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Sample records for chronic energy restriction

  1. Metabolic consequences of chronic sleep restriction in rats : Changes in body weight regulation and energy expenditure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barf, R. P.; Van Dijk, G.; Scheurink, A. J. W.; Hoffmann, K.; Novati, A.; Hulshof, H. J.; Fuchs, E.; Meerlo, P.; Desprez, Tifany

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an association between short or disrupted sleep and an increased risk to develop obesity. In animal studies, however, sleep restriction leads to an attenuation of weight gain that cannot be explained by changes in energy intake. In the present study, we assessed

  2. The effects of energy and carbohydrate restriction in patients with chronic diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, J R; West, T E; Sönksen, P H; Lowy, C; Iles, C

    1977-12-01

    Thirty-five freshly presenting, diabetic patients received 5 hour, 100 g oral glucose tolerance tests when first seen and after a period of carbohydrate and energy restriction. After treatment, the significant improvement in glucose tolerance was accompanied by increased insulin secretion and lower concentrations of blood ketone bodies, lactate, glycerol, FFA, triglycerides, cholesterol and pre-beta lipoprotein. There were no significant changes in serum growth hormone or blood pyruvate concentrations. Improvement in glucose tolerance was greater in patients who were obese (greater than 115% of desirable body weight for height) on presentation and was related to the improvement in insulin secretion and the diminished lipolysis. An hypothesis to explain the changes in insulin secretion is prosposed. Eleven out of the 35 patients showed sufficient improvement in glucose tolerance to require no treatment other than diet.

  3. Effect of chronic caloric restriction on physiological variables related to energy metabolism in the male Fischer 344 rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, P H; Feuers, R J; Leakey, J A; Nakamura, K; Turturro, A; Hart, R W

    1989-05-01

    In the present study, a number of physiological and behavioral measures that are related to metabolism were continuously monitored in 19-month-old male Fischer 344 rats that were fed ad libitum or fed a caloric restricted diet. Caloric restricted rats ate fewer meals but consumed more food during each meal and spent more time eating per meal than did rats fed ad libitum. Therefore, the timing and duration of meals as well as the total number of calories consumed may be associated with life extension. Average body temperature per day was significantly lower in restricted rats but body temperature range per day and motor activity were higher in restricted rats. Dramatic changes in respiratory quotient, indicating rapid changes in metabolic pathway and lower temperature, occurred in caloric restricted rats when carbohydrate reserves were depleted. Lower body temperature and metabolism during this time interval may result in less DNA damage, thereby increasing the survival potential of restricted rats. Nighttime feeding was found to synchronize physiological performance between ad libitum and caloric restricted rats better than daytime feeding, thereby allowing investigators to distinguish the effects of caloric restriction from those related solely to the time-of-day of feeding.

  4. Does Evidence Drive Fluid Volume Restriction in Chronic Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robin K; Thornton, Nathaniel

    2017-06-01

    Chronic heart failure is a chronic condition that is associated with increased health care expenditures and high rates of morbidity and mortality. Mainstay in heart failure management has been the prescription of a fluid restriction. The purpose of this article is to review the available evidence for fluid restriction in chronic heart failure patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Leucine supplementation of a chronically restricted protein and energy diet enhances mTOR pathway activation but not muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjarín, Rodrigo; Columbus, Daniel A; Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V; Hernandez-García, Adriana D; Hoang, Nguyet-Minh; Fiorotto, Marta L; Davis, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Suboptimal nutrient intake represents a limiting factor for growth and long-term survival of low-birth weight infants. The objective of this study was to determine if in neonates who can consume only 70 % of their protein and energy requirements for 8 days, enteral leucine supplementation will upregulate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in skeletal muscle, leading to an increase in protein synthesis and muscle anabolism. Nineteen 4-day-old piglets were fed by gastric tube 1 of 3 diets, containing (kg body weight(-1) · day(-1)) 16 g protein and 190 kcal (CON), 10.9 g protein and 132 kcal (R), or 10.8 g protein + 0.2 % leucine and 136 kcal (RL) at 4-h intervals for 8 days. On day 8, plasma AA and insulin levels were measured during 6 post-feeding intervals, and muscle protein synthesis rate and mTOR signaling proteins were determined at 120 min post-feeding. At 120 min, leucine was highest in RL (P protein synthesis, phosphorylation of S6 kinase (p-S6K1) and 4E-binding protein (p-4EBP1), and activation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4 complex (eIF4E · eIF4G). RL increased (P ≤ 0.01) p-S6K1, p-4EBP1 and eIF4E · eIF4G compared to R. In conclusion, when protein and energy intakes are restricted for 8 days, leucine supplementation increases muscle mTOR activation, but does not improve body weight gain or enhance skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs.

  6. Compensatory mechanisms activated with intermittent energy restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, Sílvia Ribeiro; Halset, Eline Holli; Gåsbakk, Sigrid

    2017-01-01

    : 39 ± 9 y) with obesity (BMI: 36 ± 4 kg/m2) were randomized to lose a similar weight with an IER (N = 18) or a CER (N = 17) diet over a 12 week period. Macronutrient composition and overall energy restriction (33% reduction) were similar between groups. Body weight/composition, RMR, fasting......) were measured before and after WL. Results: Changes in body weight (≈12.5% WL) and composition were similar in both groups. Fasting RQ and ExEff at 10 W increased in both groups. Losing weight, either by IER or CER dieting, did not induce significant changes in subjective appetite ratings. RMR......Background & aims: Strong compensatory responses, with reduced resting metabolic rate (RMR), increased exercise efficiency (ExEff) and appetite, are activated when weight loss (WL) is achieved with continuous energy restriction (CER), which try to restore energy balance. Intermittent energy...

  7. Total sleep deprivation, chronic sleep restriction and sleep disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Amy C; Banks, Siobhan

    2010-01-01

    Sleep loss may result from total sleep deprivation (such as a shift worker might experience), chronic sleep restriction (due to work, medical conditions or lifestyle) or sleep disruption (which is common in sleep disorders such as sleep apnea or restless legs syndrome). Total sleep deprivation has been widely researched, and its effects have been well described. Chronic sleep restriction and sleep disruption (also known as sleep fragmentation) have received less experimental attention. Recently, there has been increasing interest in sleep restriction and disruption as it has been recognized that they have a similar impact on cognitive functioning as a period of total sleep deprivation. Sleep loss causes impairments in cognitive performance and simulated driving and induces sleepiness, fatigue and mood changes. This review examines recent research on the effects of sleep deprivation, restriction and disruption on cognition and neurophysiologic functioning in healthy adults, and contrasts the similarities and differences between these three modalities of sleep loss.

  8. Physical activity: benefit or weakness in metabolic adaptations in a mouse model of chronic food restriction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méquinion, Mathieu; Caron, Emilie; Zgheib, Sara; Stievenard, Aliçia; Zizzari, Philippe; Tolle, Virginie; Cortet, Bernard; Lucas, Stéphanie; Prévot, Vincent; Chauveau, Christophe; Viltart, Odile

    2015-02-01

    In restrictive-type anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, physical activity is usually associated with food restriction, but its physiological consequences remain poorly characterized. In female mice, we evaluated the impact of voluntary physical activity with/without chronic food restriction on metabolic and endocrine parameters that might contribute to AN. In this protocol, FRW mice (i.e., food restriction with running wheel) reached a crucial point of body weight loss (especially fat mass) faster than FR mice (i.e., food restriction only). However, in contrast to FR mice, their body weight stabilized, demonstrating a protective effect of a moderate, regular physical activity. Exercise delayed meal initiation and duration. FRW mice displayed food anticipatory activity compared with FR mice, which was strongly diminished with the prolongation of the protocol. The long-term nature of the protocol enabled assessment of bone parameters similar to those observed in AN patients. Both restricted groups adapted their energy metabolism differentially in the short and long term, with less fat oxidation in FRW mice and a preferential use of glucose to compensate for the chronic energy imbalance. Finally, like restrictive AN patients, FRW mice exhibited low leptin levels, high plasma concentrations of corticosterone and ghrelin, and a disruption of the estrous cycle. In conclusion, our model suggests that physical activity has beneficial effects on the adaptation to the severe condition of food restriction despite the absence of any protective effect on lean and bone mass. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Leucine supplementation of a chronically restricted protein and energy diet enhances mTOR pathway activation but not muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suboptimal nutrient intake represents a limiting factor for growth and long-term survival of low-birth weight infants. The objective of this study was to determine if in neonates who can consume only 70 % of their protein and energy requirements for 8 days, enteral leucine supplementation will upreg...

  10. Protein deficiency and energy restriction in young cebus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samonds, K W; Hegsted, D M

    1978-03-01

    Infant cebus monkeys (Cebus albifrons) were fed liquid formulas that were limited in protein, energy, or a combination of the two restrictions. Weight gain, food intake, hematological development, and plasma protein and cholesterol levels were monitored over a 20-week period. The animals restricted in protein developed the classical signs of protein deficiency--reductions in plasma albumin, a mild anemia, accumulation of fat in the liver, and, in a few cases, facial edema. These animals maintained a relatively high energy intake, and apparently wasted energy when compared to similarly non-growing energy-restricted animals. Energy-restricted animals did not exhibit these symptoms, even when their daily protein intake was reduced to match that of protein-restricted monkeys. It is concluded that an energy restriction superimposed upon a limited protein intake did not increase protein requirements or precipitate protein deficiency.

  11. Impact of energy and protein restriction on energy expenditure of gestation in twin-bearing ewes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiani, Alishir; Chwalibog, Andrzej; Tauson, Anne-Helene

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of energy and protein restriction on energy expenditure of gestation (EEgest) in twin-bearing ewes. Multiparous twin-bearing ewes were fed either adequate (A: n = 10) or restricted to 60% of energy and protein requirements (R: n = 10) during the last 6...

  12. Heart rate variability for evaluating vigilant attention in partial chronic sleep restriction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henelius, Andreas; Sallinen, Mikael; Huotilainen, Minna; Müller, Kiti; Virkkala, Jussi; Puolamäki, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Examine the use of spectral heart rate variability (HRV) metrics in measuring sleepiness under chronic partial sleep restriction, and identify underlying relationships between HRV, Karolinska Sleepiness Scale ratings (KSS...

  13. Improving prediction of binge episodes by modelling chronicity of dietary restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Millicent; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Skouteris, Helen; Broadbent, Jaclyn

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates the influences of chronicity of, and time lag between, dietary restriction and binge outcome for predicting binge episode onset. Sixty-two women aged 18 to 40 years old completed an online survey at random intervals seven times daily for a 7-day period. Participants self-reported engagement in dietary restriction and/or binging, and temptation to binge. Consecutive instances of reported dietary restriction better predicted subsequent binges than single instances. As the time lag between the first report of dietary restriction and binge onset increased, a clear linear trend emerged, such that the value of restriction for predicting binges increased with the number of consecutive assessments in which they reported dietary restriction. A similar pattern was found when predicting temptation to binge. Present findings suggest that duration of restriction is a crucial determinant of binge onset. These findings have implications for clinical practice by highlighting the time course from dietary restriction to binging.

  14. Dietary sodium restriction : a neglected therapeutic opportunity in chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humalda, Jelmer K.; Navis, Gerjan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Restriction of dietary sodium is recommended at a population level as well as for groups at high cardiovascular risk, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). This review addresses recent evidence for the protective effect of dietary sodium restriction in CKD patients specifically. Recent

  15. Dietary sodium restriction : a neglected therapeutic opportunity in chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humalda, Jelmer K.; Navis, Gerjan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Restriction of dietary sodium is recommended at a population level as well as for groups at high cardiovascular risk, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). This review addresses recent evidence for the protective effect of dietary sodium restriction in CKD patients specifically. Recent

  16. Energy restriction and the prevention of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvie, Michelle; Howell, Anthony

    2012-05-01

    Energy restriction (ER) to control weight is a potential strategy for breast cancer prevention. The protective effects of habitual continuous energy restriction (CER) and weight loss on breast tumour formation have been conclusively demonstrated in animal studies over the past 100 years, and more recently in women using data from observational studies and bariatric surgery. Intermittent energy restriction (IER) and intermittent fasting (IF) are possible alternative preventative approaches which may be easier for individuals to undertake and possibly more effective than standard CER. Here, we summarise the available data on CER, IER and IF with special emphasis on their potential for breast cancer prevention. In animals, IER is superior or equivalent to CER with the exception of carcinogen-induced tumour models when initiated soon after carcinogen exposure. There are no human data on IER and breast cancer risk, but three studies demonstrated IER and CER to be equivalent for weight loss. IF regimens also reduce mammary tumour formation in animal models and also led to weight loss in human subjects, but have not been directly compared with CER. Animal and some human data suggest that both IER and IF may differ mechanistically compared with CER and may bring about greater reduction in hepatic and visceral fat stores, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels and cell proliferation, and increased insulin sensitivity and adiponectin levels. Although IER and IF were first studied 65 years ago, we conclude that further studies are required to assess their values compared with CER.

  17. Chronic sleep restriction during pregnancy--repercussion on cardiovascular and renal functioning of male offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Ingrid L B; Rodrigues, Aline F A C; Bergamaschi, Cássia T; Campos, Ruy R; Hirata, Aparecida E; Tufik, Sergio; Xylaras, Beatriz D P; Visniauskas, Bruna; Chagas, Jair R; Gomes, Guiomar N

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the maternal environment can induce fetal adaptations that result in the progression of chronic diseases in the offspring. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of maternal chronic sleep restriction on blood pressure, renal function and cardiac baroreflex response on male offspring at adult age. Female 3-month-old Wistar rats were divided in two experimental groups: control (C) and chronic sleep restricted (CSR). Pregnancy was confirmed by vaginal smear. Chronic sleep restricted females were subjected to sleep restriction by the multiple platform technique for 20 h daily, between the 1st and 20th day of pregnancy. After birth, the litters were reduced to 6 rats per mother, and were designated as offspring from control (OC) and offspring from chronic sleep restricted (OCSR). Indirect blood pressure (BPi - tail cuff) was measured by plethysmography in male offspring at 3 months old. Following, the renal function and cardiac baroreflex response were analyzed. Values of BPi in OCSR were significantly higher compared to OC [OC: 127 ± 2.6 (19); OCSR: 144 ± 2.5 (17) mmHg]. The baroreflex sensitivity to the increase of blood pressure was reduced in OCSR [Slope: OC: -2.6 ± 0.15 (9); OCRS: -1.6 ± 0.13 (9)]. Hypothalamic activity of ACE2 was significantly reduced in OCSR compared to OC [OC: 97.4 ± 15 (18); OSR: 60.2 ± 3.6 (16) UAF/min/protein mg]. Renal function alteration was noticed by the increase in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) observed in OCSR [OC: 6.4 ± 0.2 (10); OCSR: 7.4 ± 0.3 (7)]. Chronic sleep restriction during pregnancy caused in the offspring hypertension, altered cardiac baroreflex response, reduced ACE-2 activity in the hypothalamus and renal alterations. Our data suggest that the reduction of sleeping time along the pregnancy is able to modify maternal homeostasis leading to functional alterations in offspring.

  18. Physical activity, energy restriction, and the risk of pancreatic cancer: Prospective study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Lumey, L.H.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2011-01-01

    Background: Because of their influence on insulin concentrations, we hypothesized that both physical activity and energy restriction may reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. Objective: We examined the associations between physical activity, proxies for energy restriction, and pancreatic cancer risk

  19. Physical activity, energy restriction, and the risk of pancreatic cancer: Prospective study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Lumey, L.H.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2011-01-01

    Background: Because of their influence on insulin concentrations, we hypothesized that both physical activity and energy restriction may reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. Objective: We examined the associations between physical activity, proxies for energy restriction, and pancreatic cancer

  20. Energy restriction affect liver development in Hu sheep ram lambs through Hippo signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Guo-Min; Jin, Yu-Hang; Guo, Yi-Xuan; Wang, Zhen; Fan, Yi-Xuan; El-Samahy, M A; Wang, Feng

    2017-09-02

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of dietary energy restriction on postnatal liver development in Hu sheep ram lambs. A total of 16 ram lambs were randomly divided into two groups: 100% energy requirements diet and 55% energy requirements diet, which were fed for 75 d. Results showed that the final body and liver weights decreased with energy restriction (p Energy restriction caused a significant decrease in the levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and an increase in growth hormone secretion (p energy restriction, respectively (p energy restriction group (p energy restriction group (p energy restriction in ram lambs impairs liver development by increasing apoptosis, which may occur via the Hippo signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pathophysiology of chronic nitric oxide synthase inhibition-induced fetal growth restriction in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neerhof, M.G.; Synowiec, S.; Khan, S.; Thaete, L.G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the pathophysiology of chronic nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition-induced fetal growth restriction (FGR) in the rat. Methods. Timed-pregnant rats received L-NAME (2.5 mg/kg/h) with or without endothelin (ET-1) receptor A (ETA) antagonist from day 14 to 21 of gestation. In

  2. Benefits of dietary sodium restriction in the management of chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krikken, Jan A.; Laverman, Gozewijn D.; Navis, Gerjan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review To evaluate the role of restricting dietary sodium intake in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its complications. Recent findings A consistent line of evidence shows that high dietary sodium intake is a determinant of therapy resistance to blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldostero

  3. Benefits of dietary sodium restriction in the management of chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krikken, Jan A.; Laverman, Gozewijn D.; Navis, Gerjan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review To evaluate the role of restricting dietary sodium intake in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its complications. Recent findings A consistent line of evidence shows that high dietary sodium intake is a determinant of therapy resistance to blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldostero

  4. Barriers to Engagement in Sleep Restriction and Stimulus Control in Chronic Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Norah; Lewycky, Samantha; Finnegan, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Sleep restriction (SRT) and stimulus control (SC) have been found to be effective interventions for chronic insomnia (Morgenthaler et al., 2006), and yet adherence to SRT and SC varies widely. The objective of this study was to investigate correlates to adherence to SC/SRT among 40 outpatients with primary or comorbid insomnia using a…

  5. Benefits of dietary sodium restriction in the management of chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krikken, Jan A.; Laverman, Gozewijn D.; Navis, Gerjan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review To evaluate the role of restricting dietary sodium intake in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its complications. Recent findings A consistent line of evidence shows that high dietary sodium intake is a determinant of therapy resistance to blockade of the

  6. Expected energy-based restricted Boltzmann machine for classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfwing, S; Uchibe, E; Doya, K

    2015-04-01

    In classification tasks, restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs) have predominantly been used in the first stage, either as feature extractors or to provide initialization of neural networks. In this study, we propose a discriminative learning approach to provide a self-contained RBM method for classification, inspired by free-energy based function approximation (FE-RBM), originally proposed for reinforcement learning. For classification, the FE-RBM method computes the output for an input vector and a class vector by the negative free energy of an RBM. Learning is achieved by stochastic gradient-descent using a mean-squared error training objective. In an earlier study, we demonstrated that the performance and the robustness of FE-RBM function approximation can be improved by scaling the free energy by a constant that is related to the size of network. In this study, we propose that the learning performance of RBM function approximation can be further improved by computing the output by the negative expected energy (EE-RBM), instead of the negative free energy. To create a deep learning architecture, we stack several RBMs on top of each other. We also connect the class nodes to all hidden layers to try to improve the performance even further. We validate the classification performance of EE-RBM using the MNIST data set and the NORB data set, achieving competitive performance compared with other classifiers such as standard neural networks, deep belief networks, classification RBMs, and support vector machines. The purpose of using the NORB data set is to demonstrate that EE-RBM with binary input nodes can achieve high performance in the continuous input domain. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Extreme calorie restriction and energy source starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae represent distinct physiological states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boender, L.G.M.; Almering, M.J.H.; Dijk, M.; Van Maris, A.J.A.; De Winde, J.H.; Pronk, J.T.; Daran-Lapujade, P.

    2011-01-01

    Cultivation methods used to investigate microbial calorie restriction often result in carbon and energy starvation. This study aims to dissect cellular responses to calorie restriction and starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using retentostat cultivation. In retentostats, cells are continuousl

  8. Chronic sleep restriction during pregnancy--repercussion on cardiovascular and renal functioning of male offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid L B Lima

    Full Text Available Changes in the maternal environment can induce fetal adaptations that result in the progression of chronic diseases in the offspring. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of maternal chronic sleep restriction on blood pressure, renal function and cardiac baroreflex response on male offspring at adult age. Female 3-month-old Wistar rats were divided in two experimental groups: control (C and chronic sleep restricted (CSR. Pregnancy was confirmed by vaginal smear. Chronic sleep restricted females were subjected to sleep restriction by the multiple platform technique for 20 h daily, between the 1st and 20th day of pregnancy. After birth, the litters were reduced to 6 rats per mother, and were designated as offspring from control (OC and offspring from chronic sleep restricted (OCSR. Indirect blood pressure (BPi - tail cuff was measured by plethysmography in male offspring at 3 months old. Following, the renal function and cardiac baroreflex response were analyzed. Values of BPi in OCSR were significantly higher compared to OC [OC: 127 ± 2.6 (19; OCSR: 144 ± 2.5 (17 mmHg]. The baroreflex sensitivity to the increase of blood pressure was reduced in OCSR [Slope: OC: -2.6 ± 0.15 (9; OCRS: -1.6 ± 0.13 (9]. Hypothalamic activity of ACE2 was significantly reduced in OCSR compared to OC [OC: 97.4 ± 15 (18; OSR: 60.2 ± 3.6 (16 UAF/min/protein mg]. Renal function alteration was noticed by the increase in glomerular filtration rate (GFR observed in OCSR [OC: 6.4 ± 0.2 (10; OCSR: 7.4 ± 0.3 (7]. Chronic sleep restriction during pregnancy caused in the offspring hypertension, altered cardiac baroreflex response, reduced ACE-2 activity in the hypothalamus and renal alterations. Our data suggest that the reduction of sleeping time along the pregnancy is able to modify maternal homeostasis leading to functional alterations in offspring.

  9. Chronic Sleep Restriction during Pregnancy - Repercussion on Cardiovascular and Renal Functioning of Male Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Ingrid L. B.; Rodrigues, Aline F. A. C.; Bergamaschi, Cássia T.; Campos, Ruy R.; Hirata, Aparecida E.; Tufik, Sergio; Xylaras, Beatriz D. P.; Visniauskas, Bruna; Chagas, Jair R.; Gomes, Guiomar N.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the maternal environment can induce fetal adaptations that result in the progression of chronic diseases in the offspring. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of maternal chronic sleep restriction on blood pressure, renal function and cardiac baroreflex response on male offspring at adult age. Female 3-month-old Wistar rats were divided in two experimental groups: control (C) and chronic sleep restricted (CSR). Pregnancy was confirmed by vaginal smear. Chronic sleep restricted females were subjected to sleep restriction by the multiple platform technique for 20 h daily, between the 1st and 20th day of pregnancy. After birth, the litters were reduced to 6 rats per mother, and were designated as offspring from control (OC) and offspring from chronic sleep restricted (OCSR). Indirect blood pressure (BPi – tail cuff) was measured by plethysmography in male offspring at 3 months old. Following, the renal function and cardiac baroreflex response were analyzed. Values of BPi in OCSR were significantly higher compared to OC [OC: 127±2.6 (19); OCSR: 144±2.5 (17) mmHg]. The baroreflex sensitivity to the increase of blood pressure was reduced in OCSR [Slope: OC: −2.6±0.15 (9); OCRS: −1.6±0.13 (9)]. Hypothalamic activity of ACE2 was significantly reduced in OCSR compared to OC [OC: 97.4±15 (18); OSR: 60.2±3.6 (16) UAF/min/protein mg]. Renal function alteration was noticed by the increase in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) observed in OCSR [OC: 6.4±0.2 (10); OCSR: 7.4±0.3 (7)]. Chronic sleep restriction during pregnancy caused in the offspring hypertension, altered cardiac baroreflex response, reduced ACE-2 activity in the hypothalamus and renal alterations. Our data suggest that the reduction of sleeping time along the pregnancy is able to modify maternal homeostasis leading to functional alterations in offspring. PMID:25405471

  10. Simultaneous presentation of kappa-restricted chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lambda light chain AL amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Keudell, Gottfried; Sanchorawala, Vaishali; O'Hara, Carl; C Seldin, David; Sloan, J Mark

    2014-06-01

    We report on a 58-year-old man who presented with simultaneous kappa-restricted chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and a lambda-restricted plasma cell dyscrasia causing AL amyloidosis involving the kidney and GI tract. While monoclonal immunoglobulins occasionally produced by CLL has previously been implicated in AL amyloidosis, this is the first case of AL amyloidosis resulting from a distinct plasma cell dyscrasia that is not clonally related to the concurrent CLL. Appropriate treatment depended on detailed pathologic diagnosis of both disease processes.

  11. Energy restriction during childhood and early adulthood and ovarian cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo J Schouten

    Full Text Available Dietary energy restriction may protect against cancer. In parts of The Netherlands, mostly in larger cities, periods of chronically impaired nutrition and even severe famine (Hunger Winter 1944-1945 existed during the 1930s and World War II (1940-1945. We studied the association between energy restriction during childhood and early adulthood on the risk of ovarian cancer later in life. In 1986, the Netherlands Cohort Study was initiated. A self-administered questionnaire on dietary habits and other cancer risk factors was completed by 62,573 women aged 55-69 years at baseline. Follow-up for cancer was established by record linkage to the Netherlands Cancer Registry. After 16.3 years of follow-up, 364 invasive epithelial ovarian cancer cases and 2220 subcohort members (sampled from the total cohort directly after baseline with complete information confounders were available for case-cohort analyses. In multivariable analysis, ovarian cancer risk was lower for participants with an unemployed father during the 1930s (Hazard Ratio (HR, 0.70; 95% Confidence Interval (CI, 0.47-1.06 compared to participants with an employed father as well as for participants living in a city during World War II (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.54-0.90 compared to participants living in the country-side. Residence in a Western City during the famine (Hunger Winter was not associated with a decreased risk. Our results show a relation between proxy variables for modest energy restriction over a longer period of time during childhood or early adulthood and a reduced ovarian cancer risk.

  12. Salt and fluid restriction is effective in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipson, Henriette; Ekman, Inger; Forslund, Heléne B; Swedberg, Karl; Schaufelberger, Maria

    2013-11-01

    European and American guidelines have recommended salt and fluid restriction for patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) despite scarce scientific evidence. Therefore, we investigated the effects of salt and fluid restriction in patients with CHF. Ninety-seven stable patients in NYHA class II-IV, on optimal medication, with previous signs of fluid retention, treated with either >40 mg (NYHA III-IV) or >80 mg (NYHA II-IV) of furosemide daily were randomized to either individualized salt and fluid restriction or information given by the nurse-led heart failure clinics, e.g. be aware not to drink too much and use salt with caution, and followed for 12 weeks. Fluid was restricted to 1.5 L and salt to 5 g daily, and individualized dietary advice and support was given. The 24 h dietary recall procedure, urine collection on three consecutive days, and para-aminobenzoic acid 80 mg t.i.d. was used to assess adherence to diet and completeness of urine collection. The primary endpoint was a composite variable consisting of NYHA class, hospitalization, weight, peripheral oedema, quality of life (QoL), thirst, and diuretics. Results After 12 weeks, significantly more patients in the intervention than in the control group improved on the composite endpoint (51% vs. 16%; P fluid restriction can improve signs and symptoms of CHF with no negative effects on thirst, appetite, or QoL in patients with moderate to severe CHF and previous signs of fluid retention.

  13. Hypothalamic neuropeptide expression following chronic food restriction in sedentary and wheel-running rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rijke, C E; Hillebrand, J J G; Verhagen, L A W; Roeling, T A P; Adan, R A H

    2005-10-01

    When rats are given access to a running-wheel in combination with food restriction, they will become hyperactive and decrease their food intake, a paradoxical phenomenon known as activity-based anorexia (ABA). Little is known about the regulation of the hypothalamic neuropeptides that are involved in the regulation of food intake and energy balance during the development of ABA. Therefore, rats were killed during the development of ABA, before they entered a state of severe starvation. Neuropeptide mRNA expression levels were analysed using quantitative real-time PCR on punches of separate hypothalamic nuclei. As is expected in a state of negative energy balance, expression levels of agouti-related protein (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) were increased 5-fold in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of food-restricted running ABA rats vs 2-fold in sedentary food-restricted controls. The co-regulated expression of AgRP and NPY strongly correlated with relative body weight and white adipose tissue mass. Arcuate expression of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) was reduced 2-fold in the ABA group. In second-order neurons of the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) mRNA expression was upregulated 2-fold in food-restricted running rats, but not in food-restricted sedentary controls. Prepro-orexin, CART and corticotropin-releasing hormone expression levels in the LHA and the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) were unchanged in both food-restricted groups. From this study it was concluded that during the development of ABA, neuropeptides in first-order neurons in the ARC and MCH in the LHA are regulated in an adequate response to negative energy balance, whereas expression levels of the other studied neuropeptides in secondary neurons of the LHA and PVN are unchanged and are probably regulated by factors other than energy status alone.

  14. Time-of-day modulation of homeostatic and allostatic sleep responses to chronic sleep restriction in rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deurveilher, S; Rusak, B; Semba, K

    2012-01-01

    To study sleep responses to chronic sleep restriction (CSR) and time-of-day influences on these responses, we developed a rat model of CSR that takes into account the polyphasic sleep patterns in rats...

  15. Fasting ghrelin does not predict food intake after short-term energy restriction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, W.A.M.; Mars, M.; Hendriks, H.F.J.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Stafleu, A.; Kok, F.J.; Graaf, de C.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the role of ghrelin as a hunger signal during energy restriction and to test the hypothesis that changes in fasting leptin concentrations during energy restriction are associated with changes in fasting ghrelin concentrations. Research Methods and Procedures: Thirty-five healthy,

  16. Chronic Protein Restriction in Mice Impacts Placental Function and Maternal Body Weight before Fetal Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula N Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of resource allocation are essential for maternal and fetal survival, particularly when the availability of nutrients is limited. We investigated the responses of feto-placental development to maternal chronic protein malnutrition to test the hypothesis that maternal low protein diet produces differential growth restriction of placental and fetal tissues, and adaptive changes in the placenta that may mitigate impacts on fetal growth. C57BL/6J female mice were fed either a low-protein diet (6% protein or control isocaloric diet (20% protein. On embryonic days E10.5, 17.5 and 18.5 tissue samples were prepared for morphometric, histological and quantitative RT-PCR analyses, which included markers of trophoblast cell subtypes. Potential endocrine adaptations were assessed by the expression of Prolactin-related hormone genes. In the low protein group, placenta weight was significantly lower at E10.5, followed by reduction of maternal weight at E17.5, while the fetuses became significantly lighter no earlier than at E18.5. Fetal head at E18.5 in the low protein group, though smaller than controls, was larger than expected for body size. The relative size and shape of the cranial vault and the flexion of the cranial base was affected by E17.5 and more severely by E18.5. The junctional zone, a placenta layer rich in endocrine and energy storing glycogen cells, was smaller in low protein placentas as well as the expression of Pcdh12, a marker of glycogen trophoblast cells. Placental hormone gene Prl3a1 was altered in response to low protein diet: expression was elevated at E17.5 when fetuses were still growing normally, but dropped sharply by E18.5 in parallel with the slowing of fetal growth. This model suggests that nutrients are preferentially allocated to sustain fetal and brain growth and suggests the placenta as a nutrient sensor in early gestation with a role in mitigating impacts of poor maternal nutrition on fetal growth.

  17. Energy substitution game under the supply capacity restriction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-zhuo; Chen Jian

    2008-01-01

    Along with Chinese economic growth, energy plays a more and more important role in the national economy. The imbalance between insufficient energy supply and huge energy demand has become a major problem in energy utilization, and energy substitution is attracting more and more attention as a key to the sustainable and sound development of Chinese economy. Explored the possibilities of the mutual substitution of the two types of energy with different functions with game theory in light of the supply capacity. As a con-clusion, there are four equilibrium results corresponding to different levels of supply capac-ity. Subsequently, we carry on the study further by numerical simulation, investigate in one group of results most close to Chinese energy status and find the equilibrium price as well as the demand variation pattern.

  18. Chronic sleep restriction induces long-lasting changes in adenosine and noradrenaline receptor density in the rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    WEISSHAUPT, ANGELA; WEDEKIND, FRANZISKA; KROLL, TINA; MCCARLEY, ROBERT W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Although chronic sleep restriction frequently produces long-lasting behavioural and physiological impairments in humans, the underlying neural mechanisms are unknown. Here we used a rat model of chronic sleep restriction to investigate the role of brain adenosine and noradrenaline systems, known to regulate sleep and wakefulness, respectively. The density of adenosine A1 and A2a receptors and β-adrenergic receptors before, during and following 5 days of sleep restriction was assessed with autoradiography. Rats (n = 48) were sleep-deprived for 18 h day–1 for 5 consecutive days (SR1–SR5), followed by 3 unrestricted recovery sleep days (R1–R3). Brains were collected at the beginning of the light period, which was immediately after the end of sleep deprivation on sleep restriction days. Chronic sleep restriction increased adenosine A1 receptor density significantly in nine of the 13 brain areas analysed with elevations also observed on R3 (+18 to +32%). In contrast, chronic sleep restriction reduced adenosine A2a receptor density significantly in one of the three brain areas analysed (olfactory tubercle which declined 26–31% from SR1 to R1). A decrease in b-adrenergic receptors density was seen in substantia innominata and ventral pallidum which remained reduced on R3, but no changes were found in the anterior cingulate cortex. These data suggest that chronic sleep restriction can induce long-term changes in the brain adenosine and noradrenaline receptors, which may underlie the long-lasting neurocognitive impairments observed in chronic sleep restriction. PMID:25900125

  19. THE COMPLIANCE CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE PATIENT ON RESTRICTIONS LIQUIDS IN HEMODIALYSIS THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Sri P Ningsih

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nonadherence is a rampant problem among patients undergoing dialysis and can impact multiple aspects of patient care, including medications, and treatment regimens as well as dietary and fluid restriction. The purpose of this descriptive correlative research, on hemodyalysa patient with chronic renal failure was to know the influencing factors of compliance patient to fluid restriction. Method: This study used descriptive correlative design, Data was analysed by using distibution frequency and chi square for analysys relation between variable. Result: The result revealed there were nor significant statistic difference at p > 0.05 between age, gender, education level, frequency of hemodyalysa and health education from nurse to compliance patient to fluid restriction (p = 0.647; p = 0.717; p = 0.345; p = 0.774; p = 0.273. Discussion: Level of patient adherence to therapy not influenced by demographi factor but by the quality of interaction health workers and other factors. This study recommended for further analysis of the factors that influence the level of compliance of the patient as psychological factors (belieft , motivation, socio-economic, and social support.

  20. Food restriction alters energy allocation strategy during growth in tobacco hornworms (Manduca sexta larvae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Lihong; Amunugama, Kaushalya; Hayes, Matthew B; Jennings, Michael; Domingo, Azriel; Hou, Chen

    2015-08-01

    Growing animals must alter their energy budget in the face of environmental changes and prioritize the energy allocation to metabolism for life-sustaining requirements and energy deposition in new biomass growth. We hypothesize that when food availability is low, larvae of holometabolic insects with a short development stage (relative to the low food availability period) prioritize biomass growth at the expense of metabolism. Driven by this hypothesis, we develop a simple theoretical model, based on conservation of energy and allometric scaling laws, for understanding the dynamic energy budget of growing larvae under food restriction. We test the hypothesis by manipulative experiments on fifth instar hornworms at three temperatures. At each temperature, food restriction increases the scaling power of growth rate but decreases that of metabolic rate, as predicted by the hypothesis. During the fifth instar, the energy budgets of larvae change dynamically. The free-feeding larvae slightly decrease the energy allocated to growth as body mass increases and increase the energy allocated to life sustaining. The opposite trends were observed in food restricted larvae, indicating the predicted prioritization in the energy budget under food restriction. We compare the energy budgets of a few endothermic and ectothermic species and discuss how different life histories lead to the differences in the energy budgets under food restriction.

  1. TFAP2B influences the effect of dietary fat on weight loss under energy restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stocks, Tanja; Angquist, Lars; Banasik, Karina;

    2012-01-01

    Numerous gene loci are related to single measures of body weight and shape. We investigated if 55 SNPs previously associated with BMI or waist measures, modify the effects of fat intake on weight loss and waist reduction under energy restriction....

  2. Sleep restriction is not associated with a positive energy balance in adolescent boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingenberg, Lars; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Holmbäck, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    A short sleep (SS) duration has been linked to obesity in observational studies. However, experimental evidence of the potential mechanisms of sleep restriction on energy balance is conflicting and, to our knowledge, nonexistent in adolescents.......A short sleep (SS) duration has been linked to obesity in observational studies. However, experimental evidence of the potential mechanisms of sleep restriction on energy balance is conflicting and, to our knowledge, nonexistent in adolescents....

  3. Energy budget, behavior and leptin in striped hamsters subjected to food restriction and refeeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Jun Zhao

    Full Text Available Food restriction induces a loss of body mass that is often followed by rapid regaining of the lost weight when the restriction ends, consequently increasing a risk of development of obesity. To determine the physiological and behavioral mechanisms underlining the regaining, striped hamsters were restricted to 85% of initial food intake for 4 weeks and refed ad libitum for another 4 weeks. Changes in body mass, energy budget, activity, body composition and serum leptin level were measured. Body mass, body fat mass and serum leptin level significantly decreased in food-restricted hamsters, and increased when the restriction ended, showing a short "compensatory growth" rather than over-weight or obesity compared with ad libitum controls. During restriction, the time spent on activity increased significantly, which was opposite to the changes in serum leptin level. Food intake increased shortly during refeeding, which perhaps contributed to the rapid regaining of body mass. No correlation was observed between serum leptin and energy intake, while negative correlations were found in hamsters that were refed for 7 and 28 days. Exogenous leptin significantly decreased the time spent on activity during food restriction and attenuated the increase in food intake during refeeding. This suggests that low leptin in restricted animals may function as a starvation signal to induce an increase in activity behavior, and high leptin likely serves as a satiety signal to prevent activity during refeeding. Leptin may play a crucial role in controlling food intake when the restriction ends, and consequently preventing overweight.

  4. Energy Budget, Behavior and Leptin in Striped Hamsters Subjected to Food Restriction and Refeeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Jun; Zhu, Qiao-Xia; Chen, Ke-Xin; Wang, Yu-Kun; Cao, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Food restriction induces a loss of body mass that is often followed by rapid regaining of the lost weight when the restriction ends, consequently increasing a risk of development of obesity. To determine the physiological and behavioral mechanisms underlining the regaining, striped hamsters were restricted to 85% of initial food intake for 4 weeks and refed ad libitum for another 4 weeks. Changes in body mass, energy budget, activity, body composition and serum leptin level were measured. Body mass, body fat mass and serum leptin level significantly decreased in food-restricted hamsters, and increased when the restriction ended, showing a short “compensatory growth” rather than over-weight or obesity compared with ad libitum controls. During restriction, the time spent on activity increased significantly, which was opposite to the changes in serum leptin level. Food intake increased shortly during refeeding, which perhaps contributed to the rapid regaining of body mass. No correlation was observed between serum leptin and energy intake, while negative correlations were found in hamsters that were refed for 7 and 28 days. Exogenous leptin significantly decreased the time spent on activity during food restriction and attenuated the increase in food intake during refeeding. This suggests that low leptin in restricted animals may function as a starvation signal to induce an increase in activity behavior, and high leptin likely serves as a satiety signal to prevent activity during refeeding. Leptin may play a crucial role in controlling food intake when the restriction ends, and consequently preventing overweight. PMID:23372694

  5. Opposing effects of chronic stress and weight restriction on cardiovascular, neuroendocrine and metabolic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flak, Jonathan N; Jankord, Ryan; Solomon, Matia B; Krause, Eric G; Herman, James P

    2011-08-03

    Chronic stress is associated with dysregulation of energy homeostasis, but the link between the two is largely unknown. For most rodents, periods of chronic stress reduce weight gain. We hypothesized that these reductions in weight are an additional homeostatic challenge, contributing to the chronic stress syndrome. Experiment #1 examined cardiovascular responsivity following exposure to prolonged intermittent stress. We used radio-telemetry to monitor mean arterial pressure and heart rate in freely moving, conscious rats. Three groups of animals were tested: chronic variable stress (CVS), weight-matched (WM), and controls. Using this design, we can distinguish between effects due to stress and effects due to the changing body weight. WM, but not CVS, markedly reduced basal heart rate. Although an acute stress challenge elicited similar peak heart rate, WM expedited the recovery to baseline heart rate. The data suggest that CVS prevents the weight-induced attenuation of cardiovascular stress reactivity. Experiment #2 investigated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and metabolic hormone reactivity to novel psychogenic stress. WM increased corticosterone area under the curve. CVS blunted plasma glucose, leptin, and insulin levels in response to restraint. Experiment #3 tested the effects of WM and CVS on PVN oxytocin and corticotrophin-releasing hormone mRNA expression. CVS increased, while WM reduced PVN CRH mRNA expression, whereas both CVS and WM reduced dorsal parvocellular PVN oxytocin mRNA. Overall, the data suggest that weight loss is unlikely to account for the deleterious effects of chronic stress on the organism, but in fact produces beneficial effects that are effectively absent or indeed, reversed in the face of chronic stress exposure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Salt Restriction in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Simple Need or a Must?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Mallamaci

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dietary salt restriction is one of the most important non pharmacological intervention in the management of hypertension and cardiovascular complications. In Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD patients, observational and recent interventional studies investigating the relationship between sodium intake and renal outcomes suggest that low salt diet is warranted in this high risk category of patients. Moreover reducing and maintaining a low salt intake in these patients plays a fundamental role for maximizing the beneficial effect of ACE inhibitors on CKD progression. On the other hand, in hypertensive patients there is experimental evidence indicating that a very low sodium diet (<50 mEq/day generates a pro-inflammatory phenotype characterized by an increase in Procalcitonin and TNF-alpha and a reduction in an anti-inflammatory cytokine like Adiponectin. In this brief review the main mechanisms whereby salt intake may determine kidney damage and studies showing that salt restriction may have a beneficial effect in CKD patients will be discussed.

  7. Comparative effects of energy restriction and resveratrol intake on glycemic control improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton-Laskibar, I; Aguirre, L; Macarulla, M T; Etxeberria, U; Milagro, F I; Martínez, J A; Contreras, J; Portillo, M P

    2017-02-20

    Resveratrol (RSV) has been proposed as an energy restriction mimetic. This study aimed to compare the effects of RSV and energy restriction on insulin resistance induced by an obesogenic diet. Any additive effect of both treatments was also analyzed. Rats were fed a high-fat high-sucrose diet for 6 weeks. They were then distributed in four experimental groups which were either fed a standard control diet (C), or treated with RSV (30 mg/kg/d), or submitted to energy restriction (R, 15%), or treated with RSV and submitted to energy restriction (RR). A glucose tolerance test was performed, and serum glucose, insulin, fructosamine, adiponectin, and leptin concentrations determined. Muscle triacylglycerol content and protein expression of insulin receptor (IRβ), protein kinase B (Akt), Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT-4) were measured. In RSV rats, fructosamine concentrations were reduced, HOMA-IR remained unchanged, but glucose tolerance was improved, without changes in phosphorylation of IRβ, Akt, and AS160 or in GLUT-4 protein expression. Rats under energy restriction showed an improvement in all the markers related to glycemic control, as well as increased phosphorylation of AS160 and protein expression of GLUT-4. In rats from RR group the results were similar to R group, with the exception of IRβ and Akt phosphorylation, which were increased. In conclusion, mild energy restriction is more efficient than intake of RSV within a standard balanced diet, and acts by means of a different mechanism from that of RSV. No additive effects between RSV and energy restriction were observed. © 2016 BioFactors, 2016.

  8. Chronic moderate sleep restriction in older long sleepers and older average duration sleepers: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngstedt, Shawn D; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Bootzin, Richard R; Kripke, Daniel F; Cooper, Jonnifer; Dean, Lauren R; Catao, Fabio; James, Shelli; Vining, Caitlin; Williams, Natasha J; Irwin, Michael R

    2013-09-01

    Epidemiologic studies have consistently shown that sleeping sleep may be consistent with results from experimental sleep deprivation studies. However, there has been little study of chronic moderate sleep restriction and little evaluation of older adults who might be more vulnerable to negative effects of sleep restriction, given their age-related morbidities. Moreover, the risks of long sleep have scarcely been examined experimentally. Moderate sleep restriction might benefit older long sleepers who often spend excessive time in bed (TIB) in contrast to older adults with average sleep patterns. Our aims are: (1) to examine the ability of older long sleepers and older average sleepers to adhere to 60 min TIB restriction; and (2) to contrast effects of chronic TIB restriction in older long vs. average sleepers. Older adults (n = 100) (60-80 years) who sleep 8-9 h per night and 100 older adults who sleep 6-7.25 h per night will be examined at 4 sites over 5 years. Following a 2-week baseline, participants will be randomized to one of two 12-week treatments: (1) a sleep restriction involving a fixed sleep-wake schedule, in which TIB is reduced 60 min below each participant's baseline TIB; and (2) a control treatment involving no sleep restriction, but a fixed sleep schedule. Sleep will be assessed with actigraphy and a diary. Measures will include glucose tolerance, sleepiness, depressive symptoms, quality of life, cognitive performance, incidence of illness or accident, and inflammation.

  9. Leptin responsiveness to energy restriction: genetic variation in the leptin receptor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mars, M.; Rossum, van C.T.M.; Graaf, de C.; Hoebee, B.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Kok, F.J.

    2004-01-01

    Serum leptin concentrations are an important afferent signal in energy balance homeostasis. It has been speculated that the leptin responsiveness to energy restriction is affected by the functionality of the leptin receptor. The purpose of this analysis was to explore the effect of polymorphisms in

  10. The effect of intermittent energy and carbohydrate restriction v. daily energy restriction on weight loss and metabolic disease risk markers in overweight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvie, Michelle; Wright, Claire; Pegington, Mary; McMullan, Debbie; Mitchell, Ellen; Martin, Bronwen; Cutler, Roy G; Evans, Gareth; Whiteside, Sigrid; Maudsley, Stuart; Camandola, Simonetta; Wang, Rui; Carlson, Olga D; Egan, Josephine M; Mattson, Mark P; Howell, Anthony

    2013-10-01

    Intermittent energy restriction may result in greater improvements in insulin sensitivity and weight control than daily energy restriction (DER). We tested two intermittent energy and carbohydrate restriction (IECR) regimens, including one which allowed ad libitum protein and fat (IECR+PF). Overweight women (n 115) aged 20 and 69 years with a family history of breast cancer were randomised to an overall 25 % energy restriction, either as an IECR (2500-2717 kJ/d, diets (mean - 0·34 (95% CI - 0·66, - 0·02) units) and the IECR+PF diet (mean - 0·38 (95% CI - 0·75, - 0·01) units). Reductions with the IECR diets were significantly greater compared with the DER diet (mean 0·2 (95% CI - 0·19, 0·66) μU/unit, P= 0·02). Both IECR groups had greater reductions in body fat compared with the DER group (IECR: mean - 3·7 (95% CI - 2·5, - 4·9) kg, P= 0·007; IECR+PF: mean - 3·7 (95% CI - 2·8, - 4·7) kg, P= 0·019; DER: mean - 2·0 (95% CI - 1·0, 3·0) kg). During the weight maintenance phase, 1 d of IECR or IECR+PF per week maintained the reductions in insulin resistance and weight. In the short term, IECR is superior to DER with respect to improved insulin sensitivity and body fat reduction. Longer-term studies into the safety and effectiveness of IECR diets are warranted.

  11. Effects of obesity, energy restriction and neutering on the faecal microbiota of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Manuela M; Kessler, Alexandre M; Kieffer, Dorothy A; Knotts, Trina A; Kim, Kyoungmi; Wei, Alfreda; Ramsey, Jon J; Fascetti, Andrea J

    2017-09-29

    Surveys report that 25-57 % of cats are overweight or obese. The most evinced cause is neutering. Weight loss often fails; thus, new strategies are needed. Obesity has been associated with altered gut bacterial populations and increases in microbial dietary energy extraction, body weight and adiposity. This study aimed to determine whether alterations in intestinal bacteria were associated with obesity, energy restriction and neutering by characterising faecal microbiota using 16S rRNA gene sequencing in eight lean intact, eight lean neutered and eight obese neutered cats before and after 6 weeks of energy restriction. Lean neutered cats had a bacterial profile similar to obese rodents and humans, with a greater abundance (Penergy restriction (PEnergy reduction was concurrent with significant shifts in two low-abundance bacterial genera and trends in four additional genera. The greatest change was a reduction in the Firmicutes genus, Sarcina, from 4·54 to 0·65 % abundance after energy restriction. The short duration of energy restriction may explain why few bacterial changes were observed in the obese cats. Additional work is needed to understand how neutering, obesity and weight loss are related to changes in feline microbiota and how these microbial shifts affect host physiology.

  12. Resveratrol does not increase body fat loss induced by energy restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi, Goiuri; Macarulla, M Teresa; Portillo, María P; Rodríguez, Víctor M

    2014-06-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) is known to have an antiobesogenic effect because it mimics energy restriction. However, hardly any evidence exists concerning the combined effects of RSV and energy restriction on body fat reduction. So, the aim of the present study was to determine whether RSV increases body fat reduction induced by energy restriction. Male Wistar rats were fed a high-fat, high-sucrose diet for 6 weeks to obtain a diet-induced obesity model. Then they were submitted to a mild energy restriction (25%) without or with RSV supplementation (30 mg/kg body weight/day) for 2 weeks. Final body weight, subcutaneous and intra-abdominal white adipose tissues weights, Adipose Index, and serum triacylglycerol, cholesterol, glucose, and insulin were assessed. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) activities, as well as their genetic expressions, were measured in white adipose tissue. Final body weight, white adipose tissue weights, Adipose Index, and serum triacylglycerol, cholesterol, and insulin were reduced in both groups, but no differences were found among them. FAS, ACC, and LPL activities and expressions were also similar in both groups. These results suggest a lack of any adjuvant effect of RSV on energy restriction for obesity treatment purposes.

  13. Chronically Restricted Sleep Leads to Depression-Like Changes in Neurotransmitter Receptor Sensitivity and Neuroendocrine Stress Reactivity in Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novati, Arianna; Roman, Viktor; Cetin, Timur; Hagewoud, Roelina; den Boer, Johan A.; Luiten, Paul G.M.; Meerlo, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Frequently disrupted and restricted sleep is a common problem for many people in our Western society. In the long run, insufficient sleep may have repercussions for health and may sensitize individuals to psychiatric diseases. In this context, we applied an animal model of chronic

  14. Chronically Restricted Sleep Leads to Depression-Like Changes in Neurotransmitter Receptor Sensitivity and Neuroendocrine Stress Reactivity in Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novati, Arianna; Roman, Viktor; Cetin, Timur; Hagewoud, Roelina; den Boer, Johan A.; Luiten, Paul G.M.; Meerlo, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Frequently disrupted and restricted sleep is a common problem for many people in our Western society. In the long run, insufficient sleep may have repercussions for health and may sensitize individuals to psychiatric diseases. In this context, we applied an animal model of chronic

  15. Chronic leptin infusion advances, and immunoneutralization of leptin postpones puberty onset in normally fed and feed restricted female rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinoaldini, S.; Swarts, J.J.M.; Heijning, van de B.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Does leptin play a vital role in initiating puberty in female rats and can it overrule a nutrionally imposed (i.e. a 30% feed restriction, FR) delay in puberty onset? Prepubertal female rats were chronically infused for 14 days with leptin (icv or sc) or leptin-antiserum (icv) while puberty onset wa

  16. Chronic leptin infusion advances, and immunoneutralization of leptin postpones puberty onset in normally fed and feed restricted female rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinoaldini, S.; Swarts, J.J.M.; Heijning, van de B.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Does leptin play a vital role in initiating puberty in female rats and can it overrule a nutrionally imposed (i.e. a 30% feed restriction, FR) delay in puberty onset? Prepubertal female rats were chronically infused for 14 days with leptin (icv or sc) or leptin-antiserum (icv) while puberty onset

  17. Calculation of the Local Free Energy Landscape in the Restricted Region by the Modified Tomographic Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changjun

    2016-03-31

    The free energy landscape is the most important information in the study of the reaction mechanisms of the molecules. However, it is difficult to calculate. In a large collective variable space, a molecule must take a long time to obtain the sufficient sampling during the simulation. To save the calculation quantity, decreasing the sampling region and constructing the local free energy landscape is required in practice. However, the restricted region in the collective variable space may have an irregular shape. Simply restricting one or more collective variables of the molecule cannot satisfy the requirement. In this paper, we propose a modified tomographic method to perform the simulation. First, it divides the restricted region by some hyperplanes and connects the centers of hyperplanes together by a curve. Second, it forces the molecule to sample on the curve and the hyperplanes in the simulation and calculates the free energy data on them. Finally, all the free energy data are combined together to form the local free energy landscape. Without consideration of the area outside the restricted region, this free energy calculation can be more efficient. By this method, one can further optimize the path quickly in the collective variable space.

  18. Effects of chronic calorie restriction or dietary resveratrol supplementation on insulin sensitivity markers in a primate, Microcebus murinus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Marchal

    Full Text Available The prevalence of diabetes and hyperinsulinemia increases with age, inducing metabolic failure and limiting lifespan. Calorie restriction (CR without malnutrition delays the aging process, but its long-term application to humans seems difficult. Resveratrol (RSV, a dietary polyphenol, appears to be a promising CR mimetic that can be easily administered in humans. In this work, we hypothesized that both CR and RSV impact insulin sensitivity in a non-human primate compared to standard-fed control (CTL animals. Four- to five-year-old male grey mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus were assigned to three dietary groups: a CTL group, a CR group receiving 30% fewer calories than the CTL and a RSV group receiving the CTL diet supplemented with RSV (200 mg·day(-1·kg(-1. Insulin sensitivity and glycemia were assessed using an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR index evaluation after 21 or 33 months of chronic treatment. Resting metabolic rate was also measured to assess the potential relationships between this energy expenditure parameter and insulin sensitivity markers. No differences were found after a 21-month period of treatment, except for lower glucose levels 30 min after glucose loading in CR animals. After 33 months, CR and RSV decreased glycemia after the oral glucose loading without decreasing fasting blood insulin. A general effect of treatment was observed on the HOMA-IR index, with an 81% reduction in CR animals and 53% in RSV animals after 33 months of treatment compared to CTL. Chronic CR and dietary supplementation with RSV affected insulin sensitivity by improving the glucose tolerance of animals without disturbing their baseline insulin secretion. These results suggest that both CR and RSV have beneficial effects on metabolic alterations, although these effects are different in amplitude between the two anti-aging treatments and potentially rely on different metabolic

  19. Intermittent Moderate Energy Restriction Improves Weight Loss Efficiency in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika V Seimon

    Full Text Available Intermittent severe energy restriction is popular for weight management. To investigate whether intermittent moderate energy restriction may improve this approach by enhancing weight loss efficiency, we conducted a study in mice, where energy intake can be controlled.Male C57/Bl6 mice that had been rendered obese by an ad libitum diet high in fat and sugar for 22 weeks were then fed one of two energy-restricted normal chow diets for a 12-week weight loss phase. The continuous diet (CD provided 82% of the energy intake of age-matched ad libitum chow-fed controls. The intermittent diet (ID provided cycles of 82% of control intake for 5-6 consecutive days, and ad libitum intake for 1-3 days. Weight loss efficiency during this phase was calculated as (total weight change ÷ [(total energy intake of mice on CD or ID-(total average energy intake of controls]. Subsets of mice then underwent a 3-week weight regain phase involving ad libitum re-feeding.Mice on the ID showed transient hyperphagia relative to controls during each 1-3-day ad libitum feeding period, and overall ate significantly more than CD mice (91.1±1.0 versus 82.2±0.5% of control intake respectively, n = 10, P<0.05. There were no significant differences between CD and ID groups at the end of the weight loss or weight regain phases with respect to body weight, fat mass, circulating glucose or insulin concentrations, or the insulin resistance index. Weight loss efficiency was significantly greater with ID than with CD (0.042±0.007 versus 0.018±0.001 g/kJ, n = 10, P<0.01. Mice on the CD exhibited significantly greater hypothalamic mRNA expression of proopiomelanocortin (POMC relative to ID and control mice, with no differences in neuropeptide Y or agouti-related peptide mRNA expression between energy-restricted groups.Intermittent moderate energy restriction may offer an advantage over continuous moderate energy restriction, because it induces significantly greater weight loss relative

  20. Dietary phosphorus restriction in advanced chronic kidney disease: merits, challenges, and emerging strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Orlando M; Wolf, Myles

    2010-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is an independent risk factor for mortality in patients on maintenance dialysis. Since phosphorus clearance by standard three times-weekly dialysis is insufficient to balance ongoing dietary phosphorus intake, strategies to prevent absorption of dietary phosphorus are essential for attenuating increased serum levels. Dietary phosphorus binders are used widely for this purpose but dietary phosphorus restriction is relatively underutilized, most likely because of the logistical complexity of instituting and monitoring a low phosphorus diet, and for fear of worsening protein-energy wasting, which itself is a potent risk factor for mortality. In this review, we propose sustainable strategies for reducing phosphorus intake while avoiding exacerbation of protein-energy wasting. The approach is based on recognition of the dissociation between protein and phosphorus content in phosphorus-rich processed foods and the varying phosphorus bioavailability in different dietary sources. Controlling serum phosphate levels is among the most challenging aspects of day-to-day dialysis care but integration of sensible dietary interventions will likely improve phosphorus control.

  1. WTO law and economics and restrictive practices in energy trade : The case of the OPEC cartel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marhold, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The World Trade Organization cannot deal comprehensively with restrictive export practices maintained by energy cartels such as the OPEC. The main reason for this is the absence of competition rules in the multilateral trading system. However, in spite of the fact that the WTO does not have rules on

  2. Effects of moderate energy restriction on physical performance and substrate utilization in non-obese men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis-te Wierik, E.J.M.; Hoogzaad, L.V.; Berg, H. van den; Schaafsma, G.

    1994-01-01

    Energy restriction (ER) has shown to be an effective 'anti-aging' factor in rodents, resulting in an increased life span and preventing or delaying the occurrence of many age-related diseases in rodents. As a part of a feasibility study on the potential application of ER in humans, we studied the ef

  3. Effects of moderate energy restriction on physical performance and substrate utilization in non-obese men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis-te Wierik, E.J.M.; Hoogzaad, L.V.; Berg, H. van den; Schaafsma, G.

    1994-01-01

    Energy restriction (ER) has shown to be an effective 'anti-aging' factor in rodents, resulting in an increased life span and preventing or delaying the occurrence of many age-related diseases in rodents. As a part of a feasibility study on the potential application of ER in humans, we studied the

  4. Effects of energy restriction on acute adrenoceptor and metabolic responses to exercise in obese subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempen, K.P.G.; Saris, W.H.M.; Senden, J.M.G.; Menheere, P.P.C.A.; Blaak, E.E.; van Baak, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    Effects of energy restriction on acute adrenoceptor and metabolic responses to exercise in obese subjects. Kempen KP, Saris WH, Senden JM, Menheere PP, Blaak EE, van Baak MA. Department of Human Biology, University of Limburg, Maastricht, The Netherlands. This study was intended to investigate the e

  5. Effects of energy restriction on acute adrenoceptor and metabolic responses to exercise in obese subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempen, K.P.G.; Saris, W.H.M.; Senden, J.M.G.; Menheere, P.P.C.A.; Blaak, E.E.; van Baak, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    Effects of energy restriction on acute adrenoceptor and metabolic responses to exercise in obese subjects. Kempen KP, Saris WH, Senden JM, Menheere PP, Blaak EE, van Baak MA. Department of Human Biology, University of Limburg, Maastricht, The Netherlands. This study was intended to investigate the e

  6. Cognitive Performances Are Selectively Enhanced during Chronic Caloric Restriction or Resveratrol Supplementation in a Primate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Julia; Picq, Jean-Luc; Aujard, Fabienne

    2011-01-01

    Effects of an 18-month treatment with a moderate, chronic caloric restriction (CR) or an oral supplementation with resveratrol (RSV), a potential CR mimetic, on cognitive and motor performances were studied in non-human primates, grey mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus). Thirty-three adult male mouse lemurs were assigned to three different groups: a control (CTL) group fed ad libitum, a CR group fed 70% of the CTL caloric intake, and an RSV group (RSV supplementation of 200 mg.kg−1.day−1) fed ad libitum. Three different cognitive tests, two motor tests, one emotional test and an analysis of cortisol level were performed in each group. Compared to CTL animals, CR or RSV animals did not show any change in motor performances evaluated by rotarod and jump tests, but an increase in spontaneous locomotor activity was observed in both groups. Working memory was improved by both treatments in the spontaneous alternation task. Despite a trend for CR group, only RSV supplementation increased spatial memory performances in the circular platform task. Finally, none of these treatments induced additional stress to the animals as reflected by similar results in the open field test and cortisol analyses compared to CTL animals. The present data provided the earliest evidence for a beneficial effect of CR or RSV supplementation on specific cognitive functions in a primate. Taken together, these results suggest that RSV could be a good candidate to mimic long-term CR effects and support the growing evidences that nutritional interventions can have beneficial effects on brain functions even in adults. PMID:21304942

  7. Effects of restricted environmental stimulation: enhancement of hypnotizability for experimental and chronic pain control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabasz, A F; Barabasz, M

    1989-07-01

    Enhancement of hypnotizability and pain tolerance has been demonstrated using restricted environmental stimulation therapy (REST) with university students as Ss (A. F. Barabasz, 1982). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether or not similar results could be obtained with chronic pain patients. Ss consisted of outpatients in treatment for conditions in which pain is prominent who also demonstrated low hypnotizability after repeated hypnosis plateau sessions. 2 groups of Ss were exposed to REST. Situational demand characteristics (Orne, 1962) favored an increase in hypnotizability for REST Group 1 (high demand). REST Group 2 (low demand) was exposed to situational demand characteristics designed to disguise the experimental hypothesis. 2 groups of control Ss were exposed to the same alternative demand characteristic manipulations as the experimental groups, but environmental stimulation was maintained. The Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C) of Weitzenhoffer and E. R. Hilgard (1962), including a posthypnotic suggestion for an anesthetic reaction, and an ischemic pain test were administered prior to treatment and again immediately following treatment. After 6 hours of REST, significant increases in SHSS:C scores were found for high-demand and low-demand experimental Ss, as well as for high-demand control Ss. No such increase was found for low-demand controls. Significant decreases in pain scores were found for both high- and low-demand experimental groups. No significant pain score decreases were found for either control group, suggesting a relatively weak effect of demand characteristics. An independent postexperimental inquiry suggested all Ss believed they received active treatments. The inquiry, conducted 10-15 days after the experiment, also revealed a majority of experimental Ss were using hypnosis on a daily basis to reduce pain with a substantial decrease in pain medication. Only 2 control Ss (highest in hypnotizability

  8. Targeting energy metabolism in brain cancer with calorically restricted ketogenic diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Kiebish, Michael; Mukherjee, Purna; Marsh, Jeremy

    2008-11-01

    Information is presented on the calorically restricted ketogenic diet (CRKD) as an alternative therapy for brain cancer. In contrast to normal neurons and glia, which evolved to metabolize ketone bodies as an alternative fuel to glucose under energy-restricted conditions, brain tumor cells are largely glycolytic due to mitochondrial defects and have a reduced ability to metabolize ketone bodies. The CRKD is effective in managing brain tumor growth in animal models and in patients, and appears to act through antiangiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and proapoptotic mechanisms.

  9. Piromelatine, a novel melatonin receptor agonist, stabilizes metabolic profiles and ameliorates insulin resistance in chronic sleep restricted rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Meihua; Hu, Xiaobo; Su, Zehong; Zhang, Chi; Yang, Shenghua; Ding, Lin; Laudon, Moshe; Yin, Weidong

    2014-03-15

    Chronic sleep deprivation may speed the onset or increase the severity of age-related conditions such as Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity. Piromelatine (Neu-P11) is a novel melatonin agonist, which has been developed for the treatment of insomnia. Animal studies have suggested possible efficacy of piromelatine in sleep maintenance, anxiety and depression. In addition, piromelatine has been shown to inhibit weight gain and improve insulin sensitivity in high-fat/high-sucrose-fed (HFSD) rats. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of piromelatine on insulin sensitivity in sleep restricted rats. Sleep restriction was established by rotating cages intermittently for 20h thereby sleeping time of rats was limited to 4h per day. During 8 days of sleep restriction, rats were injected intraperitoneally with piromelatine (20mg/kg), melatonin (5mg/kg) or a vehicle. The results showed that sleep restriction increased plasma glucose, fasting insulin, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG) and oxidative stress markers while HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) level and glucose tolerance were decreased. However, under piromelatine or melatonin treatment, the levels of plasma glucose, TG, TC decreased and HDL-C, glucose tolerance and antioxidative potency increased when compared with the vehicle-treated group. These data suggest that chronic sleep restriction in rats induce metabolic dysfunction, oxidative stress and insulin resistance, and these symptoms were improved by treatment with piromelatine or melatonin. We conclude that piromelatine could regulate metabolic profiles and insulin sensitivity, and attenuate insulin resistance induced by sleep restriction.

