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Sample records for chronic disease practice

  1. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Niurka Mercedes Galende Hernández; Diosdania Alfonso Falcón; Carlos Alberto Martell Alonso; Alexis Díaz Mesa; Inti Santana Carballosa

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. This concept includes simple chronic bronchitis, asthmatic bronchitis, chronic obstructive bronchitis, and pulmonary emphysema; although this two last are the most commonly included. Risk factors, classification and treatment are commented, stressing the strategy of mechanical ventilation and the indications for mechanical invasive and no invasive ventilation. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most i...

  2. Prevention of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney diseases in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    van Nielen, M; Assendelft, P.; Drenthen, T; Hombergh, P. van den; Dis, I. van; Schellevis, F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To study the attitudes and working methods of general practitioners (GPs) in primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney diseases. Methods: A questionnaire with questions about primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney diseases in general practice was sent to a representative sample of 1100 Dutch GPs. The data were analyzed using frequency tables, chi-square and ANOVA. Results: 330 GPs completed and ret...

  3. Anticoagulation in chronic kidney disease patients—the practical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Stephen; Szeki, Iren; Nash, Michael J; Thachil, Jecko

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness about the risks of arterial and venous thromboembolism (TE) in hospital patients and general public which has led to consideration of thrombosis prevention measures in earnest. Early recognition of the symptoms of TE disease has led to timely administration of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs, translating to better outcome in many of these patients. In this respect, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) represent a special group. They indeed represent...

  4. Comorbidity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in family practice: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Olmos Luis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is frequent and often coexists with other diseases. The aim of this study was to quantify the prevalence of COPD and related chronic comorbidity among patients aged over 40 years visiting family practices in an area of Madrid. Methods An observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in a health area of the Madrid Autonomous Region (Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid. The practice population totalled 198,670 persons attended by 129 Family Physicians (FPs, and the study population was made up of persons over the age of 40 years drawn from this practice population. Patients were deemed to have COPD if this diagnosis appeared on their clinical histories. Prevalence of COPD; prevalence of a further 25 chronic diseases in patients with COPD; and standardised prevalence ratios, were calculated. Results Prevalence of COPD in family medicine was 3.2% (95% CI 3.0–3.3 overall, 5.3% among men and 1.4% among women; 90% of patients presented with comorbidity, with a mean of 4 ± 2.04 chronic diseases per patient, with the most prevalent related diseases being arterial hypertension (52%, disorders of lipid metabolism (34%, obesity (25%, diabetes (20% and arrhythmia (15%. After controlling for age and sex, the observed prevalence of the following ten chronic diseases was higher than expected: heart failure; chronic liver disease; asthma; generalised artherosclerosis; osteoporosis; ischaemic heart disease; thyroid disease; anxiety/depression; arrhythmia; and obesity. Conclusions Patients with COPD, who are frequent in family practice, have a complex profile and pose a clinical and organisational challenge to FPs.

  5. Predictive models for ocular chronic graft-versus-host disease diagnosis and disease activity in transplant clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Lauren M; Datiles, Manuel B; Steinberg, Seth M; Mitchell, Sandra A; Bishop, Rachel J; Cowen, Edward W; Mays, Jacqueline; McCarty, John M; Kuzmina, Zoya; Pirsl, Filip; Fowler, Daniel H; Gress, Ronald E; Pavletic, Steven Z

    2015-09-01

    Ocular chronic graft-versus-host disease is one of the most bothersome common complications following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The National Institutes of Health Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease Consensus Project provided expert recommendations for diagnosis and organ severity scoring. However, ocular chronic graft-versus-host disease can be diagnosed only after examination by an ophthalmologist. There are no currently accepted definitions of ocular chronic graft-versus-host disease activity. The goal of this study was to identify predictive models of diagnosis and activity for use in clinical transplant practice. A total of 210 patients with moderate or severe chronic graft-versus-host disease were enrolled in a prospective, cross-sectional, observational study (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 00092235). Experienced ophthalmologists determined presence of ocular chronic graft-versus-host disease, diagnosis and activity. Measures gathered by the transplant clinician included Schirmer's tear test and National Institutes of Health 0-3 Eye Score. Patient-reported outcome measures were the ocular subscale of the Lee Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease Symptom Scale and Chief Eye Symptom Intensity Score. Altogether, 157 (75%) patients were diagnosed with ocular chronic graft-versus-host disease; 133 of 157 patients (85%) had active disease. In a multivariable model, the National Institutes of Health Eye Score (Pscore (P=0.027). These results support the use of selected transplant clinician- and patient-reported outcome measures for ocular chronic graft-versus-host disease screening when providing care to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation survivors with moderate to severe chronic graft-versus-host disease. Prospective studies are needed to determine if the Lee ocular subscale demonstrates adequate responsiveness as a disease activity outcome measure. PMID:26088932

  6. Physicians’ practices for diagnosing liver fibrosis in chronic liver diseases: A nationwide, Canadian survey

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastiani, Giada; Ghali, Peter; Wong, Philip; Klein, Marina B; Deschenes, Marc; Myers, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine practices among physicians in Canada for the assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver diseases.METHODS: Hepatologists, gastroenterologists, infectious diseases specialists, members of the Canadian Gastroenterology Association and/or the Canadian HIV Trials Network who manage patients with liver diseases were invited to participate in a web-based, national survey.RESULTS: Of the 237 physicians invited, 104 (43.9%) completed the survey. Routine assessm...

  7. Employer Adoption of Evidence-Based Chronic Disease Prevention Practices: A Pilot Study

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    Jeffrey R. Harris, MD, MPH, MBA

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe conducted a pilot test of American Cancer Society Workplace Solutions, an intervention that takes a marketing approach to increasing employers’ adoption of evidence-based practices to prevent and control chronic diseases among their employees.ContextWe delivered the intervention and assessed the changes in practices of 8 large employers in the Pacific Northwest.MethodsWorkplace Solutions recommends 15 employer practices in 5 categories: 1 health insurance benefits, 2 policies, 3 workplace programs, 4 health-promoting communication, and 5 tracking of employee health behaviors to measure progress. The intervention includes 4 meetings with employers over 2 months and begins with a questionnaire-based assessment of employer practices. Tailored recommendations follow, along with practice-specific implementation assistance on requested topics. We tested the intervention in a before–after study without a comparison group.ConsequencesThe employers ranged in size from 7500 to 115,522 employees and included private companies and public employers. Seven of the eight employers implemented more of the recommended practices at follow-up (an average of 13 months after the intervention than at baseline. Overall, implementation of the practices increased from 38% at baseline to 61% at follow-up (P = .02.InterpretationWorkplace Solutions is a promising new approach to bringing evidence-based best practices for preventing chronic disease to large numbers of adults.

  8. Clinical management practices adopted by physiotherapists in India for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A national survey

    OpenAIRE

    Aripta Jingar; Gopala Krishna Alaparthi; Vaishali, K; Shyam Krishnan; Zulfeequer,; B Unnikrishnan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective: Evidence supports the use of pulmonary rehabilitation in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients both during acute exacerbation and at later stages. It is used in India; but, to date, there has been no study that has investigated the structure of pulmonary rehabilitation programs for COPD patients in India. The recent study aims to determine the current practice patterns of Indian Physiotherapists for COPD patients admitted in Intensive...

  9. Motivations for the Adoption of Chronic Disease Information Systems in General Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Carbone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to highlight the key motivational factors that lead to the successful implementation of Chronic Diseases Information Systems (CDISs in twenty eight general practices in a case study of a large general practice division network in Australia. The literature identified three major areas of CDIS motivation: patient care gap motivator, internal motivators and external motivators. Patient care emerged as the most important motivation for adopting CDIS, followed by risk management and financial incentives. However, the study also determined that the motivational forces are inter-related and suggests that the decision to adopt CDIS should consider a number of these identified factors.

  10. A national survey of organizational transfer practices in chronic disease prevention in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanusaik, Nancy; O'Loughlin, Jennifer L; Paradis, Gilles; Kishchuk, Natalie

    2011-08-01

    Underuse of best practices in chronic disease prevention (CDP) represents missed opportunities to promote healthy living and prevent chronic disease. Better understanding of how CDP programs, practices and policies (PPPs) are transferred from 'resource' organizations that develop them to 'user' organizations that implement them is crucial. The objectives of this work were to develop psychometrically sound measures of transfer practices occurring within resource organizations; describe the use of these transfer practices and identify correlates of the transfer process. Cross-sectional data were collected in structured telephone interviews with the person most knowledgeable about PPP transfer in 77 Canadian organizations that develop PPPs. Independent correlates of transfer were identified using multiple linear regression. The transfer practices most commonly used included: identification of barriers to PPP adoption/implementation, tailoring transfer strategies and designing a transfer plan. Skill at planning/implementing transfer, external sources of funding specifically allocated for transfer, type of resource organization, attitude toward process of collaboration and user-centeredness were all positively associated with the transfer process. These factors represent possible targets for interventions to improve transfer of CDP PPPs. PMID:21558441

  11. Tailored implementation of evidence-based practice for patients with chronic diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Wensing

    Full Text Available When designing interventions and policies to implement evidence based healthcare, tailoring strategies to the targeted individuals and organizations has been recommended. We aimed to gather insights into the ideas of a variety of people for implementing evidence-based practice for patients with chronic diseases, which were generated in five European countries.A qualitative study in five countries (Germany, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, United Kingdom was done, involving overall 115 individuals. A purposeful sample of four categories of stakeholders (healthcare professionals, quality improvement officers, healthcare purchasers and authorities, and health researchers was involved in group interviews in each of the countries to generate items for improving healthcare in different chronic conditions per country: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, depression in elderly people, multi-morbidity, obesity. A disease-specific standardized list of determinants of practice in these conditions provided the starting point for these groups. The content of the suggested items was categorized in a pre-defined framework of 7 domains and specific themes in the items were identified within each domain.The 115 individuals involved in the study generated 812 items, of which 586 addressed determinants of practice. These largely mapped onto three domains: individual health professional factors, patient factors, and professional interactions. Few items addressed guideline factors, incentives and resources, capacity of organizational change, or social, political and legal factors. The relative numbers of items in the different domains were largely similar across stakeholder categories within each of the countries. The analysis identified 29 specific themes in the suggested items across countries.The type of suggestions for improving healthcare practice was largely similar across different stakeholder groups, mainly addressing healthcare

  12. Care for chronic illness in Australian general practice – focus groups of chronic disease self-help groups over 10 years: implications for chronic care systems reforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Carmel M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic disease is a major global challenge. However, chronic illness and its care, when intruding into everyday life, has received less attention in Asia Pacific countries, including Australia, who are in the process of transitioning to chronic disease orientated health systems. Aim The study aims to examine experiences of chronic illness before and after the introduction of Australian Medicare incentives for longer consultations and structured health assessments in general practice. Methods Self-help groups around the conditions of diabetes, epilepsy, asthma and cancer identified key informants to participate in 4 disease specific focus groups. Audio taped transcripts of the focus groups were coded using grounded theory methodology. Key themes and lesser themes identified using a process of saturation until the study questions on needs and experiences of care were addressed. Thematic comparisons were made across the 2002/3 and 1992/3 focus groups. Findings At times of chronic illness, there was need to find and then ensure access to 'the right GP'. The 'right GP or specialist' committed to an in-depth relationship of trust, personal rapport and understanding together with clinical and therapeutic competence. The 'right GP', the main specialist, the community nurse and the pharmacist were key providers, whose success depended on interprofessional communication. The need to trust and rely on care providers was balanced by the need for self-efficacy 'to be in control of disease and treatment' and 'to be your own case manager'. Changes in Medicare appeared to have little penetration into everyday perceptions of chronic illness burden or time and quality of GP care. Inequity of health system support for different disease groupings emerged. Diabetes, asthma and certain cancers, like breast cancer, had greater support, despite common experiences of disease burden, and a need for research and support programs. Conclusion Core

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... a protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin can develop emphysema. Other risk factors for COPD are: Exposure to ...

  14. Chronic disease management in general practice: results from a national study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Darker, C

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to provide baseline data on chronic disease management (CDM) provision in Irish general practice (GP). The survey instrument was previously used in a study of primary care physicians in 11 countries, thus allowing international comparisons. The response rate was 72% (380\\/527).The majority of GPs (240\\/380; 63%) reported significant changes are needed in our health care system to make CDM work better. Small numbers of routine clinical audits are being performed (95\\/380; 25%). Irish GPs use evidence based guidelines for treatment of diabetes (267\\/380; 71%), asthma \\/ COPD (279\\/380; 74%) and hypertension (297\\/380; 79%), to the same extent as international counterparts. Barriers to delivering chronic care include increased workload (379\\/380; 99%), lack of appropriate funding (286\\/380; 76%), with GPs interested in targeted payments (244\\/380; 68%). This study provides baseline data to assess future changes in CDM.

  15. How to differentiate renal senescence from chronic kidney disease in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Carlos G; Jauregui, Jose R

    2016-09-01

    Renal aging is frequently confused with chronic nephropathy in clinical practice, since there are some similarities between them, particularly regarding reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, there are many differences between these two entities which can help any practitioner to distinguish between them, such as: GFR deterioration rate, hematocrit, renal handling of urea, creatinine and some electrolytes, tubular acidification, urinalysis, and renal imaging. Differentiation between renal aging and chronic renal disease is crucial in order to avoid unnecessary medicalization of what is a physiological change associated with the healthy aging process, and the potential harmful consequences of such overdiagnosis. A recently described equation (HUGE), as well as an adequate nephrological evaluation and follow up can help physicians to distinguish both entities. PMID:27383288

  16. Study protocol: Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease Extension (ABCDE Project

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    Thompson Sandra

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing body of international literature points to the importance of a system approach to improve the quality of care in primary health care settings. Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI concepts and techniques provide a theoretically coherent and practical way for primary care organisations to identify, address, and overcome the barriers to improvements. The Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease (ABCD study, a CQI-based quality improvement project conducted in Australia's Northern Territory, has demonstrated significant improvements in primary care service systems, in the quality of clinical service delivery and in patient outcomes related to chronic illness care. The aims of the extension phase of this study are to examine factors that influence uptake and sustainability of this type of CQI activity in a variety of Indigenous primary health care organisations in Australia, and to assess the impact of collaborative CQI approaches on prevention and management of chronic illness and health outcomes in Indigenous communities. Methods/design The study will be conducted in 40–50 Indigenous community health centres from 4 States/Territories (Northern Territory, Western Australia, New South Wales and Queensland over a five year period. The project will adopt a participatory, quality improvement approach that features annual cycles of: 1 organisational system assessment and audits of clinical records; 2 feedback to and interpretation of results with participating health centre staff; 3 action planning and goal setting by health centre staff to achieve system changes; and 4 implementation of strategies for change. System assessment will be carried out using a System Assessment Tool and in-depth interviews of key informants. Clinical audit tools include two essential tools that focus on diabetes care audit and preventive service audit, and several optional tools focusing on audits of hypertension, heart disease, renal

  17. Predictive models for ocular chronic graft-versus-host disease diagnosis and disease activity in transplant clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Lauren M.; Datiles, Manuel B.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Mitchell, Sandra A.; Bishop, Rachel J.; Cowen, Edward W.; Mays, Jacqueline; McCarty, John M.; Kuzmina, Zoya; Pirsl, Filip; Fowler, Daniel H; Gress, Ronald E.; Pavletic, Steven Z.

    2015-01-01

    Ocular chronic graft-versus-host disease is one of the most bothersome common complications following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The National Institutes of Health Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease Consensus Project provided expert recommendations for diagnosis and organ severity scoring. However, ocular chronic graft-versus-host disease can be diagnosed only after examination by an ophthalmologist. There are no currently accepted definitions of ocular chronic graft-ve...

  18. Diagnosis of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    van Schayck, C P

    1996-01-01

    There may be an overlap between the clinical pictures of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease which hampers a clear distinction between the two diseases. Most symptoms presented by patients do not clearly belong exclusively to either asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. By the nature of their discipline and training, general practitioners focus mainly on symptoms presented, which do not give a decisive answer in the differential diagnosis between the two diseases. Ther...

  19. K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines for chronic kidney disease: Evaluation, classification, and stratification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, Andrew S.; Coresh, Josef; Bolton, Kline; Culleton, Bruce; Harvey, Kathy Schiro; Ikizler, T. Alp; Johnson, Cynda Ann; Kausz, Annamaria; Kimmel, Paul L.; Kusek, John; Levin, Adeera; Minaker, Kenneth L.; Nelson, Robert; Rennke, Helmut; Steffes, Michael; Witten, Beth; Hogg, Ronald J.; Furth, Susan; Lemley, Kevin V.; Portman, Ronald J.; Schwartz, George; Lau, Joseph; Balk, Ethan; Perrone, Ronald D.; Karim, Tauqeer; Rayan, Lara; Al-Massry, Inas; Chew, Priscilla; Astor, Brad C.; De Vine, Deirdre; Eknoyan, Garabed; Levin, Nathan; Burrows-Hudson, Sally; Keane, William; Kliger, Alan; Latos, Derrick; Mapes, Donna; Oberley, Edith; Willis, Kerry; Bailie, George; Becker, Gavin; Burrowes, Jerrilynn; Churchill, David; Collins, Allan; Couser, William; de Zeeuw, Dick; Garber, Alan; Golper, Thomas; Gotch, Frank; Gotto, Antonio; Greer, Joel W.; Grimm Jr., Richard; Hannah, Ramon G.; Acosta, Jaime Herrera; Hogg, Ronald; Hunsicker, Lawrence; Klag, Michael; Klahr, Saulo; Lewis, Caya; Lowrie, Edmund; Matas, Arthur; McCulloch, Sally; Michael, Maureen; Nally, Joseph V.; Newmann, John M.; Nissenson, Allen; Norris, Keith; Owen Jr., William; Patel, Thakor G.; Payne, Glenda; Rivera-Mizzoni, Rosa A.; Smith, David; Star, Robert; Steinman, Theodore; Valderrabano, Fernando; Walls, John; Wauters, Jean-Pierre; Wenger, Nanette; Briggs, Josephine

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic kidney disease as a public health problem. Chronic kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem. In the United States, there is a rising incidence and prevalence of kidney failure, with poor outcomes and high cost. There is an even higher prevalence of earlier stages of

  20. Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Implementation of Guidelines Gold 2011 in Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Osinová D; Sadloňová J.; Rozborilová E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a disease that is characterized by a persistent blockage of airflow from the lungs. It is an under-diagnosed, life-threatening disease which is not fully reversible. COPD is not only global health problem, the disease is also serious economic problem.

  1. "Chronic Lyme Disease"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area "Chronic Lyme Disease" What is "chronic Lyme disease?" Lyme disease is an infection caused by ... J Med 357:1422-30, 2008). How is Lyme disease treated? For early Lyme disease, a short ...

  2. THE EFFECTS OF PRACTICING SWIMMING IN CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE. CASE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Petrescu S.; Ciolan G. A.; Păunescu M.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is comprised primarily of two related diseases - chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Clinical research on the effects of swimming on the quality of the life of patients with various lung diseases showed that the use of water therapy programs have significant effects on the induction of pulmonary edema as well as on mild to moderate asthma. The case study presented in this study, aged 52, male, from urban area, smoker (30PA), with a weight of 96 kg an...

  3. Care for chronic illness in Australian general practice – focus groups of chronic disease self-help groups over 10 years: implications for chronic care systems reforms

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Carmel M; Peterson Chris; Robinson Rowena; Sturmberg Joachim P

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic disease is a major global challenge. However, chronic illness and its care, when intruding into everyday life, has received less attention in Asia Pacific countries, including Australia, who are in the process of transitioning to chronic disease orientated health systems. Aim The study aims to examine experiences of chronic illness before and after the introduction of Australian Medicare incentives for longer consultations and structured health assessments in gener...

  4. Practicability and safety of dipyridamole cardiac imaging in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurnheer, R.; Laube, I.; Bloch, K.E.; Russi, E.W. [Pulmonary Division, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Switzerland, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, P.A.; Stumpe, K.D.M. [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Zuerich (Switzerland); Stammberger, U.; Weder, W. [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    We tested the practicability of dipyridamole myocardial nitrogen-13 ammonia positron emission tomography (dipyridamole {sup 13}NH{sub 3}PET) for the perioperative risk assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD) in a cohort of patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) undergoing lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). Twenty consecutive LVRS candidates, 13 men and 7 women (mean age 57 {+-}2 years), without symptoms of CAD were prospectively studied by dipyridamole {sup 13}NH {sub 3}PET. Side-effects and overall tolerance were assessed by a questionnaire and visual analogue scale. Repeated pulmonary function tests were performed before and 4, 12, 16 and 30 minutes after dipyridamole injection. All dipyridamole {sup 13}NH {sub 3}PET studies were negative for CAD. Seventeen patients underwent LVRS without cardiac complications; three patients did not undergo LVRS for other reasons. Nine patients suffered intolerable dyspnoea requiring i.v. aminophylline. Mean FEV {sub 1} decreased significantly after dipyridamole infusion: in nine patients the reduction in FEV {sub 1}exceeded 15% from baseline. We found that dipyridamole is not well tolerated and causes significant bronchoconstriction in patients with severe COPD. Although all dipyridamole-induced side effects can be promptly reversed by aminophylline, dipyridamole cannot be recommended as a pharmacological stress in this setting. (orig.) With 1 fig., 4 tabs., 35 refs.

  5. Canadian Practice Assessment in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Respiratory Specialist Physician Perception Versus Patient Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Hernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a common respiratory condition and the fourth leading cause of death in Canada. Optimal COPD management requires patients to participate in their care and physician knowledge of patients’ perceptions of their disease.

  6. K/DOQI Clinical Practice Guidelines on Hypertension and Antihypertensive Agents in Chronic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, Andrew S.; Rocco, Michael V.; Anderson, Sharon; Andreoli, Sharon P.; Bailie, George R.; Bakris, George L.; Callahan, Mary Beth; Greene, Jane H.; Johnson, Cynda Ann; Lash, James P.; McCullough, Peter A.; Miller III, Edgar R.; Nally, Joseph V.; Pirsch, John D.; Portman, Ronald J.; Sevick, Mary Ann; Sica, Domenic; Wesson, Donald E.; Agodoa, Lawrence; Bolton, Kline; Cutler, Jeffrey A.; Hostetter, Tom; Lau, Joseph; Uhlig, Katrin; Chew, Priscilla; Kausz, Annamaria; Kupelnick, Bruce; Raman, Gowri; Sarnak, Mark; Wang, Chenchen; Astor, Brad C.; Eknoyan, Garabed; Levin, Adeera; Levin, Nathan; Bailie, George; Becker, Bryan; Becker, Gavin; Burrowes, Jerrilynn; Carrera, Fernando; Churchill, David; Collins, Allan; Crooks, Peter W.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Golper, Thomas; Gotch, Frank; Gotto, Antonio; Greenwood, Roger; Greer, Joel W.; Grimm Jr., Richard; Haley, William E.; Hogg, Ronald; Hull, Alan R.; Hunsicker, Lawrence; Klag, Michael; Klahr, Saulo; Lameire, Norbert; Locatelli, Francesco; McCulloch, Sally; Michael, Maureen; Newmann, John M.; Nissenson, Allen; Norris, Keith; Obrador, Gregorio; Owen Jr., William; Patel, Thakor G.; Payne, Glenda; Ronco, Claudio; Rivera-Mizzoni, Rosa A.; Schoolwerth, Anton C.; Star, Robert; Steffes, Michael; Steinman, Theodore; Wauters, John-Pierre; Wenger, Nanette; Briggs, Josephine; Burrows-Hudson, Sally; Latos, Derrick; Mapes, Donna; Oberley, Edith; Pereira, Brian J.G.; Willis, Kerry; Gucciardo, Anthony; Fingerhut, Donna; Klette, Margaret; Schachne, Elicia

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: CHRONIC KIDNEY disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health issue. In the United States, there is a rising incidence and prevalence of kidney failure (Fig 1), with poor outcomes and high cost. The prevalence of earlier stages of CKD is approximately 100 times greater than the prevalence

  7. Patient reported outcomes in chronic skin diseases: eHealth applications for clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.D. van Cranenburgh

    2016-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis was to examine and integrate patient reported outcomes (PROs) in dermatological care. In part I, we specifically examined health-related quality of life (HRQoL), treatment satisfaction, and experiences with care in patients with chronic skin diseases. Our results indic

  8. Chronic granulomatous disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGD; Fatal granulomatosis of childhood; Chronic granulomatous disease of childhood; Progressive septic granulomatosis ... In chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), immune system cells called ... some types of bacteria and fungi. This disorder leads to long- ...

  9. Cognitive screening in persons with chronic diseases in primary care: challenges and recommendations for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athilingam, Ponrathi; Visovsky, Constance; Elliott, Amanda F; Rogal, Philip J

    2015-09-01

    An integrative literature review was performed to identify the challenges in current cognitive screening. The aim of the review was to serve as an evaluative resource to guide clinicians in the selection of the best available cognitive screening measures for early assessment of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in people with chronic diseases. The review classified the available cognitive screening measures according to purpose, time to administer, and cognitive domains assessed as: 1) simple/ brief cognitive screening measures, 2) disease specific screening measures, 3) domain specific screening measures, 4) self-administered screening measures, and 5) technology-based screening measures. There is no single optimal cognitive measure for all patient populations and settings. Although disease specific cognitive screening measures are optimal, there is a lack of validated screening measures for many chronic diseases. Technology-based screening measure is a promising avenue for increasing the accessibility of cognitive screening. Future work should focus on translating available screening measures to mobile technology format to enhance the utility in busy primary care settings. Early cognitive screening in persons with chronic disease should enhance appropriate referrals for detailed neurocognitive examination and cognitive interventions to preserve and or minimize cognitive decline. PMID:25794511

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure: research and clinical practice in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Chiumeo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and comorbidities, increasing with age, is the challenge that nowadays health care systems are facing to better care treat these patients. For this reason a clinical trial was conducted in the province of Trento by a group of 30 volunteer general practitioners members of SNAMID (Scientific Society for Continuing Medical Education of General Practitioners. The objectives were to identify: i prevalence of COPD in patients (65-98 years in the province of Trento; ii presence and incidence of heart failure (HF in COPD patients; iii early detection of other chronic diseases; and iv improving electronic medical records (EMR as an innovation way of professional care management. From May 2011 to October 2013, 17 doctors completed the two-year work using the EMR. The studied patients were men and women (65-98 years, suffering from COPD; the considered data included: anthropometric information, smoking status, International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9 diagnosis of COPD, HF and chronic diseases, specific blood and instrumental tests. The extracted results were then linked with data of sentinel therapies, collected by the EMR. The database obtained identified patients with COPD or HF not previously recognized with ICD-9 diagnosis. The study identified the sentinel drugs chosen for COPD and HF, excluding other drugs not selective for the study or confusing for a proper statistical evaluation.

  11. Clinical management practices adopted by physiotherapists in India for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aripta Jingar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Evidence supports the use of pulmonary rehabilitation in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients both during acute exacerbation and at later stages. It is used in India; but, to date, there has been no study that has investigated the structure of pulmonary rehabilitation programs for COPD patients in India. The recent study aims to determine the current practice patterns of Indian Physiotherapists for COPD patients admitted in Intensive Care Units (ICUs and wards in terms of assessment and treatment. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire-based survey was conducted across India. Questionnaires were distributed to around 800 physiotherapists via E-mail. Physiotherapists with a Master Degree and a specialization in cardiopulmonary science or a minimum of 1 year of experience in treating cardiopulmonary patients were included. The questionnaires addressed assessment measures and treatment techniques given to COPD patients. Results: A total of 342 completed questionnaires were received, yielding a response rate of 43.8%, with a majority of responses from Karnataka, Maharashtra and Gujarat. The assessment and treatment techniques used were almost similar between ICUs and wards. More than 80% of the responders carried out the assessment of certain respiratory impairments in both ICUs and wards. An objective measure of dyspnea was taken by less than 40% of the responders, with little attention given to functional exercise capacity and health-related quality of life. Eighty-five percent of the responders used Dyspnea-relieving strategies and traditional airway clearance techniques in both ICUs and wards. Eighty-three percent of the responders were giving patients in the wards training for upper and lower extremity. Fifty percent were giving strength training in the wards. Conclusion: Whether patients are admitted in ICUs or Wards, the practice pattern adopted by Physiotherapists to treat them vary

  12. The chronic kidney disease outcomes and practice patterns study Brazil (CKDopps-Brazil: Design, data and methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Bueno de Oliveira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The chronic kidney disease outcomes and practice patterns study (CKDopps is an international observational, prospective, cohort study involving patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD stages 3-5 [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2, with a major focus upon care during the advanced CKD period (eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 m2]. During a 1-year enrollment period, each one of the 22 selected clinics will enroll up to 60 advanced CKD patients (eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 m2 and not dialysis-dependent and 20 earlier stage CKD patients (eGFR between 30-59 ml/min/1.73 m2. Exclusion criteria: age < 18 years old, patients on chronic dialysis or prior kidney transplant. The study timeline include up to one year for enrollment of patients at each clinic starting in the end of 2013, followed by up to 2-3 years of patient follow-up with collection of detailed longitudinal patient-level data, annual clinic practice-level surveys, and patient surveys. Analyses will apply regression models to evaluate the contribution of patient-level and clinic practice-level factors to study outcomes, and utilize instrumental variable-type techniques when appropriate. Conclusion: Launching in 2013, CKDopps Brazil will study advanced CKD care in a random selection of nephrology clinics across Brazil to gain understanding of variation in care across the country, and as part of a multinational study to identify optimal treatment practices to slow kidney disease progression and improve outcomes during the transition period to end-stage kidney disease.

  13. THE EFFECTS OF PRACTICING SWIMMING IN CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE. CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrescu S.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is comprised primarily of two related diseases - chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Clinical research on the effects of swimming on the quality of the life of patients with various lung diseases showed that the use of water therapy programs have significant effects on the induction of pulmonary edema as well as on mild to moderate asthma. The case study presented in this study, aged 52, male, from urban area, smoker (30PA, with a weight of 96 kg and a height of 168 cm, was diagnosed with COPD in GOLD III std about 2 years ago and abdominal obesity. The functional examinations have revealed a mixed ventilatory dysfunction with FEV of 48.6% and 68.3% CV. The therapy with tiotropium and beta 2 agonists initiated as needed, along with physical therapy. After the application of aquatic programs for 6 months the results have highlighted significant changes in the lung functionality and the quality of everyday life.

  14. Clinical practice of L-1-13C-phenylalanine in staging of chronic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twelve healthy controls, eight patients with chronic hepatitis graded G2S2, twelve patients with compensated liver cirrhosis, twelve patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis are studied by L-1-13C-phenylalanine breath test which is longed for 6 hours and 24 breath samples per subject are collected. 13CO2 enrichment are measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The results show that 13CO2 half excretion time T1/2 can significantly differentiate the four groups (P13CER30 and 13Ccum60 can differentiate normal subjects, patients with compensated liver cirrhosis and decompensated liver cirrhosis, but the discrepancy of the them are not significant between patients with chronic hepatitis and healthy controls or patients with compensated (P>0.05). The three parameters are significantly correlated with some standard clinical serum-biochemical datum (P13C-phenylalanine breath test may be a promising clinical tool to grade chronic liver disease, which is safe, simple, quantificational and effective

  15. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in chronic liver diseases: Implementation in clinical practice and decisional algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giada Sebastiani

    2009-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B and C together with alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases represent the major causes of progressive liver disease that can eventually evolve into cirrhosis and its end-stage complications, including decompensation, bleeding and liver cancer. Formation and accumulation of fibrosis in the liver is the common pathway that leads to an evolutive liver disease. Precise definition of liver fibrosis stage is essential for management of the patient in clinical practice since the presence of bridging fibrosis represents a strong indication for antiviral therapy for chronic viral hepatitis, while cirrhosis requires a specific follow-up including screening for esophageal varices and hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver biopsy has always represented the standard of reference for assessment of hepatic fibrosis but it has some limitations being invasive, costly and prone to sampling errors. Recently, blood markers and instrumental methods have been proposed for the non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis. However, there are still some doubts as to their implementation in clinical practice and a real consensus on how and when to use them is not still available. This is due to an unsatisfactory accuracy for some of them, and to an incomplete validation for others. Some studies suggest that performance of non-invasive methods for liver fibrosis assessment may increase when they re combined. Combination algorithms of non-invasive methods for assessing liver fibrosis may represent a rational and reliable approach to implement noninvasive assessment of liver fibrosis in clinical practice and to reduce rather than abolish liver biopsies.

  16. Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share this: Main Content Area Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) Phagocyte (purple) engulfing Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (yellow). Credit: NIAID CGD is a genetic disorder in which white blood ...

  17. Chronic diseases in adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Rončević Nevenka; Stojadinović Aleksandra; Odri Irena

    2006-01-01

    Introduction. The prevalence of chronic diseases in adolescence is constantly increasing, especially in the last two decades. Adolescence is a period of important changes: body growth and development, sexual development, development of cognitive abilities, change in family relations and between peers, formation of personal identity and personal system of values, making decisions on future occupation etc. Chronic diseases in adolescence. Chronic disorders affect all development issues and repr...

  18. Chronic diseases in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rončević Nevenka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The prevalence of chronic diseases in adolescence is constantly increasing, especially in the last two decades. Adolescence is a period of important changes: body growth and development, sexual development, development of cognitive abilities, change in family relations and between peers, formation of personal identity and personal system of values, making decisions on future occupation etc. Chronic diseases in adolescence. Chronic disorders affect all development issues and represent an additional burden for adolescents. The interaction between chronic disorders and various development issues is complex and two-way: the disease may affect development, and development may affect the disease. Developmental, psychosocial and family factors are of great importance in the treatment of adolescents with chronic disorders. Chronic disorders affect all aspects of adolescent life, including relations with peers, school, nutrition, learning, traveling, entertainment, choice of occupation, plans for the future. Physicians should keep in mind that chronic diseases and their treatment represent only one aspect of person's life. Adolescents with chronic diseases have other needs as well, personal priorities, social roles and they expect these needs to be recognized and respected. Adolescent health care should be adjusted to the life style of adolescents.

  19. Using data from patient interactions in primary care for population level chronic disease surveillance: The Sentinel Practices Data Sourcing (SPDS) project

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Abhijeet; Charlton, Karen E.; Girdo, Lisa; Batterham, Marijka

    2014-01-01

    Background Population health planning within a health district requires current information on health profiles of the target population. Information obtained during primary care interactions may provide a valuable surveillance system for chronic disease burden. The Sentinel Practices Data Sourcing project aimed to establish a sentinel site surveillance system to obtain a region-specific estimate of the prevalence of chronic diseases and mental health disorders within the Illawarra-Shoalhaven ...

  20. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    NR Anthonisen

    2007-01-01

    The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are...

  1. Osteoporosis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Schwarz, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine the state of knowledge and clinical practice in the association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to osteoporosis and fracture incidence.......The purpose of this review is to examine the state of knowledge and clinical practice in the association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to osteoporosis and fracture incidence....

  2. Anemia of chronic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia of inflammation; AOCD; ACD ... Anemia is a lower-than-normal number of red blood cells in the blood. Some conditions can lead to anemia of chronic disease include: Autoimmune disorders , such as ...

  3. Sleep and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Sleep About Us About Sleep Key Sleep Disorders Sleep ... Sheets Data & Statistics Projects and Partners Resources Events Sleep and Chronic Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ...

  4. Optimizing pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease--practical issues: a Canadian Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniuk, Darcy D; Brooks, Dina; Butcher, Scott; Debigare, Richard; Dechman, Gail; Ford, Gordon; Pepin, Veronique; Reid, Darlene; Sheel, Andrew W; Stickland, Micheal K; Todd, David C; Walker, Shannon L; Aaron, Shawn D; Balter, Meyer; Bourbeau, Jean; Hernandez, Paul; Maltais, Francois; O'Donnell, Denis E; Bleakney, Donna; Carlin, Brian; Goldstein, Roger; Muthuri, Stella K

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) participation is the standard of care for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who remain symptomatic despite bronchodilator therapies. However, there are questions about specific aspects of PR programming including optimal site of rehabilitation delivery, components of rehabilitation programming, duration of rehabilitation, target populations and timing of rehabilitation. The present document was compiled to specifically address these important clinical issues, using an evidence-based, systematic review process led by a representative interprofessional panel of experts. The evidence reveals there are no differences in major patient-related outcomes of PR between nonhospital- (community or home sites) or hospital-based sites. There is strong support to recommend that COPD patients initiate PR within one month following an acute exacerbation due to benefits of improved dyspnea, exercise tolerance and health-related quality of life relative to usual care. Moreover, the benefits of PR are evident in both men and women, and in patients with moderate, severe and very severe COPD. The current review also suggests that longer PR programs, beyond six to eight weeks duration, be provided for COPD patients, and that while aerobic training is the foundation of PR, endurance and functional ability may be further improved with both aerobic and resistance training. PMID:20808973

  5. Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Grants Other Grants Planning and Evaluation Grantee Best Practices Hispanic/Latino Asthma Cancer Chronic Liver Disease Diabetes Heart Disease Hepatitis HIV/AIDS Immunizations Infant Heath & Mortality Mental Health Obesity Organ and Tissue Donation Stroke Stay Connected ...

  6. A practical approach to low protein diets for patients with chronic kidney disease in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashuntantang, Gloria Enow; Fouda, Hermine; Kaze, Francois Folefack; Halle, Marie-Patrice; Tabi-Arrey, Crista; Biwole-Sida, Magloire

    2016-01-01

    Cameroon is a low-middle income country with a rich diversity of culture and cuisine. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common in Cameroon and over 80 % of patients present late for care, precluding the use of therapies such as low protein diets (LPDs) that slow its progression. Moreover, the prescription of LPDs is challenging in Cameroon because dieticians are scarce, there are no renal dieticians, and people often have to fund their own healthcare. The few nephrologists that provide care for CKD patients have limited expertise in LPD design. Therefore, only moderate LPDs of 0.6 g protein per kg bodyweight per day, or relatively mild LPDs of 0.7-0.8 g protein per kg bodyweight per day are prescribed. The moderate LPD is prescribed to patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD with non-nephrotic proteinuria, no evidence of malnutrition and no interrcurrent acute illnesses. The mild LPD is prescribed to patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD with nephrotic proteinuria, non-symptomatic stage 5 CKD patients or stage 5 CKD patients on non-dialysis treatment. In the absence of local sources of amino and keto acid supplements, traditional mixed LPDs are used. For patients with limited and sporadic access to animal proteins, the prescribed LPDs do not restrict vegetable proteins, but limit intake of animal proteins (when available) to 70 % of total daily protein intake. For those with better access to animal proteins, the prescribed LPDs limit intake of animal proteins to 50-70 % of total daily protein intake, depending on their meal plan. Images of 100 g portions of meat, fish and readily available composite meals serve as visual guides of quantities for patients. Nutritional status is assessed before LPD prescription and during follow up using a subjective global assessment and serum albumin. In conclusion, LPDs are underutilised and challenging to prescribe in Cameroon because of weakness in the health system, the rarity of dieticians, a wide diversity of dietary habits, the limited

  7. A pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial of early intervention for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by practice nurse-general practitioner teams: Study Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Bunker Jeremy M; Reddel Helen K; Dennis Sarah M; Middleton Sandy; Van Schayck CP; Crockett Alan J; Hasan Iqbal; Hermiz Oshana; Vagholkar Sanjyot; Marks Guy B; Zwar Nicholas A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a leading cause of disability, hospitalization, and premature mortality. General practice is well placed to diagnose and manage COPD, but there is a significant gap between evidence and current practice, with a low level of awareness and implementation of clinical practice guidelines. Under-diagnosis of COPD is a world-wide problem, limiting the benefit that could potentially be achieved through early intervention strategies ...

  8. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Straub, Rainer H.; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that during chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs) maladaptations of the immune, nervous, endocrine and reproductive system occur. Maladaptation leads to disease sequelae in CIDs. The ultimate reason of disease sequelae in CIDs remained unclear because clinicians do not consider bodily energy trade-offs and evolutionary medicine. We review the evolution of physiological supersystems, fitness consequences of genes involved in CIDs during different life-history sta...

  9. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Peter J; Burney, Peter G J; Silverman, Edwin K; Celli, Bartolome R; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease with high global morbidity and mortality. COPD is characterized by poorly reversible airway obstruction, which is confirmed by spirometry, and includes obstruction of the small airways (chronic obstructive bronchiolitis) and emphysema, which lead to air trapping and shortness of breath in response to physical exertion. The most common risk factor for the development of COPD is cigarette smoking, but other environmental factors, such as exposure to indoor air pollutants - especially in developing countries - might influence COPD risk. Not all smokers develop COPD and the reasons for disease susceptibility in these individuals have not been fully elucidated. Although the mechanisms underlying COPD remain poorly understood, the disease is associated with chronic inflammation that is usually corticosteroid resistant. In addition, COPD involves accelerated ageing of the lungs and an abnormal repair mechanism that might be driven by oxidative stress. Acute exacerbations, which are mainly triggered by viral or bacterial infections, are important as they are linked to a poor prognosis. The mainstay of the management of stable disease is the use of inhaled long-acting bronchodilators, whereas corticosteroids are beneficial primarily in patients who have coexisting features of asthma, such as eosinophilic inflammation and more reversibility of airway obstruction. Apart from smoking cessation, no treatments reduce disease progression. More research is needed to better understand disease mechanisms and to develop new treatments that reduce disease activity and progression. PMID:27189863

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Vijayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec to FVC (forced vital capacity ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure, hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity, bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia, stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

  11. Chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enable JavaScript. Chronic kidney disease is the slow loss of kidney function over time. The main job of the kidneys is to remove wastes and excess water from the body. Causes ... over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some time. The loss of function may be so slow that you ...

  12. Resource allocation and the burden of co-morbidities among patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an observational cohort study from Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahnfeldt-Mollerup, Peder; Lykkegaard, Jesper; Rose Olsen, Kim;

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a leading cause of mortality, and associated with increased healthcare utilization and healthcare expenditure. In several countries, morbidity-based systems have changed the way resources are allocated in general practice. In primary care, fee...... analyze fee-for-service expenditure of patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease visiting Danish general practice clinics and further to assess what proportion of fee-for-service expenditure variation was explained by patient morbidity and general practice clinic characteristics......, respectively. Methods We used patient morbidity characteristics such as diagnostic markers and multi-morbidity adjustment based on adjusted clinical groups (ACGs) and fee-for-service expenditure for a sample of primary care patients for the year 2010. Our sample included 3,973 patients in 59 general practices...

  13. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation on Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) . This recommendation ...

  14. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy disease activity status: recommendations for clinical research standards and use in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.C. Gorson; I.N. van Schaik; I.S.J. Merkies; R.A. Lewis; R.J. Barohn; C.L. Koski; D.R. Cornblath; R.A.C. Hughes; A.F. Hahn; M. Baumgarten; J. Goldstein; J. Katz; M. Graves; G. Parry; P.A. van Doorn

    2010-01-01

    Defining long-term outcomes in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) has been complicated by varying definitions of treatment response and differing scales measuring impairment or disability. An expert panel was convened to devise a CIDP Disease Activity Status (CDAS) and to class

  15. Diet and Exercise Adherence and Practices among Medically Underserved Patients with Chronic Disease: Variation across Four Ethnic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzech, Kathryn M.; Vivian, James; Huebner Torres, Cristina; Armin, Julie; Shaw, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Many factors interact to create barriers to dietary and exercise plan adherence among medically underserved patients with chronic disease, but aspects related to culture and ethnicity are underexamined in the literature. Using both qualitative ("n" = 71) and quantitative ("n" = 297) data collected in a 4-year, multimethod study among patients with…

  16. Using Family Health History for Chronic Disease Prevention in the Age of Genomics: Translation to Health Education Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Carl; Novilla, Lelinneth; Barnes, Michael; De La Cruz, Natalie; Meacham, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    Advances in the field of human genomics have important implications for the prevention of chronic disease. In response to these advancements, public health professionals--including health educators--must become competent in the principles underlying the interface between genomics and the use of family health history. Family health history captures…

  17. Chronic granulomatous disease associated with chronic glomerulonephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frifelt, J J; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Valerius, Niels Henrik;

    1985-01-01

    A boy with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) developed glomerulonephritis at the age of 12 years. The glomerulonephritis progressed to terminal uraemia at age 15 when maintenance haemodialysis was started. The clinical course was complicated by pulmonary aspergillosis and Pseudomonas septicaemia...

  18. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Guía de práctica clínica para el tratamiento de la enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica grave.

    OpenAIRE

    Inti Santana Carballosa; Alexis Díaz Mesa; Carlos Alberto Martell Alonso; Diosdania Alfonso Falcón; Niurka Mercedes Galende Hernández

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. This concept includes simple chronic bronchitis, asthmatic bronchitis, chronic obstructive bronchitis, and pulmonary emphysema; although this two last are the most commonly included. Risk factors, classification and treatment are commented, stressing the strategy of mechanical ventilation and the indications for mechanical invasive and no invasive ventilation. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most i...

