypoxic episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Marta; Robertson, Carrie; Murphy, Kevin D; Rosenberg, Laura; Mlcak, Ronald; Robert, Rhonda S; Herndon, David N; Meyer, Walter J

    2005-11-01

    The neuropsychological outcomes of children who suffered hypoxic episodes following their burns are not completely understood and vary depending on the nature and severity of the episode. A retrospective review of youth that were admitted to this acute burn care facility over the past 20 years was conducted to identify the extent of cognitive and affective difficulties. Thirty-nine children who sustained hypoxic injuries related to their burns were compared with 21 controls that were matched for age, TBSA, and time of injury. Approximately a third of the children who survived from the hypoxia group continued to have long-term cognitive and emotional difficulties. For those who recovered reasonably well, no differences were found from the matched burned controls. These results probably underestimate the true extent of neuropsychological difficulties experienced by these youth given that detailed cognitive testing was not routinely performed. Prospective studies are needed to further characterize the full nature of difficulties and outcomes associated with burn related hypoxic injuries.

  19. Genetic and hypoxic alterations of the microRNA-210-ISCU1/2 axis promote iron–sulfur deficiency and pulmonary hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    White, Kevin; Lu, Yu; Annis, Sofia; Hale, Andrew E.; Chau, B. Nelson; Dahlman, James E.; Hemann, Craig; Opotowsky, Alexander R.; Vargas, Sara O.; Rosas, Ivan; Perrella, Mark A.; Juan C Osorio; Haley, Kathleen J; Graham, Brian B.; Kumar, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe‐S) clusters are essential for mitochondrial metabolism, but their regulation in pulmonary hypertension (PH) remains enigmatic. We demonstrate that alterations of the miR‐210‐ISCU1/2 axis cause Fe‐S deficiencies in vivo and promote PH. In pulmonary vascular cells and particularly endothelium, hypoxic induction of miR‐210 and repression of the miR‐210 targets ISCU1/2 down‐regulated Fe‐S levels. In mouse and human vascular and endothelial tissue affected by PH, miR‐210 was elevat...

  20. Genetic and hypoxic alterations of the microRNA-210-ISCU1/2 axis promote iron–sulfur deficiency and pulmonary hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    White, Kevin; Lu, Yu; Annis, Sofia; Hale, Andrew E.; Chau, B. Nelson; Dahlman, James E.; Hemann, Craig; Opotowsky, Alexander R.; Vargas, Sara O.; Rosas, Ivan; Perrella, Mark A.; Juan C Osorio; Haley, Kathleen J; Graham, Brian B.; Kumar, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are essential for mitochondrial metabolism, but their regulation in pulmonary hypertension (PH) remains enigmatic. We demonstrate that alterations of the miR-210-ISCU1/2 axis cause Fe-S deficiencies in vivo and promote PH. In pulmonary vascular cells and particularly endothelium, hypoxic induction of miR-210 and repression of the miR-210 targets ISCU1/2 down-regulated Fe-S levels. In mouse and human vascular and endothelial tissue affected by PH, miR-210 was elevat...

  1. Neuroendocrine and cardiac metabolic dysfunction and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in adipose tissue and pancreas following chronic spinal cord injury in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Nash

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available CVD (cardiovascular disease represents a leading cause of mortality in chronic SCI (spinal cord injury. Several component risk factors are observed in SCI; however, the underlying mechanisms that contribute to these risks have not been defined. Central and peripheral chronic inflammation is associated with metabolic dysfunction and CVD, including adipokine regulation of neuroendocrine and cardiac function and inflammatory processes initiated by the innate immune response. We use female C57 Bl/6 mice to examine neuroendocrine, cardiac, adipose and pancreatic signaling related to inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in response to experimentally induced chronic SCI. Using immuno-histochemical, -precipitation, and -blotting analysis, we show decreased POMC (proopiomelanocortin and increased NPY (neuropeptide-Y expression in the hypothalamic ARC (arcuate nucleus and PVN (paraventricular nucleus, 1-month post-SCI. Long-form leptin receptor (Ob-Rb, JAK2 (Janus kinase/STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/p38 and RhoA/ROCK (Rho-associated kinase signaling is significantly increased in the heart tissue post-SCI, and we observe the formation and activation of the NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 inflammasome in VAT (visceral adipose tissue and pancreas post-SCI. These data demonstrate neuroendocrine signaling peptide alterations, associated with central inflammation and metabolic dysfunction post-SCI, and provide evidence for the peripheral activation of signaling mechanisms involved in cardiac, VAT and pancreatic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction post-SCI. Further understanding of biological mechanisms contributing to SCI-related inflammatory processes and metabolic dysfunction associated with CVD pathology may help to direct therapeutic and rehabilitation countermeasures.

  2. Alteration of hedgehog signaling by chronic exposure to different pesticide formulations and unveiling the regenerative potential of recombinant sonic hedgehog in mouse model of bone marrow aplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaklader, Malay; Law, Sujata

    2015-03-01

    Chronic pesticide exposure-induced downregulation of hedgehog signaling and its subsequent degenerative effects on the mammalian hematopoietic system have not been investigated yet. However a number of concurrent studies have pointed out the positive correlation between chronic pesticide exposure induced bone marrow failure and immune suppression. Here, we have given an emphasis on the recapitulation of human marrow aplasia like condition in mice by chronic mixed pesticide exposures and simultaneously unravel the role of individual pesticides in the said event. Unlike the effect of mixed pesticide, individual pesticides differentially alter the hedgehog signaling in the bone marrow primitive hematopoietic compartment (Sca1 + compartment) and stromal compartment. Individually, hexaconazole disrupted hematopoietic as well as stromal hedgehog signaling activation through inhibiting SMO and facilitating PKC δ expression. On contrary, both chlorpyriphos and cypermethrin increased the sequestration and degradation of GLI1 by upregulating SU(FU) and βTrCP, respectively. However, cypermethrin-mediated inhibition of hedgehog signaling has partly shown to be circumvented by non-canonical activation of GLI1. Finally, we have tested the regenerative response of sonic hedgehog and shown that in vitro supplemented recombinant SHH protein augmented clonogenic stromal progenitors (CFU-F) as well as primitive multipotent hematopoietic clones including CFU-GEMM and CFU-GM of mixed pesticide-induced aplastic marrow. It is an indication of the marrow regeneration. Finally, our findings provide a gripping evidence that downregulated hedgehog signaling contribute to pesticide-mediated bone marrow aplasia but it could be recovered by proper supplementation of recombinant SHH along with hematopoietic base cocktail. Furthermore, SU(FU) and GLI1 can be exploited as future theradiagnostic markers for early marrow aplasia diagnosis.

  3. Neuroendocrine and Cardiac Metabolic Dysfunction and NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in Adipose Tissue and Pancreas following Chronic Spinal Cord Injury in the Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory E. Bigford

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available CVD (cardiovascular disease represents a leading cause of mortality in chronic SCI (spinal cord injury. Several component risk factors are observed in SCI; however, the underlying mechanisms that contribute to these risks have not been defined. Central and peripheral chronic inflammation is associated with metabolic dysfunction and CVD, including adipokine regulation of neuroendocrine and cardiac function and inflammatory processes initiated by the innate immune response. We use female C57 Bl/6 mice to examine neuroendocrine, cardiac, adipose and pancreatic signaling related to inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in response to experimentally induced chronic SCI. Using immunohistochemical, -precipitation, and -blotting analysis, we show decreased POMC (proopiomelanocortin and increased NPY (neuropeptide-Y expression in the hypothalamic ARC (arcuate nucleus and PVN (paraventricular nucleus, 1-month post-SCI. Long-form leptin receptor (Ob-Rb, JAK2 (Janus kinase/STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/p38 and RhoA/ROCK (Rho-associated kinase signaling is significantly increased in the heart tissue post-SCI, and we observe the formation and activation of the NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 inflammasome in VAT (visceral adipose tissue and pancreas post-SCI. These data demonstrate neuroendocrine signaling peptide alterations, associated with central inflammation and metabolic dysfunction post-SCI, and provide evidence for the peripheral activation of signaling mechanisms involved in cardiac, VAT and pancreatic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction post-SCI. Further understanding of biological mechanisms contributing to SCI-related inflammatory processes and metabolic dysfunction associated with CVD pathology may help to direct therapeutic and rehabilitation countermeasures.

  4. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... alcohol abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute ... chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be a factor in some cases. ...

  5. Experimental study on central nervous toxicity of 'misonidazole' a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, I. (Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1981-11-01

    'Misonidazole', a radiosensitizer for hypoxic cells is expected to be applied to the treatment of malignant tumors, but its side effect becomes a subject of study, because its effective dose is close to its lethal dose. The author performed experiments with mice on the central nervous toxicity, which is the most lethal of the side effects of Misonidazole, with the following results; 1. The abrupt death seen after the administration of a large dose of Misonidazole was attributable to the central nervous toxicity. LD/sub 50/ for d.d. strain mouse was 1.55 mg per body weight g. 2. The used mice always developed convulsion before death. But the administration of anticonvulsant failed to free them from death. 3. Autopsy findings were such abnormal ones as the degeneration and exfoliation of nerve cells and diapedetic focus. After sacrifice, however, no findings indicative of disturbance of central nerve could be detected. 4. Misonidazole, even in a small divided dose, left intracerebral retention, though slightly, indicating that its accumulation in the brain would be increased with increase in the dose. 5. The disturbance of central nerve was not exacerbated by the whole brain irradiation with Misonidazole.

  6. Accumulation of Regulatory T Cells and Chronic Inflammation in the Middle Ear in a Mouse Model of Chronic Otitis Media with Effusion Induced by Combined Eustachian Tube Blockage and Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Takashi; Kodama, Satoru; Kawano, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is associated with chronic otitis media (COM). In this study, we generated a murine model of COM by using eustachian tube (ET) obstruction and NTHi (10(7) CFU) inoculation into the tympanic bulla, and we investigated the relationship between regulatory T cells (Treg) and chronic inflammation in the middle ear. Middle ear effusions (MEEs) and middle ear mucosae (MEM) were collected at days 3 and 14 and at 1 and 2 months after inoculation. Untreated mice served as controls. MEEs were used for bacterial counts and to measure the concentrations of cytokines. MEM were collected for histological evaluation and flow cytometric analysis. Inflammation of the MEM was prolonged throughout this study, and the incidence of NTHi culture-positive MEE was 38% at 2 months after inoculation. The levels of interleukin-1β (IL-β), tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-10, and transforming growth factor β were increased in the middle ear for up to 2 months after inoculation. CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) Treg accumulated in the middle ear, and the percentage of Treg in the MEM increased for up to 2 months after inoculation. Treg depletion induced a 99.9% reduction of bacterial counts in MEEs and also significantly reduced the ratio of NTHi culture-positive MEE. The levels of these cytokines were also reduced in MEEs. In summary, we developed a murine model of COM, and our findings indicate that Treg confer infectious tolerance to NTHi in the middle ear.

  7. Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water can lead to resistance to antimonial drugs in a mouse model of visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Meghan R; Wyllie, Susan; Raab, Andrea; Feldmann, Joerg; Fairlamb, Alan H

    2013-12-03

    The Indian subcontinent is the only region where arsenic contamination of drinking water coexists with widespread resistance to antimonial drugs that are used to treat the parasitic disease visceral leishmaniasis. We have previously proposed that selection for parasite resistance within visceral leishmaniasis patients who have been exposed to trivalent arsenic results in cross-resistance to the related metalloid antimony, present in the pentavalent state as a complex in drugs such as sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam) and meglumine antimonate (Glucantime). To test this hypothesis, Leishmania donovani was serially passaged in mice exposed to arsenic in drinking water at environmentally relevant levels (10 or 100 ppm). Arsenic accumulation in organs and other tissues was proportional to the level of exposure and similar to that previously reported in human liver biopsies. After five monthly passages in mice exposed to arsenic, isolated parasites were found to be completely refractory to 500 μg · mL(-1) Pentostam compared with the control passage group (38.5 μg · mL(-1)) cultured in vitro in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Reassessment of resistant parasites following further passage for 4 mo in mice without arsenic exposure showed that resistance was stable. Treatment of infected mice with Pentostam confirmed that resistance observed in vitro also occurred in vivo. We conclude that arsenic contamination may have played a significant role in the development of Leishmania antimonial resistance in Bihar because inadequate treatment with antimonial drugs is not exclusive to India, whereas widespread antimonial resistance is.

  8. The complementary roles of surface-immunoglobulin clonality and fluorescence intensity, mouse rosettes, and cd5 in the diagnosis of B-chronic lymphocytic-leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batata, A; Shen, B; Yanes, B; Nicholson, G; Hines, D; Chang, J; Gross, H; Llenadolee, M; Merle, S

    1993-03-01

    Peripheral blood from 77 cases of B-CLL was analyzed to evaluate the diagnostic value of SIg clonality and fluorescence intensity, mouse rosettes (MR), and CD5. Monoclonal SIg (L-chain restriction or H-chain restriction or both) was detected in 69 cases (89.61%), with weak fluorescence (mean channel number on flow cytometry <200) in 65 (94.2%); MR was positive in 66 (85.71%); CD5 positive in 64 (83.12%). The association of SIg intensity, MR, and CD5 was as follows: weak SIg/MR+/CD5+, 41 cases (53.25%); weak SIg/MR+/CD5-, 13 (16.88%); weak SIg/MR-/CD5+, 11 (14.29%); strong SIg/MR+/CD5+, 4 (5.19%); and undetected SIg/MR+/CD5+, 8 (10.39%). Thus, by performing the three markers and accepting either two or three positive results (weak SIg, MR+, CD5+) as sufficient for diagnosis, all 77 cases (100%) were diagnosed. The study demonstrated the complementary roles between L- and H- chains, and between SIg intensity, MR, and CD5 in immunophenotyping CLL.

  9. Lack of the P2X7 receptor protects against AMD-like defects and microparticle accumulation in a chronic oxidative stress-induced mouse model of AMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Kyle A; Lin, C M; Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Yang, Dongli

    2017-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is an ATP-gated ion channel that is a key player in oxidative stress under pathological conditions. The P2X7R is expressed in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and neural retina. Chronic oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Mice lacking Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1) developed chronic oxidative stress as well as AMD-like features, but whether the P2X7R plays a causative role in oxidative stress-induced AMD is unknown. Thus, the main purpose of this study was to test if concurrent knockout (KO) of P2X7R could block AMD-like defects seen in Sod1 KO mice. Using multiple approaches, we demonstrate that Sod1 KO causes AMD-like defects, including positive staining for oxidative stress markers, 3-nitrotyrosine and carboxymethyl lysine, thinning of the RPE and retina, thickening of Bruch's membrane, presence of basal laminar and linear deposits, RPE barrier disruption and accumulation of microglia/macrophages. Moreover, we find that Sod1 KO mice accumulate more microparticles (MPs) within RPE/choroid tissues. Concurrent KO of the P2X7R protects against AMD-like defects and MP accumulation in Sod1 KO mice. Together, we show for the first time, that deficiency of P2X7R prevents in vivo oxidative stress-induced accumulation of MPs and AMD-like defects. This work could potentially lead to novel therapies for AMD and other oxidative stress-driven diseases.

  10. Acute and chronic interference with BDNF/TrkB-signaling impair LTP selectively at mossy fiber synapses in the CA3 region of mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildt, Sandra; Endres, Thomas; Lessmann, Volkmar; Edelmann, Elke

    2013-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling via TrkB crucially regulates synaptic plasticity in the brain. Although BDNF is abundant at hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) synapses, which critically contribute to hippocampus dependent memory, its role in MF synaptic plasticity (long-term potentiation, LTP) remained largely unclear. Using field potential recordings in CA3 of adult heterozygous BDNF knockout (ko, BDNF+/-) mice we observed impaired (∼50%) NMDAR-independent MF-LTP. In contrast to MF synapses, LTP at neighboring associative/commissural (A/C) fiber synapses remained unaffected. To exclude that impaired MF-LTP in BDNF+/- mice was due to developmental changes in response to chronically reduced BDNF levels, and to prove the importance of acute availability of BDNF in MF-LTP, we also tested effects of acute interference with BDNF/TrkB signaling. Inhibition of TrkB tyrosine kinase signaling with k252a, or with the selective BDNF scavenger TrkB-Fc, both inhibited MF-LTP to the same extent as observed in BDNF+/- mice. Basal synaptic transmission, short-term plasticity, and synaptic fatigue during LTP induction were not significantly altered by treatment with k252a or TrkB-Fc, or by chronic BDNF reduction in BDNF+/- mice. Since the acute interference with BDNF-signaling did not completely block MF-LTP, our results provide evidence that an additional mechanism besides BDNF induced TrkB signaling contributes to this type of LTP. Our results prove for the first time a mechanistic action of acute BDNF/TrkB signaling in presynaptic expression of MF-LTP in adult hippocampus.

  11. Sirtuin 6 protects the heart from hypoxic damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksin-Matveev, Anna; Kanfi, Yariv [The Mina and Everard Goodman, Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel); Hochhauser, Edith [The Laboratory of the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Rabin Medical Center, Petach Tikva (Israel); Isak, Ahuva; Cohen, Haim Y. [The Mina and Everard Goodman, Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel); Shainberg, Asher, E-mail: asher.shainberg@gmail.com [The Mina and Everard Goodman, Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) is a protein associated with prolonged life expectancy. We investigated whether life extension is associated with cardioprotection against hypoxia. The proposed study is to develop approaches to reduce hypoxic damage through the use of the sirtuin pathway and to elucidate the mechanism involved. For that purpose we subjected cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice (TG) with over-expression of SIRT6, to hypoxic stress in cell cultures. We hypothesized that cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice subjected to prolonged hypoxia may release survival factors or fewer damage markers to protect them from hypoxic stress compared with wild type (WT) mice. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) released to the medium and propidium iodide (PI) binding, were markedly decreased following hypoxia in TG cardiomyocytes. The protective mechanism of SIRT6 over-expression includes the activation of pAMPKα pathway, the increased protein level of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2), the inhibition of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), the decrease of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the reduction in the protein level of phospho-protein kinase B (pAkt) during hypoxia. Together, all these processes impede the necrosis/apoptosis pathways leading to the improved survival of cardiomyocytes following hypoxia, which might explain life extension. - Highlights: • Sirtuin 6 is a protein associated with prolonged life expectancy. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 protects cardiocytes from hypoxia and oxidative stress. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 activates the pAMPKα pathway and the Bcl2 expression. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 decreases ROS formation and pAkt level during hypoxia. • These pathways protect cardiocytes from hypoxia and might explain lifespan extension.

  12. Switching off malignant mesothelioma: exploiting the hypoxic microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, Noushin; Bennewith, Kevin L; Churg, Andrew; Wang, Yuzhuo; Collins, Colin C; Mutti, Luciano

    2016-11-01

    Malignant mesotheliomas are aggressive, asbestos-related cancers with poor patient prognosis, typically arising in the mesothelial surfaces of tissues in pleural and peritoneal cavity. The relative unspecific symptoms of mesotheliomas, misdiagnoses, and lack of precise targeted therapies call for a more critical assessment of this disease. In the present review, we categorize commonly identified genomic aberrations of mesotheliomas into their canonical pathways and discuss targeting these pathways in the context of tumor hypoxia, a hallmark of cancer known to render solid tumors more resistant to radiation and most chemo-therapy. We then explore the concept that the intrinsic hypoxic microenvironment of mesotheliomas can be Achilles' heel for targeted, multimodal therapeutic intervention.

  13. [Hypoxic brain injuries notified to the Danish Patient Insurance Association during 1992-2004. Secondary publication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock, J.; Christoffersen, J.K.; Hedegaard, M.;

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the files of the Danish Patient Insurance Association for newborns suffering from hypoxic brain injuries. From 1992 to 2004, a total of 127 approved claims concerning peripartum hypoxic injury were registered. Thirty-eight newborns died and the majority of the 89 surviving childre...

  14. Hypoxic preconditioning enhances neural stem cell transplantation therapy after intracerebral hemorrhage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, Takuma; Narasimhan, Purnima; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Wang, Eric; Yoshioka, Hideyuki; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki; Chan, Pak H

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that intraparenchymal transplantation of neural stem cells ameliorates neurological deficits in animals with intracerebral hemorrhage. However, hemoglobin in the host brain environment causes massive grafted cell death and reduces the effectiveness of this approach. Several studies have shown that preconditioning induced by sublethal hypoxia can markedly improve the tolerance of treated subjects to more severe insults. Therefore, we investigated whether hypoxic preconditioning enhances neural stem cell resilience to the hemorrhagic stroke environment and improves therapeutic effects in mice. To assess whether hypoxic preconditioning enhances neural stem cell survival when exposed to hemoglobin, neural stem cells were exposed to 5% hypoxia for 24 hours before exposure to hemoglobin. To study the effectiveness of hypoxic preconditioning on grafted-neural stem cell recovery, neural stem cells subjected to hypoxic preconditioning were grafted into the parenchyma 3 days after intracerebral hemorrhage. Hypoxic preconditioning significantly enhanced viability of the neural stem cells exposed to hemoglobin and increased grafted-cell survival in the intracerebral hemorrhage brain. Hypoxic preconditioning also increased neural stem cell secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor. Finally, transplanted neural stem cells with hypoxic preconditioning exhibited enhanced tissue-protective capability that accelerated behavioral recovery. Our results suggest that hypoxic preconditioning in neural stem cells improves efficacy of stem cell therapy for intracerebral hemorrhage.

  15. Resistance of hypoxic cells to ionizing radiation is influenced by homologous recombination status.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprong, D.; Janssen, H.L.K.; Vens, C.; Begg, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the role of DNA repair in hypoxic radioresistance. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Chinese hamster cell lines with mutations in homologous recombination (XRCC2, XRCC3, BRAC2, RAD51C) or nonhomologous end-joining (DNA-PKcs) genes were irradiated under normoxic (20% oxygen) and hypoxic (&

  16. Plasticity in the Neonatal Brain following Hypoxic-Ischaemic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eridan Rocha-Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischaemic damage to the developing brain is a leading cause of child death, with high mortality and morbidity, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and cognitive disabilities. The developmental stage of the brain and the severity of the insult influence the selective regional vulnerability and the subsequent clinical manifestations. The increased susceptibility to hypoxia-ischaemia (HI of periventricular white matter in preterm infants predisposes the immature brain to motor, cognitive, and sensory deficits, with cognitive impairment associated with earlier gestational age. In term infants HI causes selective damage to sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem. Even though the immature brain is more malleable to external stimuli compared to the adult one, a hypoxic-ischaemic event to the neonate interrupts the shaping of central motor pathways and can affect normal developmental plasticity through altering neurotransmission, changes in cellular signalling, neural connectivity and function, wrong targeted innervation, and interruption of developmental apoptosis. Models of neonatal HI demonstrate three morphologically different types of cell death, that is, apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy, which crosstalk and can exist as a continuum in the same cell. In the present review we discuss the mechanisms of HI injury to the immature brain and the way they affect plasticity.

  17. Regional hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in dogs with asymptomatic dirofilariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapleau, M W; Fish, R E; Levitzky, M G

    1985-06-01

    The pulmonary hemodynamic response to unilateral alveolar hypoxia was investigated in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs with mild heartworm (HW) disease and in dogs free of HW (HWF). Left lung nitrogen ventilation in HWF dogs resulted in a decrease in the fraction of the cardiac output (QT) perfusing the left lung (QL) from 0.37 +/- 0.03 (SEM) to 0.20 +/- 0.02 (P less than 0.01). In contrast, dogs with mild HW disease did not develop a significant decrease in QL/QT which decreased from 0.38 +/- 0.02 to 0.33 +/- 0.02. This attenuated pulmonary vascular response to regional alveolar hypoxia in dogs with HW disease was associated with a normal pulmonary arterial pressure (14.8 +/- 1.5 mm of Hg) that was not different from that seen in HWF dogs (15.8 +/- 1.7 mm of Hg). These results indicate that mild HW disease interferes with the ability of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction to redistribute pulmonary blood flow away from hypoxic regions of the lung.

  18. Disrupted MEK/ERK signaling in the medial orbital cortex and dorsal endopiriform nuclei of the prefrontal cortex in a chronic restraint stress mouse model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Yea-Hyun; Yoon, Sang-Sun; Kim, Yu-Han; Jo, Sangmee Ahn

    2014-09-19

    Depression is one of the most prevalent mental illnesses, and causes a constant feeling of sadness and lose of interest, which often leads to suicide. Evidence suggests that depression is associated with aberrant MEK/ERK signaling. However, studies on MEK/ERK signaling in depression have only been done in a few brain regions, such as the hippocampus and mesolimbic reward pathways. Recent studies also implicate the involvement of the prefrontal cortex in depression. Thus, we examined the changes in MEK/ERK signaling in subregions of the prefrontal cortex of C57BL/6 mice by immunohistochemistry using phospho-MEK1/2 (Ser 217/221) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) antibodies. Mice were subjected to 21 consecutive days of restraint stress (for 2h daily), and depression-like behavior was evaluated using a sociability test and tail suspension test. The antidepressant, imipramine (20mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 30min before restraint stress exposure. Chronic/repeated restraint stress produced depressive-like behavior, such as increased social avoidance in the social interaction test, and enhanced immobility time in the tail suspension test. This depressive behavior was ameliorated by imipramine. The behavioral changes well corresponded to a decrease in MEK/ERK immunoreactivity in the medial orbital (MO) cortex and dorsal endopiriform nuclei (DEn), which was averted by imipramine, but not in cingulate, prelimbic, infralimbic, and motor cortex. These results suggest that MEK/ERK signaling is disrupted in the DEn and MO subregions of the prefrontal cortex in the depressive phenotype, and that blocking a decrease in activated MEK/ERK is inherent to the antidepressant imipramine response.

  19. New Mouse Model for Chronic Infections by Gram-Negative Bacteria Enabling the Study of Anti-Infective Efficacy and Host-Microbe Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletzer, Daniel; Mansour, Sarah C.; Wuerth, Kelli; Rahanjam, Negin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Only a few, relatively cumbersome animal models enable long-term Gram-negative bacterial infections that mimic human situations, where untreated infections can last for weeks. Here, we describe a simple murine cutaneous abscess model that enables chronic or progressive infections, depending on the subcutaneously injected bacterial strain. In this model, Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis epidemic isolate LESB58 caused localized high-density skin and soft tissue infections and necrotic skin lesions for up to 10 days but did not disseminate in either CD-1 or C57BL/6 mice. The model was adapted for use with four major Gram-negative nosocomial pathogens, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Escherichia coli. This model enabled noninvasive imaging and tracking of lux-tagged bacteria, the influx of activated neutrophils, and production of reactive oxygen-nitrogen species at the infection site. Screening antimicrobials against high-density infections showed that local but not intravenous administration of gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and meropenem significantly but incompletely reduced bacterial counts and superficial tissue dermonecrosis. Bacterial RNA isolated from the abscess tissue revealed that Pseudomonas genes involved in iron uptake, toxin production, surface lipopolysaccharide regulation, adherence, and lipase production were highly upregulated whereas phenazine production and expression of global activator gacA were downregulated. The model was validated for studying virulence using mutants of more-virulent P. aeruginosa strain PA14. Thus, mutants defective in flagella or motility, type III secretion, or siderophore biosynthesis were noninvasive and suppressed dermal necrosis in mice, while a strain with a mutation in the bfiS gene encoding a sensor kinase showed enhanced invasiveness and mortality in mice compared to controls infected with wild-type P. aeruginosa PA14. PMID:28246361

  20. Disturbed hypoxic responses as a pathogenic mechanism of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrina, Sergiu-Bogdan; Zheng, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is a chronic complication of diabetes that is characterized by impaired wound healing in the lower extremities. DFU remains a major clinical challenge because of poor understanding of its pathogenic mechanisms. Impaired wound healing in diabetes is characterized by decreased angiogenesis, reduced bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) recruitment, and decreased fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation and migration. Recently, increasing evidence has suggested that increased hypoxic conditions and impaired cellular responses to hypoxia are essential pathogenic factors of delayed wound healing in DFU. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1, a heterodimer of HIF-1α and HIF-1β) is a master regulator of oxygen homeostasis that mediates the adaptive cellular responses to hypoxia by regulating the expression of genes involved in angiogenesis, metabolic changes, proliferation, migration, and cell survival. However, HIF-1 signalling is inhibited in diabetes as a result of hyperglycaemia-induced HIF-1α destabilization and functional repression. Increasing HIF-1α expression and activity using various approaches promotes angiogenesis, EPC recruitment, and granulation, thereby improving wound healing in experimental diabetes. The mechanisms underlying HIF-1α regulation in diabetes and the therapeutic strategies targeting HIF-1 signalling for the treatment of diabetic wounds are discussed in this review. Further investigations of the pathways involved in HIF-1α regulation in diabetes are required to advance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying impaired wound healing in diabetes and to provide a foundation for developing novel therapeutic approaches to treat DFU.

  1. The G. L. Brown Prize Lecture. Hypoxic regulation of ion channel function and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peers, Chris

    2002-07-01

    Acute hypoxia regulates the activity of specific ion channels in a rapid and reversible manner. Such effects underlie appropriate cellular responses to hypoxia which are designed to initiate cardiorespiratory reflexes and contribute importantly to other tissue responses, all of which are designed to improve tissue O2 supply. These responses include excitation of chemoreceptors as well as pulmonary vasoconstriction and systemic vasodilatation. However, such responses may also contribute to the adverse responses to hypoxia, such as excitotoxicity in the central nervous system. Whilst numerous ion channel types are known to be modulated by acute hypoxia, the nature of the O2 sensor in most tissues remains to be identified. Prolonged (chronic) hypoxia regulates functional expression of ion channels, and so remodels excitability of various cell types. Whilst this may contribute to adaptive responses such as high-altitude acclimatization, such altered channel expression may also contribute to the onset of pathological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. Indeed, evidence is emerging that production of pathological peptides associated with Alzheimer's disease is increased during prolonged hypoxia. Such effects may account for the known increased incidence of this disease in patients who have previously endured hypoxic episodes, such as congestive heart failure and stroke. Identification of the mechanisms coupling hypoxia to the increased production of these peptides is likely to be of therapeutic benefit.

