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Sample records for chronic ethanol feeding

  1. SIRT1 IS INVOLVED IN ENERGY METABOLISM: THE ROLE OF CHRONIC ETHANOL FEEDING AND RESVERATROL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Joan; French, Barbara A.; Li, Jun; Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia; Fu, Paul; French, Samuel W.

    2010-01-01

    Sirt1, a deacetylase involved in regulating energy metabolism in response to calorie restriction, is up regulated after chronic ethanol feeding using the intragastric feeding model of alcohol liver disease. PGC1α is also up regulated in response to ethanol. These changes are consistent with activation of the Sirt1/PGC1α pathway of metabolism and aging, involved in alcohol liver disease including steatosis, necrosis and fibrosis of the liver. To test this hypothesis, male rats fed ethanol intragastrically for 1 month were compared with rats fed ethanol plus resveratrol or naringin. Liver histology showed macrovesicular steatosis caused by ethanol and this change was unchanged by resveratrol or naringin treatment. Necrosis occurred with ethanol alone but was accentuated by resveratrol treatment, as was fibrosis. The expression of Sirt1 and PGC1α was increased by ethanol but not when naringin or resveratrol was fed with ethanol. Sirt3 was also up regulated by ethanol but not when resveratrol was fed with ethanol. These results support the concept that ethanol induces the Sirt1/PGC1α pathway of gene regulation and both naringin and resveratrol prevent the activation of this pathway by ethanol. However, resveratrol did not reduce the liver pathology caused by chronic ethanol feeding. PMID:18793633

  2. Ethanol metabolism, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in the lungs of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase deficient deer mice after chronic ethanol feeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaphalia, Lata [Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States); Boroumand, Nahal [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States); Hyunsu, Ju [Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States); Kaphalia, Bhupendra S., E-mail: bkaphali@utmb.edu [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States); Calhoun, William J. [Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    ethanol feeding causes oxidative stress, ER stress and inflammation in lungs of ADH– deer mice. • Chronic ethanol feeding generates FAEEs (nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol) in lungs of ADH– deer mice. • Chronic ethanol feeding induces CYP2E1 in the lungs of ADH– deer mice. • Lack of ER homeostasis due to a prolonged ethanol feeding could trigger inflammation.

  3. Ethanol metabolism, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in the lungs of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase deficient deer mice after chronic ethanol feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaphalia, Lata; Boroumand, Nahal; Hyunsu, Ju; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S; Calhoun, William J

    2014-06-01

    Consumption and over-consumption of alcoholic beverages are well-recognized contributors to a variety of pulmonary disorders, even in the absence of intoxication. The mechanisms by which alcohol (ethanol) may produce disease include oxidative stress and prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Many aspects of these processes remain incompletely understood due to a lack of a suitable animal model. Chronic alcohol over-consumption reduces hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the principal canonical metabolic pathway of ethanol oxidation. We therefore modeled this situation using hepatic ADH-deficient deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol daily for 3 months. Blood ethanol concentration was 180 mg% in ethanol fed mice, compared to <1.0% in the controls. Acetaldehyde (oxidative metabolite of ethanol) was minimally, but significantly increased in ethanol-fed vs. pair-fed control mice. Total fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs, nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol) were 47.6 μg/g in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to 1.5 μg/g in pair-fed controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluation showed perivascular and peribronchiolar lymphocytic infiltration, and significant oxidative injury, in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice compared to pair-fed controls. Several fold increases for cytochrome P450 2E1, caspase 8 and caspase 3 found in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to pair-fed controls suggest role of oxidative stress in ethanol-induced lung injury. ER stress and unfolded protein response signaling were also significantly increased in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice. Surprisingly, no significant activation of inositol-requiring enzyme-1α and spliced XBP1 was observed indicating a lack of activation of corrective mechanisms to reinstate ER homeostasis. The data suggest that oxidative stress and prolonged ER stress, coupled with formation and accumulation of cytotoxic FAEEs may contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic lung disease.

  4. Ethanol metabolism, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in the lungs of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase deficient deer mice after chronic ethanol feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaphalia, Lata; Boroumand, Nahal; Ju, Hyunsu; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Calhoun, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Consumption and over-consumption of alcoholic beverages are well-recognized contributors to a variety of pulmonary disorders, even in the absence of intoxication. The mechanisms by which alcohol (ethanol) may produce disease include oxidative stress and prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Many aspects of these processes remain incompletely understood due to a lack of a suitable animal model. Chronic alcohol over-consumption reduces hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the principal canonical metabolic pathway of ethanol oxidation. We therefore modeled this situation using hepatic ADH-deficient deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol daily for 3 months. Blood ethanol concentration was 180 mg% in ethanol fed mice, compared to <0.2% in the controls. Acetaldehyde (oxidative metabolite of ethanol) was minimally, but significantly increased in ethanol-fed vs. pair-fed control mice. Total fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs, nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol) were 47.6 μg/g in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to 1.5 μg/g in pair-fed controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluation showed perivascular and peribronchiolar lymphocytic infiltration, and significant oxidative injury, in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice compared to pair-fed controls. Several fold increases for cytochrome P450 2E1, caspase 8 and caspase 3 found in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to pair-fed controls suggest role of oxidative stress in ethanol-induced lung injury. ER stress and unfolded protein response signaling were also significantly increased in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice. Surprisingly, no significant activation of inositol-requiring enzyme-1α and spliced XBP1 were observed indicating a lack of activation of corrective mechanisms to reinstate ER homeostasis. The data suggest that oxidative stress and prolonged ER stress, coupled with formation and accumulation of cytotoxic FAEEs may contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic lung disease. PMID:24625836

  5. Chronic ethanol feeding increases the severity of Staphylococcus aureus skin infections by altering local host defenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlet, Corey P.; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Schlueter, Annette J.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholics are at increased risk of Staphylococcus aureus skin infection and serious sequelae, such as bacteremia and death. Despite the association between alcoholism and severe S. aureus skin infection, the impact of EtOH on anti-S. aureus cutaneous immunity has not been investigated in a model of chronic EtOH exposure. To test the hypothesis that EtOH enhances the severity of S. aureus skin infection, mice were fed EtOH for ≥12 weeks via the Meadows-Cook model of alcoholism and inoculated with S. aureus following epidermal abrasion. Evidence of exacerbated staphylococcal disease in EtOH-fed mice included: skin lesions that were larger and contained more organisms, greater weight loss, and increased bacterial dissemination. Infected EtOH-fed mice demonstrated poor maintenance and induction of PMN responses in skin and draining LNs, respectively. Additionally, altered PMN dynamics in the skin of these mice corresponded with reduced production of IL-23 and IL-1β by CD11b+ myeloid cells and IL-17 production by γδ T cells, with the latter defect occurring in the draining LNs as well. In addition, IL-17 restoration attenuated S. aureus-induced dermatopathology and improved bacterial clearance defects in EtOH-fed mice. Taken together, the findings show, in a novel model system, that the EtOH-induced increase in S. aureus-related injury/illness corresponds with defects in the IL-23/IL-17 inflammatory axis and poor PMN accumulation at the site of infection and draining LNs. These findings offer new information about the impact of EtOH on cutaneous host-defense pathways and provide a potential mechanism explaining why alcoholics are predisposed to S. aureus skin infection. PMID:25605871

  6. Antilipogenic and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Codonopsis lanceolata in Mice Hepatic Tissues after Chronic Ethanol Feeding

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    Areum Cha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the antilipogenic and anti-inflammatory effects of Codonopsis lanceolata (C. lanceolata root extract in mice with alcohol-induced fatty liver and elucidated its underlying molecular mechanisms. Ethanol was introduced into the liquid diet by mixing it with distilled water at 5% (wt/v, providing 36% of the energy, for nine weeks. Among the three different fractions prepared from the C. lanceolata root, the C. lanceolata methanol extract (CME exhibited the most remarkable attenuation of alcohol-induced fatty liver with respect to various parameters such as hepatic free fatty acid concentration, body weight loss, and hepatic accumulations of triglyceride and cholesterol. The hepatic gene and protein expression levels were analysed via RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. CME feeding significantly restored the ethanol-induced downregulation of the adiponectin receptor (adipoR 1 and of adipoR2, along with their downstream molecules. Furthermore, the study data showed that CME feeding dramatically reversed ethanol-induced hepatic upregulation of toll-like receptor- (TLR- mediated signaling cascade molecules. These results indicate that the beneficial effects of CME against alcoholic fatty livers of mice appear to be with adenosine- and adiponectin-mediated regulation of hepatic steatosis and TLR-mediated modulation of hepatic proinflammatory responses.

  7. Ethanol metabolism, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in the lungs of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase deficient deer mice after chronic ethanol feeding

    OpenAIRE

    Kaphalia, Lata; Boroumand, Nahal; Ju, Hyunsu; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Calhoun, William J

    2014-01-01

    Consumption and over-consumption of alcoholic beverages are well-recognized contributors to a variety of pulmonary disorders, even in the absence of intoxication. The mechanisms by which alcohol (ethanol) may produce disease include oxidative stress and prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Many aspects of these processes remain incompletely understood due to a lack of a suitable animal model. Chronic alcohol over-consumption reduces hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the principal c...

  8. Market for ethanol feed joint products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertzmark, D.; Gould, B.

    1979-10-01

    This report presents results of econometric estimations and mathematical simulations of markets for joint feed products of motor ethanol. The major issues considered are the nature of current market price relationships, effects on prices, including feed substitutes prices, and effects of demands for increased use of distillers' grains and gluten meal. The econometric section shows that soybean meal was by far the dominant force in the pricing of the two products. However, neither one could be adequately explained without the inclusion of corn in the estimating equations. Later research shows that this was due to the importance of both feeds for metabolizable energy as well as for protein in livestock diets. Current ration formulations would require some discounting of the value of the protein content of the two feeds. Careful siting of the ethanol facilities, and flexible design of the plants so that a maximum number of products may be extracted from the feedstock, seem necessary. Finally, the analysis indicates that substitution in animal diets of these joint products for the corn or milo used originally requires that additional energy be supplied to the animal by some type of forage crop. This implies that additional land may be required for energy production, for such marginal crops as hay and alfalfa, rather than for row crops.

  9. 长期饮酒减少大鼠睾丸间质细胞PBR和 StAR蛋白表达%Decreased protein expressions of PBR and StAR of Leydig cells in rats with chronic ethanol feeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪海东; 郑冬梅; 冯丽; 侯晓磊; 高聆; 赵家军

    2008-01-01

    目的 研究慢性饮酒对雄性大鼠睾丸外周型苯二氮类受体(PBR)和类固醇生成快速调节蛋白(StAR)表达的影响.方法 以不同浓度的乙醇饲养40只Wistar大鼠 20 周,检测睾丸组织PBR和StAR蛋白的表达.结果 慢性饮酒Wistar大鼠的睾丸曲精小管生精细胞层明显减少,管腔中可见断裂的精子鞭毛,少见完整的精子;免疫沉淀显示PBR和StAR蛋白表达下降,与对照组相比较,小、中、大剂量饮酒组PBR和StAR表达分别下降13.8%、20.9%、50.4%和34.5%、37.7%、95.2%;免疫组化显示小、中、大剂量饮酒组睾丸间质组织中的PBR和StAR表达面积分别减少33.27 %、37.71 %、63.59 %和27.12 %、51.84 %、58.41 %.结论 慢性饮酒能降低睾丸间质PBR和StAR蛋白表达,且其与乙醇浓度呈正相关.%Objective To investigate the expressions of peripheral type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) of testis in rats with chronic ethanol feeding.Methods Forty rats were treated with different ethanol dosages for twenty weeks, the morphology of testis and protein expressions of PBR and StAR were observed.Results In the ethanol-feeding rats, seminiferous tubular wall of testes became thin and the layer of germ cells was significantly reduced, moreover, the broken spermatozoon′s flagella were frequently observed and few integrated spermatozoa were produced.Compared with control group, the protein expressions of PBR and StAR protein were reduced by 13.8%, 20.9%, 50.4% and 34.5%, 37.7%, 95.2% in low-, middle- and high-dose ethanol feeding group respectively by immunoprecipitation.Similarly, both locating at interstitial cells in testes were also decreased by 33.27 %, 37.71 %, 63.59 % and 27.12 %, 51.84 %, 58.41% in the same ethanol feeding groups respectively by immunohistochemistry.Conclusion Both PBR and StAR protein expressions are decreased in interstitial cells of testes in chronic ethanol-feeding rats, which shows

  10. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Effect on Behavior of Zebrafish During Chronic Ethanol Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ana Claudia Reis; Rico, Eduardo Pacheco; de Oliveira, Diogo Losch; Rosemberg, Denis Broock; Guizzo, Ranieli; Meurer, Fábio; da Silveira, Themis Reverbel

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely consumed drug, which acts on the central nervous system to induce behavioral alterations ranging from disinhibition to sedation. Recent studies have produced accumulating evidence for the therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria in behavior. We aimed to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) on the behavior of adult zebrafish chronically exposed to ethanol. Adult wild-type zebrafish were randomly divided into four groups, each containing 15 fish. The following groups were formed: Control (C), received unsupplemented feed during the trial period; Probiotic (P), fed with feed supplemented with LGG; Ethanol (E), received unsupplemented feed and 0.5% of ethanol directly added to the tank water; and Probiotic+Ethanol (P+E), group under ethanol exposure (0.5%) and fed with LGG supplemented feed. After 2 weeks of exposure, the novel tank test was used to evaluate fish behavior, which was analyzed using computer-aided video tracking. LGG alone did not alter swimming behavior of the fish. Ethanol exposure led to robust behavioral effects in the form of reduced anxiety levels, as indicated by increased vertical exploration and more time spent in the upper region of the novel tank. The group exposed to ethanol and treated with LGG behaved similarly to animals exposed to ethanol alone. Taken together, these results show that zebrafish behavior was not altered by LGG per se, as seen in murine models. This was the first study to investigate the effects of a probiotic diet on behavior after a chronic ethanol exposure.

  11. Norepinephrine-induced diuresis in chronically ethanol-treated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohorecky, L.A. (Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Previous research from this laboratory indicated that noradrenergic mechanisms might mediate ethanol diuresis. Experiments described here examined changes in sensitivity of noradrenergic mechanisms in animals chronically treated with ethanol. Norepinephrine hydrochloride (0-12 ug intracerebroventricularly) produced dose-dependent diuresis in control and ethanol treated rats on the first day of treatment. Tolerance to ethanol diuresis was present after 10 day of ethanol treatment. Lack of responsiveness to norepinephrine-induced diuresis was evident only on the 20th day of treatment in both the ethanol and dextrin-maltose groups of rats. These results indicate a temporal dissociation between the tolerance to ethanol-induced and norepinephrine-induced diuresis and suggest that norepinephrine may not play a primary role in the development of tolerance to the diuretic action of ethanol.

  12. Acute but not chronic ethanol exposure impairs retinol oxidation in the small and large intestine of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Ellendt, K.; Lindros, K.;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Ethanol has been shown to inhibit retinol oxidation at the level of alcohol dehydrogenase in liver and colon but not previously in the small intestine. In the present study we investigated how chronic alcohol feeding and acute ethanol exposure affects retinol dehydrogenase...... activity in the colon and small intestine of the rat. METHODS: Rats were fed ethanol in a liquid diet for six weeks. Control rats received a similar diet but with ethanol isocalorically replaced by carbohydrates. Retinol dehydrogenase was analyzed from cell cytosol samples from the small and the large...... higher, respectively). While chronic alcohol feeding did not affect these parameters, acute ethanol exposure reduced V(max) and V(max)/K(m) dose-dependently (p retinol...

  13. Epigenetics of proteasome inhibition in the liver of rats fed ethanol chronically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joan Oliva; Jennifer Dedes; Jun Li; Samuel W French; Fawzia Bardag-Gorce

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of ethanol-induced proteasome inhibition, and the effects of proteasome inhibition in the regulation of epigenetic mechanisms. METHODS: Rats were fed ethanol for 1 mo using the Tsukamoto-French model and were compared to rats given the proteasome inhibitor PS-341 (Bortezomib, Velcade.) by intraperitoneal injection. Microarray analysis and real time PCR were performed and proteasome activity assays and Western blot analysis were performed using isolated nuclei. RESULTS: Chronic ethanol feeding caused a significant inhibition of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in the nucleus, which led to changes in the turnover of transcriptional factors, histone-modifying enzymes, and, therefore, affected epigenetic mechanisms. Chronic ethanol feeding was related to an increase in histone acetylation, and it is hypothesized that the proteasome proteolytic activity regulated histone modifications by controlling the stability of histone modifying enzymes, and, therefore, regulated the chromatin structure, allowing easy access to chromatin by RNA polymerase, and, thus, proper gene expression. Proteasome inhibition by PS-341 increased histone acetylation similar to chronic ethanol feeding. In addition, proteasome inhibition caused dramatic changes in hepatic remethylation reactions as there was a significant decrease in the enzymes responsible for the regeneration of S-adenosylmethionine, and, in particular, a significant decrease in the betainehomocysteine methyltransferase enzyme. This suggested that hypomethylation was associated with proteasome inhibition, as indicated by the decrease in histone methylation. CONCLUSION: The role of proteasome inhibition in regulating epigenetic mechanisms, and its link to liver injury in alcoholic liver disease, is thus a promising approach to study liver injury due to chronic ethanol consumption.

  14. Repeated episodes of chronic intermittent ethanol promote insensitivity to devaluation of the reinforcing effect of ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, M F; Becker, H C; Chandler, L J

    2014-11-01

    Studies in animal models have shown that repeated episodes of alcohol dependence and withdrawal promote escalation of drinking that is presumably associated with alterations in the addiction neurocircuitry. Using a lithium chloride-ethanol pairing procedure to devalue the reinforcing properties of ethanol, the present study determined whether multiple cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure by vapor inhalation also alters the sensitivity of drinking behavior to the devaluation of ethanol's reinforcing effects. The effect of devaluation on operant ethanol self-administration and extinction was examined in mice prior to initiation of CIE (short drinking history) and after repeated cycles of CIE or air control exposure (long drinking history). Devaluation significantly attenuated the recovery of baseline ethanol self-administration when tested either prior to CIE or in the air-exposed controls that had experienced repeated bouts of drinking but no CIE. In contrast, in mice that had undergone repeated cycles of CIE exposure that promoted escalation of ethanol drinking, self-administration was completely resistant to the effect of devaluation. Devaluation had no effect on the time course of extinction training in either pre-CIE or post-CIE mice. Taken together, these results are consistent with the suggestion that repeated cycles of ethanol dependence and withdrawal produce escalation of ethanol self-administration that is associated with a change in sensitivity to devaluation of the reinforcing properties of ethanol.

  15. Adolescent rats are resistant to the development of ethanol-induced chronic tolerance and ethanol-induced conditioned aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Godoy, Juan Carlos; Molina, Juan Carlos

    2015-11-01

    The analysis of chronic tolerance to ethanol in adult and adolescent rats has yielded mixed results. Tolerance to some effects of ethanol has been reported in adolescents, yet other studies found adults to exhibit greater tolerance than adolescents or comparable expression of the phenomena at both ages. Another unanswered question is how chronic ethanol exposure affects subsequent ethanol-mediated motivational learning at these ages. The present study examined the development of chronic tolerance to ethanol's hypothermic and motor stimulating effects, and subsequent acquisition of ethanol-mediated odor conditioning, in adolescent and adult male Wistar rats given every-other-day intragastric administrations of ethanol. Adolescent and adult rats exhibited lack of tolerance to the hypothermic effects of ethanol during an induction phase; whereas adults, but not adolescents, exhibited a trend towards a reduction in hypothermia at a challenge phase (Experiment 1). Adolescents, unlike adults, exhibited ethanol-induced motor activation after the first ethanol administration. Adults, but not adolescents, exhibited conditioned odor aversion by ethanol. Subsequent experiments conducted only in adolescents (Experiment 2, Experiment 3 and Experiment 4) manipulated the context, length and predictability of ethanol administration. These manipulations did not promote the expression of ethanol-induced tolerance. This study indicated that, when moderate ethanol doses are given every-other day for a relatively short period, adolescents are less likely than adults to develop chronic tolerance to ethanol-induced hypothermia. This resistance to tolerance development could limit long-term maintenance of ethanol intake. Adolescents, however, exhibited greater sensitivity than adults to the acute motor stimulating effects of ethanol and a blunted response to the aversive effects of ethanol. This pattern of response may put adolescents at risk for early initiation of ethanol intake.

  16. Concomitant stress potentiates the preference for, and consumption of, ethanol induced by chronic pre-exposure to ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Morais-Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol abuse is linked to several acute and chronic injuries that can lead to health problems. Ethanol addiction is one of the most severe diseases linked to the abuse of this drug. Symptoms of ethanol addiction include compulsive substance intake and withdrawal syndrome. Stress exposure has an important role in addictive behavior for many drugs of abuse (including ethanol, but the consequences of stress and ethanol in the organism when these factors are concomitant results in a complex interaction. We investigated the effects of concomitant, chronic administration of ethanol and stress exposure on the withdrawal and consumption of, as well as the preference for, ethanol in mice. Male Swiss mice (30–35 g, 8-10 per group were exposed to an ethanol liquid diet as the only source of food for 15 days. In the final 5 days, they were exposed to forced swimming stress. Twelve hours after removal of the ethanol liquid diet, animals were evaluated for ethanol withdrawal by measuring anxiety-related behaviors and locomotor activity. Twenty-four hours after evaluation of ethanol withdrawal, they were evaluated for voluntary consumption of ethanol in a “three-bottle choice” paradigm. Mice exposed to chronic consumption of ethanol had decreased locomotor activity during withdrawal. Contrary to our expectations, a concomitant forced swimming stress did not aggravate ethanol withdrawal. Nevertheless, simultaneous ethanol administration and stress exposure increased voluntary consumption of ethanol, mainly solutions containing high concentrations of ethanol. These results showed that stressful situations during ethanol intake may aggravate specific addiction-related behaviors.

  17. Concomitant stress potentiates the preference for, and consumption of, ethanol induced by chronic pre-exposure to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais-Silva, G; Fernandes-Santos, J; Moreira-Silva, D; Marin, M T

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol abuse is linked to several acute and chronic injuries that can lead to health problems. Ethanol addiction is one of the most severe diseases linked to the abuse of this drug. Symptoms of ethanol addiction include compulsive substance intake and withdrawal syndrome. Stress exposure has an important role in addictive behavior for many drugs of abuse (including ethanol), but the consequences of stress and ethanol in the organism when these factors are concomitant results in a complex interaction. We investigated the effects of concomitant, chronic administration of ethanol and stress exposure on the withdrawal and consumption of, as well as the preference for, ethanol in mice. Male Swiss mice (30-35 g, 8-10 per group) were exposed to an ethanol liquid diet as the only source of food for 15 days. In the final 5 days, they were exposed to forced swimming stress. Twelve hours after removal of the ethanol liquid diet, animals were evaluated for ethanol withdrawal by measuring anxiety-related behaviors and locomotor activity. Twenty-four hours after evaluation of ethanol withdrawal, they were evaluated for voluntary consumption of ethanol in a "three-bottle choice" paradigm. Mice exposed to chronic consumption of ethanol had decreased locomotor activity during withdrawal. Contrary to our expectations, a concomitant forced swimming stress did not aggravate ethanol withdrawal. Nevertheless, simultaneous ethanol administration and stress exposure increased voluntary consumption of ethanol, mainly solutions containing high concentrations of ethanol. These results showed that stressful situations during ethanol intake may aggravate specific addiction-related behaviors.

  18. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure causes more severe pancreatic injury and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhenhua; Yang, Fanmuyi; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yongchao; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A; Ke, Zun-Ji; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2016-10-01

    Alcohol abuse increases the risk for pancreatitis. The pattern of alcohol drinking may impact its effect. We tested a hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption in combination with binge exposure imposes more severe damage to the pancreas. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: control, chronic ethanol exposure, binge ethanol exposure and chronic plus binge ethanol exposure. For the control group, mice were fed with a liquid diet for two weeks. For the chronic ethanol exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks. In the binge ethanol exposure group, mice were treated with ethanol by gavage (5g/kg, 25% ethanol w/v) daily for 3days. For the chronic plus binge exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks and exposed to ethanol by gavage during the last 3days. Chronic and binge exposure alone caused minimal pancreatic injury. However, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure induced significant apoptotic cell death. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure altered the levels of alpha-amylase, glucose and insulin. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure caused pancreatic inflammation which was shown by the macrophages infiltration and the increase of cytokines and chemokines. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased the expression of ADH1 and CYP2E1. It also induced endoplasmic reticulum stress which was demonstrated by the unfolded protein response. In addition, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, indicating oxidative stress. Therefore, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure is more detrimental to the pancreas.

  19. Effects of ethanol feeding on hepatic lipid synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijburg, L.B.M.; MaQuedano, A.; Bijleveld, C.; Guzman, M.; Geelen, M.J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Rats were fed a high-fat, liquid diet containing either 36% of total calories as ethanol or an isocaloric amount of sucrose, for a period up to 35 days. At different time intervals we measured the effects of ethanol administration on the activities of a number of key enzymes involved in hepatic lipi

  20. Integrated systems of producing feed and ethanol from fractionated maize silage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesh, D.; Mowat, D.N.

    1985-01-01

    Systems were designed, simulated and analyzed to assess the economic feasibility of producing ethanol from high-moisture grain, gradually separated from mature whole-plant maize silage. The residual stover fraction containing some grain fines was fed, along with ethanol production by-products (stillage or maize gluten feed), to growing steers. Three systems were compared. In the control, regular maize silage was fed to growing steers with extra maize harvested later and sold as grain for cash. In one alternative (system 2), the separated grain fraction was processed to ethanol and stillage at a local farmer-cooperative plant. In another alternative (system 3), the grain fraction was transferred to a regional industrial plant for wet milling to ethanol, corn gluten-feed and other products. System comparisons were based on estimating gross costs per farm during 1980 to 1982, minus credits for products such as grain maize (control) and ethanol (alternative systems). System 3 was the more attractive alternative. When ethanol was valued at wholesale prices for regular leaded gasoline, these costs were similar in 1981 and 1982 for System 3 and the control. Further refinements of a separation unit, and detailed assessment of the feeding value of the stover fraction plus stillage or corn gluten feed, are warranted. 17 references.

  1. NEUROPEPTIDE Y (NPY) SUPPRESSES ETHANOL DRINKING IN ETHANOL-ABSTINENT, BUT NOT NON-ETHANOL-ABSTINENT, WISTAR RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Gilpin, N.W.; Stewart, R B; Badia-Elder, N.E.

    2008-01-01

    In outbred rats, increases in brain neuropeptide Y (NPY) activity suppress ethanol consumption in a variety of access conditions, but only following a history of ethanol dependence. NPY reliably suppresses ethanol drinking in alcohol-preferring (P) rats and this effect is augmented following a period of ethanol abstinence. The purpose of this experiment was to examine the effects of NPY on 2-bottle choice ethanol drinking and feeding in Wistar rats that had undergone chronic ethanol vapor exp...

  2. Emissions savings in the corn-ethanol life cycle from feeding coproducts to livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Virgil R; Liska, Adam J; Klopfenstein, Terry J; Erickson, Galen E; Yang, Haishun S; Walters, Daniel T; Cassman, Kenneth G

    2010-01-01

    Environmental regulations on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from corn (Zea mays L.)-ethanol production require accurate assessment methods to determine emissions savings from coproducts that are fed to livestock. We investigated current use of coproducts in livestock diets and estimated the magnitude and variability in the GHG emissions credit for coproducts in the corn-ethanol life cycle. The coproduct GHG emissions credit varied by more than twofold, from 11.5 to 28.3 g CO(2)e per MJ of ethanol produced, depending on the fraction of coproducts used without drying, the proportion of coproduct used to feed beef cattle (Bos taurus) vs. dairy or swine (Sus scrofa), and the location of corn production. Regional variability in the GHG intensity of crop production and future livestock feeding trends will determine the magnitude of the coproduct GHG offset against GHG emissions elsewhere in the corn-ethanol life cycle. Expansion of annual U.S. corn-ethanol production to 57 billion liters by 2015, as mandated in current federal law, will require feeding of coproduct at inclusion levels near the biological limit to the entire U.S. feedlot cattle, dairy, and swine herds. Under this future scenario, the coproduct GHG offset will decrease by 8% from current levels due to expanded use by dairy and swine, which are less efficient in use of coproduct than beef feedlot cattle. Because the coproduct GHG credit represents 19 to 38% of total life cycle GHG emissions, accurate estimation of the coproduct credit is important for determining the net impact of corn-ethanol production on atmospheric warming and whether corn-ethanol producers meet state- and national-level GHG emissions regulations.

  3. Utilization of Soft Wood Wastes as a Feed Stock to Produce Fuel Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan M. Khalil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The current research investigated the utilization of soft wood waste as a feedstock to produce a value-added product-fuel ethanol. Approach: The main issue in converting soft wood waste to fuel ethanol is the accessibility of the polysaccharides for breaking down into monosaccharides. This study focused on the use of steam as the pretreatment method. The governing factors for the effectiveness of steam pretreatment are steam temperature and retention times. Following steam pretreatment, soft wood waste was subjected to acid hydrolysis. The sugars released by acid hydrolysis were fermented in series chemical reactions that convert sugars to ethanol. The fermentation reaction was caused by yeast, which feed on the sugars. Results: Steam pretreatment was able to improve both glucose yields from acid hydrolysis and ethanol yields from fermentation. The results obtained from this study showed that steam pretreated soft wood waste are a heterogeneous material. So biomass goes through a size-reduction step to make it easier to handle and to make the ethanol production process more efficient. Steam treatment on soft wood waste increased the hydrolysis of cellulose by acid hydrolysis. Following 24 h of diluted or concentrated acid hydrolysis, a maximum cellulose conversion of 20.5% was obtained. Similarly, sugars to ethanol conversions were improved by steam treatment. Maximum sugar to ethanol conversion of 40.7% was observed. Conclusion: It was recommended that the hydrolysis process be done for 40 min to obtain the maximum sugars yield in a reasonable period of time.

  4. Chronic ethanol ingestion, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyu-In; Ju, Anes; Lee, Hee-Mi; Lee, Seong-Su; Song, Chan-Hee; Won, Wang-Youn; Jeong, Jae-Seung; Hong, Oak-Kee; Kim, Jae-Hwa; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2011-01-07

    Chronic alcohol consumption contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) while decreasing the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF may be an important regulator of glucose metabolism, so it may be associated with an increased risk for T2DM in alcoholism. We evaluated the association of chronic heavy alcohol exposure, T2DM and BDNF level. Ten week-old type 2 diabetic OLETF rats and non-diabetic LETO rats of similar weight were used. The rats were randomized by weight into four treatment groups: (1) OLETF-Ethanol (O-E, n=13), (2) OLETF-Control (O-C, n=15), (3) LETO-Ethanol (L-E, n=11), and (4) LETO-Control (L-C, n=14). The ethanol groups were fed an isocaloric liquid diet containing ethanol while the control groups were fed with the same diet containing maltose-dextran over a 6-week period using a pair-feeding control model in order to regulate different caloric ingestion. After 6 weeks of feeding, an Intraperitoneal Glucose Tolerance Test (IP-GTT) was performed and BDNF levels were analyzed. Prior to IP-GTT, the mean glucose levels in the O-E, O-C, L-E, and L-C groups were 90.38±12.84, 102.13±5.04, 95.18±6.43, and 102.36±4.43mg/dL, respectively. Thirty minutes after intraperitoneal injection, the mean glucose levels were 262.62±63.77, 229.07±51.30, 163.45±26.63, and 156.64±34.42mg/dL, respectively; the increased amount of the mean glucose level in the O-E group was significantly higher than that in the O-C group (palcohol ingestion may aggravate T2DM and may possibly lower BDNF level.

  5. Chronic ethanol exposure increases the non-dominant glucocorticoid, corticosterone, in the near-term pregnant guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Amy J; Dobson, Christine C; Brien, James F; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine E; Reynolds, James N

    2014-08-01

    Maternal-fetal signaling is critical for optimal fetal development and postnatal outcomes. Chronic ethanol exposure alters programming of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, resulting in a myriad of neurochemical and behavioral alterations in postnatal life. Based on a recent study which showed that human intra-partum fetal stress increased fetal secretion of corticosterone, the non-dominant glucocorticoid, this investigation tested the hypothesis that an established model of HPA axis programming, chronic maternal ethanol administration to the pregnant guinea pig, would result in preferential elevation of corticosterone, which is also the non-dominant glucocorticoid. Starting on gestational day (GD) 2, guinea pigs received oral administration of ethanol (4 g/kg maternal body weight/day) or isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding. Each treatment was administered daily and continued until GD 45, 55, or 65 (approximately 3 days pre-term), when pregnant animals were euthanized and fetuses delivered by Caesarean section. Maternal and fetal plasma samples were collected. After sample preparation (protein precipitation and C-18 solid phase extraction), plasma cortisol and corticosterone concentrations were determined simultaneously by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. As predicted, chronic ethanol exposure increased both fetal and maternal plasma corticosterone concentration in late gestation. In contrast, plasma cortisol did not differ across maternal treatments in maternal or fetal samples. The plasma concentration of both maternal glucocorticoids increased with gestational age. Thus, corticosterone, the non-dominant glucocorticoid, but not cortisol, was elevated by chronic ethanol exposure, which may have effects on HPA function in later life.

  6. Cytisine modulates chronic voluntary ethanol consumption and ethanol-induced striatal up-regulation of ΔFosB in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajja, Ravi Kiran; Rahman, Shafiqur

    2013-06-01

    Chronic administration of ethanol induces persistent accumulation of ΔFosB, an important transcription factor, in the midbrain dopamine system. This process underlies the progression to addiction. Previously, we have shown that cytisine, a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) partial agonist, reduces various ethanol-drinking behaviors and ethanol-induced striatal dopamine function. However, the effects of cytisine on chronic ethanol drinking and ethanol-induced up-regulation of striatal ΔFosB are not known. Therefore, we examined the effects of cytisine on chronic voluntary ethanol consumption and associated striatal ΔFosB up-regulation in C57BL/6J mice using behavioral and biochemical methods. Following the chronic voluntary consumption of 15% (v/v) ethanol under a 24-h two-bottle choice intermittent access (IA; 3 sessions/week) or continuous access (CA; 24 h/d and 7 d/week) paradigm, mice received repeated intraperitoneal injections of saline or cytisine (0.5 or 3.0 mg/kg). Ethanol and water intake were monitored for 24 h post-treatment. Pretreatment with cytisine (0.5 or 1.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced ethanol consumption and preference in both paradigms at 2 h and 24 h post-treatment. The ΔFosB levels in the ventral and dorsal striatum were determined by Western blotting 18-24 h after the last point of ethanol access. In addition, cytisine (0.5 mg/kg) significantly attenuated up-regulation of ΔFosB in the ventral and dorsal striatum following chronic ethanol consumption in IA and CA paradigms. The results indicate that cytisine modulates chronic voluntary ethanol consumption and reduces ethanol-induced up-regulation of striatal ΔFosB. Further, the data suggest a critical role of nAChRs in chronic ethanol-induced neurochemical adaptations associated with ethanol addiction.

  7. Moderate (2%, v/v) Ethanol Feeding Alters Hepatic Wound Healing after Acute Carbon Tetrachloride Exposure in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Krutika T; Liu, Shinlan; McCracken, Jennifer M; Jiang, Lu; Gaw, Ta Ehpaw; Kaydo, Lindsey N; Richard, Zachary C; O'Neil, Maura F; Pritchard, Michele T

    2016-01-06

    Wound healing consists of three overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and matrix synthesis and remodeling. Prolonged alcohol abuse can cause liver fibrosis due to deregulated matrix remodeling. Previous studies demonstrated that moderate ethanol feeding enhances liver fibrogenic markers and frank fibrosis independent of differences in CCl₄-induced liver injury. Our objective was to determine whether or not other phases of the hepatic wound healing response were affected by moderate ethanol after CCl₄ exposure. Mice were fed moderate ethanol (2% v/v) for two days and then were exposed to CCl₄ and euthanized 24-96 h later. Liver injury was not different between pair- and ethanol-fed mice; however, removal of necrotic tissue was delayed after CCl₄-induced liver injury in ethanol-fed mice. Inflammation, measured by TNFα mRNA and protein and hepatic Ly6c transcript accumulation, was reduced and associated with enhanced hepatocyte apoptosis after ethanol feeding. Hepatocytes entered the cell cycle equivalently in pair- and ethanol-fed mice after CCl₄ exposure, but hepatocyte proliferation was prolonged in livers from ethanol-fed mice. CCl₄-induced hepatic stellate cell activation was increased and matrix remodeling was prolonged in ethanol-fed mice compared to controls. Taken together, moderate ethanol affected each phase of the wound healing response to CCl₄. These data highlight previously unknown effects of moderate ethanol exposure on hepatic wound healing after acute hepatotoxicant exposure.

  8. Moderate (2%, v/v Ethanol Feeding Alters Hepatic Wound Healing after Acute Carbon Tetrachloride Exposure in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krutika T. Deshpande

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing consists of three overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and matrix synthesis and remodeling. Prolonged alcohol abuse can cause liver fibrosis due to deregulated matrix remodeling. Previous studies demonstrated that moderate ethanol feeding enhances liver fibrogenic markers and frank fibrosis independent of differences in CCl4-induced liver injury. Our objective was to determine whether or not other phases of the hepatic wound healing response were affected by moderate ethanol after CCl4 exposure. Mice were fed moderate ethanol (2% v/v for two days and then were exposed to CCl4 and euthanized 24–96 h later. Liver injury was not different between pair- and ethanol-fed mice; however, removal of necrotic tissue was delayed after CCl4-induced liver injury in ethanol-fed mice. Inflammation, measured by TNFα mRNA and protein and hepatic Ly6c transcript accumulation, was reduced and associated with enhanced hepatocyte apoptosis after ethanol feeding. Hepatocytes entered the cell cycle equivalently in pair- and ethanol-fed mice after CCl4 exposure, but hepatocyte proliferation was prolonged in livers from ethanol-fed mice. CCl4-induced hepatic stellate cell activation was increased and matrix remodeling was prolonged in ethanol-fed mice compared to controls. Taken together, moderate ethanol affected each phase of the wound healing response to CCl4. These data highlight previously unknown effects of moderate ethanol exposure on hepatic wound healing after acute hepatotoxicant exposure.

  9. Chronic ethanol consumption in rats produces opioid antinociceptive tolerance through inhibition of mu opioid receptor endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li He

    Full Text Available It is well known that the mu-opioid receptor (MOR plays an important role in the rewarding properties of ethanol. However, it is less clear how chronic ethanol consumption affects MOR signaling. Here, we demonstrate that rats with prolonged voluntary ethanol consumption develop antinociceptive tolerance to opioids. Signaling through the MOR is controlled at many levels, including via the process of endocytosis. Importantly, agonists at the MOR that promote receptor endocytosis, such as the endogenous peptides enkephalin and β-endorphin, show a reduced propensity to promote antinociceptive tolerance than do agonists, like morphine, which do not promote receptor endocytosis. These observations led us to examine whether chronic ethanol consumption produced opioid tolerance by interfering with MOR endocytosis. Indeed, here we show that chronic ethanol consumption inhibits the endocytosis of MOR in response to opioid peptide. This loss of endocytosis was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2 protein levels after chronic drinking, suggesting that loss of this component of the trafficking machinery could be a mechanism by which endocytosis is lost. We also found that MOR coupling to G-protein was decreased in ethanol-drinking rats, providing a functional explanation for loss of opioid antinociception. Together, these results suggest that chronic ethanol drinking alters the ability of MOR to endocytose in response to opioid peptides, and consequently, promotes tolerance to the effects of opioids.

  10. Jerusalem artichoke as a platform for inulin, ethanol and feed production in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anyia, A.O.; Mostafa, H.; Melnichuk, R.; Slaski, J.J. [Alberta Research Council, Vegreville, AB (Canada). Bioresource Technologies Unit

    2009-07-01

    The Alberta Research Council (ARC) is developing an extraction and fermentation process for making ethanol from Jerusalem artichoke (JA). In particular, ARC has collaborated with Olds College in developing an extraction process and an engineering process for the commercial production of inulin, ethanol, polymers and animal feed from JA tubers. Fresh JA tubers contain about 20 per cent of water soluble carbohydrates, which occur primarily in the form of inulin. Several health promoting benefits are associated with intake of inulin. High volumes of dry residual aerial biomass following tuber harvest contain 40 to 50 per cent water soluble carbohydrates that are fermentable to ethanol. Some studies have shown that under optimal climatic conditions, JA can yield more ethanol per ha than sugarcane. ARC has the exclusive North American rights to several high yielding JA cultivars. Jerusalem artichoke is not a designated food crop and has a high biomass yield for soluble sugars. This perennial crop forms tubers, has a deep root system that can be adapted to marginal lands. ARC's research involves a seed to final product technology development approach that includes new variety development, agronomy and processing. ARC applied a hot water extraction technique along with a low liquid to JA stalk ratio to achieve more than 40 per cent total water soluble carbohydrates per gram of biomass that are fermentable to ethanol without the need for weak acid or enzymatic hydrolysis. A 400 hectare plantation of JA in Alberta could produce about 1,500 tonnes of inulin and 1.5 million liters of ethanol per year in a pilot scale bio-refining plant. An economic and market analysis showed that capital investments in an inulin production plant in Alberta will be a profitable venture. ARC has estimated a 5 year Internal Rate of Return (IRR) to range from 10 to 30 per cent and payback period of 4 to 5 years depending on plant location and value of by-products. tabs., figs.

  11. Jejunal Feeding in Chronic Pancreatitis with Severe Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamvas J

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Necrotizing pancreatitis is the most serious form of pancreatic inflammatory disease leading to multiorgan failure and a high (15-20% mortality rate. The poor nutritional and metabolic conditions and secondary bacterial translocation raise the mortality rate even more. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of jejunal feeding in cases of chronic pancreatitis with extended necrosis. PATIENTS: In our institution, over a five-year period, 86 patients with severe necrotizing pancreatitis were treated for extended necrosis. In 19 patients, chronic calcifying pancreatitis was demonstrated by computed tomography showing more than 20% necrosis in the residual pancreas as well. SETTING: In 12 cases, nutrition was provided by jejunal feeding using an endoscopically placed nasojejunal feeding tube, whereas in 7 cases, hypocaloric parenteral nutrition was used. DESIGN: Retrospective unicenter study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The rate of healing with conservative treatment. RESULTS: Two of the 12 jejunally fed patients were operated on because of complications of pancreatitis. Five patients required intervention in the hypocaloric parenteral nutrition group: 4 were operated on and one more needed endoscopic intervention. The healing rate was significantly higher (P=0.045 in the jejunal feeding group (83.3% than in the parenteral nutrition (28.6% patients. CONCLUSIONS: In cases of chronic calcifying pancreatitis serious necrosis can develop in the residual pancreas resulting in a severe acute pancreatitis-like disease. A better healing rate was achieved and less interventions became necessary using nasojejunal tube feeding than in the parenteral nutrition group and this was analogous to what was observed in severe necrotizing pancreatitis This form of pancreatitis has not yet been described in the literature in detail. The authors suggest that it be regarded as a separate entity.

  12. Biliopancreatic duct injection of ethanol as an experimental model of acute and chronic pancreatitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Ethem; Atalay, Suleyman; Tolan, Huseyin Kerem; Yuksekdag, Sema; Yucel, Metin; Acar, Aylin; Basak, Fatih; Gunes, Pembegul; Bas, Gurhan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we described an easily reproducable experimental pancreatits model induced by biliopancreatic duct injection of ethyl alcohol. Seventy Wistar albino rats were divided equally into seven groups randomly: the control group (group 1), acute pancreatitis groups; induced by 20% ethanol (group 2), 48% ethanol (group 3), 80% ethanol (group 4), chronic pancreatitis groups; induced by 20% ethanol (group 5), 48% ethanol (group 6) and by 80% ethanol (group 7). Acute pancreatitis groups were sacrified on postoperative day 3, while the control group and chronic pancreatitis groups were killed on postoperative day 7. Histopathologic evaluation was done, and P acute pancreatitis (100%). Inflammatory infiltration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells, interstitial edema, and focal necrotic areas were seen in the pancreatic tissues. Similarly, all rats in group 6 developed chronic pancreatitis (100%). Interstitial fibrosis, lymphotic infiltration, ductal dilatation, acinar cell atrophy, periductal hyperplasia were seen in the pancreatic tissues. Mortality was seen only in group 7. The biliopancreatic ductal injection of 48% ethanol induced acute and chronic pancreatitis has 100% success rate.

  13. Water reclamation and value-added animal feed from corn-ethanol stillage by fungal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, M L; Khanal, S K; Pometto, A L; van Leeuwen, J Hans

    2014-01-01

    Rhizopus oligosporus was cultivated on thin stillage from a dry-grind corn ethanol plant. The aim of the research was to develop a process to replace the current energy-intensive flash evaporation and make use of this nutrient-rich stream to create a new co-product in the form of protein-rich biomass. Batch experiments in 5- and 50-L stirred bioreactors showed prolific fungal growth under non-sterile conditions. COD, suspended solids, glycerol, and organic acids removals, critical for in-plant water reuse, reached ca. 80%, 98%, 100% and 100%, respectively, within 5 d of fungal inoculation, enabling effluent recycle as process water. R. oligosporus contains 2% lysine, good levels of other essential amino acids, and 43% crude protein - a highly nutritious livestock feed. Avoiding water evaporation from thin stillage would furthermore save substantial energy inputs on corn ethanol plants.

  14. Quercetin Attenuates Chronic Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Mitochondrial Damage through Enhanced Mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Xu, Yanyan; Zhang, Shanshan; Sun, Jian; Liu, Peiyi; Xiao, Lin; Tang, Yuhan; Liu, Liegang; Yao, Ping

    2016-01-05

    Emerging evidence suggested mitophagy activation mitigates ethanol-induced liver injury. However, the effect of ethanol on mitophagy is inconsistent. Importantly, the understanding of mitophagy status after chronic ethanol consumption is limited. This study evaluated the effect of quercetin, a naturally-occurring flavonoid, on chronic ethanol-induced mitochondrial damage focused on mitophagy. An ethanol regime to mice for 15 weeks (accounting for 30% of total calories) led to significant mitochondrial damage as evidenced by changes of the mitochondrial ultrastructure, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and remodeling of membrane lipid composition, which was greatly attenuated by quercetin (100 mg/kg.bw). Moreover, quercetin blocked chronic ethanol-induced mitophagy suppression as denoted by mitophagosomes-lysosome fusion and mitophagy-related regulator elements, including LC3II, Parkin, p62 and voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), paralleling with increased FoxO3a nuclear translocation. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and extracellular signal regulated kinase 2 (ERK2), instead of AKT and Sirtuin 1, were involved in quercetin-mediated mitophagy activation. Quercetin alleviated ethanol-elicited mitochondrial damage through enhancing mitophagy, highlighting a promising preventive strategy for alcoholic liver disease.

  15. Steam reforming of ethanol over Ni-based catalysts: Effect of feed composition on catalyst stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trane-Restrup, Rasmus; Dahl, Søren; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2014-01-01

    In this work the effects of steam-to-carbon ratio (S/C), and addition of H2 or O2 to the feed on the product yields and carbon deposition in the steam reforming (SR) of ethanol over Ni/MgAl2O4, Ni/Ce0.6Zr0.4O2, and Ni/CeO2 at 600 °C have been investigated. Increasing the S/C-ratio from 1.6 to 8.......3 over Ni/MgAl2O4 increased conversion of ethanol as well as the yield of H2, while the carbon deposition and yield of hydrocarbons decreased. Oxygen addition at S/C-ratio of 6 over Ni/MgAl2O4, Ni/Ce0.6Zr0.4O2, and Ni/CeO2 increased conversion, decreased the yield of hydrocarbons, and led to a decrease...... showed stable behavior and an average rate of carbon deposition of less than 7 μg C/gCat h. The results indicate that stable operation of ethanol SR is only possible under oxidative conditions....

  16. Chronic Voluntary Ethanol Consumption Induces Favorable Ceramide Profiles in Selectively Bred Alcohol-Preferring (P Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Godfrey

    Full Text Available Heavy alcohol consumption has detrimental neurologic effects, inducing widespread neuronal loss in both fetuses and adults. One proposed mechanism of ethanol-induced cell loss with sufficient exposure is an elevation in concentrations of bioactive lipids that mediate apoptosis, including the membrane sphingolipid metabolites ceramide and sphingosine. While these naturally-occurring lipids serve as important modulators of normal neuronal development, elevated levels resulting from various extracellular insults have been implicated in pathological apoptosis of neurons and oligodendrocytes in several neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Prior work has shown that acute administration of ethanol to developing mice increases levels of ceramide in multiple brain regions, hypothesized to be a mediator of fetal alcohol-induced neuronal loss. Elevated ceramide levels have also been implicated in ethanol-mediated neurodegeneration in adult animals and humans. Here, we determined the effect of chronic voluntary ethanol consumption on lipid profiles in brain and peripheral tissues from adult alcohol-preferring (P rats to further examine alterations in lipid composition as a potential contributor to ethanol-induced cellular damage. P rats were exposed for 13 weeks to a 20% ethanol intermittent-access drinking paradigm (45 ethanol sessions total or were given access only to water (control. Following the final session, tissues were collected for subsequent chromatographic analysis of lipid content and enzymatic gene expression. Contrary to expectations, ethanol-exposed rats displayed substantial reductions in concentrations of ceramides in forebrain and heart relative to non-exposed controls, and modest but significant decreases in liver cholesterol. qRT-PCR analysis showed a reduction in the expression of sphingolipid delta(4-desaturase (Degs2, an enzyme involved in de novo ceramide synthesis. These findings indicate that ethanol intake levels

  17. Chronic Voluntary Ethanol Consumption Induces Favorable Ceramide Profiles in Selectively Bred Alcohol-Preferring (P) Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Jessica; Jeanguenin, Lisa; Castro, Norma; Olney, Jeffrey J; Dudley, Jason; Pipkin, Joseph; Walls, Stanley M; Wang, Wei; Herr, Deron R; Harris, Greg L; Brasser, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Heavy alcohol consumption has detrimental neurologic effects, inducing widespread neuronal loss in both fetuses and adults. One proposed mechanism of ethanol-induced cell loss with sufficient exposure is an elevation in concentrations of bioactive lipids that mediate apoptosis, including the membrane sphingolipid metabolites ceramide and sphingosine. While these naturally-occurring lipids serve as important modulators of normal neuronal development, elevated levels resulting from various extracellular insults have been implicated in pathological apoptosis of neurons and oligodendrocytes in several neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Prior work has shown that acute administration of ethanol to developing mice increases levels of ceramide in multiple brain regions, hypothesized to be a mediator of fetal alcohol-induced neuronal loss. Elevated ceramide levels have also been implicated in ethanol-mediated neurodegeneration in adult animals and humans. Here, we determined the effect of chronic voluntary ethanol consumption on lipid profiles in brain and peripheral tissues from adult alcohol-preferring (P) rats to further examine alterations in lipid composition as a potential contributor to ethanol-induced cellular damage. P rats were exposed for 13 weeks to a 20% ethanol intermittent-access drinking paradigm (45 ethanol sessions total) or were given access only to water (control). Following the final session, tissues were collected for subsequent chromatographic analysis of lipid content and enzymatic gene expression. Contrary to expectations, ethanol-exposed rats displayed substantial reductions in concentrations of ceramides in forebrain and heart relative to non-exposed controls, and modest but significant decreases in liver cholesterol. qRT-PCR analysis showed a reduction in the expression of sphingolipid delta(4)-desaturase (Degs2), an enzyme involved in de novo ceramide synthesis. These findings indicate that ethanol intake levels achieved by

  18. Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts diurnal rhythms of hepatic glycogen metabolism in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoh, Uduak S.; Swain, Telisha M.; Filiano, Ashley N.; Gamble, Karen L.; Young, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption has been shown to significantly decrease hepatic glycogen content; however, the mechanisms responsible for this adverse metabolic effect are unknown. In this study, we examined the impact chronic ethanol consumption has on time-of-day-dependent oscillations (rhythms) in glycogen metabolism processes in the liver. For this, male C57BL/6J mice were fed either a control or ethanol-containing liquid diet for 5 wk, and livers were collected every 4 h for 24 h and analyzed for changes in various genes and proteins involved in hepatic glycogen metabolism. Glycogen displayed a robust diurnal rhythm in the livers of mice fed the control diet, with the peak occurring during the active (dark) period of the day. The diurnal glycogen rhythm was significantly altered in livers of ethanol-fed mice, with the glycogen peak shifted into the inactive (light) period and the overall content of glycogen decreased compared with controls. Chronic ethanol consumption further disrupted diurnal rhythms in gene expression (glycogen synthase 1 and 2, glycogenin, glucokinase, protein targeting to glycogen, and pyruvate kinase), total and phosphorylated glycogen synthase protein, and enzyme activities of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase, the rate-limiting enzymes of glycogen metabolism. In summary, these results show for the first time that chronic ethanol consumption disrupts diurnal rhythms in hepatic glycogen metabolism at the gene and protein level. Chronic ethanol-induced disruption in these daily rhythms likely contributes to glycogen depletion and disruption of hepatic energy homeostasis, a recognized risk factor in the etiology of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:25857999

  19. Brain impairment in well-nourished chronic alcoholics is related to ethanol intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolás, J M; Estruch, R; Salamero, M; Orteu, N; Fernandez-Solà, J; Sacanella, E; Urbano-Márquez, A

    1997-05-01

    To determine the influence of chronic ethanol intake on the central nervous system, we studied 40 asymptomatic, well-nourished, chronic alcoholics (mean age, 42.6 +/- 9.1 years) and 20 age-, sex-, and education-matched control subjects. Studies included neuropsychological testing, visual and short-latency auditory evoked potentials, and morphometric analysis of computed tomography scans. The mean daily ethanol consumption of the alcoholics was 204 gm over an average of 26.4 years. Compared to control subjects, chronic alcoholics exhibited a significant prolongation of the P100 latency of visual evoked potentials, and a prolongation and reduction in the amplitude of the latency of the V wave of short-latency auditory evoked potentials. These abnormalities were related to the lifetime dose of ethanol consumed. Brain morphometric analysis showed that alcoholics had a significantly greater degree of brain shrinkage with age, compared to control subjects. The cortical atrophy index correlated significantly with the lifetime ethanol consumption. Neuropsychological testing in alcoholics compared to controls revealed a significant impairment of frontal skills that was related to age, degree of scholarship, and the presence of frontal atrophy. In conclusion, well-nourished chronic alcoholics exhibited significant brain impairment, as demonstrated by neuropsychological testing, evoked potentials, and brain morphometric analysis, which was correlated with the lifetime dose of ethanol consumed.

  20. Effects of chronic ethanol exposure on neuronal function in the prefrontal cortex and extended amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, Kristen E; Lowery-Gionta, Emily G; Crowley, Nicole A; Li, Chia; Marcinkiewcz, Catherine A; Rose, Jamie H; McCall, Nora M; Maldonado-Devincci, Antoniette M; Morrow, A Leslie; Jones, Sara R; Kash, Thomas L

    2015-12-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption and withdrawal leads to anxiety, escalated alcohol drinking behavior, and alcohol dependence. Alterations in the function of key structures within the cortico-limbic neural circuit have been implicated in underlying the negative behavioral consequences of chronic alcohol exposure in both humans and rodents. Here, we used chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure (CIE) in male C57BL/6J mice to evaluate the effects of chronic alcohol exposure and withdrawal on anxiety-like behavior and basal synaptic function and neuronal excitability in prefrontal cortical and extended amygdala brain regions. Forty-eight hours after four cycles of CIE, mice were either assayed in the marble burying test (MBT) or their brains were harvested and whole-cell electrophysiological recordings were performed in the prelimbic and infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex (PLC and ILC), the lateral and medial central nucleus of the amygdala (lCeA and mCeA), and the dorsal and ventral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBNST and vBNST). Ethanol-exposed mice displayed increased anxiety in the MBT compared to air-exposed controls, and alterations in neuronal function were observed in all brain structures examined, including several distinct differences between subregions within each structure. Chronic ethanol exposure induced hyperexcitability of the ILC, as well as a shift toward excitation in synaptic drive and hyperexcitability of vBNST neurons; in contrast, there was a net inhibition of the CeA. This study reveals extensive effects of chronic ethanol exposure on the basal function of cortico-limbic brain regions, suggests that there may be complex interactions between these regions in the regulation of ethanol-dependent alterations in anxiety state, and highlights the need for future examination of projection-specific effects of ethanol in cortico-limbic circuitry.

  1. Differential Effects of Chronic and Chronic-Intermittent Ethanol Treatment and Its Withdrawal on the Expression of miRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne M. Lewohl

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic and excessive alcohol misuse results in changes in the expression of selected miRNAs and their mRNA targets in specific regions of the human brain. These expression changes likely underlie the cellular adaptations to long term alcohol misuse. In order to delineate the mechanism by which these expression changes occur, we have measured the expression of six miRNAs including miR-7, miR-153, miR-152, miR-15B, miR-203 and miR-144 in HEK293T, SH SY5Y and 1321 N1 cells following exposure to ethanol. These miRNAs are predicted to target key genes involved in the pathophysiology of alcoholism. Chronic and chronic-intermittent exposure to ethanol, and its removal, resulted in specific changes in miRNA expression in each cell line suggesting that different expression patterns can be elicited with different exposure paradigms and that the mechanism of ethanol’s effects is dependent on cell type. Specifically, chronic exposure to ethanol for five days followed by a five day withdrawal period resulted in up-regulation of several miRNAs in each of these cell lines similar to expression changes identified in post mortem human brain. Thus, this model can be used to elucidate the role of miRNAs in regulating gene expression changes that occur in response to ethanol exposure.

  2. Chronic ethanol exposure decreases CB1 receptor function at GABAergic synapses in the rat central amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varodayan, Florence P; Soni, Neeraj; Bajo, Michal; Luu, George; Madamba, Samuel G; Schweitzer, Paul; Parsons, Loren H; Roberto, Marisa

    2016-07-01

    The endogenous cannabinoids (eCBs) influence the acute response to ethanol and the development of tolerance, dependence and relapse. Chronic alcohol exposure alters eCB levels and Type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1 ) expression and function in brain regions associated with addiction. CB1 inhibits GABA release, and GABAergic dysregulation in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is critical in the transition to alcohol dependence. We investigated possible disruptions in CB1 signaling of rat CeA GABAergic transmission following intermittent ethanol exposure. In the CeA of alcohol-naive rats, CB1 agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) decreased the frequency of spontaneous and miniature GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (s/mIPSCs). This effect was prevented by CB1 antagonism, but not Type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2 ) antagonism. After 2-3 weeks of intermittent ethanol exposure, these WIN inhibitory effects were attenuated, suggesting ethanol-induced impairments in CB1 function. The CB1 antagonist AM251 revealed a tonic eCB/CB1 control of GABAergic transmission in the alcohol-naive CeA that was occluded by calcium chelation in the postsynaptic cell. Chronic ethanol exposure abolished this tonic CB1 influence on mIPSC, but not sIPSC, frequency. Finally, acute ethanol increased CeA GABA release in both naive and ethanol-exposed rats. Although CB1 activation prevented this effect, the AM251- and ethanol-induced GABA release were additive, ruling out a direct participation of CB1 signaling in the ethanol effect. Collectively, these observations demonstrate an important CB1 influence on CeA GABAergic transmission and indicate that the CeA is particularly sensitive to alcohol-induced disruptions of CB1 signaling.

  3. Chronic exposure to ethanol causes steatosis and inflammation in zebrafish liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ana Claudia Reis; Gregório, Cleandra; Uribe-Cruz, Carolina; Guizzo, Ranieli; Malysz, Tais; Faccioni-Heuser, Maria Cristina; Longo, Larisse; da Silveira, Themis Reverbel

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effects of chronic exposure to ethanol in the liver and the expression of inflammatory genes in zebrafish. METHODS Zebrafish (n = 104), wild type, adult, male and female, were divided into two groups: Control and ethanol (0.05 v/v). The ethanol was directly added into water; tanks water were changed every two days and the ethanol replaced. The animals were fed twice a day with fish food until satiety. After two and four weeks of trial, livers were dissected, histological analysis (hematoxilin-eosin and Oil Red staining) and gene expression assessment of adiponectin, adiponectin receptor 2 (adipor2), sirtuin-1 (sirt-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (tnf-a), interleukin-1b (il-1b) and interleukin-10 (il-10) were performed. Ultrastructural evaluations were conducted at fourth week. RESULTS Exposing zebrafish to 0.5% ethanol developed intense liver steatosis after four weeks, as demonstrated by oil red staining. In ethanol-treated animals, the main ultrastructural changes were related to cytoplasmic lipid particles and droplets, increased number of rough endoplasmic reticulum cisterns and glycogen particles. Between two and four weeks, hepatic mRNA expression of il-1b, sirt-1 and adipor2 were upregulated, indicating that ethanol triggered signaling molecules which are key elements in both hepatic inflammatory and protective responses. Adiponectin was not detected in the liver of animals exposed and not exposed to ethanol, and il-10 did not show significant difference. CONCLUSION Data suggest that inflammatory signaling and ultrastructural alterations play a significant role during hepatic steatosis in zebrafish chronically exposed to ethanol. PMID:28357029

  4. Phosphorylation Regulates Removal of Synaptic N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptors after Withdrawal from Chronic Ethanol Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Clapp, Peter; Gibson, Emily S.; Dell'Acqua, Mark L.; Hoffman, Paula L.

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) protein levels or subcellular localization in brain after chronic ethanol exposure may contribute to withdrawal-associated seizures and neurotoxicity. We have investigated synaptic localization of NMDARs in cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurons after prolonged (7 days) exposure to, and acute withdrawal from, 80 mM ethanol using fluorescence immunocytochemistry techniques. After chronic ethanol exposure, there was a significant increase in ...

  5. Gene expression changes in the nucleus accumbens of alcohol-preferring rats following chronic ethanol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Richard L; Kimpel, Mark W; McClintick, Jeanette N; Strother, Wendy N; Carr, Lucinda G; Liang, Tiebing; Rodd, Zachary A; Mayfield, R Dayne; Edenberg, Howard J; McBride, William J

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of binge-like alcohol drinking on gene expression changes in the nucleus accumbens (ACB) of alcohol-preferring (P) rats. Adult male P rats were given ethanol under multiple scheduled access (MSA; three 1-h dark cycle sessions/day) conditions for 8 weeks. For comparison purposes, a second ethanol drinking group was given continuous/daily alcohol access (CA; 24h/day). A third group was ethanol-naïve (W group). Average ethanol intakes for the CA and MSA groups were approximately 9.5 and 6.5 g/kg/day, respectively. Fifteen hours after the last drinking episode, rats were euthanized, the brains extracted, and the ACB dissected. RNA was extracted and purified for microarray analysis. The only significant differences were between the CA and W groups (palcohol consumption and preference; 4 of these genes (Tgfa, Hspa5, Mtus1 and Creb3l2) are involved in anti-apoptosis and increased transcription, suggesting that they may be contributing to cellular protection and maintaining high alcohol intakes. Overall, these findings suggest that chronic CA drinking results in genomic changes that can be observed during the early acute phase of ethanol withdrawal. Conversely, chronic MSA drinking, with its associated protracted withdrawal periods, results in genomic changes that may be masked by tight regulation of these genes following repeated experiences of ethanol withdrawal.

  6. In Vivo Acute on Chronic Ethanol Effects in Liver: A Mouse Model Exhibiting Exacerbated Injury, Altered Metabolic and Epigenetic Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Shivendra D; Aroor, Annayya R; Restrepo, Ricardo; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2015-11-20

    Chronic alcoholics who also binge drink (i.e., acute on chronic) are prone to an exacerbated liver injury but its mechanism is not understood. We therefore investigated the in vivo effects of chronic and binge ethanol ingestion and compared to chronic ethanol followed by three repeat binge ethanol on the liver of male C57/BL6 mice fed ethanol in liquid diet (4%) for four weeks followed by binge ethanol (intragastric administration, 3.5 g/kg body weight, three doses, 12h apart). Chronic followed by binge ethanol exacerbated fat accumulation, necrosis, decrease in hepatic SAM and SAM:SAH ratio, increase in adenosine levels, and elevated CYP2E1 levels. Histone H3 lysine acetylation (H3AcK9), dually modified phosphoacetylated histone H3 (H3AcK9/PS10), and phosphorylated H2AX increased after binge whereas phosphorylation of histone H3 ser 10 (H3S10) and H3 ser 28 (H3S28) increased after chronic ethanol-binge. Histone H3 lysine 4 and 9 dimethylation increased with a marked dimethylation in H3K9 in chronic ethanol binge group. Trimethylated histone H3 levels did not change. Nuclear levels of histone acetyl transferase GCN5 and histone deacetylase HDAC3 were elevated whereas phospho-CREB decreased in a distinctive manner. Taken together, acute on chronic ethanol ingestion caused amplification of liver injury and elicited characteristic profiles of histone modifications, metabolic alterations, and changes in nuclear protein levels. These findings demonstrate that chronic ethanol exposure renders liver more susceptible to repeat acute/binge ethanol induced acceleration of alcoholic liver disease.

  7. Ginger extract protects rat's kidneys against oxidative damage after chronic ethanol administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirpoor, Aireza; Rezaei, Farzaneh; Fard, Amin Abdollahzade; Afshari, Ali Taghizadeh; Gharalari, Farzaneh Hosseini; Rasmi, Yousef

    2016-12-01

    Chronic alcohol ingestion is associated with pronounced detrimental effects on the renal system. In the current study, the protective effect of ginger extract on ethanol-induced damage was evaluated through determining 8-OHdG, cystatin C, glomerular filtration rate, and pathological changes such as cell proliferation and fibrosis in rats' kidneys. Male wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups and were treated as follows: (1) control, (2) ethanol and (3) ginger extract treated ethanolic (GETE) groups. After a six weeks period of treatment, the results revealed proliferation of glomerular and tubular cells, fibrosis in glomerular and peritubular and a significant rise in the level of 8-OHdG, cystatin C, plasma urea and creatinine. Moreover, compared to the control group, the ethanol group showed a significant decrease in the urine creatinine and creatinine clearance. In addition, significant amelioration of changes in the structure of kidneys, along with restoration of the biochemical alterations were found in the ginger extract treated ethanolic group, compared to the ethanol group. These findings indicate that ethanol induces kidneys abnormality by oxidative DNA damage and oxidative stress, and that these effects can be alleviated using ginger as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent.

  8. Chronic ethanol exposure inhibits distraction osteogenesis in a mouse model: role of the TNF signaling axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is an inflammatory cytokine that modulates osteoblastogenesis. In addition, the demonstrated inhibitory effects of chronic ethanol exposure on direct bone formation in rats are hypothetically mediated by TNF-alpha signaling. The effects in mice are unreported....