  19. Points to consider for reporting, screening for and preventing selected comorbidities in chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases in daily practice: a EULAR initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillet, Athan; Gossec, Laure; Carmona, Loreto; Wit, Maarten de; van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne; Bertheussen, Heidi; Alison, Kent; Toft, Mette; Kouloumas, Marios; Ferreira, Ricardo J O; Oliver, Susan; Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; van Assen, Sander; Dixon, William G; Finckh, Axel; Zink, Angela; Kremer, Joel; Kvien, Tore K; Nurmohamed, Michael; van der Heijde, Desirée; Dougados, Maxime

    2016-06-01

    In chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, comorbidities such as cardiovascular diseases and infections are suboptimally prevented, screened for and managed. The objective of this European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) initiative was to propose points to consider to collect comorbidities in patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. We also aimed to develop a pragmatic reporting form to foster the implementation of the points to consider. In accordance with the EULAR Standardised Operating Procedures, the process comprised (1) a systematic literature review of existing recommendations on reporting, screening for or preventing six selected comorbidities: ischaemic cardiovascular diseases, malignancies, infections, gastrointestinal diseases, osteoporosis and depression and (2) a consensus process involving 21 experts (ie, rheumatologists, patients, health professionals). Recommendations on how to treat the comorbidities were not included in the document as they vary across countries. The literature review retrieved 42 articles, most of which were recommendations for reporting or screening for comorbidities in the general population. The consensus process led to three overarching principles and 15 points to consider, related to the six comorbidities, with three sections: (1) reporting (ie, occurrence of the comorbidity and current treatments); (2) screening for disease (eg, mammography) or for risk factors (eg, smoking) and (3) prevention (eg, vaccination). A reporting form (93 questions) corresponding to a practical application of the points to consider was developed. Using an evidence-based approach followed by expert consensus, this EULAR initiative aims to improve the reporting and prevention of comorbidities in chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Next steps include dissemination and implementation. PMID:26984008

  20. Chronic granulomatous disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare congenital immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent bacterial and fungal infections as well as granuloma formation. The manifestations of this disease can involve single or multiple organ systems. The lungs are the most commonly affected organ; however, lymphatic, hepatic, skeletal, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, head and neck, and central nervous system involvement have also been described. Most patients present with symptoms in their first few years of life. Due to the nonspecific manner in which patients present, the pediatric radiologist may be among the first to recognize the pattern of infection, inflammation, and granuloma formation leading to a diagnosis of CGD. The purpose of this paper is to review the imaging findings of CGD that can manifest throughout the body. (orig.)

  1. Chronic granulomatous disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towbin, Alexander J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Chaves, Ian [Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, Department of Internal Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare congenital immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent bacterial and fungal infections as well as granuloma formation. The manifestations of this disease can involve single or multiple organ systems. The lungs are the most commonly affected organ; however, lymphatic, hepatic, skeletal, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, head and neck, and central nervous system involvement have also been described. Most patients present with symptoms in their first few years of life. Due to the nonspecific manner in which patients present, the pediatric radiologist may be among the first to recognize the pattern of infection, inflammation, and granuloma formation leading to a diagnosis of CGD. The purpose of this paper is to review the imaging findings of CGD that can manifest throughout the body. (orig.)

  2. Hyperphosphatemia of Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hruska, Keith A.; Mathew, Suresh; Lund, Richard; Qiu, Ping; Pratt, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Observational studies have determined hyperphosphatemia to be a cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Mechanistic studies have elucidated that hyperphosphatemia is a direct stimulus to vascular calcification, which is one cause of morbid cardiovascular events contributing to the excess mortality of chronic kidney disease. This review describes the pathobiology of hyperphosphatemia that develops as a consequence of positive phosphate balance in chronic kidney disease and the me...

  3. Which factors are associated with higher rates of chronic kidney disease recording in primary care? A cross-sectional survey of GP practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Nicola; Bankart, John; Brunskill, Nigel; Baker, Richard

    2011-03-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) at stage 3-5 is estimated at 8.5% in the UK, but the recorded rate of CKD from Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) registers in 2007-2008 was 2.9%. This study aimed to identify practice or patient characteristics associated with recorded rates of CKD. Demographic and QOF data for 230 general practices were combined into a database for cross-sectional analysis. Regression analyses investigated factors associated with CKD recording; deprivation, location in Leicester city or Northamptonshire, and low recording of hypertension and stroke were associated with low CKD recording. PMID:21375906

  4. A pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial of early intervention for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by practice nurse-general practitioner teams: Study Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunker Jeremy M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is a leading cause of disability, hospitalization, and premature mortality. General practice is well placed to diagnose and manage COPD, but there is a significant gap between evidence and current practice, with a low level of awareness and implementation of clinical practice guidelines. Under-diagnosis of COPD is a world-wide problem, limiting the benefit that could potentially be achieved through early intervention strategies such as smoking cessation, dietary advice, and exercise. General practice is moving towards more structured chronic disease management, and the increasing involvement of practice nurses in delivering chronic care. Design A pragmatic cluster randomised trial will test the hypothesis that intervention by a practice nurse-general practitioner (GP team leads to improved health-related quality of life and greater adherence with clinical practice guidelines for patients with newly-diagnosed COPD, compared with usual care. Forty general practices in greater metropolitan Sydney Australia will be recruited to identify patients at risk of COPD and invite them to attend a case finding appointment. Practices will be randomised to deliver either practice nurse-GP partnership care, or usual care, to patients newly-diagnosed with COPD. The active intervention will involve the practice nurse and GP working in partnership with the patient in developing and implementing a care plan involving (as appropriate, smoking cessation, immunisation, pulmonary rehabilitation, medication review, assessment and correction of inhaler technique, nutritional advice, management of psycho-social issues, patient education, and management of co-morbidities. The primary outcome measure is health-related quality of life, assessed with the St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire 12 months after diagnosis. Secondary outcome measures include validated disease-specific and general health related

  5. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from our online catalog. Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page ... What you need to know Because you have chronic kidney disease, you should take steps to protect your kidneys. ...

  6. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Chronic Tubulointerstitial Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tubulointerstitial diseases are a common final pathway toward chronic renal failure regardless the primary damage (glomerular, vascular or directly the tubulointerstitium). Chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (CTN) is characterized by interstitial scarring, fibrosis and tubule atrophy, resulting in progressive chronic kidney disease. Most frequent causes of CTN are drugs, heavy metals, obstructive uropathy, nephrolithiasis, reflux disease, immunologic diseases, neoplasia, ischemia, metabolic diseases, genetics and miscellaneous. At ultrasound (US), kidneys' morphological aspect is similar in all forms of chronic interstitial nephropathy and only chronic pyelonephritis with or without reflux shows distinguishing characteristics. In interstitial nephropathy, kidneys' profiles are finely irregular and corticomedullary differentiation is altered because of a diffused hyperechogenicity. The only indirect sign of chronic interstitial damage can be derived from the value of intrarenal resistive indexes that hardly overcome 0.75. US is mandatory in clinical chronic pyelonephritis work-up because it provides information on kidney's diameter and on growth nomogram in children. Renal profiles can be more or less altered depending on the number of cortical scars and the presence of pseudonodular areas of segmental compensatory hypertrophy. In the early stages, US diagnosis of renal tuberculosis is difficult because parenchymal lesions are non-specific. US sensitivity in the diagnosis of hydronephrosis is very high, close to 100% and, finally, US is the first choice imaging technique in the diagnosis of urinary lithiasis. PMID:27169608

  7. Genetics Home Reference: chronic granulomatous disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for This Condition autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease CGD granulomatous disease, chronic X-linked chronic granulomatous disease ... Network Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (6 links) CGD Society Immune Deficiency Foundation International Patient Organisation for ...

  8. Chronic Liver Disease and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and African Americans Among African Americans, chronic liver disease is a ... white women. At a glance – Cancer Rates for African Americans (2008-2012) Cancer Incidence Rates per 100,000 – ...

  9. Frequency of Spiritual/Religious Practices in Polish Patients with Chronic Diseases: Validation of the Polish Version of the SpREUK-P Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arndt Büssing

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to measure a wide spectrum of organized and private religious, spiritual, existential and philosophical practices, the SpREUK-P (SpREUK is the German language acronym of “Spirituality/Religiosity and Coping with Illness” questionnaire was developed as a generic instrument. To account for the fact that institutional religiosity declines, not only in Europe, and to explore the alternative use of various existing esoteric and spiritual resources, the instrument also addresses non-religious forms of spiritual practices. Previously, it was tested in a more secular context and was found to be of relevance for atheistic/agnostic individuals. Now we intended to apply the instrument to 275 Polish individuals with chronic diseases (100% Catholics, 74% women, mean age 56 ± 16 years. The factorial structure of the SpREUK-P’s Polish version was similar to the primary version, but lacked an exclusive “spiritual (mind-body practices” subscale. Factor analysis revealed four main factors, which would explain 67% of the variance, i.e., religious practices (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.90, humanistic practices (alpha = 0.87, existentialistic practices (alpha = 0.80 and gratitude/awe (alpha = 0.80. The correlation pattern underlines construct validity. Interestingly, in Polish individuals, existentialistic practices did not significantly differ between religious and non-religious individuals (nor between men and women, while all other forms of spiritual practices did differ significantly.

  10. A best practice position statement on pregnancy in chronic kidney disease: the Italian Study Group on Kidney and Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Castellino, Santina; Gernone, Giuseppe; Santoro, Domenico; Moroni, Gabriella; Giannattasio, Michele; Gregorini, Gina; Giacchino, Franca; Attini, Rossella; Loi, Valentina; Limardo, Monica; Gammaro, Linda; Todros, Tullia; Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Pregnancy is increasingly undertaken in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and, conversely, CKD is increasingly diagnosed in pregnancy: up to 3 % of pregnancies are estimated to be complicated by CKD. The heterogeneity of CKD (accounting for stage, hypertension and proteinuria) and the rarity of several kidney diseases make risk assessment difficult and therapeutic strategies are often based upon scattered experiences and small series. In this setting, the aim of this position statement of the Kidney and Pregnancy Study Group of the Italian Society of Nephrology is to review the literature, and discuss the experience in the clinical management of CKD in pregnancy. CKD is associated with an increased risk for adverse pregnancy-related outcomes since its early stage, also in the absence of hypertension and proteinuria, thus supporting the need for a multidisciplinary follow-up in all CKD patients. CKD stage, hypertension and proteinuria are interrelated, but they are also independent risk factors for adverse pregnancy-related outcomes. Among the different kidney diseases, patients with glomerulonephritis and immunologic diseases are at higher risk of developing or increasing proteinuria and hypertension, a picture often difficult to differentiate from preeclampsia. The risk is higher in active immunologic diseases, and in those cases that are detected or flare up during pregnancy. Referral to tertiary care centres for multidisciplinary follow-up and tailored approaches are warranted. The risk of maternal death is, almost exclusively, reported in systemic lupus erythematosus and vasculitis, which share with diabetic nephropathy an increased risk for perinatal death of the babies. Conversely, patients with kidney malformation, autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease, stone disease, and previous upper urinary tract infections are at higher risk for urinary tract infections, in turn associated with prematurity. No risk for malformations other than those

  11. Incorporation of Whole, Ancient Grains into a Modern Asian Indian Diet: Practical Strategies to Reduce the Burden of Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Anjali A.; Azar, Kristen M. J.; Gardner, Christopher D.; Palaniappan, Latha P.

    2011-01-01

    Refined carbohydrates, such as white rice and white flour, are the mainstay of the modern Asian Indian diet, and may contribute to the rising incidence of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in this population. Prior to the 1950s, whole grains such as amaranth, barley, brown rice, millet, and sorghum were more commonly used in Asian Indian cooking. These grains and other non-Indian grains such as couscous, quinoa, and spelt are nutritionally advantageous and may be culturally acceptable carbohydrate substitutes for Asian Indians. This review focuses on practical recommendations for culturally sensitive carbohydrate modification in a modern Asian Indian diet, in an effort to reduce type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in this population. PMID:21790614

  12. Chronic diseases and mental disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaak, P.F.M.; Heijmans, M.J.W.M.; Peters, L.; Rijken, M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to achieve a better understanding of the relationship between chronic medical illness and mental distress. Therefore, the association between chronic medical illness and mental distress was analysed, taking into account the modifying effects of generic disease characteristi

  13. Development and implementation of an integrated chronic disease model in South Africa: lessons in the management of change through improving the quality of clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Mahomed, Ozayr; Asmall, Shaidah

    2015-01-01

    Background: South Africa is facing a complex burden of disease arising from a combination of chronic infectious illness and non-communicable diseases. As the burden of chronic diseases (communicable and non-communicable) increases, providing affordable and effective care to the increasing numbers of chronic patients will be an immense challenge.Methods: The framework recommended by the Medical Research Council of the United Kingdom for the development and evaluation of complex health interven...

  14. Nutrition in Chronic Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Silva; Sara Gomes; Armando Peixoto; Paulo Torres-Ramalho; Hélder Cardoso; Rosa Azevedo; Carla Cunha; Guilherme Macedo

    2015-01-01

    Protein-calorie malnutrition is a transversal condition to all stages of chronic liver disease. Early recognition of micro or macronutrient deficiencies is essential, because the use of nutritional supplements reduces the risk of complications. The diet of patients with chronic liver disease is based on a standard diet with supplements addition as necessary. Restrictions may be harmful and should be individualized. Treatment management should aim to maintain an adequate protein and caloric...

  15. Occupational chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Oyvind; Würtz, Else Toft; Aasen, Tor Brøvig;

    2014-01-01

    Occupational-attributable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) presents a substantial health challenge. Focusing on spirometric criteria for airflow obstruction, this review of occupational COPD includes both population-wide and industry-specific exposures.......Occupational-attributable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) presents a substantial health challenge. Focusing on spirometric criteria for airflow obstruction, this review of occupational COPD includes both population-wide and industry-specific exposures....

  16. Managing chronic pain in family practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Librach, S. L.

    1993-01-01

    Pain is common in family practice. In dealing with chronic pain, both the family physician and the patient often have problems in defining and in understanding the origin of chronic pain and in providing effective pain relief. This article explores a practical, holistic approach to understanding and managing chronic pain.

  17. Chronic Liver Disease and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Grants Other Grants Planning and Evaluation Grantee Best Practices Asian American Asthma Cancer Chronic Liver Disease Diabetes Heart Disease Hepatitis HIV/AIDS Immunizations Infant Heath & Mortality Mental Health Obesity Organ and Tissue Donation Stroke Stay Connected ...

  18. Knowledge attitude and practice (kap) of chronic kidneys disease among medical officers of teaching hospitals of lahore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to determine the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) about kidney diseases among medical officers working in different hospitals of Lahore.Doctors working on the medical floors of different tertiary care teaching hospitals (Mayo Hospital (MH), Sir Ganga Ram Hospital (SGRH), Service Institute of Medical Sciences (SIMS), Fatima Memoral Hospitals (FMH), Lahore General Hospitals (LGH), Shalamar Hospital (SH), Jinnah hospital (JH)) of Lahore were included in the study. Each doctor was given a questionnaire comprising of 28 questions. Each participant was given 10-15 minutes for completing the questionnaire at the spot. Categorization of doctors according to the KAP score was done as poor (70%).Results: One hundred eighty five doctors participated in the study who fulfilled the criteria. In this study majority 134 (62.6%) of the doctors were not taught about nephrology during their graduation which was statistically significant. Most of the doctors either had some knowledge or didn't know about procedures done in nephrology. Majority of the doctors 208(97.2%) know that nephrology deals with medical diseases of the kidney which was statistically significant. Most of the doctors 138(64.5) feel that nephrology services are insufficient in their hospital. More than 90% doctors want that kidney diseases should be taught during MBBS curriculum and separate nephrology department should be established which was statistically significant. Most of the doctors don't know the management of hyperkalemia very well. About 90% of the doctors know that there are five stages of CKD. Majority of the doctors know that ACE inhibitors are used in hypertension and diabetic nephropathy. They also know that urine complete examination help in early detection of diabetic nephropathy which was statistically significant.Conclusion:Most of the doctors have poor to average knowledge and practice about kidney diseases. Most of the doctors think that nephrology services are

  19. Caring for patients with chronic kidney disease: a joint opinion of the ambulatory care and the nephrology practice and research networks of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillich, Alan J; Saseen, Joseph J; Dehart, Renee M; Dumo, Peter; Grabe, Darren W; Gilmartin, Cheryl; Hachey, David M; Hudson, Joanna Q; Pruchnicki, Maria C; Joy, Melanie S

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of patients are developing chronic kidney disease (CKD). Appropriate care for patients with CKD must occur in the earliest stages, preferably before CKD progresses to more severe stages. Therefore, recognition and treatment of CKD and its associated complications must occur in primary care settings. Patients with CKD often have comorbid conditions such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, creating specific considerations when treating these diseases. Also, these patients have CKD-related conditions, including anemia and renal osteodystrophy, that are not traditionally evaluated and monitored by the primary care practitioner. Collectively, many opportunities exist for pharmacists who practice in the primary care setting to improve the care of patients with CKD. PMID:15767229

  20. Compliance with the clinical practice guidelines for the management of hepatitis B and C virus-related chronic liver disease: a survey based on hospitalized cirrhotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele La Spada

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, significant progress has been made in furthering our knowledge of chronic liver disease (CLD and evaluating the therapeutic approaches. These have been updated in the form of recommendations by international scientific societies. Through a retrospective analysis, this study aimed to verify whether these recommendations have been applied in real practice. The study design included data gathered from all patients consecutively hospitalized for decompensated liver cirrhosis during one year. A pre-made master form was used to record data on the patients’ past knowledge of the etiology and management of their liver disease. As expected, hepatitis C virus (HCV was the most frequent cause of CLD, while 41 cases were cryptogenic. In 69 of 263 patients with HCV infection, viral genotyping had been performed, although only 39 of these cases had been treated. Only 3 of 44 patients suffering from hepatitis B virus (HBV-related liver cirrhosis had been treated in the past, while 11 patients were still being treated. Among the remaining patients, 15 were not aware that they had CLD and 15 had never been considered for antiviral treatment. In 81 cases, the disease had progressed to hepatocellular carcinoma, but only 19 patients had discovered the tumor following regular ultrasound screening. Thirty-seven patients were receiving specific treatment consistent with the stage of their disease. The management of HBV- and HCV-related CLD in Sicily is far from optimal, and although the natural history and management practices of these diseases are well known, this knowledge is a long way from being applied in our daily practice.

  1. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which the body ...

  2. Chronic Lyme Disease: An appraisal

    OpenAIRE

    Marques, Adriana

    2008-01-01

    Chronic Lyme disease” is a confusing term that has been used to describe very different patient populations. Studies have shown that most patients diagnosed with “chronic Lyme disease” either have no objective evidence of previous or current infection with B. burgdorferi or are patients that should be classified as having post-Lyme disease syndrome, which is defined as continuing or relapsing non-specific symptoms (such as fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, and cognitive complaints) in a patient...

  3. Chronic diseases and mental disorder.

    OpenAIRE

    Verhaak, P.F.M.; Heijmans, M.J.W.M.; L. Peters; Rijken, M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to achieve a better understanding of the relationship between chronic medical illness and mental distress. Therefore, the association between chronic medical illness and mental distress was analysed, taking into account the modifying effects of generic disease characteristics (concerning course, control and possible stressful consequences), physical quality of life indicators and social and relationship problems. Panel data from the Dutch national Panel of Patients w...

  4. About Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sign up for our FREE magazine, Kidney Living Organ Donation & Transplantation Be an Organ Donor Living Donation Donor ... Giving Primary menu Home Prevention Kidney Disease Patients Organ Donation & Transplantation Professionals Events Advocacy Donate Search Search Header ...

  5. Diet - chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Many foods contain extra iron (liver, beef, pork, chicken, lima and kidney beans, iron-fortified cereals). Talk to your provider or dietitian about which foods with iron you can eat because of your kidney disease.

  6. Osteoporosis across chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, M; Loperto, I; Camera, S; Cossiga, V; Di Somma, C; Colao, A; Caporaso, N; Morisco, F

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a complication of chronic liver disease, with impact on morbidity, quality of life, and survival. The progress of medicine and the new therapies stretched the disease's natural history and improved the survival of patients with liver disease. So, it is fundamental to make better the quality of life and to prevent complications. Metabolic bone disorders are common complications of chronic liver disease (CLD). Patients with CLD have an increased risk of bone fractures, with significant impact on morbidity, quality of life, and even on survival. Bone diseases, including osteomalacia, osteoporosis, and osteopenia, are frequently observed in many types of liver disease. The pathogenesis of damage and the mechanisms of bone loss are different in relation to the specific liver disease. The relevance of these conditions induced many authors to create a new nosographic entity known as "hepatic osteodystrophy", although this term is rarely used anymore and it is now commonly referred to as osteopenia or osteoporosis associated with chronic liver disease. This review is based on the personal experiences of the authors and upon research done of the available literature on this subject matter. The authors searched the PubMed database for publications containing the term "liver disease" in combination with "bone disease", "hepatic osteodistrophy", "osteoporosis", "osteopenia", "osteomalacia", and "fractures". They selected publications from the past 10 years but did not exclude older seminal publications, especially for colestatic liver diseases. This review of literature shows that osteoporosis crosses all CLD. It is important to underline that the progress of medicine and the new therapies stretched the disease's natural history and improved the survival of patients with CLD. It is fundamental to make better the quality of life and it is mandatory to prevent complications and in particular the osteoporotic ones, especially fractures. PMID:26846777

  7. Chronic Beryllium Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an immune response or “allergy” to beryllium metal, ceramic or alloy, termed beryllium sensitization (BeS). Beryllium sensitization occurs after ... Mroz MM, Newman LS. Beryllium disease screening in ceramics industry: Blood test ... at a metal, alloy and oxide production plant. Occup Environ Med 1997; ...

  8. Workplace problems and solutions for employees with chronic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Varekamp; F.J.H. van Dijk

    2010-01-01

    Background While many employees who have a chronic disease manage their jobs well, others are hampered in work performance, experience work-related problems and are at risk for job loss. Aims To identify the practical and psychosocial barriers recognized by employees with chronic disease who experie

  9. Chronic granulomatous disease of childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) of childhood is a rare entity. The disease is characterized by recurrent infections with granuloma and abscess formation caused by an inherited defective neutrophil leukocyte function. The most common sites of involvements are the lungs, lymph nodes, skin, liver, spleen and bones. Rarely are other organs affected. Two children with CGD are presented. The children were cousins, the older with bone, lung and splenic involvement. The younger had circumferential thickening of the gastric antrum. (orig./GDG)

  10. Chronic Venous Disease under pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.I. Reeder (Suzan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn chapter 1 we provide a general introduction of this thesis. Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a common medical condition that affects 2-64% of the worldwide population and leads to leg ulcers in 1% of the Western population. Venous leg ulceration (VLU) has an unfavorable prognosis with

  11. A systematic review of interventions to enhance access to best practice primary health care for chronic disease management, prevention and episodic care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comino Elizabeth

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although primary health care (PHC is a key component of all health care systems, services are not always readily available, accessible or affordable. This systematic review examines effective strategies to enhance access to best practice processes of PHC in three domains: chronic disease management, prevention and episodic care. Methods An extensive search of bibliographic data bases to identify peer and non-peer reviewed literature was undertaken. Identified papers were screened to identify and classify intervention studies that measured the impact of strategies (singly or in combination on change in use or the reach of services in defined population groups (evaluated interventions. Results The search identified 3,148 citations of which 121 were intervention studies and 75 were evaluated interventions. Evaluated interventions were found in all three domains: prevention (n = 45, episodic care (n = 19, and chronic disease management (n = 11. They were undertaken in a number of countries including Australia (n = 25, USA (n = 25, and UK (n = 15. Study quality was ranked as high (31% of studies, medium (61% and low (8%. The 75 evaluated interventions tested a range of strategies either singly (n = 46 studies or as a combination of two (n = 20 or more strategies (n = 9. Strategies targeted both health providers and patients and were categorised to five groups: practice re-organisation (n = 43 studies, patient support (n = 29, provision of new services (n = 19, workforce development (n = 11, and financial incentives (n = 9. Strategies varied by domain, reflecting the complexity of care needs and processes. Of the 75 evaluated interventions, 55 reported positive findings with interventions using a combination of strategies more likely to report positive results. Conclusions This review suggests that multiple, linked strategies targeting different levels of the health care

  12. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Marcuccilli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases.

  13. 慢性病自我管理的研究实践及问题探讨%Research Practice and Problem Discussion of Self-management of Chronic Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯梅; 蒋文慧

    2012-01-01

    慢性病自我管理是近年来国际上兴起的针对慢性病患者有效控制和管理的方法,在我国也日益受到关注和重视,但还未达到普遍认同和广泛推广的程度.该文通过分析近年来我国慢性病的流行现状,在简要介绍自我管理相关概念和内容的基础上,借鉴目前国内外对慢性病自我管理所做的研究与实践,探讨慢性病自我管理模式在实施中存在的问题,并提出相应对策,为在我国进一步推广和实施慢性病自我管理提供参考和依据.%Self-management of chronic diseases is an effective practice to manage and control chronic diseases. It is more and more concerned in China although it hag not been widely accepted and applied. This paper comprehensively reviewed the latest researches and practices of self -management on chronic diseases .Through introducing current epidemiology of chronic diseases in China , the relevant concepts and contents of chronic diseases self-management, it aimed to explore the main problems and solutions of self-management on chronic diseases, hoping to provide practical evidence and strategies for prevention and control of chronic diseases in China.

  14. Chronic asymptomatic hyperamylasemia unrelated to pancreatic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Generoso Uomo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Almost all patients presenting with chronic hyperamylasemia undergo an expensive, long, difficult and often repeated diagnostic workup even if this occurrence is not associated with symptoms or with known pancreatotoxic factors. This is in relationship with the poor knowledge that, beside hyperenzymemia secondary to pancreatic diseases and systemic illnesses, various non-pathological forms of chronic hyperamylasemia can occur in clinical practice. AIM OF THE STUDY This study was addressed to assess the clinical characteristics of patients presenting with chronic hyperamylasemia unrelated to pancreatic diseases (CHUPD. PATIENTS AND METHODS Data of all patients with CHUPD were retrospectively reviewed (June 1997-March 2007. Forty patients were included in the study; median follow- up was 33 months (range 3-84 months. CHUPD was secondary to: a chronic benign pancreatic hyperamylasemia, 16 patients (40%; b macroamylasemia, 15 patients (37.5%; c salivary hyperamylasemia, 9 patients (22.5%. Gilbert’s syndrome was present in 13 patients (32.5%; 8 with macroamylasemia and hyperdyslipidemia in 8 patients (20%; 5 with chronic benign pancreatic hyperamylasemia. Diagnostic exams (all in the normal range performed before our observation were: Ca19-9 serum level in 37/40 (92.5%, ultrasonography and computed tomography-scan in all patients, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in 21/40 (52.5%, abdominal magnetic resonance in 14/40 (35%. Previous diagnosis in these asymptomatic subjects were: chronic pancreatitis in 26 cases (65%; recurrent pancreatitis in 10 cases (25%; the remaining 4 patients (10% were addressed without a specific diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS In clinical practice, the occurrence of an unexplained chronic hyperamylasemia very often allows to an unappropriate diagnostic workup due to the poor familiarity with CHUPD conditions.

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusasco, Vito; Martinez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    COPD is characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. The morphological basis for airflow obstruction results from a varying combination of obstructive changes in peripheral conducting airways and destructive changes in respiratory bronchioles, alveolar ducts, and alveoli. A reduction of vascularity within the alveolar septa has been reported in emphysema. Typical physiological changes reflect these structural abnormalities. Spirometry documents airflow obstruction when the FEV1/FVC ratio is reduced below the lower limit of normality, although in early disease stages FEV1 and airway conductance are not affected. Current guidelines recommend testing for bronchoreversibility at least once and the postbronchodilator FEV1/FVC be used for COPD diagnosis; the nature of bronchodilator response remains controversial, however. One major functional consequence of altered lung mechanics is lung hyperinflation. FRC may increase as a result of static or dynamic mechanisms, or both. The link between dynamic lung hyperinflation and expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing has been demonstrated. Hyperinflation may increase the load on inspiratory muscles, with resulting length adaptation of diaphragm. Reduction of exercise tolerance is frequently noted, with compelling evidence that breathlessness and altered lung mechanics play a major role. Lung function measurements have been traditionally used as prognostic indices and to monitor disease progression; FEV1 has been most widely used. An increase in FVC is also considered as proof of bronchodilatation. Decades of work has provided insight into the histological, functional, and biological features of COPD. This has provided a clearer understanding of important pathobiological processes and has provided additional therapeutic options. PMID:24692133

  16. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1996-01-01

    and neurohumoral dysregulation found in cirrhosis. Recent studies have shown that the ET system is highly activated in most cirrhotic patients. Circulating ET-1 and ET-3 levels have a positive relation to the severity of the disease and fluid retention, with the highest values recorded in patients...... venous hypertension. In addition, marked associations with disturbance of systemic haemodynamics and with abnormal distribution of blood volume have been reported. Although the pathophysiological importance of the ET system in chronic liver disease is not completely understood, similarities to other......This review describes recent progress in the accumulation of knowledge about the endothelins (ETs), a family of vasoactive 21-amino acid polypeptides, in chronic liver disease. Particular prominence is given to the dynamics of ET-1 and ET-3 and their possible relation to the disturbed circulation...

  17. [Chronic prostatitis and Bechterew's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlicek, J; Svec, V

    1977-11-01

    A group of patients between 35 and 65 years old with chronic prostatitis were examined for the presence of Becherew's disease. In this connection the New York and Roman criterions for morbus Bechterew were applied. There were found one ankyosing spondylarthritis, one ankylosis of the sacroiliac joint, and 11 times a tentative sacroileitis were stated. Altogether the proved and tentative findings were only 3.68 per cent of all examinations. In our countries the morbus Bechterew is found in 0,21 per cent of the normal population. So the protion of the Bechterew's disease in patients with chronic prostatitis is indeed a little higher than average, but not so frequent as often pretended in recent times. After a second series 58 patients being treated because of Bechterew's disease of different stages and different terms were examined for the possibility of a simultaneously elapsing chronic prostatitis. A chronic prostatitis was found in 38 per cent of these patients which correspondents to the incidence published in literature for the medium-age manhood. Nobody of the test persons had complaints on the part of the urologenital tract. PMID:602457

  18. Asthma: a chronic infectious disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramori, Gaetano; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Contoli, Marco; Marku, Brunilda; Forini, Giacomo; Pauletti, Alessia; Johnston, Sebastian L; Papi, Alberto

    2012-09-01

    There are increasing data to support the "hygiene" and "microbiota" hypotheses of a protective role of infections in modulating the risk of subsequent development of asthma. There is less evidence that respiratory infections can actually cause the development of asthma. There is some evidence that rhinovirus respiratory infections are associated with the development of asthma, particularly in childhood, whereas these infections in later life seem to have a weaker association with the development of asthma. The role of bacterial infections in chronic asthma remains unclear. This article reviews the available evidence indicating that asthma may be considered as a chronic infectious disease. PMID:22929096

  19. Risk Factors for Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Webinars Tips & Stories Links & Resources Learn About Chronic Kidney Disease Kidney Glossary Ask Our Expert Toll-Free Helpline: ... Questions What You Can Do Download all the chronic kidney disease information presented here. Preview Our CKD Booklets Stage ...

  20. Pericytes in chronic lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Jessica E; Johnson, Jill R

    2014-01-01

    Pericytes are mesenchymal cells embedded within the abluminal surface of the endothelium of microvessels such as capillaries, pre-capillary arterioles, post-capillary and collecting venules, where they maintain microvascular homeostasis and participate in angiogenesis. In addition to their roles in supporting the vasculature and facilitating leukocyte extravasation, pericytes have been recently investigated as a subpopulation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) due to their capacity to differentiate into numerous cell types including the classic MSC triad, i.e. osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Other studies in models of fibrotic inflammatory disease of the lung have demonstrated a vital role of pericytes in myofibroblast activation, collagen deposition and microvascular remodelling, which are hallmark features of chronic lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Further studies into the mechanisms of the pericyte-to-myofibroblast transition and migration to fibrotic foci will hopefully clarify the role of these cells in chronic lung disease and confirm the importance of pericytes in human fibrotic pulmonary disease. PMID:25034005

  1. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1996-01-01

    This review describes recent progress in the accumulation of knowledge about the endothelins (ETs), a family of vasoactive 21-amino acid polypeptides, in chronic liver disease. Particular prominence is given to the dynamics of ET-1 and ET-3 and their possible relation to the disturbed circulation...... with functional renal failure. Studies on liver biopsies have revealed synthesis of ET-1 in hepatic endothelial and other cells, and recent investigations have identified the hepatosplanchnic system as a major source of ET-1 and ET-3 spillover into the circulation, with a direct relation to portal...... venous hypertension. In addition, marked associations with disturbance of systemic haemodynamics and with abnormal distribution of blood volume have been reported. Although the pathophysiological importance of the ET system in chronic liver disease is not completely understood, similarities to other...

  2. Aspergillosis in Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jill King; Henriet, Stefanie S. V.; Adilia Warris

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) have the highest life-time incidence of invasive aspergillosis and despite the availability of antifungal prophylaxis, infections by Aspergillus species remain the single most common infectious cause of death in CGD. Recent developments in curative treatment options, such as haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, will change the prevalence of infectious complications including invasive aspergillosis in CGD patients. However, invasive asperg...

  3. Knowledge and practice of medical doctors on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a preliminary survey from a state hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauzi, A R

    2003-06-01

    This study was done to ascertain the knowledge and practice of medical officers on spirometry and management of COPD in a medical department of a state hospital. A total of 81 questionnaires with nine items were distributed to medical officers in the medical department (MD) and in other departments (controls). Eight incomplete questionnaires were rejected. In all 15 (21%) respondents were analysed from MD and 58 (79%) from the control group. The respondents from MD were aware that spirometry was important in COPD (100% versus 69%, P Malaysian Thoracic Society COPD guidelines and also more likely to perform steroid trial (93% versus 37%, P knowledge into practice particularly in terms of use of spirometry in COPD as well as lack of awareness for home oxygen assessment. A bigger survey involving all doctors in the state to answer issues raised in this preliminary survey is being conducted. PMID:14569740

  4. Myeloperoxidase in Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Madhusudhana Rao, A; Anand, Usha; Anand, C. V.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence implicate a role of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is a well accepted fact that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at an increased risk for CVD. MPO is a pro-oxidant enzyme which could be involved in the increased susceptibility of these patients to CVD. Hence, the levels of plasma MPO was determined in healthy controls as well as in patients with CKD [stratified with the level of their kidney failure as CKD...

  5. Metformin in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James

    2014-01-01

    Metformin has traditionally been regarded as contraindicated in chronic kidney disease (CKD), though guidelines in recent years have been relaxed to permit therapy if the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is > 30 mL/min. The main problem is the perceived risk of lactic acidosis (LA). Epidemiological...... reduction, including weight loss, which are beneficial to patients. The risk of death and cardiovascular disease is reduced by about a third in non-CKD patients. Since metformin intoxication undoubtedly causes LA, and metformin is renally excreted, inappropriate dosage of metformin will increase the risk of...

  6. Incorporation of Whole, Ancient Grains into a Modern Asian Indian Diet: Practical Strategies to Reduce the Burden of Chronic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Anjali A.; Azar, Kristen M.J.; Gardner, Christopher D.; Palaniappan, Latha P

    2011-01-01

    Refined carbohydrates, such as white rice and white flour, are the mainstay of the modern Asian Indian diet, and may contribute to the rising incidence of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in this population. Prior to the 1950s, whole grains such as amaranth, barley, brown rice, millet, and sorghum were more commonly used in Asian Indian cooking. These grains and other non-Indian grains such as couscous, quinoa, and spelt are nutritionally advantageous and may be culturally acceptabl...

  7. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsiana Beiko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant decreases in morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases (CVD and cancers, morbidity and cost associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD continue to be increasing. Failure to improve disease outcomes has been related to the paucity of interventions improving survival. Insidious onset and slow progression halter research successes in developing disease-modifying therapies. In part, the difficulty in finding new therapies is because of the extreme heterogeneity within recognized COPD phenotypes. Novel biomarkers are necessary to help understand the natural history and pathogenesis of the different COPD subtypes. A more accurate phenotyping and the ability to assess the therapeutic response to new interventions and pharmaceutical agents may improve the statistical power of longitudinal clinical studies. In this study, we will review known candidate biomarkers for COPD, proposed pathways of pathogenesis, and future directions in the field.

  8. Time trends for alendronate prescription practices in women with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and women exposed to systemic glucocorticoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brask-Lindemann, Dorthe; Eiken, P; Eskildsen, P; Abrahamsen, B

    2013-01-01

    aims to evaluate alendronate prescription practices related to COPD and/or to exposure to systemic glucocorticoids among Danish women. Methods A total of 388,314 female subjects >50 years old, 64,719 of whom initiated treatment with alendronate, and 323,595 age- and gender-matched controls were...... diagnosis of COPD was associated with an increased likelihood of using alendronate (odds ratio (OR) 1.4, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.4–1.5, p < 0.001). Further, a diagnosis of COPD was associated with an increasing tendency of initiating alendronate treatment in the study period (OR 1.3 (95 % CI 1...

  9. A novel approach to population-based risk stratification, comprising individualized lifestyle intervention in Danish general practice to prevent chronic diseases: Results from a feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun Larsen, Lars; Søndergaard, Jens; Halling, Anders;

    2016-01-01

    ) identification of patients already diagnosed with a lifestyle-related chronic disease, and (4) risk estimation and stratification of apparently healthy patients using questionnaire and electronic patient record data on validated risk estimation models. We show that it is feasible to implement a novel......Early detection of patients at risk seems to be effective for reducing the prevalence of lifestyle-related chronic diseases. We aim to test the feasibility of a novel intervention for early detection of lifestyle-related chronic diseases based on a population-based stratification using a...... combination of questionnaire and electronic patient record data. The intervention comprises four elements: (1) collection of information on lifestyle risk factors using a short 15-item questionnaire, (2) electronic transfer of questionnaire data to the general practitioners’ electronic patient records, (3...

  10. Placental Origins of Chronic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Graham J; Fowden, Abigail L; Thornburg, Kent L

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence links an individual's susceptibility to chronic disease in adult life to events during their intrauterine phase of development. Biologically this should not be unexpected, for organ systems are at their most plastic when progenitor cells are proliferating and differentiating. Influences operating at this time can permanently affect their structure and functional capacity, and the activity of enzyme systems and endocrine axes. It is now appreciated that such effects lay the foundations for a diverse array of diseases that become manifest many years later, often in response to secondary environmental stressors. Fetal development is underpinned by the placenta, the organ that forms the interface between the fetus and its mother. All nutrients and oxygen reaching the fetus must pass through this organ. The placenta also has major endocrine functions, orchestrating maternal adaptations to pregnancy and mobilizing resources for fetal use. In addition, it acts as a selective barrier, creating a protective milieu by minimizing exposure of the fetus to maternal hormones, such as glucocorticoids, xenobiotics, pathogens, and parasites. The placenta shows a remarkable capacity to adapt to adverse environmental cues and lessen their impact on the fetus. However, if placental function is impaired, or its capacity to adapt is exceeded, then fetal development may be compromised. Here, we explore the complex relationships between the placental phenotype and developmental programming of chronic disease in the offspring. Ensuring optimal placentation offers a new approach to the prevention of disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity, which are reaching epidemic proportions. PMID:27604528

  11. Chronic non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, N; Alberti, K G M M

    2006-01-01

    Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCD) account for almost 60% of global mortality, and 80% of deaths from NCD occur in low- and middle-income countries. One quarter of these deaths--almost 9 million in 2005--are in men and women aged disease (30% of total global mortality), cancers (13%), chronic respiratory disease (7%) and diabetes (2%). These conditions share a small number of behavioural risk factors, which include a diet high in saturated fat and low in fresh fruit and vegetables, physical inactivity, tobacco smoking, and alcohol excess. In low- and middle-income countries such risk factors tend to be concentrated in urban areas and their prevalences are increasing as a result of rapid urbanization and the increasing globalisation of the food, tobacco and alcohol industries. Because NCD have a major impact on men and women of working age and their elderly dependents, they result in lost income, lost opportunities for investment, and overall lower levels of economic development. Reductions in the incidences of many NCD and their complications are, however, already possible. Up to 80% of all cases of cardiovascular disease or type-2 diabetes and 40% of all cases of cancer, for example, are probably preventable based on current knowledge. In addition, highly cost-effective measures exist for the prevention of some of the complications of established cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Achieving these gains will require a broad range of integrated, population-based interventions as well as measures focused on the individuals at high risk. At present, the international-assistance community provides scant resources for the control of NCD in poor countries, partly, at least, because NCD continue to be wrongly perceived as predominantly diseases of the better off. As urbanization continues apace and populations age, investment in the prevention and control of NCD in low-and middle-income countries can no longer be ignored. PMID:16899148

  12. Complications of Diabetes: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD and Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    iyabet Dunyagoz Hospitals G

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, almost half of the patients who are on chronic kidney replacement therapy have diabetes. The enormous worldwide rise in these cases pose potential economic burden for every country and therefore monitoring kidney function should be a practice provided in outpatient settings. Poorly controlled diabetes will not only result in chronic renal failure, but also patients with chronic renal disease will have some metabolic abnormalities that will increase both morbidity and mortality of the patients. While hypertension may associate with most of the diabetic cases, those people with diabetes who have no rise in blood pressure will eventually develop hypertension at later stage of the chronic kidney disease.

  13. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  14. Chronic disease prevalence from Italian administrative databases in the VALORE project: A validation through comparison of population estimates with general practice databases and national survey

    OpenAIRE

    Gini Rosa; Francesconi Paolo; Mazzaglia Giampiero; Cricelli Iacopo; Pasqua Alessandro; Gallina Pietro; Brugaletta Salvatore; Donato Daniele; Donatini Andrea; Marini Alessandro; Zocchetti Carlo; Cricelli Claudio; Damiani Gianfranco; Bellentani Mariadonata; Sturkenboom Miriam CJM

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Administrative databases are widely available and have been extensively used to provide estimates of chronic disease prevalence for the purpose of surveillance of both geographical and temporal trends. There are, however, other sources of data available, such as medical records from primary care and national surveys. In this paper we compare disease prevalence estimates obtained from these three different data sources. Methods Data from general practitioners (GP) and admin...

  15. Vitamin K Status in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. Holden

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to summarize the research to date on vitamin K status in chronic kidney disease (CKD. This review includes a summary of the data available on vitamin K status in patients across the spectrum of CKD as well as the link between vitamin K deficiency in CKD and bone dynamics, including mineralization and demineralization, as well as ectopic mineralization. It also describes two current clinical trials that are underway evaluating vitamin K treatment in CKD patients. These data may inform future clinical practice in this population.

  16. Chronic kidney disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becherucci, Francesca; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Romagnani, Paola

    2016-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem worldwide. Although relatively uncommon in children, it can be a devastating illness with many long-term consequences. CKD presents unique features in childhood and may be considered, at least in part, as a stand-alone nosologic entity. Moreover, some typical features of paediatric CKD, such as the disease aetiology or cardiovascular complications, will not only influence the child's health, but also have long-term impact on the life of the adult that they will become. In this review we will focus on the unique issues of paediatric CKD, in terms of aetiology, clinical features and treatment. In addition, we will discuss factors related to CKD that start during childhood and require appropriate treatments in order to optimize health outcomes and transition to nephrologist management in adult life. PMID:27478602

  17. Severe chronic allergic (and related) diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Anto, J M; Demoly, P;

    2012-01-01

    Concepts of disease severity, activity, control and responsiveness to treatment are linked but different. Severity refers to the loss of function of the organs induced by the disease process or to the occurrence of severe acute exacerbations. Severity may vary over time and needs regular follow......-up. Control is the degree to which therapy goals are currently met. These concepts have evolved over time for asthma in guidelines, task forces or consensus meetings. The aim of this paper is to generalize the approach of the uniform definition of severe asthma presented to WHO for chronic allergic...... and associated factors such as comorbidities and risk factors. This uniform definition will allow a better definition of the phenotypes of severe allergic (and related) diseases for clinical practice, research (including epidemiology), public health purposes, education and the discovery of novel therapies....

  18. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T50 Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  19. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheimer, D.A.; Jones, H.H.

    1982-12-01

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain.

  20. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain. (orig.)

  1. Right Ventricular Dysfunction in Chronic Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kolb, Todd M.; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Right ventricular dysfunction arises in chronic lung disease when chronic hypoxemia and disruption of pulmonary vascular beds contribute to increase ventricular afterload, and is generally defined by hypertrophy with preserved myocardial contractility and cardiac output. Although the exact prevalence is unknown, right ventricular hypertrophy appears to be a common complication of chronic lung disease, and more frequently complicates advanced lung disease. Right ventricular failure is rare, ex...