  2. Pulmonary administration of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to the lungs induces alveolar regeneration in a mouse model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Michiko; Hirokawa, Mai; Abe, Kaori; Kumagai, Harumi; Yamashita, Chikamasa

    2016-07-10

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive respiratory disease with several causes, including smoking, and no curative therapeutic agent is available, particularly for destructive alveolar lesions. In this study, we investigated the differentiation-inducing effect on undifferentiated lung cells (Calu-6) and the alveolar regenerative effect of the active vitamin 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 (VD3) with the ultimate goal of developing a novel curative drug for COPD. First, the differentiation-inducing effect of VD3 on Calu-6 cells was evaluated. Treatment with VD3 increased the proportions of type I alveolar epithelial (AT-I) and type II alveolar epithelial (AT-II) cells constituting alveoli in a concentration- and treatment time-dependent manner, demonstrating the potent differentiation-inducing activity of VD3 on Calu-6 cells. We thus administered VD3 topically to the mice lung using a previously developed intrapulmonary administration via self-inhalation method. To evaluate the alveolus-repairing effect of VD3, we administered VD3 intrapulmonarily to elastase-induced COPD model mice and computed the mean distance between the alveolar walls as an index of the extent of alveolar injury. Results showed significant decreases in the alveolar wall distance in groups of mice that received 0.01, 0.1, and 1μg/kg of intrapulmonary VD3, revealing excellent alveolus-regenerating effect of VD3. Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of VD3 on improving respiratory function using a respiratory function analyzer. Lung elasticity and respiratory competence [forced expiratory volume (FEV) 1 s %] are reduced in COPD, reflecting advanced emphysematous changes. In elastase-induced COPD model mice, although lung elasticity and respiratory competence were reduced, VD3 administered intrapulmonarily twice weekly for 2weeks recovered tissue elastance and forced expiratory volume in 0.05s to the forced vital capacity, which are indicators of lung elasticity and respiratory

  3. Chronic exposure to chlorpyrifos triggered body weight increase and memory impairment depending on human apoE polymorphisms in a targeted replacement mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peris-Sampedro, Fiona; Basaure, Pia; Reverte, Ingrid; Cabré, Maria; Domingo, José L; Colomina, Maria Teresa

    2015-05-15

    Despite restrictions on their use, humans are still constantly exposed to organophosphates (OPs). A huge number of studies have ratified the neurotoxic effects of chlorpyrifos (CPF) and suggested its association with neurodegenerative diseases, but data are still scarce. Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) plays an important role in lipid transport and distribution. In humans, the apoE4 isoform has been linked to an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). ApoE3 is the most prevalent isoform worldwide, and has been often established as the healthful one. The current study, performed in targeted replacement (TR) adult male mice, aimed to inquire whether genetic variations of the human apoE respond differently to a chronic dietary challenge with CPF. At four/five months of age, mice carrying apoE2, apoE3 or apoE4 were pair-fed a diet supplemented with CPF at 0 or 2mg/kg body weight/day for 13weeks. Cholinergic signs were monitored daily and body weight changes weekly. In the last week of treatment, learning and memory were assessed in a Barnes maze task. Dietary CPF challenge increased body weight only in apoE3 mice. Differences in the acquisition and retention of the Barnes maze were attributed to apoE genetic differences. Our results showed that apoE4 mice performed worse than apoE2 and apoE3 carriers in the acquisition period of the spatial task, and that apoE2 mice had poorer retention than the other two genotypes. On the other hand, CPF increased the search velocity of apoE2 subjects during the acquisition period. Retention was impaired only in CPF-exposed apoE3 mice. These results underline that gene×environment interactions need to be taken into account in epidemiological studies. Given that apoE3, the most common polymorphism in humans, has proved to be the most sensitive to CPF, the potential implications for human health merit serious thought.

  4. Impact of the chronic arsenic poisoning on the ultraturcture of adult mouse brain temporal lobe cortex%慢性砷中毒对成年小鼠大脑皮质颞叶超微结构的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    花伟; 臧贵勇

    2015-01-01

    Objective To observe the changes of the ultrastructure of the temporal lobe cortex for the brains of these mouse with chronic arsenicpoisoning ,to explore the mechanism of arsenic toxicity on the brain .Method 60 healthy adult Kunming mouse ( 30 male and 30 female) were selected and divided into control group ,low and high dose groups . There were 20 mouse in each group . The dye arsenic group respectively with distilled water , 1/5LD50 ,1/50LD50 ,As2 O3 solution to fill the stomach ,for three consecutive months .After building ,canister , based on the determination of arsenic in groups of mice brain ,Nepal’s dyeing were used to observe the cerebral cor‐tex of temporal morphology change ,transmission electronmicroscope to observe the changes of the ultrastructure of the cerebral cortex temporal lobe in mice .Result It might be the type the type of arsenic content in the cerebral cor‐tex was significantly higher than the control group (P<0 .05) .It was observed the decrease in the number of infec‐ted each cortical neurons ,shape was irregular ,intracytoplasmic austenite reduced .It was observed under electron microscope the prion edema groups of nerve cells ,organelles decreased ,mitochondrial cristae fracture and cavity . Conclusion Arsenic poisoning can cause nerve cell pathology and ultrastructure change of cerebral cortex .%目的:观察慢性砷中毒对小鼠大脑皮质颞叶超微结构的改变,探讨砷对大脑的毒性机制。方法选取健康成年昆明小鼠60只,雌雄各半,分为对照组、慢性砷中毒低、高剂量组,每组20只,各染砷组分别以蒸馏水、1/5LD50、1/50 LD50的As2 O3溶液灌胃,连续3个月。经造模、染毒、取材后,测定各组小鼠大脑中砷含量,采用尼氏染色观察大脑皮质颞叶形态学改变,透射电镜观察小鼠大脑皮质颞叶超微结构的变化。结果(1)染毒各组小鼠大脑皮质中砷含量明显高于对照组(P<0.05);(2)

  5. Hypoxic Living and Exercise Training Alter Adipose Tissue Leptin/Leptin Receptor in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yingli; Feng, Lianshi; Xie, Minhao; Zhang, Li; Xu, Jianfang; He, Zihong; You, Tongjian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypobaric hypoxia results in weight loss in obese individuals, and exercise training is advocated for the treatment of obesity and its related metabolic dysfunctions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hypoxic living and exercise training on obesity and adipose tissue leptin/leptin receptor in dietary-induced obese rats. Methods: One hundred and thirty high-fat diet fed Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned into one of the following groups (n = 10 each): control, sedentary hypoxic living for 1–4 weeks (SH1, SH2, SH3, and SH4), living, and exercise training in normoxic conditions for 1–4 weeks (TN1, TN2, TN3, and TN4), and living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions for 1–4 weeks (TN1, TN2, TN3, and TN4). Epididymal adipose tissue expression levels of leptin and leptin receptor were determined Results: Compared to hypoxic living and living and exercise training in normoxic conditions, living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions for 3–4 weeks resulted in lower Lee index (P exercise training in hypoxic conditions resulted in greater alterations in obesity and adipose tissue leptin/leptin receptor than hypoxic living alone and living and exercise training in normoxic conditions. PMID:27932989

  6. Overcoming Hypoxic-Resistance of Tumor Cells to TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis through Melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Jin Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A solid tumor is often exposed to hypoxic or anoxic conditions; thus, tumor cell responses to hypoxia are important for tumor progression as well as tumor therapy. Our previous studies indicated that tumor cells are resistant to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL-induced cell apoptosis under hypoxic conditions. Melatonin inhibits cell proliferation in many cancer types and induces apoptosis in some particular cancer types. Here, we examined the effects of melatonin on hypoxic resistant cells against TRAIL-induced apoptosis and the possible mechanisms of melatonin in the hypoxic response. Melatonin treatment increased TRAIL-induced A549 cell death under hypoxic conditions, although hypoxia inhibited TRAIL-mediated cell apoptosis. In a mechanistic study, hypoxia inducible factor-1α and prolyl-hydroxylase 2 proteins, which increase following exposure to hypoxia, were dose-dependently down-regulated by melatonin treatment. Melatonin also blocked the hypoxic responses that reduced pro-apoptotic proteins and increased anti-apoptotic proteins including Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Furthermore, melatonin treatment reduced TRAIL resistance by regulating the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and Bax translocation. Our results first demonstrated that melatonin treatment induces apoptosis in TRAIL-resistant hypoxic tumor cells by diminishing the anti-apoptotic signals mediated by hypoxia and also suggest that melatonin could be a tumor therapeutic tool by combining with other apoptotic ligands including TRAIL, particularly in solid tumor cells exposed to hypoxia.

  7. Hypoxic cell radiosensitization by moderate hyperthermia and glucose deprivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.H.; Kim, S.H.; Hahn, E.W.

    1983-02-01

    Cell culture studies were carried out to determine whether moderate hyperthermia reduces the oxygen enhancement ratio of cells under well-defined cultural conditions. Using asynchronously growing HeLa cells, the OER of cells with and without glucose was determined following exposure of cells to moderate hyperthermia, 40.5omicronC for 1 hr, immediately after X irradiation. The OER of cells with 5 mM glucose was 3.2, whereas the OER of glucose-deprived cells was reduced to 2.0. The pH of the cell culture medium was kept at 7.4 throughtout the experiments. The present finding may provide a clue toward further enhancing the radiosensitization of hypoxic cells by heat.

  8. Hypoxic cell radiosensitization by moderate hyperthermia and glucose deprivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.H.; Kim, S.H.; Hahn, E.W.

    1983-02-01

    Cell culture studies were carried out to determine whether moderate hyperthermia reduces the oxygen enhancement ratio of cells under well-defined cultural conditions. Using asynchronously growing HeLa cells, the OER of cells with and without glucose was determined following exposure of cells to moderate hyperthermia, 40.5 degrees C for 1 hr, immediately after X irradiation. The OER of cells with 5 mM glucose was 3.2, whereas the OER of glucose-deprived cells was reduced to 2.0. The pH of the cell culture medium was kept at 7.4 throughout the experiments. The present finding may provide a clue toward further enhancing the radiosensitization of hypoxic cells by heat.

  9. The hypoxia signaling pathway and hypoxic adaptation in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wuhan

    2015-02-01

    The hypoxia signaling pathway is an evolutionarily conserved cellular signaling pathway present in animals ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to mammals. The pathway is crucial for oxygen homeostasis maintenance. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1α and HIF-2α) are master regulators in the hypoxia signaling pathway. Oxygen concentrations vary a lot in the aquatic environment. To deal with this, fishes have adapted and developed varying strategies for living in hypoxic conditions. Investigations into the strategies and mechanisms of hypoxia adaptation in fishes will allow us to understand fish speciation and breed hypoxia-tolerant fish species/strains. This review summarizes the process of the hypoxia signaling pathway and its regulation, as well as the mechanism of hypoxia adaptation in fishes.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of SPECT radiopharmaceuticals for imaging hypoxic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, L I; Stypinski, D

    1996-09-01

    Although hypoxia has been known for decades to play an important role in the outcome of radiotherapy in oncology, and inspite of the contribution of hypoxia to a myriad of pathologies that involve vascular disease, the selective imaging of hypoxic tissue has attained prominence only within the past decade. Contemporary research in the hypoxia imaging field is based largely on radiosensitizer research of the 1960's and 1970's. Early sensitizer research identified a family of nitro-organic compounds, the N-1 substituted 2-nitroimidazoles as candidate drugs. The early champion, and still the reference standard for therapeutic radiosensitization of hypoxic tumor cells is misonidazole (MISO). Its peripheral neurotoxicity led to failure in clinical studies, but its biological, biophysical and biochemical properties have been investigated in detail and serve as a basis for further design, not only of sensitizers, but of diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals for imaging tissue hypoxia. Pharmacokinetic characterization of radiopharmaceuticals, specifically radiopharmaceuticals for imaging tissue hypoxia, has not been a central theme in their development. The advent of PET, through which quantitative determinations first became possible, opened the field for both descriptive and analytical radiopharmacokinetic studies. In SPECT, however, this approach is still undergoing refinement. This paper addresses some of the underlying issues in radiopharmaceutical pharmacokinetics. There is a paucity of published radiopharmacokinetic data for SPECT hypoxia imaging agents. Consequently, the pharmacokinetic issues for MISO are presented as a basis for development of pharmacokinetics for the chemically-related imaging agents. Properties of an hypoxia marker are described from a pharmacokinetic viewpoint, a theoretical model for descriptive pharmacokinetics is introduced and finally, recent pharmacokinetic studies from our laboratory are described.

  11. Carbohydrate Supplementation Influences Serum Cytokines after Exercise under Hypoxic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Venticinque Caris

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Exercise performed at the hypoxia equivalent of an altitude of 4200 m is associated with elevated inflammatory mediators and changes in the Th1/Th2 response. By contrast, supplementation with carbohydrates has an anti-inflammatory effect when exercise is performed under normoxic conditions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of carbohydrate supplementation on cytokines and cellular damage markers after exercise under hypoxic conditions at a simulated altitude of 4200 m. Methods: Seven adult male volunteers who exercised for 60 min at an intensity of 50% VO2Peak were randomly evaluated under three distinct conditions; normoxia, hypoxia and hypoxia + carbohydrate supplementation. Blood samples were collected at rest, at the end of exercise and after 60 min of recovery. To evaluate hypoxia + carbohydrate supplementation, volunteers received a solution of 6% carbohydrate (maltodextrin or a placebo (strawberry-flavored Crystal Light®; Kraft Foods, Northfield, IL, USA every 20 min during exercise and recovery. Statistical analyses comprised analysis of variance, with a one-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey post hoc test with a significance level of p < 0.05. Results: Under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, there was a significant increase in the concentration of IL-6 after exercise and after recovery compared to at rest (p < 0.05, while in the hypoxia + carbohydrate group, there was a significant increase in the concentration of IL-6 and TNF-α after exercise compared to at rest (p < 0.05. Furthermore, under this condition, TNF-α, IL-2 and the balance of IL-2/IL-4 were increased after recovery compared to at rest (p < 0.05. Conclusion: We conclude that carbohydrate supplementation modified the IL-6 and TNF-α serum concentrations and shifted the IL-2/IL-4 balance towards Th1 in response without glycemic, glutaminemia and cell damage effects.

  12. Inhibition of JNK Sensitizes Hypoxic Colon Cancer Cells to DNA Damaging Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilevskaya, Irina A.; Selvakumaran, Muthu; Hierro, Lucia Cabal; Goldstein, Sara R.; Winkler, Jeffrey D.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We showed previously that in HT29 colon cancer cells, modulation of hypoxia-induced stress signaling affects oxaliplatin cytotoxicity. To further study the significance of hypoxia-induced signaling through JNK, we set out to investigate how modulation of kinase activities influences cellular responses of hypoxic colon cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs. Experimental design In a panel of cell lines we investigated effects of pharmacological and molecular inhibition of JNK on sensitivity to oxaliplatin, SN-38 and 5-FU. Combination studies for the drugs and JNK inhibitor CC-401 were carried out in vitro and in vivo. Results Hypoxia-induced JNK activation was associated with resistance to oxaliplatin. CC-401 in combination with chemotherapy demonstrates synergism in colon cancer cell lines, though synergy is not always hypoxia-specific. A more detailed analysis focused on HT29 and SW620 (responsive), and HCT116 (non-responsive) lines. In HT29 and SW620 cells CC-401 treatment results in greater DNA damage in the sensitive cells. In vivo, potentiation of bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, and the combination by JNK inhibition was confirmed in HT29-derived mouse xenografts, where tumor growth delay was greater in the presence of CC-401. Finally, stable introduction of a dominant negative JNK1, but not JNK2, construct into HT29 cells rendered them more sensitive to oxaliplatin under hypoxia, suggesting differing input of JNK isoforms in cellular responses to chemotherapy. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that signaling through JNK is a determinant of response to therapy in colon cancer models, and support the testing of JNK inhibition to sensitize colon tumors in the clinic. PMID:26023085

  13. Endogenous H2S is required for hypoxic sensing by carotid body glomus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, Vladislav V; Nanduri, Jayasri; Raghuraman, Gayatri; Fox, Aaron P; Gadalla, Moataz M; Kumar, Ganesh K; Snyder, Solomon H; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2012-11-01

    H(2)S generated by the enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) has been implicated in O(2) sensing by the carotid body. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether glomus cells, the primary site of hypoxic sensing in the carotid body, generate H(2)S in an O(2)-sensitive manner and whether endogenous H(2)S is required for O(2) sensing by glomus cells. Experiments were performed on glomus cells harvested from anesthetized adult rats as well as age and sex-matched CSE(+/+) and CSE(-/-) mice. Physiological levels of hypoxia (Po(2) ∼30 mmHg) increased H(2)S levels in glomus cells, and dl-propargylglycine (PAG), a CSE inhibitor, prevented this response in a dose-dependent manner. Catecholamine (CA) secretion from glomus cells was monitored by carbon-fiber amperometry. Hypoxia increased CA secretion from rat and mouse glomus cells, and this response was markedly attenuated by PAG and in cells from CSE(-/-) mice. CA secretion evoked by 40 mM KCl, however, was unaffected by PAG or CSE deletion. Exogenous application of a H(2)S donor (50 μM NaHS) increased cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in glomus cells, with a time course and magnitude that are similar to that produced by hypoxia. [Ca(2+)](i) responses to NaHS and hypoxia were markedly attenuated in the presence of Ca(2+)-free medium or cadmium chloride, a pan voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel blocker, or nifedipine, an L-type Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, suggesting that both hypoxia and H(2)S share common Ca(2+)-activating mechanisms. These results demonstrate that H(2)S generated by CSE is a physiologic mediator of the glomus cell's response to hypoxia.

  14. [Hemo- and neurodynamics of the human brain during exposure to moderate hypoxic hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, D A; Zubarev, A F; Krupina, T N; Iarullin, Kh Kh; Kuznets, E I

    1984-01-01

    Synchronous electro- and rheoencephalography were used to study tolerance to moderate hypoxic hypoxia for 30 min at an altitude of 5000 m without additional oxygen supply. As test subject, men with autonomic-vascular dystonia (29-39 years old), 15 men over 40 (41-56 years old), and 16 essentially healthy controls (23-36 years old) were used. The aged volunteers (41-56 years old) did not differ from the controls with respect to their tolerance to hypoxic hypoxia. The men with early symptoms of hypertonic-type dystonia also showed high tolerance to hypoxic hypoxia. The subjects with hypotonic-type dystonia displayed lower tolerance.

  15. Effect of tumor hypoxia on efficacy of tirapazamine combined with fractionated irradiation in mouse tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Han [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    Tumor hypoxia can be overcome with hypoxic cytotoxin. In mouse tumor, tirapazamine's efficacy of the potentiating radiation effect was tested by the tumor oxygenation status combined with hyperfactionated radiotherapy. The control and hypoxic mouse tumors were established by inoculation of RIF-1 tumor cells into the normal or previously irradiated back and thigh of C3H mice. When the tumors reached a proper size, both the control and hypoxic tumors were given hyperfractionated treatments (8 fractions/4 days) with saline (0.02 ml/g), tirapazamin (0.08 mM/0.02 ml/kg), irradiation (2.5 Gy), irradiation combined with tirapazamine given 30 minutes prior to each irradiation. The response was evaluated by the growth delay assay by measuring tumor size from day 0 (12 hrs prior to the first fractionation) to the day when the volume had 4-fold increase or cross sectional area had 2-fold increase. Overall growth pattern showed that tirapazamine potentiated radiation effect in back and thigh tumors grew in the normal and preirradiated tumor bed. With growth delay assay using reference point of initial tumor volume or cross sectional area, tirapazamine potentiated radiation effect 1.9 times for the control and 2.4 times for the hypoxic tumors in back, and 1.85 times for the control and 1.6 times for the hypoxic tumors. With reference of 4-fold increase of the initial volume or 2-fold increase of the cross sectional area, tirapazamine potentiated radiation effect 1.48 times for the control and 2.02 times for the hypxic tumors in back, and 1.85 times for the control and 1.6 times for the hypoxic tumors. Present result indicated that radiation response of hypoxic tumors was potentiated by tirapazamine in the back or thigh tumors grew in the control or preirradiated tumor bed, and potentiation of the hypoxic tumors was equal to or greater than that of the control tumors in the back or thigh.

  16. Involvement of SIRT1 in hypoxic down-regulation of c-Myc and β-catenin and hypoxic preconditioning effect of polyphenols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Kyung-Soo [Department of Biochemistry, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Research Center for Ischemic Tissue regeneration, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jun-Ik [Department of Biochemistry, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi-Ju; Kim, Hak-Bong; Lee, Jae-Won [Department of Biochemistry, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Research Center for Ischemic Tissue regeneration, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Dao, Trong Tuan; Oh, Won Keun [BK21 Project Team, College of Pharmacy, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chi-Dug, E-mail: kcdshbw@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun-Hee, E-mail: ksh7738@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Research Center for Ischemic Tissue regeneration, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-01

    SIRT1 has been found to function as a Class III deacetylase that affects the acetylation status of histones and other important cellular nonhistone proteins involved in various cellular pathways including stress responses and apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the role of SIRT1 signaling in the hypoxic down-regulations of c-Myc and β-catenin and hypoxic preconditioning effect of the red wine polyphenols such as piceatannol, myricetin, quercetin and resveratrol. We found that the expression of SIRT1 was significantly increased in hypoxia-exposed or hypoxic preconditioned HepG2 cells, which was closely associated with the up-regulation of HIF-1α and down-regulation of c-Myc and β-catenin expression via deacetylation of these proteins. In addition, blockade of SIRT1 activation using siRNA or amurensin G, a new potent SIRT1 inhibitor, abolished hypoxia-induced HIF-1α expression but increased c-Myc and β-catenin expression. SIRT1 was also found to stabilize HIF-1α protein and destabilize c-Myc, β-catenin and PHD2 under hypoxia. We also found that myricetin, quercetin, piceatannol and resveratrol up-regulated HIF-1α and down-regulated c-Myc, PHD2 and β-catenin expressions via SIRT1 activation, in a manner that mimics hypoxic preconditioning. This study provides new insights of the molecular mechanisms of hypoxic preconditioning and suggests that polyphenolic SIRT1 activators could be used to mimic hypoxic/ischemic preconditioning. -- Graphical abstract: Polyphenols mimicked hypoxic preconditioning by up-regulating HIF-1α and SIRT1 and down-regulating c-Myc, PHD2, and β-catenin. HepG2 cells were pretreated with the indicated doses of myricetin (MYR; A), quercetin (QUR; B), or piceatannol (PIC; C) for 4 h and then exposed to hypoxia for 4 h. Levels of HIF-1α, SIRT1, c-Myc, β-catenin, and PHD2 were determined by western blot analysis. The data are representative of three individual experiments. Highlights: ► SIRT1 expression is increased in hypoxia

  17. Critical role of neuronal pentraxin 1 in mitochondria-mediated hypoxic-ischemic neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rahim, Md; Thatipamula, Shabarish; Hossain, Mir Ahamed

    2013-02-01

    Developing brain is highly susceptible to hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury leading to severe neurological disabilities in surviving infants and children. Previously, we have reported induction of neuronal pentraxin 1 (NP1), a novel neuronal protein of long-pentraxin family, following HI neuronal injury. Here, we investigated how this specific signal is propagated to cause the HI neuronal death. We used wild-type (WT) and NP1 knockout (NP1-KO) mouse hippocampal cultures, modeled in vitro following exposure to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD), and in vivo neonatal (P9-10) mouse model of HI brain injury. Our results show induction of NP1 in primary hippocampal neurons following OGD exposure (4-8 h) and in the ipsilateral hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions at 24-48 h post-HI compared to the contralateral side. We also found increased PTEN activity concurrent with OGD time-dependent (4-8 h) dephosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) and GSK-3β (Ser9). OGD also caused a time-dependent decrease in the phosphorylation of Bad (Ser136), and Bax protein levels. Immunofluorescence staining and subcellular fractionation analyses revealed increased mitochondrial translocation of Bad and Bax proteins from cytoplasm following OGD (4 h) and simultaneously increased release of Cyt C from mitochondria followed by activation of caspase-3. NP1 protein was immunoprecipitated with Bad and Bax proteins; OGD caused increased interactions of NP1 with Bad and Bax, thereby, facilitating their mitochondrial translocation and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)). This NP1 induction preceded the increased mitochondrial release of cytochrome C (Cyt C) into the cytosol, activation of caspase-3 and OGD time-dependent cell death in WT primary hippocampal neurons. In contrast, in NP1-KO neurons there was no translocation of Bad and Bax from cytosol to the mitochondria, and no evidence of ΔΨ(m) loss, increased Cyt C release and caspase-3 activation following OGD; which resulted in

  18. A Molecular and Whole Body Insight of the Mechanisms Surrounding Glucose Disposal and Insulin Resistance with Hypoxic Treatment in Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. A. Mackenzie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the mechanisms are largely unidentified, the chronic or intermittent hypoxic patterns occurring with respiratory diseases, such as chronic pulmonary disease or obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and obesity, are commonly associated with glucose intolerance. Indeed, hypoxia has been widely implicated in the development of insulin resistance either via the direct action on insulin receptor substrate (IRS and protein kinase B (PKB/Akt or indirectly through adipose tissue expansion and systemic inflammation. Yet hypoxia is also known to encourage glucose transport using insulin-dependent mechanisms, largely reliant on the metabolic master switch, 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK. In addition, hypoxic exposure has been shown to improve glucose control in type 2 diabetics. The literature surrounding hypoxia-induced changes to glycemic control appears to be confusing and conflicting. How is it that the same stress can seemingly cause insulin resistance while increasing glucose uptake? There is little doubt that acute hypoxia increases glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle and does so using the same pathway as muscle contraction. The purpose of this review paper is to provide an insight into the mechanisms underpinning the observed effects and to open up discussions around the conflicting data surrounding hypoxia and glucose control.

  19. Hypoxic training for swimmer's combined team preparation of the law university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balamutova N.M.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The matters of the hypoxic training for highly qualified swimmers as extra means of improving level for sports achievements were considered. A method of artificial hypoxic training that increase indexes of cardiorespiratory system of tested people was developed. Twelve students from the university swimming combined team took part in the experiment. In the experiment were used pedagogical testing methods, biochemistry analysis of blood, cardiorespiratory indexes rating, methods of mathematical statistics. It was determined that offered methodology of hypoxic training allows to reach higher sports achievements. It is set that the use of irregular hypoxic influences is considerably modified dependence a «dose is an effect» in regard to loadings of anaerobic alactic influence

  20. A Qualitative Study of Physician Perspectives on Prognostication in Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lisa Anne; Bell, Emily; Racine, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is the most frequent cause of neonatal encephalopathy and yields a great degree of morbidity and mortality. From an ethical and clinical standpoint, neurological prognosis is fundamental in the care of neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. This qualitative study explores physician perspectives about neurological prognosis in neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. This study aimed, through semistructured interviews with neonatologists and pediatric neurologists, to understand the practice of prognostication. Qualitative thematic content analysis was used for data analysis. The authors report 2 main findings: (1) neurological prognosis remains fundamental to quality-of-life predictions and considerations of best interest, and (2) magnetic resonance imaging is presented to parents with a greater degree of certainty than actually exists. Further research is needed to explore both the parental perspective and, prospectively, the impact of different clinical approaches and styles to prognostication for neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

  1. Non-endothelial endothelin counteracts hypoxic vasodilation in porcine large coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Elise Røge; Stankevicius, Edgaras; Simonsen, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    of large coronary arteries. RESULTS: In prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α, 10 μM)-contracted segments with endothelium, gradual lowering of oxygen tension from 95 to 1% O2 resulted in vasodilation. The vasodilation to O2 lowering was rightward shifted in segments without endothelium at all O2 concentrations except...... at 1% O2. The endothelin receptor antagonist SB217242 (10 μM) markedly increased hypoxic dilation despite the free tissue ET-1 concentration in the arterial wall was unchanged in 1% O2 versus 95% O2. Exogenous ET-1 reversed hypoxic dilation in segments with and without endothelium, and the hypoxic...... arteries showed an increased sensitivity towards ET-1 compared to the normoxic controls. Without affecting basal NO, hypoxia increased NO concentration in PGF2α-contracted arteries, and an NO synthase inhibitor, L-NOARG,(300 μM, NG-nitro-L-Arginine) reduced hypoxic vasodilation. NO-induced vasodilation...

  2. Ixr1p and the control of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae hypoxic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizoso-Vázquez, Angel; Lamas-Maceiras, Mónica; Becerra, Manuel; González-Siso, M Isabel; Rodríguez-Belmonte, Esther; Cerdán, M Esperanza

    2012-04-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adaptation to hypoxia/anaerobiosis requires the transcriptional induction or derepression of multiple genes organized in regulons controlled by specific transcriptional regulators. Ixr1p is a transcriptional regulatory factor that causes aerobic repression of several hypoxic genes (COX5B, TIR1, and HEM13) and also the activation of HEM13 during hypoxic growth. Analysis of the transcriptome of the wild-type strain BY4741 and its isogenic derivative Δixr1, grown in aerobic and hypoxic conditions, reveals differential regulation of genes related not only to the hypoxic and oxidative stress responses but also to the re-adaptation of catabolic and anabolic fluxes in response to oxygen limitation. The function of Ixr1p in the transcriptional regulation of genes from the sulfate assimilation pathway and other pathways producing α-keto acids is of biotechnological importance for industries based on yeast-derived fermentation products.

  3. Use of perampanel in one case of super-refractory hypoxic myoclonic status: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estevo Santamarina

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This case shows the potential utility of PER as a therapeutic option in super-refractory hypoxic status and even its potential use before other aggressive alternatives considering their greater morbidity.

  4. Brain diffusivity in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy following whole body hypothermia: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artzi, Moran; Sira, Liat Ben; Bassan, Haim; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Berger, Irit; Marom, Ronella; Leitner, Yael; Bental, Yoram; Shiff, Yakov; Geva, Ronny; Weinstein, Maya; Bashat, Dafna Ben

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is an important cause of neuropsychological deficits. Little is known about brain diffusivity in these infants following cooling and its potential in predicting outcome. Diffusion tensor imaging was applied to 3 groups: (1) three infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: cooled; (2) three infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: noncooled; and (3) four controls. Diffusivity values at the corticospinal tract, thalamus, and putamen were correlated with Apgar scores and early neurodevelopmental outcome. While cooled infants exhibited lower Apgar scores than noncooled infants, their developmental scores at a mean age of 8 months were higher. All groups differed in their diffusivity values with the cooled infants showing better values compared with the noncooled, correlating with early neurodevelopmental outcome. These preliminary results indicate that diffusion tensor imaging performed at an early age in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy may forecast clinical outcome and support the neuroprotective effect of hypothermia treatment.