  9. IMPROVED BIOREFINERY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL, CHEMICALS, ANIMAL FEED AND BIOMATERIALS FROM SUGAR CANE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Donal F. Day

    2009-01-29

    The Audubon Sugar Institute (ASI) of Louisiana State University’s Agricultural Center (LSU AgCenter) and MBI International (MBI) sought to develop technologies that will lead to the development of a sugar-cane biorefinery, capable of supplying fuel ethanol from bagasse. Technology development focused on the conversion of bagasse, cane-leaf matter (CLM) and molasses into high value-added products that included ethanol, specialty chemicals, biomaterials and animal feed; i.e. a sugar cane-based biorefinery. The key to lignocellulosic biomass utilization is an economically feasible method (pretreatment) for separating the cellulose and the hemicellulose from the physical protection provided by lignin. An effective pretreatment disrupts physical barriers, cellulose crystallinity, and the association of lignin and hemicellulose with cellulose so that hydrolytic enzymes can access the biomass macrostructure (Teymouri et al. 2004, Laureano-Perez, 2005). We chose to focus on alkaline pretreatment methods for, and in particular, the Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX) process owned by MBI. During the first two years of this program a laboratory process was established for the pretreatment of bagasse and CLM using the AFEX process. There was significant improvement of both rate and yield of glucose and xylose upon enzymatic hydrolysis of AFEX-treated bagasse and CLM compared with untreated material. Because of reactor size limitation, several other alkaline pretreatment methods were also co-investigated. They included, dilute ammonia, lime and hydroxy-hypochlorite treatments. Scale-up focused on using a dilute ammonia process as a substitute for AFEX, allowing development at a larger scale. The pretreatment of bagasse by an ammonia process, followed by saccharification and fermentation produced ethanol from bagasse. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) allowed two operations in the same vessel. The addition of sugarcane molasses to the hydrolysate

  10. Chronic ethanol consumption in mice alters hepatocyte lipid droplet properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Hepatosteatosis is a common pathological feature of impaired hepatic metabolism following chronic alcohol consumption. Although often benign and reversible, it is widely believed that steatosis is a risk factor for development of advanced liver pathologies, including steatohepatitis and ...

  11. Evaluation of apple pomace based reconstituted feed in rats after solid state fermentation and ethanol recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Devrajan

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available To utilize apple pomace in an economical and effective way, a feed was developed by solid state fermentation (SSF using sequential interactive co-culture of Candida utilis and Kloeckera. Removal of ethanol and drying of the left - over residue. Feeding trial was conducted in white albino rats before and after reconstitution of apple pomace feed in the choice and no choice study. Feeding of apple pomace feed in the rats before reconstitution indicated that neither in fermented nor in unfermented form it was acceptable. In the no choice study both in 100% fermented and unfermented apple pomace group feed intake decreased continuously resulting in death of rats apparently due to decreased digestibility owing to high fibre content. Further, fermented or unfermented apple pomace based feed had lower digestibility and efficiency of conversion than the standard rat feed. Compared to the standard feed group, growth rates in all the feed groups were negative. The results of choice study of different feeds corroborated with the no-choice study mentioned earlier. Incorporation of fermented apple pomace into standard rat feed in the ratio of 1:1 gave better acceptability and digestibility. Reconstituted feed with 10% jaggery, 2% groundnut oil, 0.01% mixed flavour and 1% salt was the most acceptable. The post-mortem examination of the rats that died during the feeding trial revealed generalized oedema, probably due to some hepatotoxin in the feed. The blood glucose level in the apple pomace feed group except that was reconstituted with jaggery, showed a general hypoglycemia, though falling in the range. The increased ALT and AST levels in the serum also suggest damage to the liver. The mortality rate, post-mortem examination of the rats that died during the feeding trial and blood biochemical analysis of rat serum suggest a more elaborative study for extended period of time.Para utilizar bagaço de maçã de uma maneira econômica e eficaz, foi desenvolvido

  12. Application of low-cost algal nitrogen source feeding in fuel ethanol production using high gravity sweet potato medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu; Guo, Jin-Song; Chen, You-Peng; Zhang, Hai-Dong; Zheng, Xu-Xu; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2012-08-31

    Protein-rich bloom algae biomass was employed as nitrogen source in fuel ethanol fermentation using high gravity sweet potato medium containing 210.0 g l(-1) glucose. In batch mode, the fermentation could not accomplish even in 120 h without any feeding of nitrogen source. While, the feeding of acid-hydrolyzed bloom algae powder (AHBAP) notably promoted fermentation process but untreated bloom algae powder (UBAP) was less effective than AHBAP. The fermentation times were reduced to 96, 72, and 72 h if 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 g l(-1) AHBAP were added into medium, respectively, and the ethanol yields and productivities increased with increasing amount of feeding AHBAP. The continuous fermentations were performed in a three-stage reactor system. Final concentrations of ethanol up to 103.2 and 104.3 g l(-1) with 4.4 and 5.3 g l(-1) residual glucose were obtained using the previously mentioned medium feeding with 20.0 and 30.0 g l(-1) AHBAP, at dilution rate of 0.02 h(-1). Notably, only 78.5 g l(-1) ethanol and 41.6 g l(-1) residual glucose were obtained in the comparative test without any nitrogen source feeding. Amino acids analysis showed that approximately 67% of the protein in the algal biomass was hydrolyzed and released into the medium, serving as the available nitrogen nutrition for yeast growth and metabolism. Both batch and continuous fermentations showed similar fermentation parameters when 20.0 and 30.0 g l(-1) AHBAP were fed, indicating that the level of available nitrogen in the medium should be limited, and an algal nitrogen source feeding amount higher than 20.0 g l(-1) did not further improve the fermentation performance.

  13. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhong, Wei; Li, Houkai; Li, Qiong; Qiu, Yunping; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Huiyuan; Zhao, Xueqing; Zhang, Shucha; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Zeisel, Steven H.; Jia, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the bile acid metabolism is limited by the fact that previous analyses have primarily focused on a selected few circulating bile acids; the bile acid profiles of the liver and gastrointestinal tract pools are rarely investigated. Here, we determined how chronic ethanol consumption altered the bile acids in multiple body compartments (liver, gastrointestinal tract, and serum) of rats. Rats were fed a modified Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet with 38% of calories as ethanol (the amount equivalent of 4–5 drinks in humans). While conjugated bile acids predominated in the liver (98.3%), duodenum (97.8%), and ileum (89.7%), unconjugated bile acids comprised the largest proportion of measured bile acids in serum (81.2%), the cecum (97.7%), and the rectum (97.5%). In particular, taurine-conjugated bile acids were significantly decreased in the liver and gastrointestinal tract of ethanol-treated rats, while unconjugated and glycine-conjugated species increased. Ethanol consumption caused increased expression of genes involved in bile acid biosynthesis, efflux transport, and reduced expression of genes regulating bile acid influx transport in the liver. These results provide an improved understanding of the systemic modulations of bile acid metabolism in mammals through the gut-liver axis.—Xie, G., Zhong, W., Li, H., Li, Q., Qiu, Y., Zheng, X., Chen, H., Zhao, X., Zhang, S., Zhou, Z., Zeisel, S. H., Jia, W. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption. PMID:23709616

  14. Stress-induced enhancement of ethanol intake in C57BL/6J mice with a history of chronic ethanol exposure: Involvement of kappa opioid receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Ivy Anderson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that daily forced swim stress (FSS prior to ethanol drinking sessions facilitates enhanced ethanol consumption in mice with a history of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE vapor exposure without altering ethanol intake in air-exposed controls. Because both stress and chronic ethanol exposure have been shown to activate the dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor (KOR system, the present study was designed to explore a potential role for KORs in modulating stress effects on ethanol consumption in the CIE model of dependence and relapse drinking. After stable baseline ethanol intake was established in adult male C57BL/6J mice, subjects received chronic intermittent exposure (16 hr/day x 4 days/week to ethanol vapor (CIE group or air (CTL group. Weekly cycles of inhalation exposure were alternated with 5-day limited access drinking tests (1 hour access to 15% ethanol. Experiment 1 compared effects of daily FSS and KOR activation on ethanol consumption. CIE and CTL mice were either exposed to FSS (10 min, the KOR agonist U50,488 (5 mg/kg, or a vehicle injection (non-stressed condition prior to each daily drinking session during test weeks. FSS selectively increased drinking in CIE mice. U50,488 mimicked this effect in CIE mice, but also increased drinking in CTL mice. Experiment 2 assessed effects of KOR blockade on stress-induced drinking in CIE and CTL mice. Stressed and non-stressed mice were administered the short-acting KOR antagonist LY2444296 (0 or 5 mg/kg 30 min prior to each drinking session during test weeks. FSS selectively increased ethanol consumption in CIE mice, an effect that was abolished by LY2444296 pretreatment. In Experiment 3, CIE and CTL mice were administered one of four doses of U50,488 (0,1.25, 2.5, 5.0 mg/kg one hour prior to each daily drinking test (in lieu of FSS. All doses of U50,488 increased ethanol consumption in both CIE and CTL mice. The U50,488-induced increase in drinking was

  15. Chronic enteropathy and feeding in children: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Silvia; Hauser, Bruno; Devreker, Thierry; Arrigo, Serena; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2008-01-01

    Enteropathy defines abnormalities of the small intestinal mucosa of various etiologies in which nutrition has a causal or a therapeutic role. Breast milk is the gold-standard feeding during infancy for optimal nutrition in health and the majority of diseases. Therapeutic formulae have decreased the need for enteral or parenteral support. Gastrointestinal infections are worldwide the most frequent cause of enteropathy by increasing mucosal permeability, local expression of costimulatory molecules allowing antigen penetration in the mucosa, and T-cell activation leading sometimes to disruption of oral tolerance. Concomitant malnutrition impairs not only the immunologic response but also the recovery of damaged mucosa with secondary intestinal and pancreatic enzymatic reductions. Optimal nutritional rehabilitation is the cornerstone of the management of persisting diarrhea. Celiac disease and cow's milk protein allergy are examples of chronic enteropathy. Multiple food allergies, even during breast-feeding, are increasingly reported due to an impaired development of oral tolerance. The dietary approach to allergic disease is currently evolving from passive allergen avoidance to active modulation of the immune system to (re)establish tolerance. The gastrointestinal flora provides maturational signals for the lymphoid tissue, improves balance of inflammatory cytokines, reduces bacterial invasiveness and dietary antigen load, and normalizes gut permeability. The clinical effects of nucleotides and zinc merit further clinical evaluation. Major attention has recently focused on the immune effects of dietary lipids in terms of possible prevention of allergic sensitization by downregulating inflammatory response and protecting the epithelial barrier and host-microbe interactions modifying the adherence of microbes to the mucosa.

  16. Periodontal inflammation induced by chronic ethanol consumption in ovariectomized rats

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The immune system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. The host may modulate periodontal inflammatory reactions and it determines variances in the individual susceptibility and in the periodontal disease progression speed. Osteoporosis and alcoholism are described as risk indicators of periodontal disease among the systemic acquired factors. Objective: The current study aims to analyze chronic alcohol consumption influence on induced periodontitis in rats prese...

  17. Ganoderma Lucidum Pharmacopuncture for Teating Ethanol-induced Chronic Gastric Ulcers in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Heung Park

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The stomach is a sensitive digestive organ that is susceptible to exogenous pathogens from the diet. In response to such pathogens, the stomach induces oxidative stress, which might be related to the development of both gastric organic disorders such as gastritis, gastric ulcers, and gastric cancer, and functional disorders such as functional dyspepsia. This study was accomplished to investigate the effect of Ganoderma lucidum pharmacopuncture (GLP on chronic gastric ulcers in rats. Methods: The rats were divided into 4 groups of 8 animals each: the normal, the control, the normal saline (NP and the GLP groups. In this study, the modified ethanol gastritis model was used. The rats were administrated 56% ethanol orally every other day. The dose of ethanol was 8 g/kg body weight. The normal group received the same amount of normal saline instead of ethanol. The NP and the GLP groups were treated with injection of saline and GLP respectively. The control group received no treatment. Two local acupoints CV12 (中脘 and ST36 (足三里 were used. All laboratory rats underwent treatment for 15 days. On last day, the rats were sacrificed and their stomachs were immediately excised. Results: Ulcers of the gastric mucosa appeared as elongated bands of hemorrhagic lesions parallel to the long axis of the stomach. In the NP and GLP groups, the injuries to the gastric mucosal injuries were not as severe as they were in the control group. Wound healings of the chronic gastric ulcers was promoted by using GLP and significant alterations of the indices in the gastric mucosa were observed. Such protection was demonstrated by gross appearance, histology and immunehistochemistry staining for Bcl-2-associated X (BAX, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 and Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1. Conclusion: These results suggest that GLP at CV12 and ST36 can provide significant protection to the gastric mucosa against an ethanol induced chronic gastric ulcer.

  18. Chronic ethanol exposure produces time- and brain region-dependent changes in gene coexpression networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Osterndorff-Kahanek

    Full Text Available Repeated ethanol exposure and withdrawal in mice increases voluntary drinking and represents an animal model of physical dependence. We examined time- and brain region-dependent changes in gene coexpression networks in amygdala (AMY, nucleus accumbens (NAC, prefrontal cortex (PFC, and liver after four weekly cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE vapor exposure in C57BL/6J mice. Microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles at 0-, 8-, and 120-hours following the last ethanol exposure. Each brain region exhibited a large number of differentially expressed genes (2,000-3,000 at the 0- and 8-hour time points, but fewer changes were detected at the 120-hour time point (400-600. Within each region, there was little gene overlap across time (~20%. All brain regions were significantly enriched with differentially expressed immune-related genes at the 8-hour time point. Weighted gene correlation network analysis identified modules that were highly enriched with differentially expressed genes at the 0- and 8-hour time points with virtually no enrichment at 120 hours. Modules enriched for both ethanol-responsive and cell-specific genes were identified in each brain region. These results indicate that chronic alcohol exposure causes global 'rewiring' of coexpression systems involving glial and immune signaling as well as neuronal genes.

  19. Increased anxiety, voluntary alcohol consumption and ethanol-induced place preference in mice following chronic psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahi, Amine

    2013-07-01

    Stress exposure is known to be a risk factor for alcohol use and anxiety disorders. Comorbid chronic stress and alcohol dependence may lead to a complicated and potentially severe treatment profile. To gain an understanding of the interaction between chronic psychosocial stress and drug exposure, we studied the effects of concomitant chronic stress exposure on alcohol reward using two-bottle choice and ethanol-conditioned place preference (CPP). The study consisted of exposure of the chronic subordinate colony (CSC) mice "intruders" to an aggressive "resident" mouse for 19 consecutive days. Control mice were single housed (SHC). Ethanol consumption using two-bottle choice paradigm and ethanol CPP acquisition was assessed at the end of this time period. As expected, CSC exposure increased anxiety-like behavior and reduced weight gain as compared to SHC controls. Importantly, in the two-bottle choice procedure, CSC mice showed higher alcohol intake than SHC. When testing their response to ethanol-induced CPP, CSC mice achieved higher preference for the ethanol-paired chamber. In fact, CSC exposure increased ethanol-CPP acquisition. Taken together, these data demonstrate the long-term consequences of chronic psychosocial stress on alcohol intake in male mice, suggesting chronic stress as a risk factor for developing alcohol consumption and/or anxiety disorders.

  20. Chronic psychosocial stress causes delayed extinction and exacerbates reinstatement of ethanol-induced conditioned place preference in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bahi, Amine; Dreyer, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Here, we examined the impact of chronic subordinate colony (CSC) exposure on EtOH-CPP extinction, as well as ethanol-induced reinstatement of CPP.Methods: Mice were conditioned with saline or 1.5 g/kg ethanol and were tested in the EtOH-CPP model. In the first experiment, the mice were subjected to 19 days of chronic stress, and EtOH-CPP extinction was assessed during seven daily trials without ethanol injection. In the second experiment and after the EtOH-CPP test, the mice were s...

  1. Camellia sinensis (L. Kuntze Extract Ameliorates Chronic Ethanol-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Albino Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Lodhi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective effects of aqueous extract of Camellia sinensis or green tea extract (AQGTE in chronic ethanol-induced albino rats. All animals were divided into 4 groups in the study for a 5-week duration. 50% ethanol was given orally to the rats with two doses (5 mg/kg bw and 10 mg/kg bw of AQGTE. Ethanol administration caused a significant increase in the levels of plasma and serum enzymatic markers, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP, and nonenzymatic markers (cholesterol and triglycerides, lipid peroxidation contents, malondialdehyde (MDA, and glutathione-S-transferase (GST, and decreased the activities of total proteins, albumin, and cellular antioxidant defense enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD. The elevation and reduction in these biochemical enzymes caused the damage in hepatocytes histologically due to the high production of ROS, which retards the antioxidant defense capacity of cell. AQGTE was capable of recovering the level of these markers and the damaged hepatocytes to their normal structures. These results support the suggestion that AQGTE was able to enhance hepatoprotective and antioxidant effects in vivo against ethanol-induced toxicity.

  2. Effects of ethanol on social avoidance induced by chronic social defeat stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favoretto, Cristiane A; Macedo, Giovana C; Quadros, Isabel M H

    2017-01-01

    In rodents, chronic social defeat stress promotes deficits in social interest and social interaction. We further explored these antisocial effects by comparing the consequences of two different defeat stress protocols (episodic vs. continuous stress) in a social investigation test. We expected that continuous, but not episodic, stress would induce social deficits in this model. Furthermore, we tested whether a potentially anxiolytic dose of ethanol reverses social deficits induced by defeat stress. Male Swiss mice were exposed to a 10-day social defeat protocol, using daily confrontations with an aggressive resident mouse. Episodic stress consisted of brief defeat episodes, after which the defeated mouse was returned to its home cage, until the next defeat 24 h later (n = 7-11/group). For continuous stress, similar defeat episodes were followed by cohabitation with the aggressive resident for 24 h, separated by a perforated divider, until the following defeat (n = 8-14/group). Eight days after stress termination, defeated and control mice were assessed in a social investigation test, after treatment with ethanol (1.0 g/kg, i.p.) or 0.9% saline. Considering the time spent investigating a social target, mice exposed to episodic or continuous social stress showed less social investigation than controls (p stress or ethanol. Thus, a history of social defeat stress, whether episodic or continuous, promotes deficits in social investigation that were not reversed by acute treatment with ethanol.

  3. Time-Course Analysis of Brain Regional Expression Network Responses to Chronic Intermittent Ethanol and Withdrawal: Implications for Mechanisms Underlying Excessive Ethanol Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Maren L; Lopez, Marcelo F; Archer, Kellie J; Wolen, Aaron R; Becker, Howard C; Miles, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    Long lasting abusive consumption, dependence, and withdrawal are characteristic features of alcohol use disorders (AUD). Mechanistically, persistent changes in gene expression are hypothesized to contribute to brain adaptations leading to ethanol toxicity and AUD. We employed repeated chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure by vapor chamber as a mouse model to simulate the cycles of ethanol exposure and withdrawal commonly seen with AUD. This model has been shown to induce progressive ethanol consumption in rodents. Brain CIE-responsive expression networks were identified by microarray analysis across five regions of the mesolimbic dopamine system and extended amygdala with tissue harvested from 0-hours to 7-days following CIE. Weighted Gene Correlated Network Analysis (WGCNA) was used to identify gene networks over-represented for CIE-induced temporal expression changes across brain regions. Differential gene expression analysis showed that long-lasting gene regulation occurred 7-days after the final cycle of ethanol exposure only in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus. Across all brain regions, however, ethanol-responsive expression changes occurred mainly within the first 8-hours after removal from ethanol. Bioinformatics analysis showed that neuroinflammatory responses were seen across multiple brain regions at early time-points, whereas co-expression modules related to neuroplasticity, chromatin remodeling, and neurodevelopment were seen at later time-points and in specific brain regions (PFC or HPC). In PFC a module containing Bdnf was identified as highly CIE responsive in a biphasic manner, with peak changes at 0 hours and 5 days following CIE, suggesting a possible role in mechanisms underlying long-term molecular and behavioral response to CIE. Bioinformatics analysis of this network and several other modules identified Let-7 family microRNAs as potential regulators of gene expression changes induced by CIE. Our results suggest a complex temporal

  4. Time-Course Analysis of Brain Regional Expression Network Responses to Chronic Intermittent Ethanol and Withdrawal: Implications for Mechanisms Underlying Excessive Ethanol Consumption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren L Smith

    Full Text Available Long lasting abusive consumption, dependence, and withdrawal are characteristic features of alcohol use disorders (AUD. Mechanistically, persistent changes in gene expression are hypothesized to contribute to brain adaptations leading to ethanol toxicity and AUD. We employed repeated chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE exposure by vapor chamber as a mouse model to simulate the cycles of ethanol exposure and withdrawal commonly seen with AUD. This model has been shown to induce progressive ethanol consumption in rodents. Brain CIE-responsive expression networks were identified by microarray analysis across five regions of the mesolimbic dopamine system and extended amygdala with tissue harvested from 0-hours to 7-days following CIE. Weighted Gene Correlated Network Analysis (WGCNA was used to identify gene networks over-represented for CIE-induced temporal expression changes across brain regions. Differential gene expression analysis showed that long-lasting gene regulation occurred 7-days after the final cycle of ethanol exposure only in prefrontal cortex (PFC and hippocampus. Across all brain regions, however, ethanol-responsive expression changes occurred mainly within the first 8-hours after removal from ethanol. Bioinformatics analysis showed that neuroinflammatory responses were seen across multiple brain regions at early time-points, whereas co-expression modules related to neuroplasticity, chromatin remodeling, and neurodevelopment were seen at later time-points and in specific brain regions (PFC or HPC. In PFC a module containing Bdnf was identified as highly CIE responsive in a biphasic manner, with peak changes at 0 hours and 5 days following CIE, suggesting a possible role in mechanisms underlying long-term molecular and behavioral response to CIE. Bioinformatics analysis of this network and several other modules identified Let-7 family microRNAs as potential regulators of gene expression changes induced by CIE. Our results suggest a

  5. Effects of ethanol feeding on the activity and regulation of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guzman, M.; Geelen, M.J.H.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of ethanol administration on activity and regulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I) were studied in hepatocytes isolated from rats fed a liquid, high-fat diet containing 36% of total calories as ethanol or an isocaloric amount of sucrose. Cells were isolated at several time

  6. Upregulation of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptors in Dopamine D2 Receptor Knockout Mice Is Reversed by Chronic Forced Ethanol Consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K.; Gopez, V.; Delis, F.; Michaelides, M.; Grand, D.K.; Wang, G.-J.; Kunos, G.; Volkow, N.D.

    2011-01-01

    The anatomical proximity of the cannabinoid type 1 (CNR1/CB1R) and the dopamine D2 receptors (DRD2), their ability to form CB1R-DRD2 heteromers, their opposing roles in locomotion, and their involvement in ethanol's reinforcing and addictive properties prompted us to study the levels and distribution of CB1R after chronic ethanol intake, in the presence and absence of DRD2. We monitored the drinking patterns and locomotor activity of Drd2+/+ and Drd2-/- mice consuming either water or a 20% (v/v) ethanol solution (forced ethanol intake) for 6 months and used the selective CB1 receptor antagonist [{sup 3}H]SR141716A to quantify CB1R levels in different brain regions with in vitro receptor autoradiography. We found that the lack of DRD2 leads to a marked upregulation (approximately 2-fold increase) of CB1R in the cerebral cortex, the caudate-putamen, and the nucleus accumbens, which was reversed by chronic ethanol intake. The results suggest that DRD2-mediated dopaminergic neurotransmission and chronic ethanol intake exert an inhibitory effect on cannabinoid receptor expression in cortical and striatal regions implicated in the reinforcing and addictive properties of ethanol.

  7. Chronic methylphenidate exposure during adolescence reduces striatal synaptic responses to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Nicole A; Cody, Patrick A; Davis, Margaret I; Lovinger, David M; Mateo, Yolanda

    2014-02-01

    Dopamine (DA) plays an important role in integrative functions contributing to adaptive behaviors. In support of this essential function, DA modulates synaptic plasticity in different brain areas, including the striatum. Many drugs used for cognitive enhancement are psychostimulants, such as methylphenidate (MPH), which enhance DA levels. MPH treatment is of interest during adolescence, a period of enhanced neurodevelopment during which the DA system is in a state of flux. Recent epidemiological studies report the co-abuse of MPH and ethanol in adolescents and young adults. Although repeated MPH treatment produces enduring changes that affect subsequent behavioral responses to other psychostimulants, few studies have investigated the interactions between MPH and ethanol. Here we addressed whether chronic therapeutic exposure to MPH during adolescence predisposed mice to an altered response to ethanol and whether this was accompanied by altered DA release and striatal plasticity. C57BL/6J mice were administered MPH (3-6 mg/kg/day) via the drinking water between post-natal days 30 and 60. Voltammetry experiments showed that sufficient brain MPH concentrations were achieved during adolescence in mice to increase the DA clearance in adulthood. The treatment also increased long-term depression and reduced the effects of ethanol on striatal synaptic responses. Although the injection of 0.4 or 2 g/kg ethanol dose-dependently decreased locomotion in control mice, only the higher dose decreased locomotion in MPH-treated mice. These results suggested that the administration of MPH during development promoted long-term effects on synaptic plasticity in forebrain regions targeted by DA. These changes in plasticity might, in turn, underlie alterations in behaviors controlled by these brain regions into adulthood.

  8. Effects of six weeks of chronic ethanol administration on the behavioral outcome of rats after lateral fluid percussion brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Maki, A; Dhillon, H S; Barron, S; Clerici, W J; Hicks, R; Kraemer, P J; Butcher, J; Prasad, R M

    1999-03-01

    This study examined the effects of 6 weeks of chronic ethanol administration on the behavioral outcome in rats after lateral fluid percussion (FP) brain injury. Rats were given either an ethanol liquid diet (ethanol diet-groups) or a pair-fed isocaloric sucrose control diet (control diet groups) for 6 weeks. After 6 weeks, the ethanol diet was discontinued for the ethanol diet rats and they were then given the control sucrose diet for 2 days. During those 2 days, the rats were trained to perform a beam-walking task and subjected to either lateral FP brain injury of low to moderate severity (1.8 atm) or to sham operation. In both the control diet and the ethanol diet groups, lateral FP brain injury caused beam-walking impairment on days 1 and 2 and spatial learning disability on days 7 and 8 after brain injury. There were no significant differences in beam-walking performance and spatial learning disability between brain injured animals from the control and ethanol diet groups. However, a trend towards greater behavioral deficits was observed in brain injured animals in the ethanol diet group. Histologic analysis of both diet groups after behavioral assessment revealed comparable ipsilateral cortical damage and observable CA3 neuronal loss in the ipsilateral hippocampus. These results only suggest that chronic ethanol administration, longer than six weeks of administration, may worsen behavioral outcome following lateral FP brain injury. For more significant behavioral and/or morphological change to occur, we would suggest that the duration of chronic ethanol administration must be increased.

  9. Metabolic effects of feeding ethanol or propanol to postpartum transition Holstein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raun, Birgitte Marie Løvendahl; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2011-01-01

    concentrations of propanol and ethanol increased with PT and ET, respectively. Postpartum, alcohol intake increased 49% in PT and 34% in ET from 4 to 29 d in milk, respectively. Ruminal concentrations of the alcohols remained unaffected by DIM. Treatments did not affect total ruminal volatile fatty acid...... with increasing ruminal concentration of the respective alcohol. The portal release of alcohol accounted for 43 to 85% of ingested propanol and 36 to 57% of ingested ethanol. Hepatic uptake of propanol and ethanol equaled the net portal flux and no effect of treatment was detected for net splanchnic release...... of propanol and ethanol. In conclusion, ruminal metabolism is a major component of alcohol metabolism in dairy cows. The postpartum transition dairy cow has sufficient metabolic capacity to cope with high dietary concentrations of primary alcohols even when alcohol intake is abruptly increased at the day...

  10. Ethanol withdrawal is required to produce persisting N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-dependent hippocampal cytotoxicity during chronic intermittent ethanol exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Anna R.; Berry, B. Jennifer N.; Sharrett-Field, Lynda; Prendergast, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic intermittent ethanol consumption is associated with neurodegeneration and cognitive deficits in preclinical laboratory animals and in the clinical population. While previous work suggests a role for neuroadaptations in the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in the development of ethanol dependence and manifestation of withdrawal, the relative roles of ethanol exposure and ethanol withdrawal in producing these effects have not been fully characterized. To examine underlying cytotoxic mechanisms associated with CIE exposure, organotypic hippocampal slices were exposed to 1–3 cycles of ethanol (50 mM) in cell culture medium for 5 days, followed by 24-hours of ethanol withdrawal in which a portion of slices were exposed to competitive NMDA receptor antagonist (2R)-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV; 40 µM). Cytotoxicity was assessed using immunohistochemical labeling of neuron specific nuclear protein (NeuN; Fox-3), a marker of mature neurons, and thionine (2%) staining of Nissl bodies. Multiple cycles of CIE produced neurotoxicity, as reflected in persisting losses of neuron NeuN immunoreactivity and thionine staining in each of the primary cell layers of the hippocampal formation. Hippocampi aged in vitro were significantly more sensitive to the toxic effects of multiple CIEs than were non-aged hippocampi. This effect was not demonstrated in slices exposed to continuous ethanol, in the absence of withdrawal, or to a single exposure/withdrawal regimen. Exposure to APV significantly attenuated the cytotoxicity observed in the primary cell layers of the hippocampus. The present findings suggest that ethanol withdrawal is required to produce NMDA receptor-dependent hippocampal cytotoxicity, particularly in the aging hippocampus in vitro. PMID:25746220

  11. Oxidative damage and histopathological changes in lung of rat chronically exposed to nicotine alone or associated to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhouib, H; Jallouli, M; Draief, M; Bouraoui, S; El-Fazâa, S

    2015-12-01

    Smoking is the most important preventable risk factor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. This study was designed to investigate oxidative damage and histopathological changes in lung tissue of rats chronically exposed to nicotine alone or supplemented with ethanol. Twenty-four male Wistar rats divided into three groups were used for the study. The nicotine group received nicotine (2.5mg/kg/day); the nicotine-ethanol group was given simultaneously same dose of nicotine plus ethanol (0.2g/kg/day), while the control group was administered only normal saline (1 ml/kg/day). The treatment was administered by subcutaneous injection once daily for a period of 18 weeks. Chronic nicotine administration alone or combined to ethanol caused a significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) level, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and catalase (CAT) activity in lung tissue compared to control rats suggesting an oxidative damage. However, these increases were mostly prominent in nicotine group. The histopathological examination of lung tissue of rats in both treated groups revealed many alterations in the pulmonary structures such as emphysema change (disappearance of the alveolar septa, increased irregularity and size of air sacs) and marked lymphocytic infiltration in perivascular and interstitial areas. However, the changes characterized in the nicotine group (pulmonary congestion, hemorrhage into alveoli and interstitial areas, edema) were more drastic than those observed in the nicotine-ethanol group, and they can be attributed to a significant degree of capillary endothelial permeability and microvascular leak. Conversely, the ethanol supplementation caused an appearance of fatty change and fibrosis in pulmonary tissue essentially due to a metabolism of ethanol. Finally, the lung damage illustrated in nicotine group was more severe than that observed in the nicotine-ethanol group. We conclude that the combined administration of nicotine and ethanol

  12. Projection neurons in the cortex and hippocampus: differential effects of chronic khat and ethanol exposure in adult male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alele, Paul E; Matovu, Daniel; Imanirampa, Lawrence; Ajayi, Abayomi M; Kasule, Gyaviira T

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that many individuals who chew khat recreationally also drink ethanol to offset the stimulating effect of khat. The objective of this study was to describe the separate and interactive effects of chronic ethanol and khat exposure on key projection neurons in the cortex and hippocampus of young adult male rats. Methods Young adult male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into six treatment groups: 2 g/kg khat, 4 g/kg khat, 4 g/kg ethanol, combined khat and ethanol (4 g/kg each), a normal saline control, and an untreated group. Treatments were administered orally for 28 continuous days; brains were then harvested, sectioned, and routine hematoxylin–eosin staining was done. Following photomicrography, ImageJ® software captured data regarding neuron number and size. Results No differences occurred in counts of both granular and pyramidal projection neurons in the motor cortex and all four subfields of the hippocampal formation. Khat dose-dependently increased pyramidal neuron size in the motor cortex and the CA3 region, but had different effects on granular neuron size in the dentate gyrus and the motor cortex. Mean pyramidal neuron size for the ethanol-only treatment was larger than that for the 2 g/kg khat group, and the saline control group, in CA3 and in the motor cortex. Concomitant khat and ethanol increased granular neuron size in the motor cortex, compared to the 2 g/kg khat group, the 4 g/kg khat group, and the 4 g/kg ethanol group. In the CA3 region, the 4 g/kg ethanol group showed a larger mean pyramidal neuron size than the combined khat and ethanol group. Conclusion These results suggest that concomitant khat and ethanol exposure changes granular and pyramidal projection neuron sizes differentially in the motor cortex and hippocampus, compared to the effects of chronic exposure to these two drugs separately.

  13. Interactions between chronic ethanol consumption and thiamine deficiency on neural plasticity, spatial memory and cognitive flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedder, Lindsey C.; Hall, Joseph M.; Jabrouin, Kimberly R.; Savage, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many alcoholics display moderate to severe cognitive dysfunction accompanied by brain pathology. A factor confounded with prolonged heavy alcohol consumption is poor nutrition and many alcoholics are thiamine deficient. Thus, thiamine deficiency (TD) has emerged as a key factor underlying alcohol–related brain damage (ARBD). TD in humans can lead to Wernicke Encephalitis that can progress into Wernicke–Korsakoff Syndrome and these disorders have a high prevalence among alcoholics. Animal models are critical for determining the exact contributions of ethanol- and TD-induced neurotoxicity, as well as the interactions of those factors to brain and cognitive dysfunction. Methods Adult rats were randomly assigned to one of six treatment conditions: Chronic ethanol treatment (CET) where rats consumed a 20% v/v solution of ethanol over 6 months; Severe pyrithiamine-induced TD (PTD-MAS); Moderate PTD (PTD-EAS); Moderate PTD followed by CET (PTD-CET); Moderate PTD during CET (CET-PTD); Pair-fed control (PF). After recovery from treatment, all rats were tested on spontaneous alternation and attentional set-shifting. After behavioral testing, brains were harvested for determination of mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and thalamic pathology. Results Moderate TD combined with CET, regardless of treatment order, produced significant impairments in spatial memory, cognitive flexibility and reductions in brain plasticity as measured by BDNF levels in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. These alterations are greater than those seen in moderate TD alone and the synergistic effects of moderate TD with CET leads to a unique cognitive profile. However, CET did not exacerbate thalamic pathology seen after moderate TD. Conclusions These data support the emerging theory that subclinical TD during chronic heavy alcohol consumption is critical for the development of significant cognitive impairment associated with ARBD. PMID:26419807

  14. Cellulase production using biomass feed stock and its application in lignocellulose saccharification for bio-ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukumaran, Rajeev K.; Singhania, Reeta Rani; Mathew, Gincy Marina; Pandey, Ashok [Biotechnology Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, CSIR, Trivandrum-695 019 (India)

    2009-02-15

    A major constraint in the enzymatic saccharification of biomass for ethanol production is the cost of cellulase enzymes. Production cost of cellulases may be brought down by multifaceted approaches which include the use of cheap lignocellulosic substrates for fermentation production of the enzyme, and the use of cost efficient fermentation strategies like solid state fermentation (SSF). In the present study, cellulolytic enzymes for biomass hydrolysis were produced using solid state fermentation on wheat bran as substrate. Crude cellulase and a relatively glucose tolerant BGL were produced using fungi Trichoderma reesei RUT C30 and Aspergillus niger MTCC 7956, respectively. Saccharification of three different feed stock, i.e. sugar cane bagasse, rice straw and water hyacinth biomass was studied using the enzymes. Saccharification was performed with 50 FPU of cellulase and 10 U of {beta}-glucosidase per gram of pretreated biomass. Highest yield of reducing sugars (26.3 g/L) was obtained from rice straw followed by sugar cane bagasse (17.79 g/L). The enzymatic hydrolysate of rice straw was used as substrate for ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The yield of ethanol was 0.093 g per gram of pretreated rice straw. (author)

  15. Chronic ethanol exposure increases voluntary home cage intake in adult male, but not female, Long-Evans rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Melissa; McGinnis, Molly M; McCool, Brian A

    2015-12-01

    The current experiment examined the effects of 10 days of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure on anxiety-like behavior and home cage ethanol intake using a 20% intermittent access (M, W, F) paradigm in male and female Long-Evans rats. Withdrawal from alcohol dependence contributes to relapse in humans and increases in anxiety-like behavior and voluntary ethanol consumption in preclinical models. Our laboratory has shown that 10 days of CIE exposure produces both behavioral and neurophysiological alterations associated with withdrawal in male rats; however, we have yet to examine the effects of this exposure regime on ethanol intake in females. During baseline, females consumed more ethanol than males but, unlike males, did not show escalations in intake. Rats were then exposed to CIE and were again given intermittent access to 20% ethanol. CIE males increased their intake compared to baseline, whereas air-exposed males did not. Ethanol intake in females was unaffected by CIE exposure. Notably, both sexes expressed significantly elevated withdrawal-associated anxiety-like behavior in the plus maze. Finally, rats were injected with the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, SR141716A (0, 1, 3, 10mg/kg, i.p.) which reduced ethanol intake in both sexes. However, females appear to be more sensitive to lower doses of this CB1 receptor antagonist. Our results show that females consume more ethanol than males; however, they did not escalate their intake using the intermittent access paradigm. Unlike males, CIE exposure had no effect on drinking in females. It is possible that females may be less sensitive than males to ethanol-induced increases in drinking after a short CIE exposure. Lastly, our results demonstrate that males and females may have different pharmacological sensitivities to CB1 receptor blockade on ethanol intake, at least under the current conditions.

  16. Increased brain dopamine D4-like binding after chronic ethanol is not associated with behavioral sensitization in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadros, Isabel Marian Hartmann; Nobrega, Jose Nascimento; Hipolide, Debora Cristina; Souza-Formigoni, Maria Lucia Oliveira

    2005-10-01

    Dopaminergic D4 receptors have been hypothesized to be involved in neuropsychiatric disorders and substance abuse. In mice, repeated ethanol administration may induce behavioral sensitization, a phenomenon of increased sensitivity to the drug's stimulant properties. This study aimed to analyze brain D4 receptors binding in mice with different levels of behavioral sensitization to ethanol. Male Swiss mice received 2.2 g/kg ethanol (n = 64) or saline (n = 16) intraperitoneally daily for 21 days and were weekly tested for locomotor activity and for blood ethanol levels. According to the locomotor scores presented across test days, ethanol-treated mice were classified as "sensitized" or "nonsensitized." Twenty-four hours after the last administration, mice were sacrificed and brains were processed for autoradiography. Brain D4 binding was assessed by quantitative autoradiography using [3H]nemonapride + raclopride in three groups: saline-treated controls (n = 10), ethanol-sensitized (n = 11), and ethanol-nonsensitized (n = 9) mice. Both sensitized and nonsensitized mice showed higher D4 binding densities than saline-treated controls in the posterior caudate-putamen and the olfactory tubercle (p < .02), but only sensitized mice presented higher D4 binding than controls at the lateral septal nucleus (p < .02). However, there were no differences between sensitized and nonsensitized mice in any of the brain regions analyzed. Furthermore, sensitized and nonsensitized mice presented similar blood ethanol levels during the treatment. The higher D4 binding levels observed in both ethanol-treated subgroups (sensitized and nonsensitized) suggest that chronic ethanol treatment may induce upregulation of D4 receptors in specific brain regions. However, this mechanism does not seem to be associated with the differential ability to develop behavioral sensitization to ethanol in mice.

  17. Utilization of Feeding Tubes in the Management of Feline Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Sheri

    2016-11-01

    Esophagostomy feeding tubes are useful, and in many cases essential, for the comprehensive management of cats with moderate to advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). They should be considered a lifelong therapeutic appliance to facilitate the global management of cats with CKD thus providing improved therapeutic efficacy and quality-of-life. Esophagostomy tubes facilitate the maintenance of adequate hydration and increase owner compliance by facilitating the administration of medications. Finally, feeding tubes provide a means to deliver a stage-appropriate dietary prescription for cats with CKD and maintain an adequate nutritional plane in a patient that otherwise would be subject to chronic wasting.

  18. Chronic ethanol consumption increases the levels of chemerin in the serum and adipose tissue of humans and rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-zhen REN; Xu ZHANG; Jin XU; Hai-qing ZHANG; Chun-xiao YU; Ming-feng CAO; Ling GAO; Qing-bo GUAN; Jia-jun ZHAO

    2012-01-01

    Chemerin is a new adipokine involved in adipogenesis and insulin resistance.Since ethanol affects the insulin sensitivity that is closely associated with adipokines.The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ethanol on chemerin in humans and rats.Methods:In the human study,148 men who consumed alcohol for more than 3 years and 55 men who abstained from alcohol were included.Based on ethanol consumption per day,the drinkers were classified into 3 groups:low-dose (<15 g/d),middle-dose (15-47.9 g/d) and high-dose (≥48 g/d).Anthropometric measurementsand serum parameters were collected.In the rat study,27 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups administered water or ethanol (0.5,2.5,or 5 g·kg-1·d-1) for 22 weeks.The chemerin levels in the sera,visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and liver were measured using ELISA.Results:In the high-dose group of humans and middle- and high-dose groups of rats,chronic ethanol consumption significantly increased the serum chemerin level.Both the middle- and high-dose ethanol significantly increased the chemerin level in the VAT of rats.In humans,triglyceride,fasting glucose,insulin and HOMA-IR were independently associated with chemerin.In rats,the serum chemerin level was positively correlated with chemerin in the VAT after adjustments for the liver chemerin (r=+0.768).High-dose ethanol significantly increased the body fat in humans and the VAT in rats.Conclusion:Chronic ethanol consumption dose-dependently increases the chemerin levels in the serum and VAT.The serum chemerin level is associated with metabolic parameters in humans.The increased serum chemerin level is mainly attributed to an elevation of chemerin in the VAT after the ethanol treatment.

  19. Endogenous ethanol production in a patient with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinucci, Giulio; Guidetti, Mariacristina; Lanzoni, Elisabetta; Pironi, Loris

    2006-07-01

    The case of the gastrointestinal production of ethanol from Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a Caucasian man with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction is reported. The patient, who declared to have always abstained from alcohol, was hospitalized for abdominal pain, belching and mental confusion. The laboratory findings showed the presence of ethanol in the blood. Gastric juice and faecal microbiological cultures were positive for C. albicans and S. cerevisiae. At home, he was on oral antibiotic therapy with amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid for a small bowel bacterial overgrowth, associated with a simple sugar-rich diet. Twenty-four hours after stopping both the antibiotic therapy and the simple sugar-rich diet, the blood ethanol disappeared. A provocative test, performed by giving amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid associated with the simple sugar-rich diet was followed by the reappearance of ethanol in the blood. A review of the literature is reported.

  20. Proteomic analysis of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE modified proteins in liver mitochondria from chronic ethanol-fed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly K. Andringa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic ethanol-mediated oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation increases the levels of various reactive lipid species including 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE, which can subsequently modify proteins in the liver. It has been proposed that 4-HNE modification adversely affects the structure and/or function of mitochondrial proteins, thereby impairing mitochondrial metabolism. To determine whether chronic ethanol consumption increases levels of 4-HNE modified proteins in mitochondria, male rats were fed control and ethanol-containing diets for 5 weeks and mitochondrial samples were analyzed using complementary proteomic methods. Five protein bands (approx. 35, 45, 50, 70, and 90 kDa showed strong immunoreactivity for 4-HNE modified proteins in liver mitochondria from control and ethanol-fed rats when proteins were separated by standard 1D SDS-PAGE. Using high-resolution proteomic methods (2D IEF/SDS-PAGE and BN-PAGE we identified several mitochondrial proteins immunoreactive for 4-HNE, which included mitofilin, dimethylglycine dehydrogenase, choline dehydrogenase, electron transfer flavoprotein α, cytochrome c1, enoyl CoA hydratase, and cytochrome c. The electron transfer flavoprotein α consistently showed increased 4-HNE immunoreactivity in mitochondria from ethanol-fed rats as compared to mitochondria from the control group. Increased 4-HNE reactivity was also detected for dimethylglycine dehydrogenase, enoyl CoA hydratase, and cytochrome c in ethanol samples when mitochondria were analyzed by BN-PAGE. In summary, this work identifies new targets of 4-HNE modification in mitochondria and provides useful information needed to better understand the molecular mechanisms underpinning chronic ethanol-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and liver injury.

  1. Sub-chronic safety evaluation of the ethanol extract of Aralia elata leaves in Beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengjin; He, Xiaoli; Niu, Wenying; Feng, Yuenan; Bian, Jingqi; Kuang, Haixue; Xiao, Hongbin

    2016-08-01

    Aralia elata Seem. (A. elata) is a traditional Chinese medicine to treat some diseases. This investigation aims to evaluate the pharmaceutical safety of the ethanol extract of A. elata leaves, namely ethanol leaves extract (ELE), in Beagle dogs. In sub-chronic oral toxicity study, dogs were treated with the ELE at doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg for 12 weeks and followed by 4 weeks recovery period. During experimental period, clinical signs, mortality, body temperature, food consumption and body weight were recorded. Analysis of electrocardiogram, urinalysis, ophthalmoscopy, hematology, serum biochemistry, organ weights and histopathology were performed. The results showed that both food consumption and body weight significantly decreased in high-dose group. Treatment-related side effects and mortality were observed in high-dose female dogs. Some parameters showed significant alterations in electrocardiogram, urinalysis, serum biochemistry and relative organ weights. These alterations were not related to dose or consistent across gender, which were ascribed to incidental and biological variability. The findings in this study indicated that the no-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of the ELE was 100 mg/kg in dogs and provided a vital reference for selecting a safe application dosage for human consumption.

  2. A novel mouse model for the study of the inhibitory effects of chronic ethanol exposure on direct bone formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excessive alcohol consumption has been reported to interfere with human bone homeostasis and repair in multiple ways. Previous studies have demonstrated that chronic ethanol exposure in the rat via an intragastric dietary delivery system inhibits direct bone formation during distraction osteogenesis...

  3. Post-weaning environmental enrichment, but not chronic maternal isolation, enhanced ethanol intake during periadolescence and early adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Rocio Berardo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed ethanol intake in male and female Wistar rats exposed to maternal separation (MS during infancy (postnatal days 1-21, PD1-21 and environmental enrichment (EE during adolescence (PD 21-42. Previous work revealed that MS enhances ethanol consumption during adulthood. It is still unknown if a similar effect is found during adolescence. Several studies, in turn, have revealed that EE reverses stress experiences, and reduces ethanol consumption and reinforcement; although others reported greater ethanol intake after EE. The interactive effects between these treatments upon ethanol’s effects and intake have yet to be explored. We assessed chronic ethanol intake and preference (twelve two-bottle daily sessions, spread across 30 days, 1st session on PD46 in rats exposed to MS and EE. The main finding was that male – but not female – rats that had been exposed to EE consumed more ethanol than controls given standard housing, an effect that was not affected by MS. Subsequent experiments assessed several factors associated with heightened ethanol consumption in males exposed to MS and EE; namely taste aversive conditioning and hypnotic-sedative consequences of ethanol. We also measured anxiety response in the light-dark box and in the elevated plus maze tests; and exploratory patterns of novel stimuli and behaviors indicative of risk assessment and risk-taking, via a modified version of the concentric square field (CSF test. Aversive conditioning, hypnosis and sleep time were similar in males exposed or not to environmental enrichment. EE males, however, exhibited heightened exploration of novel stimuli and greater risk taking behaviors in the CSF test. It is likely that the promoting effect of EE upon ethanol intake was due to these effects upon exploratory and risk-taking behaviors.

  4. Repeated Cycles of Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure Increases Basal Glutamate in the Nucleus Accumbens of Mice without affecting glutamate transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Griffin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Repeated cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE exposure increase voluntary consumption of ethanol in mice. Previous work has shown that extracellular glutamate in the nucleus accumbens (NAc is significantly elevated in ethanol dependent mice and that pharmacologically manipulating glutamate concentrations in the NAc will alter ethanol drinking, indicating that glutamate homeostasis plays a crucial role in ethanol drinking in this model. The present studies were designed to measure extracellular glutamate at a time point in which mice would ordinarily be allowed voluntary access to ethanol in the CIE model and, additionally, to measure glutamate transport capacity in the NAc at the same time point. Extracellular glutamate was measured using quantitative microdialysis procedures. Glutamate transport capacity was measured under Na+ dependent and Na+ independent conditions to determine whether the function of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs; also known as system XAG or of system Xc- (Glial cysteine-glutamate exchanger was influenced by CIE exposure. The results of the quantitative microdialysis experiment confirm increased extracellular glutamate (~2 –fold in the NAc of CIE exposed mice (i.e. ethanol-dependent compared to non-dependent mice in the NAc, consistent with earlier work. However, the increase in extracellular glutamate was not due to altered transporter function in the NAc of ethanol-dependent mice, because neither Na+ dependent nor Na+ independent glutamate transport was significantly altered by CIE exposure. These findings point to the possibility that hyperexcitability of cortical-striatal pathways underlies the increases in extracellular glutamate found in the nucleus accumbens of ethanol-dependent mice.

  5. Chronic Social Stress and Ethanol Increase Expression of KLF11, a Cell Death Mediator, in Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Jeremy; Wang, Niping; Zhang, Xiao; Johnson, Shakevia; Harris, Sharonda; Zheng, Baoying; Zhang, Qinli; Rajkowska, Grazyna; Miguel-Hidalgo, Jose Javier; Sittman, Donald; Ou, Xiao-Ming; Stockmeier, Craig A; Wang, Jun Ming

    2015-07-01

    Major depressive disorder and alcoholism are significant health burdens that can affect executive functioning, cognitive ability, job responsibilities, and personal relationships. Studies in animal models related to depression or alcoholism reveal that the expression of Krüppel-like factor 11 (KLF11, also called TIEG2) is elevated in frontal cortex, which suggests that KLF11 may play a role in stress- or ethanol-induced psychiatric conditions. KLF11 is a transcriptional activator of monoamine oxidase A and B, but also serves other functions in cell cycle regulation and apoptotic cell death. In the present study, immunohistochemistry was used to quantify intensity of nuclear KLF11, combined with an unbiased stereological approach to assess nuclei in fronto-limbic, limbic, and other brain regions of rats exposed chronically to social defeat or ethanol. KLF11 immunoreactivity was increased significantly in the medial prefrontal cortex, frontal cortex, and hippocampus of both stressed rats and rats fed ethanol. However, expression of KLF11 protein was not significantly affected in the thalamus, hypothalamus, or amygdala in either treatment group compared to respective control rats. Triple-label immunofluorescence revealed that KLF11 protein was localized in nuclei of neurons and astrocytes. KLF11 was also co-localized with the immunoreactivity of cleaved caspase-3. In addition, Western blot analysis revealed a significant reduction in anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-xL, but an increase of caspase-3 expression in the frontal cortex of ethanol-treated rats compared to ethanol-preferring controls. Thus, KLF11 protein is up-regulated following chronic exposure to stress or ethanol in a region-specific manner and may contribute to pro-apoptotic signaling in ethanol-treated rats. Further investigation into the KLF11 signaling cascade as a mechanism for neurotoxicity and cell death in depression and alcoholism may provide novel pharmacological targets to lessen brain damage and

  6. Chronic loss of melanin-concentrating hormone affects motivational aspects of feeding in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joram D Mul

    Full Text Available Current epidemic obesity levels apply great medical and financial pressure to the strenuous economy of obesity-prone cultures, and neuropeptides involved in body weight regulation are regarded as attractive targets for a possible treatment of obesity in humans. The lateral hypothalamus and the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh form a hypothalamic-limbic neuropeptide feeding circuit mediated by Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH. MCH promotes feeding behavior via MCH receptor-1 (MCH1R in the AcbSh, although this relationship has not been fully characterized. Given the AcbSh mediates reinforcing properties of food, we hypothesized that MCH modulates motivational aspects of feeding.Here we show that chronic loss of the rat MCH-precursor Pmch decreased food intake predominantly via a reduction in meal size during rat development and reduced high-fat food-reinforced operant responding in adult rats. Moreover, acute AcbSh administration of Neuropeptide-GE and Neuropeptide-EI (NEI, both additional neuropeptides derived from Pmch, or chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of NEI, did not affect feeding behavior in adult pmch(+/+ or pmch(-/- rats. However, acute administration of MCH to the AcbSh of adult pmch(-/- rats elevated feeding behavior towards wild type levels. Finally, adult pmch(-/- rats showed increased ex vivo electrically evoked dopamine release and increased limbic dopamine transporter levels, indicating that chronic loss of Pmch in the rat affects the limbic dopamine system.Our findings support the MCH-MCH1R system as an amplifier of consummatory behavior, confirming this system as a possible target for the treatment of obesity. We propose that MCH-mediated signaling in the AcbSh positively mediates motivational aspects of feeding behavior. Thereby it provides a crucial signal by which hypothalamic neural circuits control energy balance and guide limbic brain areas to enhance motivational or incentive-related aspects of food consumption.

  7. Chronic intermittent ethanol induced axon and myelin degeneration is attenuated by calpain inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samantaray, Supriti; Knaryan, Varduhi H; Patel, Kaushal S; Mulholland, Patrick J; Becker, Howard C; Banik, Naren L

    2015-10-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption causes multifaceted damage to the central nervous system (CNS), underlying mechanisms of which are gradually being unraveled. In our previous studies, activation of calpain, a calcium-activated neutral protease has been found to cause detrimental alterations in spinal motor neurons following ethanol (EtOH) exposure in vitro. However, it is not known whether calpain plays a pivotal role in chronic EtOH exposure-induced structural damage to CNS in vivo. To test the possible involvement of calpain in EtOH-associated neurodegenerative mechanisms the present investigation was conducted in a well-established mouse model of alcohol dependence - chronic intermittent EtOH (CIE) exposure and withdrawal. Our studies indicated significant loss of axonal proteins (neurofilament light and heavy, 50-60%), myelin proteins (myelin basic protein, 20-40% proteolipid protein, 25%) and enzyme (2', 3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, 21-55%) following CIE in multiple regions of brain including hippocampus, corpus callosum, cerebellum, and importantly in spinal cord. These CIE-induced deleterious effects escalated after withdrawal in each CNS region tested. Increased expression and activity of calpain along with enhanced ratio of active calpain to calpastatin (sole endogenous inhibitor) was observed after withdrawal compared to EtOH exposure. Pharmacological inhibition of calpain with calpeptin (25 μg/kg) prior to each EtOH vapor inhalation significantly attenuated damage to axons and myelin as demonstrated by immuno-profiles of axonal and myelin proteins, and Luxol Fast Blue staining. Calpain inhibition significantly protected the ultrastructural integrity of axons and myelin compared to control as confirmed by electron microscopy. Together, these findings confirm CIE exposure and withdrawal induced structural alterations in axons and myelin, predominantly after withdrawal and corroborate calpain inhibition as a potential protective strategy against

  8. Reversing gastric mucosal alterations during ethanol-induced chronic gastritis in rats by oral administration of Opuntia ficus- indica mucilage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ricardo Vázquez-Ramírez; Marisela Olguín-Martínez; Carlos Kubli-Garfias; Rolando Hernández-Mu(n)oz

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of mucilage obtained from cladodes of Opuntia ficus-indica (Cactaceae) on the healing of ethanol-induced gastritis in rats.METHODS: Chronic gastric mucosa injury was treated with mucilage (5 mg/kg per day) after it was induced by ethanol. Lipid composition, activity of 5'-nucleotidase (a membrane-associated ectoenzyme) and cytosolic activities of lactate and alcohol dehydrogenases in the plasma membrane of gastric mucosa were determined.Histological studies of gastric samples from the experimental groups were included.RESULTS: Ethanol elicited the histological profile of gastritis characterized by loss of the surface epithelium and infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.Phosphatidylcholine (PC) decreased and cholesterol content increased in plasma membranes of the gastric mucosa. In addition, cytosolic activity increased while the activity of alcohol dehydrogenases decreased. The administration of mucilage promptly corrected these enzymatic changes. In fact, mucilage readily accelerated restoration of the ethanol-induced histological alterations and the disturbances in plasma membranes of gastric mucosa, showing a univocal anti-inflammatory effect.The activity of 5'-nucleotidase correlated with the changes in lipid composition and the fluidity of gastric mucosal plasma membranes.CONCLUSION: The beneficial action of mucilage seems correlated with stabilization of plasma membranes of damaged gastric mucosa. Molecular interactions between mucilage monosaccharides and membrane phospholipids,mainly PC and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), may be the relevant features responsible for changing activities of membrane-attached proteins during the healing process after chronic gastric mucosal damage.

  9. Betaine Treatment Attenuates Chronic Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Steatosis and Alterations to the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusum K. Kharbanda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mitochondrial damage and disruption in oxidative phosphorylation contributes to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that the hepatoprotective actions of betaine against alcoholic liver injury occur at the level of the mitochondrial proteome. Methods. Male Wister rats were pair-fed control or ethanol-containing liquid diets supplemented with or without betaine (10 mg/mL for 4-5 wks. Liver was examined for triglyceride accumulation, levels of methionine cycle metabolites, and alterations in mitochondrial proteins. Results. Chronic ethanol ingestion resulted in triglyceride accumulation which was attenuated in the ethanol plus betaine group. Blue native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE revealed significant decreases in the content of the intact oxidative phosphorylation complexes in mitochondria from ethanol-fed animals. The alcohol-dependent loss in many of the low molecular weight oxidative phosphorylation proteins was prevented by betaine supplementation. This protection by betaine was associated with normalization of SAM : S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH ratios and the attenuation of the ethanol-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide generation in the liver. Discussion/Conclusion. In summary, betaine attenuates alcoholic steatosis and alterations to the oxidative phosphorylation system. Therefore, preservation of mitochondrial function may be another key molecular mechanism responsible for betaine hepatoprotection.

  10. Three months of chronic ethanol administration and the behavioral outcome of rats after lateral fluid percussion brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, J; Billings, B; Dhillon, H S; Mace, D; Hicks, R; Barron, S; Kraemer, P J; Dendle, P; Prasad, R M

    2000-05-01

    This study examined the effects of 3 months of chronic ethanol administration (CEAn) on the behavioral outcome in rats after lateral fluid percussion (FP) brain injury. Rats were given either an ethanol liquid diet (ethanol diet groups) or a pair-fed isocaloric sucrose control diet (control diet groups) for 3 months. Then, rats from both diet groups were subjected to either lateral FP brain injury of moderate severity (1.8 atm) or to sham operation. Postinjury behavioral measurements revealed that brain injury caused significant spatial learning disability in both diet groups. There were no significant differences in spatial learning ability in the sham or brain-injured animals between the control and ethanol diets. However, a trend towards cognitive impairment in the sham animals and a trend towards reduced deficits in the brain-injured animals were observed in the ethanol diet group. Histologic analysis of injured animals from both diet groups revealed similar extents of ipsilateral cortical and hippocampal CA3 damage. These results, in general, suggest that 3 months of CEAn does not significantly alter the behavioral and morphologic outcome of experimental brain injury.

  11. High acetone-butanol-ethanol production in pH-stat co-feeding of acetate and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Wang, Qunhui; Sakai, Kenji; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported the metabolic analysis of butanol and acetone production from exogenous acetate by (13)C tracer experiments (Gao et al., RSC Adv., 5, 8486-8495, 2015). To clarify the influence of acetate on acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production, we first performed an enzyme assay in Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. Acetate addition was found to drastically increase the activities of key enzymes involved in the acetate uptake (phosphate acetyltransferase and CoA transferase), acetone formation (acetoacetate decarboxylase), and butanol formation (butanol dehydrogenase) pathways. Subsequently, supplementation of acetate during acidogenesis and early solventogenesis resulted in a significant increase in ABE production. To establish an efficient ABE production system using acetate as a co-substrate, several shot strategies were investigated in batch culture. Batch cultures with two substrate shots without pH control produced 14.20 g/L butanol and 23.27 g/L ABE with a maximum specific butanol production rate of 0.26 g/(g h). Furthermore, pH-controlled (at pH 5.5) batch cultures with two substrate shots resulted in not only improved acetate consumption but also a further increase in ABE production. Finally, we obtained 15.13 g/L butanol and 24.37 g/L ABE at the high specific butanol production rate of 0.34 g/(g h) using pH-stat co-feeding method. Thus, in this study, we established a high ABE production system using glucose and acetate as co-substrates in a pH-stat co-feeding system with C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4.

  12. Changes of phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein in rat nucleus accumbens after chronic ethanol intake: naloxone reversal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIJing; LIYue-Hua; YUANXiao-Ru

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the changes in the expression and phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein(CREB) in the rat nucleus accumbens after chronic ethanol intake and its withdrawal. METHODS: Ethanol wasgiven in drinking water at the concentration of 6 % (v/v), for one month. Changes in the levels of CREB andphospho-CREB (p-CREB) protein in the nucleus accumbens were measured by immunohistochemistry methods.RESULTS: Ethanol given to rats in drinking water decreased the level of p-CREB protein in the nucleus accumbens(-75 %) at the time of exposure to ethanol. The decrement of p-CREB protein in the nucleus accumbens remainedat 24 h (-35 %) and 72 h (-28 %) of ethanol withdrawal, which recovered toward control level after 7 d of ethanolwithdrawal. However, chronic ethanol, as well as ethanol withdrawal failed to produce any significant alteration inthe level of CREB protein in the nucleus accumbens. Naloxone (alone) treatment of rats had no effect on the levelsof CREB and p-CREB protein in the nucleus accumbens. However, when naloxone was administered concurrentlywith ethanol treatment, it antagonized the down-regulation of p-CREB protein in the nucleus accumbens (142 %) ofrats exposed to ethanol. CONCLUSION: A long-term intake of ethanol solution down-regulates the phosphoryla-tion of CREB in the nucleus accumbens, and those changes can be reversed by naloxone, which may be one kindof the molecular mechanisms associated with ethano1 dependence.

  13. Chronic ethanol intake-induced changes in open-field behavior and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Ⅳ expression in nucleus accumbens of rats: naloxone reversal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LI; Wei-liang BIAN; Gui-qin XIE; Sheng-zhong CUI; Mei-ling WU; Yue-hua LI; Ling-li QUE; Xiao-ru YUAN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of chronic ethanol intake on the locomotor activity and the levels of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Ⅳ (CaM kinase Ⅳ) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of rats. Simultaneously, the effects of non-selective opioid antagonist (naloxone) on the CaM kinase Ⅳ expression in the NAc and ethanol consumption of rats were also observed. Methods: Ethanol was administered in drinking water at the concentrations of 6% (v/v), for 28 d. The locomotor activity of rats was investigated in the open-field apparatus. CaM kinase Ⅳ levels in the NAc were analyzed using Western blotting. Results: Rats consuming ethanol solution exhibited a significant decrease of ambulation activity, accompanied by a reduced frequency of explorative rearing in an open-field task on d 7 and d 14 of chronic ethanol ingestion, whereas presumed adaptation to the neurological effects of ethanol was observed on d 28. Chronic ethanol intake elicited a significant decrease of the CaM kinase Ⅳ expression in the nuclei, but not in the cytoplasm of the NAc on d 28. Naloxone treatment significantly attenu-ated ethanol intake of rats and antagonized the decrease of CaM kinase Ⅳ in the nuclei of NAc neurons. The cytosolic CaM kinase Ⅳ protein levels of the NAc also increased in rats exposed to ethanol plus naloxone. Conclusion: Chronic ethanol intake-induced changes in explorative behavior is mediated at least partly by changes in CaM kinase Ⅳ signaling in the nuclei of the NAc, and naloxone attenuates ethanol consumption through antagonizing the downregulation of CaM kinase Ⅳ in the NAc.

  14. Emotionality modulates the effect of chronic stress on feeding behaviour in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélique Favreau-Peigné

    Full Text Available Chronic stress is a long-lasting negative emotional state that induces negative consequences on animals' psycho-physiological state. This study aimed at assessing whether unpredictable and repeated negative stimuli (URNS influence feeding behaviour in quail. Sixty-four quail were exposed to URNS from day 17 to 40, while 64 quail were undisturbed. Two lines divergently selected on their inherent emotionality were used to assess the effect of genetic factors on the sensitivity to URNS. All quail were submitted to a sequential feeding procedure (using two diets of different energetic values which placed them in a contrasting situation. Behavioural tests were performed to assess the emotional reactivity of the two lines. Results confirmed that differences exist between them and that their emotional reactivity was enhanced by URNS. Diet preferences, motivation and daily intake were also measured. URNS did not change the preferences for the hypercaloric diet compared to the hypocaloric diet in choice tests, but they reduced daily intakes in both lines. Motivations for each diet were differently affected by URNS: they decreased the motivation to eat the hypercaloric diet in quail selected for their low inherent fearfulness whereas they increased the motivation to eat the hypocaloric diet in quail selected for their high inherent fearfulness, which suggested a devaluation process in the former and a compensatory behaviour in the later. Growth was furthermore reduced and laying delayed by URNS in both lines. In conclusion, the exposure to URNS induced interesting changes in feeding behaviour added with an increase in emotional reactivity and an alteration of production parameters. This confirms that both lines of quail experienced a chronic stress state. However differences in feed motivation and emotional reactivity between lines under chronic stress suggested that they experienced different emotional state and use different ways to cope with it

  15. Disruptions in Serotonergic Regulation of Cortical Glutamate Release in Primate Insular Cortex in Response to Chronic Ethanol and Nursery Rearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Georgia M.; Graef, John D.; Hammarback, James A.; Nordskog, Brian K.; Burnett, Elizabeth J.; Daunais, James B.; Bennett, Allyson J.; Friedman, David P.; Suomi, Stephen J.; Godwin, Dwayne W.