  2. Chronic Kidney Disease and Endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Rebić

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial cell layer is responsible for molecular traffic between the blood and surrounding tissue, and endothelial integrity plays a pivotal role in many aspects of vascular function. Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the main cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and its incidence and severity increase in direct proportion with kidney function decline. Non-traditional risk factors for CVDs, including endothelial dysfunction (ED, are highly prevalent in this population and play an important role in cardiovascular (CV events. ED is the first step in the development of atherosclerosis and its severity has prognostic value for CV events. Several risk markers have been associated with ED. Reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide plays a central role, linking kidney disease to ED, atherosclerosis, and CV events. Inflammation, loss of residual renal function, and insulin resistance are closely related to ED in CKD. ED may be followed by structural damage and remodelling that can precipitate both bleeding and thrombotic events. The endothelium plays a main role in vascular tone and metabolic pathways. ED is the first, yet potentially reversible step in the development of atherosclerosis and its severity has prognostic value for CV events.

  3. Aspergillosis in Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill King

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD have the highest life-time incidence of invasive aspergillosis and despite the availability of antifungal prophylaxis, infections by Aspergillus species remain the single most common infectious cause of death in CGD. Recent developments in curative treatment options, such as haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, will change the prevalence of infectious complications including invasive aspergillosis in CGD patients. However, invasive aspergillosis in a previously healthy host is often the first presenting feature of this primary immunodeficiency. Recognizing the characteristic clinical presentation and understanding how to diagnose and treat invasive aspergillosis in CGD is of utmost relevance to improve clinical outcomes. Significant differences exist in fungal epidemiology, clinical signs and symptoms, and the usefulness of non-culture based diagnostic tools between the CGD host and neutropenic patients, reflecting underlying differences in the pathogenesis of invasive aspergillosis shaped by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH-oxidase deficiency.

  4. Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S

    2012-03-29

    This document describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) meets the requirements and management practices of federal regulation 10 CFR 850, 'Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP).' This revision of the LLNL CBDPP incorporates clarification and editorial changes based on lessons learned from employee discussions, observations and reviews of Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and commercial industry beryllium (Be) safety programs. The information is used to strengthen beryllium safety practices at LLNL, particularly in the areas of: (1) Management of small parts and components; and (2) Communication of program status to employees. Future changes to LLNL beryllium activities and on-going operating experience will be incorporated into the program as described in Section S, 'Performance Feedback.'

  5. Kidneys in chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Hartleb; Krzysztof Gutkowski

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI),defined as an abrupt increase in the serum creatinine level by at least 0.3 mg/dL,occurs in about 20% of patients hospitalized for decompensating liver cirrhosis.Patients with cirrhosis are susceptible to developing AKI because of the progressive vasodilatory state,reduced effective blood volume and stimulation of vasoconstrictor hormones.The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis are pre-renal azotemia,hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular necrosis.Differential diagnosis is based on analysis of circumstances of AKI development,natriuresis,urine osmolality,response to withdrawal of diuretics and volume repletion,and rarely on renal biopsy.Chronic glomeruIonephritis and obstructive uropathy are rare causes of azotemia in cirrhotic patients.AKI is one of the last events in the natural history of chronic liver disease,therefore,such patients should have an expedited referral for liver transplantation.Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is initiated by progressive portal hypertension,and may be prematurely triggered by bacterial infections,nonbacterial systemic inflammatory reactions,excessive diuresis,gastrointestinal hemorrhage,diarrhea or nephrotoxic agents.Each type of renal disease has a specific treatment approach ranging from repletion of the vascular system to renal replacement therapy.The treatment of choice in type 1 hepatorenal syndrome is a combination of vasoconstrictor with albumin infusion,which is effective in about 50% of patients.The second-line treatment of HRS involves a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt,renal vasoprotection or systems of artificial liver support.

  6. Achieving Salt Restriction in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J. McMahon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is consistent evidence linking excessive dietary sodium intake to risk factors for cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD progression in CKD patients; however, additional research is needed. In research trials and clinical practice, implementing and monitoring sodium intake present significant challenges. Epidemiological studies have shown that sodium intake remains high, and intervention studies have reported varied success with participant adherence to a sodium-restricted diet. Examining barriers to sodium restriction, as well as factors that predict adherence to a low sodium diet, can aid researchers and clinicians in implementing a sodium-restricted diet. In this paper, we critically review methods for measuring sodium intake with a specific focus on CKD patients, appraise dietary adherence, and factors that have optimized sodium restriction in key research trials and discuss barriers to sodium restriction and factors that must be considered when recommending a sodium-restricted diet.

  7. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... of adults who have ever been diagnosed with emphysema: 3.4 million Percent of adults who have ...

  8. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 270 KB). Alternate Language URL Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease Page Content On ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which a person ...

  9. Current Treatment of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sood, Akshay

    2009-01-01

    The current mainstay of management of chronic beryllium disease involves cessation of beryllium exposure and use of systemic corticosteroids. However, there are no randomized controlled trials to assess the effect of these interventions on the natural history of this disease. Despite this limitation, it is prudent to remove patients with chronic beryllium disease from further exposure and consider treating progressive disease early with long-term corticosteroids. The effect of treatment shoul...

  10. Controversies in Chronic Kidney Disease Staging

    OpenAIRE

    Polkinghorne, Kevan R

    2011-01-01

    In 2002, a new chronic kidney disease staging system was developed by the US National Kidney Foundation. The classification system represented a new conceptual framework for the diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (moving to a schema based on disease severity defined by the glomerular filtration rate). While the introduction of the staging system stimulated significant clinical and research interest in kidney disease, there has been vigorous debate on its merits. This mini-review aims to summ...

  11. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis a chronic disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Mariani, Alberto; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Whether acute recurrent pancreatitis is a chronic disease is still debated and a consensus is not still reached as demonstrated by differences in the classification of acute recurrent pancreatitis. There is major evidence for considering alcoholic pancreatitis as a chronic disease ab initio while chronic pancreatitis lesions detectable in biliary acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) seem a casual association. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation, hereditary a...

  12. The care of patients with varicose veins and associated chronic venous diseases: clinical practice guidelines of the Society for Vascular Surgery and the American Venous Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloviczki, Peter; Comerota, Anthony J; Dalsing, Michael C; Eklof, Bo G; Gillespie, David L; Gloviczki, Monika L; Lohr, Joann M; McLafferty, Robert B; Meissner, Mark H; Murad, M Hassan; Padberg, Frank T; Pappas, Peter J; Passman, Marc A; Raffetto, Joseph D; Vasquez, Michael A; Wakefield, Thomas W

    2011-05-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and the American Venous Forum (AVF) have developed clinical practice guidelines for the care of patients with varicose veins of the lower limbs and pelvis. The document also includes recommendations on the management of superficial and perforating vein incompetence in patients with associated, more advanced chronic venous diseases (CVDs), including edema, skin changes, or venous ulcers. Recommendations of the Venous Guideline Committee are based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system as strong (GRADE 1) if the benefits clearly outweigh the risks, burden, and costs. The suggestions are weak (GRADE 2) if the benefits are closely balanced with risks and burden. The level of available evidence to support the evaluation or treatment can be of high (A), medium (B), or low or very low (C) quality. The key recommendations of these guidelines are: We recommend that in patients with varicose veins or more severe CVD, a complete history and detailed physical examination are complemented by duplex ultrasound scanning of the deep and superficial veins (GRADE 1A). We recommend that the CEAP classification is used for patients with CVD (GRADE 1A) and that the revised Venous Clinical Severity Score is used to assess treatment outcome (GRADE 1B). We suggest compression therapy for patients with symptomatic varicose veins (GRADE 2C) but recommend against compression therapy as the primary treatment if the patient is a candidate for saphenous vein ablation (GRADE 1B). We recommend compression therapy as the primary treatment to aid healing of venous ulceration (GRADE 1B). To decrease the recurrence of venous ulcers, we recommend ablation of the incompetent superficial veins in addition to compression therapy (GRADE 1A). For treatment of the incompetent great saphenous vein (GSV), we recommend endovenous thermal ablation (radiofrequency or laser) rather than high ligation and inversion stripping

  13. Spiritual Needs of Patients with Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold G. Koenig

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available For many patients confronted with chronic diseases, spirituality/religiosity is an important resource for coping. Patients often report unmet spiritual and existential needs, and spiritual support is also associated with better quality of life. Caring for spiritual, existential and psychosocial needs is not only relevant to patients at the end of their life but also to those suffering from long-term chronic illnesses. Spiritual needs may not always be associated with life satisfaction, but sometimes with anxiety, and can be interpreted as the patients’ longing for spiritual well-being. The needs for peace, health and social support are universal human needs and are of special importance to patients with long lasting courses of disease. The factor, Actively Giving, may be of particular importance because it can be interpreted as patients’ intention to leave the role of a `passive sufferer´ to become an active, self-actualizing, giving individual. One can identify four core dimensions of spiritual needs, i.e., Connection, Peace, Meaning/Purpose, and Transcendence, which can be attributed to underlying psychosocial, emotional, existential, and religious needs. The proposed model can provide a conceptual framework for further research and clinical practice. In fact, health care that addresses patients’ physical, emotional, social, existential and spiritual needs (referring to a bio-psychosocial-spiritual model of health care will contribute to patients’ improvement and recovery. Nevertheless, there are several barriers in the health care system that makes it difficult to adequately address these needs.

  14. Endothelial Dysfunction in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Steyers, Curtis M.; Miller, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). As the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is increasingly recognized as an inflammatory process, similarities between atherosclerosis and systemic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, lupus, psoriasis, spondyloarthritis and others have become a topic of interest. Endothelial dysfunction represents a key step in the initiati...

  15. Etiologies of chronic liver disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahmand F

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Liver diseases in children is the result of many different diseases including: metabolic, genetic, infectious, toxic and idiopathic causes. This was a case series study on 133 infants and children with age range 6 month to 12 years old, who presented clinically with manifestation of chronic liver disease and were admitted to Children Hospital Medical Center from year 1999 to 2000. In this study, 32 (24.5 percent patients had autoimmune chronic hepatitis, 15 (11.3 percent Glycogen storage diseases, 12 (9 percent extrahepatic biliary atresia, 11 (8.2 percent willson disease, 10 (7.5 percent cryptogenic cirrhosis, 6 (4.5 percent chronic hepatitis C, 5 (3.8 percen chronic hepatitic B, 5 (3.8 percent galactosemia 3 (2.25 percent congenital hepatic fibrosis, 3 (3.8 percent histiocytosis X, 3 (2.25 percent sclerosing cholangitis, 2 (1.5 percent byler’s disease 2 (1.5 percent primary tuberculosis, 1 (0.75 percent choledocalcyst, 1 (0.75 percent Alagyle syndrome. According to our data, chronic liver disease should be considered in infants and children. In our study, the most common causes are found to be: metabolic and genetic diseases (37.5 percent, chronic autoimmune hepatitis (24 percent and biliary disorders (14 percent, that encompass 86 percent of the patients.

  16. Imaging in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) diagnosis and staging are based on estimated or calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urinalysis and kidney structure at renal imaging techniques. Ultrasound (US) has a key role in evaluating both morphological changes (by means of B-Mode) and patterns of vascularization (by means of color-Doppler and contrast-enhanced US), thus contributing to CKD diagnosis and to the follow-up of its progression. In CKD, conventional US allows measuring longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness and evaluating renal echogenicity and urinary tract status. Maximum renal length is usually considered a morphological marker of CKD, as it decreases contemporarily to GFR, and should be systematically recorded in US reports. More recently, it has been found to be a significant correlation of both renal longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness with renal function. Conventional US should be integrated by color Doppler, which shows parenchymal perfusion and patency of veins and arteries, and by spectral Doppler, which is crucial for the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis and provides important information about intrarenal microcirculation. Different values of renal resistive indexes (RIs) have been associated with different primary diseases, as they reflect vascular compliance. Since RIs significantly correlate with renal function, they have been proposed to be independent risk factors for CKD progression, besides proteinuria, low GFR and arterial hypertension. Despite several new applications, US and color Doppler contribute to a definite diagnosis in <50% of cases of CKD, because of the lack of specific US patterns, especially in cases of advanced CKD. However, US is useful to evaluate CKD progression and to screen patients at risk for CKD. The indications and the recommended frequency of color Doppler US could differ in each case and the follow-up should be tailored. PMID:27170301

  17. Caregiver Burden in Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Ilhan Atagun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Duration of human life has been substantially increased in the last fifty years. Survivals of diseases have been prolonged through the advances in medicine. Together with these gratifying consequences, there appeared novel difficulties to cope with. Furthermore developments including globalization, industrialization and transition from rural to urban life occurred during the last century; so family units became smaller and numbers of members on employment in family units increased. As a result numbers of family members to undertake the responsibility of care decreased. As a concept, caregiver burden expresses physical, psychosocial and financial reactions during the course of care providing. Distinct factors including structures of social, cultural and family units and health care systems may affect conditions of care. Caregiver’s age, gender, ethnicity, education, relationship with the patient, attitude towards providing care, financial situation, coping abilities, her own health, beliefs, social support and cultural pattern are the personal factors that are related to perception of caregiver burden. Burden of care giving is geared to differential aspects of care needs. For instance care needs of physically disabled and medical care requiring patients with spinal cord injuries may differ from care needs of chronic psychiatric disorders, demented patients in advanced age of their lives or cancer patients in terminal periods. Strain due to care giving may differ as a result of properties of care demands. It is aimed to review the burden of caregivers in different medical and psychiatric care requiring conditions and to introduce differential aspects of caregiver burden in these different conditions.

  18. HIV/AIDS, chronic diseases and globalisation

    OpenAIRE

    Colvin Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract HIV/AIDS has always been one of the most thoroughly global of diseases. In the era of widely available anti-retroviral therapy (ART), it is also commonly recognised as a chronic disease that can be successfully managed on a long-term basis. This article examines the chronic character of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and highlights some of the changes we might expect to see at the global level as HIV is increasingly normalised as "just another chronic disease". The article also addresses the ...

  19. Neurohumoral fluid regulation in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1998-01-01

    regulation are outlined in order to provide an update of recent investigations on the neuroendocrine compensation of circulatory and volume dysfunction in chronic liver disease. The underlying pathophysiology is a systemic vasodilatation in which newly described potent vasoactive substances such as nitric...... and lungs. It is still an enigma why patients with chronic liver disease are at the same time overloaded and functional hypovolaemic with a hyperdynamic, hyporeactive circulation. Further research is needed to find the solution to this apparent haemodynamic conflict concerning the abnormal...... neurohumoral fluid regulation in chronic liver disease....

  20. HIV/AIDS, chronic diseases and globalisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colvin Christopher J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HIV/AIDS has always been one of the most thoroughly global of diseases. In the era of widely available anti-retroviral therapy (ART, it is also commonly recognised as a chronic disease that can be successfully managed on a long-term basis. This article examines the chronic character of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and highlights some of the changes we might expect to see at the global level as HIV is increasingly normalised as "just another chronic disease". The article also addresses the use of this language of chronicity to interpret the HIV/AIDS pandemic and calls into question some of the consequences of an uncritical acceptance of concepts of chronicity.

  1. HIV/AIDS, chronic diseases and globalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has always been one of the most thoroughly global of diseases. In the era of widely available anti-retroviral therapy (ART), it is also commonly recognised as a chronic disease that can be successfully managed on a long-term basis. This article examines the chronic character of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and highlights some of the changes we might expect to see at the global level as HIV is increasingly normalised as "just another chronic disease". The article also addresses the use of this language of chronicity to interpret the HIV/AIDS pandemic and calls into question some of the consequences of an uncritical acceptance of concepts of chronicity. PMID:21871074

  2. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis a chronic disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alberto Mariani; Pier Alberto Testoni

    2008-01-01

    Whether acute recurrent pancreaUtis is a chronic disease is still debated and a consensus is not still reached as demonstrated by differences in the classification of acute recurrent pancreatitis.There is major evidence for considering alcoholic pancreatitis as a chronic disease ab initio while chronic pancreatitis lesions detectable in biliary acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) seem a casual association.Cystic fibrosis transmembrane con ductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation,hereditary and obstructive pancreatitis seem an acute disease that progress to chronic pancreatitis,likely as a consequence of the activation and proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells that produce and activate collagen and therefore fibrosis.From the diagnostic point of view,in patients with acute recurrent pancreatitis Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) seems the more reliable technique for an accurate evaluation and follow-up of some ductal and parenchymal abnormalities suspected for early chronic pancreatitis.

  3. A Review of Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, C D W; Bholah, R; Bunchman, T E

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is complex in both adults and children, but the disease is far from the same between these populations. Here we review the marked differences in etiology, comorbidities, impact of disease on growth and quality of life, issues unique to adolescents and transitions to adult care, and special considerations of congenital kidney and urinary tract anomalies for transplantation. PMID:26766175

  4. Prevalence of chronic diseases at the onset of inflammatory arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursum, J.; Korevaar, J.C.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Peters, M.J.L.; Schellevis, F.G.; Nurmohamed, M.T.; Nielen, M.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: To explore the prevalence of chronic diseases at the onset of inflammatory arthritis (IA) in the general practice and compare this to a group of control patients without IA. Methods: In this nested-case-control study, data were used from the Netherlands Information Network of eneral Pra

  5. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... its red color and lets red blood cells transport oxygen from the lungs to the body’s tissues. ... Chronic Disease • diabetes, in which levels of blood glucose, also called blood sugar, are above normal • heart ...

  6. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy and Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sairam, Krish; Scoffone, Cesare M; Alken, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    glomerular filtration rate, including chronic kidney disease stages 0/I/II-greater than 60, stage III-30 to 59 and stages IV/V-less than 30 ml/minute/1.73 m(2). Patient characteristics, operative characteristics, outcomes and morbidity were assessed. RESULTS: Estimated glomerular filtration rate data were...... available on 5,644 patients, including 4,436 with chronic kidney disease stages 0/I/II, 994 with stage III and 214 with stages IV/V. A clinically significant minority of patients with nephrolithiasis presented with severe chronic kidney disease. A greater number of patients with stages IV/V previously...... underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy, ureteroscopy or nephrostomy and had positive urine cultures than less severely affected patients, consistent with the higher incidence of staghorn stones in these patients. Patients with chronic kidney disease stages IV/V had statistically significantly worse...

  7. Sexuality and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and erection difficulties. Therapy also can help a person work through the effects of chronic illness on sexual functioning. A sex therapist can be a psychiatrist, psychologist, physician, or social ...

  8. COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is COPD? Español COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary (PULL-mun- ... can clog them. Normal Lungs and Lungs With COPD Figure A shows the location of the lungs ...

  9. The Role of Technology in Chronic Disease Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Richard V; Bober, Robert M; Lavie, Carl J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic disease represents the epidemic of our time, present in half the adult population and responsible for 86% of United States (US) healthcare costs and 70% of deaths. The major chronic diseases are primarily due to health risk behaviors that are widely communicable across populations. As a nation, the US has performed poorly in managing chronic disease, in large part because of a failed delivery model of care. New opportunities exist as a result of recent advances in home-based wireless devices, apps and wearables, enabling health delivery systems to monitor disease metrics in near real time. These technologies provide a framework for patient engagement and a new model of care delivery utilizing integrated practice units, both of which are needed to navigate the healthcare needs of the 21st century. PMID:26772623

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease : a proteomics approach

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre, Bruno Miguel Coelho, 1980-

    2011-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Biologia (Biologia Molecular), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2012 Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic airflow limitation that is not fully reversible even under bronchodilators effect, caused by a mixture of small airway disease – obstructive bronchiolitis – and parenchymal destruction – emphysema. At the present time, COPD is the fourth leading cause of death and its prevalence and mortality are expected to contin...

  11. Patient-Centered Medical Home in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortiz G

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel Ortiz1, Len Fromer21Pediatric Pulmonary Services, El Paso, TX; 2Department of Family Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a progressive and debilitating but preventable and treatable disease characterized by cough, phlegm, dyspnea, and fixed or incompletely reversible airway obstruction. Most patients with COPD rely on primary care practices for COPD management. Unfortunately, only about 55% of US outpatients with COPD receive all guideline-recommended care. Proactive and consistent primary care for COPD, as for many other chronic diseases, can reduce hospitalizations. Optimal chronic disease management requires focusing on maintenance rather than merely acute rescue. The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH, which implements the chronic care model, is a promising framework for primary care transformation. This review presents core PCMH concepts and proposes multidisciplinary team-based PCMH care strategies for COPD.Keywords: Patient-Centered Medical Home, chronic care model, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, patient education, physician assistants, nurse practitioners

  12. Haemostasis in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Jens; Menke, Julia; Sollinger, Daniel; Schinzel, Helmut; Thürmel, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The coagulation system has gained much interest again as new anticoagulatory substances have been introduced into clinical practice. Especially patients with renal failure are likely candidates for such a therapy as they often experience significant comorbidity including cardiovascular diseases that require anticoagulation. Patients with renal failure on new anticoagulants have experienced excessive bleeding which can be related to a changed pharmacokinetic profile of the compounds. However, the coagulation system itself, even without any interference with coagulation modifying drugs, is already profoundly changed during renal failure. Coagulation disorders with either episodes of severe bleeding or thrombosis represent an important cause for the morbidity and mortality of such patients. The underlying reasons for these coagulation disorders involve the changed interaction of different components of the coagulation system such as the coagulation cascade, the platelets and the vessel wall in the metabolic conditions of renal failure. Recent work provides evidence that new factors such as microparticles (MPs) can influence the coagulation system in patients with renal insufficiency through their potent procoagulatory effects. Interestingly, MPs may also contain microRNAs thus inhibiting the function of platelets, resulting in bleeding episodes. This review comprises the findings on the complex pathophysiology of coagulation disorders including new factors such as MPs and microRNAs in patients with renal insufficiency. PMID:24132242

  13. Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap: asthmatic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic obstructive asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slats, Annelies; Taube, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are different disease entities. They are both clinical diagnoses, with diagnostic tools to discriminate between one another. However, especially in older patients (>55 years) it seems more difficult to differentiate between asthma and COPD. This has led to the definition of a new phenotype called asthma COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, our understanding of ACOS is at a very preliminary stage, as most research has involved subjects with existing diagnoses of asthma or COPD from studies with different definitions for ACOS. This has led to different and sometimes opposing results between studies on several features of ACOS, also depending on the comparison with COPD alone, asthma alone or both, which are summarized in this review.We suggest not using the term ACOS for a patient with features of both asthma and COPD, but to describe a patient with chronic obstructive airway disease as completely as possible, with regard to characteristics that determine treatment response (e.g. eosinophilic inflammation) and prognosis (such as smoking status, exacerbation rate, fixed airflow limitation, hyperresponsiveness, comorbidities). This will provide a far more clinically relevant diagnosis, and would aid in research on treatment in more homogenous groups of patients with chronic airways obstruction. More research is certainly needed to develop more evidence-based definitions for this patient group and to evaluate biomarkers, which will help to further classify these patients, treat them more adequately and unravel the underlying pathophysiological mechanism. PMID:26596632

  14. Pneumocystis jirovecii colonization in chronic pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez S.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Pneumocystis jirovecii causes pneumonia in immunosuppressed individuals. However, it has been reported the detection of low levels of Pneumocystis DNA in patients without signs and symptoms of pneumonia, which likely represents colonization. Several studies performed in animals models and in humans have demonstrated that Pneumocystis induces a local and a systemic response in the host. Since P. jirovecii colonization has been found in patients with chronic pulmonary diseases it has been suggested that P. jirovecii may play a role in the physiopathology and progression of those diseases. In this report we revise P. jirovecii colonization in different chronic pulmonary diseases such us, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, interstitial lung diseases, cystic fibrosis and lung cancer.

  15. Chronic Kidney Disease and Its Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Robert; Kanso, Abbas; Sedor, John R

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disease impacting more than twenty million individuals in the United States. Progression of CKD is associated with a number of serious complications, including increased incidence of cardiovascular disease, hyperlipidemia, anemia and metabolic bone disease. CKD patients should be assessed for the presence of these complications and receive optimal treatment to reduce their morbidity and mortality. A multidisciplinary approach is required to accomplish...

  16. Ageism as a Risk Factor for Chronic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Julie Ober

    2016-08-01

    Ageism is one of the most socially condoned and institutionalized forms of prejudice in the United States. Older adults are discriminated against in employment, health care, and other domains. Exposure to unfavorable stereotypes adversely affects the attitudes, cognitions, and behavior of older adults. Recurrent experiences with negative stereotypes combined with discrimination may make ageism a chronic stressor in the lives of older adults. The way stress influences physical health is gaining increasing support. The weathering hypothesis (Geronimus, A. T. (1992) The weathering hypothesis and the health of African-American women and infants: Evidence and speculations. Ethnicity and Disease, 2, 207-221) posits that the cumulative effects of chronic objective and subjective stressors and high-effort coping cause deterioration of the body, premature aging, and associated health problems such as chronic diseases. Researchers have found empirical support for the weathering hypothesis as well as its theorized contribution to racial and ethnic health disparities. Although ageism is not experienced over the entire life course, as racism typically is, repeated exposure to chronic stressors associated with age stereotypes and discrimination may increase the risk of chronic disease, mortality, and other adverse health outcomes. I conclude with implications for practice in the helping professions and recommendations for future research. Ageism warrants greater recognition, social condemnation, and scientific study as a possible social determinant of chronic disease. PMID:25618315

  17. Circulating Adipocytokines and Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, Katherine T.; L Lee Hamm; A Brent Alper; Chad Miller; Alhakam Hudaihed; Saravanan Balamuthusamy; Chung-Shiuan Chen; Yanxi Liu; Joseph Tarsia; Nader Rifai; Myra Kleinpeter; Jiang He; Jing Chen

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adipokines have been associated with atherosclerotic heart disease, which shares many common risk factors with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but their relationship with CKD has not been well characterized. METHODS: We investigated the association of plasma leptin, resistin and adiponectin with CKD in 201 patients with CKD and 201 controls without. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)

  18. The Western Diet and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Divya; Vellanki, Kavitha; Kramer, Holly

    2015-03-01

    Characteristics of the Western diet that fueled the obesity epidemic may also impact kidney disease incidence and progression. Enlarging portion sizes over the past half century has been accompanied by increased intake of protein, sodium, and processed foods while consumption of fruits and vegetables has declined. Overall dietary patterns play a strong role for chronic disease risk including chronic kidney disease. While dietary patterns high in fresh fruits and vegetables and low in red meats, such as the Mediterranean diet, decrease the risk of chronic diseases, the Western diet, characterized by high intake of red meat, animal fat, sweets, and desserts and low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables and low-fat dairy products, increases risk of chronic diseases. In this article, we review the potential mechanisms whereby several key characteristics of the typical Western diet may impact kidney disease incidence and progression. We also discuss a public health policy initiative to improve dietary choices. Reducing protein intake to the recommended daily allowance of 0.8 g/kg/day and increasing intake of fruit and vegetables and fiber may mitigate kidney disease progression and reduce risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. PMID:25754321

  19. Chronic Wasting Disease Agents in Nonhuman Primates

    OpenAIRE

    Race, Brent; Meade-White, Kimberly D.; Phillips, Katie; Striebel, James; Race, Richard; Chesebro, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease is a prion disease of cervids. Assessment of its zoonotic potential is critical. To evaluate primate susceptibility, we tested monkeys from 2 genera. We found that 100% of intracerebrally inoculated and 92% of orally inoculated squirrel monkeys were susceptible, but cynomolgus macaques were not, suggesting possible low risk for humans.

  20. Chronic pulmonary disease - a multifacted disease complex in the horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews chronic pulmonary disease (CPD) as an insidiously developing disease capable of being manifest in many degrees. Horses may suffer mild, sub-clinical degrees of lower respiratory tract inflammation or small airway disease withouth showing symptoms at rest. This form of disease becomes manifest as poor performance when these horses take part in athletic competition. Factors relating to the aetiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of all degrees of small airway disease of horses are discussed. 30 refs

  1. Pulmonary aspergillosis appearing as chronic nodular disease in chronic granulomatous disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic nodular pneumonia is unusual in children. Three children are described who presented with diffuse nodular pulmonary disease and in whom lung biopsy demonstrated Aspergillus infection. One child was known to have chronic granulomatous disease of childhood (CGD) and further investigation demonstrated CGD in the other two patients as well. These cases indicate that Aspergillus infection and CGD should be considered in the differential diagnosis in children who present with chronic diffuse nodular pneumonia. (orig.)

  2. Cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Julian Wright; Alastair Hutchison

    2009-01-01

    Julian Wright, Alastair HutchisonManchester Institute of Nephrology and Transplantation, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UKAbstract: Patients with chronic kidney disease have a high burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The vast majority of patients with chronic kidney disease do not progress to end stage renal failure, but do have a significantly higher incidence of all cardiovascular co-morbidities. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors only partially account for this ...

  3. Dynamic Adaptive Remote Health Monitoring for Patients with Chronic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Suh, Myung-kyung

    2012-01-01

    Chronic diseases are the leading causes of death and disability in the United States. More than 70% of deaths among Americans are caused by chronic diseases and more than 133 million Americans have at least one chronic disease. Due to the prevalence of chronic disease-related issues, it is prudent to seek out methodologies that would facilitate the prevention, monitoring, and feedback for patients with chronic diseases.This dissertation describes WANDA (Weight and Activity with Other Vital Si...

  4. Exploring metabolic dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Slee Adrian D

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Impaired kidney function and chronic kidney disease (CKD) leading to kidney failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a serious medical condition associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and in particular cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. CKD is associated with multiple physiological and metabolic disturbances, including hypertension, dyslipidemia and the anorexia-cachexia syndrome which are linked to poor outcomes. Specific hormonal, inflammatory, and nutritional-metabol...

  5. Relationship between acute and chronic disease epidemiology.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuller, L.H. (Lewis H.)

    1987-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of epidemics. The primary goal of epidemiological studies should be the identification of the determinants of disease in order to decrease morbidity and mortality. Epidemiological studies evolve through descriptive, analytical, and experimental approaches. The traditional infectious disease epidemiology studies were primarily concerned with identification of an agent, incubation period, mode of transmission, population at risk, and methods of disease control. Chronic...

  6. Diphenylhydantoin (phenytoin)-induced chronic pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit Ramakant; Dixit Kalpana; Nuwal Paras; Banerjee Arunima; Sharma Sidharth; Dave Lokendra

    2009-01-01

    Drug-induced respiratory diseases are difficult to diagnose and therefore usually not identified, probably underestimated and under-reported. We report a case of diphenylhydantoin/phenytoin-induced chronic pulmonary disease in a 62-year-old male patient presenting with progressive dyspnea, eosinophilia, and pulmonary abnormalities. The importance of drug history in clinical history-taking and early diagnosis of drug-induced respiratory diseases is emphasized so as to prevent permanent pulmona...

  7. Diphenylhydantoin (phenytoin-induced chronic pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixit Ramakant

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced respiratory diseases are difficult to diagnose and therefore usually not identified, probably underestimated and under-reported. We report a case of diphenylhydantoin/phenytoin-induced chronic pulmonary disease in a 62-year-old male patient presenting with progressive dyspnea, eosinophilia, and pulmonary abnormalities. The importance of drug history in clinical history-taking and early diagnosis of drug-induced respiratory diseases is emphasized so as to prevent permanent pulmonary damage.

  8. Natural Histories of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rennard, Stephen I.; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Concepts relating to the natural history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) arise most importantly from the classic study of Fletcher and colleagues (The Natural History of Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema, Oxford University Press, New York, 1976). This study, which evaluated working English men over 8 years, was used to construct a proposed life-long natural history. Although this is a classic study that has greatly advanced understanding of COPD, it has a number of limitations....

  9. Framing international trade and chronic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohindra Katia S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is an emerging evidence base that global trade is linked with the rise of chronic disease in many low and middle-income countries (LMICs. This linkage is associated, in part, with the global diffusion of unhealthy lifestyles and health damaging products posing a particular challenge to countries still facing high burdens of communicable disease. We developed a generic framework which depicts the determinants and pathways connecting global trade with chronic disease. We then applied this framework to three key risk factors for chronic disease: unhealthy diets, alcohol, and tobacco. This led to specific 'product pathways', which can be further refined and used by health policy-makers to engage with their country's trade policy-makers around health impacts of ongoing trade treaty negotiations, and by researchers to continue refining an evidence base on how global trade is affecting patterns of chronic disease. The prevention and treatment of chronic diseases is now rising on global policy agendas, highlighted by the UN Summit on Noncommunicable Diseases (September 2011. Briefs and declarations leading up to this Summit reference the role of globalization and trade in the spread of risk factors for these diseases, but emphasis is placed on interventions to change health behaviours and on voluntary corporate responsibility. The findings summarized in this article imply the need for a more concerted approach to regulate trade-related risk factors and thus more engagement between health and trade policy sectors within and between nations. An explicit recognition of the role of trade policies in the spread of noncommunicable disease risk factors should be a minimum outcome of the September 2011 Summit, with a commitment to ensure that future trade treaties do not increase such risks.

  10. A study of attitudes, beliefs and organisational barriers related to safe emergency oxygen therapy for patients with COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) in clinical practice and research

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, B Ronan; Bakerly, Nawar Diar; Caress, Ann-Louise; Roberts, June; Gaston, Miriam; Newton, Mark; Yorke, Janelle

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients can be harmed by receiving too little or too much oxygen. There is ongoing disagreement about the use of oxygen in medical emergencies. Methods This was a mixed methods study (survey, telephone interviews and focus groups) involving patients, the public and healthcare professionals (HCPs). Results 62 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 65 members of the public, 68 ambulance crew members, 22 doctors, 22 nurses and 10 hospital managers took part. For five factual questions about oxygen therapy, the average score for correct answers was 28% for patients with COPD, 33% for the general public and 75% for HCPs. The HCPs had an average score of 66% for five technical questions. Patients (79%) and members of the public (68%) were more likely than HCPs (36%) to believe that oxygen was beneficial in most medical emergencies and less likely to have concerns that it might harm some people (35%, 25% and 68%). All groups had complex attitudes about research into oxygen use in medical emergencies. Many participants would not wish for themselves or their loved ones to have their oxygen therapy determined by a randomised protocol, especially if informed consent was not possible in an emergency situation. Conclusions We have found low levels of factual knowledge about oxygen use among patients with COPD and the general public and many false beliefs about the potential benefits and harms of using oxygen. HCPs had a higher level of factual knowledge. All groups had complex attitudes towards research into emergency oxygen use. PMID:27252870

  11. Chronic Disease Cost not Transferable: Colombian Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Gallardo Solarte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim is to reflect on the social and economic costs of chronic non-communicable disease (NCD in Colombia to display a charging indicator of these pathologies. Material and methods: In a review of 50 studies, 27 were selected since these met the inclusion criteria, like chronical disease, studies conducted between 2002 and 2011 related to costs, chronic disease, and being Colombian. Results: This is a review study of chronic diseases vs. their costs, being here cardiovascular diseases part of the group of high cost and higher incidence diseases, thus repre­senting a great risk to the financial stability of healthcare companies. There are few studies that address the costs generated by the treatment of ncds patients that show the economic impact experienced by public and private institutions providing and promoting health services. Most of them forget the economic, family and social costs the affected population must suffer. Conclu­sions: ncds represent a burden to the health service system for their very high costs, untimely intervention and reduced significant benefit for this population and their families.

  12. Management of Pruritus in Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline Bhalerao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There continues to be uncertainty on the ideal treatment of pruritus in chronic liver disease. The aim of this study was to gather the latest information on the evidence-based management of pruritus in chronic liver disease. Methodology. A literature search for pruritus in chronic liver disease was conducted using Pubmed and Embase database systems using the MeSH terms “pruritus,” “chronic liver disease,” “cholestatic liver disease,” and “treatment.” Results. The current understanding of the pathophysiology of pruritus is described in addition to detailing research into contemporary treatment options of the condition. These medical treatments range from bile salts, rifampicin, and opioid receptor antagonists to antihistamines. Conclusion. The burden of pruritus in liver disease patients persists and, although it is a common symptom, it can be difficult to manage. In recent years there has been greater study into the etiology and treatment of the condition. Nonetheless, pruritus remains poorly understood and many patients continue to suffer, reiterating the need for further research to improve our understanding of the etiology and treatment for the condition.

  13. Chronic Diseases and Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Dept. of Health and Human Services; 2013. http://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/downloads/State-Indicator-Report-Fruits-Vegetables-2013.pdf. [PDF - 4. ...

  14. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... learn about your disease, receive counseling, and create exercise and eating plans tailored to your needs. Surgery: Rarely, patients who have very serious COPD may benefit from surgery. They might have a lung reduction ...

  15. Quality of life in chronic disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalliopi Megari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available During the past decades there was an increasing predominance of chronic disorders, with a large number of people living with chronic diseases that can adversely affect their quality of life. The aim of the present paper is to study quality of life and especially Health-related quality of life (HRQoL in chronic diseases. HRQOL is a multidimensional construct that consists of at least three broad domains − physical, psychological, and social functioning − that are affected by one’s disease and/or treatment. HRQoL is usually measured in chronic conditions and is frequently impaired to a great extent. In addition, factors that are associated with good and poor HRQoL, as well as HRQoL assessment will be discussed. The estimation of the relative impact of chronic diseases on HRQoL is necessary in order to better plan and distribute health care resources aiming at a better HRQoL.[«All the people perceive the concept of living good or being well, that is the same as being happy». (Aristotle. 384-322 BC. Ethica Nichomachea

  16. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Jette Brommann; Sværke, Claus; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich; Lange, Peter; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the risk of cancer in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including which cancer sites are most affected. We examined the short- and long-term risk of lung and extrapulmonary cancer in a nationwide cohort of COPD patients.......Little is known about the risk of cancer in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including which cancer sites are most affected. We examined the short- and long-term risk of lung and extrapulmonary cancer in a nationwide cohort of COPD patients....

  17. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Guía de práctica clínica para el tratamiento de la enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica grave.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inti Santana Carballosa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. This concept includes simple chronic bronchitis, asthmatic bronchitis, chronic obstructive bronchitis, and pulmonary emphysema; although this two last are the most commonly included. Risk factors, classification and treatment are commented, stressing the strategy of mechanical ventilation and the indications for mechanical invasive and no invasive ventilation. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.Guía de práctica clínica para el tratamiento de la enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica grave. Término que encierra a la bronquitis crónica simple, bronquitis asmática, bronquitis obstructiva crónica y enfisema pulmonar; aunque son las dos últimas las más comúnmente incluidas. Se comentan los factores de riesgo, clasificación y tratamiento con énfasis en la estrategia de ventilación mecánica, así como las indicaciones de ventilación mecánica invasiva y no invasiva. Concluye con su guía de evaluación, enfocada en los aspectos más importantes a cumplir.

  18. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in CKD Page Content On this page: What ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which the body ...

  19. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive and interstitial lung diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Charlotte U; Mellemkjær, Søren; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik;

    2013-01-01

    systematically performed in clinical practice. Given the large number of patients with chronic lung disease, biomarkers to preclude or increase suspicion of PH are needed. NT-proBNP may be used as a rule-out test, but biomarkers with a high specificity for PH are still required. It is not known whether specific...... treatment with existent drugs effective in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is beneficial in lung disease related PH. Studies investigating existing PAH drugs in animal models of lung disease related PH have indicated a positive effect, and so have case reports and open label studies. However...

  20. The strength to cope: spirituality and faith in chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unantenne, Nalika; Warren, Narelle; Canaway, Rachel; Manderson, Lenore

    2013-12-01

    The lifelong management of a chronic condition requires considerable mental fortitude and commitment in social adjustment and adherence to medical advice. In examining strategies of adaptation, we draw on ethnographic research, including interviews with 69 people with type 2 diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease. We explore how they incorporate spirituality into their self-management routines, with positive impact on their health and wellbeing, and highlight the role of spiritual practices in supporting people with chronic conditions mentally, physically and socially, so encouraging personal responsibility for one's health and wellbeing. PMID:22083464

  1. Adult stem cells for chronic lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Ana L; Rojas, Mauricio

    2013-10-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic, progressive and lethal lung diseases. The incidence of IPF and COPD increases with age, independent of exposure to common environmental risk factors. At present, there is limited understanding of the relationship between ageing and the development of chronic lung diseases. One hypothesis is that chronic injury drives to exhaustion the local and systemic repair responses in the lung. These changes are accentuated during ageing where there is a progressive accumulation of senescent cells. Recently, stem cells have emerged as a critical reparative mechanism for lung injury. In this review, we discuss the repair response of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (B-MSC) after lung injury and how their function is affected by ageing. Our own work has demonstrated a protective role of B-MSC in several animal models of acute and chronic lung injury. We recently demonstrated the association, using animal models, between age and an increase in the susceptibility to develop severe injury and fibrosis. At the same time, we have identified functional differences between B-MSC isolated from young and old animals. Further studies are required to understand the functional impairment of ageing B-MSC, ultimately leading to a rapid stem cell depletion or fatigue, interfering with their ability to play a protective role in lung injury. The elucidation of these events will help in the development of rational and new therapeutic strategies for COPD and IPF. PMID:23648014

  2. Ethical considerations in chronic musculoskeletal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, C Ronald; de Melo-Martin, Inmaculada

    2015-06-01

    Chronic diseases compromise the life of the sufferer, encumber their families, and exert intractable burdens on the health-care system. With the aging of the population, such conditions have become the primary determinants of morbidity and mortality and the leading cause of disability in our society. Despite the serious challenges they impose, the ethical discourse engendered by them has lagged behind that of acute care medicine. Of particular relevance are the challenges to individual autonomy, as the dilemmas arising in the chronic care setting have not only medical but personal and societal dimensions, may require the input of multiple participants, and resolve over longer periods of time. As such, the conventional model of autonomy is often inadequate to address problems in the chronic care setting. This paper deals with this dilemma through an examination of a clinical scenario. A framework for the exploration of ethical problems in the chronic care setting is thus presented. PMID:25864103

  3. Microcirculation in Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafrani, Lara; Ince, Can

    2015-12-01

    The renal microvasculature is emerging as a key player in acute and chronic kidney diseases. Renal microvascular disease involves alterations in endothelial barrier permeability, exaggerated inflammation, impairment of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation involving the nitric oxide system, increased oxidative stress, and loss of angiogenic factors. Moreover, evidence suggests that there is a microvascular component to the pathogenesis of renal scarring. New technology is being developed to explore renal microcirculation in vivo in experimental models and humans. This technology will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of kidney diseases and will help guide specific therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring the renal microcirculation. This article reviews the cellular and molecular mechanisms of renal microvascular dysfunction in acute and chronic kidney diseases and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these findings. Recent developments in the monitoring of renal microcirculation are described with respect to their advantages and limitations, and future directions are outlined. PMID:26231789

  4. An Update on Coronary Artery Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Afsar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the improvements in diagnostic tools and medical applications, cardiovascular diseases (CVD, especially coronary artery disease (CAD, remain the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. The main factors for the heightened risk in this population, beside advanced age and a high proportion of diabetes and hypertension, are malnutrition, chronic inflammation, accelerated atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, coronary artery calcification, left ventricular structural and functional abnormalities, and bone mineral disorders. Chronic kidney disease is now recognized as an independent risk factor for CAD. In community-based studies, decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR and proteinuria were both found to be independently associated with CAD. This paper will discuss classical and recent epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical aspects of CAD in CKD patients.

  5. A Customizable Model for Chronic Disease Coordination: Lessons Learned From the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managed resources, and 6) relationship building. These elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs. PMID:27032986

  6. A Customizable Model for Chronic Disease Coordination: Lessons Learned From the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voetsch, Karen; Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managed resources, and 6) relationship building. These elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs. PMID:27032986

  7. Caregiver Burden in Chronic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Ilhan Atagun; Ozlem Devrim Balaban; Zeliha Atagun; Mine Elagoz; Aysegul Yilmaz Ozpolat

    2011-01-01

    Duration of human life has been substantially increased in the last fifty years. Survivals of diseases have been prolonged through the advances in medicine. Together with these gratifying consequences, there appeared novel difficulties to cope with. Furthermore developments including globalization, industrialization and transition from rural to urban life occurred during the last century; so family units became smaller and numbers of members on employment in family units increased. As a resul...

  8. Multiple Bowen's disease in chronic arsenicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joydeep Singha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bowen’s disease is a carcinoma in-situ of skin. It was fi rst described by John T. Bowen. It usually present as a solitary lesion in elderly person over sun-exposed area. A case of multiple Bowen’s disease involving non-sun exposed areas of a person with clinical sign of chronic arsenicosis has been found.Read more....

  9. Multiple Bowen's disease in chronic arsenicosis

    OpenAIRE

    Joydeep Singha

    2014-01-01

    Bowen’s disease is a carcinoma in-situ of skin. It was fi rst described by John T. Bowen. It usually present as a solitary lesion in elderly person over sun-exposed area. A case of multiple Bowen’s disease involving non-sun exposed areas of a person with clinical sign of chronic arsenicosis has been found.Read more....