  10. Intermittent energy restriction in type 2 diabetes: A short discussion of medication management

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Sharayah; Peter M. Clifton; Keogh, Jennifer B.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To discuss type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) medication changes required during the popular 5:2 intermittent energy restriction (IER) diet. METHODS A search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL and Cochrane library for original research articles investigating the use of very low calorie diets (VLCD) in people with T2DM. The search terms used included “VLCD” or “very low energy diet” or “very low energy restriction” or “IER” or “intermittent fasting” or “calorie restriction” or “di...

  11. Intermittent Moderate Energy Restriction Improves Weight Loss Efficiency in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seimon, Radhika V.; Shi, Yan-Chuan; Slack, Katy; Lee, Kailun; Fernando, Hamish A.; Nguyen, Amy D.; Zhang, Lei; Lin, Shu; Enriquez, Ronaldo F.; Lau, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    Background Intermittent severe energy restriction is popular for weight management. To investigate whether intermittent moderate energy restriction may improve this approach by enhancing weight loss efficiency, we conducted a study in mice, where energy intake can be controlled. Methods Male C57/Bl6 mice that had been rendered obese by an ad libitum diet high in fat and sugar for 22 weeks were then fed one of two energy-restricted normal chow diets for a 12-week weight loss phase. The continuous diet (CD) provided 82% of the energy intake of age-matched ad libitum chow-fed controls. The intermittent diet (ID) provided cycles of 82% of control intake for 5–6 consecutive days, and ad libitum intake for 1–3 days. Weight loss efficiency during this phase was calculated as (total weight change) ÷ [(total energy intake of mice on CD or ID)–(total average energy intake of controls)]. Subsets of mice then underwent a 3-week weight regain phase involving ad libitum re-feeding. Results Mice on the ID showed transient hyperphagia relative to controls during each 1–3-day ad libitum feeding period, and overall ate significantly more than CD mice (91.1±1.0 versus 82.2±0.5% of control intake respectively, n = 10, Pweight loss or weight regain phases with respect to body weight, fat mass, circulating glucose or insulin concentrations, or the insulin resistance index. Weight loss efficiency was significantly greater with ID than with CD (0.042±0.007 versus 0.018±0.001 g/kJ, n = 10, Pweight loss relative to energy deficit in mice. PMID:26784324

  12. Water and sodium restriction on cardiovascular disease in young chronic hemodialysis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xue; WANG Wei; LI Han

    2013-01-01

    Background Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent predictor of morbidity and mortality in chronic hemodialysis (CHD) patients.It remains unclear whether efforts to correct fluid overload in young CHD can reverse LVH.This prospective single-center cohort study evaluated left ventricular masses index (LVMI) evolution in fluid overloaded young CHD patients with or without water-sodium control.Methods A total of t06 young patients aged between 22 and 44 years on CHD were enrolled in this prospective,control study.Patients were divided into three groups according to the percentage of interdialytic weight gain (PIDWG (%) =100% × (predialysis weight-dry weight)/dry weight) at baseline.Thirty-six patients with PIDWG more than 5% received health education to restrict water-sodium intake strictly (Group I).Other 36 patients with comparable fluid status levels (the PIDWG more than 5%) did not receive health education to restrict water-sodium intake strictly (Group Ⅱ) and those with PIDWG less than 5% (Group Ⅲ,n=34) were served as controls.Echocardiographic studies were performed to evaluate LVMI at baseline and then after 1,3 and 6 months.The total follow-up time was 6 months.Results There was no significant difference in clinical data (such as age,gender,aetiology of renal failure and nutritional state,etc.) among the three groups at baseline.At baseline,the prevalence of LVH in Group Ⅰ,Ⅱ and Ⅲ was 75.0%,72.2% and 55.9%,respectively.LVMI was directly correlated with PIDWG (r =0.779,P <0.01).After 6 months,the PIDWG in Group I decreased in mean by (3.77±1.09)%,and LVMI decreased in mean by (27.59±12.15) g/m2.The prevalence of LVH decreased in mean by 25.0%,and the blood pressure decreased in mean by (14.69±11.50) mmHg/(7.14±7.51) mmHg.The medication category and total medication frequency of hypotensive drugs significantly decreased in Group I at 6 months.However the urine volume and the levels of serum creatinine and serum

  13. Restricted second random phase approximations and Tamm-Dancoff approximations for electronic excitation energy calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Degao; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Peng [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Yang, Weitao, E-mail: weitao.yang@duke.edu [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2014-12-07

    In this article, we develop systematically second random phase approximations (RPA) and Tamm-Dancoff approximations (TDA) of particle-hole and particle-particle channels for calculating molecular excitation energies. The second particle-hole RPA/TDA can capture double excitations missed by the particle-hole RPA/TDA and time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), while the second particle-particle RPA/TDA recovers non-highest-occupied-molecular-orbital excitations missed by the particle-particle RPA/TDA. With proper orbital restrictions, these restricted second RPAs and TDAs have a formal scaling of only O(N{sup 4}). The restricted versions of second RPAs and TDAs are tested with various small molecules to show some positive results. Data suggest that the restricted second particle-hole TDA (r2ph-TDA) has the best overall performance with a correlation coefficient similar to TDDFT, but with a larger negative bias. The negative bias of the r2ph-TDA may be induced by the unaccounted ground state correlation energy to be investigated further. Overall, the r2ph-TDA is recommended to study systems with both single and some low-lying double excitations with a moderate accuracy. Some expressions on excited state property evaluations, such as 〈S{sup ^2}〉 are also developed and tested.

  14. Restricted second random phase approximations and Tamm-Dancoff approximations for electronic excitation energy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Degao; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Weitao

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we develop systematically second random phase approximations (RPA) and Tamm-Dancoff approximations (TDA) of particle-hole and particle-particle channels for calculating molecular excitation energies. The second particle-hole RPA/TDA can capture double excitations missed by the particle-hole RPA/TDA and time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), while the second particle-particle RPA/TDA recovers non-highest-occupied-molecular-orbital excitations missed by the particle-particle RPA/TDA. With proper orbital restrictions, these restricted second RPAs and TDAs have a formal scaling of only O(N4). The restricted versions of second RPAs and TDAs are tested with various small molecules to show some positive results. Data suggest that the restricted second particle-hole TDA (r2ph-TDA) has the best overall performance with a correlation coefficient similar to TDDFT, but with a larger negative bias. The negative bias of the r2ph-TDA may be induced by the unaccounted ground state correlation energy to be investigated further. Overall, the r2ph-TDA is recommended to study systems with both single and some low-lying double excitations with a moderate accuracy. Some expressions on excited state property evaluations, such as < hat{S}2rangle are also developed and tested.

  15. Dietary restriction and exercise for diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth Van Huffel

    Full Text Available Obesity and sedentary lifestyle are major health problems and key features to develop cardiovascular disease. Data on the effects of lifestyle interventions in diabetics with chronic kidney disease (CKD have been conflicting.Systematic review.Diabetes patients with CKD stage 3 to 5. SEARCH STRATEGY AND SOURCES: Medline, Embase and Central were searched to identify papers.Effect of a negative energy balance on hard outcomes in diabetics with CKD.Death, cardiovascular events, glycaemic control, kidney function, metabolic parameters and body composition.We retained 11 studies. There are insufficient data to evaluate the effect on mortality to promote negative energy balance. None of the studies reported a difference in incidence of Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events. Reduction of energy intake does not alter creatinine clearance but significantly reduces proteinuria (mean difference from -0.66 to -1.77 g/24 h. Interventions with combined exercise and diet resulted in a slower decline of eGFR (-9.2 vs. -20.7 mL/min over two year observation; p<0.001. Aerobic and resistance exercise reduced HbA1c (-0.51 (-0.87 to -0.14; p = 0.007 and -0.38 (-0.72 to -0.22; p = 0.038, respectively. Exercise interventions improve the overall functional status and quality of life in this subgroup. Aerobic exercise reduces BMI (-0.74% (-1.29 to -0.18; p = 0.009 and body weight (-2.2 kg (-3.9 to -0.6; p = 0.008. Resistance exercise reduces trunk fat mass (-0,7±0,1 vs. +0,8 kg ±0,1 kg; p = 0,001-0,005. In none of the studies did the intervention cause an increase in adverse events.All studies used a different intervention type and mixed patient groups.There is insufficient evidence to evaluate the effect of negative energy balance interventions on mortality in diabetic patients with advanced CKD. Overall, these interventions have beneficial effects on glycaemic control, BMI and body composition, functional status and quality of life, and no harmful

  16. Trends in the development of industrially assimilated renewable energy: the problem of resource restrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizhegorodtsev, R. M.; Ratner, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    An analysis of the dynamics of the development of wind and solar energy and potential resource restrictions of the dissemination of these technologies of energy generation associated with intensive use of rare earth metals and some other mineral resources are presented. The technological prospects of various directions of decisions of the problem of resource restrictions, including escalating of volumes of extraction and production of necessary mineral components, creating substitutes of scarce materials and development of recycling are considered. The bottlenecks of each of the above-mentioned decisions were founded. Conclusions are drawn on the prospects of development of the Russian high-tech sectors of the economy in the context of the most probable decisions of the problem of resource restrictions of wind and solar energy. An increase in extraction and production of rare earth metals and some other materials, stimulation of domestic research and development (R&D) to create the permanent magnets of new types and new technologies of wind-powered generation, and reduction of the resource-demand and technology development of recycling the components of power equipment are the most prospective directions of progress. The innovations in these directions will be in demand on the European, Chinese, and North American markets in the near decades due to the end of the life cycle (approximately 30 years) of wind and solar energy projects started at the turn of the 20th-21st centuries (the beginning of exponential growth in plants). The private investors and relevant regional and federal government agencies can use the qualitative characteristics of the dynamics of industrially assimilated renewable energy to choose the most promising investment orientations in energy projects and selection of the most economically sound development methods of energy and related industries.

  17. Pituitary-gonadal function in adult male rats subjected to chronic water restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armario, A; Campmany, L; Lopez-Calderon, A

    1987-01-01

    The effect of water restriction on the pituitary-gonadal axis has been studied in adult male rats. Water restriction did not modify FSH, LH and testosterone levels. However, both LH and testosterone responses to acute noise stress were impaired by water restriction. It was unlikely that the inhibition of the pituitary-gonadal response to stress was due to an alteration of the circadian pattern of LH since no evidence for such a daily rhythm was found in either of the two experimental groups. The effects of water restriction on the pituitary-gonadal axis appear to be at least partially a consequence of the resulting reduction in food intake, so that the pituitary-gonadal response to stress would be a more sensitive index of abnormalities induced by protein-calorie deficit than basal concentrations of LH, FSH, or T.

  18. Somatotropin as the non-ACTH factor of anterior pituitary origin for the maintenance of enhanced aldosterone secretory responsiveness of dietary sodium restriction in chronically hypophysectomized rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, T.C.; Wied, D. de

    1968-01-01

    Somatotropin treatment in chronically hypophysectomized, sodium-deprived rats effectively restored to treated animals the distinct and enhanced aldosterone secretory responsiveness of the adrenal which characterizes the adrenals of intact rats subjected to dietary sodium restriction, but absent in c

  19. Somatotropin as the non-ACTH factor of anterior pituitary origin for the maintenance of enhanced aldosterone secretory responsiveness of dietary sodium restriction in chronically hypophysectomized rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, T.C.; Wied, D. de

    1968-01-01

    Somatotropin treatment in chronically hypophysectomized, sodium-deprived rats effectively restored to treated animals the distinct and enhanced aldosterone secretory responsiveness of the adrenal which characterizes the adrenals of intact rats subjected to dietary sodium restriction, but absent in c

  20. Vitamin D receptor activator and dietary sodium restriction to reduce residual urinary albumin excretion in chronic kidney disease (ViRTUE study) : rationale and study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyzer, Charlotte A.; de Jong, Maarten A.; van Breda, G. Fenna; Vervloet, Marc G.; Laverman, Gozewijn D.; Hemmelder, Marc; Janssen, Wilbert M.; Heerspink, Hiddo J. Lambers; Navis, Gerjan; de Borst, Martin H.

    Optimal albuminuria reduction is considered essential to halting chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression. Both vitamin D receptor activator (VDRA) treatment and dietary sodium restriction potentiate the efficacy of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone- system (RAAS) blockade to reduce albuminuria. The

  1. Somatotropin as the non-ACTH factor of anterior pituitary origin for the maintenance of enhanced aldosterone secretory responsiveness of dietary sodium restriction in chronically hypophysectomized rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, T.C.; Wied, D. de

    1968-01-01

    Somatotropin treatment in chronically hypophysectomized, sodium-deprived rats effectively restored to treated animals the distinct and enhanced aldosterone secretory responsiveness of the adrenal which characterizes the adrenals of intact rats subjected to dietary sodium restriction, but absent in

  2. Chronically Increased Amino Acids Improve Insulin Secretion, Pancreatic Vascularity, and Islet Size in Growth-Restricted Fetal Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura D; Davis, Melissa; Wai, Sandra; Wesolowski, Stephanie R; Hay, William W; Limesand, Sean W; Rozance, Paul J

    2016-10-01

    Placental insufficiency is associated with reduced supply of amino acids to the fetus and leads to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). IUGR fetuses are characterized by lower glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, smaller pancreatic islets with less β-cells, and impaired pancreatic vascularity. To test whether supplemental amino acids infused into the IUGR fetus could improve these complications of IUGR we used acute (hours) and chronic (11 d) direct fetal amino acid infusions into a sheep model of placental insufficiency and IUGR near the end of gestation. IUGR fetuses had attenuated acute amino acid-stimulated insulin secretion compared with control fetuses. These results were confirmed in isolated IUGR pancreatic islets. After the chronic fetal amino acid infusion, fetal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and islet size were restored to control values. These changes were associated with normalization of fetal pancreatic vascularity and higher fetal pancreatic vascular endothelial growth factor A protein concentrations. These results demonstrate that decreased fetal amino acid supply contributes to the pathogenesis of pancreatic islet defects in IUGR. Moreover, the results show that pancreatic islets in IUGR fetuses retain their ability to respond to increased amino acids near the end of gestation after chronic fetal growth restriction.

  3. Short-term intermittent energy restriction interventions for weight management: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, L; McGarty, A; Hutchison, L; Ells, L; Hankey, C

    2017-10-04

    This systematic review synthesized the available evidence on the effect of short-term periods of intermittent energy restriction (weekly intermittent energy restriction; ≥7-d energy restriction) in comparison with usual care (daily continuous energy restriction), in the treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Six electronic databases were searched from inception to October 2016. Only randomized controlled trials of interventions (≥12 weeks) in adults with overweight and obesity were included. Five studies were included in this review. Weekly intermittent energy restriction periods ranged from an energy intake between 1757 and 6276 kJ/d(-1) . The mean duration of the interventions was 26 (range 14 to 48) weeks. Meta-analysis demonstrated no significant difference in weight loss between weekly intermittent energy restriction and continuous energy restriction post-intervention (weighted mean difference: -1.36 [-3.23, 0.51], p = 0.15) and at follow-up (weighted mean difference: -0.82 [-3.76, 2.11], p = 0.58). Both interventions achieved comparable weight loss of >5 kg and therefore were associated with clinical benefits to health. The findings support the use of weekly intermittent energy restriction as an alternative option for the treatment of obesity. Currently, there is insufficient evidence to support the long-term sustainable effects of weekly intermittent energy restriction on weight management. © 2017 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity.

  4. Effects of Chronic Blood-Flow Restriction Exercise on Skeletal Muscle Size and Myogenic Satellite Cell Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Per; Jacobsen, Mikkel; Jensen, Kasper Yde

    2016-01-01

    of continued sports activity, resulting in visible hypertrophy of his left leg. AIM: To study the effect of chronic blood-flow restricted (BFR) exercise conditions on skeletal muscle size and myogenic satellite cell (SC) expression in an arterio-venous shunt patient. METHODS: Muscle biopsies were obtained from......-regulation in myogenic satellite cell activity within all stages of the cell cycle, which was accompanied by substantial muscle hypertrophy. Specifically, muscle fiber cross-sectional area (40%) and myonuclei number (15%) were elevated in the affected leg, together with an elevated myonuclear domain (20%). This single......-case study confirms previous result from our Lab demonstrating that blood-flow restricted muscle exercise leads to a marked activation of myogenic SCs, upregulated myonuclei number and marked myofiber hypertrophy....

  5. The effect of weight loss by energy restriction on metabolic profile and glucose tolerance in ponies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Weyenberg, S; Hesta, M; Buyse, J; Janssens, G P J

    2008-10-01

    In nine initially obese ponies, a weekly weight loss according to 1% of their ideal body weight was evaluated for its impact on insulin sensitivity and metabolic profile. Weight loss was obtained solely through energy restriction, initially at 70% of maintenance energy requirements, but to maintain constant weight loss, feed amount had to be decreased to 50% and 35% of maintenance energy requirement during the course of the trial. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed at weeks 0, 10 and 17. Fasted blood samples were taken on weeks 0, 3, 10, 17 for analysis of triglycerides (TG), non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), T(3), T(4) and leptin. Total average weight loss was 18.2%. When the OGTT was performed at weeks 0, 10 and 17, ponies had lost 0.22%, 9.9% and 16.3% of their initial weight respectively. Weight loss was associated with a decreased AUC for glucose and insulin. Moreover, greater % weight loss was associated with a significantly lower glucose peak and a lower area under the curve (AUC glucose). The lower glucose response after an OGTT in lean ponies was not the result of an increased insulin secretion, but an improved insulin sensitivity. Restricted feeding led to mobilization of TG and NEFA and to a reduced basal metabolism, with lower LDH, CPK, T(3) and leptin. in obese Shetland ponies, weight loss at a rate of 1% of ideal body weight per week through restricted energy intake, ameliorated insulin sensitivity.

  6. Physical activity and weight loss are independent predictors of improved insulin sensitivity following energy restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Stefan G J A; Verhoef, Sanne P M; Westerterp, Klaas R

    2016-02-01

    The role of physical activity and the joint effect with sleep duration on insulin sensitivity (IS) during energy restriction followed by weight maintenance were determined. One hundred and two subjects (28 males) (mean ± SD age: 40 ± 9 years; BMI: 31.9 ± 3.0 kg/m(2) ) followed a very-low-energy diet for 8 weeks, followed by a 44-week period of weight maintenance. Body composition (three-compartment model based on body weight, total body water, and body volume), physical activity (accelerometry), sleep (questionnaire, Epworth Sleepiness Scale), and fasting plasma insulin and glucose concentrations were assessed before the diet and at 8, 20, and 52 weeks after the start. Compared to baseline, IS was improved significantly after 8 weeks (P physical activity counts. Maintaining daily physical activity during energy restriction is as important as weight loss itself in the improvement of IS; there was no additional effect of change in sleep duration. During weight maintenance, improved IS is maintained better if physical activity returns to baseline or higher. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  7. Standby Energy Conservation Plan No. 2: Building Temperature Restrictions Plan. Environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-02-01

    This report analyzes the environmental impacts of the proposed Building Temperature Restrictions Plan. The Plan would result in fuel and energy savings which could be diverted to other areas. Environmental impacts, with emphasis on air quality, were analyzed and found to result in a very minor improvement in air quality. Public health impacts are also minimal, and although some individuals may experience discomfort, it can be minimized by adjustments in clothing. The change in temperature is insufficient to have any significant impact on persons suffering from most diseases.

  8. Appetite and gut peptide responses to exercise and calorie restriction. The effect of modest energy deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deighton, Kevin; Batterham, Rachel L; Stensel, David J

    2014-10-01

    Weight loss is the result of a sustained negative energy balance, which is typically achieved by decreasing food intake and/or increasing physical activity. Current evidence suggests that acute energy deficits of ~4820 kJ elicit contrasting homeostatic responses when induced by exercise and food restriction but the response to government-recommended energy deficits is unknown. Twelve healthy men (mean(SD): age 24(5) years, body mass index 23.8(2.7) kg⋅m(-2), maximum oxygen uptake 55.4(9.1) mL⋅kg(-1)⋅min(-1)) completed three 8 h trials (control (Con), exercise-induced energy deficit (Ex-Def) and food restriction (Food-Def)) separated by 1 week. Thirty minutes of cycling at 64.5(3.2)% of maximum oxygen uptake was performed in Ex-Def from 0 to 0.5 h, which induced an energy deficit of 1469(256) kJ. An equivalent energy deficit was induced in Food-Def (1478(275) kJ) by reducing the energy content of standardised test meals at 1 h and 4 h. Appetite ratings, acylated ghrelin and peptide YY3-36 concentrations were measured throughout each trial. An ad libitum meal was provided at 7 h. Appetite was higher in Food-Def than Ex-Def from 4 to 8 h (P = 0.033) and tended to be higher across the entire 8 h trial (P = 0.059). However, energy intake at the ad libitum meal did not differ between trials (P = 0.634; Con 4376 (1634); Food-Def 4481 (1846); Ex-Def 4217 (1850) kJ). Acylated ghrelin was not related to changes in appetite but plasma PYY3-36 concentrations were higher in Ex-Def than Food-Def (P exercise. Appetite responses were associated with changes in plasma PYY3-36 but not acylated ghrelin concentrations and did not influence subsequent energy intake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimizing sleep/wake schedules in space: Sleep during chronic nocturnal sleep restriction with and without diurnal naps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollicone, Daniel J.; Van Dongen, Hans P. A.; Dinges, David F.

    2007-02-01

    Effective sleep/wake schedules for space operations must balance severe time constraints with allocating sufficient time for sleep in order to sustain high levels of neurobehavioral performance. Developing such schedules requires knowledge about the relationship between scheduled "time in bed" (TIB) and actual physiological sleep obtained. A ground-based laboratory study in N=93 healthy adult subjects was conducted to investigate physiological sleep obtained in a range of restricted sleep schedules. Eighteen different conditions with restricted nocturnal anchor sleep, with and without diurnal naps, were examined in a response surface mapping paradigm. Sleep efficiency was found to be a function of total TIB per 24 h regardless of how the sleep was divided among nocturnal anchor sleep and diurnal nap sleep periods. The amounts of sleep stages 1+2 and REM showed more complex relationships with the durations of the anchor and nap sleep periods, while slow-wave sleep was essentially preserved among the different conditions of the experiment. The results of the study indicated that when sleep was chronically restricted, sleep duration was largely unaffected by whether the sleep was placed nocturnally or split between nocturnal anchor sleep periods and daytime naps. Having thus assessed that split-sleep schedules are feasible in terms of obtaining physiological sleep, further research will reveal whether these schedules and the associated variations in the distribution of sleep stages may be advantageous in mitigating neurobehavioral performance impairment in the face of limited time for sleep.

  10. Effects of acute and chronic heat stress on plasma metabolites, hormones and oxidant status in restrictedly fed broiler breeders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jingjing; Tang, Li; Lu, Lin; Zhang, Liyang; Lin, Xi; Liu, Hsiao-Ching; Odle, Jack; Luo, Xugang

    2015-07-01

    Heat tolerance can be improved by feed restriction in broiler chickens. It is unknown whether the same is true for broiler breeders, which are restrictedly fed. Therefore, the current study was conducted to study the effects of heat stress on plasma metabolites, hormones, and oxidative status of restricted fed broiler breeders with special emphases on the temperature and latency of heat exposure. In trial 1, 12 broiler breeders were kept either in a thermoneutral chamber (21°C, control, n = 6) or in a chamber with a step-wise increased environmental temperature from 21 to 33°C (21, 25, 29, 33°C, heat-stressed, n = 6). Changes in plasma total cholesterol, glucose, and triiodothyronine (T3) were closely related to the environmental temperature. When the temperature reached 29°C, plasma T3 (P stressed birds, whereas plasma glucose (P stressed birds than controls regardless of the temperatures applied. In Trial 2, 24 broiler breeders were divided into 2 groups and raised under 21°C and 32°C for 8 weeks, respectively. Total cholesterol was increased in chronic heat-stressed broiler breeders after 4 weeks. Plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, P = 0.047) and glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT, P = 0.036) was up-regulated after 6 weeks of thermal treatment, whereas plasma CK (P = 0.009) was increased at the end of thermal treatment. Plasma malonaldehyde, protein carbonyl content, activity of total superoxide dismutase (SOD), and corticosterone content were not altered after acute and prolonged heat challenges. Taken together, acute heat stress primarily resulted in disturbance of plasma metabolites, whereas chronic heat stress caused tissue damage reflected by increased plasma LDA, GOT, and CK. During acute heat stress, plasma metabolites were minimally disturbed in broiler breeders until the environmental temperature reached 33°C. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  11. Enhancement of acetaminophen-induced chronic hepatotoxicity in restricted fed rats: a nonclinical approach to acetaminophen-induced chronic hepatotoxicity in susceptible patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Kazuma; Yamada, Naohito; Suzuki, Yusuke; Toyoda, Kaoru; Hashimoto, Tatsuji; Takahashi, Akemi; Kobayashi, Akio; Shoda, Toshiyuki; Kuno, Hideyuki; Sugai, Shoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a commonly used and effective analgesic and antipyretic agent. However, some patients encounter hepatotoxicity after repeated APAP dosing at therapeutic doses. In the present study, we focused on the nutritional state as one of the risk factors of APAP-induced chronic hepatotoxicity in humans and investigated the contribution of undernourishment to susceptibility to APAP-induced chronic hepatotoxicity using an animal model mimicking undernourished patients. Rats were divided into 2 groups: the ad libitum fed (ALF) and the restricted fed (RF) rats and were assigned to 3 groups (n = 8/group) for each feeding condition. The animals were given APAP at 0, 300 and 500mg/kg for 99 days under each feeding condition. Plasma and urinary glutathione-related metabolites and liver function parameters were measured during the dosing period and hepatic glutathione levels were measured at the end of the dosing period. In the APAP-treated ALF rats hepatic glutathione levels were increased and hepatic function parameters were not changed, but in the APAP-treated RF rats hepatic glutathione levels were decreased at 500mg/kg and hepatic function parameters were increased at 300 and 500mg/kg. Moreover the urinary endogenous metabolite profile after long-term treatment with APAP in the ALF and RF rats was similar to that in human non-responders and responders to APAP-induced chronic hepatotoxicity, respectively. In conclusion, the RF rats were more sensitive to APAP-induced chronic hepatotoxicity than the ALF rats and were considered to be a useful model to estimate the contribution of the nutritional state of patients to APAP-induced chronic hepatotoxicity.

  12. Restricted Equilibrium and the Energy Cascade in Rotating and Stratified Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Herbert, Corentin; Marino, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    Most of the turbulent flows appearing in nature (e.g. geophysical and astrophysical flows) are subjected to strong rotation and stratification. These effects break the symmetries of classical, homogenous isotropic turbulence. In doing so, they introduce a natural decomposition of phase space in terms of wave modes and potential vorticity modes. The appearance of a new time scale associated to the propagation of waves, in addition to the eddy turnover time, increases the complexity of the energy transfers between the various scales; nonlinearly interacting waves may dominate at some scales while balanced motion may prevail at others. In the end, it is difficult to predict \\emph{a priori} if the energy cascades downscale as in homogeneous isotropic turbulence, upscale as expected from balanced dynamics, or follows yet another phenomenology. In this paper, we suggest a theoretical approach based on equilibrium statistical mechanics for the ideal system, inspired from the restricted partition function formalism i...

  13. Metformin prevents aggressive ovarian cancer growth driven by high-energy diet: similarity with calorie restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wahab, Zaid; Mert, Ismail; Tebbe, Calvin; Chhina, Jasdeep; Hijaz, Miriana; Morris, Robert T; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Giri, Shailendra; Munkarah, Adnan R; Rattan, Ramandeep

    2015-05-10

    Caloric restriction (CR) was recently demonstrated by us to restrict ovarian cancer growth in vivo. CR resulted in activation of energy regulating enzymes adenosine monophosphate activated kinase (AMPK) and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) followed by downstream inhibition of Akt-mTOR. In the present study, we investigated the effects of metformin on ovarian cancer growth in mice fed a high energy diet (HED) and regular diet (RD) and compared them to those seen with CR in an immunocompetent isogeneic mouse model of ovarian cancer. Mice either on RD or HED diet bearing ovarian tumors were treated with 200 mg/kg metformin in drinking water. Metformin treatment in RD and HED mice resulted in a significant reduction in tumor burden in the peritoneum, liver, kidney, spleen and bowel accompanied by decreased levels of growth factors (IGF-1, insulin and leptin), inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1, IL-6) and VEGF in plasma and ascitic fluid, akin to the CR diet mice. Metformin resulted in activation of AMPK and SIRT1 and inhibition of pAkt and pmTOR, similar to CR. Thus metformin can closely mimic CR's tumor suppressing effects by inducing similar metabolic changes, providing further evidence of its potential not only as a therapeutic drug but also as a preventive agent.

  14. DNA methylation pattern in overweight women under an energy-restricted diet supplemented with fish oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Amaral, Cátia Lira; Milagro, Fermín I; Curi, Rui; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Dietary factors modulate gene expression and are able to alter epigenetic signatures in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). However, there are limited studies about the effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) on the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate gene expression. This research investigates the effects of n-3-rich fish oil supplementation on DNA methylation profile of several genes whose expression has been reported to be downregulated by n-3 PUFA in PBMC: CD36, FFAR3, CD14, PDK4, and FADS1. Young overweight women were supplemented with fish oil or control in a randomized 8-week intervention trial following a balanced diet with 30% energy restriction. Fatty acid receptor CD36 decreased DNA methylation at CpG +477 due to energy restriction. Hypocaloric diet-induced weight loss also reduced the methylation percentages of CpG sites located in CD14, PDK4, and FADS1. The methylation patterns of these genes were only slightly affected by the fish oil supplementation, being the most relevant to the attenuation of the weight loss-induced decrease in CD36 methylation after adjusting by baseline body weight. These results suggest that the n-3 PUFA-induced changes in the expression of these genes in PBMC are not mediated by DNA methylation, although other epigenetic mechanisms cannot be discarded.

  15. Metabolomic changes in fatty liver can be modified by dietary protein and calcium during energy restriction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taru K Pilvi; Tuulikki Sepp(a)nen-Laakso; Helena Simolin; Piet Finckenberg; Anne Huotari; Karl-Heinz Herzig; Riitta Korpela; Matej Ore(s)i(c); Eero M Mervaala

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To characterise the effect of energy restriction (ER) on liver lipid and primary metabolite profile by using metabolomic approach. We also investigated whether the effect of energy restriction can be further enhanced by modification of dietary protein source and calcium.METHODS: Liver metabolomic profile of lean and obese C57BI/6] mice (n = 10/group) were compared with two groups of weight-reduced mice. ER was performed on control diet and whey protein-based high-calcium diet (whey + Ca). The metabolomic an alyses were performed using the UPLC/MS based lipidomic platform and the HPLC/MS/MS based primary metabolite platform.RESULTS: ER on both diets significantly reduced hepatic lipid accumulation and lipid droplet size, while only whey + Ca diet significantly decreased blood glucose (P 0.05, vs lean). These changes were accompanied with up-regulated TCA cycle and pentose phosphate pathway metabolites.CONCLUSION: ER-induced changes on hepatic metabolomic profile can be significantly affected by dietary protein source. The therapeutic potential of whey protein and calcium should be further studied.

  16. Energy dissipation end states of the sphere restricted planar three-body problem with collisional interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, T. S. J.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    We perform a large number of gravitational granular mechanics simulations to investigate the role of energy dissipation in the sphere-restricted planar three-body problem where, for a given angular momentum, multiple end-state configurations are available to the system. For the case of three equal spheres, previous studies have mapped all relative equilibria of the problem as a function of angular momentum. We find trends in the production of end states as a function of angular momentum and dissipation parameters, as well as outline the dynamical-mechanical interactions that generate these results. For strongly dissipative systems a relationship between the minimum energy function of the system and the end-state dynamics is uncovered. In particular, the likelihood of achieving one end state over another is largely governed by the geometrical projection of the minimum energy function. In contrast, for systems with low-energy dissipation the end state becomes a function of the relative depth of the different energy wells available to the system. This study highlights the importance of having well-defined dissipative properties of a gravitational granular system, such as those used to study the dynamics of rubble pile asteroids and planetary rings.

  17. Restricted energy loss of ultrarelativistic particles in thin targets: A search for deviations from constancy

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, K K; Hansen, K R; Knudsen, H; Lund, M.; Thomsen, H D; Uggerhoj, U I; Moller, S P; Sona, P; Mangiarotti, A; Ketel, T J; Dizdar, A; Ballestrero, S

    2010-01-01

    Experimental results for the restricted energy loss of ultrarelativistic electrons, with Lorentz factors up to 3x10^5, in a 535@mm thin silicon detector are presented. The combination of high Lorentz factors and thin targets, opens for the possibi lity to study two mutually excluding effects, both based upon theory and on scarce experimental observations. One is a disappearance of the density effect when the transit time becomes so short that the effect of plasma-oscillations becomes negligible. Th is would result in an increased energy loss as the Lorentz factor increases. The other is an effect based on the existence of a coherence length over which there are contributions to the energy loss. This effect leads to a substantially decreased energy l oss for thin targets as the Lorentz factor increases. The latter is shown to be incompatible with our measurements, whereas the former may be present with a correction of a few percent to an otherwise constant energy loss. Furthermore, we point to signifi cant eff...

  18. Restricted energy loss of ultrarelativistic particles in thin targets - A search for deviations from constancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, K.K.; Esberg, J.; Hansen, K.R.; Knudsen, H.; Lund, M.; Thomsen, H.D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, Ny Munkegade, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Uggerhoj, U.I., E-mail: ulrik@phys.au.d [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, Ny Munkegade, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Moller, S.P. [Institute for Storage Ring Facilities, University of Aarhus (Denmark); Sona, P. [University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Mangiarotti, A. [LIP, Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal); Ketel, T.J. [Free University, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dizdar, A. [University of Istanbul, Istanbul (Turkey); Ballestrero, S. [University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2010-05-01

    Experimental results for the restricted energy loss of ultrarelativistic electrons, with Lorentz factors up to 3x10{sup 5}, in a 535mum thin silicon detector are presented. The combination of high Lorentz factors and thin targets, opens for the possibility to study two mutually excluding effects, both based upon theory and on scarce experimental observations. One is a disappearance of the density effect when the transit time becomes so short that the effect of plasma-oscillations becomes negligible. This would result in an increased energy loss as the Lorentz factor increases. The other is an effect based on the existence of a coherence length over which there are contributions to the energy loss. This effect leads to a substantially decreased energy loss for thin targets as the Lorentz factor increases. The latter is shown to be incompatible with our measurements, whereas the former may be present with a correction of a few percent to an otherwise constant energy loss. Furthermore, we point to significant effects related to synchrotron and transition radiation, that must be carefully considered in a possible future experiment, and may as well have been of significance for the conclusion in earlier experiments.

  19. Effects of restriction on children’s intake differ by child temperament, food reinforcement, and parent’s chronic use of restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Brandi Y; Loken, Eric; Savage, Jennifer S; Birch, Leann L

    2014-02-01

    Parents’ use of restrictive feeding practices is counterproductive, increasing children’s intake of restricted foods and risk for excessive weight gain. The aims of this research were to replicate Fisher and Birch’s (1999b) original findings that short-term restriction increases preschool children’s (3–5 y) selection, intake, and behavioral response to restricted foods, and to identify characteristics of children who were more susceptible to the negative effects of restriction. The experiment used a within-subjects design; 37 children completed the food reinforcement task and heights/weights were measured. Parents reported on their use of restrictive feeding practices and their child’s inhibitory control and approach. Overall, the findings replicated those of and revealed that the effects of restriction differed by children’s regulatory and appetitive tendencies. Greater increases in intake in response to restriction were observed among children lower in inhibitory control, higher in approach, who found the restricted food highly reinforcing, and who had previous experience with parental use of restriction. Results confirm that the use of restriction does not reduce children’s consumption of these foods, particularly among children with lower regulatory or higher appetitive tendencies.

  20. What Characterises Women Vulnerable to Chronic Energy Deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavi Kumar, K. S.; Ramachandran, Maithili; Viswanathan, Brinda

    2009-01-01

    Weight-for-squared height or body mass index (BMI) is often considered as an effective predictor of morbidity and mortality rates. This study uses BMI data from a sample of ever-married women in the age group of 15-49 years in the North Indian state of Uttar Pradesh for the year 1998-1999, to analyse the determinants of chronic energy deficiency…

  1. The olfactory neuron AWC promotes avoidance of normally palatable food following chronic dietary restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Olofsson, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Changes in metabolic state alter foraging behavior and food preference in animals. Here, I show that normally attractive food becomes repulsive to Caenorhabditis elegans if animals are chronically undernourished as a result of alimentary tract defects. This behavioral plasticity is achieved in two ways: increased food leaving and induction of aversive behavior towards food. A particularly strong food avoider is defective in the chitin synthase that makes the pharyngeal lining. Food avoidance ...

  2. Mathematical methods for restricted domain ternary liquid mixture free energy determination using light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, Chris W; Ross, David S; Thurston, George M

    2013-09-28

    We extend methods of solution of a light scattering partial differential equation for the free energy of mixing to apply to connected, isotropic ternary liquid composition domains that do not touch all three binary axes. To do so we mathematically analyze the problem of inferring needed Dirichlet boundary data, and solving for the free energy, with use of hypothetical static light scattering measurements that correspond to dielectric composition gradient vectors that have distinct directions. The physical idea behind the technique is that contrasting absorption properties of mixture components can result in such distinctly directed dielectric composition gradient vectors, due to their differing wavelength dependences of dielectric response. At suitably chosen wavelengths, contrasting light scattering efficiency patterns in the ternary composition triangle can then correspond to the same underlying free energy, and enlarge the scope of available information about the free energy, as shown here. We show how to use distinctly directed dielectric gradients to measure the free energy on both straight lines and curves within the ternary composition triangle, so as to provide needed Dirichlet conditions for light scattering partial differential equation solution. With use of Monte Carlo simulations of noisy light scattering data, we provide estimates of the overall system measurement time and sample spacing needed to determine the free energy to a desired degree of accuracy, for various angles between the assumed dielectric gradient vectors, and indicate how the measurement time depends on instrumental throughput parameters. The present analysis methods provide a way to use static light scattering to measure, directly, mixing free energies of many systems that contain such restricted liquid domains, including aqueous solutions of biological macromolecules, micellar mixtures and microemulsions, and many small molecule systems that are important in separation technology.

  3. Targeting energy metabolism in brain cancer through calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, B Thomas N; Kiebish, Michael; Marsh, Jeremy; Mukherjee, Purna

    2009-09-01

    Malignant brain tumors are a significant health problem in children and adults and are largely unmanageable. As a metabolic disorder involving the dysregulation of glycolysis and respiration (the Warburg effect), malignant brain cancer can be managed through changes in metabolic environment. In contrast to malignant brain tumors that are mostly dependent on glycolysis for energy, normal neurons and glia readily transition to ketone bodies (beta-hydroxybutyrate) for energy in vivo when glucose levels are reduced. The transition from glucose to ketone bodies as a major energy source is an evolutionary conserved adaptation to food deprivation that permits the survival of normal cells during extreme shifts in nutritional environment. Only those cells with a flexible genome, honed through millions of years of environmental forcing and variability selection, can transition from one energy state to another. We propose a different approach to brain cancer management that exploits the metabolic flexibility of normal cells at the expense of the genetically defective and less metabolically flexible tumor cells. This approach to brain cancer management is supported from recent studies in orthotopic mouse brain tumor models and in human pediatric astrocytoma treated with calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet. Issues of implementation and use protocols are discussed.

  4. Targeting energy metabolism in brain cancer through calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyfried B

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumors are a significant health problem in children and adults and are largely unmanageable. As a metabolic disorder involving the dysregulation of glycolysis and respiration (the Warburg effect, malignant brain cancer can be managed through changes in metabolic environment. In contrast to malignant brain tumors that are mostly dependent on glycolysis for energy, normal neurons and glia readily transition to ketone bodies (β-hydroxybutyrate for energy in vivo when glucose levels are reduced. The transition from glucose to ketone bodies as a major energy source is an evolutionary conserved adaptation to food deprivation that permits the survival of normal cells during extreme shifts in nutritional environment. Only those cells with a flexible genome, honed through millions of years of environmental forcing and variability selection, can transition from one energy state to another. We propose a different approach to brain cancer management that exploits the metabolic flexibility of normal cells at the expense of the genetically defective and less metabolically flexible tumor cells. This approach to brain cancer management is supported from recent studies in orthotopic mouse brain tumor models and in human pediatric astrocytoma treated with calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet. Issues of implementation and use protocols are discussed.

  5. Chronic food restriction in young rats results in depression- and anxiety-like behaviors with decreased expression of serotonin reuptake transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahng, Jeong Won; Kim, Jae Goo; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Kim, Bom-Taeck; Kang, Dong-Won; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2007-05-30

    Evidence of semi-starvation is commonly found in patients with eating disorders. This study was conducted to examine the adverse effects of chronic caloric restriction in young rats, since there have been increasing incidence of eating disorders especially among young populations. Food restriction group was supplied daily with 50% of chow consumed by its ad libitum fed control group from postnatal day 28. After 5 weeks of food restriction, brain contents of serotonin (5-hydroxy-tryptamine; 5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindol acetic acid were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and mRNA expression of 5-HT reuptake transporter (5-HTT) by in situ hybridization. Plasma corticosterone levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. Behavioral assessments were performed with Porsolt swim test for depressive behavior and with elevated plus maze test for anxiety. Five weeks of food restriction markedly increased plasma level of corticosterone, and significantly decreased 5-HT turnover rates in the hippocampus and the hypothalamus. 5-HTT mRNA expression decreased in the raphe nucleus of food restricted rats compared with free fed controls. Immobility time during the swim test increased in the food restricted group, compared to the control group. Food restricted rats spent more time in the closed arms, less time in the open arms, of elevated plus maze compared with control rats. These results suggest that chronic caloric restriction in young rats may lead to the development of depressive and/or anxiety disorders, likely, in relation with dysfunction of brain 5-HT system.

  6. Cardiometabolic and reproductive benefits of early dietary energy restriction and voluntary exercise in an obese PCOS-prone rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane, Abdoulaye; Kupreeva, Maria; Borthwick, Faye; Proctor, Spencer D; Pierce, W David; Vine, Donna F

    2015-09-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine-metabolic disorders in women of reproductive age characterized by ovulatory dysfunction, hyperandrogenism and cardiometabolic risk. The overweight-obese PCOS phenotype appears to have exacerbated reproductive dysfunction and cardiometabolic risk. In overweight-obese adult women with PCOS, exercise and energy restricted diets have shown limited and inconsistent effects on both cardiometabolic indices and reproductive outcomes. We hypothesized that an early lifestyle intervention involving exercise and dietary energy restriction to prevent or reduce the propensity for adiposity would modulate reproductive indices and cardiometabolic risk in an obese PCOS-prone rodent model. Weanling obese PCOS-prone and Lean-Control JCR:LA-cp rodents were given a chow diet ad libitum or an energy-restricted diet combined with or without voluntary exercise (4  h/day) for 8 weeks. Dietary energy restriction and exercise lowered total body weight gain and body fat mass by 30% compared to free-fed sedentary or exercising obese PCOS-prone animals (Pexercise intensity compared to free-feeding plus exercise conditions. Energy restriction and exercise decreased fasting plasma triglycerides and apoB48 concentrations in obese PCOS-prone animals compared to free-fed and exercise or sedentary groups. The energy restriction and exercise combination in obese PCOS-prone animals significantly increased plasma sex-hormone binding globulin, hypothalamic cocaine-and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and Kisspeptin mRNA expression to levels of the Lean-Control group, and this was further associated with improvements in estrous cyclicity. The combination of exercise and dietary energy restriction when initiated in early life exerts beneficial effects on cardiometabolic and reproductive indices in an obese PCOS-prone rodent model, and this may be associated with normalization of the hypothalamic neuropeptides, Kisspeptin and CART.

  7. Ghrelin Gene Expression in Broiler Proventriculus Tissue are Changed by Feed Restriction, Different Dietary Energy and Protein Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokoufe Ghazanfari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of feed restriction and different energy and protein contents of diet on ghrelin gene expression in broiler chicken. Approach: Feeding programs consisted of ad libitum and feed restriction, two energy levels (3100 and 2800 kcal ME kg-1 and three protein levels (22.3, 19.3 and 16.3% CP. Feed restriction was applied during 22-32 days of age. Proventriculus samples were collected at 21, 32 and 49 days of age. Ghrelin mRNA expression in proventriculus tissue was quantitate using Real Time quantitative PCR. Results: We found that ghrelin gene expression was increased in restricted chicks compared with those fed ad libitum at 32 days of age (p = 0.09 but feed restriction had no effect on ghrelin gene expression at 49 days of age. A positive response in ghrelin gene expression was achieved by decreasing energy level in the diet at 21 days of age (pConclusion: The present study, we investigated the effects of feed restriction and different energy and protein contents of the diet on ghrelin gene expression in broiler chicken. We have characterized chicken ghrelin cDNA in proventriculus tissue in broiler chicken. We also found that ghrelin gene expression is differently suppressed by diet manipulations. Additional studies are necessary to investigate the role of nutrition on ghrelin gene expression in proventriculus tissue in broiler chicken.

  8. Different types of errors in saccadic task are sensitive to either time of day or chronic sleep restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachowicz, Barbara; Beldzik, Ewa; Domagalik, Aleksandra; Fafrowicz, Magdalena; Gawlowska, Magda; Janik, Justyna; Lewandowska, Koryna; Oginska, Halszka; Marek, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms and restricted sleep length affect cognitive functions and, consequently, the performance of day to day activities. To date, no more than a few studies have explored the consequences of these factors on oculomotor behaviour. We have implemented a spatial cuing paradigm in an eye tracking experiment conducted four times of the day after one week of rested wakefulness and after one week of chronic partial sleep restriction. Our aim was to verify whether these conditions affect the number of a variety of saccadic task errors. Interestingly, we found that failures in response selection, i.e. premature responses and direction errors, were prone to time of day variations, whereas failures in response execution, i.e. omissions and commissions, were considerably affected by sleep deprivation. The former can be linked to the cue facilitation mechanism, while the latter to wake state instability and the diminished ability of top-down inhibition. Together, these results may be interpreted in terms of distinctive sensitivity of orienting and alerting systems to fatigue. Saccadic eye movements proved to be a novel and effective measure with which to study the susceptibility of attentional systems to time factors, thus, this approach is recommended for future research.

  9. Dietary energy restriction reduces high-fat diet-enhanced metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity is a risk factor for cancer. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of dietary energy restriction on high-fat diet-enhanced spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed an AIN93G diet or a high-fat diet (16% or 45% of energy fro...

  10. TFAP2B influences the effect of dietary fat on weight loss under energy restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Stocks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Numerous gene loci are related to single measures of body weight and shape. We investigated if 55 SNPs previously associated with BMI or waist measures, modify the effects of fat intake on weight loss and waist reduction under energy restriction. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Randomized controlled trial of 771 obese adults. ( REGISTRATION: ISRCTN25867281. One SNP was selected for replication in another weight loss intervention study of 934 obese adults. The original trial was a 10-week 600 kcal/d energy-deficient diet with energy percentage from fat (fat% in range of 20-25 or 40-45. The replication study used an 8-weeks diet of 880 kcal/d and 20 fat%; change in fat% intake was used for estimation of interaction effects. The main outcomes were intervention weight loss and waist reduction. In the trial, mean change in fat% intake was -12/+4 in the low/high-fat groups. In the replication study, it was -23/-12 among those reducing fat% more/less than the median. TFAP2B-rs987237 genotype AA was associated with 1.0 kg (95% CI, 0.4; 1.6 greater weight loss on the low-fat, and GG genotype with 2.6 kg (1.1; 4.1 greater weight loss on the high-fat (interaction p-value; p = 0.00007. The replication study showed a similar (non-significant interaction pattern. Waist reduction results generally were similar. Study-strengths include (i the discovery study randomised trial design combined with the replication opportunity (ii the strict dietary intake control in both studies (iii the large sample sizes of both studies. Limitations are (i the low minor allele frequency of the TFAP2B polymorphism, making it hard to investigate non-additive genetic effects (ii the different interventions preventing identical replication-discovery study designs (iii some missing data for non-completers and dietary intake. No adverse effects/outcomes or side-effects were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Under energy restriction, TFAP2B may modify the effect of dietary fat intake on

  11. TFAP2B influences the effect of dietary fat on weight loss under energy restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, Tanja; Angquist, Lars; Banasik, Karina; Harder, Marie N; Taylor, Moira A; Hager, Jörg; Arner, Peter; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Martinez, J Alfredo; Polak, Jan; Rousseau, Francis; Langin, Dominique; Rössner, Stephan; Holst, Claus; MacDonald, Ian A; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Kunesova, Marie; Saris, Wim H M; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Astrup, Arne; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2012-01-01

    Numerous gene loci are related to single measures of body weight and shape. We investigated if 55 SNPs previously associated with BMI or waist measures, modify the effects of fat intake on weight loss and waist reduction under energy restriction. Randomized controlled trial of 771 obese adults. ( ISRCTN25867281.) One SNP was selected for replication in another weight loss intervention study of 934 obese adults. The original trial was a 10-week 600 kcal/d energy-deficient diet with energy percentage from fat (fat%) in range of 20-25 or 40-45. The replication study used an 8-weeks diet of 880 kcal/d and 20 fat%; change in fat% intake was used for estimation of interaction effects. The main outcomes were intervention weight loss and waist reduction. In the trial, mean change in fat% intake was -12/+4 in the low/high-fat groups. In the replication study, it was -23/-12 among those reducing fat% more/less than the median. TFAP2B-rs987237 genotype AA was associated with 1.0 kg (95% CI, 0.4; 1.6) greater weight loss on the low-fat, and GG genotype with 2.6 kg (1.1; 4.1) greater weight loss on the high-fat (interaction p-value; p = 0.00007). The replication study showed a similar (non-significant) interaction pattern. Waist reduction results generally were similar. Study-strengths include (i) the discovery study randomised trial design combined with the replication opportunity (ii) the strict dietary intake control in both studies (iii) the large sample sizes of both studies. Limitations are (i) the low minor allele frequency of the TFAP2B polymorphism, making it hard to investigate non-additive genetic effects (ii) the different interventions preventing identical replication-discovery study designs (iii) some missing data for non-completers and dietary intake. No adverse effects/outcomes or side-effects were observed. Under energy restriction, TFAP2B may modify the effect of dietary fat intake on weight loss and waist reduction.

  12. Rehabilitation needs and participation restriction in patients with cognitive disorder in the chronic phase of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashika, Hironobu; Takada, Kaoruko; Kikuchi, Naohisa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to clarify psychosocial factors/problems, social participation, quality of life (QOL), and rehabilitation needs in chronic-phase traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with cognitive disorder discharged from the level-1 trauma center (L1-TC), and to inspect the effects of rehabilitation intervention to these subjects. A mixed-method research (cross-sectional and qualitative study) was conducted at an outpatient rehabilitation department. Inclusion criteria of subjects were transfer to the L1-TC due to TBI; acute-stage rehabilitation treatment received in the L1-TC from November 2006 to October 2011; age of ≥18 and rehabilitation needs, and chronic-phase rehabilitation outcomes were evaluated using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Third Edition, the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised, the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, the Sydney Psychosocial Reintegration Scale, Version 2, and the Short Form 36, Version 2, qualitative analysis of semistructured interviews, etc. Participants were classified into achieved-social-participation (n = 11; employed: 8), difficult-social-participation (n = 12; unemployed: 8), and no-cognitive-dysfunction groups (n = 8; no social participation restriction). Relative to the achieved-social-participation group, the difficult-social-participation group showed greater injury and cognitive dysfunction and lower Sydney Psychosocial Reintegration Scale and Short Form 36 role/social component summary scores (64.9/49.1 vs 44.3/30.4, respectively, P rehabilitation intervention. Chronic-phase TBI with cognitive disorder led to rehabilitation needs, and improvement of subjects’ psychosocial problems and QOL was difficult. PMID:28121947

  13. Chronic stress undermines the compensatory sleep efficiency increase in response to sleep restriction in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astill, Rebecca G; Verhoeven, Dorit; Vijzelaar, Romy L; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the effects of real-life stress on the sleep of adolescents, we performed a repeated-measures study on actigraphic sleep estimates and subjective measures during one regular school week, two stressful examination weeks and a week's holiday. Twenty-four adolescents aged 17.63 ± 0.10 years (mean ± standard error of the mean) wore actigraphs and completed diaries on subjective stress, fatigue, sleep quality, number of examinations and consumption of caffeine and alcohol for 4 weeks during their final year of secondary school. The resulting almost 500 assessments were analysed using mixed-effect models to estimate the effects of mere school attendance and additional examination stress on sleep estimates and subjective ratings. Total sleep time decreased from 7:38 h ± 12 min during holidays to 6:40 h ± 12 min during a regular school week. This 13% decrease elicited a partial compensation, as indicated by a 3% increase in sleep efficiency and a 6% decrease in the duration of nocturnal awakenings. During examination weeks total sleep time decreased to 6:23 h ± 8 min, but it was now accompanied by a decrease in sleep efficiency and subjective sleep quality and an increase in wake bout duration. In conclusion, school examination stress affects the sleep of adolescents. The compensatory mechanism of more consolidated sleep, as elicited by the sleep restriction associated with mere school attendance, collapsed during 2 weeks of sustained examination stress.

  14. Restricted neck mobility in children with chronic tension type headache: a blinded, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Mayoralas, Daniel M; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Fernández-Lao, Carolina; Pareja, Juan A

    2010-10-01

    The main purpose of this study was to analyze the differences in neck mobility between children with chronic tension type headache (CTTH) and healthy children, and to determine the influence of cervical mobility on headache intensity, frequency and duration. Fifty children, 13 boys and 37 girls (mean age 8.5 ± 1.6 years) with CTTH associated to peri-cranial tenderness (IHS 2.3.1) and 50 age- and sex matched children without headache (13 boys, 37 girls, mean age 8.5 ± 1.8 years, P = 0.955) participated. Cervical range of motion (CROM) was objectively assessed with a cervical goniometer by an assessor blinded to the children's condition. Children completed a headache diary for 4 weeks to confirm the diagnosis. Children with CTTH showed decreased CROM as compared to children without headache for flexion (z = -6.170; P 0.125) or gender (P > 0.250) did not influence CROM in either children with CTTH or without headache. Current results support the hypothesis that the cervical spine should be explored in children with headache. Further research is also needed to clearly define the potential role of the cervical spine in the genesis or maintenance of CTTH.

  15. Effect of electrolyte addition to rehydration drinks consumed after severe fluid and energy restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Lewis J; Shirreffs, Susan M

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the effect of electrolyte addition to drinks ingested after severe fluid and energy restriction (FER). Twelve subjects (6 male and 6 female) completed 3 trials consisting of 24-hour FER (energy intake: 21 kJ·kg body mass; water intake: 5 ml·kg body mass), followed by a 2-hour rehydration period and a 4-hour monitoring period. During rehydration, subjects ingested a volume of drink equal to 125% of the body mass lost during FER in 6 aliquots, once every 20 minutes. Drinks were a sugar-free lemon squash (P) or the P drink with the addition of 50 mmol·L sodium chloride (Na) or 30 mmol·L potassium chloride (K). Total void urine samples were given before and after FER and every hour during rehydration and monitoring. Over all trials, FER produced a 2.1% reduction in body mass and negative sodium (-67 mmol), potassium (-48 mmol), and chloride (-84 mmol) balances. Urine output after drinking was 1627 (540) ml (P), 1391 (388) ml (K), and 1150 (438) ml (Na), with a greater postdrinking urine output during P than Na (p ≤ 0.05). Ingestion of drink Na resulted in a more positive sodium balance compared with P or K (p drink K resulted in a more positive potassium balance compared with P or Na (p drink results in an increased sodium balance that augments greater drink retention compared with a low electrolyte placebo drink.

  16. The grey mouse lemur uses season-dependent fat or protein sparing strategies to face chronic food restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Giroud

    Full Text Available During moderate calorie restriction (CR the heterotherm Microcebus murinus is able to maintain a stable energy balance whatever the season, even if only wintering animals enter into torpor. To understand its energy saving strategies to respond to food shortages, we assessed protein and energy metabolisms associated with wintering torpor expression or summering torpor avoidance. We investigated body composition, whole body protein turnover, and daily energy expenditure (DEE, during a graded (40 and 80% 35-day CR in short-days (winter; SD40 and SD80, respectively and long-days (summer; LD40 and LD80, respectively acclimated animals. LD40 animals showed no change in fat mass (FM but a 12% fat free mass (FFM reduction. Protein balance being positive after CR, the FFM loss was early and rapid. The 25% DEE reduction, in LD40 group was mainly explained by FFM changes. LD80 animals showed a steady body mass loss and were excluded from the CR trial at day 22, reaching a survival-threatened body mass. No data were available for this group. SD40 animals significantly decreased their FM level by 21%, but maintained FFM. Protein sparing was achieved through a 35 and 39% decrease in protein synthesis and catabolism (protein turnover, respectively, overall maintaining nitrogen balance. The 21% reduction in energy requirement was explained by the 30% nitrogen flux drop but also by torpor as DEE FFM-adjusted remained 13% lower compared to ad-libitum. SD80 animals were unable to maintain energy and nitrogen balances, losing both FM and FFM. Thus summering mouse lemurs equilibrate energy balance by a rapid loss of active metabolic mass without using torpor, whereas wintering animals spare protein and energy through increased torpor expression. Both strategies have direct fitness implication: 1 to maintain activities at a lower body size during the mating season and 2 to preserve an optimal wintering muscle mass and function.

  17. The effect of abdominal resistance training and energy restricted diet on lateral abdominal muscles thickness of overweight and obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noormohammadpour, Pardis; Kordi, Ramin; Dehghani, Saeed; Rostami, Mohsen

    2012-07-01

    The role of transabdominal muscles (external oblique, internal oblique and transversus abdominis) on core stability has been shown previously. Energy restricted diet and abdominal resistance training are commonly used by overweight and obese people to reduce their weight. In this study we investigated the impact of 12 weeks concurrent energy restricted diet and abdominal resistance training on the thickness of the lateral abdominal muscles of 19 obese and overweight women employing ultrasonography in resting and drawing-in maneuvers. The results showed significant increase of the muscle thicknesses during drawing-in maneuver after 12 weeks intervention. Based on our findings, it can be concluded that 12 weeks concurrent abdominal resistance training and energy restricted diet in addition to weight loss lead to improvement of transabdominal muscles thickness in obese and overweight people. Considering the role of these muscles in core stability, using this therapeutic protocol in obese people, particularly in those who have weakness of these muscles might be helpful.

  18. n-3 Fatty acids preserve muscle mass and insulin sensitivity in a rat model of energy restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galmiche, Guillaume; Huneau, Jean-François; Mathé, Véronique; Mourot, Jacques; Simon, Noémie; Le Guillou, Céline; Hermier, Dominique

    2016-10-01

    In obese subjects, the loss of fat mass during energy restriction is often accompanied by a loss of muscle mass. The hypothesis that n-3 PUFA, which modulate protein homoeostasis via effects on insulin sensitivity, could contribute to maintain muscle mass during energy restriction was tested in rats fed a high-fat diet (4 weeks) rich in 18 : 1 n-9 (oleic acid, OLE-R), 18 : 3 n-3 (α-linolenic acid, ALA-R) or n-3 long-chain (LC-R) fatty acid and then energy restricted (8 weeks). A control group (OLE-ad libitum (AL)) was maintained with AL diet throughout the study. Rats were killed 10 min after an i.v. insulin injection. All energy-restricted rats lost weight and fat mass, but only the OLE-R group showed a significant muscle loss. The Gastrocnemius muscle was enriched with ALA in the ALA-R group and with LC-PUFA in the ALA-R and LC-R groups. The proteolytic ubiquitin-proteasome system was differentially affected by energy restriction, with MAFbx and muscle ring finger-1 mRNA levels being decreased in the LC-R group (-30 and -20 %, respectively). RAC-α serine/threonine-protein kinase and insulin receptor substrate 1 phosphorylation levels increased in the LC-R group (+70 %), together with insulin receptor mRNA (+50 %). The ALA-R group showed the same overall activation pattern as the LC-R group, although to a lesser extent. In conclusion, dietary n-3 PUFA prevent the loss of muscle mass associated with energy restriction, probably by an improvement in the insulin-signalling pathway activation, in relation to enrichment of plasma membranes in n-3 LC-PUFA.

  19. Increased food intake and changes in metabolic hormones in response to chronic sleep restriction alternated with short periods of sleep allowance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barf, R. Paulien; Desprez, Tifany; Meerlo, Peter; Scheurink, Anton J. W.

    2012-01-01

    Barf RP, Desprez T, Meerlo P, Scheurink AJ. Increased food intake and changes in metabolic hormones in response to chronic sleep restriction alternated with short periods of sleep allowance. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 302: R112-R117, 2012. First published October 19, 2011;

  20. Increased food intake and changes in metabolic hormones in response to chronic sleep restriction alternated with short periods of sleep allowance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barf, R. Paulien; Desprez, Tifany; Meerlo, Peter; Scheurink, Anton J. W.

    2012-01-01

    Barf RP, Desprez T, Meerlo P, Scheurink AJ. Increased food intake and changes in metabolic hormones in response to chronic sleep restriction alternated with short periods of sleep allowance. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 302: R112-R117, 2012. First published October 19, 2011; doi:10.1152/aj

  1. Increased food intake and changes in metabolic hormones in response to chronic sleep restriction alternated with short periods of sleep allowance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barf, R. Paulien; Desprez, Tifany; Meerlo, Peter; Scheurink, Anton J. W.

    2012-01-01

    Barf RP, Desprez T, Meerlo P, Scheurink AJ. Increased food intake and changes in metabolic hormones in response to chronic sleep restriction alternated with short periods of sleep allowance. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 302: R112-R117, 2012. First published October 19, 2011; doi:10.1152/aj

  2. The cumulative cost of additional wakefulness: dose-response effects on neurobehavioral functions and sleep physiology from chronic sleep restriction and total sleep deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dongen, Hans P A.; Maislin, Greg; Mullington, Janet M.; Dinges, David F.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To inform the debate over whether human sleep can be chronically reduced without consequences, we conducted a dose-response chronic sleep restriction experiment in which waking neurobehavioral and sleep physiological functions were monitored and compared to those for total sleep deprivation. DESIGN: The chronic sleep restriction experiment involved randomization to one of three sleep doses (4 h, 6 h, or 8 h time in bed per night), which were maintained for 14 consecutive days. The total sleep deprivation experiment involved 3 nights without sleep (0 h time in bed). Each study also involved 3 baseline (pre-deprivation) days and 3 recovery days. SETTING: Both experiments were conducted under standardized laboratory conditions with continuous behavioral, physiological and medical monitoring. PARTICIPANTS: A total of n = 48 healthy adults (ages 21-38) participated in the experiments. INTERVENTIONS: Noctumal sleep periods were restricted to 8 h, 6 h or 4 h per day for 14 days, or to 0 h for 3 days. All other sleep was prohibited. RESULTS: Chronic restriction of sleep periods to 4 h or 6 h per night over 14 consecutive days resulted in significant cumulative, dose-dependent deficits in cognitive performance on all tasks. Subjective sleepiness ratings showed an acute response to sleep restriction but only small further increases on subsequent days, and did not significantly differentiate the 6 h and 4 h conditions. Polysomnographic variables and delta power in the non-REM sleep EEG-a putative marker of sleep homeostasis--displayed an acute response to sleep restriction with negligible further changes across the 14 restricted nights. Comparison of chronic sleep restriction to total sleep deprivation showed that the latter resulted in disproportionately large waking neurobehavioral and sleep delta power responses relative to how much sleep was lost. A statistical model revealed that, regardless of the mode of sleep deprivation, lapses in behavioral alertness

  3. Energy dense, protein restricted diet increases adiposity and perturbs metabolism in young, genetically lean pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly D Fisher

    Full Text Available Animal models of obesity and metabolic dysregulation during growth (or childhood are lacking. Our objective was to increase adiposity and induce metabolic syndrome in young, genetically lean pigs. Pre-pubertal female pigs, age 35 d, were fed a high-energy diet (HED; n = 12, containing 15% tallow, 35% refined sugars and 9.1-12.9% crude protein, or a control corn-based diet (n = 11 with 12.2-19.2% crude protein for 16 wk. Initially, HED pigs self-regulated energy intake similar to controls, but by wk 5, consumed more (P<0.001 energy per kg body weight. At wk 15, pigs were subjected to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; blood glucose increased (P<0.05 in control pigs and returned to baseline levels within 60 min. HED pigs were hyperglycemic at time 0, and blood glucose did not return to baseline (P = 0.01, even 4 h post-challenge. During OGTT, glucose area under the curve (AUC was higher and insulin AUC was lower in HED pigs compared to controls (P = 0.001. Chronic HED intake increased (P<0.05 subcutaneous, intramuscular, and perirenal fat deposition, and induced hyperglycemia, hypoinsulinemia, and low-density lipoprotein hypercholesterolemia. A subset of HED pigs (n = 7 was transitioned back to a control diet for an additional six weeks. These pigs were subjected to an additional OGTT at 22 wk. Glucose AUC and insulin AUC did not improve, supporting that dietary intervention was not sufficient to recover glucose tolerance or insulin production. These data suggest a HED may be used to increase adiposity and disrupt glucose homeostasis in young, growing pigs.