  5. Neuroinflammation and MMPs: potential therapeutic targets in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury

    OpenAIRE

    Pennypacker Keith R; Leonardo Christopher C

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Exposure to hypoxic-ischemic insults during the neonatal or perinatal developmental periods produces various forms of pathology. Injuries that occur in response to these events often manifest as severe cognitive and/or motor disturbances over time. Due to difficulties regarding the early diagnosis and treatment of hypoxic-ischemic injury, there is a growing need for effective therapies that can be delivered at delayed time points. Much of the research into mechanisms of neural injury...

  6. Environmental enrichment promotes neural remodeling in newborn rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuanjun Liu; Yankui Guo; Yalu Li; Zhenying Yang

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and treatment with early environmental enrichment intervention on development of newborn rats, as evaluated by light and electron microscopy and morphometry. Early intervention with environmental enrichment intelligence training attenuated brain edema and neuronal injury, promoted neuronal repair, and increased neuronal plasticity in the frontal lobe cortex of the newborn rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  7. Inhibition of inflammatory mediator release from microglia can treat ischemic/hypoxic brain injury★

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huaibo; Guo, Weitao; Liu, Hongliang; Zeng, Rong; Lu, Mingnan; Chen, Ziqiu; Xiao, Qixian

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β aggravate neuronal injury by mediating the inflammatory reaction following ischemic/hypoxic brain injury. It remains unclear whether interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β are released by microglia or astrocytes. This study prepared hippocampal slices that were subsequently subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation. Hematoxylin-eosin staining verified that neurons exhibited hypoxic changes. Results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay found that interleukin-1α a...

  8. Renal compensation to chronic hypoxic hypercapnia: downregulation of pendrin and adaptation of the proximal tubule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Seigneux, Sophie; Malte, Hans; Dimke, Henrik;

    2007-01-01

    The molecular basis for the renal compensation to respiratory acidosis and specifically the role of pendrin in this condition are unclear. Therefore, we studied the adaptation of the proximal tubule and the collecting duct to respiratory acidosis. Male Wistar-Hannover rats were exposed to either ...

  9. Combined treatment with acetazolamide and medroxyprogesterone in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, M.; Vos, P.J.E.; Heijdra, Y.F.; Teppema, L.J.; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2002-01-01

    Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and acetazolamide (ACET) are two ventilatory stimulants which are used in hypoxic and hypercapnic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In a double-blind randomised study, the effects of a 2-week treatment with MPA (30 mg b.i.d.) or ACET (250 m

  10. Hemoglobin Effects on Nitric Oxide Mediated Hypoxic Vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Zimei; Cooper, Chris E

    2016-01-01

    The brain responds to hypoxia with an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, such an increase is generally believed to start only after the oxygen tension decreases to a certain threshold level. Although many mechanisms (different vasodilator and different generation and metabolism mechanisms of the vasodilator) have been proposed at the molecular level, none of them has gained universal acceptance. Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to play a central role in the regulation of oxygen supply since it is a vasodilator whose production and metabolism are both oxygen dependent. We have used a computational model that simulates blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the brain (BRAINSIGNALS) to test mechanism by which NO may elucidate hypoxic vasodilation. The first model proposed that NO was produced by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and metabolized by the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CCO). NO production declined with decreasing oxygen concentration given that oxygen is a substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS). However, this was balanced by NO metabolism by CCO, which also declined with decreasing oxygen concentration. However, the NOS effect was dominant; the resulting model profiles of hypoxic vasodilation only approximated the experimental curves when an unfeasibly low K m for oxygen for NOS was input into the model. We therefore modified the model such that NO generation was via the nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin instead of NOS, whilst keeping the metabolism of NO by CCO the same. NO production increased with decreasing oxygen concentration, leading to an improved reproduction of the experimental CBF versus PaO2 curve. However, the threshold phenomenon was not perfectly reproduced. In this present work, we incorporated a wider variety of oxygen dependent and independent NO production and removal mechanisms. We found that the addition of NO removal via oxidation to nitrate mediated by oxyhemoglobin resulted in the

  11. Tumorigenicity of hypoxic respiring cancer cells revealed by a hypoxia–cell cycle dual reporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Anne; Stine, Zachary E.; Nguyen, Christopher; Afzal, Junaid; Sun, Peng; Hamaker, Max; Siegel, Nicholas M.; Gouw, Arvin M.; Kang, Byung-hak; Yu, Shu-Han; Cochran, Rory L.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Song, Hongjun; Dang, Chi V.

    2014-01-01

    Although aerobic glycolysis provides an advantage in the hypoxic tumor microenvironment, some cancer cells can also respire via oxidative phosphorylation. These respiring (“non-Warburg”) cells were previously thought not to play a key role in tumorigenesis and thus fell from favor in the literature. We sought to determine whether subpopulations of hypoxic cancer cells have different metabolic phenotypes and gene-expression profiles that could influence tumorigenicity and therapeutic response, and we therefore developed a dual fluorescent protein reporter, HypoxCR, that detects hypoxic [hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) active] and/or cycling cells. Using HEK293T cells as a model, we identified four distinct hypoxic cell populations by flow cytometry. The non-HIF/noncycling cell population expressed a unique set of genes involved in mitochondrial function. Relative to the other subpopulations, these hypoxic “non-Warburg” cells had highest oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial capacity consistent with increased mitochondrial respiration. We found that these respiring cells were unexpectedly tumorigenic, suggesting that continued respiration under limiting oxygen conditions may be required for tumorigenicity. PMID:25114222

  12. Nitric oxide modulates hypoxic pulmonary smooth muscle cell proliferation and apoptosis by regulating carbon monoxide pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-fei WANG; Hong TIAN; Chao-shu TANG; Hong-fang JIN; Jun-bao DU

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To explore the role of carbon monoxide (CO) in the regulation of hypoxic pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation and apoptosis by nitric oxide (NO). Methods: PASMC of Wistar rats was cultured in vitro in the presence of a NO donor, sodium nitroprusside, or an inhibitor of heme oxygenase (HO), zinc protoporphyrin-IX, or under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions.Nitrite and carboxyhemoglobin in PASMC medium were detected with spectrophotometry. The proliferating and apoptotic percentage of PASMC was measured by flow cytometry. The expression of HO-1 mRNA in PASMC was analyzed by fluorescent real-time quantitative PCR, and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen and caspase-3 were examined by immunocytochemical analysis. Results: The results showed that hypoxia suppressed NO generation from PASMC, which promoted hypoxic PASMC proliferation and induced apoptosis. Meanwhile, hy-poxia induced HO-1 expression in PASMC and promoted CO production from PASMC, which inhibited PASMC proliferation and regulated PASMC apoptosis. NO upregulated the expression of HO-1 mRNA in hypoxic PASMC; NO also inhib-ited proliferation and promoted apoptosis of hypoxic PASMC, possibly by regu-lating the production of CO. Conclusion: The results indicated that CO could inhibit proliferation and regulate apoptosis of PASMC, and NO inhibited prolifera-tion and promoted apoptosis of hypoxic PASMC, possibly by regulating the pro-duction of CO.

  13. Effects of hypoxic culture conditions on umbilical cord-derived human mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hass Ralf

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Following cultivation of distinct mesenchymal stem cell (MSC populations derived from human umbilical cord under hypoxic conditions (between 1.5% to 5% oxygen (O2 revealed a 2- to 3-fold reduced oxygen consumption rate as compared to the same cultures at normoxic oxygen levels (21% O2. A simultaneous measurement of dissolved oxygen within the culture media from 4 different MSC donors ranged from 15 μmol/L at 1.5% O2 to 196 μmol/L at normoxic 21% O2. The proliferative capacity of the different hypoxic MSC populations was elevated as compared to the normoxic culture. This effect was paralleled by a significantly reduced cell damage or cell death under hypoxic conditions as evaluated by the cellular release of LDH whereby the measurement of caspase3/7 activity revealed little if any differences in apoptotic cell death between the various cultures. The MSC culture under hypoxic conditions was associated with the induction of hypoxia-inducing factor-alpha (HIF-1α and an elevated expression of energy metabolism-associated genes including GLUT-1, LDH and PDK1. Concomitantly, a significantly enhanced glucose consumption and a corresponding lactate production could be observed in the hypoxic MSC cultures suggesting an altered metabolism of these human stem cells within the hypoxic environment.

  14. Using the endocannabinoid system as a neuroprotective strategy in perinatal hypoxic- ischemic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lara-Celador, I.; Go(n)i-de-Cerio, F.; Antonia Alvarez; Enrique Hilario

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important causes of brain injury in the neonatal period is a perinatal hypoxic- ischemic event. This devastating condition can lead to long-term neurological deficits or even death. After hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, a variety of specific cellular mechanisms are set in motion, triggering cell damage and finally producing cell death. Effective therapeutic treatments against this phenomenon are still unavailable because of complex molecular mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. After a thorough understanding of the mechanism underlying neural plasticity following hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, various neuroprotective therapies have been developed for alleviating brain injury and improving long-term outcomes. Among them, the endocannabinoid system emerges as a natural system of neuroprotection. The endocannabinoid system modulates a wide range of physiological processes in mammals and has demonstrated neuroprotective effects in different paradigms of acute brain injury, acting as a natural neuroprotectant. The aim of this review is to study the use of different therapies to induce long-term therapeutic effects after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, and analyze the important role of the endocannabinoid system as a new neuroprotective strategy against perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

  15. Sickle erythrocytes target cytotoxics to hypoxic tumor microvessels and potentiate a tumoricidal response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Terman

    Full Text Available Resistance of hypoxic solid tumor niches to chemotherapy and radiotherapy remains a major scientific challenge that calls for conceptually new approaches. Here we exploit a hitherto unrecognized ability of sickled erythrocytes (SSRBCs but not normal RBCs (NLRBCs to selectively target hypoxic tumor vascular microenviroment and induce diffuse vaso-occlusion. Within minutes after injection SSRBCs, but not NLRBCs, home and adhere to hypoxic 4T1 tumor vasculature with hemoglobin saturation levels at or below 10% that are distributed over 70% of the tumor space. The bound SSRBCs thereupon form microaggregates that obstruct/occlude up to 88% of tumor microvessels. Importantly, SSRBCs, but not normal RBCs, combined with exogenous prooxidant zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP induce a potent tumoricidal response via a mutual potentiating mechanism. In a clonogenic tumor cell survival assay, SSRBC surrogate hemin, along with H(2O(2 and ZnPP demonstrate a similar mutual potentiation and tumoricidal effect. In contrast to existing treatments directed only to the hypoxic tumor cell, the present approach targets the hypoxic tumor vascular environment and induces injury to both tumor microvessels and tumor cells using intrinsic SSRBC-derived oxidants and locally generated ROS. Thus, the SSRBC appears to be a potent new tool for treatment of hypoxic solid tumors, which are notable for their resistance to existing cancer treatments.

  16. Quantification of structural changes in the corpus callosumin children with profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivaros, Stavros M. [Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Academic Unit of Paediatric Radiology, Royal Manchester Children' s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Centre for Imaging Sciences, Institute of Population Health, Manchester (United Kingdom); Radon, Mark R. [The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neuroradiology, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mileva, Reneta; Gledson, Ann; Keane, John A. [University of Manchester, School of Computer Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); Connolly, Daniel J.A.; Batty, Ruth [Sheffield Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neuroradiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Cowell, Patricia E. [University of Sheffield, Department of Human Communication Sciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hoggard, Nigel; Griffiths, Paul D. [University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Wright, Neville B.; Tang, Vivian [Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Academic Unit of Paediatric Radiology, Royal Manchester Children' s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    Birth-related acute profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury has specific patterns of damage including the paracentral lobules. To test the hypothesis that there is anatomically coherent regional volume loss of the corpus callosum as a result of this hemispheric abnormality. Study subjects included 13 children with proven acute profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and 13 children with developmental delay but no brain abnormalities. A computerised system divided the corpus callosum into 100 segments, measuring each width. Principal component analysis grouped the widths into contiguous anatomical regions. We conducted analysis of variance of corpus callosum widths as well as support vector machine stratification into patient groups. There was statistically significant narrowing of the mid-posterior body and genu of the corpus callosum in children with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. Support vector machine analysis yielded over 95% accuracy in patient group stratification using the corpus callosum centile widths. Focal volume loss is seen in the corpus callosum of children with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury secondary to loss of commissural fibres arising in the paracentral lobules. Support vector machine stratification into the hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury group or the control group on the basis of corpus callosum width is highly accurate and points towards rapid clinical translation of this technique as a potential biomarker of hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. (orig.)

  17. Interaction between endogenous nitric oxide and carbon monoxide in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the interaction between nitric oxygenase (NOS)/ nitric oxide (NO) and heme oxygenase (HO)/ carbon monoxide (CO) system in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. On a rat model of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, the pulmonary artery pressure was measured, and NO formation and expression of NOS in pulmonary tissues were examined after treatment with ZnPP-IX, an HO-1 inhibitor. The pulmonary artery pressure, CO formation and expression of HO-1 in pulmonary tissues were examined after treatment with L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. We found that pulmonary hypertension developed after 2-week hypoxia, while the concentration of NO in the pulmonary tissue homogenates and the expression of NOS in intrapulmonary artery endothelial cells decreased markedly. ZnPP-IX worsened pulmonary hypertension of hypoxic rats. However, it increased endogenous production of NO and the expression of NOS obviously. The concentration of CO in the pulmonary tissue homogenates and the expression of HO-1 in intrapulmonary artery smooth muscle cells increased markedly with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. L-NAME worsened pulmonary hypertension of hypoxic rats, but inhibited CO formation and HO-1 expression (P < 0.01). The results of this study suggested that endogenous NOS/NO and HO/CO systems might interact with each other and therefore play an important regulating role in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

  18. Hyperbaric oxygen suppresses hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Lu, Mengru; Li, Qing-Jie; Zhang, Zhuo; Wu, Zheng-Zheng; Li, Jie; Qian, Lai; Xu, Yun; Wang, Zhong-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The optimal therapeutic time-window and protective mechanism of hyperbaric oxygen in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage remain unclear. This study aimed to determine the neuroprotective effects of hyperbaric oxygen. Following hypoxic-ischemic brain damage modeling in neonatal rats, hyperbaric oxygen was administered at 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours and 1 week after hypoxia, respectively, once daily for 1 week. Fourteen days after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage, cell density and apoptosis rate, number of Fas-L+, caspase-8+, and caspase-3+ neuronal cells, levels of nitric oxide, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase in hippocampus were examined. Morris water maze test was conducted 28 days after insult. Significant improvements were found in cell density, rate of apoptosis, oxidative stress markers, FasL, and caspases in rats treated with hyperbaric oxygen within 72 hours compared to hypoxic-ischemic injury. Similarly, time-dependent behavioral amelioration was observed in pups treated with hyperbaric oxygen. Our findings suggest that hyperbaric oxygen protects against hypoxic-ischemic brain damage by inhibiting oxidative stress and FasL-induced apoptosis, and optimal therapeutic time window is within 72 hours after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  19. The acute hypoxic ventilatory response under halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane anaesthesia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanovic, N; Pecotic, R; Valic, M; Jeroncic, A; Carev, M; Karanovic, S; Ujevic, A; Dogas, Z

    2010-03-01

    The relative order of potency of anaesthetic agents on the hypoxic ventilatory response has been tested in humans, but animal data are sparse. We examined the effects of 1.4, 1.6, 1.8, and 2.0 MAC halothane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane on phrenic nerve activity in euoxia (baseline) and during acute normocapnic hypoxia (inspired oxygen fraction 0.09) in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. With halothane, all animals became apnoeic even in euoxia, and the hypoxic response was completely abolished at all anaesthetic levels. With isoflurane, 5 of 14 animals exhibited phrenic nerve activity in euoxia at 1.4 MAC and demonstrated a hypoxic response (302% of baseline activity), but all became apnoeic and lost the hypoxic response at higher doses. With sevoflurane, phrenic nerve activity and a hypoxic response was preserved in at least some animals at all doses (i.e. even the highest dose of 2.0 MAC). Similar to the rank order of potency previously observed in humans, the relative order of potency of depression of the hypoxic ventilatory response in rats was halothane (most depressive) > isoflurane > sevoflurane (p = 0.01 for differences between agents).

  20. Effect of acute hypoxic shock on the rat brain morphology and tripeptidyl peptidase I activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Emilia B; Dimitrova, Mashenka B; Ivanov, Ivaylo P; Pavlova, Velichka G; Dimitrova, Stella G; Kadiysky, Dimitar S

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxic events are known to cause substantial damage to the hippocampus, cerebellum and striatum. The impact of hypoxic shock on other brain parts is not sufficiently studied. Recent studies show that tripeptidyl peptidase I (TPPI) activity in fish is altered after a hypoxic stress pointing out at a possible enzyme involvement in response to hypoxia. Similar studies are not performed in mammals. In this work, the effect of sodium nitrite-induced acute hypoxic shock on the rat brain was studied at different post-treatment periods. Morphological changes in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, medulla oblongata, thalamus, mesencephalon and pons were assessed using silver-copper impregnation for neurodegeneration. TPPI activity was biochemically assayed and localized by enzyme histochemistry. Although less vulnerable to oxidative stress, the studied brain areas showed different histopathological changes, such as neuronal loss and tissue vacuolization, dilatation of the smallest capillaries and impairment of neuronal processes. TPPI activity was strictly regulated following the hypoxic stress. It was found to increase 12-24h post-treatment, then decreased followed by a slow process of recovery. The enzyme histochemistry revealed a temporary enzyme deficiency in all types of neurons. These findings indicate a possible involvement of the enzyme in rat brain response to hypoxic stress.

  1. Bradykinin is degraded in hypoxic lungs and does not affect epithelial permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brodovich, H.; Kay, J.; Coates, G.

    1985-10-01

    To investigate the effect of intravenous infusions of bradykinin (BK) on the permeability of the hypoxic pulmonary epithelium to small solutes, experiments (n = 7) were performed in yearling sheep with chronic vascular catheters. Sheep were anesthetized, intubated, paralyzed, and ventilated. After establishing stable and normal base-line pulmonary hemodynamics and blood gas tensions, the lungs were insufflated with a submicronic aerosol of technetium-/sup 99m/-labeled diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA, mol wt = 492). Radioactivity arising from the right hemithorax was measured by an NaI probe with a parallel-holed collimator. The base-line pulmonary clearance rate (k) for /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA was 0.51 +/- 0.09% (SE)/min, while the sheep were ventilated with a fractional concentration of inspired O2 (FIO2) of 0.5 (arterial partial pressure of O2 (PaO2) = 196 +/- 11.4 (SE) Torr). Clearance of 99mTc-DTPA was unaffected by hypoxia alone or BK infusions in nonhypoxic lungs. The combination of an intravenous infusion of BK at either 1.2 (n = 3) or 2.4 micrograms . kg-1 . min-1 (n = 4) and alveolar hypoxia (FIO2 = 0.11, PaO2 = 28 +/- 1.6 (SE) Torr) did not affect pulmonary clearance of 99mTc-DTPA (k = 0.43 +/- 0.08% (SE)/min). In contrast, a 0.05-ml/kg intravenous infusion of oleic acid increased clearance 10-fold in one sheep. During combined hypoxia and BK infusion the pulmonary arterial BK concentration (radioimmunoassay) increased from 0.82 +/- 0.16 (SE) to 7.05 +/- 1.86 ng/ml (P less than 0.001), but the systemic arterial concentrations were unchanged (0.67 +/- 0.19 (SE) to 0.66 +/- 0.09 ng/ml).

  2. Effects of sevoflurane on hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in anaesthetized piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerbaul, F; Bellezza, M; Guidon, C; Roussel, L; Imbert, M; Carpentier, J P; Auffray, J P

    2000-09-01

    In vitro, halogenated agents reduce the pulmonary vasoconstrictor response to alveolar hypoxia in isolated perfused lungs. However, studies in intact animals have been less convincing. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of sevoflurane on hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) in anaesthetized piglets using the pressure/cardiac index relationship (P/Q). Ten large white piglets were anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated, alternately in hyperoxia (FIO2 = 0.4) and hypoxia (FIO2 = 0.12). Multipoint plots of pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) or differences between PAP and left atrial pressure (LAP) against Q were generated by gradual inflation of a balloon introduced into the inferior vena cava. P/Q relationships were established in hyperoxia and hypoxia at baseline, and then with sevoflurane. In hypoxia, pressure gradients (PAP-LAP) increased at every level of Q, thus demonstrating active pulmonary vasoconstriction. Sevoflurane at 1 MAC did not affect these P/Q relationships in hyperoxia or hypoxia as compared with baseline. Sevoflurane at a clinically relevant concentration (1 MAC) has no significant effect on HPV in anaesthetized piglets.

  3. Stem Cell Therapy for Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel eGonzales-Portillo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Treatments for neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE have been limited. The aim of this paper is to offer translational research guidance on stem cell therapy for neonatal HIE by examining clinically relevant animal models, practical stem cell sources, safety and efficacy of endpoint assays, as well as a general understanding of modes of action of this cellular therapy. In order to do so, we discuss the clinical manifestations of HIE, highlighting its overlapping pathologies with stroke providing insights on the potential of cell therapy, currently investigated in stroke, for HIE. To this end, we draw guidance from recommendations outlined in Stem cell Therapeutics as an Emerging Paradigm for Stroke or STEPS, which have been recently modified to Baby STEPS to cater for the neonatal symptoms of HIE. These guidelines recognized that neonatal HIE exhibits distinct disease symptoms from adult stroke in need of an innovative translational approach that facilitates the entry of cell therapy in the clinic. Finally, new information about recent clinical trials, and insights into combination therapy are provided with the vision that stem cell therapy may benefit from available treatments, such as hypothermia, already being tested in children diagnosed with HIE.

  4. Concepts of hypoxic NO signaling in remote ischemic preconditioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthias; Totzeck; Ulrike; Hendgen-Cotta; Tienush; Rassaf

    2015-01-01

    Acute coronary syndromes remain a leading single cause of death worldwide. Therapeutic strategies to treat cardiomyocyte threatening ischemia/reperfusion injury are urgently needed. Remote ischemic preconditioning(r IPC) applied by brief ischemic episodes to heartdistant organs has been tested in several clinical studies, and the major body of evidence points to beneficial effects of r IPC for patients. The underlying signaling, however, remains incompletely understood. This relates particularly to the mechanism by which the protective signal is transferred from the remote site to the target organ. Many pathways have been forwarded but none can explain the protective effects completely. In light of recent experimental studies, we here outline the current knowledge relating to the generation of the protective signal in the remote organ, the signal transfer to the target organ and the transduction of the transferred signal into cardioprotection. The majority of studies favors a humoral factor that activates cardiomyocyte downstream signaling- receptor-dependent and independently. Cellular targets include deleterious calcium(Ca2+) signaling, reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial function and structure, and cellular apoptosis and necrosis. Following an outline of the existing evidence, we will furthermore characterize the existing knowledge and discuss future perspectives with particular emphasis on the interaction between the recently discovered hypoxic nitrite-nitric oxide signaling in r IPC. This refers to the protective role of nitrite, which can be activated endogenously using r IPC and which then contributes to cardioprotection by rIPC.

  5. Experimental models of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, R C

    1993-01-01

    Animal research has provided important information on the pathogenesis of and neuropathologic responses to perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia. In experimental animals, structural brain damage from hypoxia-ischemia has been produced in immature rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, sheep and monkeys (18, 20, 24, 25, 38). Of the several available animal models, the fetal and newborn rhesus monkey and immature rat have been studied most extensively because of their similarities to humans in respect to the physiology of reproduction and their neuroanatomy at or shortly following birth. Given the frequency of occurrence of human perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and the multiple, often severe neurologic handicaps which ensue in infants and children, it is not surprising that the above described animal models have been developed. These models have provided the basis for investigations to clarify not only physiologic and biochemical mechanisms of tissue injury but also the efficacy of specific management strategies. Hopefully, such animal research will continue to provide important information regarding how best to prevent or minimize the devastating consequences of perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia.

  6. North Pacific deglacial hypoxic events linked to abrupt ocean warming.

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    Praetorius, S K; Mix, A C; Walczak, M H; Wolhowe, M D; Addison, J A; Prahl, F G

    2015-11-19

    Marine sediments from the North Pacific document two episodes of expansion and strengthening of the subsurface oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) accompanied by seafloor hypoxia during the last deglacial transition. The mechanisms driving this hypoxia remain under debate. We present a new high-resolution alkenone palaeotemperature reconstruction from the Gulf of Alaska that reveals two abrupt warming events of 4-5 degrees Celsius at the onset of the Bølling and Holocene intervals that coincide with sudden shifts to hypoxia at intermediate depths. The presence of diatomaceous laminations and hypoxia-tolerant benthic foraminiferal species, peaks in redox-sensitive trace metals, and enhanced (15)N/(14)N ratio of organic matter, collectively suggest association with high export production. A decrease in (18)O/(16)O values of benthic foraminifera accompanying the most severe deoxygenation event indicates subsurface warming of up to about 2 degrees Celsius. We infer that abrupt warming triggered expansion of the North Pacific OMZ through reduced oxygen solubility and increased marine productivity via physiological effects; following initiation of hypoxia, remobilization of iron from hypoxic sediments could have provided a positive feedback on ocean deoxygenation through increased nutrient utilization and carbon export. Such a biogeochemical amplification process implies high sensitivity of OMZ expansion to warming.

  7. Natural Compounds Regulate Glycolysis in Hypoxic Tumor Microenvironment

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    Jian-Li Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the early twentieth century, Otto Heinrich Warburg described an elevated rate of glycolysis occurring in cancer cells, even in the presence of atmospheric oxygen (the Warburg effect. Recently it became a therapeutically interesting strategy and is considered as an emerging hallmark of cancer. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 is one of the key transcription factors that play major roles in tumor glycolysis and could directly trigger Warburg effect. Thus, how to inhibit HIF-1-depended Warburg effect to assist the cancer therapy is becoming a hot issue in cancer research. In fact, HIF-1 upregulates the glucose transporters (GLUT and induces the expression of glycolytic enzymes, such as hexokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase. So small molecules of natural origin used as GLUT, hexokinase, or pyruvate kinase isoform M2 inhibitors could represent a major challenge in the field of cancer treatment. These compounds aim to suppress tumor hypoxia induced glycolysis process to suppress the cell energy metabolism or enhance the susceptibility of tumor cells to radio- and chemotherapy. In this review, we highlight the role of natural compounds in regulating tumor glycolysis, with a main focus on the glycolysis under hypoxic tumor microenvironment.

  8. Ceftriaxone attenuates hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats

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    Huang Yen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perinatal brain injury is the leading cause of subsequent neurological disability in both term and preterm baby. Glutamate excitotoxicity is one of the major factors involved in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. Glutamate transporter GLT1, expressed mainly in mature astrocytes, is the major glutamate transporter in the brain. HIE induced excessive glutamate release which is not reuptaked by immature astrocytes may induce neuronal damage. Compounds, such as ceftriaxone, that enhance the expression of GLT1 may exert neuroprotective effect in HIE. Methods We used a neonatal rat model of HIE by unilateral ligation of carotid artery and subsequent exposure to 8% oxygen for 2 hrs on postnatal day 7 (P7 rats. Neonatal rats were administered three dosages of an antibiotic, ceftriaxone, 48 hrs prior to experimental HIE. Neurobehavioral tests of treated rats were assessed. Brain sections from P14 rats were examined with Nissl and immunohistochemical stain, and TUNEL assay. GLT1 protein expression was evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Results Pre-treatment with 200 mg/kg ceftriaxone significantly reduced the brain injury scores and apoptotic cells in the hippocampus, restored myelination in the external capsule of P14 rats, and improved the hypoxia-ischemia induced learning and memory deficit of P23-24 rats. GLT1 expression was observed in the cortical neurons of ceftriaxone treated rats. Conclusion These results suggest that pre-treatment of infants at risk for HIE with ceftriaxone may reduce subsequent brain injury.

  9. PUMA-mediated mitochondrial apoptotic disruption by hypoxic postconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, YuZhen; Guo, Qi; Liu, XiuHua; Wang, Chen; Song, DanDan

    2015-08-01

    Postconditioning can reduce ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by targeting mitochondria. p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) is involved in lethal I/R injury. Here, we hypothesized that postconditioning might inhibit mitochondrial pathway-mediated cardiomyocyte apoptosis by controlling PUMA expression. The cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes underwent 3 h of hypoxia and 3 h of reoxygenation. Postconditioning consisted of three cycles of 5 min reoxygenation and 5 min hypoxia after prolonged hypoxia. Hypoxic postconditioning reduced the levels of PUMA mRNA and protein. Concomitantly, the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation were decreased significantly by postconditioning. Overexpression of PUMA increased greatly not only the number of apoptotic cardiomyocytes, but also the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation under postconditioning condition. The data suggest that reduction of PUMA expression mediates the endogenous cardioprotective mechanisms of postconditioning by disrupting mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

  10. Selective Intracellular Delivery of Recombinant Arginine Deiminase (ADI) Using pH-Sensitive Cell Penetrating Peptides To Overcome ADI Resistance in Hypoxic Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Tzyy-Harn; Chen, Yun-Ru; Chen, Szu-Ying; Shen, Wei-Chiang; Ann, David K; Zaro, Jennica L; Shen, Li-Jiuan

    2016-01-04

    Arginine depletion strategies, such as pegylated recombinant arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20), offer a promising anticancer treatment. Many tumor cells have suppressed expression of a key enzyme, argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1), which converts citrulline to arginine. These tumor cells become arginine auxotrophic, as they can no longer synthesize endogenous arginine intracellularly from citrulline, and are therefore sensitive to arginine depletion therapy. However, since ADI-PEG20 only depletes extracellular arginine due to low internalization, ASS1-expressing cells are not susceptible to treatment since they can synthesize arginine intracellularly. Recent studies have found that several factors influence ASS1 expression. In this study, we evaluated the effect of hypoxia, frequently encountered in many solid tumors, on ASS1 expression and its relationship to ADI-resistance in human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. It was found that MDA-MB-231 cells developed ADI resistance in hypoxic conditions with increased ASS1 expression. To restore ADI sensitivity as well as achieve tumor-selective delivery under hypoxia, we constructed a pH-sensitive cell penetrating peptide (CPP)-based delivery system to carry ADI inside cells to deplete both intra- and extracellular arginine. The delivery system was designed to activate the CPP-mediated internalization only at the mildly acidic pH (6.5-7) associated with the microenvironment of hypoxic tumors, thus achieving better selectivity toward tumor cells. The pH sensitivity of the CPP HBHAc was controlled by recombinant fusion to a histidine-glutamine (HE) oligopeptide, generating HBHAc-HE-ADI. The tumor distribution of HBHAc-HE-ADI was comparable to ADI-PEG20 in a mouse xenograft model of human breast cancer cells in vivo. In addition, HBHAc-HE-ADI showed increased in vitro cellular uptake in cells incubated in a mildly acidic pH (hypoxic conditions) compared to normal pH (normoxic conditions), which correlated with p

  11. Monitoring of neurological parameters in newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

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    Đinđić Jasmina

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Asphyxia i a condition caused by lack of oxygen in tissues and organs. The basic pathogenic mechanisms of asphyxia are: 1hypoxemia, 2 ischemia. The effects of perinatal asphyxia on the brain of a neonatal baby are critical in development of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The diagnosis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is based on clinical data including course of pregnancy and delivery (Apgar score and especially on the neurological status of the newborn (consciousness, tonus, convulsions, reflexes, vegetative functions, etc. and it can be confirmed by biochemical analysis and neurological examinations. The aim of this paper is to determine the importance of prenatal and perinatal risk factors for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, as well as their effects on the development of neurological complications and further neurological problems. The research included 148 newborn infants born in the period from January 1, 1996 to January 1, 1999, with gestational age of 27 to 42 weeks, with hypoxic ischemic lesions of the central nervosus system. The control group included 58 children of the same age and the same gestation, with generalized hypotonia ("floppy infant" but without any signs of hypoxic ischemic lesions of the central nervous system. In the group of examined newborn infants with hypoxic ischemic lesions, from 149 children 1 (0.67% died, 87 (53.89% had normal findings, whereas the handicap was established in 61 (40.94%. Perinatal asphyxia affects the fetus and newborn infants not by individual factors, but with at least three or four associated factors. The disorders caused by asphyxia are in inverse proportion to the duration and intensity of hypoxic insults and the gestational age of the newborn. .