  10. Interleukin-10 and chronic liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, LI-JUAN; Wang, Xiao-Zhong

    2006-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 is an important immunoregulatory cytokine produced by many cell populations. Numerous investigations suggest that IL-10 plays a major role in chronic liver diseases. IL-10 gene polymorphisms are possibly associated with liver disease susceptibility or severity. Recombinant human IL-10 has been produced and is currently tested in clinical trials. These trials may give new insights into the immunobiology of IL-10 and suggest that the IL-10/IL-10 receptor system may become a ...

  11. Interleukin-10 and chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Juan Zhang; Xiao-Zhong Wang

    2006-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 is an important immunoregulatory cytokine produced by many cell populations. Numerous investigations suggest that IL-10 plays a major role in chronic liver diseases. IL-10 gene polymorphisms are possibly associated with liver disease susceptibility or severity. Recombinant human IL-10 has been produced and is currently tested in clinical trials. These trials may give new insights into the immunobiology of IL-10 and suggest that the IL-10/IL-10 receptor system may become a new therapeutic target.

  12. Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Garvey, Christine; Ortiz, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiologic data indicate that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Patients with poorly managed COPD are likely to experience exacerbations that require emergency department visits or hospitalization—two important drivers contributing to escalating healthcare resource use and costs associated with the disease. Exacerbations also contribute to worsening lung function and negative outcomes in COPD. The aim of this review is to present th...

  13. Hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Sengul, Sule; Erdem, Yunus; Batuman, Vecihi; Erturk, Sehsuvar

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, both hypertension and chronic kidney disease are major public health problems, due to their epidemic proportions and their association with high cardiovascular mortality. In 2003, the first Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Turkey (the PatenT) study was conducted in a nationally representative population (n=4910) by the Turkish Society of Hypertension and Renal Diseases, and showed that overall age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of hypertension in Turke...

  14. Invasive mucormycosis in chronic granulomatous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Otaibi, Abdulnasir M; Al-Shahrani, Dayel A; Al-Idrissi, Eman M; Al-Abdely, Hail M

    2016-05-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic fungal infection that occurs in certain immunocompromised patients. We present 2 cases of invasive mucormycosis due to Rhizopus spp. in patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) and discuss their clinical presentation, management challenges, and outcomes. PMID:27146621

  15. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 699–710. 4 Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease Eating, Diet, and Nutrition People with anemia caused by ... Phone: 202–776–0544 Fax: 202–776–0545 Internet: www. hematology. org Iron Disorders Institute P.O. Box 675 Taylors, SC 29687 ...

  16. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - adults - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... visit when they're all better. Save Your Energy at Home Place items you use often in spots where ... H, Bruhl E, et al. Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement. Health care guideline: Diagnosis and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). 10th edition. ...

  17. Osteoporosis Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Reiko; Inoue, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have revealed that osteoporosis is closely associated with common chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disorders, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a chronic inflammatory airway disease but now well known to be associated with various systemic comorbidities including osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are extremely common in COPD patients, which have significant impacts on their quality of life (QOL), activities of daily life (ADL), respiratory function, and possibly their prognosis. COPD-associated osteoporosis is however extremely under-recognized, hence undertreated. Recent studies have suggested that both decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality compromise bone strength causing fractures in COPD. In COPD patients, various general clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are present including smoking, older age, low body weight, and physical inactivity. In addition, disease-related risk factors such as decreased pulmonary function, inflammation, glucocorticoid use and vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency have been linked to the development of osteoporosis in COPD. Increased awareness of osteoporosis in COPD, especially that of high prevalence of vertebral fractures is called upon among general physicians as well as pulmonologists. Routine screening for osteoporosis and risk assessment of fractures will enable physicians to diagnose COPD patients with comorbid osteoporosis at an early stage. Timely prevention of developing osteoporosis together with appropriate treatment of established osteoporosis may improve QOL and ADL of the COPD patients, preserve their lung function and eventually result in better prognosis in these patients.

  18. Endothelial Dysfunction in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis M. Steyers

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD. As the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is increasingly recognized as an inflammatory process, similarities between atherosclerosis and systemic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, lupus, psoriasis, spondyloarthritis and others have become a topic of interest. Endothelial dysfunction represents a key step in the initiation and maintenance of atherosclerosis and may serve as a marker for future risk of cardiovascular events. Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases manifest endothelial dysfunction, often early in the course of the disease. Therefore, mechanisms linking systemic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis may be best understood at the level of the endothelium. Multiple factors, including circulating inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α, reactive oxygen species, oxidized LDL (low density lipoprotein, autoantibodies and traditional risk factors directly and indirectly activate endothelial cells, leading to impaired vascular relaxation, increased leukocyte adhesion, increased endothelial permeability and generation of a pro-thrombotic state. Pharmacologic agents directed against TNF-α-mediated inflammation may decrease the risk of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in these patients. Understanding the precise mechanisms driving endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases may help elucidate the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the general population.

  19. Ramadan fasting and chronic kidney disease: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola Luigi Bragazzi

    2014-01-01

    Ramadan fasting represents one of the five pillars of the Islam creed according to the Sunnah and the second practice of faith for the Shiaa. Even though patients are exempted from observing this religious duty, they may be eager to share this particular moment of the year with their family and peers. However, there are no guidelines or standardized protocols that can help physicians to properly address the issue of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) fasting in Ramadan and to correctl...

  20. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  1. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  2. Myocardial Ischemia Assessment in Chronic Kidney Disease: Challenges and Pitfalls

    OpenAIRE

    Susie Fei Cen Parnham; Gleadle, Jonathan M.; De Pasquale, Carmine G; Selvanayagam, Joseph B

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the chronic kidney disease population and often presents with atypical symptoms. Current diagnostic investigations of myocardial ischemia in chronic kidney disease lack sensitivity and specificity or may have adverse effects. We present a case vignette and explore the challenges of diagnostic myocardial stress investigation in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  3. Pregnancy in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellanki, Kavitha

    2013-05-01

    Despite vast improvements in fetal outcomes, pregnancy in women with CKD is fraught with hazards; worsening of renal function and complications like preeclampsia and premature delivery are common. To date, there is no accurate formula to calculate glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Also, whether the current CKD classification is better than the older classification at predicting outcomes in pregnant women with CKD is unknown. Women with an estimated GFR ≥1.4 mg/dL are at increased risk of progressive worsening of renal function regardless of the cause of the underlying kidney disease. Preeclampsia is difficult to diagnose in pregnant women with underlying CKD, and serum markers such as soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1) and placental growth factor (PIGF) may lead the way for definitive diagnosis. New-onset lupus or lupus flare is an indication for kidney biopsy during pregnancy; cyclosporine is safe and is the most effective agent that can be used during pregnancy. Women with adult polycystic kidney disease are at increased risk of hypertension and preeclampsia during pregnancy, as well as hepatic cysts later in life, the latter occurring with multiple pregnancies. Strict blood pressure control is important in pregnant women with diabetic nephropathy. A multidisciplinary team that includes nephrologists and obstetricians who deal with high-risk pregnancies should be involved in the care of pregnant women with CKD for successful pregnancy outcomes. PMID:23928386

  4. Renal imaging in children with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wiwit Rahmawati; Heru Muryawan; Farah Prabowo

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney failure is a cause of death in children. Diagnosing chronic kidney disease is often made by clinical manifestations, laboratory findings and ultrasonography or other imaging tests. Early detection of chronic kidney disease is needed for education and management of the disease. Objective To describe renal imaging findings and mortality in children with chronic kidney disease. Methods This was a cross-sectional study on children with kidney diseases who were in...

  5. Chronic Disease Self-Management by People With HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Karalyn; Slavin, Sean; Pitts, Marian K; Elliott, Julian H

    2016-05-01

    As HIV has transitioned into a chronic disease, reappraisal of clinical management has occurred with chronic disease self-management (CDSM) as one possibility. However, despite extensive work on CDSM across a range of diseases, little attention has focused on psychosocial contexts of the lives of people for whom programs are intended. This article reports semi-structured interviews used to explore health practices and motivations of 33 people with HIV (PWHIV) in Australia. Within participants' accounts, different forms of subjectivity and agency emerged with implications for how they understood and valued health-related behaviors. Four themes arose: health support and disclosure, social support and stigma, employment/structure, and health decisions beyond HIV. The experience of stigma and its intersection with CDSM remains relatively un-chartered. This study found stigma shapes agency and engagement with health. Decisions concerning health behaviors are often driven by perceived social and emotional benefit embedded in concerns of disclosure and stigma. PMID:26290540

  6. Psychosocial interventions for patients with chronic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deter Hans-Christian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Treatment of patients with chronic diseases will be one of the main challenges of medicine in the future. This paper presents an overview of different origins, mechanism, and symptoms necessary for understanding new and different interventions that include a psychosomatic view. In a psychosomatic therapeutic intervention there are very different targets, such as psychological symptoms, personality traits, attitudes toward disease and life, risk behaviour, and social isolation and as biological targets the change of autonomic imbalance and of the effects of the psycho-endocrinological or psycho-immunological stress responses. And there are also different psychosomatic measures that influence the individual biological, psychological and sociological targets. There is a need to give different answer to different questions in the field of psychosomatic and behavioral medicine. Comparative effectiveness research is an important strategy for solving some methodological issues. What is the target of treatment for different diseases: Symptom reduction, healing, or limiting progression to the worst case - the death of patients. We know that, the patient-physician relationship is important for every medical/therapeutic action for patients with chronic diseases. This volume of BioPsychoSocial Medicine will present four different psychosomatic treatment studies from the clinical field in the sense of phase 2 studies: Reports of patients with obesity, anorexia nervosa, chronic somatoform pain and coronary artery disease were presented

  7. Arterial hypertension and chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Møller, S

    2005-01-01

    This review looks at the alterations in the systemic haemodynamics of patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) in relation to essential hypertension and arterial hypertension of renal origin. Characteristic findings in patients with cirrhosis are vasodilatation with low overall systemic......, calcitonin gene-related peptide, nitric oxide, and other vasodilators, and is most pronounced in the splanchnic area. This provides an effective (although relative) counterbalance to raised arterial blood pressure. Subjects with arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the...... development of chronic liver disease, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in those with renovascular disease and high circulating renin activity. There is much dispute as to the understanding of homoeostatic regulation in cirrhotic patients with manifest arterial...

  8. Alcoholic Beverage Consumption and Chronic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Jie; Li, Sha; Zhou, Tong; Zhang, Pei; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have consistently linked alcoholic beverage consumption with the development of several chronic disorders, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and obesity. The impact of drinking is usually dose-dependent, and light to moderate drinking tends to lower risks of certain diseases, while heavy drinking tends to increase the risks. Besides, other factors such as drinking frequency, genetic susceptibility, smoking, diet, and hormone status can modify the association. The amount of ethanol in alcoholic beverages is the determining factor in most cases, and beverage types could also make an influence. This review summarizes recent studies on alcoholic beverage consumption and several chronic diseases, trying to assess the effects of different drinking patterns, beverage types, interaction with other risk factors, and provide mechanistic explanations. PMID:27231920

  9. Alcoholic Beverage Consumption and Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and experimental studies have consistently linked alcoholic beverage consumption with the development of several chronic disorders, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and obesity. The impact of drinking is usually dose-dependent, and light to moderate drinking tends to lower risks of certain diseases, while heavy drinking tends to increase the risks. Besides, other factors such as drinking frequency, genetic susceptibility, smoking, diet, and hormone status can modify the association. The amount of ethanol in alcoholic beverages is the determining factor in most cases, and beverage types could also make an influence. This review summarizes recent studies on alcoholic beverage consumption and several chronic diseases, trying to assess the effects of different drinking patterns, beverage types, interaction with other risk factors, and provide mechanistic explanations.

  10. Alcoholic Beverage Consumption and Chronic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Jie; Li, Sha; Zhou, Tong; Zhang, Pei; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have consistently linked alcoholic beverage consumption with the development of several chronic disorders, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and obesity. The impact of drinking is usually dose-dependent, and light to moderate drinking tends to lower risks of certain diseases, while heavy drinking tends to increase the risks. Besides, other factors such as drinking frequency, genetic susceptibility, smoking, diet, and hormone status can modify the association. The amount of ethanol in alcoholic beverages is the determining factor in most cases, and beverage types could also make an influence. This review summarizes recent studies on alcoholic beverage consumption and several chronic diseases, trying to assess the effects of different drinking patterns, beverage types, interaction with other risk factors, and provide mechanistic explanations. PMID:27231920

  11. Neurohumoral fluid regulation in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1998-01-01

    Impaired homeostasis of the blood volume, with increased fluid and sodium retention, is a prevailing element in the deranged systemic and splanchnic haemodynamics in patients with liver disease. In this review, some basic elements of the circulatory changes that take place and of neurohumoral fluid...... regulation are outlined in order to provide an update of recent investigations on the neuroendocrine compensation of circulatory and volume dysfunction in chronic liver disease. The underlying pathophysiology is a systemic vasodilatation in which newly described potent vasoactive substances such as nitric...... and lungs. It is still an enigma why patients with chronic liver disease are at the same time overloaded and functional hypovolaemic with a hyperdynamic, hyporeactive circulation. Further research is needed to find the solution to this apparent haemodynamic conflict concerning the abnormal...

  12. Direct renin inhibition in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Frederik; Rossing, Peter; Parving, Hans-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    that renin inhibition could hold potential for improved treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease, with diabetic nephropathy as an obvious group of patients to investigate, as the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is enhanced in these patients and as there is an unmet need...... inhibition in chronic kidney disease by reporting of the studies published so far as well as perspective on the future possibilites....... was terminated early as a beneficial effect was unlikely and there was an increased frequency of side effects. Also in non-diabetic kidney disease a few intervention studies have been carried out, but there is no ongoing hard outcome study. In this review we provide the current evidence for renin...

  13. Arterial Stiffness and Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Garnier, Anne-Sophie; Briet, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health concern due to the high prevalence of associated cardiovascular (CV) disease. CV mortality is 10-30 times higher in end-stage renal disease patients than in the age-adjusted general population. The last 20 years have been marked by a huge effort in the characterization of the vascular remodeling process associated with CKD and its consequences on the renal, CV and general prognosis. By comparison with patients with normal renal function, w...

  14. Spirometry Use among Older Adults with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: 1999–2008

    OpenAIRE

    Shawn P E Nishi; Wang, Yue; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S.; Sharma, Gulshan

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Clinical practice guidelines recommend spirometry to diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and facilitate management. National trends in spirometry use in older adults with newly diagnosed COPD are not known.

  15. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive and interstitial lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Charlotte U; Mellemkjær, Søren; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik; Bendstrup, Elisabeth; Hilberg, Ole; Simonsen, Ulf

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge on PH in relation to COPD and ILD from a clinical perspective with emphasis on diagnosis, biomarkers, prevalence, impact, treatment, and practical implications. PH in COPD and ILD is associated with a poor prognosis, and is considered one of the most frequent types of PH. However, the prevalence of PH among patients with COPD and ILD is not clear. The diagnosis of PH in chronic lung disease is often established by echocardiographic screening, but definitive diagnosis requires right heart catheterization, which is not systematically performed in clinical practice. Given the large number of patients with chronic lung disease, biomarkers to preclude or increase suspicion of PH are needed. NT-proBNP may be used as a rule-out test, but biomarkers with a high specificity for PH are still required. It is not known whether specific treatment with existent drugs effective in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is beneficial in lung disease related PH. Studies investigating existing PAH drugs in animal models of lung disease related PH have indicated a positive effect, and so have case reports and open label studies. However, treatment with systemically administered pulmonary vasodilators implies the risk of worsening the ventilation-perfusion mismatch in patients with lung disease. Inhaled vasodilators may be better suited for PH in lung disease, but new treatment modalities are also required. PMID:23849967

  16. Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Native > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, ... 54. 1 At a glance – Cancer Rates for American Indian/Alaska Natives (2008-2012) Cancer Incidence Rates per ...

  17. Cognitive impairment in human chronic Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Mangone

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available We proposed to investigate subclinical cognitive impairment secondary to chronic Chagas' disease (CCD. No similar study was previously done. The neuropsychological performance of 45 chronic Chagasic patients and 26 matched controls (age, education place and years of residency in endemic area was compared using the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE, Weschler Memory Scale (WMS and the Weschler Adult Intelligent Scale (WAIS. Non-parametric tests and Chi2 were used to compare group means and multivariate statistics in two way frequency tables for measures of independence and association of categorical variables with the disease. Results: Chagasic patients showed lower MMSE scores (p<004, poor orientation (p<.004, and attention (p<.007. Lower WMS MQ were associated with CCD (Chi2 5.9; p<.01; Fisher test p<.02. Lower WAIS IQ were associated with CCD (Chi2 6.3, p<.01; Fisher test p<.01 being the digit symbol (p<.03, picture completion (p<.03, picture arrangement (p<.01 and object assembly (p<.03 subtests the most affected. The impairment in non-verbal reasoning, speed of information processing, problem solving, learning and sequencing observed in chronic Chagas disease patients resembles the cognitive dysfunction associated with white matter disease.

  18. An assessment of chronic kidney diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Neves, José; Rosário Martins, M.; Vilhena, João; Neves, João; Gomes, Sabino; Abelha, António; Machado, José Manuel; Vicente, Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Kidney renal failure means that one’s kidney have unexpectedlystoppedfunctioning,i.e.,oncechronicdiseaseis exposed, the presence or degree of kidney dysfunction and its progression must be assessed, and the underlying syndrome has to be diagnosed. Although the patient’s history and physical examination may denote good practice, some key information has to be obtained from valuation of the glomerular filtration rate, and the analysis of serum biomarkers. Indeed, chronic kidney sickness depicts...

  19. Definition and classification of chronic kidney disease: A position statement from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, A.S.; Eckardt, K.U.; Tsukamoto, Y.; Levin, A.; Coresh, J.; Rossert, J.; Hostetter, T.H.; Lameire, N.; Eknoyan, G.; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2005-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem, with adverse outcomes of kidney failure, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and premature death. A simple definition and classification of kidney disease is necessary for international development and implementation of clinical practice g

  20. Definition and classification of chronic kidney disease : A position statement from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, AS; Eckardt, KU; Tsukamoto, Y; Levin, A; Coresh, J; Rossert, J; de Zeeuw, D; Hostetter, TH; Lameire, N; Eknoyan, G

    2005-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem, with adverse outcomes of kidney failure, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and premature death. A simple definition and classification of kidney disease is necessary for international development and implementation of clinical practice g

  1. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD. PMID:27152260

  2. Lactate metabolism in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Johanne B; Mortensen, Christian; Bendtsen, Flemming;

    2013-01-01

    Background. In the healthy liver there is a splanchnic net-uptake of lactate caused by gluconeogenesis. It has previously been shown that patients with acute liver failure in contrast have a splanchnic release of lactate caused by a combination of accelerated glycolysis in the splanchnic region and...... a reduction in hepatic gluconeogenesis. Aims. The aims of the present study were to investigate lactate metabolism and kinetics in patients with chronic liver disease compared with a control group with normal liver function. Methods. A total of 142 patients with chronic liver disease and 14 healthy...... controls underwent a liver vein catheterization. Blood samples from the femoral artery and the hepatic and renal veins were simultaneously collected before and after stimulation with galactose. Results. The fasting lactate levels, both in the hepatic vein and in the femoral artery, were higher in the...

  3. Netherlands : employment opportunities for people with chronic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooftman, W.; Houtman, I.L.D.

    2014-01-01

    There is no clear national definition of a chronic disease in a work situation in the Netherlands. Questionnaire data shows that between 25% and 30% of all workers are affected by a chronic disease. Worker with a chronic disease have slightly different working conditions as compared to workers witho

  4. Chronic Kidney Disease: What Does It Mean for Me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our online catalog. Alternate Language URL Españ​ol Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Basics Page Content Chronic Kidney Disease: The ... and My Lifestyle CKD: Tracking My Test Results Chronic Kidney Disease: The Basics You've been told that you ...

  5. Chronic granulomatous disease with gastric antral narrowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marked narrowing of the gastric antrum produced vomiting in a boy with chronic granulomatous disease; the antral stenosis resolved after five months of medical management. A review of the seven previously reported cases indicates that this uncommon lesion may be self-limited and should be given an exhaustive trial of nonsurgical therapy, in view of the high morbidity of surgery in these children. Antibiotics may speed resolution. (orig.)

  6. Diaphragm Dysfunction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ottenheijm, Coen A. C.; Heunks, Leo M.A.; Sieck, Gary C.; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Jansen, Suzanne M.; Degens, Hans; de Boo, Theo; Dekhuijzen, P.N Richard

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Hypercapnic respiratory failure because of inspiratory muscle weakness is the most important cause of death in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the pathophysiology of failure of the diaphragm to generate force in COPD is in part unclear. Objectives: The present study investigated contractile function and myosin heavy chain content of diaphragm muscle single fibers from patients with COPD. Methods: Skinned muscle fibers were isolated from muscle biopsies from t...

  7. Pneumocystis jirovecii colonization in chronic pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez S.; Respaldiza N.; Campano E.; Martínez-Risquez M.T.; Calderón E.J.; De La Horra C.

    2011-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii causes pneumonia in immunosuppressed individuals. However, it has been reported the detection of low levels of Pneumocystis DNA in patients without signs and symptoms of pneumonia, which likely represents colonization. Several studies performed in animals models and in humans have demonstrated that Pneumocystis induces a local and a systemic response in the host. Since P. jirovecii colonization has been found in patients with chronic pulmonary diseases it has been sugge...

  8. Gut microbiota, immune system and chronic diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena; Hudcovic, Tomáš; Štěpánková, Renata; Klimešová, Klára; Hrnčíř, Tomáš; Kverka, Miloslav; Rossmann, Pavel; Kozáková, Hana; Zákostelská, Zuzana; Funda, David; Kokešová, Alena; Kobayashi, K.

    Praha: Carolinum, 2012. s. 47-47. ISBN 978-80-7395-456-7. [International Nutrition and Diagnostics Conference /12./. 27.08.2012-30.08.2012, Praha] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010737; GA MZd(CZ) NT13483 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : chronic diseases * gut microbiota * anticancer response Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  9. Ethical considerations in chronic musculoskeletal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mackenzie, C. Ronald; de Melo-Martin, Inmaculada

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diseases compromise the life of the sufferer, encumber their families, and exert intractable burdens on the health-care system. With the aging of the population, such conditions have become the primary determinants of morbidity and mortality and the leading cause of disability in our society. Despite the serious challenges they impose, the ethical discourse engendered by them has lagged behind that of acute care medicine. Of particular relevance are the challenges to individual autono...

  10. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Cystic Renal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Cysts are frequently found in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and they have a different prognostic significance depending on the clinical context. Simple solitary parenchymal cysts and peripelvic cysts are very common and they have no clinical significance. At US, simple cyst appears as a round anechoic pouch with regular and thin profiles. On the other hand, hereditary polycystic disease is a frequent cause of CKD in children and adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are the best known cystic hereditary diseases. ADPKD and ARPKD show a diffused cystic degeneration with cysts of different diameters derived from tubular epithelium. Medullary cystic disease may be associated with tubular defects, acidosis and lithiasis and can lead to CKD. Acquired cystic kidney disease, finally, is secondary to progressive structural end-stage kidney remodelling and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27169740

  11. Ivabradine, heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Di Lullo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of congestive heart failure are actually increasing worldwide, especially in Western countries. In Europe and the United States, congestive heart failure represents a disabling clinical disease, accountable for increased hospitalization and health care costs. European guidelines have underlined the importance of pharmacological treatment to improve both patients’ outcomes and quality of life. The latest clinical trials to evaluate ivabradine’s efficacy have underlined its usefulness as a stand-alone medication and in combination with conventional congestive heart failure therapy, including in chronic kidney disease patients.

  12. Biomarkers in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sin, Don D; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Currently, with exception of lung function tests, there are no well validated biomarkers or surrogate endpoints that can be used to establish efficacy of novel drugs for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the lung function test is not an ideal surrogate for short-term drug...... trials because it (1) does not provide information regarding disease activity or the underlying pathologic process, (2) cannot separate the various phenotypes of COPD, (3) is not specific for COPD, and (4) is relatively unresponsive to known therapies that prolong survival. Accordingly, there are large...

  13. Diabetic Retinopathy Screening and Monitoring of Early Stage Disease in Australian General Practice: Tackling Preventable Blindness within a Chronic Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Crossland

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diabetic retinopathy (DR is the leading cause of preventable blindness in Australia. Up to 50% of people with proliferative DR who do not receive timely treatment will become legally blind within five years. Innovative and accessible screening, involving a variety of primary care providers, will become increasingly important if patients with diabetes are to receive optimal eye care. Method. An open controlled trial design was used. Five intervention practices in urban, regional, and rural Australia partnered with ophthalmologists via telehealth undertook DR screening and monitoring of type 2 diabetes patients and were compared with control practices undertaking usual care 2011–2014. Results. Recorded screening rates were 100% across intervention practices, compared with 22–53% in control practices. 31/577 (5% of patients in the control practices were diagnosed with mild-moderate DR, of whom 9 (29% had appropriate follow-up recorded. This was compared with 39/447 (9% of patients in the intervention group, of whom 37 (95% had appropriate follow-up recorded. Discussion and Conclusion. General practice-based DR screening via Annual Cycle of Care arrangements is effective across differing practice locations. It offers improved recording of screening outcomes for Australians with type 2 diabetes and better follow-up of those with screen abnormalities.

  14. Multinational observational study on clinical practices and therapeutic management of mineral and bone disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease stages 4, 5, and 5D: The OCEANOS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faissal A. M. Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to assess the current clinical practices in monitoring and treatment patterns of chronic kidney disease (CKD-mineral bone disorder and the degree to which these practices met the kidney disease improving global outcome (KDIGO guidelines. This was an international, multi-center, cross-sectional, observational study in adult patients diagnosed with CKD Stages 4, 5, and 5D. Patients were enrolled from Middle East, South Asia, Eurasia, and Africa; patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥30 mL/min/1.73 m 2 or with any medical/surgical conditions precluding their participation were excluded. Frequency of measurements, levels of serum calcium (Ca, phosphorus and parathormone (parathyroid hormone [PTH], and presence vascular/valvular calcification were recorded. Of the 2250 patients enrolled, data on 2247 patients were evaluated. Overall, only a small percentage of patients met all three target KDIGO ranges of serum Ca, phosphorus, and PTH (13.7% [95% confidence interval: 12.0; 15.4], with a higher proportion among CKD Stage 5D patients (14.8% than CKD Stage 4 and 5 (5.6% patients. Majority (84.3% of the patients received treatment with phosphorous binders, of whom 85.5% received Ca-based phosphate binders. Overall, 57.0% of patients received Vitamin D treatment with a similar frequency among patients with CKD Stages 4, 5, and 5D. Over half (65.7% of the patients were screened for vascular/valvular calcification; of these, 58.8% had ≥1 calcification. Diabetes status, P, PTH, and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol had significant impact on the prescription pattern of phosphorous binders. The current practices for the management of bone and mineral metabolism in CKD patients in the study region fall far short of meeting the KDIGO target range.

  15. Chronic kidney disease: Statins in chronic kidney disease: time to move on?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Richard; Wanner, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Statins reduce the risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease in healthy individuals and those with chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, clinical trials have suggested a minimal effect of statins on CKD progression. The PLANET trials compared the renal effects of rosuvastatin and atorvastatin, but the findings leave many questions unanswered. PMID:25802077

  16. Developing effective chronic disease interventions in Africa: insights from Ghana and Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boynton Petra

    2010-04-01

    interventions on health outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Conclusions Both Ghana and Cameroon require a comprehensive and integrative approach to chronic disease intervention that combines structural, community and individual strategies. We outline research and practice gaps and best practice models within and outside Africa that can instruct the development of future interventions.

  17. Chronic liver disease in Aboriginal North Americans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John D Scott; Naomi Garland

    2008-01-01

    A structured literature review was performed to detail the frequency and etiology of chronic liver disease (CLD) in Aboriginal North Americans. CLD affects Aboriginal North Americans disproportionately and is now one of the most common causes of death.Alcoholic liver disease is the leading etiology of CLD,but viral hepatitis, particularly hepatitis C, is an important and growing cause of CLD. High rates of autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) are reported in regions of coastal British Columbia and southeastern Alaska. Non-alcoholic liver disease is a common, but understudied, cause of CLD.Future research should monitor the incidence and etiology of CLD and should be geographically inclusive.In addition, more research is needed on the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and non-alcoholicfatty liver disease (NAFLD) in this population.

  18. Interstitial Lung Disease in a Patient with Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Moghtaderi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is an inherited phagocytes defect, characterized by defects of NADPH-oxidase and inability of bacterial killing, which leads to recurrent life-threatening infections. Respiratory problems, which are the major cause of morbidity in CGD, usually result from recurrent severe infections; however, vigorous inflammatory response could also cause respiratory diseases.Case Presentation: Herein, an 11 year-old patient with CGD is presented who suffered from chronic cough and dyspnea for 7 years. Considering the results of chest X-ray, high-resolution computed tomography, and pulmonary function test, the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease was made.Conclusion: Early recognition of manifestations associated with CGD and appropriate treatment could prevent further complications and reduce morbidity and mortality in this group of patients.

  19. Chronic idiopathic urticaria and Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, R M; Imbesi, S; Saitta, S; Campennì, A; Cannavò, S; Trimarchi, F; Gangemi, S

    2013-01-01

    Chronic urticaria is a common condition characterized by recurrent episodes of mast cell-driven wheal and flare-type skin reactions lasting for more than 6 weeks. In about 75% of cases, the underlying causes remain unknown, and the term chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) is used to emphasize that wheals develop independently of identified external stimuli. Although CIU affects about 1.0% of the general population, its etiopathogenesis is not yet well understood. It is now widely accepted that in many cases CIU should be regarded as an autoimmune disorder caused by circulating and functionally active IgG autoantibodies specific for the IgE receptor (FceRI) present on mast cells and basophils or for IgE itself. The well-known association of CIU with other autoimmune processes/diseases represents further indirect evidence of its autoimmune origin. Autoimmune thyroid diseases, especially autoimmune thyroiditis, represent the most frequently investigated diseases in association with CIU. Here we review this topic with particular regard to the association between Graves' disease and CIU. The possible pathogenetic mechanisms and the clinical implications of such an association are discussed. PMID:23609949

  20. Vitamin D deficiency in chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paula; Iruzubieta; lvaro; Terán; Javier; Crespo; Emilio; Fábrega

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D is an important secosteroid hormone with known effect on calcium homeostasis,but recently there is increasing recognition that vitamin D also is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation,has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties.Vitamin D deficiency has been frequently reported in many causes of chronic liver disease and has been associated with the development and evolution of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD)and chronic hepatitis C(CHC)virus infection.The role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and CHC is not completely known,but it seems that the involvement of vitamin D in the activation and regulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems and its antiproliferative effect may explain its importance in these liver diseases.Published studies provide evidence for routine screening for hypovitaminosis D in patients with liver disease.Further prospectives studies demonstrating the impact of vitamin D replacement in NAFLD and CHC are required.

  1. Role of cannabinoids in chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Parfieniuk; Robert Flisiak

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoids are a group of compounds acting primarily via CB1 and CB2 receptors. The expression of cannabinoid receptors in normal liver is low or absent. However, many reports have proven up-regulation of the expression of CB1 and CB2 receptors in hepatic myofibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells, as well as increased concentration of endocannabinoids in liver in the course of chronic progressive liver diseases. It has been shown that CB1 receptor signalling exerts profibrogenic and proinflammatory effects in liver tissue, primarily due to the stimulation of hepatic stellate cells, whereas the activation of CB2 receptors inhibits or even reverses liver fibrogenesis. Similarly, CB1 receptor stimulation contributes to progression of liver steatosis. In end-stage liver disease, the endocannabi-noid system has been shown to contribute to hepatic encephalopathy and vascular effects, such as portal hypertension, splanchnic vasodilatation, relative pe-ripheral hypotension and probably cirrhotic cardiomy-opathy. So far, available evidence is based on cellular cultures or animal models. Clinical data on the effects of cannabinoids in chronic liver diseases are limited. However, recent studies have shown the contribution of cannabis smoking to the progression of liver fibrosis and steatosis. Moreover, controlling CB1 or CB2 signal-ling appears to be an attractive target in managing liver diseases.

  2. Practical approach to management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolej, Lukáš; Šimkovič, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Revolutionary progress has recently changed the landscape of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Powerful prognostic factors, especially p53 mutation and/or deletion and IGHV mutation status, have refined individual patient prognosis. Purine analogs and monoclonal antibodies paved the way from palliative treatment to chemoimmunotherapy capable of eradication of minimal residual disease and prolongation of survival. Obinutuzumab (GA-101) and ofatumumab have been recently approved for the treatment of comorbid patients. Bendamustine is available for first-line treatment of patients ineligible for fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR). High-dose glucocorticoids combined with rituximab represent a promising option for refractory CLL; ofatumumab is approved for fludarabine- and alemtuzumab-refractory patients. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is the only curative option but is feasible in a highly selected group of patients only. The novel small molecule inhibitors ibrutinib and idelalisib have been recently approved for relapsed/refractory CLL. This review provides practical advice for diagnosis, prognostication and treatment of CLL. PMID:27186193

  3. Curcumin, Inflammation, and Chronic Diseases: How Are They Linked?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan He

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available It is extensively verified that continued oxidative stress and oxidative damage may lead to chronic inflammation, which in turn can mediate most chronic diseases including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, neurological, inflammatory bowel disease and pulmonary diseases. Curcumin, a yellow coloring agent extracted from turmeric, shows strong anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities when used as a remedy for the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. How oxidative stress activates inflammatory pathways leading to the progression of chronic diseases is the focus of this review. Thus, research to date suggests that chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, and most chronic diseases are closely linked, and the antioxidant properties of curcumin can play a key role in the prevention and treatment of chronic inflammation diseases.

  4. Recent updates in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Christine

    2016-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by chronic airways inflammation and progressive airflow limitation, is a common, preventable and treatable disease. Worldwide, COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality; smoking tobacco is the most important risk factor. This translational review of recent updates in COPD care for the primary care audience, includes recommendations from the 2015 Global Initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease (GOLD) report on diagnosis, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment, prevalence of comorbidities, management of exacerbations and the asthma and COPD overlap syndrome, with a focus on the importance and benefit of physical activity and exercise in COPD patients. Exacerbations and comorbidities contribute to the overall severity of COPD in individual patients. Management of exacerbations includes reducing the impact of the current exacerbation and preventing development of subsequent episodes. Healthcare professionals need to be alert to comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, anxiety/depression, lung cancer, infections and diabetes, which are common in COPD patients and can have a significant impact on HRQoL and prognosis. Pulmonary rehabilitation is recommended by a number of guidelines for all symptomatic COPD patients, regardless of severity, and involves exercise training, patient education, nutritional advice and psychosocial support. At all stages of COPD, regular physical activity and exercise can aid symptom control, improve HRQoL, reduce rates of hospitalization, and improve morbidity and respiratory mortality. Healthcare professionals play a pivotal role in improving HRQoL and health-related outcomes in COPD patients to meet their specific needs and in providing appropriate diagnosis, management and advice on smoking cessation. PMID:26560514

  5. [Pulmonary obstructive chronic disease and physical exercise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    António, Carla; Gonçalves, Ana Paula; Tavares, Alcina

    2010-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a disease that can be prevented and treated, with a pulmonary component and with significant systemic effects that contribute to the severity of clinical manifestations. COPD causes a number of changes, including those which lead to exercise tolerance limitation and to a progressive deterioration of life quality of the patients. Respiratory rehabilitation (RR) represents a key part of the treatment. The benefits of RR are independent of sex, age and disease severity. At the end of the program, the patient should have acquired a life style as independent and healthy as possible. With this article the authors intend to review the benefits of physical exercise in rehabilitation of patients with COPD and the different types of training used in the respiratory rehabilitation program established for each patient. PMID:20700562

  6. Natural histories of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rennard, Stephen I; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Concepts relating to the natural history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) arise most importantly from the classic study of Fletcher and colleagues (The Natural History of Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema, Oxford University Press, New York, 1976). This study, which evaluated working...... English men over 8 years, was used to construct a proposed life-long natural history. Although this is a classic study that has greatly advanced understanding of COPD, it has a number of limitations. Its duration is relatively short compared with the duration of COPD, so it is more cross-sectional than...... longitudinal. It was unable to distinguish among varied "natural histories." It assessed primarily the FEV(1), and the natural history of other features of COPD is largely undescribed. With advances in understanding the clinical features of COPD and with the development of evaluating new tools to assess...

  7. Impact of diabetes, chronic heart failure, congenital heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on acute and chronic exercise responses

    OpenAIRE

    Brassard, Patrice; Ferland, Annie; Marquis, Karine; Maltais, François; Jobin, Jean; Poirier, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Several chronic diseases are known to negatively affect the ability of an individual to perform exercise. However, the altered exercise capacity observed in these patients is not solely associated with the heart and lungs dysfunction. Exercise has also been shown to play an important role in the management of several pathologies encountered in the fields of cardiology and pneumology. Studies conducted in our institution regarding the influence of diabetes, chronic heart failure, congenital he...

  8. Screening for chronic kidney disease : Where does Europe go?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Paul E.; van der Velde, Marije; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Zoccali, Carmine

    2008-01-01

    This review discusses various screening approaches for chronic kidney disease that are used in Europe. The criterion for defining chronic kidney disease in the various programs differs but is frequently limited to estimated glomerular filtration rate, thus offering only data on chronic kidney diseas

  9. Hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul, Sule; Erdem, Yunus; Batuman, Vecihi; Erturk, Sehsuvar

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide, both hypertension and chronic kidney disease are major public health problems, due to their epidemic proportions and their association with high cardiovascular mortality. In 2003, the first Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Turkey (the PatenT) study was conducted in a nationally representative population (n=4910) by the Turkish Society of Hypertension and Renal Diseases, and showed that overall age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of hypertension in Turkey was 31.8%. The PatenT study also reported that overall awareness (40.7%), treatment (31.1%), and control rates (8.1%) of hypertension were strikingly low. Only 20.7% of the patients who were aware of their hypertension and receiving treatment had their blood pressure controlled to diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome were reported as 32.7%, 12.7%, 76.3%, 20.1%, and 31.3%, respectively. The prevalence and awareness of hypertension in CREDIT population was 32.7% and 48.6%, respectively. According to the data obtained from national surveys, the prevalence of hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey is alarmingly high. To improve prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of these major public health problems, appropriate health strategies should be implemented by the government, together with medical societies, non-governmental organizations, industry, health-care providers, and academia. PMID:25019009

  10. Clinical practical guidelines of nutritional support for chronic kidney diseases%慢性肾脏病营养临床实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周巧玲

    2007-01-01

    随着人口老龄化、糖尿病发病率上升以及原发肾脏疾病或其他原因导致肾脏损害的疾病均促使慢性肾脏病(chronic kidney disease,CKD)患者的数量在世界范围内与日俱增。根据目前发展趋势,预计到2010年终末期肾病(end stage renal disease,ESRD)患者人数将超过200万。CKD患者的逐年增加不但是一个人类健康问题,同时由于肾脏替代治疗(透析和肾移植)的高额费用,使患者家庭和政府必须承担巨大的经济负担,因此,CKD还是一个重要的全球性公共卫生问题。

  11. [Palliative care in non-cancer, chronic, progressive diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radványi, Ildikó; Nagy, Lajos; Balogh, Sándor; Csikós, Ágnes

    2015-10-18

    Malignant and other chronic diseases cause the death of 2.5 million people in Europe annually. It is anticipated that this number will grow due to the aging of the European population. The death of a significant proportion of patients having progressive chronic disease is preceded by an extended end of life stadium. In this stage the patients have severe symptoms and pain that necessitate their symptomatic treatment and palliative care. The assessment of the life expectancy of patients, estimation of the prognosis of their illness and, therefore, selection of patients with a need of intensified palliative care often pose difficulties. This paper provides a summary on the basic elements of "good palliative care". It introduces the most frequent models for the procession of chronic diseases and those indicators that help practicing doctors to recognise easier patients with a need of intensified palliative care, and as a result provides more adequate medical attendance that is better suited to the specific needs of the patients. PMID:26551310

  12. Curcumin, Inflammation, and Chronic Diseases: How Are They Linked?

    OpenAIRE

    Yan He; Yuan Yue; Xi Zheng; Kun Zhang; Shaohua Chen; Zhiyun Du

    2015-01-01

    It is extensively verified that continued oxidative stress and oxidative damage may lead to chronic inflammation, which in turn can mediate most chronic diseases including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, neurological, inflammatory bowel disease and pulmonary diseases. Curcumin, a yellow coloring agent extracted from turmeric, shows strong anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities when used as a remedy for the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. How oxidative stress activate...

  13. Analysis of electrocardiogram in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lazović Biljana; Zlatković-Švenda Mirjana; Mazić Sanja; Stajić Zoran; Đelić Marina

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is the fourth leading cause of mortality worldwide. It is defined as a persistent airflow limitation usually progressive and not fully reversible to treatment. The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and severity of disease is confirmed by spirometry. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease produces electrical changes in the heart which shows characteristic electrocardiogram pattern. The aim of this study was to observe an...

  14. Pathophysiology and treatment of inflammatory anorexia in chronic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Theodore P.; Marks, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    Decreased appetite and involuntary weight loss are common occurrences in chronic disease and have a negative impact on both quality of life and eventual mortality. Weight loss in chronic disease comes from both fat and lean mass, and is known as cachexia. Both alterations in appetite and body weight loss occur in a wide variety of diseases, including cancer, heart failure, renal failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and HIV. An increase in circulating inflammatory cytokines has been ...

  15. Myocardial Ischemia Assessment in Chronic Kidney Disease: Challenges and Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Fei Cen Parnham

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the chronic kidney disease population and often presents with atypical symptoms. Current diagnostic investigations of myocardial ischemia in chronic kidney disease lack sensitivity and specificity or may have adverse effects. We present a case vignette and explore the challenges of diagnostic myocardial stress investigation in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  16. [Pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelmeier, C; Koczulla, R; Fehrenbach, H; Bals, R

    2006-09-01

    It is currently believed that the most important factor in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is inflammation of the small airways caused by inhaled particles and gases. In this context, a disturbance of the physiological balance between proteases and antiproteases develops that may cause lung emphysema. Moreover, oxidative stress seems to be important, as it may enhance the inflammatory reaction. The development of emphysema may also involve a loss of alveolar cells by apoptosis. Finally, several studies have indicated that a systemic inflammation is induced by COPD that may be of relevance to the development of systemic components that are observed in COPD patients. PMID:16845536

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in women

    OpenAIRE

    Louis Laviolette; Yves Lacasse; Mariève Doucet; Miriam Lacasse; Karine Marquis; Didier Saey; Pierre Leblanc; François Maltais

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the comparative impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) between women and men and about women’s response to pulmonary rehabilitation.OBJECTIVES: To compare lung function, disability, mortality and response to pulmonary rehabilitation between women and men with COPD.METHODS: In the present retrospective study, 68 women (mean age 62.5±8.9 years) and 168 men (mean age 66.3±8.4 years) were evaluated by means of pulmonary function testing and an inc...

  18. Chronic Granulomatous Disease as a Risk Factor for Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    De Ravin, Suk See; Naumann, Nora; Cowen, Edward W.; Friend, Julia; Hilligoss, Dianne; Marquesen, Martha; Balow, James E.; Karyl S. Barron; Turner, Maria L.; Gallin, John I.; Malech, Harry L.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is characterized by recurrent infections and granuloma formation. In addition, we have observed a number of diverse autoimmune conditions in our CGD population, suggesting that patients with CGD are at an elevated risk for development of autoimmune (AI) disorders. In this report, we describe antiphospholipid syndrome (aPL), recurrent pericardial effusion, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), IgA nephropathy, cutaneous lupus erythematosus, and autoimmune pul...

  19. [Prevention of Chronic Kidney Disease and strategies to counteract chronic diseases in Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrilli, Valeria; D'Elia, Roberto; Galeone, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The Prevention of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is placed in the more general context of prevention of major chronic Non Communicable Diseases (NCDs): cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, chronic lung diseases and tumors that are the main problem for public health worldwide. Any health policy strategy aimed to the prevention of NCDs has to provide knowledge of health and socioeconomic status of the population, to reduce the level of exposure to risk factors and to adapt health services to the request for assistance. To this purpose, population monitoring systems have been implemented in the last years. The NCDs share some risk factors that are related, in large part, to unhealthy individual behaviours: smoking, alcohol abuse, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. NCDs prevention has to be understood as the set of all actions, sanitary and not, aiming to prevent or delay the onset of diseases or their complications. Preventive measures should, therefore, involve not only the health sector but also all the actors that can help to prevent that disease. As for the Prevention of CKD, the Ministry of Health has established a working table, which handled the Drafting of the "Position paper for the CKD", approved in the State-Regions Conference on august 8th 2014. The document draws a national strategy to combat this disease through primary prevention, early diagnosis and the establishment of diagnostic - therapeutic pathways (DTP). PMID:27545630

  20. Update on the "Dutch hypothesis" for chronic respiratory disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, J; Prescott, E

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients with chronic obstructive lung disease show increased airways responsiveness to histamine. We investigated the hypothesis that increased airways responsiveness predicts the development and remission of chronic respiratory symptoms. METHODS: We used data from 24-year follow...