  4. Dairy-Rich Diets Augment Fat Loss on an Energy-Restricted Diet: A Multicenter Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. Zemel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A 12-week randomized controlled multi-center clinical trial was conducted in 106 overweight and obese adults. Diets were designed to produce a 2,093 kJ/day energy deficit with either low calcium (LC; ~600 mg/day, high calcium (HC; ~1,400 mg/day, or high dairy (HD; three dairy servings, diet totaling ~1,400 mg/day. Ninety-three subjects completed the trial, and 68 met all a priori weekly compliance criteria. Both HC and HD contained comparable levels of calcium, but HC was only ~30% as effective as HD in suppressing 1,25-(OH2D and exerted no significant effects on weight loss or body composition compared to LC. In the group that met compliance criteria, HD resulted in ~two-fold augmentation of fat loss compared to LC and HC (HD: -4.43 ± 0.53 kg; LC: -2.69 ± 0.0.53 kg; HC: -2.23 ± 0.73kg, p < 0.025; assessment of all completers and an intent-to-treat analysis produced similar trends. HD augmentated central (trunk fat loss (HD: -2.38 ± 0.30 kg; HC: -1.42 ± 0.30 kg; LC: -1.36 ± 0.42 kg, p < 0.05 and waist circumference (HD: -7.65 ± 0.75 cm; LC: -4.92 ± 0.74 cm; LC: -4.95 ± 1.05 cm, p < 0.025. Similar effects were noted among all subjects completing the study and in an intent-to-treat analysis. These data indicate that dairy-rich diets augment weight loss by targeting the fat compartment during energy restriction.

  5. Validity of resting energy expenditure predictive equations before and after an energy-restricted diet intervention in obese women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatan R Ruiz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We investigated the validity of REE predictive equations before and after 12-week energy-restricted diet intervention in Spanish obese (30 kg/m(2>BMI<40 kg/m(2 women. METHODS: We measured REE (indirect calorimetry, body weight, height, and fat mass (FM and fat free mass (FFM, dual X-ray absorptiometry in 86 obese Caucasian premenopausal women aged 36.7±7.2 y, before and after (n = 78 women the intervention. We investigated the accuracy of ten REE predictive equations using weight, height, age, FFM and FM. RESULTS: At baseline, the most accurate equation was the Mifflin et al. (Am J Clin Nutr 1990; 51: 241-247 when using weight (bias:-0.2%, P = 0.982, 74% of accurate predictions. This level of accuracy was not reached after the diet intervention (24% accurate prediction. After the intervention, the lowest bias was found with the Owen et al. (Am J Clin Nutr 1986; 44: 1-19 equation when using weight (bias:-1.7%, P = 0.044, 81% accurate prediction, yet it provided 53% accurate predictions at baseline. CONCLUSIONS: There is a wide variation in the accuracy of REE predictive equations before and after weight loss in non-morbid obese women. The results acquire especial relevance in the context of the challenging weight regain phenomenon for the overweight/obese population.

  6. Frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondria-related β-amyloid accumulation by chronic sleep restriction in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyi; Wu, Huijuan; He, Jialin; Zhuang, Jianhua; Liu, Zhenyu; Yang, Yang; Huang, Liuqing; Zhao, Zhongxin

    2016-08-17

    Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by mitochondria-related β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation is increasingly being considered a novel risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology. The close relationship between chronic sleep restriction (CSR) and cortical Aβ elevation was confirmed recently. By assessing frontal cortical mitochondrial function (electron microscopy manifestation, cytochrome C oxidase concentration, ATP level, and mitochondrial membrane potential) and the levels of mitochondria-related Aβ in 9-month-old adult male C57BL/6J mice subjected to CSR and as an environmental control (CO) group, we aimed to evaluate the association of CSR with mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondria-related Aβ accumulation. In this study, frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction was significantly more severe in CSR mice compared with CO animals. Furthermore, CSR mice showed higher mitochondria-associated Aβ, total Aβ, and mitochondria-related β-amyloid protein precursor (AβPP) levels compared with CO mice. In the CSR model, mouse frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction was correlated with mitochondria-associated Aβ and mitochondria-related AβPP levels. However, frontal cortical mitochondria-associated Aβ levels showed no significant association with cortical total Aβ and mitochondrial AβPP concentrations. These findings indicated that CSR-induced frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondria-related Aβ accumulation, which was closely related to mitochondrial dysfunction under CSR.

  7. The Effect of Chronic Sodium Loading and Sodium Restriction on Plasma Prostaglandin A, E and F Concentrations in Normal Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zusman, Randall M.; Spector, David; Caldwell, Burton V.; Speroff, Leon; Schneider, George; Mulrow, Patrick J.

    1973-01-01

    It has been suggested that prostaglandins may be involved in the control of sodium homeostasis. Prostaglandin A and prostaglandin E have been shown to increase renal blood flow and urinary sodium excretion and prostaglandin A has been shown to stimulate aldosterone release. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of chronic sodium loading and sodium restriction on plasma prostaglandin A, E, and F concentrations. Seven normal human volunteers were placed on three sodium intake diets: (a) ad lib. sodium intake, (b) high sodium intake, and (c) low sodium intake. Plasma prostaglandin A, E, and F concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay. Mean prostaglandin A levels on the ad lib. diet were 1.60 ng/ml. Prostaglandin A levels decreased 49% to 0.82 ng/ml on the high sodium intake and increased 34% to 2.14 ng/ml on the low sodium intake. Prostaglandin A levels increased 161% on the low sodium diet in comparison with levels on the high sodium diet. Plasma prostaglandin E and F concentrations did not change significantly during variation in sodium intake. These results show that dietary sodium content markedly effects plasma prostaglandin A levels and that prostaglandins may play a role in the physiologic mechanism of sodium homeostasis. PMID:4700484

  8. Calorie Restriction-like Effects of 30 Days of Resveratrol Supplementation on Energy Metabolism and Metabolic Profile in Obese Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, S.; Konings, E.; Bilet, L.; Houtkooper, R.H.; Weijer, van de T.; Goossens, G.H.; Hoeks, J.; Krieken, van der S.; Ryu, D.; Kersten, A.H.; Moonen-Kornips, E.; Hesselink, M.K.C.; Kunz, I.; Schrauwen-Hinderling, V.B.; Blaak, E.E.; Auwerx, J.; Schrauwen, P.

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol is a natural compound that affects energy metabolism and mitochondrial function and serves as a calorie restriction mimetic, at least in animal models of obesity. Here, we treated 11 healthy, obese men with placebo and 150 mg/day resveratrol (resVida) in a randomized double-blind

  9. Short-term moderate energy restriction does not affect indicators of oxidative stress and genotoxicity in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis-te Wierik, E.J.M.; Leeuwen, R.E.W. van; Hendriks, H.F.J.; Verhagen, H.; Loft, S.; Poulsen, H.E.; Berg, H. van den

    1995-01-01

    Restriction of energy intake (ER), without malnutrition of essential nutrients, has repeatedly been demonstrated to increase longevity in rodents. In the antioxidant theory of aging the lack of balance between the generation of free radicals and free radical scavenging was thought to be a main

  10. Calorie Restriction-like Effects of 30 Days of Resveratrol Supplementation on Energy Metabolism and Metabolic Profile in Obese Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, S.; Konings, E.; Bilet, L.; Houtkooper, R.H.; Weijer, van de T.; Goossens, G.H.; Hoeks, J.; Krieken, van der S.; Ryu, D.; Kersten, A.H.; Moonen-Kornips, E.; Hesselink, M.K.C.; Kunz, I.; Schrauwen-Hinderling, V.B.; Blaak, E.E.; Auwerx, J.; Schrauwen, P.

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol is a natural compound that affects energy metabolism and mitochondrial function and serves as a calorie restriction mimetic, at least in animal models of obesity. Here, we treated 11 healthy, obese men with placebo and 150 mg/day resveratrol (resVida) in a randomized double-blind crossov

  11. Calorie Restriction-like Effects of 30 Days of Resveratrol Supplementation on Energy Metabolism and Metabolic Profile in Obese Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, S.; Konings, E.; Bilet, L.; Houtkooper, R.H.; Weijer, van de T.; Goossens, G.H.; Hoeks, J.; Krieken, van der S.; Ryu, D.; Kersten, A.H.; Moonen-Kornips, E.; Hesselink, M.K.C.; Kunz, I.; Schrauwen-Hinderling, V.B.; Blaak, E.E.; Auwerx, J.; Schrauwen, P.

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol is a natural compound that affects energy metabolism and mitochondrial function and serves as a calorie restriction mimetic, at least in animal models of obesity. Here, we treated 11 healthy, obese men with placebo and 150 mg/day resveratrol (resVida) in a randomized double-blind crossov

  12. Habitual physical activity and plasma metabolomic patterns distinguish individuals with low vs. high weight loss during controlled energy restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight loss (WL) induced by energy restriction is highly variable even in controlled clinical trials. An integrative analysis of the plasma metabolome coupled to traditional clinical variables may reveal a WL “responder” phenotype. Therfore, we predicted WL in overweight and obese individuals on a...

  13. Fasting leptin and appetite responses induced by a 4-day 65%-energy-restricted diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mars, M.; Graaf, de C.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Rossum, van C.T.M.; Kok, F.J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Animal studies show that the leptin decline after acute severe caloric restriction is a peripheral signal to increase food intake. However, most human studies have failed to observe such a relationship. We studied the acute effects of severe caloric restriction on the association between

  14. Fasting leptin and appetite responses induced by a 4-day 65%-energy-restricted diet.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mars, M; Graaf, C de; Groot, C P G M de; Rossum, Caroline T M van; Kok, F J

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Animal studies show that the leptin decline after acute severe caloric restriction is a peripheral signal to increase food intake. However, most human studies have failed to observe such a relationship. We studied the acute effects of severe caloric restriction on the association between

  15. Cognitive development in children with chronic protein energy malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandramouli B A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition is associated with both structural and functional pathology of the brain. A wide range of cognitive deficits has been reported in malnourished children. Effect of chronic protein energy malnutrition (PEM causing stunting and wasting in children could also affect the ongoing development of higher cognitive processes during childhood (>5 years of age. The present study examined the effect of stunted growth on the rate of development of cognitive processes using neuropsychological measures. Methods Twenty children identified as malnourished and twenty as adequately nourished in the age groups of 5–7 years and 8–10 years were examined. NIMHANS neuropsychological battery for children sensitive to the effects of brain dysfunction and age related improvement was employed. The battery consisted of tests of motor speed, attention, visuospatial ability, executive functions, comprehension and learning and memory Results Development of cognitive processes appeared to be governed by both age and nutritional status. Malnourished children performed poor on tests of attention, working memory, learning and memory and visuospatial ability except on the test of motor speed and coordination. Age related improvement was not observed on tests of design fluency, working memory, visual construction, learning and memory in malnourished children. However, age related improvement was observed on tests of attention, visual perception, and verbal comprehension in malnourished children even though the performance was deficient as compared to the performance level of adequately nourished children. Conclusion Chronic protein energy malnutrition (stunting affects the ongoing development of higher cognitive processes during childhood years rather than merely showing a generalized cognitive impairment. Stunting could result in slowing in the age related improvement in certain and not all higher order cognitive processes and may also result in

  16. Postnatal growth after intrauterine growth restriction alters central leptin signal and energy homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bérengère Coupé

    Full Text Available Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR is closely linked with metabolic diseases, appetite disorders and obesity at adulthood. Leptin, a major adipokine secreted by adipose tissue, circulates in direct proportion to body fat stores, enters the brain and regulates food intake and energy expenditure. Deficient leptin neuronal signalling favours weight gain by affecting central homeostatic circuitry. The aim of this study was to determine if leptin resistance was programmed by perinatal nutritional environment and to decipher potential cellular mechanisms underneath.We clearly demonstrated that 5 months old IUGR rats develop a decrease of leptin sentivity, characterized by no significant reduction of food intake following an intraperitoneal injection of leptin. Apart from the resistance to leptin injection, results obtained from IUGR rats submitted to rapid catch-up growth differed from those of IUGR rats with no catch-up since we observed, for the first group only, fat accumulation, increased appetite for food rich in fat and increased leptin synthesis. Centrally, the leptin resistant state of both groups was associated with a complex and not always similar changes in leptin receptor signalling steps. Leptin resistance in IUGR rats submitted to rapid catch-up was associated with alteration in AKT and mTOR pathways. Alternatively, in IUGR rats with no catch-up, leptin resistance was associated with low hypothalamic expression of LepRa and LepRb. This study reveals leptin resistance as an early marker of metabolic disorders that appears before any evidence of body weight increase in IUGR rats but whose mechanisms could depend of nutritional environment of the perinatal period.

  17. Food restriction during pregnancy in rabbits: effects on hormones and metabolites involved in energy homeostasis and metabolic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchetti, L; Brecchia, G; Canali, C; Cardinali, R; Polisca, A; Zerani, M; Boiti, C

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the effects of food restriction during rabbit pregnancy on hormones and metabolites involved in energy homeostasis and metabolic programming. Pregnant does were assigned to four groups: the control group was fed a standard ration while the others received a restricted amount of food (30% restriction) during early (0-9 days), mid (9-18 days), and late (19-28 days) pregnancy. The pregnancy induced a coordinated range of adaptations to fulfil energy requirements of both mother and foetus, such as hyperleptinaemia and hyperinsulinaemia, reduced insulin sensitivity, increased cortisol and non-esterified fatty acid. Food restriction altered leptin, insulin, T3, non-esterified fatty acids and glucose concentrations depending on the gestational phase in which it was applied. Collectively, present data confirm that the endocrinology of pregnancy and the adaptive responses to energy deficit make the rabbit an ideal model for studying nutritional-related disorders and foetal programming of metabolic disease.

  18. DIFFERENTIAL KINETICS IN ALTERATION AND RECOVERY OF COGNITIVE PROCESSES FROM A CHRONIC SLEEP RESTRICTION IN YOUNG HEALTHY MEN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Alexandre Rabat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic sleep restriction (CSR induces neurobehavioral deficits in young and healthy people with a morning failure of sustained attention process. Testing both the kinetic of failure and recovery of different cognitive processes (i.e. attention, executive under CSR and their potential links with subject’s capacities (stay awake, baseline performance, age and with some biological markers of stress and anabolism would be useful in order to understand the role of sleep debt on human behavior. Twelve healthy subjects spent 14 days in laboratory with 2 baseline days (B1 and B2, 8h TIB followed by 7 days of sleep restriction (SR1-SR7, 4h TIB, 3 sleep recovery days (R1-R3, 8h TIB and 2 more ones 8 days later (R12-R13. Subjective sleepiness (KSS, maintenance of wakefulness latencies (MWT were evaluated 4 times a day (10:00, 12:00 a.m. and 2:00, 4:00 p.m. and cognitive tests were realized at morning (8:30 a.m. and evening (6:30 p.m. sessions during B2, SR1, SR4, SR7, R2, R3 and R13. Saliva (B2, SR7, R2, R13 and blood (B1, SR6, R1, R12 samples were collected in the morning. Cognitive processes were differently impaired and recovered with a more rapid kinetic for sustained attention process. Besides, a significant time of day effect was only evidenced for sustained attention failures that seemed to be related to subject’s age and their morning capacity to stay awake. Executive processes were equally disturbed/recovered during the day and this failure/recovery process seemed to be mainly related to baseline subject’s performance and to their capacity to stay awake. Morning concentrations of testosterone, cortisol and α-amylase were significantly decreased at SR6-SR7, but were either and respectively early (R1, tardily (after R2 and no recovered (R13. All these results suggest a differential deleterious and restorative effect of CSR on cognition through biological changes of the stress pathway and subject’s capacity (ClinicalTrials-NCT01989741.

  19. Differential Kinetics in Alteration and Recovery of Cognitive Processes from a Chronic Sleep Restriction in Young Healthy Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabat, Arnaud; Gomez-Merino, Danielle; Roca-Paixao, Laura; Bougard, Clément; Van Beers, Pascal; Dispersyn, Garance; Guillard, Mathias; Bourrilhon, Cyprien; Drogou, Catherine; Arnal, Pierrick J; Sauvet, Fabien; Leger, Damien; Chennaoui, Mounir

    2016-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction (CSR) induces neurobehavioral deficits in young and healthy people with a morning failure of sustained attention process. Testing both the kinetic of failure and recovery of different cognitive processes (i.e., attention, executive) under CSR and their potential links with subject's capacities (stay awake, baseline performance, age) and with some biological markers of stress and anabolism would be useful in order to understand the role of sleep debt on human behavior. Twelve healthy subjects spent 14 days in laboratory with 2 baseline days (B1 and B2, 8 h TIB) followed by 7 days of sleep restriction (SR1-SR7, 4 h TIB), 3 sleep recovery days (R1-R3, 8 h TIB) and two more ones 8 days later (R12-R13). Subjective sleepiness (KSS), maintenance of wakefulness latencies (MWT) were evaluated four times a day (10:00, 12:00 a.m. and 2:00, 4:00 p.m.) and cognitive tests were realized at morning (8:30 a.m.) and evening (6:30 p.m.) sessions during B2, SR1, SR4, SR7, R2, R3 and R13. Saliva (B2, SR7, R2, R13) and blood (B1, SR6, R1, R12) samples were collected in the morning. Cognitive processes were differently impaired and recovered with a more rapid kinetic for sustained attention process. Besides, a significant time of day effect was only evidenced for sustained attention failures that seemed to be related to subject's age and their morning capacity to stay awake. Executive processes were equally disturbed/recovered during the day and this failure/recovery process seemed to be mainly related to baseline subject's performance and to their capacity to stay awake. Morning concentrations of testosterone, cortisol and α-amylase were significantly decreased at SR6-SR7, but were either and respectively early (R1), tardily (after R2) and not at all (R13) recovered. All these results suggest a differential deleterious and restorative effect of CSR on cognition through biological changes of the stress pathway and subject's capacity (ClinicalTrials-NCT01989741).

  20. Metabolic effects of a 24-week energy-restricted intervention combined with low or high dairy intake in overweight women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hong; Lorenzen, Janne Kunchel; Astrup, Arne;

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of a 24-week energy-restricted intervention with low or high dairy intake (LD or HD) on the metabolic profiles of urine, blood and feces in overweight/obese women by NMR spectroscopy combined with ANOVA-simultaneous component analysis (ASCA). A significant effect of dairy...... intake was found on the urine metabolome. HD intake increased urinary citrate, creatinine and urea excretion, and decreased urinary excretion of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and hippurate relative to the LD intake, suggesting that HD intake was associated with alterations in protein catabolism, energy...... metabolism and gut microbial activity. In addition, a significant time effect on the blood metabolome was attributed to a decrease in blood lipid and lipoprotein levels due to the energy restriction. For the fecal metabolome, a trend for a diet effect was found and a series of metabolites, such as acetate...

  1. Fasting leptin and appetite responses induced by a 4-day 65%-energy-restricted diet.

    OpenAIRE

    Mars, M; De Graaf, C.; de Groot, C. P. G. M.; Rossum, Caroline T M van; Kok, F.J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Animal studies show that the leptin decline after acute severe caloric restriction is a peripheral signal to increase food intake. However, most human studies have failed to observe such a relationship. We studied the acute effects of severe caloric restriction on the association between serum leptin concentrations and subjective appetite. SUBJECTS: A total of 44 healthy adult men (aged: 43 +/- 5 years; BMI: 27.3 +/- 3.2 kg/m(2)). MEASUREMENTS: Fasting serum leptin concentrations a...

  2. Time-of-day modulation of homeostatic and allostatic sleep responses to chronic sleep restriction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deurveilher, S; Rusak, B; Semba, K

    2012-06-15

    To study sleep responses to chronic sleep restriction (CSR) and time-of-day influences on these responses, we developed a rat model of CSR that takes into account the polyphasic sleep patterns in rats. Adult male rats underwent cycles of 3 h of sleep deprivation (SD) and 1 h of sleep opportunity (SO) continuously for 4 days, beginning at the onset of the 12-h light phase ("3/1" protocol). Electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) recordings were made before, during, and after CSR. During CSR, total sleep time was reduced by ∼60% from baseline levels. Both rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) during SO periods increased initially relative to baseline and remained elevated for the rest of the CSR period. In contrast, NREMS EEG delta power (a measure of sleep intensity) increased initially, but then declined gradually, in parallel with increases in high-frequency power in the NREMS EEG. The amplitude of daily rhythms in NREMS and REMS amounts was maintained during SO periods, whereas that of NREMS delta power was reduced. Compensatory responses during the 2-day post-CSR recovery period were either modest or negative and gated by time of day. NREMS, REMS, and EEG delta power lost during CSR were not recovered by the end of the second recovery day. Thus the "3/1" CSR protocol triggered both homeostatic responses (increased sleep amounts and intensity during SOs) and allostatic responses (gradual decline in sleep intensity during SOs and muted or negative post-CSR sleep recovery), and both responses were modulated by time of day.

  3. Chronic hyperinsulinemia contributes to insulin resistance under dietary restriction in association with altered lipid metabolism in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Ippei; Tanimoto, Keiichi; Akiyama, Nobuteru; Naya, Noriyuki; Fujieda, Kumiko; Iwasaki, Takanori; Yukioka, Hideo

    2017-04-01

    Hyperinsulinemia is widely thought to be a compensatory response to insulin resistance, whereas its potentially causal role in the progression of insulin resistance remains to be established. Here, we aimed to examine whether hyperinsulinemia could affect the progression of insulin resistance in Zucker fatty diabetic (ZDF) rats. Male ZDF rats at 8 wk of age were fed a diet ad libitum (AL) or dietary restriction (DR) of either 15 or 30% from AL feeding over 6 wk. Insulin sensitivity was determined by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. ZDF rats in the AL group progressively developed hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia by 10 wk of age, and then plasma insulin rapidly declined to nearly normal levels by 12 wk of age. Compared with AL group, DR groups showed delayed onset of hyperglycemia and persistent hyperinsulinemia, leading to weight gain and raised plasma triglycerides and free fatty acids by 14 wk of age. Notably, insulin sensitivity was significantly reduced in the DR group rather than the AL group and inversely correlated with plasma levels of insulin and triglyceride but not glucose. Moreover, enhanced lipid deposition and upregulation of genes involved in lipogenesis were detected in liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissues of the DR group rather than the AL group. Alternatively, continuous hyperinsulinemia induced by insulin pellet implantation produced a decrease in insulin sensitivity in ZDF rats. These results suggest that chronic hyperinsulinemia may lead to the progression of insulin resistance under DR conditions in association with altered lipid metabolism in peripheral tissues in ZDF rats. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Effects of Chronic Sleep Restriction during Early Adolescence on the Adult Pattern of Connectivity of Mouse Secondary Motor Cortex123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeh, Yazan N.; Bernard, Amy; de Vivo, Luisa; Honjoh, Sakiko; Mihalas, Stefan; Ng, Lydia; Koch, Christof

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cortical circuits mature in stages, from early synaptogenesis and synaptic pruning to late synaptic refinement, resulting in the adult anatomical connection matrix. Because the mature matrix is largely fixed, genetic or environmental factors interfering with its establishment can have irreversible effects. Sleep disruption is rarely considered among those factors, and previous studies have focused on very young animals and the acute effects of sleep deprivation on neuronal morphology and cortical plasticity. Adolescence is a sensitive time for brain remodeling, yet whether chronic sleep restriction (CSR) during adolescence has long-term effects on brain connectivity remains unclear. We used viral-mediated axonal labeling and serial two-photon tomography to measure brain-wide projections from secondary motor cortex (MOs), a high-order area with diffuse projections. For each MOs target, we calculated the projection fraction, a combined measure of passing fibers and axonal terminals normalized for the size of each target. We found no homogeneous differences in MOs projection fraction between mice subjected to 5 days of CSR during early adolescence (P25–P30, ≥50% decrease in daily sleep, n=14) and siblings that slept undisturbed (n=14). Machine learning algorithms, however, classified animals at significantly above chance levels, indicating that differences between the two groups exist, but are subtle and heterogeneous. Thus, sleep disruption in early adolescence may affect adult brain connectivity. However, because our method relies on a global measure of projection density and was not previously used to measure connectivity changes due to behavioral manipulations, definitive conclusions on the long-term structural effects of early CSR require additional experiments. PMID:27351022

  5. Effects of feed restriction and forage:concentrate ratio on digestibility, methane emission, and energy utilization by goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rebeca Castro Lima

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study was carried out to to evaluate how feed restriction and different forage:concentrate ratios affect digestibility, methane emission (using the SF6 technique, and energy utilization of Anglo-Nubian goats. Fifteen (15 dry and non-pregnant Anglo Nubian goats, averaging 30±2.9 kg body weight, were used. The experiment was divided into two trials, the first of which was designed to study the effects of feed restriction (0% or ad libitum; 15% of feed restriction or equivalent to 85% of ad libitum intake; and 40% of feed restriction or equivalent to 60% of ad libitum intake and the second, to study the effects of forage:concentrate (F:C ratios (75:25, 54:46, and 25:75 in the diet. The sulfur hexafluoride (SF6 tracer gas method was used to collect and estimate methane (CH4 emissions. Feed restriction level did not affect apparent total tract digestibility of dry matter (DM, organic matter, crude protein, and neutral detergent fiber. Methane emission (g d−1 decreased linearly as intake level decreased. However, energy loss in methane proportional to organic matter intake was similar among levels of feed restriction; consequently, dietary metabolizability did not differ among treatments. Methane gas (g d−1 as a function of F:C ratio revealed a quadratic response, showing the highest values when animals were fed the 46:54 F:C ratio diet (18.2 g d−1, suggesting that the decrease in absolute CH4 occurred when the level of concentrate inclusion in the diet surpassed approximately 50%. The results presented herein may be relevant for the ongoing and future efforts towards completion of an IPCC inventory regarding the contribution of goats to the greenhouse gas effects on the planet.

  6. Effects of almond consumption on the post-lunch dip and long-term cognitive function in energy-restricted overweight and obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Jaapna; Tan, Sze-Yen; Mattes, Richard D

    2017-02-01

    The post-lunch dip in cognition is a well-established phenomenon of decreased alertness, memory and vigilance after lunch consumption. Lunch composition reportedly influences the post-lunch dip. Moreover, dieting is associated with cognitive function impairments. The negative effects of dieting have been reversed with nut-supplemented diets. The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate the acute effect of an almond-enriched high-fat lunch or high-carbohydrate lunch on the post-lunch decline in cognitive function, and (2) evaluate the effects of chronic almond consumption as part of an energy-restricted diet on the memory and attention domains of cognitive function. In total, eighty-six overweight and obese adults were randomised to consume either an almond-enriched diet (AED) or a nut-free control diet (NFD) over a 12-week weight loss intervention. Participants were also randomised to receive either an almond-enriched high-fat lunch (A-HFL) (>55 % energy from fat, almonds contributing 70-75 % energy) or a high-carbohydrate lunch (HCL) (>85 % energy from carbohydrates) at the beginning and end of the weight loss intervention. Memory and attention performance indices decreased after lunch consumption (Pconsumption at a midday meal can reduce the post-lunch dip in memory. However, long-term almond consumption may not further improve cognitive function outcomes in a weight loss intervention.

  7. Temporal Dissociation between Myeloperoxidase (MPO)-Modified LDL and MPO Elevations during Chronic Sleep Restriction and Recovery in Healthy Young Men

    OpenAIRE

    Karim Zouaoui Boudjeltia; Brice Faraut; Maria José Esposito; Patricia Stenuit; Michal Dyzma; Pierre Van Antwerpen; Dany Brohée; Luc Vanhamme; Nicole Moguilevsky; Michel Vanhaeverbeek; Myriam Kerkhofs

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Many studies have evaluated the ways in which sleep disturbances may influence inflammation and the possible links of this effect to cardiovascular risk. Our objective was to investigate the effects of chronic sleep restriction and recovery on several blood cardiovascular biomarkers. METHODS AND RESULTS: Nine healthy male non-smokers, aged 22-29 years, were admitted to the Sleep Laboratory for 11 days and nights under continuous electroencephalogram polysomnography. The study cons...

  8. The Impact of Acute and Chronic Weight Restriction and Weight Regulation practices on Physiological, Osteogenic, Metabolic and Cognitive Function in Elite Jockeys

    OpenAIRE

    Dolan, Eimear

    2010-01-01

    Horse racing is a weight category sport. One of the key challenges facing jockeys is the pressure of “making weight” throughout the protracted racing season. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a chronically weight restrictive lifestyle and acute weight loss practices on aspects of physiological, osteogenic, metabolic and cognitive function in jockeys. Methods: The primary aim was achieved through the completion of four related studies. Study One: The effect of a 4% reduct...

  9. Dietary Energy Density, Renal Function, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is evidence of the association between dietary energy density and chronic diseases. However, no report exists regarding the relation between DED and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Objective. To examine the association between dietary energy density (DED), renal function, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Three nephrology clinics. Subjects. Two hundred twenty-one subjects with diagnosed CKD. Main Outcome Measure. Dietary intake ...

  10. Effects of Chronic Exercise on Feelings of Energy and Fatigue: A Quantitative Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puetz, Timothy W.; O'Connor, Patrick; Dishman, Rod K.

    2006-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of chronic exercise on feelings of energy and fatigue using meta-analytic techniques. Chronic exercise increased feelings of energy and lessened feelings of fatigue compared with control conditions by a mean effect delta of 0.37. The effect varied according to the presence or absence of a placebo control or…

  11. Trans-10, cis-12-conjugated linoleic acid does not increase body fat loss induced by energy restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, Arrate; Churruca, Itziar; Simón, Edurne; Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; Rodríguez, Victor Manuel; Portillo, María Puy

    2008-12-01

    Very little evidence exists concerning the effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on body fat reduction induced by energy restriction. Moreover, although an effect of trans-10, cis-12-CLA on lipolysis has been suggested, it has not been consistently shown. The aims of the present study were to determine whether trans-10, cis-12-CLA increases the reduction of body fat induced by energy restriction, and to analyse its effect on lipolysis and adipose tissue lipase expression (hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and adipose tissue TAG lipase (ATGL)). Male Syrian Golden hamsters were fed a high-fat diet during 7 weeks in order to make them fatter. Then they were submitted to a mild energy restriction (25 %) without or with supplementation of 0.5 % trans-10, cis-12-CLA for 3 weeks. Basal glycerol release and lipolysis stimulated by several drugs acting at different levels of the lipolytic cascade were measured in epididymal adipose tissue. The expression of HSL and ATGL was assessed by real-time RT-PCR. No differences were found in adipose tissues size between the experimental groups. Medium adipocyte size and total number of adipocytes were similar in both experimental groups. Animals fed the CLA-enriched diet showed similar lipolytic rates as well as HSL and ATGL expressions to the controls. In conclusion, trans-10, cis-12-CLA does not promote adipose tissue lipid mobilisation nor does it heighten body fat reduction induced by energy restriction. Consequently, this CLA isomer does not seem to be a useful tool to be included in body weight-loss strategies followed in obesity treatment.

  12. Hypoventilation in chronic mountain sickness: a mechanism to preserve energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubieta-Calleja, G R; Paulev, P-E; Zubieta-Calleja, L; Zubieta-Calleja, N; Zubieta-Castillo, G

    2006-09-01

    Chronic Mountain Sickness (CMS) patients have repeatedly been found to hypoventilate. Low saturation in CMS is attributed to hypoventilation. Although this observation seems logical, a further understanding of the exact mechanism of hypoxia is mandatory. An exercise study using the Bruce Protocol in CMS (n = 13) compared to normals N (n = 17), measuring ventilation (VE), pulse (P), and saturation by pulse oximetry (SaO(2)) was performed. Ventilation at rest while standing, prior to exercise in a treadmill was indeed lower in CMS (8.37 l/min compared with 9.54 l/min in N). However, during exercise, stage one through four, ventilation and cardiac frequency both remained higher than in N. In spite of this, SaO(2) gradually decreased. Although CMS subjects increased ventilation and heart rate more than N, saturation was not sustained, suggesting respiratory insufficiency. The degree of veno-arterial shunting of blood is obviously higher in the CMS patients both at rest and during exercise as judged from the SaO(2) values. The higher shunt fraction is due probably to a larger degree of trapped air in the lungs with uneven ventilation of the CMS patients. One can infer that hypoventilation at rest is an energy saving mechanism of the pneumo-dynamic and hemo-dynamic pumps. Increased ventilation would achieve an unnecessary high SaO(2) at rest (low metabolism). This is particularly true during sleep.

  13. Protein-Energy Wasting and Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezio Gianetta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-energy wasting (PEW is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and is associated with an increased death risk from cardiovascular diseases. However, while even minor renal dysfunction is an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular prognosis, PEW becomes clinically manifest at an advanced stage, early before or during the dialytic stage. Mechanisms causing loss of muscle protein and fat are complex and not always associated with anorexia, but are linked to several abnormalities that stimulate protein degradation and/or decrease protein synthesis. In addition, data from experimental CKD indicate that uremia specifically blunts the regenerative potential in skeletal muscle, by acting on muscle stem cells. In this discussion recent findings regarding the mechanisms responsible for malnutrition and the increase in cardiovascular risk in CKD patients are discussed. During the course of CKD, the loss of kidney excretory and metabolic functions proceed together with the activation of pathways of endothelial damage, inflammation, acidosis, alterations in insulin signaling and anorexia which are likely to orchestrate net protein catabolism and the PEW syndrome.

  14. Occurrence of respiratory symptoms in persons with restrictive ventilatory impairment compared with persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: The PLATINO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonato, Nívia L; Nascimento, Oliver A; Padilla, Rogelio P; de Oca, Maria M; Tálamo, Carlos; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Lisboa, Carmen; López, Maria V; Celli, Bartolomé; Menezes, Ana Maria B; Jardim, José R

    2015-08-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) usually complain of symptoms such as cough, sputum, wheezing, and dyspnea. Little is known about clinical symptoms in individuals with restrictive ventilatory impairment. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence and type of respiratory symptoms in patients with COPD to those reported by individuals with restrictive ventilatory impairment in the Proyecto Latinoamericano de Investigacion en Obstruccion Pulmonar study. Between 2002 and 2004, individuals ≥40 years of age from five cities in Latin America performed pre and post-bronchodilator spirometry and had their respiratory symptoms recorded in a standardized questionnaire. Among the 5315 individuals evaluated, 260 (5.1%) had a restrictive spirometric diagnosis (forced vital capacity (FVC) < lower limit of normal (LLN) with forced expiratory volume in the first second to forced vital capacity ratio (FEV1/FVC) ≥ LLN; American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) 2005) and 610 (11.9%) were diagnosed with an obstructive pattern (FEV1/FVC < LLN; ATS/ERS 2005). Patients with mild restriction wheezed more ((30.8%) vs. (17.8%); p < 0.028). No difference was seen in dyspnea, cough, and sputum between the two groups after adjusting for severity stage. The health status scores for the short form 12 questionnaire were similar in restricted and obstructed patients for both physical (48.4 ± 9.4 vs. 48.3 ± 9.8) and mental (50.8 ± 10.6 vs. 50.0 ± 11.5) domains. Overall, respiratory symptoms are not frequently reported by patients with restricted and obstructed patterns as defined by spirometry. Wheezing was more frequent in patients with restricted pattern compared with those with obstructive ventilatory defect. However, the prevalence of cough, sputum production, and dyspnea are not different between the two groups when adjusted by the same severity stage. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Is it stress? The role of stress related systems in chronic food restriction-induced augmentation of heroin seeking in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas eSedki

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Drug addiction is a chronic disease characterized by recurring episodes of abstinence and relapse. The precise mechanisms underlying this pattern are yet to be elucidated, but stress is thought to be a major factor in relapse. Recently, we reported that rats under withdrawal and exposed to a mild chronic stressor, prolonged food restriction, show increased heroin seeking compared to sated controls. Previous studies demonstrated a critical role for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF and corticosterone, hormones involved in the stress response, in acute food deprivation-induced reinstatement of extinguished drug seeking. However, the role of CRF and corticosterone in chronic food restriction-induced augmentation of drug seeking remains unknown. Here, male Long-Evans rats were trained to self-administer heroin for 10 days in operant conditioning chambers. Rats were then removed from the training chambers, and subjected to 14 days of unrestricted (sated rats or a mildly restricted (FDR rats access to food, which maintained their body weight at 90% of their baseline weight. On day 14, different groups of rats were administered a selective CRF1 receptor antagonist (R121919; 0.0, 20.0 mg/kg; s.c., a non-selective CRF receptor antagonist (α-helical CRF; 0.0, 10.0, 25.0 μg/μl; i.c.v. or a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist (RU486; 0.0, 30.0 mg/kg; i.p., and underwent a 1 h drug seeking test under extinction conditions. An additional group of rats was tested following adrenalectomy. All FDR rats showed a statistically significant increase in heroin seeking compared to the sated rats. No statistically significant effects for treatment with α-helical CRF, R121919, RU486 or adrenalectomy were observed. These findings suggest that stress may not be a critical factor in the augmentation of heroin seeking in food-restricted rats.

  16. Weight-Loss Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Intermittent Energy Restriction Trials Lasting a Minimum of 6 Months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Headland

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to summarise the effects of intermittent energy restriction on weight and biological markers in long term intervention studies of >6 months duration. An electronic search was performed using the MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library databases for intervention trials lasting 6 months or longer investigating the effects of intermittent energy restriction. A total of nine studies were identified as meeting the pre-specified criteria. All studies included an intermittent energy restriction arm, with six being directly compared to continuous energy restriction. A total of 981 subjects were enrolled and randomised, with weight loss observed in all intermittent energy restriction arms regardless of study duration or follow up length. Eight interventions in six trials were used for the meta-analyses, with results indicating neither intermittent or continuous energy restriction being superior with respect to weight loss, 0.084 ± 0.114 (overall mean difference between groups ± standard error; p = 0.458. The effects of intermittent energy restriction in the long term remain unclear. The number of long term studies conducted is very limited, and participant numbers typically small (less than 50 completers, indicating the need for larger, long term trials of 12 months or more, to be conducted in order to understand the impact of intermittent energy restriction on weight loss and long term weight management. Blood lipid concentrations, glucose, and insulin were not altered by intermittent energy expenditure in values greater than those seen with continuous energy restriction.

  17. Vegetarian, Gluten-Free, and Energy Restricted Diets in Female Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Lynn Cialdella-Kam; Danielle Kulpins; Melinda M. Manore

    2016-01-01

    Female athletes who follow a diet that fails to meet energy and nutrient needs are at risk for musculoskeletal injuries, menstrual disturbances, and poor sports performance. Common nutritional concerns for the female athlete include low energy availability (EA) (i.e., energy intake from food remaining for metabolic processes after accounting for energy expended during exercise) and inadequate dietary intakes (i.e., not meeting sports nutrition guidelines) of carbohydrates, protein, essential ...

  18. Insulin sensitivity is normalized in the third generation (F3 offspring of developmentally programmed insulin resistant (F2 rats fed an energy-restricted diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin John F

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aims The offspring and grandoffspring of female rats fed low protein diets during pregnancy and lactation, but fed nutritionally adequate diets thereafter, have been shown to exhibit altered insulin sensitivity in adulthood. The current study investigates the insulin sensitivity of the offspring and grandoffspring of female rats fed low protein diets during pregnancy, and then maintained on energy-restricted diets post weaning over three generations. Methods Female Sprague Dawley rats (F0 were mated with control males and protein malnourished during pregnancy/lactation. F1 offspring were then weaned to adequate but energy-restricted diets into adulthood. F1 dams were fed energy-restricted diets throughout pregnancy/lactation. F2 offspring were also fed energy-restricted diets post weaning. F2 pregnant dams were maintained as described above. Their F3 offspring were split into two groups; one was maintained on the energy-restricted diet, the other was maintained on an adequate diet consumed ad libitum post weaning. Results F2 animals fed energy-restricted diets were insulin resistant (p ad libitum postweaning diets (p Conclusion Maternal energy-restriction did not consistently program reduced insulin sensitivity in offspring over three consecutive generations. The reasons for this remain unclear. It is possible that the intergenerational transmission of developmentally programmed insulin resistance is determined in part by the relative insulin sensitivity of the mother during pregnancy/lactation.

  19. Protein or energy restriction during late gestation alters fetal growth and visceral organ mass: an evidence of intrauterine programming in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z X; Wu, D Q; Sun, Z H; Tan, Z L; Qiao, J Y; Ran, T; Tang, S X; Zhou, C S; Han, X F; Wang, M; Kang, J H; Beauchemin, K A

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of maternal protein or energy restriction during late gestation on postnatal fetal growth and visceral organ mass of goats. Eighty pregnant goats with similar age (2.0 ± 0.3 yr) and body weight (BW, 20.0 ± 1.0 kg before pregnancy) were assigned to 3 dietary treatments during late gestation: control (CON), 40% protein restricted (PR) and 40% energy restricted (ER) diets until parturition, after which offspring received normal diets for nutritional recovery. Kids were killed and visceral tissues were harvested at birth and week 6. Maternal protein or energy restriction decreased (P nutritional recovery, there was no difference (P = 0.91) in BW among groups; the kids from nutritional restriction groups showed a greater (P goats, particularly the proportional responses of fetal organs relative to BW, including thymus, small intestine, kidney and liver. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Temporal dissociation between myeloperoxidase (MPO-modified LDL and MPO elevations during chronic sleep restriction and recovery in healthy young men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Zouaoui Boudjeltia

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Many studies have evaluated the ways in which sleep disturbances may influence inflammation and the possible links of this effect to cardiovascular risk. Our objective was to investigate the effects of chronic sleep restriction and recovery on several blood cardiovascular biomarkers. METHODS AND RESULTS: Nine healthy male non-smokers, aged 22-29 years, were admitted to the Sleep Laboratory for 11 days and nights under continuous electroencephalogram polysomnography. The study consisted of three baseline nights of 8 hours sleep (from 11 pm to 7 am, five sleep-restricted nights, during which sleep was allowed only between 1 am and 6 am, and three recovery nights of 8 hours sleep (11 pm to 7 am. Myeloperoxidase-modified low-density lipoprotein levels increased during the sleep-restricted period indicating an oxidative stress. A significant increase in the quantity of slow-wave sleep was measured during the first recovery night. After this first recovery night, insulin-like growth factor-1 levels increased and myeloperoxidase concentration peaked. CONCLUSIONS: We observed for the first time that sleep restriction and the recovery process are associated with differential changes in blood biomarkers of cardiovascular disease.

  1. Structural basis for catalytically restrictive dynamics of a high-energy enzyme state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovermann, Michael; Ådén, Jörgen; Grundström, Christin; Elisabeth Sauer-Eriksson, A.; Sauer, Uwe H.; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2015-07-01

    An emerging paradigm in enzymology is that transient high-energy structural states play crucial roles in enzymatic reaction cycles. Generally, these high-energy or `invisible' states cannot be studied directly at atomic resolution using existing structural and spectroscopic techniques owing to their low populations or short residence times. Here we report the direct NMR-based detection of the molecular topology and conformational dynamics of a catalytically indispensable high-energy state of an adenylate kinase variant. On the basis of matching energy barriers for conformational dynamics and catalytic turnover, it was found that the enzyme's catalytic activity is governed by its dynamic interconversion between the high-energy state and a ground state structure that was determined by X-ray crystallography. Our results show that it is possible to rationally tune enzymes' conformational dynamics and hence their catalytic power--a key aspect in rational design of enzymes catalysing novel reactions.

  2. Vegetarian, Gluten-Free, and Energy Restricted Diets in Female Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Cialdella-Kam

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Female athletes who follow a diet that fails to meet energy and nutrient needs are at risk for musculoskeletal injuries, menstrual disturbances, and poor sports performance. Common nutritional concerns for the female athlete include low energy availability (EA (i.e., energy intake from food remaining for metabolic processes after accounting for energy expended during exercise and inadequate dietary intakes (i.e., not meeting sports nutrition guidelines of carbohydrates, protein, essential fatty acids (EFAs, B-vitamins, calcium, iron, and vitamin D. Low EA and the associated nutrient deficiencies are more common in athletes who compete in weight-sensitive sports (i.e., aesthetic, gravitational, and weight category sports because low body fat and mass confer a competitive advantage. Other athletes at risk for energy and nutrient deficits include athletes following a vegetarian or gluten-free diet (GFD. Careful dietary planning can help an athlete meet energy and nutrient needs. This review covers the nutrition issues associated with low EA and special diets (i.e., vegetarian and GFD and describes strategies to help female athletes meet their energy and nutrient needs.

  3. Potential Benefits and Harms of Intermittent Energy Restriction and Intermittent Fasting Amongst Obese, Overweight and Normal Weight Subjects—A Narrative Review of Human and Animal Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvie, Michelle; Howell, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Intermittent energy restriction (IER) has become popular as a means of weight control amongst people who are overweight and obese, and is also undertaken by normal weight people hoping spells of marked energy restriction will optimise their health. This review summarises randomised comparisons of intermittent and isoenergetic continuous energy restriction for weight loss to manage overweight and obesity. It also summarises the potential beneficial or adverse effects of IER on body composition, adipose stores and metabolic effects from human studies, including studies amongst normal weight subjects and relevant animal experimentation. Six small short term (animal models highlight the potential beneficial and adverse effects of intermittent compared to continuous energy restriction on ectopic and visceral fat stores, adipocyte size, insulin resistance, and metabolic flexibility. The longer term benefits or harms of IER amongst people who are overweight or obese, and particularly amongst normal weight subjects, is not known and is a priority for further investigation. PMID:28106818

  4. Restrictions on negative energy density for the Dirac field in flat spacetime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Wei-Xing; Yu Hong-Wei; Li Fei; Wu Pu-Xun; Ren Zhong-Zhou

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the quantum Dirac field in n + 1-dimensional flat spacetime and derives a lower bound in the form of quantum inequality on the energy density averaged against spacetime sampling functions. The stateindependent quantum inequality derived in the present paper is similar to the temporal quantum energy inequality and it is stronger for massive field than for massless one. It also presents the concrete results of the quantum inequality in 2 and 4-dimensional spacetimes.

  5. Effects of nutrient restriction and melatonin supplementation on maternal and foetal hepatic and small intestinal energy utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezotto, L D; Lemley, C O; Camacho, L E; Doscher, F E; Meyer, A M; Caton, J S; Awda, B J; Vonnahme, K A; Swanson, K C

    2014-08-01

    To determine how nutrient restriction and melatonin supplementation influence ewe and foetal hepatic and small intestinal energy use, 32 primiparous ewes on d 50 of gestation were fed 60% (RES) or 100% (ADQ) of NRC recommendations with 0 (CON) or 5 mg/d (MEL) of dietary melatonin. On d 130 of gestation, small intestine and liver were weighed and collected. Data were analysed as a completely randomized design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Liver weight (g/kg EBW) decreased (p = 0.02) in RES ewes. Jejunum weight (g/kg BW) increased (interaction p = 0.04) in ADQ-MEL ewes compared with all other treatments. Total in vitro O2 consumption (mol/min/tissue) and total citrate synthase activity (mol/min/tissue and mol/min/kg EBW) in liver decreased (p ≤ 0.03) in RES ewes. Oxygen consumption (mol/min/kg EBW) increased (interaction p = 0.02) in jejunum of ADQ-CON versus RES-MEL and ADQ-CON. Citrate synthase activity (mol/min/kg of EBW) increased (interaction p = 0.03) in jejunum of ADQ-MEL compared with RES-MEL and ADQ-CON. Foetal liver weight (g/kg BW) decreased (p = 0.02) in RES versus ADQ. Foetal small intestine weight (g/kg BW) decreased (interaction p = 0.05) in RES-MEL versus ADQ-MEL. Total O2 consumption (mol/min/tissue) and total citrate synthase activity (mol/min/kg of BW) in foetal liver decreased (p ≤ 0.05) in RES versus ADQ. Foetal small intestinal O2 consumption (mol/min/kg of BW) was greater (interaction p = 0.03) in RES-CON and ADQ-MEL than RES-MEL and ADQ-CON. Maternal nutrient restriction had a greater effect than melatonin supplementation on liver and jejunum mass and energy utilization in dams and foetuses. Because intestinal mass and energy utilization were more responsive to melatonin supplementation in ewes fed adequate nutrition compared with restricted ewes, melatonin may have limited use as a therapeutic supplement to help overcome potential negative effects of nutrient restriction.

  6. How can we restrict the sale of sports and energy drinks to children? A proposal for a World Health Organization-sponsored framework convention to restrict the sale of sports and energy drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, G

    2017-04-17

    High-sugar drinks, including fruit drinks, soft drinks, sports drinks and energy drinks, are of no nutritional value and contribute to the burden of dental disease in all age groups. The manufacturers of sports and energy drinks have elected to target children in their marketing campaigns and promote a misleading association between their products, healthy lifestyles and sporting prowess. The World Health Organization (WHO) has acknowledged that strategies aimed at prevention of dental disease are the only economically viable options for managing the oral health of children in low- and middle-income countries. Developed nations will also be advantaged by preventive programmes given that the cost of providing dental care to those who cannot pay draws valuable resources away from more pressing health issues. The Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) obligates governments to develop legislation to protect the health of children. A framework convention modelled on the existing Framework Convention for Tobacco Control, supported by the WHO, would assist governments to proactively legislate to restrict the sale of sports and energy drinks to children. This article will consider how a framework convention would be an advantage with reference to the strategies used by sports and energy drink manufacturers in Australia. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  7. Pegylated human recombinant leptin (PEG-OB) causes additional weight loss in severely energy-restricted, overweight men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hukshorn, Chris J; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S; Saris, Wim H M

    2003-04-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that falling leptin concentrations observed during fasting act as a peripheral signal of starvation, which serves to conserve energy in the face of limited reserves. An extension of this hypothesis is that exogenous leptin should affect energy regulation during severe energy restriction. To explore this hypothesis, we assessed whether elevated leptin concentrations achieved with the use of long-acting pegylated human recombinant leptin [polyethylene glycol-OB protein (PEG-OB)] affected weight loss and changes in body composition, energy expenditure, appetite, and metabolic variables during semistarvation in healthy overweight men. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was executed in overweight men with a mean (+/- SEM) age of 34.8 +/- 1.3 y and body mass index (in kg/m2) of 28.8 +/- 0.5. All subjects received weekly treatment with 80 mg PEG-OB (n = 12) or matching placebo (n = 10) for 46 d while their energy intake was reduced to 2.1 MJ/d by means of a very-low-energy diet. Body composition (hydrodensitometry and deuterium dilution), energy expenditure (ventilated hood), and appetite (visual analogue scales) were evaluated at the start and the end of the study. Metabolic variables were measured throughout the study period. Compared with placebo treatment, treatment with PEG-OB led to significant (P < 0.03) additional weight loss (14.6 +/- 0.8 compared with 11.8 +/- 0.9 kg) and a reduction in appetite (P < 0.05) after 46 d, but the 2 treatment groups did not differ significantly in changes in body composition, energy expenditure, and metabolic variables. Our observations support the hypothesis that the decrease in leptin concentrations during starvation increases appetite in humans.

  8. The Effects of Exercise Training in Addition to Energy Restriction on Functional Capacities and Body Composition in Obese Adults during Weight Loss: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Clint T.; Fraser, Steve F.; Levinger, Itamar; Straznicky, Nora E.; Dixon, John B.; Reynolds, John; Selig, Steve E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with impairments of physical function, cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength and the capacity to perform activities of daily living. This review examines the specific effects of exercise training in relation to body composition and physical function demonstrated by changes in cardiovascular fitness, and muscle strength when obese adults undergo energy restriction. Methods Electronic databases were searched for randomised controlled trials comparing energy restriction plus exercise training to energy restriction alone. Studies published to May 2013 were included if they used multi-component methods for analysing body composition and assessed measures of fitness in obese adults. Results Fourteen RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Heterogeneity of study characteristics prevented meta-analysis. Energy restriction plus exercise training was more effective than energy restriction alone for improving cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, and increasing fat mass loss and preserving lean body mass, depending on the type of exercise training. Conclusion Adding exercise training to energy restriction for obese middle-aged and older individuals results in favourable changes to fitness and body composition. Whilst weight loss should be encouraged for obese individuals, exercise training should be included in lifestyle interventions as it offers additional benefits. PMID:24409219

  9. Response to dietary-induced energy restriction in dairy sheep divergently selected for resistance or susceptibility to mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvier-Muller, J; Allain, C; Enjalbert, F; Tabouret, G; Portes, D; Caubet, C; Tasca, C; Foucras, G; Rupp, R

    2016-01-01

    Dairy ruminants experiencing a severe postpartum negative energy balance (NEB) are considered to be more susceptible to mastitis. Although the genetic variability of mastitis resistance is well established, the biological basis of the link between energy metabolism and resistance is mostly unknown. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of NEB on metabolism and immune response according to the genetic background for mastitis resistance or susceptibility. Forty-eight ewes from high and low somatic cell score (SCS) genetic lines were allocated to 2 homogeneous subgroups 2 wk after lambing: one group (NEB) received an energy-restricted diet to cover 60% of their energy requirements, and the other group received a control (positive energy balance: PEB) diet. Both diets met the protein requirements. After 10 d on either the NEB or PEB diet, all ewes were injected with a Pam3CSK4/MDP solution in one half-udder to induce an inflammatory response. The ewes were monitored for milk production, somatic cell count (SCC), body weight (BW), body condition score (BCS), and blood metabolites. Differential milk cell counts were determined by flow cytometry. Plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and triiodothyronine were determined. Energy restriction resulted in an increased fat:protein ratio in milk and decreased milk yield, BW, and BCS. The NEB ewes had significantly higher NEFA and BHB and lower plasma glucose concentrations than PEB ewes, reflecting a mobilization of body reserves and ketone body synthesis. High-SCS ewes had a higher SCS than low-SCS throughout the experiment, except after the inflammatory challenge, which resulted in similar SCS in all 4 groups. A noteworthy interaction between genetic background and diet was evidenced on metabolic parameters and BW. Indeed, high-SCS ewes subjected to NEB showed greater decrease in BW and increased NEFA and BHB concentrations compared with low

  10. Prenatal programming in an obese swine model: sex-related effects of maternal energy restriction on morphology, metabolism and hypothalamic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Óvilo, Cristina; González-Bulnes, Antonio; Benítez, Rita; Ayuso, Miriam; Barbero, Alicia; Pérez-Solana, Maria L; Barragán, Carmen; Astiz, Susana; Fernández, Almudena; López-Bote, Clemente

    2014-02-01

    Maternal energy restriction during pregnancy predisposes to metabolic alterations in the offspring. The present study was designed to evaluate phenotypic and metabolic consequences following maternal undernutrition in an obese pig model and to define the potential role of hypothalamic gene expression in programming effects. Iberian sows were fed a control or a 50 % restricted diet for the last two-thirds of gestation. Newborns were assessed for body and organ weights, hormonal and metabolic status, and hypothalamic expression of genes implicated in energy homeostasis, glucocorticoid function and methylation. Weight and adiposity were measured in adult littermates. Newborns of the restricted sows were lighter (P gene was down-regulated in the restricted animals (P gene expression at birth and higher growth and adiposity in adulthood suggest a female-specific programming effect for a positive energy balance, possibly due to overexposure to endogenous stress-induced glucocorticoids.

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor mRNA levels are modified by dietary n-3 fatty acid restriction and energy restriction in the brain and liver of growing rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Without dietary sources of long chain (LC) n-3 fatty acids, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA;18:3n-3) is the precursor for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3). It is not known how energy restriction (ER) impacts ALA conversion to DHA. We tested the hypothesis that ER reduces LCn-3 content in growing rats ...

  12. Development of injury in a rat model of chronic renal allograft rejection: effect of dietary protein restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombas, A; Stein-Oakley, A N; Baxter, K; Thomson, N M; Jablonski, P

    1999-01-01

    Non-allogeneic factors such as increased nephron "workload" may contribute to chronic renal allograft rejection. Reducing dietary protein from 20% to 8% was tested in a model of chronic rejection: Dark Agouti kidney to Albino Surgery recipient, "tolerised" by previous donor blood transfusions. Survival, weight gain, serum creatinine concentration and creatinine clearance were similar for both groups at all times. Urinary protein was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the low-protein (LP) group 1 month after transplantation. After 3 and 6 months, both groups demonstrated mild chronic rejection. After 6 months, tubular atrophy was significantly (P < 0.05) less in the LP group and interstitial fibrosis was marginally reduced. Glomerular hypertrophy, glomerular sclerosis, tubular dilatation, leucocyte infiltration, adhesion molecule expression and TGF-beta1 mRNA expression were similarly increased in both groups. Thus, reducing dietary protein to 8% lowered urinary protein, but did not significantly affect the development of chronic rejection in renal allografts beyond affording a degree of protection from tubulointerstitial damage.

  13. [Incurable keratitis and chronic palmoplantar hyperkeratosis with hypertyrosinemia. Cure using a tyrosine-restricted diet. Type II tyrosinemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, F; Moreno, J L; Ogier, H; Saudubray, J M; De Prost, Y; Duffier, J L; Charpentier, C; Lemonnier, F; Frézal, J

    1986-01-01

    One should henceforth systematically search for hypertyrosinemia which, too often, goes unrecognized for years, in patients presenting chronic keratitis associated with palmar and plantar hyperkeratosis. As a matter of fact, this highly crippling disease may be cured with an appropriate diet and the diagnosis, once suspected, is easily confirmed by simple investigations.

  14. Restriction on the energy and luminosity of e(+)e(-) storage rings due to beamstrahlung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telnov, V I

    2013-03-15

    The role of beamstrahlung in high-energy e(+)e(-) storage-ring colliders (SRCs) is examined. Particle loss due to the emission of single energetic beamstrahlung photons is shown to impose a fundamental limit on SRC luminosities at energies 2E(0)≳140  GeV for head-on collisions and 2E(0)≳40  GeV for crab-waist collisions. With beamstrahlung taken into account, we explore the viability of SRCs in the 2E(0)=240-500   GeV range, which is of interest in the precision study of the Higgs boson. At 2E(0)=240  GeV, SRCs are found to be competitive with linear colliders; however, at 2E(0)=400-500  GeV, the attainable SRC luminosity would be a factor 15-25 smaller than desired.

  15. Elevated Energy Production in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lawson, Nick; Hsieh, Chung-Han; March, Dana; Wang, Xinnan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is a debilitating disease characterized by physical and mental exhaustion. The underlying pathogenesis is unknown, but impairments in certain mitochondrial functions have been found in some CFS patients. To thoroughly reveal mitochondrial deficiencies in CFS patients, here we examine the key aspects of mitochondrial function in blood cells from a paired CFS patient-control series. Surprisingly, we discover that in patients the ATP levels are higher and mitochond...

  16. Potential Benefits and Harms of Intermittent Energy Restriction and Intermittent Fasting Amongst Obese, Overweight and Normal Weight Subjects—A Narrative Review of Human and Animal Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Harvie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent energy restriction (IER has become popular as a means of weight control amongst people who are overweight and obese, and is also undertaken by normal weight people hoping spells of marked energy restriction will optimise their health. This review summarises randomised comparisons of intermittent and isoenergetic continuous energy restriction for weight loss to manage overweight and obesity. It also summarises the potential beneficial or adverse effects of IER on body composition, adipose stores and metabolic effects from human studies, including studies amongst normal weight subjects and relevant animal experimentation. Six small short term (<6 month studies amongst overweight or obese individuals indicate that intermittent energy restriction is equal to continuous restriction for weight loss, with one study reporting greater reductions in body fat, and two studies reporting greater reductions in HOMA insulin resistance in response to IER, with no obvious evidence of harm. Studies amongst normal weight subjects and different animal models highlight the potential beneficial and adverse effects of intermittent compared to continuous energy restriction on ectopic and visceral fat stores, adipocyte size, insulin resistance, and metabolic flexibility. The longer term benefits or harms of IER amongst people who are overweight or obese, and particularly amongst normal weight subjects, is not known and is a priority for further investigation.

  17. Investigation into the acute effects of total and partial energy restriction on postprandial metabolism among overweight/obese participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Rona; Johnston, Kelly L; Collins, Adam L; Robertson, M Denise

    2016-03-28

    The intermittent energy restriction (IER) approach to weight loss involves short periods of substantial (75-100 %) energy restriction (ER) interspersed with normal eating. This study aimed to characterise the early metabolic response to these varying degrees of ER, which occurs acutely and prior to weight loss. Ten (three female) healthy, overweight/obese participants (36 (SEM 5) years; 29·0 (sem 1·1) kg/m2) took part in this acute three-way cross-over study. Participants completed three 1-d dietary interventions in a randomised order with a 1-week washout period: isoenergetic intake, partial 75 % ER and total 100 % ER. Fasting and postprandial (6-h) metabolic responses to a liquid test meal were assessed the following morning via serial blood sampling and indirect calorimetry. Food intake was also recorded for two subsequent days of ad libitum intake. Relative to the isoenergetic control, postprandial glucose responses were increased following total ER (+142 %; P=0·015) and to a lesser extent after partial ER (+76 %; P=0·051). There was also a delay in the glucose time to peak after total ER only (P=0·024). Both total and partial ER interventions produced comparable reductions in postprandial TAG responses (-75 and -59 %, respectively; both Penergy intake deficits of approximately 30 % (both P=0·015). Resting and meal-induced thermogenesis were not significantly affected by either ER intervention. In conclusion, our data demonstrate the ability of substantial ER to acutely alter postprandial glucose-lipid metabolism (with partial ER producing the more favourable overall response), as well as incomplete energy-intake compensation amongst overweight/obese participants. Further investigations are required to establish how metabolism adapts over time to the repeated perturbations experienced during IER, as well as the implications for long-term health.

  18. Chronic maternal vitamin B12 restriction induced changes in body composition & glucose metabolism in the Wistar rat offspring are partly correctable by rehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalle Anand Kumar

    Full Text Available Maternal under-nutrition increases the risk of developing metabolic diseases. We studied the effects of chronic maternal dietary vitamin B12 restriction on lean body mass (LBM, fat free mass (FFM, muscle function, glucose tolerance and metabolism in Wistar rat offspring. Prevention/reversibility of changes by rehabilitating restricted mothers from conception or parturition and their offspring from weaning was assessed. Female weaning Wistar rats (n = 30 were fed ad libitum for 12 weeks, a control diet (n = 6 or the same with 40% restriction of vitamin B12 (B12R (n = 24; after confirming deficiency, were mated with control males. Six each of pregnant B12R dams were rehabilitated from conception and parturition and their offspring weaned to control diet. While offspring of six B12R dams were weaned to control diet, those of the remaining six B12R dams continued on B12R diet. Biochemical parameters and body composition were determined in dams before mating and in male offspring at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of their age. Dietary vitamin B12 restriction increased body weight but decreased LBM% and FFM% but not the percent of tissue associated fat (TAF% in dams. Maternal B12R decreased LBM% and FFM% in the male offspring, but their TAF%, basal and insulin stimulated glucose uptake by diaphragm were unaltered. At 12 months age, B12R offspring had higher (than controls fasting plasma glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR and impaired glucose tolerance. Their hepatic gluconeogenic enzyme activities were increased. B12R offspring had increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant status. Changes in body composition, glucose metabolism and stress were reversed by rehabilitating B12R dams from conception, whereas rehabilitation from parturition and weaning corrected them partially, highlighting the importance of vitamin B12 during pregnancy and lactation on growth, muscle development, glucose tolerance and metabolism in the offspring.