    2015-01-01

    Early-life stress has been shown to increase susceptibility to anxiety and substance abuse. Disrupted activity within the anterior insular cortex (AIC) has been shown to play a role in both of these disorders. Altered serotonergic processing is implicated in controlling the activity levels of the associated cognitive networks. We therefore investigated changes in both serotonin receptor expression and glutamatergic synaptic activity in the AIC of alcohol-drinking rhesus monkeys. We studied tissues from male rhesus monkeys raised under two conditions: Male rhesus monkeys 1) “Mother reared” (MR) by adult females (n=9), or; 2) “Nursery reared” (NR), i.e., separated from their mothers and reared as a separate group under surrogate/peer-reared conditions (n=9). The NR condition represents a long-standing and well-validated nonhuman primate model of early life stress. All monkeys were trained to self-administer ethanol (4% w/v) or an isocaloric maltose-dextrin control solution. Subsets from each rearing condition were then given daily access to either ethanol, water or maltose dextrin for 12 months. Tissues were collected at necropsy and were further analyzed. Using real time RT-PCR we found that ethanol-naïve, NR monkeys had lower AIC levels of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor mRNA compared to ethanol-naïve, MR animals. While NR monkeys consumed more ethanol over the 12-month period compared to MR animals, both MR and NR animals expressed greater 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor mRNA levels following chronic alcohol self-administration. The interaction between nursery-rearing conditions and alcohol consumption resulted in a significant enhancement of both 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor mRNA levels such that lower expression levels observed in nursery rearing conditions were not found in the alcohol self-administration group. Using voltage clamp recordings in the whole cell configuration we recorded excitatory postsynaptic currents in both ethanol-naïve and chronic self

  16. Time-dependent effect of ethanol force-feeding on glycogen repletion: NMR evidence of a link with ATP turnover in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvieux, Marie-Christine; Gin, Henri; Roumes, Hélène; Kassem, Cendrella; Couzigou, Patrice; Gallis, Jean-Louis

    2015-09-01

    The purpose was to study the hepatic effects of low-dose ethanol on the links between ATP and glycogen production. Fasted male Wistar rats received a single force-feeding of glucose plus ethanol or isocaloric glucose. At different times after force-feeding (0-10 h), glycogen repletion and ATP characteristics (content, apparent catalytic time constant, mitochondrial turnover) were monitored by (13)C- or (31)P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in perfused and isolated liver. In vivo glycogen repletion after force-feeding was slower after glucose plus ethanol vs. glucose (12.04 ± 0.68 and 8.50 ± 0.86 μmol/h/g liver wet weight [ww], respectively), reaching a maximum at the 6th hour. From the 3rd to the 8th hour, glycogen content was lower after glucose plus ethanol vs. glucose. After glucose plus ethanol, the correlation between glycogen and ATP contents presented two linear steps: before and after the 3rd hour (30 and 102 μmol glycogen/g ww per μmol ATP/g ww, respectively, the latter being near the single step measured in glucose). After glucose plus ethanol, ATP turnover remained stable for 2 h, was 3-fold higher from the 3rd hour to the 8th hour, and was higher than after glucose (2.59 ± 0.45 and 1.39 ± 0.19 μmol/min/g ww, respectively). In the 1st hour, glucose plus ethanol induced a transient acidosis and an increase in the phosphomonoesters signal. In conclusion, after ethanol consumption, a large part of the ATP production was diverted to redox re-equilibrium during the first 2 h, thereby reducing the glycogen synthesis. Thereafter, the maintenance of a large oxidative phosphorylation allowed the stimulation of glycogen synthesis requiring ATP.

  17. Alternative Splicing of AMPA subunits in Prefrontal Cortical Fields of Cynomolgus Monkeys following Chronic Ethanol Self-Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen eAcosta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional impairment of the orbital and medial prefrontal cortex underlies deficits in executive control that characterize addictive disorders, including alcohol addiction. Previous studies indicate that alcohol alters glutamate neurotransmission and one substrate of these effects may be through the reconfiguration of the subunits constituting ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR complexes. Glutamatergic transmission is integral to cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical communication and alcohol-induced changes in the abundance of the receptor subunits and/or their splice variants may result in critical functional impairments of prefrontal cortex in alcohol dependence. To this end, the effects of chronic ethanol self-administration on glutamate receptor ionotropic AMPA (GRIA subunit variant and kainate (GRIK subunit mRNA expression were studied in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC of male cynomolgus monkeys. In DLPFC, total AMPA splice variant expression and total kainate receptor subunit expression were significantly decreased in alcohol drinking monkeys. Expression levels of GRIA3 flip and flop and GRIA4 flop mRNAs in this region were positively correlated with daily ethanol intake and blood ethanol concentrations averaged over the six months prior to necropsy. In OFC, AMPA subunit splice variant expression was reduced in the alcohol treated group. GRIA2 flop mRNA levels in this region were positively correlated with daily ethanol intake and blood ethanol concentrations averaged over the six months prior to necropsy. Results from these studies provide further evidence of transcriptional regulation of iGluR subunits in the primate brain following chronic alcohol self-administration. Additional studies examining the cellular localization of such effects in the framework of primate prefrontal cortical circuitry are warranted.

  18. Chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence through early adulthood in female rats induces emotional and memory deficits associated with morphological and molecular alterations in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana Ca; Pereira, Maria Cs; Santana, Luana N da Silva; Fernandes, Rafael M; Teixeira, Francisco B; Oliveira, Gedeão B; Fernandes, Luanna Mp; Fontes-Júnior, Enéas A; Prediger, Rui D; Crespo-López, Maria E; Gomes-Leal, Walace; Lima, Rafael R; Maia, Cristiane do Socorro Ferraz

    2015-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that heavy ethanol exposure in early life may produce long-lasting neurobehavioral consequences, since brain structural maturation continues until adolescence. It is well established that females are more susceptible to alcohol-induced neurotoxicity and that ethanol consumption is increasing among women, especially during adolescence. In the present study, we investigated whether chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence through early adulthood in female rats may induce hippocampal histological damage and neurobehavioral impairments. Female rats were treated with distilled water or ethanol (6.5 g/kg/day, 22.5% w/v) by gavage from the 35(th)-90(th) day of life. Ethanol-exposed animals displayed reduced exploration of the central area and increased number of fecal boluses in the open field test indicative of anxiogenic responses. Moreover, chronic high ethanol exposure during adolescence induced marked impairments on short-term memory of female rats addressed on social recognition and step-down inhibitory avoidance tasks. These neurobehavioral deficits induced by ethanol exposure during adolescence through early adulthood were accompanied by the reduction of hippocampal formation volume as well as the loss of neurons, astrocytes and microglia cells in the hippocampus. These results indicate that chronic high ethanol exposure during adolescence through early adulthood in female rats induces long-lasting emotional and memory deficits associated with morphological and molecular alterations in the hippocampus.

  19. Action of metadoxine on isolated human and rat alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases. Effect on enzymes in chronic ethanol-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parés, X; Moreno, A; Peralba, J M; Font, M; Bruseghini, L; Esteras, A

    1991-01-01

    Metadoxine (pyridoxine-pyrrolidone carboxylate) has been reported to accelerate ethanol metabolism. In the present work we have investigated the effect of metadoxine on the activities of isolated alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases from rat and man, and on the activity of these enzymes in chronic ethanol-fed rats. Our results indicate that in vitro metadoxine does not activate any of the enzymatic forms of alcohol dehydrogenase (classes I and II) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (low-Km and high-Km, cytosolic and mitochondrial). At concentrations higher than 0.1 mM, metadoxine inhibits rat class II alcohol dehydrogenase, although this would probably not affect the physiological ethanol metabolism. Chronic ethanol intake for 5 weeks results in a 25% decrease of rat hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (class I) activity as compared with the pair-fed controls. The simultaneous treatment with metadoxine prevents activity loss, suggesting that the positive effect of metadoxine on ethanol metabolism can be explained by the maintenance of normal levels of alcohol dehydrogenase during chronic ethanol intake. No specific effect of chronic exposure to ethanol or to metadoxine was detected on rat aldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

  20. Adaptive response to chronic mild ethanol stress involves ROS, sirtuins and changes in chromosome dosage in wine yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Potocki, Leszek; Rawska, Ewa; Pabian, Sylwia; Kaplan, Jakub; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-05-24

    Industrial yeast strains of economic importance used in winemaking and beer production are genomically diverse and subjected to harsh environmental conditions during fermentation. In the present study, we investigated wine yeast adaptation to chronic mild alcohol stress when cells were cultured for 100 generations in the presence of non-cytotoxic ethanol concentration. Ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide signals promoted growth rate during passages that was accompanied by increased expression of sirtuin proteins, Sir1, Sir2 and Sir3, and DNA-binding transcription regulator Rap1. Genome-wide array-CGH analysis revealed that yeast genome was shaped during passages. The gains of chromosomes I, III and VI and significant changes in the gene copy number in nine functional gene categories involved in metabolic processes and stress responses were observed. Ethanol-mediated gains of YRF1 and CUP1 genes were the most accented. Ethanol also induced nucleolus fragmentation that confirms that nucleolus is a stress sensor in yeasts. Taken together, we postulate that wine yeasts of different origin may adapt to mild alcohol stress by shifts in intracellular redox state promoting growth capacity, upregulation of key regulators of longevity, namely sirtuins and changes in the dosage of genes involved in the telomere maintenance and ion detoxification.

  1. Mathematical modelling of ethanol metabolism in normal subjects and chronic alcohol misusers

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, G.D.; Shaw, L. J.; Maini, P. K.; Ward, R J; Peters, T. J.; Murray, J D

    1993-01-01

    The time course of ethanol disappearance from the blood has been examined in normal males and females and in alcohol misusers. Blood alcohol estimations were made over a period of 3 hr, following an oral dose of ethanol (0.8 g/kg body weight) administered in the form of whisky. Attempts were made to fit the data to zero order, first order and mixed zero + first order kinetics. In the majority (75%) of normal females the blood ethanol concentration was still increasing at 30 min. This was only...

  2. Effect of chronic ethanol consumption in female rats subjected to experimental sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, C.L. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Patologia, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Aguiar-Nemer, A.S. [Departamento de Nutrição, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Castro-Faria-Neto, H.C. [Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barros, F.R. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Patologia, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Rocha, E.M.S. [Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Silva-Fonseca, V.A. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-12-10

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the interference of ethanol consumption by female rats with cytokines involved in the sepsis process and its correlation with mortality, the main outcome of sepsis. Female Wistar rats in estrus phase were evaluated in three experiments. Experiment 1 (n=40) was performed to determine survival rates. Experiment 2 (n=69) was designed for biochemical analysis, measurement of cytokine and estrogen levels before and after sepsis, and experiment 3 (n=10) was performed to evaluate bacterial growth by colony counts of peritoneal fluid. In all experiments, treated animals were exposed to a 10% ethanol/water solution (v/v) as the single drinking source, while untreated animals were given tap water. After 4 weeks, sepsis was induced in the rats by ip injection of feces. In experiment 1, mortality in ethanol-exposed animals was delayed compared with those that drank water (48 h; P=0.0001). Experiment 2 showed increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and decreased interleukin-6 (IL-6) and macrophage migration inhibitory factor in septic animals exposed to ethanol compared to septic animals not exposed. Sepsis also increased TNF-α and IL-6 levels in both ethanol- and water-exposed groups. Biochemical analysis showed higher creatinine, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase and decreased glucose levels in septic animals that were exposed to ethanol. In experiment 3, septic animals exposed to ethanol showed decreased numbers of colony-forming units than septic animals exposed to water. These results suggest that ethanol consumption delays the mortality of female rats in estrus phase after sepsis induction. Female characteristics, most probably sex hormones, may be involved in cytokine expression.

  3. Chronic Rumex Patientia Seed Feeding Improves Passive Avoidance Learning and Memory in Streptozotocin-Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tourandokht Baluchnejadmojarad

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A B S T R A C T Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is accompanied with disturbances in learning, memory, and cognitive skills in the human society and experimental animals. Due to anti-diabetic and antioxidant activity of Rumex patientia (RP, this research study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of chronic Rumex patientia feeding on alleviation of learning and memory disturbance in streptozotocindiabetic rats. Methods: Male Wistar rats were divided into control, diabetic, RP-treatedcontrol and -diabetic groups. For induction of diabetes, streptozotcin (STZ was administered at a dose of 60 mg/Kg. Meanwhile, RP-treated groups received RP seed powder mixed with standard pelleted food at a weight ratio of 6% for 4 weeks. For evaluation of learning and memory, initial latency (IL and step-through latency (STL were determined at the end of study using passive avoidance test. Results: It was found out that regarding initial latency, there was no significant difference among the groups. In addition, diabetic rats developed a significant impairment in retention and recall in passive avoidance test (p<0.01, as it is evident by a lower STL. Furthermore, RP treatment of diabetic rats did produce a significant improvement in retention and recall (p<0.05. Discussion: Taken together, chronic RP feeding could improve retention and recall capability in passive avoidance test in STZ-diabetic rats

  4. Effects of ethanol on the proteasome interacting proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fawzia; Bardag-Gorce

    2010-01-01

    Proteasome dysfunction has been repeatedly reported in alcoholic liver disease. Ethanol metabolism endproducts affect the structure of the proteasome, and, therefore, change the proteasome interaction with its regulatory complexes 19S and PA28, as well as its interacting proteins. Chronic ethanol feeding alters the ubiquitin-proteasome activity by altering the interaction between the 19S and the 20S proteasome interaction. The degradation of oxidized and damaged proteins is thus decreased and leads to accum...

  5. Effects of ethanol on voltage-sensitive Na-channels in cultured skeletal muscle: Up-regulation as a result of chronic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, C.; Sampson, S.R. (Bar-Ilan Univ., Ramat-Gan (Israel))

    1990-12-01

    The effects of acute and chronic treatment with ethanol were studied on the number and activity of tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na-channels in cultured rat skeletal muscle. The number of channels was determined by measurements of specific binding of (3H) saxitoxin (STX) in whole cell preparations. Measurements were also made of the frequency and rate of rise of spontaneously occurring action potentials, which are the physiologic expression of Na-channel density. Acute ethanol (37.5-150 mM), while causing depolarization of membrane potential and blockade of electrical activity, was without effect on specific STX binding. Neither methanol, acetaldehyde nor ethylene glycol had significant effects on these properties when given acutely in the same concentrations as ethanol. Chronic ethanol caused dose-related increases in STX binding and action potential properties with maximal levels being attained after 3 days of treatment at a concentration of 150 mM. On removal of ethanol from the culture medium all properties returned to control levels after 48 hr. Both increased external K+ and tetrodotoxin, which up-regulate Na-channels by reducing cytosolic Ca++, potentiated the ethanol-induced increase in Na-channel density. The increase in STX binding was not associated with changes in affinity of the binding sites for the ligand but was completely prevented by treatment with cycloheximide and actinomycin D. The results demonstrate that ethanol interacts with the cell membrane to induce synthesis of STX-binding sites.

  6. Influence of chronic ethanol intake on mouse synaptosomal aspartyl aminopeptidase and aminopeptidase A: relationship with oxidative stress indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayas, María Dolores; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; García, María Jesús; Carrera, María Pilar; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel

    2012-08-01

    Aminopeptidase A (APA) and aspartyl aminopeptidase (ASAP) not only act as neuromodulators in the regional brain renin-angiotensin system, but also release N-terminal acidic amino acids (glutamate and aspartate). The hyperexcitability of amino acid neurotransmitters is responsible for several neurodegenerative processes affecting the central nervous system. The purpose of the present work was to study the influence of chronic ethanol intake, a well known neurotoxic compound, on APA and ASAP activity under resting and K(+)-stimulated conditions at the synapse level. APA and ASAP activity were determined against glutamate- and aspartate-β-naphthylamide respectively in mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes and in their incubation supernatant in a Ca(2+)-containing or Ca(2+)-free artificial cerebrospinal fluid. The neurotoxic effects were analyzed by determining free radical generation, peroxidation of membrane lipids and the oxidation of synaptosomal proteins. In addition, the bioenergetic behavior of synaptosomes was analyzed under different experimental protocols. We obtained several modifications in oxidative stress parameters and a preferential inhibitor effect of chronic ethanol intake on APA and ASAP activities. Although previous in vitro studies failed to show signs of neurodegeneration, these in vivo modifications in oxidative stress parameters do not seem to be related to changes in APA and ASAP, invalidating the idea that an excess of free acidic amino acids released by APA and ASAP induces neurodegeneration.

  7. Evaluation of direct and indirect ethanol biomarkers using a likelihood ratio approach to identify chronic alcohol abusers for forensic purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladio, Eugenio; Martyna, Agnieszka; Salomone, Alberto; Pirro, Valentina; Vincenti, Marco; Zadora, Grzegorz

    2017-02-01

    The detection of direct ethanol metabolites, such as ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs), in scalp hair is considered the optimal strategy to effectively recognize chronic alcohol misuses by means of specific cut-offs suggested by the Society of Hair Testing. However, several factors (e.g. hair treatments) may alter the correlation between alcohol intake and biomarkers concentrations, possibly introducing bias in the interpretative process and conclusions. 125 subjects with various drinking habits were subjected to blood and hair sampling to determine indirect (e.g. CDT) and direct alcohol biomarkers. The overall data were investigated using several multivariate statistical methods. A likelihood ratio (LR) approach was used for the first time to provide predictive models for the diagnosis of alcohol abuse, based on different combinations of direct and indirect alcohol biomarkers. LR strategies provide a more robust outcome than the plain comparison with cut-off values, where tiny changes in the analytical results can lead to dramatic divergence in the way they are interpreted. An LR model combining EtG and FAEEs hair concentrations proved to discriminate non-chronic from chronic consumers with ideal correct classification rates, whereas the contribution of indirect biomarkers proved to be negligible. Optimal results were observed using a novel approach that associates LR methods with multivariate statistics. In particular, the combination of LR approach with either Principal Component Analysis (PCA) or Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) proved successful in discriminating chronic from non-chronic alcohol drinkers. These LR models were subsequently tested on an independent dataset of 43 individuals, which confirmed their high efficiency. These models proved to be less prone to bias than EtG and FAEEs independently considered. In conclusion, LR models may represent an efficient strategy to sustain the diagnosis of chronic alcohol consumption

  8. Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts the core molecular clock and diurnal rhythms of metabolic genes in the liver without affecting the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley N Filiano

    Full Text Available Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts several metabolic pathways including β-oxidation and lipid biosynthesis, facilitating the development of alcoholic fatty liver disease. Many of these same metabolic pathways are directly regulated by cell autonomous circadian clocks, and recent studies suggest that disruption of daily rhythms in metabolism contributes to multiple common cardiometabolic diseases (including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. However, it is not known whether ethanol disrupts the core molecular clock in the liver, nor whether this, in turn, alters rhythms in lipid metabolism. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption disrupts the molecular circadian clock in the liver and potentially changes the diurnal expression patterns of lipid metabolism genes. Consistent with previous studies, male C57BL/6J mice fed an ethanol-containing diet exhibited higher levels of liver triglycerides compared to control mice, indicating hepatic steatosis. Further, the diurnal oscillations of core clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Cry1, Cry2, Per1, and Per2 and clock-controlled genes (Dbp, Hlf, Nocturnin, Npas2, Rev-erbα, and Tef were altered in livers from ethanol-fed mice. In contrast, ethanol had only minor effects on the expression of core clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. These results were confirmed in Per2(Luciferase knock-in mice, in which ethanol induced a phase advance in PER2::LUC bioluminescence oscillations in liver, but not SCN. Further, there was greater variability in the phase of PER2::LUC oscillations in livers from ethanol-fed mice. Ethanol consumption also affected the diurnal oscillations of metabolic genes, including Adh1, Cpt1a, Cyp2e1, Pck1, Pdk4, Ppargc1a, Ppargc1b and Srebp1c, in the livers of C57BL/6J mice. In summary, chronic ethanol consumption alters the function of the circadian clock in liver. Importantly, these results suggest that chronic ethanol consumption, at levels sufficient to

  9. Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts the core molecular clock and diurnal rhythms of metabolic genes in the liver without affecting the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiano, Ashley N; Millender-Swain, Telisha; Johnson, Russell; Young, Martin E; Gamble, Karen L; Bailey, Shannon M

    2013-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts several metabolic pathways including β-oxidation and lipid biosynthesis, facilitating the development of alcoholic fatty liver disease. Many of these same metabolic pathways are directly regulated by cell autonomous circadian clocks, and recent studies suggest that disruption of daily rhythms in metabolism contributes to multiple common cardiometabolic diseases (including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease). However, it is not known whether ethanol disrupts the core molecular clock in the liver, nor whether this, in turn, alters rhythms in lipid metabolism. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption disrupts the molecular circadian clock in the liver and potentially changes the diurnal expression patterns of lipid metabolism genes. Consistent with previous studies, male C57BL/6J mice fed an ethanol-containing diet exhibited higher levels of liver triglycerides compared to control mice, indicating hepatic steatosis. Further, the diurnal oscillations of core clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Cry1, Cry2, Per1, and Per2) and clock-controlled genes (Dbp, Hlf, Nocturnin, Npas2, Rev-erbα, and Tef) were altered in livers from ethanol-fed mice. In contrast, ethanol had only minor effects on the expression of core clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). These results were confirmed in Per2(Luciferase) knock-in mice, in which ethanol induced a phase advance in PER2::LUC bioluminescence oscillations in liver, but not SCN. Further, there was greater variability in the phase of PER2::LUC oscillations in livers from ethanol-fed mice. Ethanol consumption also affected the diurnal oscillations of metabolic genes, including Adh1, Cpt1a, Cyp2e1, Pck1, Pdk4, Ppargc1a, Ppargc1b and Srebp1c, in the livers of C57BL/6J mice. In summary, chronic ethanol consumption alters the function of the circadian clock in liver. Importantly, these results suggest that chronic ethanol consumption, at levels sufficient to cause steatosis

  10. Effects of chronic ethanol administration on expression of BDNF and trkB mRNAs in rat hippocampus after experimental brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Dhillon, H S; Barron, S; Hicks1, R R; Prasad, R M; Seroogy, K B

    2000-06-23

    Previous evidence indicates that both chronic alcohol treatment and traumatic brain injury modulate expression of certain neurotrophins and neurotrophin receptors in cortical tissue. However, the combined effects of chronic alcohol and brain trauma on expression of neurotrophins and their receptors have not been investigated. In the present study, we examined the effects of 6 weeks of chronic ethanol administration on lateral fluid percussion (FP) brain injury-induced alterations in expression of mRNAs for the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its high affinity receptor, trkB, in rat hippocampus. In both the control- (pair-fed isocaloric sucrose) diet and the chronic ethanol-diet groups, unilateral FP brain injury induced a bilateral increase in levels of both BDNF and trkB mRNAs in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer, and of BDNF mRNA in hippocampal region CA3. However, no significant differences in expression were found between the control-diet and ethanol-diet groups, in either the sham-injured or FP-injured animals. These findings suggest that 6 weeks of chronic ethanol administration does not alter the plasticity of hippocampal BDNF/trkB expression in response to experimental brain injury.

  11. An optimised mouse model of chronic pancreatitis with a combination of ethanol and cerulein

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, Abbas; Nikkhoo, Bahram; Mokarizadeh, Aram; Rahmani, Mohammad-Reza; Fakhari, Shohreh; Mohammadi, Mehdi; Jalili, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an intractable and multi-factorial disorder. Developing appropriate animal models is an essential step in pancreatitis research, and the best ones are those which mimic the human disorder both aetiologically and pathophysiologically. The current study presents an optimised protocol for creating a murine model of CP, which mimics the initial steps of chronic pancreatitis in alcohol chronic pancreatitis and compares it with two other mouse models treate...

  12. Chronic leptin infusion advances, and immunoneutralization of leptin postpones puberty onset in normally fed and feed restricted female rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinoaldini, S.; Swarts, J.J.M.; Heijning, van de B.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Does leptin play a vital role in initiating puberty in female rats and can it overrule a nutrionally imposed (i.e. a 30% feed restriction, FR) delay in puberty onset? Prepubertal female rats were chronically infused for 14 days with leptin (icv or sc) or leptin-antiserum (icv) while puberty onset wa

  13. Chronic prenatal ethanol exposure increases glucocorticoid-induced glutamate release in the hippocampus of the near-term foetal guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, U; Brien, J F; Kapoor, A; Matthews, S G; Reynolds, J N

    2006-11-01

    Exposure to high cortisol concentration can injure the developing brain, possibly via an excitotoxic mechanism involving glutamate (Glu). The present study tested the hypothesis that chronic prenatal ethanol exposure (CPEE) activates the foetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to produce high cortisol exposure in the foetal compartment and alters sensitivity to glucocorticoid-induced Glu release in the foetal hippocampus. Pregnant guinea pigs received daily oral administration of ethanol (4 g/kg maternal body weight/day) or isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding from gestational day (GD) 2 until GD 63 (term, approximately GD 68) at which time they were euthanised, 1 h after their final treatment. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol concentrations were determined in foetal plasma. Basal and electrically stimulated Glu and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) efflux in the presence or absence of dexamethasone (DEX), a selective glucocorticoid-receptor agonist, were determined ex vivo in foetal hippocampal slices. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor NR1 subunit mRNA expression were determined in situ in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus. In the near-term foetus, CPEE increased foetal plasma ACTH and cortisol concentrations. Electrically stimulated glutamate, but not GABA, release was increased in CPEE foetal hippocampal slices. Low DEX concentration (0.3 microM) decreased stimulated glutamate, but not GABA, release in both CPEE and control foetal hippocampal slices. High DEX concentration (3.0 microM) increased basal release of Glu, but not GABA, in CPEE foetal hippocampal slices. GR, but not MR, mRNA expression was elevated in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus, whereas NR1 mRNA expression was increased in the CA1 and CA3 fields of the foetal hippocampus. These data demonstrate that CPEE increases high glucocorticoid concentration-induced Glu release in the foetal hippocampus, presumably as a

  14. Chronic Ethanol Exposure Effects on Vitamin D Levels Among Subjects with Alcohol Use Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunsakin, Olalekan; Hottor, Tete; Mehta, Ashish; Lichtveld, Maureen; McCaskill, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D has been previously recognized to play important roles in human immune system and function. In the pulmonary system, vitamin D regulates the function of antimicrobial peptides, especially cathelicidin/LL-37. Human cathelicidin/LL-37 is a bactericidal, bacteriostatic, and antiviral endogenous peptide with protective immune functions. Chronic exposure to excessive alcohol has the potential to reduce levels of vitamin D (inactive vitamin D [25(OH)D3] and active vitamin D [1, 25(OH)2D3]) and leads to downregulation of cathelicidin/LL-37. Alcohol-mediated reduction of LL-37 may be partly responsible for increased incidence of more frequent and severe respiratory infections among subjects with alcohol use disorder (AUD). The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which alcohol exerts its influence on vitamin D metabolism. In addition, the aim was to establish associations between chronic alcohol exposures, levels of pulmonary vitamin D, and cathelicidin/LL-37 using broncho-alveolar lavage fluid samples of subjects with AUD and healthy controls. Findings from the experiment showed that levels of inactive vitamin D (25(OH)D3), active vitamin D (1, 25(OH)2D3), cathelicidin/LL-37, and CYP27B1 proteins were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) when compared with the matched healthy control group. However, CYP2E1 was elevated in all the samples examined. Chronic exposure to alcohol has the potential to reduce the levels of pulmonary vitamin D and results in subsequent downregulation of the antimicrobial peptide, LL-37, in the human pulmonary system. PMID:27795667

  15. Fish Oil Reduces Hepatic Injury by Maintaining Normal Intestinal Permeability and Microbiota in Chronic Ethanol-Fed Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Jiun-Rong Chen; Ya-Ling Chen; Hsiang-Chi Peng; Yu-An Lu; Hsiao-Li Chuang; Hsiao-Yun Chang; Hsiao-Yun Wang; Yu-Ju Su; Suh-Ching Yang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ameliorative effects of fish oil on hepatic injury in ethanol-fed rats based on the intestinal permeability and microbiota. Rats were assigned to 6 groups and fed either a control diet or an ethanol diet such as C (control), CF25 (control with 25% fish oil), CF57 (control with 57% fish oil), E (ethanol), EF25 (ethanol with 25% fish oil), and EF57 (ethanol with 57% fish oil) groups. Rats were sacrificed at the end of 8 weeks. Plasma aspartate aminot...

  16. Reversing gastric mucosal alterations during ethanol-induced chronic gastritis in rats by oral administration of Opuntia ficus-indica mucilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Ramírez, Ricardo; Olguín-Martínez, Marisela; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of mucilage obtained from cladodes of Opuntia ficus-indica (Cactaceae) on the healing of ethanol-induced gastritis in rats. METHODS: Chronic gastric mucosa injury was treated with mucilage (5 mg/kg per day) after it was induced by ethanol. Lipid composition, activity of 5’-nucleotidase (a membrane-associated ectoenzyme) and cytosolic activities of lactate and alcohol dehydrogenases in the plasma membrane of gastric mucosa were determined. Histological studies of gastric samples from the experimental groups were included. RESULTS: Ethanol elicited the histological profile of gastritis characterized by loss of the surface epithelium and infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) decreased and cholesterol content increased in plasma membranes of the gastric mucosa. In addition, cytosolic activity increased while the activity of alcohol dehydrogenases decreased. The administration of mucilage promptly corrected these enzymatic changes. In fact, mucilage readily accelerated restoration of the ethanol-induced histological alterations and the disturbances in plasma membranes of gastric mucosa, showing a univocal anti-inflammatory effect. The activity of 5’-nucleotidase correlated with the changes in lipid composition and the fluidity of gastric mucosal plasma membranes. CONCLUSION: The beneficial action of mucilage seems correlated with stabilization of plasma membranes of damaged gastric mucosa. Molecular interactions between mucilage monosaccharides and membrane phospholipids, mainly PC and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), may be the relevant features responsible for changing activities of membrane-attached proteins during the healing process after chronic gastric mucosal damage. PMID:16865772

  17. Antihyperglycemic Effect on Chronic Administration of Butanol Fraction of Ethanol Extract of Moringa Stenopetala Leaves in Alloxan Induced Diabetic Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alemayehu Toma; Eyasu Makonnen; Asfaw Debella; Birhanu Tesfaye

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The present study was conducted to evaluate the antihyperglycemic activity on chronic administration of the butanol fraction of the ethanol extract of Moringa Stenopetala leaves in alloxan induced diabetic mice. Methods: The mice were grouped in four groups; Normal control, Diabetic control, Butanol fraction treated and standard drug treated groups. The Diabetic mice received the butanol fraction of Moringa stenopetala daily for 28 days. Results: The butanol fraction of Moringastenopetala treatment resulted in significant reduction of fasting blood glucose level, serum total cholesterol and triglycerides level. This fraction also showed a tendency to improve body weight gain in diabetic mice. Its oral LD50 was found to be greater than 5000mg/Kg indicating its safety in mice. Conclusions: Though the mechanism of action of Moringa stenopetala seems to be similar to that of sulfonylureas, further studies should be done to confirm its mechanism of antidiabetic action. Furthermore the active principle(s) responsible for the antidabetic effects should also be identified.

  18. Glutathione accumulation in ethanol-stat fed-batch culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a switch to cysteine feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisamedtinov, Ildar; Kevvai, Kaspar; Orumets, Kerti; Rautio, Jari J; Paalme, Toomas

    2010-06-01

    Shot-wise supplementation of cysteine to a yeast culture is a common means of promoting glutathione (GSH) production. In the present work, we study the accumulation kinetics of cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine, and GSH and the expression of genes involved in GSH and sulfur metabolism in ethanol-stat fed-batch cultures as a result of switching to a medium enriched with cysteine and glycine. Supplementation in this fashion resulted in a rapid but short-term increase in the rate of GSH synthesis, while the expression of GSH1 decreased. Expression of GSH1 and GSH synthesis rate were observed to revert close to the base level after a few hours. These results indicate that, under such conditions, the control of GSH synthesis at higher concentrations occurred at the enzymatic, rather than the transcriptional level. The incorporation of cysteine into GSH was limited to approximately 40% of the theoretical yield, due to its requirement as a source of sulfur for protein synthesis under conditions whereby the sulfate assimilation pathway is down-regulated. This was supported by the expression profiles of genes involved in cysteine and homocysteine interconversion.

  19. Effect of chronic ethanol (EtOH) and aging on drug metabolism in F-344 male rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galinsky, R.E.; Johnson, D.H.; Kimura, R.E.; Franklin, M.R. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City (USA))

    1989-02-09

    The effects of chronic ethanol on in vitro and in vivo drug metabolism were examined in 6 and 25 month old male Fischer 344 rats. Animals were divided into three diet groups: (1) Diet containing EtOH, (2) pair-fed controls and (3) rat chow ad lib. Rats in groups 1 and 2 were fed 3 times daily for six weeks via permanent gastrostomy and received EtOH at doses of 5-8 g/kg/day in the first 3 weeks and 12 g/kg/day for the last 3 weeks. Total caloric intake was 90-120 kcal/kg/day. After 6 weeks, the pharmacokinetics of i.v. acetaminophen (A), 30 mg/kg, were examined to probe in vivo drug conjugation. There was no effects of EtOH on the total CL of A in young or old rats. The fraction of the dose recovered in the urine as A-glucuronide and the partial clearance to A-glucuronide was increased by EtOH. There was no effect on the rate of A-sulfate formation. EtOH increased the renal clearance of A but not of A-sulfate or A-glucuronide. In vitro, EtOH increased hepatic cytochrome P-450 concentration and p-nitroanisole demethylase activity, especially in old rats where values returned to those seen in untreated young males. Erythromycin and ethylmorphine demethylase and p-nitrophenol hydroxylase activities were not increased by the EtOH treatment. EtOH increased UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activity towards 1-naphthol, but not towards morphine, estrone, or testosterone. EtOH had no effect on the cytosolic glutathione S-transferase (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) and phenol sulfotransferase (p-nitrophenol) activities.

  20. Effect of bicuculline and angiotensin II fragment 3-7 on learning and memory processes in rats chronically treated with ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuziemka-Leska, M; Car, H; Wiśniewski, K

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the possible influence of bicuculline, the antagonist of GABA-A receptor on behavioral activity (recall, acquisition of conditioned reflexes) of angiotension II fragment 3-7 (A II 3-7) in rats chronically treated with ethanol. Long term (9 weeks) ethanol intoxication profoundly impaired learning and memory processes in all testes used. The GABA-A receptor antagonist bicuculline (0.5 mg/kg ip) did not influence exploratory and motor activity in the control rats, but we observed tendency (without significance) to decrease the locomotor activity, in the alcohol-intoxicated groups of animals, when the drug was injected together with A II 3-7 (2 microgram icv). Bicuculline did not influence retrieval process in passive avoidance recall in both investigated groups, and when the drug was given together with AII 3-7 significantly enhanced its action in the control group and in rats chronically treated with ethanol. Bicuculline significantly improved acquisition in the active avoidance test in the control and alcohol-intoxicated groups. Bicuculline injected together with A II 3-7 significantly decreased its action in the control group. Coadministration of bicuculline with A II 3-7 did not significantly change the activity of A II 3-7 in the acquisition of active avoidance test in the alcohol-intoxicated groups of rats.

  1. Carnitine deficiency presenting with encephalopathy and hyperammonemia in a patient receiving chronic enteral tube feeding: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Peter

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Carnitine is an essential cofactor in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. Carnitine deficiency results in accumulation of non-oxidized fatty acyl-coenzyme A molecules, and this inhibits intra-mitochondrial degradation of ammonia. Hyperammonemia may lead to encephalopathy. This scenario has been previously reported. Case presentation We report the case of a 47-year-old Caucasian man who had sustained a remote motor vehicle accident injury and relied on long-term tube feeding with a commercial product that wascarnitine-free. He was also on phenytoin therapy for control of his chronic seizures. He developed significant acute psychological and behavioral changes superimposed on his chronic neurological impairment. His ammonia level was found to be elevated at 75 to 100μmol/L (normal Conclusion This case illustrates the importance of avoiding carnitine deficiency and anti-convulsant toxicity in tube-fed patients encountered in hospital wards and nursing homes. These patients should have their carnitine levels assessed regularly, and supplementation should be provided as necessary. Manufacturers of enteral feeds and formulas should consider adding carnitine to their product lines.

  2. Hepatoprotective effects of Arctium lappa Linne on liver injuries induced by chronic ethanol consumption and potentiated by carbon tetrachloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Song-Chow; Lin, Chia-Hsien; Lin, Chun-Ching; Lin, Yun-Ho; Chen, Chin-Fa; Chen, I-Cheng; Wang, Li-Ya

    2002-01-01

    Arctium lappa Linne (burdock) is a perennial herb which is popularly cultivated as a vegetable. In order to evaluate its hepatoprotective effects, a group of rats (n = 10) was fed a liquid ethanol diet (4 g of absolute ethanol/ 80 ml of liquid basal diet) for 28 days and another group (n = 10) received a single intraperitoneal injection of 0.5 ml/kg carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) in order to potentiate the liver damage on the 21st day (1 day before the beginning of A. lappa treatment). Control group rats were given a liquid basal diet which did not contain absolute ethanol. When 300 mg/kg A. lappa was administered orally 3 times per day in both the 1-day and 7-day treatment groups, some biochemical and histopathological parameters were significantly altered, both in the ethanol group and the groups receiving ethanol supplemented with CCl(4). A. lappa significantly improved various pathological and biochemical parameters which were worsened by ethanol plus CCl(4)-induced liver damage, such as the ethanol plus CCl(4)-induced decreases in total cytochrome P-450 content and NADPH-cytochrome c reductase activity, increases in serum triglyceride levels and lipid peroxidation (the deleterious peroxidative and toxic malondialdehyde metabolite may be produced in quantity) and elevation of serum transaminase levels. It could even restore the glutathione content and affect the histopathological lesions. These results tended to imply that the hepatotoxicity induced by ethanol and potentiated by CCl(4) could be alleviated with 1 and 7 days of A. lappa treatment. The hepatoprotective mechanism of A. lappa could be attributed, at least in part, to its antioxidative activity, which decreases the oxidative stress of hepatocytes, or to other unknown protective mechanism(s).

  3. Distinct Effects of Nalmefene on Dopamine Uptake Rates and Kappa Opioid Receptor Activity in the Nucleus Accumbens Following Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie H. Rose

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of pharmacotherapeutics that reduce relapse to alcohol drinking in patients with alcohol dependence is of considerable research interest. Preclinical data support a role for nucleus accumbens (NAc κ opioid receptors (KOR in chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE exposure-induced increases in ethanol intake. Nalmefene, a high-affinity KOR partial agonist, reduces drinking in at-risk patients and relapse drinking in rodents, potentially due to its effects on NAc KORs. However, the effects of nalmefene on accumbal dopamine transmission and KOR function are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of nalmefene on dopamine transmission and KORs using fast scan cyclic voltammetry in NAc brain slices from male C57BL/6J mice following five weeks of CIE or air exposure. Nalmefene concentration-dependently reduced dopamine release similarly in air and CIE groups, suggesting that dynorphin tone may not be present in brain slices. Further, nalmefene attenuated dopamine uptake rates to a greater extent in brain slices from CIE-exposed mice, suggesting that dopamine transporter-KOR interactions may be fundamentally altered following CIE. Additionally, nalmefene reversed the dopamine-decreasing effects of a maximal concentration of a KOR agonist selectively in brain slices of CIE-exposed mice. It is possible that nalmefene may attenuate withdrawal-induced increases in ethanol consumption by modulation of dopamine transmission through KORs.

  4. Chronic ethanol intake modifies pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activity in mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes under resting and K+ -stimulated conditions: role of calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayas, María Dolores; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; García-López, María Jesús; Carrera, María Pilar; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel

    2008-07-04

    Pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase (Pcp) is an omega peptidase that removes pyroglutamyl N-terminal residues of peptides such as thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH), which is one of the neuropeptides that has been localized into many areas of the brain and acts as an endogenous neuromodulator of several parameters related to ethanol (EtOH) consumption. In this study, we analysed the effects of chronic EtOH intake on Pcp activity on mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes and their corresponding supernatant under basal and K+ -stimulated conditions, in presence and absence of calcium (Ca2+) to know the regulation of Pcp on TRH. In basal conditions, chronic EtOH intake significantly decreased synaptosomes Pcp activity but only in absence of Ca2+. However, supernatant Pcp activity is also decreased in presence and absence of calcium. Under K+-stimulated conditions, chronic EtOH intake decreased synaptosomes Pcp activity but only in absence of Ca2+, whereas supernatant Pcp activity was significantly decreased only in presence of Ca2+. The general inhibitory effect of chronic EtOH intake on Pcp activity suggests an inhibition of TRH metabolism and an enhancement of TRH neurotransmitter/neuromodulator functions, which could be related to putative processes of tolerance to EtOH in which TRH has been involved. Our data may also indicate that active peptides and their degrading peptidases are released together to the synaptic cleft to regulate the neurotransmitter/neuromodulator functions of these peptides, through a Ca2+ -dependent mechanism.

  5. Chronic alcohol feeding inhibits atherogenesis in C57BL/6 hyperlipidemic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emeson, E E; Manaves, V; Singer, T; Tabesh, M

    1995-12-01

    Although there is abundant clinical evidence that the consumption of alcohol (ethanol) in moderate amounts has a protective effect on coronary artery disease, the mechanism of this effect is not understood. The prevailing theory supported by a limited number of clinical and experimental animal studies indicates that the ability of alcohol to elevate serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels is an important mechanism. Although there have been a large number of studies on the effects of alcohol on serum lipoprotein and apolipoproteins on coronary artery disease, there have been very few that have, at the same time, looked directly and systematically at its effects on the histopathological development of atherosclerotic lesions. In the following studies we employed the hyperlipidemic C57BL/6 female mouse model and formulated an all liquid high fat atherogenic diet to provide the mice with the 3% or 6% alcohol. After 22 weeks on this diet, alcohol markedly inhibited the development of fatty streak atherosclerotic lesions in a dose-dependent fashion. Surprisingly, there was a dose-dependent decrease in plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol values, which suggests that high-density lipoprotein alterations play little or no role in the amelioration of atherosclerosis in this model.

  6. Effects of quercetin on hyper-proliferation of gastric mucosal cells in rats treated with chronic oral ethanol through the reactive oxygen species-nitric oxide pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Li Liu; Jun Du; Ling-Ling Fan; Xiao-Yan Liu; Luo Gu; Ying-Bin Ge

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of quercetin (3,3,4',5,7-pentahydroxy flavone),a major flavonoid in human diet,on hyper-proliferation of gastric mucosal cells in rats treated with chronic oral ethanol.METHODS:Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats,weighing 200-250 g,were randomly divided into control group (tap water ad//b/tum),ethanol treatment group (6 mL/L ethanol),quercetin treatment group (intragastric garage with 100 mg/kg of quercetin per day),and ethanol plus quercetin treatment group (quercetin and 6 mL/L ethanol).Expression levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Cyclin D1 were detected by Western blot to assay gastric mucosal cell proliferation in rats.To demonstrate the influence of quercetin on the production of extra-cellular reactive oxygen species/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in rats,changes in levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBAR5),protein carbonyl,nitrite and nitrate (NOx) and nitrotyrosine (NT) were determined.The activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) including iNOS and nNOS was also detected by Western blot,RESULTS:Compared to control animals,cell proliferation in the gastric mucosa of animals subjected to ethanol treatment for 7 days was significant increased (increased to 290% for PCNA density P < 0.05,increased to150 for Cyclin D1 density P < 0.05 and 21.6 + 0.8 vs 42.3 + 0.7 for PCNA positive cells per view field),accompanied by an increase in ROS generation (1.298 ± 0.135 μmol vs 1.772 ± 0.078 μmol for TBARS P < 0.05;4.36 + 0.39 mmol vs 7.48 4- 0.40 mmol for carbonyl contents P < 0.05) and decrease in NO generation (11.334 + 0.467 μmol vs 7.978 ± 0.334 μmol P < 0.01 for NOx;8.986 ± 1.351 μmol vs 6.854 ± 0.460 μmol for nitrotyrosine P < 0.01) and nNOS activity (decreased to 43% P < 0.05).This function was abolished by the co-administration of quercetin.CONCLUSION:The antioxidant action of quercetin relies,in part,on its ability to stimulate nNOS and enhance production of NO that

  7. Deletion of GSTA4-4 results in increased mitochondrial post-translational modification of proteins by reactive aldehydes following chronic ethanol consumption in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin T. Shearn

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol consumption induces hepatic oxidative stress resulting in production of highly reactive electrophilic α/β-unsaturated aldehydes that have the potential to modify proteins. A primary mechanism of reactive aldehyde detoxification by hepatocytes is through GSTA4-driven enzymatic conjugation with GSH. Given reports that oxidative stress initiates GSTA4 translocation to the mitochondria, we hypothesized that increased hepatocellular damage in ethanol (EtOH-fed GSTA4−/− mice is due to enhanced mitochondrial protein modification by reactive aldehydes. Chronic ingestion of EtOH increased hepatic protein carbonylation in GSTA4−/− mice as evidenced by increased 4-HNE and MDA immunostaining in the hepatic periportal region. Using mass spectrometric analysis of biotin hydrazide conjugated carbonylated proteins, a total of 829 proteins were identified in microsomal, cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions. Of these, 417 were novel to EtOH models. Focusing on mitochondrial fractions, 1.61-fold more carbonylated proteins were identified in EtOH-fed GSTA4−/− mice compared to their respective WT mice ingesting EtOH. Bioinformatic KEGG pathway analysis of carbonylated proteins from the mitochondrial fractions revealed an increased propensity for modification of proteins regulating oxidative phosphorylation, glucose, fatty acid, glutathione and amino acid metabolic processes in GSTA4−/− mice. Additional analysis revealed sites of reactive aldehyde protein modification on 26 novel peptides/proteins isolated from either SV/GSTA4−/− PF or EtOH fed mice. Among the peptides/proteins identified, ACSL, ACOX2, MTP, and THIKB contribute to regulation of fatty acid metabolism and ARG1, ARLY, and OAT, which regulate nitrogen and ammonia metabolism having direct relevance to ethanol-induced liver injury. These data define a role for GSTA4-4 in buffering hepatic oxidative stress associated with chronic alcohol consumption and that this GST

  8. Chronic toxicity of silver nanoparticles to Daphnia magna under different feeding conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackevica, Aiga; Skjolding, Lars Michael; Gergs, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Despite substantial information on the acute toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) to aquatic organisms, little is known about their potential chronic effects and the applicability of current test guidelines for testing nanomaterials. The purpose of this study was to study the influence of food...... availability on toxicity. This was done through a series of Daphnia magna 21-day reproduction tests (OECD 211) using 30 nm citric acid stabilized AgNP aimed at studying the influence of food abundance on the reproductive toxicity of AgNP in D. magna. The experiments were carried out as static renewal tests...... and reproduction were observed in concentrations higher than 10 mu g Ag/L, whereas the animals exposed to 10 mu g Ag/L had larger body length and produced more offspring than controls at both food treatments. High food treatment resulted in higher animal survival, growth and reproduction compared to result found...

  9. Attenuation of oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis by ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Crocus sativus L. stigma after chronic constriction injury of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAHAREH AMIN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In our previous study, the ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Crocus sativus elicited antinociceptive effects in the chronic constriction injury (CCI model of neuropathic pain. In this study, we explored anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic effects of such extracts in CCI animals. A total of 72 animals were divided as vehicle-treated CCI rats, sham group, CCI animals treated with the effective dose of aqueous and ethanolic extracts (200 mg/kg, i.p.. The lumbar spinal cord levels of proinflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β and interleukin 6 (IL-6, were evaluated at days 3 and 7 after CCI (n=3, for each group. The apoptotic protein changes were evaluated at days 3 and 7 by western blotting. Oxidative stress markers including malondialdehyde (MDA and glutathione reduced (GSH, were measured on day 7 after CCI. Inflammatory cytokines levels increased in CCI animals on days 3 and 7, which were suppressed by both extracts. The ratio of Bax/ Bcl2 was elevated on day 3 but not on day 7, in CCI animals as compared to sham operated animals and decreased following treatment with both extracts at this time. Both extracts attenuated MDA and increased GSH levels in CCI animals. It may be concluded that saffron alleviates neuropathic pain, at least in part, through attenuation of proinflammatory cytokines, antioxidant activity and apoptotic pathways.

  10. Attenuation of oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis by ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Crocus sativus L. stigma after chronic constriction injury of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Bahareh; Abnous, Khalil; Motamedshariaty, Vahideh; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2014-12-01

    In our previous study, the ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Crocus sativus elicited antinociceptive effects in the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain. In this study, we explored anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic effects of such extracts in CCI animals. A total of 72 animals were divided as vehicle-treated CCI rats, sham group, CCI animals treated with the effective dose of aqueous and ethanolic extracts (200 mg/kg, i.p.). The lumbar spinal cord levels of proinflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), were evaluated at days 3 and 7 after CCI (n=3, for each group). The apoptotic protein changes were evaluated at days 3 and 7 by western blotting. Oxidative stress markers including malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione reduced (GSH), were measured on day 7 after CCI. Inflammatory cytokines levels increased in CCI animals on days 3 and 7, which were suppressed by both extracts. The ratio of Bax/ Bcl2 was elevated on day 3 but not on day 7, in CCI animals as compared to sham operated animals and decreased following treatment with both extracts at this time. Both extracts attenuated MDA and increased GSH levels in CCI animals. It may be concluded that saffron alleviates neuropathic pain, at least in part, through attenuation of proinflammatory cytokines, antioxidant activity and apoptotic pathways.

  11. Cueing, demand fading, and positive reinforcement to establish self-feeding and oral consumption in a child with chronic food refusal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiselli, J K

    2000-07-01

    A 3-year-old child with multiple medical disorders and chronic food refusal was treated successfully using a program that incorporated antecedent control procedures combined with positive reinforcement. The antecedent manipulations included visual cueing of a criterion number of self-feeding responses that were required during meals to receive reinforcement and a gradual increase in the imposed criterion (demand fading) that was based on improved frequency of oral consumption. As evaluated in a changing criterion design, the child learned to feed himself as an outcome of treatment. One year following intervention, he was consuming a variety of foods and had gained weight. Advantages of antecedent control methods for the treatment of chronic food refusal are discussed.

  12. Evaluation of Acute and Sub-chronic Toxicities of Aqueous Ethanol Root Extract of Raphia hookeri Palmaceae on Swiss Albino Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.O. Mbaka

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the acute and sub-chronic toxicities of treatment with aqueous ethanol root extract of Raphia hookri (Palmaceae on rats. In acute toxicity study, the root extract in a graded doses of 125-2000 mg/kg bwt administered Intra-Peritoneal (IP produced dose dependent mortality with median acute toxicity (LD50 of approximately 562.3 mg/kg bwt. The animals fed with the extract by gavages tolerated up to 4000 mg/kg body weight (bwt with no sign of physical/behavioural changes hence 1/20th of the dose (200 mg/kg was used as the highest therapeutic dose. In sub-chronic toxicity study, significant increase (p0.05 decrease in Red Blood Cell (RBC count and haemoglobin (Hb level while White Blood Cell (WBC showed increase. In tissue analysis, the extract caused marked deleterious effect on the testes leading to drastic reduction in sperm cells whereas tissues of liver, kidney and heart however showed normal appearance.

  13. The Use of Feed Additives to Reduce the Effects of Aflatoxin and Deoxynivalenol on Pig Growth, Organ Health and Immune Status during Chronic Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Woo Kim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Three feed additives were tested to improve the growth and health of pigs chronically challenged with aflatoxin (AF and deoxynivalenol (DON. Gilts (n = 225, 8.8 ± 0.4 kg were allotted to five treatments: CON (uncontaminated control; MT (contaminated with 150 µg/kg AF and 1100 µg/kg DON; A (MT + a clay additive; B (MT + a clay and dried yeast additive; and C (MT + a clay and yeast culture additive. Average daily gain (ADG and feed intake (ADFI were recorded for 42 days, blood collected for immune analysis and tissue samples to measure damage. Feeding mycotoxins tended to decrease ADG and altered the immune system through a tendency to increase monocytes and immunoglobulins. Mycotoxins caused tissue damage in the form of liver bile ductule hyperplasia and karyomegaly. The additives in diets A and B reduced mycotoxin effects on the immune system and the liver and showed some ability to improve growth. The diet C additive played a role in reducing liver damage. Collectively, we conclude that AF and DON can be harmful to the growth and health of pigs consuming mycotoxins chronically. The selected feed additives improved pig health and may play a role in pig growth.

  14. The use of feed additives to reduce the effects of aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol on pig growth, organ health and immune status during chronic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Alexandra C; See, M Todd; Hansen, Jeff A; Kim, Yong B; De Souza, Anna L P; Middleton, Teena F; Kim, Sung Woo

    2013-07-01

    Three feed additives were tested to improve the growth and health of pigs chronically challenged with aflatoxin (AF) and deoxynivalenol (DON). Gilts (n = 225, 8.8 ± 0.4 kg) were allotted to five treatments: CON (uncontaminated control); MT (contaminated with 150 µg/kg AF and 1100 µg/kg DON); A (MT + a clay additive); B (MT + a clay and dried yeast additive); and C (MT + a clay and yeast culture additive). Average daily gain (ADG) and feed intake (ADFI) were recorded for 42 days, blood collected for immune analysis and tissue samples to measure damage. Feeding mycotoxins tended to decrease ADG and altered the immune system through a tendency to increase monocytes and immunoglobulins. Mycotoxins caused tissue damage in the form of liver bile ductule hyperplasia and karyomegaly. The additives in diets A and B reduced mycotoxin effects on the immune system and the liver and showed some ability to improve growth. The diet C additive played a role in reducing liver damage. Collectively, we conclude that AF and DON can be harmful to the growth and health of pigs consuming mycotoxins chronically. The selected feed additives improved pig health and may play a role in pig growth.

  15. Protracted abstinence from chronic ethanol exposure alters the structure of neurons and expression of oligodendrocytes and myelin in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, A I; Mandyam, C D

    2015-05-01

    In rodents, chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure (CIE) produces alcohol dependence, alters the structure and activity of pyramidal neurons and decreases the number of oligodendroglial progenitors in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In this study, adult Wistar rats were exposed to seven weeks of CIE and were withdrawn from CIE for 21 days (protracted abstinence; PA). Tissue enriched in the mPFC was processed for Western blot analysis and Golgi-Cox staining to investigate the long-lasting effects of CIE on the structure of mPFC neurons and the levels of myelin-associated proteins. PA increased dendritic arborization within apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons. These changes occurred concurrently with hypophosphorylation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor 2B (NR2B) at Tyr-1472. PA increased myelin basic protein (MBP) levels which occurred concurrently with hypophosphorylation of the premyelinating oligodendrocyte bHLH transcription factor Olig2 in the mPFC. Given that PA is associated with increased sensitivity to stress and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation, and stress alters oligodendrocyte expression as a function of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation, the levels of total GR and phosphorylated GR were also evaluated. PA produced hypophosphorylation of the GR at Ser-232 without affecting expression of total protein. These findings demonstrate persistent and compensatory effects of ethanol in the mPFC long after cessation of CIE, including enhanced myelin production and impaired GR function. Collectively, these results suggest a novel relationship between oligodendrocytes and GR in the mPFC, in which stress may alter frontal cortex function in alcohol dependent subjects by promoting hypermyelination, thereby altering the cellular composition and white matter structure in the mPFC.

  16. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure alters stress effects on (3α,5α-3-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one (3α,5α-THP immunolabeling of amygdala neurons in C57BL/6J mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoniette M Maldonado-Devincci

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The GABAergic neuroactive steroid (3α,5α-3-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one (3α,5α-THP, allopregnanolone is decreased in various brain regions of C57BL/6J mice following exposure to an acute stressor or chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE exposure and withdrawal. It is well established that there are complex interactions between stress and ethanol drinking, with mixed literature regarding the effects of stress on ethanol intake. However, there is little research examining how chronic ethanol exposure alters stress responses. The present work examined the impact of CIE exposure and withdrawal on changes in brain levels of 3α,5α-THP, hormonal, and behavioral responses to forced swim stress (FSS. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to four cycles of CIE to induce ethanol dependence. Following 8 or 72 hr withdrawal, mice were subjected to FSS for 10 min, and 50 min later brains were collected for immunohistochemical analysis of cellular 3α,5α-THP. Behavioral and circulating corticosterone responses to the FSS were quantified. Following 8 hr withdrawal, ethanol exposure potentiated the corticosterone response to FSS. Following 72 hr withdrawal, this difference was no longer observed. Following 8 hr withdrawal, stress-exposed mice showed no differences in immobility, swimming or struggling behavior. However, following 72 hr withdrawal, ethanol-exposed mice showed less immobility and greater swimming behavior compared to air-exposed mice. Interestingly, cellular 3α,5α-THP levels were increased in the lateral amygdala 8 hr and 72 hr post-withdrawal in stressed ethanol-exposed mice compared to ethanol-exposed/non-stressed mice. In the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, stress exposure decreased 3α,5α-THP levels compared to controls following 72 hr withdrawal, but no differences were observed 8 hr post-withdrawal. There were no differences in cellular 3α,5α-THP levels in the nucleus accumbens shell at either withdrawal time point. These data

  17. Ethanol Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  18. Ethanol impairs mucosal immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection by disrupting interleukin 17 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevejo-Nunez, Giraldina; Chen, Kong; Dufour, Jason P; Bagby, Gregory J; Horne, William T; Nelson, Steve; Kolls, Jay K

    2015-05-01

    Acute ethanol intoxication suppresses the host immune responses against Streptococcus pneumoniae. As interleukin 17 (IL-17) is a critical cytokine in host defense against extracellular pathogens, including S. pneumoniae, we hypothesized that ethanol impairs mucosal immunity against this pathogen by disrupting IL-17 production or IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) signaling. A chronic ethanol feeding model in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaques and acute ethanol intoxication in a murine model were used. Transcriptome analysis of bronchial brushes in the nonhuman primate model showed downregulation of the expression of IL-17-regulated chemokines in ethanol-fed animals, a finding also replicated in the murine model. Surprisingly, recombinant CXCL1 and CXCL5 but not IL-17 or IL-23 plus IL-1β rescued bacterial burden in the ethanol group to control levels. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that ethanol impairs IL-17-mediated chemokine production in the lung. Thus, exogenous luminal restoration of IL-17-related chemokines, CXCL1 and CXCL5, improves host defenses against S. pneumoniae.

  19. Plant-based food and feed protein structure changes induced by gene-transformation, heating and bio-ethanol processing: a synchrotron-based molecular structure and nutrition research program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2010-11-01

    Unlike traditional "wet" analytical methods which during processing for analysis often result in destruction or alteration of the intrinsic protein structures, advanced synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy has been developed as a rapid and nondestructive and bioanalytical technique. This cutting-edge synchrotron-based bioanalytical technology, taking advantages of synchrotron light brightness (million times brighter than sun), is capable of exploring the molecular chemistry or structure of a biological tissue without destruction inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions. In this article, a novel approach is introduced to show the potential of the advanced synchrotron-based analytical technology, which can be used to study plant-based food or feed protein molecular structure in relation to nutrient utilization and availability. Recent progress was reported on using synchrotron-based bioanalytical technique synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and diffused reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy to detect the effects of gene-transformation (Application 1), autoclaving (Application 2), and bio-ethanol processing (Application 3) on plant-based food and feed protein structure changes on a molecular basis. The synchrotron-based technology provides a new approach for plant-based protein structure research at ultra-spatial resolutions at cellular and molecular levels.

  20. Similar changes in muscle lipid metabolism are induced by chronic high-fructose feeding and high-fat feeding in C57BL/J6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guang-Yao; Ren, Lu-Ping; Chen, Shu-Chun; Wang, Chao; Liu, Na; Wei, Li-Min; Li, Fan; Sun, Wen; Peng, Lan-Bo; Tang, Yong

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of high fructose and high fat feeding on muscle lipid metabolism and to illustrate the mechanisms by which the two different dietary factors induce muscle lipid accumulation. C57BL/J6 mice were fed either a standard, high-fructose (HFru) or high-fat diet. After 16 weeks feeding, mice were killed and plasma triglyceride (TG) and free fatty acid (FFA) levels were detected. In addition, muscle TG and long chain acyl CoA (LCACoA) content was determined, glucose tolerance was evaluated and the protein content of fatty acid translocase CD36 (FATCD36) in muscle was measured. Mitochondrial oxidative function in the muscle was evaluated by estimating the activity of oxidative enzymes, namely cytochrome oxidase (COx), citrate synthase (CS) and β-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (β-HAD), and the muscle protein content of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1), cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-1 and proliferator-activated receptor coactivator (PGC)-1α was determined. Finally, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) gene expression and fatty acid synthase (FAS) protein content were determined in muscle tissues. After 16 weeks, plasma TG and FFA levels were significantly increased in both the HFru and HF groups. In addition, mice in both groups exhibited significant increases in muscle TG and LCACoA content. Compared with mice fed the standard diet (control group), those in the HFru and HF groups developed glucose intolerance and exhibited increased FATCD36 protein levels, enzyme activity related to fatty acid utilization in the mitochondria and protein expressions of CPT-1, COX-1 and PGC-1α in muscle tissue. Finally, mice in both the HFru and HF groups exhibited increase SREBP-1c expression and FAS protein content. In conclusion, high fructose and high fat feeding lead to similar changes in muscle lipid metabolism in C57BL/J6 mice. Lipid accumulation in the muscle may be associated with increased expression

  1. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 132-F-1, 141-F Chronic Feeding Sheep Barn, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-029

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2006-08-23

    The 132-F-1 site is the former location of the 141-F Chronic Feeding Sheep Barn that was part of the experimental animal farm at the 100-F Area. It was an L-shaped concrete block building with a concrete floor and concrete animal pens located both inside and outside the building. The 141-F Building was demolished in 1977 following relocation of animal research to the 300 Area. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  2. Models of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Markus M; Gorelick, Fred S

    2013-06-01

    Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis have been created to examine mechanisms of pathogenesis, test therapeutic interventions, and study the influence of inflammation on the development of pancreatic cancer. In vitro models can be used to study early stage, short-term processes that involve acinar cell responses. Rodent models reproducibly develop mild or severe disease. One of the most commonly used pancreatitis models is created by administration of supraphysiologic concentrations of caerulein, an ortholog of cholecystokinin. Induction of chronic pancreatitis with factors thought to have a role in human disease, such as combinations of lipopolysaccharide and chronic ethanol feeding, might be relevant to human disease. Models of autoimmune chronic pancreatitis have also been developed. Most models, particularly of chronic pancreatitis, require further characterization to determine which features of human disease they include.

  3. FAT10 suppression stabilizes oxidized proteins in liver cells: Effects of HCV and ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Murali; Hindman, Joseph; Tillman, Brittany; Jaramillo, Lee; Poluektova, Larisa I; French, Barbara A; Kharbanda, Kusum K; French, Samuel W; Osna, Natalia A

    2015-12-01

    FAT10 belongs to the ubiquitin-like modifier (ULM) family that targets proteins for degradation and is recognized by 26S proteasome. FAT10 is presented on immune cells and under the inflammatory conditions, is synergistically induced by IFNγ and TNFα in the non-immune (liver parenchymal) cells. It is not clear how viral proteins and alcohol regulate FAT10 expression on liver cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether FAT10 expression on liver cells is activated by the innate immunity factor, IFNα and how HCV protein expression in hepatocytes and ethanol-induced oxidative stress affect the level of FAT10 in liver cells. For this study, we used HCV(+) transgenic mice that express structural HCV proteins and their HCV(-) littermates. Mice were fed Lieber De Carli diet (control and ethanol) as specified in the NIH protocol for chronic-acute ethanol feeding. Alcohol exposure enhanced steatosis, induced oxidative stress and decreased proteasome activity in the liversof these mice, with more robust response to ethanol in HCV(+) mice. IFNα induced transcriptional activation of FAT10 in liver cells, which was dysregulated by ethanol feeding. Accordingly, IFNα-activated expression of FAT10 in hepatocytes (measured by indirect immunofluorescent of liver tissue) was also suppressed by ethanol exposure in both HCV(+) and HCV(-) mice. This suppression was accompanied with ethanol-mediated induction of lipid peroxidation marker, 4-HNE. All aforementioned effects of ethanol were attenuated by in vivo feeding of mice with the pro-methylating agent, betaine, which exhibits strong anti-oxidant properties. Based on this study, we hypothesize that FAT10 targets oxidatively modified proteins for proteasomal degradation, and that the reduction in FAT10 levels along with decreased proteasome activity may contribute to stabilization of these altered proteins in hepatocytes. In conclusion, IFNα induced FAT10 expression, which is suppressed by ethanol feeding in both HCV

  4. Chronic ethanol exposure combined with high fat diet up-regulates P2X7 receptors that parallels neuroinflammation and neuronal loss in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asatryan, Liana; Khoja, Sheraz; Rodgers, Kathleen E; Alkana, Ronald L; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Davies, Daryl L

    2015-08-15

    The present investigation tested the role of ATP-activated P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) in alcohol-induced brain damage using a model that combines intragastric (iG) ethanol feeding and high fat diet in C57BL/6J mice (Hybrid). The Hybrid paradigm caused increased levels of pro-inflammatory markers, changes in microglia and astrocytes, reduced levels of neuronal marker NeuN and increased P2X7R expression in ethanol-sensitive brain regions. Observed changes in P2X7R and NeuN expression were more pronounced in Hybrid paradigm with inclusion of additional weekly binges. In addition, high fat diet during Hybrid exposure aggravated the increase in P2X7R expression and activation of glial cells.

  5. Ethanol Metabolism and Osmolarity Modify Behavioral Responses to Ethanol in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaimo, Joseph T.; Davis, Scott J.; Song, Sam S.; Burnette, Christopher R.; Grotewiel, Mike; Shelton, Keith L.; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan T.; Davies, Andrew G.; Bettinger, Jill C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ethanol is metabolized by a two-step process in which alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) oxidizes ethanol to acetaldehyde, which is further oxidized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Although variation in ethanol metabolism in humans strongly influences the propensity to chronically abuse alcohol, few data exist on the behavioral effects of altered ethanol metabolism. Here, we used the nematode C. elegans to directly examine how changes in ethanol metabolism alter behavioral responses to alcohol during an acute exposure. Additionally, we investigated ethanol solution osmolarity as a potential explanation for contrasting published data on C. elegans ethanol sensitivity. Methods We developed a gas chromatography assay and validated a spectrophotometric method to measure internal ethanol in ethanol-exposed worms. Further, we tested the effects of mutations in ADH and ALDH genes on ethanol tissue accumulation and behavioral sensitivity to the drug. Finally, we tested the effects of ethanol solution osmolarity on behavioral responses and tissue ethanol accumulation. Results Only a small amount of exogenously applied ethanol accumulated in the tissues of C. elegans and consequently their tissue concentrations were similar to those that intoxicate humans. Independent inactivation of an ADH-encoding gene (sodh-1) or an ALDH-encoding gene (alh-6 or alh-13) increased the ethanol concentration in worms and caused hypersensitivity to the acute sedative effects of ethanol on locomotion. We also found that the sensitivity to the depressive effects of ethanol on locomotion is strongly influenced by the osmolarity of the exogenous ethanol solution. Conclusions Our results indicate that ethanol metabolism via ADH and ALDH has a statistically discernable but surprisingly minor influence on ethanol sedation and internal ethanol accumulation in worms. In contrast, the osmolarity of the medium in which ethanol is delivered to the animals has a more substantial effect on

  6. Effects of ethanol, acetaldehyde and cholesteryl esters on pancreatic lysosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, J S; Apte, M V; Thomas, M. C.; Haber, P S; Pirola, R C

    1992-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that altered lysosomal function may be involved in the early stages of pancreatic injury. Chronic consumption of ethanol increases rat pancreatic lysosomal fragility. The aim of this study is to determine whether the lysosomal fragility observed after chronic ethanol consumption is mediated by ethanol per se, its oxidative metabolite acetaldehyde or cholesteryl esters (substances which accumulate in the pancreas after ethanol consumption). Pancreatic lysosomes from cho...