  1. Tobacco smoking and chronic destructive periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Jan

    2004-09-01

    Tobacco smoking is the main risk factor associated with chronic destructive periodontal disease. No other known factor can match the strength of smoking in causing harm to the periodontium. The harmful effects manifest themselves by interfering with vascular and immunologic reactions, as well as by undermining the supportive functions of the periodontal tissues. The typical characteristic of smoking-associated periodontal disease is the destruction of the supporting tissues of the teeth, with the ensuing clinical symptoms of bone loss, attachment loss, pocket formation, and eventually tooth loss. A review of the international literature that has accumulated over the past 20 years offers convincing evidence that smokers exhibit greater bone loss and attachment loss, as well as more pronounced frequencies of periodontal pockets, than non-smokers do. In addition, tooth loss is more extensive in smokers. Smoking, thus, considerably increases the risk for destructive periodontal disease. Depending on the definition of disease and the exposure to smoking, the risk is 5- to 20-fold elevated for a smoker compared to a never-smoker. For a smoker exposed to heavy long-life smoking, the risk of attracting destructive periodontal disease is equivalent to that of attracting lung cancer. The outcome of periodontal treatment is less favorable or even unfavorable in smokers. Although long-term studies are rare, available studies unanimously agree that treatment failures and relapse of disease are predominantly seen in smokers. This contention is valid irrespective of treatment modality, suggesting that smoking will interfere with an expected normal outcome following commonplace periodontal therapies. The majority of available studies agree that the subgingival microflora of smokers and non-smokers are no different given other conditions. As a consequence, the elevated morbidity in smokers does not depend on particular microflora. The mechanisms behind the destructive effects of

  2. [Neurourological signs of chronic cerebral vascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvarts, P G; Dutov, V V; Kadykov, A S; Shvedkov, V V; Popov, S V; Plotnikov, A N

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of urination, along with motor and cognitive disorders, are characteristic of different forms of chronic cerebral vascular diseases (CCVD). Irritation symptoms are more frequent in subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (SAE) and multi infarct hypertonic encephalopathy (MIHE). Overactive urine bladder syndrome (OUBS) caused by neurogenic detrusive hyperactivity manifests itself in frequent urination, nocturia and imperative enuresis and thus decreases quality of life and results in disability of patents with CCVD. At the same time, the character of symptoms points indirectly to the localization of lacunar infarction or the extent of severity of leukoareosis. It is the most frequent form of disorders of urination in the first years of disease that significantly aggravates its course and needs timed diagnosis and pharmacological treatment. Competitive antagonists of muscarinic receptors M2, M3 subtypes are the most effective drugs for treatment of OUBS comorbid to CCVD. PMID:23994932

  3. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Deborah

    As chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the major causes of worldwide mortality, it is important to prevent, diagnose and manage it. COPD creates a huge burden on the NHS and has a significant impact on patients. This is a problem with the increase in morbidity and mortality rates. In primary care there is a lack of knowledge, under-use of quality-assured spirometry and under-diagnosis in about half of all cases. To be able to effectively diagnose, assess and manage COPD, health professionals must understand the physiology and aetiology of the disease. COPD is similar to asthma in its presentation and physiology but management of the condition can differ. The authors therefore looked at the similarities between the two conditions and what tests one can use to make a diagnosis of COPD. PMID:27081728

  4. Treatment of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennard, Stephen I

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a readily diagnosable disorder that responds to treatment. Smoking cessation can reduce symptoms and prevent progression of disease. Bronchodilator therapy is key in improvement of lung function. Three classes of bronchodilators-beta agonists, anticholinergics, and theophylline-are available and can be used individually or in combination. Inhaled glucocorticoids can also improve airflow and can be combined with bronchodilators. Inhaled glucocorticoids, in addition, might reduce exacerbation frequency and severity as might some bronchodilators. Effective use of pharmacotherapy in COPD needs integration with a rehabilitation programme and successful treatment of co-morbidities, including depression and anxiety. Treatment for stable COPD can improve the function and quality of life of many patients, could reduce admissions to hospital, and has been suggested to improve survival. PMID:15337408

  5. Psoriasis: experiencing a chronic skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrissopoulos, A; Cleaver, G

    1996-03-01

    Psoriasis is an incurable chronic skin disease that affects one in fifty people. Psychological factors play a role in the aetiology and experience of psoriasis but there is little pertaining to the psychological experience of psoriasis in research literature. In this study the phenomenological approach is used to describe the everyday experiences of a person with psoriasis. By using Giorgi's (1985) steps of data analysis a description of the lifeworld of the person with psoriasis was compiled. The description presented several essential components of the experience of psoriasis and the results emphasize the effects of the disease on the sufferer's life. Problematic interpersonal relationships, a negative selfconcept, fluctuating moods, loss of control, negativity and loneliness are a part of this experience. It is hoped that knowledge of the world of the psoriasis sufferer will assist the help professions to understanding and empathize with the suffering and limitations that psoriasis brings. PMID:9257576

  6. [Chronic ischaemic heart disease in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Calderón, Alberto; Vidán, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    It is the aim of this manuscript to take into account the peculiarities and specific characteristics of elderly patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease from a multidisciplinary perspective, with the participation of the Spanish Society of Cardiology (sections of Geriatric Cardiology and Ischaemic Heart Disease/Acute Cardiovascular Care), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians and the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology. This consensus document shows that in order to adequately address these elderly patients a comprehensive assessment is needed, which includes comorbidity, frailty, functional status, polypharmacy and drug interactions. We conclude that in most patients medical treatment is the best option and that this treatment must take into account the above factors and the biological changes associated with aging. PMID:27102136

  7. Chronic Liver Disease: Stem Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal MA Hassan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic liver diseases (CLD affect hundreds of millions of patientsworldwide. Stem Cells (SCs therapy to treat chronic liver diseasesis resorted and is considered as the dream of the future. AlthoughSCs are a promising means for treatment of liver diseases, studiesare still at the beginning of this era. SCs are undifferentiatedcells capable of renewing themselves throughout their life and ofgenerating one or more types of differentiated cells. Different typesof SCs with hepatic differentiation potential are theoretically eligiblefor liver cell replacement. These include Embryonic and fetal liverSCs, induced pluripotent SCs, hepatoblasts, annex SCs (pluripotentSCs obtained from umbilical cord and umbilical cord blood,placenta and amniotic fluid, and adult SCs, such hepatic progenitorcells, hematopoietic SCs, and mesenchymal stem cell. The optimalSCs delivery route should be easy to perform, less invasive andtraumatic, minimum side effects, and with high cells survival rate.Liver SCs can be transplanted through several routes: Intraperitonealand percutaneous intrahepatic artery catheterization in acute liverfailure, and umbilical vein catheterization, percutaneous intrahepaticroute, and portal vein or intrahepatic artery catheterization inmetabolic liver diseases. Whatever the source or delivery route ofSCs, how they can be manipulated for therapeutic interventionsin a variety of hepatic diseases is of course of great interest infuture studies. Although all clinical trials to date have shown someimprovement in liver function and CD34+ cells have been usedsafely for bone marrow transplantation for over 20 years, onlyrandomized controlled clinical trials will be able to fully assess thepotential clinical benefit of adult SCs therapy for patients with CLD.

  8. Chronic Pulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehari, Alem; Klings, Elizabeth S

    2016-05-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), the most common genetic hemolytic anemia worldwide, affects 250,000 births annually. In the United States, SCD affects approximately 100,000 individuals, most of African descent. Hemoglobin S (HbS) results from a glutamate-to-valine mutation of the sixth codon of the β-hemoglobin allele; the homozygous genotype (HbSS) is associated with the most prevalent and severe form of the disease. Other SCD genotypes include HbSC, composed of one HbS allele and one HbC (glutamate-to-lysine mutation) allele; and HbS-β-thalassemia(0) or HbS-β-thalassemia(+), composed of one HbS allele and one β-thalassemia allele with absent or reduced β-chain production, respectively. Despite advances in care, median survival remains in the fifth decade, due in large part to chronic complications of the disease. Chronic pulmonary complications in SCD are major contributors to this early mortality. Although our understanding of these conditions has improved much over the past 10 to 15 years, there remains no specific treatment for pulmonary complications of SCD. It is unclear whether conventional treatment regimens directed at non-SCD populations have equivalent efficacy in patients with SCD. This represents a critical research need. In this review, the authors review the state-of-the-art understanding of the following pulmonary complications of SCD: (1) pulmonary hypertension; (2) venous thromboembolic disease; (3) sleep-disordered breathing; (4) asthma and recurrent wheezing; and (5) pulmonary function abnormalities. This review highlights the advances as well as the knowledge gaps in this field to update clinicians and other health care providers and to garner research interest from the medical community. PMID:26836905

  9. TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE IN REAL CLINICAL PRACTICE ACCORDING TO THE DATA FROM PROGNOZ IBS REGISTER. (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Tolpygina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the data from PROGNOZ IBS register drugs with proven efficacy in secondary prevention of cardiovascular complications (antiplatelets, β-blockers, ACE inhibitors, statins were not often prescribed in patients with stable ischemic heart disease prior to hospitalization. Significant improvement of the treatment quality was found during the cardiology hospital stay. The prescription rate of ACE inhibitors increased from 20% to 84.4%, statins - from 10% to 85.5%, β-blockers - from 20% to 91%, acetylsalicylic acid - from 74% to 96%. However, some drugs (statins have been used in inadequate doses. Low-density lipoprotein level <2.5 mmol/L was achieved at discharge only in 6.3% of patients.

  10. Advances in mechanical ventilation onrespiratoryfailure as a result of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchial asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Zhuang

    2011-01-01

    Over years,great strides have been made in theories and practices of mechanical ventilation.The indications of non-invasive ventilation have been increasing,while invasive ventilation has been playing a vital role in patients who are critically ill with inadequate drainage of sputum and fail to benefit from non-invasive ventilation.Chronic diseases,including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD),one of the most common chronic diseases,and bronchial asthma,the incidence of which is ascen...

  11. [Chronic pruritus : Care in daily practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ständer, S; Ständer, H F; Steinke, S; Bruland, P; Dugas, M; Augustin, M

    2016-08-01

    Chronic pruritus is a highly prevalent, multifactorial symptom requiring extensive diagnostics, treatment and consideration of accompanying symptoms (reduced quality of life, sleep disorders, psychic factors). Patient care is thus complex and requires consideration of individual treatment goals. Patients indicate their wish for a symptom-free life an explanation of the causes and a trustful physician-patient relationship. The targeted use of questionnaires is thus advisable in order to structurally survey the history, pruritus intensity, quality of life and treatment progression. Nevertheless, there are many administrative and economical hurdles in the health care system to overcome in order to provide patients with chronic pruritus the best possible care, also per the recommended guidelines. The development of specialized centers and training courses for medical practitioners is thus urgently needed. PMID:27316924

  12. Improving the effectiveness of multidisciplinary team meetings for patients with chronic diseases: a prospective observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Raine, R; Wallace, I.; Nic a’ Bháird, C.; Xanthopoulou, P.; Lanceley, A.; Clarke, A.; Prentice, A; Ardron, D.; Harris, M; Gibbs, J. S. R.; Ferlie, E.; M. King; Blazeby, J M; Michie, S; Livingston, G

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings have been endorsed by the Department of Health as the core model for managing chronic diseases. However, the evidence for their effectiveness is mixed and the degree to which they have been absorbed into clinical practice varies widely across conditions and settings. We aimed to identify the key characteristics of chronic disease MDT meetings that are associated with decision implementation, a measure of effectiveness, and to derive a set of...

  13. Cardiovascular Disease and Chronic Inflammation in End Stage Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Zyga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD is one of the most severe diseases worldwide. In patients affected by CKD, a progressive destruction of the nephrons is observed not only in structuralbut also in functional level. Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease of large and medium-sized arteries. It is characterized by the deposition of lipids and fibrous elements and is a common complication of the uremic syndrome because of the coexistence of a wide range of risk factors. High blood pressure, anaemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, high oxidative stress are some of the most common factors that cause cardiovascular disease and atherogenesis in patients suffering from End Stage Kidney Disease (ESRD. At the same time, the inflammatory process constitutes a common element in the apparition and development of CKD. A wide range of possible causes can justify the development of inflammation under uremic conditions. Such causes are oxidative stress, oxidation, coexistentpathological conditions as well as factors that are due to renal clearance techniques. Patients in ESRD and coronary disease usually show increased acute phase products. Pre-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-a, and acute phase reactants, such as CRP and fibrinogen, are closely related. The treatment of chronic inflammation in CKD is of high importance for the development ofthe disease as well as for the treatment of cardiovascular morbidity.Conclusions: The treatment factors focus on the use of renin-angiotensic system inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid, statins and anti-oxidant treatment in order to prevent the action of inflammatorycytokines that have the ability to activate the mechanisms of inflammation.

  14. Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Page ... choices? Points to Remember Clinical Trials Why is nutrition important for someone with early chronic kidney disease ( ...

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Prem

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is the fourth leading cause of death world-wide and a further increase in the prevalence as well as mortality of the disease is predicted for coming decades. There is now an increased appreciation for the need to build awareness regarding COPD and to help the thousands of people who suffer from this disease and die prematurely from COPD or its associated complication(s. Peripheral neuropathy in COPD has received scanty attention despite the fact that very often clinicians come across COPD patients having clinical features suggestive of peripheral neuropathy. Electrophysiological tests like nerve conduction studies are required to distinguish between axonal and demyelinating type of disorder that cannot be analyzed by clinical examination alone. However, various studies addressing peripheral neuropathy in COPD carried out so far have included patients with COPD having markedly varying baseline characteristics like severe hypoxemia, elderly patients, those with long duration of illness, etc. that are not uniform across the studies and make it difficult to interpret the results to a consistent conclusion. Almost one-third of COPD patients have clinical evidence of peripheral neuropathy and two-thirds have electrophysiological abnormalities. Some patients with no clinical indication of peripheral neuropathy do have electrophysiological deficit suggestive of peripheral neuropathy. The more frequent presentation consists of a polyneuropathy that is subclinical or with predominantly sensory signs, and the neurophysiological and pathological features of predominantly axonal neuropathy. The presumed etiopathogenic factors are multiple: chronic hypoxia, tobacco smoke, alcoholism, malnutrition and adverse effects of certain drugs.

  16. Current treatment in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李嘉惠

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is defined by fixed airflow limitation associated with an abnormal pulmonary and systemic inflammatory response of the lungs to cigarette smoke. COPD represents an increasing burden worldwide, reported to be the sixth leading cause of death in 1990 and the fourth in 2000. Discouragingly, it is projected to jump to third place by the year 2020.There is increasing evidence that COPD is a more complex systemic disease than an airway and lung disease. In particular, cachexia, skeletal muscle abnormalities, diabetes, coronary artery disease, heart failure, cancer and pulmonary vascular disease are the most common comorbidities. It is associated with a wide variety of systemic consequences, most notably systemic inflammation. Because COPD patients have in general ahigher cardiovascular risk than the average population, cardiovascular safety in a COPD medication is of critical importance.SINGH et al performed a systematic review and recta-analysis of 17 clinical trials enrolling 14 783 patients treated with inhaled anticholinergic drugs used for the treatment of COPD. Inhaled anticholinergics significantly increased the risk of cardiovascular death, MI, or stroke ( 1.8 % vs 1.2 % for control; RR, 1.58 (95 % CI,1.21 - 2.06); P < 0.001 ). However, UPLIIFT (Understanding the Potential Long-Term Impacts on Function with Tiotropium) , a large, 4-year, placebo controlled clinical trial with tiotropium in approximately 6 000 patients with COPD. The preliminary results of UPLIFT showed that there was no increased risk of stroke with tiotropium bromide compared to placebo.A meta-analysis is always considered less convincing than a large prospective trial designed to assess the outcome of interest. However, COPD is a systemic disease. COPD management needs to focus on four major areas: smoking cessation, pharmacologic therapy, exercise training, and pulmonary rehabilitation. Clinicians and patients should always carefully consider any

  17. Chronic lead poisoning: a "forgotten" cause of renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjelloun, Meryem; Tarrass, Faissal; Hachim, Khadija; Medkouri, Ghislaine; Benghanem, Mohamed Gharbi; Ramdani, Benyounes

    2007-03-01

    Chronic lead nephropathy occurs as a result of years of lead exposure. Nowadays, with the induction of high standards for industrial hygiene, symptomatic lead intoxication has become extremely rare. We report a case of chronic lead nephropathy in a 59-year-old man who worked in a battery-recycling unit and was diagnosed with plumbism during a regular health screening few years ago. The diagnosis was suggested by the following findings: serum creatinine 160 microg/L, creatinine clearance 46 ml/min, daily urine protein excretion 0.1 g, uric acid 9.7 mg/dl, blood lead 9.2 microg/dl, and a urinary excretion of 850 microg lead/72 h after a mobilisation test by a Na2-Ca-EDTA chelating agent. Renal ultrasound showed bilateral borderline small kidneys. The kidney biopsy revealed moderate focal atrophy, loss of proximal tubules, and prominent interstitial fibrosis. The patient was prescribed angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors to slow the progression of renal insufficiency and control the blood pressure. Hyperuricemia was also treated and controlled. During the regular follow-up, renal function remained stable with no proteinuria. A high index of suspicion for lead intoxication in chronic kidney disease patients should be practiced, especially in patients with hyperuricemia. Chelation of lead urinary excretion is helpful in the diagnosis of this disease. PMID:17237897

  18. The Evolution of Integrated Chronic Disease Prevention in Alberta, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Raine, Kim; Wolbeck Minke, Sharlene; Khalema, Ernest; Smith, Cynthia; Plotnikoff, Ronald C.

    2006-01-01

    Background Recognition of the common risk factors for leading chronic diseases in Canada has contributed to the development of integrated chronic disease prevention and health promotion approaches. The Alberta Heart Health Project studied the capacity of health organizations in Alberta, Canada, to engage in heart health promotion. This article describes how the Alberta Heart Health Project acted on emerging research findings describing the preliminary stages of integrated chronic disease prev...

  19. Exploring metabolic dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slee Adrian D

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Impaired kidney function and chronic kidney disease (CKD leading to kidney failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD is a serious medical condition associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and in particular cardiovascular disease (CVD risk. CKD is associated with multiple physiological and metabolic disturbances, including hypertension, dyslipidemia and the anorexia-cachexia syndrome which are linked to poor outcomes. Specific hormonal, inflammatory, and nutritional-metabolic factors may play key roles in CKD development and pathogenesis. These include raised proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 and −6, tumor necrosis factor, altered hepatic acute phase proteins, including reduced albumin, increased C-reactive protein, and perturbations in normal anabolic hormone responses with reduced growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis activity. Others include hyperactivation of the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS, with angiotensin II and aldosterone implicated in hypertension and the promotion of insulin resistance, and subsequent pharmacological blockade shown to improve blood pressure, metabolic control and offer reno-protective effects. Abnormal adipocytokine levels including leptin and adiponectin may further promote the insulin resistant, and proinflammatory state in CKD. Ghrelin may be also implicated and controversial studies suggest activities may be reduced in human CKD, and may provide a rationale for administration of acyl-ghrelin. Poor vitamin D status has also been associated with patient outcome and CVD risk and may indicate a role for supplementation. Glucocorticoid activities traditionally known for their involvement in the pathogenesis of a number of disease states are increased and may be implicated in CKD-associated hypertension, insulin resistance, diabetes risk and cachexia, both directly and indirectly through effects on other systems including activation of the mineralcorticoid

  20. Methylotroph Infections and Chronic Granulomatous Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, E Liana; Petts, Jennifer R; Fasano, Mary Beth; Ford, Bradley; Nauseef, William M; Neves, João Farela; Simões, Maria João; Tierce, Millard L; de la Morena, M Teresa; Greenberg, David E; Zerbe, Christa S; Zelazny, Adrian M; Holland, Steven M

    2016-03-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by a defect in production of phagocyte-derived reactive oxygen species, which leads to recurrent infections with a characteristic group of pathogens not previously known to include methylotrophs. Methylotrophs are versatile environmental bacteria that can use single-carbon organic compounds as their sole source of energy; they rarely cause disease in immunocompetent persons. We have identified 12 infections with methylotrophs (5 reported here, 7 previously reported) in patients with CGD. Methylotrophs identified were Granulibacter bethesdensis (9 cases), Acidomonas methanolica (2 cases), and Methylobacterium lusitanum (1 case). Two patients in Europe died; the other 10, from North and Central America, recovered after prolonged courses of antimicrobial drug therapy and, for some, surgery. Methylotrophs are emerging as disease-causing organisms in patients with CGD. For all patients, sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was required for correct diagnosis. Geographic origin of the methylotroph strain may affect clinical management and prognosis. PMID:26886412

  1. MR imaging of chronic infiltrative lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the potential role of MR imaging in chronic infiltrative lung disease (CILD) by comparison with high-resolution CT (HRCT). Twenty patients with proved CILD (six with UIP, six with sarcoidosis, two with extrinsic allergic alveolities [EAA], and six miscellaneous) underwent 1.5-T MR imaging and HRCT of the chest. Cardiac-gated T1 (TR, 800 msec; TE, 20 msec) and proton density and T2 (TR, 2,000 msec; TE, 30/80 msec) sequences were performed. The MR images were reviewed by two chest radiologists, and the findings were compared with the HRCT scans. HRCT was superior to MR imaging in the anatomic assessment of the lung parenchyma and in the demonstration of mild fibrosis. However, MR images provided greater contrast between areas of airspace opacification and normal lung than did MRCT. In two patients with UIP, two with sarcoidosis, and two with EAA, MR images demonstrated airspace opacification not readily apparent on CT scans. In the two patients with EAA, the EAA had initially been missed with HRCT. HRCT is superior to MR imaging in anatomic assessment of the lung. However, the increased contrast on MR images allows better assessment of the presence and extent of airspace opacification, which has been shown to reflect disease activity. MR imaging may play an important role in the assessment of disease activity and response to treatment in patients with CILD

  2. Thyroid Disorders and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mohamedali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones play a very important role regulating metabolism, development, protein synthesis, and influencing other hormone functions. The two main hormones produced by the thyroid are triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4. These hormones can also have significant impact on kidney disease so it is important to consider the physiological association of thyroid dysfunction in relation to chronic kidney disease (CKD. CKD has been known to affect the pituitary-thyroid axis and the peripheral metabolism of thyroid hormones. Low T3 levels are the most common laboratory finding followed by subclinical hypothyroidism in CKD patients. Hyperthyroidism is usually not associated with CKD but has been known to accelerate it. One of the most important links between thyroid disorders and CKD is uremia. Patients who are appropriately treated for thyroid disease have a less chance of developing renal dysfunction. Clinicians need to be very careful in treating patients with low T3 levels who also have an elevation in TSH, as this can lead to a negative nitrogen balance. Thus, clinicians should be well educated on the role of thyroid hormones in relation to CKD so that proper treatment can be delivered to the patient.

  3. Invasive Aspergillus infections in hospitalized patients with chronic lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessolossky M

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mireya Wessolossky,1 Verna L Welch,2 Ajanta Sen,1 Tara M Babu,1 David R Luke21Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Medical Affairs, Pfizer Inc, Collegeville, PA, USABackground: Although invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA is more prevalent in immunocompromised patients, critical care clinicians need to be aware of the occurrence of IPA in the nontraditional host, such as a patient with chronic lung disease. The purpose of this study was to describe the IPA patient with chronic lung disease and compare the data with that of immunocompromised patients.Methods: The records of 351 patients with Aspergillus were evaluated in this single-center, retrospective study for evidence and outcomes of IPA. The outcomes of 57 patients with chronic lung disease and 56 immunocompromised patients were compared. Patients with chronic lung disease were defined by one of the following descriptive terms: emphysema, asthma, idiopathic lung disease, bronchitis, bronchiectasis, sarcoid, or pulmonary leukostasis.Results: Baseline demographics were similar between the two groups. Patients with chronic lung disease were primarily defined by emphysema (61% and asthma (18%, and immunocompromised patients primarily had malignancies (27% and bone marrow transplants (14%. A higher proportion of patients with chronic lung disease had a diagnosis of IPA by bronchoalveolar lavage versus the immunocompromised group (P < 0.03. The major risk factors for IPA were found to be steroid use in the chronic lung disease group and neutropenia and prior surgical procedures in the immunocompromised group. Overall, 53% and 69% of chronic lung disease and immunocompromised patients were cured (P = 0.14; 55% of chronic lung patients and 47% of immunocompromised patients survived one month (P = 0.75.Conclusion: Nontraditional patients with IPA, such as those with chronic lung disease, have outcomes and mortality similar to that in the

  4. Recent advances in chronic granulomatous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, David

    2014-11-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by abnormities in the NADPH Oxidase that is involved in the respiratory burst responsible for initiating the killing of microbes ingested by phagocytic cells. The hallmark of CGD is recurrent infection but the inflammatory complications can prove difficult to treat. New insights into the mechanisms responsible for the inflammatory complications have led to new therapies. The treatment of CGD colitis with an anti-tumour necrosis alpha agent has been shown to be successful but associated with significant infectious complications. Haematopoietic stem cell transplants offer the possibility of cure for those with ether a matched or unrelated donor transplant, with results of the latter improving significantly over recent years. Gene Therapy offers the promise of cure without the need for a transplant but better vectors are required. PMID:25264161

  5. Airway distensibility in Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler Wille, Mathilde Marie; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Dirksen, Asger; Petersen, Jens; De Bruijne, Marleen

    2013-01-01

    airway distensibility, defined as the ratio of relative change in lumen diameter to the relative change in total lung volume (TLV) divided by predicted total lung capacity (pTLC) . Methods – We included 1900 participants from the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial (DLCST); all randomized to annual low......-dose CT for a period of 5 years (table 1). Images were reconstructed both with high contrast resolution (3 mm, kernel C) for emphysema analysis and with high spatial resolution (1 mm, kernel D) for airway analysis. Images were analysed by in-house developed software designed to segment lungs and localize......), 10-20% (mild), 20%-30% (moderate) or >30% (severe). Spirometry was performed annually and participants were divided into severity groups according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). Data were analysed in a mixed effects regression model with log(airway lumen...

  6. Slowing progression of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawz, Paul E; Rosenberg, Mark E

    2013-12-01

    Early identification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) provides an opportunity to implement therapies to improve kidney function and slow progression. The goal of this article is to review established and developing clinical therapies directed at slowing progression. The importance of controlling blood pressure will be discussed along with the target blood pressure that should be achieved in CKD patients. Therapy directed at inhibiting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system remains the mainstay of treatment with single-agent inhibition of this system being as good as dual blockade with fewer adverse effects. Other therapies that may be used include correction of metabolic acidosis, dietary protein restriction, and new models for delivering care to patients with CKD. Emerging therapies targeting endothelin, uric acid, kidney fibrosis, and oxidant stress hold promise for the future. PMID:25019022

  7. The pathology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, James C; Timens, Wim

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is based on the innate and adaptive inflammatory immune response to the inhalation of toxic particles and gases. Although tobacco smoking is the primary cause of this inhalation injury, many other environmental and occupational exposures contribute to the pathology of COPD. The immune inflammatory changes associated with COPD are linked to a tissue-repair and -remodeling process that increases mucus production and causes emphysematous destruction of the gas-exchanging surface of the lung. The common form of emphysema observed in smokers begins in the respiratory bronchioles near the thickened and narrowed small bronchioles that become the major site of obstruction in COPD. The mechanism(s) that allow small airways to thicken in such close proximity to lung tissue undergoing emphysematous destruction remains a puzzle that needs to be solved. PMID:18954287

  8. Growth hormone in chronic renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe growth retardation (below the third percentile for height is seen in up to one-third children with chronic kidney disease. It is thought to be multifactorial and despite optimal medical therapy most children are unable to reach their normal height. Under-nutrition, anemia, vitamin D deficiency with secondary hyperparathyroidism, metabolic acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, renal osteodystrophy; abnormalities in the growth hormone/insulin like growth factor system and sex steroids, all have been implicated in the pathogenesis of growth failure. Therapy includes optimization of nutritional and metabolic abnormalities. Failure to achieve adequate height despite 3-6 months of optimal medical measures mandates the use of recombinant GH (rGH therapy, which has shown to result in catch-up growth, anywhere from 2 cm to 10 cm with satisfactory liner, somatic and psychological development.

  9. Pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Clinical management of acute and chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbicki, Adam

    2010-07-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism falls between the areas of pulmonology and cardiology, internal medicine and intensive care, radiology and nuclear medicine, and hematology and cardiothoracic surgery. Depending on their clinical background, physicians faced with a patient with a pulmonary thromboembolism may speak different languages and adopt different treatment approaches. Now, however, there is an opportunity to end the Tower of Babel surrounding pulmonary thromboembolism. There is a growing acknowledgement that the key clinical problems in both acute pulmonary embolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension are linked to right ventricular pressure overload and right ventricular failure. As a result, cardiologists and cardiac intensive care specialists are taking an increasing interest in understanding and combating these conditions. The European Society of Cardiology was the first to elaborate comprehensive clinical practice guidelines for pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The task forces involved in producing these guidelines included radiologists, pulmonologists, hematologists, intensive care physicians and surgeons, which ensured that the final document was universally acceptable. The aim of this article was to provide an overview of the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention of acute pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, while taking into account European Society of Cardiology guidelines and incorporating new evidence where necessary. PMID:20609317

  10. Chronic Kidney Disease in Southwestern Iranian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ahmadzadeh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The aim of the study was to determine the etiology of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD among children attending the pediatric nephrology service at Abuzar children's hospital in Ahvaz city, the referral center in Southwest of Iran.Methods:We reviewed the records of 139 children, diagnosed to have CKD over a 10-year period. CKD was defined a glomerular filtration rate (GFR below 60 ml/1.73 m2/min persisting for more than 3 months.Findings: Among 139 children 81 (58% were males. The mean age at diagnosis of CKD in the patients was 4.2 (�3.6 years. Mean level of serum creatinine at presentation was 1.9 (�1.4 mg/dl. The mean GFR at presentation was 33.5 (�15.4 ml/1.73m2/min while 22% of the patients were already at end stage renal failure indicating that these children were referred too late. Congenital urologic malformation was the commonest cause of CKD present in 70 (50.4% children [reflux nephropathy (23.1%, hypo/dysplastic kidney (15.8%, obstructive uropathy (10.8%, and prune belly syndrome (0.7%]. Other causes included hereditary nephropathies (17.2%, chronic glomerulo-nephritis (6.5%, multisystemic diseases (4.3%, miscellaneous and unknown (each one 10.8%. The mean duration of follow-up was 26 (�24.67 months. Peritoneal or hemodialysis was performed in 10 patients. Six patients underwent (4 live-related and 2 non-related renal transplantation. The rest have died or received standard conservative management for CKD.Conclusion: The commonest causes of CKD were reflux nephropathy, hypo/dysplastic kidney, hereditary nephropathy and obstructive uropathy. Patients presented late, had severe CKD and were malnourished and stunted.

  11. Chronic Kidney Disease in Southwestern Iranian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Zangeneh Kamali

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the etiology of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD among children attending the pediatric nephrology service at Abuzar children's hospital in Ahvaz city, the referral center in Southwest of Iran.Methods: We reviewed the records of 139 children, diagnosed to have CKD over a 10-year period. CKD was defined a glomerular filtration rate (GFR below 60 ml/1.73 m2/min persisting for more than 3 months.Findings: Among 139 children 81 (58% were males. The mean age at diagnosis of CKD in the patients was 4.2 (±3.6 years. Mean level of serum creatinine at presentation was 1.9 (±1.4 mg/dl. The mean GFR at presentation was 33.5 (±15.4 ml/1.73m2/min while 22% of the patients were already at end stage renal failure indicating that these children were referred too late. Congenital urologic malformation was the commonest cause of CKD present in 70 (50.4% children [reflux nephropathy (23.1%, hypo/dysplastic kidney (15.8%, obstructive uropathy (10.8%, and prune belly syndrome (0.7%]. Other causes included hereditary nephropathies (17.2%, chronic glomerulo-nephritis (6.5%, multisystemic diseases (4.3%, miscellaneous and unknown (each one 10.8%. The mean duration of follow-up was 26 (±24.67 months. Peritoneal or hemodialysis was performed in 10 patients. Six patients underwent (4 live-related and 2 non-related renal transplantation. The rest have died or received standard conservative management for CKD.Conclusion: The commonest causes of CKD were reflux nephropathy, hypo/dysplastic kidney, hereditary nephropathy and obstructive uropathy. Patients presented late, had severe CKD and were malnourished and stunted.

  12. Oxygen therapy in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brill SE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Simon E Brill, Jadwiga A Wedzicha Airway Disease Section, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, UK Abstract: Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are important events in the history of this debilitating lung condition. Associated health care utilization and morbidity are high, and many patients require supplemental oxygen or ventilatory support. The last 2 decades have seen a substantial increase in our understanding of the best way to manage the respiratory failure suffered by many patients during this high-risk period. This review article examines the evidence underlying supplemental oxygen therapy during exacerbations of COPD. We first discuss the epidemiology and pathophysiology of respiratory failure in COPD during exacerbations. The rationale and evidence underlying oxygen therapy, including the risks when administered inappropriately, are then discussed, along with further strategies for ventilatory support. We also review current recommendations for best practice, including methods for improving oxygen provision in the future. Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, exacerbation, oxygen therapy, respiratory failure, hypercapnia

  13. Association between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulsamet Tanik

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD morbidity and mortality is high and increasing levels of a disease. COPD is becoming a growing epidemic due to smoking consumption especially in developing countries all over the world. Above the age of forty, affects adult population contributing to the community. COPD is characterized by a progressive, irreversible limitation of airflow associated with an abnormal inflammatory response to noxious particles or gases. It is caused primarily by smoking. In many studies, systemic conditions such as COPD were found to be a risk factor for periodontitis. In many studies with bacteria, has proven to be the same microorganisms in the oral cavity with microorganisms which lung infection. Therefore, on this subject, longer, with the large populations, clinical, microbiological and epidemiological studies are needed.

  14. Radiology of chronic diseases of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The etiology of chronic diseases of the ankle joint comprises a wide spectrum including chronic inflammatory processes and chronic degenerative, tumorous and neuropathic processes, as well as some specific syndromes based on chronic changes of the ankle joint. Of the inflammatory processes, chronic juvenile arthritis (JVC) is the most common disease. However, also Reiter disease, psoriasis or chronic monoarthritid diseases such as gout, as well as granulomatous diseases (tuberculosis, sarcoidosis) and fungal infections, may affect the ankle joint in a chronic course. Chronic degenerative changes are usually secondary due to abnormal positioning of the joint constituents or repetitive trauma. Neuropathic changes, as frequently seen in the course of diabetes, present with massive osseous destruction and malposition of the articular constituents. Chronic osseous as well as cartilaginous and synovial changes are seen in hemoplici patients. Chronic traumatic changes are represented by pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), and chondromatosis, both with a predilection for the ankle joint. Due to the possibilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diagnosis of chronic ankle changes includes chronic ligamentous, tendinous and soft tissue changes. With the use MRI, specific syndromes can be defined which particularly affect the ankle joint in a chronic way, such as the os trigonum syndrome, the anterolateral impingement syndrome and the sinus tarsi syndrome. Nevertheless, plain film radiographs are still the basic element of any investigation. MRI, however, can be potentially used as a second investigation, saving an unnecessary cascade of investigations with ultrasound and CT. The latter investigations are used only with very specific indications, for instance CT for subtle bone structures and sonography for a limited investigation of tendons or evaluation of fluid. Particularly due to the possibilities of MRI and the development of special gradient-echo imaging or

  15. Vegetarian diets, chronic diseases and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginter, E

    2008-01-01

    Vegetarians form a non-homogenous group consisting of semivegetarians (plant food, dairy products, eggs and fish), lacto-ovo vegetarians (plant food, dairy products, eggs) and vegans (plant food only). According to pure vegetarian ideologists, people consuming vegetarian diet have better health and live longer than nonvegetarians, because persons consuming milk, dairy products, meat, eggs and fish are at health risk. In fact the most healthy people in Europe are inhabitants of Iceland, Switzerland and Scandinavia, consuming great amounts of food of animal origin. Meta-analysis of several prospective studies showed no significant differences in the mortality caused by colorectal, stomach, lung, prostate or breast cancers and stroke between vegetarians and "health-conscious" nonvegetarians. In vegetarians, a decrease of ischemic heart disease mortality was observed probably due to lower total serum cholesterol levels, lower prevalence of obesity and higher consumption of antioxidants. Very probably, an ample consumption of fruits and vegetables and not the exclusion of meat make vegetarians healthful. Now, the largest cohort study of diet and health on more than half million of persons, the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, will bring new data on the relationships between diet, lifestyle and environmental factors and the incidence of cancer, cardiovascular and other chronic diseases. Vegetarianism is a form of food restriction; and in our overfed society, food restriction is a plus unless it results in a nutritional deficiency (Fig. 1, Tab. 2, Ref. 18). PMID:19166134

  16. Diphenhydramine disposition in chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, C G; Christian, C D; Johnson, R F; Madhavan, S V; Schenker, S

    1984-04-01

    Diphenhydramine (DPHM) disposition was examined in nine patients with chronic alcohol-related liver disease and in eight normal subjects. Sleep of 1 to 2 hr duration was induced in all subjects by a 0.8 mg/kg iv dose without an apparent increase in cerebral sensitivity in the patients with cirrhosis. Protein binding as determined by equilibrium dialysis (3H-DPHM) revealed a 15% decrease in the cirrhotic patients, while recovery of unchanged DPHM in urine (2%) was of the same order in the two groups. Computerized biexponential curve analysis was used to compare the plasma profiles for five of the patients and six of the normal subjects. Monoexponential curve analysis of the terminal beta-phase, including all subjects, was also used to compare the two groups. The means of plasma clearance and apparent volume of distribution in cirrhotic patients were respectively less and greater than in normal subjects, but these differences were not significant. The t1/2 for the beta-phase (t1/2 beta), which reflects this reciprocal trend, was increased in the patients (15.2 +/- 1.5 and 9.3 +/- 0.9 hr). This correlated in part with severity of disease, with r = 0.723 between t1/2 beta and the serum bilirubin levels. In conclusion, a single intravenous dose of DPHM provided safe and effective sedation in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:6705445

  17. Molecular diagnosis of chronic granulomatous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, D; de Boer, M

    2014-02-01

    Patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) suffer from recurrent, life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections of the skin, the airways, the lymph nodes, liver, brain and bones. Frequently found pathogens are Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus species, Klebsiella species, Burkholderia cepacia and Salmonella species. CGD is a rare (∼1:250 000 births) disease caused by mutations in any one of the five components of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase in phagocytes. This enzyme generates superoxide and is essential for intracellular killing of pathogens by phagocytes. Molecular diagnosis of CGD involves measuring NADPH oxidase activity in phagocytes, measuring protein expression of NADPH oxidase components and mutation analysis of genes encoding these components. Residual oxidase activity is important to know for estimation of the clinical course and the chance of survival of the patient. Mutation analysis is mandatory for genetic counselling and prenatal diagnosis. This review summarizes the different assays available for the diagnosis of CGD, the precautions to be taken for correct measurements, the flow diagram to be followed, the assays for confirmation of the diagnosis and the determinations for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:24016250

  18. ANESTHETIC CONSIDERATION S IN CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMON ARY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awati

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a spectrum of diseases that includes emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and small airway disease. It i s characterized by progressive increased resistance to breathing. Patients with marked obstructive pulmonary disease are at increased risk for both intraoperative and Postoperative pulmonary complications. These patients require thorough preoperative prepa ration, meticulous intraoperative management & postoperative care. This article describes anesthetic considerations in a patient with COPD.

  19. Chronic inflammatory disease and its treatment during pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Bröms, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    The decision to have children is often coupled with varying degrees of apprehension. Women with chronic disease often worry about how the disease itself or its treatment will affect pregnancy and the fetus. The aim of this thesis was to add to the current knowledge concerning pregnancy and birth outcomes in chronic inflammatory disease. First, we studied pregnancy and delivery complications in women with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, the main types of inflammatory bowel diseas...

  20. Actinomyces in chronic granulomatous disease: an emerging and unanticipated pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Reichenbach, J.; Lopatin, U; Mahlaoui, N.; Beovic, B; Siler, U; Zbinden, R.; Seger, R.A.; Galmiche, L; Brousse, N; Kayal, S.; Güngör, T; Blanche, S; Holland, S M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare inherited disease of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase system that causes defective production of toxic oxygen metabolites, impaired bacterial and fungal killing, and recurrent life-threatening infections, mostly by catalase-producing organisms. We report for the first time, to our knowledge, chronic infections with Actinomyces species in 10 patients with CGD. Actinomycosis is a chronic granulomatous condition that commonly manifests as cerv...

  1. Granulomatous cystitis in chronic granulomatous disease: Ultrasound diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a fatal hereditary disease of childhood characterized by chronic recurrent bacterial infections. Involvement of the genitourinary tract is uncommon. We report a child with CGD with granulomatous cystitis demonstrated by both ultrasound and computed tomography. (orig.)

  2. Predictors of objective cough frequency in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumner, Helen; Woodcock, Ashley; Kolsum, Umme;

    2013-01-01

    Cough is one of the principal symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but the potential drivers of cough are likely to be multifactorial and poorly understood.......Cough is one of the principal symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but the potential drivers of cough are likely to be multifactorial and poorly understood....

  3. Inflammatory biomarkers and comorbidities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mette; Dahl, Morten; Lange, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have evidence of systemic inflammation that may be implicated in the development of comorbidities.......Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have evidence of systemic inflammation that may be implicated in the development of comorbidities....

  4. [Chronic diseases and employment: impact on social health inequalities].

    OpenAIRE

    Dray-Spira, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    International audience BACKGROUND: Differential consequences of ill health according to individuals' position on the social scale may constitute an important pathway underlying social health inequalities. In the current context, chronic diseases have major consequences on employment. These consequences may play a substantial role in the process of social health inequalities. Understanding the employment consequences of chronic diseases and their socially differentiated nature constitutes a...

  5. Prevalence of chronic diseases in adolescents with intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeseburg, B.; Jansen, D. E. M. C.; Dijkstra, G. J.; Groothoff, J. W.; Reijneveld, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    Valid community-based data on the prevalence of chronic diseases in adolescents (12-18 years) with intellectual disability (ID-adolescents) are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence rates and the nature of chronic diseases in a population of ID-adolescents and to compare them wi

  6. Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Page Content On this page: Why ... Why is nutrition important for someone with early chronic kidney disease (CKD)? Controlling blood glucose, also called blood sugar, ...