  12. Concerted modulation of alanine and glutamate metabolism in young Medicago truncatula seedlings under hypoxic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limami, Anis M; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Ricoult, Claudie; Cliquet, Jean-Bernard; Planchet, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The modulation of primary nitrogen metabolism by hypoxic stress was studied in young Medicago truncatula seedlings. Hypoxic seedlings were characterized by the up-regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) and mitochondrial alanine aminotransferase (mAlaAT), and down-regulation of glutamine synthetase 1b (GS1b), NADH-glutamate synthase (NADH-GOGAT), glutamate dehydrogenase 3 (GDH3), and isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) gene expression. Hypoxic stress severely inhibited GS activity and stimulated NADH-GOGAT activity. GDH activity was lower in hypoxic seedlings than in the control, however, under either normoxia or hypoxia, the in vivo activity was directed towards glutamate deamination. (15)NH(4) labelling showed for the first time that the adaptive reaction of the plant to hypoxia consisted of a concerted modulation of nitrogen flux through the pathways of both alanine and glutamate synthesis. In hypoxic seedlings, newly synthesized (15)N-alanine increased and accumulated as the major amino acid, asparagine synthesis was inhibited, while (15)N-glutamate was synthesized at a similar rate to that in the control. A discrepancy between the up-regulation of GDH1 expression and the down-regulation of GDH activity by hypoxic stress highlighted for the first time the complex regulation of this enzyme by hypoxia. Higher rates of glycolysis and ethanol fermentation are known to cause the fast depletion of sugar stores and carbon stress. It is proposed that the expression of GDH1 was stimulated by hypoxia-induced carbon stress, while the enzyme protein might be involved during post-hypoxic stress contributing to the regeneration of 2-oxoglutarate via the GDH shunt.

  13. Immunohistochemical investigation of hypoxic/ischemic brain damage in forensic autopsy cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, O

    1994-01-01

    A neuropathological study of 41 forensic autopsy cases of hypoxic/ischemic brain damage has been undertaken, using immunohistochemical staining to detect the 70-kDa heat shock protein (hsp70) and the status of the glial cells. In cases surviving 2-5 h after hypoxic/ischemic injury, ischemic cell changes were seen whereas glial reactions were not apparent. In cases of longer survival, neuronal necrosis and a loss of neurons were seen, and these changes were accompanied by proliferation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), vimentin-positive astrocytes and microglia which transformed into rod cells or lipid-laden macrophages. In cases with a history of hypoxic attacks, GFAP-positive and vimentin-negative astrocytes had proliferated in the CA3 and CA4 regions of hippocampus. The cases of severe hypoxic injury, such as an asthmatic attack and choking, showed no ischemic changes in the hippocampal neurons. On the other hand, the CA1 pyramidal cells showed neuronal necrosis in a patient suffering from tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), who survived for 2 h after a traffic accident. Therefore, it is suggested that even moderate hypoxic injury induces astrocytosis in the CA3 and CA4 regions and may affect the neuronal proteins and the metabolism, and that in cases with a history of hypoxic attacks neuronal damage may be severe even several hours after ischemic injury. The protein hsp70 expression was found in the CA2, CA3 and CA4 regions in cases of long-term survival after severe hypoxic/ischemic injury and in cases of alcoholic intake or toluene abuse just before acute death.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Metabolic profiling of hypoxic cells revealed a catabolic signature required for cell survival.

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    Christian Frezza

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is one of the features of poorly vascularised areas of solid tumours but cancer cells can survive in these areas despite the low oxygen tension. The adaptation to hypoxia requires both biochemical and genetic responses that culminate in a metabolic rearrangement to counter-balance the decrease in energy supply from mitochondrial respiration. The understanding of metabolic adaptations under hypoxia could reveal novel pathways that, if targeted, would lead to specific death of hypoxic regions. In this study, we developed biochemical and metabolomic analyses to assess the effects of hypoxia on cellular metabolism of HCT116 cancer cell line. We utilized an oxygen fluorescent probe in anaerobic cuvettes to study oxygen consumption rates under hypoxic conditions without the need to re-oxygenate the cells and demonstrated that hypoxic cells can maintain active, though diminished, oxidative phosphorylation even at 1% oxygen. These results were further supported by in situ microscopy analysis of mitochondrial NADH oxidation under hypoxia. We then used metabolomic methodologies, utilizing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS, to determine the metabolic profile of hypoxic cells. This approach revealed the importance of synchronized and regulated catabolism as a mechanism of adaptation to bioenergetic stress. We then confirmed the presence of autophagy under hypoxic conditions and demonstrated that the inhibition of this catabolic process dramatically reduced the ATP levels in hypoxic cells and stimulated hypoxia-induced cell death. These results suggest that under hypoxia, autophagy is required to support ATP production, in addition to glycolysis, and that the inhibition of autophagy might be used to selectively target hypoxic regions of tumours, the most notoriously resistant areas of solid tumours.

  15. Influence of hyperbaric oxygen on the differentiation of hypoxic/ischemic brain-derived neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengrong Peng; Sue Wang; Pingtian Xiao

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been previously shown that hyperbaric oxygen may promote proliferation of neural stem cells and reduce death of endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs).OBJECTIVE: To explore the effects of hyperbaric oxygen on the differentiation of hypoxic/ischemic brain-derived NSCs into neuron-like cells and compare with high-concentration oxygen and high pressure.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An in vitro contrast study, performed at Laboratory of Neurology,Central South University between January and May 2006.MATERIALS: A hyperbaric oxygen chamber (YLC 0.5/1A) was provided by Wuhan Shipping Design Research Institute; mouse anti-rat microtubute-associated protein 2 monoclonal antibody by Jingmei Company, Beijing; mouse anti-rat glial fibrillary acidic protein monoclonal antibody by Neo Markers,USA; mouse anti-rat galactocerebroside monoclonal antibody by Santa Cruz Biotechnology Inc.,USA; and goat anti-mouse fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled secondary antibody by Wuhan Boster Bioengineering Co., Ltd., China.METHODS: Brain-derived NSCs isolated from brain tissues of neonatal Sprague Dawiey rats werecloned and passaged, and assigned into five groups: normal control, model, high-concentration oxygen, high pressure, and hyperbaric oxygen groups. Cells in the four groups, excluding the normal control group, were incubated in serum-containing DMEM/F12 culture medium. Hypoxic/ischemic models of NSCs were established in an incubator comprising 93% N2, 5% CO2, and 2% O2.Thereafter, cells were continuously cultured as follows: compressed air (0.2 MPa, 1 hour, once a day)in the high pressure group, compressed air+a minimum of 80% O2 in the hyperbaric oxygen group,and a minimum of 80% O2 in the high-concentration oxygen group. Cells in the normal control and model groups were cultured as normal.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: At day 7 after culture, glial fibrillary acidic protein,microtubule-associated protein 2, and galactocerebroside immunofluorescence staining were examined to

  16. Tolbutamide attenuates diazoxide-induced aggravation of hypoxic cell injury.

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    Pissarek, M; Reichelt, C; Krauss, G J; Illes, P

    1998-11-23

    ATP-dependent potassium (KATP) channels of neurons are closed in the presence of physiological levels of intracellular ATP and open when ATP is depleted during hypoxia or metabolic damage. The present study investigates hypoxic alterations of purine and pyrimidine nucleotide levels supposed to intracellularly modulate KATP channels. In addition, the effects of the KATP channel activator diazoxide and its antagonist tolbutamide were investigated on ATP, GTP, CTP and UTP levels in slices of the parietal cortex. Hypoxia was evoked by saturation of the medium with 95% N2-5% CO2 instead of 95% O2-5% CO2 for 5 min. Nucleotide contents were measured by anion-exchange HPLC in neutralized perchloric acid extracts obtained from slices frozen immediately at the end of incubation. Hypoxia per se decreased purine and pyrimidine nucleoside triphosphate contents. Thus, ATP and GTP contents were reduced to 69.9 and 77.6% of the respective normoxic levels. UTP and CTP contents were even more decreased (to 60.9 and 41.6%),, probably because the salvage pathway of these pyrimidine nucleotides is less effective than that of the purine nucleotides ATP and GTP. While tolbutamide (30 microM) had no effect on the hypoxia-induced decrease of nucleotides, diazoxide at 300, but not 30 microM aggravated the decline of ATP, UTP and CTP to 51.8, 37.5 and 28.5% of the contents observed at normoxia; GTP levels also showed a tendency to decrease after diazoxide application. Tolbutamide (300 microM) antagonized the effects of diazoxide (300 but not 30 microM aggravated the decline of ATP, UTP and CTP to 51.8, 37.5 and 28.5% of the contents observed at normoxia; GTP levels also showed a tendency to decrease after diazoxide application. Tolbutamide (300 microM) antagonized the effects of diazoxide (300 MicroM). Nucleoside diphosphate (ADP, GDP and UDP) levels were uniformly increased by hypoxia. There was no hypoxia-induced increase of ADP contents in the presence of tolbutamide (300 microM). The ATP

  17. A Piglet Model of Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy.

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    Kyng, Kasper J; Skajaa, Torjus; Kerrn-Jespersen, Sigrid; Andreassen, Christer S; Bennedsgaard, Kristine; Henriksen, Tine B

    2015-05-16

    Birth asphyxia, which causes hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), accounts for 0.66 million deaths worldwide each year, about a quarter of the world's 2.9 million neonatal deaths. Animal models of HIE have contributed to the understanding of the pathophysiology in HIE, and have highlighted the dynamic process that occur in brain injury due to perinatal asphyxia. Thus, animal studies have suggested a time-window for post-insult treatment strategies. Hypothermia has been tested as a treatment for HIE in pdiglet models and subsequently proven effective in clinical trials. Variations of the model have been applied in the study of adjunctive neuroprotective methods and piglet studies of xenon and melatonin have led to clinical phase I and II trials(1,2). The piglet HIE model is further used for neonatal resuscitation- and hemodynamic studies as well as in investigations of cerebral hypoxia on a cellular level. However, it is a technically challenging model and variations in the protocol may result in either too mild or too severe brain injury. In this article, we demonstrate the technical procedures necessary for establishing a stable piglet model of neonatal HIE. First, the newborn piglet (< 24 hr old, median weight 1500 g) is anesthetized, intubated, and monitored in a setup comparable to that found in a neonatal intensive care unit. Global hypoxia-ischemia is induced by lowering the inspiratory oxygen fraction to achieve global hypoxia, ischemia through hypotension and a flat trace amplitude integrated EEG (aEEG) indicative of cerebral hypoxia. Survival is promoted by adjusting oxygenation according to the aEEG response and blood pressure. Brain injury is quantified by histopathology and magnetic resonance imaging after 72 hr.

  18. Chemoreflex blunting of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction is vagally mediated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L B; Levitzky, M G

    1989-02-01

    We investigated the role of the autonomic nervous system in the arterial chemoreceptor attenuation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) using anesthetized dogs. Total pulmonary blood flow (Qt) and left pulmonary blood flow (Ql) were determined using electromagnetic flow probes. Carotid body chemoreceptors were perfused using blood pumped from an extracorporeal circuit containing an oxygenator. Four groups were used: 1) prevagotomy (control), 2) bilateral vagotomy, 3) post-atropine, and 4) post-propranolol. Left lung hypoxia decreased Ql/Qt from 42.9 +/- 2.9 to 28.1 +/- 3.0%, from 41.1 +/- 5.3 to 26.7 +/- 4.2%, from 38.6 +/- 1.3 to 22.2 +/- 2.4%, and from 48.2 +/- 4.2 to 28.5 +/- 3.7% in the four groups, respectively. Chemoreceptor stimulation during unilateral hypoxia increased Ql/Qt from 28.1 +/- 3.0 to 39.1 +/- 4.9% and from 28.5 +/- 3.7 to 40.6 +/- 3.7% in the control and propranolol groups. However, chemoreceptor stimulation had no effect on Ql/Qt during left lung hypoxia after vagotomy or atropine, as Ql/Qt went from 26.7 +/- 4.2 to 29.3 +/- 5.2% and from 22.2 +/- 2.4 to 24.1 +/- 1.5% in groups 2 and 3, respectively. Because chemoreceptor stimulation did not affect HPV in groups 2 and 3, we conclude that the chemoreceptor attenuation of HPV is mediated by the parasympathetic nervous system.

  19. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... Chronic myelogenous leukemia is grouped into phases: Chronic Accelerated Blast crisis The chronic phase can last for ...

  20. Acute effect of tetrandrine pulmonary targeting microspheres on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程德云; 陈文彬; 莫晓能

    2002-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of tetrandrine (Tet) pulmonary targeting microspheres on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and evaluate its selective action on pulmonary circulation. Methods Twenty rats were exposed to hypoxic conditions for 3 weeks. Ten rats were used as normoxic controls. We administered Tet pulmonary targeting microspheres to 10 hypoxic rats and Tet aqueous solution to 10 hypoxic rats and the 10 control rats. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) was measured by a right cardiac catheterization, and mean systemic blood pressure (mSBP) was measured by left femoral catheterization. Results Rats exposed to hypoxia developed pulmonary hypertension. The decrease in mPAP in rats treated with Tet pulmonary targeting microspheres was significantly greater than that in rats receiving Tet aqueous solution (P<0.05), and the effects were longer with Tet pulmonary targeting microspheres. Moreover, Tet pulmonary targeting microspheres, unlike Tet aqueous solution, did not decrease mSBP. Conclusion Tet pulmonary targeting microspheres were more effective than Tet aqueous solution in treating hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and acted selectively on the pulmonary circulation.

  1. Keynote address: cellular reduction of nitroimidazole drugs: potential for selective chemotherapy and diagnosis of hypoxic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, J.D.; Lee, J.; Meeker, B.E.

    1989-04-01

    Nitroimidazole drugs were initially developed as selective radiosensitizers of hypoxic cells and, consequently, as adjuvants to improve the local control probabilities of current radiotherapies. Misonidazole (MISO), the prototype radiosensitizing drug, was found in Phase I clinical studies to cause dose-limiting neurotoxicities (mainly peripheral neuropathies). MISO was also found to be cytotoxic in the absence of radiation and to covalently bind to cellular molecules, both processes demonstrating rates much higher in hypoxic compared with oxygenated cells. It is likely that neurotoxicity, cellular cytotoxicity and adduct formation results from reactions between reduction intermediates of MISO and cellular target molecules. Spin-offs from radiosensitizer research include the synthesis and characterization of more potent hypoxic cytotoxins and the exploitation of sensitizer-adducts as probes for measuring cellular and tissue oxygen levels. Current developments in hypoxic cell cytotoxin and hypoxic cell marker research are reviewed with specific examples from studies which characterize the cellular reduction of TF-MISO, (1-(2-nitro-1-imidazolyl)-3(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)-2-propanol). 45 references.

  2. Inhibition of inflammatory mediator release from microglia can treat ischemic/hypoxic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaibo Wang; Weitao Guo; Hongliang Liu; Rong Zeng; Mingnan Lu; Ziqiu Chen; Qixian Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β aggravate neuronal injury by mediating the inflammatory reaction following ischemic/hypoxic brain injury. It remains unclear whether interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β are released by microglia or astrocytes. This study prepared hippocampal slices that were subsequently subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation. Hematoxylin-eosin staining verified that neurons exhibited hypoxic changes. Results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay found that interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β participated in this hypoxic process. Moreover, when hypoxic injury occurred in the hippocampus, the release of interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β was mediated by the P2X4 receptor and P2X7 receptor. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that during ischemia/hypoxia, the P2X4 receptor, P2X7 receptor, interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β expression was detectable in rat hippocampal microglia, but only P2X4 receptor and P2X7 receptor expression was detected in astrocytes. Results suggested that the P2X4 receptor and P2X7 receptor, respectively, mediated interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β released by microglia, resulting in hippocampal ischemic/hypoxic injury. Astrocytes were activated, but did not synthesize or release interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β.

  3. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  4. [A comparison of a neuroprotective effects of hypoxic postconditioning and cerebrolysin in the experimental model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybnikova, E A; Vorob'ev, M G; Pivina, S G; Samoĭlov, M O

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic postconditioning using episodes of mild hypobaric hypoxia is a new neuroprotective technique. We compared the neuroprotective efficacy of hypoxic postconditioning and cerebrolysin in a model of posthypoxic pathology in rats. Animals that survived the severe hypoxia (180 Torr, 3 h) were exposed to hypoxic postconditioning or received cerebrolysin. Postconditioning prevented the injury and loss of hippocampal (fields CA1, CA4) and neocortical neurons whereas cerebrolysin was protective only for CA4 and the neocortex. Besides that, postconditioning, unlike cerebrolysin, led to the complete functional rehabilitation from the severe hypoxia by normalizing the level of anxiety and the pituitary-adrenal axis activity. The findings demonstrate that the elaborated postconditioning technique might provide useful tool for therapy of posthypoxic pathology and stroke.

  5. Effects of minocycline on learning and memory of mice following ischemic-hypoxic cerebral injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongling Fan; Yuanyin Zheng; Lijuan Xu; Zhichao Zhong; Shining Cai; Shuling Zhang; Quanzhong Chang

    2012-01-01

    An ischemic-hypoxic animal model was established using right common carotid artery occlusions and inhalation of low concentrations of oxygen in mice. At 10 days after the ischemic-hypoxic injuries, saline-treated mice exhibited significantly prolonged escape latencies in water-maze tests and significantly shorter memory latencies and more mistakes in step-down tests. In contrast, mice treated with 5 mg/kg minocycline exhibited significant reversals of each of these effects compared with the saline-treated control mice. Moreover, we found that minocycline can relieve brain water content and morphological changes in mice following ischemic-hypoxic cerebral injuries. Accordingly, our findings indicate that minocycline provides some protections against the deleterious effects of these injuries in mice.

  6. Killing of glucose-deprived hypoxic cells with moderate hyperthermia. [HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.H.; Kim, S.H.; Hahn, E.W.

    1978-08-01

    Investigations were carried out to determine the importance of glucose as a modifying factor for hyperthermic cellular damage. HeLa S-3 cells were heated under oxic and hypoxic conditions, in the presence and absence of D-glucose. Temperatures as low as 41/sup 0/C selectively enhanced killing of the glucose deprived hypoxic cell. Glucose deprivation (37/sup 0/C, 2 hr) or heat alone (41/sup 0/C for 2 hr in regular medium with glucose) produced minimal cell kill under oxic or hypoxic conditions. No enhancement was seen with hyperthermia under oxic condition in the absence of glucose. The result suggests that the interplay between glucose concentration is important for hyperthermic cell kill.

  7. Role of NLRP3 inflammasomes in lung injury induced by gut hypoxic stress and its mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-qiang XIONG

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic stress of the gut may induce impairment of gut barrier function, ensuing translocation of gutderived factors which can damage the function of remote organs, especially the development of acute lung injury (ALI. High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE is a non-cardiogenic pulmonary injury caused by hypoxia, while inflammation involved in the pathogenesis of HAPE has been gradually recognized. It has been also recognized that the cleavage and maturation of proinflammatory cytokines mediated by NLRP3 inflammasome play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of lung injury. Further investigation on the role of NLRP3 inflammasome in lung injury induced by gut hypoxic stress is of an important clinical significance for further improvement in the treatment of hypoxic inflammatory diseases. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.11.14

  8. Blood immunological parameters upon hypoxic-ischemic injuries of central nervous system in newborns and infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulomjan Khalimbetov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies interrelation between immune system condition and circulating concentrations of neuropeptides and neuron-specific enolase (NSE upon perinatal pathology in newborns and infants. Reactivity of cytokine and interleukin links of immune systems was found varying in newborns and infants with CNS hypoxic-ischemic pathology, accompanied by psychomotor retardation, a psycho-speech disorder, emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD and paroxysmal syndrome. At admission irrespectively of a syndrome type in the patients with CNS hypoxic-ischemic pathology, as compared with the patients in the control group, circulating TNF-α and IL-1 were found increased by 3.4-4.1 and 6.4-7.9 times, respectively. Release of S100 protein and NSE seems to be the underlying mechanism for enhancement of synthesis and/or release of TNF-α and IL-1 into circulation of patients with CNS hypoxic-ischemic pathology.

  9. Intermittent hypoxic exposure does not improve sleep at 4300 m.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Juli E; Muza, Stephen R; Fulco, Charles S; Beidleman, Beth A; Tapia, Michael L; Cymerman, Allen

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine in sea-level residents if 6 to 7 consecutive days of normobaric intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE) (hypoxia room: 2-h ambient PO2=90 mmHg sedentary and 1-h ambient PO2=110 mmHg exercising at 80+/-5% of maximum heart rate) improved sleep quality (awakenings per hour) and quantity at altitude (4300 m). We hypothesized that IHE would improve sleep arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) levels and decrease desaturation events, thereby contributing to improvements in sleep quality and quantity during subsequent exposure to high altitude. Ten sea-level residents (mean+/-SE: 22+/-1 yr, 179+/-2 cm, 79+/-3 kg) were assigned to an IHE group and six to a SHAM group (20+/-0.5 yr, 180+/-3 cm, 77+/-4 kg). Sleep quantity, SaO2, and heart rate (HR) were monitored at sea level and during high altitude (i.e., 4300 m in a hypobaric chamber) before pretest (PRE-T) and 60 h after posttest (POST-T) for the last IHE or SHAM treatment. Over the 6 to 7 days of IHE, resting SaO2 increased from 75+/-1% to 81+/-3% in the IHE group, while the SHAM group remained at 98+/-1%. From PRE-T to POST-T at 4300-m exposure, both the IHE and SHAM groups had significantly higher sleep SaO2, fewer desaturation events per hour, and an increase in the percentage of time asleep while sleeping (sleep percent). The IHE group, but not the SHAM group, had significantly lower sleep HR and a trend to more awakenings during the POST-T 4300-m exposure. These results indicate that although IHE treatment induced significant ventilatory acclimatization, relative to the SHAM group, IHE did not further improve sleep SaO2 quality and quantity following rapid ascent to 4300 m. Rather, it is likely that the acquired ventilatory acclimatization was lost in the 60 h between the last IHE session and the POST-T altitude exposure.

  10. Effects of resistance training under hypoxic conditions on muscle hypertrophy and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurobe, Kazumichi; Huang, Zhong; Nishiwaki, Masato; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Ogita, Futoshi

    2015-05-01

    It has been reported that exercise under hypoxic conditions elevates acute growth hormone secretion after exercise compared with that under normoxic conditions. This study examined the influence of resistance training under moderate hypoxic conditions on muscle thickness, strength and hormonal responses. Thirteen healthy men were assigned into two groups matched for physical fitness level and then randomized into two groups that performed exercise under normoxic (FiO2  = 20·9%) or hypoxic (FiO2  = 12·7%) conditions. Three sets of elbow extensions with unilateral arm were performed to exhaustion at a workload of a 10 repetition maximum with 1-minute intervals for 3 days per week for 8 weeks. The thickness of the biceps and triceps brachii was determined using B-mode ultrasound before and after training. Blood sampling was carried out before and after exercise, as well as during the first and last training sessions. Increase in the thickness of the triceps brachii in trained arm was significantly greater in the hypoxic group than in the normoxic group. The 10 repetition maximum was significantly increased not only in the trained arm but also in the untrained arm in both groups. Serum growth hormone concentrations after exercise were significantly higher in the hypoxic group than in the normoxic group on both the first and last training sessions. These findings suggest that hypoxic resistance training elicits more muscle hypertrophy associated with a higher growth hormone secretion, but that the greater muscle hypertrophy did not necessarily contribute a greater gain of muscle strength.

  11. Options for Managing Hypoxic Blackwater in River Systems: Case Studies and Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, Kerry L.; Kerr, Janice L.; Mosley, Luke M.; Conallin, John; Hardwick, Lorraine; Baldwin, Darren S.

    2013-10-01

    Hypoxic blackwater events occur when large amounts of organic material are leached into a water body (e.g., during floodplain inundation) and rapid metabolism of this carbon depletes oxygen from the water column, often with catastrophic effects on the aquatic environment. River regulation may have increased the frequency and severity of hypoxic blackwater events in lowland river systems, necessitating management intervention to mitigate the impacts of these events on aquatic biota. We examine the effectiveness of a range of mitigation interventions that have been used during large-scale hypoxic blackwater events in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia and that may be applicable in other environments at risk from hypoxic blackwater. Strategies for hypoxia mitigation include: delivery of dilution flows; enhancement of physical re-aeration rates by increasing surface turbulence; and diversion of blackwater into shallow off-channel storages. We show that the impact of dilution water delivery is determined by relative volumes and water quality and can be predicted using simple models. At the dilution water inflow point, localized oxygenated plumes may also act as refuges. Physical re-aeration strategies generally result in only a small increase in dissolved oxygen but may be beneficial for local refuge protection. Dilution and natural re-aeration processes in large, shallow lake systems can be sufficient to compensate for hypoxic inflows and water processed in off-channel lakes may be able to be returned to the river channel as dilution flows. We provide a set of predictive models (as electronic supplementary material) for estimation of the re-aeration potential of intervention activities and a framework to guide the adaptive management of future hypoxic blackwater events.

  12. Study of capillary network directionality and irrigation of hypoxic tissue in an angiogenesis lattice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moglia, Belén; Guisoni, Nara; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2013-12-01

    To shed light on the understanding of the angiogenesis process, we study a simplified lattice model for the capillary network formation between an existing blood vessel and an initially hypoxic tissue. We consider that the cells of the tissue surface can release growth factors that will diffuse, leading to the formation of new capillaries that ultimately arrive at the tissue. Additionally, we consider the local production of growth factors by the growing capillary network. We also propose the existence of an inhibition mechanism at the hypoxic surface, i.e., a fixed number of neighboring sites of an already irrigated site of the hypoxic tissue stop releasing growth factors due to the arrival of nutrients. Particularly, the goal of this work is to study the effect of the release of local growth factors and the inhibition mechanism on properties such as the directionality of the growing network and the irrigation of the hypoxic tissue. Therefore we propose the quantification of these two relevant features for angiogenesis modeling. We establish a relationship between the model behavior without the release of local growth factors in the presence of the inhibition mechanism and a normal angiogenesis process. In this situation, the model gives a directional capillary network and a good irrigation of the hypoxic tissue. On the other hand, for a large number of released local growth factors in the absence of the inhibition mechanism, the model could be appropriate for the description of tumor angiogenesis. In this case, the model provides a rather small directionality for the growing structure, with a worse degree of irrigation of the hypoxic tissue, as well as a more tortuous capillary network with many closed branches and loops.

  13. Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: severity determinants and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Teixeira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE after perinatal asphyxia is one of the most critical pathologic conditions in neonatal medicine due to the potential for neurological sequelae in later life. The aim of our study is to identify the factors that are associated with a higher degree of severity in HIE and evaluate the outcomes. We performed a retrospective study of all newborns with HIE treated at our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU from January 2010 to December 2013. Data collected include information about prenatal period, peripartum period, demographic characteristics, admission and evolution during NICU stay and outcomes (assessed in three different times: at discharge, at 6-9 months and 18 months. Forty seven newborns were enrolled in our study, 11 (23.4% with mild HIE, 21 (44.7% with moderate HIE and 15 (31.9% with severe HIE. Prenatal, perinatal and demographic data showed no statistically significant differences between groups. Statistically significant differences were found in values of Thompson score (p < 0.0001, abnormal aEEG/EEG at admission (p = 0.025 and at 48 hours (p = 0.018, need of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.004, acute renal failure (p = 0.002 and length of stay (p = 0.038 with high rates in the moderate and severe HIE groups. Regarding the outcomes, statistically significant differences were found in the prevalence of death (p = 0.010; need of antiepileptic drugs at discharge (p = 0.001; motor deficits requiring physiotherapy (p = 0.046, abnormal deep tendon reflex (p = 0.006 and need of antiepileptic drugs (p = 0.001 at 6-9 months follow-up; and cerebral palsy with cognitive impairment at 18 months (p = 0.041 with high rates in the severe HIE group. These results suggest that Thompson score, abnormal aEEG/EEG at admission and at 48 hours, mechanical ventilation, acute renal failure and length of stay are associated with more severe HIE. We also concluded that more severe HIE reflects worse outcomes whereas

  14. Analysis of 127 peripartum hypoxic brain injuries from closed claims registered by the Danish Patient Insurance Association

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock, J.; Christoffersen, J.K.; Hedegaard, M.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the most feared complications in medicine is hypoxic brain damage to a newborn. The authors investigated the circumstances of registered peripartum hypoxic brain injuries in order to identify potential opportunities to improve patient safety and prevent injuries. METHODS: The a...