  19. Chronic maternal vitamin B12 restriction induced changes in body composition & glucose metabolism in the Wistar rat offspring are partly correctable by rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kalle Anand; Lalitha, Anumula; Reddy, Umakar; Chandak, Giriraj Ratan; Sengupta, Shantanu; Raghunath, Manchala

    2014-01-01

    Maternal under-nutrition increases the risk of developing metabolic diseases. We studied the effects of chronic maternal dietary vitamin B12 restriction on lean body mass (LBM), fat free mass (FFM), muscle function, glucose tolerance and metabolism in Wistar rat offspring. Prevention/reversibility of changes by rehabilitating restricted mothers from conception or parturition and their offspring from weaning was assessed. Female weaning Wistar rats (n = 30) were fed ad libitum for 12 weeks, a control diet (n = 6) or the same with 40% restriction of vitamin B12 (B12R) (n = 24); after confirming deficiency, were mated with control males. Six each of pregnant B12R dams were rehabilitated from conception and parturition and their offspring weaned to control diet. While offspring of six B12R dams were weaned to control diet, those of the remaining six B12R dams continued on B12R diet. Biochemical parameters and body composition were determined in dams before mating and in male offspring at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of their age. Dietary vitamin B12 restriction increased body weight but decreased LBM% and FFM% but not the percent of tissue associated fat (TAF%) in dams. Maternal B12R decreased LBM% and FFM% in the male offspring, but their TAF%, basal and insulin stimulated glucose uptake by diaphragm were unaltered. At 12 months age, B12R offspring had higher (than controls) fasting plasma glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR and impaired glucose tolerance. Their hepatic gluconeogenic enzyme activities were increased. B12R offspring had increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant status. Changes in body composition, glucose metabolism and stress were reversed by rehabilitating B12R dams from conception, whereas rehabilitation from parturition and weaning corrected them partially, highlighting the importance of vitamin B12 during pregnancy and lactation on growth, muscle development, glucose tolerance and metabolism in the offspring.

  20. Oral protein-energy supplements for children with chronic disease: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poustie, Vanessa J; Watling, Ruth M; Smyth, Rosalind L

    2003-11-01

    Growth failure and poor nutritional status are features of children with chronic disease. Oral protein-energy supplements are one of a number of interventions provided with the aim of improving nutritional status in these children. The present paper describes a Cochrane systematic review assessing the efficacy of these products in children with chronic disease. The objective was to examine the evidence that in children with chronic disease oral protein-energy supplements alter nutrient intake, nutritional indices, survival and quality of life. All randomised controlled trials of the use of oral protein-energy supplements in children with chronic disease were identified through searching electronic databases and hand searching the abstract books of nutrition conferences. Studies identified were independently assessed for eligibility and methodological quality, and data on outcomes of interest were combined in a meta-analysis where possible. Two trials were eligible for inclusion in the review, both of which were undertaken with children with cystic fibrosis. No statistical differences could be found between treatment and control groups when data from both studies were combined. Oral protein-energy supplements are widely used to improve the nutritional status of children with chronic disease. No conclusions can be drawn on the efficacy of these products based on the limited data available. Further randomised controlled trials are required to investigate the use of these products in children with chronic disease. Until further data are available, these products should be used with caution.

  1. Temperature Dependence of the Kinetic Energy of the Correlated Electron Plasma by Restricted Path-Integral Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Keith; Deymier, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Recent progress in orbital-free Density Functional Theory (OF-DFT), particularly with regard to temperature dependent functionals, has promise for the simulation of warm dense matter (WDM) systems. WDM includes systems with densities of an order of magnitude beyond ambient or more and temperatures measured in kilokelvin. A challenge for the development of temperature dependent OF-DFT functionals is the lack of benchmark information with temperature and pressure dependence on simple models under WDM conditions. We present an approach to fill this critical gap using the restricted path-integral molecular dynamics (rPIMD) method. Electrons are described as harmonic necklaces within the discrete path integral representation while quantum exchange takes the form of cross linking between electron necklaces. A molecular dynamics algorithm is used to sample phase space and the fermion sign problem is addressed by restricting the density matrix to positive values. The temperature dependence of kinetic energies for the strongly coupled electron plasma is presented for a number of Wigner-Seitz radii in terms of a fourth order Sommerfeld expansion. Supported by US DoE Grant DE-SC0002139

  2. Muscle fibre size optimisation provides flexibility for energy budgeting in calorie-restricted coho salmon transgenic for growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Ian A; de la Serrana, Daniel Garcia; Devlin, Robert H

    2014-10-01

    Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) transgenic for growth hormone (GH) show substantially faster growth than wild-type (WT) fish. We fed GH-transgenic salmon either to satiation (1 year; TF) or the same smaller ration of wild-type fish (2 years; TR), resulting in groups matched for body size to WT salmon. The myotomes of TF and WT fish had the same number and size distribution of muscle fibres, indicating a twofold higher rate of fibre recruitment in the GH transgenics. Unexpectedly, calorie restriction was found to decrease the rate of fibre production in transgenics, resulting in a 20% increase in average fibre size and reduced costs of ionic homeostasis. Genes for myotube formation were downregulated in TR relative to TF and WT fish. We suggest that muscle fibre size optimisation allows the reallocation of energy from maintenance to locomotion, explaining the observation that calorie-restricted transgenics grow at the same rate as WT fish whilst exhibiting markedly higher foraging activity.

  3. Should Restrictions Be Relaxed for Metformin Use in Chronic Kidney Disease? No, We Should Never Again Compromise Safety!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2016-07-01

    Metformin is and has been considered as first-line therapy for type 2 diabetes for over a quarter of a century. Like other biguanides, metformin can cause a lactic acidosis that is exceptionally rare but fatal. The likelihood of metformin-associated lactic acidosis is substantially higher in patients with kidney impairment and also among those with seemingly normal kidney function who are at risk of acute kidney injury (AKI). Hence, regulatory agencies in many industrialized nations have maintained strict renal restrictions surrounding metformin. However, there have been millions of people exposed to metformin for many years, many of them with serum creatinine values at or close to 1.5 mg/dL with estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) much below 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) who have not developed lactic acidosis. Thus, there clearly remains controversy in this area, and there has been heightened pressure to remove the renal restrictions of metformin. To provide a discussion on the pros and cons of relaxing the renal restrictions for metformin use, we provide a Point-Counterpoint. In the point narrative below, Drs. Kalantar-Zadeh and Kovesdy provide their argument that although there is little evidence of the potential benefits of metformin in kidney disease, just considering the sheer numbers of metformin users and the high fatality rate of its associated lactic acidosis, the most appropriate practice is to avoid metformin use in people with eGFR 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2)-William T. CefaluEditor in Chief, Diabetes Care.

  4. Should Restrictions Be Relaxed for Metformin Use in Chronic Kidney Disease? Yes, They Should Be Relaxed! What's the Fuss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakris, George L; Molitch, Mark E

    2016-07-01

    Metformin is and has been considered as first-line therapy for type 2 diabetes for over a quarter of a century. Like other biguanides, metformin can cause a lactic acidosis that is exceptionally rare but fatal. The likelihood of metformin-associated lactic acidosis is substantially higher in patients with kidney impairment and also among those with seemingly normal kidney function who are at risk of acute kidney injury (AKI). Hence, regulatory agencies in many industrialized nations have maintained strict renal restrictions surrounding metformin. However, there have been millions of people exposed to metformin for many years, many of them with serum creatinine values at or close to 1.5 mg/dL with estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) much below 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) who have not developed lactic acidosis. Thus, there clearly remains controversy in this area, and there has been heightened pressure to remove the renal restrictions of metformin. To provide a discussion on the pros and cons of relaxing the renal restrictions for metformin use, we provide a Point-Counterpoint. In the preceding point narrative, Drs. Kalantar-Zadeh and Kovesdy provide their argument that although there is little evidence of the potential benefits of metformin in kidney disease, just considering the sheer numbers of metformin users and the high fatality rate of its associated lactic acidosis, the most appropriate practice is to avoid metformin use in people with eGFR 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2)-William T. CefaluEditor in Chief, Diabetes Care.

  5. Dietary fat and not calcium supplementation or dairy product consumption is associated with changes in anthropometrics during a randomized, placebo-controlled energy-restriction trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemel Michael B

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Insufficient calcium intake has been proposed to cause unbalanced energy partitioning leading to obesity. However, weight loss interventions including dietary calcium or dairy product consumption have not reported changes in lipid metabolism measured by the plasma lipidome. Methods The objective of this study was to determine the relationships between dairy product or supplemental calcium intake with changes in the plasma lipidome and body composition during energy restriction. A secondary objective of this study was to explore the relationships among calculated macronutrient composition of the energy restricted diet to changes in the plasma lipidome, and body composition during energy restriction. Overweight adults (n = 61 were randomized into one of three intervention groups including a deficit of 500kcal/d: 1 placebo; 2 900 mg/d calcium supplement; and 3 3-4 servings of dairy products/d plus a placebo supplement. Plasma fatty acid methyl esters of cholesterol ester, diacylglycerol, free fatty acids, lysophosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and triacylglycerol were quantified by capillary gas chromatography. Results After adjustments for energy and protein (g/d intake, there was no significant effect of treatment on changes in weight, waist circumference or body composition. Plasma lipidome did not differ among dietary treatment groups. Stepwise regression identified correlations between reported intake of monounsaturated fat (% of energy and changes in % lean mass (r = -0.44, P P Conclusions Dairy product consumption or calcium supplementation during energy restriction over the course of 12 weeks did not affect plasma lipids. Independent of calcium and dairy product consumption, short-term energy restriction altered body composition. Reported dietary fat composition of energy restricted diets was associated with the degree of change in body composition in these overweight and obese individuals.

  6. Skeletal muscle metabolic characteristics before and after energy restriction in human obesity: fibre type, enzymatic beta-oxidative capacity and fatty acid-binding protein content.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempen, K.P.G.; Saris, W.H.M.; Kuipers, H.; Glatz, J.F.; van der Vusse, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    University of Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands. BACKGROUND: Skeletal muscle has the ability to adapt as result of dietary, hormonal or pharmacological interventions affecting energy metabolism. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of energy restriction on skeletal muscl

  7. Energy-momentum restrictions on the creation of gott time machines

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, S M; Guth, A H; Olum, K D; Sean M Carroll; Edward Farhi; Alan H Guth; Ken D Olum

    1994-01-01

    The discovery by Gott of a remarkably simple spacetime with closed timelike curves (CTC's) provides a tool for investigating how the creation of time machines is prevented in classical general relativity. The Gott spacetime contains two infinitely long, parallel cosmic strings, which can equivalently be viewed as point masses in (2+1)-dimensional gravity. We examine the possibility of building such a time machine in an open universe. Specifically, we consider initial data specified on an edgeless, noncompact, spacelike hypersurface, for which the total momentum is timelike (i.e., not the momentum of a Gott spacetime). In contrast to the case of a closed universe (in which Gott pairs, although not CTC's, can be produced from the decay of stationary particles), we find that there is never enough energy for a Gott-like time machine to evolve from the specified data; it is impossible to accelerate two particles to sufficiently high velocity. Thus, the no-CTC theorems of Tipler and Hawking are enforced in an open ...

  8. Energy-restricted diets based on a distinct food selection affecting the glycemic index induce different weight loss and oxidative response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abete, Itziar; Parra, Dolores; Martinez, J Alfredo

    2008-08-01

    Low glycemic index (GI) based diets could influence the accompanying physiological adaptations to energy restriction in the treatment of obesity. It was aimed to investigate the effects of two energy-restricted diets with different food distribution and GI values on weight loss and energy metabolism in the nutritional treatment of obesity. Participants (n=32; BMI: 32.5+/-4.3 kg/m(2)) were randomly assigned to follow two energy-restricted diets with higher-GI or lower-GI for 8 weeks. The energy restriction was -30% in relation to energy expenditure. Anthropometry, energy expenditure and mitochondrial oxidation were assessed at baseline and at the endpoint of the intervention. Body weight was also measured one year after the treatment. The work was approved by the ethical committees of the University of Navarra (54/2006). Volunteers consuming the lower-GI diet showed a significantly higher weight loss than their counterparts (-5.3+/-2.6% vs -7.5+/-2.9%; p=0.032), although the decrease in resting energy expenditure (REE) was similar between groups (p=0.783). Mitochondrial oxidation was significantly affected by the type of diet (p=0.001), being activated after the lower-GI treatment (p=0.022). Interestingly, one year after the nutritional intervention weight regain was only statistically significant in the higher-GI group (p=0.033). Lower-GI energy-restricted diets achieved through a specific differential food selection can improve the energy adaptations during obesity treatment, favouring weight loss and probably weight maintenance compared with higher-GI hypocaloric diets.

  9. WALKING CAPACITY AND FALLS-EFFICACY CORRELATES WITH PARTICIPATION RESTRICTION IN INDIVIDUALS WITH CHRONIC STROKE: A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Nayak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mobility impairments seen after Stroke impact walking speed, endurance and balance. Almost all the individuals with Stroke have fear of fall. The physical impairments in balance and gait along with individual’s perception about his/her own abilities to maintain balance might have an impact on level of activity and participation in the community. The association of these variables with recovery of Stroke has been well studied. However, it is currently unknown which of these variables are most associated with activity and participation in the community. This study aimed to identify the correlation of walking capacity and perception of fall with activity & participation. Methods: 30 Subjects were assessed for - walking capacity (6 minute walk test & Self-efficacy for falls (Modified Falls Efficacy scale. Level of Activity Limitation (AL & Participation Restriction (PR was graded on validated ICF Measure of Participation and Activities. (IMPACT-S Results: Data was analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient & regression model. Walking distance and Falls-efficacy is significantly correlated (r=-0.751 and -0.683, respectively with Participation restriction. Walking distance correlated with Activity Limitation (r=-0.714 significantly. Falls efficacy has a correlation coefficient of -0.642 with Activity Limitation. When put into Regression models, Walking Capacity & Gait Velocity was found to be independently associated with AL &PR. Conclusion: There is significant relationship between falls self-efficacy, walking capacity and Post-stroke activity & participation. Participation can be impacted by factors such as self-motivation and confidence about one's balance abilities. This is reflected by the correlation between falls efficacy and participation. Physical parameters such as the distance walked can contribute to participating in the community, and can predict variation in AL-PR

  10. Dietary starch type affects body weight and glycemic control in freely fed but not energy-restricted obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Alfred A; Kenney, Laura S; Goulet, Benoit; Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed

    2009-10-01

    This study comprised 2 experiments that tested the hypothesis that a high-amylose starch diet (AMO) would improve body weight and glycemic control relative to a high-amylopectin starch diet (AMN) in rats with diet-induced obesity. After inducing obesity with a high-fat and -energy diet (Expt. 1), male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 46) were divided into 4 groups and given free or restricted access to either an AMN or an AMO diet for 4 wk (Expt. 2). After 3 wk, rats from each group underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. At the end of the experiment, food-deprived rats were killed by decapitation and blood and tissues were collected for analyses. AMO led to lower total energy intake, weight gain, fat pad mass, and glycemic response but higher insulin sensitivity index than AMN, only when consumed ad libitum (AL) (P resistant starch content rather than its glycemic index. We conclude that starches high in AMO can be effective in weight and glycemic control in obesity.

  11. Relatively high-protein or 'low-carb' energy-restricted diets for body weight loss and body weight maintenance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soenen, Stijn; Bonomi, Alberto G; Lemmens, Sofie G T; Scholte, Jolande; Thijssen, Myriam A M A; van Berkum, Frank; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2012-10-10

    'Low-carb' diets have been suggested to be effective in body weight (BW) management. However, these diets are relatively high in protein as well. To unravel whether body-weight loss and weight-maintenance depends on the high-protein or the 'low-carb' component of the diet. Body-weight (BW), fat mass (FM), blood- and urine-parameters of 132 participants (age=50 ± 12 yr; BW=107 ± 20 kg; BMI=37 ± 6 kg/m(2); FM=47.5 ± 11.9 kg) were compared after 3 and 12 months between four energy-restricted diets with 33% of energy requirement for the first 3 months, and 67% for the last 9 months: normal-protein normal-carbohydrate (NPNC), normal-protein low-carbohydrate (NPLC); high-protein normal-carbohydrate (HPNC), high-protein low-carbohydrate (HPLC); 24h N-analyses confirmed daily protein intakes for the normal-protein diets of 0.7 ± 0.1 and for the high-protein diets of 1.1 ± 0.2g/kg BW (pcarb' component of the diet, while it is unrelated to the concomitant fat-content of the diet. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Energy-restricted diet benefits body composition but degrades bone integrity in middle-aged obese female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chwan-Li; Zhu, Wenbin; Gao, Weimin; Wang, Shu; Chen, Lixia; Chyu, Ming-Chien

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the effects of a restricted diet (RD) on body composition and musculoskeletal health along with endocrines and molecular mechanism in established mature obese rats. Twenty female rats were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD) ad libitum for 4 months and then assigned to either HFD or RD group for another 4 months. Another 10 rats were on a low-fat diet for 8 months. Outcome measures included body composition, bone mineral density, microarchitecrure, and strength; serum leptin, adiponectin, insulin-like growth factor I, and liver glutathione peroxidase activity; and protein expression and spleen tumor necrosis factor α messenger RNA expression. We hypothesized that mature obese rats on a 35% energy restriction diet for 4 months would improve body composition but degrade microstructural and mechanical properties of long bones, and such changes in musculoskeletal integrity are related to the modulation of obesity-related endocrines and proinflammation. Relative to HFD, RD benefited body composition (decreased body weight and %fat mass and increased %fat-free mass); decreased insulin-like growth factor I and leptin; elevated adiponectin, glutathione peroxidase activity and protein expression and tumor necrosis factor α messenger RNA expression; and suppressed bone formation and increased bone resorption, resulting in decreased trabecular and cortical bone volume, bone mineral density, and bone strength. Relative to low-fat diet, RD had a similar effect on body composition and serum markers but increased bone turnover rate and decreased bone mineral density and strength. Our data suggest that long-term RD has a negative impact on bone remodeling in obese female rats, probably through modification of endocrines and elevation of proinflammation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Adiposity and serum parameters in hamsters fed energy restricted diets supplemented or not with trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, A; Simón, E; Churruca, I; Fernández-Quintela, A; Rodríguez, V M; Portillo, M P

    2007-12-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) modulates body composition, reducing body fat accumulation in various mammalian species. However, very few studies have been carried out to assess the effect of CLA on previously stored body fat. The aim of the present work was to analyse the effectiveness of trans-10,cis-12 CLA in improving alterations produced by high-fat feeding in body fat and serum parameters when it was included in an energy-restricted diet. For this purpose male Syrian Golden hamsters were fed on high-fat diet for 7 weeks in order to increase their body fat content, and a further 25% energy-restricted diet supplemented or not with 0.5% trans-10,cis-12 CLA for 3 weeks. Adipose tissues, liver and gastrocnemious muscles were dissected and weighed. Adipocyte diameter and number were assessed in epididymal adipose tissue. Total cholesterol, triacylglycerols, non-esterified fatty acids and glucose were measured in serum. Three weeks of energy restriction resulted in a reduction in body weight and white adipose tissue size in all anatomical locations, without changes in liver and gastrocnemious muscle weights. Epididymal adipocyte size was reduced, but total adipocyte number remained unchanged. Serum cholesterol, triacylglycerols and glucose were significantly reduced. No differences were observed between the restricted groups (control and CLA supplemented). In conclusion, under our experimental conditions, the addition of trans-10,cis-12 CLA to the diet does not increase the benefits produced by energy restriction.

  14. Region-specific increases in FosB/ΔFosB immunoreactivity in the rat brain in response to chronic sleep restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Shannon; Deurveilher, Samüel; Ko, Kristin Robin; Burns, Joan; Semba, Kazue

    2017-03-30

    Using a rat model of chronic sleep restriction (CSR) featuring periodic sleep deprivation with slowly rotating wheels (3h on/1h off), we previously observed that 99h of this protocol induced both homeostatic and allostatic (adaptive) changes in physiological and behavioural measures. Notably, the initial changes in sleep intensity and attention performance gradually adapted during CSR despite accumulating sleep loss. To identify brain regions involved in these responses, we used FosB/ΔFosB immunohistochemistry as a marker of chronic neuronal activation. Adult male rats were housed in motorized activity wheels and underwent the 3/1 CSR protocol for 99h, or 99h followed by 6 or 12days of recovery. Control rats were housed in home cages, locked activity wheels, or unlocked activity wheels that the animals could turn freely. Immunohistochemistry was conducted using an antibody that recognized both FosB and ΔFosB, and 24 brain regions involved in sleep/wake, autonomic, and limbic functions were examined. The number of darkly-stained FosB/ΔFosB-immunoreactive cells was increased immediately following 99h of CSR in 8/24 brain regions, including the medial preoptic and perifornical lateral hypothalamic areas, dorsomedial and paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei, and paraventricular thalamic nucleus. FosB/ΔFosB labeling was at control levels in all 8 brain areas following 6 or 12 recovery days, suggesting that most of the immunoreactivity immediately after CSR reflected FosB, the more transient marker of chronic neuronal activation. This region-specific induction of FosB/ΔFosB following CSR may be involved in the mechanisms underlying the allostatic changes in behavioural and physiological responses to CSR.

  15. Adipose tissue remodeling in late-lactation dairy cows during feed-restriction-induced negative energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, G Andres; Thelen, Kyan; Schmidt, Sarah E; Strieder-Barboza, Clarissa; Preseault, Courtney L; Raphael, William; Kiupel, Matti; Caron, John; Lock, Adam L

    2016-12-01

    Excessive rates of demand lipolysis in the adipose tissue (AT) during periods of negative energy balance (NEB) are associated with increased susceptibility to disease and limited lactation performance. Lipolysis induces a remodeling process within AT that is characterized by an inflammatory response, cellular proliferation, and changes in the extracellular matrix (ECMT). The adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) is a key component of the inflammatory response. Infiltration of ATM-forming cellular aggregates was demonstrated in transition cows, suggesting that ATM trafficking and phenotype changes may be associated with disease. However, it is currently unknown if ATM infiltration occurs in dairy cows only during NEB states related to the transition period or also during NEB-induced lipolysis at other stages of lactation. The objective of this study was to evaluate changes in ATM trafficking and inflammatory phenotypes, and the expression of genetic markers of AT remodeling in healthy late-lactation cows during feed restriction-induced NEB. After a 14-d (d -14 to d -1) preliminary period, Holstein cows were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 feeding protocols, ad libitum (AL) or feed restriction (FR), for 4 d (d 1-4). Caloric intake was reduced in FR to achieve a targeted energy balance of -15 Mcal/d of net energy for lactation. Omental and subcutaneous AT samples were collected laparoscopically to harvest stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells on d -3 and 4. The FR induced a NEB of -14.1±0.62 Mcal/d of net energy for lactation, whereas AL cows remained in positive energy balance (3.2±0.66 Mcal/d of NEL). The FR triggered a lipolytic response reflected in increased plasma nonesterified fatty acids (0.65±0.05 mEq/L on d 4), enhanced phosphorylation of hormone sensitive lipase, and reduced adipocyte diameter. Flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that on d 4, FR cows had increased numbers of CD172a(+), an ATM (M1 and M2) surface marker, cells in SVF that were

  16. Food cravings and energy regulation: the characteristics of craved foods and their relationship with eating behaviors and weight change during 6 months of dietary energy restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilhooly, C H; Das, S K; Golden, J K; McCrory, M A; Dallal, G E; Saltzman, E; Kramer, F M; Roberts, S B

    2007-12-01

    To examine characteristics of craved foods in relation to dietary energy restriction (ER) with high (HG) and low glycemic load (LG) diets. Assessments of food cravings before and during a randomized controlled trial of HG and LG diets provided for 6 months. Thirty-two healthy, overweight women aged 20-42 years. Self-reported food cravings and dietary intake, body weight, weight history and measures of eating behaviors. Foods craved at baseline were more than twice as high in energy density as the habitual diet (3.7+/-1.5 vs 1.7+/-0.3 kcal/g; Pcraved foods after 6 months of ER. There was a significant relationship between reported portion size of craved food consumed at baseline and lifetime high body mass index (r=0.49, P=0.005). Additionally, there was a significant association between susceptibility to hunger and craving frequency at baseline, and there were significant relationships between hunger score, craving frequency, strength and percentage of time that cravings are given in to after 6 months of ER. In multiple regression models, subjects who lost a greater percentage of weight craved higher energy-dense foods at month 6 of ER, but also reported giving in to food cravings less frequently (adjusted R (2)=0.31, P=0.009). High energy density and fat content, and low protein and fiber contents were identifying characteristics of craved foods. The relationships between craving variables and hunger score suggest that the relative influence of hunger susceptibility on cravings may be important before and especially after ER. Portion size of craved foods and frequency of giving in to food cravings appear to be important areas for focus in lifestyle modification programs for long-term weight loss.

  17. Phenotypic Stability of Energy Balance Responses to Experimental Total Sleep Deprivation and Sleep Restriction in Healthy Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Dennis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies have shown that sleep restriction (SR and total sleep deprivation (TSD produce increased caloric intake, greater fat consumption, and increased late-night eating. However, whether individuals show similar energy intake responses to both SR and TSD remains unknown. A total of N = 66 healthy adults (aged 21–50 years, 48.5% women, 72.7% African American participated in a within-subjects laboratory protocol to compare daily and late-night intake between one night of SR (4 h time in bed, 04:00–08:00 and one night of TSD (0 h time in bed conditions. We also examined intake responses during subsequent recovery from SR or TSD and investigated gender differences. Caloric and macronutrient intake during the day following SR and TSD were moderately to substantially consistent within individuals (Intraclass Correlation Coefficients: 0.34–0.75. During the late-night period of SR (22:00–04:00 and TSD (22:00–06:00, such consistency was slight to moderate, and participants consumed a greater percentage of calories from protein (p = 0.01 and saturated fat (p = 0.02 during SR, despite comparable caloric intake (p = 0.12. Similarly, participants consumed a greater percentage of calories from saturated fat during the day following SR than TSD (p = 0.03. Participants also consumed a greater percentage of calories from protein during recovery after TSD (p < 0.001. Caloric intake was greater in men during late-night hours and the day following sleep loss. This is the first evidence of phenotypic trait-like stability and differential vulnerability of energy balance responses to two commonly experienced types of sleep loss: our findings open the door for biomarker discovery and countermeasure development to predict and mitigate this critical health-related vulnerability.

  18. Phenotypic Stability of Energy Balance Responses to Experimental Total Sleep Deprivation and Sleep Restriction in Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Laura E; Spaeth, Andrea M; Goel, Namni

    2016-12-19

    Experimental studies have shown that sleep restriction (SR) and total sleep deprivation (TSD) produce increased caloric intake, greater fat consumption, and increased late-night eating. However, whether individuals show similar energy intake responses to both SR and TSD remains unknown. A total of N = 66 healthy adults (aged 21-50 years, 48.5% women, 72.7% African American) participated in a within-subjects laboratory protocol to compare daily and late-night intake between one night of SR (4 h time in bed, 04:00-08:00) and one night of TSD (0 h time in bed) conditions. We also examined intake responses during subsequent recovery from SR or TSD and investigated gender differences. Caloric and macronutrient intake during the day following SR and TSD were moderately to substantially consistent within individuals (Intraclass Correlation Coefficients: 0.34-0.75). During the late-night period of SR (22:00-04:00) and TSD (22:00-06:00), such consistency was slight to moderate, and participants consumed a greater percentage of calories from protein (p = 0.01) and saturated fat (p = 0.02) during SR, despite comparable caloric intake (p = 0.12). Similarly, participants consumed a greater percentage of calories from saturated fat during the day following SR than TSD (p = 0.03). Participants also consumed a greater percentage of calories from protein during recovery after TSD (p sleep loss. This is the first evidence of phenotypic trait-like stability and differential vulnerability of energy balance responses to two commonly experienced types of sleep loss: our findings open the door for biomarker discovery and countermeasure development to predict and mitigate this critical health-related vulnerability.

  19. The water-water cycle in leaves is not a major alternative electron sink for dissipation of excess excitation energy when CO2 assimilation is restricted

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driever, S.M.; Baker, N.R.

    2011-01-01

    Electron flux from water via photosystem II (PSII) and PSI to oxygen (water–water cycle) may provide a mechanism for dissipation of excess excitation energy in leaves when CO2 assimilation is restricted. Mass spectrometry was used to measure O2 uptake and evolution together with CO2 uptake in leaves

  20. A low-fat diet has a higher potential than energy restriction to improve high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muurling, M.; Jong, M.C.; Mensink, R.P.; Hornstra, G.; Dahlmans, V.E.H.; Pijl, H.; Voshol, P.J.; Havekes, L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that energy restriction (ER) or low-fat (LF) diets have beneficial effects on high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity and non-insulin-dependent diabetes. However, comparison between ER and low-fat diet regarding the effect on insulin resistance and lipid metabolism has not bee

  1. A low-fat diet has a higher potential than energy restriction to improve high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muurling, M.; Jong, M.C.; Mensink, R.P.; Hornstra, G.; Dahlmans, V.E.H.; Pijl, H.; Voshol, P.J.; Havekes, L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that energy restriction (ER) or low-fat (LF) diets have beneficial effects on high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity and non-insulin-dependent diabetes. However, comparison between ER and low-fat diet regarding the effect on insulin resistance and lipid metabolism has not

  2. A low-fat diet has a higher potential than energy restriction to improve high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muurling, M.; Jong, M.C.; Mensink, R.P.; Hornstra, G.; Dahlmans, V.E.H.; Pijl, H.; Voshol, P.J.; Havekes, L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that energy restriction (ER) or low-fat (LF) diets have beneficial effects on high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity and non-insulin-dependent diabetes. However, comparison between ER and low-fat diet regarding the effect on insulin resistance and lipid metabolism has not bee

  3. The water-water cycle in leaves is not a major alternative electron sink for dissipation of excess excitation energy when CO2 assimilation is restricted

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driever, S.M.; Baker, N.R.

    2011-01-01

    Electron flux from water via photosystem II (PSII) and PSI to oxygen (water–water cycle) may provide a mechanism for dissipation of excess excitation energy in leaves when CO2 assimilation is restricted. Mass spectrometry was used to measure O2 uptake and evolution together with CO2 uptake in leaves

  4. The viability of an ecologically valid chronic sleep restriction and circadian timing protocol: An examination of sample attrition, compliance, and effectiveness at impacting sleepiness and mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Sean P. A.; McElroy, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction (SR) increases sleepiness, negatively impacts mood, and impairs a variety of cognitive performance measures. The vast majority of work establishing these effects are tightly controlled in-lab experimental studies. Examining commonly-experienced levels of SR in naturalistic settings is more difficult and generally involves observational methods, rather than active manipulations of sleep. The same is true for analyzing behavioral and cognitive outcomes at circadian unfavorable times. The current study tested the ability of an at-home protocol to manipulate sleep schedules (i.e., impose SR), as well as create a mismatch between a subject’s circadian preference and time of testing. Viability of the protocol was assessed via completion, compliance with the SR, and success at manipulating sleepiness and mood. An online survey was completed by 3630 individuals to assess initial eligibility, 256 agreed via email response to participate in the 3-week study, 221 showed for the initial in-person session, and 184 completed the protocol (175 with complete data). The protocol consisted of 1 week at-home SR (5-6 hours in bed/night), 1 week wash-out, and 1 week well-rested (WR: 8-9 hours in bed/night). Sleep was monitored with actigraphy, diary, and call-ins. Risk management strategies were implemented for subject safety. At the end of each experimental week, subjects reported sleepiness and mood ratings. Protocol completion was 83%, with lower depression scores, higher anxiety scores, and morning session assignment predicting completion. Compliance with the sleep schedule was also very good. Subjects spent approximately 2 hours less time in bed/night and obtained an average of 1.5 hours less nightly sleep during SR, relative to WR, with 82% of subjects obtaining at least 60 minutes less average nightly sleep. Sleepiness and mood were impacted as expected by SR. These findings show the viability of studying experimental chronic sleep restriction outside

  5. Effect of protein or energy restriction during late gestation on hormonal and metabolic status in pregnant goats and postnatal male offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z X; Sun, Z H; Beauchemin, K A; Yang, W Z; Tang, S X; Zhou, C S; Han, X F; Wang, M; Kang, J H; Tan, Z L

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of maternal protein or energy restriction on hormonal and metabolic status of pregnant goats during late gestation and their postnatal male kids. Forty-five pregnant goats were fed a control (CON), 40% protein-restricted (PR) or 40% energy-restricted (ER) diet from 90 days of gestation until parturition. Plasma of mothers (90, 125 and 145 days of gestation) and kids (6 weeks of age) were sampled to determine metabolites and hormones. Glucose concentration for pregnant goats subjected to PR or ER was less (P goats at 125 and 145 days of gestation. However, plasma nonesterified fatty acids concentration was greater (P nutritional restriction, with greater (P goats but less (P goats at 125 days of gestation. After 6 weeks of nutritional recovery, plasma concentrations of most metabolic and hormonal parameters in restricted kids were similar to CON kids, except for reduced (P < 0.05) insulin concentration in ER, and reduced (P < 0.05) Asp concentration in PR and ER kids. These results provide information on potential metabolic mechanisms responsible for fetal programming.

  6. Immediate and residual effects of heat stress and restricted intake on milk protein and casein composition and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, F C; Barber, D G; Houlihan, A V; Poppi, D P

    2015-04-01

    The effects of heat stress on dairy production can be separated into 2 distinct causes: those effects that are mediated by the reduced voluntary feed intake associated with heat stress, and the direct physiological and metabolic effects of heat stress. To distinguish between these, and identify their effect on milk protein and casein concentration, mid-lactation Holstein-Friesian cows (n = 24) were housed in temperature-controlled chambers and either subjected to heat stress [HS; temperature-humidity index (THI) ~78] or kept in a THIheat-stressed cows (TN-R) for 7 d. A control group of cows was kept in a THIheat stress. Heat stress reduced the milk protein concentration, casein number, and casein concentration and increased the urea concentration in milk beyond the effects of restriction of intake. Under HS, the proportion in total casein of αS1-casein increased and the proportion of αS2-casein decreased. Because no effect of HS on milk fat or lactose concentration was found, these effects appeared to be the result of specific downregulation of mammary protein synthesis, and not a general reduction in mammary activity. No residual effects were found of HS or TN-R on milk production or composition after THIHeat-stressed cows had elevated blood concentrations of urea and Ca, compared with TN-R and TN-AL. Cows in TN-R had higher serum nonesterified fatty acid concentrations than cows in HS. It was proposed that HS and TN-R cows may mobilize different tissues as endogenous sources of energy.

  7. Dietary Energy Density, Renal Function, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Rouhani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is evidence of the association between dietary energy density and chronic diseases. However, no report exists regarding the relation between DED and chronic kidney disease (CKD. Objective. To examine the association between dietary energy density (DED, renal function, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Three nephrology clinics. Subjects. Two hundred twenty-one subjects with diagnosed CKD. Main Outcome Measure. Dietary intake of patients was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire. DED (in kcal/g was calculated with the use of energy content and weight of solid foods and energy yielding beverages. Renal function was measured by blood urea nitrogen (BUN, serum creatinine (Cr, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. Results. Patients in the first tertile of DED consumed more amounts of carbohydrate, dietary fiber, potassium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, calcium, folate, vitamin C, and vitamin B2. After adjusting for confounders, we could not find any significant trend for BUN and Cr across tertiles of DED. In multivariate model, an increased risk of being in the higher stage of CKD was found among those in the last tertile of DED (OR: 3.15; 95% CI: 1.30, 7.63; P=0.01. Conclusion. We observed that lower DED was associated with better nutrient intake and lower risk of CKD progression.

  8. Dietary Energy Density, Renal Function, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhani, Mohammad Hossein; Najafabadi, Mojgan Mortazavi; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Feizi, Awat

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is evidence of the association between dietary energy density and chronic diseases. However, no report exists regarding the relation between DED and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Objective. To examine the association between dietary energy density (DED), renal function, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Three nephrology clinics. Subjects. Two hundred twenty-one subjects with diagnosed CKD. Main Outcome Measure. Dietary intake of patients was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire. DED (in kcal/g) was calculated with the use of energy content and weight of solid foods and energy yielding beverages. Renal function was measured by blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Cr), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results. Patients in the first tertile of DED consumed more amounts of carbohydrate, dietary fiber, potassium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, calcium, folate, vitamin C, and vitamin B2. After adjusting for confounders, we could not find any significant trend for BUN and Cr across tertiles of DED. In multivariate model, an increased risk of being in the higher stage of CKD was found among those in the last tertile of DED (OR: 3.15; 95% CI: 1.30, 7.63; P = 0.01). Conclusion. We observed that lower DED was associated with better nutrient intake and lower risk of CKD progression. PMID:27819022

  9. Effects of maternal protein or energy restriction during late gestation on antioxidant status of plasma and immune tissues in postnatal goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z X; Sun, Z H; Tan, Z L; Tang, S X; Zhou, C S; Han, X F; Wang, M; Wu, D Q; Kang, J H; Beauchemin, K A

    2012-12-01

    Maternal malnutrition can have temporary or long-lasting effects on development and physiological function of offspring. Our objective was to investigate whether maternal protein or energy restriction in late gestation affects the antioxidant status of plasma, immune organs (thymus and spleen), and natural barrier organs (jejunum) in neonatal goats and whether the effects could be reversed after nutritional recovery. Forty-five pregnant goats (Liuyang Blacks) of similar age (2.0 ± 0.3 yr) and BW (22.2 ± 1.5 kg at d 90 of gestation) were assigned to 3 dietary treatments during late gestation: control (ME = 9.34 MJ/kg and CP = 12.5%, DM basis), 40% protein restricted (PR), and 40% energy restricted (ER) until parturition, after which offspring received the normal diet for nutritional recovery. Plasma and tissues of kids were sampled to determine antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), and catalase (CAT)] and gene expression of antioxidant enzymes (Cu/Zn-SOD [SOD1], CAT, and peroxiredoxin 2 [PRDX2]). Maternal protein or energy restriction decreased (P nutritional recovery of 6 wk, SOD activities in thymus (both in PR and ER) and spleen (only in PR) were greater (P nutritional recovery of 22 wk, SOD1 and PRDX2 expression in thymus (both in PR and ER) and SOD1 expression in liver (only in ER) were greater (P nutritional recovery.

  10. Understanding the consequences of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy from impairments to activity and participation restrictions and reduced quality of life: the ICE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkies, Ingemar S J; Hughes, Richard A C; Donofrio, Peter; Bril, Vera; Dalakas, Marinos C; Hanna, Kim; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Latov, Norman; van Doorn, Pieter A; Deng, Chunqin

    2010-09-01

    A randomized trial (ICE trial) in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) demonstrated significantly more improvement with intravenous immunoglobulin (Gamunex(®), Talecris Biotherapeutics, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC) than placebo. To understand the relationship between CIDP impairments, activity and participation restrictions, and quality of life (QoL) in this trial, we investigated the association between scales representing these outcome levels. Gamunex or placebo was given every 3 weeks for up to 24 weeks to 117 patients in an initial treatment period after which treatment failures were crossed over (alternative treatment). We assessed impairments, activity and participation, and SF-36 component mental (MCS) and physical summaries (PCS). Regression analyses of baseline data were performed (all subjects) and change from baseline to endpoint (Gamunex-treated group only) to determine correlations between outcomes. Grip strength, medical research council (MRC) sum score, and inflammatory neuropathy cause and treatment (INCAT) sensory sum score were the strongest explanatory variables of disability (at baseline: r(2) = 0.46; change from baseline: r(2) = 0.66). Only up to half of the variance in QoL scores (PCS at baseline: r(2) = 0.30; change from baseline: r(2) = 0.41; MCS: at baseline: r(2) = 0.10; change from baseline: r(2) = 0.24) was explained by impairment and activity and participation measures. Future studies are required to elucidate the impact of CIDP on disability and QoL changes, because the obtained correlations provide only partial explanation.

  11. An immunodominant HLA-A*1101-restricted CD8+ T-cell response targeting hepatitis B surface antigen in chronic hepatitis B patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoling; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Shufeng; Meng, Gang; Zhang, Mengjun; Ni, Bing; Wu, Yuzhang; Wang, Li

    2013-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a worldwide public health problem. HBV-specific CD8(+) CTLs are vital for viral clearance. Identification of immunodominant CTL epitopes from HBV-associated antigens is necessary for therapeutic vaccine development. We showed that the HLA-A*1101 allele is one of the most common alleles in both healthy individuals and chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients in the Chongqing area, China. However, less than 10% of epitopes of HBV-associated antigens have been identified in an HLA-A*1101 context. Here, we describe an immunodominant CD8(+) T-cell response targeting a hepatitis B surface antigen determinant (HBs(295-304)) restricted by HLA-A*1101 in both healthy individuals and CHB patients. Moreover, HBs(295-304) is more immunogenic for CTL induction than a known naturally HLA-A*1101-processed epitope from hepatitis B core antigen (HBc(88-96)). Therefore, the newly identified epitope, HBs(295-304), will benefit the development of immunotherapeutic approaches for HBV infection.

  12. Metabolic Effects of a 24-Week Energy-Restricted Intervention Combined with Low or High Dairy Intake in Overweight Women: An NMR-Based Metabolomics Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hong; Lorenzen, J.K.; Astrup, A.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of a 24-week energy-restricted intervention with low or high dairy intake (LD or HD) on the metabolic profiles of urine, blood and feces in overweight/obese women by NMR spectroscopy combined with ANOVA-simultaneous component analysis (ASCA). A significant effect of dairy...... intake was found on the urine metabolome. HD intake increased urinary citrate, creatinine and urea excretion, and decreased urinary excretion of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and hippurate relative to the LD intake, suggesting that HD intake was associated with alterations in protein catabolism, energy...... metabolism and gut microbial activity. In addition, a significant time effect on the blood metabolome was attributed to a decrease in blood lipid and lipoprotein levels due to the energy restriction. For the fecal metabolome, a trend for a diet effect was found and a series of metabolites, such as acetate...

  13. Effects of energy and protein restriction, followed by nutritional recovery on morphological development of the gastrointestinal tract of weaned kids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Z H; He, Z X; Zhang, Q L; Tan, Z L; Han, X F; Tang, S X; Zhou, C S; Wang, M; Yan, Q X

    2013-01-01

    ...), nutritional restriction period (7 to 48 d), and recovery period (49 to 111 d). Three kids from each group were killed at d 48 and 111, and the rumen, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were harvested. On d 48...

  14. [Effect of high-fat diet and food restriction on energy metabolism in obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianmin; Wang, Junxia; Zheng, Long; Lian, Weiguang; Liu, Shufeng

    2015-09-01

    To explore the effect of high-fat diet and food restriction on energy metabolism in obesity-prone (OP) and obesity-resistant (OR) rats. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into OP, OR and control groups according to their body weight gain after fed with high-fat diet for 3 wk. OP and OR groups were fed with high-fat diet in the following 12 wk to promote the development of obesity. Then one-half of the rats of each group began to food restriction and were allowed access to 50% of their individual baseline mean daily food intake each day, while the other half were maintained on ad libitum food for 2 wk. Basal metabolic rate (BMR), resting metabolic rate (RMR) of each group were measured by indirect calorimetry during the high-fat diet feeding and food restriction conditions. After the rats were sacrificed, body fat content was measured. OR rats had significantly higher BMR and RMR than the other two groups during high-fat diet feeding condition. There was no significant difference between OP and control group. Food restriction led to a reduction in BMR and RMR in all groups. OR rats showed a significantly greater reduction. OP group showed a significant decrease in body fat weight and fat content during the food restriction period, while there was no significant differences in OR rats. There are significant differences between OP and OR rats in BMR and RMR either in high-fat diet feeding condition or food restricted state. OR rat has the ability to sense and respond to energy imbalance more accurately than OP rat.

  15. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiomyopathy - restrictive; Infiltrative cardiomyopathy; Idiopathic myocardial fibrosis ... In a case of restrictive cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle is of normal size or slightly enlarged. Most of the time, it also pumps normally. However, it does ...

  16. 制约建筑节能推进的因素探究%Exploring the Restrictive Factors to Promote the Construction of Energy-efficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid development of the global economy, building problems especial y the energy consumption problem becomes more and more significant, and actively promoted the urgent task of energy-saving construction work. This paper thr-ough the analysis of the significance of energy-saving constru-ction work, analyzes the restricting factors to promote the con-struction of energy-saving, aims to break the restriction factor to promote the construction of energy-saving in China, to acce-lerate the construction of energy-saving, let building energy ef-ficiency become the people's livelihood project which benefit the nation and people.%  随着全球经济的快速发展,建筑带来的问题特别是能源消耗问题越来越显著,积极推进建筑节能工作任务紧迫。本文通过分析建筑节能工作的意义,剖析制约我国建筑节能推进的因素,旨在破除我国建筑节能推进的制约因素,加快我国建筑节能的步伐,让建筑节能成为利国利民的民生工程。

  17. A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Regression Analysis on Early-Life Energy Restriction and Cancer Risk in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elands, Rachel J. J.; Simons, Colinda C. J. M.; van Dongen, Martien; Schouten, Leo J.; Verhage, Bas A. J.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Weijenberg, Matty P.

    2016-01-01

    Background In animal models, long-term moderate energy restriction (ER) is reported to decelerate carcinogenesis, whereas the effect of severe ER is inconsistent. The impact of early-life ER on cancer risk has never been reviewed systematically and quantitatively based on observational studies in humans. Objective We conducted a systematic review of observational studies and a meta-(regression) analysis on cohort studies to clarify the association between early-life ER and organ site-specific cancer risk. Methods PubMed and EMBASE (1982 –August 2015) were searched for observational studies. Summary relative risks (RRs) were estimated using a random effects model when available ≥3 studies. Results Twenty-four studies were included. Eleven publications, emanating from seven prospective cohort studies and some reporting on multiple cancer endpoints, met the inclusion criteria for quantitative analysis. Women exposed to early-life ER (ranging from 220–1660 kcal/day) had a higher breast cancer risk than those not exposed (RRRE all ages = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.05–1.56; RRRE for 10–20 years of age = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.09–1.34). Men exposed to early-life ER (ranging from 220–800kcal/day) had a higher prostate cancer risk than those not exposed (RRRE = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.03–1.30). Summary relative risks were not computed for colorectal cancer, because of heterogeneity, and for stomach-, pancreas-, ovarian-, and respiratory cancer because there were <3 available studies. Longer duration of exposure to ER, after adjustment for severity, was positively associated with overall cancer risk in women (p = 0.02). Ecological studies suggest that less severe ER is generally associated with a reduced risk of cancer. Conclusions Early-life transient severe ER seems to be associated with increased cancer risk in the breast (particularly ER exposure at adolescent age) and prostate. The duration, rather than severity of exposure to ER, seems to positively influence relative risk

  18. Resting energy expenditure and glucose, protein and fat oxidation in severe chronic virus hepatitis B patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study and determine the resting energy ex- penditure (REE) and oxidation rates of glucose, fat and protein in severe chronic hepatitis B patients. METHODS: A total of 100 patients with liver diseases were categorized into three groups: 16 in the acute hepatitis group, 56 in the severe chronic hepatitis group, and 28 in the cirrhosis group. The REE and the oxidation rates of glucose, fat and protein were as- sessed by indirect heat measurement using the CCM-D nutritive metabolic investigation system. RESULTS: The REE of the severe chronic hepatitis group (20.7 ± 6.1 kcal/d per kg) was significantly lower than that of the acute hepatitis group (P = 0.014). The respiratory quotient (RQ) of the severe chronic hepatitis group (0.84 ± 0.06) was significantly lower than that of the acute hepatitis and cirrhosis groups (P = 0.001). The glucose oxidation rate of the severe hepatitis group (39.2%) was significantly lower than that of the acute hepatitis group and the cirrhosis group (P < 0.05), while the fat oxidation rate (39.8%) in the severe hepatitis group was markedly higher than that of the other two groups (P < 0.05). With improve- ment of liver function, the glucose oxidation rate in- creased from 41.7% to 60.1%, while the fat oxidation rate decreased from 26.3% to 7.6%. CONCLUSION: The glucose oxidation rate is signifi- cantly decreased, and a high proportion of energy is provided by fat in severe chronic hepatitis. These re- sues warrant a large clinical trail to assess the optimal nutritive support therapy for patients with severe liver disease.

  19. EFFICACY OF MULLIGAN MOBILIZATION VERSUS MUSCLE ENERGY TECHNIQUE IN CHRONIC SACROILIAC JOINT DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabah Mohammed Easa Alkady

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sacroiliac joint dysfunction represents 15% of low back pain conditions. Normal sacroiliac joint works as a safeguard and transmits upper body weight into the pelvis and lower extremities. If the SIJ is hypomobile, it cannot effectively absorb forces and other body parts may be overstressed causing musculoskeletal dysfunction. The study conducted by comparing the effectiveness of Mulligan mobilization versus muscle energy technique in chronic SIJ dysfunction. Methods: 45 patients with chronic sacroiliac joint dysfunction from both genders joined the study. They were divided into three groups 15 in each group. Group A: received Mulligan mobilization with movement using posterior and anterior innominate methods plus conventional treatment program. Group B: received muscle energy technique using a post-isometric relaxation technique to erector spinae, hamstrings, iliopsoas and quadratus lumborum plus conventional treatment program. Group C: control group obtained conventional treatment program only. Doppler imaging of vibration, palpation meter, and the visual analogue scale was utilized for evaluating patients (pre and post-treatment. Results: The study findings revealed a statistical remarkable improvement in post-intervention values for sacroiliac mobility in Mulligan mobilization group (p > 0.0001 and a statistically significant decrease of anterior pelvic tilting angle in Mulligan mobilization and muscle energy technique groups (p > 0.0001, also a significant decrease of pain in the 3 groups compared with pre-intervention values (p > 0.0001, additionally, Mulligan mobilization group showed a statistical high detectable difference in right and left sacroiliac mobility more than muscle energy technique and control groups (p > 0.0001. Conclusion: Mulligan mobilization is more effective than muscle energy technique in the treatment of chronic sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

  20. Cost curves for the navigation between families of low energy Fast Periodic Transfer Orbits in the Earth-Moon planar circular restricted Three Body Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, J. P.; Leiva, A. M.; Briozzo, C. B.

    Using characteristic curves of low energy fast periodic transfer orbits in the Earth-Moon planar circular restricted three body problem we constructed cost curves that enable the study of maneuvers between them. In an appropiate surface of section the numerical diagrams show regions where transfer maneuvers involve lower costs and that would allow determine family members which make the propelent minimum for these maneuvers. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH.

  1. Health effects of lean fish consumption in overweight and obese young adults following an energy-restricted diet for eight weeks

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    In the cross-European study SEAFOODplus YOUNG it was recently shown that consumption of lean fish increases weight loss in men and has other positive health effects. The aims of this thesis were to investigate whether lean fish consumption increases weight loss and improves cardiovascular risk factors in a dose-dependent manner during an eight-week energy restriction in young overweight or mildly obese healthy adults. A total of 126 Icelandic individuals were grouped into three isocaloric die...

  2. Liquid Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry Based Metabolomics Study of Cloned versus Normal Pigs Fed Either Restricted or Ad Libitum High-Energy Diets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kirstine Lykke; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Jørgensen, Henry

    2012-01-01

    of the metabolome of cloned pigs compared to normal control pigs was performed to elucidate the variation and possible differences in the metabolic phenotypes during a dietary intervention. A total of 19 control pigs and 17 cloned pigs were given the same high-energy dense diet either ad libitum or in a restricted...... was however not established, suggesting a strong role for epigenetics and/or the gut microbiota to develop variation....

  3. Evaluation of antiviral resistant hepatitis B virus subpopulations in patients with chronic hepatitis B by using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Ergin

    2015-12-01

    Antiviral therapies with nucleotide analogues (NA) is crucial in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B as it substantially protects patients from the complications of the disease . However in most of the available NA therapies, resistance emerges in the patients' HBV populations. Therefore, detection of antiviral resistance as early as possible by means of genotypically monitoring the patients' HBV pool during NA therapy is critical to manage treatment regime. In this research study we have investigated the sensitivity and specificity of the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) method in detecting HBV subpopulations carrying antiviral resistance mutations. For this aim, differentiation of mutant strains from wild type strains was demonstrated by PCR-RFLP method. With using recombinant plasmids containing mutant and wild type HBV genomes, we constructed artificial HBV genome populations in order to determine the sensitivity of PCR-T-RFLP method in detecting antiviral resistant minor HBV populations. Finally by comparing with the DNA sequencing method, we demonstrated the specificity of T-RFLP method in genotyping HBV populations. As a result we showed that T-RFLP is able to detect HBV subpopulations representing as low as 1 % of the whole viral population. Additionally T-RFLP showed 100 % concordance with the DNA sequencing method in genotyping HBV populations. As a conclusion, considering the other genotyping methods used in evaluating HBV populations, T-RFLP showed high sensitivity and specificity profiles in detecting antiviral resistant HBV subpopulations. Therefore T-RFLP method can be easily employed in genotypic evaluation of patients' HBV populations during the course of antiviral treatment.

  4. Energy expenditure in chronic stroke patients playing Wii Sports: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stam Henk J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is one of the leading causes of long-term disability in modern western countries. Stroke survivors often have functional limitations which might lead to a vicious circle of reduced physical activity, deconditioning and further physical deterioration. Current evidence suggests that routine moderate- or vigorous-intensity physical activity is essential for maintenance and improvement of health among stroke survivors. Nevertheless, long-term participation in physical activities is low among people with disabilities. Active video games, such as Nintendo Wii Sports, might maintain interest and improve long-term participation in physical activities; however, the intensity of physical activity among chronic stroke patients while playing Wii Sports is unknown. We investigated the energy expenditure of chronic stroke patients while playing Wii Sports tennis and boxing. Methods Ten chronic (≥ 6 months stroke patients comprising a convenience sample, who were able to walk independently on level ground, were recruited from a rehabilitation centre. They were instructed to play Wii Sports tennis and boxing in random order for 15 minutes each, with a 10-minute break between games. A portable gas analyzer was used to measure oxygen uptake (VO2 during sitting and during Wii Sports game play. Energy expenditure was expressed in metabolic equivalents (METs, calculated as VO2 during Wii Sports divided by VO2 during sitting. We classified physical activity as moderate (3-6 METs or vigorous (> 6 METs according to the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association Guidelines. Results Among the 10 chronic stroke patients, 3 were unable to play tennis because they had problems with timing of hitting the ball, and 2 were excluded from the boxing group because of a technical problem with the portable gas analyzer. The mean (± SD energy expenditure during Wii Sports game play was 3.7 (± 0.6 METs for tennis and 4.1 (

  5. Association between farming and chronic energy deficiency in rural South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasinghe, Asvini K; Walker, Karen Z; Evans, Roger G; Srikanth, Velandai; Arabshahi, Simin; Kartik, Kamakshi; Kalyanram, Kartik; Thrift, Amanda G

    2014-01-01

    To examine factors associated with chronic energy deficiency (CED) and anaemia in disadvantaged Indian adults who are mostly involved in subsistence farming. A cross-sectional study in which we collected information on socio-demographic factors, physical activity, anthropometry, blood haemoglobin concentration, and daily household food intake. These data were used to calculate body mass index (BMI), basal metabolic rate (BMR), daily energy expenditure, and energy and nutrient intake. Multivariable backward stepwise logistic regression was used to assess socioeconomic and lifestyle factors associated with CED (defined as BMIfactor associated with CED in this rural Indian population and low dietary iron is not the main cause of anaemia. Better farming practice may help to reduce CED in this population.

  6. Acute and chronic effects of gum chewing on food reinforcement and energy intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Christine; Temple, Jennifer L

    2013-04-01

    Although chewing gum has been considered a potential method for reducing energy intake, little empirical data exist to support this idea. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that chewing gum before eating reduces motivation to eat, hunger, and energy intake. In order to test this hypothesis, we conducted two experiments in which participants chewed gum prior to completing a food reinforcement task or before all eating occasions for two of three weeks. In Experiment 1, we found that chewing gum had no influence on the reinforcing value of food, but chewing mint gum reduced liking of and energy intake from fruit. In addition, chewing gum reduced self-reported hunger immediately after gum chewing and after eating compared with the no gum condition. In Experiment 2, gum chewing had no significant effect on total energy intake, but participants consumed fewer meals, consumed more energy per meal, and had a lower nutrient adequacy ratio during the gum chewing weeks. These studies provide no evidence that acute or chronic gum chewing reduces hunger or energy intake. In fact, chewing mint-flavored gum may deter consumption of fruit and reduce diet quality.

  7. EFFECT OF LOW ENERGY VERSUS MEDIUM ENERGY RADIAL SHOCK WAVE THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC PLANTER FASCIITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Z. Fouda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plantar fasciitis (PF is the most common cause of heel pain and it can often be a challenge for clinicians to treat successfully. Radial shock wave therapy (RSWT has been introduced recently for treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. Different energy levels of shock wave therapy have been used in the literatures for treatment of PF with no clear settled parameters. Therefore, the purpose of this study was intended to investigate and compare the efficacy of two different energy levels of RSWT on PF patients. Methods: Forty patients having unilateral chronic PF were recruited for the study from orthopedic outpatient clinics of Cairo University hospitals and National Institute of Neuromotor System Cairo Egypt, with a mean age of (47.15±4.57 years. Patients were randomly assigned into two equal groups. Group (A treated with low intensity level of 1.6 bars (0.16 mJ/mm2 RSWT and group (B treated with medium intensity level of 4 bars (0.38 mJ/mm2 RSWT. Functional assessment of the foot based on Foot Function Index (FFI and Present pain intensity was measured during rest by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Results: There was as significant decreased in the total FFI scores from (118.42 ±6.51 to (81.37 ±3.46 for group (A and from (118.93 ±6.85 to (58.50 ±3.22 for group (B. Also regarding VAS Scores there was as significant decreased in the pain intensity from (5.11 ±0.41 to (2.85 ±0.31 for group (A and from (4.95 ±0.39 to (2.05 ±0.22 for group (B. Conclusion: Radial shock wave therapy is an effective modality that should be considered in the treatment of chronic PF, while the medium energy level RSWT is better than the low energy level RSWT in regarding to the measured treatment outcomes.

  8. Chronic Maternal Low-Protein Diet in Mice Affects Anxiety, Night-Time Energy Expenditure and Sleep Patterns, but Not Circadian Rhythm in Male Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Sangeetha K.; Fiorotto, Marta L.; Van den Veyver, Ignatia B.

    2017-01-01

    Offspring of murine dams chronically fed a protein-restricted diet have an increased risk for metabolic and neurobehavioral disorders. Previously we showed that adult offspring, developmentally exposed to a chronic maternal low-protein (MLP) diet, had lower body and hind-leg muscle weights and decreased liver enzyme serum levels. We conducted energy expenditure, neurobehavioral and circadian rhythm assays in male offspring to examine mechanisms for the body-weight phenotype and assess neurodevelopmental implications of MLP exposure. C57BL/6J dams were fed a protein restricted (8%protein, MLP) or a control protein (20% protein, C) diet from four weeks before mating until weaning of offspring. Male offspring were weaned to standard rodent diet (20% protein) and single-housed until 8–12 weeks of age. We examined body composition, food intake, energy expenditure, spontaneous rearing activity and sleep patterns and performed behavioral assays for anxiety (open field activity, elevated plus maze [EPM], light/dark exploration), depression (tail suspension and forced swim test), sociability (three-chamber), repetitive (marble burying), learning and memory (fear conditioning), and circadian behavior (wheel-running activity during light-dark and constant dark cycles). We also measured circadian gene expression in hypothalamus and liver at different Zeitgeber times (ZT). Male offspring from separate MLP exposed dams had significantly greater body fat (P = 0.03), less energy expenditure (P = 0.004), less rearing activity (P = 0.04) and a greater number of night-time rest/sleep bouts (P = 0.03) compared to control. MLP offspring displayed greater anxiety-like behavior in the EPM (P<0.01) but had no learning and memory deficit in fear-conditioning assay (P = 0.02). There was an effect of time on Per1, Per 2 and Clock circadian gene expression in the hypothalamus but not on circadian behavior. Thus, transplacental and early developmental exposure of dams to chronic MLP reduces

  9. Energy restriction and exercise modulate angiopoietins and vascular endothelial growth factor expression in the cavernous tissue of high-fat diet-fed rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    In(ě)s Tomada; Nuno Tomada; Henrique Almeida; Delminda Neves

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effect of a high-fat (HF) diet,energy restriction and exercise on the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF),angiopoietin (Ang) 1 and 2,and their receptors in rat corpus cavernosum (CC).Male Wistar rats were fed adlibitum with an HF diet for 8 or 16 weeks.After 8 weeks of the HF diet,a group of rats was subjected to energy restriction with or without exercise for 8 weeks.Control animals had free access to standard diet for the same period.After euthanasia,blood was collected and the penises removed for immunofluorescence assays (VEGF,VEGF receptor (VEGFR) 1 and 2,Ang1,Ang2 and Tie2) and semiquantification of VEGF,VEGFR1,VEGFR2,Ang1,Ang2,Tie2,endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Akt/phospho-Akt by Western blotting.HF diet-fed rats exhibited lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) levels,higher systolic blood pressure and an increased atherogenic index.A significant increase in Ang2 expression in the CC was verified and coupled to a decrease in VEGF and VEGFRs.The Akt pathway was activated by the HF diet.Energy restriction and exercise increased eNOS expression and restored most HF diet-induced modifications except for VEGFR2 expression.These results emphasize the role of diet on vascular function regulation,demonstrating that cavernous imbalance of VEGF/VEGFRs and Angs/rie2 systems occurs before serum lipid changes and obesity onset,antedating structural atherosclerotic features.

  10. Cocoa extract intake for 4 weeks reduces postprandial systolic blood pressure response of obese subjects, even after following an energy-restricted diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idoia Ibero-Baraibar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiometabolic profile is usually altered in obesity. Interestingly, the consumption of flavanol-rich foods might be protective against those metabolic alterations. Objective: To evaluate the postprandial cardiometabolic effects after the acute consumption of cocoa extract before and after 4 weeks of its daily intake. Furthermore, the bioavailability of cocoa extract was investigated. Design: Twenty-four overweight/obese middle-aged subjects participated in a 4-week intervention study. Half of the volunteers consumed a test meal enriched with 1.4 g of cocoa extract (415 mg flavanols, while the rest of the volunteers consumed the same meal without the cocoa extract (control group. Glucose and lipid profile, as well as blood pressure and cocoa metabolites in plasma, were assessed before and at 60, 120, and 180 min post-consumption, at the beginning of the study (Postprandial 1 and after following a 4-week 15% energy-restricted diet including meals containing or not containing the cocoa extract (Postprandial 2. Results: In the Postprandial 1 test, the area under the curve (AUC of systolic blood pressure (SBP was significantly higher in the cocoa group compared with the control group (p=0.007, showing significant differences after 120 min of intake. However, no differences between groups were observed at Postprandial 2. Interestingly, the reduction of postprandial AUC of SBP (AUC_Postprandial 2-AUC_Postprandial 1 was higher in the cocoa group (p=0.016. Furthermore, cocoa-derived metabolites were detected in plasma of the cocoa group, while the absence or significantly lower amounts of metabolites were found in the control group. Conclusions: The daily consumption of cocoa extract within an energy-restricted diet for 4 weeks resulted in a greater reduction of postprandial AUC of SBP compared with the effect of energy-restricted diet alone and independently of body weight loss. These results suggest the role of cocoa flavanols on

  11. Effect of a negative energy balance induced by feed restriction in lactating sows on hepatic lipid metabolism, milk production and development of litters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Denise K; Gröne, Birthe; Rosenbaum, Susann; Most, Erika; Hillen, Sonja; Becker, Sabrina; Erhardt, Georg; Reiner, Gerald; Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    In rodents, forced activation of hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) by administration of exogenous PPARα activators during lactation leads to a reduction of milk triacylglycerol (TAG) production. Herein, we investigated whether a negative energy balance (NEB) induced by feed restriction (about 18% lower feed and energy intake) during lactation by increasing the release of fatty acids, which act as PPARα agonists, causes a disruption of hepatic lipid metabolism and thereby impairs milk TAG production in sows. Nutrient and energy content of the milk on day 20 of lactation and gains of litters during the first 14 d and the whole 21 d suckling period did not differ between Control and feed-restricted sows. The mRNA concentrations of several sterol regulatory element-binding protein target genes involved in lipid synthesis in the liver and the plasma concentration of TAG were reduced in the feed-restricted sows, whereas the mRNA concentrations of PPARα target genes involved in fatty acid oxidation in liver and skeletal muscle were not different between groups. In conclusion, it was shown that an NEB during lactation does not adversely affect milk composition and gains of litters, despite inhibiting hepatic expression of genes involved in lipid synthesis and reducing plasma TAG concentration. The finding that PPARα target genes involved in fatty acid utilisation in liver and muscle of sows are not induced by the NEB during lactation may explain that fatty acid availability in the mammary gland is sufficient to maintain milk TAG production and to allow normal litter gain.