  7. Theory in Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael; Elise, Eifert

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality related to chronic diseases are a primary concern of health professionals, including Health Educators. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over one half of the adult population in the United States suffer from one or more chronic conditions. Understanding the health risk behaviors that contribute to…

  8. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Parenchymal Chronic Renal Diseases - Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Meola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Secondary nephropathies can be associated with disreactive immunological disorders or with a non-inflammatory glomerular damage. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis as in other connective tissue diseases, kidney volume and cortex echogenicity are the parameters that best correlate with clinical severity of the disease, even if the morphological aspect is generally non-specific. Doppler studies in SLE document the correlation between resistance indexes (RIs) values and renal function. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV) causes different types of renal damage. At ultrasound (US), kidneys have almost a normal volume, while during superinfection they enlarge (coronal diameter >13 cm) and become globular, loosing their normal aspect. Cortex appears highly hyperechoic, uniform or patchy. Microcalcifications of renal cortex and medulla are a US sign that can suggest HIV. In amyloidosis, kidneys appear normal or increased in volume in the early stages of disease. Renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic and pyramids can show normal size and morphology, but more often they appear poorly defined and hyperechoic. RIs are very high since the early stages of the disease. Nephromegaly with normal kidney shape is the first sign of lymphoma or multiple myeloma. In systemic vasculitis, renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic, while pyramids appear hypoechoic and globular due to interstitial edema. When vasculitis determines advanced chronic kidney disease stages, kidneys show no specific signs. Microcirculation damage is highlighted by increased RIs values >0.70 in the chronic phase. PMID:27169551

  9. Chronic radiation disease. Consequences and outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic Radiation Disease (CRD), induced by chronic external gamma-irradiation in cumulative dose 1.0-10.0 Gy ever a period of employment from 7 months to 7 years was described for the atomic enterprise workers during adjustment of that enterprise (1948-54). Key clinical syndromes of CRD were cytopenia in the peripheral blood (decrease of a number of thrombocytes, leukocytes, neutrophils to 50-60% from an initial level), changes in the nervous system (vegetative-vascular dysfunction of the hypotonic type, asthenic syndrome and at a cumulative dose more than 4.0 Gy - demyelinatied encephalomyelosis). The annual medical examination allowed assessing consequences of CRD for long-term period of monitoring (35-40 years) of 632 workers. By 10-15 years after termination of an exposure the characteristics of the peripheral blood are reverted to initial level (before employment at enterprise). However even by 40th year of observation in a part of cases the moderate hypoplasia of bone marrow (7.3%) and partial hypoplasia granulocytopoiesis (4.3%) is diagnosed. In lymphocytes of the peripheral blood the frequency of chromosome aberrations 4-5 times greater than a spontaneous level. Decrease of parameters of T-cell immunity remains. In cases of high exposure doses (cumulative dose more than 3.5-4.0 Gy) the early cerebral atherosclerosis (not older than 45) was diagnosed. By 40th year of monitoring the radiation cataracts were not detected. During the first decade of monitoring prevailing causes of death were an acute myeloid leukemia, during subsequent 30 years of monitoring - lung cancer was prevailing causes of death for worker who had contact with plutonium 239. (author)

  10. Association of periodontitis and chronic kidney disease in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. U. Nabi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of our study is to study the etiopathogenesis of periodontitis in chronic kidney disease and to identify a correlation between periodontitis and chronic kidney disease, with the help of periodontal exaamination, ultrasonographic and hematobiochemical analysis. Materials and Methods: 46 dogs with renal failure were studied and classified as presenting a slight (56.52%, moderate (36.95% and severe (47.8% degree of periodontal disease. Results: Marked gingival recession involving whole maxillary dental arcade, Oral mucosa ulcers and tissue necrosis and mobility of mandibular incisors was observed in dogs with chronic kidney disease. Dogs with normal renal function were observed to have minimal gingival recession of the mandibular teeth only. Conclusion: In view of the causative association between periodontal infection, generalized inflammation and important systemic diseases like chronic kidney disease, we hypothesize that targeted prophylaxis and careful treatment of oral diseases can prevent the progression of renal failure

  11. Tackling Africa's chronic disease burden: from the local to the global

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Catherine

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Africa faces a double burden of infectious and chronic diseases. While infectious diseases still account for at least 69% of deaths on the continent, age specific mortality rates from chronic diseases as a whole are actually higher in sub Saharan Africa than in virtually all other regions of the world, in both men and women. Over the next ten years the continent is projected to experience the largest increase in death rates from cardiovascular disease, cancer, respiratory disease and diabetes. African health systems are weak and national investments in healthcare training and service delivery continue to prioritise infectious and parasitic diseases. There is a strong consensus that Africa faces significant challenges in chronic disease research, practice and policy. This editorial reviews eight original papers submitted to a Globalization and Health special issue themed: "Africa's chronic disease burden: local and global perspectives". The papers offer new empirical evidence and comprehensive reviews on diabetes in Tanzania, sickle cell disease in Nigeria, chronic mental illness in rural Ghana, HIV/AIDS care-giving among children in Kenya and chronic disease interventions in Ghana and Cameroon. Regional and international reviews are offered on cardiovascular risk in Africa, comorbidity between infectious and chronic diseases and cardiovascular disease, diabetes and established risk factors among populations of sub-Saharan African descent in Europe. We discuss insights from these papers within the contexts of medical, psychological, community and policy dimensions of chronic disease. There is an urgent need for primary and secondary interventions and for African health policymakers and governments to prioritise the development and implementation of chronic disease policies. Two gaps need critical attention. The first gap concerns the need for multidisciplinary models of research to properly inform the design of interventions. The second

  12. Tackling Africa's chronic disease burden: from the local to the global.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Unwin, Nigel; Agyemang, Charles; Allotey, Pascale; Campbell, Catherine; Arhinful, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Africa faces a double burden of infectious and chronic diseases. While infectious diseases still account for at least 69% of deaths on the continent, age specific mortality rates from chronic diseases as a whole are actually higher in sub Saharan Africa than in virtually all other regions of the world, in both men and women. Over the next ten years the continent is projected to experience the largest increase in death rates from cardiovascular disease, cancer, respiratory disease and diabetes. African health systems are weak and national investments in healthcare training and service delivery continue to prioritise infectious and parasitic diseases. There is a strong consensus that Africa faces significant challenges in chronic disease research, practice and policy. This editorial reviews eight original papers submitted to a Globalization and Health special issue themed: "Africa's chronic disease burden: local and global perspectives". The papers offer new empirical evidence and comprehensive reviews on diabetes in Tanzania, sickle cell disease in Nigeria, chronic mental illness in rural Ghana, HIV/AIDS care-giving among children in Kenya and chronic disease interventions in Ghana and Cameroon. Regional and international reviews are offered on cardiovascular risk in Africa, comorbidity between infectious and chronic diseases and cardiovascular disease, diabetes and established risk factors among populations of sub-Saharan African descent in Europe. We discuss insights from these papers within the contexts of medical, psychological, community and policy dimensions of chronic disease. There is an urgent need for primary and secondary interventions and for African health policymakers and governments to prioritise the development and implementation of chronic disease policies. Two gaps need critical attention. The first gap concerns the need for multidisciplinary models of research to properly inform the design of interventions. The second gap concerns understanding

  13. Chronic kidney disease and the skeleton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul D Miller

    2014-01-01

    Fractures across the stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) could be due to osteoporosis, some form of renal osteodystrophy defined by specific quantitative histomorphometry or chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD). CKD–MBD is a systemic disease that links disorders of mineral and bone metabolism due to CKD to either one or all of the following:abnormalities of calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone or vitamin D metabolism;abnormalities in bone turnover, mineralization, volume, linear growth or strength;or vascular or other soft-tissue calcification. Osteoporosis, as defined by the National Institutes of Health, may coexist with renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD. Differentiation among these disorders is required to manage correctly the correct disorder to reduce the risk of fractures. While the World Health Organization (WHO) bone mineral density (BMD) criteria for osteoporosis can be used in patients with stages 1–3 CKD, the disorders of bone turnover become so aberrant by stages 4 and 5 CKD that neither the WHO criteria nor the occurrence of a fragility fracture can be used for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. The diagnosis of osteoporosis in stages 4 and 5 CKD is one of the exclusion—excluding either renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD as the cause of low BMD or fragility fractures. Differentiations among the disorders of renal osteodystrophy, CKD–MBD or osteoporosis are dependent on the measurement of specific biochemical markers, including serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and/or quantitative bone histomorphometry. Management of fractures in stages 1–3 CKD does not differ in persons with or without CKD with osteoporosis assuming that there is no evidence for CKD–MBD, clinically suspected by elevated PTH, hyperphosphatemia or fibroblast growth factor 23 due to CKD. Treatment of fractures in persons with osteoporosis and stages 4 and 5 CKD is not evidence-based, with the exception of post-hoc analysis suggesting efficacy and

  14. Ovarian carcinoma in two patients with chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehlika Isildak; Gulay Sain Guven; Murat Kekilli; Yavuz Beyazit; Mustafa Erman

    2005-01-01

    Ascites is a common and debilitating complication of cirrhosis. However, patients with chronic liver disease are not spared from other causes of ascites and physicians should be careful not to miss an underlying malignancy.Ovarian cancer is an insidious disease, which is difficult to diagnose and it ranks first in mortality among all gynecological cancers. Here, we present two cases of patients with chronic liver disease that developed ascites not simply because of cirrhosis but as a manifestation of ovarian cancer. We would like to emphasize that the causes of ascites, other than the liver itself, should not be overlooked in patients with chronic liver disease.

  15. Herbal Products: Benefits, Limits, and Applications in Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Del Prete

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Complementary and alternative medicine soughts and encompasses a wide range of approaches; its use begun in ancient China at the time of Xia dynasty and in India during the Vedic period, but thanks to its long-lasting curative effect, easy availability, natural way of healing, and poor side-effects it is gaining importance throughout the world in clinical practice. We conducted a review describing the effects and the limits of using herbal products in chronic liver disease, focusing our attention on those most known, such as quercetin or curcumin. We tried to describe their pharmacokinetics, biological properties, and their beneficial effects (as antioxidant role in metabolic, alcoholic, and viral hepatitis (considering that oxidative stress is the common pathway of chronic liver diseases of different etiology. The main limit of applicability of CAM comes from the lacking of randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials giving a real proof of efficacy of those products, so that anecdotal success and personal experience are frequently the driving force for acceptance of CAM in the population.

  16. [Concept analysis of medication adherence in patients with chronic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-Ying; Chen, Hsing-Mei

    2014-06-01

    Pharmacotherapy plays an important role in the management of chronic diseases. However, many patients with chronic disease do not adhere to their medication regimen. This results in worsening symptoms and frequent re-hospitalizations. As a result, healthcare providers may view these patients as bad. Medication adherence is a complex concept. Analyzing this concept may assist nurses to improve patient-centered care. This paper uses Walker & Avant's method to conduct a concept analysis of medication adherence. Results show the defining attributes of medication adherence as: (1) knowing and agreeing to the medication; (2) communicating and negotiating the regimen; and (3) active, continuous involvement in and appraisal of the treatment effect. Identified antecedents of medication adherence included the patient having: (1) a prescribed medication regimen; (2) cognitive and action abilities in her / his role as a patient; and (3) level of preparation for medication treatment. Identified consequences of medication adherence include: (1) improving symptom control; (2) decreasing re-hospitalizations and mortality; (3) reducing medical care costs; (4) restoring self-esteem; and (5) diminishing depression. It is hoped that this concept analysis provides a reference for nurses to achieve a better understanding of medication adherence and further improve nursing practice. PMID:24899565

  17. Cognitive Changes in Chronic Kidney Disease and After Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sandwijk, Marit S; Ten Berge, Ineke J M; Majoie, Charles B L M; Caan, Matthan W A; De Sonneville, Leo M J; Van Gool, Willem A; Bemelman, Frederike J

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive impairment is very common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is strongly associated with increased mortality. This review article will discuss the pathophysiology of cognitive impairment in CKD, as well as the effect of dialysis and transplantation on cognitive function. In CKD, uremic toxins, hyperparathyroidism and Klotho deficiency lead to chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and vascular calcifications. This results in an increased burden of cerebrovascular disease in CKD patients, who consistently have more white matter hyperintensities, microbleeds, microinfarctions and cerebral atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging scans. Hemodialysis, although beneficial in terms of uremic toxin clearance, also contributes to cognitive decline by causing rapid fluid and osmotic shifts. Decreasing the dialysate temperature and increasing total dialysis time limits these shifts and helps maintain cognitive function in hemodialysis patients. For many patients, kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment modality, because it reverses the underlying mechanisms causing cognitive impairment in CKD. These positive effects have to be balanced against the possible neurotoxicity of infections and immunosuppressive medications, especially glucocorticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors. A limited number of studies have addressed the overall effect of transplantation on cognitive function. These have mostly found an improvement after transplantation, but have a limited applicability to daily practice because they have only included relatively young patients. PMID:26479287

  18. Analysis of electrocardiogram in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazović Biljana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is the fourth leading cause of mortality worldwide. It is defined as a persistent airflow limitation usually progressive and not fully reversible to treatment. The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and severity of disease is confirmed by spirometry. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease produces electrical changes in the heart which shows characteristic electrocardiogram pattern. The aim of this study was to observe and evaluate diagnostic values of electrocardiogram changes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with no other comorbidity. Material and Methods. We analyzed 110 electrocardiogram findings in clinically stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and evaluated the forced expiratory volume in the first second, ratio of forces expiratory volume in the first second to the fixed vital capacity, chest radiographs and electrocardiogram changes such as p wave height, QRS axis and voltage, right bundle branch block, left bundle branch block, right ventricular hypertrophy, T wave inversion in leads V1-V3, S1S2S3 syndrome, transition zone in praecordial lead and QT interval. Results. We found electrocardiogram changes in 64% patients, while 36% had normal electrocardiogram. The most frequent electrocardiogram changes observed were transition zone (76.36% low QRS (50% and p pulmonale (14.54%. Left axis deviation was observed in 27.27% patients. Conclusion. Diagnostic values of electrocardiogram in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease suggest that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients should be screened electrocardiographically in addition to other clinical investigations.

  19. Circulating adipocytokines and chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine T Mills

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adipokines have been associated with atherosclerotic heart disease, which shares many common risk factors with chronic kidney disease (CKD, but their relationship with CKD has not been well characterized. METHODS: We investigated the association of plasma leptin, resistin and adiponectin with CKD in 201 patients with CKD and 201 controls without. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2 or presence of albuminuria. Quantile regression and logistic regression models were used to examine the association between adipokines and CKD adjusting for multiple confounding factors. RESULTS: Compared to controls, adjusted median leptin (38.2 vs. 17.2 ng/mL, p<0.0001 and adjusted mean resistin (16.2 vs 9.0 ng/mL, p<0.0001 were significantly higher in CKD cases. The multiple-adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval of CKD comparing the highest tertile to the lower two tertiles was 2.3 (1.1, 4.9 for leptin and 12.7 (6.5, 24.6 for resistin. Median adiponectin was not significantly different in cases and controls, but the odds ratio comparing the highest tertile to the lower two tertiles was significant (1.9; 95% CI, 1.1, 3.6. In addition, higher leptin, resistin, and adiponectin were independently associated with lower eGFR and higher urinary albumin levels. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that adipocytokines are independently and significantly associated with the risk and severity of CKD. Longitudinal studies are warranted to evaluate the prospective relationship of adipocytokines to the development and progression of CKD.

  20. Proof That Chronic Lyme Disease Exists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Cameron

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The evidence continues to mount that Chronic Lyme Disease (CLD exists and must be addressed by the medical community if solutions are to be found. Four National Institutes of Health (NIH trials validated the existence and severity of CLD. Despite the evidence, there are physicians who continue to deny the existence and severity of CLD, which can hinder efforts to find a solution. Recognizing CLD could facilitate efforts to avoid diagnostic delays of two years and durations of illness of 4.7 to 9 years described in the NIH trials. The risk to society of emerging antibiotic-resistant organisms should be weighed against the societal risks associated with failing to treat an emerging population saddled with CLD. The mixed long-term outcome in children could also be examined. Once we accept the evidence that CLD exists, the medical community should be able to find solutions. Medical professionals should be encouraged to examine whether: (1 innovative treatments for early LD might prevent CLD, (2 early diagnosis of CLD might result in better treatment outcomes, and (3 more effective treatment regimens can be developed for CLD patients who have had prolonged illness and an associated poor quality of life.

  1. Clinical imaging of vascular disease in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sag, Alan A; Covic, Adrian; London, Gerard; Vervloet, Marc; Goldsmith, David; Gorriz, Jose Luis; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    Arterial wall calcification, once considered an incidental finding, is now known to be a consistent and strong predictor of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic renal insufficiency. It is also commonly encountered in radiologic examinations as an incidental finding. Forthcoming bench, translational, and clinical data seek to establish this and pre-calcification changes as surrogate imaging biomarkers for noninvasive prognostication and treatment follow-up. Emerging paradigms seek to establish vascular calcification as a surrogate marker of disease. Imaging of pre-calcification and decalcification events may prove more important than imaging of the calcification itself. Data-driven approaches to screening will be necessary to limit radiation exposure and prevent over-utilization of expensive imaging techniques. PMID:26898824

  2. Understanding uptake of continuous quality improvement in Indigenous primary health care: lessons from a multi-site case study of the Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Togni Samantha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimentation with continuous quality improvement (CQI processes is well underway in Indigenous Australian primary health care. To date, little research into how health organizations take up, support, and embed these complex innovations is available on which services can draw to inform implementation. In this paper, we examine the practices and processes in the policy and organisational contexts, and aim to explore the ways in which they interact to support and/or hinder services' participation in a large scale Indigenous primary health care CQI program. Methods We took a theory-driven approach, drawing on literature on the theory and effectiveness of CQI systems and the Greenhalgh diffusion of innovation framework. Data included routinely collected regional and service profile data; uptake of tools and progress through the first CQI cycle, and data collected quarterly from hub coordinators on their perceptions of barriers and enablers. A total of 48 interviews were also conducted with key people involved in the development, dissemination, and implementation of the Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease (ABCD project. We compiled the various data, conducted thematic analyses, and developed an in-depth narrative account of the processes of uptake and diffusion into services. Results Uptake of CQI was a complex and messy process that happened in fits and starts, was often characterised by conflicts and tensions, and was iterative, reactive, and transformational. Despite initial enthusiasm, the mixed successes during the first cycle were associated with the interaction of features of the environment, the service, the quality improvement process, and the stakeholders, which operated to produce a set of circumstances that either inhibited or enabled the process of change. Organisations had different levels of capacity to mobilize resources that could shift the balance toward supporting implementation. Different forms of

  3. Improving the Differential Diagnosis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Price, David B.; Yawn, Barbara P; Rupert C M Jones

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma represent a substantial portion of primary care practice. In adults, differentiating asthma from COPD can be difficult but is important because of the marked differences in treatment, disease progression, and outcomes between the 2 conditions. Currently, clinical COPD is often misdiagnosed or undiagnosed until late in the disease. Earlier diagnosis could markedly reduce morbidity and improve quality of life. Establishing a diagnosis of C...

  4. Challenges for nephrology nurses in the management of children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Deborah; Macdonald, Dina; Kolnacki, Ken; Simek, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    An important treatment goal for pediatric nephrology caregivers is the optimization of a child's capacity for normal growth and development. However, the physiologic and metabolic derangements associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) significantly alter these processes, creating important challenges in the care of affected children. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines support early recognition and treatment of CKD-related complications to improve growth and development and, ultimately, quality of life for children with this chronic condition. PMID:15303424

  5. Association between Celiac Disease and Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Garg, Ashish; Reddy, Chandrasekhar; Duseja, Ajay; Chawla, Yogesh; Radha K. Dhiman

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease affects the proximal small intestine and is caused by a local immune response to dietary gluten. Celiac disease usually presents with chronic diarrhea; however, presentations with elevated hepatic transaminase levels in blood or with iron-deficiency anemia have been described. Celiac disease has been reported to be associated with autoimmune liver diseases. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) can also initiate autoimmune disease process. Therefore, HCV infection and celiac disease may occu...

  6. Developing a Framework to Generate Evidence of Health Outcomes From Social Media Use in Chronic Disease Management

    OpenAIRE

    Merolli, Mark; Gray, Kathleen; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Background While there is an abundance of evidence-based practice (EBP) recommendations guiding management of various chronic diseases, evidence suggesting best practice for using social media to improve health outcomes is inadequate. The variety of social media platforms, multiple potential uses, inconsistent definitions, and paucity of rigorous studies, make it difficult to measure health outcomes reliably in chronic disease management. Most published investigations report on an earlier gen...

  7. Mapping Collaborative Relations among Canada's Chronic Disease Prevention Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contandriopoulos, Damien; Hanusaik, Nancy; Maximova, Katerina; Paradis, Gilles; O'Loughlin, Jennifer L

    2016-08-01

    In the field of chronic disease prevention (CDP), collaborations between organizations provide a vital framework for intersectoral engagement and exchanges of knowledge, expertise and resources. However, little is known about how the structures of preventive health systems actually articulate with CDP capacity and outcomes. Drawing upon data from the Public Health Organizational Capacity Study - a repeat census of all public health organizations in Canada - we used social network analysis to map and examine interorganizational collaborative relationships in the Canadian preventive health system. The network of relationships obtained through our study shows that provincial boundaries remain a major factor influencing collaborative patterns. Not only are collaborations scarce on the interprovincial level but they are also mostly limited to links with federal and multi-provincial organizations. Given this finding, federal or multi-provincial organizations that occupy central bridging positions in the Canadian CDP collaborative structure should serve as key players for shaping CDP practices in the country. PMID:27585030

  8. Vegetarianism: advantages and drawbacks in patients with chronic kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauveau, Philippe; Combe, Christian; Fouque, Denis; Aparicio, Michel

    2013-11-01

    Vegetarian diet is a very old practice that is liable to confer some health benefits. Recent studies have demonstrated that modification of the dietary pattern with a reduction of animal protein intake and increased consumption of plant-based foods could influence cardiovascular risk profile and mortality rate. Moreover, phosphate bioavailability from plant proteins is reduced. These statements could lead to some benefits for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This review summarizes the characteristics and benefits of vegetarian diets in the general population and the potential beneficial effects of such a diet on phosphate balance, insulin sensitivity, and the control of metabolic acidosis in CKD patients. Potential drawbacks exist when a vegetarian diet is associated with protein intake that is too restrictive and/or insufficient energy intake, justifying an early and regular nutritional follow-up jointly assumed by a nephrologist and a renal dietitian. PMID:24070587

  9. Major affective disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease compared with other chronic respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pothirat C

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chaicharn Pothirat, Warawut Chaiwong, Nittaya Phetsuk, Sangnual Pisalthanapuna, Nonglak Chetsadaphan, Juthamas InchaiDivision of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Allergy, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, ThailanBackground: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and other chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs have significant impacts on quality of life including psychomotor domain.Purpose: To evaluate three major affective disorders in subjects with COPD compared with other CRDs and nonill population.Materials and methods: The Thai version of Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI was used as a diagnostic instrument for three major affective disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive disorder, and panic disorder by face-to-face interview in assessing patients with CRDs [COPD, asthma, rhinasthma, all asthma (asthma and rhinasthma, and chronic rhinitis], and nonill subjects. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine the relation between major affective disorders and CRDs adjusting for age, sex, and disease severity.Results: Major affective disorders were more prevalent in CRDs than nonill groups (adjusted OR =2.6 [95% CI, 1.8-3.9], P<0.001. COPD patients had significantly more generalized anxiety and panic disorder (adjusted OR =4.0 [95% CI, 1.4-11.9], P=0.011, and 4.4 [95% CI, 1.1-18.1], P=0.038, respectively but not major depressive disorder (adjusted OR =2.7 [95% CI, 0.8-9.0, P=0.105] than nonill group. Comparing with all asthma, COPD patients had lower occurrence of major depressive and panic disorders (adjusted OR =0.1 [95% CI, 0.0-0.4], P=0.002, and 0.1 [95% CI, 0.0-0.9], P=0.043, respectively. There was no difference in major mood disorders in COPD, rhinasthma, and chronic rhinitis patients. Major affective disorders were not increased by disease severity in COPD.Conclusion: Major affective disorders were significantly higher in CRDs than nonill

  10. [Autoimmunity in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urboniene, Daiva; Sakalauskas, Raimundas; Sitkauskiene, Brigita

    2005-01-01

    For years, smoking induced inflammatory reaction, comprised mainly of neutrophils and macrophages, has been accepted to be the major component in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. New developments in molecular and cell biology have provided scientists with new knowledge and understanding of inflammatory processes in lung. Recent reports have underlined the role of autoimmunity and T lymphocytes as a potential important factor, which takes place in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article reviews potential mechanism of T cell mediated immune response in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:15827384

  11. Hepatitis A and B Superimposed on Chronic Liver Disease: Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Keeffe, Emmet B.

    2006-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that the acquisition of hepatitis A or hepatitis B in patients with chronic liver disease is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Superimposition of acute hepatitis A in patients with chronic hepatitis C has been associated with a particularly high mortality rate, and chronic hepatitis B virus coinfection with hepatitis C virus is associated with an accelerated progression of chronic liver disease to cirrhosis, decompensated liver diseas...

  12. Challenges in the management of chronic noncommunicable diseases by Indonesian community pharmacists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puspitasari HP

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We explored factors influencing Indonesian primary care pharmacists’ practice in chronic noncommunicable disease management and proposed a model illustrating relationships among factors. Methods: We conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews with pharmacists working in community health centers (Puskesmas, n=5 and community pharmacies (apotek, n=15 in East Java Province. We interviewed participating pharmacists using Bahasa Indonesia to explore facilitators and barriers to their practice in chronic disease management. We audiorecorded all interviews, transcribed ad verbatim, translated into English and analyzed the data using an approach informed by “grounded-theory”. Results: We extracted five emergent themes/factors: pharmacists’ attitudes, Puskesmas/apotek environment, pharmacy education, pharmacy professional associations, and the government. Respondents believed that primary care pharmacists have limited roles in chronic disease management. An unfavourable working environment and perceptions of pharmacists’ inadequate knowledge and skills were reported by many as barriers to pharmacy practice. Limited professional standards, guidelines, leadership and government regulations coupled with low expectations of pharmacists among patients and doctors also contributed to their lack of involvement in chronic disease management. We present the interplay of these factors in our model. Conclusion: Pharmacists’ attitudes, knowledge, skills and their working environment appeared to influence pharmacists’ contribution in chronic disease management. To develop pharmacists’ involvement in chronic disease management, support from pharmacy educators, pharmacy owners, professional associations, the government and other stakeholders is required. Our findings highlight a need for systematic coordination between pharmacists and stakeholders to improve primary care pharmacists’ practice in Indonesia to achieve continuity of care.

  13. Smoking Cessation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashkin, Donald P

    2015-08-01

    Smoking cessation is the most effective strategy for slowing down the progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and reducing mortality in the approximately 50% of patients with diagnosed COPD who continue to smoke. While behavioral interventions (including simple advice) have modest efficacy in improving smoking quit rates, the combination of counseling and pharmacotherapy is more effective than either alone. When combined with even brief counseling, nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), bupropion SR, and varenicline have all been shown to be effective in promoting smoking cessation and sustained abstinence in smokers with COPD to a degree comparable to that observed in the general smoking population. However, the recidivism rate is high after initial quitting so that at the end of 1 year, approximately 80% or more of patients are still smoking. Thus, new approaches to smoking cessation are needed. One approach is to combine different pharmacotherapies, for example, nicotine patch plus rapidly acting NRT (e.g., gum or nasal spray) and/or bupropion or even varenicline plus either NRT or bupropion, in a stepwise approach over a varying duration depending on the severity of nicotine dependence and nicotine withdrawal symptoms during the quit attempt, as proposed in the American College of Chest Physicians Tobacco Dependence Took Kit. Electronic (e)-cigarettes, which deliver vaporized nicotine without most of the noxious components in the smoke from burning tobacco cigarettes, also has potential efficacy as a smoking cessation aid, but their efficacy and safety as either substitutes for regular cigarettes or smoking cessation aids require additional study. This task is complicated because e-cigarettes are currently unregulated and hundreds of different brands are currently available. PMID:26238637

  14. Obesity and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čekerevac Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nutritional abnormalities have one of the most important systematic effects on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. A relationship between COPD and obesity has been observed and recognized. In COPD patients, beside changes in the total body weight, changes in body composition are also possible with the loss of fat-free mass (FFM. Objective. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of obesity and the change of body composition on the pulmonary function, dyspnoea level and the quality of life in COPD patients. Methods. Seventy-nine patients in the stable state of COPD were evaluated. Pulmonary function and arterial blood gas analysis were assessed. Nutritional status was analyzed according to Body Mass Index (BMI. Body composition was evaluated by using anthropometric measurement by fat free mass index (FFMI. Quality of life was assessed using the St. George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ. The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS was used to evaluate dyspnoea. Results. The highest prevalence of obesity (50.0% was found in patients with mild COPD, while the lowest prevalence was detected in very severe COPD patients (10.0%. The loss of FFM occurred in 22.2% patients with normal body weight and in 9.0% of overweight COPD patients. The quality of life was lower in obese patients compared to other COPD patients. A higher dyspnoea level was also present in obese patients. The lowest airflow obstruction was in obese patients (p=0.023. We found a significant positive correlation between forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1% and BMI (r=0.326, p=0.003, FEV1% and FFMI (r=0.321, p=0.004. Conclusion. The highest prevalence of obesity was in patients with mild COPD. Obese patients with COPD had the lowest level of airflow obstruction, higher dyspnoea level and lower quality of life in comparison to other COPD patients.

  15. 慢性肾脏病患儿营养临床实践指南介绍%Introduction to NKF-K/DOQI Clinical Practice Guideline for Nutrition in Children with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟群; 沈颖

    2010-01-01

    @@ 当前,我国儿童慢性肾衰竭(chronic renal failure,CRF)患病人数及其在泌尿系统疾病的构成比例逐年上升~([1]),生存率(2年、5年分别为48%和15%~([2]))明显低于欧美发达国家(10年及20年生存率分别为79%~82%和66%~79%~([3-4])),慢性肾脏病(chronic kidney disease,CKD)已经成为危害我国儿童健康的重大疾病之一.

  16. Chronic pain: the burden of disease and treatment innovations

    OpenAIRE

    S. Monti; Caporali, R

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions are the most frequent cause of chronic pain and affect around 1 in 5 adults in Europe. When chronic pain occurs, it becomes disease itself, with substantial clinical, social and economic impact. Effi cacy and tolerability problems are encountered with all therapeutic strategies available to treat musculoskeletal pain. This often limits effective analgesia and patients’ long term compliance, with the result that chronic pain is persistently underestimated and undertr...

  17. Media coverage of chronic diseases in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wardt, van der Elly M.; Taal, Erik; Rasker, Johannes J.; Wiegman, Oene

    1999-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about the quantity or quality of information on rheumatic diseases provided by the mass media. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the media coverage of rheumatic diseases compared with other chronic diseases in the Netherlands. - Materials and Methods: Newspap

  18. 75 FR 80734 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) (63 FR 66940). After considering the comments received, DOE... CFR Part 850 RIN 1992-AA39 Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program AGENCY: Office of Health... beryllium disease prevention program. The Department solicits comment and information on the...

  19. Management of Chronic Infectious Diseases in School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    This document contains guidelines for developing policies and procedures related to chronic infectious diseases, as recommended by the Illinois Task Force on School Management of Infectious Disease. It is designed to help school personnel understand how infectious diseases can be transmitted, and to assist school districts in the development and…

  20. Renal imaging in children with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwit Rahmawati

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Chronic kidney failure is a cause of death in children. Diagnosing chronic kidney disease is often made by clinical manifestations, laboratory findings and ultrasonography or other imaging tests. Early detection of chronic kidney disease is needed for education and management of the disease. Objective To describe renal imaging findings and mortality in children with chronic kidney disease. Methods This was a cross-sectional study on children with kidney diseases who were inpatients at Dr. Kariadi Hospital from January 2008 to June 2011. Data were taken from medical records. Chronic kidney disease was confirmed by clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and radiologic imaging. Renal ultrasound findings were determined by the radiologist responsible at that time. Results were presented as frequency distributions. Results Of 37 chronic kidney disease cases, 27 were males and 10 were females. Subjects’ most common complaints were dyspnea (7 out of 37 and edema (30 out of 37. Renal ultrasound imaging of subjects with chronic kidney disease yielded the following findings: reduced cortico-medullary differentiation (30 out of 37, bilateral echogenic kidneys (21 out of 37, reduced renal cortex thickness (4 out of 37 and small-sized kidneys (4 out of 37. Eight of the 37 children died. These 8 subjects had the following radiologic imaging findings: both kidneys appeared small in size (4 out of 8, reduced ‘renal cortex’ thickness (4 out of 8, echogenic kidneys (6 out of 8, and reduced cortico-medullary differentiation (8 out of 8. Conclusion Renal ultrasound imaging of pediatric subjects with chronic kidney disease revealed findings of reduced cortico-medullary differentiation, bilateral echogenic kidneys, reduced renal cortex thickness, and small kidneys bilaterally. [Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:193-9.].

  1. Lumbar hernia associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Tao; Zhang, Shuwei; Wang, Huaying; YU, WANJUN

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar hernias are very rare posterolateral abdominal wall hernias, and they are spontaneous in most adult patients. Here we report two cases of spontaneous lumbar hernias associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Some factors such as chronic cough, poor nutritional status and old age in patients with COPD would contribute to lumbar hernia.

  2. Oral disease profiles in chronic graft versus host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassim, C W; Fassil, H; Mays, J W; Edwards, D; Baird, K; Steinberg, S M; Cowen, E W; Naik, H; Datiles, M; Stratton, P; Gress, R E; Pavletic, S Z

    2015-04-01

    At least half of patients with chronic graft-versus-host-disease (cGVHD), the leading cause of morbidity and non-relapse mortality after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, have oral manifestations: mucosal lesions, salivary dysfunction, and limited mouth-opening. cGVHD may manifest in a single organ or affect multiple organ systems, including the mouth, eyes, and the skin. The interrelationship of the 3 oral manifestations of cGVHD with each other and with the specific manifestations of extraoral cGVHD has not been studied. In this analysis, we explored, in a large group of patients with cGVHD, the potential associations between: (1) oral mucosal disease and erythematous skin disease, (2) salivary gland dysfunction and lacrimal gland dysfunction, and (3) limited mouth-opening and sclerotic skin cGVHD. Study participants, enrolled in a cGVHD Natural History Protocol (NCT00331968, n = 212), underwent an oral examination evaluating: (1) mucosal cGVHD [NIH Oral Mucosal Score (OMS)], (2) salivary dysfunction (saliva flow and xerostomia), and (3) maximum mouth-opening measurement. Parameters for dysfunction (OMS > 2, saliva flow ≤ 1 mL/5 min, mouth-opening ≤ 35 mm) were analyzed for association with skin cGVHD involvement (erythema and sclerosis, skin symptoms), lacrimal dysfunction (Schirmer's tear test, xerophthalmia), Lee cGVHD Symptom Scores, and NIH organ scores. Oral mucosal disease (31% prevalence) was associated with skin erythema (P prevalence) was associated with lacrimal dysfunction (P = 0.010) and xerostomia with xerophthalmia (r = 0.32, P = 0.001); and limited mouth-opening (17% prevalence) was associated with skin sclerosis (P = 0.008) and skin symptoms (P = 0.001). There was no association found among these 3 oral cGVHD manifestations. This analysis supports the understanding of oral cGVHD as 3 distinct diseases: mucosal lesions, salivary gland dysfunction, and mouth sclerosis. Clear classification of oral cGVHD as 3 separate manifestations will

  3. Reliever salbutamol use as a measure of exacerbation risk in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenkins, Christine R.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Anzueto, Antonio R.; Make, Barry J.; Peterson, Stefan; Eriksson, Goran; Calverley, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Debate exists regarding which endpoints most sensitively reflect day-to-day variation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) symptoms and are most useful in clinical practice to predict COPD exacerbations. We hypothesized that short-acting beta(2)-agonist (SABA) reliever use wou

  4. One risk assessment tool for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Alssema (Marjan); R.S. Newson (Rachel); S.J.L. Bakker (Stephan); C.D. Stehouwer (Coen); M.W. Heymans (Martijn); M.G.A.A.M. Nijpels (Giel); H.L. Hillege (Hans); A. Hofman (Albert); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); R.T. Gansevoort; J.M. Dekker (Jacqueline)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE - Individuals at high risk for chronic cardiometabolic disease (cardiovascular disease [CVD], type 2 diabetes, and chronic kidney disease [CKD]) share many risk factors and would benefit from early intervention. We developed a nonlaboratory-based risk-assessment tool for identi

  5. One Risk Assessment Tool for Cardiovascular Disease, Type 2 Diabetes, and Chronic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alssema, Marjan; Newson, Rachel S.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Stehouwer, Coen D. A.; Heymans, Martijn W.; Nijpels, Giel; Hillege, Hans L.; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Dekker, Jacqueline M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-Individuals at high risk for chronic cardiometabolic disease (cardiovascular disease [CVD], type 2 diabetes, and chronic kidney disease [CKDD]) share many risk factors and would benefit from early intervention. We developed a nonlaboratory-based risk-assessment tool for identification of p

  6. Pericardial effusions in two boys with chronic granulomatous disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pericardial involvement in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is very rare. We present two children with known CGD and pericardial effusions in whom no microbial cause for the effusions was found. (orig.)

  7. Airway vascular reactivity and vascularisation in human chronic airway disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailey, Simon R; Boustany, Sarah; Burgess, Janette K; Hirst, Stuart J; Sharma, Hari S; Simcock, David E; Suravaram, Padmini R; Weckmann, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Altered bronchial vascular reactivity and remodelling including angiogenesis are documented features of asthma and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Expansion of the bronchial vasculature under these conditions involves both functional (vasodilation, hyperperfusion, increased microvascular

  8. Pneumonectomy for chronic inflammatory lung disease: indications and complications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE Gang; LIU Guo-jun; Jean Deslauriers; FAN Zhi-min

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chronic inflammatory lung disease is a common health problem and often treated with potent antibiotics, anti-tuberculosis drugs, and antifungal agents. However, in case of medical therapy failure, surgical treatment has been often considered as an effective procedure.

  9. Tuberculosis and chronic respiratory disease: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L. Byrne

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: In tuberculosis endemic areas, tuberculosis is strongly associated with the presence of chronic respiratory disease in adults. Efforts to improve long-term lung health should be part of tuberculosis care.

  10. Quantifying psychiatric comorbidity - Lessions from chronic disease epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batstra, L; Bos, EH; Neeleman, J

    2002-01-01

    Background Comorbidity research in psychiatric epidemiology mostly uses measures of association like odds or risk ratios to express how strongly disorders are linked. In contrast, chronic disease epidemiologists increasingly use measures of clustering, like multimorbidity (cluster) coefficients, to

  11. Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Stojceva-Taneva

    2016-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Our study showed that chronic kidney disease is frequent in the Republic of Macedonia and is associated with older age and diabetes. Diabetes had a significantly stronger association with CKD at younger age.

  12. Physical Activity Recommendations in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, Jorine E.; Boezen, H. Marike; Zuidema, Menno J.; de Greef, Mathieu H. G.; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Boezen, Hendrika

    2014-01-01

    Background: Physical activity recommendations are hardly studied in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and specifically recommendations that are individualized to a patient's aerobic fitness level are not studied. Objectives: To compare individualized (relative) and nonindiv

  13. [Chronic wasting disease guidelines for the National Elk Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This memorandum provides the Regional Refuge Biologist some guidelines on transport of elk to or from chronic wasting disease (CWD) contaminated sites, and...

  14. Six-minute-walk test in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polkey, Michael I; Spruit, Martijn A; Edwards, Lisa D;

    2013-01-01

    Outcomes other than spirometry are required to assess nonbronchodilator therapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Estimates of the minimal clinically important difference for the 6-minute-walk distance (6MWD) have been derived from narrow cohorts using nonblinded intervention....

  15. Nutrition in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cereals Bran cereals Egg whites Egg yolks Sorbet Ice cream Source: Phosphorous: Tips for People with Chronic Kidney ... for Scientists Current Funding Opportunities Funded Grants & Grant History Funding Process Research Programs & Contacts Research Training & Career ...

  16. Metabolic Syndrome, Chronic Kidney, and Cardiovascular Diseases: Role of Adipokines

    OpenAIRE

    Manfredi Tesauro; Maria Paola Canale; Giuseppe Rodia; Nicola Di Daniele; Davide Lauro; Angelo Scuteri; Carmine Cardillo

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease, whose incidence is alarmingly growing. It is associated with metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular complications. These complications are clustered in the metabolic syndrome (MetS) leading to high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity predisposes to diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis, and focal and segmental glomerular sclerosis and represents an independent risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease ...

  17. Pericardial effusions in two boys with chronic granulomatous disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Macedo, F.; McHugh, K; Goldblatt, D

    1999-01-01

    Pediatr Radiol. 1999 Nov;29(11):820-2. Pericardial effusions in two boys with chronic granulomatous disease. Macedo F, McHugh K, Goldblatt D. SourceDepartment of Radiology, Hospital Geral de Santo Antonio, Porto, Portugal. Abstract Pericardial involvement in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is very rare. We present two children with known CGD and pericardial effusions in whom no microbial cause for the effusions was found. PMID: 10552060 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

  18. Obstructive sleep apnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lee, Ruth

    2011-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) represent two of the most prevalent chronic respiratory disorders and cardiovascular diseases are major co-morbidities in both. Co-existence of both disorders (overlap syndrome) occurs in 1% of adults and overlap patients have worse nocturnal hypoxemia and hypercapnia than COPD and OSA patients alone. The present review discusses recent data concerning the pathophysiological and clinical significance of the overlap syndrome.

  19. Quality of life in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Carolina Cruz; Carolina Andrade; Milton Urrutia; Sergio Draibe; Luiz Antônio Nogueira-Martins; Ricardo de Castro Cintra Sesso

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To compare the dimensions of quality of life in the stages of chronic kidney disease and the influence of sociodemographic, clinical and laboratory data. INTRODUCTION: The information available on the quality of life of patients on conservative treatment and the relationship between the quality of life and glomerular filtration rate is limited. METHODS: 155 patients in stages 1-5 of chronic kidney disease and 36 in hemodialysis were studied. Quality of life was rated by the Medical Outco...

  20. Pesticides and human chronic diseases: Evidences, mechanisms, and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostafalou, Sara; Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Abdollahi@UToronto.Ca

    2013-04-15

    Along with the wide use of pesticides in the world, the concerns over their health impacts are rapidly growing. There is a huge body of evidence on the relation between exposure to pesticides and elevated rate of chronic diseases such as different types of cancers, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson, Alzheimer, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), birth defects, and reproductive disorders. There is also circumstantial evidence on the association of exposure to pesticides with some other chronic diseases like respiratory problems, particularly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular disease such as atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, chronic nephropathies, autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematous and rheumatoid arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, and aging. The common feature of chronic disorders is a disturbance in cellular homeostasis, which can be induced via pesticides' primary action like perturbation of ion channels, enzymes, receptors, etc., or can as well be mediated via pathways other than the main mechanism. In this review, we present the highlighted evidence on the association of pesticide's exposure with the incidence of chronic diseases and introduce genetic damages, epigenetic modifications, endocrine disruption, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), impairment of ubiquitin proteasome system, and defective autophagy as the effective mechanisms of action. - Highlights: ► There is a link between exposure to pesticides and incidence of chronic diseases. ► Genotoxicity and proteotoxicity are two main involved mechanisms. ► Epigenetic knowledge may help diagnose the relationships. ► Efficient policies on safe use of pesticides should be set up.

  1. ANAESTHESIA FOR CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE AND RENAL TRANSPLANT: AN UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic k idney disease have unique pathophysiology relating to both CKD and its underlying cause and therefore present a challenge to anaesthesiologists & surgeons . The aim of this article is to present the features of chronic kidney disease (CKD that influence th e conduct of anaesthesia and to introduce some of the anaesthetic techniques used for this challenging group of patients.

  2. Pesticides and human chronic diseases: Evidences, mechanisms, and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Along with the wide use of pesticides in the world, the concerns over their health impacts are rapidly growing. There is a huge body of evidence on the relation between exposure to pesticides and elevated rate of chronic diseases such as different types of cancers, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson, Alzheimer, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), birth defects, and reproductive disorders. There is also circumstantial evidence on the association of exposure to pesticides with some other chronic diseases like respiratory problems, particularly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular disease such as atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, chronic nephropathies, autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematous and rheumatoid arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, and aging. The common feature of chronic disorders is a disturbance in cellular homeostasis, which can be induced via pesticides' primary action like perturbation of ion channels, enzymes, receptors, etc., or can as well be mediated via pathways other than the main mechanism. In this review, we present the highlighted evidence on the association of pesticide's exposure with the incidence of chronic diseases and introduce genetic damages, epigenetic modifications, endocrine disruption, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), impairment of ubiquitin proteasome system, and defective autophagy as the effective mechanisms of action. - Highlights: ► There is a link between exposure to pesticides and incidence of chronic diseases. ► Genotoxicity and proteotoxicity are two main involved mechanisms. ► Epigenetic knowledge may help diagnose the relationships. ► Efficient policies on safe use of pesticides should be set up

  3. Neuroinflammation and neurological alterations in chronic liver diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Carmina Montoliu; Marta Llansola; Vicente Felipo

    2015-01-01

    Several million people with chronic liver diseases (cirrhosis, hepatitis) show neurological alterations, named hepatic encephalopathy (HE) with cognitive and motor alterations that impair quality of life and reduces life span. Inflammation acts synergistically with hyperammonemia to induce cognitive and motor alterations in patients with chronic liver disease and minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). Previous studies in animal models have suggested that neuroinflammation is a major player in ...

  4. C reactive protein and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Vestbo, Jørgen; Zacho, Jeppe; Lange, Peter; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2011-01-01

    It is unclear whether elevated plasma C reactive protein (CRP) is causally related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The authors tested the hypothesis that genetically elevated plasma CRP causes COPD using a Mendelian randomisation design.......It is unclear whether elevated plasma C reactive protein (CRP) is causally related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The authors tested the hypothesis that genetically elevated plasma CRP causes COPD using a Mendelian randomisation design....

  5. Chronic mild cerebrovascular dysfunction as a cause for Alzheimer's disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Humpel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive chronic disorder and is characterized by β-amyloid plaques and angiopathy, tau pathology, neuronal cell death, and inflammatory responses. The reasons for this disease are not known. This review proposes the hypothesis that a chronic mild longlasting cerebrovascular dysfunction could initiate a cascade of events leading to AD. It is suggested that (vascular) risk factors (e.g. hypercholesterolemia, type 2 diabetes, hyperhomocysteinemia) causes either ...