  7. Evaluation of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of saffron, Crocus sativus L., and its constituents, safranal and crocin in allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Bahareh; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2012-07-01

    The current study was designed to evaluate therapeutic potential of systemically administered ethanolic and aqueous extracts of saffron as well as its bioactive ingredients, safranal and crocin, in chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain in rats. The von Frey filaments, acetone drop, and radiant heat test were performed to assess the degree of mechanical allodynia, thermal allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia respectively, at different time intervals, i.e., one day before surgery and 3, 5, 7 and 10 days post surgery. The ambulatory behavior was evaluated using the open field test. A 7-day treatment with the ethanolic and aqueous extracts (50,100 and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) and safranal (0.025, 0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg, i.p.), attenuated the behavioral symptoms of neuropathic pain in a dose dependent manner. Crocin even at the high dose (50 mg/kg) failed to produce any protective role. However, gabapentine (100 mg/kg) as a reference drug significantly alleviated all behavioral manifestations of neuropathic pain compared to control group. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that ethanolic and aqueous extracts of saffron as well as safranal could be useful in treatment of different kinds of neuropathic pains and as an adjuvant to conventional medicines.

  8. Pervaporation of ethanol produced from banana waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Roger Hoel; Linzmeyer, Poliana; Franco, Cláudia Maria Bueno; Souza, Ozair; Sellin, Noeli; Medeiros, Sandra Helena Westrupp; Marangoni, Cintia

    2014-08-01

    Banana waste has the potential to produce ethanol with a low-cost and sustainable production method. The present work seeks to evaluate the separation of ethanol produced from banana waste (rejected fruit) using pervaporation with different operating conditions. Tests were carried out with model solutions and broth with commercial hollow hydrophobic polydimethylsiloxane membranes. It was observed that pervaporation performance for ethanol/water binary mixtures was strongly dependent on the feed concentration and operating temperature with ethanol concentrations of 1-10%; that an increase of feed flow rate can enhance the permeation rate of ethanol with the water remaining at almost the same value; that water and ethanol fluxes was increased with the temperature increase; and that the higher effect in flux increase was observed when the vapor pressure in the permeate stream was close to the ethanol vapor pressure. Better results were obtained with fermentation broth than with model solutions, indicated by the permeance and membrane selectivity. This could be attributed to by-products present in the multicomponent mixtures, facilitating the ethanol permeability. By-products analyses show that the presence of lactic acid increased the hydrophilicity of the membrane. Based on this, we believe that pervaporation with hollow membrane of ethanol produced from banana waste is indeed a technology with the potential to be applied.

  9. Sorghum to Ethanol Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlberg, Jeffrey A. [Univ. of California, Parlier, CA (United States). Kearney Research and Extension Center; Wolfrum, Edward J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States). Process and Analytical Engineering Group

    2010-09-28

    The development of a robust source of renewable transportation fuel will require a large amount of biomass feedstocks. It is generally accepted that in addition to agricultural and forestry residues, we will need crops grown specifically for subsequent conversion into fuels. There has been a lot of research on several of these so-called "dedicated bioenergy crops" including switchgrass, miscanthus, sugarcane, and poplar. It is likely that all of these crops will end up playing a role as feedstocks, depending on local environmental and market conditions. Many different types of sorghum have been grown to produce syrup, grain, and animal feed for many years. It has several features that may make it as compelling as other crops mentioned above as a renewable, sustainable biomass feedstock; however, very little work has been done to investigate sorghum as a dedicated bioenergy crop. The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum biomass to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy crop that could help

  10. Sorghum to Ethanol Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlberg, Jeff; Wolfrum, Ed

    2010-06-30

    The development of a robust source of renewable transportation fuel will require a large amount of biomass feedstocks. It is generally accepted that in addition to agricultural and forestry residues, we will need crops grown specifically for subsequent conversion into fuels. There has been a lot of research on several of these so-called dedicated bioenergy crops including switchgrass, miscanthus, sugarcane, and poplar. It is likely that all of these crops will end up playing a role as feedstocks, depending on local environmental and market conditions. Many different types of sorghum have been grown to produce syrup, grain, and animal feed for many years. It has several features that may make it as compelling as other crops mentioned above as a renewable, sustainable biomass feedstock; however, very little work has been done to investigate sorghum as a dedicated bioenergy crop. The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum biomass to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy crop that could help

  11. Sorghum to Ethanol Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeff Dahlberg, Ph D; Ed Wolfrum, Ph D

    2010-06-30

    The development of a robust source of renewable transportation fuel will require a large amount of biomass feedstocks. It is generally accepted that in addition to agricultural and forestry residues, we will need crops grown specifically for subsequent conversion into fuels. There has been a lot of research on several of these so-called "dedicated bioenergy crops" including switchgrass, miscanthus, sugarcane, and poplar. It is likely that all of these crops will end up playing a role as feedstocks, depending on local environmental and market conditions. Many different types of sorghum have been grown to produce syrup, grain, and animal feed for many years. It has several features that may make it as compelling as other crops mentioned above as a renewable, sustainable biomass feedstock; however, very little work has been done to investigate sorghum as a dedicated bioenergy crop. The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum biomass to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy crop that could help

  12. Alzheimer's disease and methanol toxicity (part 1): chronic methanol feeding led to memory impairments and tau hyperphosphorylation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meifeng; Lu, Jing; Miao, Junye; Rizak, Joshua; Yang, Jianzhen; Zhai, Rongwei; Zhou, Jun; Qu, Jiagui; Wang, Jianhong; Yang, Shangchuan; Ma, Yuanye; Hu, Xintian; He, Rongqiao

    2014-01-01

    Although methanol toxicity is well known for acute neurological sequelae leading to blindness or death, there is a new impetus to investigate the chronic effects of methanol exposure. These include a recently established link between formaldehyde, a methanol metabolite, and Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. In the present study, mice were fed with methanol to revisit the chronic effects of methanol toxicity, especially as it pertains to AD progression. Three groups of mice (n = 9) were given either water as a control or a methanol solution (concentrations of 2% or 3.8%) over a 6-week period. The methanol-fed mice were found to have impaired spatial recognition and olfactory memory in Y-maze and olfactory memory paradigms. Immunohistochemical analysis of the mouse brains found increased neuronal tau phosphorylation in the hippocampus and an increased cellular apoptotic marker in hippocampal CA1 neurons (~10% of neurons displayed chromatin condensation) in the methanol-fed groups. Two additional in vitro experiments in mouse embryonic cerebral cortex neurons and mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells found that formaldehyde, but not methanol or the methanol end product formic acid, induced microtubule disintegration and tau protein hyperphosphorylation. The findings of the behavioral tests and immunohistochemical analysis suggested that the methanol-fed mice presented with partial AD-like symptoms. The in vitro experiments suggested that formaldehyde was most likely the detrimental component of methanol toxicity related to hippocampal tau phosphorylation and the subsequent impaired memory in the mice. These findings add to a growing body of evidence that links formaldehyde to AD pathology.

  13. Cellulosic ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindedam, Jane; Bruun, Sander; Jørgensen, Henning;

    2010-01-01

    Background Variations in sugar yield due to genotypic qualities of feedstock are largely undescribed for pilot-scale ethanol processing. Our objectives were to compare glucose and xylose yield (conversion and total sugar yield) from straw of five winter wheat cultivars at three enzyme loadings (2...

  14. Steam reforming of ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trane-Restrup, Rasmus; Dahl, Søren; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2013-01-01

    Steam reforming (SR) of oxygenated species like bio-oil or ethanol can be used to produce hydrogen or synthesis gas from renewable resources. However, deactivation due to carbon deposition is a major challenge for these processes. In this study, different strategies to minimize carbon deposition...... on Ni-based catalysts during SR of ethanol were investigated in a flow reactor. Four different supports for Ni were tested and Ce0.6Zr0.4O2 showed the highest activity, but also suffered from severe carbon deposition at 600 °C or below. Operation at 600 °C or above were needed for full conversion...... 400 ppm of the carbon in the feed at approx. 600 °C. The different promoters did not influence the product distribution to any significant extent. Selective poisoning with small amounts of K2SO4 on Ni–CeO2/MgAl2O4 at 600 °C decreased carbon deposition from 900 to 200 ppm of the carbon in the feed...

  15. Ethanol enrichment from ethanol-water mixtures using high frequency ultrasonic atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpalani, D M; Suzuki, K

    2011-09-01

    The influence of high frequency ultrasound on the enrichment of ethanol from ethanol-water mixtures was investigated. Experiments performed in a continuous enrichment system showed that the generated atomized mist was at a higher ethanol concentration than the feed and the enrichment ratio was higher than the vapor liquid equilibrium curve for ethanol-water above 40 mol%. Well-controlled experiments were performed to analyze the effect of physical parameters; temperature, carrier gas flow and collection height on the enrichment. Droplet size measurements of the atomized mist and visualization of the oscillating fountain jet formed during sonication were made to understand the separation mechanism.

  16. Pathology review of proliferative lesions of the exocrine pancreas in two chronic feeding studies in rats with ammonium perfluorooctanoate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. Caverly Rae

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two chronic dietary studies, conducted years apart, with ammonium perfluorooctanoate (APFO in Sprague Dawley rats have been previously reported. Although both included male 300 ppm dietary dose groups, only the later study, conducted in 1990–1992 by Biegel et al., reported an increase in proliferative lesions (hyperplasia and adenoma of the acinar pancreas. An assessment of the significance of the differences between both studies requires careful consideration of: the diagnostic criteria for proliferative acinar cell lesions of the rat pancreas (for example, the diagnosis of pancreatic acinar cell hyperplasia versus adenoma is based on the two-dimensional size of the lesion rather than distinct morphological differences; the basis for those criteria in light of their relevance to biological behavior; and the potential diagnostic variability between individual pathologists for difficult-to-classify lesions. A pathology peer review of male exocrine pancreatic tissues from the earlier study, conducted in 1981–1983 by Butenhoff et al., was undertaken. This review identified an increase in acinar cell hyperplasia but not adenoma or carcinoma in the earlier study. Both studies observed a proliferative response in the acinar pancreas which was more pronounced in the study by Biegel et al. Definitive reasons for the greater incidence of proliferative lesions in the later study were not identified, but some possible explanations are presented herein. The relevance of this finding to human risk assessment, in the face of differences in the biological behavior of human and rat pancreatic proliferative lesions and the proposed mechanism of formation of these lesions, are questionable.

  17. A differential role for neuropeptides in acute and chronic adaptive responses to alcohol: behavioural and genetic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippa Mitchell

    Full Text Available Prolonged alcohol consumption in humans followed by abstinence precipitates a withdrawal syndrome consisting of anxiety, agitation and in severe cases, seizures. Withdrawal is relieved by a low dose of alcohol, a negative reinforcement that contributes to alcohol dependency. This phenomenon of 'withdrawal relief' provides evidence of an ethanol-induced adaptation which resets the balance of signalling in neural circuits. We have used this as a criterion to distinguish between direct and indirect ethanol-induced adaptive behavioural responses in C. elegans with the goal of investigating the genetic basis of ethanol-induced neural plasticity. The paradigm employs a 'food race assay' which tests sensorimotor performance of animals acutely and chronically treated with ethanol. We describe a multifaceted C. elegans 'withdrawal syndrome'. One feature, decrease reversal frequency is not relieved by a low dose of ethanol and most likely results from an indirect adaptation to ethanol caused by inhibition of feeding and a food-deprived behavioural state. However another aspect, an aberrant behaviour consisting of spontaneous deep body bends, did show withdrawal relief and therefore we suggest this is the expression of ethanol-induced plasticity. The potassium channel, slo-1, which is a candidate ethanol effector in C. elegans, is not required for the responses described here. However a mutant deficient in neuropeptides, egl-3, is resistant to withdrawal (although it still exhibits acute responses to ethanol. This dependence on neuropeptides does not involve the NPY-like receptor npr-1, previously implicated in C. elegans ethanol withdrawal. Therefore other neuropeptide pathways mediate this effect. These data resonate with mammalian studies which report involvement of a number of neuropeptides in chronic responses to alcohol including corticotrophin-releasing-factor (CRF, opioids, tachykinins as well as NPY. This suggests an evolutionarily conserved role

  18. Complex Feeding Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Miles PhD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Where swallowing difficulties are chronic or progressive, or a patient is palliative, tube feeding is often not deemed appropriate. Instead, patients continue to eat and drink despite the risks of pneumonia and death. There is currently little evidence to guide clinical practice in this field often termed “risk feeding.” This qualitative study investigated staff, patient, and family member perceptions of risk feeding practices in one New Zealand hospital. Method: Twenty-nine staff members and six patients and/or their family were interviewed. Results: Thematic analysis revealed four global themes: supporting practice, communication, complexity of feeding decisions, and patient and family-centered care. Staff described limited education and organizational policy around risk feeding decisions. Communication was considered a major factor in the success. Conclusion: Feeding decisions are complex in the hospital environment. The themes identified in this study provide a foundation for hospital guideline development and implementation.

  19. Cytologic alterations in the oral mucosa after chronic exposure to ethanol Alterações citológicas na mucosa bucal após exposição crônica ao etanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Regina de Almeida Reis

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of ethanol alone on the oral mucosa are still poorly understood, especially because there are few non-smoking chronic consumers of alcoholic beverages. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of micronucleus, abnormal nucleus/cytoplasm ratio, pyknosis, karyorrhexis and karyolysis in exfoliated cells from the buccal mucosa and from the lateral border of the tongue in 36 non-smoker alcoholics (ethanol group and 18 non-smokers and non-drinkers (control group. The Papanicolaou method was used. Since alcoholics generally have hepatobiliary involvement, the association between serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT and some of the analyzed oral mucosa alterations was also investigated. The ethanol group showed a significant increase in the frequency of all alterations analyzed in the tongue cells when compared with the control group (p 0.05; Mann-Whitney. In the ethanol group, the correlation between serum GGT and the frequency of micronucleus and abnormal nucleus/cytoplasm ratio in oral mucosa cells was not significant (p > 0.05; Spearman. In conclusion, chronic exposure to ethanol may be associated with carcinogenic cytologic changes in the oral mucosa, even in the absence of tobacco smoking. These alterations were not correlated with hepatobiliary injury.Os efeitos do etanol isoladamente sobre a mucosa bucal permanecem pouco esclarecidos, sobretudo devido ao baixo número de não-fumantes consumidores crônicos de bebidas alcoólicas. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar as freqüências de micronúcleo, relação núcleo/citoplasma anormal, picnose, cariorrexe e cariólise em células esfoliadas da mucosa jugal e do bordo lateral da língua de 36 alcoólatras não-fumantes (grupo etanol e 18 abstêmios de álcool e fumo (grupo controle. O método de Papanicolaou foi utilizado. Uma vez que indivíduos alcoólatras geralmente apresentam comprometimento hepatobiliar, a associação entre gama-glutamil transpeptidase (GGT s

  20. Inhibitory Effect of the Hexane Fraction of the Ethanolic Extract of the Fruits of Pterodon pubescens Benth in Acute and Chronic Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Hoscheid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fruits of Pterodon pubescens Benth have been used traditionally for the treatment of rheumatism, sore throat, and respiratory disorders, and also as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, depurative, tonic, and hypoglycemic agent. The study was aimed at evaluating the anti-inflammatory activity of the hexane fraction of an ethanolic extract of P. pubescens fruits. The oil from P. pubescens fruits was extracted with ethanol and partitioned with hexane. The anti-inflammatory activity was measured with increasing doses of the hexane fraction (FHPp by using a carrageenan-induced rat model of pleurisy and a rat model of complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis by using an FHPp dose of 250 mg/kg for 21 days. Treatment with an FHPp resulted in anti-inflammatory activity in both models. The results of biochemical, hematological, and histological analyses indicated a significant decrease in glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides levels (18.32%, 34.20%, and 41.70%, resp. and reduction in the numbers of total leukocytes and mononuclear cells. The FHPp dose of 1000 mg/kg induced no changes in behavioral parameters, and no animal died. The results of this study extend the findings of previous reports that have shown that administration of extracts and fractions obtained from species of the genus Pterodon exhibits anti-inflammatory activity and lacks toxicity.

  1. Ethanol consumption as inductor of pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    José; A; Tapia; Ginés; M; Salido; Antonio; González

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a major cause of pancreatitis, a condition that can manifest as both acute necroinflammation and chronic damage (acinar atrophy and f ibrosis). Pancreatic acinar cells can metabolize ethanol via the oxidative pathway, which generates acetaldehyde and involves the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase and possibly cytochrome P4502E1. Additionally, ethanol can be metabolized via a nonoxidative pathway involving fatty acid ethyl ester synthases. Metabolism of ethanol by acinar and other pancreatic cells and the consequent generation of toxic metabolites, are postulated to play an important role in the development of alcohol-related acute and chronic pancreatic injury. This current work will review some recent advances in the knowledge about ethanol actions on the exocrine pancreas and its relationship to inflammatory disease and cancer.

  2. Alfalfa non-feed uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-feed uses for alfalfa such as biomass energy and phytoremediation could increase alfalfa acreage and improve farm profitability. The new bio-energy alfalfa and production system increased forage yield and ethanol production. New alfalfas with enhanced nitrogen cycling capacities would protect wa...

  3. Efficient production of ethanol from waste paper and the biochemical methane potential of stillage eluted from ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Hiroto; Tan, Li; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Tang, Yue-Qin; Kida, Kenji; Morimura, Shigeru

    2016-02-01

    Waste paper can serve as a feedstock for ethanol production due to being rich in cellulose and not requiring energy-intensive thermophysical pretreatment. In this study, an efficient process was developed to convert waste paper to ethanol. To accelerate enzymatic saccharification, pH of waste paper slurry was adjusted to 4.5-5.0 with H2SO4. Presaccharification and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (PSSF) with enzyme loading of 40 FPU/g waste paper achieved an ethanol yield of 91.8% and productivity of 0.53g/(Lh) with an ethanol concentration of 32g/L. Fed-batch PSSF was used to decrease enzyme loading to 13 FPU/g waste paper by feeding two separate batches of waste paper slurry. Feeding with 20% w/w waste paper slurry increased ethanol concentration to 41.8g/L while ethanol yield decreased to 83.8%. To improve the ethanol yield, presaccharification was done prior to feeding and resulted in a higher ethanol concentration of 45.3g/L, a yield of 90.8%, and productivity of 0.54g/(Lh). Ethanol fermentation recovered 33.2% of the energy in waste paper as ethanol. The biochemical methane potential of the stillage eluted from ethanol fermentation was 270.5mL/g VTS and 73.0% of the energy in the stillage was recovered as methane. Integrating ethanol fermentation with methane fermentation, recovered a total of 80.4% of the energy in waste paper as ethanol and methane.

  4. Metabolic engineering to improve ethanol production in Thermoanaerobacter mathranii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Shuo; Mikkelsen, Marie Just

    2010-01-01

    Thermoanaerobacter mathranii can produce ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass at high temperatures, but its biotechnological exploitation will require metabolic engineering to increase its ethanol yield. With a cofactor-dependent ethanol production pathway in T. mathranii, it may become crucial...... to regenerate cofactor to increase the ethanol yield. Feeding the cells with a more reduced carbon source, such as mannitol, was shown to increase ethanol yield beyond that obtained with glucose and xylose. The ldh gene coding for lactate dehydrogenase was previously deleted from T. mathranii to eliminate...... an NADH oxidation pathway. To further facilitate NADH regeneration used for ethanol formation, a heterologous gene gldA encoding an NAD+-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase was expressed in T. mathranii. One of the resulting recombinant strains, T. mathranii BG1G1 (Δldh, P xyl GldA), showed increased ethanol...

  5. GENETICALLY MODIFIED LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS FOR IMPROVEMENT OF ETHANOL PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qijun Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Production of ethanol from lignocellulosic feed-stocks is of growing interest worldwide in recent years. However, we are currently still facing significant technical challenges to make it economically feasible on an industrial scale. Genetically modified lignocellulosic biomass has provided a potential alternative to address such challenges. Some studies have shown that genetically modified lignocellulosic biomass can increase its yield, decreasing its enzymatic hydrolysis cost and altering its composition and structure for ethanol production. Moreover, the modified lignocellulosic biomass also makes it possible to simplify the ethanol production procedures from lignocellulosic feed-stocks.

  6. 幽门螺杆菌感染者长期饮酒时PGE2与胃癌相关病变的关系%Relationship between Prostaglandin E2 and gastric cancer-related diseases in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection with chronic ethanol ingestion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲宝戈; 潘锦敦; 王中东; 韩新海; 乔瑞玲; 葛慧; 张晓光

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨长期饮酒合并幽门螺杆菌感染患者胃液及血液中PGE2与胃癌相关性病变的关系.方法 2007年1月-2010年12月符合条件的幽门螺杆菌感染同时长期饮酒56例和单纯长期饮酒64例患者,进行内镜下胃黏膜组织活检并进行病理学观察,同时抽静脉血及胃液用ELISA法检测PGE2浓度.结果 幽门螺杆菌感染同时长期饮酒组中胃黏膜轻度萎缩亚组和轻度肠化亚组患者血清PGE2浓度明显高于长期饮酒胃黏膜轻度萎缩亚组和轻度肠化亚组患者血清PGE2浓度(P=0.02或P=0.01).长期饮酒合并幽门螺杆菌阳性感染组中胃黏膜有不典型增生亚组患者血清PGE2浓度明显高于长期饮酒组中胃黏膜有不典型增生亚组患者(P=0.02).两组患者各亚组之间胃液PGE2浓度对比,差异无统计学意义(P均>0.05).结论 幽门螺杆菌感染同时长期饮酒患者血液PGE2浓度升高与胃黏膜轻度萎缩和肠化及不典型增生之间存在明显关系,但胃液中PGE2与胃黏膜萎缩、肠化和不典型增生之间无明显关系.%Objective To explore relationship between Prostaglandin E2(PGE2) and gastric cancer-related diseases in the patients with Helicobacter pylori infection with chronic ethanol ingestion. Methods Pathology examination of gastric mucosa acquired by gastroscope was conducted in 56 patients with Helicobacter pylori infection with chronic ethanol ingestion and 64 patients with chronic ethanol ingestion from January 2007 to December 2010. PGE2 in venous blood and gastric juice sample were taken and examined by enzymelinked immunosorbent assay. Results The concentration of PGE2 in serum was seen in slight atrophy or slight intestinal metaplasia in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection with the chronic ethanol ingestion was significant higher than that in patients with the chronic ethanol ingestion only(P =0.02 or P =0. 01 ). The serum concentration of PGE2 in the gastric mucosal dysplasia group of

  7. N-乙酰半胱氨酸对慢性饮酒大鼠肺纤维化的干预作用%The Intervention of N-Acetylcysteine on the Pulmonary Fibrosis of Chronic Ethanol Ingestion in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王静宜; 于洪志; 武俊萍; 杜钟珍; 吴琦

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the influence of N -acetylcysteine (NAC) on the pulmonary fibrosis induced by chronic ethanol ingestion in rats, and observe the changes of pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis with detecting the content of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) of lung tissue. Methods: Thirty healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into alcohol group (n=10), alcohol+NAC group (n=10), and control group (n=10). Ethanol liquid diet was given to rats in alcohol group and alcohol+NAC group. NAC 300 mg/(kg·d) was given to rats of alcohol+NAC group. The pathological changes of lung tissue were observed after 8-week treatment. The activity of SOD and content of MDA of lung tissue were detected. Results: there were varying degree of alveolar and alveolar septal infiltration of inflammatory cells, and more deposition of collagen fibers at intervals of alveolar in alcohol group. The similar pathological changes were found in alcohol+NAC group, but the degree was lower than that of alcohol group. The degree of alveolitis and the degree of pulmonary fibrosis were lower in alcohol+NAC group than those in alcohol group (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01, respectively). The SOD activity of lung tissue was higher in alcohol+NAC group than that of alcohol group. The MDA content of lung tissue was lower in alcohol+NAC group than that of alcohol group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: NAC can increase the SOD activity and decrease the content of MDA of lung tissue, and restrain the oxidative stress induced by alcohol, decrease the degree of pulmonary fibrosis induced by chronic ethanol ingestion in rats.%目的:探讨N-乙酰半胱氨酸(NAC)对慢性饮酒大鼠肺组织的病理形态及肺组织超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)、丙二醛(MDA)含量的影响.方法:30只健康雄性大鼠随机分成乙醇组、NAC组、对照组各10只,乙醇组和NAC组每日给予乙醇液体饲料,NAC组给予NAC 300 mg/(kg·d).8周后处死,观察肺组织病理改变,检测肺组织

  8. Simultaneous Determination of Four Tanshinones by UPLC-TQ/MS and Their Pharmacokinetic Application after Administration of Single Ethanol Extract of Danshen Combined with Water Extract in Normal and Adenine-Induced Chronic Renal Failure Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Die Cai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Salvia miltiorrhiza, one of the major traditional Chinese medicines, is commonly used and the main active ingredients—tanshinones—possess the ability to improve renal function. In this paper, the UPLC-TQ/MS method of simultaneously determining four tanshinones—tanshinone IIA, dihydrotanshinone I, tanshinone I, and cryptotanshinone—was established and applied to assess the pharmacokinetics in normal and chronic renal failure (CRF rat plasma. The pharmacokinetics of tanshinones in rats were studied after separately intragastric administration of Salvia miltiorrhiza ethanol extract (SMEE (0.65 g/kg, SMEE (0.65 g/kg combined with Salvia miltiorrhiza water extract (SMWE (1.55 g/kg. The results showed Cmax and AUC0–t of tanshinone IIA, tanshinone I, cryptotanshinone reduced by 50%~80% and CLz/F increased by 2~4 times (p < 0.05 in model group after administrated with SMEE. Nevertheless, after intragastric administration of a combination of SMWE and SMEE, the Cmax and AUC0–t of four tanshinones were upregulated and CLz/F was downregulated, which undulated similarity from the model group to the normal group with compatibility of SMEE and SMWE. These results hinted that SMWE could improve the bioavailability of tanshinones in CRF rats, which provides scientific information for further exploration the mechanism of the combination of SMWE and SMEE and offers a reference for clinical administration of Salvia miltiorrhiza.

  9. Rat Strain Differences in Susceptibility to Alcohol-Induced Chronic Liver Injury and Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. DeNucci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The finding of more severe steatohepatitis in alcohol fed Long Evans (LE compared with Sprague Dawley (SD and Fisher 344 (FS rats prompted us to determine whether host factors related to alcohol metabolism, inflammation, and insulin/IGF signaling predict proneness to alcohol-mediated liver injury. Adult FS, SD, and LE rats were fed liquid diets containing 0% or 37% (calories ethanol for 8 weeks. Among controls, LE rats had significantly higher ALT and reduced GAPDH relative to SD and FS rats. Among ethanol-fed rats, despite similar blood alcohol levels, LE rats had more pronounced steatohepatitis and fibrosis, higher levels of ALT, DNA damage, pro-inflammatory cytokines, ADH, ALDH, catalase, GFAP, desmin, and collagen expression, and reduced insulin receptor binding relative to FS rats. Ethanol-exposed SD rats had intermediate degrees of steatohepatitis, increased ALT, ADH and profibrogenesis gene expression, and suppressed insulin receptor binding and GAPDH expression, while pro-inflammatory cytokines were similarly increased as in LE rats. Ethanol feeding in FS rats only reduced IL-6, ALDH1–3, CYP2E1, and GAPDH expression in liver. In conclusion, susceptibility to chronic steatohepatitis may be driven by factors related to efficiency of ethanol metabolism and degree to which ethanol exposure causes hepatic insulin resistance and cytokine activation.

  10. Lithium-mediated protection against ethanol neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Luo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Lithium has long been used as a mood stabilizer in the treatment of manic-depressive (bipolar disorder. Recent studies suggest that lithium has neuroprotective properties and may be useful in the treatment of acute brain injuries such as ischemia and chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. One of the most important neuroprotective properties of lithium is its anti-apoptotic action. Ethanol is a neuroteratogen and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD are caused by maternal ethanol exposure during pregnancy. FASD is the leading cause of mental retardation. Ethanol exposure causes neuroapoptosis in the developing brain. Ethanol-induced loss of neurons in the central nervous system underlies many of the behavioral deficits observed in FASD. Excessive alcohol consumption is also associated with Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome and neurodegeneration in the adult brain. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that lithium is able to ameliorate ethanol-induced neuroapoptosis. Lithium is an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3 which has recently been identified as a mediator of ethanol neurotoxicity. Lithium’s neuroprotection may be mediated by its inhibition of GSK3. In addition, lithium also affects many other signaling proteins and pathways that regulate neuronal survival and differentiation. This review discusses the recent evidence of lithium-mediated protection against ethanol neurotoxicity and potential underlying mechanisms.

  11. Encephalon Condition in Chronic Alcohol Intoxication and the Role of Amoebic Invasion of this Organ in the Development of Ethanol Attraction in Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Shormanov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This presentation reviews data from studies on the encephalon in 27 men ranging in age from 21 to 51 years, showing signs of chronic alcohol intoxication and who died from causes other than skull injury and 14 control subjects. The specimens were fixed in formalin or Karnua liquid, filled with paraffin and then examined, utilizing a variety of histological, histochemical and morphometric techniques. The data refers to the structural changes in the various tissue components of the brain (nervous, glia-cells, arteries, veins, as well as pertinent information concerning the presence of Protozoa in all the sections examined which according to their morphological signs and behavioral reactions indicate that amoeba had been present. The degree of cerebral tissue insemination by these parasites has been demonstrated. The condition of the membranes of these microorganisms, their cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleoli as well as the chromatoid corpuscles has been assessed and recorded. The ability of these microorganisms to split, migrate within the CNS limits, to trigger incitement and dystrophic changes and in the case of death – calcification or exulceration is shown. Further, the issue of species characteristics of amoeba occurring in the patients’ brains is discussed. The hypothesis of a possible link of amebic invasion with the development of alcohol dependence in humans is proposed.

  12. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions with ethanol (alcohol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander; Anderson, Gail D

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol (alcohol) is one of the most widely used legal drugs in the world. Ethanol is metabolized by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 drug-metabolizing enzyme that is also responsible for the biotransformation of xenobiotics and fatty acids. Drugs that inhibit ADH or CYP2E1 are the most likely theoretical compounds that would lead to a clinically significant pharmacokinetic interaction with ethanol, which include only a limited number of drugs. Acute ethanol primarily alters the pharmacokinetics of other drugs by changing the rate and extent of absorption, with more limited effects on clearance. Both acute and chronic ethanol use can cause transient changes to many physiologic responses in different organ systems such as hypotension and impairment of motor and cognitive functions, resulting in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. Evaluating drug interactions with long-term use of ethanol is uniquely challenging. Specifically, it is difficult to distinguish between the effects of long-term ethanol use on liver pathology and chronic malnutrition. Ethanol-induced liver disease results in decreased activity of hepatic metabolic enzymes and changes in protein binding. Clinical studies that include patients with chronic alcohol use may be evaluating the effects of mild cirrhosis on liver metabolism, and not just ethanol itself. The definition of chronic alcohol use is very inconsistent, which greatly affects the quality of the data and clinical application of the results. Our study of the literature has shown that a significantly higher volume of clinical studies have focused on the pharmacokinetic interactions of ethanol and other drugs. The data on pharmacodynamic interactions are more limited and future research addressing pharmacodynamic interactions with ethanol, especially regarding the non-central nervous system effects, is much needed.

  13. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  14. The expanding U. S. ethanol industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fecht, B.

    1991-01-01

    American experience in the ethanol industry is discussed. Archer Daniel Midlands Co. (ADM) is a large agri-processing company that is the largest processor of grains and oilseeds, and processes ca 400,000 bushels of corn per day at its Decateur facility. Waste water and heat from the plant is used to grow vegetables hydroponically, with carbon dioxide from distillation used to speed growing at night. About 40,000 heads of lettuce per day are harvested, with cucumbers and tomatoes grown as premium crops. The plant includes a state-of-the-art fluidized bed power plant that burns high sulfur coal without sulfur emission. Approval has recently been granted by the Environmental Protection Agency to burn used tires, and payback for the process is expected to take 3-4 years. Ethanol is produced by steeping corn and separating germ and starch, with the starch used to make corn sweeteners. As well as ethanol, byproducts include animal feed, hydroponics, oils and margarines. ADM is the largest barging company in the U.S., with 14,000 rail cars, 1,200 dedicated to fuel ethanol. The Clean Air Act will mandate a 2.7% oxygen gasoline, and 10% ethanol additive gives 3.3% oxygen. The high octane rating of ethanol-blend gasoline is a strong selling point, and is a good deal for refiners, especially at octane-poor refineries.

  15. Determination of virginiamycin in feeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragheb, H S; Black, L J; Waisner, D L

    1979-05-01

    Virginiamycin was extracted from the feed by ethanol-pH 2.5 phosphate buffer (1 + 1). The pH during extraction was adjusted (when necessary) to between 4 and 5. Sample dilutions and the standard dose response line were prepared to contain ethanol pH 6 phosphate buffer (2 + 8), and the test organism was Sarcina lutea. Three feeds (a poultry ration, a swine finishing ration, and a swine starter ration) showed virginiamycin recovery of 88.8--108.9% when standard solutions were added at concentrations of 4.54--90.8 g/ton. The coefficient of variation (4--20%) was larger for low potency feeds (10 g/ton) compared to the higher feeds (100 g/ton). Similarly, excellent recovery was obtained when the swine starter feed was fortified by a commercial premix. Amprolium, roxarsone, and monensin can be present at 20 times the concentration of virginiamycin with little or no interference in the antibiotic determination. Lasalocid at 10 times the concentration of virginiamycin caused a slightly positive bias (recovery, 107.4%).

  16. SILIBININ INHIBITS ETHANOL METABOLISM AND ETHANOL-DEPENDENT CELL PROLIFERATION IN AN IN VITRO MODEL OF HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon-Warner, Elizabeth; Sugg, James A.; Schrum, Laura W.; McKillop, Iain H.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption is a known risk factor for developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The use of plant-derived antioxidants is gaining increasing clinical prominence as a potential therapy to ameliorate the effects of ethanol on hepatic disease development and progression. This study demonstrates silibinin, a biologically active flavanoid derived from milk thistle, inhibits cytochrome p4502E1 induction, ethanol metabolism and reactive oxygen species generation in HCC cells in vitro. These silibinin-mediated effects also inhibit ethanol-dependent increases in HCC cell proliferation in culture. PMID:19900758

  17. Autophagy and ethanol neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Excessive ethanol exposure is detrimental to the brain. The developing brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol such that prenatal ethanol exposure causes fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Neuronal loss in the brain is the most devastating consequence and is associated with mental retardation and other behavioral deficits observed in FASD. Since alcohol consumption during pregnancy has not declined, it is imperative to elucidate the underlying mechanisms and develop effective therapeutic strategies. One cellular mechanism that acts as a protective response for the central nervous system (CNS) is autophagy. Autophagy regulates lysosomal turnover of organelles and proteins within cells, and is involved in cell differentiation, survival, metabolism, and immunity. We have recently shown that ethanol activates autophagy in the developing brain. The autophagic preconditioning alleviates ethanol-induced neuron apoptosis, whereas inhibition of autophagy potentiates ethanol-stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and exacerbates ethanol-induced neuroapoptosis. The expression of genes encoding proteins required for autophagy in the CNS is developmentally regulated; their levels are much lower during an ethanol-sensitive period than during an ethanol-resistant period. Ethanol may stimulate autophagy through multiple mechanisms; these include induction of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress, modulation of MTOR and AMPK signaling, alterations in BCL2 family proteins, and disruption of intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. This review discusses the most recent evidence regarding the involvement of autophagy in ethanol-mediated neurotoxicity as well as the potential therapeutic approach of targeting autophagic pathways.

  18. Session 4: Catalytic behavior of Ni(II)-Al hydrotalcite like compounds in bio-ethanol steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comas, J.; Laborde, M.; Amadeo, N. [Laboratorio de Procesos Cataliticos, Dpto. Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Ingenieria. Pabellon de Industrias. Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2004-07-01

    In this work, the ethanol steam reforming on massive Ni(II)-Al hydrotalcite like compounds as catalyst, at 773 K and atmospheric pressure, was studied. In particular, from the experiments carried out at different water/ethanol feed ratio is possible to elucidate the catalytic behavior for ethanol steam reforming over Ni(II)-Al hydrotalcite. (authors)

  19. Alcohol causes a fatty pancreas. A rat model of ethanol-induced pancreatic steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J S; Colley, P W; Sosula, L; Pirola, R C; Chapman, B A; Somer, J B

    1982-01-01

    To develop an animal mode of alcoholic pancreatic steatosis, female Wistar rats were pair fed liquid diets, containing ethanol as 36% of calories or an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate for 3 weeks. Electron microscopic examination showed lipid vesicles localized principally at the bases of pancreatic acinar cells in the ethanol-fed rats. Ethanol feeding significantly increased pancreatic content of cholesteryl ester without changing levels of other lipids. Ethanol feeding enhanced labeled acetate, palmitate, oleate, and linoleate incorporation into cholesteryl ester. Therefore, increased esterification of cholesterol may, in part, explain the observed accumulation of cholesteryl ester.

  20. “Jello® Shots” and Cocktails as Ethanol Vehicles: Parametric Studies with High- and Low-Saccharin-Consuming Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy K. Dess

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Naïve humans and rats voluntarily consume little ethanol at concentrations above ~6% due to its aversive flavor. Developing procedures that boost intake of ethanol or ethanol-paired flavors facilitates research on neural mechanisms of ethanol-associated behaviors and helps identify variables that modulate ethanol intake outside of the lab. The present study explored the impact on consumption of ethanol and ethanol-paired flavors of nutritionally significant parametric variations: ethanol vehicle (gelatin or solution, with or without polycose; ethanol concentration (4% or 10%; and feeding status (chow deprived or ad lib. during flavor conditioning and flavor preference testing. Individual differences were modeled by testing rats of lines selectively bred for high (HiS or low (LoS saccharin intake. A previously reported preference for ethanol-paired flavors was replicated when ethanol had been drunk during conditioning. However, indifference or aversion to ethanol-paired flavors generally obtained when ethanol had been eaten in gelatin during conditioning, regardless of ethanol concentration, feeding status, or caloric value of the vehicle. Modest sex and line variations occurred. Engaging different behavioral systems when eating gelatin, rather than drinking solution, may account for these findings. Implications for parameter selection in future neurobiological research and for understanding conditions that influence ethanol intake outside of the lab are discussed.

  1. RAB GTPASES ASSOCIATE WITH ISOLATED LIPID DROPLETS (LDS) AND SHOW ALTERED CONTENT AFTER ETHANOL ADMINISTRATION: POTENTIAL ROLE IN ALCOHOL-IMPAIRED LD METABOLISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasineni, Karuna; McVicker, Benita L.; Tuma, Dean J.; McNiven, Mark A.; Casey, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Alcoholic liver disease is manifested by the presence of fatty liver, primarily due to accumulation of hepatocellular lipid droplets (LDs). The presence of membrane-trafficking proteins (e.g. Rab GTPases) with LDs indicates that LDs may be involved in trafficking pathways known to be altered in ethanol damaged hepatocytes. Since these Rab GTPases are crucial regulators of protein trafficking, we examined the effect ethanol administration has on hepatic Rab protein content and association with LDs. Methods Male Wistar rats were pair-fed Lieber-DeCarli diets for 5 to 8 weeks. Whole liver and isolated LD fractions were analyzed. Identification of LDs and associated Rab proteins was performed in frozen liver or paraffin-embedded sections followed by immunohistochemical analysis. Results Lipid accumulation was characterized by larger LD vacuoles and increased total triglyceride content in ethanol-fed rats. Rabs 1, 2, 3d, 5, 7 and 18 were analyzed in post-nuclear supernatant (PNS) as well as LDs. All of the Rabs were found in the PNS, and Rabs 1, 2, 5 and 7 did not show alcohol-altered content, while Rab 3d content was reduced by over 80%, and Rab 18 also showed ethanol-induced reduction in content. Rab 3d was not found to associate with LDs, while all other Rabs were found in the LD fractions, and several showed an ethanol-related decrease (Rabs 2, 5, 7, 18). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the enhanced content of a LD-associated protein, perilipin 2 (PLIN2) that was paralleled with an associated decrease of Rab 18 in ethanol-fed rat sections. Conclusion Chronic ethanol feeding was associated with increased PLIN2 and altered Rab GTPase content in enriched LD fractions. Although mechanisms driving these changes are not established, further studies on intracellular protein trafficking and LD biology after alcohol administration will likely contribute to our understanding of fatty liver disease. PMID:24117505

  2. Ethanol from corn silage. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehlberg, R.L.

    1981-10-01

    The corn silage to ethanol process is described. The process feed is corn silage preserved with sulfuric acid. No anaerobic ensilement is necessary since H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ completely prevents microbial growth. The acidified corn silage is heated by steam injection as it is loaded into a batch reactor. The polysaccharides are hydrolyzed to xylose and glucose over a 6 to 8 hour period. Then the sugars are washed from the residual fibers over a 6 to 12 hour period with thin stillage or water. The hot, acidic syrup is then neutralized and cooled for fermentation. After fermentation the ethanol is distilled. The residual fibers containing the thin stillage, corn germ, cellulose, and lignin are unloaded from the reactor and dried with flue gases for animal feed.

  3. Chronic high fat feeding increases anxiety-like behaviour and reduces transcript abundance of glucocorticoid signalling genes in the hippocampus of female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanathan, Shathveekan; Thavartnam, Kabriya; Arif, Shahneen; Elegino, Trisha; McGowan, Patrick O

    2015-06-01

    The consumption of diets high in saturated fats and obesity have been associated with impaired physical and mental health. Previous studies indicate that chronic high fat diet consumption leads to systemic inflammation in humans and non-human animal models. Studies in non-human animals suggest that altered physiological responses to stress are also a consequence of high fat diet consumption. Glucocorticoid signalling mechanisms may link immune and stress-related pathways in the brain, and were shown to be significantly altered in the brains of female rat offspring of mothers exposed to chronic high fat diet during pregnancy and lactation. For adult females, the consequence of chronic high fat diet consumption on these signalling pathways and their relationship to stress-related behaviour is not known. In this study, we examined the effects of chronic consumption of a high fat diet compared to a low fat control diet among adult female Long Evans rats. We found significant differences in weight gain, caloric intake, anxiety-related behaviours, and glucocorticoid-related gene expression over a 10-week exposure period. As expected, rats in the high fat diet group gained the most weight and consumed the greatest number of calories. Rats in the high fat diet group showed significantly greater levels of anxiety-related behaviour in the Light Dark and Open Field tasks compared to rats in the low fat diet group. Rats consuming high fat diet also exhibited reduced transcript abundance in the hippocampus of stress-related mineralocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid receptor genes, as well as nuclear factor kappa beta gene expression, implicated in inflammatory processes. Together, these data indicate that chronic high fat diet consumption may increase anxiety-like behaviour at least in part via alterations in glucocorticoid signalling mechanisms in limbic brain regions.

  4. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant promotes intestinal barrier function, balances Treg and TH17 cells and ameliorates hepatic injury in a mouse model of chronic-binge alcohol feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui-Cong; Xu, Lan-Man; Du, Shan-Jie; Huang, Si-Si; Wu, He; Dong, Jia-Jia; Huang, Jian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Feng, Wen-Ke; Chen, Yong-Ping

    2016-01-22

    Impaired intestinal barrier function plays a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic injury, and the subsequent excessive absorbed endotoxin and bacterial translocation activate the immune response that aggravates the liver injury. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant (LGG-s) has been suggested to improve intestinal barrier function and alleviate the liver injury induced by chronic and binge alcohol consumption, but the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. In this study, chronic-binge alcohol fed model was used to determine the effects of LGG-s on the prevention of alcoholic liver disease in C57BL/6 mice and investigate underlying mechanisms. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli diet containing 5% alcohol for 10 days, and one dose of alcohol was gavaged on Day 11. In one group, LGG-s was supplemented along with alcohol. Control mice were fed isocaloric diet. Nine hours later the mice were sacrificed for analysis. Chronic-binge alcohol exposure induced an elevation in liver enzymes, steatosis and morphology changes, while LGG-s supplementation attenuated these changes. Treatment with LGG-s significantly improved intestinal barrier function reflected by increased mRNA expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and villus-crypt histology in ileum, and decreased Escherichia coli (E. coli) protein level in liver. Importantly, flow cytometry analysis showed that alcohol reduced Treg cell population while increased TH17 cell population as well as IL-17 secretion, which was reversed by LGG-s administration. In conclusion, our findings indicate that LGG-s is effective in preventing chronic-binge alcohol exposure-induced liver injury and shed a light on the importance of the balance of Treg and TH17 cells in the role of LGG-s application.

  5. Roles for the endocannabinoid system in ethanol-motivated behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson-Redmond, Angela N; Guindon, Josée; Morgan, Daniel J

    2016-02-04

    Alcohol use disorder represents a significant human health problem that leads to substantial loss of human life and financial cost to society. Currently available treatment options do not adequately address this human health problem, and thus, additional therapies are desperately needed. The endocannabinoid system has been shown, using animal models, to modulate ethanol-motivated behavior, and it has also been demonstrated that chronic ethanol exposure can have potentially long-lasting effects on the endocannabinoid system. For example, chronic exposure to ethanol, in either cell culture or preclinical rodent models, causes an increase in endocannabinoid levels that results in down-regulation of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and uncoupling of this receptor from downstream G protein signaling pathways. Using positron emission tomography (PET), similar down-regulation of CB1 has been noted in multiple regions of the brain in human alcoholic patients. In rodents, treatment with the CB1 inverse agonist SR141716A (Rimonabant), or genetic deletion of CB1 leads to a reduction in voluntary ethanol drinking, ethanol-stimulated dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, operant self-administration of ethanol, sensitization to the locomotor effects of ethanol, and reinstatement/relapse of ethanol-motivated behavior. Although the clinical utility of Rimonabant or other antagonists/inverse agonists for CB1 is limited due to negative neuropsychiatric side effects, negative allosteric modulators of CB1 and inhibitors of endocannabinoid catabolism represent therapeutic targets worthy of additional examination.

  6. Fuel grade ethanol by solvent extraction: Final subcontract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedder, D.W.

    1987-04-01

    This report summarizes final results for ethanol recovery by solvent extraction and extractive distillation. At conclusion this work can be summarized as ethanol dehydration and recovery dilute fermentates is feasible using liquid/liquid extraction and extractive distillation. Compared to distillation, the economics are more attractive for less than 5 wt % ethanol. However, an economic bias in favor of SEED appears to exist even for 10 wt % feeds. It is of particular interest to consider the group extraction of ethanol and acetic acid followed by conversion to a mixture of ethanol and ethyl acetate. The latter species is a more valuable commodity and group extraction of inhibitory species is one feature of liquid/liquid extraction that is not easily accomodated using distillation. Upflow immobilized reactors offer the possibility of achieving high substrate conversion while also maintaining low metabolite concentrations. However, many questions remain to be answered with such a concept. 135 refs., 42 figs., 61 tabs.

  7. Fermentation method producing ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daniel I. C.; Dalal, Rajen

    1986-01-01

    Ethanol is the major end product of an anaerobic, thermophilic fermentation process using a mutant strain of bacterium Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum. This organism is capable of converting hexose and pentose carbohydrates to ethanol, acetic and lactic acids. Mutants of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum are capable of converting these substrates to ethanol in exceptionally high yield and with increased productivity. Both the mutant organism and the technique for its isolation are provided.

  8. Feed palatability and the alternative protein sources in shrimp feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chutima Tantikitti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Feed palatability in carnivorous aquaculture species, shrimps in particular, has been crucially related to the presence of compounds acting as attractants that are commonly associated with the prey components under wild conditions. Thus a nutritionally adequate and organoleptically-pleasing diet is essential to achieve satisfactory intake and growth in shrimps. Historically, fishmeal has been an essential dietary component of intensive shrimp cultures because of its nutrient composition and compounds of high attractability. However, in recent years the fishmeal supplies have been dwindling due to over hunting, a diminishing natural fish-stock, elevating prices and market volatility. This has led to search for cheaper sources of suitable protein as fishmeal substitutes. To improve the palatability of diets, various substances have been investigated for their effectiveness in aqua-feed including natural feed ingredients and synthetic flavor substances. For crustacean, attractants characteristically are of low molecular weight, water and ethanol soluble, and amphoteric or basic compounds that are released from potential prey items. Compounds such as free amino acids, especially taurine, hydroxyproline, glycine, arginine, glutamic acid and alanine have been identified to stimulate feeding in shrimps. The same has been identified with organic acids, nucleotides and nucleosides, betaine, and some small peptides. Palatability also has been associated with animal’s past experience with the feed. Understanding the factors that regulate feed palatability is therefore primary for successful shrimp culture.

  9. Grain ethanol as a petroleum substitute: a perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alston, T.G.

    1980-04-01

    Present tax exemptions for gasohol are more than sufficient to move ethanol into the gasoline market in a number of states. The principal near-term response to this profit opportunity, production of ethanol from feed grains, matches a limited biomass resource to an enormous market. This report estimates upper-bound prices for feed grains resulting from gasohol tax exemptions and concludes that grain price increases could be substantial. As shown else-where by Alston and Asbury, industrial uses constitute a more economical market for grain ethanol, one in which the product is now competitive with ethanol derived from petroleum and natural gas liquids. Without tax exemptions for gasohol, grain ethanol would now be displacing petroleum in the industrial market at a net economic gain, rather than in the fuel market at a net economic loss. The present analysis indicates that this industrial market for ethanol could grow significantly, principally by use of grain ethanol as an intermediate in production of chemicals now derived from petroleum and natural gas.

  10. Ethanol regulation of serum glucocorticoid kinase 1 expression in DBA2/J mouse prefrontal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blair N Costin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously identified a group of glucocorticoid-responsive genes, including Serum Glucocorticoid kinase 1 (Sgk1, regulated by acute ethanol in prefrontal cortex of DBA2/J mice. Acute ethanol activates the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis (HPA causing release of glucocorticoids. Chronic ethanol dysregulates the HPA response in both humans and rodents, possibly contributing to important interactions between stress and alcoholism. Because Sgk1 regulates ion channels and learning and memory, we hypothesized that Sgk1 contributes to HPA-dependent acute and adaptive neuronal responses to ethanol. These studies characterized acute and chronic ethanol regulation of Sgk1 mRNA and protein and their relationship with ethanol actions on the HPA axis. RESULTS: Acute ethanol increased Sgk1 mRNA expression in a dose and time dependent manner. Three separate results suggested that ethanol regulated Sgk1 via circulating glucocorticoids: acute ethanol increased glucocorticoid receptor binding to the Sgk1 promoter; adrenalectomy blocked ethanol induction of Sgk1 mRNA; and chronic ethanol exposure during locomotor sensitization down-regulated HPA axis activation and Sgk1 induction by acute ethanol. SGK1 protein had complex temporal responses to acute ethanol with rapid and transient increases in Ser422 phosphorylation at 15 min. following ethanol administration. This activating phosphorylation had functional consequences, as suggested by increased phosphorylation of the known SGK1 target, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1. After repeated ethanol administration during locomotor sensitization, basal SGK1 protein phosphorylation increased despite blunting of Sgk1 mRNA induction by ethanol. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that HPA axis and glucocorticoid receptor signaling mediate acute ethanol induction of Sgk1 transcription in mouse prefrontal cortex. However, acute ethanol also causes complex changes in SGK1 protein expression and

  11. Sequential Treatment of a Feeding Problem Using a Pacifier and Flipped Spoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Kristi D.; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Kadey, Heather J.; Volkert, Valerie M.; Stewart, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Parents may be reluctant to treat the feeding disorder of a chronically ill child who exhibits distressed behavior during feeding. In this study, we identified a child with chronic medical problems and a feeding disorder who cried during feedings. We introduced treatment components sequentially to address parental concerns about crying. First, we…

  12. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G A S; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S

    2014-04-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with 1,10-PT + ethanol and ∼1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I-III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol.

  13. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G. A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with l,10-PT + ethanol and ~1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I—III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol. PMID:24281792

  14. Ethanol production from bread residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Roodpeyma, Shapoor [Chemical Engineering Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran); Khanahmadi, Morteza [Agricultural Engineering Research Department, Isfahan Center for the Research of Agricultural Science and Natural Resources, Isfahan (Iran); Taherzadeh, Mohammad J. [School of Engineering, University of Boraas, SE-50190 Boraas (Sweden)

    2008-04-15

    Bread residues were converted into a suitable fermentation feed via a two-step starch hydrolysis using amylolytic enzymes. Wheat flour hydrolysis was also carried out at the same conditions for comparison. For the first stage, namely liquefaction, effects of temperature (50-85{sup o}C) and substrate concentration (20% and 35%) were investigated. The 3-h liquefaction of the 20% bread suspension made 70% of initial dry matter soluble regardless of the temperature. The liquefaction of the 35% bread suspension had to be carried out by a fed-batch method due to the pasty behavior of the suspension. It resulted in a 65% dissolution of the suspended bread at 85{sup o}C. Saccharification of the latter product led to a fermentation feedstock having a dextrose equivalent (DE) of more than 95 and almost 80% dissolution of the initial dry matter. The prepared feedstock was then cultivated using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which resulted in an overall yield of 350 g ethanol per kg of initial bread dry matter. Staling of the bread for a week had no effect on liquefaction, saccharification and ethanol yield. (author)

  15. Neurosteroid effects on sensitivity to ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa M Helms

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Harrison and Simmonds (1984 provided the first clear evidence that neuroactive steroids act at specific neurotransmitter receptors, investigating the potentiation of muscimol-induced GABAA responses by alphaxalone (3α-hydroxy 5α -pregnane l l,20-dione in cortical slices. Within 2 years, a progesterone metabolite (3α-hydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one, 3α,5α-THP, allopregnanolone and a deoxycorticosterone metabolite (3α,21-dihydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one, 3α,5α-THDOC, tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone, THDOC were shown to be positive modulators of GABAA receptors (Majewska et al., 1986. That same year, publications showed that ethanol has direct action at GABAA receptors (Allan and Harris, 1986, Suzdak et al., 1986. Thus, the GABAA receptor complex was identified as a membrane-bound target providing a pharmacological basis for shared sensitivity between neurosteroids and ethanol. The common behavioral effects of ethanol and neuroactive steroids were compared directly using drug discrimination procedures (Ator et al., 1993. The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor complex, a membrane-bound ionophore important for excitatory glutamate neurotransmission, was shown to be antagonized by low concentrations of ethanol (Lovinger et al., 1989. Since data were emerging for neurosteroid activity at NMDA receptors (Wu et al., 1991, the stage was set for the suggestion that neurosteroids, and physiological states that alter circulating neuroactive steroids, could affect sensitivity to alcohol (Grant et al., 1997. The unique interface of ethanol and neurosteroids encompasses molecular, cellular, physiological and behavioral processes. This review will highlight a variety of mechanisms by which neurosteroids affect sensitivity to ethanol, including metabolic pathways, physiological states associated with activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axes, and the effects of chronic exposure to ethanol, in addition to

  16. Effects of Chronic Ethanol Intoxication on the Ultrastructures of Cerebellar Purkinje Cells in Adult Mice%慢性酒精中毒对成年小鼠小脑浦肯野细胞超微结构的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张长征; 朱庆丰

    2011-01-01

    目的 观察慢性酒精中毒所致的成年小鼠小脑皮质浦肯野细胞(Purkinje cell,PC)胞体的超微结构变化,探讨其对神经元超微结构的影响方式及生理意义.方法 用15%酒精饲喂3月龄小白鼠3个月,经行为学检测后,取小脑前叶做电镜包埋,切片,染色,透射电镜下观察并拍照.结果 酒精中毒组PC核周质中线粒体膨解,基质囊泡化;高尔基复合体扁平囊扩张;粗面内质网碎裂,核糖体颗粒减少;"空泡变性"出现;双层核膜界限不清;染色质边集等变化.结论 慢性酒精中毒可导致小脑浦肯野细胞多种细胞器出现异常改变,推测这些变化可引起胞内物质合成减少,空间构筑紊乱,神经元死亡,最终导致小脑功能损伤.%Objective We observed chronic ethanol-induced ultrastructural alterations of Purkinje cell (PC) somata in the mouse cerebellar cortex, in order to explore the manner of ethanol impacts on neuronal ultrastructures and the physiological influences underlying these alterations. Methods 3-month old mice were fed with 15% alcohol for 3 months. After the behavioral test to manifest the symptoms of ethanol intoxication, the anterior lobe from each mouse cerebellum was selected for embedding , sectioning, and staining. Undera transmission electron microscope, the organelles of PC somata were observed and photos were taken. Results The organelles in ethanol-intoxicated PCs exhibited the following changes: the mitochondria swelled and the matrix decomposed; the sacs of Golgi apparatus dilated; the rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) collapsed, accompanied with a great loss of the ribosomes; the "vacuolation" emerged;the double nuclear membrane became illegible; and the chromatin marginally condensed in the nucleus.Conclusion Chronic ethanol intoxication induces degenerative alterations in the organelles of cerebellar PCs, which might result in the decrease in substance synthesis, the disorder in intraneuronal configuration, the

  17. [Concentration of endogenous ethanol and alcoholic motivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, Iu V; Treskov, V G; Kampov-Polevoĭ, A B; Kovalenko, A E; Rodionov, A P

    1983-11-01

    Trials with patients suffering from stage II chronic alcoholism and normal test subjects as well as experiments made on male C57BL mice (with genetically determined alcoholic motivation) and CBA mice (with genetically determined alcoholic aversion) and random-bred male rats with different levels of initial alcoholic motivation have shown the presence of reverse proportional dependence between blood plasma endogenous ethanol and alcoholic motivation.

  18. Hormonal imbalance and disturbances in carbohydrate metabolism associated with chronic feeding of high sucrose low magnesium diet in weanling male wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Meenakshi; Mehra, Pranav; Bansal, Devi Dayal

    2014-04-01

    This study was designed to determine chronic effect of high sucrose low magnesium (HSLM) diet in weanling rats on plasma thyroid profile, catecholamines and activities of key hepatic glycolytic, and gluconeogenic enzymes. Compared to control diet fed group, significantly elevated levels of plasma triiodothyronine, tetraiodothyronine, catecholamines (epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine) and activity of hepatic glycolytic (hexokinase and glucokinase), and gluconeogenic (glucose-6-phosphatase) enzymes were observed in high sucrose and low magnesium fed groups. However, HSLM diet had an additive effect on all these three parameters. The study thus, assumes significance as it shows that hormonal imbalance and disorders in carbohydrate metabolism at an early stage of development can be due to dietary modification or due to deficiency of key element magnesium.

  19. Analysis of Maize versus Ethanol Production in Nebraska, United States and International Agricultural Droughts: Lessons for Global Food Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boken, V.; Tenkorang, F.

    2012-04-01

    Nebraska is one of the eight main corn (maize) belt states of the United States. Maize is the major crop of Nebraska with an average annual production of about 38 million tons (about 12% of U.S. production), which contributes billions of dollars to the state's economy. The yield of maize has increased significantly over the past century - from 1.6 t/ha in 1900 to 10.4 t/ha in 2010. While the majority of maize (about 40%) is currently used for animal feed and ethanol production, only about six percent is exported. It is estimated that about one billion people accounting for about 15% population of the world live in chronic hunger because of low agricultural productivity and drought. Most of these people depend on the U.S. for grains including maize. If a greater quantity of maize is diverted to ethanol production, considerably less quantity of maize would be available for export to developing countries where it could be used for human consumption and to mitigate hunger and improve food security. This paper presents analysis of maize production in Nebraska for the past three decades and examines how its commercialization for ethanol production has affected its exports in the face of drought at an international level.

  20. Dietary betaine promotes generation of hepatic S-adenosylmethionine and protects the liver from ethanol-induced fatty infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, A J; Beckenhauer, H C; Junnila, M; Tuma, D J

    1993-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that ethanol feeding to rats alters methionine metabolism by decreasing the activity of methionine synthetase. This is the enzyme that converts homocysteine in the presence of vitamin B12 and N5-methyltetrahydrofolate to methionine. The action of the ethanol results in an increase in the hepatic level of the substrate N5-methyltetrahydrofolate but as an adaptive mechanism, betaine homocysteine methyltransferase, is induced in order to maintain hepatic S-adenosylmethionine at normal levels. Continued ethanol feeding, beyond 2 months, however, produces depressed levels of hepatic S-adenosylmethionine. Because betaine homocysteine methyltransferase is induced in the livers of ethanol-fed rats, this study was conducted to determine what effect the feeding of betaine, a substrate of betaine homocysteine methyltransferase, has on methionine metabolism in control and ethanol-fed animals. Control and ethanol-fed rats were given both betaine-lacking and betaine-containing liquid diets for 4 weeks, and parameters of methionine metabolism were measured. These measurements demonstrated that betaine administration doubled the hepatic levels of S-adenosylmethionine in control animals and increased by 4-fold the levels of hepatic S-adenosylmethionine in the ethanol-fed rats. The ethanol-induced infiltration of triglycerides in the liver was also reduced by the feeding of betaine to the ethanol-fed animals. These results indicate that betaine administration has the capacity to elevate hepatic S-adenosylmethionine and to prevent the ethanol-induced fatty liver.

  1. Effect of acute ethanol ingestion on fat absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boquillon, M

    1976-12-01

    A test meal (300 mg casein, 600 mg sucrose, 100 mg corn oil, tracer dose of 9.10(3)H oleic acid) was given to fasting adult rats with intestinal lymph fistulas. One group received an acute oral dose of ethanol (3.2 g/kg body weight) simultaneously with the test meal. Controls received 2.5 ml of water instead of ethanol. Ingestion of ethanol temporarily delayed the removal of lipid radioactivity from the stomachs. More than 25% of radioactivity fed remained 8 hr after feeding whereas with control rats less than 10% of lipid radioactivity fed remained 6 hr after feeding. In controls and ethanol-treated rats, the amounts of exogenous lipids in the intestinal lumen and mucosa were low and similar enough. Quantities of endogenous and exogenous lipids found in the lymph collected during 24 hr after feeding were similar in the two groups, but the fat absorption peak was found after 6 hr in alcoholic rats and before 6 hr in controls. This delay was probably due to the retention of lipids in the stomach. More of the exogenous lipid was always transported by small particles moving in the region of alpha1 globulins in cellulose acetate electrophoresis than by larger particles remaining at the origin. This proportion was enhanced in the ethanol-treated animals. The larger fat particles were richer in endogenous fatty acids in alcohol-treated rats than in controls.

  2. Nonoxidative ethanol metabolism in humans-from biomarkers to bioactive lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heier, Christoph; Xie, Hao; Zimmermann, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Ethanol is a widely used psychoactive drug whose chronic abuse is associated with organ dysfunction and disease. Although the prevalent metabolic fate of ethanol in the human body is oxidation a smaller fraction undergoes nonoxidative metabolism yielding ethyl glucuronide, ethyl sulfate, phosphatidylethanol and fatty acid ethyl esters. Nonoxidative ethanol metabolites persist in tissues and body fluids for much longer than ethanol itself and represent biomarkers for the assessment of ethanol intake in clinical and forensic settings. Of note, the nonoxidative reaction of ethanol with phospholipids and fatty acids yields bioactive compounds that affect cellular signaling pathways and organelle function and may contribute to ethanol toxicity. Thus, despite low quantitative contributions of nonoxidative pathways to overall ethanol metabolism the resultant ethanol metabolites have important biological implications. In this review we summarize the current knowledge about the enzymatic formation of nonoxidative ethanol metabolites in humans and discuss the implications of nonoxidative ethanol metabolites as biomarkers of ethanol intake and mediators of ethanol toxicity. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(12):916-923, 2016.

  3. Bioconversion of sugarcane biomass into ethanol: an overview about composition, pretreatment methods, detoxification of hydrolysates, enzymatic saccharification, and ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canilha, Larissa; Kumar Chandel, Anuj; dos Santos Milessi, Thais Suzane; Fernandes Antunes, Felipe Antônio; da Costa Freitas, Wagner Luiz; das Graças Almeida Felipe, Maria; da Silva, Silvio Silvério

    2012-01-01

    Depleted supplies of fossil fuel, regular price hikes of gasoline, and environmental damage have necessitated the search for economic and eco-benign alternative of gasoline. Ethanol is produced from food/feed-based substrates (grains, sugars, and molasses), and its application as an energy source does not seem fit for long term due to the increasing fuel, food, feed, and other needs. These concerns have enforced to explore the alternative means of cost competitive and sustainable supply of biofuel. Sugarcane residues, sugarcane bagasse (SB), and straw (SS) could be the ideal feedstock for the second-generation (2G) ethanol production. These raw materials are rich in carbohydrates and renewable and do not compete with food/feed demands. However, the efficient bioconversion of SB/SS (efficient pretreatment technology, depolymerization of cellulose, and fermentation of released sugars) remains challenging to commercialize the cellulosic ethanol. Among the technological challenges, robust pretreatment and development of efficient bioconversion process (implicating suitable ethanol producing strains converting pentose and hexose sugars) have a key role to play. This paper aims to review the compositional profile of SB and SS, pretreatment methods of cane biomass, detoxification methods for the purification of hydrolysates, enzymatic hydrolysis, and the fermentation of released sugars for ethanol production.

  4. Bioconversion of Sugarcane Biomass into Ethanol: An Overview about Composition, Pretreatment Methods, Detoxification of Hydrolysates, Enzymatic Saccharification, and Ethanol Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Canilha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Depleted supplies of fossil fuel, regular price hikes of gasoline, and environmental damage have necessitated the search for economic and eco-benign alternative of gasoline. Ethanol is produced from food/feed-based substrates (grains, sugars, and molasses, and its application as an energy source does not seem fit for long term due to the increasing fuel, food, feed, and other needs. These concerns have enforced to explore the alternative means of cost competitive and sustainable supply of biofuel. Sugarcane residues, sugarcane bagasse (SB, and straw (SS could be the ideal feedstock for the second-generation (2G ethanol production. These raw materials are rich in carbohydrates and renewable and do not compete with food/feed demands. However, the efficient bioconversion of SB/SS (efficient pretreatment technology, depolymerization of cellulose, and fermentation of released sugars remains challenging to commercialize the cellulosic ethanol. Among the technological challenges, robust pretreatment and development of efficient bioconversion process (implicating suitable ethanol producing strains converting pentose and hexose sugars have a key role to play. This paper aims to review the compositional profile of SB and SS, pretreatment methods of cane biomass, detoxification methods for the purification of hydrolysates, enzymatic hydrolysis, and the fermentation of released sugars for ethanol production.

  5. Impacts on potential ethanol and crude protein yield in alfalfa

    Science.gov (United States)

    An alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) biomass energy production system would produce two products. Leaves would be separated from stems to produce a high protein feed for livestock while stems would be processed to produce ethanol. Therefore, maximum yields of both leaves and stems are essential for profi...

  6. Competitiveness of Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Compared to US Corn Ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Crago, Christine Lasco; Khanna, Madhu; Barton, Jason; Giuliani, Eduardo; Amaral, Weber

    2010-01-01

    Corn ethanol produced in the US and sugarcane ethanol produced in Brazil are the world’s leading sources of biofuel. Current US biofuel policies create both incentives and constraints for the import of ethanol from Brazil, and together with the competitiveness and greenhouse gas intensity of sugarcane ethanol compared to corn ethanol will determine the extent of these imports. This study analyzes the supply-side determinants of this competitiveness and compares the greenhouse gas intensity of...