  12. Caloric restriction induces energy-sparing alterations in skeletal muscle contraction, fiber composition and local thyroid hormone metabolism that persist during catch-up fat upon refeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Bresciani M. De Andrade

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Weight regain after caloric restriction results in accelerated fat storage in adipose tissue. This catch-up fat phenomenon is postulated to result partly from suppressed skeletal muscle thermogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated whether the reduced rate of skeletal muscle contraction-relaxation cycle that occurs after caloric restriction persists during weight recovery and could contribute to catch-up fat. Using a rat model of semistarvation-refeeding, in which fat recovery is driven by suppressed thermogenesis, we show that contraction and relaxation of leg muscles are slower after both semistarvation and refeeding. These effects are associated with (i higher expression of muscle deiodinase type 3 (DIO3 which inactivates tri-iodothyronine (T3, and lower expression of T3-activating enzyme, deiodinase type 2 (DIO2, (ii slower net formation of T3 from its T4 precursor in muscles, and (iii accumulation of slow fibers at the expense of fast fibers. These semistarvation-induced changes persisted during recovery and correlated with impaired expression of transcription factors involved in slow-twitch muscle development.We conclude that diminished muscle thermogenesis following caloric restriction results from reduced muscle T3 levels, alteration in muscle-specific transcription factors, and fast-to-slow fiber shift causing slower contractility. Energy-sparing effects persist during weight recovery and likely contribute to catch-up fat.

  13. Restricted Airspace

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Redstone Technical Test Center has restricted airspace up to 30,000 feet ASL. Airspace encompasses R-2104 (Redstone). Airspace is used extensively for airborne/UAV...

  14. 10 CFR 1045.16 - Criteria for evaluation of restricted data and formerly restricted data information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... § 1045.16 Criteria for evaluation of restricted data and formerly restricted data information. (a) The... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criteria for evaluation of restricted data and formerly restricted data information. 1045.16 Section 1045.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS)...

  15. Effects of maternal protein or energy restriction during late gestation on immune status and responses to lipopolysaccharide challenge in postnatal young goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z X; Sun, Z H; Yang, W Z; Beauchemin, K A; Tang, S X; Zhou, C S; Han, X F; Wang, M; Kang, J H; Tan, Z L

    2014-11-01

    Knowledge of maternal malnutrition of ruminants and effects on development of the immune system of their offspring is lacking. A study was conducted to investigate the effects of maternal protein or energy restriction during late gestation on immune status of their offspring at different ages. Sixty-three pregnant goats (local breed, Liuyang black goat, 22.2 ± 1.5 kg at d 90 of gestation) were fed control (CON, ME = 9.34 MJ/kg and CP = 12.5%, DM basis), 40% protein restricted (PR), or 40% energy restricted (ER) diets from d 91 of gestation to parturition, after which all animals received an adequate diet for nutritional recovery. Plasma concentrations of complement components (C3, C4), C-reactive protein (CRP) and immunoglobulins (IgG and IgM), jejunum cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, and IL-10) expression levels and morphology in the offspring were measured. Additionally, plasma concentration of complement and IL-6, and cytokines expression levels in gastrointestinal tract obtained at 6 wk from young goats were assessed under saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenging conditions. Maternal PR or ER decreased (P 0.05) plasma CRP concentration. The IL-10 mRNA expression of jejunum from PR kids was also less (P 0.05) in any plasma or tissue immune parameters among the 3 treatments. However, when given a LPS challenge, ER and PR kids had greater (P = 0.02) IL-6 concentration compared with CON kids. Our results suggest that both PR and ER during late gestation induced short-term as well as long-lasting alterations on immune responses in their offspring, which may make the animals more susceptible to a bacterial pathogen challenge. The present findings expand the existing knowledge in immunological mechanisms responsible for the development of disease in later life.

  16. Whole Grain Compared with Refined Wheat Decreases the Percentage of Body Fat Following a 12-Week, Energy-Restricted Dietary Intervention in Postmenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mette; Toubro, Søren; Jensen, Morten Georg;

    2012-01-01

    ) with whole-grain wheat (WW) for 12 wk on body weight and composition after a 2-wk run-in period of consumption of RW-containing food intake. In this open-label randomized trial, 79 overweight or obese postmenopausal women were randomized to an energy-restricted diet (deficit of approximately 1250 k......Observational studies show inverse associations between intake of whole grain and adiposity and cardiovascular risk; however, only a few dietary intervention trials have investigated the effect of whole-grain consumption on health outcomes. We studied the effect of replacing refined wheat (RW......J/d) with RW or WW foods providing 2 MJ/d. Body weight and composition, blood pressure, and concentration of circulating risk markers were measured at wk 0, 6, and 12. Fecal output and energy excretion were assessed during run-in and wk 12. Plasma alkylresorcinol analysis indicated good compliance...

  17. Selection of HLA-B57-associated Gag A146P mutant by HLA-B∗48:01-restricted Gag140-147-specific CTLs in chronically HIV-1-infected Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruto, Takuya; Murakoshi, Hayato; Chikata, Takayuki; Koyanagi, Madoka; Kawashima, Yuka; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Oka, Shinichi; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2011-08-01

    We previously showed the possibility that Gag A146P, which is an escape mutant from HLA-B∗57-restricted CTLs, was selected by HLA-B∗48:01-restricted Gag138-147(LI10)-specific CTLs in a Japanese cohort in which HLA-B∗57 individuals were not detected. We herein demonstrated Gag140-147(GI8) to be the optimal epitope rather than LI10 and that GI8-specific T cells failed to recognize the A146P mutant virus-infected cells. The sequence analysis of Gag146 in 261 chronically HIV-1-infected Japanese showed the accumulation of the A146P mutation in HLA-B∗48:01(+) individuals. These findings together indicate that the A146P mutant is accumulating in Japanese by selection by GI8-specific CTLs.

  18. Effects of chronic weight perturbation on energy homeostasis and brain structure in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravussin, Y.; Gutman, R.; Diano, S.; Shanabrough, M.; Borok, E.; Sarman, B.; Lehmann, A.; LeDuc, C. A.; Rosenbaum, M.; Horvath, T. L.

    2011-01-01

    Maintenance of reduced body weight in lean and obese human subjects results in the persistent decrease in energy expenditure below what can be accounted for by changes in body mass and composition. Genetic and developmental factors may determine a central nervous system (CNS)-mediated minimum threshold of somatic energy stores below which behavioral and metabolic compensations for weight loss are invoked. A critical question is whether this threshold can be altered by environmental influences and by what mechanisms such alterations might be achieved. We examined the bioenergetic, behavioral, and CNS structural responses to weight reduction of diet-induced obese (DIO) and never-obese (CON) C57BL/6J male mice. We found that weight-reduced (WR) DIO-WR and CON-WR animals showed reductions in energy expenditure, adjusted for body mass and composition, comparable (−10–15%) to those seen in human subjects. The proportion of excitatory synapses on arcuate nucleus proopiomelanocortin neurons was decreased by ∼50% in both DIO-WR and CON-WR mice. These data suggest that prolonged maintenance of an elevated body weight (fat) alters energy homeostatic systems to defend a higher level of body fat. The synaptic changes could provide a neural substrate for the disproportionate decline in energy expenditure in weight-reduced individuals. This response to chronic weight elevation may also occur in humans. The mouse model described here could help to identify the molecular/cellular mechanisms underlying both the defense mechanisms against sustained weight loss and the upward resetting of those mechanisms following sustained weight gain. PMID:21411766

  19. Chronic Caloric Restriction and Exercise Improve Metabolic Conditions of Dietary-Induced Obese Mice in Autophagy Correlated Manner without Involving AMPK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxia Cui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the role of AMPK activation and autophagy in mediating the beneficial effects of exercise and caloric restriction in obesity. Methods. Dietary-induced obesity mice were made and divided into 5 groups; one additional group of normal mice serves as control. Mice in each group received different combinations of interventions including low fat diet, caloric restriction, and exercise. Then their metabolic conditions were assessed by measuring serum glucose and insulin, serum lipids, and liver function. AMPK phosphorylation and autophagy activity were detected by western blotting. Results. Obese mice models were successfully induced by high fat diet. Caloric restriction consistently improved the metabolic conditions of the obese mice, and the effects are more prominent than the mice that received only exercise. Also, caloric restriction, exercise, and low fat diet showed a synergistic effect in the improvement of metabolic conditions. Western blotting results showed that this improvement was not related with the activation of AMPK in liver, skeletal muscle, or heart but correlates well with the autophagy activity. Conclusion. Caloric restriction has more prominent beneficial effects than exercise in dietary-induced obese mice. These effects are correlated with the autophagy activity and may be independent of AMPK activation.

  20. Effects of dry matter intake restriction on diet digestion, energy partitioning, phosphorus retention, and ruminal fermentation by beef steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J H; Olson, K C; Schmidt, T B; Linville, M L; Alkire, D O; Meyer, D L; Rentfrow, G K; Carr, C C; Berg, E P

    2007-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of DMI restriction on diet digestion, ruminal fermentation, ME intake, and P retention by beef steers. In Exp. 1, twelve Angus x steers (average initial BW = 450 +/- 18 kg) were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 diets that were formulated to promote a 1.6-kg ADG at intake levels corresponding approximately to 100% (ad libitum, AL), 90% (IR90), or 80% (IR80) of ad libitum DMI. In Exp. 2, twelve crossbred steers (average initial BW = 445 +/- 56 kg) fitted with ruminal cannulae were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 diets that were formulated to promote a 1.6-kg ADG at AL or IR80. All diets delivered similar total NE, MP, Ca, and P per day. During both experiments, fecal DM output by IR80 was less (P /= 0.20) among treatments during both experiments, whereas P retention was similar (P >/= 0.46) among treatments during Exp. 1. Total VFA and the molar proportion of acetate of AL were greater (P fermentation patterns in finishing steers. Improvements in performance associated with programmed-feeding regimens of the type studied here do not appear to be related to changes in diet digestion or ME intake.

  1. Center for Environmental Information's Ninth International Conference on Global Energy Strategies : Living with Restricted Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The world is getting warmer. Among scientists concerned with global climate change this is the broad consensus. How fast and by how much, are questions which cannot be answered quantitatively, but the probability of rising temperatures must be faced in a prudent manner - there is enough certainty of change so that we must anticipate and prepare before irreparable damage is done to our world. Even if it isn't going to be as bad as some people think, the actions we propose will benefit the earth and give us a kind of insurance. The root of the change is population growth, and its attendant demand for energy. While the developed world expects to hold future emissions relatively steady, the developing countries, where population growth is most rampant, will expand the use of energy as they aspire to a better quality of life. H greater energy use is inevitable it behooves us to produce that energy in the least objectionable manner, and to produce it where the cost is lowest in dollars, GNP, and environmental chang...

  2. Management of protein-energy wasting in non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease: reconciling low protein intake with nutritional therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kopple, Joel D; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-06-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW), characterized by a decline in body protein mass and energy reserves, including muscle and fat wasting and visceral protein pool contraction, is an underappreciated condition in early to moderate stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and a strong predictor of adverse outcomes. The prevalence of PEW in early to moderate CKD is ≥20-25% and increases as CKD progresses, in part because of activation of proinflammatory cytokines combined with superimposed hypercatabolic states and declines in appetite. This anorexia leads to inadequate protein and energy intake, which may be reinforced by prescribed dietary restrictions and inadequate monitoring of the patient's nutritional status. Worsening uremia also renders CKD patients vulnerable to potentially deleterious effects of uncontrolled diets, including higher phosphorus and potassium burden. Uremic metabolites, some of which are anorexigenic and many of which are products of protein metabolism, can exert harmful effects, ranging from oxidative stress to endothelial dysfunction, nitric oxide disarrays, renal interstitial fibrosis, sarcopenia, and worsening proteinuria and kidney function. Given such complex pathways, nutritional interventions in CKD, when applied in concert with nonnutritional therapeutic approaches, encompass an array of strategies (such as dietary restrictions and supplementations) aimed at optimizing both patients' biochemical variables and their clinical outcomes. The applicability of many nutritional interventions and their effects on outcomes in patients with CKD with PEW has not been well studied. This article reviews the definitions and pathophysiology of PEW in patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD, examines the current indications for various dietary modification strategies in patients with CKD (eg, manufactured protein-based supplements, amino acids and their keto acid or hydroxyacid analogues), discusses the rationale behind their potential use in patients

  3. Prevention and treatment of protein energy wasting in chronic kidney disease patients: a consensus statement by the International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ikizler, T. Alp; Cano, Noël; Franch, Harold; Fouque, Denis; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kuhlmann, M. K; Stenvinkel, Peter; TerWee, Pieter; Teta, Daniel; Wang, Angela Yee-Moon; Wanner, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Protein energy wasting (PEW) is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with adverse clinical outcomes, especially in individuals receiving maintenance dialysis therapy...

  4. Performance and energy metabolism in restrictively fed weanling pigs are not affected by feeding either fermented cereals or their end-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruininx, E M A M; Binnendijk, G P; Zandstra, T; Heetkamp, M J W; Van Der Peet-Schwering, C M C; Gerrits, W J J

    2010-12-01

    To study the effects of feeding fermented cereals or just fermentation end-products on performance and energy metabolism, 18 restrictedly fed groups of eight pigs each were assigned to one of three dietary treatments: (i) a liquid control diet (C) containing 40% of a mixture of barley and wheat; or (ii) a liquid diet (F) containing 40% fermented barley and wheat; or (iii) a liquid diet as C with the addition of some important fermentation end-products (FP; organic acids and ethanol) in concentrations similar to those in the fermented F-diet. Energy and nitrogen balances, heat production, and performance traits were measured during two consecutive periods (days 1-5 and days 6-14). There was a considerable increase in average dry matter intake that tended (p = 0.06) to be higher in the FP-group than in the other groups. Apparent fecal digestibility of dry matter, ash, nitrogen and energy during period 2 were not affected (p > 0.1). Averaged over both periods, none of the energy metabolism parameters were affected by the diets (p > 0.1). However, there were diet × period interactions for metabolizable energy-intake (p = 0.07), energy retention (p feeding of either 40% fermented cereals nor their fermentation end-products affected performance and energy metabolism traits in weanling pigs. Nevertheless, lower postprandial activity-related heat production by pigs given the fermented cereals suggest a stimulating effect of fermented cereals on short term satiety that was not seen in pigs given fermentation end-products only.

  5. Sodium restriction on top of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade increases circulating levels of N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline in chronic kidney disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakernaak, Arjan J.; Waanders, Femke; Slagman, Maartje C. J.; Dokter, Martin M.; Laverman, Gozewijn D.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Navis, Gerjan

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Sodium restriction potentiates the efficacy of the rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS)-blockade and improves long-term cardiovascular and renal protection, even independent of the better blood pressure control. The mechanisms underlying the potentiation of cardiorenal protection b

  6. Pronounced energy restriction with elevated protein intake results in no change in proteolysis and reductions in skeletal muscle protein synthesis that are mitigated by resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hector, Amy J; McGlory, Chris; Damas, Felipe; Mazara, Nicole; Baker, Steven K; Phillips, Stuart M

    2017-09-12

    Preservation of lean body mass (LBM) may be important during dietary energy restriction (ER) and requires equal rates of muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle protein breakdown (MPB). Currently, the relative contribution of MPS and MPB to the loss of LBM during ER in humans is unknown. We aimed to determine the impact of dietary protein intake and resistance exercise on MPS and MPB during a controlled short-term energy deficit. Adult men (body mass index, 28.6 ± 0.6 kg/m(2); age 22 ± 1 yr) underwent 10 d of 40%-reduced energy intake while performing unilateral resistance exercise and consuming lower protein (1.2 g/kg/d, n = 12) or higher protein (2.4 g/kg per d, n = 12). Pre- and postintervention testing included dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, primed constant infusion of ring-[(13)C6]phenylalanine, and (15)[N]phenylalanine to measure acute postabsorptive MPS and MPB; D2O to measure integrated MPS; and gene and protein expression. There was a decrease in acute MPS after ER (higher protein, 0.059 ± 0.006 to 0.051 ± 0.009%/h; lower protein, 0.061 ± 0.005-0.045 ± 0.006%/h; P resistance exercise (higher protein, 0.067 ± 0.01%/h; lower protein, 0.061 ± 0.006%/h), and integrated MPS followed a similar pattern. There was no change in MPB (energy balance, 0.080 ± 0.01%/hr; ER rested legs, 0.078 ± 0.008%/hr; ER exercised legs, 0.079 ± 0.006%/hr). We conclude that a reduction in MPS is the main mechanism that underpins LBM loss early in ER in adult men.-Hector, A. J., McGlory, C., Damas, F., Mazara, N., Baker, S. K., Phillips, S. M. Pronounced energy restriction with elevated protein intake results in no change in proteolysis and reductions in skeletal muscle protein synthesis that are mitigated by resistance exercise. © FASEB.

  7. Comparison of energy-restricted very low-carbohydrate and low-fat diets on weight loss and body composition in overweight men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvestre R

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To compare the effects of isocaloric, energy-restricted very low-carbohydrate ketogenic (VLCK and low-fat (LF diets on weight loss, body composition, trunk fat mass, and resting energy expenditure (REE in overweight/obese men and women. Design Randomized, balanced, two diet period clinical intervention study. Subjects were prescribed two energy-restricted (-500 kcal/day diets: a VLCK diet with a goal to decrease carbohydrate levels below 10% of energy and induce ketosis and a LF diet with a goal similar to national recommendations (%carbohydrate:fat:protein = ~60:25:15%. Subjects 15 healthy, overweight/obese men (mean ± s.e.m.: age 33.2 ± 2.9 y, body mass 109.1 ± 4.6 kg, body mass index 34.1 ± 1.1 kg/m2 and 13 premenopausal women (age 34.0 ± 2.4 y, body mass 76.3 ± 3.6 kg, body mass index 29.6 ± 1.1 kg/m2. Measurements Weight loss, body composition, trunk fat (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and resting energy expenditure (REE were determined at baseline and after each diet intervention. Data were analyzed for between group differences considering the first diet phase only and within group differences considering the response to both diets within each person. Results Actual nutrient intakes from food records during the VLCK (%carbohydrate:fat:protein = ~9:63:28% and the LF (~58:22:20% were significantly different. Dietary energy was restricted, but was slightly higher during the VLCK (1855 kcal/day compared to the LF (1562 kcal/day diet for men. Both between and within group comparisons revealed a distinct advantage of a VLCK over a LF diet for weight loss, total fat loss, and trunk fat loss for men (despite significantly greater energy intake. The majority of women also responded more favorably to the VLCK diet, especially in terms of trunk fat loss. The greater reduction in trunk fat was not merely due to the greater total fat loss, because the ratio of trunk fat/total fat was also significantly reduced during

  8. Dairy Intake Enhances Body Weight and Composition Changes during Energy Restriction in 18–50-Year-Old Adults—A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welma Stonehouse

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs was performed to investigate the effects of dairy food or supplements during energy restriction on body weight and composition in 18–50-year-old. Methods: RCTs ≥ 4 weeks comparing the effect of dairy consumption (whole food or supplements with control diets lower in dairy during energy restriction on body weight, fat and lean mass were identified by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, Pubmed, Cochrane Central and World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP until March 2016. Reports were identified and critically appraised in duplicate. Data were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. Chi2- and I2-statistics indicated heterogeneity. Dose effect was assessed using meta-regression analysis. GRADE guidelines were used to rate the quality (QR of the evidence considering risk of bias, inconsistency, indirectness, imprecision, publication bias and effect estimates. Results: 27 RCTs were reviewed. Participants consumed between 2 and 4 standard servings/day of dairy food or 20–84 g/day of whey protein compared to low dairy control diets, over a median of 16 weeks. A greater reduction in body weight (−1.16 kg [−1.66, −0.66 kg], p < 0.001, I2 = 11%, QR = high, n = 644 and body fat mass (−1.49 kg [−2.06, −0.92 kg], p < 0.001, I2 = 21%, n = 521, QR = high were found in studies largely including women (90% women. These effects were absent in studies that imposed resistance training (QR = low-moderate. Dairy intake resulted in smaller loss of lean mass (all trials pooled: 0.36 kg [0.01, 0.71 kg], p = 0.04, I2 = 64%, n = 651, QR = moderate. No between study dose-response effects were seen. Conclusions: Increased dairy intake as part of energy restricted diets resulted in greater loss in bodyweight and fat mass while attenuating lean mass loss in 18–50-year-old adults. Further research in males is needed to investigate sex effects.

  9. Intake of milk with added micronutrients increases the effectiveness of an energy-restricted diet to reduce body weight: a randomized controlled clinical trial in Mexican women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Jorge L; Garcia, Olga P; Ronquillo, Dolores; Hervert-Hernández, Deisy; Caamaño, Maria Del C; Martínez, Guadalupe; Gutiérrez, Jessica; García, Sandra

    2011-10-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies have been associated with an increase in fat deposition and body weight; thus, adding them to low-fat milk may facilitate weight loss when accompanied by an energy-restricted diet. The objective was to evaluate the effect of the intake of low-fat milk and low-fat milk with added micronutrients on anthropometrics, body composition, blood glucose levels, lipids profile, C-reactive protein, and blood pressure of women following an energy-restricted diet. A 16-week randomized, controlled intervention study. One hundred thirty-nine obese women (aged 34±6 years) from five rural communities in Querétaro, Mexico. Women followed an energy-restricted diet (-500 kcal) and received in addition one of the following treatments: 250 mL of low-fat milk (LFM) three times/day, 250 mL of low-fat milk with micronutrients (LFM+M) three times/day, or a no milk control group (CON). Weight, height, and hip and waist circumferences were measured at baseline and every 4 weeks. Body composition measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, blood pressure, and blood analysis were done at baseline and at the end of the 16 weeks. Changes in weight and body composition. One-factor analysis of variance, adjusted by age, baseline values, and community random effects. After the 16-week intervention, participants in the LFM+M group lost significantly more weight (-5.1 kg; 95% CI: -6.2 to -4.1) compared with LFM (-3.6 kg; 95% CI: -4.7 to -2.6) and CON (-3.2 kg; 95% CI: -4.3 to -2.2) group members (P=0.035). Body mass index change in the LFM+M group (-2.3; 95% CI: -2.7 to -1.8) was significantly greater than LFM group members (-1.5; 95% CI: -2.0 to -1.1) and CON group members (-1.4; 95% CI: -1.9 to -0.9) (P=0.022). Change in percent body fat among LFM+M group members (-2.7%; 95% CI: -3.2 to -2.1) was significantly higher than LFM group members (-1.8%; 95% CI: -2.3 to -1.3) and CON group members (-1.6%; 95% CI: -2.2 to -1.0) (P=0.019). Change in bone mineral content was

  10. Effects of dietary restriction followed by high dietary energy or protein on compensatory growth of Ashanti Black × Large White crossbred weaner pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addah, Weseh; Dzewu, Reuben Rudolph Kafui; Alenyorege, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The study determined the effect of re-alimenting dietary protein or energy on compensatory growth. Eighteen Ashanti Black × Large White crossbred weaner pigs (7.5 ± 0.30 kg) were randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatments in a completely randomized design resulting in three replicate pens per treatment (n = 3) and two pigs per pen. In the first treatment, pigs were fed ad libitum a diet containing 12.0 MJ/kg of metabolizable energy (ME) and 14.4% crude protein (CP) (maintenance diet) for 56 days. In the second and third dietary treatments, pigs were fed the maintenance diet for the initial 28 days and then switched to a high protein (17.4% dry matter (DM) CP; protein) or high (14.0 MJ/kg DM; energy) diet for the rest of the 28-day period. Dry matter intake and growth performance were similar (P ≥ 0.52) among treatments during the first 28 days of restrictive feeding, but pigs re-alimented with the protein diet achieved superior (P = 0.004) DM intake, average daily gain (ADG), and feed efficiency than those fed the maintenance diet or re-alimented with the energy diet in the re-alimentation period. At the end of the entire 56-day period, pigs re-alimented with the protein diet had higher (P ≥ 0.01) live weight gains and ADG compared with those fed the maintenance diet or re-alimented with the energy diet, but DM intake was similar (P = 0.66) among treatments. It was concluded that re-alimentation with protein rather than energy can improve compensatory growth of Ashanti Black × Large White crossbred weaner pigs.

  11. The Changes of Energy Interactions between Nucleus Function and Mitochondria Functions Causing Transmutation of Chronic Inflammation into Cancer Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponizovskiy, Michail R

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between nucleus and mitochondria functions induce the mechanism of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy according to the first law of thermodynamics in able-bodied cells and changes the mechanisms of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy creating a transition stationary state of ablebodied cells into quasi-stationary pathologic states of acute inflammation transiting then into chronic inflammation and then transmuting into cancer metabolism. The mechanisms' influences of intruding etiologic pathologic agents (microbe, virus, etc.) lead to these changes of energy interactions between nucleus and mitochondria functions causing general acute inflammation, then passing into local chronic inflammation, and reversing into cancer metabolism transmutation. Interactions between biochemical processes and biophysical processes of cellular capacitors' operations create a supplementary mechanism of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy in the norm and in pathology. Discussion of some scientific works eliminates doubts of the authors of these works.

  12. Calorie restriction and stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzanero Silvia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stroke, a major cause of disability and mortality in the elderly, occurs when a cerebral blood vessel is occluded or ruptured, resulting in ischemic damage and death of brain cells. The injury mechanism involves metabolic and oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, apoptosis and inflammatory processes, including activation of glial cells and infiltration of leukocytes. In animal models, dietary energy restriction, by daily calorie reduction (CR or intermittent fasting (IF, extends lifespan and decreases the development of age-related diseases. Dietary energy restriction may also benefit neurons, as suggested by experimental evidence showing that CR and IF protect neurons against degeneration in animal models. Recent findings by our group and others suggest the possibility that dietary energy restriction may protect against stroke induced brain injury, in part by inducing the expression of neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF; protein chaperones, including heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 and glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78; antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases (SOD and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1, uncoupling proteins and anti-inflammatory cytokines. This article discusses the protective mechanisms activated by dietary energy restriction in ischemic stroke.

  13. Insulin modulates energy and substrate sensing and protein catabolism induced by chronic peritonitis in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute infection promotes skeletal muscle wasting and insulin resistance, but the effect of insulin on energy and substrate sensing in skeletal muscle of chronically infected neonates has not been studied. Eighteen 2-d-old pigs underwent cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham surgery (CON) to ind...

  14. Association between farming and chronic energy deficiency in rural South India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asvini K Subasinghe

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine factors associated with chronic energy deficiency (CED and anaemia in disadvantaged Indian adults who are mostly involved in subsistence farming. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study in which we collected information on socio-demographic factors, physical activity, anthropometry, blood haemoglobin concentration, and daily household food intake. These data were used to calculate body mass index (BMI, basal metabolic rate (BMR, daily energy expenditure, and energy and nutrient intake. Multivariable backward stepwise logistic regression was used to assess socioeconomic and lifestyle factors associated with CED (defined as BMI<18 kg/m² and anaemia. SETTING: The study was conducted in 12 villages, in the Rishi Valley, Andhra Pradesh, India. SUBJECTS: Individuals aged 18 years and above, residing in the 12 villages, were eligible to participate. RESULTS: Data were available for 1178 individuals (45% male, median age 36 years (inter quartile range (IQR 27-50. The prevalence of CED (38% and anaemia (25% was high. Farming was associated with CED in women (2.20, 95% CI: 1.39-3.49 and men (1.71, 95% CI: (1.06-2.74. Low income was also significantly associated with CED, while not completing high school was positively associated with anaemia. Median iron intake was high: 35.7 mg/day (IQR 26-46 in women and 43.4 mg/day (IQR 34-55 in men. CONCLUSIONS: Farming is an important risk factor associated with CED in this rural Indian population and low dietary iron is not the main cause of anaemia. Better farming practice may help to reduce CED in this population.

  15. Energy efficiency in the Hellenic building sector. An assessment of the restrictions and perspectives of the market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karkanias, C.; Papadopoulos, A.M.; Karagiannidis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Boemi, S.N. [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, GR 30100 Agrinio (Greece); Tsoutsos, T.D. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Kounoupidiana Campus, GR 19009 Chania (Greece)

    2010-06-15

    The significance of bioclimatic architecture has become widely accepted since the 1970s and the implementation of its principles in practice is a key factor in order to achieve energy efficiency in the building sector. The way, however, from scientific acceptance to commercial utilization is not a straightforward one. This paper deals with the notion of bioclimatic architecture in buildings and investigates the aspects of this concept in Hellas. A sample of university researchers, building contractors and members of public organisations was interviewed using a standardised set of guidelines. The barriers to promoting bioclimatic design, role of the local government in the adoption process, level of environmental culture as well as perspectives of this concept in Hellas were the key areas of discussion in each of the interviews. The results from the data analysis reveal insufficient economic incentives, a lack in technical information as well as a lack in specific environmental policies that would foster the propagation of bioclimatic architecture. (author)

  16. Energy efficiency in the Hellenic building sector: An assessment of the restrictions and perspectives of the market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karkanias, C. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Boemi, S.N. [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, GR 30100 Agrinio (Greece); Papadopoulos, A.M. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Tsoutsos, T.D., E-mail: theocharis.tsoutsos@enveng.tuc.g [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Kounoupidiana Campus, GR 19009 Chania (Greece); Karagiannidis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2010-06-15

    The significance of bioclimatic architecture has become widely accepted since the 1970s and the implementation of its principles in practice is a key factor in order to achieve energy efficiency in the building sector. The way, however, from scientific acceptance to commercial utilization is not a straightforward one. This paper deals with the notion of bioclimatic architecture in buildings and investigates the aspects of this concept in Hellas. A sample of university researchers, building contractors and members of public organisations was interviewed using a standardised set of guidelines. The barriers to promoting bioclimatic design, role of the local government in the adoption process, level of environmental culture as well as perspectives of this concept in Hellas were the key areas of discussion in each of the interviews. The results from the data analysis reveal insufficient economic incentives, a lack in technical information as well as a lack in specific environmental policies that would foster the propagation of bioclimatic architecture.

  17. Arylesterase activity is associated with antioxidant intake and paraoxonase-1 (PON1) gene methylation in metabolic syndrome patients following an energy restricted diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Iglesia, Rocio; Mansego, Maria L; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J; Zulet, M Angeles; Martinez, J Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The arylesterase (ARE) activity linked to the paraoxonase-1 (PON1) gene is known to protect lipoproteins from oxidation and provide defense against metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular diseases. The epigenetic regulation of enzymatic activities is gaining importance nowadays. This research aimed to assess the potential relationships between the ARE activity with the methylation levels of the PON1 gene transcriptional regulatory region, anthropometrics, biochemical markers and antioxidant dietary components. Forty-seven subjects (47 ± 10 y.o; BMI 36.2 ± 3.8 kg/m(2); 46.8 % female) with MetS features, who followed a six-month energy-restricted dietary weight-loss intervention, were included in this study (www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT01087086). Anthropometric, biochemical, enzymatic and dietary data were assessed using validated procedures. PON1 transcriptional regulatory region methylation was analyzed by a microarray technical approach. Volunteers reduced ARE activity in parallel with body weight (p = 0.005), BMI (p = 0.006), total fat mass (p = 0.020), diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.018), mean blood pressure (p = 0.022) and triglycerides (p = 0.014). Methylation levels of some CpG sites of the PON1 gene correlated negatively with ARE activity (p < 0.05). Interestingly, dietary vitamin C (p = 0.001), tocopherols (p = 0.009) and lycopene (p = 0.038) were positively associated with ARE activity and showed an inverse correlation (p = 0.004, p = 0.029 and p = 0.021, respectively) with the methylation of some selected CpG sites of the PON1 gene. In conclusion, ARE activity decreased in parallel with MetS-related markers associated to the energy restriction, while dietary antioxidants might enhance the ARE activity by lowering the PON1 gene methylation in patients with MetS features.

  18. Effects of intermittent compared to continuous energy restriction on short-term weight loss and long-term weight loss maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, J B; Pedersen, E; Petersen, K S; Clifton, P M

    2014-06-01

    Effective strategies are needed to help individuals lose weight and maintain weight loss. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effect of intermittent energy restriction (IER) compared to continuous energy restriction (CER) on weight loss after 8 weeks and weight loss maintenance after 12 months. Secondary aims were to determine changes in waist and hip measurements and diet quality. In a randomized parallel study, overweight and obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 27 kg m(-2)) women were stratified by age and BMI before randomization. Participants undertook an 8-week intensive period with weight, waist and hip circumference measured every 2 weeks, followed by 44 weeks of independent dieting. A food frequency questionnaire was completed at baseline and 12 months, from which diet quality was determined. Weight loss was not significantly different between the two groups at 8 weeks (-3.2 ± 2.1 kg CER, n = 20, -2.0 ± 1.9 kg IER, n = 25; P = 0.06) or at 12 months (-4.2 ± 5.6 kg CER, n = 17 -2.1 ± 3.8 kg IER, n = 19; P = 0.19). Weight loss between 8 and 52 weeks was -0.7 ± 49 kg CER vs. -1 ± 1.1 kg IER; P = 0.6. Waist and hip circumference decreased significantly with time (P intermittent dieting was as effective as continuous dieting over 8 weeks and for weight loss maintenance at 12 months. This may be useful for individuals who find CER too difficult to maintain.

  19. Comparison of Physical Therapy with Energy Healing for Improving Range of Motion in Subjects with Restricted Shoulder Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Linda Baldwin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two forms of energy healing, Reconnective Healing (RH and Reiki, which involve light or no touch, were tested for efficacy against physical therapy (PT for increasing limited range of motion (ROM of arm elevation in the scapular plane. Participants were assigned to one of 5 groups: PT, Reiki, RH, Sham Healing, or no treatment. Except for no treatment, participants were blinded as to grouping. Range of Motion, self-reported pain, and heart rate variability (HRV were assessed before and after a 10-minute session. On average, for PT, Reiki, RH, Sham Healing, and no treatment, respectively, ROM increased by 12°, 20°, 26°, 0.6°, and 3° and pain score decreased by 11.5%, 10.1%, 23.9%, 15.4%, and 0%. Physical therapy, Reiki, and RH were more effective than Sham Healing for increasing ROM (PT: , ; Reiki: , ; RH: , . It is possible that this improvement was not mediated by myofascial release because the subjects’ HRV did not change, suggesting no significant increase in vagal activity. Sham treatment significantly reduced pain compared to no treatment (, and was just as effective as PT, Reiki, and RH. It is the authors’ opinion that the accompanying pain relief is a placebo effect.

  20. Energy and Protein Intake and Its Relationship with Pulmonary Function in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Yazdanpanah

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is a public health problem worldwide. Increased energy and protein needs, decreased energy and protein intake are common in COPD patients. Adequate intake is essential to improve pulmonary function and immune system, prevention of weight loss and maintaining muscle mass and strength. Assessment of energy and protein intake and its relationship with pulmonary function in COPD patients was performed in this study. The study group included 63 COPD patients. For all subjects, evaluation of energy and protein intake by Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ and 24-hour recall, spirometry for measuring pulmonary function and determining disease severity were performed. The subjects were divided into three groups based on disease severity according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD stages. Relationship between energy and protein intake with pulmonary function was assessed. Energy and protein intake were lower than the calculated energy and protein demand for all groups. Significant relationship was found between the amount of protein intake extrapolated from food frequency questionnaire with Forced Vital Capacity (FVC (r=0.2, P=0.02 and Vital Capacity (VC (r=0.3, P=0.008. The results of the study suggest that accurate evaluation of protein and energy intake and requirements should be included in the goals of medical treatment of COPD patients.

  1. Change in Proportional Protein Intake in a 10-Week Energy-Restricted Low- or High-Fat Diet, in Relation to Changes in Body Size and Metabolic Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Stocks

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate in a secondary analysis of a randomised trial the effects of a low-/high-fat diet and reported change from baseline in energy% from protein (prot%, in relation to changes in body size and metabolic factors. Methods: Obese adults (n = 771 were randomised to a 600 kcal energy-deficient low-fat (20-25 fat% or high-fat (40-45 fat% diet over 10 weeks. Dietary intake data at baseline and during the intervention were available in 585 completers. We used linear regression to calculate the combined effects of randomised group and groups of prot% change (2 on outcomes. Results: The low-fat group with >2 prot% increase lost 1.1 kg more weight (p = 0.03 and reduced cholesterol by 0.25 mmol/l more (p = 0.003 than the high-fat group with >2 prot% decrease. These differences were 2.5-fold and 1.8-fold greater than the differences between the low-fat and high-fat groups while not considering prot% change. The high-fat group reduced plasma triglycerides more than the low-fat group, but not compared to those in the low-fat group with >2 units prot% increase (p fat-protein interaction = 0.01. Conclusions: Under energy restriction, participants on a low-fat diet who had increased the percentage energy intake from protein showed the greatest reduction in weight and cholesterol, and a triglyceride reduction equally large to that of participants on a high-fat diet.

  2. Weight regain after slimming induced by an energy-restricted diet depends on interleukin-6 and peroxisome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma2 gene polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyenechea, Estibaliz; Dolores Parra, M; Alfredo Martínez, J

    2006-11-01

    Weight-loss maintenance after following an energy-restricted diet is a major problem that a number of studies are trying to characterise. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of IL-6 -174G>C and PPAR-gamma2 Pro12Ala variants on weight regulation in obese subjects receiving a low-energy diet and at 1 year after the acute slimming period. Sixty-seven volunteers (age 34.7 (SD 7.0) years; BMI 35.8 (SD 4.8) kg/m(2)) were enrolled in a 10-week dietary intervention and were contacted again 1 year after the end of this period. Body composition was measured at three times during the study. Also, PPAR-gamma2 Pro12Ala and IL-6 -174G>C polymorphisms were analysed in the participants. No statistical differences were observed depending on the genetic variants at baseline for anthropometric variables, or after the intervention. However, the C allele of the -174G>C IL-6 gene polymorphism was more frequently observed (P=0.032) in subjects with successful weight maintenance (C polymorphism gives protection against regain of weight lost. Moreover, the presence of the Ala allele of the PPARgamma-2 together with the C allele strengthens this protection. These findings support a role for these polymorphisms on weight regulation and suggest a synergetic effect of both variants on weight maintenance after following a diet to lose weight.

  3. [Possible changes in energy-minimizer mechanisms of locomotion due to chronic low back pain - a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Alberito Rodrigo; Andrade, Alexandro; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    One goal of the locomotion is to move the body in the space at the most economical way possible. However, little is known about the mechanical and energetic aspects of locomotion that are affected by low back pain. And in case of occurring some damage, little is known about how the mechanical and energetic characteristics of the locomotion are manifested in functional activities, especially with respect to the energy-minimizer mechanisms during locomotion. This study aimed: a) to describe the main energy-minimizer mechanisms of locomotion; b) to check if there are signs of damage on the mechanical and energetic characteristics of the locomotion due to chronic low back pain (CLBP) which may endanger the energy-minimizer mechanisms. This study is characterized as a narrative literature review. The main theory that explains the minimization of energy expenditure during the locomotion is the inverted pendulum mechanism, by which the energy-minimizer mechanism converts kinetic energy into potential energy of the center of mass and vice-versa during the step. This mechanism is strongly influenced by spatio-temporal gait (locomotion) parameters such as step length and preferred walking speed, which, in turn, may be severely altered in patients with chronic low back pain. However, much remains to be understood about the effects of chronic low back pain on the individual's ability to practice an economic locomotion, because functional impairment may compromise the mechanical and energetic characteristics of this type of gait, making it more costly. Thus, there are indications that such changes may compromise the functional energy-minimizer mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Integrating spot short-term measurements of carbon emissions and backward dietary energy partition calculations to estimate intake in lactating dairy cows fed ad libitum or restricted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, A B D; Utsumi, S A; Dorich, C D; Brito, A F

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to use spot short-term measurements of CH4 (QCH4) and CO2 (QCO2) integrated with backward dietary energy partition calculations to estimate dry matter intake (DMI) in lactating dairy cows. Twelve multiparous cows averaging 173±37d in milk and 4 primiparous cows averaging 179±27d in milk were blocked by days in milk, parity, and DMI (as a percentage of body weight) and, within each block, randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatments: ad libitum intake (AL) or restricted intake (RI=90% DMI) according to a crossover design. Each experimental period lasted 22d with 14d for treatments adaptation and 8d for data and sample collection. Diets contained (dry matter basis): 40% corn silage, 12% grass-legume haylage, and 48% concentrate. Spot short-term gas measurements were taken in 5-min sampling periods from 15 cows (1 cow refused sampling) using a portable, automated, open-circuit gas quantification system (GreenFeed, C-Lock Inc., Rapid City, SD) with intervals of 12h between the 2daily samples. Sampling points were advanced 2h from a day to the next to yield 16 gas samples per cow over 8d to account for diurnal variation in QCH4 and QCO2. The following equations were used sequentially to estimate DMI: (1) heat production (MJ/d)=(4.96 + 16.07 ÷ respiratory quotient) × QCO2; respiratory quotient=0.95; (2) metabolizable energy intake (MJ/d)=(heat production + milk energy) ± tissue energy balance; (3) digestible energy (DE) intake (MJ/d)=metabolizable energy + CH4 energy + urinary energy; (4) gross energy (GE) intake (MJ/d)=DE + [(DE ÷ in vitro true dry matter digestibility) - DE]; and (5) DMI (kg/d)=GE intake estimated ÷ diet GE concentration. Data were analyzed using the MIXED procedure of SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) and Fit Model procedure in JMP (α=0.05; SAS Institute Inc.). Cows significantly differed in DMI measured (23.8 vs. 22.4kg/d for AL and RI, respectively). Dry matter intake estimated using QCH4 and QCO2 coupled with

  5. Longitudinal variation of circulating irisin after an energy restriction-induced weight loss and following weight regain in obese men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crujeiras, Ana B; Pardo, María; Arturo, Roca-Rivada; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Zulet, M Angeles; Martínez, J Alfredo; Casanueva, Felipe F

    2014-01-01

    The recently discovered peptide irisin has been hypothesized to be a regulator of body metabolism. The objective of this work was to evaluate whether circulating human irisin levels are modulated by body size and changes in adiposity during an energy restriction treatment and the subsequent weight regain. A group of 94 obese patients (50 men, 44 women; 49.4 ± 9.4 years; BMI 35.6 ± 4.5 kg/m(2) ) participated in a weight loss program following an 8-week hypocaloric diet (-30% energy expenditure) with a weight maintenance follow-up. The patients were evaluated at 0, 8, and 24 weeks after starting treatment. In addition, 48 normal-weight subjects (16 men, 32 women; 35.71 ± 8.8 years; BMI 22.9 ± 2.2 kg/m(2) ) participated as controls. Plasma irisin, body weight, body composition, and hormones controlling energy homeostasis were measured. Irisin levels were higher in obese subjects (353.1 ± 18.6 ng/mL) than in those of normal-weight (198.4 ± 7.8 ng/mL; P ≤ 0.001) and were also higher in men (340.9 ± 20 ng/mL) than in women (267.6 ± 12 ng/mL; P weight, BMI, waist circumference, and fat mass, as measured by bioimpedance, but not with height or leptin levels. Interestingly, irisin levels paralleled body weight reduction after the dietary treatment (week 8) and again returned to the baseline levels at 24 weeks in those patients regaining the lost weight. Irisin strongly reflects body fat mass, suggesting that the irisin circulating levels are conditioned by adiposity level. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Restricted Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette; Lassen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    communities and shopping centres through mobility lenses. The article shows how different mobility systems enable and restrict the public access to private-public spaces, and it points out that proprietary communities create an unequal potential for human movement and access in the city. The main argument......Privatisation of public spaces in the contemporary city has increased during the last decades but only few studies have approached this field from a mobility perspective. Therefore the article seeks to rectify this by exploring two Australian examples of private spaces in the city; gated...... in the article is that the many mobility systems enable specialization of places that are targeted at a special section of the population. This means that various forms of motilities not only create new opportunities for urban life but it is also one of the most critical components of production of new exclusion...

  7. Protein-energy wasting syndrome in advanced chronic kidney disease: prevalence and specific clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Torres, Almudena; González Garcia, M Elena; San José-Valiente, Belén; Bajo Rubio, M Auxiliadora; Celadilla Diez, Olga; López-Sobaler, Ana M; Selgas, Rafael

    2017-07-26

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW) is associated with increased mortality and differs depending on the chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage and the dialysis technique. The prevalence in non-dialysis patients is understudied and ranges from 0 to 40.8%. To evaluate the nutritional status of a group of Spanish advanced CKD patients by PEW criteria and subjective global assessment (SGA). Cross-sectional study of 186 patients (101 men) with a mean age of 66.1±16 years. The nutritional assessment consisted of: SGA, PEW criteria, 3-day dietary records, anthropometric parameters and bioelectrical impedance vector analysis. The prevalence of PEW was 30.1%, with significant differences between men and women (22.8 vs. 33.8%, p < 0.005), while 27.9% of SGA values were within the range of malnutrition. No differences were found between the 2methods. Men had higher proteinuria, percentage of muscle mass and nutrient intake. Women had higher levels of total cholesterol, HDL and a higher body fat percentage. The characteristics of patients with PEW were low albumin levels and a low total lymphocyte count, high proteinuria, low fat and muscle mass and a high Na/K ratio. The multivariate analysis found PEW to be associated with: proteinuria (OR: 1.257; 95% CI: 1.084-1.457, p=0.002), percentage of fat intake (OR: 0.903; 95% CI: 0.893-0.983, p=0.008), total lymphocyte count (OR: 0.999; 95% CI: 0.998-0.999, p=0.001) and cell mass index (OR: 0.995; 95% CI: 0.992-0.998). Malnutrition was identified in Spanish advanced CKD patients measured by different tools. We consider it appropriate to adapt new diagnostic elements to PEW criteria. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Paroxetine ameliorates changes in hippocampal energy metabolism in chronic mild stress-exposed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khedr LH

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Lobna H Khedr, Noha N Nassar, Ezzeldin S El-Denshary, Ahmed M Abdel-tawab 1Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Misr International University, 2Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, 3Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt Abstract: The molecular mechanisms underlying stress-induced depression have not been fully outlined. Hence, the current study aimed at testing the link between behavioral changes in chronic mild stress (CMS model and changes in hippocampal energy metabolism and the role of paroxetine (PAROX in ameliorating these changes. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: vehicle control, CMS-exposed rats, and CMS-exposed rats receiving PAROX (10 mg/kg/day intraperitoneally. Sucrose preference, open-field, and forced swimming tests were carried out. Corticosterone (CORT was measured in serum, while adenosine triphosphate and its metabolites, cytosolic cytochrome-c (Cyt-c, caspase-3 (Casp-3, as well as nitric oxide metabolites (NOx were measured in hippocampal tissue homogenates. CMS-exposed rats showed a decrease in sucrose preference as well as body weight compared to control, which was reversed by PAROX. The latter further ameliorated the CMS-induced elevation of CORT in serum (91.71±1.77 ng/mL vs 124.5±4.44 ng/mL, P<0.001 as well as the changes in adenosine triphosphate/adenosine diphosphate (3.76±0.02 nmol/mg protein vs 1.07±0.01 nmol/mg protein, P<0.001. Furthermore, PAROX reduced the expression of Cyt-c and Casp-3, as well as restoring NOx levels. This study highlights the role of PAROX in reversing depressive behavior associated with stress-induced apoptosis and changes in hippocampal energy metabolism in the CMS model of depression. Keywords: rats, CMS, hippocampus, paroxetine, apoptosis, adenine nucleotides, cytochrome-c, caspase-3

  9. Low-Energy Extracorporeal Shock-Wave Therapy in the Treatment of Chronic Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy: A Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Vito Pavone; Luca Cannavò; Antonio Di Stefano; Gianluca Testa; Luciano Costarella; Giuseppe Sessa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We report the results of a series of 40 patients with chronic insertional Achilles tendinopathy treated with low-energy ESWT after the failure of a 3-month program of eccentric exercises alone. Methods and Materials. 40 patients, 28 (70%) males and 12 (30%) females, were treated between January and December 2014. All patients were previously treated with only eccentric exercises for a 3-month period. The treatment protocol included 4 sessions of ESWT with a 2-week interval, from...

  10. Restriction of Helmholtz Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Polunin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of the experimental studies of physical mechanisms of energy dissipation in the oscillating system in which air cavity held by the forces of magnetic levitation is used as the elastic element, and magnetic fluid prepared on the basis of dispersing media with different viscosity level is used as the inertial element are considered in the article. Based on the obtained results the conclusion on the restriction of the applicability of Helmholtz equation, caused by boundary effects is made.

  11. Effects of altered glucose supply and adiposity on expression of hypothalamic energy balance regulatory genes in late gestation growth restricted ovine fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, C L; Bake, T; Findlay, P A; Milne, J S; Aitken, R P; Wallace, J M

    2011-11-01

    Intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR) predisposes obesity in adulthood. This may be due to altered fetal nutrition causing sustained changes within the developing hypothalamic energy balance regulatory system. Using our established ovine model of IUGR, 130-day singleton fetuses (term=147 days) were obtained from growing adolescent mothers on control dietary intake (C), high intake (H) or H with growth hormone administration during either early (H+early GH) or late gestation (H+late GH) (n=6/group). GH increased maternal glycemia for the duration of treatment. H and H+early GH fetuses showed IUGR compared with C fetuses; body weight was partially restored in H+late GH fetuses, with 40% increased adiposity. In the fetal hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript mRNA (anorexigenic) was decreased in H fetuses and correlated across all groups with total fetal liver glycogen. Neuropeptide Y, agouti-related peptide (orexigenic) and proopiomelanocortin (anorexigenic) mRNAs were not different between groups. Insulin receptor mRNA in the ARC was increased in H, H+early GH and H+late GH fetuses and correlated negatively with fetal plasma insulin. Leptin receptor mRNA in the ARC correlated positively with fetal plasma leptin concentration and fetal fat content. Therefore, in IUGR fetuses, a key anorexigenic neuropeptide is sensitive to altered glucose supply and the hypothalamic leptin-signaling pathway is altered prenatally by increased adiposity and leptinemia. These changes could impact on postnatal energy balance regulation. Copyright © 2011 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Presence of HLA-E-Restricted, CMV-Specific CD8+ T Cells in the Blood of Lung Transplant Recipients Correlates with Chronic Allograft Rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy C Sullivan

    Full Text Available The human cytomegalovirus (CMV immune evasion protein, UL40, shares an identical peptide sequence with that found in the leader sequence of many human leukocyte antigen (HLA-C alleles and when complexed with HLA-E, can modulate NK cell functions via interactions with the CD94-NKG2 receptors. However the UL40-derived sequence can also be immunogenic, eliciting robust CD8+ T cell responses. In the setting of solid organ transplantation these T cells may not only be involved in antiviral immunity but also can potentially contribute to allograft rejection when the UL40 epitope is also present in allograft-encoded HLA. Here we assessed 15 bilateral lung transplant recipients for the presence of HLA-E-restricted UL40 specific T cells by tetramer staining of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. UL40-specific T cells were observed in 7 patients post-transplant however the magnitude of the response varied significantly between patients. Moreover, unlike healthy CMV seropositive individuals, longitudinal analyses revealed that proportions of such T cells fluctuated markedly. Nine patients experienced low-grade acute cellular rejection, of which 6 also demonstrated UL40-specific T cells. Furthermore, the presence of UL40-specific CD8+ T cells in the blood was significantly associated with allograft dysfunction, which manifested as Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome (BOS. Therefore, this study suggests that minor histocompatibility antigens presented by HLA-E can represent an additional risk factor following lung transplantation.

  13. Dietary restriction with and without caloric restriction for healthy aging [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changhan Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction is the most effective and reproducible dietary intervention known to regulate aging and increase the healthy lifespan in various model organisms, ranging from the unicellular yeast to worms, flies, rodents, and primates. However, caloric restriction, which in most cases entails a 20–40% reduction of food consumption relative to normal intake, is a severe intervention that results in both beneficial and detrimental effects. Specific types of chronic, intermittent, or periodic dietary restrictions without chronic caloric restriction have instead the potential to provide a significant healthspan increase while minimizing adverse effects. Improved periodic or targeted dietary restriction regimens that uncouple the challenge of food deprivation from the beneficial effects will allow a safe intervention feasible for a major portion of the population. Here we focus on healthspan interventions that are not chronic or do not require calorie restriction.

  14. Effect of a conventional energy-restricted modified diet with or without meal replacement on weight loss and cardiometabolic risk profile in overweight women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schäfer Sandy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia and hypertension are essential risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Several studies showed favorable effects of weight loss in overweight subjects on cardiometabolic risk profile. Methods This open-label, randomized, controlled study investigated the effect of an energy-restricted modified diet with (MR or without meal replacements for weight control (C on weight loss, body composition and cardiometabolic risk profile in overweight women. Of 105 randomized participants, 87 were eligible for per protocol analysis. Anthropometric, clinical, blood, 24 h-urine parameters and dietary intake were assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks. Results Dietary intervention resulted in a significant weight loss in both groups (MR: -5.98 ± 2.82 kg; p 5% was higher in MR (77% versus C group (50% (p = 0.010. A significant reduction in waist circumference (WC and body fat mass (BFM was observed in both groups. Body cell mass (BCM and lean body mass (LBM decreased, while percentage of BCM of body weight increased in MR more than in C group. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP significantly decreased and to a similar extent in both groups. Total cholesterol (TC, LDL-C but also HDL-C declined significantly in both groups, while no change occurred in triglycerides. Conclusions Both dietary intervention strategies had a similar effect on weight loss and body fat distribution, but rate of responder was significantly higher in MR group. Systolic BP decreased to a similar extent in both groups. Cardiometabolic risk profile improved only partly in both groups.

  15. Effects of dumb-bell exercise with and without energy restriction on resting metabolic rate, diet-induced thermogenesis and body composition in mildly obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, T; Suzuki, M

    1999-06-01

    The effects of dumb-bell exercise (aerobic-resistance exercise) with and without low calorie diet (LCD) therapy on resting metabolic rate (RMR), diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) and body composition were studied in 12 mildly obese women aged 19-20 years. The subjects were randomly assigned to one of the following two groups: dumb-bell exercise with LCD (DEx + LCD group), and dumb-bell exercise only (DEx group). The subjects performed dumb-bell exercises with pairs of 2 kg dumb-bells every day after dinner for approximately 20 min. In the DEx + LCD group, subjects also received a liquid-formula diet based on a commercially available diet supplement, Micro Diet, for two of their three daily meals. Thus, they were restricted to approximately 4.18 MJ of energy intake per day for 12 weeks. Subjects underwent several measurements (body composition, RMR and DIT tests) before commencing the experiment and again after 12 weeks while still dieting. During the 12 week experimental period, body weight and body fat decreased significantly in both the DEx + LCD and the DEx groups without reducing fat free mass (FFM). The decreases in body weight and body fat were significantly larger in the LCD + DEx group than in the DEx group. These results suggest that dumb-bell exercise decreases body weight and body fat without reducing FFM in relation to increasing RMR and DIT. Micro Diet LCD may strengthen the effect of dumb-bell exercise on body weight and body fat, but weaken the effects on RMR and DIT.

  16. Integrative analyses of hepatic differentially expressed genes and blood biomarkers during the peripartal period between dairy cows overfed or restricted-fed energy prepartum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khuram Shahzad

    Full Text Available Using published dairy cattle liver transcriptomics dataset along with novel blood biomarkers of liver function, metabolism, and inflammation we have attempted an integrative systems biology approach applying the classical functional enrichment analysis using DAVID, a newly-developed Dynamic Impact Approach (DIA, and an upstream gene network analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA. Transcriptome data was generated from experiments evaluating the impact of prepartal plane of energy intake [overfed (OF or restricted (RE] on liver of dairy cows during the peripartal period. Blood biomarkers uncovered that RE vs. OF led to greater prepartal liver distress accompanied by a low-grade inflammation and larger proteolysis (i.e., higher haptoglobin, bilirubin, and creatinine. Post-partum the greater bilirubinaemia and lipid accumulation in OF vs. RE indicated a large degree of liver distress. The re-analysis of microarray data revealed that expression of >4,000 genes was affected by diet × time. The bioinformatics analysis indicated that RE vs. OF cows had a liver with a greater lipid and amino acid catabolic capacity both pre- and post-partum while OF vs. RE cows had a greater activation of pathways/functions related to triglyceride synthesis. Furthermore, RE vs. OF cows had a larger (or higher capacity to cope with ER stress likely associated with greater protein synthesis/processing, and a higher activation of inflammatory-related functions. Liver in OF vs. RE cows had a larger cell proliferation and cell-to-cell communication likely as a response to the greater lipid accumulation. Analysis of upstream regulators indicated a pivotal role of several lipid-related transcription factors (e.g., PPARs, SREBPs, and NFE2L2 in priming the liver of RE cows to better face the early postpartal metabolic and inflammatory challenges. An all-encompassing dynamic model was proposed based on the findings.

  17. Integrative Analyses of Hepatic Differentially Expressed Genes and Blood Biomarkers during the Peripartal Period between Dairy Cows Overfed or Restricted-Fed Energy Prepartum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Khuram; Bionaz, Massimo; Trevisi, Erminio; Bertoni, Giuseppe; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.; Loor, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    Using published dairy cattle liver transcriptomics dataset along with novel blood biomarkers of liver function, metabolism, and inflammation we have attempted an integrative systems biology approach applying the classical functional enrichment analysis using DAVID, a newly-developed Dynamic Impact Approach (DIA), and an upstream gene network analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Transcriptome data was generated from experiments evaluating the impact of prepartal plane of energy intake [overfed (OF) or restricted (RE)] on liver of dairy cows during the peripartal period. Blood biomarkers uncovered that RE vs. OF led to greater prepartal liver distress accompanied by a low-grade inflammation and larger proteolysis (i.e., higher haptoglobin, bilirubin, and creatinine). Post-partum the greater bilirubinaemia and lipid accumulation in OF vs. RE indicated a large degree of liver distress. The re-analysis of microarray data revealed that expression of >4,000 genes was affected by diet × time. The bioinformatics analysis indicated that RE vs. OF cows had a liver with a greater lipid and amino acid catabolic capacity both pre- and post-partum while OF vs. RE cows had a greater activation of pathways/functions related to triglyceride synthesis. Furthermore, RE vs. OF cows had a larger (or higher capacity to cope with) ER stress likely associated with greater protein synthesis/processing, and a higher activation of inflammatory-related functions. Liver in OF vs. RE cows had a larger cell proliferation and cell-to-cell communication likely as a response to the greater lipid accumulation. Analysis of upstream regulators indicated a pivotal role of several lipid-related transcription factors (e.g., PPARs, SREBPs, and NFE2L2) in priming the liver of RE cows to better face the early postpartal metabolic and inflammatory challenges. An all-encompassing dynamic model was proposed based on the findings. PMID:24914544

  18. Predicting energy requirement with pedometer-determined physical-activity level in women with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Nighat; Slinde, Frode; Carlsson, Maine; Håglin, Lena; Sandström, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, in the absence of objective measures, simple methods to predict energy requirement in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) needs to be evaluated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate predicted energy requirement in females with COPD using pedometer-determined physical activity level (PAL) multiplied by resting metabolic rate (RMR) equations. Energy requirement was predicted in 18 women with COPD using pedometer-determined PAL multiplied by six different RMR equations (Harris-Benedict; Schofield; World Health Organization; Moore; Nordic Nutrition Recommendations; Nordenson). Total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured by the criterion method: doubly labeled water. The predicted energy requirement was compared with measured TEE using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analyses. The energy requirement predicted by pedometer-determined PAL multiplied by six different RMR equations was within a reasonable accuracy (±10%) of the measured TEE for all equations except one (Nordenson equation). The ICC values between the criterion method (TEE) and predicted energy requirement were: Harris-Benedict, ICC =0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.23-0.89; Schofield, ICC =0.71, 95% CI 0.21-0.89; World Health Organization, ICC =0.74, 95% CI 0.33-0.90; Moore, ICC =0.69, 95% CI 0.21-0.88; Nordic Nutrition Recommendations, ICC =0.70, 95% CI 0.17-0.89; and Nordenson, ICC =0.40, 95% CI -0.19 to 0.77. Bland-Altman plots revealed no systematic bias for predicted energy requirement except for Nordenson estimates. For clinical purposes, in absence of objective methods such as doubly labeled water method and motion sensors, energy requirement can be predicted using pedometer-determined PAL and common RMR equations. However, for assessment of nutritional status and for the purpose of giving nutritional treatment, a clinical judgment is important regarding when to accept a predicted energy requirement both at individual

  19. Expression changes of hippocampal energy metabolism enzymes contribute to behavioural abnormalities during chronic morphine treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Lan Chen; Jing-Gen Liu; Gang Lu; Ying-Xia Gong; Liang-Cai Zhao; Jie Chen; Zhi-Qiang Chi; Yi-Ming Yang; Zhong Chen; Qing-lin Li

    2007-01-01

    Dependence and impairment of learning and memory are two well-established features caused by abused drugs such as opioids. The hippocampus is an important region associated with both drug dependence and learning and memory. However, the molecular events in hippocampus following exposure to abused drugs such as opioids are not well understood. Here we examined the effect of chronic morphine treatment on hippocampal protein expression by proteomic analyses. We found that chronic exposure of mice to morphine for 10 days produced robust morphine withdrawal jumping and memory impairment, and also resulted in a significant downregulation of hippocampal protein levels of three metabolic enzymes, including Fe-S protein 1 of NADH dehydrogenase, dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase or E2 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and lactate dehydrogenase 2. Further real-time quantitative PCR analyses confirmed that the levels of the corresponding mRNAs were also remarkably reduced. Consistent with these findings, lower ATP levels and an impaired ability to convert glucose into ATP were also observed in the hippocampus of chronically treated mice. Opioid antagonist naltrexone administrated concomitantly with morphine significantly suppressed morphine withdrawal jumping and reversed the downregulation of these proteins. Acute exposure to morphine also produced robust morphine withdrawal jumping and significant memory impairment, but failed to decrease the expression of these three proteins. Intrahippocampal injection of D-glucose before morphine administration significantly enhanced ATP levels and suppressed morphine withdrawal jumping and memory impairment in acute morphine-treated but not in chronic morphine-treated mice. Intraperitoneal injection of high dose of D-glucose shows a similar effect on morphine-induced withdrawal jumping as the central treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that reduced expression of the three metabolic enzymes in the hippocampus as

  20. Effect of energy restriction and physical exercise intervention on phenotypic flexibility as examined by transcriptomics analyses of mRNA from adipose tissue and whole body magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sindre; Norheim, Frode; Langleite, Torgrim M; Noreng, Hans J; Storås, Trygve H; Afman, Lydia A; Frost, Gary; Bell, Jimmy D; Thomas, E Louise; Kolnes, Kristoffer J; Tangen, Daniel S; Stadheim, Hans K; Gilfillan, Gregor D; Gulseth, Hanne L; Birkeland, Kåre I; Jensen, Jørgen; Drevon, Christian A; Holen, Torgeir

    2016-11-01

    Overweight and obesity lead to changes in adipose tissue such as inflammation and reduced insulin sensitivity. The aim of this study was to assess how altered energy balance by reduced food intake or enhanced physical activity affect these processes. We studied sedentary subjects with overweight/obesity in two intervention studies, each lasting 12 weeks affecting energy balance either by energy restriction (~20% reduced intake of energy from food) in one group, or by enhanced energy expenditure due to physical exercise (combined endurance- and strength-training) in the other group. We monitored mRNA expression by microarray and mRNA sequencing from adipose tissue biopsies. We also measured several plasma parameters as well as fat distribution with magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Comparison of microarray and mRNA sequencing showed strong correlations, which were also confirmed using RT-PCR In the energy restricted subjects (body weight reduced by 5% during a 12 weeks intervention), there were clear signs of enhanced lipolysis as monitored by mRNA in adipose tissue as well as plasma concentration of free-fatty acids. This increase was strongly related to increased expression of markers for M1-like macrophages in adipose tissue. In the exercising subjects (glucose infusion rate increased by 29% during a 12-week intervention), there was a marked reduction in the expression of markers of M2-like macrophages and T cells, suggesting that physical exercise was especially important for reducing inflammation in adipose tissue with insignificant reduction in total body weight. Our data indicate that energy restriction and physical exercise affect energy-related pathways as well as inflammatory processes in different ways, probably related to macrophages in adipose tissue.

  1. Behavior, physiology, and energy deposition in rats chronically exposed to 2450-MHz radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Andrea, J.A.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1987-11-01

    The research program was initiated to determine both the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the behavioral and physiological consequences of chronic c-w microwave radiation exposure at 2450 MHz in the laboratory rat. Whole-body average and local SARs at discrete sites within the body of rats and mice were determined experimentally using different exposure systems and analytical techniques. The whole-body average SAR and the distribution of SAR within the body depends on a variety of factors: type of exposure system, polarization of the field, size of the animal, and angle of radiation incident on the body. Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of chronic exposure to 2450-MHz microwave radiation on several measures of rat behavior and physiology. Groups of rats were exposed intermittently to 2450-MHz radiation at power densities of 0.5 mW/sq. cm. or 2.5 mW/sq. cm. for 90 days.