  6. Impaired vascular reactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetzner, Fabian; Scholze, Alexandra; Wittstock, Antje;

    2008-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show increased cardiovascular morbidity. We hypothesized that vascular properties which can be routinely evaluated noninvasively are related to different stages of CKD and their clinical and biochemical characteristics.......Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show increased cardiovascular morbidity. We hypothesized that vascular properties which can be routinely evaluated noninvasively are related to different stages of CKD and their clinical and biochemical characteristics....

  7. Stroke and bleeding in atrial fibrillation with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Kamper, Anne-Lise;

    2012-01-01

    Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions.......Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions....

  8. Oral protein calorie supplementation for children with chronic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Francis, Damian K.; Smith, Joanne; Saljuqi, Tawab; Watling, Ruth M

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor growth and nutritional status are common in children with chronic diseases. Oral protein calorie supplements are used to improve nutritional status in these children. These expensive products may be associated with some adverse effects, e.g. the development of inappropriate eating behaviour patterns. This is a new update of a Cochrane review last updated in 2009. Objectives To examine evidence that in children with chronic disease, oral protein calorie supplements alter daily ...

  9. A STUDY OF LIPID PROFILE IN CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Modini Venkata; Srikanti; Surya Kiran; Hanumanth Rao

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) the third leading cause of death in the world , represents an important public health challenge that is both preventable and treatable. According to Global Initiative f or Chronic Obstructiv e Lung Disease (GOLD) , Spirometric tests , Forced Expiratory Volume in first second (FEV1) less than 80% of the expected value and forced expiratory volume in first second to the forced vital capa...

  10. Calorie restriction and prevention of age-associated chronic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Omodei, Daniela; Fontana, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Life expectancy in the world has increased dramatically during the last century; the number of older adults is expected to rise while the number of youths will decline in the near future. This demographic shift has considerable public health and economic implications since aging is associated with the development of serious chronic diseases. Calorie restriction (CR) is the most effective nutritional intervention for slowing aging and preventing chronic disease in rodents. In non-human and hum...

  11. Adiponectin and chronic kidney disease; a review on recent findings

    OpenAIRE

    Heidari Maryam; Nasri Parto; Nasri Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin is a multifunctional cytokine that has a role in regulating inflammation. In patients without chronic renal failure (CRF) and type 2 diabetics, decreased adiponectin levels are associated with insulin resistance. Lower serum plasma adiponectin values are link to larger tumor size and metastasis in clear-cell carcinoma of the kidney too. However, in patients with established chronic kidney disease (CKD), adiponectin levels are elevated and positively predict progression of disease....

  12. Chronic respiratory disease in premature infants caused by Chlamydia trachomatis.

    OpenAIRE

    Numazaki, K; Chiba, S.; Kogawa, K; Umetsu, M; Motoya, H; Nakao, T.

    1986-01-01

    The relation between chronic respiratory disease and infection with Chlamydia trachomatis in premature infants was investigated to ascertain the aetiological importance of intrauterine C trachomatis infection and chronic respiratory disease in premature infants. Serum IgM antibodies against C trachomatis were determined by enzyme linked fluorescence assay. Sections of lung tissues obtained by biopsy and at necropsy were also tested for the presence of antigens using fluorescein conjugated mon...

  13. The Expert Patient and Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Philippe Boulet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of “expert patient” has been developed in the last two decades to define a patient who has a significant knowledge of his/her disease and treatment in addition to self-management skills. However, this concept has evolved over the last years, and these patients are now considered, not only to be more efficient in the management of their own condition and communicating effectively with health professionals, but to also act as educators for other patients and as resources for the last, provide feedback on care delivery, and be involved in the production and implementation of practice guidelines, as well as in the development and conduct of research initiatives. There are some barriers, however, to the integration of this new contributor to the health care team, and specific requirements need to be considered for an individual to be considered as an expert. This new player has, however, a potentially important role to improve current care, particularly in respiratory health.

  14. Anemia and pregnancy: a link to maternal chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Raja; Karoshi, Mahantesh; Keith, Louis

    2011-11-01

    Anemia is a global public health problem. It has serious short- and long-term consequences during pregnancy and beyond. The anemic condition is often worsened by the presence of other chronic diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis, HIV, and diabetes. Untreated anemia also leads to increased morbidity and mortality from these chronic conditions as well. It is surprising that despite these chronic conditions (such as malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV) often being preventable, they still pose a real threat to public health. This article aims to review the current understanding of the pathophysiology, risks, prevention, and treatment of anemia in the light of these chronic conditions. PMID:22099433

  15. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a relatively common complication of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Its appearance during the course of COPD is associated with a worsened prognosis, due to reduced life expectancy and greater use of health care resources. Although a well-defined lineal relationship has not been shown, the prevalence of PH in patients with COPD is higher in cases characterized by greater obstruction and severity. PH is infrequent in cases of mild and moderate COPD. In cases of COPD, PH is generally mild or moderate, and seldom impairs right ventricular function. In many cases it is not apparent during rest, and manifests itself during exercise. PH can be severe or out of proportion with the severity of COPD. In this situation, the possibility of associated conditions should be explored, although COPD might be the only final explanation. There is scarce knowledge about the prevalence and behavior of PH in patients with COPD residing at intermediate and high altitudes (>2.500 meters above sea level), which is a common situation in Latin America and Asia. PH in COPD is not exclusively related with hypoxia/hypoxaemia and hypercapnia. The mechanical disturbances related with COPD (hyper inflation and high alveolar pressure) and inflammation may prevail as causes of endothelial injury and remodeling of pulmonary circulation, which contribute to increased pulmonary vascular pressure and resistance. The appearance of signs of corpulmonale indicates advanced PH. This condition should therefore be suspected early when dyspnoea, hypoxaemia, and impairment of diffusion are not in keeping with the degree of obstruction. PH is confirmed by Doppler echocardiography. Right heart catheterization may be justified in selected cases. Long-term oxygen therapy is the only intervention proven to be temporarily useful. Conventional vasodilators do not produce medium- or long-term improvement and can be detrimental to the ventilation-perfusion relation. Neither

  16. Vascular cognitive impairments in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Rogova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of development of cognitive impairments (CIs, the role of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and renal failure-induced factors in patients with Stages I–IV chronic kidney disease (CKD and to assess an association of CIs with the signs of vascular wall remodeling in them. Patients and methods. Fifty-one patients aged 53±10 years with CKD were examined. Among them, there were 20 patients with Stages I–II CKD: a glomerular filtration rate (GFR of і60 ml/min/1.73 m2, signs of renal lesion; 20 with Stages III CKD: a GFR of <60–30 ml/min/1.73 m2, and 11 with Stages VI CKD: a GFR of <30–15 ml/min/1.73 m2. Results and discussion. CIs were more common in the patients with Stages III–IV than in those with Stages I–II, as shown by the scores of the mini-mental state examination (p<0.001, the frontal assessment battery (p=0.001, and the regulatory function test (p<0.001. These tests showed that the magnitude of CIs increased with the higher stage of CKD. Stages III–IV CKD is an independent predictor of CIs in persons with predialysis-stage kidney lesion. CIs were found to be related to hyperhomocysteinemia, anemia, abdominal obesity, left ventricular hypertrophy, and patient age. The signs of atherosclerotic lesion of the common carotid arteries and the indicators of arterial stiffness were also associated with the incidence and magnitude of CIs in CKD. The detection of CIs in patients with early CKD allows one to timely initiate adequate therapy aimed particularly at improving cerebral circulation, eliminating the impact of risk factors, and slowing down the vascular remodeling. The management tactics for patients with CKD must involve the identification and correction of cardiovascular risk factors, and duplex scanning of the wall of the common carotid arteries may be used as a noninvasive method to assess the risk of the development and progression of CIs in predialysis CKD. 

  17. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats. PMID:27593574

  18. Influence of chronic kidney disease on the outcome of patients with chronic total occlusion

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qing-Bin; Chen, Li-Ming; Min LI; Cui, Yu-Qi; Zhao, Chuan-Yan; Cui, Lian-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) predicted a poor prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease. There is a paucity of data on outcomes after revascularization in patients with chronic total occlusion (CTO) and CKD. This study aims to investigate the impact of CKD on the revascularization of CTO. Methods: This study enrolled 1,092 CTO patients received treatments in our hospital between February 2009 and January 2014. Major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) and al...

  19. The impact of chronic heart failure on misinterpretation and misclassification of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity

    OpenAIRE

    Vyshnyvetskyy, I.I.; Borovtsova, A. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the impact of comorbid chronic heart failure (CHF) on the severity of symptoms and correctness of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) classification.Materials and methods. Cross-sectional study included 177 patients with COPD and concomitant cardiovascular diseases. All patients were undergone spirometry, chest radiography, echocardiography, validated questionnaires (COPD assessment test (CAT), Hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS)). Multiple regression was us...

  20. The impact of chronic pain on direct medical utilization and costs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts MH; Mapel DW; Thomson HN

    2015-01-01

    Melissa H Roberts,1 Douglas W Mapel,1 Heather N Thomson2 1Lovelace Clinic Foundation, Albuquerque, NM, USA; 2Endo Pharmaceuticals, Malvern, PA, USA Objective: To examine how pain affects health care utilization and direct medical costs in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) compared to patients with other chronic diseases. Study design: A retrospective cohort analysis using administrative data of a managed health care system in the Southwestern US for years 2006&...

  1. Spirometry use: detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the primary care setting

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, T.

    2011-01-01

    Thomas A Barnes1, Len Fromer21Department of Cardiopulmonary Sciences, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 2David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAObjective: To describe a practical method for family practitioners to stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by the use of office spirometry.Methods: This is a review of the lessons learned from evaluations of the use of office spirometry in the primary care setting to identify best practices using the most re...

  2. Chronic Pancreatitis Correlates With Increased Risk of Cerebrovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tuck-Siu; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lin, Chi-Ming; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lai, Shih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to explore whether there is a relationship between chronic pancreatitis and cerebrovascular disease in Taiwan. Using the claims data of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, we identified 16,672 subjects aged 20 to 84 years with a new diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis from 2000 to 2010 as the chronic pancreatitis group. We randomly selected 65,877 subjects aged 20 to 84 years without chronic pancreatitis as the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Both groups were matched by sex, age, comorbidities, and the index year of diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. The incidence of cerebrovascular disease at the end of 2011 was measured. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to measure the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for cerebrovascular disease risk associated with chronic pancreatitis and other comorbidities. The overall incidence of cerebrovascular disease was 1.24-fold greater in the chronic pancreatitis group than that in the nonchronic pancreatitis group (14.2 vs. 11.5 per 1000 person-years, 95% CI = 1.19–1.30). After controlling for confounding factors, the adjusted HR of cerebrovascular disease was 1.27 (95% CI = 1.19–1.36) for the chronic pancreatitis group as compared with the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Woman (adjusted HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.31–1.51), age (every 1 year, HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.04–1.05), atrial fibrillation (adjusted HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.02–1.48), chronic kidney disease (adjusted HR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.31–1.67), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (adjusted HR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.16–1.40), diabetes mellitus (adjusted HR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.72–1.92), hypertension (adjusted HR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.56–1.76), and peripheral atherosclerosis (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.06–1.51) were other factors significantly associated with cerebrovascular disease. Chronic pancreatitis is

  3. The chronic renal disease course: from early symptons to discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia Fortunato Fortes

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An exploratory and descriptive study with a qualitative approach aim at understanding the significance of the discovery of chronic kidney disease and the need for the hemodialysis machine. The research was made with twenty patients from two hemodialysis services of the city of RS. The data collection took place between September and December of 2007, throughout semi-structured interviews. The thematic analysis generated the following categories: history of chronic kidney disease, from the silence of the disease to the classical clinical symptoms; the discovery and its immediate effects; life after the discovery; acceptance of the dependence on a machine. We conclude that there is a need to adapt the daily life of patients with chronic kidney disease, because the hemodialysis causes physical and social changes, requiring support from health-team to manage the disease. The professional should not abdicate knowledge, safety and technical skill, as requirements to care.

  4. Functional genomics in renal transplantation and chronic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the past decade, the development of genomic technology has revolutionized modern biological research. Functional genomic analyses enable biologists to study genetic events on a genome wide scale. Examples of applications are gene discovery, biomarker determination, disease classification, and drug target identification. Global expression profiles performed with microarrays enable a better understanding of molecular signature of human disease, including acute and chronic kidney disease. About 10 % of the population in western industrialized nations suffers from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Treatment of end stage renal disease, the final stage of CKD is performed by either hemo- or peritoneal dialysis or renal transplantation. The preferred treatment is renal transplantation, because of the higher quality of life. But the pathophysiology of the disease on a molecular level is not well enough understood and early biomarkers for acute and chronic kidney disease are missing. In my studies I focused on genomics of allograft biopsies, prevention of delayed graft function after renal transplantation, anemia after renal transplantation, biocompatibility of hemodialysis membranes and peritoneal dialysis fluids and cardiovascular diseases and bone disorders in CKD patients. Gene expression profiles, pathway analysis and protein-protein interaction networks were used to elucidate the underlying pathophysiological mechanism of the disease or phenomena, identifying early biomarkers or predictors of disease state and potentially drug targets. In summery my PhD thesis represents the application of functional genomic analyses in chronic kidney disease and renal transplantation. The results provide a deeper view into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of kidney disease. Nevertheless, future multicenter collaborative studies, meta-analyses of existing data, incorporation of functional genomics into large-scale prospective clinical trials are needed and will give biomedical

  5. Chronic Obstructive PulmonaryDisease : Early detection and prevention in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Stratelis, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims. Early detection of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and secondary prevention by means of smoking cessation are the only available methods of stopping the progression of the disease. The overall aim was to examine the possibilities of early detection and prevention of COPD in General Practice. The specific aims were to evaluate a method of detecting COPD at its early stages, to investigate the rate of emphysema in smokers with normal lung function and smokers d...

  6. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic interstitial lung diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Antonella Caminati; Roberto Cassandro; Sergio Harari

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), particularly in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and ILD associated with connective tissue disease. However, other lung diseases, such as combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema syndrome, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and lymphangioleiomyomatosis, may also include PH in their clinical manifestations. In all of these diseases, PH is associated with reduced exercise capacity and poor prognosis. ...

  7. Lack of exercise is a major cause of chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Frank W; Roberts, Christian K; Laye, Matthew J

    2012-04-01

    Chronic diseases are major killers in the modern era. Physical inactivity is a primary cause of most chronic diseases. The initial third of the article considers: activity and prevention definitions; historical evidence showing physical inactivity is detrimental to health and normal organ functional capacities; cause versus treatment; physical activity and inactivity mechanisms differ; gene-environment interaction (including aerobic training adaptations, personalized medicine, and co-twin physical activity); and specificity of adaptations to type of training. Next, physical activity/exercise is examined as primary prevention against 35 chronic conditions [accelerated biological aging/premature death, low cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, obesity, insulin resistance, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, coronary heart disease, peripheral artery disease, hypertension, stroke, congestive heart failure, endothelial dysfunction, arterial dyslipidemia, hemostasis, deep vein thrombosis, cognitive dysfunction, depression and anxiety, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, balance, bone fracture/falls, rheumatoid arthritis, colon cancer, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, polycystic ovary syndrome, erectile dysfunction, pain, diverticulitis, constipation, and gallbladder diseases]. The article ends with consideration of deterioration of risk factors in longer-term sedentary groups; clinical consequences of inactive childhood/adolescence; and public policy. In summary, the body rapidly maladapts to insufficient physical activity, and if continued, results in substantial decreases in both total and quality years of life. Taken together, conclusive evidence exists that physical inactivity is one important cause of most chronic diseases. In addition, physical activity primarily prevents, or delays, chronic diseases, implying that chronic disease need not be an inevitable outcome during life

  8. Chronic liver disease related mortality pattern in northern Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To describe the mortality pattern pertaining to chronic liver disease (CLD) in Northern Pakistan. Results: There were a total of 8529 admissions in twelve months period from August 2001 to July 2002. There were 283 (3.31%) total deaths. Out of these, 160 deaths were pertaining to medical causes. Out of these medical cases, 33 (20.6%) patients had died of chronic liver disease. Other major causes of death were cerebro-vascular accident (18.7%), malignancy (18.1%) and acute myocardial infarction (10.6%). Out of 33 patients of CLD, 12 (36%) presented with acute gastrointestinal (Gl) bleeding, 9(27%) presented with Ascites and 6(18%) presented with altered mental status due to hepatic encephalopathy. Rest of them had jaundice and fever as their initial presentation. Out of these 33 patients with CLD, 23 (70%) had hepatitis C virus (HCV) as cause of their liver disease, 4 (12%) had hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, 3(9%) had both hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus infections and 3 (9%) had no known cause of their chronic liver disease. Conclusion: Chronic liver disease is a major cause of mortality in this part of Pakistan at a tertiary care hospital. HCV infection is the main cause of chronic liver disease followed by either HBV or a combination of these viruses. Major manifestations of CLD have been gastrointestinal bleeding, hepatic failure and portal hypertension.(author)

  9. Unmet needs in severe chronic upper airway disease (SCUAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Jean; Bachert, Claus; Canonica, Giorgio W; Casale, Thomas B; Cruz, Alvaro A; Lockey, Richard J; Zuberbier, Torsten

    2009-09-01

    Although the majority of patients with chronic upper airway diseases have controlled symptoms during treatment, many patients have severe chronic upper airway diseases (SCUADs). SCUAD defines those patients whose symptoms are inadequately controlled despite adequate (ie, effective, safe, and acceptable) pharmacologic treatment based on guidelines. These patients have impaired quality of life, social functioning, sleep, and school/work performance. Severe uncontrolled allergic rhinitis, nonallergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis, aspirin-exacerbated respiratory diseases, or occupational airway diseases are defined as SCUADs. Pediatric SCUADs are still unclear. In developing countries SCUADs exist, but risk factors can differ from those seen in developed countries. Comorbidities are common in patients with SCUADs and might increase their severity. The present document is the position of a group of experts considering that SCUADs should be considered differently from mild chronic upper airway diseases. It reviews the state of the art, highlighting gaps in our knowledge, and proposes several areas for a better understanding, prevention, and management of SCUADs. This document can also serve to optimize the pharmacoeconomic evaluation of SCUADs by means of comparison with mild chronic upper airway diseases. PMID:19660803

  10. Cost Analysis of Chronic Disease Self-Management Programmes Being Delivered in South Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Timothy F.; Palmer, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic disease accounts for the majority of healthcare costs. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) has been shown to be effective in reducing the burden of chronic disease. Objectives: The objective of this study was to measure the cost of delivering the Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) in order to…

  11. The natural history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mannino, DM; Watt, G; Hole, D;

    2006-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the USA, and it remains one of the few diseases that continues to increase its numbers. The development and progression of COPD can vary dramatically between individuals. A low level of lung function rem...

  12. Novel biomarkers for progression of chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bi-cheng; L(U) Lin-li

    2010-01-01

    @@ CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PROGRESSION OF CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE (CKD) Although there are different initiators of CKD, it is generally recognized that the secondary pathological pathway is quite common to all CKD. CKD may inevitably progress to end stage renal disease (ESRD) due to a vicious cycle of nephron destruction by progressive glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis.

  13. Vitamin D status and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Thuesen, Betina Heinsbæk;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Vitamin D deficiency is common among persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Whether vitamin D affects the development and deterioration of COPD or is a consequence of the disease lacks clarity. We investigated the association between vitamin D status and prevalent ...

  14. Cardiovascular disease relates to intestinal uptake of p-cresol in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Poesen, Ruben; Viaene, Liesbeth; Verbeke, Kristin; Augustijns, Patrick; Bammens, Bert; Claes, Kathleen; Kuypers, Dirk; Evenepoel, Pieter; Meijers, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Background Serum p-cresyl sulfate (PCS) associates with cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. PCS concentrations are determined by intestinal uptake of p-cresol, human metabolism to PCS and renal clearance. Whether intestinal uptake of p-cresol itself is directly associated with cardiovascular disease in patients with renal dysfunction has not been studied to date. Methods We performed a prospective study in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 1 – 5 (NCT004416...

  15. Infectious Disease Practice Gaps in Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Shelby; Quest, Tyler L; Wanat, Karolyn A

    2016-07-01

    The article highlights different educational and practice gaps in infectious diseases as they pertain to dermatology. These gaps include the use of antibiotics in relation to atopic dermatitis and acne vulgaris, treatment of skin and soft tissue infection, and diagnosis and treatment of onychomycosis. In addition, practice gaps related to use of imiquimod for molluscum contagiosum, risk of infections related to immunosuppressive medications and rates of vaccination, and the use of bedside diagnostics for diagnosing common infections were discussed. PMID:27363885

  16. Blocking Interleukin-1β in Acute and Chronic Autoinflammatory Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Dinarello, Charles A

    2011-01-01

    An expanding spectrum of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases are considered “autoinflammatory” diseases. This review considers autoinflammatory diseases as being distinct from “autoimmune” diseases. Autoimmune diseases are associated with dysfunctional T-cells and treated with “biologicals” including anti-TNFα, CTLA-Ig, anti-IL-12/23, anti-CD20, anti-IL-17 and anti-IL-6 receptor. In contrast, autoinflammatory diseases are uniquely due to a dysfunctional monocyte caspase-1 activity and sec...

  17. Role of Myeloperoxidase in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisic, Bojana; Miric, Dijana; Dragojevic, Ilija; Rasic, Julijana; Popovic, Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Patients with CKD have a number of disorders in the organism, and the presence of oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in these patients is the subject of numerous studies. Chronic inflammation joined with oxidative stress contributes to the development of numerous complications: accelerated atherosclerosis process and cardiovascular disease, emergence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, development of malnutrition, anaemia, hyperparathyroidism, and so forth, affecting the prognosis and quality of life of patients with CKD. In this review we presented the potential role of the myeloperoxidase enzyme in the production of reactive/chlorinating intermediates and their role in oxidative damage to biomolecules in the body of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In addition, we discussed the role of modified lipoprotein particles under the influence of prooxidant MPO intermediates in the development of endothelial changes and cardiovascular complications in renal failure. PMID:27127544

  18. Chronic fluorosis: The disease and its anaesthetic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri S Kurdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic fluorosis is a widespread disease-related to the ingestion of high levels of fluoride through water and food. Prolonged ingestion of fluoride adversely affects the teeth, bones and other organs and alters their anatomy and physiology. Fluoride excess is a risk factor in cardiovascular disease and other major diseases, including hypothyroidism, diabetes and obesity. Although anaesthesiologists may be aware of its skeletal and dental manifestations, other systemic manifestations, some of which may impact anaesthetic management are relatively unknown. Keeping this in mind, the topic of chronic fluorosis was hand searched from textbooks, scientific journals and electronically through Google, PubMed and other scientific databases. This article concentrates on the effect of chronic fluorosis on various organ systems, its clinical features, diagnosis and the anaesthetic implications of the disease.

  19. Chronic fluorosis: The disease and its anaesthetic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdi, Madhuri S

    2016-03-01

    Chronic fluorosis is a widespread disease-related to the ingestion of high levels of fluoride through water and food. Prolonged ingestion of fluoride adversely affects the teeth, bones and other organs and alters their anatomy and physiology. Fluoride excess is a risk factor in cardiovascular disease and other major diseases, including hypothyroidism, diabetes and obesity. Although anaesthesiologists may be aware of its skeletal and dental manifestations, other systemic manifestations, some of which may impact anaesthetic management are relatively unknown. Keeping this in mind, the topic of chronic fluorosis was hand searched from textbooks, scientific journals and electronically through Google, PubMed and other scientific databases. This article concentrates on the effect of chronic fluorosis on various organ systems, its clinical features, diagnosis and the anaesthetic implications of the disease. PMID:27053777

  20. Patient access to complex chronic disease records on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartlett Cherry

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Access to medical records on the Internet has been reported to be acceptable and popular with patients, although most published evaluations have been of primary care or office-based practice. We tested the feasibility and acceptability of making unscreened results and data from a complex chronic disease pathway (renal medicine available to patients over the Internet in a project involving more than half of renal units in the UK. Methods Content and presentation of the Renal PatientView (RPV system was developed with patient groups. It was designed to receive information from multiple local information systems and to require minimal extra work in units. After piloting in 4 centres in 2005 it was made available more widely. Opinions were sought from both patients who enrolled and from those who did not in a paper survey, and from staff in an electronic survey. Anonymous data on enrolments and usage were extracted from the webserver. Results By mid 2011 over 17,000 patients from 47 of the 75 renal units in the UK had registered. Users had a wide age range (90 yrs but were younger and had more years of education than non-users. They were enthusiastic about the concept, found it easy to use, and 80% felt it gave them a better understanding of their disease. The most common reason for not enrolling was being unaware of the system. A minority of patients had security concerns, and these were reduced after enrolling. Staff responses were also strongly positive. They reported that it aided patient concordance and disease management, and increased the quality of consultations with a neutral effect on consultation length. Neither patient nor staff responses suggested that RPV led to an overall increase in patient anxiety or to an increased burden on renal units beyond the time required to enrol each patient. Conclusions Patient Internet access to secondary care records concerning a complex chronic disease is feasible and popular

  1. Does treating obesity stabilize chronic kidney disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atray Naveen K

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a growing health issue in the Western world. Obesity, as part of the metabolic syndrome adds to the morbidity and mortality. The incidence of diabetes and hypertension, two primary etiological factors for chronic renal failure, is significantly higher with obesity. We report a case with morbid obesity whose renal function was stabilized with aggressive management of his obesity. Case report A 43-year old morbidly obese Caucasian male was referred for evaluation of his chronic renal failure. He had been hypertensive with well controlled blood pressure with a body mass index of 46 and a baseline serum creatinine of 4.3 mg/dl (estimated glomerular filtration rate of 16 ml/min. He had failed all conservative attempts at weight reduction and hence was referred for a gastric by-pass surgery. Following the bariatric surgery he had approximately 90 lbs. weight loss over 8-months and his serum creatinine stabilized to 4.0 mg/dl. Conclusion Obesity appears to be an independent risk factor for renal failure. Targeting obesity is beneficial not only for better control of hypertension and diabetes, but also possibly helps stabilization of chronic kidney failure.

  2. Patient-Specific Airway Wall Remodeling in Chronic Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Mona; Kuschner, Ware G; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-10-01

    Chronic lung disease affects more than a quarter of the adult population; yet, the mechanics of the airways are poorly understood. The pathophysiology of chronic lung disease is commonly characterized by mucosal growth and smooth muscle contraction of the airways, which initiate an inward folding of the mucosal layer and progressive airflow obstruction. Since the degree of obstruction is closely correlated with the number of folds, mucosal folding has been extensively studied in idealized circular cross sections. However, airflow obstruction has never been studied in real airway geometries; the behavior of imperfect, non-cylindrical, continuously branching airways remains unknown. Here we model the effects of chronic lung disease using the nonlinear field theories of mechanics supplemented by the theory of finite growth. We perform finite element analysis of patient-specific Y-branch segments created from magnetic resonance images. We demonstrate that the mucosal folding pattern is insensitive to the specific airway geometry, but that it critically depends on the mucosal and submucosal stiffness, thickness, and loading mechanism. Our results suggests that patient-specific airway models with inherent geometric imperfections are more sensitive to obstruction than idealized circular models. Our models help to explain the pathophysiology of airway obstruction in chronic lung disease and hold promise to improve the diagnostics and treatment of asthma, bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and respiratory failure. PMID:25821112

  3. [Therapeutic training and sports in chronic diseases of the lung].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolsky, A; Haber, P

    1993-01-01

    Training is defined as systematic physical activity in order to improve the physical working capacity, which causes measurable morphological and functional changes in organs. Effects and the rules of applying aerobic endurance training in patients with chronic diseases of the lungs are dealt with. Training does not replace the normal medication, but is an additional therapeutic mean in order to regain physical working capacity, lost by chronic immobilization in the natural course of disease. Contraindications are acute diseases and exacerbations, but not a certain degree of the disease. Training does not improve the lung function, but the function of the other organs, the physical working capacity ist based on (circulation, musculature). This helps to use optimally the remaining reserves of lung function. Methods of aerobic endurance training are described, the definition of aims, performance diagnostic and the finding of the exact doses of training according to intensity, duration, frequency and the weekly netto training time. The training in different diseases of the lungs is discussed: In asthma bronchiale the prophylaxis of the exercise induced asthma and permitted and forbidden drugs for asthmatics according to the rules of international olympic committee. In chronic bronchitis with arterial hypoxemia, in restrictive lung diseases and in pulmonary hypertension. At last the way to prescribing training for patients with chronic pulmonary diseases is described as well as the advising of patients wishing to do sport by their own motivation or planning projects, for instance touristic ones, which require physical stress. PMID:8465532

  4. Severity of chronic Lyme disease compared to other chronic conditions: a quality of life survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Johnson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Overview. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC health-related quality of life (HRQoL indicators are widely used in the general population to determine the burden of disease, identify health needs, and direct public health policy. These indicators also allow the burden of illness to be compared across different diseases. Although Lyme disease has recently been acknowledged as a major health threat in the USA with more than 300,000 new cases per year, no comprehensive assessment of the health burden of this tickborne disease is available. This study assesses the HRQoL of patients with chronic Lyme disease (CLD and compares the severity of CLD to other chronic conditions. Methods. Of 5,357 subjects who responded to an online survey, 3,090 were selected for the study. Respondents were characterized as having CLD if they were clinically diagnosed with Lyme disease and had persisting symptoms lasting more than 6 months following antibiotic treatment. HRQoL of CLD patients was assessed using the CDC 9-item metric. The HRQoL analysis for CLD was compared to published analyses for the general population and other chronic illnesses using standard statistical methods. Results. Compared to the general population and patients with other chronic diseases reviewed here, patients with CLD reported significantly lower health quality status, more bad mental and physical health days, a significant symptom disease burden, and greater activity limitations. They also reported impairment in their ability to work, increased utilization of healthcare services, and greater out of pocket medical costs. Conclusions. CLD patients have significantly impaired HRQoL and greater healthcare utilization compared to the general population and patients with other chronic diseases. The heavy burden of illness associated with CLD highlights the need for earlier diagnosis and innovative treatment approaches that may reduce the burden of illness and concomitant costs

  5. Chronic Disease Management: A Definition And Systematic Approach To Component Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Susan L. Norris; Glasgow, Russell E.; Engelgau, Michael M; Patrick J. OConnor; David McCulloch

    2003-01-01

    The burden of chronic diseases is tremendous, and traditional methods of healthcare delivery are unsuitable for addressing these needs. Chronic disease management has emerged as a new strategy for chronic disease care, but a consistent definition has not been utilized. Our objective is to present an operational definition of chronic disease management. Based on prior systematic reviews of chronic disease management programs, we propose a definition encompassing the main constructs noted in ou...

  6. Ulcerative colitis associated with chronic granulomatous disease: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Imanzade, Farid; Sayarri, Aliakbar; Tajik, Pantea

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is an inherited primary immunodeficiency disease which increases the body’s susceptibility to infections caused by certain bacteria and fungi. CGD is a rare disease, caused by four genes, one type is 1X linked and the other three are “autosomal recessive”. Although clinical presentation is variable, but characteristic features are recurrent pneumonia, lymphadenitis, hepatic or other abscesses. Gastrointestinal tract symptoms are common in x-linked recessive...

  7. Impaired renal function in relatives of chronic kidney disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pradip Kumar Dutta; Md Shafiul Haider; Abul Kashem

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is now a public health burden. If simple screening tests like the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and presence of albuminuria are done in asymptomatic persons, CKD can be diagnosed earlier that will help in halting the disease and not let it progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Aim: This study was conducted to see the proportion of renal function abnormality in the relatives of CKD patients. Settings and Design: This was a cross-sectional compa...

  8. Influenza Vaccination Reduces Dementia Risk in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ju-Chi; Hsu, Yi-Ping; Kao, Pai-Feng; Hao, Wen-Rui; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lin, Chao-Feng; Sung, Li-Chin; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Taiwan has the highest prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) worldwide. CKD, a manifestation of vascular diseases, is associated with a high risk of dementia. Here, we estimated the association between influenza vaccination and dementia risk in patients with CKD. Data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan were used in this study. The study cohort included all patients diagnosed with CKD (according to International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revisio...

  9. An integrated framework for the geographic surveillance of chronic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Schopflocher Donald P; Svenson Lawrence W; Yiannakoulias Nikolaos

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Geographic public health surveillance is concerned with describing and disseminating geographic information about disease and other measures of health to policy makers and the public. While methodological developments in the geographical analysis of disease are numerous, few have been integrated into a framework that also considers the effects of case ascertainment bias on the effectiveness of chronic disease surveillance. Results We present a framework for the geographic ...

  10. The risk of atherosclerosis in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Olechnowicz-Tietz, Sylwia; Gluba, Anna; Paradowska, Anna; Banach, Maciej; Rysz, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is becoming a serious health problem; the number of people with impaired renal function is rapidly rising, especially in industrialized countries. A major complication of CKD is cardiovascular disease. Accelerated atherosclerosis has been observed in early stages of renal dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the degree of renal insufficiency and both the prevalence and intensity of coronary artery disease (asses...

  11. Chronic Disease Management Programmes: an adequate response to patients’ needs?

    OpenAIRE

    Rijken, M; Bekkema, N.; Boeckxstaens, P.; Schellevis, F G; De Maeseneer, J M; Groenewegen, P. P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Inspired by American examples, several European countries are now developing disease management programmes (DMPs) to improve the quality of care for patients with chronic diseases. Recently, questions have been raised whether the disease management approach is appropriate to respond to patient-defined needs. Objective: In this article we consider the responsiveness of current European DMPs to patients needs defined in terms of multimorbidity, functional and participation problems,...

  12. The pathophysiology of thrombocytopenia in chronic liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sigal, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Oscar Mitchell,1 David M Feldman,1,2 Marla Diakow,1 Samuel H Sigal3 1Department of Medicine, 2Division of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, New York University School of Medicine, Langone Medical Center, New York, 3Division of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA Abstract: Thrombocytopenia is the most common hematological abnormality encountered in patients with chronic liver disease (CL...

  13. Chronic Diseases in Captive Geriatric Female Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    OpenAIRE

    Nunamaker, Elizabeth A; Lee, D Rick; Lammey, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    The current aging population of captive chimpanzees is expected to develop age-related diseases and present new challenges to providing their veterinary care. Spontaneous heart disease and sudden cardiac death are the main causes of death in chimpanzees (especially of male animals), but little is known about the relative frequency of other chronic diseases. Furthermore, female chimpanzees appear to outlive the males and scant literature addresses clinical conditions that affect female chimpan...

  14. Innovations in health information technologies for chronic pulmonary diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Himes, Blanca E; Weitzman, Elissa R

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are common chronic obstructive lung disorders in the US that affect over 49 million people. There is no cure for asthma or COPD, but clinical guidelines exist for controlling symptoms that are successful in most patients that adhere to their treatment plan. Health information technologies (HITs) are revolutionizing healthcare by becoming mainstream tools to assist patients in self-monitoring and decision-making, and subsequently, driving...

  15. Autoimmunity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: clinical and experimental evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Kheradmand, Farrah; Shan, Ming; Xu, Chuang; Corry, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few decades, neutrophils and macrophages had co-occupied center stage as the critical innate immune cells underlying the pathobiology of cigarette smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung parenchymal destruction (i.e., emphysema). While chronic exposure to smoke facilitates the recruitment of innate immune cells into the lung, a clear role for adaptive immunity in emphysema has emerged. Evidence from human studies specifically point to a role for recruitment ...

  16. Relevance of Chronic Lyme Disease to Family Medicine as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth Borgermans

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review.

  17. Chronic Chagas disease: from basics to laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberland, Annekathrin; Saravia, Silvia Gilka Munoz; Wallukat, Gerd; Ziebig, Reinhard; Schimke, Ingolf

    2013-02-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is ranked as the most serious parasitic disease in Latin America and has huge potential to become a worldwide problem, due to increasing migration, and international tourism, as well as infectant transfer by blood contact and transfusion, intrauterine transfer, and organ transplantation. Nearly 30% of chronically-infected patients become symptomatic, often with a latency of 10-30 years, developing life-threatening complications. Of those, nearly 90% develop Chagas heart disease, while the others manifest gastrointestinal disease and neuronal disorders. Besides interrupting the infection cycle and chemo therapeutic infectant elimination, starting therapy early in symptomatic patients is important for counteracting the disease. This would be essentially supported by optimized patient management, involving risk assessment, early diagnosis and monitoring of the disease and its treatment. From economic and logistic viewpoints, the tools of laboratory medicine should be especially able to guarantee this. After summarizing the basics of chronic Chagas disease, such as the epidemiological data, the pathogenetic mechanisms thought to drive symptomatic Chagas disease and also treatment options, we present tools of laboratory medicine that address patient diagnosis, risk assessment for becoming symptomatic and guidance, focusing on autoantibody estimation for risk assessment and heart marker measurement for patient guidance. In addition, increases in levels of inflammation and oxidative stress markers in chronic Chagas disease are discussed. PMID:23045386

  18. Effect of yoga in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulambarker, Ashok; Farooki, Basheeruddin; Kheir, Fayez; Copur, Ahmet Sinan; Srinivasan, Lavanya; Schultz, Stephen

    2012-03-01

    Yoga is adjunctively utilized outside the United States in the treatment of a variety of diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but there are no studies assessing its adjunctive efficacy in the United States. We prospectively evaluated the effects of yoga training on the quality of life (QOL) and the parameters of lung function in patients with COPD. Thirty-three patients with documented COPD, per Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease criteria, were recruited. All patients received standard COPD care. The QOL was assessed by the St. George Respiratory questionnaire. Standard spirometry and maximum inspiratory (maximal inspiratory pressure) and expiratory pressure (maximal expiratory pressure) were measured. Patients were taught selected yoga exercises including breathing exercises, meditation, and yoga postures for 1 hour, thrice a week for 6 weeks by a certified yoga therapist. The quality of life and lung function were again assessed at the end of 6 weeks. Twenty-two patients completed the study. Differences in preyoga versus postyoga scores were evaluated using paired t-tests. Statistically significant improvements (P < 0.05) were observed for the St. George Respiratory questionnaire [95% confidence interval (CI) 43.13-58.47], vital capacity (95% CI 2.53-7.65), maximal inspiratory pressure (95% CI 6.62-23.64), and maximal expiratory pressure (95% CI 1.63-13.81). Yoga when practiced by patients with COPD results in improvement in the QOL and lung function on a short-term basis. Additional research is needed to confirm these findings in a randomized controlled trial and in the longer term. PMID:21048431

  19. Factor analysis for the adoption of nuclear technology in diagnosis and treatment of chronic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify and evaluate latent variables (variables that are not directly observed) for adopting and using nuclear technologies in diagnosis and treatment of chronic diseases. The measurement and management of these latent factors are important for health care due to complexities of the sector. Methods: An exploratory factor analysis study was conducted among 52 physicians practicing in the areas of Cardiology, Neurology and Oncology in the State of Sao Paulo who agreed to participate in the study between 2009 and 2010. Data were collected using an attitude measurement questionnaire, and analyzed according to the principal component method with Varimax rotation. Results: The component matrix after factor rotation showed three elucidative groups arranged according to demand for nuclear technology: clinical factors, structural factors, and technological factors. Clinical factors included questionnaire answers referring to medical history, previous interventions, complexity and chronicity of the disease. Structural factors included patient age, physician's practice area, and payment ability. Technological factors included prospective growth in the use of nuclear technology and availability of services. Conclusions: The clinical factors group dimension identified in the study included patient history, prior interventions, and complexity and chronicity of the disease. This dimension is the main motivating for adopting nuclear technology in diagnosis and treatment of chronic diseases. (author)

  20. Renal cystic disease: A practical overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal cystic disease includes a group of lesions with extremely diverse clinical, radiographic, and pathologic findings. The recent development of multiple imaging systems to study renal cystic disease has resulted in considerable interest in correlating the images obtained by different modalities with each other and with the underlying gross pathology. A thorough knowledge of the disturbed morphology and natural history of these diseases will lead to a better understanding of their appearance on radiologic imaging. This refresher course correlates disturbed morphology with appearances on diagnostic imaging, urography, US, angiography, CT, and MR imaging. The advantages and limitations of each imaging method are detailed. A practical classification emphasizing differential features is presented. The presentation is divided into two parts. In the first part typical and atypical cystic masses, including acquired cystic disease (from dialysis), Von Hippel-Lindau disease, and the cystic disease of tuberous sclerosis are discussed. In the second part, polycystic kidney disease (dominant and recessive), medullary cystic disease, medullary sponge kidney, multicycle-dysplastic kidney, renal sinus cysts (peripelvic), and pluricystic kidney disease are discussed

  1. Carbon Nanotubes and Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara P. Barna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Use of nanomaterials in manufactured consumer products is a rapidly expanding industry and potential toxicities are just beginning to be explored. Combustion-generated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT or nanoparticles are ubiquitous in non-manufacturing environments and detectable in vapors from diesel fuel, methane, propane, and natural gas. In experimental animal models, carbon nanotubes have been shown to induce granulomas or other inflammatory changes. Evidence suggesting potential involvement of carbon nanomaterials in human granulomatous disease, has been gathered from analyses of dusts generated in the World Trade Center disaster combined with epidemiological data showing a subsequent increase in granulomatous disease of first responders. In this review we will discuss evidence for similarities in the pathophysiology of carbon nanotube-induced pulmonary disease in experimental animals with that of the human granulomatous disease, sarcoidosis.

  2. Nutrition in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000 Chicago, IL 60606–6995 Internet: ... does not endorse or favor any specific commercial product or company. Trade, proprietary, or company names appearing ...

  3. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... EPO. Infectious diseases that cause AI/ACD include tuberculosis, an infection in the lungs HIV/AIDS, an ... Research at NIDDK Research Resources Technology Advancement & Transfer Meetings & Events Health Information Health Topics La Información de ...

  4. Chronic Lyme disease: misconceptions and challenges for patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halperin JJ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available John J HalperinDepartment of Neurosciences, Overlook Medical Center, Summit, NJ, USAAbstract: Lyme disease, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, causes both specific and nonspecific symptoms. In untreated chronic infection, specific manifestations such as a relapsing large-joint oligoarthritis can persist for years, yet subside with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Nervous system involvement occurs in 10%–15% of untreated patients and typically involves lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, and/or mononeuritis multiplex; in some rare cases, patients have parenchymal inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Nervous system infection is similarly highly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, including oral doxycycline. Nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, perceived cognitive slowing, headache, and others occur in patients with Lyme disease and are indistinguishable from comparable symptoms occurring in innumerable other inflammatory states. There is no evidence that these nonspecific symptoms reflect nervous system infection or damage, or that they are in any way specific to or diagnostic of this or other tick-borne infections. When these symptoms occur in patients with Lyme disease, they typically also subside after antimicrobial treatment, although this may take time. Chronic fatigue states have been reported to occur following any number of infections, including Lyme disease. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear, although there is no evidence in any of these infections that these chronic posttreatment symptoms are attributable to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi or any other identified organism. Available appropriately controlled studies indicate that additional or prolonged courses of antimicrobial therapy do not benefit patients with a chronic fatigue-like state after appropriately treated Lyme disease. Keywords: Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, chronic, diagnosis, treatment, chronic

  5. Per-rectal portal scintigraphy in chronic liver diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portal circulation has been evaluated by per-rectal portal scintigraphy in 21 controls and in 30 pts affected by chronic liver diseases. Tc99m-pertechnetate (10 mci) was given through a Nelaton's catheter in the upper rectum; a per-rectal portal shunt index (SI) was calculated. A relevant overlap is evident between controls and CHP pts; no overlap exists between controls and B or C graded cirrhosis. We conclude that the technique may be suggested to monitor the course of chronic liver diseases and different therapeutic regimens. (orig.)

  6. Specialty Care Use in US Patients with Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saundra H. Glover

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite efforts to eliminate health disparities, racial, ethnic, and geographic groups continue lag behind their counterparts in health outcomes in the United States. The purpose of this study is to determine variation in specialty care utilization by chronic disease status. Data were extracted from the Commonwealth Fund 2006 Health Care Quality Survey (n = 2475. A stratified minority sample design was employed to ensure a representative sample. Logistic regression was used in analyses to predict specialty care utilization in the sample. Poor perceived health, minority status, and lack of insurance was associated with reduced specialty care use and chronic disease diagnosis.