  7. Scorpion ethanol extract and valproic acid effects on hippocampal glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in a rat model of chronic-kindling epilepsy induced by lithium chloride-pilocarpine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Liang; Hongbin Sun; Liang Yu; Baoming He; Yan Xie

    2012-01-01

    The present study analyzed the effects of ethanol extracts of scorpion on epilepsy prevention and hippocampal expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in a lithium chloride-pilocarpine epileptic rat model. Results were subsequently compared with valproic acid. Results showed gradually-increased hippocampal glial fibrillary acidic protein expression following model establishment; glial fibrillary acidic protein mRNA expression was significantly increased at 3 days, reached a peak at 7 days, and then gradually decreased thereafter. Ethanol extracts of scorpion doses of 580 and 1 160 mg/kg, as well as 120 mg/kg valproic acid, led to a decreased number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells and glial fibrillary acidic protein mRNA expression, as well as decreased seizure grades and frequency of spontaneously recurrent seizures. The effects of 1 160 mg/kg ethanol extracts of scorpion were equal to those of 120 mg/kg valproic acid. These results suggested that the anti-epileptic effect of ethanol extracts of scorpion were associated with decreased hippocampal glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in a rat model of lithium chloride-pilocarpine induced epilepsy.

  8. The influence of ethanol on hepatic transmethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, A J; Beckenhauer, H C

    1988-01-01

    One of the most important biochemical pathways in the organism is the biosynthesis of methionine from the methylation of homocysteine. Two different reactions are responsible for this methylation, one utilizing N5-methyltetra-hydrofolate as a methylating agent and the other using betaine as the methyl donor. This paper reviews some recent findings in this laboratory, which demonstrate that ethanol-feeding to rats impairs the folate-induced reaction. Our findings also show that this impairment is compensated for through the adaptive increase in the enzyme using betaine in the biosynthesis of methionine. Further studies indicate that the mechanism of action in the impairment may occur through the formation of individual adducts between the folate-induced enzyme (methionine synthetase), its essential cofactors and acetaldehyde, a metabolic product of ethanol. These findings suggest a basis for why rats are more resistant to alcoholic liver injury than humans and may offer a means of protecting against alcoholic liver injury in man.

  9. The effect of low concentrations of ethanol on gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Lingjiao; Chen Shaohua; Zhang Yu; Pan Hongming

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption has been identified as a significant risk factor for cancer in humans. The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of low concentrations of ethanol on gastric adenocarcinoma cell viability, apoptosis, and changes in the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase with ethanol treatment. Gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines (MGC803, MGC823 and SGC7901) were treated with different concentrations of ethanol (0.03125%, 0.0625%, 0.125%, 0....

  10. The bio refinery; producing feed and fuel from grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholey, D V; Burton, E J; Williams, P E V

    2016-04-15

    It is both possible and practicable to produce feed and fuel from grain. Using the value of grain to produce renewable energy for transport, while using the remaining protein content of the grain as a valuable protein source for livestock and for fish, can be seen as a complimentary and optimal use of all the grain constituents. Consideration must be given to maximise the value of the yeast components, as substantial yeast is generated during the fermentation of the grain starch to produce ethanol. Yeast is a nutritionally rich feed ingredient, with potential for use both as feed protein and as a feed supplement with possible immunity and gut health enhancing properties. Bioprocessing, with the consequent economies of scale, is a process whereby the value of grain can be optimised in a way that is traditional, natural and sustainable for primarily producing protein and oil for feed with a co-product ethanol as a renewable fuel.

  11. Biotechnological processes for conversion of corn into ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bothast, R.J.; Schlicher, M.A. [National Corn-To-Ethanol Research Center, Southern Illinois Univ. Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL (United States)

    2005-04-01

    Ethanol has been utilized as a fuel source in the United States since the turn of the century. However, it has repeatedly faced significant commercial viability obstacles relative to petroleum. Renewed interest exists in ethanol as a fuel source today owing to its positive impact on rural America, the environment and United States energy security. Today, most fuel ethanol is produced by either the dry grind or the wet mill process. Current technologies allow for 2.5 gallons (wet mill process) to 2.8 gallons (dry grind process) of ethanol (1 gallon = 3.7851) per bushel of corn. Valuable co-products, distillers dried grains with solubles (dry grind) and corn gluten meal and feed (wet mill), are also generated in the production of ethanol. While current supplies are generated from both processes, the majority of the growth in the industry is from dry grind plant construction in rural communities across the corn belt. While fuel ethanol production is an energy-efficient process today, additional research is occurring to improve its long-term economic viability. Three of the most significant areas of research are in the production of hybrids with a higher starch content or a higher extractable starch content, in the conversion of the corn kernel fiber fraction to ethanol, and in the identification and development of new and higher-value co-products. (orig.)

  12. Effects of Repeated Ethanol Exposures on NMDA Receptor Expression and Locomotor Sensitization in Mice Expressing Ethanol Resistant NMDA Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Carolina R.; Gilstrap, Meghin; Eaton, Bethany; Lench, Daniel H.; Mulholland, Patrick J.; Homanics, Gregg. E.; Woodward, John J.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence from a large number of preclinical studies suggests that chronic exposure to drugs of abuse, such as psychostimulants or ethanol induces changes in glutamatergic transmission in key brain areas associated with reward and control of behavior. These changes include alterations in the expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors including N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) that are important for regulating neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity. NMDA receptors are inhibited by ethanol and reductions in NMDA-mediated signaling are thought to trigger homestatic responses that limit ethanol's effects on glutamatergic transmission. Following repeated exposures to ethanol, these homeostatic responses may become unstable leading to an altered glutamatergic state that contributes to the escalations in drinking and cognitive deficits observed in alcohol-dependent subjects. An important unanswered question is whether ethanol-induced changes in NMDAR expression are modulated by the intrinsic sensitivity of the receptor to ethanol. In this study, we examined the effects of ethanol on NMDAR subunit expression in cortical (orbitofrontal, medial prefrontal), striatal (dorsal and ventral striatum) and limbic (dorsal hippocampus, basolateral amygdala) areas in mice genetically modified to express ethanol-resistant receptors (F639A mice). These mice have been previously shown to drink more ethanol than their wild-type counterparts and have altered behavioral responses to certain actions of ethanol. Following long-term voluntary drinking, F639A mice showed elevations in GluN2A but not GluN1 or GluN2B expression as compared to wild-type mice. Mice treated with repeated injections with ethanol (2–3.5 g/kg; i.p.) showed changes in NMDAR expression that varied in a complex manner with genotype, brain region, subunit type and exposure protocol all contributing to the observed response. F639A mice, but not wild-type mice, showed enhanced motor activity following repeated

  13. Feeding Your Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Feeding Your Newborn KidsHealth > For Parents > Feeding Your Newborn ... giving up the breast. previous continue About Formula Feeding Commercially prepared infant formula is a nutritious alternative ...

  14. Ethanol-water separation by pervaporation using silicone and polyvinyl alcohol membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinchiw, S.

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research, experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of operating parameters onthe pervaporation performance for the separation of ethanol-water solutions. Composite silicone membranessupported on polysulfone prepared with varied silicone contents and commercial polyvinyl alcohol (Pervap®2211, Sulzer membranes were used. The results showed that the composite silicone/polysulfone membranescoated with 3 wt% of silicone exhibited highest permeation flux with slightly lower separation factor forethanol. Furthermore, it was found that the composite silicone/polysulfone membranes were suitable for theseparation of ethanol from a dilute ethanol solutions. Both the separation factor and permeation flux of the composite membranes increased with increasing temperature and feed concentration. A membrane coated with a 7 wt% silicone gave highest separation factor of 7.32 and permeation flux of 0.44 kg/m2h at 5 wt% ethanol feed concentration and feed temperature of 70ºC. For polyvinyl alcohol membranes, the results showed that the membranes were suitable for the dehydration of concentrated ethanol solutions. The permeation flux increased and the separation factor for water decreased with increasing water feed concentration and temperature. The membrane gave highest separation factor of 248 and permeation flux of 0.02 kg/m2h at 5 wt% water feed concentration and feed temperature of 30ºC.

  15. Histone acetylation of the htr3a gene in the prefrontal cortex of Wistar rats regulates ethanol-seeking behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yahui Xu; Xuebing Liu; Xiaojie Zhang; Guanbai Zhang; Ruiling Zhang; Tieqiao Liu; Wei Hao

    2012-01-01

    Previous reports showed that decreased histone deacetylase activity significantly potentiated the rewarding effects of psychostimulants, and that encoding of the 5-HT3 receptor by the htr3a gene was related to ethanol-seeking behavior. However, the effects of a histone deacetylase inhibitor on ethanol-seeking behavior and epigenetic regulation of htr3a mRNA expression after chronic ethanol exposure are not fully understood. Using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, we investigated the effects of chronic ethanol exposure and its interaction with a histone deacetylase inhibitor on histone-acetylation-mediated changes in htr3a mRNA expression in the htr3a promoter region. The conditioned place preference procedure was used to evaluate ethanol-seeking behavior. Chronic exposure to ethanol effectively elicited place conditioning. In the prefrontal cortex, the acetylation of H3K9 and htr3a mRNA expression in the htr3a promoter region were significantly higher in the ethanol group than in the saline group. The histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate potentiated the effects of ethanol on htr3a mRNA expression and enhanced ethanol-induced conditioned place preferences. These results suggest that ethanol upregulates htr3a levels through mechanisms involving H3K9 acetylation, and that histone acetylation may be a therapeutic target for treating ethanol abuse.

  16. Ethanol concentration in food and body condition affect foraging behavior in Egyptian fruit bats ( Rousettus aegyptiacus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Francisco; Korine, Carmi; Kotler, Burt P.; Pinshow, Berry

    2008-06-01

    Ethanol occurs in fleshy fruit as a result of sugar fermentation by both microorganisms and the plant itself; its concentration [EtOH] increases as fruit ripens. At low concentrations, ethanol is a nutrient, whereas at high concentrations, it is toxic. We hypothesized that the effects of ethanol on the foraging behavior of frugivorous vertebrates depend on its concentration in food and the body condition of the forager. We predicted that ethanol stimulates food consumption when its concentration is similar to that found in ripe fruit, whereas [EtOH] below or above that of ripe fruit has either no effect, or else deters foragers, respectively. Moreover, we expected that the amount of food ingested on a particular day of feeding influences the toxic effects of ethanol on a forager, and consequently shapes its feeding decisions on the following day. We therefore predicted that for a food-restricted forager, ethanol-rich food is of lower value than ethanol-free food. We used Egyptian fruit bats ( Rousettus aegyptiacus) as a model to test our hypotheses, and found that ethanol did not increase the value of food for the bats. High [EtOH] reduced the value of food for well-fed bats. However, for food-restricted bats, there was no difference between the value of ethanol-rich and ethanol-free food. Thus, microorganisms, via their production of ethanol, may affect the patterns of feeding of seed-dispersing frugivores. However, these patterns could be modified by the body condition of the animals because they might trade-off the costs of intoxication against the value of nutrients acquired.

  17. Inhibitors of biofilm formation by fuel ethanol contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Industrial fuel ethanol production suffers from chronic and acute infections that reduce yields and cause “stuck fermentations” that result in costly shutdowns. Lactic acid bacteria, particularly Lactobacillus sp., are recognized as major contaminants. In previous studies, we observed that certain...

  18. Conversion of corn milling low-value co-products to ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dien, B.S.; Hespell, R.B.; Bothast, R.J. [Dept. of Agriculture, Peoria, IL (United States); Ingram, L.O. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Most of the fuel ethanol produced in the United States is derived from corn starch. The ethanol yield can be significantly increased if the hemicellulose fraction of the corn kernel is also fermented. The hemicellulose and cellulose fractions are presently marketed as cattle feed. Conversion of the hemicellulose fraction to ethanol is problematic because, in addition to glucose from the residual starch, hydrolysis of the hemicellulose gives a mixture of pentoses (arabinose and xylose) and traditional industrial yeast do not ferment pentoses. We have evaluated non-traditional recombinant microorganisms for conversion of the hemicellulose fractions into ethanol. The hemicellulose were hydrolyzed with weak acid solutions and resulting sugar mixtures fermented using recombinant Escherichia coli strains K011 and SL40. Results of the fermentation are discussed in terms of volumetric ethanol production rates, ethanol yields, and effect of inhibitors produced during hydrolysis. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Ethanol tolerance in yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, G P; Ingledew, W M

    1986-01-01

    It is now certain that the inherent ethanol tolerance of the Saccharomyces strain used is not the prime factor regulating the level of ethanol that can be produced in a high sugar brewing, wine, sake, or distillery fermentation. In fact, in terms of the maximum concentration that these yeasts can produce under batch (16 to 17% [v/v]) or fed-batch conditions, there is clearly no difference in ethanol tolerance. This is not to say, however, that under defined conditions there is no difference in ethanol tolerance among different Saccharomyces yeasts. This property, although a genetic determinant, is clearly influenced by many factors (carbohydrate level, wort nutrition, temperature, osmotic pressure/water activity, and substrate concentration), and each yeast strain reacts to each factor differently. This will indeed lead to differences in measured tolerance. Thus, it is extremely important that each of these be taken into consideration when determining "tolerance" for a particular set of fermentation conditions. The manner in which each alcohol-related industry has evolved is now known to have played a major role in determining traditional thinking on ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces yeasts. It is interesting to speculate on how different our thinking on ethanol tolerance would be today if sake fermentations had not evolved with successive mashing and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of rice carbohydrate, if distillers' worts were clarified prior to fermentation but brewers' wort were not, and if grape skins with their associated unsaturated lipids had not been an integral part of red wine musts. The time is now ripe for ethanol-related industries to take advantage of these findings to improve the economies of production. In the authors' opinion, breweries could produce higher alcohol beers if oxygenation (leading to unsaturated lipids) and "usable" nitrogen source levels were increased in high gravity worts. White wine fermentations could also, if

  20. Inflammation and wound healing in cats with chronic gingivitis/stomatitis after extraction of all premolars and molars were not affected by feeding of two diets with different omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbee, R J; Booij-Vrieling, H E; van de Lest, C H A; Penning, L C; Tryfonidou, M A; Riemers, F M; Hazewinkel, H A W

    2012-08-01

    Feline chronic gingivitis/stomatitis (FCGS) is a painful inflammatory disease in cats. Extraction of teeth, including all premolars and molars, has been shown to be the therapy of choice in cats not responding sufficiently to home care (e.g. tooth brushing) and/or medical treatment (corticosteroids and/or antibiotics). In this study, we hypothesize that a cat food with an omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω6 PUFA) to ω3 PUFA ratio of 10:1 reduces inflammation of the FCGS and accelerates soft tissue wound healing of the gingiva after dental extractions, compared to a cat food with a ω6:ω3 PUFA ratio of 40:1. The cats were fed diets with chicken fat and fish oil as sources of fatty acids. In one diet, part of the fish oil was replaced by safflower oil, resulting in two diets with ω6:ω3 PUFA ratios of 10:1 and 40:1. This double-blinded study in two groups of seven cats revealed that dietary fatty acids influence the composition of plasma cholesteryl esters and plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines. The diet with the 10:1 ratio lowered PGD(2) , PGE(2) and LTB(4) plasma levels significantly, compared to the diet with the 40:1 ratio (p = 0.05, p = 0.04, and p = 0.02 respectively). However, feeding diets with dietary ω6:ω3 PUFA ratios of 10:1 and 40:1, given to cats with FCGS for 4 weeks after extraction of all premolars and molars, did not alter the degree of inflammation or wound healing.

  1. Land usage attributed to corn ethanol production in the United States: sensitivity to technological advances in corn grain yield, ethanol conversion, and co-product utilization

    OpenAIRE

    Mumm, Rita H.; Goldsmith, Peter D.; Rausch, Kent D; Stein, Hans H

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the system for producing yellow corn grain is well established in the US, its role among other biofeedstock alternatives to petroleum-based energy sources has to be balanced with its predominant purpose for food and feed as well as economics, land use, and environmental stewardship. We model land usage attributed to corn ethanol production in the US to evaluate the effects of anticipated technological change in corn grain production, ethanol processing, and livestock feedi...

  2. Genetic dissection of acute ethanol responsive gene networks in prefrontal cortex: functional and mechanistic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron R Wolen

    Full Text Available Individual differences in initial sensitivity to ethanol are strongly related to the heritable risk of alcoholism in humans. To elucidate key molecular networks that modulate ethanol sensitivity we performed the first systems genetics analysis of ethanol-responsive gene expression in brain regions of the mesocorticolimbic reward circuit (prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and ventral midbrain across a highly diverse family of 27 isogenic mouse strains (BXD panel before and after treatment with ethanol.Acute ethanol altered the expression of ~2,750 genes in one or more regions and 400 transcripts were jointly modulated in all three. Ethanol-responsive gene networks were extracted with a powerful graph theoretical method that efficiently summarized ethanol's effects. These networks correlated with acute behavioral responses to ethanol and other drugs of abuse. As predicted, networks were heavily populated by genes controlling synaptic transmission and neuroplasticity. Several of the most densely interconnected network hubs, including Kcnma1 and Gsk3β, are known to influence behavioral or physiological responses to ethanol, validating our overall approach. Other major hub genes like Grm3, Pten and Nrg3 represent novel targets of ethanol effects. Networks were under strong genetic control by variants that we mapped to a small number of chromosomal loci. Using a novel combination of genetic, bioinformatic and network-based approaches, we identified high priority cis-regulatory candidate genes, including Scn1b, Gria1, Sncb and Nell2.The ethanol-responsive gene networks identified here represent a previously uncharacterized intermediate phenotype between DNA variation and ethanol sensitivity in mice. Networks involved in synaptic transmission were strongly regulated by ethanol and could contribute to behavioral plasticity seen with chronic ethanol. Our novel finding that hub genes and a small number of loci exert major influence over the ethanol

  3. Bioavailability of ethanol is reduced in several commonly used liquid diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, N C; de Fiebre, C M; Booker, T K; Nelson, S; Collins, A C

    1994-01-01

    Liquid diets are often used as a vehicle for chronically treating laboratory animals with ethanol. However, a recent report suggested that one or more components of these diets may bind ethanol which could result in a decrease in the bioavailability of ethanol. Consequently, we compared the blood ethanol concentration vs. time curves obtained following the intragastric (i.g.) administration of ethanol dissolved in water or in one of three liquid diets (Bioserv AIN-76, Sustacal, or Carnation Slender) using the long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mouse lines. The initial rates of absorption were generally the same for the water-ethanol and diet-ethanol groups, but the diets generally produced lower peak levels and the areas under the ethanol concentration-time curves were less for all of the liquid diets than for the control, ethanol-water solution. In vitro dialysis experiments indicated that the Bioserv diet binds ethanol in a saturable manner. Therefore, it may be that the slower release of ethanol, which should occur as a result of binding, serves to increase the role of first pass metabolism in regulating ethanol concentrations following oral administration. Because the effects of the diets were seen even after pyrazole treatment, it may be that the lower blood ethanol levels arise because metabolism by gastric ADH, rather than hepatic ADH, is responsible for a major portion of ethanol metabolism as ethanol is slowly released by the diets. If so, the observation that the diet/water differences were uniformly greater in the LS mice may indicate that LS-SS differences in gastric ADH exist.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Effect of ethanol as a co-solvent on the aerosol performance and stability of spray-dried lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Shuying; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Mu, Huiling

    2016-01-01

    -solvent on the stability and aerosol performance of spray-dried protein. Lysozyme was dissolved in solutions with various ratios of ethanol and water, and subsequently spray-dried. A change from spherical particles into wrinkled and folded particles was observed upon increasing the ratio of ethanol in the feed...

  5. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... alcohol abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute ... chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be a factor in some cases. ...

  6. Hepatic lipid profiling of deer mice fed ethanol using {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy: A dose-dependent subchronic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernando, Harshica; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A. Shakeel; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S., E-mail: bkaphali@utmb.edu

    2012-11-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse is a 2nd major cause of liver disease resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is characterized by a wide spectrum of pathologies starting from fat accumulation (steatosis) in early reversible stage to inflammation with or without fibrosis and cirrhosis in later irreversible stages. Previously, we reported significant steatosis in the livers of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH{sup −}) vs. hepatic ADH-normal (ADH{sup +}) deer mice fed 4% ethanol daily for 2 months [Bhopale et al., 2006, Alcohol 39, 179–188]. However, ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 4% ethanol also showed a significant mortality. Therefore, a dose-dependent study was conducted to understand the mechanism and identify lipid(s) involved in the development of ethanol-induced fatty liver. ADH{sup −} and ADH{sup +} deer mice fed 1, 2 or 3.5% ethanol daily for 2 months and fatty infiltration in the livers were evaluated by histology and by measuring dry weights of extracted lipids. Lipid metabolomic changes in extracted lipids were determined by proton ({sup 1}H) and {sup 31}phosphorus ({sup 31}P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The NMR data was analyzed by hierarchical clustering (HC) and principle component analysis (PCA) for pattern recognition. Extensive vacuolization by histology and significantly increased dry weights of total lipids found only in the livers of ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls suggest a dose-dependent formation of fatty liver in ADH{sup −} deer mouse model. Analysis of NMR data of ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls shows increases for total cholesterol, esterified cholesterol, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), triacylglycerides and unsaturation, and decreases for free cholesterol, phospholipids and allylic and diallylic protons. Certain classes of neutral lipids (cholesterol esters, fatty acyl chain (-COCH{sub 2}-) and FAMEs) were

  7. Brain plasticity and cognitive functions after ethanol consumption in C57BL/6J mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stragier, E; Martin, V; Davenas, E; Poilbout, C; Mongeau, R; Corradetti, R; Lanfumey, L

    2015-01-01

    Acute or chronic administrations of high doses of ethanol in mice are known to produce severe cognitive deficits linked to hippocampal damage. However, we recently reported that chronic and moderate ethanol intake in C57BL/6J mice induced chromatin remodeling within the Bdnf promoters, leading to both enhanced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression and hippocampal neurogenesis under free-choice protocol. We performed here a series of cellular and behavioral studies to analyze the consequences of these modifications. We showed that a 3-week chronic free-choice ethanol consumption in C57BL/6J mice led to a decrease in DNA methylation of the Bdnf gene within the CA1 and CA3 subfields of the hippocampus, and upregulated hippocampal BDNF signaling pathways mediated by ERK, AKT and CREB. However, this activation did not affect long-term potentiation in the CA1. Conversely, ethanol intake impaired learning and memory capacities analyzed in the contextual fear conditioning test and the novel object recognition task. In addition, ethanol increased behavioral perseveration in the Barnes maze test but did not alter the mouse overall spatial capacities. These data suggested that in conditions of chronic and moderate ethanol intake, the chromatin remodeling leading to BDNF signaling upregulation is probably an adaptive process, engaged via epigenetic regulations, to counteract the cognitive deficits induced by ethanol. PMID:26670281

  8. Ethanol as a Prodrug: Brain Metabolism of Ethanol Mediates its Reinforcing effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahanian, Eduardo; Quintanilla, María Elena; Tampier, Lutske; Rivera-Meza, Mario; Bustamante, Diego; Gonzalez-Lira, Víctor; Morales, Paola; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Israel, Yedy

    2011-01-01

    Backround While the molecular entity responsible for the rewarding effects of virtually all drugs of abuse is known; that for ethanol remains uncertain. Some lines of evidence suggest that the rewarding effects of alcohol are mediated not by ethanol per se but by acetaldehyde generated by catalase in the brain. However, the lack of specific inhibitors of catalase has not allowed strong conclusions to be drawn about its role on the rewarding properties of ethanol. The present studies determined the effect on voluntary alcohol consumption of two gene vectors; one designed to inhibit catalase synthesis and one designed to synthesize alcohol dehydrogenase, to respectively inhibit or increase brain acetaldehyde synthesis. Methods The lentiviral vectors, which incorporate the genes they carry into the cell genome, were: (i) one encoding a shRNA anticatalase synthesis and (ii) one encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (rADH1). These were stereotaxically microinjected into the brain ventral tegmental area (VTA) of Wistar-derived rats bred for generations for their high alcohol preference (UChB), which were allowed access to an ethanol solution and water. Results Microinjection into the VTA of the lentiviral vector encoding the anticatalase shRNA virtually abolished (-94% p<0.001) the voluntary consumption of alcohol by the rats. Conversely, injection into the VTA of the lentiviral vector coding for alcohol dehydrogenase greatly stimulated (2-3 fold p<0.001) their voluntary ethanol consumption. Conclusions The study strongly suggests that to generate reward and reinforcement, ethanol must be metabolized into acetaldehyde in the brain. Data suggest novel targets for interventions aimed at reducing chronic alcohol intake. PMID:21332529

  9. Imipramine blocks ethanol-induced ASMase activation, ceramide generation, and PP2A activation, and ameliorates hepatic steatosis in ethanol-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Rahmini, Yasmeen; Ross, Ruth A; Zhao, Zhenwen; Xu, Yan; Crabb, David W

    2012-03-01

    Our previous data showed the inhibitory effect of ethanol on AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, which appears to be mediated, in part, through increased levels of hepatic ceramide and activation of protein phosphatase 2A (Liangpunsakul S, Sozio MS, Shin E, Zhao Z, Xu Y, Ross RA, Zeng Y, Crabb DW. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 298: G1004-G1012, 2010). The effect of ethanol on AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation was reversed by imipramine, suggesting that the generation of ceramide via acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) is stimulated by ethanol. In this study, we determined the effects of imipramine on the development of hepatic steatosis, the generation of ceramide, and downstream effects of ceramide on inflammatory, insulin, and apoptotic signaling pathways, in ethanol-fed mice. The effect of ethanol and imipramine (10 μg/g body wt ip) on ceramide levels, as well as inflammatory, insulin, and apoptotic signaling pathways, was studied in C57BL/6J mice fed the Lieber-DeCarli diet. Ethanol-fed mice developed the expected steatosis, and cotreatment with imipramine for the last 2 wk of ethanol feeding resulted in improvement in hepatic steatosis. Ethanol feeding for 4 wk induced impaired glucose tolerance compared with controls, and this was modestly improved with imipramine treatment. There was a significant decrease in total ceramide concentrations in response to imipramine in ethanol-fed mice treated with and without imipramine (287 ± 11 vs. 348 ± 12 pmol/mg tissue). The magnitude and specificity of inhibition on each ceramide species differed. A significant decrease was observed for C16 (28 ± 3 vs. 33 ± 2 pmol/mg tissue) and C24 (164 ± 9 vs. 201 ± 4 pmol/mg tissue) ceramide. Ethanol feeding increased the levels of the phosphorylated forms of ERK slightly and increased phospho-p38 and phospho-JNK substantially. The levels of phospho-p38 and phospho-JNK were reduced by treatment with imipramine. The activation of ASMase and generation

  10. Update of distillers grains displacement ratios for corn ethanol life-cycle analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, S.; Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

    2011-02-01

    Production of corn-based ethanol (either by wet milling or by dry milling) yields the following coproducts: distillers grains with solubles (DGS), corn gluten meal (CGM), corn gluten feed (CGF), and corn oil. Of these coproducts, all except corn oil can replace conventional animal feeds, such as corn, soybean meal, and urea. Displacement ratios of corn-ethanol coproducts including DGS, CGM, and CGF were last updated in 1998 at a workshop at Argonne National Laboratory on the basis of input from a group of experts on animal feeds, including Prof. Klopfenstein (University of Nebraska, Lincoln), Prof. Berger (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Mr. Madson (Rapheal Katzen International Associates, Inc.), and Prof. Trenkle (Iowa State University) (Wang 1999). Table 1 presents current dry milling coproduct displacement ratios being used in the GREET model. The current effort focuses on updating displacement ratios of dry milling corn-ethanol coproducts used in the animal feed industry. Because of the increased availability and use of these coproducts as animal feeds, more information is available on how these coproducts replace conventional animal feeds. To glean this information, it is also important to understand how industry selects feed. Because of the wide variety of available feeds, animal nutritionists use commercial software (such as Brill Formulation{trademark}) for feed formulation. The software recommends feed for the animal on the basis of the nutritional characteristics, availability, and price of various animal feeds, as well as on the nutritional requirements of the animal (Corn Refiners Association 2006). Therefore, feed formulation considers both the economic and the nutritional characteristics of feed products.

  11. Ethanol Sensitization during Adolescence or Adulthood Induces Different Patterns of Ethanol Consumption without Affecting Ethanol Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara-Nascimento, Priscila F.; Hoffmann, Lucas B.; Contó, Marcos B.; Marcourakis, Tania; Camarini, Rosana

    2017-01-01

    In previous study, we demonstrated that ethanol preexposure may increase ethanol consumption in both adolescent and adult mice, in a two-bottle choice model. We now questioned if ethanol exposure during adolescence results in changes of consumption pattern using a three-bottle choice procedure, considering drinking-in-the-dark and alcohol deprivation effect as strategies for ethanol consumption escalation. We also analyzed aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity as a measurement of ethanol metabolism. Adolescent and adult Swiss mice were treated with saline (SAL) or 2.0 g/kg ethanol (EtOH) during 15 days (groups: Adolescent-SAL, Adolescent-EtOH, Adult-SAL and Adult-EtOH). Five days after the last injection, mice were exposed to the three-bottle choice protocol using sucrose fading procedure (4% + sucrose vs. 8%–15% ethanol + sucrose vs. water + sucrose) for 2 h during the dark phase. Sucrose was faded out from 8% to 0%. The protocol was composed of a 6-week acquisition period, followed by four withdrawals and reexposures. Both adolescent and adult mice exhibited ethanol behavioral sensitization, although the magnitude of sensitization in adolescents was lower than in adults. Adolescent-EtOH displayed an escalation of 4% ethanol consumption during acquisition that was not observed in Adult-EtOH. Moreover, Adult-EtOH consumed less 4% ethanol throughout all the experiment and less 15% ethanol in the last reexposure period than Adolescent-EtOH. ALDH activity varied with age, in which older mice showed higher ALDH than younger ones. Ethanol pretreatment or the pattern of consumption did not have influence on ALDH activity. Our data suggest that ethanol pretreatment during adolescence but not adulthood may influence the pattern of ethanol consumption toward an escalation in ethanol consumption at low dose, without exerting an impact on ALDH activity.

  12. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002937.htm Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A gastrostomy feeding tube insertion is the placement of a feeding ...

  13. Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding KidsHealth > For Parents > Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding Print ... a lactation specialist. previous continue All About Formula Feeding Commercially prepared infant formulas are a nutritious alternative ...

  14. Animal Feeding Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Healthy Water Home Animal Feeding Operations Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) What are Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs)? According to the United States Environmental ...

  15. Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A What's in this article? All About Breastfeeding Breastfeeding Challenges All About Formula Feeding Formula Feeding Challenges Making a Choice en español Lactancia materna versus lactancia artificial Choosing whether to breastfeed or formula feed their ...

  16. Agricultural sector impacts of making ethanol from grain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertzmark, D.; Ray, D.; Parvin, G.

    1980-03-01

    This report presents the results of a model of the effects on the agricultural sector of producing ethanol from corn in the United States between 1979 and 1983. The model is aggregated at the national level, and results are given for all of the major food and feed crops, ethanol joint products, farm income, government payment, and agricultural exports. A stochastic simulation was performed to ascertain the impacts of yield and demand variations on aggregate performance figures. Results indicate minimal impacts on the agricultural sector for production levels of less than 1 billion gallons of ethanol per year. For higher production levels, corn prices will rise sharply, the agricultural sector will be more vulnerable to variations in yields and demands, and joint-product values will fall. Possibilities for ameliorating such effects are discussed, and such concepts as net energy and the biomass refinery are explored.

  17. Effects of ethanol and NAP on cerebellar expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule L1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devon M Fitzgerald

    Full Text Available The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 is critical for brain development and plays a role in learning and memory in the adult. Ethanol inhibits L1-mediated cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs, and these actions might underlie the cerebellar dysmorphology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. The peptide NAP potently blocks ethanol inhibition of L1 adhesion and prevents ethanol teratogenesis. We used quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting of extracts of cerebellar slices, CGNs, and astrocytes from postnatal day 7 (PD7 rats to investigate whether ethanol and NAP act in part by regulating the expression of L1. Treatment of cerebellar slices with 20 mM ethanol, 10(-12 M NAP, or both for 4 hours, 24 hours, and 10 days did not significantly affect L1 mRNA and protein levels. Similar treatment for 4 or 24 hours did not regulate L1 expression in primary cultures of CGNs and astrocytes, the predominant cerebellar cell types. Because ethanol also damages the adult cerebellum, we studied the effects of chronic ethanol exposure in adult rats. One year of binge drinking did not alter L1 gene and protein expression in extracts from whole cerebellum. Thus, ethanol does not alter L1 expression in the developing or adult cerebellum; more likely, ethanol disrupts L1 function by modifying its conformation and signaling. Likewise, NAP antagonizes the actions of ethanol without altering L1 expression.

  18. Xylose fermentation to ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

  19. Efficiency of water removal from water/ethanol mixtures using supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Rodrigues

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Techniques involving supercritical carbon dioxide have been successfully used for the formation of drug particles with controlled size distributions. However, these processes show some limitations, particularly in processing aqueous solutions. A diagram walking algorithm based on available experimental data was developed to evaluate the effect of ethanol on the efficiency of water removal processes under different process conditions. Ethanol feeding was the key parameter resulting in a tenfold increase in the efficiency of water extraction.

  20. Ethanol Metabolism Activates Cell Cycle Checkpoint Kinase, Chk2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Dahn L.; Mahan Schneider, Katrina J.; Nuss, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic ethanol abuse results in hepatocyte injury and impairs hepatocyte replication. We have previously shown that ethanol metabolism results in cell cycle arrest at the G2/M transition, which is partially mediated by inhibitory phosphorylation of the cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdc2. To further delineate the mechanisms by which ethanol metabolism mediates this G2/M arrest, we investigated the involvement of upstream regulators of Cdc2 activity. Cdc2 is activated by the phosphatase Cdc25C. The activity of Cdc25C can, in turn, be regulated by the checkpoint kinase, Chk2, which is regulated by the kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). To investigate the involvement of these regulators of Cdc2 activity, VA-13 cells, which are Hep G2 cells modified to efficiently express alcohol dehydrogenase, were cultured in the presence or absence of 25 mM ethanol. Immunoblots were performed to determine the effects of ethanol metabolism on the activation of Cdc25C, Chk2, and ATM. Ethanol metabolism increased the active forms of ATM, and Chk2, as well as the phosphorylated form of Cdc25C. Additionally, inhibition of ATM resulted in approximately 50% of the cells being rescued from the G2/M cell cycle arrest, and ameliorated the inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdc2. Our findings demonstrate that ethanol metabolism activates ATM. ATM can activate the checkpoint kinase Chk2, resulting in phosphorylation of Cdc25C, and ultimately in the accumulation of inactive Cdc2. This may, in part, explain the ethanol metabolism-mediated impairment in hepatocyte replication, which may be important in the initiation and progression of alcoholic liver injury. PMID:21924579

  1. Enhanced ethanol fermentation of brewery wastewater using the genetically modified strain E. coli KO11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kripa; Chaudhari, Vaibhav; Varanasi, Sasidhar; Kim, Dong-Shik

    2007-02-01

    We have used liquid waste obtained from a beer brewery process to produce ethanol. To increase the productivity, genetically modified organism, Escherichia coli KO11, was used for ethanol fermentation. Yeast was also used to produce ethanol from the same feed stock, and the ethanol production rates and resulting concentrations of sugars and ethanol were compared with those of KO11. In the experiments, first the raw wastewater was directly fermented using two strains with no saccharification enzymes added. Then, commercial enzymes, alpha-amylase, pectinase, or a combination of both, were used for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation, and the results were compared with those of the no-enzyme experiments for KO11 and yeast. Under the given conditions with or without the enzymes, yeast produced ethanol more rapidly than E. coli KO11, but the final ethanol concentrations were almost the same. For both yeast and KO11, the enzymes were observed to enhance the ethanol yields by 61-84% as compared to the fermentation without enzymes. The combination of the two enzymes increased ethanol production the most for the both strains. The advantages of using KO11 were not demonstrated clearly as compared to the yeast fermentation results.

  2. Electrochemical kinetic and mass transfer model for direct ethanol alkaline fuel cell (DEAFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, S.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Hasran, U. A.; Masdar, M. S.; Daud, W. R. W.

    2016-07-01

    A mathematical model is developed for a liquid-feed DEAFC incorporating an alkaline anion-exchange membrane. The one-dimensional mass transport of chemical species is modelled using isothermal, single-phase and steady-state assumptions. The anode and cathode electrochemical reactions use the Tafel kinetics approach, with two limiting cases, for the reaction order. The model fully accounts for the mixed potential effects of ethanol oxidation at the cathode due to ethanol crossover via an alkaline anion-exchange membrane. In contrast to a polymer electrolyte membrane model, the current model considers the flux of ethanol at the membrane as the difference between diffusive and electroosmotic effects. The model is used to investigate the effects of the ethanol and alkali inlet feed concentrations at the anode. The model predicts that the cell performance is almost identical for different ethanol concentrations at a low current density. Moreover, the model results show that feeding the DEAFC with 5 M NaOH and 3 M ethanol at specific operating conditions yields a better performance at a higher current density. Furthermore, the model indicates that crossover effects on the DEAFC performance are significant. The cell performance decrease from its theoretical value when a parasitic current is enabled in the model.

  3. A Sustainable Ethanol Distillation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuelei Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The discarded fruit and vegetable waste from the consumer and retailer sectors provide a reliable source for ethanol production. In this paper, an ethanol distillation system has been developed to remove the water contents from the original wash that contains only around 15% of the ethanol. The system has an ethanol production capacity of over 100,000 liters per day. It includes an ethanol condenser, a wash pre-heater, a main exhaust heat exchanger as well as a fractionating column. One unique characteristic of this system is that it utilizes the waste heat rejected from a power plant to vaporize the ethanol, thus it saves a significant amount of energy and at the same time reduces the pollution to the environment.

  4. Protective effect of quercetin in the regression of ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhya A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the protective effects of quercetin on chronic ethanol-induced liver injury. Rats were treated with ethanol at a dose of 4 g/100 g/day for 90 days. After ethanol intoxication, levels of serum amino transferases were significantly elevated. Decreased activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase was also observed on ethanol administration. Increased amounts of lipid peroxidation products viz. hydroperoxides, conjugated dienes and malodialdehyde were observed on ethanol intoxication. Ethanol administration resulted in significant decrease in liver glutathione content. After 90 days, the control animals were divided into two groups, the control group and the control+quercetin group. Ethanol-treated group was divided into two groups, abstention group and quercetin-supplemented group. After 30 days, the animals were sacrificed and various biochemical parameters were analyzed. The changes in enzyme activities as well as levels of lipid peroxidation products were reversed to a certain extent by quercetin. Quercetin supplementation resulted in increase of glutathione content to a significant level compared to normal abstention group. Quercetin supplemented group showed a faster recovery than abstention group. This shows the protective effect of quercetin against chronic ethanol induced hepatotoxicity. Histopathological study is also in line with these results.

  5. Electrocatalytic Activity of Pt/C Electrodes for Ethanol Oxidation in Vapor Phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Hong; YE Dai-qi; LIN Wei-ming

    2005-01-01

    High performance platinized-carbon electrodes have been developed for the electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde in electrogenerative processes. A load current density of the electrode can be achieved as high as 600 mA per square centimeter for oxygen reducing in 3 mol/L sulfuric acid with a good stability. With these electrodes and sulfuric acid as an electrolyte in fuel cells, ethanol vapor carried by nitrogen gas can be oxidized selectively to acetaldehyde. Selectivity of acetaldehyde depends on the potential of the cell and the feed rate of ethanol vapor and it can be more than 80% under optimized conditions. The initial product of ethanol oxidized on a platinized-carbon electrode is acetaldehyde and the ethanol oxidation mechanism is discussed.

  6. Ethanol elevates physiological all-trans-retinoic acid levels in select loci through altering retinoid metabolism in multiple loci: a potential mechanism of ethanol toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Maureen A.; Folias, Alexandra E.; Wang, Chao; Napoli, Joseph L.

    2010-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) supports embryonic development, central nervous system function, and the immune response. atRA initiates neurogenesis and dendritic growth in the hippocampus and is required for spatial memory; superphysiological atRA inhibits neurogenesis, causes teratology and/or embryo toxicity, and alters cognitive function and behavior. Because abnormal atRA shares pathological conditions with alcoholism, inhibition of retinol (vitamin A) activation into atRA has been credited widely as a mechanism of ethanol toxicity. Here, we analyze the effects of ethanol on retinoid concentrations in vivo during normal vitamin A nutriture, using sensitive and analytically robust assays. Ethanol either increased or had no effect on atRA, regardless of changes in retinol and retinyl esters. Acute ethanol (3.5 g/kg) increased atRA in adult hippocampus (1.6-fold), liver (2.4-fold), and testis (1.5-fold). Feeding dams a liquid diet with 6.5% ethanol from embryonic day 13 (e13) to e19 increased atRA in fetal hippocampus (up to 20-fold) and cortex (up to 50-fold), depending on blood alcohol content. One-month feeding of the 6.5% ethanol diet increased atRA in adult hippocampus (20-fold), cortex (2-fold), testis (2-fold), and serum (10-fold). Tissue-specific increases in retinoid dehydrogenase mRNAs and activities, extrahepatic retinol concentrations, and atRA catabolism combined to produce site-specific effects. Because a sustained increase in atRA has deleterious effects on the central nervous system and embryo development, these data suggest that superphysiological atRA contributes to ethanol pathological conditions, including cognitive dysfunction and fetal alcohol syndrome.—Kane, M. A., Folias, A. E., Wang, C., Napoli, J. L. Ethanol elevates physiological all-trans-retinoic acid levels in select loci through altering retinoid metabolism in multiple loci: a potential mechanism of ethanol toxicity. PMID:19890016

  7. Ethanol Regulation of Synaptic GABAA α4 Receptors Is Prevented by Protein Kinase A Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Stephen L; Bohnsack, John Peyton; Morrow, A Leslie

    2016-04-01

    Ethanol alters GABAA receptor trafficking and function through activation of protein kinases, and these changes may underlie ethanol dependence and withdrawal. In this study, we used subsynaptic fraction techniques and patch-clamp electrophysiology to investigate the biochemical and functional effects of protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) activation by ethanol on synaptic GABAA α4 receptors, a key target of ethanol-induced changes. Rat cerebral cortical neurons were grown for 18 days in vitro and exposed to ethanol and/or kinase modulators for 4 hours, a paradigm that recapitulates GABAergic changes found after chronic ethanol exposure in vivo. PKA activation by forskolin or rolipram during ethanol exposure prevented increases in P2 fraction α4 subunit abundance, whereas inhibiting PKA had no effect. Similarly, in the synaptic fraction, activation of PKA by rolipram in the presence of ethanol prevented the increase in synaptic α4 subunit abundance, whereas inhibiting PKA in the presence of ethanol was ineffective. Conversely, PKC inhibition in the presence of ethanol prevented the ethanol-induced increases in synaptic α4 subunit abundance. Finally, we found that either activating PKA or inhibiting PKC in the presence of ethanol prevented the ethanol-induced decrease in GABA miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current decay τ1, whereas inhibiting PKA had no effect. We conclude that PKA and PKC have opposing effects in the regulation of synaptic α4 receptors, with PKA activation negatively modulating, and PKC activation positively modulating, synaptic α4 subunit abundance and function. These results suggest potential targets for restoring normal GABAergic functioning in the treatment of alcohol use disorders.

  8. The Hydrocarbon Pool in Ethanol-to-Gasoline over HZSM-5 Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Roger; Hruby, S.L.; Hansen, Jeppe Rass;

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that the conversion of ethanol-to-gasoline over an HZSM-5 catalyst yields essentially the same product distribution as for methanol-to-gasoline performed over the same catalyst. Interestingly, there is a significant difference between the identity of the hydrocarbon molecules trapped...... inside the HZSM-5 catalyst when ethanol is used as a feed instead of methanol. In particular, the hydrocarbon pool contains a significant amount of ethylsubstituted aromatics when ethanol is used as feedstock, but there remains only methyl-substituted aromatics in the product slate....

  9. Brain glucose content in fetuses of ethanol-fed rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pullen, G.; Singh, S.P.; Snyder, A.K.; Hoffen, B.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated impaired placental glucose transfer and fetal hypoglycemia in association with ethanol ingestion by pregnant rats. The present study examines the relationship between glucose availability and fetal brain growth under the same conditions. Rats (EF) were fed ethanol (30% of caloric intake) in liquid diet throughout gestation. Controls received isocaloric diet without ethanol by pair-feeding (PF) or ad libitum (AF). On the 22nd day of gestation fetuses were obtained by cesarean section. Fetal brains were removed and freeze-clamped. Brain weight was significantly reduced (p < 0.001) by maternal ethanol ingestion (206 +/- 2, 212 +/- 4 and 194 +/- 2 mg in AF, FP and EF fetuses respectively). Similarly, fetal brain glucose content was lower (p < 0.05) in the EF group (14.3 +/- 0.9 mmoles/g dry weight) than in the PF (18.6 +/- 1.0) or the AF (16.2 +/- 0.9) groups. The protein: DNA ratio, an indicator of cell size, correlated positively (r = 0.371, p < 0.005) with brain glucose content. In conclusion, maternal ethanol ingestion resulted in lower brain weight and reduced brain glucose content. Glucose availability may be a significant factor in the determination of cell size in the fetal rat brain.

  10. Corn ethanol production, food exports, and indirect land use change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallington, T J; Anderson, J E; Mueller, S A; Kolinski Morris, E; Winkler, S L; Ginder, J M; Nielsen, O J

    2012-06-05

    The approximately 100 million tonne per year increase in the use of corn to produce ethanol in the U.S. over the past 10 years, and projections of greater future use, have raised concerns that reduced exports of corn (and other agricultural products) and higher commodity prices would lead to land-use changes and, consequently, negative environmental impacts in other countries. The concerns have been driven by agricultural and trade models, which project that large-scale corn ethanol production leads to substantial decreases in food exports, increases in food prices, and greater deforestation globally. Over the past decade, the increased use of corn for ethanol has been largely matched by the increased corn harvest attributable mainly to increased yields. U.S. exports of corn, wheat, soybeans, pork, chicken, and beef either increased or remained unchanged. Exports of distillers' dry grains (DDG, a coproduct of ethanol production and a valuable animal feed) increased by more than an order of magnitude to 9 million tonnes in 2010. Increased biofuel production may lead to intensification (higher yields) and extensification (more land) of agricultural activities. Intensification and extensification have opposite impacts on land use change. We highlight the lack of information concerning the magnitude of intensification effects and the associated large uncertainties in assessments of the indirect land use change associated with corn ethanol.

  11. Ethanol emission from loose corn silage and exposed silage particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Montes, Felipe; Rotz, C. Alan; Mitloehner, Frank

    2010-11-01

    Silage on dairy farms has been identified as a major source of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. However, rates of VOC emission from silage are not accurately known. In this work, we measured ethanol (a dominant silage VOC) emission from loose corn silage and exposed corn silage particles using wind tunnel systems. Flux of ethanol was highest immediately after exposing loose silage samples to moving air (as high as 220 g m -2 h -1) and declined by as much as 76-fold over 12 h as ethanol was depleted from samples. Emission rate and cumulative 12 h emission increased with temperature, silage permeability, exposed surface area, and air velocity over silage samples. These responses suggest that VOC emission from silage on farms is sensitive to climate and management practices. Ethanol emission rates from loose silage were generally higher than previous estimates of total VOC emission rates from silage and mixed feed. For 15 cm deep loose samples, mean cumulative emission was as high as 170 g m -2 (80% of initial ethanol mass) after 12 h of exposure to an air velocity of 5 m s -1. Emission rates measured with an emission isolation flux chamber were lower than rates measured in a wind tunnel and in an open setting. Results show that the US EPA emission isolation flux chamber method is not appropriate for estimating VOC emission rates from silage in the field.

  12. Dynamic modeling of a three-stage low-temperature ethanol reformer for fuel cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Vanesa M.; Serra, Maria [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial (CSIC-UPC), Llorens i Artigas 4-6, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Lopez, Eduardo; Llorca, Jordi [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, ed. ETSEIB, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    A low-temperature ethanol reformer based on a cobalt catalyst for the production of hydrogen has been designed aiming the feed of a fuel cell for an autonomous low-scale power production unit. The reformer comprises three stages: ethanol dehydrogenation to acetaldehyde and hydrogen over SnO{sub 2} followed by acetaldehyde steam reforming over Co(Fe)/ZnO catalyst and water gas shift reaction. Kinetic data have been obtained under different experimental conditions and a dynamic model has been developed for a tubular reformer loaded with catalytic monoliths for the production of the hydrogen required to feed a 1 kW PEMFC. (author)

  13. The effect of ethanol on sup 35 -S-TBPS binding to mouse brain membranes in the presence of chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liljequist, S.; Culp, S.; Tabakoff, B. (Laboratory for Studies of Neuroadaptive Processes, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, Bethesda (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The effect of in vitro and in vivo administration of ethanol on the binding of {sup 35}S-t-butyl-bicyclophosphorothionate ({sup 35}S-TBPS) to cortical brain membranes of C57B1 mice was investigated using KCl containing assay media. The in vitro addition of ethanol produced a dose-dependent inhibition of basal {sup 35}S-TBPS binding. In the presence of chloride ions, GABA and pentobarbital had a biphasic action on {sup 35}S-TBPS binding, whereas diazepam only stimulated the binding. Ethanol reduced the stimulatory effects of GABA and pentobarbital in a dose-dependent manner, but had no effect on the enhancement of {sup 35}S-TBPS binding produced by diazepam. {sup 35}S-TBPS binding to cortical brain membranes was inhibited by the putative Cl{sup -} channel blocking agent DIDS. This inhibitory action of DIDS was significantly, and dose-dependently reduced by ethanol. Chronic ethanol ingestion in vivo, which produced tolerance to and physical dependence on ethanol in the animals, did not alter the stimulatory and inhibitory effects of GABA and pentobarbital on {sup 35}S-TBPS binding. The enhancement of {sup 35}S-TBPS binding produced by diazepam was slightly, but significantly, enhanced in brain membranes from animals which had undergone 24 hours of ethanol withdrawal. Chronic ethanol treatment did not change the potency of picrotoxin and of the peripheral BDZ-receptor ligand RO 5-4864 to competitively inhibit {sup 35}S-TBPS binding. Our results suggest that in vitro addition of ethanol alters the activity of the activity of the GABA benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptor complex. Although there was no change in basal {sup 35}S-TBPS binding following chronic in vivo ethanol administration, our curent data suggest that chronic ethanol ingestion may cause specific changes of the GABA BDZ receptor proteins, in this study revealed as an altered modulation of {sup 35}S-TBPS binding by diazepam.

  14. The effect of low concentrations of ethanol on gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Lingjiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol consumption was identified as a significant risk factor for cancer in humans. The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of low concentrations of ethanol on gastric adenocarcinoma cell viability, apoptosis, and changes in the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase with ethanol treatment. Gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines (MGC803, MGC823 and SGC7901 were treated with different concentrations of ethanol (0.03125%, 0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, and 4%. The MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and flow cytometry were used to analyze the effect of ethanol treatment on cell viability and apoptosis. Western blotting was used to analyze the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase in gastric carcinoma cells. Ethanol treatment inhibited cell proliferation in gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines in a significant dose-dependent manner. Ethanol induced apoptosis of gastric adenocarcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. The alcohol dehydrogenase activity of gastric adenocarcinoma cells increased with the increase in the concentration of ethanol. Ethanol inhibited cell viability and the growth of gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines. Low concentrations of ethanol also induced apoptosis and increased the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase of the gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines.

  15. The effect of low concentrations of ethanol on gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Lingjiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol consumption has been identified as a significant risk factor for cancer in humans. The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of low concentrations of ethanol on gastric adenocarcinoma cell viability, apoptosis, and changes in the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase with ethanol treatment. Gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines (MGC803, MGC823 and SGC7901 were treated with different concentrations of ethanol (0.03125%, 0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, and 4%. An MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and flow cytometry were used to analyze the effect of ethanol treatment on cell viability and apoptosis. Western blotting was used to analyze the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase in gastric carcinoma cells. Ethanol treatment inhibited cell proliferation in gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines in a significant dose-dependent manner. Ethanol was also able to induce the apoptosis of gastric adenocarcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity of gastric adenocarcinoma cells increased with the increase in the concentration of ethanol. Ethanol inhibited cell viability and growth of gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines. Low concentrations of ethanol also induced apoptosis and increased the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase of the gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines.

  16. Ethanol-Induced Neurodegeneration and Glial Activation in the Developing Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Saito

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol induces neurodegeneration in the developing brain, which may partially explain the long-lasting adverse effects of prenatal ethanol exposure in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD. While animal models of FASD show that ethanol-induced neurodegeneration is associated with glial activation, the relationship between glial activation and neurodegeneration has not been clarified. This review focuses on the roles of activated microglia and astrocytes in neurodegeneration triggered by ethanol in rodents during the early postnatal period (equivalent to the third trimester of human pregnancy. Previous literature indicates that acute binge-like ethanol exposure in postnatal day 7 (P7 mice induces apoptotic neurodegeneration, transient activation of microglia resulting in phagocytosis of degenerating neurons, and a prolonged increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes. In our present study, systemic administration of a moderate dose of lipopolysaccharides, which causes glial activation, attenuates ethanol-induced neurodegeneration. These studies suggest that activation of microglia and astrocytes by acute ethanol in the neonatal brain may provide neuroprotection. However, repeated or chronic ethanol can induce significant proinflammatory glial reaction and neurotoxicity. Further studies are necessary to elucidate whether acute or sustained glial activation caused by ethanol exposure in the developing brain can affect long-lasting cellular and behavioral abnormalities observed in the adult brain.

  17. Metabolic engineering of ethanol production in Thermoanaerobacter mathranii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shou Yao

    2010-11-15

    Strain BG1 is a xylanolytic, thermophilic, anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium originally isolated from an Icelandic hot spring. The strain belongs to the species Thermoanaerobacter mathranii. The strain ferments glucose, xylose, arabinose, galactose and mannose simultaneously and produces ethanol, acetate, lactate, CO{sub 2}, and H2 as fermentation end-products. As a potential ethanol producer from lignocellulosic biomass, tailor-made BG1 strain with the metabolism redirected to produce ethanol is needed. Metabolic engineering of T. mathranii BG1 is therefore necessary to improve ethanol production. Strain BG1 contains four alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) encoding genes. They are adhA, adhB, bdhA and adhE encoding primary alcohol dehydrogenase, secondary alcohol dehydrogenase, butanol dehydrogenase and bifunctional alcohol/acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, respectively. The presence in an organism of multiple alcohol dehydrogenases with overlapping specificities makes the determination of the specific role of each ADH difficult. Deletion of each individual adh gene in the strain revealed that the adhE deficient mutant strain fails to produce ethanol as the fermentation product. The bifunctional alcohol/acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, AdhE, is therefore proposed responsible for ethanol production in T. mathranii BG1, by catalyzing sequential NADH-dependent reductions of acetyl-CoA to acetaldehyde and then to ethanol under fermentative conditions. Moreover, AdhE was conditionally expressed from a xylose-induced promoter in a recombinant strain (BG1E1) with a concomitant deletion of a lactate dehydrogenase. Over-expression of AdhE in strain BG1E1 with xylose as a substrate facilitates the production of ethanol at an increased yield. With a cofactor-dependent ethanol production pathway in T. mathranii BG1, it may become crucial to regenerate cofactor to increase the ethanol yield. Feeding the cells with a more reduced carbon source, such as mannitol, was shown to increase ethanol

  18. Ethanol metabolism modifies hepatic protein acylation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristofer S Fritz

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial protein acetylation increases in response to chronic ethanol ingestion in mice, and is thought to reduce mitochondrial function and contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. The mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 regulates the acetylation status of several mitochondrial proteins, including those involved in ethanol metabolism. The newly discovered desuccinylase activity of the mitochondrial sirtuin SIRT5 suggests that protein succinylation could be an important post-translational modification regulating mitochondrial metabolism. To assess the possible role of protein succinylation in ethanol metabolism, we surveyed hepatic sub-cellular protein fractions from mice fed a control or ethanol-supplemented diet for succinyl-lysine, as well as acetyl-, propionyl-, and butyryl-lysine post-translational modifications. We found mitochondrial protein propionylation increases, similar to mitochondrial protein acetylation. In contrast, mitochondrial protein succinylation is reduced. These mitochondrial protein modifications appear to be primarily driven by ethanol metabolism, and not by changes in mitochondrial sirtuin levels. Similar trends in acyl modifications were observed in the nucleus. However, comparatively fewer acyl modifications were observed in the cytoplasmic or the microsomal compartments, and were generally unchanged by ethanol metabolism. Using a mass spectrometry proteomics approach, we identified several candidate acetylated, propionylated, and succinylated proteins, which were enriched using antibodies against each modification. Additionally, we identified several acetyl and propionyl lysine residues on the same sites for a number of proteins and supports the idea of the overlapping nature of lysine-specific acylation. Thus, we show that novel post-translational modifications are present in hepatic mitochondrial, nuclear, cytoplasmic, and microsomal compartments and ethanol ingestion, and its associated

  19. Ethanol Metabolism Modifies Hepatic Protein Acylation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Kristofer S.; Green, Michelle F.; Petersen, Dennis R.; Hirschey, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein acetylation increases in response to chronic ethanol ingestion in mice, and is thought to reduce mitochondrial function and contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. The mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 regulates the acetylation status of several mitochondrial proteins, including those involved in ethanol metabolism. The newly discovered desuccinylase activity of the mitochondrial sirtuin SIRT5 suggests that protein succinylation could be an important post-translational modification regulating mitochondrial metabolism. To assess the possible role of protein succinylation in ethanol metabolism, we surveyed hepatic sub-cellular protein fractions from mice fed a control or ethanol-supplemented diet for succinyl-lysine, as well as acetyl-, propionyl-, and butyryl-lysine post-translational modifications. We found mitochondrial protein propionylation increases, similar to mitochondrial protein acetylation. In contrast, mitochondrial protein succinylation is reduced. These mitochondrial protein modifications appear to be primarily driven by ethanol metabolism, and not by changes in mitochondrial sirtuin levels. Similar trends in acyl modifications were observed in the nucleus. However, comparatively fewer acyl modifications were observed in the cytoplasmic or the microsomal compartments, and were generally unchanged by ethanol metabolism. Using a mass spectrometry proteomics approach, we identified several candidate acetylated, propionylated, and succinylated proteins, which were enriched using antibodies against each modification. Additionally, we identified several acetyl and propionyl lysine residues on the same sites for a number of proteins and supports the idea of the overlapping nature of lysine-specific acylation. Thus, we show that novel post-translational modifications are present in hepatic mitochondrial, nuclear, cytoplasmic, and microsomal compartments and ethanol ingestion, and its associated metabolism, induce specific

  20. The Effect of Ethanol Intoxication on the Spectral Characteristics for Blood Components of White Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Korobova O.; Dudok T.; Trach I.; Moroz O.; Vlokh I.; Vlokh R.

    2003-01-01

    The present paper is devoted to studying, with the aid of different organic dyes, the transmittance spectra of hemoglobin and immunoglobulin G extracted from the blood of laboratory rats, which have been chronically intoxicated with ethanol. The differences in the spectra are detected, when compare with those for the control group. It is shown that the presence of ethanol in blood probably leads to uncoiling partially the hemoglobin molecules. The essential difference is also found in the tra...

  1. Change of Cystine/Glutamate Antiporter Expression in Ethanol-Dependent Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Tiziana Peana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some drugs of abuse down regulate the expression of cystine/glutamate (xCT antiporter in the nucleus accumbens (Acb after extinction or withdrawal. The altered level of xCT exchanger in Acb, a structure involved in ethanol reinforcement, may contribute to the pathological glutamatergic signalling, linked to addiction. We hypothesised that the expression of xCT may be changed in Acb and whole brain also in non-dependent (occasional drinkers, ethanol-dependent rats, as well as, during ethanol withdrawal.Methods: Wistar rats were made ethanol-dependent by chronic exposure to an alcoholic milk beverage (from 2.4 to 7.2% v/v ethanol. Ethanol non-dependent rats were exposed to a similar, but non-alcoholic liquid diet and self-administered ethanol (10% twice a week. Withdrawal in ethanol-dependent rats was studied at 12 hours after the last ethanol-enriched diet exposure. Immediately after the measurement of somatic signs of withdrawal, Western blot analysis with a polyclonal antibody against xCT was carried out in a naïve control group, non-dependent and ethanol-dependent rats as well as withdrawal rats, in order to study the level of xCT expression in Acb and whole brain. Results. Non-dependent rats self-administered an average dose of 1.21±0.02 g/kg per session (30 min. Daily ethanol consumption during chronic exposure to the alcoholic beverage ranged from 6.30±0.16 to 13.99±0.66 g/kg. Ethanol dependent rats after suspension of the ethanol-enriched diet have shown significant somatic signs of withdrawal. Western blotting analysis of Acb lysates revealed that xCT was over expressed in ethanol-dependent rats whereas in whole brain preparations xCT was over expressed in both non-dependent and ethanol-dependent rats compared to control group. On the contrary, xCT expression during withdrawal was down regulated in Acb and restored to control level in whole brain preparations. Conclusions: The changes of xCT expression in both Acb and

  2. Maternal metallothionein and zinc after acute ethanol exposure during gestation in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, J.E. (Univ. of Kansas, Kansas City (United States))

    1992-02-26

    Acute exposure of the rat fetus to ethanol at critical periods can cause growth retardation and brain damage; the mechanism(s) is not known. Ethanol may cause redistribution of maternal zinc which results in fetal zinc deficiency and subsequent interruption of growth and development. The purpose was to determine if acute ethanol administration to the pregnant rat alters Zn and the Zn binding protein metallothionein (MT) in selected tissues. On gestational day (gd) 14, eighteen pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into groups. By intragastric tube, ethanol treated dams were given ethanol and pairfed controls were given a 0.85% NaCl solution. On gd 15, intragastric feedings were repeated. Throughout, the Lieber-DeCarli control diet was fed (adlibitum to untreated controls and ethanol treated dams and in appropriate quantities to pair fed controls). Blood ethanol concentrations at 90 minutes after the ethanol dose were 154 {plus minus} 46 and 265 {plus minus} 110 mg% on gd 14 and 15, respectively.

  3. The combination of atorvastatin and ethanol is not more hepatotoxic to rats than the administration of each drug alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.T. Ito

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Animal studies and premarketing clinical trials have revealed hepatotoxicity of statins, primarily minor elevations in serum alanine aminotransferase levels. The combined chronic use of medicines and eventual ethanol abuse are common and may present a synergistic action regarding liver injury. Our objective was to study the effect of the chronic use of atorvastatin associated with acute ethanol administration on the liver in a rat model. One group of rats was treated daily for 5 days a week for 2 months with 0.8 mg/kg atorvastatin by gavage. At the end of the treatment the livers were perfused with 72 mM ethanol for 60 min. Control groups (at least 4 animals in each group consisted of a group of 2-month-old male Wistar EPM-1 rats exposed to 10% ethanol (v/v ad libitum replacing water for 2 months, followed by perfusion of the liver with 61 nM atorvastatin for 60 min, and a group of animals without chronic ethanol treatment whose livers were perfused with atorvastatin and/or ethanol. The combination of atorvastatin with ethanol did not increase the release of injury marker enzymes (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactic dehydrogenase from the liver and no change in liver function markers (bromosulfophthalein clearance, and oxygen consumption was observed. Our results suggest that the combination of atorvastatin with ethanol is not more hepatotoxic than the separate use of each substance.

  4. Ethanol vehicle fuel : energy balance, GHG reductions, supply and economic overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rilett, J.

    2003-04-15

    This paper examined the following four aspects of ethanol vehicle fuels: energy balance of ethanol, potential for greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions, Canadian production capacity based on available ethanol feedstock, and an overview of the economic issues in the Canadian ethanol industry. All recent research conducted by private consulting firms, government researchers in Canada and the United States, and academia indicate that ethanol presents a positive energy balance. Only one recent study concludes that ethanol has a negative energy balance. It was argued that this conclusion was reached because the data was outdated and improper assumptions were made concerning energy inputs for the production of ethanol. Researchers indicate that ethanol as a vehicle fuel yields GHG emission reductions. Mixtures of 10 per cent ethanol and 90 per cent gasoline (E10) result in GHG reductions estimated in the 1 to 5 per cent range when compared to pure gasoline. The same estimates suggest that if all gasoline sold in Alberta was an E10 blend, the minimum reduction of GHG emissions would be approximately 103,220 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent. In this paper, wheat was considered as a feed stock, and numbers indicate that 4.6 million tonnes of wheat would be suitable for ethanol feedstock, exceeding the government goal of having 35 per cent of all gasoline as E10 blend. Corn produced in eastern Canada would also increase available feedstock. A large ethanol industry in Canada would require fuel tax exemptions and mandatory blending percentages to make it a viable market. 20 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig.