  2. High-energy extracorporeal shock-wave therapy for treating chronic calcific tendinitis of the shoulder: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannuru, Raveendhara R; Flavin, Nina E; Vaysbrot, Elizaveta; Harvey, William; McAlindon, Timothy

    2014-04-15

    Calcific and noncalcific tendinitis of the shoulder can be unresponsive to conventional therapies. Extracorporeal shock-wave therapy (ESWT) has been suggested as an alternative treatment. To assess the efficacy of ESWT in patients with calcific and noncalcific tendinitis. MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Google Scholar were searched up to 1 November 2013. Randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) comparing high-energy versus low-energy ESWT or placebo for treatment of calcific or noncalcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Outcome measures included pain (visual analogue scale score), functional assessment (Constant-Murley score), and resolution of calcifications. Three independent reviewers abstracted data and determined eligibility and quality by consensus. Twenty-eight RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Studies were heterogeneous. Twenty RCTs compared ESWT energy levels and placebo and consistently showed that high-energy ESWT was significantly better than placebo in decreasing pain and improving function and resorption of calcifications in calcific tendinitis. No significant difference was found between ESWT and placebo in treatment of noncalcific tendinitis. The number of RCTs was small, and the studies were heterogeneous. High-energy ESWT is effective for improving pain and shoulder function in chronic calcific shoulder tendinitis and can result in complete resolution of calcifications. This therapy may be underutilized for a condition that can be difficult to manage. None.

  3. High-nitrogen and low-irradiance can restrict energy utilization in photosynthesis of successional tree species in low subtropical forest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xi'An; SUN GuChou; ZHAO Ping; LIU XiaoJing

    2008-01-01

    Responses of photosynthesis and the partition of energy utilization to high-nitrogen importation and high-light intensity in leaves of three dominant tree species of subtropical forest, including sun plant or early-successional species Schima superba, mesophyte or intermediate-successional species Can-stanopsis hystrix, and shading-tolerant plant or late-successional species Cryptocarya concinna were studied by using the CO2 exchange system and chlorophyll fluorescence method. Our results showed that, regardless of plant species, net photosynthetic rate (Pn) was higher in high-nitrogen supply and high irradiance (HNHL)plants than in low-nitrogen supply and high irradiance (LNHL) plants, implying that low-nitrogen importation would limit Pn of plants grown under high irradiance. However, high-nitrogen supply and low irradiance (HNLL) plants had a lower Pn. Insignificant change of quantum yield (Fv'/Fm') in opened PS II was found in leaves of HNHL, LNHL or HNLL plants of S. superba and C. hystrix, while a higher Fv'/Fm' occurred in HNHL plants of C. concinna in comparison with LNHL or HNLL plants. The HNHL plants of C. concinna also had a higher photochemical quantum yield (ARFm') than LNHL or HNLL plants, however no similar responses were found in plants of S. superba and C. hystrix (P0.05) and it was significantly higher than in HNLL plants (P<0.05). C. hystrixalso had a similar response in φPSII to nitrogen supply and irradiance. Regardless of species HNLL plants had a significant φPSII, and higher heat dissipation in light, and this effect was more severe in C. concinna than in S. superba or C. hystrix. The results may mean that high-nitrogen importation by nitrogen deposit and low irradiance caused by changing climate or air pollution would more severely restrict photo-synthetic processes in the late-successional species C. concinna than in the early-successional species S. superba and intermediate-successional species C. hystrix. The continuous high

  4. Recurrent restriction of sleep and inadequate recuperation induce both adaptive changes and pathological outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, Carol A; Szabo, Aniko

    2009-11-01

    Chronic restriction of a basic biological need induces adaptations to help meet requisites for survival. The adaptations to chronic restriction of sleep are unknown. A single episode of 10 days of partial sleep loss in rats previously was shown to be tolerated and to result in increased food intake and loss of body weight as principal signs. The purpose of the present experiment was to investigate the extent to which adaptation to chronic sleep restriction would ameliorate short-term effects and result in a changed internal phenotype. Rats were studied during 10 wk of multiple periods of restricted and unrestricted sleep to allow adaptive changes to develop. Control rats received the same ambulatory requirements only consolidated into periods that lessened interruptions of their sleep. The results indicate a latent period of relatively stable food and water intake without weight gain, followed by a dynamic phase marked by enormous increases in food and water intake and progressive loss of body weight, without malabsorption of calories. Severe consequences ensued, marked especially by changes to the connective tissues, and became fatal for two individuals. The most striking changes to internal organs in sleep-restricted rats included lengthening of the small intestine, decreased size of adipocytes, and increased incidence of multilocular adipocytes. Major organs accounted for an increased proportion of total body mass. These changes to internal tissues appear adaptive in response to high energy production, decomposition of lipids, and increased need to absorb nutrients, but ultimately insufficient to compensate for inadequate sleep.

  5. Chronic fluoxetine treatment directs energy metabolism towards the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in rat hippocampal nonsynaptic mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipović, Dragana; Costina, Victor; Perić, Ivana; Stanisavljević, Andrijana; Findeisen, Peter

    2017-03-15

    Fluoxetine (Flx) is the principal treatment for depression; however, the precise mechanisms of its actions remain elusive. Our aim was to identify protein expression changes within rat hippocampus regulated by chronic Flx treatment versus vehicle-controls using proteomics. Fluoxetine-hydrohloride (15mg/kg) was administered daily to adult male Wistar rats for 3weeks, and cytosolic and nonsynaptic mitochondrial hippocampal proteomes were analyzed. All differentially expressed proteins were functionally annotated according to biological process and molecular function using Uniprot and Blast2GO. Our comparative study revealed that in cytosolic and nonsynaptic mitochondrial fractions, 60 and 3 proteins respectively, were down-regulated, and 23 and 60 proteins, respectively, were up-regulated. Proteins differentially regulated in cytosolic and nonsynaptic mitochondrial fractions were primarily related to cellular and metabolic processes. Of the identified proteins, the expressions of calretinin and parvalbumine were confirmed. The predominant molecular functions of differentially expressed proteins in both cell hippocampal fractions were binding and catalytic activity. Most differentially expressed proteins in nonsynaptic mitochondria were catalytic enzymes involved in the pyruvate metabolism, citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, ATP synthesis, ATP transduction and glutamate metabolism. Results indicate that chronic Flx treatment may influence proteins involved in calcium signaling, cytoskeletal structure, chaperone system and stimulates energy metabolism via the upregulation of GAPDH expression in cytoplasm, as well as directing energy metabolism toward the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in nonsynaptic mitochondria. This approach provides new insight into the chronic effects of Flx treatment on protein expression in a key brain region associated with stress response and memory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Altered energy balance and cytokine gene expression in a murine model of chronic infection with Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenijevic, D; Girardier, L; Seydoux, J; Chang, H R; Dulloo, A G

    1997-05-01

    The temporal pattern of changes in energy balance and cytokine mRNA expression in spleen and brain were examined in a mouse model of infection with Toxoplasma gondii. During days 1-7 postinfection, food intake was unaltered, but energy expenditure was significantly increased, and this was associated with elevated tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-5, and interferon (IFN)-gamma. The hypermetabolic state persisted during subsequent anorexia, whose onset coincided with elevated IL-2, and at the end of the acute phase of cachexia, the dual anorexic and hypermetabolic states were associated with the cytokines examined: TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, and IFN-gamma. In the chronic phase of the infection, the mice showed either partial weight recovery (gainers) or no weight regain (nongainers). The infected gainers, though still hypophagic, were no longer hypermetabolic, and their cytokine mRNA was no longer elevated, except for TNF-alpha and IL-10. In contrast, the infected nongainers continued to show both anoroxia and hypermetabolism, which were associated with elevations in all cytokines examined and particularly those of the TH2 profile (IL-4 and IL-5) and IL-6. Taken together, these studies reveal a distinct pattern of cytokine mRNA expression underlying 1) hypermetabolism vs. anorexia, 2) acute vs. chronic cachexia, and 3) stable weight loss vs. partial weight recovery.

  7. Chronic stress impairs performance, energy metabolism and welfare indicators in European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax): The combined effects of fish crowding and water quality deterioration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, G.A.; Schrama, J.W.; Mamauag, R.E.P.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Rearing fish at high densities may act as a chronic stressor leading to a reduced performance. We hypothesise that this is due to an increase in energy requirements for maintenance and altered energy partitioning. To test this hypothesis, European seabass (mean initial weight 82.1 g) were stocked at

  8. Chronic stress impairs performance, energy metabolism and welfare indicators in European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax): The combined effects of fish crowding and water quality deterioration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, G.A.; Schrama, J.W.; Mamauag, R.E.P.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Rearing fish at high densities may act as a chronic stressor leading to a reduced performance. We hypothesise that this is due to an increase in energy requirements for maintenance and altered energy partitioning. To test this hypothesis, European seabass (mean initial weight 82.1 g) were stocked at

  9. High-nitrogen and low-irradiance can restrict energy utilization in photosynthesis of successional tree species in low subtropical forest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Responses of photosynthesis and the partition of energy utilization to high-nitrogen importation and high-light intensity in leaves of three dominant tree species of subtropical forest,including sun plant or early-successional species Schima superba,mesophyte or intermediate-successional species Canstanopsis hystrix,and shading-tolerant plant or late-successional species Cryptocarya concinna were studied by using the CO2 exchange system and chlorophyll fluorescence method.Our results showed that,regardless of plant species,net photosynthetic rate(Pn)was higher in high-nitrogen supply and high irradiance(HNHL)plants than in low-nitrogen supply and high irradiance(LNHL)plants,implying that low-nitrogen importation would limit Pn of plants grown under high irradiance.However, high-nitrogen supply and low irradiance(HNLL)plants had a lower Pn.Insignificant change of quantum yield(Fv′/Fm′)in opened PS II was found in leaves of HNHL,LNHL or HNLL plants of S.superba and C. hystrix,while a higher Fv′/Fm′occurred in HNHL plants of C.concinna in comparison with LNHL or HNLL plants.The HNHL plants of C.concinna also had a higher photochemical quantum yield(△F/Fm′) than LNHL or HNLL plants,however no similar responses were found in plants of S.superba and C. hystrix(P<0.05).In the irradiance range of 0―2000μmol photon·m -2·s -1,the fraction of energy consumed by photochemistry(φ PSII )was 18.2%in LNHL plants of S.superba which was higher than that in HNHL plants(P>0.05)and it was significantly higher than in HNLL plants(P<0.05).C.hystrix also had a similar response inφ PSII to nitrogen supply and irradiance.Regardless of species HNLL plants had a significantφ PSII and higher heat dissipation in light,and this effect was more severe in C.concinna than in S.superba or C.hystrix.The results may mean that high-nitrogen importation by nitrogen deposit and low irradiance caused by changing climate or air pollution would more severely restrict photosynthetic

  10. High intake of dairy during energy restriction does not affect energy balance or the intestinal microflora compared to low dairy intake in overweight individuals in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Line Quist; Blædel, Trine; Holm, Jacob Bak

    2017-01-01

    During weight loss, dairy calcium is proposed to accelerate weight and fat mass loss through increased fecal fat excretion. The primary objective was to investigate if a high-dairy energy-restricted diet is superior to low-dairy in terms of changes in body weight, body composition and fecal fat...... (2100 kJ) deficit diet either high (HD: 1500 mg calcium/d) or low (LD: 600 mg calcium/d) in dairy products for 24 weeks. Habitual calcium intake was ~1000 mg/d. Body weight loss (HD: -6.6±1.3 kg, LD: -7.9±1.5 kg, P=0.73), fat mass loss (HD: -7.8±1.3 %, LD: -8.5±1.1 %, P=0.76), changes in fecal fat...... excretion (HD: -0.57±0.76 g, LD: 0.46±0.70 g, P=0.12) and microbiota composition were similar for the groups over 24 weeks. However, total fat mass loss was positively associated with relative abundance of Papillibacter (P=0.017) independent of diet group. Consumption of a high dairy diet did...

  11. Effects of an exercise programme for chronically ill and mobility-restricted elderly with structured support by the general practitioner's practice (HOMEfit - study protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinrichs Timo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exercise programmes can be administered successfully as therapeutic agents to patients with a number of chronic diseases and help to improve physical functioning in older adults. Usually, such programmes target either healthy and mobile community-dwelling seniors or elderly individuals living in nursing institutions or special residences. Chronically ill or mobility-restricted individuals, however, are difficult to reach when they live in their own homes. A pilot study has shown good feasibility of a home-based exercise programme that is delivered to this target group through cooperation between general practitioners and exercise therapists. A logical next step involves evaluation of the effects of the programme. Methods/design The study is designed as a randomised controlled trial. We plan to recruit 210 patients (≥ 70 years in about 15 general practices. The experimental intervention (duration 12 weeks-a multidimensional home-based exercise programme-is delivered to the participant by an exercise therapist in counselling sessions at the general practitioner's practice and on the telephone. It is based on methods and strategies for facilitating behaviour change according to the Health Action Process Approach (HAPA. The control intervention-baseline physical activities-differs from the experimental intervention with regard to content of the counselling sessions as well as to content and frequency of the promoted activities. Primary outcome is functional lower body strength measured by the "chair-rise" test. Secondary outcomes are: physical function (battery of motor tests, physical activity (step count, health-related quality of life (SF-8, fall-related self-efficacy (FES-I, and exercise self-efficacy (SSA-Scale. The hypothesis that there will be differences between the two groups (experimental/control with respect to post-interventional chair-rise time will be tested using an ANCOVA with chair-rise time at baseline

  12. Effects of an exercise programme for chronically ill and mobility-restricted elderly with structured support by the general practitioner's practice (HOMEfit) - study protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Exercise programmes can be administered successfully as therapeutic agents to patients with a number of chronic diseases and help to improve physical functioning in older adults. Usually, such programmes target either healthy and mobile community-dwelling seniors or elderly individuals living in nursing institutions or special residences. Chronically ill or mobility-restricted individuals, however, are difficult to reach when they live in their own homes. A pilot study has shown good feasibility of a home-based exercise programme that is delivered to this target group through cooperation between general practitioners and exercise therapists. A logical next step involves evaluation of the effects of the programme. Methods/design The study is designed as a randomised controlled trial. We plan to recruit 210 patients (≥ 70 years) in about 15 general practices. The experimental intervention (duration 12 weeks)-a multidimensional home-based exercise programme-is delivered to the participant by an exercise therapist in counselling sessions at the general practitioner's practice and on the telephone. It is based on methods and strategies for facilitating behaviour change according to the Health Action Process Approach (HAPA). The control intervention-baseline physical activities-differs from the experimental intervention with regard to content of the counselling sessions as well as to content and frequency of the promoted activities. Primary outcome is functional lower body strength measured by the "chair-rise" test. Secondary outcomes are: physical function (battery of motor tests), physical activity (step count), health-related quality of life (SF-8), fall-related self-efficacy (FES-I), and exercise self-efficacy (SSA-Scale). The hypothesis that there will be differences between the two groups (experimental/control) with respect to post-interventional chair-rise time will be tested using an ANCOVA with chair-rise time at baseline, treatment group, and study

  13. Low-Energy Extracorporeal Shock-Wave Therapy in the Treatment of Chronic Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Pavone

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We report the results of a series of 40 patients with chronic insertional Achilles tendinopathy treated with low-energy ESWT after the failure of a 3-month program of eccentric exercises alone. Methods and Materials. 40 patients, 28 (70% males and 12 (30% females, were treated between January and December 2014. All patients were previously treated with only eccentric exercises for a 3-month period. The treatment protocol included 4 sessions of ESWT with a 2-week interval, from 800 shots in each one (4 Hz, 14 KeV, together with eccentric exercises. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS Hindfoot score were recorded. Results. At the 12-month follow-up, 26 (65.0% patients did not complain about pain (VAS 4. There was no significative improvement in both scores after eccentric exercises alone. Mean VAS improvement was 5.8±1.3 SD points (P<0.001. Mean AOFAS Hindfoot score improvement was 19.8±5.0 SD points (P<0.001. Conclusions. ESWT is recommended, in combination with an eccentric exercise program, in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy being both insertional and not.

  14. Low-Energy Extracorporeal Shock-Wave Therapy in the Treatment of Chronic Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy: A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavone, Vito; Di Stefano, Antonio; Testa, Gianluca; Costarella, Luciano; Sessa, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We report the results of a series of 40 patients with chronic insertional Achilles tendinopathy treated with low-energy ESWT after the failure of a 3-month program of eccentric exercises alone. Methods and Materials. 40 patients, 28 (70%) males and 12 (30%) females, were treated between January and December 2014. All patients were previously treated with only eccentric exercises for a 3-month period. The treatment protocol included 4 sessions of ESWT with a 2-week interval, from 800 shots in each one (4 Hz, 14 KeV), together with eccentric exercises. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Hindfoot score were recorded. Results. At the 12-month follow-up, 26 (65.0%) patients did not complain about pain (VAS 4). There was no significative improvement in both scores after eccentric exercises alone. Mean VAS improvement was 5.8 ± 1.3 SD points (P < 0.001). Mean AOFAS Hindfoot score improvement was 19.8 ± 5.0 SD points (P < 0.001). Conclusions. ESWT is recommended, in combination with an eccentric exercise program, in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy being both insertional and not. PMID:27843949

  15. Intellectual abilities and protein-energy malnutrition : acute malnutrition VS. chronic undernutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorweg, J.C.; Stanfield, J.P.; Brozek, J.

    1979-01-01

    Three groups of Ugandan children (20 in each group) and one comparison group of 20 children were examined between 11 and 17 years of age. The children in the first three groups had suffered from energy-protein malnutrition 10 to 16 years previously when they were hospitalised at different ages

  16. Predictors of energy cost during stair ascent and descent in individuals with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polese, Janaine Cunha; Scianni, Aline Alvim; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci Fuscaldi

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine which clinical measures of walking performance and lower limb muscle strength would predict energy cost during stair ascent and descent in community-dwelling individuals with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Regression analysis of cross-sectional data from 55 individuals between one and five years post-stroke was used to investigate the measures of walking (speed and distance covered during the 6-minute walk test [6MWT]), and strength of the paretic knee extensor and ankle plantar flexor muscles would predict energy cost during stair ascent and descent. [Results] Three predictors (habitual walking speed, distance covered during the 6MWT, and strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles) were kept in the model. Habitual walking speed alone explained 47% of the variance in energy cost during stair ascent and descent. When the strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles was included in the model, the explained variance increased to 53%. By adding the distance covered during the 6MWT, the variance increased to 58%. [Conclusion] Habitual walking speed, distance covered during the 6MWT, and strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles were significant predictors of energy cost during stair ascent and descent in individuals with mild walking limitations.

  17. Intellectual abilities and protein-energy malnutrition : acute malnutrition VS. chronic undernutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorweg, J.C.; Stanfield, J.P.; Brozek, J.

    1979-01-01

    Three groups of Ugandan children (20 in each group) and one comparison group of 20 children were examined between 11 and 17 years of age. The children in the first three groups had suffered from energy-protein malnutrition 10 to 16 years previously when they were hospitalised at different ages (betw

  18. Kefir drink leads to a similar weight loss, compared with milk, in a dairy-rich non-energy-restricted diet in overweight or obese premenopausal women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Yasamin; Faghih, Shiva; Zibaeenezhad, Mohammad Javad; Tabatabaei, Sayed Hamid Reza

    2016-02-01

    Controversy exists regarding whether increasing dairy intake without energy restriction would lead to weight loss. We aimed to compare the potential weight-reducing effects of kefir drink (a probiotic dairy product) and milk in a dairy-rich non-energy-restricted diet in overweight or obese premenopausal women. One hundred and forty-four subjects were assessed for eligibility in this single-center, multi-arm, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial. Of these, seventy-five eligible women aged 25-45 years were randomly assigned to three groups, labeled as control, milk, and kefir, to receive an outpatient dietary regimen for 8 weeks. Subjects in the control group received a diet providing a maintenance level of energy intake, containing 2 servings/day of low-fat dairy products, while those in the milk and kefir groups received a weight maintenance diet, containing 2 additional servings/day (a total of 4 servings/day) of dairy products from low-fat milk or commercial kefir drink, respectively. Anthropometric outcomes including weight, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC) were measured every 2 weeks. Fifty-eight subjects completed the study. Using analysis of covariance models in the intention-to-treat population (n = 75), we found that at 8 weeks, subjects in the kefir and milk groups had significantly greater reductions in weight, BMI, and WC compared to those in the control group (all p kefir and milk groups. Kefir drink leads to a similar weight loss, compared with milk, in a dairy-rich non-energy-restricted diet in overweight or obese premenopausal women. However, further studies are warranted.

  19. Caloric restriction, caloric restriction mimetics, and healthy aging in Okinawa: controversies and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcox, Bradley J; Willcox, Donald C

    2014-01-01

    To examine the role of two nutritional factors implicated in the healthy aging of the Okinawans: caloric restriction; and traditional foods with potential caloric restriction-mimetic properties. Caloric restriction is a research priority for the US National Institute on Aging. However, little is known regarding health effects in humans. Some caloric restriction-related outcomes, such as cause-specific mortality and lifespan, are not practical for human clinical trials. Therefore, epidemiological data on older Okinawans, who experienced a caloric restriction-like diet for close to half their lives, are of special interest. The nutritional data support mild caloric restriction (10-15%) and high consumption of foods that may mimic the biological effects of caloric restriction, including sweet potatoes, marine-based carotenoid-rich foods, and turmeric. Phenotypic evidence is consistent with caloric restriction (including short stature, low body weight, and lean BMI), less age-related chronic disease (including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and dementia), and longer lifespan (mean and maximum). Both caloric restriction and traditional Okinawan functional foods with caloric restriction-mimetic properties likely had roles in the extended healthspan and lifespan of the Okinawans. More research is needed on health consequences of caloric restriction and foods with caloric restriction-mimetic properties to identify possible nutritional interventions for healthy aging.

  20. An analysis of partial efficiencies of energy utilisation of different macronutrients by barramundi (Lates calcarifer) shows that starch restricts protein utilisation in carnivorous fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glencross, Brett D; Blyth, David; Bourne, Nicholas; Cheers, Susan; Irvin, Simon; Wade, Nicholas M

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the effect of including different dietary proportions of starch, protein and lipid, in diets balanced for digestible energy, on the utilisation efficiencies of dietary energy by barramundi (Lates calcarifer). Each diet was fed at one of three ration levels (satiety, 80 % of initial satiety and 60 % of initial satiety) for a 42-d period. Fish performance measures (weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion ratio) were all affected by dietary energy source. The efficiency of energy utilisation was significantly reduced in fish fed the starch diet relative to the other diets, but there were no significant effects between the other macronutrients. This reduction in efficiency of utilisation was derived from a multifactorial change in both protein and lipid utilisation. The rate of protein utilisation deteriorated as the amount of starch included in the diet increased. Lipid utilisation was most dramatically affected by inclusion levels of lipid in the diet, with diets low in lipid producing component lipid utilisation rates well above 1·3, which indicates substantial lipid synthesis from other energy sources. However, the energetic cost of lipid gain was as low as 0·65 kJ per kJ of lipid deposited, indicating that barramundi very efficiently store energy in the form of lipid, particularly from dietary starch energy. This study defines how the utilisation efficiency of dietary digestible energy by barramundi is influenced by the macronutrient source providing that energy, and that the inclusion of starch causes problems with protein utilisation in this species.

  1. Predicting energy requirement with pedometer-determined physical-activity level in women with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooqi N

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nighat Farooqi,1 Frode Slinde,2 Maine Carlsson,3 Lena Håglin,4 Thomas Sandström1 1Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine and Allergy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; 2Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 3Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; 4Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Family Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden Background: In clinical practice, in the absence of objective measures, simple methods to predict energy requirement in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD needs to be evaluated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate predicted energy requirement in females with COPD using pedometer-determined physical activity level (PAL multiplied by resting metabolic rate (RMR equations. Methods: Energy requirement was predicted in 18 women with COPD using pedometer-determined PAL multiplied by six different RMR equations (Harris–Benedict; Schofield; World Health Organization; Moore; Nordic Nutrition Recommendations; Nordenson. Total energy expenditure (TEE was measured by the criterion method: doubly labeled water. The predicted energy requirement was compared with measured TEE using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and Bland–Altman analyses. Results: The energy requirement predicted by pedometer-determined PAL multiplied by six different RMR equations was within a reasonable accuracy (±10% of the measured TEE for all equations except one (Nordenson equation. The ICC values between the criterion method (TEE and predicted energy requirement were: Harris–Benedict, ICC =0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.23–0.89; Schofield, ICC =0.71, 95% CI 0.21–0.89; World Health Organization, ICC =0.74, 95% CI 0.33–0.90; Moore, ICC =0.69, 95% CI 0.21–0.88; Nordic

  2. Protein energy wasting in chronic kidney disease: An update with focus on nutritional interventions to improve outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashpal P Jadeja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-energy wasting (PEW is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. PEW is one of the strongest predictors of mortality in patients with CKD. The International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism (ISRNM expert panel has defined PEW as a, "state of decreased body stores of protein and energy fuels (body protein and fat masses". The ISRNM panel has also proposed diagnostic criteria of PEW with four categories. Cachexia is a severe form of PEW. The proposed causes of PEW are multi-factorial and include nutritional and non-nutritional mechanisms. The literature indicates that PEW can be mitigated or corrected with an appropriate diet and enteral nutritional support that targets dietary protein intake. Dietary requirements and enteral nutritional support must also be considered in patients with CKD and diabetes mellitus and in children with CKD, in addition to dialysis patients. Features of ideal dietary supplement have also been discussed. Dietary interventions such as enteral feeding with high-protein meals or supplements might improve the nutritional status and outcomes in dialysis patients.

  3. Energy industry law in the field of tension between freedom of the market and governmental restrictions; Energiewirtschaftrecht im Spannungsfeld von marktlicher Freiheit und hoheitlichen Einschraenkungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehricke, Ulrich (ed.) [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer das Recht der Europaeischen Union; Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energierecht

    2011-07-01

    The book contains the papers presented at the 39th annual meeting on energy law of the Institute of Energy Law of Cologne University, held on 4 November 2010: Problems of recommunalisation from the view of the communities as illustrated by the example of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg; The development of market definition in the light of the market dynamics of the electricity and gas markets; Legal problems of long-term capacity bookings in the gas infrastructure; Interconnection of the European electricity markets, reality or chimera?; The European energy stock exchange in the point of intersection of energy regulation and bank supervision - current information on the development of the supervision regime for the energy market; Problems of the new energy competence title in Art. 194A EnV; Current rulings of the 3th cartel senate of the Duesseldorf Higher Regional Court on energy law; New lines for environmental protection: Obstacles to the grid integration of renewable energy sources. (orig./RHM)

  4. Review paper The role of physiological elements in the future therapies of rheumatoid arthritis. II. The relevance of energy redistribution in the process of chronic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Gajewski

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The reasons for development of chronic inflammation are complex and not fully understood. One of the factors affecting the prolongation of inflammation is changes in cell metabolism, occurring at the center of the inflammatory process. In chronic inflammation there is an imbalance between the processes of storage and consumption of energy reserves. Hypoxia that is a consequence of edema results in transition of white blood cells to anaerobic metabolism. Neutrophils, lymphocytes and macrophages produce active oxygen metabolites which on one hand facilitate the elimination of pathogens, and on the other hand, can cause damage to healthy cells located in the inflamed tissue. In this paper, we discuss the importance of disturbed redistribution of energy as one of the main reasons for transformation of the acute inflammatory process into the chronic one.

  5. The role of physiological elements in the future therapies of rheumatoid arthritis. II. The relevance of energy redistribution in the process of chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Michał; Rzodkiewicz, Przemysław; Wojtecka-Łukasik, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The reasons for development of chronic inflammation are complex and not fully understood. One of the factors affecting the prolongation of inflammation is changes in cell metabolism, occurring at the center of the inflammatory process. In chronic inflammation there is an imbalance between the processes of storage and consumption of energy reserves. Hypoxia that is a consequence of edema results in transition of white blood cells to anaerobic metabolism. Neutrophils, lymphocytes and macrophages produce active oxygen metabolites which on one hand facilitate the elimination of pathogens, and on the other hand, can cause damage to healthy cells located in the inflamed tissue. In this paper, we discuss the importance of disturbed redistribution of energy as one of the main reasons for transformation of the acute inflammatory process into the chronic one.

  6. Dietary fat and not calcium supplementation or dairy product consumption is associated with changes in anthropometrics during a randomized, placebo-controlled energy-restriction trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insufficient calcium intake has been proposed to cause unbalanced energy partitioning leading to obesity. However, weight loss interventions including dietary calcium or dairy product consumption have not reported changes in lipid metabolism measured by the plasma lipidome. Methods. The objective ...

  7. Evaluation of monoenergetic late iodine enhancement dual-energy computed tomography for imaging of chronic myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichmann, Julian L.; Kerl, J.M.; Frellesen, Claudia; Bodelle, Boris; Lehnert, Thomas; Vogl, Thomas J.; Bauer, Ralf W. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Arbaciauskaite, Ruta [Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Department of Cardiology, Kaunas (Lithuania); Monsefi, Nadejda [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    To evaluate image quality and diagnostic accuracy of selective monoenergetic reconstructions of late iodine enhancement (LIE) dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) for imaging of chronic myocardial infarction (CMI). Twenty patients with a history of coronary bypass surgery underwent cardiac LIE-DECT and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). LIE-DECT images were reconstructed as selective monoenergetic spectral images with photon energies of 40, 60, 80, and 100 keV and the standard linear blending setting (M{sub 0}.6). Images were assessed for late enhancement, transmural extent, signal characteristics and subjective image quality. Seventy-nine myocardial segments (23 %) showed LGE. LIE-DECT detected 76 lesions. Images obtained at 80 keV and M{sub 0}.6 showed a high signal-to-noise ratio (15.9; 15.1), contrast-to-noise ratio (4.2; 4.0) and sensitivity (94.9 %; 92.4 %) while specificity was identical (99.6 %). Differences between these series were not statistically significant. Transmural extent of LIE was overestimated in both series (80 keV: 40 %; M{sub 0}.6: 35 %) in comparison to MRI. However, observers preferred 80 keV in 13/20 cases (65 %, κ = 0.634) over M{sub 0}.6 (4/20 cases) regarding subjective image quality. Post-processing of LIE-DECT data with selective monoenergetic reconstructions at 80 keV significantly improves subjective image quality while objective image quality shows no significant difference compared to standard linear blending. (orig.)

  8. Prolonged REM sleep restriction induces metabolic syndrome-related changes: Mediation by pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venancio, Daniel Paulino; Suchecki, Deborah

    2015-07-01

    Chronic sleep restriction in human beings results in metabolic abnormalities, including changes in the control of glucose homeostasis, increased body mass and risk of cardiovascular disease. In rats, 96h of REM sleep deprivation increases caloric intake, but retards body weight gain. Moreover, this procedure increases the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), which may be involved with the molecular mechanism proposed to mediate insulin resistance. The goal of the present study was to assess the effects of a chronic protocol of sleep restriction on parameters of energy balance (food intake and body weight), leptin plasma levels and its hypothalamic receptors and mediators of the immune system in the retroperitoneal adipose tissue (RPAT). Thirty-four Wistar rats were distributed in control (CTL) and sleep restriction groups; the latter was kept onto individual narrow platforms immersed in water for 18h/day (from 16:00h to 10:00h), for 21days (SR21). Food intake was assessed daily, after each sleep restriction period and body weight was measured daily, after the animals were taken from the sleep deprivation chambers. At the end of the 21day of sleep restriction, rats were decapitated and RPAT was obtained for morphological and immune functional assays and expression of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) was assessed in skeletal muscle. Another subset of animals was used to evaluate blood glucose clearance. The results replicated previous findings on energy balance, e.g., increased food intake and reduced body weight gain. There was a significant reduction of RPAT mass (psleep restriction by the platform method induced metabolic syndrome-related alterations that may be mediated by inflammation of the RPAT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dual-energy CT perfusion and angiography in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: diagnostic accuracy and concordance with radionuclide scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dournes, Gael; Verdier, Damien; Montaudon, Michel; Laurent, Francois; Lederlin, Mathieu [Hopital Haut-Leveque, CHU Bordeaux, Department of Medical Imaging, Pessac (France); University Bordeaux Segalen, Bordeaux Cedex (France); Bullier, Eric; Riviere, Annalisa [Hopital Haut-Leveque, CHU Bordeaux, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pessac (France); Dromer, Claire [Hopital Haut-Leveque, CHU Bordeaux, Department of Respiratory Diseases, Pessac (France); Picard, Francois [Hopital Haut-Leveque, CHU Bordeaux, Department of Cardiology, Pessac (France); Billes, Marc-Alain [Hopital Haut-Leveque, CHU Bordeaux, Department of Cardiac Surgery, Pessac (France); Corneloup, Olivier [Hopital Haut-Leveque, CHU Bordeaux, Department of Medical Imaging, Pessac (France)

    2014-01-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) perfusion and angiography versus ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), and to assess the per-segment concordance rate of DECT and scintigraphy. Forty consecutive patients with proven pulmonary hypertension underwent V/Q scintigraphy and DECT perfusion and angiography. Each imaging technique was assessed for the location of segmental defects. Diagnosis of CTEPH was established when at least one segmental perfusion defect was detected by scintigraphy. Diagnostic accuracy of DECT perfusion and angiography was assessed and compared with scintigraphy. In CTEPH patients, the per-segment concordance between scintigraphy and DECT perfusion/angiography was calculated. Fourteen patients were diagnosed with CTEPH and 26 with other aetiologies. DECT perfusion and angiography correctly identified all CTEPH patients with sensitivity/specificity values of 1/0.92 and 1/0.93, respectively. At a segmental level, DECT perfusion showed moderate agreement (κ = 0.44) with scintigraphy. Agreement between CT angiography and scintigraphy ranged from fair (κ = 0.31) to slight (κ = 0.09) depending on whether completely or partially occlusive patterns were considered, respectively. Both DECT perfusion and angiography show satisfactory performance for the diagnosis of CTEPH. DECT perfusion is more accurate than angiography at identifying the segmental location of abnormalities. (orig.)

  10. Chronic oxytocin administration inhibits food intake, increases energy expenditure, and produces weight loss in fructose-fed obese rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, James E; Graham, James L; Morton, Gregory J; Bales, Karen L; Schwartz, Michael W; Baskin, Denis G; Havel, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    Despite compelling evidence that oxytocin (OT) is effective in reducing body weight (BW) in diet-induced obese (DIO) rodents, studies of the effects of OT in humans and rhesus monkeys have primarily focused on noningestive behaviors. The goal of this study was to translate findings in DIO rodents to a preclinical translational model of DIO. We tested the hypothesis that increased OT signaling would reduce BW in DIO rhesus monkeys by inhibiting food intake and increasing energy expenditure (EE). Male DIO rhesus monkeys from the California National Primate Research Center were adapted to a 12-h fast and maintained on chow and a daily 15% fructose-sweetened beverage. Monkeys received 2× daily subcutaneous vehicle injections over 1 wk. We subsequently identified doses of OT (0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg) that reduced food intake and BW in the absence of nausea or diarrhea. Chronic administration of OT for 4 wk (0.2 mg/kg for 2 wk; 0.4 mg/kg for 2 wk) reduced BW relative to vehicle by 3.3 ± 0.4% (≈0.6 kg; P intake by 26 ± 7% (P intake by 27 ± 5% (P intake by 18 ± 8% (P food intake as well as increased EE and lipolysis.

  11. Change in proportional protein intake in a 10-week energy-restricted low- or high-fat diet, in relation to changes in body size and metabolic factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stocks, Tanja; Taylor, Moira A; Ängquist, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate in a secondary analysis of a randomised trial the effects of a low-/high-fat diet and reported change from baseline in energy% from protein (prot%), in relation to changes in body size and metabolic factors. Methods: Obese adults (n = 771) were randomised to a 600 kcal e...... increased the percentage energy intake from protein showed the greatest reduction in weight and cholesterol, and a triglyceride reduction equally large to that of participants on a high-fat diet. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.......Objective: To investigate in a secondary analysis of a randomised trial the effects of a low-/high-fat diet and reported change from baseline in energy% from protein (prot%), in relation to changes in body size and metabolic factors. Methods: Obese adults (n = 771) were randomised to a 600 kcal...... energy-deficient low-fat (20-25 fat%) or high-fat (40-45 fat%) diet over 10 weeks. Dietary intake data at baseline and during the intervention were available in 585 completers. We used linear regression to calculate the combined effects of randomised group and groups of prot% change (2) on outcomes...

  12. Lipid metabolism and mitochondrial energy production are key pathways involved in adipose tissue of cows transitioning from feed restriction to ad libitum diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feed costs account for over 70% of the annual expenditures in cow/calf production. The majority of the nutrients are used to support the cow’s maintenance requirements and substrate cycling has been identified as one of the major contributors toward this type of energy expenditure. The objective of ...

  13. Weight regain after slimming induced by an energy-restricted diet depends on interleukin-6 and peroxisome-proliferator-activated-receptor-[gamma]2 gene polymorphisms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Estibaliz Goyenechea; M Dolores Parra; J Alfredo Martínez

    2006-01-01

    .... The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of IL-6 -174G > C and PPAR-γ2 Pro12Ala variants on weight regulation in obese subjects receiving a low-energy diet and at 1 year after the acute slimming period...

  14. Estimativa das necessidades energéticas em pacientes com doença renal crônica Estimating the energy requirement of chronic kidney disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cordeiro Dias Rodrigues

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Estabelecer as necessidades energéticas de pacientes com doença renal crônica é importante para que se possam tratar os distúrbios nutricionais encontrados nessa população. Segundo os guias de condutas voltados ao cuidado nutricional de pacientes com essa doença, a recomendação energética pode variar entre 30 e 40kcal/kg/dia. Contudo, trabalhos que avaliaram os componentes do gasto energético nos pacientes com doença renal crônica sugerem que as necessidades energéticas dessa população podem diferir do valor recomendado acima, a depender da condição clínica (presença de comorbidades, da modalidade de tratamento empregado e do nível de atividade física. Dessa forma, o presente trabalho tem como objetivo fazer uma revisão dos estudos sobre o gasto energético de pacientes com doença renal crônica, com o intuito de abordar as seguintes questões: (1 as atuais recomendações de energia para pacientes com doença renal crônica estão adequadas? (2 qual equação de predição poderia ser empregada para estimar as necessidades energéticas desse grupo de pacientes? Assim, esta revisão busca auxiliar o nutricionista ao estimar as necessidades energéticas de pacientes com doença renal crônica.Estimating the energy requirement of patients with chronic kidney disease is highly important for treating the nutritional disorders often seen in this population. According to the specific guidelines for patients with chronic kidney disease, the currently recommended daily energy intake varies from 30 to 40kcal/kg/day. However, studies that investigated energy expenditure components of patients with chronic kidney disease suggested that the energy requirement may differ from the one proposed earlier, depending on overall clinical condition (i.e. presence of comorbidities, treatment modality and level of physical activity. With this perspective in mind, the present study aims to review the studies assessing energy expenditure

  15. Effect of a negative energy balance induced by feed restriction on pro-inflammatory and endoplasmic reticulum stress signalling pathways in the liver and skeletal muscle of lactating sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Denise K; Gröne, Birthe; Rosenbaum, Susann; Most, Erika; Hillen, Sonja; Becker, Sabrina; Erhardt, Georg; Reiner, Gerald; Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    High-producing sows develop typical signs of an inflammatory condition and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the liver during lactation. At present, it is unknown whether a negative energy balance (NEB) is causative for this. Therefore, an experiment with lactating sows, which were either restricted in their feed intake to 82% of their energy requirement (Group FR) or were fed to meet their energy requirement (Control), was performed and the effect on ER stress-induced unfolded protein response (UPR), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and NOD-like receptor P3 (NLRP3) inflammasome signalling in the liver was evaluated. Relative mRNA concentrations of several genes involved in ER stress-induced UPR, NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammasome signalling were reduced in the liver of Group FR compared to the Control group. Plasma concentrations of haptoglobin and C-reactive protein were 13% and 37%, respectively, lower in Group FR than in the Control group, but these differences were not significant. In conclusion, feed restriction in lactating sows inhibits pro-inflammatory and ER stress signalling pathways in the liver, which suggests that not the NEB per se is causative for inflammation and ER stress induction in the liver of lactating sows. Rather it is likely that ER stress during lactation is the consequence of the presence of potent pro-inflammatory and ER stress-inducing stimuli, such as cytokines, reactive oxygen species and microbial components, which enter the circulation as a result of infectious diseases that frequently occur in sows after farrowing.

  16. The Effect of Restrictive Energy Diet on Serum Leptin and Soluble Leptin Receptor of Rats%限制饮食对大鼠血清瘦素和可溶性瘦素受体影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪毅; 周琨; 李松波; 汪洋; 张爱芳

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨20%能量限制的饮食对大鼠血清瘦素及可溶性瘦素受体的影响,通过相关指标的变化主要分析20%能量限制的饮食对于肥胖的影响和作用机制。方法:21只4周龄雄性SD大鼠随机分为对照组(C组)、限食组(R组)和高脂组(H组)。C组喂养普通饲料,H组大鼠给予高脂饲料喂养,R组给予20%能量限制的饲料喂养。喂养第16周末,测定大鼠体重、身长、肥胖评定指数(Lee’s指数)、肾周脂肪、附睾脂肪,腹主动脉取血分离血清,测试血清瘦素(Leptin)和可溶性瘦素受体(sLR)。结果:H组大鼠体重、肾脏周围脂肪和附睾周围脂肪重量非常显著性高于C组,而R组的大鼠体重、肾脏周围脂肪和附睾周围脂肪重量显著性低于C组;R组和H组大鼠的Lee’s指数与C组比较均有非常显著性差异。与C组相比,R组Leptin显著降低,H组显著升高;同时R组sLR非常显著升高,H组sLR显著降低。结论:16周的高脂饮食能显著增加大鼠的体重,提高大鼠血清Lp浓度,降低血清sLR浓度,形成肥胖。16周限制20%能量摄入的饮食,能有效地降低大鼠的体重,显著降低大鼠血清Lp浓度,提高血清sLR浓度,限制了肥胖的发生。%Objective:To study the effect of 20% restrictive energy diet on serum leptin and soluble leptin receptor of rats,then provide theoretic evidence on 20% restrictive energy diet for dietary therapy of obesity.Method:21 4-weeks male SD rats were randomly divided into 3 groups,the control group were given normal diet,the high-fat diet group were given high-fat diet and the restricting group were given 20% restrictive energy diet.After 16 weeks feeding,we detected the weight,length,Lee's index,fat around the kidneys and epididymal fat.After that,we detected the serum indicators including the leptin and sLR.Result:Comparing with the control group,the weight,the fat around the kidneys and the epididymal fat are

  17. related Factors of chronic Energy Deficiency at Pregnant Woman in kamoning and Tambelangan Sub District, Sampang District, West Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vita Kartika Mahirawati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available background:Pregnant woman who suffered Chronic Energy Deficiency (CED has delivered babies with low birth weight and increased the risk for mortality. The objective of this research was to analyze the related factors of CED at pregnant woman. Method:A Cross sectional design was used. A random sample of pregnant women who registered in kohort. has taken 104 people as the samples. Collecting data using questionnaires (quantitative and secondary data obtain through kohort register during 2012–2013 and profile of Dinkes 2012, conducted during 6 (six months 2013 in Puskesmas Kamoning and Tambelangan. The data were analyzed descriptively and statistically using Chi Square test. result: The socio-economic factors: 35.5% mother’s education mostly elementary school graduates. 29.4 % didn’t graduate from elementary school. The majority of their husband (39.2% work as farm worker with income less than 1 million rupiah per month. The maternal factors: the average age between 21 until 34 years old (70.6%. The age of marriage mostly under 17 years old (41.1% and most of them (31.4% have their first pregnancy in the age between 18 until 21 years old. The most pregnant women (54.9% ate 3 times/day. 70.6% pregnant women with CED suffered from anemia; 66.7% of them took irow tablets every day. conclusion:economic factors social conditions associated with the incidence of maternal CED husband is education and maternal work status, whereas maternal factors are gestational age, hemoglobin levels in the blood and consumption of iron pills. recommendation:Areas programme and sectorce, should be involved to reduce the CED prevalence.

  18. Restrictions and Proportionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2009-01-01

    The article discusses three central aspects of the freedoms under European Community law, namely 1) the prohibition against restrictions as an important extension of the prohibition against discrimination, 2) a prohibition against exit restrictions which is just as important as the prohibition...

  19. Contribution of energy restriction and macronutrient composition to changes in adipose tissue gene expression during dietary weight-loss programs in obese women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capel, Frédéric; Viguerie, Nathalie; Vega, Nathalie;

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Hypoenergetic diets are used to reduce body fat mass and metabolic risk factors in obese subjects. The molecular changes in adipose tissue associated with weight loss and specifically related to the dietary composition are poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: We investigated adipose tissue gene...... diet. SUBJECTS: Two sets of 47 women in each dietary arm were selected among 648 subjects matched for anthropometric and biological parameters. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: We measured adipose tissue gene expression changes in one set using a candidate gene approach. The other set was used to survey 24...... expression from human obese women according to energy deficit and the fat and carbohydrate content of the diet. DESIGN AND SETTING: Obese subjects recruited among eight European clinical centers were followed up 10 wk of either a low-fat (high carbohydrate) or a moderate-fat (low carbohydrate) hypoenergetic...

  20. Dairy Foods in a Moderate Energy Restricted Diet Do Not Enhance Central Fat, Weight, and Intra-Abdominal Adipose Tissue Losses nor Reduce Adipocyte Size or Inflammatory Markers in Overweight and Obese Adults: A Controlled Feeding Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta D. Van Loan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Research on dairy foods to enhance weight and fat loss when incorporated into a modest weight loss diet has had mixed results. Objective. A 15-week controlled feeding study to determine if dairy foods enhance central fat and weight loss when incorporated in a modest energy restricted diet of overweight and obese adults. Design. A 3-week run-in to establish energy needs; a 12-week 500 kcal/d energy reduction with 71 low-dairy-consuming overweight and obese adults randomly assigned to diets: ≤1 serving dairy/d (low dairy, LD or ≤4 servings dairy/d (adequate dairy, AD. All foods were weighed and provided by the metabolic kitchen. Weight, fat, intra-abdominal adipose tissue (IAAT, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT macrophage number, SAT inflammatory gene expression, and circulating cytokines were measured. Results. No diet differences were observed in weight, fat, or IAAT loss; nor SAT mRNA expression of inflammation, circulating cytokines, fasting lipids, glucose, or insulin. There was a significant increase (P=0.02 in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the AD group. Conclusion. Whether increased dairy intake during weight loss results in greater weight and fat loss for individuals with metabolic syndrome deserves investigation. Assessment of appetite, hunger, and satiety with followup on weight regain should be considered.

  1. Effect of food restriction on energy metabolism and thermogenesis in striped hamster (Cricetulus barabensis)%食物限制对黑线仓鼠能量代谢和产热的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵志军

    2012-01-01

    为阐明动物应对食物短缺的能量学对策与其自身的代谢水平的关系,测定了不同限食程度下黑线仓鼠的体重、基础代谢率和非颤抖性产热.结果发现,限食使基础代谢率、非颤抖性产热、褐色脂肪组织细胞色素c氧化酶活性降低.90%限食驯化4周后,存活率为80%,60%限食驯化4周后,存活率为30%.低温驯化使黑线仓鼠基础代谢率和非颤抖性产热显著增加,使80%限食动物的体重和存活率显著降低.高基础代谢率组的摄食量比低基础代谢率组多23.8%,80%限食后两组体重降低的幅度和存活率差异不显著.结果表明:高水平的代谢率使黑线仓鼠对食物资源短缺的敏感性增加;支持“代谢率转换假说”,符合“具有储食习性的动物对食物短缺的生理耐受性较低”的预测.%To examine the relationship between the energy strategy in response to food restriction and the levels of metabolism in small mammals, body mass, basal metabolic rate (BMR) and nonshivering thermogenesis ( NST) were measured in striped hamsters ( Cricetulus barabensis) that were subjected to different levels of food restriction ( FR). The data showed that BMR, NST and cytochrome c oxidase activity of brown adipose tissue all were significantly decreased in FR hamsters. Eighty percent of hamsters survived for 4 weeks after being restricted to 90% of ad libitum food intake, but survival rate was 30% in hamsters restricted to 60% of ad libitum food intake. Cold-exposed hamsters had significantly increased BMR and NST, but had decreased body mass and survival rate after being restricted to 80% of ad libitum food intake compared with their counterparts maintained at room temperature. Hamsters with higher BMR consumed 23. 8% higher food than individuals with lower BMR, whereas no differences were observed in body mass and survival rate between the two groups after being restricted to 80% of ad libitum food intake. This suggests

  2. Human Capital Distribution,Energy Restriction and Regional Disparity%人力资本分布、能源约束与区域发展差距

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢波; 陈懿

    2015-01-01

    以1990-2012年我国30个省际面板数据为对象,计算出泰尔指数,以考察中国区域差距的演变趋势。同时建立线性和非线性计量模型,运用二阶段最小二乘估计回归方法,考察了省际人力资本分布、能源消耗对区域发展差距的影响。结论表明:人力资本分布的不平衡是导致区域差距拉大的重要原因;东部地区能源消耗缩小了区域间差距,而中西部地区能源消耗拉大了区域间差距;人力资本平均存量、对外开放程度、经济增长率均对区域差距扩大有正向影响,而物质资本存量、市场规模、政府规模对区域发展差距有负向影响,影响的程度各不相同。%The authors calculate the theil index and set up linear model and non -linear model using 2SLS regression to study the impact of human capital distribution and resources consumption to regional development gap in 30 provinces of China,from 1990 to 2012.The result shows that the imbalance of human capital distri-bution is an important factor of regional disparity.Energy consumption makes contribution to the decrease of re-gional disparity in the eastern area,while energy consumption motivates the expansion of gap in the western and middle areas.Human capital,economically open degree and economic growth rate have a positive influence on regional disparity while capital stock,market size and government size have negative influence on it.

  3. 10 CFR 1016.34 - Accountability for Secret Restricted Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. 1016.34 Section... Information § 1016.34 Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. Each permittee possessing documents containing Secret Restricted Data shall establish a document accountability procedure and shall...

  4. Relations of adipose tissue CIDEA gene expression to basal metabolic rate, energy restriction, and obesity: population-based and dietary intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gummesson, Anders; Jernås, Margareta; Svensson, Per-Arne; Larsson, Ingrid; Glad, Camilla A M; Schéle, Erik; Gripeteg, Lena; Sjöholm, Kajsa; Lystig, Theodore C; Sjöström, Lars; Carlsson, Björn; Fagerberg, Björn; Carlsson, Lena M S

    2007-12-01

    Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-alpha-like effector A (CIDEA) could be a potential target for the treatment of obesity via the modulation of metabolic rate, based on the findings that CIDEA inhibits the brown adipose tissue uncoupling process in rodents. Our objects were to investigate the putative link between CIDEA and basal metabolic rate in humans and to elucidate further the role of CIDEA in human obesity. We have explored CIDEA gene expression in adipose tissue in two different human studies: a cross-sectional and population-based study assessing body composition and metabolic rate (Mölndal Metabolic study, n = 92); and a longitudinal intervention study of obese subjects treated with a very low calorie diet (VLCD) (VLCD study, n = 24). The CIDEA gene was predominantly expressed in adipocytes as compared with other human tissues. CIDEA gene expression in adipose tissue was inversely associated with basal metabolic rate independently of body composition, age, and gender (P = 0.014). The VLCD induced an increase in adipose tissue CIDEA expression (P dysregulation of CIDEA expression was observed in individuals with the metabolic syndrome when compared with body mass index-matched controls. In a separate sample of VLCD-treated subjects (n = 10), uncoupling protein 1 expression was reduced during diet (P = 0.0026) and inversely associated with CIDEA expression (P = 0.0014). The findings are consistent with the concept that CIDEA plays a role in adipose tissue energy expenditure.

  5. Impact of chronic low to moderate alcohol consumption on blood lipid and heart energy profile in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fan; Cao, Quan; Wang, Cong; Ma, Xin; Shen, Cheng; Liu, Xiang-wei; Bu, Li-ping; Zou, Yun-zeng; Hu, Kai; Sun, Ai-jun; Ge, Jun-bo

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the roles of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), the key enzyme of ethanol metabolism, in chronic low to moderate alcohol consumption-induced heart protective effects in mice. Twenty-one male wild-type (WT) or ALDH2-knockout (KO) mice were used in this study. In each genotype, 14 animals received alcohol (2.5%, 5% and 10% in week 1-3, respectively, and 18% in week 4-7), and 7 received water for 7 weeks. After the treatments, survival rate and general characteristics of the animals were evaluated. Serum ethanol and acetaldehyde levels and blood lipids were measured. Metabolomics was used to characterize the heart and serum metabolism profiles. Chronic alcohol intake decreased the survival rate of KO mice by 50%, and significantly decreased their body weight, but did not affect those of WT mice. Chronic alcohol intake significantly increased the serum ethanol levels in both WT and KO mice, but KO mice had significantly higher serum acetaldehyde levels than WT mice. Chronic alcohol intake significantly increased the serum HDL cholesterol levels in WT mice, and did not change the serum HDL cholesterol levels in KO mice. After chronic alcohol intake, WT and KO mice showed differential heart and serum metabolism profiles, including the 3 main energy substrate types (lipids, glucose and amino acids) and three carboxylic acid cycles. Low to moderate alcohol consumption increases HDL cholesterol levels and improves heart energy metabolism profile in WT mice but not in ALDH2-KO mice. Thus, preserved ALDH2 function is essential for the protective effect of low to moderate alcohol on the cardiovascular system.

  6. 饮食蛋白的限制对高龄患者营养状况和慢性肾脏病进展的影响%Effects of dietary protein restriction on the nutritional status and renal function in the very elderly with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘旭利; 程庆砾; 刘胜; 王小丹; 赵佳慧; 李青霖; 张晓英

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察饮食蛋白的限制对老年慢性肾脏病(CKD)患者营养状况及肾功能进展的影响.方法 对168例高龄(75 ~94岁)男性CKD 3期患者的低蛋白饮食(LPD)治疗情况进行回顾性分析.采用Maroni公式估算患者平均每日蛋白质入量(eDPI)以评估患者对LPD的依从性,并依据eDPI水平及是否服用复方α-酮酸制剂(KA)治疗将患者分为单纯限制蛋白组、限制蛋白+KA组、未限制蛋白组及未限制蛋白+KA组,比较分析18个月病程中四组患者的营养状况和肾功能的进展.结果 单纯限制蛋白组患者的血清白蛋白水平和前白蛋白水平降低(P<0.05);未限制蛋白组患者的血磷水平明显升高(P<0.05),服用KA制剂两组患者的血钙水平明显升高(P<0.05);较未限制蛋白组及单纯限制蛋白组,限制蛋白+KA组患者的eGFR下降幅度最小(P<0.05).结论 高龄CKD患者单纯给予限制蛋白治疗,可能会导致营养不良;KA可以改善CKD患者的营养状况和血钙水平;限制蛋白并辅以KA治疗可以有效延缓老年CKD进展.%Objective To investigate the effects of dietary protein restriction supplemented with or without α-ketoacids(KA) on nutritional status and renal function in the very elderly with chronic kidney disease (CKD).Methods The clinical data of 168 elderly patients with CKD stage 3 were analyzed in this retrospective cohort study.The compliance to LPD was evaluated using estimated daily protein intake (eDPI).According to the level of eDPI and supplementation with or without KA,the patients were divided into four groups including protein-restriction alone,protein-restriction + KA,non protein-restriction and non protein-restriction + KA.The nutritional status and the changes of eGFR were recorded and followed up for 18 months.Results The levels of serum albumin,serum prealbumin and serum calcium in protein-restriction + KA group and non protein-restriction + KA group were higher than that in

  7. Solid cancer mortality associated with chronic external radiation exposure at the French atomic energy commission and nuclear fuel company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz-Flamant, C; Samson, E; Caër-Lorho, S; Acker, A; Laurier, D

    2011-07-01

    Studies of nuclear workers make it possible to directly quantify the risks associated with ionizing radiation exposure at low doses and low dose rates. Studies of the CEA (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique) and AREVA Nuclear Cycle (AREVA NC) cohort, currently the most informative such group in France, describe the long-term risk to nuclear workers associated with external exposure. Our aim is to assess the risk of mortality from solid cancers among CEA and AREVA NC nuclear workers and its association with external radiation exposure. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated and internal Poisson regressions were conducted, controlling for the main confounding factors [sex, attained age, calendar period, company and socioeconomic status (SES)]. During the period 1968-2004, there were 2,035 solid cancers among the 36,769 CEA-AREVA NC workers. Cumulative external radiation exposure was assessed for the period 1950-2004, and the mean cumulative dose was 12.1 mSv. Mortality rates for all causes and all solid cancers were both significantly lower in this cohort than in the general population. A significant excess of deaths from pleural cancer, not associated with cumulative external dose, was observed, probably due to past asbestos exposure. We observed a significant excess of melanoma, also unassociated with dose. Although cumulative external dose was not associated with mortality from all solid cancers, the central estimated excess relative risk (ERR) per Sv of 0.46 for solid cancer mortality was higher than the 0.26 calculated for male Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors 50 years or older and exposed at the age of 30 years or older. The modification of our results after stratification for SES demonstrates the importance of this characteristic in occupational studies, because it makes it possible to take class-based lifestyle differences into account, at least partly. These results show the great potential of a further joint international study of

  8. The effect of two energy-restricted diets, a low-fructose diet versus a moderate natural fructose diet, on weight loss and metabolic syndrome parameters: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madero, Magdalena; Arriaga, Julio C; Jalal, Diana; Rivard, Christopher; McFann, Kim; Pérez-Méndez, Oscar; Vázquez, Armando; Ruiz, Arturo; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Jimenez, Carlos Roncal; Johnson, Richard J; Lozada, Laura-Gabriela Sánchez

    2011-11-01

    One of the proposed causes of obesity and metabolic syndrome is the excessive intake of products containing added sugars, in particular, fructose. Although the ability of excessive intake of fructose to induce metabolic syndrome is mounting, to date, no study has addressed whether a diet specifically lowering fructose but not total carbohydrates can reduce features of metabolic syndrome. A total of 131 patients were randomized to compare the short-term effects of 2 energy-restricted diets-a low-fructose diet vs a moderate natural fructose diet-on weight loss and metabolic syndrome parameters. Patients were randomized to receive 1500, 1800, or 2000 cal diets according to sex, age, and height. Because natural fructose might be differently absorbed compared with fructose from added sugars, we randomized obese subjects to either a low-fructose diet (diet with natural fruit supplements (50-70 g/d) and compared the effects of both diets on the primary outcome of weight loss in a 6-week follow-up period. Blood pressure, lipid profile, serum glucose, insulin resistance, uric acid, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and quality of life scores were included as secondary outcomes. One hundred two (78%) of the 131 participants were women, mean age was 38.8 ± 8.8 years, and the mean body mass index was 32.4 ± 4.5 kg/m(2). Each intervention diet was associated with significant weight loss compared with baseline. Weight loss was higher in the moderate natural fructose group (4.19 ± 0.30 kg) than the low-fructose group (2.83 ± 0.29 kg) (P = .0016). Compared with baseline, each intervention diet was associated with significant improvement in secondary outcomes. Reduction of energy and added fructose intake may represent an important therapeutic target to reduce the frequency of obesity and diabetes. For weight loss achievement, an energy-restricted moderate natural fructose diet was superior to a low-fructose diet.

  9. Moderate Walking Enhances the Effects of an Energy-Restricted Diet on Fat Mass Loss and Serum Insulin in Overweight and Obese Adults in a 12-Week Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleist, Bernadette; Wahrburg, Ursel; Stehle, Peter; Schomaker, Ralph; Greiwing, Andreas; Stoffel-Wagner, Birgit; Egert, Sarah

    2017-08-09

    Background: Increased physical activity may be advantageous for weight loss.Objective: We investigated the effects of an energy-restricted diet with and without moderate walking on body weight, body composition, resting energy expenditure (REE), and endocrine and cardiometabolic risk variables in overweight and obese participants.Methods: A 12-wk, randomized, 2-arm, parallel, controlled, energy-restricted (500-800 kcal/d) dietary intervention study was conducted in 82 men and women [mean baseline characteristics: age, 39.4 y; weight, 99.3 kg; body mass index (in kg/m(2)), 31.9]. Participants were divided into 2 groups. One group received a hypoenergetic diet (DI) only (n = 44). The second group received the same DI and participated in a regular walking program of 2.5 h/wk (DI + walking; n = 38).Results: After the 12-wk intervention, body weight was significantly decreased in the DI + walking group and the DI group (-8.8 compared with -7.0 kg, P = 0.064 for intergroup differences). The decrease in body weight was accompanied by a significant reduction in total fat mass, which was significantly more pronounced in the DI + walking group than in the DI group (-6.4 ± 3.1 compared with -4.8 ± 3.0 kg; P = 0.020). REE after 12 wk was not significantly different compared with the baseline REE. Diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, LDL cholesterol, and non-HDL cholesterol were similarly significantly improved by both interventions. In the DI + walking group, insulin and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index were also significantly reduced. Serum free triiodothyronine was significantly decreased and serum cortisol was significantly increased in both groups.Conclusions: Participation in a 12-wk weight-loss study resulted in significant reductions in body weight and fat mass and was associated with significant improvements in biomarkers for cardiovascular disease risk. Moderate weight loss was not accompanied by a reduction in REE

  10. Restricted Conformal Property of Compressive Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Energy and direction are tow basic properties of a vector. A discrete signal is a vector in nature. RIP of compressive sensing can not show the direction information of a signal but show the energy information of a signal. Hence, RIP is not complete. Orthogonal matrices can preserve angles and lengths. Preservation of length can show energies of signals like RIP do; and preservation of angle can show directions of signals. Therefore, Restricted Conformal Property (RCP) is proposed according t...

  11. Energy and power source mix in East Asia. Restrictions on resource, fund and environment and the future prospect; Higashi Asia no energy dengen mix. Shigen shikin kankyo no seiyaku to kongo no tenbo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    In Asian countries, the economic growth rate is extremely higher as compared with the world average, and accordingly a large growth in energy supply/demand and electric power supply/demand is paid attention to. Besides, at users` side, a fear is the worsening of the environmental problem which is brought about by a rapid increase in energy consumption. At suppliers` side, introduction/expansion of a large amount of foreign funds for rapid promotion of power source development become necessary so that supplying facilities catch up with the growth in demand. Moreover, dependence of the supply upon outside the area is becoming higher, and problems in safety guarantee are also becoming prominent. As for energy/power source mix in East Asian countries, the stable supply is basically considered as most important, and economical efficiency is also important including competition conditions among energies and potential raising of investment in supplying facilities. It is no exaggeration to say that the increase in the rate of coal which occupies most of the primary energy supply/power source in East Asian countries depends upon the progress of environmental harmony technology such as clean coal technology. 39 figs., 132 tabs.

  12. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Foland, Andrew Dean

    2007-01-01

    Energy is the central concept of physics. Unable to be created or destroyed but transformable from one form to another, energy ultimately determines what is and isn''t possible in our universe. This book gives readers an appreciation for the limits of energy and the quantities of energy in the world around them. This fascinating book explores the major forms of energy: kinetic, potential, electrical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear.

  13. The contact geometry of the restricted 3-body problem

    CERN Document Server

    Albers, Peter; van Koert, Otto; Paternain, Gabriel P

    2010-01-01

    We show that the planar circular restricted three body problem is of restricted contact type for all energies below the first critical value (action of the first Lagrange point) and for energies slightly above it. This opens up the possibility of using the technology of Contact Topology to understand this particular dynamical system.

  14. Supplementation of branched-chain amino acids in protein-restricted diets modulates the expression levels of amino acid transporters and energy metabolism associated regulators in the adipose tissue of growing pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghui Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA supplemented in protein-restricted diets on the growth performance and the expression profile of amino acid transporters and energy metabolism related regulators in the white adipose tissue (WAT of different regional depots including dorsal subcutaneous adipose (DSA and abdominal subcutaneous adipose (ASA. A total of 24 crossbred barrows (7.40 ± 0.70 kg were randomly divided into 4 groups and were fed the following isocaloric diets for 33 days: 1 a recommended adequate protein diet (AP, 20% CP, as a positive control; 2 a low protein diet (LP, 17% CP; 3 the LP diet supplemented with BCAA (LP + B, 17% CP to reach the same level of the AP diet group; 4 the LP diet supplemented with 2 times the amount of BCAA (LP + 2B, 17% CP. The daily gain and daily feed intake of the LP diet group were the lowest among all the treatments (P  0.05. Moreover, BCAA supplementation down-regulated the expression levels of amino acid transporters including L-type amino acid transporter 1 and sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 in DSA, but up-regulated the expression level of L-type amino acid transporter 4 in ASA (P < 0.05. Meanwhile, the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase α was activated in the DSA of pigs fed LP diet and in the ASA of the pigs fed AP or LP + 2B diets (P < 0.05. The mRNA expression profile of the selected mitochondrial component and mitochondrial biogenesis associated regulators in DSA and ASA also responded differently to dietary BCAA supplementation. These results suggested that the growth performance of growing pigs fed protein restricted diets supplemented with BCAA could catch up to that of the pigs fed AP diets. The results also partly demonstrated that the regulation mechanisms of BCAA are different in the adipose tissues of different depots.