  15. Sex-dependent regulation of hypoxic ventilation in mice and humans is mediated by erythropoietin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliz, Jorge; Thomsen, Jonas Juhl; Soulage, Christophe;

    2009-01-01

    . Alterations of catecholamines in the brain stem's respiratory centers were also sex dependent. In a proof-of-concept study, human volunteers were intravenously injected with 5,000 units rhEpo and subsequently exposed to 10% oxygen. Compared with men, the hypoxic ventilatory response was significantly...... increased in women. We conclude that Epo exerts a sex-dependent impact on hypoxic ventilation improving the response in female mice and in women that most probably involves sexual hormones. Our data provides an explanation as to why women are less susceptible to hypoxia-associated syndromes than men....

  16. MRI in paediatric hypoxic-ischemic disease, metabolic disorders and malformations-A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beitzke, Dietrich [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Medical University, Graz (Austria)], E-mail: dietrich.beitzke@meduni-graz.at; Simbrunner, Josef [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Medical University, Graz (Austria); Riccabona, Michael [Department of Radiology, Division of Paediatric Radiology, Medical University, Graz (Austria)

    2008-11-15

    MRI has become the most important modality in paediatric neuroimaging. It provides an excellent anatomical overview with good spatial and temporal resolution, allows investigations of the blood vessels, and - using technologies such as diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy - it allows quick and exact differentiation of ischemic, hypoxic, inflammatory, oncologic, traumatic and metabolic diseases. This review presents an overview of brain MRI in infants and children with suspected hypoxic-ischemic disease, metabolic disorders or (vascular) malformations, illustrating these issues by some MRI findings in selected important conditions and discussing some major clinical and pathophysiological aspects important for imaging.

  17. Cerebrospinal lfuid from rats given hypoxic preconditioning protects neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-bo Zhang; Zheng-dong Guo; Mei-yi Li; Si-jie Li; Jing-zhong Niu; Ming-feng Yang; Xun-ming Ji; Guo-wei Lv

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning activates endogenous mechanisms that protect against cerebral isch-emic and hypoxic injury. To better understand these protective mechanisms, adult rats were housed in a hypoxic environment (8% O2/92% N2) for 3 hours, and then in a normal oxygen environment for 12 hours. Their cerebrospinal fluid was obtained to culture cortical neurons from newborn rats for 1 day, and then the neurons were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation for 1.5 hours. The cerebrospinal lfuid from rats subjected to hypoxic preconditioning reduced oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury, increased survival rate, upregulated Bcl-2 expression and downregulated Bax expression in the cultured cortical neurons, compared with control. These results indicate that cerebrospinal lfuid from rats given hypoxic preconditioning protects against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury by affecting apoptosis-related protein expres-sion in neurons from newborn rats.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid from rats given hypoxic preconditioning protects neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Bo; Guo, Zheng-Dong; Li, Mei-Yi; Li, Si-Jie; Niu, Jing-Zhong; Yang, Ming-Feng; Ji, Xun-Ming; Lv, Guo-Wei

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning activates endogenous mechanisms that protect against cerebral ischemic and hypoxic injury. To better understand these protective mechanisms, adult rats were housed in a hypoxic environment (8% O2/92% N2) for 3 hours, and then in a normal oxygen environment for 12 hours. Their cerebrospinal fluid was obtained to culture cortical neurons from newborn rats for 1 day, and then the neurons were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation for 1.5 hours. The cerebrospinal fluid from rats subjected to hypoxic preconditioning reduced oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury, increased survival rate, upregulated Bcl-2 expression and downregulated Bax expression in the cultured cortical neurons, compared with control. These results indicate that cerebrospinal fluid from rats given hypoxic preconditioning protects against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injury by affecting apoptosis-related protein expression in neurons from newborn rats.

  19. Impact of perinatal systemic hypoxic-ischemic injury on the brain of male offspring rats: an improved model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in early preterm newborns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuejun Huang

    Full Text Available In this study, we attempted to design a model using Sprague-Dawley rats to better reproduce perinatal systemic hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE in early preterm newborns. On day 21 of gestation, the uterus of pregnant rats were exposed and the blood supply to the fetuses of neonatal HIE groups were thoroughly abscised by hemostatic clamp for 5, 10 or 15 min. Thereafter, fetuses were moved from the uterus and manually stimulated to initiate breathing in an incubator at 37 °C for 1 hr in air. We showed that survival rates of offspring rats were decreased with longer hypoxic time. TUNEL staining showed that apoptotic cells were significant increased in the brains of offspring rats from the 10 min and 15 min HIE groups as compared to the offspring rats in the control group at postnatal day (PND 1, but there was no statistical difference between the offspring rats in the 5 min HIE and control groups. The perinatal hypoxic treatment resulted in decreased neurons and increased cleaved caspase-3 protein levels in the offspring rats from all HIE groups at PND 1. Platform crossing times and the percentage of the time spent in the target quadrant of Morris Water Maze test were significantly reduced in the offspring rats of all HIE groups at PND 30, which were associated with decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and neuronal cells in the hippocampus of offspring rats at PND 35. These data demonstrated that perinatal ischemic injury led to the death of neuronal cells and long-lasting impairment of memory. This model reproduced hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in early preterm newborns and may be appropriate for investigating therapeutic interventions.

  20. Impact of perinatal systemic hypoxic-ischemic injury on the brain of male offspring rats: an improved model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in early preterm newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuejun; Lai, Huihong; Xu, Hongwu; Wu, Weizhao; Lai, Xiulan; Ho, Guyu; Chen, Yunbin; Ma, Lian

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to design a model using Sprague-Dawley rats to better reproduce perinatal systemic hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in early preterm newborns. On day 21 of gestation, the uterus of pregnant rats were exposed and the blood supply to the fetuses of neonatal HIE groups were thoroughly abscised by hemostatic clamp for 5, 10 or 15 min. Thereafter, fetuses were moved from the uterus and manually stimulated to initiate breathing in an incubator at 37 °C for 1 hr in air. We showed that survival rates of offspring rats were decreased with longer hypoxic time. TUNEL staining showed that apoptotic cells were significant increased in the brains of offspring rats from the 10 min and 15 min HIE groups as compared to the offspring rats in the control group at postnatal day (PND) 1, but there was no statistical difference between the offspring rats in the 5 min HIE and control groups. The perinatal hypoxic treatment resulted in decreased neurons and increased cleaved caspase-3 protein levels in the offspring rats from all HIE groups at PND 1. Platform crossing times and the percentage of the time spent in the target quadrant of Morris Water Maze test were significantly reduced in the offspring rats of all HIE groups at PND 30, which were associated with decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and neuronal cells in the hippocampus of offspring rats at PND 35. These data demonstrated that perinatal ischemic injury led to the death of neuronal cells and long-lasting impairment of memory. This model reproduced hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in early preterm newborns and may be appropriate for investigating therapeutic interventions.

  1. Changes in the activity levels of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase in rats subjected to hypoxic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, P.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Kumria, M. M. L.; Singh, S. N.; Patil, S. K. B.; Rangnathan, S.; Sridharan, K.

    Exposure to high altitude causes loss of body mass and alterations in metabolic processes, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The present study was conducted to elucidate the role of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase under conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia. Four groups, each consisting of 12 male albino rats (Wistar strain), were exposed to a simulated altitude of 7620 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h per day for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Blood haemoglobin, blood glucose, protein levels in the liver, muscle and plasma, glycogen content, and glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and glycogen synthetase activities in liver and muscle were determined in all groups of exposed and in a group of unexposed animals. Food intake and changes in body mass were also monitored. There was a significant reduction in body mass (28-30%) in hypoxia-exposed groups as compared to controls, with a corresponding decrease in food intake. There was rise in blood haemoglobin and plasma protein in response to acclimatisation. Over a three-fold increase in liver glycogen content was observed following 1 day of hypoxic exposure (4.76+/-0.78 mg.g-1 wet tissue in normal unexposed rats; 15.82+/-2.30 mg.g-1 wet tissue in rats exposed to hypoxia for 1 day). This returned to normal in later stages of exposure. However, there was no change in glycogen synthetase activity except for a decrease in the 21-days hypoxia-exposed group. There was a slight increase in muscle glycogen content in the 1-day exposed group which declined significantly by 56.5, 50.6 and 42% following 7, 14, and 21 days of exposure, respectively. Muscle glycogen synthetase activity was also decreased following 21 days of exposure. There was an increase in glutaminase activity in the liver and muscle in the 7-, 14- and 21-day exposed groups. Glutamine synthetase activity was higher in the liver in 7- and 14-day exposed groups; this returned to normal following 21 days of exposure

  2. Microbial respiration and extracellular enzyme activity in sediments from the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study explores the relationship between sediment chemistry (TC, TN, TP) and microbial respiration (DHA) and extracellular enzyme activity (EEA) across the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) hypoxic zone. TC, TN, and TP were all positively correlated with each other (r=0.19-0.68). DHA was ...

  3. Hypoxic-state estimation of brain cells by using wireless near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Jinn-Rung; Lin, Bor-Shyh; Cheng, Chih-Lun; Chio, Chung-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a modern measuring technology in neuroscience. It can be used to noninvasively measure the relative concentrations of oxyhemoglobin (OxyHb) and deoxyhemoglobin (DeoHb), which can reflect information related to cerebral blood volume and cerebral oxygen saturation. Therefore, it has the potential for noninvasive monitoring of cerebral ischemia. However, there is still a lack of reliable physiological information on the relationship between the concentrations of OxyHb and DeoHb in cerebral blood and the exact hypoxic state of brain cells under cerebral ischemia. In this study, we describe a wireless multichannel NIRS system, which we designed to noninvasively monitor the relative concentrations of OxyHb and DeoHb in bilateral cerebral blood before, during, and after middle cerebral artery occlusion. By comparing the results with the lactate/pyruvate ratio measured by microdialysis, we investigated the correlation between the relative concentrations of OxyHb and DeoHb in cerebral blood and the hypoxic state of brain cells. The results showed that the relationship between the concentration changes of DeoHb in cerebral blood and the hypoxic state of brain cells was significant. Therefore, by monitoring the changes in concentrations of DeoHb, the wireless NIRS can be used to estimate the hypoxic state of brain cells indirectly.

  4. Expression of Clock genes in the pineal glands of newborn rats with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Sun; Xing Feng; Xin Ding; Li Bao; Yongfu Li; Jun He; Meifang Jin

    2012-01-01

    Clock genes are involved in circadian rhythm regulation,and surviving newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy may present with sleep-wake cycle reversal.This study aimed to determine the expression of the clock genes Clock and Bmall,in the pineal gland of rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.Results showed that levels of Clock mRNA were not significantly changed within 48 hours after cerebral hypoxia and ischemia.Expression levels of CLOCK and BMAL1 protein were significantly higher after 48 hours.The levels of Bmall mRNA reached a peak at 36 hours,but were significantly reduced at 48 hours.Experimental findings indicate that Clock and Bmall genes were indeed expressed in the pineal glands of neonatal rats.At the initial stage (within 36 hours) of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage,only slight changes in the expression levels of these two genes were detected,followed by significant changes at 36 48 hours.These changes may be associated with circadian rhythm disorder induced by hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  5. Does aetiology of neonatal encephalopathy and hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy influence the outcome of treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcintyre, Sarah; Badawi, Nadia; Blair, Eve; Nelson, Karin B

    2015-04-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy, a clinical syndrome affecting term-born and late preterm newborn infants, increases the risk of perinatal death and long-term neurological morbidity, especially cerebral palsy. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, a treatment designed for hypoxic or ischaemic injury, associated mortality and morbidity rates have decreased. Unfortunately, only about one in eight neonates (95% confidence interval) who meet eligibility criteria for therapeutic cooling apparently benefit from the treatment. Studies of infants in representative populations indicate that neonatal encephalopathy is a potential result of a variety of antecedents and that asphyxial complications at birth account for only a small percentage of neonatal encephalopathy. In contrast, clinical case series suggest that a large proportion of neonatal encephalopathy is hypoxic or ischaemic, and trials of therapeutic hypothermia are specifically designed to include only infants exposed to hypoxia or ischaemia. This review addresses the differences, definitional and methodological, between infants studied and investigations undertaken, in population studies compared with cooling trials. It raises the question if there may be subgroups of infants with a clinical diagnosis of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) in whom the pathobiology of neonatal neurological depression is not fundamentally hypoxic or ischaemic and, therefore, for whom cooling may not be beneficial. In addition, it suggests approaches to future trials of cooling plus adjuvant therapy that may contribute to further improvement of care for these vulnerable neonates.

  6. Magneto-aerotactic bacteria deliver drug-containing nanoliposomes to tumour hypoxic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felfoul, Ouajdi; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Taherkhani, Samira; de Lanauze, Dominic; Zhong Xu, Yong; Loghin, Dumitru; Essa, Sherief; Jancik, Sylwia; Houle, Daniel; Lafleur, Michel; Gaboury, Louis; Tabrizian, Maryam; Kaou, Neila; Atkin, Michael; Vuong, Té; Batist, Gerald; Beauchemin, Nicole; Radzioch, Danuta; Martel, Sylvain

    2016-11-01

    Oxygen-depleted hypoxic regions in the tumour are generally resistant to therapies. Although nanocarriers have been used to deliver drugs, the targeting ratios have been very low. Here, we show that the magneto-aerotactic migration behaviour of magnetotactic bacteria, Magnetococcus marinus strain MC-1 (ref. 4), can be used to transport drug-loaded nanoliposomes into hypoxic regions of the tumour. In their natural environment, MC-1 cells, each containing a chain of magnetic iron-oxide nanocrystals, tend to swim along local magnetic field lines and towards low oxygen concentrations based on a two-state aerotactic sensing system. We show that when MC-1 cells bearing covalently bound drug-containing nanoliposomes were injected near the tumour in severe combined immunodeficient beige mice and magnetically guided, up to 55% of MC-1 cells penetrated into hypoxic regions of HCT116 colorectal xenografts. Approximately 70 drug-loaded nanoliposomes were attached to each MC-1 cell. Our results suggest that harnessing swarms of microorganisms exhibiting magneto-aerotactic behaviour can significantly improve the therapeutic index of various nanocarriers in tumour hypoxic regions.

  7. Acute hypoxic exercise does not alter post-exercise iron metabolism in moderately trained endurance athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govus, A.D.; Abbiss, C.R.; Garvican-Lewis, L.A.; Swinkels, D.W.; Laarakkers, C.M.; Gore, C.J.; Peeling, P.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study measured the influence of acute hypoxic exercise on Interleukin-6 (IL-6), hepcidin, and iron biomarkers in athletes. METHODS: In a repeated measures design, 13 moderately trained endurance athletes performed 5 x 4 min intervals at 90 % of their peak oxygen consumption velocity (v

  8. Association of NOS3 gene variants and clinical contributors of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmanić Šamija, R. [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Primorac, D. [School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia); Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Osijek, Osijek (Croatia); Eberly College of Science, Penn State University, University Park, PA (United States); St. Catherine Speciality Hospital, Zabok (Croatia); Rešić, B. [School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia); Pavlov, V. [Department of Neonatology, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Čapkun, V. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Punda, H. [School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia); Lozić, B. [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Zemunik, T. [Department of Medical Biology, School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia)

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association of different clinical contributors of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy with NOS3 gene polymorphisms. A total of 110 children with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and 128 control children were selected for this study. Association of gender, gestational age, birth weight, Apgar score, cranial ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings with genotypic data of six haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms and the most commonly investigated rs1800779 and rs2070744 polymorphisms was analyzed. The TGT haplotype of rs1800783, rs1800779, and rs2070744 polymorphisms was associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Children with the TGT haplotype were infants below 32 weeks of gestation and they had the most severe brain damage. Increased incidence of the TT genotype of the NOS3 rs1808593 SNP was found in the group of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy patients with medium and severe brain damage. The probability of brain damage was twice as high in children with the TT genotype than in children with the TG genotype of the same polymorphism. Furthermore, the T allele of the same polymorphism was twice as frequent in children with lower Apgar scores. This study strongly suggests associations of NOS3 gene polymorphism with intensity of brain damage and severity of the clinical picture in affected children.

  9. From top to bottom: the two faces of HIPK2 for regulation of the hypoxic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzado, Marco A; De La Vega, Laureano; Munoz, Eduardo; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2009-06-01

    Oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) triggers a complex network of signaling pathways that result in changed gene expression patterns in order to cope with this challenge. Recent work has identified the serine/threonine kinase HIPK2 as a novel regulatory protein participating in hypoxic gene regulation. HIPK2 can affect apical as well as downstream events during the hypoxic response. Under normoxic conditions, HIPK2-mediated phosphorylation of the ubiquitin E3 ligase Siah2 weakens mutual binding and destabilizes the phosphorylated E3 ligase. Low oxygen levels result in strongly increased HIPK2/Siah2 interactions that lead to efficient polyubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation of the kinase. At the apical level, the Siah2 inhibiting phosphorylations are lost, thus allowing Siah2-dependent proteolysis of dioxygenases which in turn allows for activation of transcription factor HIF. Downstream events of the hypoxic response are affected by the proteasomal elimination of HIPK2 from gene repressing complexes, an event that allows for full induction of gene expression. Thus HIPK2 can regulate a subset of HIF-dependent and -independent genes during the hypoxic response.

  10. Hypoxic treatment inhibits insulin-induced chondrogenesis of ATDC5 cells despite upregulation of DEC1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Fink, Trine; Ebbesen, Peter;

    2006-01-01

    Chondrogenesis occurs in vivo in a hypoxic environment, in which the hypoxia inducible factor 1, HIF-1, plays a regulatory role, possibly mediated through the transcription factor DEC1. We have analyzed the effect of hypoxia (1% oxygen) alone and in combination with insulin on the chondrogenic di...

  11. Augmented hypoxic cerebral vasodilation in men during 5 days at 3,810 m altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Sperling, B; Severinghaus, J W;

    1996-01-01

    hypoxic cerebrovascular reactivity: fractional VCBF = x[60/ (SaO2-40)-1], where X is the fractional increase of VCBF at 70%.X rose from 0.346 +/- 0.104 (SD) at sea level to 0.463 +/- 0.084 on altitude day 5 (P

  12. Defining the critical hypoxic threshold that promotes vascular remodeling in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujerdi, Amin; Milner, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In animal models, hypoxic pre-conditioning confers protection against subsequent neurological insults, mediated in part through an extensive vascular remodeling response. In light of the therapeutic potential of this effect, the goal of this study was to establish the dose-response relationship between level of hypoxia and the extent of cerebrovascular modeling, and to define the mildest level of hypoxia that promotes remodeling. Mice were exposed to different levels of continuous hypoxia (8-21% O2) for seven days before several aspects of vascular remodeling were evaluated, including endothelial proliferation, total vascular area, arteriogenesis, and fibronectin/α5β1 integrin expression. For most events, the threshold level of hypoxia that stimulated remodeling was 12-13% O2. Interestingly, many parameters displayed a biphasic dose-response curve, with peak levels attained at 10% O2, but declined thereafter. Further analysis in the 12-13% O2 range revealed that vascular remodeling occurs by two separate mechanisms: (i) endothelial hyperplasia, triggered by a hypoxic threshold of 13% O2, which leads to increased capillary growth, and (ii) endothelial hypertrophy, triggered by a more severe hypoxic threshold of 12% O2, which leads to expansion of large vessels and arteriogenesis. Taken together, these results define the hypoxic thresholds for vascular remodeling in the brain, and point to two separate mechanisms mediating this process.

  13. Cerebral perfusion and metabolism in resuscitated patients with severe post-hypoxic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, A.; de Jong, B M; Bams, J.L.; Haaxma-Reiche, H; Pruim, J; Zijlstra, J G

    2003-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was used for the study of regional cerebral perfusion and metabolism in eight patients with severe post-hypoxic encephalopathy, caused by cardiac arrest and resulting in a coma lasting for at least 24 h. Using this method, we aimed to identify regional vulnerabilit

  14. Therapeutic Evaluation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Gut Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0666 TITLE: Therapeutic Evaluation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Gut Inflammation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...4Aug2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0666 Therapeutic Evaluation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Gut Inflammation 5b...in a well-characterized mouse model of chronic colonic inflammation . Hypothesis: We propose that ex vivo-generated MSCs suppress chronic gut

  15. Chronic cholecystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholecystitis - chronic ... Most of the time, chronic cholecystitis is caused by repeated attacks of acute (sudden) cholecystitis. Most of these attacks are caused by gallstones in the gallbladder. These ...

  16. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. × ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. ...

  17. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a problem you need to take care of. Chronic pain is different. The pain signals go on ... there is no clear cause. Problems that cause chronic pain include Headache Low back strain Cancer Arthritis ...

  18. Non-endothelial endothelin counteracts hypoxic vasodilation in porcine large coronary arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fröbert Ole

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The systemic vascular response to hypoxia is vasodilation. However, reports suggest that the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 (ET-1 is released from the vasculature during hypoxia. ET-1 is reported to augment superoxide anion generation and may counteract nitric oxide (NO vasodilation. Moreover, ET-1 was proposed to contribute to increased vascular resistance in heart failure by increasing the production of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA. We investigated the role of ET-1, the NO pathway, the potassium channels and radical oxygen species in hypoxia-induced vasodilation of large coronary arteries. Results In prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α, 10 μM-contracted segments with endothelium, gradual lowering of oxygen tension from 95 to 1% O2 resulted in vasodilation. The vasodilation to O2 lowering was rightward shifted in segments without endothelium at all O2 concentrations except at 1% O2. The endothelin receptor antagonist SB217242 (10 μM markedly increased hypoxic dilation despite the free tissue ET-1 concentration in the arterial wall was unchanged in 1% O2 versus 95% O2. Exogenous ET-1 reversed hypoxic dilation in segments with and without endothelium, and the hypoxic arteries showed an increased sensitivity towards ET-1 compared to the normoxic controls. Without affecting basal NO, hypoxia increased NO concentration in PGF2α-contracted arteries, and an NO synthase inhibitor, L-NOARG,(300 μM, NG-nitro-L-Arginine reduced hypoxic vasodilation. NO-induced vasodilation was reduced in endothelin-contracted preparations. Arterial wall ADMA concentrations were unchanged by hypoxia. Blocking of potassium channels with TEA (tetraethylammounium chloride(10 μM inhibited vasodilation to O2 lowering as well as to NO. The superoxide scavenger tiron (10 μM and the putative NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (10 μM leftward shifted concentration-response curves for O2 lowering without changing vasodilation to 1% O2. PEG (polyethylene

  19. Extreme Hypoxic Conditions Induce Selective Molecular Responses and Metabolic Reset in Detached Apple Fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukrov, Dubravka; Zermiani, Monica; Brizzolara, Stefano; Cestaro, Alessandro; Licausi, Francesco; Luchinat, Claudio; Santucci, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo; Van Veen, Hans; Zuccolo, Andrea; Ruperti, Benedetto; Tonutti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The ripening physiology of detached fruit is altered by low oxygen conditions with profound effects on quality parameters. To study hypoxia-related processes and regulatory mechanisms, apple (Malus domestica, cv Granny Smith) fruit, harvested at commercial ripening, were kept at 1°C under normoxic (control) and hypoxic (0.4 and 0.8 kPa oxygen) conditions for up to 60 days. NMR analyses of cortex tissue identified eight metabolites showing significantly different accumulations between samples, with ethanol and alanine displaying the most pronounced difference between hypoxic and normoxic treatments. A rapid up-regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate-related metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, alanine aminotransferase) gene expression was detected under both hypoxic conditions with a more pronounced effect induced by the lowest (0.4 kPa) oxygen concentration. Both hypoxic conditions negatively affected ACC synthase and ACC oxidase transcript accumulation. Analysis of RNA-seq data of samples collected after 24 days of hypoxic treatment identified more than 1000 genes differentially expressed when comparing 0.4 vs. 0.8 kPa oxygen concentration samples. Genes involved in cell-wall, minor and major CHO, amino acid and secondary metabolisms, fermentation and glycolysis as well as genes involved in transport, defense responses, and oxidation-reduction appeared to be selectively affected by treatments. The lowest oxygen concentration induced a higher expression of transcription factors belonging to AUX/IAA, WRKY, HB, Zinc-finger families, while MADS box family genes were more expressed when apples were kept under 0.8 kPa oxygen. Out of the eight group VII ERF members present in apple genome, two genes showed a rapid up-regulation under hypoxia, and western blot analysis showed that apple MdRAP2.12 proteins were differentially accumulated in normoxic and hypoxic samples, with the highest level reached under 0.4 kPa oxygen. These data suggest

  20. Chronic prostatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Brian; Schaeffer, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and usually occurs without positive bacterial cultures from prostatic secretions (known as chronic abacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome [CP/CPPS]). Bacterial infection can result from urinary tract instrumentation, but the cause and natural history of CP/CPPS are unknown.

  1. Chronic prostatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, Bradley A.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Le, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and usually occurs without positive bacterial cultures from prostatic secretions (known as chronic abacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome, CP/CPPS). Bacterial infection can result from urinary tract instrumentation, but the cause and natural history of CP/CPPS are unknown.

  2. Evidence of hypoxic foraging forays by yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and potential consequences for prey consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James J.; Grecay, Paul A.; Ludsin, Stuart A.; Pothoven, Steve A.; Vanderploeg, Henry A.; Höök, Tomas O.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies in a variety of ecosystems have shown that ecologically and economically important benthic and bentho-pelagic fishes avoid hypoxic (−1) habitats by moving vertically or horizontally to more oxygenated areas. While avoidance of hypoxic conditions generally leads to a complete shift away from preferred benthic prey, some individual fish continue to consume benthic prey items in spite of bottom hypoxia, suggesting complex habitat utilisation and foraging patterns. For example, Lake Erie yellow perch (Perca flavescens) continue to consume benthic prey, despite being displaced vertically and horizontally by hypolimnetic hypoxia. We hypothesised that hypolimnetic hypoxia can negatively affect yellow perch by altering their distribution and inducing energetically expensive foraging behaviour. To test this hypothesis, we used drifting hydroacoustics and trawl sampling to quantify water column distribution, sub-daily vertical movement and foraging behaviour of yellow perch within hypoxic and normoxic habitats of Lake Erie’s central basin during August-September 2007. We also investigated the effects of rapid changes in ambient oxygen conditions on yellow perch consumption potential by exposing yellow perch to various static and fluctuating oxygen conditions in a controlled laboratory experiment. Our results indicate that, while yellow perch in general avoid hypoxic conditions, some individuals undertake foraging forays into hypoxic habitats where they experience greater fluctuations in abiotic conditions (pressure, temperature and oxygen concentration) than at normoxic sites. However, laboratory results suggest short-term exposure to low oxygen conditions did not negatively impact consumption potential of yellow perch. Detailed understanding of sub-daily individual behaviours may be crucial for determining interactive individual- and ecosystem-level effects of stressors such as hypoxia.

  3. Honey dilution impact on in vitro wound healing: Normoxic and hypoxic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Amrita; Bag, Swarnendu; Barui, Ananya; Banerjee, Provas; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2015-01-01

    Honey is known as a popular healing agent against tropical infections and wounds. However, the effects of honey dilutions on keratinocyte (HaCaT) wound healing under hypoxic condition is still not explored. In this study, we examined whether honey dilution have wound healing potential under hypoxic stress. The antioxidant potential and healing efficacy of honey dilution on in vitro wound of human epidermal keratinocyte (HaCaT cells) under hypoxia (3% O2 ), and normoxia is explored by nitro blue tetrazolium assay. The cell survival % quantified by MTT assay to select four honey dilutions like 10, 1, 0.1, and 0.01 v/v% and the changes in cellular function was observed microscopically. Further, the cell proliferation, migration, cell-cell adhesion, and relevant gene expression were studied by flow cytometry, migration/scratch assay, immunocytochemistry, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The expression pattern of cardinal molecular features viz. E-cadherin, cytoskeletal protein F-actin, p63, and hypoxia marker Hif 1α were examined. Honey dilution in 0.1% v/v combat wound healing limitations in vitro under normoxia and hypoxia (3%). Its wound healing potential was quantified by immunocytochemistry and real-time PCR for the associated molecular features that were responsible for cell proliferation and migration. Our data showed that honey dilution can be effective in hypoxic wound healing. Additionally, it reduced superoxide generation and supplied favorable bioambience for cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation during hypoxic wound healing. These findings may reveal the importance of honey as an alternative and cost effective therapeutic natural product for wound healing in hypoxic condition.

  4. The capacity of red blood cells to reduce nitrite determines nitric oxide generation under hypoxic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel H Fens

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a key regulator of vascular tone. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS is responsible for NO generation under normoxic conditions. Under hypoxia however, eNOS is inactive and red blood cells (RBC provide an alternative NO generation pathway from nitrite to regulate hypoxic vasodilation. While nitrite reductase activity of hemoglobin is well acknowledged, little is known about generation of NO by intact RBC with physiological hemoglobin concentrations. We aimed to develop and apply a new approach to provide insights in the ability of RBC to convert nitrite into NO under hypoxic conditions. We established a novel experimental setup to evaluate nitrite uptake and the release of NO from RBC into the gas-phase under different conditions. NO measurements were similar to well-established clinical measurements of exhaled NO. Nitrite uptake was rapid, and after an initial lag phase NO release from RBC was constant in time under hypoxic conditions. The presence of oxygen greatly reduced NO release, whereas inhibition of eNOS and xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR did not affect NO release. A decreased pH increased NO release under hypoxic conditions. Hypothermia lowered NO release, while hyperthermia increased NO release. Whereas fetal hemoglobin did not alter NO release compared to adult hemoglobin, sickle RBC showed an increased ability to release NO. Under all conditions nitrite uptake by RBC was similar. This study shows that nitrite uptake into RBC is rapid and release of NO into the gas-phase continues for prolonged periods of time under hypoxic conditions. Changes in the RBC environment such as pH, temperature or hemoglobin type, affect NO release.