  5. Ethanol production by recombinant and natural xylose-utilising yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliasson, Anna

    2000-07-01

    from P. stipitis and the endogenous XKS1 gene under control of the PGKI promoter, into the HIS3 locus of S. cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7A. The strain was stable for more than forty generations in continuous fermentation. The metabolic fluxes during xylose metabolism were quantitatively analysed and anaerobic ethanol formation from xylose in recombinant S. cerevisiae was demonstrated for the first time. The xylose uptake rate increased with increasing xylose concentration in the feed. However, with a feed of 15 g/l xylose and 5 g/l glucose, the xylose flux was 2.2 times lower than the glucose flux, indicating that transport limits the xylose flux. The role of mitochondria in ethanol formation from xylose was investigated using cells of recombinant xylose-utilising S. cerevisiae with two different respiratory capacities and cells from P. stipitis grown under conditions of optimal ethanol formation. Different inhibitors were used either to inhibit the electron transport chain and simulate oxygen limitation, or to inhibit the tricarboxylic acid cycle while not disturbing the electron transport chain. The response to the inhibitors differed significantly for glucose and xylose and the effect was more pronounced for S. cerevisiae. The results indicate that mitochondria play a significant role in the maintenance of the cytoplasmic redox balance during xylose fermentation, through the action of cytoplasmically directed NADH dehydrogenase activity. Thus, more carbon was directed towards ethanol in chemostat cultivations of xylose/glucose mixtures by S. cerevisiae TMB 3001, in the presence of low amounts of oxygen. P. stipitis possesses a second, cyanide-insensitive terminal oxidase, the alternative oxidase, which seems to be of particular importance for efficient ethanol formation from xylose. The highest activity of cyanide-insensitive respiration (CIR), the highest ethanol productivity and lowest xylitol formation were all observed with cells grown under oxygen-limited conditions

  6. Ethanol production by recombinant and natural xylose-utilising yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliasson, Anna

    2000-07-01

    from P. stipitis and the endogenous XKS1 gene under control of the PGKI promoter, into the HIS3 locus of S. cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7A. The strain was stable for more than forty generations in continuous fermentation. The metabolic fluxes during xylose metabolism were quantitatively analysed and anaerobic ethanol formation from xylose in recombinant S. cerevisiae was demonstrated for the first time. The xylose uptake rate increased with increasing xylose concentration in the feed. However, with a feed of 15 g/l xylose and 5 g/l glucose, the xylose flux was 2.2 times lower than the glucose flux, indicating that transport limits the xylose flux. The role of mitochondria in ethanol formation from xylose was investigated using cells of recombinant xylose-utilising S. cerevisiae with two different respiratory capacities and cells from P. stipitis grown under conditions of optimal ethanol formation. Different inhibitors were used either to inhibit the electron transport chain and simulate oxygen limitation, or to inhibit the tricarboxylic acid cycle while not disturbing the electron transport chain. The response to the inhibitors differed significantly for glucose and xylose and the effect was more pronounced for S. cerevisiae. The results indicate that mitochondria play a significant role in the maintenance of the cytoplasmic redox balance during xylose fermentation, through the action of cytoplasmically directed NADH dehydrogenase activity. Thus, more carbon was directed towards ethanol in chemostat cultivations of xylose/glucose mixtures by S. cerevisiae TMB 3001, in the presence of low amounts of oxygen. P. stipitis possesses a second, cyanide-insensitive terminal oxidase, the alternative oxidase, which seems to be of particular importance for efficient ethanol formation from xylose. The highest activity of cyanide-insensitive respiration (CIR), the highest ethanol productivity and lowest xylitol formation were all observed with cells grown under oxygen-limited conditions

  7. Ethanol-withdrawal seizures are controlled by tissue plasminogen activator via modulation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Robert; Melchor, Jerry P; Matys, Tomasz; Skrzypiec, Anna E; Strickland, Sidney

    2005-01-11

    Chronic ethanol abuse causes up-regulation of NMDA receptors, which underlies seizures and brain damage upon ethanol withdrawal (EW). Here we show that tissue-plasminogen activator (tPA), a protease implicated in neuronal plasticity and seizures, is induced in the limbic system by chronic ethanol consumption, temporally coinciding with up-regulation of NMDA receptors. tPA interacts with NR2B-containing NMDA receptors and is required for up-regulation of the NR2B subunit in response to ethanol. As a consequence, tPA-deficient mice have reduced NR2B, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation, and seizures after EW. tPA-mediated facilitation of EW seizures is abolished by NR2B-specific NMDA antagonist ifenprodil. These results indicate that tPA mediates the development of physical dependence on ethanol by regulating NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

  8. Bio-ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    , however, shown that by following this path, we will lose more than we gain on both CO2 emission and fossil fuel dependency. Being renewable, CO2 neutral and storable, biomass is a priority resource for fossil fuel substitution in general. Investigations of the magnitude of biomass that is or can be made...... available for energy purposes - be it from waste, agricultural residues or energy crops - show, however, that biomass is very limited compared to the potential use of it. Even in the most optimistic near term scenarios (30 years ahead), the total physically available biomass can at maximum substitute around......, but they do not improve the energy balance enough for bio-ethanol to compete with alternative uses of the biomass. When using biomass to substitute fossil fuels in heat & power production, a close to 100% substitution efficiency is achieved. The best alternative for CO2 reduction and oil saving is, therefore...

  9. The effect of low concentrations of ethanol on gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Lingjiao; Chen Shaohua; Zhang Yu; Pan Hongming

    2013-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption was identified as a significant risk factor for cancer in humans. The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of low concentrations of ethanol on gastric adenocarcinoma cell viability, apoptosis, and changes in the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase with ethanol treatment. Gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines (MGC803, MGC823 and SGC7901) were treated with different concentrations of ethanol (0.03125%, 0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, and 4%). The MTT...

  10. Stress Alone or associated with Ethanol Induces Prostanoid Release in Rat Aorta via α2-Adrenoceptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Rafaela de Fátima Ferreira [Departamento de Farmacologia - Instituto de Biociências - Universidade Estadual Paulista - UNESP - São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Farmacologia - Faculdade de Medicina de Marília - FAMEMA, SP (Brazil); Taipeiro, Elane de Fátima [Laboratório de Farmacologia - Faculdade de Medicina de Marília - FAMEMA, SP (Brazil); Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa [Departamento de Análise Clínica - Toxicológica e Ciência de Alimentos - Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas - USP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Chies, Agnaldo Bruno [Departamento de Farmacologia - Instituto de Biociências - Universidade Estadual Paulista - UNESP - São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Farmacologia - Faculdade de Medicina de Marília - FAMEMA, SP (Brazil); Cordellini, Sandra, E-mail: cordelli@ibb.unesp.br [Departamento de Farmacologia - Instituto de Biociências - Universidade Estadual Paulista - UNESP - São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    Stress and ethanol are both, independently, important cardiovascular risk factors. To evaluate the cardiovascular risk of ethanol consumption and stress exposure, isolated and in association, in male adult rats. Rats were separated into 4 groups: Control, ethanol (20% in drinking water for 6 weeks), stress (immobilization 1h day/5 days a week for 6 weeks) and stress/ethanol. Concentration-responses curves to noradrenaline - in the absence and presence of yohimbine, L-NAME or indomethacin - or to phenylephrine were determined in thoracic aortas with and without endothelium. EC50 and maximum response (n=8-12) were compared using two-way ANOVA/Bonferroni method. Either stress or stress in association with ethanol consumption increased the noradrenaline maximum responses in intact aortas. This hyper-reactivity was eliminated by endothelium removal or by the presence of either indomethacin or yohimbine, but was not altered by the presence of L-NAME. Meanwhile, ethanol consumption did not alter the reactivity to noradrenaline. The phenylephrine responses in aortas both with and without endothelium also remained unaffected regardless of protocol. Chronic stress increased rat aortic responses to noradrenaline. This effect is dependent upon the vascular endothelium and involves the release of vasoconstrictor prostanoids via stimulation of endothelial alpha-2 adrenoceptors. Moreover, chronic ethanol consumption appeared to neither influence noradrenaline responses in rat thoracic aorta, nor did it modify the increase of such responses observed as a consequence of stress exposure.

  11. Feeding tube - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007235.htm Feeding tube - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A feeding tube is a small, soft, plastic tube placed ...

  12. Jejunostomy feeding tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000181.htm Jejunostomy feeding tube To use the sharing features on this ... vomiting Your child's stomach is bloated Alternate Names Feeding - jejunostomy tube; G-J tube; J-tube; Jejunum ...

  13. Nasogastric feeding tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000182.htm Nasogastric feeding tube To use the sharing features on this ... the nose. It can be used for all feedings or for giving a person extra calories. It ...

  14. Tube Feeding Troubleshooting Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tube Feeding Troubleshoot ing Guide This guide is a tool to assist you, and should not replace your doctor’s ... everyone. table of contents Going Home with Tube Feedings....................................................2 Nausea and ... ...

  15. Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parks EP, Shaikhkhalil A, Groleau V, Wendel D, Stallings VA. Feeding healthy infants, children, and adolescents. In: ... 2016:chap. Stettler N, Bhatia J, Parish A, Stallings VA. Feeding healthy infants, children, and adolescents. In: ...

  16. Feeding Your Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for your child. These guidelines on breastfeeding and bottle feeding can help you make the decision that's right ... formula is a nutritious alternative to breast milk. Bottle feeding can offer more freedom and flexibility for moms, ...

  17. Gastroenteric tube feeding: Techniques, problems and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstein, Irina; Shastri, Yogesh M; Stein, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Gastroenteric tube feeding plays a major role in the management of patients with poor voluntary intake, chronic neurological or mechanical dysphagia or gut dysfunction, and patients who are critically ill. However, despite the benefits and widespread use of enteral tube feeding, some patients experience complications. This review aims to discuss and compare current knowledge regarding the clinical application of enteral tube feeding, together with associated complications and special aspects. We conducted an extensive literature search on PubMed, Embase and Medline using index terms relating to enteral access, enteral feeding/nutrition, tube feeding, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy/jejunostomy, endoscopic nasoenteric tube, nasogastric tube, and refeeding syndrome. The literature showed common routes of enteral access to include nasoenteral tube, gastrostomy and jejunostomy, while complications fall into four major categories: mechanical, e.g., tube blockage or removal; gastrointestinal, e.g., diarrhea; infectious e.g., aspiration pneumonia, tube site infection; and metabolic, e.g., refeeding syndrome, hyperglycemia. Although the type and frequency of complications arising from tube feeding vary considerably according to the chosen access route, gastrointestinal complications are without doubt the most common. Complications associated with enteral tube feeding can be reduced by careful observance of guidelines, including those related to food composition, administration rate, portion size, food temperature and patient supervision. PMID:25024606

  18. Gastroenteric tube feeding: techniques, problems and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstein, Irina; Shastri, Yogesh M; Stein, Jürgen

    2014-07-14

    Gastroenteric tube feeding plays a major role in the management of patients with poor voluntary intake, chronic neurological or mechanical dysphagia or gut dysfunction, and patients who are critically ill. However, despite the benefits and widespread use of enteral tube feeding, some patients experience complications. This review aims to discuss and compare current knowledge regarding the clinical application of enteral tube feeding, together with associated complications and special aspects. We conducted an extensive literature search on PubMed, Embase and Medline using index terms relating to enteral access, enteral feeding/nutrition, tube feeding, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy/jejunostomy, endoscopic nasoenteric tube, nasogastric tube, and refeeding syndrome. The literature showed common routes of enteral access to include nasoenteral tube, gastrostomy and jejunostomy, while complications fall into four major categories: mechanical, e.g., tube blockage or removal; gastrointestinal, e.g., diarrhea; infectious e.g., aspiration pneumonia, tube site infection; and metabolic, e.g., refeeding syndrome, hyperglycemia. Although the type and frequency of complications arising from tube feeding vary considerably according to the chosen access route, gastrointestinal complications are without doubt the most common. Complications associated with enteral tube feeding can be reduced by careful observance of guidelines, including those related to food composition, administration rate, portion size, food temperature and patient supervision.

  19. Production of ethanol from molasses at 45 C using alginate-immobilized Kluyveromyces marxianus imb3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gough, S. [Biotechnology Research Group, Univ. of Ulster (United Kingdom); Brady, D. [Biotechnology Research Group, Univ. of Ulster (United Kingdom); Nigam, P. [Biotechnology Research Group, Univ. of Ulster (United Kingdom); Marchant, R. [Biotechnology Research Group, Univ. of Ulster (United Kingdom); McHale, A.P. [Biotechnology Research Group, Univ. of Ulster (United Kingdom)

    1997-05-01

    The thermotolerant, ethanol-producing yeast strain, Kluyveromyces marxianus IMB3, has been immobilized in calcium alginate matrices. The ability of the biocatalyst to produce ethanol from cane molasses originating in Guatemala, Honduras, Senegal, Guyana and the Philippines was examined. In each case the molasses was diluted to yield a sugar concentration of 140 g/l and fermentations were carried out in batch-fed mode at 45 C. During the first 24 hours, the maximum ethanol concentrations obtained ranged from 43-57 g/l with optimum production on the molasses from Honduras. Ethanol production during subsequent re-feeding of the fermentations at 24-hour intervals over a 120-hour period, decreased steadily to concentrations ranging from 20-36 g/l and it was found that ethanol productivity remained highest in fermentations containing the molasses from Guyana. When each set of fermentations was re-fed at 120 h and allowed to continue for 48 h, ethanol production again increased to a maximum with concentrations ranging from 25-52 g/l. It was also found however, that increasing the time between re-feeding at this stage in fermentation had a detrimental effect on the functionality of the biocatalyst. (orig.). With 2 figs.

  20. ETHANOL DEHYDRATION IN PACKED DISTILLATION COLUMN USING GLYCEROL AS ENTRAINER: EXPERIMENTS AND HETP EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. L. R. Souza

    Full Text Available Abstract The ethanol-water separation is very important because ethanol is widely applied in the chemical industry and its use as a fuel can reduce the pollution emitted to the air. However, anhydrous ethanol production using conventional distillation is impossible, at atmospheric pressure, due to the presence of an azeotrope. In the present work, experimental tests were carried out in order to evaluate the use of glycerol as an entrainer, in substitution of ethylene glycol in an extractive distillation. The use of glycerol is motivated by the biodiesel production units, due to the fact that it is the main byproduct and a new market is necessary to consume its overproduction. The experiments were carried out in a distillation column packed with Raschig rings, varying the glycerol/feed (ethanol and water ratio, S/F, from 0.5 to 0.9. The samples were analyzed using a digital densimeter. The results showed that glycerol was effective to promote ethanol dehydration and the presence of an azeotrope was not observed using a solvent to feed ratio (S/F equal to 0.9. Some empirical correlations were investigated to evaluate the HETP (Height Equivalent to a Theoretical Plate, and the results provided a useful tool for designing a packed bed column for ethanol-water separation.

  1. Growth environment, harvest management and germplasm impacts on potential ethanol and crude protein yield in alfalfa

    Science.gov (United States)

    An alfalfa (Medicago sativa L) biomass energy production system would produce two products. Leaves would be separated from stems to produce a high protein feed for livestock and stems would be processed to produce ethanol. Therefore, maximum yields of both leaves and stems are essential for profitab...

  2. Impact of using virginiamycin in the fuel ethanol production process on distillers grains coproducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are frequently used to reduce bacterial contamination in commercial fuel ethanol fermentations, but there is concern that antibiotic residues may persist in the distillers grains (DDG) coproducts that are utilized for cattle feed. A study was conducted in the pilot plant facilities at t...

  3. Ethanol from Whey: Continuous Fermentation with a Catabolite Repression-Resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, S L; Bernard, A; Bailey, R B

    1984-09-01

    An alternative method for the conversion of cheese whey lactose into ethanol has been demonstrated. With the help of continuous-culture technology, a catabolite repression-resistant mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae completely fermented equimolar mixtures of glucose and galactose into ethanol. The first step in this process was a computer-controlled fed-batch operation based on the carbon dioxide evolution rate of the culture. In the absence of inhibitory ethanol concentrations, this step allowed us to obtain high biomass concentrations before continuous fermentation. The continuous anaerobic process successfully incorporated a cell-recycle system to optimize the fermentor productivity. Under conditions permitting a low residual sugar concentration (feed at a dilution rate of 0.2 h. Complete fermentation of highly concentrated feed solutions (20%) was also demonstrated, but only with greatly diminished fermentor productivity (5.5 g liter h).

  4. Orexin-1 and orexin-2 receptor antagonists reduce ethanol self-administration in high-drinking rodent models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Ivy Anderson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To examine the role of orexin-1 and orexin-2 receptor activity on ethanol self-administration, compounds that differentially target orexin (OX receptor subtypes were assessed in various self-administration paradigms using high-drinking rodent models. Effects of the OX1 antagonist SB334867, the OX2 antagonist LSN2424100, and the mixed OX1/2 antagonist almorexant (ACT-078573 on home cage ethanol consumption were tested in ethanol-preferring (P rats using a 2-bottle choice procedure. In separate experiments, effects of SB334867, LSN2424100, and almorexant on operant ethanol self-administration were assessed in P rats maintained on a progressive ratio operant schedule of reinforcement. In a third series of experiments, SB334867, LSN2424100, and almorexant were administered to ethanol-preferring C57BL/6J mice to examine effects of OX receptor blockade on ethanol intake in a binge-like drinking (drinking-in-the-dark model. In P rats with chronic home cage free-choice ethanol access, SB334867 and almorexant significantly reduced ethanol intake, but almorexant also reduced water intake, suggesting nonspecific effects on consummatory behavior. In the progressive ratio operant experiments, LSN2424100 and almorexant reduced breakpoints and ethanol consumption in P rats, whereas the almorexant inactive enantiomer and SB334867 did not significantly affect the motivation to consume ethanol. As expected, vehicle-injected mice exhibited binge-like drinking patterns in the drinking-in-the-dark model. All three OX antagonists reduced both ethanol intake and resulting blood ethanol concentrations relative to vehicle-injected controls, but SB334867 and LSN2424100 also reduced sucrose consumption in a different cohort of mice, suggesting nonspecific effects. Collectively, these results contribute to a growing body of evidence indicating that OX1 and OX2 receptor activity influences ethanol self-administration, although the effects may not be selective for ethanol

  5. Environmental Releases in the Fuel Ethanol Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn ethanol is the largest produced alternate biofuel in the United States. More than 13 billion gallons of ethanol were produced in 2010. The projected corn ethanol production is 15 billion gallons by 2015. With increased production of ethanol, the environmental releases from e...

  6. Enhancement of germ cell apoptosis induced by ethanol in transgenic mice overexpressing Fas Ligand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HENG CHUAN XIA; FENG LI; ZHEN LI; ZU CHUAN ZHANG

    2003-01-01

    It was suggested that chronic ethanol exposure could result in testicular germ cell apoptosis, but the mechanism is still unclear. In the present study, we use a model of transgenic mice ubiquitously overexpressing human FasL to investigate whether Fas ligand plays a role in ethanol-induced testicular germ cell apoptosis. Both wild-type (WT)mice and transgenic (TG) mice were treated with acute ethanol (20% v/v) by introperitoneal injection for five times.After ethanol injection, WT mice displayed up-regulation of Fas ligand in the testes, which was shown by FITCconjugated flow cytometry and western blotting. Moreover, TG mice exhibited significantly more apoptotic germ cells than WT mice did after ethanol injection, which was demonstrated by DNA fragmentation, PI staining flow cytometry and TUNEL staining. In addition, histopathological examination revealed that degenerative changes of epithelial component of the tubules occurred in FasL overexpressing transgenic mice while testicular morphology was normal in wild-type mice after acute ethanol exposure, suggesting FasL expression determines the sensitivity of testes to ethanol in mice. In summary, we provide the direct evidences that Fas ligand mediates the apoptosis of testicular germ cells induced by acute ethanol using FasL transgenic mice.

  7. Breast-Feeding Twins: Making Feedings Manageable

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more than one baby? Here's help breast-feeding twins or other multiples, from getting positioned and ensuring ... babies who are born prematurely, as are many twins and higher order multiples. Breast milk is easier ...

  8. Preliminary Economics for the Production of Pyrolysis Oil from Lignin in a Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2009-04-01

    Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery economics can be potentially improved by converting by-product lignin into high valued products. Cellulosic biomass is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery, cellulose and hemicellullose are converted to ethanol via fermentation. The raw lignin portion is the partially dewatered stream that is separated from the product ethanol and contains lignin, unconverted feed and other by-products. It can be burned as fuel for the plant or can be diverted into higher-value products. One such higher-valued product is pyrolysis oil, a fuel that can be further upgraded into motor gasoline fuels. While pyrolysis of pure lignin is not a good source of pyrolysis liquids, raw lignin containing unconverted feed and by-products may have potential as a feedstock. This report considers only the production of the pyrolysis oil and does not estimate the cost of upgrading that oil into synthetic crude oil or finished gasoline and diesel. A techno-economic analysis for the production of pyrolysis oil from raw lignin was conducted. comparing two cellulosic ethanol fermentation based biorefineries. The base case is the NREL 2002 cellulosic ethanol design report case where 2000 MTPD of corn stover is fermented to ethanol (NREL 2002). In the base case, lignin is separated from the ethanol product, dewatered, and burned to produce steam and power. The alternate case considered in this report dries the lignin, and then uses fast pyrolysis to generate a bio-oil product. Steam and power are generated in this alternate case by burning some of the corn stover feed, rather than fermenting it. This reduces the annual ethanol production rate from 69 to 54 million gallons/year. Assuming a pyrolysis oil value similar to Btu-adjusted residual oil, the estimated ethanol selling price ranges from $1.40 to $1.48 (2007 $) depending upon the yield of pyrolysis oil. This is considerably above the target minimum ethanol selling

  9. Ethanol production from waste materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shahid Iqbal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Experiment was designed for ethanol production using corn andother organic waste material containing starch contents andcellulosic material while barely used for diastase and acidicdigestion methods. The effect of temperature, yeast, barely diastaseand various dilutions of acid (sulfuric acids were investigated onethanol production. The result showed that corn yielded highamount of ethanol (445ml as compared to cellulosic material whichproduced 132ml of ethanol from one kg of weight. It was also notedthat with the increase of barely and yeast amount in a proper mannercan increase ethanol production from different starch sources. It wasalso noted that acid dilutions affected cellulose digestion where highyield of reducing sugar was noted at 0.75% of sulfuric acid dilution.It was concluded from the present experiment that economicalsources of starch and various dilutions of acids should be tried oncellulose digestion for bio-fuel production to withstand in thisenergy crisis time.

  10. Secondary liquefaction in ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of producing ethanol by fermentation, said method comprising a secondary liquefaction step in the presence of a themostable acid alpha-amylase or, a themostable maltogenic acid alpha-amylase.......The invention relates to a method of producing ethanol by fermentation, said method comprising a secondary liquefaction step in the presence of a themostable acid alpha-amylase or, a themostable maltogenic acid alpha-amylase....

  11. Control of packed column fouling in the continuous fermentation and stripping of ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, F; Kurantz, M J; Goldberg, N; Craig, J C

    1996-07-05

    By recycling the contents of a 14 L fermentor through a stripping column to continuously remove ethanol and reduce product inhibition, continuous complete conversion of nutrient feed containing 600 g/L glucose was achieved in a small pilot plant. Ethanol was recovered from the carbon dioxide stripping gas in a refrigerated condenser, and the gas was reheated with steam and recycled by a blower. Productivity of ethanol in the fermentor as high as 15.8 g/L/h and condensate production of up to 10 L/day of almost 50% by volume ethanol were maintained for up to 60 days of continuous operation. Weekly washing of the column packing in situ was required to prevent loss of performance caused by attached growth of yeast cells, which restricts the gas flow rate through the stripping column. (c) 1996 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Long-term ethanol exposure decreases the endotoxin-induced hepatic acute phase response in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glavind, Emilie; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Grønbaek, Henning

    2017-01-01

    -fed rats showed either no liver histopathological changes or varying degrees of steatosis. Ethanol feeding decreased the spontaneous liver mRNA expression of the prevailing acute phase protein alpha-2-macroglobulin by 30% (Ptumor necrosis factor...... an induced acute phase response is impaired in long-term ethanol-fed rats. METHODS: For six weeks, rats were either fed a Lieber-DeCarli ethanol-containing (36% as calories) liquid diet ad libitum or calorically pair-fed. Then, the rats were injected intraperitoneally with a low-dose of lipopolysaccharide...... (LPS) (0.5 mg/kg) to induce an acute phase response. Two hours after LPS, we measured the plasma concentrations of an array of inflammatory cytokines. Twenty-four hours after LPS, we measured the hepatic mRNA expression and serum concentrations of prominent rat acute phase proteins. RESULTS: Ethanol...

  13. Performance Assessment of SOFC Systems Integrated with Bio-Ethanol Production and Purification Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumittra Charojrochkul

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The overall electrical efficiencies of the integrated systems of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC and bio-ethanol production with purification processes at different heat integration levels were investigated. The simulation studies were based on the condition with zero net energy. It was found that the most suitable operating voltage is between 0.7 and 0.85 V and the operating temperature is in the range from 973 to 1173 K. For the effect of percent ethanol recovery, the optimum percent ethanol recovery is at 95%. The most efficient case is the system with full heat integration between SOFC and bio-ethanol production and purification processes with biogas reformed for producing extra hydrogen feed for SOFC which has the overall electrical efficiency = 36.17%. However more equipment such as reformer and heat exchangers are required and this leads to increased investment cost.

  14. Ethanol-Water Near-Azeotropic Mixture Dehydration by Compound Starch-Based Adsorbent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙津生; 师明; 王文平

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol-water near-azeotropic mixture dehydration was investigated by formulated compound starch-based adsorbent(CSA), which consists of corn, sweet potato and foaming agent. The net retention time and separa-tion factor of water over ethanol were measured by inverse gas chromatography(IGC). Results indicated that water has a longer net retention time than ethanol and that low temperature is beneficial to this dehydration process. Or-thogonal test was conducted under different vapor feed flow rates, bed temperatures and bed heights, to obtain op-timal fixed-bed dehydration condition. Dynamic saturated adsorbance was also studied. It was found that CSA has the same water adsorption capacity(0.15 g/g)as some commercial molecular sieves. Besides, this biosorptive dehy-dration process was found to be the most energy-efficient compared with other ethanol purification processes.

  15. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  16. Schistosome feeding and regurgitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J Skelly

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomes are parasitic flatworms that infect >200 million people worldwide, causing the chronic, debilitating disease schistosomiasis. Unusual among parasitic helminths, the long-lived adult worms, continuously bathed in blood, take up nutrients directly across the body surface and also by ingestion of blood into the gut. Recent proteomic analyses of the body surface revealed the presence of hydrolytic enzymes, solute, and ion transporters, thus emphasising its metabolic credentials. Furthermore, definition of the molecular mechanisms for the uptake of selected metabolites (glucose, certain amino acids, and water establishes it as a vital site of nutrient acquisition. Nevertheless, the amount of blood ingested into the gut per day is considerable: for males ∼100 nl; for the more actively feeding females ∼900 nl, >4 times body volume. Ingested erythrocytes are lysed as they pass through the specialized esophagus, while leucocytes become tethered and disabled there. Proteomics and transcriptomics have revealed, in addition to gut proteases, an amino acid transporter in gut tissue and other hydrolases, ion, and lipid transporters in the lumen, implicating the gut as the site for acquisition of essential lipids and inorganic ions. The surface is the principal entry route for glucose, whereas the gut dominates amino acid acquisition, especially in females. Heme, a potentially toxic hemoglobin degradation product, accumulates in the gut and, since schistosomes lack an anus, must be expelled by the poorly understood process of regurgitation. Here we place the new observations on the proteome of body surface and gut, and the entry of different nutrient classes into schistosomes, into the context of older studies on worm composition and metabolism. We suggest that the balance between surface and gut in nutrition is determined by the constraints of solute diffusion imposed by differences in male and female worm morphology. Our conclusions have

  17. Myeloperoxidase formation of PAF receptor ligands induces PAF receptor-dependent kidney injury during ethanol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Nagy, Laura E; McIntyre, Thomas M

    2015-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) induction and oxidative metabolism of ethanol in hepatocytes inflame and damage liver. Chronic ethanol ingestion also induces kidney dysfunction, which is associated with mortality from alcoholic hepatitis. Whether the kidney is directly affected by ethanol or is secondary to liver damage is not established. We found that CYP2E1 was induced in kidney tubules of mice chronically ingesting a modified Lieber-deCarli liquid ethanol diet. Phospholipids of kidney tubules were oxidized and fragmented in ethanol-fed mice with accumulation of azelaoyl phosphatidylcholine (Az-PC), a nonbiosynthetic product formed only by oxidative truncation of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine. Az-PC stimulates the inflammatory PAF receptor (PTAFR) abundantly expressed by neutrophils and kidney tubules, and inflammatory cells and myeloperoxidase-containing neutrophils accumulated in the kidneys of ethanol-fed mice after significant hysteresis. Decreased kidney filtration and induction of the acute kidney injury biomarker KIM-1 in tubules temporally correlated with leukocyte infiltration. Genetic ablation of PTAFR reduced accumulation of PTAFR ligands and reduced leukocyte infiltration into kidneys. Loss of this receptor in PTAFR(-/-) mice also suppressed oxidative damage and kidney dysfunction without affecting CYP2E1 induction. Neutrophilic inflammation was responsible for ethanol-induced kidney damage, because loss of neutrophil myeloperoxidase in MPO(-/-) mice was similarly protective. We conclude that ethanol catabolism in renal tubules results in a self-perpetuating cycle of CYP2E1 induction, local PTAFR ligand formation, and neutrophil infiltration and activation that leads to myeloperoxidase-dependent oxidation and damage to kidney function. Hepatocytes do not express PTAFR, so this oxidative cycle is a local response to ethanol catabolism in the kidney.

  18. The reformation of ethanol and application to fuel cells; A reforma do etanol e sua aplicacao em celulas a combustivel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Ennio Peres da; Camargo, Joao Carlos [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Energia]. E-mails: lh2ennio@ifi.unicamp.br; joaoc@fem.unicamp.br; Carolino, Iaponira Rando [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica]. e-mail: yaponira@hotmail.com

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents the perspectives for using of ethanol (EtOH) obtained from the sugar cane for electric power production, through a integrated system constituted by a hydrogen generator, by using the ethanol reforming associated to a fuel cell feed with the produced hydrogen. The paper also focuses the present re-structuration of the Brazilian electric sector identifying the possibility of implantation that system.

  19. Fermented liquid feed for pigs: an ancient technique for the future

    OpenAIRE

    Missotten, Joris; Michiels, Joris; Degroote, Jeroen; De Smet, Stefaan

    2015-01-01

    Fermented liquid feed is feed that has been mixed with water at a ratio ranging from 1:1.5 to 1:4. By mixing with water, lactic acid bacteria and yeasts naturally occurring in the feed proliferate and produce lactic acid, acetic acid and ethanol which reduces the pH of the mixture. This reduction in pH inhibits pathogenic organisms from developing in the feed. In addition, when this low pH mixture is fed, it reduces the pH in the stomach of pigs and prevents the proliferation of pathogens suc...

  20. Is gastric sham feeding really sham feeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclafani, A; Nissenbaum, J W

    1985-03-01

    Rats were fitted with gastric cannulas, food deprived, and allowed to drink a sugar solution that drained out of the opened cannula; i.e., the rats sham-fed. Although this procedure is thought to prevent absorption of ingested food, it was found that the sham feeding of a 32% glucose or sucrose solution significantly elevated blood glucose levels. The addition of acarbose, a drug that inhibits the digestion of sucrose, to the 32% sucrose solution blocked the blood glucose rise, as did closing the pylorus with an inflatable pyloric cuff. Neither the drug nor the cuff, however, reduced the amount of sucrose solution consumed. These findings indicate that gastric sham feeding does not necessarily prevent the digestion and absorption of food, although absorption is not essential for the appearance of a vigorous sham-feeding response. Nevertheless the possibility that neural or hormonal feedback from the stomach contributes to the sham-feeding response cannot be excluded, and until this issue is resolved the results of gastric sham-feeding studies should be interpreted with caution.

  1. Post-pyloric feeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eva Niv; Zvi Fireman; Nachum Vaisman

    2009-01-01

    Postpyloric feeding is an important and promising alternative to parenteral nutrition. The indications for this kind of feeding are increasing and include a variety of clinical conditions, such as gastroparesis, acute pancreatitis, gastric outlet stenosis, hyperemesis (including gravida), recurrent aspiration, tracheoesophageal fistula and stenosis in gastroenterostomy. This review discusses the differences between pre- and postpyloric feeding, indications and contraindications, advantages and disadvantages, and provides an overview of the techniques of placement of various postpyloric devices.

  2. Pharmacological activation of CB2 receptors counteracts the deleterious effect of ethanol on cell proliferation in the main neurogenic zones of the adult rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eRivera

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol exposure reduces endocannabinoid activity and disrupts adult neurogenesis in rodents, which results in structural and functional alterations. Cannabinoid receptor agonists promote adult neural progenitor cell (NPC proliferation. We evaluated the protective effects of the selective CB1 receptor agonist ACEA, the selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 and the fatty-acid amide-hydrolase (FAAH inhibitor URB597, which enhances endocannabinoid receptor activity, on NPC proliferation in rats with forced consumption of ethanol (10% or sucrose liquid diets for two weeks. We performed immunohistochemical and stereological analyses of cells expressing the mitotic phosphorylation of histone-3 (phospho-H3+ and the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU+ in the main neurogenic zones of adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ, subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ and hypothalamus. Animals were allowed ad libitum ethanol intake (7.3±1.1 g/kg/day after a controlled isocaloric pair-feeding period of sucrose and alcoholic diets. Alcohol intake reduced the number of BrdU+ cells in SGZ, SVZ and hypothalamus. The treatments (URB597, ACEA, JWH133 exerted a differential increase in alcohol consumption over time, but JWH133 specifically counteracted the deleterious effect of ethanol on NPC proliferation in the SVZ and SGZ, and ACEA reversed this effect in the SGZ only. JWH133 also induced an increased number of BrdU+ cells expressing neuron-specific β3-tubulin in the SVZ and SGZ. These results indicated that the specific activation of CB2 receptors rescued alcohol-induced impaired NPC proliferation, which is a potential clinical interest for the risk of neural damage in alcohol dependence.

  3. Pharmacological activation of CB2 receptors counteracts the deleterious effect of ethanol on cell proliferation in the main neurogenic zones of the adult rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Bindila, Laura; Alen, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Rubio, Leticia; Pavón, Francisco J.; Serrano, Antonia; Lutz, Beat; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure reduces endocannabinoid activity and disrupts adult neurogenesis in rodents, which results in structural and functional alterations. Cannabinoid receptor agonists promote adult neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation. We evaluated the protective effects of the selective CB1 receptor agonist ACEA, the selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 and the fatty-acid amide-hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597, which enhances endocannabinoid receptor activity, on NPC proliferation in rats with forced consumption of ethanol (10%) or sucrose liquid diets for 2 weeks. We performed immunohistochemical and stereological analyses of cells expressing the mitotic phosphorylation of histone-3 (phospho-H3+) and the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) in the main neurogenic zones of adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ) and hypothalamus. Animals were allowed ad libitum ethanol intake (7.3 ± 1.1 g/kg/day) after a controlled isocaloric pair-feeding period of sucrose and alcoholic diets. Alcohol intake reduced the number of BrdU+ cells in SGZ, SVZ, and hypothalamus. The treatments (URB597, ACEA, JWH133) exerted a differential increase in alcohol consumption over time, but JWH133 specifically counteracted the deleterious effect of ethanol on NPC proliferation in the SVZ and SGZ, and ACEA reversed this effect in the SGZ only. JWH133 also induced an increased number of BrdU+ cells expressing neuron-specific β3-tubulin in the SVZ and SGZ. These results indicated that the specific activation of CB2 receptors rescued alcohol-induced impaired NPC proliferation, which is a potential clinical interest for the risk of neural damage in alcohol dependence. PMID:26483633

  4. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... Chronic myelogenous leukemia is grouped into phases: Chronic Accelerated Blast crisis The chronic phase can last for ...

  5. Analysis of fractionation in corn-to-ethanol plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Camille

    As the dry grind ethanol industry has grown, the research and technology surrounding ethanol production and co-product value has increased. Including use of back-end oil extraction and front-end fractionation. Front-end fractionation is pre-fermentation separation of the corn kernel into 3 fractions: endosperm, bran, and germ. The endosperm fraction enters the existing ethanol plant, and a high protein DDGS product remains after fermentation. High value oil is extracted out of the germ fraction. This leaves corn germ meal and bran as co-products from the other two streams. These 3 co-products have a very different composition than traditional corn DDGS. Installing this technology allows ethanol plants to increase profitability by tapping into more diverse markets, and ultimately could allow for an increase in profitability. An ethanol plant model was developed to evaluate both back-end oil extraction and front-end fractionation technology and predict the change in co-products based on technology installed. The model runs in Microsoft Excel and requires inputs of whole corn composition (proximate analysis), amino acid content, and weight to predict the co-product quantity and quality. User inputs include saccharification and fermentation efficiencies, plant capacity, and plant process specifications including front-end fractionation and backend oil extraction, if applicable. This model provides plants a way to assess and monitor variability in co-product composition due to the variation in whole corn composition. Additionally the co-products predicted in this model are entered into the US Pork Center of Excellence, National Swine Nutrition Guide feed formulation software. This allows the plant user and animal nutritionists to evaluate the value of new co-products in existing animal diets.

  6. Danger of zooplankton feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Jiang, H.; Colin, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Zooplankton feed in any of three ways: they generate a feeding current while hovering, cruise through the water or are ambush feeders. Each mode generates different hydrodynamic disturbances and hence exposes the grazers differently to mechanosensory predators. Ambush feeders sink slowly and ther......Zooplankton feed in any of three ways: they generate a feeding current while hovering, cruise through the water or are ambush feeders. Each mode generates different hydrodynamic disturbances and hence exposes the grazers differently to mechanosensory predators. Ambush feeders sink slowly...

  7. Infant feeding: formula, solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barness, L A

    1985-04-01

    This article discusses and evaluates current formulas, traces their continual improvement (based largely on new information on breast milk composition), and then discusses the question of supplemental feedings.

  8. Autophagy Constitutes a Protective Mechanism against Ethanol Toxicity in Mouse Astrocytes and Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, Antoni; Pascual, María; Guerri, Consuelo

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol induces brain damage and neurodegeneration by triggering inflammatory processes in glial cells through activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. Recent evidence indicates the role of protein degradation pathways in neurodegeneration and alcoholic liver disease, but how these processes affect the brain remains elusive. We have demonstrated that chronic ethanol consumption impairs proteolytic pathways in mouse brain, and the immune response mediated by TLR4 receptors participates in these dysfunctions. We evaluate the in vitro effects of an acute ethanol dose on the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) on WT and TLR4-/- mouse astrocytes and neurons in primary culture, and how these changes affect cell survival. Our results show that ethanol induces overexpression of several autophagy markers (ATG12, LC3-II, CTSB), and increases the number of lysosomes in WT astrocytes, effects accompanied by a basification of lysosomal pH and by lowered phosphorylation levels of autophagy inhibitor mTOR, along with activation of complexes beclin-1 and ULK1. Notably, we found only minor changes between control and ethanol-treated TLR4-/- mouse astroglial cells. Ethanol also triggers the expression of the inflammatory mediators iNOS and COX-2, but induces astroglial death only slightly. Blocking autophagy by using specific inhibitors increases both inflammation and cell death. Conversely, in neurons, ethanol down-regulates the autophagy pathway and triggers cell death, which is partially recovered by using autophagy enhancers. These results support the protective role of the ALP against ethanol-induced astroglial cell damage in a TLR4-dependent manner, and provide new insight into the mechanisms that underlie ethanol-induced brain damage and are neuronal sensitive to the ethanol effects.

  9. Developmental changes in the acute ethanol sensitivity of glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission in the BNST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, T A; Kash, T L; Winder, D G

    2013-11-01

    Glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission undergo significant changes during adolescence. Receptors for both of these transmitters (NMDAR, and GABAA) are known to be key targets for the acute effects of ethanol in adults. The current study set out to investigate the acute effects of ethanol on both NMDAR-mediated excitatory transmission and GABAergic inhibitory transmission within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) across age. The BNST is an area of the brain implicated in the negative reinforcing properties associated with alcohol dependence, and the BNST plays a critical role in stress-induced relapse. Therefore, assessing the developmental regulation of ethanol sensitivity in this key brain region is important to understanding the progression of ethanol dependence. To do this, whole-cell recordings of isolated NMDAR-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) or evoked GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) were performed on BNST neurons in slices from 4- or 8-week-old male C57BL/6J mice. Ethanol (50 mm) produced greater inhibition of NMDAR-eEPSCs in adolescent mice than in adult mice. This enhanced sensitivity in adolescence was not a result of shifts in function of the GluN2B subunit of the NMDAR, measured by Ro25-6981 inhibition and decay kinetics measured across age. Adolescent mice also exhibited greater ethanol sensitivity of GABAergic transmission, as ethanol (50 mm) enhanced eIPSCs in the BNST of adolescent but not adult mice. Collectively, this work illustrates that a moderate dose of ethanol produces greater inhibition of transmission in the BNST (through greater excitatory inhibition and enhancement of inhibitory transmission) in adolescents compared to adults. Given the role of the BNST in alcohol dependence, these developmental changes in acute ethanol sensitivity could accelerate neuroadaptations that result from chronic ethanol use during the critical period of adolescence.

  10. Kinetics of Leaching Flavonoids from Pueraria Lobata with Ethanol%乙醇从葛根中提取黄酮动力学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    池汝安; 田君; 高洪; 周芳; 刘敏; 王存文; 吴元欣

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics of leaching flavonoids from Pueraria Lobata with ethanol was investigated. The effects of leaching temperature, mechanical agitation rate, concentration of ethanol and feed particle size on leaching kinetics were examined. It is found that the smaller the feed particle size or the higher the leaching temperature, the higher the leaching rate. The leaching process can be described by the shrinking-core model. The apparent activation energy is 10.8kJ·mol-1, suggesting that the leaching process is controlled by the inner diffusion. An empirical equation relating the flavonoids leaching rate constant to the feed particle size and leaching temperature was expected.

  11. Lipids and Oxidative Stress Associated with Ethanol-Induced Neurological Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Hernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The excessive intake of alcohol is a serious public health problem, especially given the severe damage provoked by chronic or prenatal exposure to alcohol that affects many physiological processes, such as memory, motor function, and cognitive abilities. This damage is related to the ethanol oxidation in the brain. The metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde and then to acetate is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species that accentuate the oxidative state of cells. This metabolism of ethanol can induce the oxidation of the fatty acids in phospholipids, and the bioactive aldehydes produced are known to be associated with neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration. As such, here we will review the role of lipids in the neuronal damage induced by ethanol-related oxidative stress and the role that lipids play in the related compensatory or defense mechanisms.

  12. Bio-ethanol steam reforming: Insights on the mechanism for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benito, M.; Sanz, J.L.; Isabel, R.; Padilla, R.; Daza, L. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Arjona, R. [Greencell (ABENGOA BIOENERGIA), Av. de la Buhaira 2, 41018 Sevilla (Spain)

    2005-10-10

    New catalysts for hydrogen production by steam reforming of bio-ethanol have been developed. Catalytic tests have been performed at laboratory scale, with the reaction conditions demanded in a real processor: i.e. ethanol and water feed, without a diluent gas. Catalyst ICP0503 has shown high activity and good resistance to carbon deposition. Reaction results show total conversion, high selectivity to hydrogen (70%), CO{sub 2}, CO and CH{sub 4} being the only by-products obtained. The reaction yields 4.25mol of hydrogen by mol of ethanol fed, close to the thermodynamic equilibrium prediction. The temperature influence on the catalytic activity for this catalyst has been studied. Conversion reaches 100% at temperature higher than 600{sup o}C. In the light of reaction results obtained, a reaction mechanism for ethanol steam reforming is proposed. Long-term reaction experiments have been performed in order to study the stability of the catalytic activity. The excellent stability of the catalyst ICP0503 indicates that the reformed stream could be fed directly to a high temperature fuel cell (MCFC, SOFC) without a further purification treatment. These facts suggest that ICP0503 is a good candidate to be implemented in a bio-ethanol processor for hydrogen production to feed a fuel cell. (author)

  13. High Frequency Electrical Stimulation of Lateral Habenula Reduces Voluntary Ethanol Consumption in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zuo, Wanhong; Fu, Rao; Xie, Guiqin; Kaur, Amandeep; Bekker, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Background: Development of new strategies that can effectively prevent and/or treat alcohol use disorders is of paramount importance, because the currently available treatments are inadequate. Increasing evidence indicates that the lateral habenula (LHb) plays an important role in aversion, drug abuse, and depression. In light of the success of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the LHb in improving helplessness behavior in rodents, we assessed the effects of LHb HFS on ethanol-drinking behavior in rats. Methods: We trained rats to drink ethanol under an intermittent access two-bottle choice procedure. We used c-Fos immunohistochemistry and electrophysiological approaches to examine LHb activity. We applied a HFS protocol that has proven effective for reducing helplessness behavior in rats via a bipolar electrode implanted into the LHb. Results: c-Fos protein expression and the frequency of both spontaneous action potential firings and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents were higher in LHb neurons of ethanol-withdrawn rats compared to their ethanol-naïve counterparts. HFS to the LHb produced long-term reduction of intake and preference for ethanol, without altering locomotor activity. Conversely, low-frequency electrical stimulation to the LHb or HFS applied to the nearby nucleus did not affect drinking behavior. Conclusions: Our results suggest that withdrawal from chronic ethanol exposure increases glutamate release and the activity of LHb neurons, and that functional inhibition of the LHb via HFS reduces ethanol consumption. Thus, LHb HFS could be a potential new therapeutic option for alcoholics. PMID:27234303

  14. Selection of Feed Intake or Feed Efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veerkamp, Roel F; Pryce, Jennie E; Spurlock, Diane

    2013-01-01

    . In February 2013, the co-authors discussed how information on DMI should be incorporated in the breeding decisions. The aim of this paper is to present the overall discussion and main positions taken by the group on four topics related to feed efficiency: i) breeding goal definition; ii) biological variation...

  15. Creep Feeding Beef Calves

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Creep feeding is the managerial practice of supplying supplemental feed (usually concentrates) to the nursing calf. Milk from a lactating beef cow furnishes only about 50 percent of the nutrients that a 3-4 month-old calf needs for maximum growth.

  16. Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadder, G.R.

    1998-11-24

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

  17. Fermentation of hexoses to ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Lena [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology]|[Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept of Chemical Reaction Engineering

    2000-06-01

    The Goals of the project has been: to increase the ethanol yield by reducing the by-product formation, primarily biomass and glycerol, and to prevent stuck fermentations, i.e. to maintain a high ethanol production rate simultaneously with a high ethanol yield. The studies have been performed both in defined laboratory media and in a mixture of wood- and wheat hydrolysates. The yeast strains used have been both industrial strains of bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and haploid laboratory strains. The Relevance of these studies with respect to production of ethanol to be used as fuel is explained by: With the traditional process design used today, it is very difficult to reach a yield of more than 90 % of the theoretical maximal value of ethanol based on fermented hexose. During 'normal' growth and fermentation conditions in either anaerobic batch or chemostat cultures, substrate is lost as biomass and glycerol in the range of 8 to 11 % and 6 to 11 % of the substrate consumed (kg/kg). It is essential to reduce these by-products. Traditional processes are mostly batch processes, in which there is a risk that the biocatalyst, i.e. the yeast, may become inactivated. If for example yeast biomass production is avoided by use of non-growing systems, the ethanol production rate is instantaneously reduced by at least 50%. Unfortunately, even if yeast biomass production is not avoided on purpose, it is well known that stuck fermentations caused by cell death is a problem in large scale yeast processes. The main reason for stuck fermentations is nutrient imbalances. For a good process economy, it is necessary to ensure process accessibility, i.e. to maintain a high and reproducible production rate. This will both considerably reduce the necessary total volume of the fermentors (and thereby the investment costs), and moreover minimize undesirable product fall-out.

  18. Transition feeding of sows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theil, Peter Kappel

    2015-01-01

    becomes catabolic due to the high priority of milk production and to current feeding practices. Indeed, feed is changed from a gestation to a lactation diet for most sows and the feed supply typically goes from a restricted supply to an ad libitum allowance. In addition, transition sows are often exposed...... the first few days of lactation, and milk yield increases throughout the transition period and becomes the most important determinant of nutrient requirements. Thus, nutrient requirements of transition sows are affected by many intrinsic factors and these requirements change rapidly, yet, sow feeding...... practices do not acknowledge these changes. Development of new feeding strategies specifically adapted for the transition sow is likely of importance to match the rapid changes in nutrient requirements....

  19. Betaine inhibits Toll-like receptor 4 expression in rats with ethanol-induced liver injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To test whether ethanol feeding could induce Toll-like receptor 4(TLR4)responses,assess the hepatoprotective effect of betaine and its inhibitive effect on TLR4 in animal models of alcoholic liver injury.METHODS:Forty-eight female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups as control,model,low and high dose betaine groups.Except control group,all rats were fed with high fat-containing diet plus ethanol and fish oil gavages for 8 wk.Betaine was administered intragastrically after exposure...

  20. Prenatal ethanol exposure leads to greater ethanol-induced appetitive reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautassi, Ricardo M; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Spear, Norman E; Molina, Juan C

    2012-09-01

    Prenatal ethanol significantly heightens later alcohol consumption, but the mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon are poorly understood. Little is known about the basis of 'this effect of prenatal ethanol on the sensitivity to ethanol's reinforcing effects. One possibility is that prenatal ethanol exposure makes subjects more sensitive to the appetitive effects of ethanol or less sensitive to ethanol's aversive consequences. The present study assessed ethanol-induced second-order conditioned place preference (CPP) and aversion and ethanol-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) in infant rats prenatally exposed to ethanol (2.0 g/kg) or vehicle (water) or left untreated. The involvement of the κ opioid receptor system in ethanol-induced CTA was also explored. When place conditioning occurred during the ascending limb of the blood-ethanol curve (Experiment 1), the pups exposed to ethanol in utero exhibited greater CPP than untreated controls, with a shift to the right of the dose-response curve. Conditioning during a later phase of intoxication (30-45 min post-administration; Experiment 2) resulted in place aversion in control pups exposed to vehicle during late gestation but not in pups that were exposed to ethanol in utero. Ethanol induced a reliable and similar CTA (Experiment 3) in the pups treated with vehicle or ethanol during gestation, and CTA was insensitive to κ antagonism. These results suggest that brief exposure to a moderate ethanol dose during late gestation promotes ethanol-mediated reinforcement and alters the expression of conditioned aversion by ethanol. This shift in the motivational reactivity to ethanol may be an underlying basis of the effect of prenatal ethanol on later ethanol acceptance.

  1. Impact of low dose prenatal ethanol exposure on glucose homeostasis in Sprague-Dawley rats aged up to eight months.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E Probyn

    Full Text Available Excessive exposure to alcohol prenatally has a myriad of detrimental effects on the health and well-being of the offspring. It is unknown whether chronic low-moderate exposure of alcohol prenatally has similar and lasting effects on the adult offspring's health. Using our recently developed Sprague-Dawley rat model of 6% chronic prenatal ethanol exposure, this study aimed to determine if this modest level of exposure adversely affects glucose homeostasis in male and female offspring aged up to eight months. Plasma glucose concentrations were measured in late fetal and postnatal life. The pancreas of 30 day old offspring was analysed for β-cell mass. Glucose handling and insulin action was measured at four months using an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and insulin challenge, respectively. Body composition and metabolic gene expression were measured at eight months. Despite normoglycaemia in ethanol consuming dams, ethanol-exposed fetuses were hypoglycaemic at embryonic day 20. Ethanol-exposed offspring were normoglycaemic and normoinsulinaemic under basal fasting conditions and had normal pancreatic β-cell mass at postnatal day 30. However, during a glucose tolerance test, male ethanol-exposed offspring were hyperinsulinaemic with increased first phase insulin secretion. Female ethanol-exposed offspring displayed enhanced glucose clearance during an insulin challenge. Body composition and hepatic, muscle and adipose tissue metabolic gene expression levels at eight months were not altered by prenatal ethanol exposure. Low-moderate chronic prenatal ethanol exposure has subtle, sex specific effects on glucose homeostasis in the young adult rat. As aging is associated with glucose dysregulation, further studies will clarify the long lasting effects of prenatal ethanol exposure.

  2. Effects of chronic crowding stress on growth, feeding, and behavior in Chinese sturgeon Acipenser sinensis F2 juveniles%中华鲟幼鱼对慢性拥挤胁迫的生长、摄食及行为反应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建明; 郭柏福; 高勇

    2013-01-01

      设置低、中、高3个初始养殖密度(1 g/L、4 g/L、8 g/L),进行40 d的养殖实验,研究慢性拥挤胁迫对子二代中华鲟(Acipenser sinensis Gray)幼鱼生长、摄食及行为的影响。研究表明,慢性拥挤胁迫对子二代中华鲟的生长和摄食有显著影响,体质量、体质量特定生长率、体长特定生长率、日增重随着养殖密度的升高显著降低(P<0.05),实验结束时,高密度组肥满度显著低于中、低密度组(P<0.05);各实验组的摄食率随着养殖密度的升高而降低,饵料系数随着养殖密度的升高而升高(P<0.05)。慢性拥挤胁迫对子二代中华鲟的行为也有显著的影响,随着养殖密度的增大,表现为呼吸频率、摆尾频率和游动速度显著加快等应急行为。研究结果表明高养殖密度对中华鲟的生长、摄食和行为存在显著的负面作用,不利于中华鲟幼鱼生长发育。%Chinese sturgeon(Acipenser sinensis) are an endangered anadromous species listed on the IUCN Red List. The species was characterized as a national level key protected animal of China in 1988 and fell under the protection of CITES Appendix II in 1998. Because of their perilous status, there is considerable interest in artifi-cial breeding and species conservation. To aid development of conservation breeding programs, we evaluated the effects of chronic crowding stress on growth, feeding, and behavior in F2 Chinese sturgeon. The fish were cultured at three stocking densities (low:1 g/L, medium:4 g/L, high:8 g/L) for 40 d to evaluate the influence of stocking density on growth, feeding and behavior. Density had a significant effect on growth and feeding. The body weight, growth efficiency, specific growth rate, and daily weight gain decreased significantly as stocking density increased. The feeding rate for the experimental groups also decreased as the stocking density increased and the feed conver-sion ratio increased as the

  3. Re-engineering bacteria for ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-05-06

    The invention provides recombinant bacteria, which comprise a full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes. Expression of the full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes causes the recombinant bacteria to produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product when grown in mineral salts medium, without the addition of complex nutrients. Methods for producing the recombinant bacteria and methods for producing ethanol using the recombinant bacteria are also disclosed.

  4. Separation of ethanol and water by extractive distillation with salt and solvent as entrainer: process simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Gil

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to simulate and analyze an extractive distillation process for azeotropic ethanol dehydration with ethylene glycol and calcium chloride mixture as entrainer. The work was developed with Aspen Plus® simulator version 11.1. Calculation of the activity coefficients employed to describe vapor liquid equilibrium of ethanol - water - ethylene glycol - calcium chloride system was done with the NRTL-E equation and they were validated with experimental data. The dehydration process used two columns: the main extractive column and the recovery column. The solvent to feed molar ratio S/F=0.3, molar reflux ratio RR=0.35, number of theoretical stages Ns=18, feed stage Sf=12, feed solvent stage SS=3, and feed solvent temperature TS=80 ºC, were determined to obtain a distillate with at least 99.5 % mole of ethanol. A substantial reduction in the energy consumption, compared with the conventional processes, was predicted by using ethylene glycol and calcium chloride as entrainer.

  5. Alpha-ketoglutarate reduces ethanol toxicity in Drosophila melanogaster by enhancing alcohol dehydrogenase activity and antioxidant capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliak, Maria M; Shmihel, Halyna V; Lylyk, Maria P; Storey, Kenneth B; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2016-09-01

    Ethanol at low concentrations (alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity as compared with those reared on control diet or diet with ethanol only. Native gel electrophoresis data suggested that this combination diet might promote post-translational modifications of ADH protein with the formation of a highly active ADH form. The ethanol-containing diet led to significantly higher levels of triacylglycerides stored in adult flies, and this parameter was not altered by AKG supplement. The influence of diet on antioxidant defenses was also assessed. In ethanol-fed flies, catalase activity was higher in males and the levels of low molecular mass thiols were unchanged in both sexes compared to control values. Feeding on a mixture of AKG and ethanol did not affect catalase activity but caused a higher level of low molecular mass thiols compared to ethanol-fed flies. It can be concluded that both a stimulation of some components of antioxidant defense and the increase in ADH activity may be responsible for the protective effects of AKG diet supplementation in combination with ethanol. The results suggest that AKG might be useful as a treatment option to neutralize toxic effects of excessive ethanol intake and to improve the physiological state of D. melanogaster and other animals, potentially including humans.

  6. Hawaii ethanol from molasses project. Report on plant inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, W.O.; Mashima, K.I.; Roberts, R.R.; Chen, C.S.

    1979-09-18

    Personal inspections were made of several ethanol plants in Europe and the US in order to determine the best commercial processes presently in operation, prepare a conceptual design of a large plant incorporating these processes, describe the processes, and list best estimates of yields, energy requirements, capital costs and operating costs. Information was obtained from fermentation plant manufacturers and alcohol producers concerning their company-sponsored process improvement and new process developments. A summary of the highlights of these observations are included in this report. The inspectors: observed commercial incineration of waste sulfite liquors; observed the pilot plant (not in operation) to incinerate various waste liquors resulting from fermentation of different feedstocks; observed commercial continuous and batch fermentation of beet molasses for the production of ethanol and stillage evaporation to 70% dissolved solids for animal feed; observed pilot plant operation of a new process (Carver-Greenfield process) for handling stillage; observed anhydrous ethanol production from fermentation of sulfite waste liquor using ethyl ether as the dehydrating agent; and observed the safety precautions taken when using this hazardous material.

  7. Characterization of Endogenous Ethanol in the Mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, I R; Contag, A O; Olson, R E

    1960-01-01

    Ethanol has been isolated from the tissues of several animal species in amounts ranging from 23 to 145 micromole/100 gm of tissue. Intestinal bacterial flora appear to be excluded as a source of this ethanol. Radioactivity from pyruvate-2-C(14) appeared in ethanol after incubation with liver slices; this finding indicates an endogenous synthesis.

  8. Meer ethanol uit suikerbieten halen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de C.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Wageningen UR en adviesbureau DSD testen in proeffabriek Chembeet in Lelystad hoe meer ethanol uit suikerbieten is te halen. Het doel van het onderzoek is na te gaan of uit suikerbieten op een rendabele manier grondstoffen kunnen worden gehaald voor de chemische industrie.

  9. Pilot study of transcatheter arterial ethanol embolization under closed renal circuit for large renal cell carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Satoru; Tajima, Hiroyuki; Onozawa, Shiro; Kumita, Shinichiro [Nippon Medical School, Department of Radiology/Center for Advanced Medical Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Kondo, Yukihiro [Nippon Medical School, Department of Urology, Tokyo (Japan); Nomura, Kazuhiro [Tokyo Labor-Welfare Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-07-15

    The safety of a new technique, designated ''transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with aspiration via a balloon-occluded renal drainage vein'' (TAE-ABOD), for the management of large renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). The subjects were 25 patients with RCC who underwent a total of 27 sessions of TAE-ABOD. This TAE-ABOD technique incorporates two procedures: balloon occlusion of renal drainage vein and infusion of absolute ethanol into the tumor-feeding arteries during aspiration of blood via a balloon catheter, thereby reducing leakage of absolute ethanol into the systemic circulation. Our primary endpoint was to establish a safe regimen for high-dose ethanol injection therapy, and our secondary endpoint was to assess global survival of the patients. The administered dose of ethanol ranged from 0.2 to 0.5 ml/kg [median: 0.34 (SD: 0.10) ml/kg], increased in a stepwise manner. The systemic ethanol concentration was measurable in 14 patients, and was less than 0.1 mg/ml in 12 and from 0.1 to less than 0.2 mg/ml in two. There were no major complications such as renal failure or renal abscess. TAE-ABOD can safely deliver a high dose of absolute ethanol for the treatment of large RCCs. (orig.)

  10. Safety evaluation of topical applications of ethanol on the skin and inside the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2008-01-01

    scientific research on the long-term effects, there is a requirement for independent studies on this topic. The research focus should be set on the chronic toxic effects of ethanol and acetaldehyde at the point of impact, with special regard to children and individuals with genetic deficiencies in ethanol metabolism.

  11. Safety evaluation of topical applications of ethanol on the skin and inside the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachenmeier Dirk W

    2008-11-01

    as a general lack of scientific research on the long-term effects, there is a requirement for independent studies on this topic. The research focus should be set on the chronic toxic effects of ethanol and acetaldehyde at the point of impact, with special regard to children and individuals with genetic deficiencies in ethanol metabolism.

  12. Membrane Tolerance to Ethanol is Rapidly Lost after Withdrawal: A Model for Studies of Membrane Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraschi, Theodore F.; Ellingson, John S.; Wu, Alice; Zimmerman, Robert; Rubin, Emanuel

    1986-06-01

    The structural properties of liver microsomes and erythrocytes obtained from rats that had been chronically administered ethanol were examined by electron spin resonance (ESR) following ethanol withdrawal for 1-10 days. Membranes obtained from control animals exhibited considerable molecular disordering upon the addition of ethanol in vitro (50-100 mM). Conversely, microsomal and erythrocyte membranes from alcoholic animals were resistant to this disordering by ethanol (membrane tolerance). These membrane properties were also apparent in lipid bilayers comprised of either total lipids or phospholipids isolated from the control and alcoholic animals. While several weeks of ethanol administration were required for both erythrocytes and microsomes to develop membrane tolerance, erythrocytes from alcoholic animals were disordered by ethanol in vitro after the animals had been withdrawn from ethanol for only 1 day. The same rapid loss of tolerance was observed in microsomes after 2 days of withdrawal. The same time course for the loss of tolerance was observed in lipid bilayers prepared from the total lipid and phospholipid extracts. No significant differences in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio were observed between the microsomal or erythrocyte membranes isolated before and after withdrawal. Thus, alterations in the microsomal and erythrocyte phospholipids, and not cholesterol content, were responsible for conveying membrane tolerance. Membrane structural properties can be rapidly adjusted in a mammalian system in response to the withdrawal of the external membrane perturbant ethanol. The withdrawal model, which begins with established membrane tolerance and leads to rapid and complete loss of tolerance, provides a model to analyze the compositional changes responsible for this tolerance to disordering by ethanol.

  13. [Ethanol metabolism and pathobiochemistry of organ damage--1992. IV. Ethanol in relation to the cardiovascular system. Hematologic, immunologic, endocrine disorders and muscle and bone damage caused by ethanol. Fetal alcohol syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zima, T

    1993-01-01

    Peripheral vasodilatation with increased cardiac output, tachycardia and increased blood pressure are described after alcohol administration. An increased HDL-cholesterol is found in moderate drinkers (both HDL-2 and HDL-3 fractions), with diminishing risk of coronary heart diseases. Acute ethanol intake causes an increased the level of triglycerides without changes in HDL-cholesterol level. This may be put into correlation with higher incidence of cardiovascular diseases in so-called "week-end" drinkers. Alcohol abuse may result in central diabetes insipidus. An increased elimination of lactate diminishes tubular secretion of uric acid with subsequent secondary hyperuricemia. Ethanol reduced the number of lymphocytes, reduces phagocytosis by macrophages and diminishes the activity of NK-cells. Bone marrow cellulity diminishes with the subsequent reduction in erythropoiesis, trombopoiesis and leukopoiesis. Alcohol may cause sideropenic and megaloblastic anemia. There are two forms of alcohol muscle injury: the acute one, with myonecrosis and inflammatory reaction, and chronic one, with muscle weakness and atrophy. Alcohol is one of etiologic factors of osteoporosis. An acute intoxication result in transitory hypoparatthyreoidism, while chronic ethanol intake make grow the PTH level and decreases the level of D vitamin metabolises. Stimulation of cortisol secretion, decrease of testosterone level and a reversible decrease of T3 and T4 levels have been described following ethanol administration. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis suffers alteration in alcoholics, and secondary amenorrhea is observed in female alcoholics. Ethanol behaves as an agonist on GABA receptor. Fetal alcohol syndrome together with Down's syndrome and spina bifida are the most frequent reasons of mental retardation in developed countries. Toxicity of ethanol affects the whole pregnancy period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Fermented liquid feed for pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Missotten, Joris; Michiels, Joris; Ovyn, Anneke; De Smet, Stefaan; Dierick, Noël

    2010-01-01

    Since the announcement of the ban on the use of antibiotics as antimicrobial growth promoters in the feed of pigs in 2006 the investigation towards alternative feed additives has augmented considerably. Although fermented liquid feed is not an additive, but a feeding strategy, the experimental work examining its possible advantages also saw a rise. The use of fermented liquid feed (FLF) has two main advantages, namely that the simultaneous provision of feed and water may result in an alleviat...

  15. Glutamine supplementation attenuates ethanol-induced disruption of apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and ameliorates gut barrier dysfunction and fatty liver in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit K; Shukla, Pradeep K; Mir, Hina; Manda, Bhargavi; Gangwar, Ruchika; Yadav, Nikki; McMullen, Megan; Nagy, Laura E; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies showed that glutamine (Gln) prevents acetaldehyde-induced disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers and human colonic mucosa. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Gln supplementation on ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction and liver injury in mice in vivo. Ethanol feeding caused a significant increase in inulin permeability in distal colon. Elevated permeability was associated with a redistribution of tight junction and adherens junction proteins and depletion of detergent-insoluble fractions of these proteins, suggesting that ethanol disrupts apical junctional complexes in colonic epithelium and increases paracellular permeability. Ethanol-induced increase in colonic mucosal permeability and disruption of junctional complexes were most severe in mice fed Gln-free diet. Gln supplementation attenuated ethanol-induced mucosal permeability and disruption of tight junctions and adherens junctions in a dose-dependent manner, indicating the potential role of Gln in nutritional intervention to alcoholic tissue injury. Gln supplementation dose-dependently elevated reduced-protein thiols in colon without affecting the level of oxidized-protein thiols. Ethanol feeding depleted reduced protein thiols and elevated oxidized protein thiols. Ethanol-induced protein thiol oxidation was most severe in mice fed with Gln-free diet and absent in mice fed with Gln-supplemented diet, suggesting that antioxidant effect is one of the likely mechanisms involved in Gln-mediated amelioration of ethanol-induced gut barrier dysfunction. Ethanol feeding elevated plasma transaminase and liver triglyceride, which was accompanied by histopathologic lesions in the liver; ethanol-induced liver damage was attenuated by Gln supplementation. These results indicate that Gln supplementation ameliorates alcohol-induced gut and liver injury.

  16. Compound list: ethanol [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ethanol ETN 00137 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/ethanol....Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/ethanol....Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/ethanol....Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/ethanol.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  17. Preparation of Different Silane-modified Silicalite-1 Membranes and Their Pervaporation Properties for Aqueous Ethanol Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Na; MA Ying; MA Yalu

    2016-01-01

    A multi-layer mesoporous silicalite-1 membrane supported on commercially available porous alumina tubes was prepared by firstly dip-coating the tubes in silica colloid sol and then using a hydrothermal synthetic process. The mesoporous silicalite-1 membrane was further modified by grafting organosilane compounds with various alkyl chains length (CnH2n+1(CH3)2SiCl;n = 1, 3, 8, 12 and 18). These hydrophobic silicalite-1 membranes containing silane coupling agents effectively removed ethanol from 3 wt.%, 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% aqueous ethanol solutions by pervaporation over a temperature range of 303-323 K. The separation factor (α) of ethanol decreased as the ethanol content in the feed solu-tion increased from 3% to 10% whereas the permeation flux (J) basically remained constant. Ethanol separation factors (α) of 7.90-22.24 with total fluxes (J) of 0.76-2.89 kg/(m2·h) were obtained by pervaporation at 303-323 K for ethanol feed composition of 3%-10%.

  18. Chronic cholecystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholecystitis - chronic ... Most of the time, chronic cholecystitis is caused by repeated attacks of acute (sudden) cholecystitis. Most of these attacks are caused by gallstones in the gallbladder. These ...

  19. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. × ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. ...

  20. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a problem you need to take care of. Chronic pain is different. The pain signals go on ... there is no clear cause. Problems that cause chronic pain include Headache Low back strain Cancer Arthritis ...

  1. Nuclear effects of ethanol-induced proteasome inhibition in liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fawzia Bardag-Gorce

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol ingestion causes alteration in several cellular mechanisms, and leads to inflammation, apoptosis,immunological response defects, and fibrosis. These phenomena are associated with significant changes in the epigenetic mechanisms, and subsequently,to liver cell memory. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is one of the vital pathways in the cell that becomes dysfunctionial as a result of chronic ethanol consumption. Inhibition of the proteasome activity in the nucleus causes changes in the turnover of transcriptional factors, histone modifying enzymes,and therefore, affects epigenetic mechanisms.Alcohol consumption has been associated with an increase in histone acetylation and a decrease in histone methylation, which leads to gene expression changes. DNA and histone modifications that result from ethanol-induced proteasome inhibition are key players in regulating gene expression, especially genes involved in the cell cycle, immunological responses,and metabolism of ethanol. The present review highlights the consequences of ethanol-induced proteasome inhibition in the nucleus of liver cells that are chronically exposed to ethanol.