  7. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea: overlaps in pathophysiology, systemic inflammation, and cardiovascular disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNicholas, Walter T

    2012-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome represent two of the most prevalent chronic respiratory disorders in clinical practice, and cardiovascular diseases represent a major comorbidity in each disorder. The two disorders coexist (overlap syndrome) in approximately 1% of adults but asymptomatic lower airway obstruction together with sleep-disordered breathing is more prevalent. Although obstructive sleep apnea syndrome has similar prevalence in COPD as the general population, and vice versa, factors such as body mass index and smoking influence relationships. Nocturnal oxygen desaturation develops in COPD, independent of apnea\\/hypopnea, and is more severe in the overlap syndrome, thus predisposing to pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, upper airway flow limitation contributes to nocturnal desaturation in COPD without apnea\\/hypopnea. Evidence of systemic inflammation in COPD and sleep apnea, involving C-reactive protein and IL-6, in addition to nuclear factor-kappaB-dependent pathways involving tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-8, provides insight into potential basic interactions between both disorders. Furthermore, oxidative stress develops in each disorder, in addition to activation and\\/or dysfunction of circulating leukocytes. These findings are clinically relevant because systemic inflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and the cell\\/molecular pathways involved are similar to those identified in COPD and sleep apnea. However, the pathophysiological and clinical significance of systemic inflammation in COPD and sleep apnea is not proven, and thus, studies of patients with the overlap syndrome should provide insight into the mechanisms of systemic inflammation in COPD and sleep apnea, in addition to potential relationships with cardiovascular disease.

  8. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and occupational exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeni Elena

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both industrialized and developing countries. Cigarette smoking is the major risk factor for COPD. However, relevant information from the literature published within the last years, either on general population samples or on workplaces, indicate that about 15% of all cases of COPD is work-related. Specific settings and agents are quoted which have been indicated or confirmed as linked to COPD. Coal miners, hard-rock miners, tunnel workers, concrete-manufacturing workers, nonmining industrial workers have been shown to be at highest risk for developing COPD. Further evidence that occupational agents are capable of inducing COPD comes from experimental studies, particularly in animal models. In conclusion, occupational exposure to dusts, chemicals, gases should be considered an established, or supported by good evidence, risk factor for developing COPD. The implications of this substantial occupational contribution to COPD must be considered in research planning, in public policy decision-making, and in clinical practice.

  9. Exhaled nitric oxide in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is elevated in nonsmoking subjects with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and compare it with the results in patients with asthma and a control population. Pulmonology Clinic at a University Hospital. Twenty five control subjects, 25 steroid naive asthmatics and 14 COPD patients were studied. All the patients were nonsmokers and stable at the time of the study. All subjects completed a questionnaire and underwent spirometry. Exhaled nitric oxide was measured online by chemiluminescence, using single-breath technique. All the study subjects were males. Subjects with stable COPD had significantly higher values of FENO than controls (56.54+ - 28.01 vs 22.00 + -6.69; P =0.0001) but lower than the subjects with asthma (56.54+ - 28.01 vs 84.78+ - 39.32 P 0.0285). The FENO values in COPD subjects were inversely related to the FEV 1 /FVC ratio. There was a significant overlap between the FENO values in COPD and the control subjects. There is a significant elevation in FENO in patients with stable COPD, but the elevation is less than in asthmatic subjects. Its value in clinical practice may be limited by the significant overlap with control subjects. (author)

  10. Prenatal Diagnosis of Chronic Granulomatous Disease in a Male Fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Köker m

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in any of four known NADPH-oxidase components lead to CGD. X-linked CGD (X-CGD is caused by defects in CYBB, the gene that encodes gp91-phox. Autosomal recessive (AR CGD is caused by defects in the genes for p47 phox, p22-phox or p67-phox. The aim of this study was to screen the molecular defect in the fetus of an X-CGD carrier mother and postnatal confirmation of the results. In a family whose first-born child died from X-CGD, fetal DNA was obtained from an ongoing pregnancy by chorionic villus sampling (CVS. Direct sequencing was used to detect the previously identified CYBB gene mutation. The NADPH oxidase activity in the neutrophils from the carrier mother and from the newborn was analyzed by the DHR assay. Our studies predicted that the fetus in question was not affected by chronic granulomatous disease, which was demonstrated to be correct at birth. For prenatal screening in a pregnant X-CGD carrier, direct sequencing is a good method for detecting the mutation in the fetal DNA. Postnatal confirmation of results with the DHR assay is more practical than mutation screening to show whether the newborn have normal NADPH oxidase activity or does not.

  11. Exhaled nitric oxide in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beg Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objective : The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO is elevated in nonsmoking subjects with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and compare it with the results in patients with asthma and a control population. Design : Cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods : Pulmonology Clinic at a University Hospital. Twenty five control subjects, 25 steroid naοve asthmatics and 14 COPD patients were studied. All the patients were nonsmokers and stable at the time of the study. All subjects completed a questionnaire and underwent spirometry. Exhaled nitric oxide was measured online by chemiluminescence, using single-breath technique. Results : All the study subjects were males. Subjects with stable COPD had significantly higher values of FENO than controls (56.54±28.01 vs 22.00±6.69; P =0.0001 but lower than the subjects with asthma (56.54±28.01 vs 84.78±39.32 P = 0.0285.The FENO values in COPD subjects were inversely related to the FEV 1 /FVC ratio. There was a significant overlap between the FENO values in COPD and the control subjects. Conclusion : There is a significant elevation in FENO in patients with stable COPD, but the elevation is less than in asthmatic subjects. Its value in clinical practice may be limited by the significant overlap with control subjects.

  12. Ramadan fasting and chronic kidney disease: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi

    2014-07-01

    Ramadan fasting represents one of the five pillars of the Islam creed according to the Sunnah and the second practice of faith for the Shiaa. Even though patients are exempted from observing this religious duty, they may be eager to share this particular moment of the year with their family and peers. However, there are no guidelines or standardized protocols that can help physicians to properly address the issue of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) fasting in Ramadan and to correctly advise them. Moreover, in a more interconnected and globalized society, in which more and more Muslim patients live in the Western countries, this topic is of high interest also for the general practitioner. For this purpose, we carried out a systematic review, including also articles written in Arabic, Turkish, and Persian languages. Our main findings are that: recipients of kidney allograft can safely fast during Ramadan;evidences for safety in patients with nephrolithiasis and CKD are instead mixed and controversial. On the other hand,most studies have been carried out during Ramadan falling in cold seasons, and there is scarce information about Ramadan fasting in hot seasons. For these reasons, the findings may be not generalizable and therefore cautions should be taken and applied; the physicians should carefully monitor their patients during the fasting period with an adequate follow-up, in order to avoid any injurious effect. PMID:25364369

  13. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Caminati

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH is a common complication of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs, particularly in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and ILD associated with connective tissue disease. However, other lung diseases, such as combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema syndrome, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and lymphangioleiomyomatosis, may also include PH in their clinical manifestations. In all of these diseases, PH is associated with reduced exercise capacity and poor prognosis. The degree of PH in ILDs is typically mild-to-moderate. However, some of these patients may develop a disproportionate increase in PH that cannot be justified solely by hypoxia and parenchymal injury: this condition has been termed “out-of-proportion” PH. The pathogenesis of PH in these diseases is various, incompletely understood and may be multifactorial. The clinical suspicion (i.e. increased dyspnoea, low diffusion capacity and echocardiographic assessment are the first steps towards proper diagnosis of PH; however, right heart catheterisation remains the current gold standard for diagnosis of PH. At present, no specific therapies have been approved for the treatment of PH in patients with ILDs.

  14. SICK EUTHYROID SYNDROME IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sick euthyroid syndrome is an undermined entity seen in many chronic illness. CKD is one of the forerunners in terms of magnitude in the list of chronic illnesses. Also there is evidence of abnormal thyroid metabolism at several levels in uremia. Hence the need to evaluate thyroid function in CKD patients exists, as revealed by recent studies. AIMS: To study thyroid function test in patients of chronic renal failure. Also, to study the correlation between thyroid function test and severity of renal failure, defined by creatinine clearance. MATERIALS & METHODS : In a cross sectional observational case control study, 50 patients of chronic renal failure either on conservative management or on maintenance haemodialysis and 50 normal healthy subjects as control were enrolled. Creatinine clearance was calculated by Cockcroft – Gault Equation. Thyroid function tests were done by C.L.I.A (Chemiluminescence Immunoassay. RESULTS : Of the 50 patients (M:F – 58:42%, with a mean age 40.58 ± 12.65 years, 28 (56% were on conservative management, 22 (44% were on hemodialysis for a minimum period of three months. All patients were clinically euthyroid. Thyroid function tests were normal (all parameters within normal range in 13 (26% patien ts. However 37 (74% out of 50 patients of CKD had deranged thyroid function test (sick euthyroid syndrome. Mean Total T3 in patients of CKD and controls were 71.52 ± 27.88ng/dl and 95.34 ± 16.31ng/dl respectively (p < 0.005. Mean Free T3 in patients of CKD and controls were 2.19 ± 0.70pg/ml and 3.23 ± 0.79pg/ml respectively (p < 0.005. Mean Total T4 in patients of CKD and controls were 6.03 ± 1.60μg/dl and 6.88 ± 1.06μg/dl respectively (p < 0.005. Mean Free T4 in patients of CKD and controls were 1. 18 ± 0.55ng/ml and 1.29 ± 0.24ng/dl respectively (no statistically significant difference. Mean TSH in patients of CKD and controls were 2.90 ± 1.39 vs. 2.81 ± 0.99μIU/ml respectively (no

  15. Collected literature on isoflavones and chronic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie A. Miller

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Isoflavones are organic compounds, which have been linked to the health benefits and prevention of many diseases. Common isoflavones are genistein, daidzein, and glycitein. Genistein has been researched in regard to its effect on the reduction of menopausal symptoms and reduction of cardiovascular risk factors in osteopenic, post-menopausal women. Research on daidzein focuses on bone mineral density implications in post-menopausal women, therapeutic effects early in prostate cancer, and protection against DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenesis. The most recent research on daidzein has implications for its effect on cardiovascular risk reduction. Research on glycitein focuses on it bioavailability, as well as its role in angiogenesis and invasion of malignant glioma cells. The health benefits of these specific isoflavones are instrumental in the prevention and treatment of many diseases. This review of literature focuses on the effects of genistein, daidzein, and glycitein on health outcomes, such as breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, and prostate cancer.

  16. Role of Bone Biopsy in Stages 3 to 4 Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sprague, Stuart M.

    2008-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism develops relatively early in chronic kidney disease as a consequence of impaired phosphate, calcium, and vitamin D homeostasis. The disease state in chronic kidney disease, which includes the histologic features of bone disease, defined as renal osteodystrophy, and the hormonal and biochemical disturbances, have recently been redefined as a disease syndrome and is referred to as “chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder.” As chronic kidney disease progres...

  17. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the elderly -- a geriatrician's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munikrishnappa, Devaraj

    2007-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is becoming increasingly prevalent among many different populations all over the world, including the US and Europe. Its multitude of complications with devastating outcomes leads to a significantly higher risk for cardio-vascular and all-cause mortality in an individual. However, it is clear now that early detection of CKD might not only delay some of the complications but also prevent them. Therefore, various important public health organizations all over the world have turned their focus and attention to CKD and its risk factors, early detection and early intervention. Nevertheless, the general goals in preventing the increase in CKD and its complications are far from being completely achieved. Why is this so? What is the magnitude and complexity of the problem? How is it affecting the population - are there differences in its affection by age, gender or frail elderly versus the robust? Are we modifying the risk factors appropriately and aggressively? Are there subtle differences in managing the risk factors in those on dialysis versus the non-dialysis CKD patients? Is it important to treat anaemia of CKD aggressively, will it make a difference in the disease progression, its complications or to quality of life? What do these unfortunate individuals commonly succumb to? What do we advise patients who refuse dialysis or those who desire dialysis or transplant? Are there useful non-dialytic treatment recommendations for those who refuse dialysis? What is the role of the physicians caring for the elderly with CKD? When should the primary care givers refer a CKD patient to a nephrologist? The key to eventually controlling incident and prevalent CKD and improve quality of life of affected individuals, lies in not only knowing these and many other vital aspects, but also in applying such knowledge compulsively in day-to-day practice by each and every one us. As CKD is increasingly a disease of the elderly with men being affected more, this

  18. Chronic pain as a variant of depressive disease: the pain-prone disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, D; Heilbronn, M

    1982-07-01

    Review of the literature shows that the common syndrome of chronic pain of uncertain origin appears to be perpetuated by central mechanisms. No plausible neurological theory has been proposed. While the alternative concept of chronic pain as a psychogenic disorder has remained a vague entity, there is strong support to view chronic pain as the prime expression of a muted depressive state. This form of masked depression, however, tends to be associated with a number of characteristic traits. Our studies of patients with chronic pain have led to the identification of a well defined psychobiological disorder with characteristic clinical, psychodynamic, biographic, and genetic features. This syndrome is termed the pain-prone disorder and is viewed as a variant of depressive disease. It proves a distinct entity when compared with a group of patients whose pain can be related to a well defined somatic disease. The chronicity of the disorder appears partially related to the practice of protracted, costly, and futile physical procedures, focusing on a phantom peripheral source of the pain-- a practice commonly pursued by patients and physicians. Recognition of the disorder allows for early, rational, and more effective treatment approaches. PMID:7086394

  19. MicroRNAs: New Insights into Chronic Childhood Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Omran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases are the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and have shown increasing incidence rates among children in the last decades. Chronic illnesses in the pediatric population, even if well managed, affect social, psychological, and physical development and often limit education and active participation and increase the risk for health complications. The significant pediatric morbidity and mortality rates caused by chronic illnesses call for serious efforts toward better understanding of the pathogenesis of these disorders. Recent studies have shown the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs in various aspects of major pediatric chronic non-neoplastic diseases. This review focuses on the role of miRNAs in four major pediatric chronic diseases including bronchial asthma, diabetes mellitus, epilepsy and cystic fibrosis. We intend to emphasize the importance of miRNA-based research in combating these major disorders, as we believe this approach will result in novel therapies to aid securing normal development and to prevent disabilities in the pediatric population.

  20. Neuroinflammation and neurological alterations in chronic liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmina Montoliu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several million people with chronic liver diseases (cirrhosis, hepatitis show neurological alterations, named hepatic encephalopathy (HE with cognitive and motor alterations that impair quality of life and reduces life span. Inflammation acts synergistically with hyperammonemia to induce cognitive and motor alterations in patients with chronic liver disease and minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE. Previous studies in animal models have suggested that neuroinflammation is a major player in HE. This would also be the case in patients with liver cirrhosis or hepatitis C with HE. Rats with MHE show microglial activation and neuroinflammation that is associated with cognitive impairment and hypokinesia. The anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen reduces microglial activation and neuroinflammation and restores cognitive and motor functions in rats with MHE. Chronic hyperammonemia per se induces neuroinflammation. Both peripheral inflammation and hyperammonemia would contribute to neuroinflammation in chronic liver failure. Therefore, neuroinflammation may be a key therapeutic target to improve the cognitive and motor alterations in MHE and overt HE. Identifying new targets to reduce neuroinflammation in MHE without inducing secondary effects would serve to develop new therapeutic tools to reverse the cognitive and motor alterations in patients with HE associated with chronic liver diseases.

  1. Patient Education in Chronic Skin Diseases: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Bes, de, L.M.; Legierse, C.M.; Prinsen, C.A.C.; Korte, MR

    2011-01-01

    The negative impact of skin disease on quality of life (QoL) has been described in many studies. Patient education as an adjunct to treatment, with the aim of improving QoL and reducing disease severity, is a relatively new technique in dermatology. The objective of this article is to analyse and summarise evidence concerning the effects of patient education on QoL and disease severity in patients with chronic skin diseases. All source material was identified through searches in MEDLINE and E...

  2. Identifying organisational principles and management practices important to the quality of health care services for chronic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Anne

    2012-01-01

    which management practices in the CCM are most efficient and in what combinations. In addition, financial incentives and public reporting of performance are often considered effective at improving the quality of health care services, but this has not yet been definitively proved.......The quality of health care services offered to people suffering from chronic diseases often fails to meet standards in Denmark or internationally. The population consisting of people with chronic diseases is large and accounts for about 70% of total health care expenses. Given that resources are...

  3. Significance of diet in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazar Chaudhary Muhammad Junaid

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available It is obvious that malnutrition is extremely dominant in end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients. Malnutrition in pre-dialysis, dialysis, and post-dialysis stages is related to multiple factors. However, research work shows that if we try to improve the poor nutrition status of ESRD patients, good clinical outcomes may result. But the long-term effect of nutrition in the presence of other comorbid conditions has not been well established by many studies. So this aspect of nutrition is still researchable. Some studies emphasise that malnutrition is a major comorbid condition in ESRD victims as are hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM and cardiovascular disease. Researchers believe that the nutritional status, treatment and diagnostic parameters of these patients should be altered to achieve progress not only in their mortality outcome, but also in their quality of life

  4. Sympatho-renal axis in chronic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sobotka, Paul A.; Mahfoud, Felix; Schlaich, Markus P; Hoppe, Uta C.; Böhm, Michael; Krum, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Essential hypertension, insulin resistance, heart failure, congestion, diuretic resistance, and functional renal disease are all characterized by excessive central sympathetic drive. The contribution of the kidney’s somatic afferent nerves, as an underlying cause of elevated central sympathetic drive, and the consequences of excessive efferent sympathetic signals to the kidney itself, as well as other organs, identify the renal sympathetic nerves as a uniquely logical therapeutic target for d...

  5. Chronic granulomatous disease presenting as retinal mass

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad M. Mansour; Al Dairy, Mays; Hamam, Rola; Hidayat, Ahmed A

    2008-01-01

    1-year-old girl was admitted for fever of unknown origin. Funduscopy revealed juxtapapillary retinal inflammatory mass in one eye with a differential diagnosis of sarcoidosis, tuberculosis, retinoblastoma or metastatic disease. Retinal biopsy showed necrotizing granulomatous retinitis. Extensive workup and therapeutic trials failed to confirm the diagnosis of tuberculosis or sarcoidosis. Her 7-month brother and 4-year-old male cousin presented with nystagmus, poor vision, paravascular pigment...

  6. Phenotype of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rhee, Chin Kook

    2015-01-01

    Many patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have overlapping characteristics of both diseases. By spirometric definition, patients with both fixed airflow obstruction (AO) and bronchodilator reversibility or fixed AO and bronchial hyperresponsiveness can be considered to have asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, patients regarded to have ACOS by spirometric criteria alone are heterogeneous and can be classified by phenotype. Eosinophilic inflammation, a ...

  7. Chronic granulomatous disease with recurrent hepatic abscesses in an adult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a condition of inability to deal with bacterial and fungal infections, due to defective respiratory burst in neutrophils leading to recurrent cutaneous and visceral infections. Usually a disease of childhood, but patients nowadays may survive to adulthood and diagnosis might be difficult if not considered. We describe a 20-year-old female with previously undiagnosed CGD, presenting with recurrent cutaneous and hepatic abscesses. (author)

  8. Deficient autophagy unravels the ROS paradox in chronic granulomatous disease

    OpenAIRE

    Van De Veerdonk, Frank L.; Dinarello, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy defects resulting in inflammation appear to be a key feature in the pathogenesis of Crohn colitis. An inflammatory colitis indistinguishable from Crohn disease is described in patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). Patients with CGD have a mutated NADPH complex and are therefore deficient in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production; however, the underlying mechanism for the inflammatory colitis in CGD remained unknown. In a recent study, our group reported that NADPH-dep...

  9. Disparities in Periodontitis Prevalence among Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannidou, E; Swede, H.

    2011-01-01

    Because of adverse effects of uremia in the innate and adaptive immune systems, we hypothesized that chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients would have higher prevalence of moderate periodontitis compared with individuals without CKD. We examined this hypothesis using the NHANES III dataset, including 12,081 adults stratified by Race-Ethnicity. We followed the American Academy of Periodontology/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition for moderate periodontitis. Estimated glomerula...

  10. The natural history of beryllium sensitization and chronic beryllium disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, L. S.; Lloyd, J.; Daniloff, E.

    1996-01-01

    With the advent of in vitro immunologic testing, we can now detect exposed individuals who are sensitized to beryllium and those who have chronic beryllium disease (CBD) with lung pathology and impairment. Earlier detection and more accurate diagnostic tools raise new questions about the natural history of sensitization and granulomatous disease. Preliminary data suggest that early detection identifies people who are sensitized to beryllium and that these individuals are at risk for progressi...

  11. Holistic interaction model for peoble living with a chronic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Villalba Mora, Elena

    2008-01-01

    Ambient Intelligence (AmI) allows the intelligent and natural interaction between the context and individuals. This paradigm will facilitate user support through novel medical protocol design for chronic disease treatment, based on the healthy lifestyle promotion. Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) account for 45% of all deaths in the western world according to the 2004 World Health Organization statistic report. Heart Failure (HF), CVD’s primary paradigm, mainly affects people older than 65. The ...

  12. Early chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: definition, assessment, and prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Rennard, Stephen I; Drummond, M Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death worldwide. COPD, however, is a heterogeneous collection of diseases with differing causes, pathogenic mechanisms, and physiological effects. Therefore a comprehensive approach to COPD prevention will need to address the complexity of COPD. Advances in the understanding of the natural history of COPD and the development of strategies to assess COPD in its early stages make prevention a reasonable, if ambitious, goal.

  13. Early chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: definition, assessment, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennard, Stephen I; Drummond, M Bradley

    2015-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death worldwide. COPD, however, is a heterogeneous collection of diseases with differing causes, pathogenic mechanisms, and physiological effects. Therefore a comprehensive approach to COPD prevention will need to address the complexity of COPD. Advances in the understanding of the natural history of COPD and the development of strategies to assess COPD in its early stages make prevention a reasonable, if ambitious, goal. PMID:25943942

  14. The origin of interstitial myofibroblasts in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Grgic, Ivica; Duffield, Jeremy S.; Humphreys, Benjamin D.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic kidney diseases (CKD), independent of their primary cause, lead to progressive, irreversible loss of functional renal parenchyma. Renal pathology in CKD is characterized by tubulointerstitial fibrosis with excessive matrix deposition produced by myofibroblasts. Because blocking the formation of these scar-forming cells represents a logical therapeutic target for patients with progressive fibrotic kidney disease, the origin of renal myofibroblasts is a subject of intense investigation....

  15. In Search of a Germ Theory Equivalent for Chronic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Egger, Garry

    2012-01-01

    The fight against infectious disease advanced dramatically with the consolidation of the germ theory in the 19th century. This focus on a predominant cause of infections (ie, microbial pathogens) ultimately led to medical and public health advances (eg, immunization, pasteurization, antibiotics). However, the resulting declines in infections in the 20th century were matched by a rise in chronic, noncommunicable diseases, for which there is no single underlying etiology. The discovery of a for...

  16. Oxygen therapy in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wedzicha, Wisia

    2014-01-01

    Simon E Brill, Jadwiga A Wedzicha Airway Disease Section, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, UK Abstract: Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are important events in the history of this debilitating lung condition. Associated health care utilization and morbidity are high, and many patients require supplemental oxygen or ventilatory support. The last 2 decades have seen a substantial increase in our understanding of the best way to ma...

  17. Lung cancer screening in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Jessica; Marín, Marta; Sánchez-Salcedo, Pablo; Zulueta, Javier J.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are two intimately related diseases, with great impact on public health. Annual screening using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) of the chest significantly reduces mortality due to lung cancer, and several scientific societies now recommend this technique. COPD, defined by the presence of airflow obstruction [forced expiratory volume and forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio less than 0.70], and their clinical phenotypes, namely emph...

  18. Spontaneous globe luxation associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ashok Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous globe luxation is a rarely reported condition which can lead to complications like optic neuropathy. Common causes are thyroid eye disease, shallow orbit and floppy eyelid syndrome. We report a case of spontaneous globe luxation with the onset and severity associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. To our knowledge, this is the first case of spontaneous globe luxation associated with COPD.

  19. Classification of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease based on chest radiography

    OpenAIRE

    Leilane Marcos; Gerson Linck Bichinho; Emmanuel Alvarenga Panizzi; Keidy Karla Goncalves Storino; Davi Carpintero Pinto

    2013-01-01

    Objective Quantitative analysis of chest radiographs of patients with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) determining if the data obtained from such radiographic images could classify such individuals according to the presence or absence of disease. Materials and Methods For such a purpose, three groups of chest radiographic images were utilized, namely: group 1, including 25 individuals with COPD; group 2, including 27 individuals without COPD; and group 3 (utilized fo...

  20. Chronic kidney disease and bone fracture: a growing concern

    OpenAIRE

    Nickolas, Thomas L.; Leonard, Mary B.; Shane, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Susceptibility to fracture is increased across the spectrum of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Moreover, fracture in patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) results in significant excess mortality. The incidence and prevalence of CKD and ESKD are predicted to increase markedly over the coming decades in conjunction with the aging of the population. Given the high prevalence of both osteoporosis and CKD in older adults, it is of the utmost public health relevance to be able to assess fract...

  1. Early chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: definition, assessment, and prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennard, Stephen I; Drummond, M Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death worldwide. COPD, however, is a heterogeneous collection of diseases with differing causes, pathogenic mechanisms, and physiological effects. Therefore a comprehensive approach to COPD prevention will need to address the complexity of COPD. Advances in the understanding of the natural history of COPD and the development of strategies to assess COPD in its early stages make prevention a reasonable, if ambitious, goal. PMID:25943942

  2. Telomere and telomerase in chronic liver disease and hepatocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Carulli, Lucia; Anzivino, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis is not completely elucidated. Although in the majority of patients, the risk factors may be identified in B and C viral hepatitis, alcohol intake, drugs or fatty liver disease, there is a small percentage of patients with no apparent risk factors. In addition, the evolution of chronic liver disease is highly heterogeneous from one patient to another. Among patient with identical risk factors, some rapidly progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (...

  3. Clinic Practical Guides for Cerebrovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Angel Buergo Zuaznábar; Otman Fernández Concepción; Jesús Pérez Nellar; Gloria Lara Fernández; Carlos Maya Entenza; Alejandro Pando Cabrera

    2007-01-01

    The clinic practical guides for cerebrovascular diseases are presented. They include different aspects as its concept, classification, and epidemiological data in Cuba as well as worldwide. They also offer its diagnosis, classification, complications and treatment. The frequency of assessment of its application including the tools to measure the quality of life in patients with cerebrovascular accident and the way to proceed with them are shown

  4. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cerebrovascular Disease Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Rubén Bembibre Taboada; Diosdania Alfonso Falcón; Julio Héctor Jova Dueñas; Tania Pérez Ramos

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cerebrovascular Disease Treatment. Even when this term makes reference to the whole process affecting part of cerebral vessel system and cerebral tissue, this document focuses on the cerebrovascular or acute neurological event abruptly affecting the cerebral tissue and the neurological condition of the patient. This condition is usually cause by an abrupt vessel occlusion, of thrombotic or embolic origin, or by subarachnoid or intraventricular intraparenchymat...

  5. Corticosteroid Therapy for Liver Abscess in Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Leiding, Jennifer W; FREEMAN, ALEXANDRA F.; Marciano, Beatriz E.; Anderson, Victoria L.; Uzel, Gulbu; Malech, Harry L.; DeRavin, SukSee; Wilks, David; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Zerbe, Christa S.; Heller, Theo; Holland, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Liver abscesses in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) are typically difficult to treat and often require surgery. We describe 9 X-linked CGD patients with staphylococcal liver abscesses refractory to conventional therapy successfully treated with corticosteroids and antibiotics. Corticosteroids may have a role in treatment of Staphylococcus aureus liver abscesses in CGD.

  6. Actinomyces and Nocardia Infections in Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shahindokht Bassiri-Jahromi; Aida Doostkam

    2011-01-01

    Objective : Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder of the Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced oxidase complex characterized by recurrent bacterial and fungal infections. Disseminated infection by combination of opportunistic agents is being increasingly reported in CGD patients. We presented in the retrospective review of medical records, the etiology, presentation, clinical characteristics the infections detected, predisposing condition and outcome of no...

  7. Chronic granulomatous disease presenting as refractory pneumonia in late adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    SARWAR, Ghulam; de Malmanche, Theo; Rassam, Loui; Grainge, Christopher; Williams, Andrew; Arnold, David

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of refractory pneumonia in an adult patient with underlying chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). Her lobectomy tissue grew B urkholderia cepacia and histopathology revealed diffuse severe pneumonic consolidation with suppurative/necrotizing granulomata. An initial attempt to find an underlying immune deficiency was unsuccessful. Following recurrent invasive infections, repeat immunological assessment revealed reduced neutrophil function, demonstrating skewed carrier status (...

  8. Current Concepts of Hyperinflammation in Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolaus Rieber; Andreas Hector; Taco Kuijpers; Dirk Roos; Dominik Hartl

    2012-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is the most common inherited disorder of phagocytic functions, caused by genetic defects in the leukocyte nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. Consequently, CGD phagocytes are impaired in destroying phagocytosed microorganisms, rendering the patients susceptible to bacterial and fungal infections. Besides this immunodeficiency, CGD patients suffer from various autoinflammatory symptoms, such as granuloma formation in the skin or urinary trac...

  9. Herbal medicine use among Turkish patients with chronic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munevver Tulunay

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: In this study herbal medicine use was found to be higher among patients who had been diagnosed with chronic diseases. Therefore physicians should be aware of herbal medicine usage of their patients and inform them about the effectivity and side effects of herbal medicines. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2015; 4(3.000: 217-220

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients admitted with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, K K; Kjaergaard, J; Akkan, D;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an important differential diagnosis in patients with heart failure (HF). The primary aims were to determine the prevalence of COPD and to test the accuracy of self-reported COPD in patients admitted with HF. Secondary aims were to study a...

  11. Unsuspected organic disease in chronic schizophrenia demonstrated by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unsuspected intracranial pathology was demonstrated in 12 of 136 chronic schizophrenic patients examined by computed tomography (CT). Seven cases of cerebral infarction were found, and one each of porencephalic cyst, meningioma, cystic enlargement of the pineal body, and two of subdural haematoma. Attention is drawn to the value of CT in demonstrating organic disease in schizophrenia. (author)

  12. Invasive fungal infections in patients with chronic granulomatous disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henriet, S.S.V.; Verweij, P.E.; Holland, S.M.; Warris, A.

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are a major threat for chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients. The present study provides a comprehensive overview of published invasive fungal infections in the CGD host through an extensive review of epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic data. In ad

  13. Remodeling in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Dirkje S; Timens, Wim

    2006-01-01

    Airway and lung tissue remodeling and fibrosis play an important role in the development of symptoms associated with lung function loss in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the past decades, much attention has been paid to the inflammatory cellular process involved in airwa

  14. Children with Rare Chronic Skin Diseases: Hemangiomas and Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sheila Dove; Miller, Cynthia Dieterich

    The paper reports on studies involving children having the rare chronic skin diseases of hemangiomas and epidermolysis bullosa (characterized by easy blistering). One study compared the self-concept and psychosocial development of young (mean age 46 months) children (N=19) with hemangiomas with 19 children without hemangiomas. Findings indicated…

  15. Heliox in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Andrews, R.; Lynch, M

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine if breathing helium oxygen mixtures in addition to conventional therapy in non-intubated adult chronic obstructive airways disease (COPD) patients reduces the arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) more than conventional treatment alone, and confers an advantage in terms of the odds of intubation in the acute setting.

  16. Prognostic value of nutritional status in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landbo, C; Prescott, E; Lange, P;

    1999-01-01

    The association between low body mass index (BMI) and poor prognosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common clinical observation. We prospectively examined whether BMI is an independent predictor of mortality in subjects with COPD from the Copenhagen City Heart...

  17. Challenges Surrounding the Education of Children with Chronic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Maria, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    While governing bodies have mandated that all students have the right to an education, with disabled students treated to the same rights and opportunities as non-disabled students, policymakers do not always agree on what all-inclusive education should look like. "Challenges Surrounding the Education of Children with Chronic Diseases"…

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and risk of infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This review article focuses on the risk of infections in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Throughout the years there have been a number of studies describing the risk of pulmonary infections in patients with COPD, whereas only few studies have focused on the risk of inf...

  19. Research on stage of chronic kidney disease in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈莹

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical value of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 45 ml·min-1·1.73 m-2for the stage assessment in the elderly patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) .Methods From June 2009 to December 2011,2258 patients were recruited and divided

  20. Evaluation of Continuing Medical Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Wang, Virginia; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A continuing medical education program is discussed that addresses chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and that links primary care physicians to a source of needed clinical knowledge at a relatively low cost. The educational methods, evaluation design, diagnosis of educational needs, selection of program content and behavioral outcomes are…

  1. Formoterol in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Paschalis Steiropoulos; Argyris Tzouvelekis; Demosthenes Bouros

    2008-01-01

    Paschalis Steiropoulos, Argyris Tzouvelekis, Demosthenes BourosDepartment of Pneumonology, University Hospital of Alexandroupolis, GreeceAbstract: Bronchodilators represent the hallmark of symptomatic treatment of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). There are four categories of bronchodilators: anticholinergics, methylxanthines, short-acting β2-agonists, and long-acting β2-agonists such as formoterol. Significant research has been performed to investigate the effic...

  2. Sarcopenia and Physical Inactivity in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Keiji; Ookawara, Susumu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Sarcopenia and physical inactivity synergistically progress in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are strong predictors of mortality in this population. Exercise training and essential amino acids and vitamin D supplements may contribute to improving sarcopenia and physical inactivity in CKD patients. PMID:27570755

  3. Kidney Stones and the Risk for Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rule, Andrew D.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Melton, L. Joseph; Li, Xujian; Amy L. Weaver; Lieske, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Kidney stones lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD) in people with rare hereditary disorders (e.g., primary hyperoxaluria, cystinuria), but it is unknown whether kidney stones are an important risk factor for CKD in the general population.

  4. Participatory Research for Chronic Disease Prevention in Inuit Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittelsohn, Joel; Roache, Cindy; Kratzmann, Meredith; Reid, Rhonda; Ogina, Julia; Sharma, Sangita

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To develop a community-based chronic disease prevention program for Inuit in Nunavut, Canada. Methods: Stakeholders contributed to intervention development through formative research [in-depth interviews (n = 45), dietary recalls (n = 42)], community workshops, group feedback and implementation training. Results: Key cultural themes…

  5. Congenital Pulmonary Artery Stenoses Masquerading as Chronic Thromboembolic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hemnes, Anna R.; Doyle, Thomas P.; Janssen, Dana; Robbins, Ivan M.

    2009-01-01

    Stenotic pulmonary vascular lesions, often amenable to balloon angioplasty, can erroneously appear to suggest chronic thromboembolic disease on ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scan. We report a case of multiple peripheral pulmonary artery stenoses and describe radiologic findings and treatment options.

  6. Antioxidant Phytochemicals for the Prevention and Treatment of Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jie Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Overproduction of oxidants (reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in the human body is responsible for the pathogenesis of some diseases. The scavenging of these oxidants is thought to be an effective measure to depress the level of oxidative stress of organisms. It has been reported that intake of vegetables and fruits is inversely associated with the risk of many chronic diseases, and antioxidant phytochemicals in vegetables and fruits are considered to be responsible for these health benefits. Antioxidant phytochemicals can be found in many foods and medicinal plants, and play an important role in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases caused by oxidative stress. They often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities, as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits, such as anticancer, anti-aging, and protective action for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, obesity and neurodegenerative diseases. This review summarizes recent progress on the health benefits of antioxidant phytochemicals, and discusses their potential mechanisms in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases.

  7. Central Blood Pressure and Chronic Kidney Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie L. Cohen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension, diabetes, and proteinuria are well-recognized risk factors for progressive kidney function loss. However, despite excellent antihypertensive and antidiabetic drug therapies, which also often lower urinary protein excretion, there remains a significant reservoir of patients with chronic kidney disease who are at high risk for progression to end-stage kidney disease. This has led to the search for less traditional cardiovascular risk factors that will help stratify patients at risk for more rapid kidney disease progression. Among these are noninvasive estimates of vascular structure and function. Arterial stiffness, manifested by the pulse wave velocity in the aorta, has been established in a number of studies as a significant risk factor for kidney disease progression and cardiovascular endpoints. Much less well studied in chronic kidney disease are measures of central arterial pressures. In this paper we cover the physiology behind the generation of the central pulse wave contour and the studies available using these approaches and conclude with some speculations on the rationale for why measurements of central pressure may be informative for the study of chronic kidney disease progression.

  8. [Determinants of vascular wall stiffness in patients with chronic renal disease undergoing hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharlamova, U V; Il'icheva, O E

    2012-01-01

    Examination of 109 patients with chronic renal disease undergoing hemodialysis revealed significant impairment of arterial wall distensibility (accordingly, decreased Peterson's and Young's elastic moduli, distensibility coefficient). The relative thickness of the common carotid artery and pulse wave velocity were significantly greater than in practically healthy subjects. Independent factors influencing arterial wall rigidity included age, arterial pressure, total cholesterol and homocystein, stable metabolites of nitric oxide, creatinine, calcium, phosphorus levels, calcium x phosphorus product, duration of hemodialysis, interdialytic weight gain. PMID:23516853

  9. Comparison of Canadian versus United States Emergency Department Visits for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbation

    OpenAIRE

    Rowe, Brian H; Rita K Cydulka; Chu-Lin Tsai; Sunday Clark; Douglas Sinclair; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Despite the frequency of emergency department (ED) visits for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation, little is known about practice variation in EDs.OBJECTIVES: To examine the differences between Canadian and United States (US) COPD patients, and the ED management they receive.METHODS: A prospective multicentre cohort study was conducted involving 29 EDs in the US and Canada. Using a standard protocol, consecutive ED patients with COPD exacerbations were inte...

  10. Web-based lifestyle management for chronic kidney disease patients in a clinical setting

    OpenAIRE

    Nauta, Jan M.; van der Boog, Paul J M; Slegten, Jacqueline T.; Janssen, Ruud; Hettinga, Marike

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining a proper lifestyle is important for chronic kidney disease patients. This study investigates whether an online lifestyle diary supplementary to the support received in the outpatient clinic can help patients to get to such a lifestyle. A total of 33 participants expressed their willingness to participate in the study. However, 11 of them did not start actually. The remaining 22 participants used an online lifestyle diary. They received limited support regarding practical issues an...

  11. Polypharmacy, chronic diseases and nutritional markers in community-dwelling older

    OpenAIRE

    Erika Aparecida Silveira; Luana Dalastra; Valéria Pagotto

    2014-01-01

    Polypharmacy is a common practice among the elderly, but few studies have evaluated its association with nutritional markers. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of polypharmacy and its association with nutritional markers, chronic diseases, sociodemographic and health variables. This research is part of the Study Elderly/Goiânia, which evaluated 418 elderly community in a cross-sectional design. Polypharmacy was defined as the use of five or more concomitant medications. The...

  12. Variability of antibiotic prescribing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Boggon, R; Hubbard, R.; Smeeth, L; Gulliford, M; Cassell, J; Eaton, S; Pirmohamed, M; Van Staa, TP

    2013-01-01

    Background: The role of antibiotics in treating mild or moderate exacerbations in patients with acute chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is unclear. The aims were to: (i) describe patient characteristics associated with acute exacerbations amongst a representative COPD population, (ii) explore the relationship between COPD severity and outcomes amongst patients with exacerbations, and (iii) quantify variability by general practice in prescribing of antibiotics for COPD exacerba...

  13. Treatment of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: From Molecular Bases to Practical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ripellino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP is an autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system, in which both cellular and humoral immune responses are involved. The disease is clinically heterogeneous with some patients displaying pure motor form and others also showing a variable degree of sensory dysfunction; disease evolution may also differ from patient to patient, since monophasic, progressive, and relapsing forms are reported. Underlying such clinical variability there is probably a broad spectrum of molecular dysfunctions that are and will be the target of therapeutic strategies. In this review we first explore the biological bases of current treatments and subsequently we focus on the practical management that must also take into account pharmacoeconomic issues.

  14. Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Chronic Kidney Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkin Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Aplastic Anemia; AL Amyloidosis; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Disease; Sickle Cell Anemia; Autoimmune Diseases; Thalassemia

  15. Fructose; a Hidden Threat for Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Korkmaz

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Incremental usage of the fructose derived from corn by processed-food manufacturers has become a crucial threat in terms of human health. Although it is known as fruit sugar, the most important source of dietary fructose is now, processed-food prepared by using high-fructose corn syrup. Basically, fructose is metabolized within liver and its energy load is equal to glucose. Nevertheless, it does not make up satiety and fullness. Therefore, fructose-rich foods and beverages can be consumed in large amount because the absence of satiety. Studies performed recently unveil a connection between amount of fructose consumed and metabolic disorders such as cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and obesity. The incidence of metabolic diseases which are already affecting more than half of the adults has been increasing among children. Moreover, these types of foods are generally consumed by children. Therefore, in order to reduce the frequency of metabolic disorders in all ages, the amount of fructose in processed-foods and beverages should also be taken into consideration. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(4.000: 343-346

  16. Chronic Disease Surveillance Systems Within the US Associated Pacific Island Jurisdictions

    OpenAIRE

    Hosey, Gwen; Ichiho, Henry; Satterfield, Dawn; Dankwa-Mullan, Irene; Kuartei, Stevenson; Rhee, Kyu; Belyeu-Camacho, Tayna; deBrum, Ione; Demei, Yorah; Lippwe, Kipier; Solidum Luces, Patrick; Roby, Faiese

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, illness and death due to chronic disease in the US Associated Pacific Islands (USAPI) jurisdictions have dramatically increased. Effective chronic disease surveillance can help monitor disease trends, evaluate public policy, prioritize resource allocation, and guide program planning, evaluation, and research. Although chronic disease surveillance is being conducted in the USAPI, no recently published capacity assessments for chronic disease surveillance are available. The obj...

  17. Early diagnosis saves lives: focus on patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ecder, Tevfik

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a global public health problem. Patients with chronic kidney disease have an increased risk of developing end-stage kidney disease and its complications. Early identification and management of patients with chronic kidney disease is important in order to decrease the morbidity and mortality. Early detection of chronic kidney disease is possible with screening programs targeting high-risk patients, such as patients with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, elderly patient...

  18. Prevalence, survival analysis and multimorbidity of chronic diseases in the general veterinarian-attended horse population of the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Claire E; Duz, Marco; Parkin, Timothy D H; Marshall, John F

    2016-09-01

    The average age of the global human population is increasing, leading to increased interest in the effects of chronic disease and multimorbidity on health resources and patient welfare. It has been posited that the average age of the general veterinarian-attended horse population of the UK is also increasing, and therefore it could be assumed that chronic diseases and multimorbidity would pose an increasing risk here also. However, evidence for this trend in ageing is very limited, and the current prevalence of many chronic diseases, and of multimorbidity, is unknown. Using text mining of first-opinion electronic medical records from seven veterinary practices around the UK, Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard modelling, we were able to estimate the apparent prevalence among veterinarian-attended horses of nine chronic diseases, and to assess their relative effects on median life expectancy following diagnosis. With these methods we found evidence of increasing population age. Multimorbidity affected 1.2% of the study population, and had a significant effect upon survival times, with co-occurrence of two diseases, and three or more diseases, leading to 6.6 and 21.3 times the hazard ratio compared to no chronic disease, respectively. Laminitis was involved in 74% of cases of multimorbidity. The population of horses attended by UK veterinarians appears to be aging, and chronic diseases and their co-occurrence are common features, and as such warrant further investigation. PMID:27544263

  19. Chronic radiation proctopathy: A practical review of endoscopic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Luciano; Rohr, Rachel; Nakao, Frank; Libera, Ermelindo; Ferrari, Angelo

    2016-02-27

    Chronic radiation proctopathy (CRP) is a troublesome complication of pelvic radiotherapy. The most common presentation is rectal bleeding. CRP symptoms interfere with daily activities and decrease quality of life. Rectal bleeding management in patients with CRP represents a conundrum for practitioners. Medical therapy is ineffective in general and surgical approach has a high morbid-mortality. Endoscopy has a role in the diagnosis, staging and treatment of this disease. Currently available endoscopic modalities are formalin, potassium titanyl phosphate laser, neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, argon laser, bipolar electrocoagulation (BiCAP), heater probe, band ligation, cryotherapy, radiofrequency ablation and argon plasma coagulation (APC). Among these options, APC is the most promising. PMID:26981189

  20. Pulmonary comorbidities associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Luppi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by a relatively irreversible airflow limitation caused by chronic inflammation, in most cases tobacco-related. The impact of COPD on morbidity and mortality at the single-patient level depends upon the severity of COPD symptoms and the existence of other types of systemic and/or pulmonary disease, also known as co-morbid conditions.Materials and methods This review examines the pulmonary diseases commonly associated with COPD, in terms of their prevalence, clinical features, pathogenic mechanisms, prognoses, and implications for management of COPD.Results The incidence and prevalence of various pulmonary diseases are significantly increased in patients with COPD. These conditions include symptomatic bronchiectasis, combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema, lung cancer, sleep-related respiratory disorders, and pulmonary embolism. Some of these concomitant respiratory diseases have an independent negative impact on the prognosis of COPD patients, and their presence has important implications for treatment of these patients.Conclusions Physicians treating patients with COPD need to be aware of these coexisting pulmonary diseases. All patients with COPD should be carefully evaluated to identify pulmonary comorbidities, since they not only influence the prognosis but also have an impact on disease management. The treatment of COPD is no longer restricted exclusively to inhaled therapy. The therapeutic approach to this disease is becoming increasingly multidimensional in view of the fact that successful management of comorbidities might positively affect the course of COPD itself.