  5. The capacity of red blood cells to reduce nitrite determines nitric oxide generation under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fens, Marcel H; Larkin, Sandra K; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Morris, Claudia R; Kuypers, Frans A

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key regulator of vascular tone. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is responsible for NO generation under normoxic conditions. Under hypoxia however, eNOS is inactive and red blood cells (RBC) provide an alternative NO generation pathway from nitrite to regulate hypoxic vasodilation. While nitrite reductase activity of hemoglobin is well acknowledged, little is known about generation of NO by intact RBC with physiological hemoglobin concentrations. We aimed to develop and apply a new approach to provide insights in the ability of RBC to convert nitrite into NO under hypoxic conditions. We established a novel experimental setup to evaluate nitrite uptake and the release of NO from RBC into the gas-phase under different conditions. NO measurements were similar to well-established clinical measurements of exhaled NO. Nitrite uptake was rapid, and after an initial lag phase NO release from RBC was constant in time under hypoxic conditions. The presence of oxygen greatly reduced NO release, whereas inhibition of eNOS and xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) did not affect NO release. A decreased pH increased NO release under hypoxic conditions. Hypothermia lowered NO release, while hyperthermia increased NO release. Whereas fetal hemoglobin did not alter NO release compared to adult hemoglobin, sickle RBC showed an increased ability to release NO. Under all conditions nitrite uptake by RBC was similar. This study shows that nitrite uptake into RBC is rapid and release of NO into the gas-phase continues for prolonged periods of time under hypoxic conditions. Changes in the RBC environment such as pH, temperature or hemoglobin type, affect NO release.

  6. Acute dietary nitrate supplementation enhances compensatory vasodilation during hypoxic exercise in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Darren P; Treichler, David P; Ganger, Charles T; Schneider, Aaron C; Ueda, Kenichi

    2015-01-15

    We have previously demonstrated that aging reduces the compensatory vasodilator response during hypoxic exercise due to blunted nitric oxide (NO) signaling. Recent evidence suggests that NO bioavailability can be augmented by dietary nitrate through the nitrate-nitrite pathway. Thus we tested the hypothesis that acute dietary nitrate supplementation increases the compensatory vasodilator response to hypoxic exercise, particularly in older adults. Thirteen young (25 ± 1 yr) and 12 older (64 ± 2 yr) adults performed rhythmic forearm exercise at 20% of maximum voluntary contraction during normoxia and hypoxia (∼80% O2 saturation); both before (control) and 3 h after beetroot juice (BR) consumption. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC; ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1)) was calculated from forearm blood flow (ml/min) and blood pressure (mmHg). Compensatory vasodilation was defined as the relative increase in FVC due to hypoxic exercise (i.e., % increase compared with respective normoxic exercise trial). Plasma nitrite was determined from venous blood samples obtained before the control trials and each of the exercise trials (normoxia and hypoxia) after BR. Consumption of BR increased plasma nitrite in both young and older adults (P vasodilator response to hypoxic exercise was attenuated in older compared with young adults (3.8 ± 1.7% vs. 14.2 ± 1.2%, P vasodilation did not change in young (13.7 ± 3.3%, P = 0.81) adults but was substantially augmented in older adults (11.4 ± 2.1%, P vasodilator response to hypoxic exercise in older but not young adults.

  7. Astrocyte-derived proinflammatory cytokines induce hypomyelination in the periventricular white matter in the hypoxic neonatal brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyu Deng

    Full Text Available Hypoxic exposure in the perinatal period causes periventricular white matter damage (PWMD, a condition associated with myelination abnormalities. Under hypoxic conditions, glial cells were activated and released a large number of inflammatory mediators in the PWM in neonatal brain, which may result in oligodendrocyte (OL loss and axonal injury. This study aims to determine if astrocytes are activated and generate proinflammatory cytokines that may be coupled with the oligodendroglial loss and hypomyelination observed in hypoxic PWMD. Twenty-four 1-day-old Wistar rats were exposed to hypoxia for 2 h. The rats were then allowed to recover under normoxic conditions for 7 or 28 days before being killed. Another group of 24 rats kept outside the chamber was used as age-matched controls. Upregulated expression of TNF-α and IL-1β was observed in astrocytes in the PWM of P7 hypoxic rats by double immunofluorescence, western blotting and real time RT-PCR. This was linked to apoptosis and enhanced expression of TNF-R1 and IL-1R1 in APC(+ OLs. PLP expression was decreased significantly in the PWM of P28d hypoxic rats. The proportion of myelinated axons was markedly reduced by electron microscopy (EM and the average g-ratios were higher in P28d hypoxic rats. Upregulated expression of TNF-α and IL-1β in primary cultured astrocytes as well as their corresponding receptors in primary culture APC(+ oligodendrocytes were detected under hypoxic conditions. Our results suggest that following a hypoxic insult, astrocytes in the PWM of neonatal rats produce inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β, which induce apoptosis of OLs via their corresponding receptors associated with them. This results in hypomyelination in the PWM of hypoxic rats.

  8. Hypoxic repression of CYP7A1 through a HIF-1α- and SHP-independent mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Yunwon; Park, Bongju; Park, Hyunsung

    2016-01-01

    Liver cells experience hypoxic stress when drug-metabolizing enzymes excessively consume O2 for hydroxylation. Hypoxic stress changes the transcription of several genes by activating a heterodimeric transcription factor called hypoxia-inducible factor-1α/β (HIF-1α/β). We found that hypoxic stress (0.1% O2) decreased the expression of cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1), a rate-limiting enzyme involved in bile acid biosynthesis. Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a major component of bile acids, represses...

  9. Peripheral Neuropathy in Mouse Models of Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolivalt, Corinne G; Frizzi, Katie E; Guernsey, Lucie; Marquez, Alex; Ochoa, Joseline; Rodriguez, Maria; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a frequent complication of chronic diabetes that most commonly presents as a distal degenerative polyneuropathy with sensory loss. Around 20% to 30% of such patients may also experience neuropathic pain. The underlying pathogenic mechanisms are uncertain, and therapeutic options are limited. Rodent models of diabetes have been used for more than 40 years to study neuropathy and evaluate potential therapies. For much of this period, streptozotocin-diabetic rats were the model of choice. The emergence of new technologies that allow relatively cheap and routine manipulations of the mouse genome has prompted increased use of mouse models of diabetes to study neuropathy. In this article, we describe the commonly used mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and provide protocols to phenotype the structural, functional, and behavioral indices of peripheral neuropathy, with a particular emphasis on assays pertinent to the human condition. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Determination of the Chronic Mammalian Toxicological Effects of RDX. Twenty-Four Month Chronic Toxicity/Carcinogenicity Study of Hexahydro-1,3,5- Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine (RDX) in the B6C3F1 Hybrid Mouse. Phase 6. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    viruses : GD-VII virus , K virus , Mouse Adenovirus, Sendai virus , Reovirus 3...Pneumonia virus of mice, Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis, Polyoma virus , Minute virus of mice, Mouse Hepatitis and Ectomelia. These tests for antibody...OC" " N " N " NN C. C% N " C" N " C’ C" N N N C" C’ C, C" C" 04 C"J C" N C" C" N N" C"d N C" 04 04 C" CS C" C’) NCV C" cc I-XLU -I 0 1c Mc -tm WrL

  11. A voxel-based multiscale model to simulate the radiation response of hypoxic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza, I., E-mail: iespinoza@fis.puc.cl [Institute of Physics, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 7820436, Chile and Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Peschke, P. [Clinical Cooperation Unit Molecular Radiooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Karger, C. P. [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumors to irradiation prior to the treatment. This is especially important for hypoxic tumors, which are known to be highly radioresistant. Mathematical modeling based on the dose distribution, biological parameters, and medical images may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. Methods: A voxel-based multiscale tumor response model for simulating the radiation response of hypoxic tumors was developed. It considers viable and dead tumor cells, capillary and normal cells, as well as the most relevant biological processes such as (i) proliferation of tumor cells, (ii) hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, (iii) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor growth, (iv) oxygen-dependent cell survival after irradiation, (v) resorption of dead cells, and (vi) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor shrinkage. Oxygenation is described on a microscopic scale using a previously published tumor oxygenation model, which calculates the oxygen distribution for each voxel using the vascular fraction as the most important input parameter. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model, the dependence of the oxygen distribution on tumor growth and radiation-induced shrinkage is investigated. In addition, the impact of three different reoxygenation processes is compared and tumor control probability (TCP) curves for a squamous cells carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSSC) are simulated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Results: The model describes the spatiotemporal behavior of the tumor on three different scales: (i) on the macroscopic scale, it describes tumor growth and shrinkage during radiation treatment, (ii) on a mesoscopic scale, it provides the cell density and vascular fraction for each voxel, and (iii) on the microscopic scale, the oxygen distribution may be obtained in terms of oxygen histograms. With increasing tumor size, the simulated tumors develop a hypoxic core. Within the

  12. Chronic active hepatitis in transgenic mice expressing interferon-gamma in the liver.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Interferon-gamma may play an important role in the immune response and in inflammatory diseases, including chronic active hepatitis. To understand the role of interferon-gamma in the regulation of inflammation and to establish a mouse model of chronic active hepatitis, we produced transgenic mice in which the mouse interferon-gamma gene was regulated by a liver-specific promoter, the serum amyloid P component gene promoter. Four transgenic mouse lines were generated, and two of these lines ex...

  13. Effects of hypoxic exposure during feeding on SDA and postprandial cardiovascular physiology in the Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrens, Jane; Axelsson, Michael; Neuenfeldt, Stefan;

    2012-01-01

    Some Atlantic cod in the Bornholm Basin undertake vertical foraging migrations into severely hypoxic bottom water. Hypoxic conditions can reduce the postprandial increase in gastrointestinal blood flow (GBF). This could subsequently postpone or reduce the postprandial increase in oxygen consumption...... on fed G. morhua in order to understand how the cardio-respiratory system of feeding fish respond to a period of hypoxia and a subsequent return to normoxia. These were exposed to 35% water oxygen saturation for 90 minutes, equivalent to the time and oxygen level cod voluntarily endure when searching...... course of the measured variables are similar to values obtained from fish not exposed to the hypoxic period. In conclusion, when cod in the field search for and ingest prey under moderate hypoxic conditions they appear to stay within safe limits of oxygen availability as we saw no indications...

  14. Effects of morphine in the isolated mouse urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, C G; Tamayo, L; Contreras, E

    1986-01-01

    Acute morphine increased the responses to acetylcholine of the isolated mouse urinary bladder. A chronic morphine treatment did not change the responses of the urinary bladder to acetylcholine or ATP. The acute administration of morphine did not modify the contractile response to ATP in the urinary bladders from untreated or chronically morphine treated mice. Methadone and ketocyclazocine decreased the responses to the electrical stimulation of the urinary bladder. These depressant effects were not modified by naloxone. The results suggest the nonexistence of opiate receptors in the mouse urinary bladder and the lack of direct effects of morphine on the neuroeffector junction.

  15. Prolonged hypoxic culture and trypsinization increase the pro-angiogenic potential of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe Grøndahl; Frøbert, Ole; Pilgaard, Linda;

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), including adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC), is a promising option in the treatment of vascular disease. Short-term hypoxic culture of MSC augments secretion of anti-apoptotic and angiogenic cytokines. We hypothesized that prolonged hypoxic...... (1% and 5% oxygen) culture and trypsinization would augment ASC expression of anti-apoptotic and angiogenic cytokines and increase the angiogenic potential of ASC-conditioned media....

  16. Amplitude-integrated Electroencephalography in Full-term Newborns without Severe Hypoxic-ischemic Encephalopathy: Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Osredkar,Damjan; Derganc, Metka; Paro-Panjan, Darja; Neubauer, David

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To assess the diagnostic value of amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (EEG) in comparison to standard EEG in newborns without severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy who were at risk for seizures. Methods: The study included a consecutive series of 18 term newborns without severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, but with clinical signs suspicious of epileptic seizures, history of loss of social contact, disturbance of muscle tone, hyperirritability, and/or jitteriness. Amplitud...

  17. Evaluation of Hypoxic Tissue Dynamics with F-18-FMISO PET in a Rat Model of Permanent Cerebral Ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas, Santiago; Herance, José Raul; Abad, Sergio; Jiménez, Xavier; Pareto, Deborah; Ruiz, Alba; Torrent, Èlia; Figueiras, Francisca P.; Popota, Foteini; Fernández-Soriano, Francisco J.; Planas, Anna M; Gispert, Juan D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: [18F]Fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) is a nitroimidazole derivative that has been proposed as a positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer to detect hypoxic tissue in vivo. This compound accumulates in hypoxic but viable tissue and may be a good candidate for evaluating the ischemic penumbra. We evaluated the time course of 18F-FMISO uptake using PET in a rat model of permanent cerebral ischemia and the correlation with histological changes. Procedures: Rats (n = 14) were subjecte...

  18. Whole body, regional fat accumulation, and appetite-related hormonal response after hypoxic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Takuma; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Goto, Kazushige

    2014-03-01

    The present study was conducted to determine change in regional fat accumulation and appetite-related hormonal response following hypoxic training. Twenty sedentary subjects underwent hypoxic (n = 9, HYPO, FiO(2) = 15%) or normoxic training (n = 11, NOR, FiO(2) = 20·9%) during a 4-week period (3 days per week). They performed a 4-week training at 55% of maximal oxygen uptake (V·O(2max)) for each condition. Before and after the training period, V·O(2max), whole body fat mass, abdominal fat area, intramyocellular lipid content (IMCL), fasting and postprandial appetite-related hormonal responses were determined. Both groups showed a significant increase in V·O(2max) following training (Pdecreased in both groups (Pappetite-related hormones.

  19. Hypoxic preconditioning induces neuroprotective stanniocalcin-1 in brain via IL-6 signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westberg, Johan A; Serlachius, Martina; Lankila, Petri

    2007-01-01

    . Increased expression of IL-6 is evident, particularly in the lungs of animals subjected to hypoxic preconditioning. Stanniocalcin-1 (STC-1) is a 56-kDa homodimeric glycoprotein originally discovered in bony fish, where it regulates calcium/phosphate homeostasis and protects against toxic hypercalcemia. We...... mRNA levels in brains of wild-type and IL-6 deficient mice. Furthermore, we monitored the Stc-1 response in brains of wild-type and transgenic mice, overexpressing IL-6 in the astroglia, before and after induced brain injury. RESULTS: Hypoxic preconditioning induced an upregulated expression of Stc......-1 in brains of wild-type but not of IL-6-deficient mice. Induced brain injury elicited a stronger STC-1 response in brains of transgenic mice, with targeted astroglial IL-6 expression, than in brains of wild-type mice. Moreover, IL-6 induced STC-1 expression via MAPK signaling in neural Paju cells...

  20. Loss of CSL Unlocks a Hypoxic Response and Enhanced Tumor Growth Potential in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eike-Benjamin Braune

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Notch signaling is an important regulator of stem cell differentiation. All canonical Notch signaling is transmitted through the DNA-binding protein CSL, and hyperactivated Notch signaling is associated with tumor development; thus it may be anticipated that CSL deficiency should reduce tumor growth. In contrast, we report that genetic removal of CSL in breast tumor cells caused accelerated growth of xenografted tumors. Loss of CSL unleashed a hypoxic response during normoxic conditions, manifested by stabilization of the HIF1α protein and acquisition of a polyploid giant-cell, cancer stem cell-like, phenotype. At the transcriptome level, loss of CSL upregulated more than 1,750 genes and less than 3% of those genes were part of the Notch transcriptional signature. Collectively, this suggests that CSL exerts functions beyond serving as the central node in the Notch signaling cascade and reveals a role for CSL in tumorigenesis and regulation of the cellular hypoxic response.

  1. Cerebral water and ion balance remains stable when humans are exposed to acute hypoxic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avnstorp, Magnus B; Rasmussen, Peter; Brassard, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    both circumstances. No cerebral net exchange of Na(+) or K(+) was evident. Likewise, no significant net-exchange of water over the brain was demonstrated and the arterial and jugular venous hemoglobin concentrations were similar. CONCLUSION: Challenging exercise in hypoxia for 30 min affected muscle......Avnstorp, Magnus B., Peter Rasmussen, Patrice Brassard, Thomas Seifert, Morten Overgaard, Peter Krustrup, Niels H. Secher, and Nikolai B. Nordsborg. Cerebral water and ion balance remains stable when humans are exposed to acute hypoxic exercise. High Alt Med Biol 16:000-000, 2015.-Background...... intense exercise is carried out in hypoxia and monitored the influence of muscle metabolism for changes in arterial variables. METHODS: On two separate days, in random order, 30 min cycling exercise was performed in either hypoxia (10% O2) or normoxia at an intensity that was exhaustive in the hypoxic...

  2. Leucoencefalopatía hipóxica tardía Delayed Hypoxic Leukoencephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Sartori

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available La Leucoencefalopatía Hipóxica Tardía (LHT es una enfermedad desmielinizante de infrecuente presentación. Se produce como consecuencia de un fenómeno de hipoxia-anoxia y aparece días o semanas más tarde.Los síntomas y cambios imagenológicos remiten casi totalmente y tienen un buen pronóstico En este reporte se ilustra el caso de una joven que desarrolló LHT luego de sufrir un paro cardiorrespiratorio.Delayed Hypoxic Leukoencephalopathy (DHL is a rare demyelinating disease. This condition occurs days or weeks after a hypoxic-anoxic injury. Symptoms and imaging changes almost fully resolve, with a good prognosis. We report the case of a young woman who developed DHL after a cardiopulmonary arrest.

  3. The Hypoxic Regulator of Sterol Synthesis Nro1 Is a Nuclear Import Adaptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T Yeh; C Lee; L Amzel; P Espenshade; M Bianchet

    2011-12-31

    Fission yeast protein Sre1, the homolog of the mammalian sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP), is a hypoxic transcription factor required for sterol homeostasis and low-oxygen growth. Nro1 regulates the stability of the N-terminal transcription factor domain of Sre1 (Sre1N) by inhibiting the action of the prolyl 4-hydroxylase-like Ofd1 in an oxygen-dependent manner. The crystal structure of Nro1 determined at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution shows an all-{alpha}-helical fold that can be divided into two domains: a small N-terminal domain, and a larger C-terminal HEAT-repeat domain. Follow-up studies showed that Nro1 defines a new class of nuclear import adaptor that functions both in Ofd1 nuclear localization and in the oxygen-dependent inhibition of Ofd1 to control the hypoxic response.

  4. Learning-Memory Function and Swimming Capability of Rat and Ergonomic Evaluation Under Hypoxic Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Ding-yu; DAI Rong-ji; LI Bo; MAO Jian; GENG Li-na; DENG Yu-lin

    2009-01-01

    Effects of hypoxia on learning-memory function and swimming capability of rat were studied and the ergonomics under hypoxic condition was also evaluated from the biological point of view. Three modes of hypoxia were designed and plots of oxygen concentration versus time for each group in hypoxic environment were produced. Results showed that the effects of hypoxia on learning-memory function and swimming capability were related with the time and strength of hypoxia. It had nothing to do with the individual difference of rat models. 10% O2 long-term intermittent anamorphosis hypoxia could improve the swimming capability of rat model significantly. Stimulating with proper level of hypoxia, carbon dioxide could improve ergonomics in airtight hypoxia environment. Under hypoxia condition, from the ergonomic point of view, 6% O2 is the important threshold and might belong in critical region.

  5. Actualities on molecular pathogenesis and repairing processes of cerebral damage in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distefano, Giuseppe; Praticò, Andrea D

    2010-09-16

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is the most important cause of cerebral damage and long-term neurological sequelae in the perinatal period both in term and preterm infant. Hypoxic-ischemic (H-I) injuries develop in two phases: the ischemic phase, dominated by necrotic processes, and the reperfusion phase, dominated by apoptotic processes extending beyond ischemic areas. Due to selective ischemic vulnerability, cerebral damage affects gray matter in term newborns and white matter in preterm newborns with the typical neuropathological aspects of laminar cortical necrosis in the former and periventricular leukomalacia in the latter. This article summarises the principal physiopathological and biochemical processes leading to necrosis and/or apoptosis of neuronal and glial cells and reports recent insights into some endogenous and exogenous cellular and molecular mechanisms aimed at repairing H-I cerebral damage.

  6. Actualities on molecular pathogenesis and repairing processes of cerebral damage in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praticò Andrea D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is the most important cause of cerebral damage and long-term neurological sequelae in the perinatal period both in term and preterm infant. Hypoxic-ischemic (H-I injuries develop in two phases: the ischemic phase, dominated by necrotic processes, and the reperfusion phase, dominated by apoptotic processes extending beyond ischemic areas. Due to selective ischemic vulnerability, cerebral damage affects gray matter in term newborns and white matter in preterm newborns with the typical neuropathological aspects of laminar cortical necrosis in the former and periventricular leukomalacia in the latter. This article summarises the principal physiopathological and biochemical processes leading to necrosis and/or apoptosis of neuronal and glial cells and reports recent insights into some endogenous and exogenous cellular and molecular mechanisms aimed at repairing H-I cerebral damage.

  7. Inhibition of TYRO3/Akt signaling participates in hypoxic injury in hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-zhen Zhu; Wei Wang; Na Xian; Bing Wu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the TYRO3/Akt signaling pathway in hypoxic injury to hippocampal neurons. 3-(4,5-Dimethylth-iazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that hypoxia inhibited the proliferation and viability of hippocampal neurons. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay demonstrated that hypoxia induced neuronal apoptosis in a time-dependent manner, with a greater number of apoptotic cells with longer hypoxic exposure. Immunolfuorescence labeling revealed that hypoxia suppressed TYRO3 expression. Western blot assay showed that hypoxia decreased Akt phosphorylation levels in a time-de-pendent manner. Taken together, these ifndings suggest that hypoxia inhibits the proliferation of hippocampal neurons and promotes apoptosis, and that the inhibition of the TYRO3/Akt signaling pathway plays an important role in hypoxia-induced neuronal injury.

  8. Molecular targeting of carbonic anhydrase IX in mice with hypoxic HT29 colorectal tumor xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Carlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX is a membrane spanning protein involved in the enzymatic regulation of tumor acid-base balance. CAIX has been shown to be elevated in a number of hypoxic tumor types. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficiency of intact and IgG fragments of cG250 to target CAIX in vivo in a hypoxic tumor model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Conventional biodistribution studies were performed with (111In-DO3A-cG250, (111In-DO3A-F(ab'(2-cG250 and (111In-DO3A-Fab-cG250. Additional ex vivo analysis of the tumor was performed with markers for tumor hypoxia, blood perfusion and endogenous CAIX expression. All four data sets were digitally correlated to determine the optimal agent for determining hypoxia in a HT29 colon cancer xenograft. The HT29 human colorectal tumor xenografts show strong CAIX expression in hypoxic areas of poor blood perfusion. The intact IgG had an initial high focal uptake at the periphery of these hypoxic regions and penetration into the areas of highest CAIX expression over the 7-day study period. The lower molecular weight antibody fragments had a faster uptake into areas of high CAIX expression, but had a much lower absolute uptake at the optimal imaging times. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: For the clinical detection of hypoxia induced CAIX using cG250 antibody based agents, imaging with the intact IgG at 7 days post injection would allow for the most sensitive and accurate detection of CAIX.

  9. MicroRNA expression and function in neonatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Looney, Ann-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a devastating neonatal condition which affects 2-3 per 1000 infants annually. The current gold standard of treatment - induced hypothermia, has the ability to reduce neonatal mortality and improve neonatal morbidity. However, to be effective it needs to be initiated within the therapeutic window which exists following initial insult until approximately 6 hours after birth. Current methods of assessment which are relied upon to identify infants with HI...

  10. Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Freezing of Gait in Patients After Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Seo Yeon; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Yong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate spatiotemporal characteristics with gait variability in patients with freezing of gait (FOG) after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HIBI). Eleven patients showing FOG after HIBI and 15 normal controls were consecutively enrolled. We performed gait analysis using a computerized gait system (VICON MX-T10 Motion Analysis System) and compared spatiotemporal characteristics and gait variability in both groups. Additionally, we performed correla...

  11. A proteomic view of Caenorhabditis elegans caused by short-term hypoxic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yonghong

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is both sensitive and tolerant to hypoxic stress, particularly when the evolutionarily conserved hypoxia response pathway HIF-1/EGL-9/VHL is involved. Hypoxia-induced changes in the expression of a number of genes have been analyzed using whole genome microarrays in C. elegans, but the changes at the protein level in response to hypoxic stress still remain unclear. Results Here, we utilized a quantitative proteomic approach to evaluate changes in the expression patterns of proteins during the early response to hypoxia in C. elegans. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE was used to compare the proteomic maps of wild type C. elegans strain N2 under a 4-h hypoxia treatment (0.2% oxygen and under normoxia (control. A subsequent analysis by MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS revealed nineteen protein spots that were differentially expressed. Nine of the protein spots were significantly upregulated, and ten were downregulated upon hypoxic stress. Three of the upregulated proteins were involved in cytoskeletal function (LEV-11, MLC-1, ACT-4, while another three upregulated (ATP-2, ATP-5, VHA-8 were ATP synthases functionally related to energy metabolism. Four ribosomal proteins (RPL-7, RPL-8, RPL-21, RPS-8 were downregulated, indicating a decrease in the level of protein translation upon hypoxic stress. The overexpression of tropomyosin (LEV-11 was further validated by Western blot. In addition, the mutant strain of lev-11(x12 also showed a hypoxia-sensitive phenotype in subsequent analyses, confirming the proteomic findings. Conclusions Taken together, our data suggest that altered protein expression, structural protein remodeling, and the reduction of translation might play important roles in the early response to oxygen deprivation in C. elegans, and this information will help broaden our knowledge on the mechanism of hypoxia response.

  12. Biogeochemical processes and buffering capacity concurrently affect acidification in a seasonally hypoxic coastal marine basin

    OpenAIRE

    Hagens, M.; Slomp, C. P.; Meysman, F. J. R.; Seitaj, D.; Harlay, J.; Borges, A. V.; J. J. Middelburg

    2015-01-01

    Coastal areas are impacted by multiple natural and anthropogenic processes and experience stronger pH fluctuations than the open ocean. These variations can weaken or intensify the ocean acidification signal induced by increasing atmospheric pCO2. The development of eutrophication-induced hypoxia intensifies coastal acidification, since the CO2 produced during respiration decreases the buffering capacity of the hypoxic bottom water. To assess the combined ecosystem im...

  13. Clusterin and chemotherapy sensitivity under normoxic and graded hypoxic conditions in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kevans, David

    2012-06-01

    In vitro studies have shown that clusterin modulates treatment sensitivity in a number of human cancers; however, the interaction between clusterin expression and hypoxia in controlling treatment response in CRC has not previously been examined. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of clusterin overexpression in CRC cells on sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin and FOLFOX treatment under normoxic and graded hypoxic conditions.

  14. Conditioned medium from hypoxic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells enhances wound healing in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    Full Text Available Growing evidence indicates that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs enhance wound repair via paracrine. Because the extent of environmental oxygenation affects the innate characteristics of BM-MSCs, including their stemness and migration capacity, the current study set out to elucidate and compare the impact of normoxic and hypoxic cell-culture conditions on the expression and secretion of BM-MSC-derived paracrine molecules (e.g., cytokines, growth factors and chemokines that hypothetically contribute to cutaneous wound healing in vivo. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA analyses of normoxic and hypoxic BM-MSCs and their conditioned medium fractions showed that the stem cells expressed and secreted significantly higher amounts of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF,vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A interleukin 6 (IL-6 and interleukin 8 (IL-8 under hypoxic conditions. Moreover, hypoxic BM-MSC-derived conditioned medium (hypoCM vs. normoxic BM-MSC-derived conditioned medium (norCM or vehicle control medium significantly enhanced the proliferation of keratinocytes, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, the migration of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells and monocytes, and the formation of tubular structures by endothelial cells cultured on Matrigel matrix. Consistent with these in vitro results, skin wound contraction was significantly accelerated in Balb/c nude mice treated with topical hypoCM relative to norCM or the vehicle control. Notably increased in vivo cell proliferation, neovascularization as well as recruitment of inflammatory macrophages and evidently decreased collagen I, and collagen III were also found in the hypoCM-treated group. These findings suggest that BM-MSCs promote murine skin wound healing via hypoxia-enhanced paracrine.

  15. Dynamic hypoxic zones in Lake Erie compress fish habitat, altering vulnerability to fishing gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Richard T.; Knight, Carey T.; Farmer, Troy M.; Gorman, Ann Marie; Collingsworth, Paris D.; Warren, Glenn J.; Kocovsky, Patrick M.; Conroy, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal degradation of aquatic habitats from hypoxia occurs in numerous freshwater and coastal marine systems and can result in direct mortality or displacement of fish. Yet, fishery landings from these systems are frequently unresponsive to changes in the severity and extent of hypoxia, and population-scale effects have been difficult to measure except in extreme hypoxic conditions with hypoxia-sensitive species. We investigated fine-scale temporal and spatial variability in dissolved oxygen in Lake Erie as it related to fish distribution and catch efficiencies of both active (bottom trawls) and passive (trap nets) fishing gears. Temperature and dissolved oxygen loggers placed near the edge of the hypolimnion exhibited much higher than expected variability. Hypoxic episodes of variable durations were frequently punctuated by periods of normoxia, consistent with high-frequency internal waves. High-resolution interpolations of water quality and hydroacoustic surveys suggest that fish habitat is compressed during hypoxic episodes, resulting in higher fish densities near the edges of hypoxia. At fixed locations with passive commercial fishing gear, catches with the highest values occurred when bottom waters were hypoxic for intermediate proportions of time. Proximity to hypoxia explained significant variation in bottom trawl catches, with higher catch rates near the edge of hypoxia. These results emphasize how hypoxia may elevate catch rates in various types of fishing gears, leading to a lack of association between indices of hypoxia and fishery landings. Increased catch rates of fish at the edges of hypoxia have important implications for stock assessment models that assume catchability is spatially homogeneous.