  15. Energy expenditure at rest and during walking in patients with chronic respiratory failure: a prospective two-phase case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Crisafulli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Measurements of Energy Expenditure (EE at rest (REE and during physical activities are increasing in interest in chronic patients. In this study we aimed at evaluating the validity/reliability of the SenseWear®Armband (SWA device in terms of REE and EE during assisted walking in Chronic Respiratory Failure (CRF patients receiving long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a two-phase prospective protocol we studied 40 severe patients and 35 age-matched healthy controls. In phase-1 we determined the validity and repeatability of REE measured by SWA (REEa in comparison with standard calorimetry (REEc. In phase-2 we then assessed EE and Metabolic Equivalents-METs by SWA during the 6-minute walking test while breathing oxygen in both assisted (Aid or unassisted (No-Aid modalities. When compared with REEc, REEa was slightly lower in patients (1351±169 vs 1413±194 kcal/day respectively, p<0.05, and less repeatable than in healthy controls (0.14 and 0.43 coefficient respectively. COPD patients with CRF patients reported a significant gain with Aid as compared with No-Aid modality in terms of meters walked, perceived symptoms and EE. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SWA provides a feasible and valid method to assess the energy expenditure in CRF patients on LTOT, and it shows that aided walking results in a substantial energy saving in this population.

  16. Late gestational nutrient restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tygesen, Malin Plumhoff; Nielsen, Mette Olaf; Nørgaard, Peder;

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of 50% nutrient restriction during the last 6 weeks of gestation on twin-pregnant ewes' plasma glucose, non-esterified fatty acid, ß-hydroxybutyrate, insulin, IGF-1 and leptin concentrations and the effects on lamb birth weight and ewes' lactation performance. Plasma...... metabolite and hormone concentrations in restricted ewes suggest that maternal tissues were being mobilised. Despite the ewes' adaptations their lambs weighed significantly less at birth. Furthermore, colostrum and milk yields were markedly reduced up until the latest measurement at 3 weeks post partum...

  17. [Nutrition and chronic renal failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayúcar Ruiz de Galarreta, A; Cordero Lorenzana, M L; Martínez-Puga y López, E; Gómez Seijo, A; Escudero Alvarez, E

    2000-01-01

    The causes of malnutrition in chronic terminal kidney failure are reviewed in the situation both before and after dialysis, as are the malnutrition rates in both circumstances and their treatment. Malnutrition has a high prevalence in terminal kidney patients, partly as a result of the therapeutic restriction on calories and proteins, but also due to the metabolic reactions typical of the disease and to anorexia. In patients subjected to dialytical methods, certain other mechanisms are added. In addition to malnutrition, there are alterations in the metabolism of calcium, phosphorus and potassium, as well as lipids, thus limiting nutritional therapy's ability to restore the nutritional status to normal. An awareness of energy expenditure in chronic terminal kidney failure and the consequences of malnutrition have led to new challenges in nutritional therapy, both in the dose and quality of the proteins, with a debate raging over the advantages of ketoanalogues, and also in the methods for providing nutrients. The ideal nutritional method for repletion is oral administration, but this can be enhanced with artificial support such as oral supplements, parenteral nutrition during dialysis or such alternatives as enteral nutrition at home in the case of chronic kidney problems in children, using percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG), in order to nourish the patients and minimize growth disorders.

  18. Enhancing the output current of a CdTe solar cell via a CN-free hydrocarbon luminescent down-shifting fluorophore with intramolecular energy transfer and restricted internal rotation characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yilin; Olsen, Joseph; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2015-04-01

    A CN-free hydrocarbon fluorophore (Perylene-TPE) was synthesized as a new luminescent down-shifting (LDS) material. Its photophysical properties in both the solution state and the solid state were studied. The unity fluorescence quantum yield of Perylene-TPE observed in its solid state is considered to be from the characteristics of intramolecular energy transfer (IET) and restricted internal rotation (RIR). This is supported by the results from theoretical calculations and spectroscopic measurements. For the photovoltaic application of Perylene-TPE, a theoretical modeling study suggests that using the LDS film of Perylene-TPE may increase the output short circuit current density (Jsc) of a CdTe solar cell by 2.95%, enhance the spectral response of a CdTe solar cell at 400 nm by 41%, and shift the incident solar photon distribution from short-wavelength (500 nm). Experimentally, placing a LDS film of Perylene-TPE on a CdTe solar cell can enhance its output Jsc by as high as 3.30 ± 0.31%, which is comparable to the current commercially available LDS material – Y083 (3.28% ± 0.37%).

  19. The effect of whole-grain compared to refined wheat on the gut microbial composition and integrity in a colonic epithelial cell model following a 12-week energy-restricted dietary intervention in postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ellen Gerd; Licht, Tine Rask; Kristensen, M.;

    Intake of whole-grain products are considered to decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This effect could potentially be linked to a prebiotic effect, hence positive modulation of the gut microbial composition or activity. Kristensen and coworkers recently conducted a study in postmen......Intake of whole-grain products are considered to decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This effect could potentially be linked to a prebiotic effect, hence positive modulation of the gut microbial composition or activity. Kristensen and coworkers recently conducted a study...... in postmenopausal women who were randomized to either whole-grain wheat (WW) (n=38) or refined wheat (RW) (n=34) consumption as part of an energy-restricted diet for 12-weeks following a 2-week run-in period with RW. Percentage fat mass as well as serum total and LDL cholesterol were found to differ between the two...... groups (Kristensen, et al, 2012). We used fecal samples from the same study to examine effects of WW and RW on the bacterial composition by quantitative PCR targeting the phylums Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, and the genera Bifidobacteria, Lactobacillus, Bacteroides, and Prevotella, as well...

  20. Short-term re-feeding of previously energy-restricted C57BL/6 male mice restores body weight and body fat and attenuates the decline in natural killer cell function after primary influenza infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinthorne, Jonathan F; Adams, Douglas J; Fenton, Jenifer I; Ritz, Barry W; Gardner, Elizabeth M

    2010-08-01

    A hallmark of energy restriction (ER) is a decrease in total body fat, which is thought to increase lifespan and maintain immune function. However, we have shown that during primary influenza infection, ER induces rapid weight loss, impairs natural killer (NK) cell function, and increases mortality in young and aged mice. To determine whether influenza-induced NK cell function could be restored in ER mice, young adult (6 mo) male C57BL/6 mice were fed an ER diet or re-fed (RF) control diet ad libitum for 2 wk before infection with PR8 influenza A. An initial hyperphagic response was observed in RF mice, characterized by increased food intake, rapid weight gain, and restoration of body fat and fat depots by 5-7 d of re-feeding to levels comparable to control ad libitum (AL) mice. Re-feeding improved survival and attenuated the decline in NK cell function during infection, evidenced by increased numbers, percentages, and CD69 expression by d 3 postinfection in RF mice. Interestingly, an altered metabolic phenotype was observed during infection of RF mice, with plasma leptin concentrations greater than in ER mice but less than in AL mice. In contrast, adiponectin concentrations of RF mice were lower than those of both ER and AL mice. These data suggest that re-feeding for a defined period before, and perhaps throughout, influenza season may provide the energy needed to counter the deleterious effects of ER on NK cell function, especially during exposure to newly emerging strains of influenza, for which vaccines are limited or unavailable.

  1. Training Restricted Boltzmann Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Asja

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs) are probabilistic graphical models that can also be interpreted as stochastic neural networks. Training RBMs is known to be challenging. Computing the likelihood of the model parameters or its gradient is in general computationally intensive. Thus, training...

  2. Bilinear Fourier restriction theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Demeter, Ciprian

    2012-01-01

    We provide a general scheme for proving $L^p$ estimates for certain bilinear Fourier restrictions outside the locally $L^2$ setting. As an application, we show how such estimates follow for the lacunary polygon. In contrast with prior approaches, our argument avoids any use of the Rubio de Francia Littlewood--Paley inequality.

  3. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2002-01-01

    Confounded by kinetic energy? Suspect that teaching about simple machines isn t really so simple? Exasperated by electricity? If you fear the study of energy is beyond you, this entertaining book will do more than introduce you to the topic. It will help you actually understand it. At the book s heart are easy-to-grasp explanations of energy basics work, kinetic energy, potential energy, and the transformation of energy and energy as it relates to simple machines, heat energy, temperature, and heat transfer. Irreverent author Bill Robertson suggests activities that bring the basic concepts of energy to life with common household objects. Each chapter ends with a summary and an applications section that uses practical examples such as roller coasters and home heating systems to explain energy transformations and convection cells. The final chapter brings together key concepts in an easy-to-grasp explanation of how electricity is generated. Energy is the second book in the Stop Faking It! series published by NS...

  4. A study on the Efficacy of Muscle Energy Technique as compared to Conventional Therapy on Lumbar Spine Range of Motion in Chronic Low Back Pain of Sacroiliac Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreet Bindra

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sacroiliac joint dysfunction is a term often used to describe pain in and around the region of the joint that is presumed to be due to biomechanical disorders of the joint. Despite of high incidence, the contribution of sacroiliac joint to low back pain has been a matter of controversy. Physical therapists routinely assess spinal range of motion in patients with low back pain and believe that spinal range of motion and disability are closely linked. The present study was aimed to determine the relative efficacy of Muscle Energy Technique as compared to Conventional Therapy on lumbar spine range of motion in chronic low back pain of Sacroiliac origin. It was found that the subjects who were treated with Muscle Energy Technique showed greater improvements in lumbar spine range of motion as compared to Conventional Therapy Group. As far as reduction in pain and disability are concerned both the groups showed almost similar results. The study concluded that sacroiliac joint dysfunction affects lumbar spine range of motion and is a significant contributor to chronic low back pain.

  5. Gasto energético de repouso em pacientes com doença renal crônica Resting energy expenditure in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ayako Kamimura

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O conhecimento do gasto energético de repouso é de fundamental importância na determinação das necessidades energéticas e, conseqüentemente, no estabelecimento das recomendações de energia de um indivíduo. O elevado gasto energético, se não compensado por uma ingestão alimentar suficiente, poderá contribuir para a desnutrição e o maior risco de morbidade e mortalidade. Nos pacientes com doença renal crônica, a uremia per se e o tratamento de diálise estão, freqüentemente, associados a vários distúrbios, como a acidose metabólica, a resistência insulínica, o hiperparatireoidismo secundário e a inflamação, que podem aumentar o catabolismo protéico e, em parte, contribuir para o aumento do gasto energético de repouso. A presente revisão tem como objetivo descrever os estudos sobre o gasto energético de repouso nos pacientes com doença renal crônica e os aspectos que influenciam o gasto energético nesta população.Knowledge of resting energy expenditure is of paramount importance for the determination of energy requirements and consequently for the establishment of energy recommendations of an individual. Elevated energy expenditure, if not supplied by enough food consumption, may contribute to malnutrition and higher risk of morbidity and mortality. In patients with chronic kidney disease, uremia per se and the dialysis treatment are frequently associated with several disturbances, such as metabolic acidosis, insulin resistance, secondary hyperparathyroidism and inflammation, that might in part contribute to the increase in resting energy expenditure. The present review aims to describe the studies on resting energy expenditure in patients with chronic kidney disease and the factors influencing energy expenditure in this population.

  6. Restricted and quasi-toral restricted Lie-Rinehart algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Bing

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce the definition of restrictable Lie-Rinehart algebras, the concept of restrictability is by far more tractable than that of a restricted Lie-Rinehart algebra. Moreover, we obtain some properties of p-mappings and restrictable Lie-Rinehart algebras. Finally, we give some sufficient conditions for the commutativity of quasi-toral restricted Lie-Rinehart algebras and study how a quasi-toral restricted Lie-Rinehart algebra with zero center and of minimal dimension should be.

  7. Intrauterine growth restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need C-section delivery . When to Contact a Medical Professional Contact your health care provider right away if you are pregnant and notice ... regular prenatal care. If you have a chronic medical condition or you ... see your health care provider before you get pregnant. This can help reduce ...

  8. License restrictions at Barnwell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autry, V.R. [S.C. Dept. of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia, SC (United States). Bureau of Radiological Health

    1991-12-31

    The State of South Carolina was delegated the authority by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to regulate the receipt, possession, use and disposal of radioactive material as an Agreement State. Since 1970, the state has been the principal regulatory authority for the Barnwell Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility operated by Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. The radioactive material license issued authorizing the receipt and disposal of low-level waste contains numerous restrictions to ensure environmental protection and compliance with shallow land disposal performance criteria. Low-level waste has evolved from minimally contaminated items to complex waste streams containing high concentrations of radionuclides and processing chemicals which necessitated these restrictions. Additionally, some waste with their specific radionuclides and concentration levels, many classified as low-level radioactive waste, are not appropriate for shallow land disposal unless additional precautions are taken. This paper will represent a number of these restrictions, the rationale for them, and how they are being dealt with at the Barnwell disposal facility.

  9. Metabolic management of glioblastoma multiforme using standard therapy together with a restricted ketogenic diet: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servadei Franco

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM has been difficult using standard therapy (radiation with temozolomide chemotherapy. The ketogenic diet is used commonly to treat refractory epilepsy in children and, when administered in restricted amounts, can also target energy metabolism in brain tumors. We report the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with progressive memory loss, chronic headaches, nausea, and a right hemisphere multi-centric tumor seen with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Following incomplete surgical resection, the patient was diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme expressing hypermethylation of the MGMT gene promoter. Methods Prior to initiation of the standard therapy, the patient conducted water-only therapeutic fasting and a restricted 4:1 (fat: carbohydrate + protein ketogenic diet that delivered about 600 kcal/day. The patient also received the restricted ketogenic diet concomitantly during the standard treatment period. The diet was supplemented with vitamins and minerals. Steroid medication (dexamethasone was removed during the course of the treatment. The patient was followed using MRI and positron emission tomography with fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG-PET. Results After two months treatment, the patient's body weight was reduced by about 20% and no discernable brain tumor tissue was detected using either FDG-PET or MRI imaging. Biomarker changes showed reduced levels of blood glucose and elevated levels of urinary ketones. MRI evidence of tumor recurrence was found 10 weeks after suspension of strict diet therapy. Conclusion This is the first report of confirmed GBM treated with standard therapy together with a restricted ketogenic diet. As rapid regression of GBM is rare in older patients following incomplete surgical resection and standard therapy alone, the response observed in this case could result in part from the action of the calorie restricted ketogenic diet. Further studies are needed

  10. 10 CFR 2.903 - Protection of restricted data and national security information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protection of restricted data and national security... Restricted Data and/or National Security Information § 2.903 Protection of restricted data and national security information. Nothing in this subpart shall relieve any person from safeguarding Restricted Data...

  11. Cumulative neurobehavioral and physiological effects of chronic caffeine intake: individual differences and implications for the use of caffeinated energy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaeth, Andrea M; Goel, Namni; Dinges, David F

    2014-10-01

    The use of caffeine-containing energy products has increased worldwide in recent years. All of the top-selling energy drinks contain caffeine, which is likely to be the primary psychoactive ingredient in these products. Research shows that caffeine-containing energy products can improve cognitive and physical performance. Presumably, individuals consume caffeine-containing energy products to counteract feelings of low energy in situations causing tiredness, fatigue, and/or reduced alertness. This review discusses the scientific evidence for sleep loss, circadian phase, sleep inertia, and the time-on-task effect as causes of low energy and summarizes research assessing the efficacy of caffeine to counteract decreased alertness and increased fatigue in such situations. The results of a placebo-controlled experiment in healthy adults who had 3 nights of total sleep deprivation (with or without 2-hour naps every 12 hours) are presented to illustrate the physiological and neurobehavioral effects of sustained low-dose caffeine. Individual differences, including genetic factors, in the response to caffeine and to sleep loss are discussed. The review concludes with future directions for research on this important and evolving topic.

  12. An Infinite Restricted Boltzmann Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Marc-Alexandre; Larochelle, Hugo

    2016-07-01

    We present a mathematical construction for the restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM) that does not require specifying the number of hidden units. In fact, the hidden layer size is adaptive and can grow during training. This is obtained by first extending the RBM to be sensitive to the ordering of its hidden units. Then, with a carefully chosen definition of the energy function, we show that the limit of infinitely many hidden units is well defined. As with RBM, approximate maximum likelihood training can be performed, resulting in an algorithm that naturally and adaptively adds trained hidden units during learning. We empirically study the behavior of this infinite RBM, showing that its performance is competitive to that of the RBM, while not requiring the tuning of a hidden layer size.

  13. Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Canada, Britain, and Spain. We found that the energy industry is not in crisis ; however, U.S. government policies, laws, dollars, and even public...CEIMAT (Centro de Investagaciones Energeticas , Medioambeintales y Tecnologicas) Research and development Page 3 of 28ENERGY 8/10/04http://www.ndu.edu...meet an emerging national crisis (war), emergency (natural disaster), or major impact event (Y2K). Certain resources are generally critical to the

  14. Assessment of the reliability and consistency of the "malnutrition inflammation score" (MIS) in Mexican adults with chronic kidney disease for diagnosis of protein-energy wasting syndrome (PEW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ortiz, Ailema Janeth; Arce-Santander, Celene Viridiana; Vega-Vega, Olynka; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Angeles

    2014-10-04

    The protein-energy wasting syndrome (PEW) is a condition of malnutrition, inflammation, anorexia and wasting of body reserves resulting from inflammatory and non-inflammatory conditions in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).One way of assessing PEW, extensively described in the literature, is using the Malnutrition Inflammation Score (MIS). To assess the reliability and consistency of MIS for diagnosis of PEW in Mexican adults with CKD on hemodialysis (HD). Study of diagnostic tests. A sample of 45 adults with CKD on HD were analyzed during the period June-July 2014.The instrument was applied on 2 occasions; the test-retest reliability was calculated using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC); the internal consistency of the questionnaire was analyzed using Cronbach's αcoefficient. A weighted Kappa test was used to estimate the validity of the instrument; the result was subsequently compared with the Bilbrey nutritional index (BNI). The reliability of the questionnaires, evaluated in the patient sample, was ICC=0.829.The agreement between MIS observations was considered adequate, k= 0.585 (p MIS has adequate reliability and validity for diagnosing PEW in the population with chronic kidney disease on HD. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  15. Chronic pyruvate supplementation increases exploratory activity and brain energy reserves in young and middle-aged mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koivisto, Hennariikka; Leinonen, Henri; Puurula, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported neuroprotective effects of pyruvate when given in systemic injections. Impaired glucose uptake and metabolism are found in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in AD mouse models. We tested whether dietary pyruvate supplementation is able to provide added energy supply to b...

  16. Ghrelin对慢性心力衰竭能量代谢的影响%Effect of Ghrelin on Energy Metabolism in Chronic Heart Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐建平; 杨保燕

    2011-01-01

    Ghrelin能通过生长激素非依赖性机制,刺激食欲、增加体重和诱导肥胖,并参与糖代谢和脂肪代谢,而引起正性能量平衡.Ghrelin通过抑制炎症细胞因子的产生和拮抗心肌重构的作用,以改善心力衰竭恶液质患者的心脏功能,调节能量代谢紊乱.因此,Ghrelin在慢性心力衰竭恶液质患者的能量代谢稳态中,起到重要作用.其逆转和拮抗代谢重构的有益作用,是心力衰竭晚期恶液质治疗的一条新途经.Ghrelin可作为一种监测指标,对病情严重程度和预后进行评估.%Ghrelin stimulates appetite and weight gain, inducing obesity through a growth hormone-independent mechanism. It is involved in glucose and fat metabolism. Ghrelin could improve cardiac function and disturbed energy metabolism through inhibiting the production of inflammatory factors and myocardial remodeling in cachectic patients with chronic heart failure. Therefore, ghrelin plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis of myocardial energy metabolism in cachectic patients with chronic heart failure. With the beneficial effects of ghrelin on reversing myocardial remodeling, it may be a new therapeutic strategy for cachectic patients with end-stage heart failure. As a monitoring index, ghrelin might aid in the evaluation of the severity of the disease and patient prognosis.

  17. Nutritional status, dietary energy intake and the risk of exacerbations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, Runa; Koivisto-Hursti, Ulla-Kaisa; Lindberg, Eva; Janson, Christer

    2006-03-01

    Loss of body weight, as a result of imbalance between increased energy demand and/or reduced dietary intake, is a common problem in patients with COPD. The aim of this investigation was to examine the relationship between nutritional intake, change in body weight and the risk of exacerbation in patients with COPD. The study comprised 41 patients who were hospitalised because of an exacerbation of COPD. The follow-up period was 12 months. Weight, height and lung function were measured at baseline. At the 12-month follow-up, weight change and current weight were assessed by an interview and nutritional intake was recorded in a food diary for 7 days. An acute exacerbation was defined as having been admitted to hospital and/or making an emergency visit to hospital, due to COPD during the follow-up period. At baseline, 24% of the patients were underweight (body mass index (BMI)25 kg/m2). Energy intake was lower than the calculated energy demand for all groups. During the follow-up period, 24 of the 41 patients had an exacerbation. A low BMI at inclusion and weight loss during the follow-up period were independent risk factors for having an exacerbation (P=0.003 and 0.006, respectively). We conclude that, in patients who are hospitalised because of COPD, underweight and weight loss during the follow-up period are related to a higher risk of having new exacerbations.

  18. Restricted Access Federal Lands in Western North America

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set depicts federal lands having restrictions on access or activities -- that is, lands mangaed by the National Park Service, Defense Department, or Energy...

  19. Sleep Restriction Worsens Mood and Emotion Regulation in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Katherine T.; Desai, Anjali; Field, Julie; Miller, Lauren E.; Rausch, Joseph; Beebe, Dean W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The relationship between inadequate sleep and mood has been well-established in adults and is supported primarily by correlational data in younger populations. Given that adolescents often experience shortened sleep on school nights, we sought to better understand the effect of experimentally induced chronic sleep restriction on…

  20. The role of adipokines in chronic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancuso P

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Peter Mancuso Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Abstract: Adipose tissue has traditionally been defined as connective tissue that stores excess calories in the form of triacylglycerol. However, the physiologic functions attributed to adipose tissue are expanding, and it is now well established that adipose tissue is an endocrine gland. Among the endocrine factors elaborated by adipose tissue are the adipokines; hormones, similar in structure to cytokines, produced by adipose tissue in response to changes in adipocyte triacylglycerol storage and local and systemic inflammation. They inform the host regarding long-term energy storage and have a profound influence on reproductive function, blood pressure regulation, energy homeostasis, the immune response, and many other physiologic processes. The adipokines possess pro- and anti-inflammatory properties and play a critical role in integrating systemic metabolism with immune function. In calorie restriction and starvation, proinflammatory adipokines decline and anti-inflammatory adipokines increase, which informs the host of energy deficits and contributes to the suppression of immune function. In individuals with normal metabolic status, there is a balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines. This balance shifts to favor proinflammatory mediators as adipose tissue expands during the development of obesity. As a consequence, the proinflammatory status of adipose tissue contributes to a chronic low-grade state of inflammation and metabolic disorders associated with obesity. These disturbances are associated with an increased risk of metabolic disease, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and many other pathological conditions. This review focuses on the impact of energy homeostasis on the adipokines in immune function. Keywords: calorie restriction, obesity, adipose tissue, type 2 diabetes, macrophage, infection, chronic

  1. Training Restricted Boltzmann Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Asja

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs) are probabilistic graphical models that can also be interpreted as stochastic neural networks. Training RBMs is known to be challenging. Computing the likelihood of the model parameters or its gradient is in general computationally intensive. Thus, training...... relies on sampling based approximations of the log-likelihood gradient. I will present an empirical and theoretical analysis of the bias of these approximations and show that the approximation error can lead to a distortion of the learning process. The bias decreases with increasing mixing rate...... of the applied sampling procedure and I will introduce a transition operator that leads to faster mixing. Finally, a different parametrisation of RBMs will be discussed that leads to better learning results and more robustness against changes in the data representation....

  2. Very strict selectional restrictions

    CERN Document Server

    Laporte, Eric; Dias, Maria Carmelita P

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the characteristics and behaviour of two parallel classes of verbs in two Romance languages, French and Portuguese. Examples of these verbs are Port. abater [gado] and Fr. abattre [b\\'etail], both meaning "slaughter [cattle]". In both languages, the definition of the class of verbs includes several features: - They have only one essential complement, which is a direct object. - The nominal distribution of the complement is very limited, i.e., few nouns can be selected as head nouns of the complement. However, this selection is not restricted to a single noun, as would be the case for verbal idioms such as Fr. monter la garde "mount guard". - We excluded from the class constructions which are reductions of more complex constructions, e.g. Port. afinar [instrumento] com "tune [instrument] with".

  3. Chronic pyruvate supplementation increases exploratory activity and brain energy reserves in young and middle-aged mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennariikka eKoivisto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have reported neuroprotective effects of pyruvate when given in systemic injections. Impaired glucose uptake and metabolism are found in Alzheimer's disease (AD and in AD mouse models. We tested whether dietary pyruvate supplementation is able to provide added energy supply to brain and thereby attenuate aging- or AD-related cognitive impairment. Mice received ~ 800 mg/kg/day Na-pyruvate in their chow for 2- 6 months. In middle-aged wild-type mice and in 6.5-month-old APP/PS1 mice, pyruvate facilitated spatial learning and increased exploration of a novel odor. However, in passive avoidance task for fear memory, the treatment group was clearly impaired. Independent of age, long-term pyruvate increased explorative behavior, which likely explains the paradoxical impairment in passive avoidance. We also assessed pyruvate effects on body weight, muscle force and endurance, and found no effects. Metabolic post-mortem assays revealed increased energy compounds in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as well as increased brain glycogen storages in the pyruvate group. Pyruvate supplementation may counteract aging-related behavioral impairment but its beneficial effect seems related to increased explorative activity rather than direct memory enhancement.

  4. Sodium Restriction in Patients With CKD : A Randomized Controlled Trial of Self-management Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuleman, Yvette; Hoekstra, Tiny; Dekker, Friedo W.; Navis, Gerjan; Vogt, Liffert; van der Boog, Paul J. M.; Bos, Willem Jan W.; van Montfrans, Gert A.; van Dijk, Sandra

    Background: To evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of self-managed sodium restriction in patients with chronic kidney disease. Study Design: Open randomized controlled trial. Setting & Participants: Patients with moderately decreased kidney function from 4 hospitals in the Netherlands.

  5. Emergency building temperature restrictions. Final evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-11-01

    On July 5, 1979, DOE promulgated final regulations of the Emergency Building Temperature Restrictions program, placing emergency restrictions on thermostat settings for space heating, space cooling, and hot water in commercial, industrial, and nonresidential public buildings. The final regulations restricted space heating to a maximum of 65/sup 0/F, hot water temperature to a maximum of 105/sup 0/F, and cooling temperature to a minimum of 78/sup 0/F. A comprehensive evaluation of the entire EBTF program for a nine-month period from July 16, 1979 is presented. In Chapter 1, an estimate of the population of buildings covered by EBTR is presented. In Chapter 2, EBTR compliance by building type and region is reported. Exemptions are also discussed. In Chapter 3, the simulations of building energy use are explained and the relative impact of various building characteristics and effectiveness of different control strategies are estimated. Finally, in Chapter 4, the methodology for scaling the individual building energy savings to the national level is described, and estimated national energy savings are presented.

  6. Visceral adiposity in persons with chronic spinal cord injury determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirnigliaro, Christopher M; LaFountaine, Michael F; Dengel, Donald R; Bosch, Tyler A; Emmons, Racine R; Kirshblum, Steven C; Sauer, Sue; Asselin, Pierre; Spungen, Ann M; Bauman, William A

    2015-09-01

    To determine visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volume (VATvol) by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in spinal cord injured (SCI) and able-bodied (AB) participants and to explore the relationships between VATvol and routine anthropometric measures. Sixty-three subjects with SCI and 126 healthy male AB controls were stratified as low risk [LR: waist circumference (WC) MHR: WC ≥ 102 cm) for identification of risk for cardiometabolic disease: AB-LR, SCI-LR, AB-MHR, and SCI-MHR. Anthropometrics and standard body composition measurements by DXA with analysis to derive VATvol were performed. Comparison of the four subgroups demonstrated the highest subcutaneous adipose tissue volume (SATvol) in the AB-MHR group (P MHR group (P < 0.01). Furthermore, when compared to the AB group, participants with SCI had a 27% increase in VATvol for every centimeter increase in WC and a 20% increase in VATvol for every unit increase in BMI. Because cutoff values for the routine surrogate measures of adiposity underestimate visceral adiposity in persons with SCI, the risk of adverse metabolic consequences would also be underestimated, which necessitates adjustment of the these cutoff values or, preferably, to perform its direct measurement. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  7. Property Rights, Restrictions and Responsibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    Land Administration Systems are the basis for conceptualizing rights, restrictions and responsibilities related to people, policies and places. Property rights are normally concerned with ownership and tenure whereas restrictions usually control use and activities on land. Responsibilities relate...... more to a social, ethical commitment or attitude to environmental sustainability and good husbandry. This paper provides an overall understanding of the concept of land administration systems for dealing with rights, restrictions and responsibilities in future spatially enabled government. Finally...

  8. Keto-analogues and essential aminoacids and other supplements in the conservative management of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupisti, Adamasco; Bolasco, Piergiorgio

    2017-06-01

    The manipulation of dietary protein intake is the mainstay of nutritional treatment of patients affected by chronic renal insufficiency, with the aim to reduce the burden of uremic toxins in order to decrease uremic toxicity and delay the need for dialysis. Consensus exists regarding the benefit of progressive protein restriction towards delaying the progression of renal failure and the need for dialysis, provided adequate energy supply. Although pivotal, protein restriction is only one aspect of the dietary management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Additional features, though strictly related to proteins, include modifications in sodium, phosphorus and energy intake, as well as in the source (animal or plant derived) of protein and lipids. In addition, supplements play an important role as a means to obtain both beneficial effects and nutritional safety in the renal patient. Essential amino acid and ketoacid mixtures are the most utilized types of supplementation in CKD patients on restricted protein regimens. The essential amino acids plus ketoacid supplementation is mandatory in conjunction with a very low-protein diet in order to assure an adequate essential amino acid supply. It is needed to safely implement a very low protein (and phosphorus) intake, so as to obtain the beneficial effect of a severe protein restriction while preventing malnutrition. Protein-free products and energy supplements are also crucial for the prevention of protein-energy wasting in CKD patients. Calcium, iron, native vitamin D and omega-3 PUFAs are other types of supplementation of potential benefits in the CKD patients on conservative management.

  9. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... Chronic myelogenous leukemia is grouped into phases: Chronic Accelerated Blast crisis The chronic phase can last for ...

  10. Formation reconfiguration in restricted three body problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengping Gong; Junfeng Li; Hexi Baoyin; Yunfeng Gao

    2007-01-01

    Reconfiguration of formation flying around a halo orbit of the Sun-Earth restricted three body system is investigated with impulse maneuvers. For a short time reconfiguration, the two-impulse maneuver is investigated with both analytical and numerical methods and the BeginningEnding (BE) method is proven to be an energy-optimal one of all two-impulse (TI) reconfigurations, and the energy consumption of BE is independent of the position of the chief spacecraft, and decreases with the reconfiguration time.Then, genetic algorithm is adopted to optimize the energy consumption. The results show that the optimal energy increases with radius difference between the initial and final orbits, and decreases with the reconfiguration time.

  11. 10 CFR 1016.21 - Protection of Restricted Data in storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protection of Restricted Data in storage. 1016.21 Section 1016.21 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) SAFEGUARDING OF RESTRICTED DATA Physical... pursuant to an Access Permit shall store Secret and Confidential documents and material when not in use in...

  12. Dual-energy CT angiography of chronic thromboembolic disease: Can it help recognize links between the severity of pulmonary arterial obstruction and perfusion defects?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renard, Benoit [Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, University Centre of Lille (EA 2694), Boulevard Jules Leclercq, 59037 Lille cedex (France); Remy-Jardin, Martine, E-mail: mremy-jardin@chru-lille.fr [Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, University Centre of Lille (EA 2694), Boulevard Jules Leclercq, 59037 Lille cedex (France); Santangelo, Teresa; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Tacelli, Nunzia; Remy, Jacques [Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, University Centre of Lille (EA 2694), Boulevard Jules Leclercq, 59037 Lille cedex (France); Duhamel, Alain [Department of Biostatistics, University Centre of Lille (EA 2694), 59037 Lille cedex (France)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate whether dual-energy CT angiography (DE-CTA) could identify links between morphologic and functional abnormalities in chronic pulmonary thromboembolism (CPTE). Materials and methods: Seventeen consecutive patients with CPTE without underlying cardio-respiratory disease were investigated with DE-CTA. Two series of images were generated: (a) transverse diagnostic scans (i.e., contiguous 1-mm thick averaged images from both tubes), and (b) perfusion scans (i.e., images of the iodine content within the microcirculation; 4-mm thick MIPs). Two radiologists evaluated by consensus the presence of: (a) pulmonary vascular features of CPTE and abnormally dilated systemic arteries on diagnostic CT scans, and (b) perfusion defects of embolic type on perfusion scans. Results: Diagnostic examinations showed a total of 166 pulmonary arteries (166/833; 19.9%) with features of CPTE, more frequent at the level of peripheral than central arteries (8.94 vs 0.82; p < 0.0001), including severe stenosis with partial (97/166; 58.4%) or complete (20/166; 12.0%) obstruction, webs and bands (37/166; 22.3%), partial filling defects without stenosis (7/166; 4.2%), focal stenosis (4/166; 2.4%) and abrupt vessel narrowing (1/166; 0.6%). Perfusion examinations showed 39 perfusion defects in 8 patients (median number: 4.9; range: 1-11). The most severe pulmonary arterial features of CPTE were seen with a significantly higher frequency in segments with perfusion defects than in segments with normal perfusion (p < 0.0001). Enlarged systemic arteries were observed with a significantly higher frequency ipsilateral to lungs with perfusion defects (9/12; 75%) compared with lungs without perfusion defects (5/22; 22.7%) (p = 0.004). Conclusion: Dual-energy CTA demonstrates links between the severity of pulmonary arterial obstruction and perfusion impairment, influenced by the degree of development of the systemic collateral supply.

  13. Performance and hormonal profile in broiler chickens fed with different energy levels during post restriction period Desempenho e perfil hormonal de frangos alimentados com diferentes níveis energéticos após restrição alimentar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana Fernanda Giachetto

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of diet energy level on performance and hormonal profiles of broilers during post restriction period. It was a split-plot experiment, and the main treatments were in a 2x2 factorial scheme. Birds were fed restricted to 30% of the ad libitum intake, from 7 to 14 days of age. After the restriction period, birds were fed ad libitum with diets containing low (2,900 kcal ME/kg or high (3,200 kcal ME/kg energy until 49 days of age. Broilers fed with high energy ration showed lower feed intake and better feed conversion and decreased carcass protein; however, abdominal fat pad, and total carcass fat were not affected by ration energy levels or feeding program. Neither diet energy level nor feed restriction program changed body weight at 49 days. The profile of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 was reduced during the feed restriction period, but increased at refeeding period. Feeding program and ration energy level did not affect T3, T4 and growth hormone serum concentrations. Feed restriction at 30% of ad libitum intake is not enough to promote changes on carcass quality, related to fat deposition, and on metabolic hormone levels, except IGF-1 seric level that has rapid increase after feed restriction.O objetivo deste trabalho foi investigar o efeito do nível energético da dieta no desempenho e nos níveis hormonais após um período de restrição alimentar. O experimento foi em parcelas subdivididas, com os tratamentos principais em um esquema fatorial 2x2. O consumo de ração das aves foi reduzido em 30% em relação ao grupo controle, do 7º ao 14º dia de idade, sendo posteriormente alimentadas ad libitum com dietas contendo baixa (2.900 kcal EM/kg ou alta energia (3.200 kcal EM/kg, até os 49 dias de idade. Aves alimentadas com o maior nível energético mostraram um menor consumo de ração, melhor conversão alimentar e decréscimo na quantidade de proteína da carcaça. A gordura

  14. Repletion of TNFα or leptin in calorically restricted mice suppresses post-restriction hyperphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambly, Catherine; Duncan, Jacqueline S.; Archer, Zoë A.; Moar, Kim M.; Mercer, Julian G.; Speakman, John R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The causes of post-restriction hyperphagia (PRH) represent a target for drug-based therapies to prevent obesity. However, the factors causing PRH are poorly understood. We show that, in mice, the extent of PRH was independent of the time under restriction, but depended on its severity, suggesting that PRH was driven by signals from altered body composition. Signals related to fat mass were important drivers. Circulating levels of leptin and TNFα were significantly depleted following caloric restriction (CR). We experimentally repleted their levels to match those of controls, and found that in both treatment groups the level of PRH was significantly blunted. These data establish a role for TNFα and leptin in the non-pathological regulation of energy homeostasis. Signals from adipose tissue, including but not limited to leptin and TNFα, regulate PRH and might be targets for therapies that support people engaged in CR to reduce obesity. PMID:21954068

  15. Protein restriction in children with chronic renal failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. Kist-van Holthe tot Echten

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe progressive nature of renal functional impairment has been recognized for a long time (Mitch 1976, Rutherford 1977). Once glomerularfiltration rate has decreased to 25 ml!min/1.73m' progression to end stage renal disease is inevitable and independent of the primary renal disease

  16. Protein restriction in children with chronic renal failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. Kist-van Holthe tot Echten

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe progressive nature of renal functional impairment has been recognized for a long time (Mitch 1976, Rutherford 1977). Once glomerularfiltration rate has decreased to 25 ml!min/1.73m' progression to end stage renal disease is inevitable and independent of the primary renal disease (Leu

  17. Should sodium intake be restricted in chronic heart failure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Castro-Gutiérrez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen La restricción de sodio en insuficiencia cardiaca crónica ha sido recomendada desde hace décadas. Sin embargo, la evidencia sobre sus beneficios no es tan clara, e incluso podría asociarse a riesgos. Utilizando la base de datos Epistemonikos, la cual es mantenida mediante búsquedas en múltiples bases de datos, identificamos tres revisiones sistemáticas que en conjunto incorporan 13 estudios en total que responden la pregunta de interés, incluyendo 10 estudios aleatorizados. Extrajimos la información, realizamos un metanálisis y confeccionamos una tabla de resumen de los resultados utilizando el método GRADE. Concluimos que la restricción de sodio en pacientes con insuficiencia cardíaca crónica podría aumentar la mortalidad y la readmisión hospitalaria, pero la certeza de la evidencia es baja.

  18. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  19. Children, Sports, and Chronic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Barry

    1990-01-01

    Discusses four chronic diseases (cystic fibrosis, congenital heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and asthma) that affect American children. Many have their physical activities unnecessarily restricted, though sports and exercise can actually alleviate symptoms and improve their psychosocial development. Physicians are encouraged to prescribe…

  20. Constrictive Pericarditis Versus Restrictive Cardiomyopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mario J

    2016-05-01

    About one-half of the patients with congestive heart failure have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). Although the etiology of HFpEF is most commonly related to long-standing hypertension and atherosclerosis, a significant number of suspected HFpEF patients have a restrictive cardiomyopathy or chronic pericardial disease. Recognizing these syndromes is important because early diagnosis may lead to instituting specific therapy that may prolong survival, improve quality of life, and/or recognize and treat an underlying systemic disorder. Advances in diagnostic imaging, biomarkers, and genetic testing today allow identification of the specific etiology in most cases. Novel pharmacological, immunologic, and surgical therapies are leading to improved quality of life and survival.

  1. Advanced cocaine-related necrotising sinusitis presenting with restrictive ophthalmolplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascaratos, Gerassimos; McHugh, James; McCarthy, Karon; Bunting, Howard

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of bilateral infero-medial orbital wall destruction, associated with loss of sinonasal architecture. The patient presented with intermittent horizontal diplopia following an acute on chronic infective sinusitis. Eight months previously the patient had developed a midline hard palate fistula for which a palatine prosthesis had been fitted. The broad differential diagnosis is discussed, though in this patient chronic cocaine abuse was identified as the underlying aetiology. Eye movement restriction worsened progressively with bilateral inflammation around the medial and inferior rectus muscles. Attempts to resolve the recurring cycle of sinus infection and inflammation by palatal fistula closure failed despite augmented techniques mobilising flaps from both nasal and palatal sides.

  2. Comparison of Skinfold Thicknesses and Bioimpedance Spectroscopy to Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry for the Body Fat Measurement in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymarz, Aleksandra; Szamotulska, Katarzyna; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the amount of body fat measured by skinfold thickness (SFT) and bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as a reference method. Forty-eight patients undergoing hemodialysis treatment thrice-weekly for at least 3 months (HD group) with a mean age of 59.8 ± 15.5 years, 61 patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and a mean age of 58.7 ± 17.0 years (control group) were included. Mean percentages of body fat measured by SFT did not significantly differ from those measured by DXA in the HD group ( P = .249) and the PreD group ( P = .355). In the control group, mean percentage of fat mass measured by SFT was significantly higher than measured by DXA ( P = .004). Mean difference was 1.99% ± 3.65%. The measurements of body fat performed by BIS were significantly higher than those performed by DXA in all studied groups ( P < .001). Age was statistically significant and the strongest factor that influenced the variability of measurements obtained by BIS and DXA in all studied groups ( R(2) = 0.302, 0.153, and 0.250, respectively, for HD, PreD, and control groups). SFT as a method of fat mass assessment in daily routine practice seems to be more reliable then BIS in patients treated with hemodialysis and in patients with stage IV/V CKD. However, methods based on bioimpedance techniques can potentially offer more data such as overhydration or an amount of lean tissue mass, but further investigations are needed to establish method the most suitable for patients with CKD.

  3. Remarks on restricted Nevanlinna transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Jankowski, Lech

    2010-01-01

    The Nevanlinna transform K(z), of a measure and a real constant, plays an important role in the complex analysis and more recently in the free probability theory (boolean convolution). It is shown that its restriction k(it) (the restricted Nevanlinna transform) to the imaginary axis can be expressed as the Laplace transform of the Fourier transform (characteristic function) of the corresponding measure. Finally, a relation between the Voiculescu and the boolean convolution is indicated.

  4. Nutrition in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Growth Failure in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease Nutrition for Chronic Kidney Disease in Children What is ... lack of energy, and slowed growth. Why is nutrition important for children with CKD? Health problems from ...

  5. Food restriction modifies ultrastructure of hippocampal synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babits, Réka; Szőke, Balázs; Sótonyi, Péter; Rácz, Bence

    2016-04-01

    Consumption of high-energy diets may compromise health and may also impair cognition; these impairments have been linked to tasks that require hippocampal function. Conversely, food restriction has been shown to improve certain aspects of hippocampal function, including spatial memory and memory persistence. These diet-dependent functional changes raise the possibility that the synaptic structure underlying hippocampal function is also affected. To examine how short-term food restriction (FR) alters the synaptic structure of the hippocampus, we used quantitative electron microscopy to analyze the organization of neuropil in the CA1 stratum radiatum of the hippocampus in young rats, consequent to reduced food. While four weeks of FR did not modify the density, size, or shape of postsynaptic spines, the synapses established by these spines were altered, displaying increased mean length, and more frequent perforations of postsynaptic densities. That the number of perforated synapses (believed to be an indicator of synaptic enhancement) increased, and that the CA1 spine population had on average significantly longer PSDs suggests that synaptic efficacy of axospinous synapses also increased in the CA1. Taken together, our ultrastructural data reveal previously unrecognized structural changes at hippocampal synapses as a function of food restriction, supporting a link between metabolic balance and synaptic plasticity.

  6. Chronic Bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Chronic bronchitis is one type ...

  7. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a problem you need to take care of. Chronic pain is different. The pain signals go on ... there is no clear cause. Problems that cause chronic pain include Headache Low back strain Cancer Arthritis ...

  8. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. × ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. ...

  9. The role of adipokines in chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue has traditionally been defined as connective tissue that stores excess calories in the form of triacylglycerol. However, the physiologic functions attributed to adipose tissue are expanding, and it is now well established that adipose tissue is an endocrine gland. Among the endocrine factors elaborated by adipose tissue are the adipokines; hormones, similar in structure to cytokines, produced by adipose tissue in response to changes in adipocyte triacylglycerol storage and local and systemic inflammation. They inform the host regarding long-term energy storage and have a profound influence on reproductive function, blood pressure regulation, energy homeostasis, the immune response, and many other physiologic processes. The adipokines possess pro- and anti-inflammatory properties and play a critical role in integrating systemic metabolism with immune function. In calorie restriction and starvation, proinflammatory adipokines decline and anti-inflammatory adipokines increase, which informs the host of energy deficits and contributes to the suppression of immune function. In individuals with normal metabolic status, there is a balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines. This balance shifts to favor proinflammatory mediators as adipose tissue expands during the development of obesity. As a consequence, the proinflammatory status of adipose tissue contributes to a chronic low-grade state of inflammation and metabolic disorders associated with obesity. These disturbances are associated with an increased risk of metabolic disease, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and many other pathological conditions. This review focuses on the impact of energy homeostasis on the adipokines in immune function.

  10. Chronic prostatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Brian; Schaeffer, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and usually occurs without positive bacterial cultures from prostatic secretions (known as chronic abacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome [CP/CPPS]). Bacterial infection can result from urinary tract instrumentation, but the cause and natural history of CP/CPPS are unknown.

  11. Chronic prostatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, Bradley A.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Le, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and usually occurs without positive bacterial cultures from prostatic secretions (known as chronic abacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome, CP/CPPS). Bacterial infection can result from urinary tract instrumentation, but the cause and natural history of CP/CPPS are unknown.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: familial restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions familial restrictive cardiomyopathy familial restrictive cardiomyopathy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Familial restrictive cardiomyopathy is a genetic form of heart disease. For ...

  13. 10 CFR 2.911 - Admissibility of restricted data or other national security information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Admissibility of restricted data or other national security information. 2.911 Section 2.911 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING PROCEEDINGS AND ISSUANCE OF ORDERS Special Procedures Applicable to Adjudicatory Proceedings Involving Restricted Data and/or...

  14. 10 CFR 2.907 - Notice of intent to introduce restricted data or national security information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of intent to introduce restricted data or national security information. 2.907 Section 2.907 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING PROCEEDINGS AND ISSUANCE OF ORDERS Special Procedures Applicable to Adjudicatory Proceedings Involving Restricted Data...

  15. 10 CFR 95.25 - Protection of National Security Information and Restricted Data in storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Protection of National Security Information and Restricted Data in storage. (a) Secret matter, while... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protection of National Security Information and Restricted Data in storage. 95.25 Section 95.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY...

  16. Effects of chronic trimetazidine treatment on atrial energy metabolism in a canine model of chronic atrial fibrillation%心房颤动犬能量代谢变化及曲美他嗪干预研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩薇; 傅松滨; 杨树森; 魏娜; 霍红; 李为民; 周宏艳; 周国; 曹勇; 董国

    2008-01-01

    目的 研究慢性心房颤动(房颤)犬心房能量代谢的变化,探讨曲美他嗪对房颤能量代谢和内皮功能的影响.方法 18只健康杂种犬,随机分为窦性心律组、心房起搏组和曲美他嗪组,每组6只犬.心房起搏组以400次/min快速起搏心房6周,建立房颤犬动物模型;曲美他嗪组给予曲美他嗪5 mg·kg-1·d-1口服,随后以400次/min快速起搏心房6周.采用高效液相色谱测定心肌组织磷酸肌酸(CrP)、三磷酸腺苷(ATP)、二磷酸腺苷(ADP)和一磷酸腺苷(AMP)含量,计算总腺苷酸池(TAN);用Western blot定量、免疫组化定性检测左房内皮型一氧化氮合酶(eNOS)蛋白表达,酶联免疫吸附定量检测血浆血管性血友病因子(vWF)含量,采用硝酸还原酶法测定血浆NO2-/NO3-(NOx)含量.结果 与窦性心律组相比,心房起搏6周后,心房肌CrP(P0.05),内皮细胞功能标志物血浆vWF明显增高,NOx降低,心房eNOS蛋白表达减少.曲美他嗪治疗6周,心房肌CrP、CrP/ATP、ATP、ADP、AMP和TAN差异均无统计学意义,但eNOS蛋白表达上调(P0.05).Plasma vWF Was significantly increased and plasma NOx significantly decreased in paced animals compared to sham-operated animals.Atrial expression of eNOS Was also significantly reduced in paced animals(Pchronic AF induced disturbance in energy metabolism but may improve endothelial function through a NOx depended manner.

  17. Energy-restricted diets result in higher numbers of CD4+, CD8+, immunoglobulins (A, M, and G), and CD45RA cells in spleen and CD4+, immunoglobulin A, and CD45RA cells in colonic lamina propria of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Bob N; Friel, James K; Rempel, Curtis B; Jones, Peter J H

    2009-07-01

    Dietary energy restriction (ER) offers certain health benefits, particularly when ER is controlled through manipulation of dietary fats. Our hypothesis is that cellular immunity is modulated by dietary ER. Furthermore, we believe that the immune response may differ between spleen and colon because their lymphatic and vascular organization is different. The objective of the study was to test this hypothesis by determining the effects of dietary ER through manipulation of energy intake from high-fat (HF) diets on the expression and frequency of the CD4(+) (T-helper/T-inducer) and CD8(+) (T-cytotoxic/T-suppressor) cells, CD45RA (B-cell-specific marker), and immunoglobulins (Ig) A-, G-, and M-bearing cells in spleen and colon in rats by immunohistochemical method. Rats fed the HF diet had a significantly (P < .05) reduced number of immune cells as compared with those fed ER diets. Energy-restricted diet-fed rats showed higher (P < .05) numbers of CD4(+), CD8(+), IgA, IgM, IgG, and CD45RA cells in spleen and CD4(+), IgA, and CD45RA cells in colonic lamina propria. The IgA-containing cells were markedly higher in the colon compared with the spleen. No change occurred in the number of IgM- and IgG-containing cells in colonic tissues between groups, except for the 20% ER group where IgM-labeled cells were higher (P < .05) compared with HF and 40% ER groups. These findings suggest that ER may modulate adaptive immune function and that CD4(+) and IgA cells may serve as biological indicators for dietary energy-modulated immunoresponse in spleen and colon, respectively.

  18. Molecular motion in restricted geometries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Siddharth Gautam; S Mitra; R Mukhopadhyay

    2008-10-01

    Molecular dynamics in restricted geometries is known to exhibit anomalous behaviour. Diffusion, translational or rotational, of molecules is altered significantly on confinement in restricted geometries. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) offers a unique possibility of studying molecular motion in such systems. Both time scales involved in the motion and the geometry of motion can be studied using QENS. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation not only provides insight into the details of the different types of motion possible but also does not suffer limitations of the experimental set-up. Here we report the effect of confinement on molecular dynamics in various restricted geometries as studied by QENS and MD simulations: An example where the QENS technique provided direct evidence of phase transition associated with change in the dynamical behaviour of the molecules is also discussed.

  19. Risk Factors for Restricting Back Pain in Older Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Una E.; Fraenkel, Liana; Han, Ling; Leo-Summers, Linda; Gill, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To identify risk factors for back pain leading to restricted activity (restricting back pain) in older persons. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Greater New Haven, Connecticut. Participants 731 men and women aged 70 years or older, who were community-living and non-disabled in essential activities of daily living at baseline. Measurements Candidate risk factors were ascertained every 18 months for 108 months during comprehensive home-based assessments. Restricting back pain was assessed during monthly telephone interviews for up to 126 months. Incident episodes of: (1) short-term (one episode lasting one month) restricting back pain; and (2) persistent (one episode lasting two or more months) or recurrent (two or more episodes of any duration) restricting back pain were determined during each 18-month interval. The associations between the candidate risk factors and short-term and persistent/recurrent restricting back pain, respectively, were evaluated using a multivariable Cox model. Results The cumulative incidence was 21.3% (95% confidence interval (CI) 19.6%, 23.1%) for short-term restricting back pain and 20.6% (CI 18.6%, 22.9%) for persistent/recurrent restricting back pain over a median follow-up of 109 months. In a recurrent event multivariable analysis, female sex (HR 1.30; 1.07, 1.58), weak grip strength (HR 1.24; 1.01,1.52), and hip weakness (HR 1.19; 1.07,1.32) were independently associated with an increased likelihood of having short-term restricting back pain, while female sex (HR 1.48; CI 1.13,1.94), depressive symptoms (HR 1.57; 1.23, 2.00), 2 or more chronic conditions (HR 1.38; 1.08, 1.77), and arthritis (HR1.66; 1.31, 2.09) were independently associated with persistent/recurrent restricting back pain. Conclusion In this prospective study, several factors were independently associated with restricting back pain, including some that may be modifiable and therefore potential targets for interventions to reduce this common and

  20. Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order with ROTC 1, Revision No. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-02-01

    Many Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Use Restrictions (URs) have been established at various corrective action sites (CASs) as part of FFACO corrective actions (FFACO, 1996; as amended January 2007). Since the signing of the FFACO in 1996, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective action (RBCA) have evolved. This document is part of an effort to re-evaluate all FFACO URs against the current RBCA criteria (referred to in this document as the Industrial Sites [IS] RBCA process) as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). Based on this evaluation, the URs were sorted into the following categories: 1. Where sufficient information exists to determine that the current UR is consistent with the RCBA criteria 2. Where sufficient information exists to determine that the current UR may be removed or downgraded based on RCBA criteria. 3. Where sufficient information does not exist to evaluate the current UR against the RCBA criteria. After reviewing all the existing FFACO URs, the 49 URs addressed in this document have sufficient information to determine that these current URs may be removed or downgraded based on RCBA criteria. This document presents recommendations on modifications to existing URs that will be consistent with the RCBA criteria.

  1. The Effect of Dried Glycyrrhiza Glabra L. Extract on Obesity Management with Regard to PPAR-γ2 (Pro12Ala) Gene Polymorphism in Obese Subjects Following an Energy Restricted Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Nazli; Alizadeh, Mohammad; Mirtaheri, Elham; Farajnia, Safar

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: Obesity is a multi-factorial health problem which results from the interaction of environmental and genetic factors. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of dried licorice extract with a calorie restricted diet on anthropometric indices and insulin resistance with nutrigenetic approach. Methods: For this pilot, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial, 72 eligible subjects were randomly allocated to Licorice or placebo group. They received a low-calorie diet either with a 1.5 g/day of Licorice extract or placebo for 8 weeks. Results: There were no significant differences in anthropometric indices and dietary intake in genotype subgroups at the baseline. Findings indicated that supplementation with Licorice extract did not change anthropometric indices and biochemical parameters significantly compared to a hypocaloric diet alone. However, from the nutrigenetic point of view, significant changes in anthropometric indices and QUICKI were observed in the Pro12Pro genotypes compared to the Pro12Ala at the end of the study (pPro12Ala genotype was found. Conclusion: In obese subjects, the Pro/Pro polymorphism of the PPAR-γ2 gene seems to induce favourable effects on obesity management. Further studies are needed to clarify whether PPAR-γ2 gene polymorphisms or other obesity genes can affect responses to obesity treatment.

  2. Effect of energy restriction and physical exercise intervention on phenotypic flexibility as examined by transcriptomics analyses of mRNA from adipose tissue and whole body magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Sindre; Norheim, Frode; Langleite, Torgrim M.; Noreng, Hans J.; Storås, Trygve H.; Afman, Lydia A.; Frost, Gary; Bell, Jimmy D.; Thomas, E.L.; Kolnes, Kristoffer J.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity lead to changes in adipose tissue such as inflammation and reduced insulin sensitivity. The aim of this study was to assess how altered energy balance by reduced food intake or enhanced physical activity affect these processes. We studied sedentary subjects with

  3. Effect of energy restriction and physical exercise intervention on phenotypic flexibility as examined by transcriptomics analyses of mRNA from adipose tissue and whole body magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Sindre; Norheim, Frode; Langleite, Torgrim M.; Noreng, Hans J.; Storås, Trygve H.; Afman, Lydia A.; Frost, Gary; Bell, Jimmy D.; Thomas, E.L.; Kolnes, Kristoffer J.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity lead to changes in adipose tissue such as inflammation and reduced insulin sensitivity. The aim of this study was to assess how altered energy balance by reduced food intake or enhanced physical activity affect these processes. We studied sedentary subjects with overweight/

  4. [Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franques, J; Azulay, J-P; Pouget, J; Attarian, S

    2010-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a demyelinating chronic neuropathy of immune origin whose diagnosis is based upon clinical, biological and electrophysiological data; previously critical to the diagnosis the nerve biopsy is now restricted to the rare situations where accurate diagnosis cannot be reached using these data alone. CIDP are mainly idiopathic, but a few associated diseases must be sought for as they require specific attention. Such associated diseases must particularly be discussed when the manifestations are severe or resistant to immunomodulating or immunosuppressive agents. Indeed, idiopathic CIDP are usually responsive to these treatments. The effectiveness of these treatments is limited by the importance of the secondary axonal loss. The dependence or the resistance may sometimes justify the association of several immunomodulating treatments. A single randomized controlled trial support the use of cytotoxic drugs and none with rituximab.

  5. Anticipatory and reactive responses to chocolate restriction in frequent chocolate consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Chelsey L; Mattes, Richard D; Tan, Sze-Yen

    2015-06-01

    Many individuals have difficulty adhering to a weight loss diet. One possible explanation could be that dietary restriction paradoxically contributes to overconsumption. The objective of this study was to examine ingestive behavior under a forced chocolate restriction with a focus on the anticipatory restriction period and the post-restriction period in frequent chocolate consumers. Fifty-six male (N = 18) and female (N = 38) high chocolate consumers with high (N = 25) or low (N = 31) cognitive disinhibition participated. Chocolate snacks were provided for a week each to establish baseline, pre-restriction, and post-restriction consumption, Chocolate snacks were replaced with nonchocolate snacks during a 3-week chocolate restriction period. Highly disinhibited participants felt more guilty and consumed significantly more energy than low disinhibited participants across snack conditions. Low disinhibited participants consumed significantly less in the post-restriction period compared to baseline and the pre-restriction period, while high disinhibited participants consumed the same amount across all conditions. Aggregating the data, high and low disinhibited chocolate consumers ate snacks more frequently in the pre- and post-restriction periods compared to the baseline period. This study suggests that for some individuals, restriction of a preferred food like chocolate may be contraindicated for energy restriction and weight management. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  6. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and the Antiproteinuric Response to Dietary Sodium Restriction During Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humalda, Jelmer K; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Kwakernaak, Arjan J; Slagman, Maartje C J; Waanders, Femke; Vervloet, Marc G; Ter Wee, Pieter M; Navis, Gerarda; de Borst, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    Background: Residual proteinuria during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade is a major renal and cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS blockade, but residual proteinuria remains in many patient

  7. Fibroblast growth factor 23 and the antiproteinuric response to dietary sodium restriction during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humalda, J.K.; Lambers Heerspink, H.J.; Kwakernaak, A.J.; Slagman, M.C.; Waanders, F.; Vervloet, M.G.; Wee, P.M. Ter; Navis, G.; Borst, M.H. de; Wee, P.M. ter; Vervloet, M.; Bindels, R.J.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Hillebrands, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Residual proteinuria during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade is a major renal and cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS blockade, but residual proteinuria remains in many patient

  8. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and the Antiproteinuric Response to Dietary Sodium Restriction During Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humalda, Jelmer K; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Kwakernaak, Arjan J; Slagman, Maartje C J; Waanders, Femke; Vervloet, Marc G; Ter Wee, Pieter M; Navis, Gerarda; de Borst, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    Background: Residual proteinuria during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade is a major renal and cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS blockade, but residual proteinuria remains in many patient

  9. Fibroblast growth factor 23 and the antiproteinuric response to dietary sodium restriction during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humalda, J.K.; Lambers Heerspink, H.J.; Kwakernaak, A.J.; Slagman, M.C.; Waanders, F.; Vervloet, M.G.; Wee, P.M. Ter; Navis, G.; Borst, M.H. de; Wee, P.M. ter; Vervloet, M.; Bindels, R.J.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Hillebrands, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Residual proteinuria during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade is a major renal and cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS blockade, but residual proteinuria remains in many patient

  10. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and the Antiproteinuric Response to Dietary Sodium Restriction During Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humalda, Jelmer K; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Kwakernaak, Arjan J; Slagman, Maartje C J; Waanders, Femke; Vervloet, Marc G; Ter Wee, Pieter M; Navis, Gerarda; de Borst, Martin H

    Background: Residual proteinuria during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade is a major renal and cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS blockade, but residual proteinuria remains in many

  11. Fibroblast growth factor 23 and the antiproteinuric response to dietary sodium restriction during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humalda, J.K.; Lambers Heerspink, H.J.; Kwakernaak, A.J.; Slagman, M.C.; Waanders, F.; Vervloet, M.G.; Wee, P.M. Ter; Navis, G.; Borst, M.H. de; Wee, P.M. ter; Vervloet, M.; Bindels, R.J.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Hillebrands, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Residual proteinuria during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade is a major renal and cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS blockade, but residual proteinuria remains in many

  12. The effect of under-reporting of energy intake on dietary patterns and on the associations between dietary patterns and self-reported chronic disease in women aged 50-69 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markussen, Marianne S; Veierød, Marit B; Ursin, Giske; Andersen, Lene F

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate whether under-reporting of energy intake affects derived dietary patterns and the association between dietary patterns and self-reported chronic disease. Diets of 6204 women aged 50-69 years participating in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program were assessed using a 253-item FFQ. We identified dietary patterns using principal component analysis. According to the revised Goldberg cut-off method, women with a ratio of reported energy intake:estimated BMRpatterns and self-reported chronic diseases by log-binomial regression, and the results are presented as prevalence ratios (PR) and CI. 'Prudent', 'Western' and 'Continental' dietary patterns were identified among all reporters and plausible reporters. The PR expressing the associations between the 'Western' and 'Prudent' dietary pattern scores and self-reported chronic diseases were consistently highest among plausible reporters except for joint/muscle/skeletal disorders. The largest difference in PR among plausible v. all reporters was found for the association between the 'Prudent' pattern and diabetes (PR for highest v. lowest tertile: PRall reporters 2·16; 95 % CI 1·50, 3·13; P trendpattern and disease. In studies of dietary patterns, investigators ought to consider reporting effect estimates both for all individuals and for plausible reporters.

  13. Research progress on protein-energy wasting in patients with chronic kidney disease%慢性肾脏病患者蛋白质-能量消耗研究新进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    古琳琳; 刘岩; 谭荣韶; 周道远; 肖笑

    2014-01-01

    蛋白质-能量消耗在慢性肾脏病患者中发病率较高,临床上主要表现为饮食摄入、生化指标、体重指数、肌肉质量等方面的异常,其发病机制非常复杂,跟摄入不足、炎症、代谢性酸中毒、激素水平紊乱、透析相关因素等有关,严重影响透析患者的预后,因此早期发现、诊断和防治显得非常重要,将营养评估列入慢性肾脏病患者诊疗的日常工作当中,并对照诊断标准,及早诊断和采取各种措施防治蛋白质-能量消耗,最终提高慢性肾脏病患者的预后和生存率.本文对慢性肾脏病引起的蛋白质-能量消耗流行病学特点、发病机理、评估方式、治疗及干预措施等进行阐述.%Patients with chronic kidney disease often experience protein-energy wasting.The clinical manifestations performs include the abnormality of nutrient intake,biochemical index,body mass index,and muscle mass.Protein-energy wasting always results from decreased dietary intake,inflammation,metabolic acidosis,hormone level disorder,dialysis related factors,social psychological factors and so on,and seriously affects the prognosis and survival rates of patients with chronic kidney disease.Therefore,early detection,diagnosis and prevention and cure are very important.Nutritional evaluation should be included in daily diagnosis and treatment in patients with chronic kidney diseases.Contrasting diagnostic criteria,prevention and control of protein-energy wasting with early diagnosis and taking various measures will improve the prognosis and survival rate of patients with chronic kidney disease ultimately.Thus,the aim is to improve the patients' understanding of epidemiological characteristics,pathogenesis,assessment,treatment and intervention measures of protein-energy wasting in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  14. Isocitrate ameliorates anemia by suppressing the erythroid iron restriction response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Chanté L; Delehanty, Lorrie L; Bullock, Grant C; Rival, Claudia M; Tung, Kenneth S; Kimpel, Donald L; Gardenghi, Sara; Rivella, Stefano; Goldfarb, Adam N

    2013-08-01

    The unique sensitivity of early red cell progenitors to iron deprivation, known as the erythroid iron restriction response, serves as a basis for human anemias globally. This response impairs erythropoietin-driven erythropoiesis and underlies erythropoietic repression in iron deficiency anemia. Mechanistically, the erythroid iron restriction response results from inactivation of aconitase enzymes and can be suppressed by providing the aconitase product isocitrate. Recent studies have implicated the erythroid iron restriction response in anemia of chronic disease and inflammation (ACDI), offering new therapeutic avenues for a major clinical problem; however, inflammatory signals may also directly repress erythropoiesis in ACDI. Here, we show that suppression of the erythroid iron restriction response by isocitrate administration corrected anemia and erythropoietic defects in rats with ACDI. In vitro studies demonstrated that erythroid repression by inflammatory signaling is potently modulated by the erythroid iron restriction response in a kinase-dependent pathway involving induction of the erythroid-inhibitory transcription factor PU.1. These results reveal the integration of iron and inflammatory inputs in a therapeutically tractable erythropoietic regulatory circuit.