  2. The new gold rush: fueling ethanol production while protecting water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Thomas W; Sharpley, Andrew N; Howarth, Robert W; Paerl, Hans W; Mankin, Kyle R

    2008-01-01

    Renewable fuel production, particularly grain-based ethanol, is expanding rapidly in the USA. Although subsidized grain-based ethanol may provide a competitively priced transportation fuel, concerns exist about potential environmental impacts. This contribution focuses on potential water quality implications of expanded grain-based ethanol production and potential impacts of perennial-grass-based cellulosic ethanol. Expanded grain-based ethanol will increase and intensify corn production. Even with recommended fertilizer and land conservation measures, corn acreage can be a major source of N loss to water (20-40 kg ha(-1) yr(-1)). A greater acreage of corn is estimated to increase N and P loss to water by 37% (117 million kg) and 25% (9 million kg), respectively, and measures to encourage adoption of conservation practices are essential to mitigate water quality impairments. Dried distiller's grains remaining after ethanol production from corn grain are used as animal feed and can increase manure P content and may increase N content. Cellulosic fuel-stocks from perennials such as switchgrass and woody materials have the potential to produce ethanol. Although production, storage, and handling of cellulosic materials and conversion technology are limitations, accelerating development of cellulosic ethanol has the potential to reduce dependence on grain fuel-stocks and provide water quality and other environmental benefits. All alternative fuel production technologies could have environmental impacts. There is a need to understand these impacts to help guide policy and help make programmatic and scientific decisions that avoid or mitigate unintended environmental consequences of biofuel production.

  3. The global atmospheric budget of ethanol revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. V. Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is an important biogenic volatile organic compound, which is increasingly used as a fuel for motor vehicles; therefore, an improved understanding of its atmospheric cycle is important. In this paper we use three sets of observational data, measured emissions of ethanol from living plants, measured concentrations of ethanol in the atmosphere and measured hydroxyl concentrations in the atmosphere (by methyl chloroform titration, to make two independent estimates related to the rate of cycling of ethanol through the atmosphere. In the first estimate, simple calculations give the emission rate of ethanol from living plants as 26 (range, 10–38 Tg yr−1. This contributes significantly to the total global ethanol source of 42 (range, 25–56 Tg yr−1. In the second estimate, the total losses of ethanol from the global atmosphere are 70 (range, 50–90 Tg yr−1, with about three-quarters of the ethanol removed by reaction with hydroxyl radicals in the gaseous and aqueous phases of the atmosphere, and the remainder lost through wet and dry deposition to land. These values of both the source of ethanol from living plants and the removal of atmospheric ethanol via oxidation by hydroxyl radicals (derived entirely from observations are significantly larger than those in recent literature. We suggest that a revision of the estimate of global ethanol emissions from plants to the atmosphere to a value comparable with this analysis is warranted.

  4. Feasibility of ethanol production from coffee husks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouvea, B M; Torres, C; Franca, A S; Oliveira, L S; Oliveira, E S

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of ethanol production by fermentation of coffee husks by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Batch fermentation studies were performed employing whole and ground coffee husks, and aqueous extract from ground coffee husks. It was observed that fermentation yield decreased with an increase in yeast concentration. The best results were obtained for the following conditions: whole coffee husks, 3 g yeast/l substrate, temperature of 30 degrees C. Under these conditions ethanol production was 8.49 +/- 0.29 g/100 g dry basis (13.6 +/- 0.5 g ethanol/l), a satisfactory value in comparison to literature data for other residues such as corn stalks, barley straw and hydrolyzed wheat stillage (5-11 g ethanol/l). Such results indicate that coffee husks present excellent potential for residue-based ethanol production.

  5. Daidzin decreases ethanol consumption in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, G M; Keung, W M; Vallee, B L

    1996-09-01

    In a previous study, daidzin, a constituent of an ancient Chinese herbal treatment for alcoholism, decreased home-cage ethanol consumption in laboratory Syrian golden hamsters. The present study tested the generality of daidzin's antidipsotropic effects. Rats served as subjects in a two-lever choice procedure. At one lever, responses earned 10% ethanol, flavored with saccharin. At the other lever, responses earned an isocaloric starch solution. Daidzin decreased both ethanol and starch consumption, but the decreases in ethanol intake were larger. Changes in consumption were dose dependent, and differences in ethanol and food consumption increased slightly (but significantly) as dose increased. Daidzin produced a similar pattern of decreases in lever pressing. In baseline, there was an approximately equal distribution of responses between the two levers; at the highest daidzin dose, the relative number of responses at the ethanol lever decreased to 30%. These results replicate and extend earlier findings, and they encourage further research on daidzin's capacity to decrease ethanol consumption.

  6. Chronic prostatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Brian; Schaeffer, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and usually occurs without positive bacterial cultures from prostatic secretions (known as chronic abacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome [CP/CPPS]). Bacterial infection can result from urinary tract instrumentation, but the cause and natural history of CP/CPPS are unknown.

  7. Chronic prostatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, Bradley A.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Le, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and usually occurs without positive bacterial cultures from prostatic secretions (known as chronic abacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome, CP/CPPS). Bacterial infection can result from urinary tract instrumentation, but the cause and natural history of CP/CPPS are unknown.

  8. Percepção das mães sobre a importância das práticas alimentares no tratamento da constipação crônica funcional Mothers' perception about the importance of feeding habits in the treatment of functional chronic constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Palo Pereira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar o significado das práticas alimentares compreendendo as percepções, experiências e valores sobre a alimentação de mães de crianças e adolescentes com diagnóstico de constipação crônica funcional. MÉTODOS: 17 mães foram entrevistadas com base em um questionário semidirigido, que compreendia questões relacionadas à alimentação. Para análise, as falas foram agrupadas nos temas: "ambiente familiar durante as refeições", "dificuldades relacionadas à alimentação da criança e do adolescente", "atitudes das mães frente à recusa de alimentos" e "conhecimentos maternos sobre alimentação e sua relação com a constipação crônica funcional". RESULTADOS: A idade das mães variou de 20 a 35 anos. A maioria era casada, possuía ensino fundamental incompleto e renda familiar entre dois e três salários mínimos. Observou-se, no relato das mães, que: muitas não consideram o momento das refeições em família agradável; a limitação financeira é a maior dificuldade relacionada à alimentação dos filhos; a maioria delas, frente à recusa alimentar, adota estratégias para convencer a criança a aceitar a refeição; demonstram ter noção da importância da alimentação para melhora da constipação; creem que alguns alimentos têm efeito "obstipante". CONCLUSÕES: Mães de crianças com constipação intestinal crônica sabem que a alimentação é importante no tratamento dessa afecção e, no entanto, apenas uma parcela reconhece o papel das fibras alimentares. A refeição não é um momento prazeroso e o fator financeiro é limitante para definir os alimentos que compõem a dieta dessas crianças.OBJECTIVE: Analyze the meaning of feeding habits according to the perceptions, experiences and values of mothers whose children and teenagers present functional chronic constipation. METHODS: 17 mothers were interviewed based on a semi-conducted questionnaire about feeding habits. The answers were gathered

  9. Effects of Ethanol Extract of Scorpion on the mRNA Expression of Hippocampus GFAP in Rats with Chronic Epilepsia%全蝎醇提物对慢性癫痫模型大鼠海马GFAPmRNA表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁益; 孙红斌; 喻良; 何保明; 谢彦; 杨艳萍

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of ethanol extract of Scorpion (EES) on mRNA expression of hippocampus GFAP in rats with chronic epilepsia. METHODS: Rats were injected with lithium chloride (Licl) 127 mg-kg-1(3 mmol-kg-1) and atropine sulfate 1 mg-kg-1 for 18-24 h intraperitoneally on the first day. 30 min later, they were given pilocarpine (Pilo) 30 mg-kg-1 intraperitoneally to induce chronic epilepsia model. Model rats were randomly divided into normal control group(isovolumic saline), model group (isovolumic saline), valproic acid group(120 mg-kg-1), EES low-dose(290 mg-kg-1),medium-dose(580 mg-kg-1)and high-dose (1 160 mg-kg-1) groups. The degree of chronic epilepsia attack in rats was observed, and the mRNA expression of hippocampus GFAP was observed by RT-PCR at 6 hour and 1 day, 3 day, 7 day, 14 day and 30 day after status epilepti-cus. RESULTS: Compared with model group, epileptic seizures grading was significantly changed in EES high-dose group and EES medium dose group.3 days after modeling, mRNA expression of hippocampus GFAP in rats was up-regulated significantly, reached to the peak 7 days later, and then declined gradually, which was still higher than normal control group. Compared with model group, GFAP mRNA contents had declined significantly in EES high-dose and medium-dose groups after 7 days of treatment(P< 0.05). CONCLUSION: High-dose and medium-dose of EES can reduce the mRNA expression of hippocampus GFAP in rats with chronic epilepsia, which is an important anti-epileptic mechanism.%目的:研究全蝎醇提物(EES)对慢性癫痫模型大鼠海马胶质纤维酸性蛋白(GFAP)mRNA表达的影响.方法:大鼠首日腹腔注射氯化锂(Licl)127 mg·kg-1(3 mmol·kg-1),18~24 h后腹腔注射硫酸阿托品1 mg·kg-1,30 min后腹腔注射毛果芸香碱(Pilo)30 mg·kg-1,以复制慢性癫痫模型.实验分为正常对照(等容生理盐水)、模型(等容生理盐水)、丙戊酸(120 mg·kg-1)和EES高、中、低剂量(1160、580、290mg

  10. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed....

  11. EFFECTS OF ETHANOL DURING GIARDIASIS IN SHEEP INTESTINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaiyan Ahmed Khan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections with Giardia lamblia are one of the most common intestinal maladies in the world. These infections can lead to acute diarrhea, cramps, and nausea, although asymptomatic infections are the most common. Although most infections are controlled by an effective immune response, some individuals develop chronic disease. The effects of Giardia lamblia infection on D-glucose uptake and brush border enzymes was studied in ethanol fed sheep. Giardia lamblia trophozoite counts were significantly lower in the intestine of ethanol fed sheep than in the controls. Also sodium dependant uptake of D-glucose and brush border enzymes was significantly reduced in the Giardia lamblia infected sheep intestine. There was no change in sodium dependent D-glucose transporter (SGLT-1 and brush border lactase was reduced in Giardia lamblia infected sheep compared with those of controls. However, the mRNA levels encoding these proteins in ethanol fed animals and control animals were in the sheep intestine. The D-glucose malabsorption was observed and probably it causes a significant decrease in activity of disaccharidases in Giardia lamblia infection.

  12. The HPA axis and ethanol: a synthesis of mathematical modelling and experimental observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čupić, Željko; Stanojević, Ana; Marković, Vladimir M; Kolar-Anić, Ljiljana; Terenius, Lars; Vukojević, Vladana

    2016-05-18

    Stress and alcohol use are interrelated-stress contributes to the initiation and upholding of alcohol use and alcohol use alters the way we perceive and respond to stress. Intricate mechanisms through which ethanol alters the organism's response to stress remain elusive. We have developed a stoichiometric network model to succinctly describe neurochemical transformations underlying the stress response axis and use numerical simulations to model ethanol effects on complex daily changes of blood levels of cholesterol, 6 peptide and 8 steroid hormones. Modelling suggests that ethanol alters the dynamical regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity by affecting the amplitude of ultradian oscillations of HPA axis hormones, which defines the threshold with respect to which the response to stress is being set. These effects are complex-low/moderate acute ethanol challenge (8 mM) increases instantaneous CORT levels and the amplitude of ultradian CORT oscillations in a dose-dependent manner, affecting the HPA axis activity also during the following day(s). Chronic exposure to ethanol qualitatively changes the HPA axis dynamics, whereas ethanol at intoxicating levels shuts down this dynamic regulation mechanism. Mathematical modelling gives a quantitative biology-based framework that can be used for predicting how the integral HPA axis response is perturbed by alcohol.

  13. Metabolic effects of feeding high doses of propanol and propylacetate to lactating Holstein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raun, Birgitte Marie Løvendahl; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2012-01-01

    BHBA and acetate concentrations; increased net portal flux of propanol; increased net hepatic flux of glucose; and increased propanol, isopropanol, and caproate uptake by the liver. Contrary to our hypothesis that propylacetate supplementation would exacerbate the metabolic effects of propanol, we...... observed for a number of variables that treatment differences between C and P were partly reversed in PPA. This applied to ruminal propanol and propylacetate; arterial concentrations of ethanol, propanol, isopropanol, and isobutyrate; net portal flux of ethanol, propanol, and isopropanol; net hepatic flux...... of BHBA, propanol, isopropanol, and isobutyrate; net splanchnic flux of propionate; hepatic extraction of ethanol and portal recovery of dietary ethanol. The overall metabolic effect of feeding large doses of propanol was a glucogenic response presumably driven by hepatic metabolism of propanol...

  14. Synthesis of nanoparticles using ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jia Xu

    2017-01-24

    The present disclosure relates to methods for producing nanoparticles. The nanoparticles may be made using ethanol as the solvent and the reductant to fabricate noble-metal nanoparticles with a narrow particle size distributions, and to coat a thin metal shell on other metal cores. With or without carbon supports, particle size is controlled by fine-tuning the reduction power of ethanol, by adjusting the temperature, and by adding an alkaline solution during syntheses. The thickness of the added or coated metal shell can be varied easily from sub-monolayer to multiple layers in a seed-mediated growth process. The entire synthesis of designed core-shell catalysts can be completed using metal salts as the precursors with more than 98% yield; and, substantially no cleaning processes are necessary apart from simple rinsing. Accordingly, this method is considered to be a "green" chemistry method.

  15. Ethanol annual report FY 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Texeira, R.H.; Goodman, B.J. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the research progress and accomplishments of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Ethanol from Biomass Program, field managed by the Solar Energy Research Institute, during FY 1990. The report includes an overview of the entire program and summaries of individual research projects. These projects are grouped into the following subject areas: technoeconomic analysis; pretreatment; cellulose conversion; xylose fermentation; and lignin conversion. Individual papers have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  16. Chronobiology of ethanol: animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenwasser, Alan M

    2015-06-01

    Clinical and epidemiological observations have revealed that alcohol abuse and alcoholism are associated with widespread disruptions in sleep and other circadian biological rhythms. As with other psychiatric disorders, animal models have been very useful in efforts to better understand the cause and effect relationships underlying the largely correlative human data. This review summarizes the experimental findings indicating bidirectional interactions between alcohol (ethanol) consumption and the circadian timing system, emphasizing behavioral studies conducted in the author's laboratory. Together with convergent evidence from multiple laboratories, the work summarized here establishes that ethanol intake (or administration) alters fundamental properties of the underlying circadian pacemaker. In turn, circadian disruption induced by either environmental or genetic manipulations can alter voluntary ethanol intake. These reciprocal interactions may create a vicious cycle that contributes to the downward spiral of alcohol and drug addiction. In the future, such studies may lead to the development of chronobiologically based interventions to prevent relapse and effectively mitigate some of the societal burden associated with such disorders.

  17. Fungal protein and ethanol from lignocelluloses using Rhizopus pellets under simultaneous saccharification, filtration and fermentation (SSFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh FazeliNejad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The economic viability of the 2nd generation bioethanol production process cannot rely on a single product but on a biorefinery built around it. In this work, ethanol and fungal biomass (animal feed were produced from acid-pretreated wheat straw slurry under an innovative simultaneous saccharification, fermentation, and filtration (SSFF strategy. A membrane unit separated the solids from the liquid and the latter was converted to biomass or to both biomass and ethanol in the fermentation reactor containing Rhizopus sp. pellets. Biomass yields of up to 0.34 g/g based on the consumed monomeric sugars and acetic acid were achieved. A surplus of glucose in the feed resulted in ethanol production and reduced the biomass yield, whereas limiting glucose concentrations resulted in higher consumption of xylose and acetic acid. The specific growth rate, in the range of 0.013-0.015/h, did not appear to be influenced by the composition of the carbon source. Under anaerobic conditions, an ethanol yield of 0.40 g/g was obtained. The present strategy benefits from the easier separation of the biomass from the medium and the fungus ability to assimilate carbon residuals in comparison with when yeast is used. More specifically, it allows in-situ separation of insoluble solids leading to the production of pure fungal biomass as a value-added product.

  18. Composition of corn dry-grind ethanol by-products: DDGS, wet cake, and thin stillage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngmi; Mosier, Nathan S; Hendrickson, Rick; Ezeji, Thaddeus; Blaschek, Hans; Dien, Bruce; Cotta, Michael; Dale, Bruce; Ladisch, Michael R

    2008-08-01

    DDGS and wet distillers' grains are the major co-products of the dry grind ethanol facilities. As they are mainly used as animal feed, a typical compositional analysis of the DDGS and wet distillers' grains mainly focuses on defining the feedstock's nutritional characteristics. With an increasing demand for fuel ethanol, the DDGS and wet distillers' grains are viewed as a potential bridge feedstock for ethanol production from other cellulosic biomass. The introduction of DDGS or wet distillers' grains as an additional feed to the existing dry grind plants for increased ethanol yield requires a different approach to the compositional analysis of the material. Rather than focusing on its nutritional value, this new approach aims at determining more detailed chemical composition, especially on polymeric sugars such as cellulose, starch and xylan, which release fermentable sugars upon enzymatic hydrolysis. In this paper we present a detailed and complete compositional analysis procedure suggested for DDGS and wet distillers' grains, as well as the resulting compositions completed by three different research groups. Polymeric sugars, crude protein, crude oil and ash contents of DDGS and wet distillers' grains were accurately and reproducibly determined by the compositional analysis procedure described in this paper.

  19. Brain glucosamine boosts protective glucoprivic feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osundiji, Mayowa A; Zhou, Ligang; Shaw, Jill; Moore, Stephen P; Yueh, Chen-Yu; Sherwin, Robert; Heisler, Lora K; Evans, Mark L

    2010-04-01

    The risk of iatrogenic hypoglycemia is increased in diabetic patients who lose defensive glucoregulatory responses, including the important warning symptom of hunger. Protective hunger symptoms during hypoglycemia may be triggered by hypothalamic glucose-sensing neurons by monitoring changes downstream of glucose phosphorylation by the specialized glucose-sensing hexokinase, glucokinase (GK), during metabolism. Here we investigated the effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of glucosamine (GSN), a GK inhibitor, on food intake at normoglycemia and protective feeding responses during glucoprivation and hypoglycemia in chronically catheterized rats. ICV infusion of either GSN or mannoheptulose, a structurally different GK inhibitor, dose-dependently stimulated feeding at normoglycemia. Consistent with an effect of GSN to inhibit competitively glucose metabolism, ICV coinfusion of d-glucose but not l-glucose abrogated the orexigenic effect of ICV GSN at normoglycemia. Importantly, ICV infusion of a low GSN dose (15 nmol/min) that was nonorexigenic at normoglycemia boosted feeding responses to glucoprivation in rats with impaired glucose counterregulation. ICV infusion of 15 nmol/min GSN also boosted feeding responses to threatened hypoglycemia in rats with defective glucose counterregulation. Altogether our findings suggest that GSN may be a potential therapeutic candidate for enhancing defensive hunger symptoms during hypoglycemia.

  20. Ethical Challenges in Infant Feeding Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binns, Colin; Lee, Mi Kyung; Kagawa, Masaharu

    2017-01-11

    Infants have a complex set of nutrient requirements to meet the demands of their high metabolic rate, growth, and immunological and cognitive development. Infant nutrition lays the foundation for health throughout life. While infant feeding research is essential, it must be conducted to the highest ethical standards. The objective of this paper is to discuss the implications of developments in infant nutrition for the ethics of infant feeding research and the implications for obtaining informed consent. A search was undertaken of the papers in the medical literature using the PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Knowledge, Proquest, and CINAHL databases. From a total of 9303 papers identified, the full text of 87 articles that contained discussion of issues in consent in infant feeding trials were obtained and read and after further screening 42 papers were included in the results and discussion. Recent developments in infant nutrition of significance to ethics assessment include the improved survival of low birth weight infants, increasing evidence of the value of breastfeeding and evidence of the lifelong importance of infant feeding and development in the first 1000 days of life in chronic disease epidemiology. Informed consent is a difficult issue, but should always include information on the value of preserving breastfeeding options. Project monitoring should be cognisant of the long term implications of growth rates and early life nutrition.

  1. Enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaushik, Neeraj; Pietraszewski, Marie; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: All forms of commonly practiced enteral feeding techniques stimulate pancreatic secretion, and only intravenous feeding avoids it. In this study, we explored the possibility of more distal enteral infusions of tube feeds to see whether activation of the ileal brake mechanism can result...... in enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation, with particular reference to trypsin, because the avoidance of trypsin stimulation may optimize enteral feeding in acute pancreatitis. METHODS: The pancreatic secretory responses to feeding were studied in 36 healthy volunteers by standard double......-lumen duodenal perfusion/aspiration techniques over 6 hours. Subjects were assigned to no feeding (n = 7), duodenal feeding with a polymeric diet (n = 7) or low-fat elemental diet (n = 6), mid-distal jejunal feeding (n = 11), or intravenous feeding (n = 5). All diets provided 40 kcal/kg ideal body weight/d and 1...

  2. Ameliorative effect of Opuntia ficus indica juice on ethanol-induced oxidative stress in rat erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimi, Hichem; Hfaeidh, Najla; Bouoni, Zouhour; Sakly, Mohsen; Rhouma, Khémais Ben

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of Opuntia ficus indica f. inermis fruit juice (OFIj) on reversing oxidative damages induced by chronic ethanol intake in rat erythrocytes. OFIj was firstly analyzed with HPLC for phenolic and flavonoids content. Secondly, 40 adult male Wistar rats were equally divided into five groups and treated for 90 days as follows: control (C), ethanol-only 3 g/kg body weight (b.w) (E), low dose of OFIj 2 ml/100 g b.w+ethanol (Ldj+E), high dose of OFIj 4 ml/100 g b.w+ethanol (Hdj+E), and only a high dose of OFIj 4 ml/100g b.w (Hdj). HPLC analysis indicated high concentrations of phenolic acids and flavonoids in OFIj. Ethanol treatment markedly decreased the activities of erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and the level of reduced glutathione (GSH). Changes in the erythrocyte's antioxidant ability were accompanied by enhanced oxidative modification of lipids (increase of malondialdeyde level) and proteins (increase in carbonyl groups). Interestingly, pre-administration of either 2 ml/100 g b.w or 4 ml/100 g b.w of OFIj to ethanol-intoxicated rats significantly reversed decreases in enzymatic as well as non enzymatic antioxidants parameters in erythrocytes. Also, the administration of OFIj significantly protected lipids and proteins against ethanol-induced oxidative modifications in rat erythrocytes. The beneficial effect of OFIj can result from the inhibition of ethanol-induced free radicals chain reactions in rat erythrocytes or from the enhancement of the endogenous antioxidants activities.

  3. Feeding broiler breeder flocks in relation to bird welfare aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de I.C.; Krimpen, van M.M.

    2011-01-01

    To ensure health and reproductive capacity of the birds, broiler breeders are fed restricted during the rearing period, and to a lesser extent also during the production period. Although restricted feeding improves health and thereby bird welfare, on the other hand the birds are chronically hungry a

  4. A Mathematical model for ethanol production by extractive fermentation in a continuous stirred tank fermentor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollerup, F; Daugulis, A J

    1985-09-01

    Extractive fermentation is a technique that can be used to reduce the effect of end product inhibition through the use of a water-immiscible phase that removes fermentation products in situ. This has the beneficial effect of not only removing inhibitory products as they are formed (thus keeping reaction rates high) but also has the potential for reducing product recovery costs. We have chosen to examine the ethanol fermentation as a model system for end product inhibition and extractive fermentation and have developed a computer model predicting the productivity enhancement possible with this technique together with other key parameters such as extraction efficiency and residual glucose concentration. The model accommodates variable liquid flowrates entering and leaving the system, since it was found that the aqueous outlet flowrate could be up to 35% lower than the inlet flowrate during extractive fermentation of concentrated glucose feeds due to the continuous removal of ethanol from the fermentation broth by solvent extraction. The model predicts a total ethanol productivity of 82.6 g/L h if a glucose feed of 750 g/L is fermented with a solvent having a distribution coefficient of 0.5 at a solvent dilution rate of 5.0 h(-1). This is more than 10 times higher than for a conventional chemostat fermentation of a 250 g/L glucose feed. The model has furthermore illustrated the possible trade-offs that exist between obtaining a high extraction efficiency and a low residual glucose concentration.

  5. Ethanol-Induced Changes in the Expression of Proteins Related to Neurotransmission and Metabolism in Different Regions of the Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahr, Natalie M.; Bell, Richard L.; Ringham, Heather N.; Sullivan, Edith V.; Witzmann, Frank A.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive description of the damaging effects of chronic alcohol exposure on brain structure, mechanistic explanations for the observed changes are just emerging. To investigate regional brain changes in protein expression levels following chronic ethanol treatment, one rat per sibling pair of male Wistar rats was exposed to intermittent (14 hr/day) vaporized ethanol, the other to air for 26 weeks. At the end of 24 weeks of vapor exposure, the ethanol group had blood ethanol levels averaging 450 mg %, had not experienced a protracted (>16 hr) withdrawal from ethanol, and revealed only mild evidence of hepatic steatosis. Extracted brains were micro-dissected to isolate the prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsal striatum (STR), corpus callosum genu (CCg), CC body (CCb), anterior vermis (AV), and anterior dorsal lateral cerebellum (ADLC) for protein analysis with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Expression levels for 54 protein spots were significantly different between the ethanol- and air- treated groups. Of these 54 proteins, tandem mass spectroscopy successfully identified 39 unique proteins, the levels of which were modified by ethanol treatment: 13 in the PFC, 7 in the STR, 2 in the CCg, 7 in the CCb, 7 in the AV, and 5 in the ADLC. The functions of the proteins altered by chronic ethanol exposure were predominately associated with neurotransmitter systems in the PFC and cell metabolism in the STR. Stress response proteins were elevated only in the PFC, AV, and ADLC perhaps supporting a role for frontocerebellar circuitry disruption in alcoholism. Of the remaining proteins, some had functions associated with cytoskeletal physiology (e.g., in the CCb) and others with transcription/translation (e.g., in the ADLC). Considered collectively, all but 4 of the 39 proteins identified in the present study have been previously identified in ethanol gene- and/or protein- expression studies lending support for their role in ethanol-related brain alterations. PMID

  6. 用于乙醇脱水的生物质吸附性能%ADSORPTION CAPABILITY OF BIOMASS FOR ETHANOL DEHYDRATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常华; 袁希钢; 曾爱武

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption capability of paddy flour and maize flour for gaseous phase selective adsorption for ethanol dehydration was investigated via a bench-test fixed-bed adsorber at constant temperature. Ethanol concentration in the feed was 93.4% (mass) and each of the dried biomass was used as adsorbent, and breakthrough curves and temperature distribution in adsorptive bed were obtained for different bed depths,superficial velocities, granularities of adsorbent and temperatures. Bed pressure drop curves for different bed depths and superficial velocities were also measured. A product of ethanol purity of 99.5% (mass) could be obtained through both kinds of biomass adsorbent. When 99.5% (mass) of ethanol purity is defined as the breakthrough point, the production capacity for either adsorbent was within 0.0915-0.2256 (gram product/gram adsorbent). Tests on pure ethanol adsorption were also performed to extrapolate the selectivity of both adsorbents.

  7. Representing infant feeding: content analysis of British media portrayals of bottle feeding and breast feeding

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, L.; KITZINGER, Jenny; Green, J.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To examine how breast feeding and bottle feeding are represented by the British media.\\ud Design: Content analysis.\\ud Subjects: Television programmes and newspaper articles that made reference to infant feeding during March 1999.\\ud Setting: UK mass media.\\ud Main outcome measures: Visual and verbal references to breast or bottle feeding in newspapers and television programmes.\\ud Results: Overall, 235 references to infant feeding were identified in the television sample and 38 in...

  8. Prospects for Corn Ethanol in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce A. Babcock; Miguel Carriquiry

    2012-01-01

    Countries that export biofuel feedstocks such as grain or sugar and that are also importers of motor fuels will have a natural competitive advantage over other countries in the production of biofuels. Argentina is one of a very few countries that both export potential feedstocks and import gasoline and diesel. This combination means that an Argentine ethanol plant will pay less for feedstock and receive a higher price for ethanol than an ethanol plant located in a country that imports feedsto...

  9. Catching a conserved mechanism of ethanol teratogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Lovely, Charles Ben; Eberhart, Johann Karl

    2014-01-01

    Due to its profound impact on human development, ethanol teratogenicity is a field of intense study. The complexity of variables that influence the outcomes of embryonic or prenatal ethanol exposure compels the use of animal models in which these variables can be isolated. Numerous model systems have been used in these studies. The zebrafish is a powerful model system, which has seen a recent increase in usage for ethanol studies. Those using zebrafish for alcohol studies often face two quest...

  10. Hydrogen Generation from Plasmatron Reforming Ethanol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Fu-bing; HU You-ping; LI Ge-sheng; GAO Xiao-hong

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen generation through plasmatron reforming of ethanol has been carried out in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The reforming of pure ethanol and mixtures of ethanol-water have been studied. The gas chromatography (GC) analysis has shown that in all conditions the reforming yield was H2, CO, CH4 and CO2 as the main products, and with little C2* . The hydrogen-rich gas can be used as fuel for gasoline engine and other applications.

  11. Effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG on hepatic and serum lipid profiles in zebrafish exposed to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ana Claudia Reis; Machado, Alice Beatriz Mombach Pinheiro; de Assis, Adriano Martimbianco; Hermes, Djuli Milene; Schaefer, Pedro Guilherme; Guizzo, Ranieli; Fracasso, Laísa Beduschi; de-Paris, Fernanda; Meurer, Fábio; Barth, Afonso Luis; da Silveira, Themis Reverbel

    2014-08-01

    Zebrafish is a powerful tool in pharmacological research and useful to identify new therapies. Probiotics can offer therapeutic options in alcoholic liver disease. This study was done in two independent experiments: first, we confirmed the intestinal colonization of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) after ethanol exposure. Second, four groups were performed: control (C), probiotic (P), ethanol (E), and probiotic+ethanol (P+E). Liver histology, hepatocytes morphometry, hepatic and serum lipid quantifications were conducted in second experiment. During 4 weeks, P and P+E groups were fed with LGG supplemented feed; E and C unsupplemented. E and P+E groups received 0.5% of ethanol added into tank water. Zebrafish exposed to ethanol (E group) presented intense liver steatosis after 28 days in contrast to the almost normalized liver histology of P+E group at the same period. Liver morphometry showed a significant enlargement of hepatocytes of E group after 4 weeks (pzebrafish intestines was demonstrated. LGG decreased serum levels of triglycerides and cholesterol and improved hepatic steatosis.

  12. Conversion of paper sludge to ethanol, II: process design and economic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhiliang; Lynd, Lee R

    2007-01-01

    Process design and economics are considered for conversion of paper sludge to ethanol. A particular site, a bleached kraft mill operated in Gorham, NH by Fraser Papers (15 tons dry sludge processed per day), is considered. In addition, profitability is examined for a larger plant (50 dry tons per day) and sensitivity analysis is carried out with respect to capacity, tipping fee, and ethanol price. Conversion based on simultaneous saccharification and fermentation with intermittent feeding is examined, with ethanol recovery provided by distillation and molecular sieve adsorption. It was found that the Fraser plant achieves positive cash flow with or without xylose conversion and mineral recovery. Sensitivity analysis indicates economics are very sensitive to ethanol selling price and scale; significant but less sensitive to the tipping fee, and rather insensitive to the prices of cellulase and power. Internal rates of return exceeding 15% are projected for larger plants at most combinations of scale, tipping fee, and ethanol price. Our analysis lends support to the proposition that paper sludge is a leading point-of-entry and proving ground for emergent industrial processes featuring enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass.

  13. Influence of a thiazole derivative on ethanol and thermally oxidized sunflower oil-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kode, Aruna; Rajagopalan, Rukkumani; Penumathsa, Suresh Varma; Menon, Venugopal P

    2004-10-01

    The present work describes the protective influence of the dendrodoine analogue (DA) [4-amino-5-benzoyl-2-(4-methoxy phenylamino) thiazole] on thermally oxidized sunflower oil and ethanol-induced oxidative stress. Ethanol was fed to animals at a level of 20% [(7.9 g/kg body weight (bw)] and thermally oxidized sunflower oil at a level of 15% (15 mL/100 g feed). Hepatotoxicity was assessed by measuring the activity of plasma aspartate transaminase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), which were elevated in thermally oxidized oil, and ethanol fed rats when compared with normal control rats. Tissue damage was associated with increased lipid peroxidation and disruption in the antioxidant defence mechanism in thermally oxidized oil- and ethanol-fed groups when compared with normal control group. The activity of liver marker enzymes (AST, ALP and GGT) and the level of lipid peroxidation decreased when DA was administered along with ethanol and thermally oxidized oil. The antioxidant status was near normal in DA-administered groups. Thus we propose that DA exerts antioxidant properties by modulating the activity of hepatic marker enzymes, level of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status.

  14. Impact of Furfural on Rapid Ethanol Production Using a Membrane Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad J. Taherzadeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A membrane bioreactor was developed to counteract the inhibition effect of furfural in ethanol production. Furfural, a major inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolyzates, is a highly toxic substance which is formed from pentose sugars released during the acidic degradation of lignocellulosic materials. Continuous cultivations with complete cell retention were performed at a high dilution rate of 0.5 h−1. Furfural was added directly into the bioreactor by pulse injection or by addition into the feed medium to obtain furfural concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 21.8 g L−1. At all pulse injections of furfural, the yeast was able to convert the furfural very rapidly by in situ detoxification. When injecting 21.8 g L−1 furfural to the cultivation, the yeast converted it by a specific conversion rate of 0.35 g g−1 h−1. At high cell density, Saccharomyces cerevisiae could tolerate very high furfural levels without major changes in the ethanol production. During the continuous cultures when up to 17.0 g L−1 furfural was added to the inlet medium, the yeast successfully produced ethanol, whereas an increase of furfural to 18.6 and 20.6 g L−1 resulted in a rapidly decreasing ethanol production and accumulation of sugars in the permeate. This study show that continuous ethanol fermentations by total cell retention in a membrane bioreactor has a high furfural tolerance and can conduct rapid in situ detoxification of medium containing high furfural concentrations.

  15. Continuous Production of Ethanol from Starch Using Glucoamylase and Yeast Co-Immobilized in Pectin Gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Raquel L. C.; Trovati, Joubert; Schmidell, Willibaldo

    This work presents a continuous simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process to produce ethanol from starch using glucoamylase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae co-immobilized in pectin gel. The enzyme was immobilized on macroporous silica, after silanization and activation of the support with glutaraldehyde. The silicaenzyme derivative was co-immobilized with yeast in pectin gel. This biocatalyst was used to produce ethanol from liquefied manioc root flour syrup, in three fixed bed reactors. The initial reactor yeast load was 0.05 g wet yeast/ml of reactor (0.1 g wet yeast/g gel), used in all SSF experiments. The enzyme concentration in the reactor was defined by running SSF batch assays, using different amount of silica-enzyme derivative, co-immobilized with yeast in pectin gel. The chosen reactor enzyme concentration, 3.77 U/ml, allowed fermentation to be the rate-limiting step in the batch experiment. In this condition, using initial substrate concentration of 166.0 g/1 of total reducing sugars (TRS), 1 ml gel/1 ml of medium, ethanol productivity of 8.3 g/l/h was achieved, for total conversion of starch to ethanol and 91% of the theoretical yield. In the continuous runs, feeding 163.0 g/1 of TRS and using the same enzyme and yeast concentrations used in the batch run, ethanol productivity was 5.9 g ethanol/1/h, with 97% of substrate conversion and 81% of the ethanol theoretical yield. Diffusion effects in the extra-biocatalyst film seemed to be reduced when operating at superficial velocities above 3.7 × 10-4 cm/s.

  16. Ethanol production at 45 C by Kluyveromyces marxianus IMB3 during growth on molasses pre-treated with Amberlite {sup trademark} and non-living biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, E.A.; Bustard, M.; Gough, S.; McMullan, G.; Singh, P.; Singh, D.; McHale, A.P. [Biotechnology Research Group, Univ. of Ulster, School of Applied Biological and Chemical Sciences, Biotechnology Research Group, Derry (United Kingdom)

    1998-09-01

    The use of high concentrations of molasses as a fermentation feed-stock for ethanol production is normally precluded by the presence of inhibitory compounds. Use of the thermotolerant, ethanol-producing yeast strain Kluyveromyces marxianus IMB3 in fermentations containing high concentrations of molasses resulted in suboptimal production of ethanol. The results suggested that this was caused by the presence of inhibitory materials rather than an intolerance to increased concentrations of ethanol. In the current study we describe the pretreatment of molasses preparations with either an Amberlite{sup R} monobed mixed ion-exchange resin or non-living microbial biomass from a local distillery. In the study molasses samples diluted to yield a final sugar concentration of 160 g/l were used as the substrate. Control fermentations using the untreated molasses dilutions yielded a maximum ethanol concentration of 40 g/l, representing 49% of the maximum theoretical yield. Fermentations using molasses samples pre-treated with Amberlite{sup R} or non-living biomass yielded maximum ethanol concentrations of 58 and 54 g/l, representing 71 and 66% of the maximum theoretical yield, respectively. The results suggest that pretreatment brings about removal of toxic or inhibitory materials from the fermentation feed-stock and we believe that such pre-treatments, particularly using the less expensive non-living biomass preparations may find a role in processes concerned with the commercial production of ethanol from molasses using this microorganism. (orig.)

  17. Low Emission Feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klop, G.

    2016-01-01

    Research into manipulating methane (CH4) production as a result of enteric fermentation in ruminants currently receives global interest. Using feed additives may be a feasible strategy to mitigate CH4 as they are supplied in such amounts that the basal diet composition will not be largely affected.

  18. Feeding of Diarmis Proboscis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jocelyn

    2005-01-01

    The feeding of Diarmis proboscis is an exciting outdoor laboratory activity that demonstrates a single concept of adaptations--cryptic colorations. The students are "transformed" into D. proboscis (no Harry Potter magic needed) in order to learn how adaptations work in the natural world. Prior to beginning this activity, students should have a…

  19. Feed sources for livestock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanten, van H.H.E.

    2016-01-01

    Production of food has re-emerged at the top of the global political agenda, driven by two contemporary challenges: the challenge to produce enough nutritious food to feed a growing and more prosperous human population, and the challenge to produce this food in an environmentally sustainable way. Cu

  20. Mixed waste paper to ethanol fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the use of mixed waste paper for the production of ethanol fuels and to review the available conversion technologies, and assess developmental status, current and future cost of production and economics, and the market potential. This report is based on the results of literature reviews, telephone conversations, and interviews. Mixed waste paper samples from residential and commercial recycling programs and pulp mill sludge provided by Weyerhauser were analyzed to determine the potential ethanol yields. The markets for ethanol fuel and the economics of converting paper into ethanol were investigated.

  1. High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Carriera, Laura H.

    1983-01-01

    Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

  2. Changes in Chinese Standard for Ethanol Gasoline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xin; Zhang Yongguang

    2006-01-01

    At the beginning of the tests on application of ethanol gasoline in 2001, Chinese government promulgated a national standard, GB 18351-2001 "Ethanol Gasoline for Motor Vehicles". The standard specifies three kinds of ethanol gasoline, namely E10 (90 RON), E 10 (93 RON) and E10(95RON). There were ethanol gasoline grades (90 RON and 93 RON) and conventional unleaded gasoline(97 RON) available in the areas where tests were carried out. Vehicle owners were worried about the harmful action of ethanol to their vehicles because of lack of knowledge regarding ethanol fuel,and they only refueled their cars with conventional 97 RON unleaded gasoline. This idea might cause unnecessary costs to customers and could bring about difficulty to the tests as well. Besides, some other technical questions emerged during the experimental application of ethanol gasoline, such as water content, ethanol content in gasoline, etc. Based on the experiences accumulated during the application tests, the national standard GB 18351-2001 "Ethanol Gasoline for Motor Vehicles" was revised. The revised edition is designated as GB 18351-2004.

  3. Effects of (R)-(-)-5-methyl-1-nicotinoyl-2-pyrazoline on glutamate transporter 1 and cysteine/glutamate exchanger as well as ethanol drinking behavior in male, alcohol-preferring rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aal-Aaboda, Munaf; Alhaddad, Hasan; Osowik, Francis; Nauli, Surya M; Sari, Youssef

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol consumption is largely associated with alterations in the extracellular glutamate concentrations in several brain reward regions. We recently showed that glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) is downregulated following chronic exposure to ethanol for 5 weeks in alcohol-preferring (P) rats and that upregulation of the GLT-1 levels in nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex results, in part, in attenuating ethanol consumption. Cystine glutamate antiporter (xCT) is also downregulated after chronic ethanol exposure in P rats, and its upregulation could be valuable in attenuating ethanol drinking. This study examines the effect of a synthetic compound, (R)-(-)-5-methyl-1-nicotinoyl-2-pyrazoline (MS-153), on ethanol drinking and expressions of GLT-1 and xCT in the amygdala and the hippocampus of P rats. P rats were exposed to continuous free-choice access to water, 15% and 30% ethanol, and food for 5 weeks, after which they received treatments of MS-153 or vehicle for 5 days. The results show that MS-153 treatment significantly reduces ethanol consumption. It was revealed that GLT-1 and xCT expressions were downregulated in both the amygdala and the hippocampus of ethanol-vehicle-treated rats (ethanol-vehicle group) compared with water-control animals. MS-153 treatment upregulated GLT-1 and xCT expressions in these brain regions. These findings demonstrate an important role for MS-153 in these glutamate transporters for the attenuation of ethanol-drinking behavior.

  4. Serotonin-3 Receptors in the Posterior Ventral Tegmental Area Regulate Ethanol Self-Administration of Alcohol-Preferring (P) Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodd, Zachary A.; Bell, Richard L.; Oster, Scott M.; Toalston, Jamie E.; Pommer, Tylene J.; McBride, William J.; Murphy, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies indicated the involvement of serotonin-3 (5-HT3) receptors in regulating alcohol-drinking behavior. The objective of this study was to determine the involvement of 5-HT3 receptors within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in regulating ethanol self-administration by alcohol-preferring (P) rats. Standard two-lever operant chambers were used to examine the effects of 7 consecutive bilateral micro-infusions of ICS205-930 (ICS), a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, directly into the posterior VTA on the acquisition and maintenance of 15% (v/v) ethanol self-administration. P rats readily acquired ethanol self-administration by the 4th session. The three highest doses (0.125, 0.25 and 1.25 ug) of ICS prevented acquisition of ethanol self-administration. During the acquisition post-injection period, all rats treated with ICS demonstrated higher responding on the ethanol lever, with the highest dose producing the greatest effect. In contrast, during the maintenance phase, the 3 highest doses (0.75, 1.0 and 1.25 ug) of ICS significantly increased responding on the ethanol lever; following the 7-day dosing regimen, responding on the ethanol lever returned to control levels. Micro-infusion of ICS into the posterior VTA did not alter the low responding on the water lever, and did not alter saccharin (0.0125% w/v) self-administration.. Micro-infusion of ICS into the anterior VTA did not alter ethanol self-administration. Overall, the results of this study suggest that 5-HT3 receptors in the posterior VTA of the P rat may be involved in regulating ethanol self-administration. In addition, chronic operant ethanol self-administration, and/or repeated treatments with a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist may alter neuronal circuitry within the posterior VTA. PMID:20682192

  5. Candida albicans ethanol stimulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa WspR-controlled biofilm formation as part of a cyclic relationship involving phenazines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie I Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In chronic infections, pathogens are often in the presence of other microbial species. For example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common and detrimental lung pathogen in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF and co-infections with Candida albicans are common. Here, we show that P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and phenazine production were strongly influenced by ethanol produced by the fungus C. albicans. Ethanol stimulated phenotypes that are indicative of increased levels of cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP, and levels of c-di-GMP were 2-fold higher in the presence of ethanol. Through a genetic screen, we found that the diguanylate cyclase WspR was required for ethanol stimulation of c-di-GMP. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that ethanol stimulates WspR signaling through its cognate sensor WspA, and promotes WspR-dependent activation of Pel exopolysaccharide production, which contributes to biofilm maturation. We also found that ethanol stimulation of WspR promoted P. aeruginosa colonization of CF airway epithelial cells. P. aeruginosa production of phenazines occurs both in the CF lung and in culture, and phenazines enhance ethanol production by C. albicans. Using a C. albicans adh1/adh1 mutant with decreased ethanol production, we found that fungal ethanol strongly altered the spectrum of P. aeruginosa phenazines in favor of those that are most effective against fungi. Thus, a feedback cycle comprised of ethanol and phenazines drives this polymicrobial interaction, and these relationships may provide insight into why co-infection with both P. aeruginosa and C. albicans has been associated with worse outcomes in cystic fibrosis.

  6. Gestational Exposure to Inhaled Vapors of Ethanol and Gasoline-Ethanol Blends in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US automotive fleet is powered primarily by gasoline-ethanol fuel blends containing up to 10% ethanol (ElO). Uncertainties regarding the health risks associated with exposure to ElO prompted assessment of the effects of prenatal exposure to inhaled vapors of gasoline-ethanol ...

  7. High ethanol tolerance of the thermophilic anaerobic ethanol producer Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva, Tania I.; Mikkelsen, Marie Just; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2007-01-01

    The low ethanol tolerance of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria, generally less than 2% (v/v) ethanol, is one of the main limiting factors for their potential use for second generation fuel ethanol production. In this work, the tolerance of thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG 1L1 ...

  8. Fermented liquid feed for pigs: an ancient technique for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missotten, Joris Am; Michiels, Joris; Degroote, Jeroen; De Smet, Stefaan

    2015-01-01

    Fermented liquid feed is feed that has been mixed with water at a ratio ranging from 1:1.5 to 1:4. By mixing with water, lactic acid bacteria and yeasts naturally occurring in the feed proliferate and produce lactic acid, acetic acid and ethanol which reduces the pH of the mixture. This reduction in pH inhibits pathogenic organisms from developing in the feed. In addition, when this low pH mixture is fed, it reduces the pH in the stomach of pigs and prevents the proliferation of pathogens such as coliforms and Salmonella in the gastrointestinal tract. For piglets, the use of fermented liquid feed offers the possibility of simultaneously providing feed and water, which may facilitate an easier transition from sow's milk to solid feed. Secondly, offering properly produced fermented liquid feed may strengthen the role of the stomach as the first line of defense against possible pathogenic infections by lowering the pH in the gastrointestinal tract thereby helping to exclude enteropathogens. Finally, feeding fermented liquid feed to pigs has been shown to improve the performance of suckling pigs, weaner pigs and growing-finishing pigs. In this review, current knowledge about the use of fermented liquid feed in pig diets will be discussed. This will include a discussion of the desirable properties of fermented liquid feed and factors affecting fermentation. In addition, advantages and disadvantages of fermented liquid feed will be discussed including its effects on gastrointestinal health, intestinal pH and the types of bacteria found in the gastrointestinal tract as well as the effects of fermented liquid feeds on pig performance.

  9. Consequences of amygdala kindling and repeated withdrawal from ethanol on amphetamine-induced behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Tamzin L; Dunworth, Sarah J; Stephens, David N

    2002-09-01

    It has been shown previously that chronic ethanol treatment in mice leads to accelerated behavioural sensitization to psychomotor stimulants [Manley & Little (1997) J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther., 281, 1330-1339], whilst repeated experience of ethanol withdrawal sensitizes pathways underlying seizure activity (Becker & Hale (1993) Alcohol Clin. Exp. Res., 17, 94-98]. The aim of the current experiment was to investigate the consequences of repeated withdrawal from ethanol on amphetamine-induced behaviours in the rat and compare this with animals with electrical kindling of the amygdala, a procedure that has been shown to enhance alcohol withdrawal seizures [Pinel et al. (1975) Can. J. Neurol. Sci., 2, 467-475]. For the kindling experiments, electrodes were surgically implanted in the left basolateral amygdala and were stimulated daily at the afterdischarge threshold until a criterion of three consecutive stage 5 seizures was reached. Fully kindled rats showed a marginally significant reduction in sensitivity to the locomotor stimulant effects of acute amphetamine compared with sham and partially kindled rats which had experienced subthreshold stimulation of the amygdala. Sham and partially kindled rats sensitized readily to the locomotor activating effects of amphetamine (0.125 mg/kg) following repeated treatments, but the fully kindled rats did not. Fully kindled rats also failed to show place preference conditioning to amphetamine (0.5 mg/kg). Rats, withdrawn three times from chronic ethanol (liquid-diet), kindled more quickly to PTZ (30 mg/kg, i.p.) than rats with the same overall exposure to ethanol (24 days) followed by a single withdrawal or control animals. However, there was no difference in the locomotor stimulating effects of acute amphetamine (0.25-1 mg/kg, i.p.), the rate of sensitization to amphetamine (0.125 mg/kg, i.p.) or amphetamine induced conditioned place preference (1 mg/kg, i.p.). These observations suggest that, in rats, repeated withdrawal from a

  10. Daidzin, an antioxidant isoflavonoid, decreases blood alcohol levels and shortens sleep time induced by ethanol intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, C I; Lin, R C; Antony, V; Lumeng, L; Li, T K; Mai, K; Liu, C; Wang, Q D; Zhao, Z H; Wang, G F

    1994-12-01

    The extract from an edible vine, Pueraria lebata, has been reported to be efficacious in lessening alcohol intoxication. In this study, we have tested the efficacy of one of the major components, daidzin, from this plant extract. When ethanol (40% solution, 3 g/kg body weight) was given to fasted rats intragastrically, blood alcohol concentration (BAC) peaked at 30 min after alcohol ingestion and reached 1.77 +/- 0.14 mg/ml (mean values +/- SD, n = 6). If daidzin (30 mg/kg) was mixed with the ethanol solution and given to animals intragastrically, BAC was found to peak at 90 min after alcohol ingestion and reached only 1.20 +/- 0.30 mg/ml (n = 6) (p daidzin to delay and decrease peak BAC level after ethanol ingestion was also observed in fed animals. In both fasted and fed rats given alcohol without daidzin, BAC quickly declined after reaching its peak at 30 min. By contrast, BAC levels receded more slowly if daidzin was also fed to the animals. Daidzin showed a chronic effect. Rats fed daidzin for 7 days before ethanol challenge, but not on the day of challenge, also produced lower and later peak BAC levels. Interestingly, daidzin, whether fed to rats only once or chronically for 7 days, did not significantly alter activities of either alcohol dehydrogenase or mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase in the liver. Further experiments demonstrated that daidzin shortened sleep time for rats receiving ethanol intragastrically (7 g/kg) but not intraperitoneally (2 g/kg). To test whether daidzin delayed stomach-emptying, [14C]polyethylene glycol was mixed with ethanol and fed to rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Prion infectivity detected in swine challenged with chronic wasting disease via the intracerebral or oral route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a naturally-occurring, fatal neurodegenerative disease of North American cervids. The potential for swine to serve as a host for the agent of chronic wasting disease is unknown. In the US, feeding of ruminant by-products to ruminants is prohibited, but feeding of rum...

  12. [Chronicity, chronicization, systematization of delusions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapet, P; Fernandez, C; Galtier, M C; Gisselmann, A

    1984-05-01

    Chronicity in psychopathology is indicative of a term, a decay. Chronicization only leads the way to this term. Here, chronicization is taken literally as an inscription in the time course of delusions. The mechanism of systematization seems to be a central mark in the approach to chronic delusions. It is not an alienation or an irreversible closing but an attempted accommodation with reality in the life of psychotic subjects, irrespective of the delusional structure. The role of therapy and drug treatment as a follow-up may in that case assume another meaning.

  13. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Froeling, Fieke EM

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas owing to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects 3–9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  14. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Kadaba, Raghu

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas due to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects between 3 and 9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  15. Bidirectional enantioselective effects of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen in two mouse models of excessive ethanol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, Chelsea R; Blasingame, Shelby N; Boehm, Stephen L

    2015-02-01

    The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen has been studied extensively in preclinical models of alcohol-use disorders, yet results on its efficacy have been uncertain. Racemic baclofen, which is used clinically, can be broken down into separate enantiomers of the drug. Baclofen has been shown to produce enantioselective effects in behavioral assays, including those modeling reflexive and sexual behavior. The current studies sought to characterize the enantioselective effects of baclofen in two separate models of ethanol consumption. The first was a Drinking-in-the-Dark procedure that provides "binge-like" ethanol access to mice by restricting access to a 2-h period, 3 h into the dark cycle. The second was a two-bottle choice procedure that utilized selectively bred High Alcohol Preferring 1 (HAP1) mice to model chronic ethanol access. HAP1 mice are selectively bred to consume pharmacologically relevant amounts of ethanol in a 24-h two-bottle choice paradigm. The results showed that baclofen yields enantioselective effects on ethanol intake in both models, and that these effects are bidirectional. Total ethanol intake was decreased by R(+)-baclofen, while total intake was increased by S(-)-baclofen in the binge-like and chronic drinking models. Whereas overall binge-like saccharin intake was significantly reduced by R(+)-baclofen, chronic intake was not significantly altered. S(-)-baclofen did not significantly alter saccharin intake. Neither enantiomer significantly affected locomotion during binge-like reinforcer consumption. Collectively, these results demonstrate that baclofen produces enantioselective effects on ethanol consumption. More importantly, the modulation of consumption is bidirectional. The opposing enantioselective effects may explain some of the variance seen in published baclofen literature.

  16. Sweet Sorghum Alternative Fuel and Feed Pilot Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slack, Donald C. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Dept.; Kaltenbach, C. Colin [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2013-07-30

    The University of Arizona undertook a “pilot” project to grow sweet sorghum on a field scale (rather than a plot scale), produce juice from the sweet sorghum, deliver the juice to a bio-refinery and process it to fuel-grade ethanol. We also evaluated the bagasse for suitability as a livestock feed and as a fuel. In addition to these objectives we evaluated methods of juice preservation, ligno-cellulosic conversion of the bagasse to fermentable sugars and alternative methods of juice extraction.

  17. Sub-toxic Ethanol Exposure Modulates Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity of Antioxidant Systems to Provide Neuroprotection in Hippocampal HT22 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casañas-Sánchez, Verónica; Pérez, José A.; Quinto-Alemany, David; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is known to cause severe systemic damage often explained as secondary to oxidative stress. Brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) because the high amounts of lipids, and because nerve cell membranes contain high amounts of peroxidable fatty acids. Usually these effects of ethanol are associated to high and/or chronic exposure to ethanol. However, as we show in this manuscript, a low and acute dose of ethanol trigger a completely different response in hippocampal cells. Thus, we have observed that 0.1% ethanol exposure to HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal-derived cell line, increases the transcriptional expression of different genes belonging to the classical, glutathione/glutaredoxin and thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin antioxidant systems, these including Sod1, Sod2, Gpx1, Gclc, and Txnrd1. Paralleling these changes, enzyme activities of total superoxide dismutase (tSOD), catalase, total glutathione peroxidase (tGPx), glutathione-S-reductase (GSR), and total thioredoxin reductase (tTXNRD), were all increased, while the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as indicators of lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels remained unaltered. Ethanol exposure did not affect cell viability or cell growing as assessed by real-time cell culture monitoring, indicating that low ethanol doses are not deleterious for hippocampal cells, but rather prevented glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. In summary, we conclude that sub-toxic exposure to ethanol may well be neuroprotective against oxidative insults in hippocampal cells. PMID:27512374

  18. Ethanol enhances arsenic-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression via both NFAT and NF-κB signalings in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Hitron, John Andrew; Wise, James T F; Son, Young-Ok; Roy, Ram Vinod; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Zhang, Zhuo; Xu, Mei; Luo, Jia; Shi, Xianglin

    2015-10-15

    Arsenic is a known carcinogen to humans, and chronic exposure to environmental arsenic is a worldwide health concern. As a dietary factor, ethanol carries a well-established risk for malignancies, but the effects of co-exposure to arsenic and ethanol on tumor development are not well understood. In the present study, we hypothesized that ethanol would enhance the function of an environmental carcinogen such as arsenic through increase in COX-2 expression. Our in vitro results show that ethanol enhanced arsenic-induced COX-2 expression. We also show that the increased COX-2 expression associates with intracellular ROS generation, up-regulated AKT signaling, with activation of both NFAT and NF-κB pathways. We demonstrate that antioxidant enzymes have an inhibitory effect on arsenic/ethanol-induced COX-2 expression, indicating that the responsive signaling pathways from co-exposure to arsenic and ethanol relate to ROS generation. In vivo results also show that co-exposure to arsenic and ethanol increased COX-2 expression in mice. We conclude that ethanol enhances arsenic-induced COX-2 expression in colorectal cancer cells via both the NFAT and NF-κB pathways. These results imply that, as a common dietary factor, ethanol ingestion may be a compounding risk factor for arsenic-induced carcinogenesis/cancer development.

  19. Simulation of Fuel Ethanol Production from Lignocellulosic Biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张素平; Francois Maréchal; Martin Gassner; 任铮伟; 颜涌捷; Daniel Favrat

    2009-01-01

    Models for hydrolysis, fermentation and concentration process, production and utilization of biogas as well as lignin gasification are developed to calculate the heat demand of ethanol production process and the amounts of heat and power generated from residues and wastewater of the process. For the energy analysis, all relevant information about the process streams, physical properties, and mass and energy balances are considered. Energy integration is investigated for establishing a network of facilities for heat and power generation from wastewater and residues treatment aiming at the increase of energy efficiency. Feeding the lignin to an IGCC process, the electric efficiency is increased by 4.4% compared with combustion, which leads to an overall energy efficiency of 53.8%. A detailed sensitivity analysis on energy efficiency is also carried out.

  20. PERVAPORATION OF ETHANOL/WATER MIXTURES WITH HIGH FLUX BY ZEOLITE-FILLED PDMS/PVDF COMPOSITE MEMBRANES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Zhan; Ji-ding Li; Jian Chen; Jun-qi Huang

    2009-01-01

    Thin-film zeolite-filled silicone/PVDF composite membranes were fabricated by incorporating zeolite particles into PDMS (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) membranes. The morphology of zeolite particles and zeolite filled silicone composite membranes were characterized by SEM. The zeolite-filled PDMS/PVDF composite membranes were applied for the pervaporation of ethanol/water mixtures and showed higher flux compared with that reported in literatures. The effect of zeolite loading and Si/Al ratio of zeolite particles on pervaporation performance of ethanol/water mixtures was investigated. With the increase of zeolite loading from 10% to 30%, the total flux increased significantly from 265.0 g/(m~2h) to 820.7 g/(m~2h) with 5 wt% ethanol feed concentration at 50℃, and the separation factor increased from 11.3 to 13.7. The effects of operation temperature and ethanol feed concentration on pervaporation performance were also studied. As the temperature increased from 40℃ to 80℃, the separation factor varied from 12.1 to 13.7 which maintained the maximum value at 50℃, and the total flux increased exponentially from 435.5 g/(m~2h) to 2993.8 g/(m~2h) with 30% zeolite loading. Besides, the zeolite filled PDMS/PVDF composite membrane with 30% zeolite loading was ethanol perm-selective over a wide range of ethanol feed concentration (5 wt%-90 wt%), and especially showed excellent pervaporation performance in the low concentration range.

  1. Simulation of ethanol extractive distillation with mixed glycols as separating agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Gil

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Extractive distillation is an alternative for ethanol dehydration processes that has been shown to be more effective than azeotropic distillation and, in close proximity, to be very competitive against the process that uses adsorption with molecular sieves. Glycols have been shown to be the most effective solvents in extractive distillation, mainly ethylene glycol and glycerol. In this work, an extractive distillation column was simulated with the Aspen Plus software platform, using the RadFrac module for distillation columns, to investigate the effect on the separation of the ethylene glycol-glycerol mixture composition, the separating agent feed stages, the separating agent split stream feed, and the azeotropic feed temperature. The NRTL model was used to calculate the phase equilibrium of these strongly polar mixtures. A rigorous simulation of the extractive distillation column finally established was also performed, including a secondary recovery column for the mixture of solvents and a recycle loop, to simulate an industrially relevant situation. This simulation allowed establishing the complete parameters to dehydrate ethanol: the optimal stage for separating agent feed is stage 4; the most adequate composition for the glycols mixture is 60 mol% ethylene glycol and 40 mol% glycerol. Finally, energetically efficient operating conditions for each one of the columns were established through a preliminary pinch analysis.

  2. The Impact of Ethanol and Ethanol Subsidies on Corn Prices: Revisiting History

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce A. Babcock

    2011-01-01

    The rapid rise in corn prices that began in the fall of 2006 coincided with exponential growth in U.S. corn ethanol production. At about the same time, new ethanol consumption mandates were added to existing ethanol import tariffs and price subsidies. This troika of subsidies leads critics to view the ethanol industry as being beholden to subsidies, which then leads to the conclusion that ethanol subsidies lead to high corn prices. But droughts, floods, a severe U.S. recession, and two genera...

  3. A novel RNA binding protein that interacts with NMDA R1 mRNA: regulation by ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anji, Antje; Kumari, Meena

    2006-05-01

    Excitatory NMDA receptors are an important target of ethanol. Chronic ethanol exposure, in vivo and in vitro, increases polypeptide levels of NR1 subunit, the key subunit of functional NMDA receptors. In vitro, chronic ethanol treatment increases the half-life of NR1 mRNA and this observation is dependent on new protein synthesis. The present study was undertaken to locate cis-acting region(s) within the NR1 3'-untranslated region (UTR) and identify NR1 3'-UTR binding trans-acting proteins expressed in mouse fetal cortical neurons. Utilizing RNA gel shift assays we identified a 156-nt cis-acting region that binds to polysomal trans-acting proteins. This binding was highly specific as inclusion of cyclophilin RNA or tRNA did not interfere with cis-trans interactions. Importantly, the 3'-UTR binding activity was significantly up-regulated in the presence of ethanol. UV cross-link analysis detected three NR1 3'-UTR binding proteins and their molecular mass calculated by Northwestern analysis was approximately 88, 60 and 47 kDa, respectively. Northwestern analysis showed a significant up-regulation of the 88-kDa protein after chronic ethanol treatment. The 88-kDa protein was purified and identified by tandem mass spectrometry as the beta subunit of alpha glucosidase II (GIIbeta). That GIIbeta is indeed a trans-acting protein and binds specifically to 3'-UTR of NR1 mRNA was confirmed by RNA gel mobility supershift assays and immuno RT-PCR. Western blotting data established a significant increase of GIIbeta polypeptide in chronic ethanol-exposed fetal cortical neurons. We hypothesize that the identified cis-acting region and the associated RNA-binding proteins are important regulators of NR1 subunit gene expression.

  4. Manufacturing Ethyl Acetate From Fermentation Ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, Naresh K.; Ingham, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Conceptual process uses dilute product of fermentation instead of concentrated ethanol. Low-concentration ethanol, extracted by vacuum from fermentation tank, and acetic acid constitutes feedstock for catalytic reaction. Product of reaction goes through steps that increases ethyl acetate content to 93 percent by weight. To conserve energy, heat exchangers recycle waste heat to preheat process streams at various points.

  5. Antidepressant Effect of Aminophylline After Ethanol Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudeiro, Sarah Souza; Soares, Paula Matias; Almeida, Anália Barbosa; de Freitas Guimarães Lobato, Rodrigo; de Araujo, Dayane Pessoa; Macedo, Danielle Silveira; Sousa, Francisca Cléa Florenço; Patrocínio, Manoel Cláudio Azevedo; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes

    2013-01-01

    This work investigated the association of acute ethanol and aminophylline administration on behavioral models of depression and prefrontal monoamine levels (i.e. norepinephrine and dopamine) in mice. The animals received a single dose of ethanol (2 g/kg) or aminophylline (5 or 10 mg/kg) alone or in association. Thirty minutes after the last drug administration, the animals were assessed in behavioral models by the forced swimming and tail suspension tests. After these tests, the animals were sacrificed and the prefrontal cortices dissected to measure monoamine content. Results showed that ethanol presented depression-like activity in the forced swimming and tail suspension tests. These effects were reversed by the association with aminophylline in all tests. Norepinephrine and dopamine levels decreased, while an increase in the dopamine metabolite, (4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)acetic acid (DOPAC), after ethanol administration was observed. On the contrary, the association of ethanol and aminophylline increased the norepinephrine and dopamine content, while it decreased DOPAC when compared to the ethanol group, confirming the alterations observed in the behavioral tests. These data reinforce the involvement of the adenosinergic system on ethanol effects, highlighting the importance of the norepinephrine and dopamine pathways in the prefrontal cortex to the effects of ethanol. PMID:23641339

  6. Ethanol precipitation analysis of thymus histone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijvoet, P.

    1957-01-01

    An analytical ethanol precipitation technique, similar to 's salting-out procedure, was used for the characterisation of whole thymus histone and the products obtained by preparative ethanol fractionation. The analysis was carried out at —5° C and pH 6.5. Whole histone prepared according to et al.,

  7. Feed sources for livestock

    OpenAIRE

    Zanten, van, H.H.E.

    2016-01-01

    Production of food has re-emerged at the top of the global political agenda, driven by two contemporary challenges: the challenge to produce enough nutritious food to feed a growing and more prosperous human population, and the challenge to produce this food in an environmentally sustainable way. Current levels of production of especially animal-source food (ASF), pose severe pressure on the environment via their emissions to air, water, and soil; and their use of scarce resources, such as la...

  8. Live feeds in aquaculture

    OpenAIRE

    Dhert, Ph.; Sorgeloos, P

    1995-01-01

    Over the past two decades intensive larviculture of several fish and shellfish species has expanded into a multimillion dollar industry. Although much progress has been made in identifying the dietary requirements of the larvae of various aquaculture species, the mass culture of their early larval stages still requires the use of live feeds. Selected either through trial and error approaches or because of their convenience in mass production and use, hatcheries are relying today on three grou...