  16. Hypoxic hypoxia at moderate altitudes: review of the state of the science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrassi, Frank A; Hodkinson, Peter D; Walters, P Lynne; Gaydos, Steven J

    2012-10-01

    Unpressurized aircraft routinely operate at altitudes where hypoxia may be of concern. A systematic literature review was conducted regarding hypoxic impairment, including mental functions, sensory deficits, and other pertinent research findings that may affect aviation-related duties at moderate altitude (8000 to 15,000 ft/2438 to 4572 m). The results of this review suggest that cognitive and psychomotor deficits may include learning, reaction time, decision-making, and certain types of memory. However, results are difficult to quantify and reliably reproduce. Inconsistency of results may be related to the subtlety of deficits compared to high altitude, differences among individual compensatory mechanisms, variation in methodology or sensitivity of metrics, presence or absence of exercise, heterogeneous neuronal central nervous system (CNS) response, and interindividual variation. Literature regarding hypoxic visual decrements is more consistent. Rod photoreceptors are more susceptible to hypoxia; visual degradation has been demonstrated at 4000 to 5000 ft (1219 to 1524 m) under scotopic and 10,000 ft (3048 m) under photopic conditions. Augmented night vision goggle resolution demonstrates more resilience to mild hypoxic effects than the unaided eye under starlight conditions. Hypocapnia enhances visual sensitivity and contrast discrimination. Hyperventilation with resulting respiratory alkalosis and cerebral vasoconstriction may confound both cognitive/ psychomotor and visual experimental results. Future research should include augmentation of validated neuropsychological metrics (surrogate investigational end points) with actual flight metrics, investigation of mixed gas formulations, contribution of hypocapnic vasoconstrictive effects on hypoxic performance, and further investigation into cellular- and systems-level approaches for heterogeneous CNS response. Research is also required into the contribution of mild-moderate hypoxia in human factors- and spatial

  17. NOC/oFQ and NMDA contribute to piglet hypoxic ischemic hypotensive cerebrovasodilation impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstead, William M

    2002-05-01

    Previous studies have observed that hypotensive pial artery dilation was blunted after hypoxia-ischemia. In unrelated studies, the opioid nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOC/oFQ) was observed to contribute to hypoxic ischemic impairment of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced pial dilation. This study determined the contribution of NOC/oFQ and NMDA to hypoxic ischemic hypotensive cerebrovasodilation impairment in newborn pigs equipped with a closed cranial window. Global cerebral ischemia was produced via elevated intracranial pressure. Hypoxia decreased PO(2) to 33 +/- 3 mm Hg. Topical NOC/oFQ (10(-10) M), the cerebrospinal fluid concentration after hypoxia-ischemia, had no effect on pial artery diameter by itself but attenuated hypotension (mean arterial blood pressure decrease of 44 +/- 2%) -induced pial artery dilation (35 +/- 2% versus 22 +/- 3%). Hypotensive pial artery dilation was blunted by hypoxia-ischemia, but such dilation was partially protected by pretreatment with the putative NOC/oFQ receptor antagonist, [F/G] NOC/oFQ (1-13) NH(2) (10(-6) M; 29 +/- 2%, sham control; 7 +/- 2%, hypoxia-ischemia; and 13 +/- 2%, hypoxia-ischemia and [F/G] NOC/oFQ (1-13) NH(2)). Coadministration of the NMDA antagonist MK801 (10(-5) M) with NOC/oFQ(10(-10) M) partially prevented hypotensive pial dilation impairment. Similarly, pretreatment with MK801 partially protected hypoxic ischemia impairment of hypotensive pial dilation (35 +/- 2%, sham control; 7 +/- 1%, hypoxia-ischemia; 22 +/- 2%, hypoxia-ischemia + MK801). These data show that NOC/oFQ and NMDA contribute to hypoxic ischemic hypotensive cerebrovasodilation impairment. These data suggest that NOC/oFQ modulation of NMDA vascular activity also contributes to such hypotensive impairment.

  18. Prohibition of artificial hypoxic environments in sports: health risks rather than ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Franchini, Massimo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2007-12-01

    There is actual debate on a recent position of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), which has cautiously refrained from banning hypoxic tents and intends to monitor their health risk. Regardless of teleological and deontological concepts, we highlight that the health risks inherent to the widespread use of these artificial performance-enhancing devices would make them as unsafe as other forms of blood doping.

  19. Influence of CO2 Concentration on Adsorption Behavior of 99Tc in Clay Under Hypoxic Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; Zhi-xin; BAO; Liang-jin; JIANG; Tao; CHEN; Xi

    2013-01-01

    Under hypoxic conditions,using the Beishan groundwater the influence of the CO2 concentration on the adsorption behavior of 99Tc in the Longdong clay was studied by batch method.Meanwhile,the buffering effect of clay rocks on the pH value of aqueous solution at different CO2 concentrations was discussed.The adsorption behavior of 99Tc on clay at different initial pH values was also researched.

  20. Resveratrol alleviate hypoxic pulmonary hypertension via anti-inflammation and anti-oxidant pathways in rats

    OpenAIRE

    XU, DUNQUAN; Li, Yan; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yanxia; Liu, Yi; Luo, Ying; Niu, Wen; Dong, Mingqing; Liu, Manling; Dong, Haiying; Zhao, Pengtao; Li, Zhichao

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol, a plant-derived polyphenolic compound and a phytoestrogen, was shown to possess multiple protective effects including anti-inflammatory response and anti-oxidative stress. Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is a progressive disease characterized by sustained vascular resistance and marked pulmonary vascular remodeling. The exact mechanisms of HPH are still unclear, but inflammatory response and oxidative stress was demonstrated to participate in the progression of HPH. The pres...

  1. Cable bacteria generate a firewall against euxinia in seasonally hypoxic basins

    OpenAIRE

    Seitaj, Dorina; Schauer, Regina; Sulu-Gambari, Fatimah; Hidalgo-Martinez, Silvia; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Burdorf, Laurine D. W.; Slomp, Caroline P.; Meysman, Filip J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal oxygen depletion (hypoxia) in coastal bottom waters can lead to the release and persistence of free sulfide (euxinia), which is highly detrimental to marine life. Although coastal hypoxia is relatively common, reports of euxinia are less frequent, which suggests that certain environmental controls can delay the onset of euxinia. However, these controls and their prevalence are poorly understood. Here we present field observations from a seasonally hypoxic marine basin (Grevelingen, T...

  2. Early blood glucose profile and neurodevelopmental outcome at two years in neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nadeem, Montasser

    2011-02-04

    Abstract Background To examine the blood glucose profile and the relationship between blood glucose levels and neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Methods Blood glucose values within 72 hours of birth were collected from 52 term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Hypoglycaemia [< 46.8 mg\\/dL (2.6 mmol\\/L)] and hyperglycaemia [> 150 mg\\/dL (8.3 mmol\\/L)] were correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months of age. Results Four fifths of the 468 blood samples were in the normoglycaemic range (392\\/468:83.8%). Of the remaining 76 samples, 51.3% were in the hypoglycaemic range and (48.7%) were hyperglycaemic. A quarter of the hypoglycaemic samples (28.2%:11\\/39) and a third of the hyperglycaemic samples (32.4%:12\\/37) were recorded within the first 30 minutes of life. Mean (SD) blood glucose values did not differ between infants with normal and abnormal outcomes [4.89(2.28) mmol\\/L and 5.02(2.35) mmol\\/L, p value = 0.15] respectively. In term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, early hypoglycaemia (between 0-6 hours of life) was associated with adverse outcome at 24 months of age [OR = 5.8, CI = 1.04-32)]. On multivariate analysis to adjust for grade of HIE this association was not statistically significant. Late hypoglycaemia (6-72 hours of life) was not associated with abnormal outcome [OR = 0.22, CI (0.04-1.14)]. The occurrence of hyperglycaemia was not associated with adverse outcome. Conclusion During the first 72 hours of life, blood glucose profile in infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy varies widely despite a management protocol. Early hypoglycaemia (0-6 hours of life) was associated with severe HIE, and thereby; adverse outcome.

  3. Early blood glucose profile and neurodevelopmental outcome at two years in neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nadeem, Montasser

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: To examine the blood glucose profile and the relationship between blood glucose levels and neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. METHODS: Blood glucose values within 72 hours of birth were collected from 52 term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Hypoglycaemia [< 46.8 mg\\/dL (2.6 mmol\\/L)] and hyperglycaemia [> 150 mg\\/dL (8.3 mmol\\/L)] were correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months of age. RESULTS: Four fifths of the 468 blood samples were in the normoglycaemic range (392\\/468:83.8%). Of the remaining 76 samples, 51.3% were in the hypoglycaemic range and (48.7%) were hyperglycaemic. A quarter of the hypoglycaemic samples (28.2%:11\\/39) and a third of the hyperglycaemic samples (32.4%:12\\/37) were recorded within the first 30 minutes of life. Mean (SD) blood glucose values did not differ between infants with normal and abnormal outcomes [4.89(2.28) mmol\\/L and 5.02(2.35) mmol\\/L, p value = 0.15] respectively. In term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, early hypoglycaemia (between 0-6 hours of life) was associated with adverse outcome at 24 months of age [OR = 5.8, CI = 1.04-32)]. On multivariate analysis to adjust for grade of HIE this association was not statistically significant. Late hypoglycaemia (6-72 hours of life) was not associated with abnormal outcome [OR = 0.22, CI (0.04-1.14)]. The occurrence of hyperglycaemia was not associated with adverse outcome. CONCLUSION: During the first 72 hours of life, blood glucose profile in infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy varies widely despite a management protocol. Early hypoglycaemia (0-6 hours of life) was associated with severe HIE, and thereby; adverse outcome.

  4. Slow breathing and hypoxic challenge: cardiorespiratory consequences and their central neural substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, Hugo D; Nicotra, Alessia; Chiesa, Patrizia A; Nagai, Yoko; Gray, Marcus A; Minati, Ludovico; Bernardi, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Controlled slow breathing (at 6/min, a rate frequently adopted during yoga practice) can benefit cardiovascular function, including responses to hypoxia. We tested the neural substrates of cardiorespiratory control in humans during volitional controlled breathing and hypoxic challenge using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty healthy volunteers were scanned during paced (slow and normal rate) breathing and during spontaneous breathing of normoxic and hypoxic (13% inspired O2) air. Cardiovascular and respiratory measures were acquired concurrently, including beat-to-beat blood pressure from a subset of participants (N = 7). Slow breathing was associated with increased tidal ventilatory volume. Induced hypoxia raised heart rate and suppressed heart rate variability. Within the brain, slow breathing activated dorsal pons, periaqueductal grey matter, cerebellum, hypothalamus, thalamus and lateral and anterior insular cortices. Blocks of hypoxia activated mid pons, bilateral amygdalae, anterior insular and occipitotemporal cortices. Interaction between slow breathing and hypoxia was expressed in ventral striatal and frontal polar activity. Across conditions, within brainstem, dorsal medullary and pontine activity correlated with tidal volume and inversely with heart rate. Activity in rostroventral medulla correlated with beat-to-beat blood pressure and heart rate variability. Widespread insula and striatal activity tracked decreases in heart rate, while subregions of insular cortex correlated with momentary increases in tidal volume. Our findings define slow breathing effects on central and cardiovascular responses to hypoxic challenge. They highlight the recruitment of discrete brainstem nuclei to cardiorespiratory control, and the engagement of corticostriatal circuitry in support of physiological responses that accompany breathing regulation during hypoxic challenge.

  5. Transrectal ultrasound-integrated spectral optical tomography of hypoxic progression of a regressing tumor in a canine prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z; Piao, D; Bartels, K E; Holyoak, G R; Ritchey, J W; Ownby, C L; Rock, K; Slobodov, G

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate if transrectal optical tomography implemented at three wavelength bands for spectral detection could monitor changes of the hemoglobin oxygen saturation (StO2) in addition to those of the total hemoglobin concentration ([HbT]) in lesions of a canine prostate, including an induced tumor modeling canine prostate cancer. Near-infrared (NIR) optical tomography was integrated with ultrasound (US) for transrectal imaging. Multi-spectral detection at 705_nm, 785_nm and 808_nm rendered measurements of [HbT] and StO2. Canine transmissible venereal tumor (TVT) cells were injected into the right lobe of a dog's prostate gland, which had a pre-existing cyst in the left lobe. Longitudinal assessments of the prostate were performed weekly over a 63-day duration by NIR imaging concurrent with grey-scale and Doppler US. Ultrasonography revealed a bi-lobular tumor-mass regressing from day-49 to day-63. At day-49 this tumor-mass developed a hypoxic core that became larger and more intense by day-56 and expanded further by day-63. The tumor-mass presented a strong hyper-[HbT] feature on day-56 that was inconsistent with US-visualized blood flow. Histology confirmed two necrotic TVT foci within this tumor-mass. The cyst appeared to have a large anoxic-like interior that was greater in size than its ultrasonographically delineated lesion, and a weak lesional elevation of [HbT]. On day-56, the cyst presented a strong hyper-[HbT] feature consistent with US-resolved blood flow. Histology revealed acute and chronic hemorrhage in the periphery of the cyst. The NIR imaging features of two other TVT nodules and a metastatic lymph node were evaluated retrospectively. Transrectal US-integrated spectral optical tomography seems to enable longitudinal monitoring of intra-lesional oxygenation dynamics in addition to the hemoglobin content of lesions in the canine prostate.

  6. COMPARATIVE GENOTOXIC RESPONSES TO ARSENITE IN GUINEA PIG, MOUSE, RAT AND HUMAN LYMPHOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative genotoxic responses to arsenite in guinea pig, mouse, rat and human lymphocytes.Inorganic arsenic is a known human carcinogen causing skin, lung, and bladder cancer following chronic exposures. Yet, long-term laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies have ...

  7. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-bo Li; Yan Wang; Ji-ping Tang; Di Chen; Sha-li Wang

    2015-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1 is the major pharmacologically active component of ginseng, and is reported to have various therapeutic actions. To determine whether it induces the differentiation of neural stem cells, and whether neural stem cell transplantation after induction has therapeutic effects on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, we cultured neural stem cells in 10–80 μM ginsenoside Rg1. Immunohistochemistry revealed that of the concentrations tested, 20 mM ginsenoside Rg1 had the greatest differentiation-inducing effect and was the concentration used for subsequent exper-iments. Whole-cell patch clamp showed that neural stem cells induced by 20 μM ginsenoside Rg1 were more mature than non-induced cells. We then established neonatal rat models of hypox-ic-ischemic encephalopathy using the suture method, and ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells were transplantedvia intracerebroventricular injection. These tests conifrmed that neural stem cells induced by ginsenoside had fewer pathological lesions and had a signiifcantly better behavioral capacity than model rats that received saline. Transplanted neural stem cells expressed neuron-speciifc enolase, and were mainly distributed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The present data suggest that ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells can promote the partial recovery of complicated brain functions in models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  8. Blood carbon dioxide levels and adverse outcome in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nadeem, Montasser

    2012-01-31

    We investigated pCO(2) patterns and the relationship between pCO(2) levels and neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Blood gases during the first 72 hours of life were collected from 52 infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Moderate hypocapnia (pCO(2) <3.3 kPa), severe hypocapnia (pCO(2) <2.6 kPa), and hypercapnia (pCO(2) >6.6 kPa) were correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months. Normocapnia was documented in 416\\/551 (75.5%) of samples and was present during the entire 72 hours in only 6 out of 52 infants. Mean (standard deviation) pCO(2) values did not differ between infants with normal and abnormal outcomes: 5.43 (2.4) and 5.41 (2.03), respectively. There was no significant association between moderate hypocapnia, severe hypocapnia, or hypercapnia and adverse outcome (odds ratio [OR] = 1.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.49 to 6.89; OR = 3.16, CI = 0.14 to 28.45; and OR = 1.07, CI = 0.24 to 5.45, respectively). In conclusion, only one in nine newborns had normocapnia throughout the first 72 hours. Severe hypocapnia was rare and occurred only in ventilated babies. Hypercapnia and hypocapnia in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy during the first 72 hours of life were not associated with adverse outcome.

  9. Thioperamide treats neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy by postsynaptic H1 receptors*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feiyong Jia; Lin Du; Yunpeng Hao; Shicheng Liu; Ning Li; Huiyi Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Thioperamide, a selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, can increase histamine content in the brain, improve brain edema, and exert a neuroprotective effect. This study aimed to examine the mechanism of action of thioperamide during brain edema in a rat model of neonatal hypoxic- is-chemic encephalopathy. Our results showed that thioperamide significantly decreased brain water content and malondialdehyde levels, while significantly increased histamine levels and superoxide dismutase activity in the hippocampus. This evidence demonstrates that thioperamide could pre-vent oxidative damage and attenuate brain edema fol owing neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encepha-lopathy. We further observed that changes in the above indexes occurred after combined treatment of thioperamide with the H1 receptor antagonist, pyrilamine, and the H2 receptor antagonist, ci-metidine. Experimental findings indicated that pyrilamine reversed the effects of thioperamide;however, cimetidine had no significant influence on the effects of thioperamide. Our present findings suggest that thioperamide can increase brain histamine content and attenuate brain edema and oxidative damage by acting in combination with postsynaptic H1 receptors in a rat model of neo-natal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  10. Mutual regulation between SIAH2 and DYRK2 controls hypoxic and genotoxic signaling pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Moisés Pérez; Carmen García-Limones; Inés Zapico; Anabel Marina; M. Lienhard Schmitz; Eduardo Mu(n)oz; Marco A. Calzado

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin E3 ligase SIAH2 is an important regulator of the hypoxic response as it leads to the ubiquitin/proteasomal degradation of prolyl hydroxylases such as PHD3,which in turn increases the stability of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α.In the present study,we identify the serine/threonine kinase DYRK2 as SIAH2 interaction partner that phosphorylates SIAH2 at five residues (Ser16,Thr26,Ser28,Ser68,and Thr119).Phosphomimetic and phospho-mutant forms of SIAH2 exhibit different subcellular localizations and consequently change in PHD3 degrading activity.Accordingly,phosphorylated SIAH2 is more active than the wild-type E3 ligase and shows an increased ability to trigger the HIF-1α-mediated transcriptional response and angiogenesis.We also found that SIAH2 knockdown increases DYRK2 stability,whereas SIAH2 expression facilitates DYRK2 polyubiquitination and degradation.Hypoxic conditions cause a SIAH2-dependent DYRK2 polyubiquitination and degradation which ultimately also results in an impaired SIAH2 phosphorylation.Similarly,DYRK2-mediated phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 is impaired under hypoxic conditions,suggesting a molecular mechanism underlying chemotherapy resistance in solid tumors.

  11. Acute high-altitude hypoxic brain injury Identification of ten differential proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianyu Li; Yuting Qi; Hui Liu; Ying Cui; Li Zhang; Haiying Gong; Yaxiao Li; Lingzhi Li; Yongliang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia can cause severe brain damage and mitochondrial dysfunction, and is involved in hypoxic brain injury. However, little is currently known about the mechanisms responsible for mi-tochondrial dysfunction in hypobaric hypoxic brain damage. In this study, a rat model of hypobaric hypoxic brain injury was established to investigate the molecular mechanisms associated with mi-tochondrial dysfunction. As revealed by two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis, 16, 21, and 36 differential protein spots in cerebral mitochondria were observed at 6, 12, and 24 hours post-hypobaric hypoxia, respectively. Furthermore, ten protein spots selected from each hypobaric hypoxia subgroup were similarly regulated and were identified by mass spectrometry. These de-tected proteins included dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2, creatine kinase B-type, isova-leryl-CoA dehydrogenase, elongation factor Ts, ATP synthase beta-subunit, 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase, electron transfer flavoprotein alpha-subunit, Chain A of 2-enoyl-CoA hydratase, NADH dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein 8 and tropomyosin beta chain. These ten proteins are al involved in the electron transport chain and the function of ATP synthase. Our findings indicate that hypobaric hypoxia can induce the differential expression of several cerebral mitochondrial proteins, which are involved in the regulation of mitochondrial energy production.

  12. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

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    Ying-bo Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside Rg1 is the major pharmacologically active component of ginseng, and is reported to have various therapeutic actions. To determine whether it induces the differentiation of neural stem cells, and whether neural stem cell transplantation after induction has therapeutic effects on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, we cultured neural stem cells in 10-80 µM ginsenoside Rg1. Immunohistochemistry revealed that of the concentrations tested, 20 mM ginsenoside Rg1 had the greatest differentiation-inducing effect and was the concentration used for subsequent experiments. Whole-cell patch clamp showed that neural stem cells induced by 20 µM ginsenoside Rg1 were more mature than non-induced cells. We then established neonatal rat models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy using the suture method, and ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells were transplanted via intracerebroventricular injection. These tests confirmed that neural stem cells induced by ginsenoside had fewer pathological lesions and had a significantly better behavioral capacity than model rats that received saline. Transplanted neural stem cells expressed neuron-specific enolase, and were mainly distributed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The present data suggest that ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells can promote the partial recovery of complicated brain functions in models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  13. Erdosteine protects rat testis tissue from hypoxic injury by reducing apoptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven, A; Ickin, M; Uzun, O; Bakar, C; Balbay, E Gulec; Balbay, O

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of hypobaric hypoxia on testis morphology and the effects of erdosteine on testis tissue. Caspase-3 and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α expressions were detected by immunohistochemistry. Adult male Wistar rats were placed in a hypobaric hypoxic chamber. Rats in the erdosteine group were exposed to the same conditions and treated orally with erdosteine (20 mg kg(-1) daily) at the same time from the first day of hypoxic exposure for 2 weeks. The normoxia group was evaluated as the control. The hypoxia group showed decreased height of spermatogenic epithelium in some seminiferous tubules, vacuolisation in spermatogenic epithelial cells, deterioration and gaps in the basal membrane and an increase in blood vessels in the interstitial area. The erdosteine group showed amelioration of both epithelial cell vacuolisation and basal membrane deterioration. Numbers of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α-immunostained Sertoli and Leydig cells were significantly higher in the hypoxia group than in the erdosteine group. The number of seminiferous tubules with caspase-3-immunostained germ cells was highest in the hypoxia group and decreased in the erdosteine and normoxia groups respectively. Based on these observations, erdosteine protects testis tissue from hypoxic injury by reducing apoptotic cell death.

  14. Post-hypoxic recovery of respiratory rhythm generation is gender dependent.

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    Alfredo J Garcia

    Full Text Available The preBötzinger complex (preBötC is a critical neuronal network for the generation of breathing. Lesioning the preBötC abolishes respiration, while when isolated in vitro, the preBötC continues to generate respiratory rhythmic activity. Although several factors influence rhythmogenesis from this network, little is known about how gender may affect preBötC function. This study examines the influence of gender on respiratory activity and in vitro rhythmogenesis from the preBötC. Recordings of respiratory activity from neonatal mice (P10-13 show that sustained post-hypoxic depression occurs with greater frequency in males compared to females. Moreover, extracellular population recordings from the preBötC in neonatal brainstem slices (P10-13 reveal that the time to the first inspiratory burst following reoxygenation (TTFB is significantly delayed in male rhythmogenesis when compared to the female rhythms. Altering activity of ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP with either the agonist, diazoxide, or the antagonist, tolbutamide, eliminates differences in TTFB. By contrast, glucose supplementation improves post-hypoxic recovery of female but not male rhythmogenesis. We conclude that post-hypoxic recovery of respiration is gender dependent, which is, in part, centrally manifested at the level of the preBötC. Moreover, these findings provide potential insight into the basis of increased male vulnerability in a variety of conditions such as Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS.

  15. Expression profile of apoptotic and proliferative proteins in hypoxic HUVEC treated with statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaochen; Liu, Xiansheng; Xu, Yongjian; He, Yuanzhou; Liu, Jin; Xie, Min

    2015-02-01

    Vascular endothelial hyperproliferation is involved in the pathophysiological process of angiogenesis, which is indispensable for tumor growth and spread in hypoxic adaptation. There is increasing evidence indicating that statins have potential anti-angiogenesis benefits. However, the intracellular signaling mechanism underlying the effect of statins in vascular endothelial cells is undefined. The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of fluvastatin on cell proliferation and apoptosis in normoxic and hypoxic human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Flow cytometric analyses revealed that statins reversed hypoxia-induced cell proliferation by slowing down G1 to S transition and inducing cell apoptosis. To get further insights into the downstream effects of statins, we measured the expression of various apoptosis-associated proteins in hypoxic HUVEC using human apoptosis antibody array. The results suggested that cell apoptosis was accompanied by upregulation of caspase-3, p27, IGFBP-6 and a decrease of bcl-2, survivin levels. Subsequent studies confirmed the results of array and demonstrated that fluvastatin activated mitochondrial apoptosis through enhancing bax/bcl-2 ratio, releasing cytochrome c, in turn activating caspase-9 and caspase-3, and eventually cleaving PARP. Further experiments showed that inhibition of cell proliferation by fluvastatin was associated with elevated IGFBP-6, p27, p53 levels and reduced survivin, cyclin B1, cyclin D1 and VEGF expression. Taken together, fluvastatin suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of HUVEC in hypoxia via multiple signaling pathways, providing a theoretical basis for statins in the therapy of cancer.

  16. Mutual regulation between SIAH2 and DYRK2 controls hypoxic and genotoxic signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Moisés; García-Limones, Carmen; Zapico, Inés; Marina, Anabel; Schmitz, M Lienhard; Muñoz, Eduardo; Calzado, Marco A

    2012-10-01

    The ubiquitin E3 ligase SIAH2 is an important regulator of the hypoxic response as it leads to the ubiquitin/proteasomal degradation of prolyl hydroxylases such as PHD3, which in turn increases the stability of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α. In the present study, we identify the serine/threonine kinase DYRK2 as SIAH2 interaction partner that phosphorylates SIAH2 at five residues (Ser16, Thr26, Ser28, Ser68, and Thr119). Phosphomimetic and phospho-mutant forms of SIAH2 exhibit different subcellular localizations and consequently change in PHD3 degrading activity. Accordingly, phosphorylated SIAH2 is more active than the wild-type E3 ligase and shows an increased ability to trigger the HIF-1α-mediated transcriptional response and angiogenesis. We also found that SIAH2 knockdown increases DYRK2 stability, whereas SIAH2 expression facilitates DYRK2 polyubiquitination and degradation. Hypoxic conditions cause a SIAH2-dependent DYRK2 polyubiquitination and degradation which ultimately also results in an impaired SIAH2 phosphorylation. Similarly, DYRK2-mediated phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 is impaired under hypoxic conditions, suggesting a molecular mechanism underlying chemotherapy resistance in solid tumors.

  17. Different Bacterial Communities Involved in Peptide Decomposition between Normoxic and Hypoxic Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuting; Wawrik, Boris; Liu, Zhanfei

    2017-01-01

    Proteins and peptides are key components of the labile dissolved organic matter pool in marine environments. Knowing which types of bacteria metabolize peptides can inform the factors that govern peptide decomposition and further carbon and nitrogen remineralization in marine environments. A 13C-labeled tetrapeptide, alanine-valine-phenylalanine-alanine (AVFA), was added to both surface (normoxic) and bottom (hypoxic) seawater from a coastal station in the northern Gulf of Mexico for a 2-day incubation experiment, and bacteria that incorporated the peptide were identified using DNA stable isotope probing (SIP). The decomposition rate of AVFA in the bottom hypoxic seawater (0.018–0.035 μM h-1) was twice as fast as that in the surface normoxic seawater (0.011–0.017 μM h-1). SIP experiments indicated that incorporation of 13C was highest among the Flavobacteria, Sphingobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Acidimicrobiia, Verrucomicrobiae, Cyanobacteria, and Actinobacteria in surface waters. In contrast, highest 13C-enrichment was mainly observed in several Alphaproteobacteria (Thalassococcus, Rhodobacteraceae, Ruegeria) and Gammaproteobacteria genera (Colwellia, Balneatrix, Thalassomonas) in the bottom water. These data suggest that a more diverse group of both oligotrophic and copiotrophic bacteria may be involved in metabolizing labile organic matter such as peptides in normoxic coastal waters, and several copiotrophic genera belonging to Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria and known to be widely distributed may contribute to faster peptide decomposition in the hypoxic waters. PMID:28326069

  18. UCP2 inhibits ROS-mediated apoptosis in A549 under hypoxic conditions.

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    Sanming Deng

    Full Text Available The Crosstalk between a tumor and its hypoxic microenvironment has become increasingly important. However, the exact role of UCP2 function in cancer cells under hypoxia remains unknown. In this study, UCP2 showed anti-apoptotic properties in A549 cells under hypoxic conditions. Over-expression of UCP2 in A549 cells inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation (P<0.001 and apoptosis (P<0.001 compared to the controls when the cells were exposed to hypoxia. Moreover, over-expression of UCP2 inhibited the release of cytochrome C and reduced the activation of caspase-9. Conversely, suppression of UCP2 resulted in the ROS generation (P = 0.006, the induction of apoptosis (P<0.001, and the release of cytochrome C from mitochondria to the cytosolic fraction, thus activating caspase-9. These data suggest that over-expression of UCP2 has anti-apoptotic properties by inhibiting ROS-mediated apoptosis in A549 cells under hypoxic conditions.

  19. Prostanoid production in the presence of platelet activation in hypoxic cocaine-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togna, G; Graziani, M; Sorrentino, C; Caprino, L

    1996-01-01

    To extend our previous in vitro data, we investigated the effects of cocaine on thromboxane A2 (TXA2) and prostacyclin (PGI2) production in vivo in the rat. To obtain the slight platelet activation that our in vitro experiments showed useful to highlight the effect of cocaine, we infused cocaine in rats in the presence of platelet-activating factors (circulation of blood through a perspex vascular device or by infusion of sodium arachidonate) and in various respiratory conditions. Experiments were conducted in rats breathing atmospheric air (normoxic conditions) and in rats breathing an oxygen-poor mixture (hypoxic conditions). In rats under hypoxic conditions cocaine invariably increased TXA2 plasma levels, whereas in normoxic conditions it increased TXA2 only in the presence of platelet-activating factors. Cocaine significantly increased PGI2 plasma levels in arachidonate-treated rats in hypoxic respiratory conditions; in normoxic conditions cocaine left PGI2 levels unchanged. These results support the hypothesis that in cocaine users who have concomitant pathological conditions able to activate platelets, such as atherosclerosis, coronary vasospasm or ischaemia, or both, cocaine may contribute to the onset of thrombotic phenomena by interfering with the prostaglandin system.

  20. An Argonaute 2 Switch Regulates Circulating miR-210 to Coordinate Hypoxic Adaptation across Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Andrew; Lee, Changjin; Annis, Sofia; Min, Pil-Ki; Pande, Reena; Creager, Mark A.; Julian, Colleen G.; Moore, Lorna G.; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Hwang, Sarah J.; Kourembanas, Stella; Chan, Stephen Y.