  15. The Effects of Calorie Restriction in Depression and Potential Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Changhong; Zhao, Yinghao; Zhang, Xingyi; Li, Bingjin; Cui, Ranji

    2015-01-01

    Depression, also called major depressive disorder, is a neuropsychiatric disorder jeopardizing an increasing number of the population worldwide. To date, a large number of studies have devoted great attention to this problematic condition and raised several hypotheses of depression. Based on these theories, many antidepressant drugs were developed for the treatment of depression. Yet, the depressed patients are often refractory to the antidepressant therapies. Recently, increasing experimental evidences demonstrated the effects of calorie restriction in neuroendocrine system and in depression. Both basic and clinical investigations indicated that short-term calorie restriction might induce an antidepressant efficacy in depression, providing a novel avenue for treatment. Molecular basis underlying the antidepressant actions of calorie restriction might involve multiple physiological processes, primarily including orexin signaling activation, increased CREB phosphorylation and neurotrophic effects, release of endorphin and ketone production. However, the effects of chronic calorie restriction were quite controversial, in the cases that it often resulted in the long-term detrimental effects via inhibiting the function of 5-HT system and decreasing leptin levels. Here we review such dual effects of calorie restriction in depression and potential molecular basis behind these effects, especially focusing on antidepressant effects. PMID:26412073

  16. Alterações metabólicas induzidas pela restrição energética e pela suplementação com vitamina E em ratos submetidos ao exercício Metabolic changes induced by energy restriction and vitamin E supplementation in exercised rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Lima de OLIVEIRA

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo investigou os efeitos da restrição energética (em carboidratos e da suplementação com vitamina E em parâmetros metabólicos associados ao exercício físico. Ratos machos Wistar, de onze semanas de idade, após receberem dieta controle, restrita (controle modificada ou suplementada (controle, adicionada de vitamina E, por cinco meses, foram subdivididos em duas categorias: exercitados e não exercitados. Antes do sacrifício, os ratos do grupo exercitado foram submetidos a exercício em esteira até a exaustão. Determinaram-se glicogênio hepático e muscular, glicemia, insulina plasmática e lactato sanguíneo, e registrou-se o tempo para alcançar a exaustão. A restrição energética aumentou o glicogênio hepático e a resistência ao exercício exaustivo e, quando associada ao exercício, reduziu a glicemia. A suplementação com vitamina E reduziu a resistência à exaustão, quando comparada à restrição energética, mas esta redução não foi significativa em relação à dieta controle. Estes resultados indicam que a restrição energética melhorou o desempenho físico, mas a suplementação com vitamina E não apresentou o mesmo efeito.The effects of energy (carbohydrate restriction and vitamin E supplementation on some exercise-induced metabolic modifications in rats were studied. Male Wistar, eleven-week old rats were fed control, or restricted amounts of a modified control, or control plus vitamin E diets. After feeding the diets for five months, the animals in each group were divided into exercised and non-exercised categories. Before being killed, the rats of the exercised category were required to run on a treadmill to exhaustion. Hepatic and muscular glycogen, plasma glucose, plasma insulin and blood lactate were determined and the time to reach exhaustion was registered. Energy restriction increased hepatic glycogen and resistance to exhaustive exercise and, associated to exercise, lowered the plasma

  17. Restrictive dermopathy and fetal behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, EJH; Beemer, FA; Stoutenbeek, P

    2001-01-01

    We report three siblings from consecutive pregnancies affected with restrictive dermopathy (RD). During the second pregnancy, fetal behavioural development and growth were studied extensively using ultrasound at 1-4 week intervals. Dramatic and sudden changes occurred in fetal body movements and gro

  18. Legal restrictions and Investment Growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lensink, B.W.; Scholtens, B.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the impact of legal restrictions on investment growth at the firm level. With the help of a unique firm-level survey database, we analyze whether firm investments are related to the efficiency and quality of the judiciary. Furthermore, we analyze whether the investment behavior of large a

  19. Legal restrictions and investment growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lensink, B.W.; Scholtens, B.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the impact of legal restrictions on investment growth at the firm level. With the help of a unique firm-level survey database, we analyze whether firm investments are related to the efficiency and quality of the judiciary, Furthermore, we analyze whether the investment behavior of large a

  20. Restricted Morgan’s problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈树中; 曹立

    1996-01-01

    A new list of regular feedback invariant integers called right independent orders is introduced.That the restricted Morgan’s problem is equivalent to a kind of nonlinear algebraic equations is proved and the condition that the nonlinear algebraic equations degenerate into linear algebraic equations is given.

  1. Evolution under dietary restriction increases male reproductive performance without survival cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Cindy; Georgolopoulos, Grigorios; Maklakov, Alexei A.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), a reduction in nutrient intake without malnutrition, is the most reproducible way to extend lifespan in a wide range of organisms across the tree of life, yet the evolutionary underpinnings of the DR effect on lifespan are still widely debated. The leading theory suggests that this effect is adaptive and results from reallocation of resources from reproduction to somatic maintenance, in order to survive periods of famine in nature. However, such response would cease to be adaptive when DR is chronic and animals are selected to allocate more resources to reproduction. Nevertheless, chronic DR can also increase the strength of selection resulting in the evolution of more robust genotypes. We evolved Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies on ‘DR’, ‘standard’ and ‘high’ adult diets in replicate populations with overlapping generations. After approximately 25 generations of experimental evolution, male ‘DR’ flies had higher fitness than males from ‘standard’ and ‘high’ populations. Strikingly, this increase in reproductive success did not come at a cost to survival. Our results suggest that sustained DR selects for more robust male genotypes that are overall better in converting resources into energy, which they allocate mostly to reproduction. PMID:26911958

  2. Changes in brain protein expression are linked to magnesium restriction-induced depression-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, Nigel; Li, Lin; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Yang, Jae-Won; Sartori, Simone B; Lubec, Gert; Singewald, Nicolas

    2011-04-01

    There is evidence to suggest that low levels of magnesium (Mg) are associated with affective disorders, however, causality and central neurobiological mechanisms of this link are largely unproven. We have recently shown that mice fed a low Mg-containing diet (10% of daily requirement) display enhanced depression-like behavior sensitive to chronic antidepressant treatment. The aim of the present study was to utilize this model to gain insight into underlying mechanisms by quantifying amygdala/hypothalamus protein expression using gel-based proteomics and correlating changes in protein expression with changes in depression-like behavior. Mice fed Mg-restricted diet displayed reduced brain Mg tissue levels and altered expression of four proteins, N(G),N(G)-dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 1 (DDAH1), manganese-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) and voltage-dependent anion channel 1. The observed alterations in protein expression may indicate increased nitric oxide production, increased anti-oxidant response to increased oxidative stress and potential alteration in energy metabolism. Aberrant expressions of DDAH1, MnSOD and GDH1 were normalized by chronic paroxetine treatment which also normalized the enhanced depression-like behavior, strengthening the link between the changes in these proteins and depression-like behavior. Collectively, these findings provide first evidence of low magnesium-induced alteration in brain protein levels and biochemical pathways, contributing to central dysregulation in affective disorders.

  3. 30 CFR 56.11008 - Restricted clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Restricted clearance. 56.11008 Section 56.11008 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Restricted clearance. Where restricted clearance creates a hazard to persons, the restricted clearance...

  4. 30 CFR 57.11008 - Restricted clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Restricted clearance. 57.11008 Section 57.11008... Escapeways Travelways-Surface and Underground § 57.11008 Restricted clearance. Where restricted clearance creates a hazard to persons, the restricted clearance shall be conspicuously marked....

  5. The GOAT-ghrelin system is not essential for hypoglycemia prevention during prolonged calorie restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Xia Yi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Ghrelin acylation by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT has recently been reported to be essential for the prevention of hypoglycemia during prolonged negative energy balance. Using a unique set of four different genetic loss-of-function models for the GOAT/ghrelin/growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR system, we thoroughly tested the hypothesis that lack-of-ghrelin activation or signaling would lead to hypoglycemia during caloric deprivation. METHODOLOGY: Male and female knockout (KO mice for GOAT, ghrelin, GHSR, or both ghrelin and GHSR (dKO were subjected to prolonged calorie restriction (40% of ad libitum chow intake. Body weight, fat mass, and glucose levels were recorded daily and compared to wildtype (WT controls. Forty-eight hour blood glucose profiles were generated for each individual mouse when 2% or less body fat mass was reached. Blood samples were obtained for analysis of circulating levels of acyl- and desacyl-ghrelin, IGF-1, and insulin. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Chronic calorie restriction progressively decreased body weight and body fat mass in all mice regardless of genotype. When fat mass was depleted to 2% or less of body weight for 2 consecutive days, random hypoglycemic events occurred in some mice across all genotypes. There was no increase in the incidence of hypoglycemia in any of the four loss-of-function models for ghrelin signaling including GOAT KO mice. Furthermore, no differences in insulin or IGF-1 levels were observed between genotypes. CONCLUSION: The endogenous GOAT-ghrelin-GHSR system is not essential for the maintenance of euglycemia during prolonged calorie restriction.

  6. Energies; Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    In the framework of the National Debate on the energies in a context of a sustainable development some associations for the environment organized a debate on the nuclear interest facing the renewable energies. The first part presents the nuclear energy as a possible solution to fight against the greenhouse effect and the associated problem of the wastes management. The second part gives information on the solar energy and the possibilities of heat and electric power production. A presentation of the FEE (French wind power association) on the situation and the development of the wind power in France, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  7. Efeitos da restrição alimentar protéica ou energética sobre o crescimento de frangos de corte criados em diferentes temperaturas ambiente Effect of protein or energy restriction on broilers growth reared at different environmental temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabete Regina Leone

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente experimento foi conduzido com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito da restrição protéica ou energética, entre o 8º e o 14º dia de idade, sobre o crescimento e a composição da carcaça de frangos de corte criados em diferentes temperaturas ambientes. Foram utilizados 900 pintos de um dia, machos, da linhagem Ross, os quais foram alojados em três diferentes câmaras climatizadas nas temperaturas de 18, 25 ou 33°C, do 1º ao 42º dia de idade. Para cada temperatura, o delineamento experimental utilizado foi o inteiramente casualizado, em esquema de parcelas subdivididas, em que as parcelas corresponderam ao programa alimentar (controle - 2850 kcal EM/kg e 20% de proteína bruta do 1º ao 21º dia de idade e 3040 kcal EM/kg e 17% de PB do 22º ao 42º dia; restrição energética - 2565 kcal EM/kg e 20% de PB e restrição protéica - 2850 kcal EM/kg e 15% de PB entre o 8º e o 14º dia de idade e as subparcelas, à idade das aves. Entre o 1º e o 7º dia de idade e após o período de restrição as aves receberam a mesma dieta do que os animais controles. Foram avaliados o peso vivo e a composição da carcaça das aves. Os resultados mostraram que, de forma independente da temperatura de criação, as restrições alimentares (energética ou protéica não afetaram o peso vivo e a composição da carcaça aos 42 dias de idade, evidenciando que o frango em temperaturas ambientes diversas mantém a capacidade de ganho compensatório.The present experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of protein or energy restriction from 8th to 14th days of age, on growth and carcass composition of broiler chickens raised at different environmental temperatures. It was used 900 day-old, male chickens from Ross strain, reared in three environmentally controlled rooms where ambient temperature were maintained at 18, 25 and 33°C up to 42 days of age. For each temperature, a split-plot design was used with feed program as the main plot (control

  8. Down-regulation of the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum ryanodine channel in severely food-restricted rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Vizotto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have shown that myocardial dysfunction induced by food restriction is related to calcium handling. Although cardiac function is depressed in food-restricted animals, there is limited information about the molecular mechanisms that lead to this abnormality. The present study evaluated the effects of food restriction on calcium cycling, focusing on sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2, phospholamban (PLB, and ryanodine channel (RYR2 mRNA expressions in rat myocardium. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats, 60 days old, were submitted to ad libitum feeding (control rats or 50% diet restriction for 90 days. The levels of left ventricle SERCA2, PLB, and RYR2 were measured using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Body and ventricular weights were reduced in 50% food-restricted animals. RYR2 mRNA was significantly decreased in the left ventricle of the food-restricted group (control = 5.92 ± 0.48 vs food-restricted group = 4.84 ± 0.33, P < 0.01. The levels of SERCA2 and PLB mRNA were similar between groups (control = 8.38 ± 0.44 vs food-restricted group = 7.96 ± 0.45, and control = 1.52 ± 0.06 vs food-restricted group = 1.53 ± 0.10, respectively. Down-regulation of RYR2 mRNA expressions suggests that chronic food restriction promotes abnormalities in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release.

  9. 我国海上风电发展前景与制约因素分析%Analysis on China’s Offshore Wind Energy Development Prospects and Restriction Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卞恩林

    2013-01-01

    China is rich in offshore wind resources, and the eastern coast region is power load center in China. As the increasing national support and further development of offshore wind energy technology, the offshore wind industry has a wide development prospect. However, Nowadays, technologically immature, experience lacking and low yields all make the large-scale offshore wind energy industry face much investment risk.%  我国海上风能资源丰富,且靠近电力负荷中心,随着国家扶持力度不断加大和我国海上风电技术的进一步发展,海上风电具有广阔的的发展前景。然而,技术不成熟、经验欠缺和投资收益率低等因素仍使现阶段大规模开发海上风电面临较大投资风险。

  10. [Chronicity, chronicization, systematization of delusions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapet, P; Fernandez, C; Galtier, M C; Gisselmann, A

    1984-05-01

    Chronicity in psychopathology is indicative of a term, a decay. Chronicization only leads the way to this term. Here, chronicization is taken literally as an inscription in the time course of delusions. The mechanism of systematization seems to be a central mark in the approach to chronic delusions. It is not an alienation or an irreversible closing but an attempted accommodation with reality in the life of psychotic subjects, irrespective of the delusional structure. The role of therapy and drug treatment as a follow-up may in that case assume another meaning.

  11. Temperature based Restricted Boltzmann Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqi; Deng, Lei; Xu, Yi; Wen, Changyun; Wang, Wei; Pei, Jing; Shi, Luping

    2016-01-13

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs), which apply graphical models to learning probability distribution over a set of inputs, have attracted much attention recently since being proposed as building blocks of multi-layer learning systems called deep belief networks (DBNs). Note that temperature is a key factor of the Boltzmann distribution that RBMs originate from. However, none of existing schemes have considered the impact of temperature in the graphical model of DBNs. In this work, we propose temperature based restricted Boltzmann machines (TRBMs) which reveals that temperature is an essential parameter controlling the selectivity of the firing neurons in the hidden layers. We theoretically prove that the effect of temperature can be adjusted by setting the parameter of the sharpness of the logistic function in the proposed TRBMs. The performance of RBMs can be improved by adjusting the temperature parameter of TRBMs. This work provides a comprehensive insights into the deep belief networks and deep learning architectures from a physical point of view.

  12. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Froeling, Fieke EM

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas owing to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects 3–9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  13. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Kadaba, Raghu

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas due to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects between 3 and 9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  14. Physiogenomic analysis of weight loss induced by dietary carbohydrate restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruaño, Gualberto; Windemuth, Andreas; Kocherla, Mohan; Holford, Theodore; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Forsythe, Cassandra E; Wood, Richard J; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S

    2006-05-15

    Diets that restrict carbohydrate (CHO) have proven to be a successful dietary treatment of obesity for many people, but the degree of weight loss varies across individuals. The extent to which genetic factors associate with the magnitude of weight loss induced by CHO restriction is unknown. We examined associations among polymorphisms in candidate genes and weight loss in order to understand the physiological factors influencing body weight responses to CHO restriction. We screened for genetic associations with weight loss in 86 healthy adults who were instructed to restrict CHO to a level that induced a small level of ketosis (CHO approximately 10% of total energy). A total of 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected from 15 candidate genes involved in fat digestion/metabolism, intracellular glucose metabolism, lipoprotein remodeling, and appetite regulation. Multiple linear regression was used to rank the SNPs according to probability of association, and the most significant associations were analyzed in greater detail. Mean weight loss was 6.4 kg. SNPs in the gastric lipase (LIPF), hepatic glycogen synthase (GYS2), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and galanin (GAL) genes were significantly associated with weight loss. A strong association between weight loss induced by dietary CHO restriction and variability in genes regulating fat digestion, hepatic glucose metabolism, intravascular lipoprotein remodeling, and appetite were detected. These discoveries could provide clues to important physiologic adaptations underlying the body mass response to CHO restriction.

  15. Physiogenomic analysis of weight loss induced by dietary carbohydrate restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Richard J

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diets that restrict carbohydrate (CHO have proven to be a successful dietary treatment of obesity for many people, but the degree of weight loss varies across individuals. The extent to which genetic factors associate with the magnitude of weight loss induced by CHO restriction is unknown. We examined associations among polymorphisms in candidate genes and weight loss in order to understand the physiological factors influencing body weight responses to CHO restriction. Methods We screened for genetic associations with weight loss in 86 healthy adults who were instructed to restrict CHO to a level that induced a small level of ketosis (CHO ~10% of total energy. A total of 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were selected from 15 candidate genes involved in fat digestion/metabolism, intracellular glucose metabolism, lipoprotein remodeling, and appetite regulation. Multiple linear regression was used to rank the SNPs according to probability of association, and the most significant associations were analyzed in greater detail. Results Mean weight loss was 6.4 kg. SNPs in the gastric lipase (LIPF, hepatic glycogen synthase (GYS2, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP and galanin (GAL genes were significantly associated with weight loss. Conclusion A strong association between weight loss induced by dietary CHO restriction and variability in genes regulating fat digestion, hepatic glucose metabolism, intravascular lipoprotein remodeling, and appetite were detected. These discoveries could provide clues to important physiologic adaptations underlying the body mass response to CHO restriction.

  16. Postoperative activity restrictions: any evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Larissa F; Nygaard, Ingrid E; Wilken, Jason; Brandt, Debra; Janz, Kathleen F

    2006-02-01

    Because of a widespread but untested belief that increased intra-abdominal pressure contributes to pelvic floor disorders, physicians commonly restrict various activities postoperatively. Our aim was to describe intra-abdominal pressures during common physical activities. Thirty women of wide age and weight ranges who were not undergoing treatment for pelvic floor disorders performed 3 repetitions of various activities while intra-abdominal pressures (baseline and maximal) were approximated via microtip rectal catheters. We calculated median peak and net pressures (centimeters of H(2)O). We assessed correlations between abdominal pressures and body mass index, abdominal circumference, and grip strength (a proxy for overall strength). P climbing stairs, walking briskly, or doing abdominal crunches. Body mass index and abdominal circumference each correlated positively with peak, but not net, pressures. Age and grip strength were not associated with abdominal pressure. Some activities commonly restricted postoperatively have no greater effect on intra-abdominal pressures than unavoidable activities like rising from a chair. How lifting is done impacts intra-abdominal pressure. Many current postoperative guidelines are needlessly restrictive. Further research is needed to determine whether increased intra-abdominal pressure truly promotes pelvic floor disorders. III.

  17. Benefit restrictions and gout treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sharon M; Aranda, Gustavus A; Gao, Sara; Patel, Bimal V

    2013-01-01

    Gout is a chronic rheumatic disease that can have serious sequelae, including persistent pain, nerve compression, joint destruction and deformities if left untreated. Febuxostat, initially introduced in the United States in 2009, was the first new treatment option for gout in over 40 years. With the introduction of a new drug into a therapeutic class that is composed of generically available options, utilization management will be a common strategy employed in an effort to contain cost; however, the effects of these strategies are not known for chronic gout treatment. To evaluate the effect of utilization management strategies on chronic gout treatment. This retrospective analysis examined claims data from a large, national pharmacy benefits manager with a client base that includes commercial HMOs, Medicaid, Medicare Part D, and self-insurers. The study population included patients aged 18 years or older who had at least 1 rejected claim for febuxostat in the 16-month identification period from March 1, 2009, through June 30, 2010. Outcomes of interest were the proportion of patients who filled a febuxostat prescription and proportion of patients who filled a prescription for another chronic gout treatment within 1 month of the febuxostat claim rejection date (the index date). Multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess factors affecting patient response to a rejected febuxostat claim. Of 1,034 patients with rejected febuxostat claims, 95% had claims denied due to utilization management: 36% due to step therapy, 25% due to lack of drug coverage, 18% due to quantity or other limits (i.e., fill limit exceeded, days supply exceeding benefit maximum, or maximum days supply limit exceeded), 16% due to prior authorization requirements, while 5% were due to "other reasons" unrelated to the utilization management strategies of interest. "Other reasons" included over 100 possible rejection reasons such as fill dispensed too soon, missing/invalid days supply

  18. Oral glycotoxins determine the effects of calorie restriction on oxidant stress, age-related diseases, and lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weijing; He, John C; Zhu, Li; Chen, Xue; Zheng, Feng; Striker, Gary E; Vlassara, Helen

    2008-08-01

    We previously showed that the content of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the diet correlates with serum AGE levels, oxidant stress (OS), organ dysfunction, and lifespan. We now show that the addition of a chemically defined AGE (methyl-glyoxal-BSA) to low-AGE mouse chow increased serum levels of AGEs and OS, demonstrating that dietary AGEs are oxidants that can induce systemic OS. OS predisposes to the development of cardiovascular and chronic kidney diseases; calorie restriction (CR) is the most studied means to decrease OS, increase longevity, and reduce OS-related organ damage in mammals. Because reduction of food intake also decreases oxidant AGE s intake, we asked whether the beneficial effects of CR in mammals are related to the restriction of oxidants or energy. Pair-fed mice were provided either a CR diet or a high-AGE CR diet in which AGEs were elevated by brief heat treatment (CR-high). Old CR-high mice developed high levels of 8-isoprostanes, AGEs, RAGE, and p66(shc), coupled with low AGER1 and GSH/GSSG levels, insulin resistance, marked myocardial and renal fibrosis, and shortened lifespan. In contrast, old CR mice had low OS, p66(shc), RAGE, and AGE levels, but high AGER1 levels, coupled with longer lifespan. Therefore, the beneficial effects of a CR diet may be partly related to reduced oxidant intake, a principal determinant of oxidant status in aging mice, rather than decreased energy intake.

  19. 10 CFR 2.913 - Review of Restricted Data or other National Security Information received in evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Review of Restricted Data or other National Security... Adjudicatory Proceedings Involving Restricted Data and/or National Security Information § 2.913 Review of Restricted Data or other National Security Information received in evidence. At the close of the reception...

  20. Food restriction-induced hyperactivity: addiction or adaptation to famine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, Martine; Ouerdani, Amel; Mormède, Pierre; Konsman, Jan Pieter

    2013-06-01

    Increased physical activity is present in 30-80% of anorexia nervosa patients. To explain the paradox of low food intake and excessive exercise in humans and other animals, it has been proposed that increased physical activity along with food restriction activates brain reward circuits and is addictive. Alternatively, the fleeing-famine hypothesis postulates that refusal of known scarce energy-low food sources and hyperactivity facilitate migration towards new habitats that potentially contain new energy-rich foodstuffs. The use of rewarding compounds that differ in energy density, such as the energy-free sweetener saccharin and the energy rich sucrose makes it possible to critically test the reward-addiction and fleeing-famine hypotheses. The aims of the present work were to study if sucrose and/or saccharin could attenuate food restriction-induced hyperactivity, weight loss, increased plasma corticosterone, and activation of brain structures involved in neuroendocrine control, energy balance, physical activity, and reward signaling in rats. Its major findings are that access to sucrose, but not to saccharin, attenuated food restriction-induced running wheel activity, weight loss, rises in plasma corticosterone, and expression of the cellular activation marker c-Fos in the paraventricular and arcuate hypothalamus and in the nucleus accumbens. These findings suggest that the energy-richness and easy availability of sucrose interrupted a fleeing-famine-like hyperactivity response. Since corticosterone mediates food restriction-induced wheel running (Duclos et al., 2009), we propose that the attenuating effect of sucrose consumption on plasma corticosterone plays a role in reduced wheel running and weight loss by lowering activation of the nucleus accumbens and arcuate hypothalamus in these animals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Preliminary fMRI findings in experimentally sleep-restricted adolescents engaged in a working memory task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tlustos Sarah J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Here we report preliminary findings from a small-sample functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study of healthy adolescents who completed a working memory task in the context of a chronic sleep restriction experiment. Findings were consistent with those previously obtained on acutely sleep-deprived adults. Our data suggest that, when asked to maintain attention and burdened by chronic sleep restriction, the adolescent brain responds via compensatory mechanisms that accentuate the typical activation patterns of attention-relevant brain regions. Specifically, it appeared that regions that are normally active during an attention-demanding working memory task in the well-rested brain became even more active to maintain performance after chronic sleep restriction. In contrast, regions in which activity is normally suppressed during such a task in the well-rested brain showed even greater suppression to maintain performance after chronic sleep restriction. Although limited by the small sample, study results provide important evidence of feasibility, as well as guidance for future research into the functional neurological effects of chronic sleep restriction in general, the effects of sleep restriction in children and adolescents, and the neuroscience of attention and its disorders in children.

  2. Null effect of dietary restriction on prostate carcinogenesis in the Wistar-Unilever rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, David L; Johnson, William D; Haryu, Todd M; Bosland, Maarten C; Lubet, Ronald A; Steele, Vernon E

    2007-01-01

    Chronic dietary restriction inhibits carcinogenesis in several sites in laboratory animals. To determine the effects of dietary restriction on prostate carcinogenesis, prostate cancers were induced in male Wistar-Unilever rats by a sequential regimen of cyproterone acetate (50 mg/day; 21 days); testosterone propionate (100 mg/kg/day; 3 days); N-methyl-N-nitrosourea [MNU; 30 mg/kg; single dose]; and testosterone (subcutaneous implants of 2 pellets containing 40 mg each). Dietary restriction (0% [ad libitum control], 15%, or 30%) was initiated 2 wk post-MNU, and continued until study termination at 12 mo. Dietary restriction induced a rapid suppression of body weight gain but conferred no protection against prostate carcinogenesis. 74% of carcinogen-treated ad libitum controls developed accessory sex gland cancers, versus cancer incidences of 64% and 72% in groups restricted by 15% and 30%, respectively. Similarly, 44% of dietary controls developed cancers limited to the dorsolateral/prostate, versus incidences of 45% and 53% in groups restricted by 15% and 30%. The results of the present study do not support the hypothesis that prostate carcinogenesis can be prevented by reducing caloric intake. Reducing mean body weight by up to 25% through chronic dietary restriction has no effect on the induction of prostate cancers in the Wistar-Unilever rat model.

  3. Electromagnetic Fields Restrictions and Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Katsenelenbaum, Boris Z

    2003-01-01

    The fields scattered by metallic bodies or radiated by some types of antennas are created by the surfaces currents and therefore they are subject to some restrictions. The book is the first one where the properties of these fields are investigated in details. The properties have the important significance for the antenna synthesis, body shape reconstruction and other diffraction problems. The material of the book lies in the meetingpoint of the antenna theory, highfrequency electrodynamics and inverse scattering problems. The author is an internationally renowned investigator in the field of e

  4. Rurality study of restricted areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Rivaroli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Two main perspectives of investigation emerge from the study of a territory’s rurality: a geographical approach and a sociological approach. The research examines the sub-regional study case of ‘Nuovo circondario imolese’. The analysis shows that the combination of traditional institutional criteria with detailed informations about the territory, generates more accurate results which determine a better comprehension of the characteristics of restricted areas’ rurality. Over the period 1991-2001, the study highlights an increase in rural areas. This result could be interpreted as an effect of urban sprawl’s intensification, that increases the competition between non-farm residences and agricultural activities.

  5. Parenting and restrictions in childhood epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, R.; Meijer, A.M.; Scherphof, C.; Carpay, J.A.; Augustijn, P.; Aldenkamp, A.P.; Deković, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: From the overprotection literature, the predictive and interactional (moderation) effects of controlling and indulgent parenting on restrictions in children with epilepsy were examined. Methods: Parents of 73 children with epilepsy completed questionnaires on parenting, restrictions, and

  6. Querying Schemas With Access Restrictions

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Michael; Ley, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    We study verification of systems whose transitions consist of accesses to a Web-based data-source. An access is a lookup on a relation within a relational database, fixing values for a set of positions in the relation. For example, a transition can represent access to a Web form, where the user is restricted to filling in values for a particular set of fields. We look at verifying properties of a schema describing the possible accesses of such a system. We present a language where one can describe the properties of an access path, and also specify additional restrictions on accesses that are enforced by the schema. Our main property language, AccLTL, is based on a first-order extension of linear-time temporal logic, interpreting access paths as sequences of relational structures. We also present a lower-level automaton model, Aautomata, which AccLTL specifications can compile into. We show that AccLTL and A-automata can express static analysis problems related to "querying with limited access patterns" that h...

  7. Ear infection - chronic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... up. When this happens, infection can occur. A chronic ear infection develops when fluid or an infection ...

  8. Chronic Pelvic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Chronic Pelvic Pain Home For Patients Search FAQs Chronic Pelvic Pain ... Chronic Pelvic Pain FAQ099, August 2011 PDF Format Chronic Pelvic Pain Gynecologic Problems What is chronic pelvic pain? What ...

  9. Employees with Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... one in five Americans suffer from chronic pain (Sternberg, 2005). What is chronic pain? While acute pain ... nih.gov/disorders/chronic_pain/chronic_pain.htm Sternberg, S. (2005). Chronic pain: The enemy within. Retrieved December ...

  10. 7 CFR 982.14 - Restricted hazelnuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restricted hazelnuts. 982.14 Section 982.14... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 982.14 Restricted hazelnuts. Restricted hazelnuts...

  11. 29 CFR 18.56 - Restricted access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Restricted access. 18.56 Section 18.56 Labor Office of the... ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES General § 18.56 Restricted access. On his or her own motion, or on the motion of any party, the administrative law judge may direct that there be a restricted access portion of the...

  12. 28 CFR 68.51 - Restricted access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Restricted access. 68.51 Section 68.51... ALIENS, UNFAIR IMMIGRATION-RELATED EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES, AND DOCUMENT FRAUD § 68.51 Restricted access. On... be a restricted access portion of the record to contain any material in the record to which...

  13. Problem-Solving Test: Restriction Endonuclease Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    The term "restriction endonuclease mapping" covers a number of related techniques used to identify specific restriction enzyme recognition sites on small DNA molecules. A method for restriction endonuclease mapping of a 1,000-basepair (bp)-long DNA molecule is described in the fictitious experiment of this test. The most important fact needed to…

  14. Restriction Enzyme Mapping: A Simple Student Practical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Stephen J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    An experiment that uses the recombinant plasmid pX1108 to illustrate restriction mapping is described. The experiment involves three restriction enzymes and employs single and double restriction enzyme digestions. A list of needed materials, procedures, safety precautions, results, and discussion are included. (KR)

  15. Restrictive Imputation of Incomplete Survey Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, G.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on finding plausible imputations when there is some restriction posed on the imputation model. In these restrictive situations, current imputation methodology does not lead to satisfactory imputations. The restrictions, and the resulting missing data problems are real-life

  16. 47 CFR 1.1208 - Restricted proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restricted proceedings. 1.1208 Section 1.1208... Restricted Proceedings § 1.1208 Restricted proceedings. Unless otherwise provided by the Commission or its... in all proceedings not listed as exempt in § 1.1204(b) or permit-but-disclose in § 1.1206(a) of...

  17. Energy biotechnology with cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angermayr, S.; Hellingwerf, K.; Lindblad, P.; Teixeira De Mattos, J.

    2009-01-01

    The world's future energy demand calls for a sustainable alternative for the use of fossil fuels, to restrict further global warming. Harvesting solar energy via photosynthesis is one of Nature's remarkable achievements. Existing technologies exploit this process for energy ‘production’ via processi

  18. Vegetarianism: advantages and drawbacks in patients with chronic kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauveau, Philippe; Combe, Christian; Fouque, Denis; Aparicio, Michel

    2013-11-01

    Vegetarian diet is a very old practice that is liable to confer some health benefits. Recent studies have demonstrated that modification of the dietary pattern with a reduction of animal protein intake and increased consumption of plant-based foods could influence cardiovascular risk profile and mortality rate. Moreover, phosphate bioavailability from plant proteins is reduced. These statements could lead to some benefits for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This review summarizes the characteristics and benefits of vegetarian diets in the general population and the potential beneficial effects of such a diet on phosphate balance, insulin sensitivity, and the control of metabolic acidosis in CKD patients. Potential drawbacks exist when a vegetarian diet is associated with protein intake that is too restrictive and/or insufficient energy intake, justifying an early and regular nutritional follow-up jointly assumed by a nephrologist and a renal dietitian. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sleep restriction alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response to stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, P; Koehl, M; van der Borght, K; Turek, FW

    2002-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction is an increasing problem in many countries and may have many, as yet unknown, consequences for health and well being. Studies in both humans and rats suggest that sleep deprivation may activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, one of the main neuroendocrine

  20. THE GRONINGEN ACTIVITY RESTRICTION SCALE FOR MEASURING DISABILITY - ITS UTILITY IN INTERNATIONAL COMPARISONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SUURMEIJER, TPBM; DOEGLAS, DM; MOUM, T; BRIANCON, S; KROL, B; SANDERMAN, R; GUILLEMIN, F; BJELLE, A; VAMDENHEUVEL, WJA

    1994-01-01

    Objectives. The Groningen Activity Restriction Scale (GARS) is a non-disease-specific instrument to measure disability in activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). It was developed in studies of Dutch samples consisting of elderly or chronically ill people.

  1. Sleep restriction alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response to stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, P; Koehl, M; van der Borght, K; Turek, FW

    2002-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction is an increasing problem in many countries and may have many, as yet unknown, consequences for health and well being. Studies in both humans and rats suggest that sleep deprivation may activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, one of the main neuroendocrine st

  2. Importancia de los problemas reumáticos en la población de Cataluña: prevalencia y repercusión en la salud percibida, restricción de actividades y utilización de recursos sanitarios Importance of chronic musculoskeletal problems in the population of Catalonia (Spain: prevalence and effect on self-perceived health, activity restriction and use of health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Pueyo

    2012-02-01

    population of Catalonia (Spain and their effect on self-perceived health, activity restriction and use of health services. Methods: A population-based survey of 15,926 adults was performed. Multistage stratified sampling was performed. The variables gathered were sociodemographic characteristics, self-reported chronic health problems, self-perceived health, activity restriction and use of health services. Musculoskeletal problems were grouped into four categories: osteoarthritis-arthritis or rheumatism (OA, chronic dorsal or lumbar pain (LBP, chronic cervical pain (UBP, and osteoporosis. Results: Chronic health problems were reported by 77.4% of the adult population. The most frequent health problem was LBP, followed by UBP and OA. After adjustment by age was performed, female sex increased the risk of reporting OA, LBP, UBP and osteoporosis (OR=2.6, 1.5, 2.3, and 5.3, respectively. The prevalence increased with greater age and with lower socioeconomic status. After adjustment was performed by age, sex, social class and obesity, self-perceived health was worse in people with these problems (42.7% vs 11%. The four categories were the main causes of activity restriction in the last year (OR 2.70 and the last 15 days (OR=2.32 and were associated with a higher use of health services. Conclusiones: Los problemas reumáticos son los principales problemas de salud crónicos declarados por la población adulta. La prevalencia es mayor es las mujeres, aumenta con la edad y en las clases desfavorecidas. Hay una asociación significativa entre declarar problemas musculoesqueléticos y salud autopercibida mala o regular, y mayor restricción de actividades y uso de servicios sanitarios.

  3. [Chronic hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa Barrios, R

    1995-01-01

    Medical literature about chronic hepatitis is reviewed. This unresolving disease caused by viruses, drugs or unknown factors may progress to in cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma. A classification based on liver biopsy histology into chronic persistent and chronic active types has been largely abandoned and emphasis is placed on recognizing the etiology of the various types. One is associated with continuing hepatitis B virus infection; another is related to chronic hepatitis C virus infection and the third is termed autoinmune, because of the association with positive serum autoantibodies. A fourth type with similar clinical functional and morphologic features is found with some drug reactions. Long term corticoesteroid therapy is usually successful in autoinmune type. Associations between antibodies to liver-kidney microsomes and the hepatitis C virus can cause diagnostic difficulties. Antiviral treatment of chronic hepatitis B and C with interpheron alfa is employed, controlling symptoms and abnormal biochemistry and the progression to cirrhosis and liver cancer in 30 to 40% patients. Alternative therapies or combinations with interpheron are being evaluated waiting for final results.

  4. Gentile statistics and restricted partitions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C S Srivatsan; M V N Murthy; R K Bhaduri

    2006-03-01

    In a recent paper (Tran et al, Ann. Phys. 311, 204 (2004)), some asymptotic number theoretical results on the partitioning of an integer were derived exploiting its connection to the quantum density of states of a many-particle system. We generalise these results to obtain an asymptotic formula for the restricted or coloured partitions $p_{k}^{s} (n)$, which is the number of partitions of an integer into the summand of th powers of integers such that each power of a given integer may occur utmost times. While the method is not rigorous, it reproduces the well-known asymptotic results for = 1 apart from yielding more general results for arbitrary values of .

  5. Stillbirth and fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Radek

    2010-09-01

    The association between stillbirth and fetal growth restriction is strong and supported by a large body of evidence and clinically employed for the stillbirth prediction. However, although assessment of fetal growth is a basis of clinical practice, it is not trivial. Essentially, fetal growth is a result of the genetic growth potential of the fetus and placental function. The growth potential is the driving force of fetal growth, whereas the placenta as the sole source of nutrients and oxygen might become the rate limiting element of fetal growth if its function is impaired. Thus, placental dysfunction may prevent the fetus from reaching its full genetically determined growth potential. In this sense fetal growth and its aberration provides an insight into placental function. Fetal growth is a proxy for the test of the effectiveness of placenta, whose function is otherwise obscured during pregnancy.

  6. INTERPOLATION WITH RESTRICTED ARC LENGTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petar Petrov

    2003-01-01

    For given data (ti,yi), I= 0,1,…,n,0 = t0 <t1 <…<tn = 1we study constrained interpolation problem of Favard type inf{‖f"‖∞|f∈W2∞[0,1],f(ti)=yi,i=0,…,n,l(f;[0,1])≤l0}, wherel(f";[0,1])=∫1 0 / 1+f'2(x)dx is the arc length off in [0,1]. We prove the existence of a solution f* of the above problem, that is a quadratic spline with a second derivative f"* , which coincides with one of the constants - ‖f"*‖∞,0,‖f"*‖∞ between every two consecutive knots. Thus, we extend a result ofKarlin concerning Favard problem, to the case of restricted length interpolation.

  7. Neurodevelopment after fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baschat, Ahmet A

    2014-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) can emerge as a complication of placental dysfunction and increases the risk for neurodevelopmental delay. Marked elevations of umbilical artery (UA) Doppler resistance that set the stage for cardiovascular and biophysical deterioration with subsequent preterm birth characterize early-onset FGR. Minimal, or absent UA Doppler abnormalities and isolated cerebral Doppler changes with subtle deterioration and a high risk for unanticipated term stillbirth are characteristic for late-onset FGR. Nutritional deficiency manifested in lagging head growth is the most powerful predictor of developmental delay in all forms of FGR. Extremes of blood flow resistance and cardiovascular deterioration, prematurity and intracranial hemorrhage increase the risks for psychomotor delay and cerebral palsy. In late-onset FGR, regional cerebral vascular redistribution correlates with abnormal behavioral domains. Irrespective of the phenotype of FGR, prenatal tests that provide precise and independent stratification of risks for adverse neurodevelopment have yet to be determined.

  8. A Traffic Restriction Scheme for Enhancing Carpooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Ding

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of alleviating traffic congestion, this paper proposes a scheme to encourage travelers to carpool by traffic restriction. By a variational inequity we describe travelers’ mode (solo driving and carpooling and route choice under user equilibrium principle in the context of fixed demand and detect the performance of a simple network with various restriction links, restriction proportions, and carpooling costs. Then the optimal traffic restriction scheme aiming at minimal total travel cost is designed through a bilevel program and applied to a Sioux Fall network example with genetic algorithm. According to various requirements, optimal restriction regions and proportions for restricted automobiles are captured. From the results it is found that traffic restriction scheme is possible to enhance carpooling and alleviate congestion. However, higher carpooling demand is not always helpful to the whole network. The topology of network, OD demand, and carpooling cost are included in the factors influencing the performance of the traffic system.

  9. Restricted Interval Valued Neutrosophic Sets and Restricted Interval Valued Neutrosophic Topological Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjan Mukherjee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce the concept of restricted interval valued neutrosophic sets (RIVNS in short. Some basic operations and properties of RIVNS are discussed. The concept of restricted interval valued neutrosophic topology is also introduced together with restricted interval valued neutrosophic finer and restricted interval valued neutrosophic coarser topology. We also define restricted interval valued neutrosophic interior and closer of a restricted interval valued neutrosophic set. Some theorems and examples are cites. Restricted interval valued neutrosophic subspace topology is also studied.

  10. Thrombocytopenia in Preterm Infants with Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuda,Miwa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Sick preterm infants often have thrombocytopenia at birth, and this is often associated with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, or birth weights less than the 10th percentile. The pathogenesis of the thrombocytopenia and its importance in IUGR are still unclear. We studied the characteristics of preterm IUGR infants with thrombocytopenia. Twenty-seven singleton Japanese preterm IUGR infants were born between January 2002 and June 2007 at Okayama University Hospital. Infants with malformation, chromosomal abnormalities, alloimmune thrombocytopenia, sepsis, and maternal aspirin ingestion were excluded. The infants were divided into group A (n=8, which had thrombocytopenia within 72h after birth, and group B (n=19, which did not. There were significant differences in birth weight, head circumference, umbilical artery (UA-pulsatility index (PI, middle cerebral artery-PI, UA-pH, UA-pO2, and UA-pCO2. The infants in group A were smaller, had abnormal blood flow patterns, and were hypoxic at birth. We speculate that the infants with thrombocytopenia were more severely growth-restricted by chronic hypoxia. Thrombocytopenia is an important parameter for chronic hypoxia in the uterine.

  11. Antitumor effects of energy restriction-mimetic agents: thiazolidinediones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Hany A; Salama, Samir A; Arafa, El-Shaimaa A; Weng, Jing-Ru

    2013-07-01

    Distinct metabolic strategies used by cancer cells to gain growth advantages, such as shifting from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, constitute a basis for their selective targeting as a novel approach for cancer therapy. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are ligands for the nuclear transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and they are clinically used as oral hypoglycemic agents. Accumulating evidence suggests that the ability of TZDs to suppress cancer cell proliferation through the interplay between apoptosis and autophagy was, at least in part, mediated through PPARγ-independent mechanisms. This review highlights recent advances in the pharmacological exploitation of the PPARγ-independent anticancer effects of TZDs to develop novel agents targeting tumor metabolism, including glucose transporter inhibitors and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, which have translational potential as cancer therapeutic agents.

  12. Acute energy restriction triggers Wallerian degeneration in mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, Susana; Moldovan, Mihai; Krarup, Christian

    2008-01-01

    the neurotoxic effect of NO with the effect of the mitochondrial uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) on electrically active axons of mouse sciatic nerve. The right tibial nerve was stimulated at the ankle. Muscle responses were recorded from plantar muscles and ascending nerve action potentials were recorded form...... the exposed sciatic nerve by means of a hook electrode. The sciatic nerve was focally immersed over a length of 1 cm in either phosphate buffered saline (PBS), a solution of approximately 4 microM NO obtained from 10 mM of the NO-donor DETA NONOate, or a solution of up to 1 mM DNP. Following 3 hours of 200 Hz...

  13. Sodium restriction potentiates the renoprotective effects of combined vitamin D receptor activation and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition in established proteinuric nephropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirkovic, Katarina; Frenay, Anne-Roos S; van den Born, Jacob; van Goor, Harry; Navis, Gerjan; de Borst, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade provides renoprotective effects in chronic kidney disease (CKD); yet progressive renal function loss remains common. Dietary sodium restriction potentiates the renoprotective effects of RAAS blockade. Vitamin D receptor activator (VDRA

  14. Fasting and Caloric Restriction in Cancer Prevention and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, Sebastian; Longo, Valter D

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the USA and among the leading major diseases in the world. It is anticipated to continue to increase because of the growth of the aging population and prevalence of risk factors such as obesity, smoking, and/or poor dietary habits. Cancer treatment has remained relatively similar during the past 30 years with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in combination with surgery remaining the standard therapies although novel therapies are slowly replacing or complementing the standard ones. According to the American Cancer Society, the dietary recommendation for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy is to increase calorie and protein intake. In addition, there are no clear guidelines on the type of nutrition that could have a major impact on cancer incidence. Yet, various forms of reduced caloric intake such as calorie restriction (CR) or fasting demonstrate a wide range of beneficial effects able to help prevent malignancies and increase the efficacy of cancer therapies. Whereas chronic CR provides both beneficial and detrimental effects as well as major compliance challenges, periodic fasting (PF), fasting-mimicking diets (FMDs), and dietary restriction (DR) without a reduction in calories are emerging as interventions with the potential to be widely used to prevent and treat cancer. Here, we review preclinical and preliminary clinical studies on dietary restriction and fasting and their role in inducing cellular protection and chemotherapy resistance.

  15. Mechanisms and efficacy of dietary FODMAP restriction in IBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudacher, Heidi M; Irving, Peter M; Lomer, Miranda C E; Whelan, Kevin

    2014-04-01

    IBS is a debilitating condition that markedly affects quality of life. The chronic nature, high prevalence and associated comorbidities contribute to the considerable economic burden of IBS. The pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood and evidence to guide management is variable. Interest in dietary intervention continues to grow rapidly. Ileostomy and MRI studies have demonstrated that some fermentable carbohydrates increase ileal luminal water content and breath hydrogen testing studies have demonstrated that some carbohydrates also increase colonic hydrogen production. The effects of fermentable carbohydrates on gastrointestinal symptoms have also been well described in blinded, controlled trials. Dietary restriction of fermentable carbohydrates (popularly termed the 'low FODMAP diet') has received considerable attention. An emerging body of research now demonstrates the efficacy of fermentable carbohydrate restriction in IBS; however, limitations still exist with this approach owing to a limited number of randomized trials, in part due to the fundamental difficulty of placebo control in dietary trials. Evidence also indicates that the diet can influence the gut microbiota and nutrient intake. Fermentable carbohydrate restriction in people with IBS is promising, but the effects on gastrointestinal health require further investigation.

  16. [Chronic polyradiculoneuritis and its frontiers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat, J M; Tabaraud, F; Magy, L; Macian, F

    2002-12-01

    The Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathies (CIDP) constitute a syndrome whose incidence is difficult to evaluate, and is probably underestimated. In the course of this presentation, we deliberately restricted discussion to issues raised in recent years concerning the extent of this syndrome. We discuss diagnostic criteria, especially electrophysiological ones. As the criteria proposed by the ad hoc committee of the American Academy of Neurology in 1991 have been questioned due to lack of sensitivity, new ones have been proposed recently. We briefly discuss the different types of chronic dysimmune demyelinating neuropathy: not only the CIDP, but also the Lewis and Sumner syndrome or multifocal inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy and the multiple conduction block neuropathies. At last, we point out the consistent finding of axonal involvement in the course of a chronic demyelinating neuropathy; over time, it can become pre-dominant, which may make diagnosis difficult by suggesting a chronic axonal neuropathy that may be assumed to be primary. Consideration of these points may help clinicians recognize more chronic dysimmune neuropathies, for which immunosuppressive therapy has been found to be effective.

  17. Management of chronic refractory cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Peter G; Vertigan, Anne E

    2015-12-14

    Chronic refractory cough (CRC) is defined as a cough that persists despite guideline based treatment. It is seen in 20-46% of patients presenting to specialist cough clinics and it has a substantial impact on quality of life and healthcare utilization. Several terms have been used to describe this condition, including the recently introduced term cough hypersensitivity syndrome. Key symptoms include a dry irritated cough localized around the laryngeal region. Symptoms are not restricted to cough and can include globus, dyspnea, and dysphonia. Chronic refractory cough has factors in common with laryngeal hypersensitivity syndromes and chronic pain syndromes, and these similarities help to shed light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Its pathophysiology is complex and includes cough reflex sensitivity, central sensitization, peripheral sensitization, and paradoxical vocal fold movement. Chronic refractory cough often occurs after a viral infection. The diagnosis is made once the main diseases that cause chronic cough have been excluded (or treated) and cough remains refractory to medical treatment. Several treatments have been developed over the past decade. These include speech pathology interventions using techniques adapted from the treatment of hyperfunctional voice disorders, as well as the use of centrally acting neuromodulators such as gabapentin and pregabalin. Potential new treatments in development also show promise.

  18. Chronic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipponen, Pentti; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2015-06-01

    Prevalence of chronic gastritis has markedly declined in developed populations during the past decades. However, chronic gastritis is still one of the most common serious pandemic infections with such severe killing sequelae as peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. Globally, on average, even more than half of people may have a chronic gastritis at present. Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood is the main cause of chronic gastritis, which microbial origin is the key for the understanding of the bizarre epidemiology and course of the disease. A life-long and aggressive inflammation in gastritis results in destruction (atrophic gastritis) of stomach mucosa with time (years and decades). The progressive worsening of atrophic gastritis results subsequently in dysfunctions of stomach mucosa. Atrophic gastritis will finally end up in a permanently acid-free stomach in the most extreme cases. Severe atrophic gastritis and acid-free stomach are the highest independent risk conditions for gastric cancer known so far. In addition to the risks of malignancy and peptic ulcer, acid-free stomach and severe forms of atrophic gastritis may associate with failures in absorption of essential vitamins, like vitamin B12, micronutrients (like iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc), diet and medicines.

  19. Chronic sleep reduction, functioning at school and school achievement in preadolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between chronic sleep reduction, functioning at school and school achievement of boys and girls. To establish individual consequences of chronic sleep reduction (tiredness, sleepiness, loss of energy and emotional instability) the Chronic Sleep Reduction Ques

  20. Chronic sleep reduction, functioning at school and school achievement in preadolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between chronic sleep reduction, functioning at school and school achievement of boys and girls. To establish individual consequences of chronic sleep reduction (tiredness, sleepiness, loss of energy and emotional instability) the Chronic Sleep Reduction

  1. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Singh Gulati, G., E-mail: gulatigurpreet@rediffmail.com [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Seth, S. [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Sharma, S. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India)

    2012-02-15

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  2. [How to prevent protein-energy wasting in patients with chronic kidney disease--position statement of the Croatian Society of Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bašić-Jukić, Nikolina; Rački, Sanjin; Kes, Petar; Ljutić, Dragan; Vujičić, Bozidar; Lovčić, Vesna; Orlić, Lidija; Prkačin, Ingrid; Radić, Josipa; Jakić, Marko; Klarić, Dragan; Gulin, Marijana

    2014-04-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW) is a frequent problem in patients with end-stage renal disease, which is associated with adverse outcome. Risk factors for development of PEW in dialysis patients include anorexia, limitations in food intake due to problems with mineral metabolism (hyperphosphatemia, hyperkalemia). Prevention of PEW in dialysis population demands different therapeutic measures to correct abnormalities and to prevent loss of energy and proteins. Therapeutic approach should be individualized based on the specific problems of each patient in order to correct metabolic problems and to optimize food intake. In patients with inability to maintain nutritional status with standard oral feeding, other measures which include oral nutrition supplements and intradialytic parenteral feeding should be applied. Anabolic steroids, growth hormone and adequate oral nutritional supplements, together with physical activity may prevent further catabolism and correct abnormalities. Appetite stimulators, antiinflammatory interventions and anabolic drugs seem promising; however, their efficacy should be investigated in future clinical trials.

  3. Assessing restrictiveness of national alcohol marketing policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Marissa B; Jernigan, David H

    2014-01-01

    To develop an approach for monitoring national alcohol marketing policies globally, an area of the World Health Organization's (WHO) Global Alcohol Strategy. Data on restrictiveness of alcohol marketing policies came from the 2002 and 2008 WHO Global Surveys on Alcohol and Health. We included four scales in a sensitivity analysis to determine optimal weights to score countries on their marketing policies and applied the selected scale to assess national marketing policy restrictiveness. Nearly, 36% of countries had no marketing restrictions. The overall restrictiveness levels were not significantly different between 2002 and 2008. The number of countries with strict marketing regulations did not differ across years. This method of monitoring alcohol marketing restrictiveness helps track progress towards implementing WHO'S Global Alcohol Strategy. Findings indicate a consistent lack of restrictive policies over time, making this a priority area for national and global action. © The Author 2014. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  4. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to fat-free yogurts and fermented milks with live yogurt cultures complying with the specifications ?fat free?, ?low in sugars?, ?high protein?, ?source of calcium? and ?source of vitamin D? for nutrition claims and maintenance of lean body mass in the context of an energy-restricted diet pursuant to Article 13.5 of Regulation (EC No 1924/2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Following an application from Federación Nacional de Industrias Lácteas (FeNIL, submitted pursuant to Article 13.5 of Regulation (EC No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of Spain, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim related to fat-free yogurts and fermented milks with live yogurt cultures complying with the specifications “fat free”, “low in sugars”, “high protein”, “source of calcium” and “source of vitamin D” for nutrition claims and maintenance of lean body mass in the context of an energy-restricted diet. The Panel considers that the food that is the subject of the claim, fat-free yogurts and fermented milks complying with the specifications “fat free”, “low in sugars”, “high protein”, “source of calcium” and “source of vitamin D” for nutrition claims, is sufficiently characterised. The Panel considers that maintenance of lean body mass in the context of an energy-restricted diet is a beneficial physiological effect. No human intervention studies from which conclusions could be drawn for the scientific substantiation of the claim were provided. The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of fat-free yogurts and fermented milks with live yogurt cultures complying with the specifications “fat free”, “low in sugars”, “high protein”, “source of calcium” and “source of vitamin D” for nutrition claims and maintenance of lean body mass in the context of an energy-restricted diet.

  5. Measuring Regulatory Restrictions in Logistics Services

    OpenAIRE

    Claire HOLLWEG; Marn-Heong WONG

    2009-01-01

    This study measures the extent of restrictions on trade in logistics services in the ASEAN+6 economies by constructing a logistics regulatory restrictiveness index for each economy that quantifies the extent of government regulations faced by logistics service providers. This is the first study of its kind to construct a regulatory index of the entire logistics sector, which includes the main modes of international transport and customs restrictions. The indices show that large differences ex...

  6. Second law of thermodynamics under control restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilming, H; Gallego, R; Eisert, J

    2016-04-01

    The second law of thermodynamics, formulated as an ultimate bound on the maximum extractable work, has been rigorously derived in multiple scenarios. However, the unavoidable limitations that emerge due to the lack of control on small systems are often disregarded when deriving such bounds, which is specifically important in the context of quantum thermodynamics. Here we study the maximum extractable work with limited control over the working system and its interaction with the heat bath. We derive a general second law when the set of accessible Hamiltonians of the working system is arbitrarily restricted. We then apply our bound to particular scenarios that are important in realistic implementations: limitations on the maximum energy gap and local control over many-body systems. We hence demonstrate in what precise way the lack of control affects the second law. In particular, contrary to the unrestricted case, we show that the optimal work extraction is not achieved by simple thermal contacts. Our results not only generalize the second law to scenarios of practical relevance, but also take first steps in the direction of local thermodynamics.

  7. Chronic Pelvic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Chronic Pelvic Pain Home For Patients Search FAQs Chronic Pelvic Pain ... Pelvic Pain FAQ099, August 2011 PDF Format Chronic Pelvic Pain Gynecologic Problems What is chronic pelvic pain? What ...

  8. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information > Children/Pediatric > Chronic Pancreatitis in Children test Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child ... pancreatitis will develop diabetes in adolescence. Who gets chronic pancreatitis? Those at risk for chronic pancreatitis are ...

  9. Chronic Beryllium Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Education & Training Home Conditions Chronic Beryllium Disease Chronic Beryllium Disease Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... MD, MSPH, FCCP (February 01, 2016) What is chronic beryllium disease (CBD)? Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is ...

  10. Low back pain - chronic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonspecific back pain; Backache - chronic; Lumbar pain - chronic; Pain - back - chronic; Chronic back pain - low ... Low back pain is common. Almost everyone has back pain at some time in their life. Often, the exact cause ...

  11. Chronic motor tic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start ...

  12. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto thyroiditis; Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis; Autoimmune thyroiditis; Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis; Lymphadenoid goiter - Hashimoto; Hypothyroidism - Hashimoto; Type 2 polyglandular autoimmune ...

  13. Lung perfusion characteristics in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and peripheral forms of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (pCTEPH): Dual-energy CT experience in 31 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano, Jessica; Khung, Suonita; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Department of Thoracic Imaging, Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain [University Lille, CHU Lille, Department of Biostatistics, Lille (France); Hossein-Foucher, Claude; Bellevre, Dimitri [University Lille, CHU Lille, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Salengro, Lille (France); Lamblin, Nicolas [University Lille, CHU Lille, Department of Cardiology, Cardiology Hospital, Lille (France)

    2017-04-15

    To compare lung perfusion in PAH and pCTEPH on dual-energy CT (DECT) examinations. Thirty-one patients with PAH (group 1; n = 19) and pCTEPH (group 2; n = 12) underwent a dual-energy chest CTA with reconstruction of diagnostic and perfusion images. Perfusion alterations were analysed at a segmental level. V/Q scintigraphy was available in 22 patients (group 1: 13/19; group 2: 9/12). CT perfusion was abnormal in 52.6 % of group 1 patients and in 100 % of group 2 patients (p = 0.0051). The patterns of perfusion alteration significantly differed between the two groups (p < 0.0001): (1) in group 1, 96.6 % of segments with abnormal perfusion showed patchy defects; (2) in group 2, the most frequent abnormalities consisted of patchy (58.5 %) and PE-type (37.5 %) defects. Paired comparison of CT perfusion and scintigraphy showed concordant findings in 76.9 % of group 1 (10/13) and 100 % of group 2 (9/9) patients, with a predominant or an exclusive patchy pattern in group 1 and a mixed pattern of abnormalities in group 2. Lung perfusion alterations at DECT are less frequent and more homogeneous in PAH than in pCTEPH, with a high level of concordant findings with V/Q scintigraphy. (orig.)

  14. The Cumulative Neurobehavioral and Physiological Effects of Chronic Caffeine Intake: Individual Differences and Implications for the Use of Caffeinated Energy Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaeth, Andrea M; Goel, Namni; Dinges, David F

    2014-01-01

    The use of caffeine-containing energy products (CCEP) has increased worldwide in recent years and research shows that CCEP can improve cognitive and physical performance. All of the top-selling energy drinks contain caffeine, which is likely to be the primary psychoactive ingredient in CCEP. Presumably, individuals consume CCEP to counteract feelings of ‘low-energy’ in situations causing tiredness, fatigue, and/or reduced alertness. This review discusses the scientific evidence for sleep loss, circadian phase, sleep inertia and the time-on-task effect as causes of ‘low energy’ and summarizes research assessing the efficacy of caffeine to counteract decreased alertness and increased fatigue in such situations. The results of a placebo-controlled experiment on healthy adults undergoing three nights of total sleep deprivation (with or without 2 hour naps every 12 hours) are presented to illustrate the physiological and neurobehavioral effects of sustained low-dose caffeine. Individual differences, including genetic factors, in the response to caffeine and to sleep loss are discussed. We conclude with future directions for research on this important and evolving topic. PMID:25293542

  15. Effects of Energy Intake on Index of Heart Function for Chronic Heart Failure%不同能量摄入对慢性心力衰竭病人心功能相关指标的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱文艺; 达丽炜; 张艺; 刘晓莉; 王建

    2012-01-01

    目的:了解慢性心力衰竭病人能量摄入情况对心功能的影响。方法:随机选取重庆市新桥医院心内科和心外科慢性心力衰竭病人45例,调查其能量摄入情况后分成能量摄入不足组和能量摄入达标组,然后比较两组心功能状况的相关指标如血钠、B型脑钠肽、左室射血分数、血红蛋白、红细胞分布宽度等之间的差异。结果:与能量摄入不足组比较,能量摄入达标组左室射血分数、红细胞分布宽度有明显差异,有统计学意义(P〈0.05);而血钠、血红蛋白及B型脑钠肽虽有差异,但无统计学意义(P〉0.05)。结论:慢性心力衰竭病人提供较适当的能量可以改善左室射血分数、红细胞分布宽度等心功能相关指标,从而减轻心力衰竭程度。%[Objective] To understand the effects of energy intake on index of heart function for Chronic Heart Failure. [Method] A total of 45 medical patients in department of cardiology and cardiovascular surgery of Xinqiao Hospital were randomly selected and were divided into good group and poor group according to energy intake, then analyzed these indexes such as blood sodium, type B brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF), haemoglobin(HGB), red cell distribution width (RDW) and so on between two groups. [Result] Compared with the poor group, there were significant differences on LVEF and RDW (P〈0.05), and there were no significant differences on blood sodium, BNP and HGB (P〉0.05) . [Conclusion] Appropriate energy intake can improve these index such as LVEF and RDW for Chronic Heart Failure, thus relieve the heart failure.

  16. 33 CFR 203.46 - Restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm: The Corps Rehabilitation and Inspection Program § 203.46 Restrictions. (a) Restrictions to flood control works. Flood control works are designed and...) Non-flood related rehabilitation. Rehabilitation of flood control structures damaged by...

  17. Restricted Interests and Teacher Presentation of Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocco, Corey S.; Thompson, Rachel H.; Rodriguez, Nicole M.

    2011-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behavior (RRB) is more pervasive, prevalent, frequent, and severe in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) than in their typical peers. One subtype of RRB is restricted interests in items or activities, which is evident in the manner in which individuals engage with items (e.g., repetitious wheel spinning),…

  18. 7 CFR 400.407 - Restricted access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restricted access. 400.407 Section 400.407 Agriculture... Social Security Account Numbers and Employer Identification Numbers § 400.407 Restricted access. The Manager, other officer, or employee of FCIC or an authorized person may have access to the SSNs and...

  19. 42 CFR 2.13 - Confidentiality restrictions.

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    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Confidentiality restrictions. 2.13 Section 2.13 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.13 Confidentiality restrictions...

  20. Application of dual-energy X-ray in vascular calcification in patients with chronic kidney disease%双能X线在慢性肾脏病患者血管钙化中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴晓婵; 罗福漳; 洪国保

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨双能X线骨密度检测在慢性肾脏病(CKD)患者血管钙化诊断中的应用价值。方法选取2013年1月~2014年12月本院接诊的42例CKD 3~5期患者作为研究对象,所有患者均行双能X线检查。以多层螺旋CT诊断为金标准,评价双能X线检测在CKD 3~5期患者血管钙化诊断中的敏感度和特异性。结果多层螺旋 CT在 CKD 3期、CKD 4期、CKD 5期的检出率分别为33.3%、52.2%、100.0%,双能X线的检出率分别为22.2%、43.5%、90.0%,且多层螺旋CT的总检出率为59.5%,与双能X线检测的50.0%比较,差异无统计学意义(P跃0.05)。以多层螺旋CT检测为金标准,双能X线检测的特异性为100.0%,敏感度为84.0%。结论双能X线可应用于检测CKD 3~5期患者的血管钙化,具有较好的临床价值。%Objective To exolore the application value of dual-energy X-ray in the detection of vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Methods 42 cases of CKD 3-5 stages from January 2013 to December 2014 in our hospital were selected as the research objects.All patients were given dual-energy X-ray examination.The sensi-tivity and specificity of dual-energy X-ray examination in the diagnosis of vascular calcification in patients with CKD 3-5 stages were evaluated by using the gold standard of the diagnosis of multi-slice spiral CT. Results The detection rate in CKD 3-5 stages by multi-slice spiral CT was 33.3%,52.2%,100.0% respectively,while the detection rate in CKD 3-5 stages by dual-energy X-ray was 22.2%,43.5%,90.0% respectively.The total detection rate of multi-slice spiral CT was 59.5%,the otal detection rate of multi-slice spiral CT was 50.0%,there was no significant difference (P>0.05).The specificity of dual energy X-ray detection was 84%,and the sensitivity was 100%,with the detection of multi slice spiral CT as gold standard. Conclusion Dual-energy X-ray can be used in the detection of vascular calcification in chronic