  9. Inflammatory PAF Receptor Signaling Initiates Hedgehog Signaling and Kidney Fibrogenesis During Ethanol Consumption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calivarathan Latchoumycandane

    Full Text Available Acute inflammation either resolves or proceeds to fibrotic repair that replaces functional tissue. Pro-fibrotic hedgehog signaling and induction of its Gli transcription factor in pericytes induces fibrosis in kidney, but molecular instructions connecting inflammation to fibrosis are opaque. We show acute kidney inflammation resulting from chronic ingestion of the common xenobiotic ethanol initiates Gli1 transcription and hedgehog synthesis in kidney pericytes, and promotes renal fibrosis. Ethanol ingestion stimulated transcription of TGF-ß, collagens I and IV, and alpha-smooth muscle actin with accumulation of these proteins. This was accompanied by deposition of extracellular fibrils. Ethanol catabolism by CYP2E1 in kidney generates local reactive oxygen species that oxidize cellular phospholipids to phospholipid products that activate the Platelet-activating Factor receptor (PTAFR for inflammatory phospholipids. Genetically deleting this ptafr locus abolished accumulation of mRNA for TGF-ß, collagen IV, and α-smooth muscle actin. Loss of PTAFR also abolished ethanol-stimulated Sonic (Shh and Indian hedgehog (Ihh expression, and abolished transcription and accumulation of Gli1. Shh induced in pericytes and Ihh in tubules escaped to urine of ethanol-fed mice. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO is required for ethanol-induced kidney inflammation, and Shh was not present in kidney or urine of mpo-/- mice. Shh also was present in urine of patients with acute kidney injury, but not in normal individuals or those with fibrotic liver cirrhosis We conclude neither endogenous PTAFR signaling nor CYP2E1-generated radicals alone are sufficient to initiate hedgehog signaling, but instead PTAFR-dependent neutrophil infiltration with myeloperoxidase activation is necessary to initiate ethanol-induced fibrosis in kidney. We also show fibrogenic mediators escape to urine, defining a new class of urinary mechanistic biomarkers of fibrogenesis for an organ not

  10. [Ethanol pharmacokinetics in narcotic action and endogenous ethanol in female rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronova, L M; Ushakova, M M; Kudriavtsev, R V; Barkov, N K

    1982-12-01

    Experiments were made on female rats to demonstrate a positive correlation between the time of ethanol anesthesia in estrus and diestrus and (1) subsequent preference of ethanol to water (r = 0.68) and (2) ethanol consumption dosage (r = 0.72). In the same rats (during estrus and diestrus), the endogenous level and blood concentrations of ethanol were measured 30 minutes after administering the anesthetic dose (4.5 g/kg) and during the animal's "egress" from anesthesia. The low level of endogenous ethanol and rapid decrease of the blood ethanol concentration upon administering the anesthetic dose during estrus were characteristic of those female rats which, under the conditions of free choice, preferred ethanol to water and consumed it in large doses.

  11. Production of ethanol from wheat straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smuga-Kogut Małgorzata

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a method for the production of ethanol from wheat straw lignocellulose where the raw material is chemically processed before hydrolysis and fermentation. The usefulness of wheat straw delignification was evaluated with the use of a 4:1 mixture of 95% ethanol and 65% HNO3 (V. Chemically processed lignocellulose was subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis to produce reducing sugars, which were converted to ethanol in the process of alcoholic fermentation. Chemical processing damages the molecular structure of wheat straw, thus improving ethanol yield. The removal of lignin from straw improves fermentation by eliminating lignin’s negative influence on the growth and viability of yeast cells. Straw pretreatment facilitates enzymatic hydrolysis by increasing the content of reducing sugars and ethanol per g in comparison with untreated wheat straw.

  12. African perspective on cellulosic ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bensah, Edem Cudjoe; Kemausuor, Francis; Miezah, Kodwo;

    2015-01-01

    to ethanol, among others. While the industrialized and some emerging countries are gradually breaking grounds in cellulosic ethanol, most African countries have made little effort in research and development even though the continent is rich in lignocellulosic biomass. The paper estimates residues from......A major challenge to commercial production of cellulosic ethanol pertains to the cost-effective breakdown of the complex and recalcitrant structure of lignocellulose into its components via pretreatment, the cost of enzymes for hydrolysis and fermentation, and the conversion rate of C5 sugars...... widely available crops and municipal waste and determines their respective theoretical ethanol potential (around 22 billion litres annually). It further reviews stages involved in the production of cellulosic ethanol, focussing on processing methods that can be adapted to current situation in most...

  13. Genetic correlations with ethanol withdrawal severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabbe, J C; Young, E R; Kosobud, A

    1983-01-01

    A major goal of pharmacogenetic research on alcoholism remains the identification of some "marker" that could predict the liability of a particular individual for a genetic susceptibility to develop alcoholism. The present paper presents evidence that the severity of withdrawal from physical dependence on ethanol varies widely among inbred strains of mice, and that withdrawal severity is negatively genetically correlated with initial sensitivity and magnitude of tolerance to ethanol hypothermia. These correlations are supported by differences in hypothermic response between replicate lines of mice genetically selected for susceptibility and resistance to ethanol withdrawal seizures. The genetic relationships reported suggest that the effects of ethanol on thermoregulation in mice may offer a predictive marker for susceptibility to ethanol physical dependence.

  14. Food Safety Information RSS feed

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This is an RSS Feed of Food Safety information that’s produced in real-time by the CDC. This RSS feed is the integration of two other XML feeds, one from the USDA's...

  15. Coupling between crossed dipole feeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J.; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans; Lessow, H.

    1974-01-01

    as a function of orientation and feeding network properties. The antennas are used as feeds for a parabolic reflector, and the effect of coupling on the secondary fields is analyzed. Especially significant is the polarization loss and it may, to some extent, be reduced by a proper choice of feeding network....

  16. Infrastructure Requirements for an Expanded Fuel Ethanol Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, Robert E. [Downstream Alternatives, Inc., South Bend, IN (United States)

    2002-01-15

    This report provides technical information specifically related to ethanol transportation, distribution, and marketing issues. This report required analysis of the infrastructure requirements for an expanded ethanol industry.

  17. A qualitative systematic review of maternal infant feeding practices in transitioning from milk feeds to family foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Michelle; Brodribb, Wendy; Hepworth, Julie

    2016-10-03

    Evidence supports the establishment of healthy feeding practices early in life to promote lifelong healthy eating patterns protective against chronic disease such as obesity. Current early childhood obesity prevention interventions are built on extant understandings of how feeding practices relate to infant's cues of hunger and satiety. Further insights regarding factors that influence feeding behaviors in early life may improve program designs and outcomes. Four electronic databases were searched for peer-reviewed qualitative studies published between 2000 to 2014 with transitional infant feeding practice rationale from developed countries. Reporting transparency and potential bias was assessed using the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research quality checklist. Thematic synthesis of 23 manuscripts identified three themes (and six sub-themes): Theme 1. Infant (physical cues and behavioural cues) focuses on the perceived signs of readiness to start solids and the feeding to influence growth and "health happiness." Theme 2. Mother (coping strategies and knowledge and skills) focuses on the early survival of the infant and the family and the feeding to satisfy hunger and influence infant contentment, and sleep. Theme 3. Community (pressure and inconsistent advice) highlights the importance of generational feeding and how conflicting feeding advice led many mothers to adopt valued familial or culturally established practices. Overall, mothers were pivotal to feeding decisions. Satisfying infant's needs to reach "good mothering" status as measured by societal expectations was highly valued but lacked consideration of nutrition, obesity, and long term health. Maternal interpretation of healthy infant feeding and successful parenting need attention when developing strategies to support new families.

  18. Feed or bioenergy production from agri-industrial residues?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonini, Davide; Hamelin, Lorie; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    Second generation biofuels produced from “residual” biomasses are considered promising ways of producing bioenergy. However, many studies tend to forget that these biomasses are today used for specific purposes, (e.g. feeding). This means that their use for energy would induce cascading...... considered: combustion, fermentation to ethanol, and to biogas. The iLUC impacts were quantified and included in the assessment. The LCA results revealed that, for all scenarios, GHG emissions from indirect land-use changes were the major contributor to the total GHG impact (up to ca. 40-60% of the total...... induced GHG emissions). All in all, the use of biomasses that are today used as animal feed (e.g. beet molasses) induced significant GHG emissions through iLUC. These were quantified at between 1-3.5 t CO2/t dry residue depending upon the nutritional value. The recommendation is to avoid the use...

  19. Separate hydrolysis and co-fermentation for improved xylose utilization in integrated ethanol production from wheat meal and wheat straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdei Borbála

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The commercialization of second-generation bioethanol has not been realized due to several factors, including poor biomass utilization and high production cost. It is generally accepted that the most important parameters in reducing the production cost are the ethanol yield and the ethanol concentration in the fermentation broth. Agricultural residues contain large amounts of hemicellulose, and the utilization of xylose is thus a plausible way to improve the concentration and yield of ethanol during fermentation. Most naturally occurring ethanol-fermenting microorganisms do not utilize xylose, but a genetically modified yeast strain, TMB3400, has the ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose. However, the xylose uptake rate is only enhanced when the glucose concentration is low. Results Separate hydrolysis and co-fermentation of steam-pretreated wheat straw (SPWS combined with wheat-starch hydrolysate feed was performed in two separate processes. The average yield of ethanol and the xylose consumption reached 86% and 69%, respectively, when the hydrolysate of the enzymatically hydrolyzed (18.5% WIS unwashed SPWS solid fraction and wheat-starch hydrolysate were fed to the fermentor after 1 h of fermentation of the SPWS liquid fraction. In the other configuration, fermentation of the SPWS hydrolysate (7.0% WIS, resulted in an average ethanol yield of 93% from fermentation based on glucose and xylose and complete xylose consumption when wheat-starch hydrolysate was included in the feed. Increased initial cell density in the fermentation (from 5 to 20 g/L did not increase the ethanol yield, but improved and accelerated xylose consumption in both cases. Conclusions Higher ethanol yield has been achieved in co-fermentation of xylose and glucose in SPWS hydrolysate when wheat-starch hydrolysate was used as feed, then in co-fermentation of the liquid fraction of SPWS fed with the mixed hydrolysates. Integration of first-generation and

  20. HIGH ETHANOL DOSE DURING EARLY ADOLESCENCE INDUCES LOCOMOTOR ACTIVATION AND INCREASES SUBSEQUENT ETHANOL INTAKE DURING LATE ADOLESCENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Acevedo, María Belén; Molina, Juan Carlos; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Spear, Norman E.; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2010-01-01

    Adolescent initiation of ethanol consumption is associated with subsequent heightened probability of ethanol-use disorders. The present study examined the relationship between motivational sensitivity to ethanol initiation in adolescent rats and later ethanol intake. Experiment 1 determined that ethanol induces locomotor activation shortly after administration but not if tested at a later post-administration interval. In Experiment 2, adolescents were assessed for ethanol-induced locomotor ac...

  1. Adolescent binge-like ethanol exposure reduces basal α-MSH expression in the hypothalamus and the amygdala of adult rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma-Cabrera, Jose Manuel; Carvajal, Francisca; Alcaraz-Iborra, Manuel; de la Fuente, Leticia; Navarro, Montserrat; Thiele, Todd E.; Cubero, Inmaculada

    2013-01-01

    Melanocortins (MC) are central peptides that have been implicated in the modulation of ethanol consumption. There is experimental evidence that chronic ethanol exposure reduces α-MSH expression in limbic and hypothalamic brain regions and alters central pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA activity in adult rats. Adolescence is a critical developmental period of high vulnerability in which ethanol exposure alters corticotropin releasing factor, neuropeptide Y, substance P and neurokinin neuropeptide activities, all of which have key roles in ethanol consumption. Given the involvement of MC and the endogenous inverse agonist AgRP in ethanol drinking, here we evaluate whether a binge-like pattern of ethanol treatment during adolescence has a relevant impact on basal and/or ethanol-stimulated α-MSH and AgRP activities during adulthood. To this end, adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats (beginning at PND25) were pre-treated with either saline (SP group) or binge-like ethanol exposure (BEP group; 3.0 g/kg given in intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections) of one injection per day over two consecutive days, followed by 2 days without injections, repeated for a total of 8 injections. Following 25 ethanol-free days, we evaluated α-MSH and AgRP immunoreactivity (IR) in the limbic and hypothalamic nuclei of adult rats (PND63) in response to ethanol (1.5 or 3.0 g/kg i.p.) and saline. We found that binge-like ethanol exposure during adolescence significantly reduced basal α-MSH IR in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), the arcuate nucleus (Arc) and the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) during adulthood. Additionally, acute ethanol elicited AgRP IR in the Arc. Rats given the adolescent ethanol treatment required higher doses of ethanol than saline-treated rats to express AgRP. In light of previous evidence that endogenous MC and AgRP regulate ethanol intake through MC-receptor signaling, we speculate that the α-MSH and AgRP disturbances induced by binge-like ethanol

  2. Techno-Economic Analysis of Integrating First and Second-Generation Ethanol Production Using Filamentous Fungi: An Industrial Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Rajendran

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The 2nd generation plants producing ethanol from lignocelluloses demand risky and high investment costs. This paper presents the energy- and economical evaluations for integrating lignocellulose in current 1st generation dry mill ethanol processes, using filamentous fungi. Dry mills use grains and have mills, liquefactions, saccharifications, fermentation, and distillation to produce ethanol, while their stillage passes centrifugation, and evaporation to recycle the water and dry the cake and evaporated syrup into animal feed. In this work, a bioreactor was considered to cultivate fungi on the stillage either before or after the centrifugation step together with pretreated lignocellulosic wheat bran. The results showed that the integrated 1st and 2nd generation ethanol process requires a capital investment of 77 million USD, which could yield NPV of 162 million USD after 20 years. Compared to the fungal cultivation on thin stillage modified 1st generation process, the integrated process resulted in 53 million USD higher NPV. The energy analysis showed that the thin stillage modified 1st generation process could reduce the overall energy consumption by 2.5% and increase the ethanol production by 4%. Such modifications in the 1st generation processes and integration concepts could be interesting for the ethanol industries, as integrating lignocelluloses to their existing setup requires less capital investment.

  3. Modelling and simulation of a direct ethanol fuel cell considering multistep electrochemical reactions, transport processes and mixed potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Marco [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Melke, Julia, E-mail: julia.melke@gmail.co [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Gerteisen, Dietmar [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: A DEFC model considering the mixed potential formation at cathode and anode. The low cell voltage at open circuit is due to the parasitic reaction of ethanol and oxygen. Under load, only the parasitic oxidation of ethanol is significant. Inhibiting the parasitic reactions can approximately double the current density. - Abstract: In this work a one-dimensional mathematical model of a direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) is presented. The electrochemical oxidation of ethanol in the catalyst layers is described by several reaction steps leading to surface coverage with adsorbed intermediates (CH{sub 3}CO, CO, CH{sub 3} and OH) and to the final products acetaldehyde, acetic acid and CO{sub 2}. A bifunctional reaction mechanism is assumed for the activation of water on a binary catalyst favouring the further oxidation of adsorbates blocking active catalyst sites. The chemical reactions are highly coupled with the charge and reactant transport. The model accounts for crossover of the reactants through the membrane leading to the phenomenon of cathode and anode mixed potentials due to the parasitic oxidation and reduction of ethanol and oxygen, respectively. Polarisation curves of a DEFC were recorded for various ethanol feed concentrations and were used as reference data for the simulation. Based on one set of model parameters the characteristic of electronic and protonic potential, the relative surface coverage and the parasitic current densities in the catalyst layers were studied.

  4. Synbiotics reduce ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and inflammation by improving intestinal permeability and microbiota in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Wan-Chun; Huang, Ya-Li; Chen, Ya-Ling; Peng, Hsiang-Chi; Liao, Wei-Hsiang; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Chen, Jiun-Rong; Yang, Suh-Ching

    2015-05-01

    Clinical and animal experiments indicated that gut-derived endotoxin and imbalanced intestinal microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). In this study, we investigated whether synbiotic supplementation could improve ALD in rats by altering the intestinal microbial composition and improving the intestinal integrity. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups according to plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities and subjected to either a normal liquid diet (C), a normal liquid diet with synbiotic supplementation (C + S), an ethanol liquid diet (E), or an ethanol liquid diet with synbiotic supplementation (E + S) for 12 weeks. Results revealed that the ethanol-fed group showed increases in plasma AST and ALT activities, the endotoxin level, the hepatic triglyceride (TG) level, and hepatic tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 levels, and a decrease in the hepatic IL-10 level. Ethanol-feeding also contributed to increased intestinal permeability and decreased fecal bifidobacteria and lactobacilli amounts. However, synbiotic supplementation effectively attenuated the plasma endotoxin, hepatic TG and TNF-α levels, and increased the hepatic IL-10 level. Furthermore, synbiotic supplementation protected the rats against ethanol-induced hyperpermeability of the intestine, and significantly increased amounts of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the feces. This study demonstrated that synbiotics possess a novel hepatoprotective function by improving the intestinal permeability and microbiota in rats with ethanol-induced liver injury.

  5. Adaptations in Basal and Hypothalamic–Pituitary–Adrenal-Activated Deoxycorticosterone Responses Following Ethanol Self-administration in Cynomolgus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Vanessa A.; Porcu, Patrizia; Morrow, A. Leslie; Grant, Kathleen A.

    2017-01-01

    Acute ethanol activates the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis, while long-term exposure results in a blunted neuroendocrine state, particularly with regards to the primary endpoint, cortisol, the primary glucocorticoid produced in the adrenal cortex. However, it is unknown if this dampened neuroendocrine status also influences other adrenocortical steroids. Plasma concentration of the mineralocorticoid and neuroactive steroid precursor deoxycorticosterone (DOC) is altered by pharmacological challenges of the HPA axis in cynomolgus monkeys. The present study investigated HPA axis regulation of circulating DOC concentration over the course of ethanol (4% w/v) induction and self-administration in non-human primates (Macaca fasciculata, n = 10). Plasma DOC, measured by radioimmunoassay, was compared at baseline (ethanol naïve), during schedule-induced polydipsia, and following 6-months of 22 h/day access to ethanol and water. The schedule induction of ethanol drinking did not alter basal DOC levels but selectively dampened the DOC response to pharmacological challenges aimed at the anterior pituitary (ovine corticotrophin-releasing hormone) and adrenal gland (post-dexamethasone adrenocorticotropin hormone), while pharmacological inhibition of central opioid receptors with naloxone greatly enhanced the DOC response during induction. Following 6 months of ethanol self-administration, basal DOC levels were increased more than twofold, while responses to each of the challenges normalized somewhat but remained significantly different than baseline. These data show that HPA axis modulation of the neuroactive steroid precursor DOC is markedly altered by the schedule induction of ethanol drinking and long-term voluntary ethanol self-administration. The consequences of chronic ethanol consumption on HPA axis regulation of DOC point toward allostatic modification of hypothalamic and adrenal function. PMID:28220108

  6. Mississippi Ethanol Gasification Project, Final Scientific / Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, Larry, E.

    2007-04-30

    The Mississippi Ethanol (ME) Project is a comprehensive effort to develop the conversion of biomass to ethanol utilizing a proprietary gasification reactor technology developed by Mississippi Ethanol, LLC. Tasks were split between operation of a 1/10 scale unit at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) of Mississippi State University (MSU) and the construction, development, and operation of a full scale pilot unit located at the ME facility in Winona, Mississippi. In addition to characterization of the ME reactor gasification system, other areas considered critical to the operational and economic viability of the overall ME concept were evaluated. These areas include syngas cleanup, biological conversion of syngas to alcohol, and effects of gasification scale factors. Characterization of run data from the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units has allowed development of the factors necessary for scale-up from the small unit to the larger unit. This scale range is approximately a factor of 10. Particulate and tar sampling gave order of magnitude values for preliminary design calculations. In addition, sampling values collected downstream of the ash removal system show significant reductions in observed loadings. These loading values indicate that acceptable particulate and tar loading rates could be attained with standard equipment additions to the existing configurations. Overall operation both the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units proceeded very well. The Pilot Unit was operated as a system, from wood receiving to gas flaring, several times and these runs were used to address possible production-scale concerns. Among these, a pressure feed system was developed to allow feed of material against gasifier system pressure with little or no purge requirements. Similarly, a water wash system, with continuous ash collection, was developed, installed, and tested. Development of a biological system for alcohol production was conducted at Mississippi State University with

  7. Performance of dairy cows fed high levels of acetic acid or ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, J L P; Amaral, R C; Sá Neto, A; Cabezas-Garcia, E H; Bispo, A W; Zopollatto, M; Cardoso, T L; Spoto, M H F; Santos, F A P; Nussio, L G

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol and acetic acid are common end products from silages. The main objective of this study was to determine whether high concentrations of ethanol or acetic acid in total mixed ration would affect performance in dairy cows. Thirty mid-lactation Holstein cows were grouped in 10 blocks and fed one of the following diets for 7 wk: (1) control (33% Bermuda hay + 67% concentrates), (2) ethanol [control diet + 5% ethanol, dry matter (DM) basis], or (3) acetic acid (control diet + 5% acetic acid, DM basis). Ethanol and acetic acid were diluted in water (1:2) and sprayed onto total mixed rations twice daily before feeding. An equal amount of water was mixed with the control ration. To adapt animals to these treatments, cows were fed only half of the treatment dose during the first week of study. Cows fed ethanol yielded more milk (37.9 kg/d) than those fed the control (35.8 kg/d) or acetic acid (35.3 kg/d) diets, mainly due to the higher DM intake (DMI; 23.7, 22.2, and 21.6 kg/d, respectively). The significant diet × week interaction for DMI, mainly during wk 2 and 3 (when acetic acid reached the full dose), was related to the decrease in DMI observed for the acetic acid treatment. There was a diet × week interaction in excretion of milk energy per DMI during wk 2 and 3, due to cows fed acetic acid sustained milk yield despite lower DMI. Energy efficiency was similar across diets. Blood metabolites (glucose, insulin, nonesterified fatty acids, ethanol, and γ-glutamyl transferase activity) and sensory characteristics of milk were not affected by these treatments. Animal performance suggested similar energy value for the diet containing ethanol compared with other diets. Rumen conversion of ethanol to acetate and a concomitant increase in methane production might be a plausible explanation for the deviation of the predicted energy value based on the heat of combustion. Therefore, the loss of volatile compounds during the drying process in the laboratory should be

  8. Fermented liquid feed for pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missotten, Joris A M; Michiels, Joris; Ovyn, Anneke; De Smet, Stefaan; Dierick, Noël A

    2010-12-01

    Since the announcement of the ban on the use of antibiotics as antimicrobial growth promoters in the feed of pigs in 2006 the investigation towards alternative feed additives has augmented considerably. Although fermented liquid feed is not an additive, but a feeding strategy, the experimental work examining its possible advantages also saw a rise. The use of fermented liquid feed (FLF) has two main advantages, namely that the simultaneous provision of feed and water may result in an alleviation of the transition from the sow milk to solid feed and may also reduce the time spent to find both sources of nutrients, and secondly, that offering FLF with a low pH may strengthen the potential of the stomach as a first line of defence against possible pathogenic infections. Because of these two advantages, FLF is often stated as an ideal feed for weaned piglets. The results obtained so far are rather variable, but in general they show a better body weight gain and worse feed/gain ratio for the piglets. However, for growing-finishing pigs on average a better feed/gain ratio is found compared to pigs fed dry feed. This better performance is mostly associated with less harmful microbiota and better gut morphology. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of FLF for pigs,dealing with the FLF itself as well as its effect on the gastrointestinal tract and animal performance.

  9. Role of Transcription Factors in Steatohepatitis and Hypertension after Ethanol: The Epicenter of Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rais A.; Husain, Kazim; Rizvi, Syed A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption induces multi-organ damage, including alcoholic liver disease (ALD), pancreatitis and hypertension. Ethanol and ethanol metabolic products play a significant role in the manifestation of its toxicity. Ethanol metabolizes to acetaldehyde and produces reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) by cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase. Ethanol metabolism mediated by cytochrome-P450 2E1 causes oxidative stress due to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Acetaldehyde, increased redox cellular state and ROS activate transcription factors, which in turn activate genes for lipid biosynthesis and offer protection of hepatocytes from alcohol toxicity. Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) and peroxisome proliferator activated-receptors (PPARs) are two key lipogenic transcription factors implicated in the development of fatty liver in alcoholic and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. SREBP-1 is activated in the livers of chronic ethanol abusers. An increase in ROS activates nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) to provide protection to hepatocytes from ethanol toxicity. Under ethanol exposure, due to increased gut permeability, there is release of gram-negative bacteria-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from intestine causing activation of immune response. In addition, the metabolic product, acetaldehyde, modifies the proteins in hepatocyte, which become antigens inviting auto-immune response. LPS activates macrophages, especially the liver resident macrophages, Kupffer cells. These Kupffer cells and circulating macrophages secrete various cytokines. The level of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8 and IL-12 have been found elevated among chronic alcoholics. In addition to elevation of these cytokines, the peripheral iron (Fe2+) is also mobilized. An increased level of hepatic iron has been observed among alcoholics. Increased ROS, IL-1

  10. First feeding of larval herring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Munk, Peter; Støttrup, Josianne

    1985-01-01

    The transition period from endogenous to exogenous feeding by larval herring was investigated in the laboratory for four herring stocks in order to evaluate the chances of survival at the time of fiest feeding. Observations on larval activity, feeding and growth were related to amount of yolk......, visual experience with potential prey organisms prior to first feeding and prey density. Herring larvae did not initiate exogenous feeding until around the time of yolk resorption. The timing of first feeding was not influenced by prior exposure to potential prey organisms during the yolk sac stage....... In the light of these observations, the ecological significance of the yolk sac stage is discussed. Initiation of exogenous feeding was delayed by 1-4 days at a low (7.5 nauplii .cntdot. l-1) compared to a high (120 nauplii .cntdot. l-1) prey density, but even at prey densities corresponding to the lower end...

  11. Analysis of self-feeding in children with feeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Kristi M; Piazza, Cathleen C; Roane, Henry S; Volkert, Valerie M; Stewart, Victoria; Kadey, Heather J; Groff, Rebecca A

    2014-01-01

    In the current investigation, we evaluated a method for increasing self-feeding with 3 children with a history of food refusal. The children never (2 children) or rarely (1 child) self-fed bites of food when the choice was between self-feeding and escape from eating. When the choice was between self-feeding 1 bite of food or being fed an identical bite of food, self-feeding was low (2 children) or variable (1 child). Levels of self-feeding increased for 2 children when the choice was between self-feeding 1 bite of food or being fed multiple bites of the same food. For the 3rd child, self-feeding increased when the choice was between self-feeding 1 bite of food or being fed multiple bites of a less preferred food. The results showed that altering the contingencies associated with being fed increased the probability of self-feeding, but the specific manipulations that produced self-feeding were unique to each child.

  12. Ethanol and xylitol production from glucose and xylose at high temperature by Kluyveromyces sp. IIPE453.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sachin; Singh, Surendra P; Mishra, Indra M; Adhikari, Dilip K

    2009-12-01

    A yeast strain Kluyveromyces sp. IIPE453 (MTCC 5314), isolated from soil samples collected from dumping sites of crushed sugarcane bagasse in Sugar Mill, showed growth and fermentation efficiency at high temperatures ranging from 45 degrees C to 50 degrees C. The yeast strain was able to use a wide range of substrates, such as glucose, xylose, mannose, galactose, arabinose, sucrose, and cellobiose, either for growth or fermentation to ethanol. The strain also showed xylitol production from xylose. In batch fermentation, the strain showed maximum ethanol concentration of 82 +/- 0.5 g l(-1) (10.4% v/v) on initial glucose concentration of 200 g l(-1), and ethanol concentration of 1.75 +/- 0.05 g l(-1) as well as xylitol concentration of 11.5 +/- 0.4 g l(-1) on initial xylose concentration of 20 g l(-1) at 50 degrees C. The strain was capable of simultaneously using glucose and xylose in a mixture of glucose concentration of 75 g l(-1) and xylose concentration of 25 g l(-1), achieving maximum ethanol concentration of 38 +/- 0.5 g l(-1) and xylitol concentration of 14.5 +/- 0.2 g l(-1) in batch fermentation. High stability of the strain was observed in a continuous fermentation by feeding the mixture of glucose concentration of 75 g l(-1) and xylose concentration of 25 g l(-1) by recycling the cells, achieving maximum ethanol concentration of 30.8 +/- 6.2 g l(-1) and xylitol concentration of 7.35 +/- 3.3 g l(-1) with ethanol productivity of 3.1 +/- 0.6 g l(-1) h(-1) and xylitol productivity of 0.75 +/- 0.35 g l(-1) h(-1), respectively.

  13. Prenatal ethanol increases sucrose reinforcement, an effect strengthened by postnatal association of ethanol and sucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culleré, Marcela Elena; Spear, Norman E; Molina, Juan Carlos

    2014-02-01

    Late prenatal exposure to ethanol recruits sensory processing of the drug and of its motivational properties, an experience that leads to heightened ethanol affinity. Recent studies indicate common sensory and neurobiological substrates between this drug and sweet tastants. Using a recently developed operant conditioning technique for infant rats, we examined the effects of prenatal ethanol history upon sucrose self-administration (postnatal days, PDs 14-17). Prior to the last conditioning session, a low (0.5 g/kg) or a high (2.5 g/kg) ethanol dose were paired with sucrose. The intention was to determine if ethanol would inflate or devalue the reinforcing capability of the tastant and if these effects are dependent upon prenatal ethanol history. Male and female pups prenatally exposed to ethanol (2.0 g/kg) responded more when reinforced with sucrose than pups lacking this antenatal experience. Independently of prenatal status, a low ethanol dose (0.5 g/kg) enhanced the reinforcing capability of sucrose while the highest dose (2.5 g/kg) seemed to ameliorate the motivational properties of the tastant. During extinction (PD 18), two factors were critical in determining persistence of responding despite reinforcement omission. Pups prenatally exposed to ethanol that subsequently experienced the low ethanol dose paired with sucrose, showed higher resistance to extinction. The effects here reported were not associated with differential blood alcohol levels across prenatal treatments. These results indicate that fetal ethanol experience promotes affinity for a natural sweet reinforcer and that low doses of ethanol are also capable of enhancing the positive motivational consequences of sucrose when ethanol and sucrose are paired during infancy.

  14. The Role of Acetaldehyde in the Increased Acceptance of Ethanol after Prenatal Ethanol Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaztañaga, Mirari; Angulo-Alcalde, Asier; Spear, Norman E.; Chotro, M. Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies show that acetaldehyde, the first metabolite in the oxidation of ethanol, can be responsible for both, the appetitive and the aversive effects produced by ethanol intoxication. More specifically, it has been hypothesized that acetaldehyde produced in the periphery by the liver is responsible for the aversive effects of ethanol, while the appetitive effects relate to the acetaldehyde produced centrally through the catalase system. On the other hand, from studies in our and other laboratories, it is known that ethanol exposure during the last gestational days (GD) consistently enhances the postnatal acceptance of ethanol when measured during early ontogeny in the rat. This increased liking of ethanol is a conditioned appetitive response acquired by the fetus by the association of ethanol’s flavor and an appetitive reinforcer. Although this reinforcer has not yet been fully identified, one possibility points to acetaldehyde produced centrally in the fetus as a likely candidate. This hypothesis is supported by data showing that very early in the rat’s ontogeny brain catalases are functional, while the liver’s enzymatic system is still immature. In this study, rat dams were administered on GD 17–20 with water or ethanol, together with an acetaldehyde-sequestering agent (D-penicillamine). The offspring’s responses to ethanol was then assessed at different postnatal stages with procedures adequate for each developmental stage: on day 1, using the “odor crawling locomotion test” to measure ethanol’s odor attractiveness; on day 5, in an operant conditioning procedure with ethanol as the reinforcer; and on day 14 in an ethanol intake test. Results show that the absence of acetaldehyde during prenatal ethanol exposure impeded the observation of the increased acceptance of ethanol at any age. This seems to confirm the crucial role of acetaldehyde as a reinforcer in the appetitive learning occurring during prenatal ethanol exposure. PMID:28197082

  15. Ear infection - chronic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... up. When this happens, infection can occur. A chronic ear infection develops when fluid or an infection ...

  16. Ethanol tolerance of immobilized brewers' yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, S; Watson, K; D'Amore, T

    1995-04-01

    A method based on the survival of yeast cells subjected to an ethanol or heat shock was utilized to compare the stress resistance of free and carrageenan-immobilized yeast cells. Results demonstrated a significant increase of yeast survival against ethanol for immobilized cells as compared to free cells, while no marked difference in heat resistance was observed. When entrapped cells were released by mechanical disruption of the gel beads and submitted to the same ethanol stress, they exhibited a lower survival rate than entrapped cells, but a similar or slightly higher survival rate than free cells. The incidence of ethanol- or heat-induced respiratory-deficient mutants of entrapped cells was equivalent to that of control or non-stressed cells (1.3 +/- 0.5%) whereas ethanol- and heat-shocked free and released cells exhibited between 4.4% and 10.9% average incidence of respiration-deficient mutants. It was concluded that the carrageenan gel matrix provided a protection against ethanol, and that entrapped cells returned to normal physiological behaviour as soon as they were released. The cell growth rate was a significant factor in the resistance of yeast to high ethanol concentrations. The optimum conditions to obtain reliable and reproducible results involved the use of slow-growing cells after exhaustion of the sugar substrate.

  17. Feeding and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia) in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the Public / Speech, Language and Swallowing / Swallowing Feeding and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia) in Children What are ... children with feeding and swallowing disorders ? What are feeding and swallowing disorders? Feeding disorders include problems gathering ...

  18. Feeding Tips For Your Baby with CHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How To Feed Your Baby Either breast- or bottle-feeding works well for babies with heart problems, but ... do best with a combination of breast- and bottle-feeding. Breast-Feeding Your Baby If your baby is ...

  19. Feeding the Beast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström, Anders; Hervik, Peter

    2014-01-01

    of fear, we argue, this predisposes people to vote for anti-immigration parties. Our analysis highlights the position of anti-immigration parties; hence, the Sweden Democrats (SD) in Sweden and the Danish People’s Party (DPP) in Denmark. We use frame analysis to detect recurrent frames in the media debate...... as such plays a similar role and provides the DPP with an identity. We conclude that we are confronted with a two-faced beast that feeds on perceptions of the people as ultimately afraid of what are not recognized as native goods....

  20. Re-feeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadaba, A; Paine, J; Adlard, R; Dilkes, M

    2001-09-01

    The effect of a therapeutically administered high calorie diet in a severely malnourished patient is discussed in this case report. In patients with advanced head and neck cancer prolonged periods of malnutrition prior to admission are frequently encountered. This case report highlights the need to constantly monitor the electrolyte and vitamin levels during the early stages of instituting enteral or parenteral nutrition. By vigilant monitoring and a high index of suspicion re-feeding syndrome or severe hypophosphataemia and its associated complications can be avoided.

  1. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of starch for ethanol production in a fluidized-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nghiem, N.P.; Davison, B.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sun, M.Y.; Bienkowski, P.R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Immobilized Zymomonas mobilis has been used to produce ethanol from glucose in fluidized-bed reactor at volumetric productivity as high as 60 g/L-h and theoretical yield. This research was extended to study the production of ethanol from starch. The bacteria were co-immobilized with an industrial glucoamylase within small uniform beads (2 to 2.5 mm diameter) of k-carrageenan. The reactor was a glass column of 1.2 m in length with a uniform 2.54 cm diameter. The substrate included a commercially available maltodextrin and a soluble starch solution which was produced by hydrolysis of ground corn meals using amylase under the conditions commonly used in an industrial process. Light steep water was used as the complex nutrient source. Statistical experimental design was used to study the effects of substrate concentration and feed rate on ethanol yield and reactor productivity. The experiments were performed at 30{degrees}C and pH 5. The substrate concentration ranged from 93 to 2.7 g/L and the feed rates from 6.6 to 26.7 mL/min. The results of these studies will be discussed.

  2. Molecular pathways underpinning ethanol-induced neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan eGoldowitz*

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available While genetics impacts the type and severity of damage following developmental ethanol exposure, little is currently known about the molecular pathways that mediate these effects. Traditionally, research in this area has used a candidate gene approach and evaluated effects on a gene-by-gene basis. Recent studies, however, have begun to use unbiased approaches and genetic reference populations to evaluate the roles of genotype and epigenetic modifications in phenotypic changes following developmental ethanol exposure, similar to studies that evaluated numerous alcohol-related phenotypes in adults. Here, we present work assessing the role of genetics and chromatin-based alterations in mediating ethanol-induced apoptosis in the developing nervous system. Utilizing the expanded family of BXD recombinant inbred mice, animals were exposed to ethanol at postnatal day 7 via subcutaneous injection (5.0 g/kg in 2 doses. Tissue was collected 7 hours after the initial ethanol treatment and analyzed by activated caspase-3 immunostaining to visualize dying cells in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In parallel, the levels of two histone modifications relevant to apoptosis, γH2AX and H3K14 acetylation, were examined in the cerebral cortex using protein blot analysis. Activated caspase-3 staining identified marked differences in cell death across brain regions between different mouse strains. Genetic analysis of ethanol susceptibility in the hippocampus led to the identification of a quantitative trait locus on chromosome 12, which mediates, at least in part, strain-specific differential vulnerability to ethanol-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, analysis of chromatin modifications in the cerebral cortex revealed a global increase in γH2AX levels following ethanol exposure, but did not show any change in H3K14 acetylation levels. Together, these findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms and genetic contributions underlying ethanol

  3. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Ethanol Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanmuyi Yang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol abuse affects virtually all organ systems and the central nervous system (CNS is particularly vulnerable to excessive ethanol exposure. Ethanol exposure causes profound damages to both the adult and developing brain. Prenatal ethanol exposure induces fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD which is associated with mental retardation and other behavioral deficits. A number of potential mechanisms have been proposed for ethanol-induced brain damage; these include the promotion of neuroinflammation, interference with signaling by neurotrophic factors, induction of oxidative stress, modulation of retinoid acid signaling, and thiamine deficiency. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER regulates posttranslational protein processing and transport. The accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen triggers ER stress and induces unfolded protein response (UPR which are mediated by three transmembrane ER signaling proteins: pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK, inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1, and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6. UPR is initiated to protect cells from overwhelming ER protein loading. However, sustained ER stress may result in cell death. ER stress has been implied in various CNS injuries, including brain ischemia, traumatic brain injury, and aging-associated neurodegeneration, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Huntington’s disease (HD, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and Parkinson’s disease (PD. However, effects of ethanol on ER stress in the CNS receive less attention. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the study of ER stress in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. We also examine the potential mechanisms underlying ethanol-mediated ER stress and the interaction among ER stress, oxidative stress and autophagy in the context of ethanol neurotoxicity.

  4. Ethanol production using nuclear petite yeast mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutter, A.; Oliver, S.G. [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, UMIST, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    Two respiratory-deficient nuclear petites, FY23{Delta}pet191 and FY23{Delta}cox5a, of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were generated using polymerase-chain-reaction-mediated gene disruption, and their respective ethanol tolerance and productivity assessed and compared to those of the parental grande, FY23WT, and a mitochondrial petite, FY23{rho}{sup 0}. Batch culture studies demonstrated that the parental strain was the most tolerant to exogenously added ethanol with an inhibition constant. K{sub i}, of 2.3% (w/v) and a specific rate of ethanol production, q{sub p}, of 0.90 g ethanol g dry cells{sup -1} h{sup -1}. FY23{rho}{sup 0} was the most sensitive to ethanol, exhibiting a K{sub i} of 1.71% (w/v) and q{sub p} of 0.87 g ethanol g dry cells{sup -1} h{sup -1}. Analyses of the ethanol tolerance of the nuclear petites demonstrate that functional mitochondria are essential for maintaining tolerance to the toxin with the 100% respiratory-deficient nuclear petite, FY23{Delta}pet191, having a K{sub i} of 2.14% (w/v) and the 85% respiratory-deficient FY23{Delta}cox5a, having a K{sub i} of 1.94% (w/v). The retention of ethanol tolerance in the nuclear petites as compared to that of FY23{rho}{sup 0} is mirrored by the ethanol productivities of these nuclear mutants, being respectively 43% and 30% higher than that of the respiratory-sufficient parent strain. This demonstrates that, because of their respiratory deficiency, the nuclear petites are not subject of the Pasteur effect and so exhibit higher rates of fermentation. (orig.)

  5. Industrial symbiosis: corn ethanol fermentation, hydrothermal carbonization, and anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Brandon M; Jader, Lindsey R; Schendel, Frederick J; Hahn, Nicholas J; Valentas, Kenneth J; McNamara, Patrick J; Novak, Paige M; Heilmann, Steven M

    2013-10-01

    The production of dry-grind corn ethanol results in the generation of intermediate products, thin and whole stillage, which require energy-intensive downstream processing for conversion into commercial animal feed products. Hydrothermal carbonization of thin and whole stillage coupled with anaerobic digestion was investigated as alternative processing methods that could benefit the industry. By substantially eliminating evaporation of water, reductions in downstream energy consumption from 65% to 73% were achieved while generating hydrochar, fatty acids, treated process water, and biogas co-products providing new opportunities for the industry. Processing whole stillage in this manner produced the four co-products, eliminated centrifugation and evaporation, and substantially reduced drying. With thin stillage, all four co-products were again produced, as well as a high quality animal feed. Anaerobic digestion of the aqueous product stream from the hydrothermal carbonization of thin stillage reduced chemical oxygen demand (COD) by more than 90% and converted 83% of the initial COD to methane. Internal use of this biogas could entirely fuel the HTC process and reduce overall natural gas usage.

  6. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for ethanol production without foreign genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngnyun

    Worldwide dependence on finite petroleum-based energy necessitates alternative energy sources that can be produced from renewable resources. A successful example of an alternative transportation fuel is bioethanol, produced by microorganisms, from corn starch that is blended with gasoline. However, corn, currently the main feedstock for bioethanol production, also occupies a significant role in human food and animal feed chains. As more corn is diverted to bioethanol, the cost of corn is expected to increase with an increase in the price of food, feed and ethanol. Using lignocellulosic biomass for ethanol production is considered to resolve this problem. However, this requires a microbial biocatalyst that can ferment hexoses and pentoses to ethanol. Escherichia coli is an efficient biocatalyst that can use all the monomeric sugars in lignocellulose, and recombinant derivatives of E. coli have been engineered to produce ethanol as the major fermentation product. In my study, ethanologenic E. coli strains were isolated from a ldhA-, pflB- derivative without introduction of foreign genes. These isolates grew anaerobically and produced ethanol as the main fermentation product. The mutation responsible for anaerobic growth and ethanol production was mapped in the lpdA gene and the mutation was identified as E354K in three of the isolates tested. Another three isolates carried an lpdA mutation, H352Y. Enzyme kinetic studies revealed that the mutated form of the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LPD) encoded by the lpdA was significantly less sensitive to NADH inhibition than the native LPD. This reduced NADH sensitivity of the mutated LPD was translated into lower sensitivity to NADH of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in strain SE2378. The net yield of 4 moles of NADH and 2 moles of acetyl-CoA per mole of glucose produced by a combination of glycolysis and PDH provided a logical basis to explain the production of 2 moles of ethanol per glucose. The development of E

  7. Elevated systolic pressure following chronic low-level cadmiun feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, H M; Erlanger, M; Perry, E F

    1977-02-01

    Groups of 16 female Long-Evans rats received 0, 1, 2.5, 5, 10, 25, and 50 mg cadmium/liter dringking water (parts per million (ppm)), from the time they were weaned until they were 30 mo old. Systolic pressure was measured indirectly in triplicate at 6-mo intervals. Both 2.5 and 5 ppm cadmium consistently induced significant elevations in mean systolic pressure, ranging from 13 to 33 mmHg. At 6 mo, 10 and 25 ppm cadmium also induced significant elevations, whereas at 12 mo and subsequently 1 ppm cadmium induced significant elevations. With 10 ppm cadmium or less weight gain was normal and there was no evidence of cadmium toxicity. With 25 and 50 ppm cadmium weight gain was diminished, suggesting toxicity. Five rats with each level of exposure were sacrificed every 6 mo from a second population of similarly handled rats in order to determine renal cadmium concetrations. Cadmium intakes that had induced hypertension were associated with mean renal cadmium concentrations ranging from 5 to 50 mug/g kidney.

  8. Use of clinoptilolite in ethanol dehydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tihmillioglu, F. [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey); Ulku, S. [Izmir Institute of Technology (Turkey)

    1996-12-01

    Clinoptilolite-type natural zeolite, which exists in various regions of Turkey, has been experimentally studied. For the ethanol-water-local clinoptilolite system, uptake and breakthrough curves were determined under a nitrogen gas atmosphere. In adsorption kinetics and adsorption equilibrium studies, the effects of particle size, temperature and, amount of zeolite on the uptake rate have been investigated. The breakthrough curves for four different flow rates of ethanol and three different bed heights were determined in dynamic column studies. The results of the experiments show that intraparticle diffusion is the main resistance. The local clinoptilolite is a promising adsorbent for water adsorption from aqueous ethanol.

  9. Wastepaper as a feedstock for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeron, P.W.; Riley, C.J.

    1991-11-01

    The possibility of using wastepaper as a cheap feedstock for production of ethanol is discussed. As the single largest material category in the municipal solid waste (MSW) stream, wastepaper is the main target of efforts to reduce the volume of MSW. And in the process for producing ethanol from lignocellulosics, the feedstock represents the highest cost. If wastepaper could be obtained cheaply in large enough quantities and if conversion process cost and efficiency prove to be similar to those for wood, the cost of ethanol could be significantly reduced. At the same time, the volume of wastepaper that must be disposed of in landfills could be lessened. 13 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Environmental analysis of biomass-ethanol facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbus, D.; Putsche, V.

    1995-12-01

    This report analyzes the environmental regulatory requirements for several process configurations of a biomass-to-ethanol facility. It also evaluates the impact of two feedstocks (municipal solid waste [MSW] and agricultural residues) and three facility sizes (1000, 2000, and 3000 dry tons per day [dtpd]) on the environmental requirements. The basic biomass ethanol process has five major steps: (1) Milling, (2) Pretreatment, (3) Cofermentation, (4) Enzyme production, (5) Product recovery. Each step could have environmental impacts and thus be subject to regulation. Facilities that process 2000 dtpd of MSW or agricultural residues would produce 69 and 79 million gallons of ethanol, respectively.

  11. Assessment of Ethanol Trends on the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jay; Carter, Layne; Kayatin, Matthew; Gazda, Daniel; McCoy, Torin; Limero, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) provides a working environment for six crewmembers through atmosphere revitalization and water recovery systems. In the last year, elevated ethanol levels have presented a unique challenge for the ISS ECLSS. Ethanol is monitored on the ISS by the Air Quality Monitor (AQM). The source of this increase is currently unknown. This paper documents the credible sources for the increased ethanol concentration, the monitoring provided by the AQM, and the impact on the atmosphere revitalization and water recovery systems.

  12. A student project to quantify machinability of plastics using corn ethanol co-products as biofiller – an educational perspective for green manufacturing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn ethanol processing by-products are primarily used as animal feeds. Other potential applications include the manufacture of biodegradable plastic composites. This, however, requires subsequent processing, adding cost to the final product. Thus, it is necessary to investigate alternative methods ...

  13. Oxytocin, feeding and satiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy eSabatier

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin neurones have a physiological role in food intake and energy balance. Central administration of oxytocin is powerfully anorexigenic, reducing food intake and meal duration. The central mechanisms underlying this effect of oxytocin have become better understood in the past few years. Parvocellular neurones of the paraventricular nucleus project to the caudal brainstem to regulate feeding via autonomic functions including the gastrointestinal vago-vagal reflex. In contrast, magnocellular neurones of the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei release oxytocin from their dendrites to diffuse to distant hypothalamic targets involved in satiety.The ventromedial hypothalamus, for example, expresses a high density of oxytocin receptors but does not contain detectable oxytocin nerve fibres. Magnocellular neurones represent targets for the anorexigenic neuropeptide α-melanocyte stimulating hormone. . In addition to homeostatic control, oxytocin may also have a role in reward-related feeding. Evidence suggests that oxytocin can selectively suppress sugar intake and that it may have a role in limiting the intake of palatable food by inhibiting the reward pathway.

  14. Advanced Liquid Feed Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distefano, E.; Noll, C.

    1993-06-01

    The Advanced Liquid Feed Experiment (ALFE) is a Hitchhiker experiment flown on board the Shuttle of STS-39 as part of the Space Test Payload-1 (STP-1). The purpose of ALFE is to evaluate new propellant management components and operations under the low gravity flight environment of the Space Shuttle for eventual use in an advanced spacecraft feed system. These components and operations include an electronic pressure regulator, an ultrasonic flowmeter, an ultrasonic point sensor gage, and on-orbit refill of an auxiliary propellant tank. The tests are performed with two transparent tanks with dyed Freon 113, observed by a camera and controlled by ground commands and an on-board computer. Results show that the electronic pressure regulator provides smooth pressure ramp-up, sustained pressure control, and the flexibility to change pressure settings in flight. The ultrasonic flowmeter accurately measures flow and detects gas ingestion. The ultrasonic point sensors function well in space, but not as a gage during sustained low-gravity conditions, as they, like other point gages, are subject to the uncertainties of propellant geometry in a given tank. Propellant transfer operations can be performed with liquid-free ullage equalization at a 20 percent fill level, gas-free liquid transfer from 20-65 percent fill level, minimal slosh, and can be automated.

  15. Co-production of ethanol, biogas, protein fodder and natural fertilizer in organic farming – Evaluation of a concept for a farm-scale biorefinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr; Kádár, Zsófia; Heiske, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The addition of a biorefinery to an organic farm was investigated, where ethanol was produced from germinated rye grains and whey, and the effluent was separated into two streams: the protein-rich solid fraction, to be used as animal feed, and the liquid fraction, which can be co-digested with cl......The addition of a biorefinery to an organic farm was investigated, where ethanol was produced from germinated rye grains and whey, and the effluent was separated into two streams: the protein-rich solid fraction, to be used as animal feed, and the liquid fraction, which can be co...... to serve as natural fertilizer. A technoeconomic analysis was also performed; total capital investment was estimated to be approximately 4 M USD. Setting a methane selling price according to available incentives for “green electricity” (0.72 USD/m3) led to a minimum ethanol selling price of 1.89 USD...

  16. Survey of mycotoxins in corn distillers' dried grains with solubles from seventy-eight ethanol plants in twelve States in the U.S. In 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatibi, Piyum A; McMaster, Nicole J; Musser, Robert; Schmale, David G

    2014-03-26

    Fuel ethanol co-products known as distillers' dried grains with solubles (DDGS) are a significant source of energy, protein, and phosphorous in animal feed. Fuel ethanol production may concentrate mycotoxins present in corn into DDGS. One hundred and forty one corn DDGS lots collected in 2011 from 78 ethanol plants located in 12 states were screened for the mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON), nivalenol (NIV), and zearalenone (ZON). DON ranged from 1 and 5.0 and 10.0 μg g-1 DON. All DDGS lots contaminated with unacceptable levels of DON evaded detection prior to their commercial distribution and were likely sold as feed products.

  17. Cane molasses fermentation for continuous ethanol production in an immobilized cells reactor by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbani, Farshid; Younesi, Habibollah; Esmaeili Sari, Abbas [Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Natural Resources and Marine Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Noor, P.O. Box: 64414-356 (Iran); Najafpour, Ghasem [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Noshirvani University of Technology, Babol (Iran)

    2011-02-15

    Sodium-alginate immobilized yeast was employed to produce ethanol continuously using cane molasses as a carbon source in an immobilized cell reactor (ICR). The immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was performed by entrapment of the cell cultured media harvested at exponential growth phase (16 h) with 3% sodium alginate. During the initial stage of operation, the ICR was loaded with fresh beads of mean diameter of 5.01 mm. The ethanol production was affected by the concentration of the cane molasses (50, 100 and 150 g/l), dilution rates (0.064, 0.096, 0.144 and 0.192 h{sup -1}) and hydraulic retention time (5.21, 6.94, 10.42 and 15.63 h) of the media. The pH of the feed medium was set at 4.5 and the fermentation was carried out at an ambient temperature. The maximum ethanol production, theoretical yield (Y{sub E/S}), volumetric ethanol productivity (Q{sub P}) and total sugar consumption was 19.15 g/l, 46.23%, 2.39 g l{sup -1} h{sup -1} and 96%, respectively. (author)

  18. Ethanol production from dry-mill corn starch in a fluidized-bed bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, M.S.; Nghiem, N.P.; Davison, B.H.

    1998-08-01

    The development of a high-rate process for the production of fuel ethanol from dry-mill corn starch using fluidized-bed bioreactor (FBR) technology is discussed. Experiments were conducted in a laboratory scale FBR using immobilized biocatalysts. Two ethanol production process designs were considered in this study. In the first design, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was performed at 35 C using {kappa}-carageenan beads (1.5 mm to 1.5 mm in diameter) of co-immobilized glucoamylase and Zymomonas mobilis. For dextrin feed concentration of 100 g/L, the single-pass conversion ranged from 54% to 89%. Ethanol concentrations of 23 to 36 g/L were obtained at volumetric productivities of 9 to 15 g/L-h. No accumulation of glucose was observed, indicating that saccharification was the rate-limiting step. In the second design, saccharification and fermentation were carried out sequentially. In the first stage, solutions of 150 to 160 g/L dextrins were pumped through an immobilized glucoamylase packed column maintained at 55 C. Greater than 95% conversion was obtained at a residence time of 1 h, giving a product of 165 to 170 g glucose/L. In the second stage, these glucose solutions were fed to the FBR containing Z. mobilis immobilized in {kappa}-carageenan beads. At a residence time of 2 h, 94% conversion and ethanol concentration of 70 g/L was achieved, giving an overall productivity of 23 g/L-h.

  19. The cost of ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass -- A comparison of selected alternative processes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grethlein, H.E.; Dill, T.

    1993-04-30

    The purpose of this report is to compare the cost of selected alternative processes for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. In turn, this information will be used by the ARS/USDA to guide the management of research and development programs in biomass conversion. The report will identify where the cost leverages are for the selected alternatives and what performance parameters need to be achieved to improve the economics. The process alternatives considered here are not exhaustive, but are selected on the basis of having a reasonable potential in improving the economics of producing ethanol from biomass. When other alternatives come under consideration, they should be evaluated by the same methodology used in this report to give fair comparisons of opportunities. A generic plant design is developed for an annual production of 25 million gallons of anhydrous ethanol using corn stover as the model substrate at $30/dry ton. Standard chemical engineering techniques are used to give first order estimates of the capital and operating costs. Following the format of the corn to ethanol plant, there are nine sections to the plant; feed preparation, pretreatment, hydrolysis, fermentation, distillation and dehydration, stillage evaporation, storage and denaturation, utilities, and enzyme production. There are three pretreatment alternatives considered: the AFEX process, the modified AFEX process (which is abbreviated as MAFEX), and the STAKETECH process. These all use enzymatic hydrolysis and so an enzyme production section is included in the plant. The STAKETECH is the only commercially available process among the alternative processes.

  20. Effect of Ethanol Extract of Sesamum indicum Seeds on Lipid Profile in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Ali Ghani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of active compound (sesamin found in defatted ethanol extract of Sesamum indicum seeds on the serum levels of lipid in mice. The qualitative and quantitative determination of sesamin bioactive compound in defatted ethanol extract using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC analysis was carried out and compared with standard sesamin. It was found that the concentration of sesamin was 79.9% of ethanolic extract according to total peak area. The ffect of active compound (sesamin in defatted ethanol sesame extract was evaluated in mice blood serum (in vivo after feeding them high and low fat diet for one month. Defatted Sesame extract at concentration 500 mg/kg of body weight (B.W showed significant reduction (p#0.05 in the level of total cholesterol (62.26 , 56.14 mg/dl, triglycerides (61.54 , 61.12 mg/dl , and low density lipoprotein LDL (29.97 , 23.21 mg/dl and significant increase in the level of high density lipoprotein HDL (19.39 , 20.70 mg/dl in comparison with both high and low fat diet groups which recorded (80.43 , 68.24 mg/dl, (77.50 , 74.16 mg/dl, (16.80 , 19.32 mg/dl, and (48.09 , 34.08 mg/dL, respectively.

  1. Expression and activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase and endothelial nitric oxide synthase correlate with ethanol-induced liver injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Jin Yuan; Xiao-Rong Zhou; Zuo-Jiong Gong; Pin Zhang; Xiao-Mei Sun; Shi-Hua Zheng

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the expression and activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in rats with ethanol-induced liver injury and their relation with liver damage, activation of nuclear factor-KB (NF-кB) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)expression in the liver.METHODS: Female Sprague-Dawley rats were given fish oil (0.5 mL) along with ethanol or isocaloric dextrose daily via gastrogavage for 4 or 6 wk. Liver injury was assessed using serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT)activity and pathological analysis. Liver malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide contents, iNOS and eNOS activity were determined. NF-KB p65, iNOS, eNOS and TNF-αprotein or mRNA expression in the liver were detected by immunohistochemistry or reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).RESULTS: Chronic ethanol gavage for 4 wk caused steatosis, inflammation and necrosis in the liver, and elevated serum ALT activity. Prolonged ethanol administration (6 wk) enhanced the liver damage. These responses were accompanied with increased lipid peroxidation, NO contents, iNOS activity and reduced eNOS activity. NF-кB p65, iNOS and TNF-α protein or mRNA expression were markedly induced after chronic ethanol gavage, whereas eNOS mRNA expression remained unchanged. The enhanced iNOS activity and expression were positively correlated with the liver damage, especially the necro-inflammation, activation of NF-кB, and TNF-α mRNA expression.CONCLUSION: iNOS expression and activity are induced in the liver after chronic ethanol exposure in rats, which are correlated with the liver damage, especially the necro-inflammation, activation of NF-KB and TNF-αexpression. eNOS activity is reduced, but its mRNA expression is not affected.

  2. TEMPERATURE INFLUENCE ON PHASE STABILITY OF ETHANOL-GASOLINE MIXTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerian Cerempei

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates phase stability of ethanol-gasoline mixtures depending on their composition, water concentration in ethanol and ethanol-gasoline mixture and temperature. There have been determined the perfect functioning conditions of spark ignition engines fueled with ethanol-gasoline mixtures.

  3. Developing Biofuel in the Teaching Laboratory: Ethanol from Various Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Jessica L.; Vieira, Matthew; Aryal, Binod; Vera, Nicolas; Solis, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    In this series of experiments, we mimic a small-scale ethanol plant. Students discover that the practical aspects of ethanol production are determined by the quantity of biomass produced per unit land, rather than the volume of ethanol produced per unit of biomass. These experiments explore the production of ethanol from different sources: fruits,…

  4. Survey of U.S. fuel ethanol plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ethanol industry is progressively growing in response to increased consumer demands for fuel as well as the renewable fuel standard. Corn ethanol processing creates the following products: 1/3 ethanol, 1/3 distillers grains, and 1/3 carbon dioxide. As the production of ethanol increases so too ...

  5. Protective effect of berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid ameliorates ethanol-induced oxidative stress and memory dysfunction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shaktipal; Tawari, Santosh; Mundhada, Dharmendra; Nadeem, Sayyed

    2015-09-01

    Memory impairment induced by ethanol in rats is a consequence of changes in the CNS that are secondary to impaired oxidative stress and cholinergic dysfunction. Treatment with antioxidants and cholinergic agonists are reported to produce beneficial effects in this model. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid is reported to exhibit antioxidant effect and cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitor activity. However, no report is available on the influence of berberine on ethanol-induced memory impairment. Therefore, we tested its influence against cognitive dysfunction in ethanol-induced rats using Morris water maze paradigm. Lipid peroxidation and glutathione levels as parameter of oxidative stress and cholinesterase (ChE) activity as a marker of cholinergic function were assessed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Forty five days after ethanol treated rats showed a severe deficit in learning and memory associated with increased lipid peroxidation, decreased glutathione, and elevated ChE activity. In contrast, chronic treatment with berberine (25-100mg/kg, p.o., once a day for 45days) improved cognitive performance, and lowered oxidative stress and ChE activity in ethanol treated rats. In another set of experiments, berberine (100mg/kg) treatment during training trials also improved learning and memory, and lowered oxidative stress and ChE activity. Chronic treatment (45days) with vitamin C, and donepezil during training trials also improved ethanol-induced memory impairment and reduced oxidative stress and/or cholinesterase activity. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that treatment with berberine prevents the changes in oxidative stress and ChE activity, and consequently memory impairment in ethanol treated rats.

  6. Continuous ethanol fermentation at 45 C using Kluyveromyces marxianus IMB3 immobilized in Calcium alginate and kissiris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, G.; Gough, S.; Brady, D.; Barron, N.; Nigam, P.; Marchant, R.; McHale, A.P. [Biotechnology Research Group, School of Applied Biological and Chemical Sciences, University of Ulster (United Kingdom); Singh, D. [Microbiology Dept., Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar (India)

    1998-03-01

    The thermotolerant ethanol-producing yeast strain Kluyveromyces marxianus IMB3 was immobilized in calcium alginate and a 1:1 mixture of calcium alginate and the porous volcanic mineral, kissiris. Immobilized preparations were placed in fixed-bed column bioreactors and continuous ethanol production by systems containing both immobilized preparations was examined at 45 C with a 100 g/l glucose feed. The effect of residence time on product concentration, bioreactor efficiency and volumetric productivities have been examined and these were all higher in systems containing the alginate/kissiris mixed immobilization matrix. Maximum ethanol concentrations produced by the continuous system ranged between 46 and 48 g/l representing efficiencies of 90-94%. (orig.) With 1 tab., 13 refs.

  7. [Chronic hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa Barrios, R

    1995-01-01

    Medical literature about chronic hepatitis is reviewed. This unresolving disease caused by viruses, drugs or unknown factors may progress to in cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma. A classification based on liver biopsy histology into chronic persistent and chronic active types has been largely abandoned and emphasis is placed on recognizing the etiology of the various types. One is associated with continuing hepatitis B virus infection; another is related to chronic hepatitis C virus infection and the third is termed autoinmune, because of the association with positive serum autoantibodies. A fourth type with similar clinical functional and morphologic features is found with some drug reactions. Long term corticoesteroid therapy is usually successful in autoinmune type. Associations between antibodies to liver-kidney microsomes and the hepatitis C virus can cause diagnostic difficulties. Antiviral treatment of chronic hepatitis B and C with interpheron alfa is employed, controlling symptoms and abnormal biochemistry and the progression to cirrhosis and liver cancer in 30 to 40% patients. Alternative therapies or combinations with interpheron are being evaluated waiting for final results.

  8. Application of quantitative ethanol detector (QED) test kit to measure ethanol concentration in blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biwasaka, H; Tokuta, T; Sasaki, Y; Niitsu, H; Kumagai, R; Aoki, Y

    2001-12-27

    In this paper, the applicability of the quantitative ethanol detector (QED) test kit for screening of ethanol concentrations in blood samples was investigated. The pretreatment of blood using the sulfosalicylic acid solution and the three-way stopcock followed by membrane filtration gave satisfactory results. The ethanol concentrations in whole blood samples (n=61) determined by QED correlated well with those determined by gas chromatography; the correlation coefficient indicated 0.990. Because a high correlation coefficient (0.928) was also confirmed in trial by investigators, QED test should be highly considered for ethanol screening in forensic praxis.

  9. Report of the PRI biofuel-ethanol; Rapport du PRI biocarburant-ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This evaluation report presents three research programs in the framework of the physiological behavior of the yeast ''Saccharomyces cerevisiae'', with high ethanol content. These studies should allowed to select an efficient yeast for the ethanol production. The first study concerns the development of an enzymatic process for the hydrolysis and the fermentation. The second study deals with the molecular and dynamical bases for the yeast metabolic engineering for the ethanol fuel production. The third research concerns the optimization of performance of microbial production processes of ethanol. (A.L.B.)

  10. Treatment of biomass to obtain ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunson, Jr., James B.; Elander, Richard T.; Tucker, III, Melvin P.; Hennessey, Susan Marie

    2011-08-16

    Ethanol was produced using biocatalysts that are able to ferment sugars derived from treated biomass. Sugars were obtained by pretreating biomass under conditions of high solids and low ammonia concentration, followed by saccharification.

  11. Rewiring Lactococcus lactis for Ethanol Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solem, Christian; Dehli, Tore Ibsen; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2013-01-01

    genes ldhX, ldhB, and ldh and introducing codon-optimized Z. mobilis alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHB) in addition to PDC resulted in high-yield ethanol formation when strains were grown on glucose, with only minor amounts of by-products formed. Finally, a strain with ethanol as the sole observed......Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known for their high tolerance toward organic acids and alcohols (R. S. Gold, M. M. Meagher, R. Hutkins, and T. Conway, J. Ind. Microbiol. 10:45–54, 1992) and could potentially serve as platform organisms for production of these compounds. In this study, we attempted...... small amounts of ethanol were obtained after introducing PDC, probably due to a low native alcohol dehydrogenase activity. When the same strains were grown on maltose, ethanol was the major product and lesser amounts of lactate, formate, and acetate were formed. Inactivating the lactate dehydrogenase...

  12. Intraperitoneal Injection of Ethanol Results in Drastic Changes in Bone Metabolism Not Observed When Ethanol is Administered by Oral Gavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Turner, Russell T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic alcohol abuse is associated with increased risk for osteoporosis while light to moderate alcohol intake correlates with reduced osteoporosis risk. Addition of alcohol to a liquid diet is often used to model chronic alcohol abuse. Methods to model intermittent drinking (including bindge drinking and light to moderate consumption) include 1) intragastric administration of alcohol by oral gavage or 2) intraperitoneal (ip) administration of alcohol by injection. However, it is unclear whether the latter two methods produce comparable results. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the skeletal response to alcohol delivered daily by oral gavage or ip injection. Materials and Methods Ethanol or vehicle was administered to 4-month-old female Sprague Dawley rats once daily at 1.2 g/kg body weight for 7 days. Following necropsy, bone formation and bone architecture were evaluated in tibial diaphysis (cortical bone) and proximal tibial metaphysis (cancellous bone) by histomorphometry. mRNA was measured for bone matrix proteins in distal femur metaphysis. Results Administration of alcohol by gavage had no significant effect on body weight gain or bone measurements. In contrast, administration of the same dose of alcohol by ip injection resulted in reduced body weight, total suppression of periosteal bone formation in tibial diaphysis, decreased cancellous bone formation in proximal tibial metaphysis, and decreased mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins in distal femur. Conclusions Our findings raise concerns regarding the use of ip injection of ethanol in rodents as a method for modeling the skeletal effects of intermittent exposure to alcohol in humans. This concern is based on a failure of the ip route to replicate the oral route of alcohol administration. PMID:23550821

  13. [Optimization of spraying dry technology of Biqiu ranules ethanol extract by Box-Behnken response surface method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-jun; Liu, Li-li; Hu, Jun-hua; Wu, Yun; Chao, En-xiang; Xiao, Wei

    2015-09-01

    With inlet temperature, specific gravity, feeding speed as independent variables, the comprehensive evaluating indexes of content of schisandrin and arctiin as dependent variable, the experimental data were fitted to a second order polynomial equation. Based on establishing the mathematical relationship between the comprehensive evaluating indexes and respective variables, Box-Benhnken central composite test and response surface analysis method was employed to optimize the spray drying technology of Biqiu granules ethanol extract. The optimal drying parameter was as follows: the inlet temperature was 175 degrees C, the specific gravity was 1.10, feeding speed was 32 r x min(-1). Under these conditions, the comprehensive evaluating indexes of spraying dry processes was 92.68, which was close to the model prediction. The spraying dry technology of Biqiu granules ethanol extract optimized by response surface methodology was accurate and feasible, which provided theoretical experiment basis for the industrialization production.

  14. Voluntary Ingestion of Natural Cocoa Extenuated Hepatic Damage in Rats with Experimentally Induced Chronic Alcoholic Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godwin Sokpor

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic ethanol ingestion causes hepatic damage imputable to an increasedoxidative stress engendered by alcoholic toxicity. Polyphenols in cocoa have antioxidant properties, and natural cocoa powder (NCP contains the highest levels of total antioxidant c