    2014-01-01

    Complex organisms may coordinate molecular responses to hypoxia by specialized avenues of communication across multiple tissues, but these mechanisms are poorly understood. Plasma-based, extracellular microRNAs have been described, yet, their regulation and biological functions in hypoxia remain enigmatic. We found a unique pattern of release of the hypoxia-inducible microRNA-210 (miR-210) from hypoxic and reoxygenated cells. This microRNA is also elevated in human plasma in physiologic and pathologic conditions of altered oxygen demand and delivery. Released miR-210 can be delivered to recipient cells, and its direct suppression of its direct target ISCU and mitochondrial metabolism is primarily evident in hypoxia. To regulate these hypoxia-specific actions, prolyl-hydroxylation of Argonaute 2 acts as a molecular switch that reciprocally modulates miR-210 release and intracellular activity in source cells as well as regulates intracellular activity in recipient cells after miR-210 delivery. Therefore, Argonaute 2-dependent control of released miR-210 represents a unique communication system that integrates the hypoxic response across anatomically distinct cells, preventing unnecessary activity of delivered miR-210 in normoxia while still preparing recipient tissues for incipient hypoxic stress and accelerating adaptation. PMID:24983771

  1. Reactive nitrogen species in mitochondria and their implications in plant energy status and hypoxic stress tolerance

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    Kapuganti Jagadis Gupta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic and anoxic conditions result in the energy crisis that leads to cell damage. Since mitochondria are the primary organelles for energy production, the support of these organelles in a functional state is an important task during oxygen deprivation. Plant mitochondria adapted the strategy to survive under hypoxia by keeping electron transport operative even without oxygen via the use of nitrite as a terminal electrons acceptor. The process of nitrite reduction to nitric oxide (NO in the mitochondrial electron transport chain recycles NADH and leads to a limited rate of ATP production. The produced ATP alongside with the ATP generated by fermentation supports the processes of transcription and translation required for hypoxic survival and recovery of plants. Non-symbiotic hemoglobins (called phytoglobins in plants scavenge NO and thus contribute to regeneration of NAD+ and nitrate required for the operation of anaerobic energy metabolism. This overall operation represents an important strategy of biochemical adaptation that results in the improvement of energy status and thereby in protection of plants in the conditions of hypoxic stress.

  2. 急慢性注射地卓西平马来酸盐对小鼠额叶microRNA-181b表达的影响%The effects of acute and chronic dizocilpine maleate exposure on the expression of microRNA-181b in the mouse frontal cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向熙; 刘卫青; 余艺; 王栋; 陈晓岗

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of acute and chronic dizocilpine (MK-801) exposure on the expression of microRNA(miR)-181b, a schizophrenia-associated microRNA, in the frontal cortex of mouse brain and its potential role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Methods In the acute experiment, forty mouse were divided into four groups randomly, the MK-801 and control groups were given intraperitoneal injection of different doses of MK-801 (0.125 mg/kg, 0.25 mg/kg and 0.5 mg/kg) and vehicle, respectively. In the chronic experiment, twenty-two mice were divided into two groups randomly. Mice were given vehicle or MK-801 (0.25 mg/kg per day) for 14 d. Quantitative real-time PCR technique was then used to detect the relative expression levels of miR-181b in the frontal cortex at 15 min after treatment in acute experiment or at 15 min after last injection on 14th day in chronic experiment. Results In the acute MK-801 administration groups, relative expression levels of miR-l81b were 1.00 ± 0.13 in control group, 0.65 ± 0.05 in 0.125 mg/kg group, 0.61 ± 0.05 in 0.25 mg/kg group, and 0.91 ± 0.08 in 0.5 mg/kg group, respectively. MiR-181b expression levels significantly decreased in MK 0.125 mg/kg and MK 0.25 mg/kg groups while remained unchanged in 0.5 mg/kg group compared to the control group. In the chronic MK-801 administration group, relative expression level of miR-181b significantly increased compared to the control group (1.86 ± 0.19 vs. 1.00 ± 0.10, P < 0.05). Conclusion There are different effects of acute and chronic administration of MK-801 on miR-181b in the mouse frontal cortex, indicating that miR-181b may play different roles in the acute and chronic mouse models of schizophrenia.%目的 研究急慢性注射地卓西平马来酸盐(MK-801)对小鼠额叶中与精神分裂症相关的微小RNA(microRNA,miRNA)-181b表达的影响,探讨其参与精神分裂症病理学的可能机制.方法 急性注射实验中40只小鼠随机分成四组,

  3. [Chronicity, chronicization, systematization of delusions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapet, P; Fernandez, C; Galtier, M C; Gisselmann, A

    1984-05-01

    Chronicity in psychopathology is indicative of a term, a decay. Chronicization only leads the way to this term. Here, chronicization is taken literally as an inscription in the time course of delusions. The mechanism of systematization seems to be a central mark in the approach to chronic delusions. It is not an alienation or an irreversible closing but an attempted accommodation with reality in the life of psychotic subjects, irrespective of the delusional structure. The role of therapy and drug treatment as a follow-up may in that case assume another meaning.

  4. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Froeling, Fieke EM

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas owing to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects 3–9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  5. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Kadaba, Raghu

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas due to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects between 3 and 9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  6. Chronic hypoxia induces the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in wild-type and APPswe-PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Rojas-Abalos, Macarena; Abbott, Ana C.; Moya, Esteban A.; Iturriaga, Rodrigo; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia modulates proliferation and differentiation of cultured embryonic and adult stem cells, an effect that includes β-catenin, a key component of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Here we studied the effect of mild hypoxia on the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in the hippocampus of adult mice in vivo. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α) was analyzed as a molecular control of the physiological hypoxic response. Exposure to chronic hypoxia (10% oxygen for 6–72 h) stimulated the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Because the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a positive modulator of adult neurogenesis, we evaluated whether chronic hypoxia was able to stimulate neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Results indicate that hypoxia increased cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult wild-type mice as determined by Ki67 staining, Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and double labeling with doublecortin (DCX). Chronic hypoxia also induced neurogenesis in a double transgenic APPswe-PS1ΔE9 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), which shows decreased levels of neurogenesis in the SGZ. Our results show for the first time that exposure to hypoxia in vivo can induce the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade in the hippocampus, suggesting that mild hypoxia may have a therapeutic value in neurodegenerative disorders associated with altered Wnt signaling in the brain and also in pathological conditions in which hippocampal neurogenesis is impaired. PMID:24574965

  7. Chronic hypoxia induces the in vivo activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in wild-type and APPswe-PS1deltaE9 transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena eVarela-Nallar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia modulates proliferation and differentiation of cultured embryonic and adult stem cells, an effect that includes β-catenin a key component of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Here we studied in vivo the effect of mild hypoxia on the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in the hippocampus of adult mice. As a molecular control of the physiological hypoxic response the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α was analyzed. Exposure to chronic hypoxia (10% oxygen for 6-72 h stimulated the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Because the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a positive modulator of adult neurogenesis, we evaluated whether chronic hypoxia was able to stimulate neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Results indicate that hypoxia increased cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult wild-type mice as determined by Ki67 staining, BrdU incorporation and double labeling with doublecortin. Chronic hypoxia also induced neurogenesis in double transgenic APPswe-PS1deltaE9 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, which shows decreased levels of neurogenesis at the SGZ. Our results show for the first time that in vivo exposure to hypoxia can induce the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade in the hippocampus, suggesting that mild hypoxia may have a therapeutic value in neurodegenerative disorder associated with altered Wnt signaling in the brain and also in pathological conditions in which hippocampal neurogenesis is impaired.

  8. Role of gap junction and connexin-43 in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jieying Lin; Niyang Lin

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTEVE:Gap junctin (GJ)is the structural basis for direct intercellular communication of nerve cells . Connexin(Cx) is the protein subunit for constructling GJ channel. Among them, Cx43is closely related with nervous system. Both Cx43 and nervous system play an important role in the pathophysiological development of hypoxic-ischemic injury. We are in attempt to investigate GJ,Cx43 and their correlations with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage by research.DATA SOURCES:Using the terms "brain gap junction"in English and "gap junction"in Chinese, we searched the Medline database and Chinese BioMedical Literature Database as well as China Hospital Knowledge Database to identify the articles published from 1996 to 2006 about GJ and brain hypoxic-ischemic injury.STUDY SELECTION:The articles were selected firstly and abstracts of 250 articles were read thuugh.Articles in which the experimental design met randomized controlled principle were included,and study articles and case reports with repetitve contents were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION:Among 53 included correlative articles, 23 were excluded for repetitive contents and the other 30 were analyzed.DATA SYNTHESIS:GJ,widely esistling in nervous system,plays a key role in maintainling normal differentiation and development as well as physiological function brain tissue.GJ channel is a hydrophilic,low-selectivity and lowohmic channel, which can provide direct channel for intercellular substance transmission and information communication. It plays an important role in the differentiation and development of nerve cells and regulation of physiological function,The funtions of GJ channel are regulated by many factors,which invilved intracellular Ph value, Ca2+concentration, ATP concentration, phosphorylation of Cx, transchannel pressure,some neurohormonal factors,regulatory factors of protein and so on. Cx43 is the main component of GJ channel in the brain tissues. Its expression in the brain tissue of mammal is the strongest

  9. Hypoxic conditions induce a cancer-like phenotype in human breast epithelial cells.

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    Marica Vaapil

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Solid tumors are less oxygenated than their tissue of origin. Low intra-tumor oxygen levels are associated with worse outcome, increased metastatic potential and immature phenotype in breast cancer. We have reported that tumor hypoxia correlates to low differentiation status in breast cancer. Less is known about effects of hypoxia on non-malignant cells. Here we address whether hypoxia influences the differentiation stage of non-malignant breast epithelial cells and potentially have bearing on early stages of tumorigenesis. METHODS: Normal human primary breast epithelial cells and immortalized non-malignant mammary epithelial MCF-10A cells were grown in a three-dimensional overlay culture on laminin-rich extracellular matrix for up to 21 days at normoxic or hypoxic conditions. Acinar morphogenesis and expression of markers of epithelial differentiation and cell polarization were analyzed by immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, qPCR and immunoblot. RESULTS: In large ductal carcinoma in situ patient-specimens, we find that epithelial cells with high HIF-1α levels and multiple cell layers away from the vasculature are immature compared to well-oxygenated cells. We show that hypoxic conditions impaired acinar morphogenesis of primary and immortalized breast epithelial cells grown ex vivo on laminin-rich matrix. Normoxic cultures formed polarized acini-like spheres with the anticipated distribution of marker proteins associated with mammary epithelial polarization e.g. α6-integrin, laminin 5 and Human Milk Fat Globule/MUC1. At hypoxia, cells were not polarized and the sub-cellular distribution pattern of the marker proteins rather resembled that reported in vivo in breast cancer. The hypoxic cells remained in a mitotic state, whereas proliferation ceased with acinar morphogenesis at normoxia. We found induced expression of the differentiation repressor ID1 in the undifferentiated hypoxic MCF-10A cell structures. Acinar

  10. Hypoxic regulation of cytoglobin and neuroglobin expression in human normal and tumor tissues

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    Emara Marwan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytoglobin (Cygb and neuroglobin (Ngb are recently identified globin molecules that are expressed in vertebrate tissues. Upregulation of Cygb and Ngb under hypoxic and/or ischemic conditions in vitro and in vivo increases cell survival, suggesting possible protective roles through prevention of oxidative damage. We have previously shown that Ngb is expressed in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM cell lines, and that expression of its transcript and protein can be significantly increased after exposure to physiologically relevant levels of hypoxia. In this study, we extended this work to determine whether Cygb is also expressed in GBM cells, and whether its expression is enhanced under hypoxic conditions. We also compared Cygb and Ngb expression in human primary tumor specimens, including brain tumors, as well as in human normal tissues. Immunoreactivity of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX, a hypoxia-inducible metalloenzyme that catalyzes the hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate, was used as an endogenous marker of hypoxia. Results Cygb transcript and protein were expressed in human GBM cells, and this expression was significantly increased in most cells following 48 h incubation under hypoxia. We also showed that Cygb and Ngb are expressed in both normal tissues and human primary cancers, including GBM. Among normal tissues, Cygb and Ngb expression was restricted to distinct cell types and was especially prominent in ductal cells. Additionally, certain normal organs (e.g. stomach fundus, small bowel showed distinct regional co-localization of Ngb, Cygb and CA IX. In most tumors, Ngb immunoreactivity was significantly greater than that of Cygb. In keeping with previous in vitro results, tumor regions that were positively stained for CA IX were also positive for Ngb and Cygb, suggesting that hypoxic upregulation of Ngb and Cygb also occurs in vivo. Conclusions Our finding of hypoxic up-regulation of Cygb/Ngb in GBM cell lines and human

  11. Hypoxic Repeat Sprint Training Improves Rugby Player's Repeated Sprint but Not Endurance Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Michael J.; Olsen, Peter D.; Marshall, Helen C.; Lizamore, Catherine A.; Elliot, Catherine A.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the performance changes in 19 well-trained male rugby players after repeat-sprint training (six sessions of four sets of 5 × 5 s sprints with 25 s and 5 min of active recovery between reps and sets, respectively) in either normobaric hypoxia (HYP; n = 9; FIO2 = 14.5%) or normobaric normoxia (NORM; n = 10; FIO2 = 20.9%). Three weeks after the intervention, 2 additional repeat-sprint training sessions in hypoxia (FIO2 = 14.5%) was investigated in both groups to gauge the efficacy of using “top-up” sessions for previously hypoxic-trained subjects and whether a small hypoxic dose would be beneficial for the previously normoxic-trained group. Repeated sprint (8 × 20 m) and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 (YYIR1) performances were tested twice at baseline (Pre 1 and Pre 2) and weekly after (Post 1–3) the initial intervention (intervention 1) and again weekly after the second “top-up” intervention (Post 4–5). After each training set, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and rate of perceived exertion were recorded. Compared to baseline (mean of Pre 1 and Pre 2), both the hypoxic and normoxic groups similarly lowered fatigue over the 8 sprints 1 week after the intervention (Post 1: −1.8 ± 1.6%, −1.5 ± 1.4%, mean change ± 90% CI in HYP and NORM groups, respectively). However, from Post 2 onwards, only the hypoxic group maintained the performance improvement compared to baseline (Post 2: −2.1 ± 1.8%, Post 3: −2.3 ± 1.7%, Post 4: −1.9 ± 1.8%, and Post 5: −1.2 ± 1.7%). Compared to the normoxic group, the hypoxic group was likely to have substantially less fatigue at Post 3–5 (−2.0 ± 2.4%, −2.2 ± 2.4%, −1.6 ± 2.4% Post 3, Post 4, Post 5, respectively). YYIR1 performances improved throughout the recovery period in both groups (13–37% compared to baseline) with unclear differences found between groups. The addition of two sessions of “top-up” training after intervention 1, had little effect on either

  12. The Knockout Mouse Project

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, Christopher P.; Battey, James F.; Bradley, Allan; Bucan, Maja; Capecchi, Mario; Collins, Francis S; Dove, William F.; Duyk, Geoffrey; Dymecki, Susan; Eppig, Janan T.; Grieder, Franziska B.; Heintz, Nathaniel; Hicks, Geoff; Insel, Thomas R; Joyner, Alexandra

    2004-01-01

    Mouse knockout technology provides a powerful means of elucidating gene function in vivo, and a publicly available genome-wide collection of mouse knockouts would be significantly enabling for biomedical discovery. To date, published knockouts exist for only about 10% of mouse genes. Furthermore, many of these are limited in utility because they have not been made or phenotyped in standardized ways, and many are not freely available to researchers. It is time to harness new technologies and e...

  13. Replacing the computer mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Dernoncourt, Franck

    2014-01-01

    In a few months the computer mouse will be half-a-century-old. It is known to have many drawbacks, the main ones being: loss of productivity due to constant switching between keyboard and mouse, and health issues such as RSI. Like the keyboard, it is an unnatural human-computer interface. However the vast majority of computer users still use computer mice nowadays. In this article, we explore computer mouse alternatives. Our research shows that moving the mouse cursor can be done efficiently ...

  14. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  15. The Antiproliferative and Colony-suppressive Activities of STAT3 Inhibitors in Human Cancer Cells Is Compromised Under Hypoxic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jilai; Xiao, Hui; Wu, Ruohan; Cao, Yang; Li, Chenglong; Xu, Ronald; Pierson, Christopher R; Finlay, Jonathan L; Yang, Fang; Gu, Ning; Lin, Jiayuh

    2017-02-01

    Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been indicated as a novel cancer drug target, since it plays an important role in diverse oncogenic processes including survival, cell proliferation and migration. Emerging STAT3 inhibitors have demonstrated efficacy in cancer cells and animal tumor models. It is well known that most solid tumors are characterized by hypoxia, but it is not clear if hypoxic conditions affect activity of STAT3 inhibitors. To examine this, two STAT3 inhibitors were tested to investigate their inhibitory efficacy in cancer cells grown under hypoxic conditions compared with those without hypoxia. Cell proliferation, colony formation and western blot assays were performed to examine the differences in the cell viability, proliferation and proteins in the STAT3 pathway. Under hypoxic conditions, the half-maximal inhibitory concentration values for both STAT3 inhibitors were increased compared to normoxic conditions in human pancreatic cancer, medulloblastoma and sarcoma cell lines. In addition, the ability of both STAT3 inhibitors to inhibit colony formation in pancreatic cancer, medulloblastoma and sarcoma cell lines was reduced under hypoxic conditions when compared to cells under normoxic conditions. Furthermore, there was an increase in phosphorylated STAT3 levels in cancer cells under hypoxic conditions, suggesting this may be one of the mechanisms of resistance. In summary, the results presented here provide a novel finding of STAT3 inhibitor activity under hypoxic conditions and indicate that under such low oxygen conditions, the anticancer efficacy of STAT3 inhibitors was indeed hampered. These results highlight the need to develop new therapeutic strategies to overcome the resistance of cancer cells to STAT3 inhibitors under hypoxic conditions.

  16. Hypoxia monitoring activities within the FP7 EU-project HYPOX: diverse approaches to understand a complex phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, F.; Waldmann, C.; Boetius, A.

    2012-04-01

    Hypoxic conditions in aquatic systems and the occurrence of 'dead zones' increase worldwide due to man-made eutrophication and global warming with consequences for biodiversity, ecosystem functions and services such as fisheries, aquaculture and tourism. Monitoring of hypoxia and its consequences has to (1) account for the appropriate temporal and spatial scales, (2) separate anthropogenic from natural drivers and long-term trends from natural variations, (3) assess ecosystem response, (4) use modeling tools for generalization and prediction, and (5) share data and obtained knowledge. In 2009 the EU FP7 project HYPOX (www.hypox.net) started out as a pioneering attempt to improve and integrate hypoxia observation capacities addressing these requirements. Target ecosystems selected for HYPOX cover a broad range of settings (e.g., hydrography, oxygenation status, biological activity, anthropogenic impact) and differ in their sensitivity towards change. Semi-enclosed basins with permanent anoxia (Black Sea, Baltic Sea), are included as well as seasonally or locally hypoxic land-locked systems (fjords, lagoons, lakes) and open ocean systems with high sensitivity to global warming (North Atlantic - Arctic transition). Adopted monitoring approaches involve autonomous, cabled, and shipboard instruments and include static and profiling moorings, benthic observatories, drifters, as well as classical CTD surveys. In order to improve observatory performance, project activities encompass developments of oxygen sensors as well as calibration procedures and technologies to reduce biofouling. Modeling and data assimilation are used to synthesize findings, to obtain an in-depth understanding of hypoxia causes and consequences, and to improve forecasting capacities. For integration of the collected information into a global oxygen observing system, results are disseminated through the HYPOX portal following GEOSS data sharing principles. This presentation will give an overview of

  17. Serum- and stromal cell-free hypoxic generation of embryonic stem cell-derived hematopoietic cells in vitro, capable of multilineage repopulation of immunocompetent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesinski, Dietrich Armin; Heinz, Niels; Pilat-Carotta, Sandra; Rudolph, Cornelia; Jacobs, Roland; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Klump, Hannes; Schiedlmeier, Bernhard

    2012-08-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may become a promising source for the generation of patient-specific hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in vitro. A crucial prerequisite will be the availability of reliable protocols for the directed and efficient differentiation toward HSCs. So far, the most robust strategy for generating HSCs from pluripotent cells in vitro has been established in the mouse model involving ectopic expression of the human transcription factor HOXB4. However, most differentiation protocols include coculture on a xenogenic stroma cell line and the use of animal serum. Involvement of any of both would pose a major barrier to the translation of those protocols to human autologous iPSCs intended for clinical use. Therefore, we asked whether long-term repopulating HSCs can, in principle, be generated from embryonic stem cells without stroma cells or serum. Here, we showed that long-term multilineage engraftment could be accomplished in immunocompetent mice when HSCs were generated in serum-free medium without stroma cell support and when hypoxic conditions were used. Under those conditions, HOXB4(+) embryonic stem cell-derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells were immunophenotypically similar to definitive bone marrow resident E-SLAM(+) (CD150(+)CD48(-)CD45(+)CD201(+)) HSCs. Thus, our findings may ease the development of definitive, adult-type HSCs from pluripotent stem cells, entirely in vitro.

  18. Genetic and hypoxic alterations of the microRNA-210-ISCU1/2 axis promote iron–sulfur deficiency and pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kevin; Lu, Yu; Annis, Sofia; Hale, Andrew E; Chau, B Nelson; Dahlman, James E; Hemann, Craig; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Vargas, Sara O; Rosas, Ivan; Perrella, Mark A; Osorio, Juan C; Haley, Kathleen J; Graham, Brian B; Kumar, Rahul; Saggar, Rajan; Saggar, Rajeev; Wallace, W Dean; Ross, David J; Khan, Omar F; Bader, Andrew; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Matar, Majed; Polach, Kevin; Johannessen, Nicolai M; Prosser, Haydn M; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Zweier, Jay L; Bindoff, Laurence A; Systrom, David; Waxman, Aaron B; Jin, Richard C; Chan, Stephen Y

    2015-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are essential for mitochondrial metabolism, but their regulation in pulmonary hypertension (PH) remains enigmatic. We demonstrate that alterations of the miR-210-ISCU1/2 axis cause Fe-S deficiencies in vivo and promote PH. In pulmonary vascular cells and particularly endothelium, hypoxic induction of miR-210 and repression of the miR-210 targets ISCU1/2 down-regulated Fe-S levels. In mouse and human vascular and endothelial tissue affected by PH, miR-210 was elevated accompanied by decreased ISCU1/2 and Fe-S integrity. In mice, miR-210 repressed ISCU1/2 and promoted PH. Mice deficient in miR-210, via genetic/pharmacologic means or via an endothelial-specific manner, displayed increased ISCU1/2 and were resistant to Fe-S-dependent pathophenotypes and PH. Similar to hypoxia or miR-210 overexpression, ISCU1/2 knockdown also promoted PH. Finally, cardiopulmonary exercise testing of a woman with homozygous ISCU mutations revealed exercise-induced pulmonary vascular dysfunction. Thus, driven by acquired (hypoxia) or genetic causes, the miR-210-ISCU1/2 regulatory axis is a pathogenic lynchpin causing Fe-S deficiency and PH. These findings carry broad translational implications for defining the metabolic origins of PH and potentially other metabolic diseases sharing similar underpinnings. PMID:25825391

  19. Impact of Niflumic Acid on Expression of mCLCA mRNA and MAPK in Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells of Rats with Hypoxic Pulmonary Hypertension%尼氟灭酸对低氧性肺动脉高压大鼠肺动脉平滑肌细胞mCLCA mRNA及MAPK表达的影响Symbol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盛文超; 刘建; 余维巍; 马海丽

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究氯通道阻滞剂尼氟灭酸(niflumic acid,NFA)对低氧性肺动脉高压大鼠肺动脉平滑肌细胞钙激活氯离子通道蛋白 (chloride channel calcium activated protein,mouse;mCLCA) mRNA及丝裂原活化蛋白激酶(mitogen-activated protein kinase,MAPK )表达的影响.方法 健康雄性SD大鼠24只,随机分为对照组、低氧组、低氧+用药组,每组8只.建立常压低氧肺动脉高压大鼠模型,低氧组及低氧+用药组均在低氧箱中缺氧8 h/d,共21 d.于缺氧前3 d开始,低氧+用药组每天腹腔内注射NFA 3 mg/kg体重,低氧组注射同等剂量对照剂.缺氧21 d后测量右心室肥厚指数(RVHI).分离并培养原代肺动脉平滑肌细胞;采用RT-PCR方法检测肺动脉平滑肌细胞mCLCA mRNA表达的变化;免疫细胞化学方法检测肺动脉平滑肌细胞中MAPK表达的变化.结果 低氧+用药组RVHI、mCLCA mRNA表达、MAPK表达均较低氧组明显降低(均P<0.05).结论氯通道阻滞剂NFA对低氧性肺动脉高压大鼠肺动脉平滑肌细胞mCLCA mRNA及MAPK的表达有抑制作用,从而推测NFA对低氧性肺动脉高压有一定治疗作用.%Objective To investigate the impact of chloride channel blocker (niflumic acid,NFA) on the expression of mCLCA mRNA of chloride channels and MAPK of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in rats with hypoxic pul monary hypertension (HPH). Methods Twenty four healthy male SD rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: control group,hypoxic group,hypoxic+NFA group (n = 8 each). The rat HPH model was constructed. The rats in hypoxic group and hypoxic+NFA group were housed in a hypoxia box 8 h per day. The rats in hypoxic group were injected intraperitoneally with placebo,and those in hypoxic+NFA group with NFA (3 mg/kg body weight) for 21 days. The changes in the right ventricle were tested by RVHI. The expression of mCLCA mRNA of chloride channels in PASMCs was detected by using RT PCR,and the expression of MAPK by using immuno

  20. Gaze beats mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateo, Julio C.; San Agustin, Javier; Hansen, John Paulin

    2008-01-01

    Facial EMG for selection is fast, easy and, combined with gaze pointing, it can provide completely hands-free interaction. In this pilot study, 5 participants performed a simple point-and-select task using mouse or gaze for pointing and a mouse button or a facial-EMG switch for selection. Gaze...

  1. The MOUSE Squad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a New York city after-school program started by MOUSE (Making Opportunities for Upgrading Schools and Education), a national nonprofit group that teaches students how to fix computers, and equips them with the communication and problem-solving skills to help them in the working world. The MOUSE program is part of a trend…

  2. Ear infection - chronic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... up. When this happens, infection can occur. A chronic ear infection develops when fluid or an infection ...

  3. Mouse genome database 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data.

  4. 低氧运动/训练研究新动向%New Trends of the Hypoxic Exercises/Trainings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王茹

    2012-01-01

    低氧训练与竞技能力提高、与健康有关的问题一直是国际运动科学的研究热点。以2012年第59届美国运动医学会年会交流论文为例,低氧训练/低氧运动为主题,从低氧运动在健康促进中的研究与应用、低氧训练促进竞技水平研究中的新发现、低氧运动/训练机制研究新进展、低氧运动中的营养补充等四个方面进行综述。2012年ACSM大会上低氧运动研究涉及医学、航天,体育等领域,人们对其研究涉及诸多内容,低氧运动形式各自存在着相应的适用范围及优缺点,采取有效措施扬长避短发挥低氧运动优势,促进潜能发挥,是本次大会低氧运动的核心理念。%Hypoxic training issues relating to the enhancement of competitiveness and health have always been a hot topic of the international sports science.The paper uses the papers published in the 59th America College of Sports Medicine in 2012 as the example,focused on the topic of the hypoxic training/hypoxic exercises to make a review from four perspectives,namely,the research and application of the hypoxic exercises in the promotion of health,the new findings in the enhancing effect of hypoxic training in competitiveness,new development in the research of the hypoxic exercises/training mechanism and the nutrition supplement of the hypoxic exercises.The academic researches reported in the ACSM meeting in 2012 relate to the field of medicine,aviation and sports.The researches cover a wide range of topics.Different forms of hypoxic exercises have corresponding application scope,advantages and disadvantages.The core notion of the hypoxic exercise research in the meeting is to adopt effective measures to develop its advantages while avoid its disadvantages and promote the display of its potential.

  5. HIF1α deficiency reduces inflammation in a mouse model of proximal colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dessislava N. Mladenova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α is a transcription factor that regulates the adaptation of cells to hypoxic microenvironments, for example inside solid tumours. Stabilisation of HIF1α can also occur in normoxic conditions in inflamed tissue or as a result of inactivating mutations in negative regulators of HIF1α. Aberrant overexpression of HIF1α in many different cancers has led to intensive efforts to develop HIF1α-targeted therapies. However, the role of HIF1α is still poorly understood in chronic inflammation that predisposes the colon to carcinogenesis. We have previously reported that the transcription of HIF1α is upregulated and that the protein is stabilised in inflammatory lesions that are caused by the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID sulindac in the mouse proximal colon. Here, we exploited this side effect of long-term sulindac administration to analyse the role of HIF1α in colon inflammation using mice with a Villin-Cre-induced deletion of Hif1α exon 2 in the intestinal epithelium (Hif1αΔIEC. We also analysed the effect of sulindac sulfide on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR pathway in vitro in colon cancer cells. Most sulindac-treated mice developed visible lesions, resembling the appearance of flat adenomas in the human colon, surrounded by macroscopically normal mucosa. Hif1αΔIEC mice still developed lesions but they were smaller than in the Hif1α-floxed siblings (Hif1αF/F. Microscopically, Hif1αΔIEC mice had significantly less severe colon inflammation than Hif1αF/F mice. Molecular analysis showed reduced MIF expression and increased E-cadherin mRNA expression in the colon of sulindac-treated Hif1αΔIEC mice. However, immunohistochemistry analysis revealed a defect of E-cadherin protein expression in sulindac-treated Hif1αΔIEC mice. Sulindac sulfide treatment in vitro upregulated Hif1α, c-JUN and IL8 expression through the AHR pathway. Taken together, HIF1α expression augments inflammation

  6. Neurotrophic Effect of Asiatic acid, a Triterpene of Centella asiatica Against Chronic 1-Methyl 4-Phenyl 1, 2, 3, 6-Tetrahydropyridine Hydrochloride/Probenecid Mouse Model of Parkinson's disease: The Role of MAPK, PI3K-Akt-GSK3β and mTOR Signalling Path