WorldWideScience

Sample records for chronic disease management

  1. New Directions in Chronic Disease Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun-Sung Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A worldwide epidemic of chronic disease, and complications thereof, is underway, with no sign of abatement. Healthcare costs have increased tremendously, principally because of the need to treat chronic complications of non-communicable diseases including cardiovascular disease, blindness, end-stage renal disease, and amputation of extremities. Current healthcare systems fail to provide an appropriate quality of care to prevent the development of chronic complications without additional healthcare costs. A new paradigm for prevention and treatment of chronic disease and the complications thereof is urgently required. Several clinical studies have clearly shown that frequent communication between physicians and patients, based on electronic data transmission from medical devices, greatly assists in the management of chronic disease. However, for various reasons, these advantages have not translated effectively into real clinical practice. In the present review, we describe current relevant studies, and trends in the use of information technology for chronic disease management. We also discuss limitations and future directions.

  2. Management of patients with chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    management of the complications of CKD, e.g. renal anaemia, ... ARTICLE. Management of patients with chronic kidney disease. T Gerntholtz,1 FCP (SA); G Paget,2 ..... Telmisartan, ramipril, or both in patients at high risk for vascular events.

  3. Mobile phone technology in chronic disease management

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, Holly

    2008-01-01

    Mobile phones are being used to improve nurse-patient communication and monitor health outcomes in chronic disease. Innovative applications of mobile technology are expected to increase over time in community management of cancer, heart disease, asthma and diabetes. This article focuses on mobile phone technology and its contribution to health care.

  4. [Disease management for chronic heart failure patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bläuer, Cornelia; Pfister, Otmar; Bächtold, Christa; Junker, Therese; Spirig, Rebecca

    2011-02-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited in their quality of life, have a poor prognosis and face frequent hospitalisations. Patient self-management was shown to improve quality of life, reduce rehospitalisations and costs in patients with chronic HF. Comprehensive disease management programmes are critical to foster patient self-management. The chronic care model developed by the WHO serves as the basis of such programmes. In order to develop self-management skills a needs orientated training concept is mandatory, as patients need both knowledge of the illness and the ability to use the information to make appropriate decisions according to their individual situation. Switzerland has no established system for the care of patients with chronic diseases in particular those with HF. For this reason a group of Swiss experts for HF designed a model for disease management for HF patients in Switzerland. Since 2009 the Swiss Heart Foundation offers an education programme based on this model. The aim of this programme is to offer education and support for practitioners, patients and families. An initial pilot evaluation of the program showed mixed acceptance by practitioners, whereas patient assessed the program as supportive and in line with their requirements.

  5. Precision medicine for managing chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwczynski, Andrzej; Orlewska, Ewa

    2016-08-18

    Precision medicine (PM) is an important modern paradigm for combining new types of metrics with big medical datasets to create prediction models for prevention, diagnosis, and specific therapy of chronic diseases. The aim of this paper was to differentiate PM from personalized medicine, to show potential benefits of PM for managing chronic diseases, and to define problems with implementation of PM into clinical practice. PM strategies in chronic airway diseases, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases show that the key to developing PM is the addition of big datasets to the course of individually profiling diseases and patients. Integration of PM into clinical practice requires the reengineering of the health care infrastructure by incorporating necessary tools for clinicians and patients to enable data collection and analysis, interpretation of the results, as well as to facilitate treatment choices based on new understanding of biological pathways. The size of datasets and their large variability pose a considerable technical and statistical challenge. The potential benefits of using PM are as follows: 1) broader possibilities for physicians to use the achievements of genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and other "omics" disciplines in routine clinical practice; 2) better understanding of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of diseases; 3) a revised approach to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of chronic diseases; 4) better integration of electronic medical records as well as data from sensors and software applications in an interactive network of knowledge aimed at improving the modelling and testing of therapeutic and preventative strategies, stimulating further research, and spreading information to the general public.

  6. Chronic Disease Management in Family Practice: Clinical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    disease management in the family practice selling. This paper discusses chronic disease management in the family practice selling....Chronic disease management is the process of evaluating and treating a medical condition or disease state which can not be readily cured so as to...minimize it’s negative impact on the individual. Examples of chronic disease management include the treatment of hypertension, diabetes, osteoporosis

  7. Health Technologies for the Improvement of Chronic Disease Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitovic, M; Brener, S

    2013-01-01

    Background As part of ongoing efforts to improve the Ontario health care system, a mega-analysis examining the optimization of chronic disease management in the community was conducted by Evidence Development and Standards, Health Quality Ontario (previously known as the Medical Advisory Secretariat [MAS]). Objective The purpose of this report was to identify health technologies previously evaluated by MAS that may be leveraged in efforts to optimize chronic disease management in the community. Data Sources The Ontario Health Technology Assessment Series and field evaluations conducted by MAS and its partners between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2011. Review Methods Technologies related to at least 1 of 7 disease areas of interest (type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, stroke, and chronic wounds) or that may greatly impact health services utilization were reviewed. Only technologies with a moderate to high quality of evidence and associated with a clinically or statistically significant improvement in disease management were included. Technologies related to other topics in the mega-analysis on chronic disease management were excluded. Evidence-based analyses were reviewed, and outcomes of interest were extracted. Outcomes of interest included hospital utilization, mortality, health-related quality of life, disease-specific measures, and economic analysis measures. Results Eleven analyses were included and summarized. Technologies fell into 3 categories: those with evidence for the cure of chronic disease, those with evidence for the prevention of chronic disease, and those with evidence for the management of chronic disease. Conclusions The impact on patient outcomes and hospitalization rates of new health technologies in chronic disease management is often overlooked. This analysis demonstrates that health technologies can reduce the burden of illness; improve patient

  8. Correlates and management of anaemia of chronic kidney disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anaemia is a common complication of chronic kidney disease. There is paucity of published local and regional data regarding its associated factors and management. Objective: To assess the correlates and management of anaemia in chronic kidney disease. Design: Cross sectional descriptive study

  9. Chronic diseases are not being managed effectively in either high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic diseases are not being managed effectively in either high-risk or low-risk populations in South Africa. M Brand, AJ Woodiwiss, F Michel, HL Booysen, OHI Majane, MJ Maseko, MG Veller, GR Norton ...

  10. Management of patients with chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article deals with these aspects, including follow-up guidelines and management and treatment ... those with ischaemic heart disease also require cardiac review at least once a year. .... doses when fluid losses are high, e.g. sweating in hot environments, ... dried beans, lentils, offal, salmon, chocolate, cola drinks and.

  11. Health information technology: transforming chronic disease management and care transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shaline; Brammer, Craig; McKethan, Aaron; Buntin, Melinda B

    2012-06-01

    Adoption of health information technology (HIT) is a key effort in improving care delivery, reducing costs of health care, and improving the quality of health care. Evidence from electronic health record (EHR) use suggests that HIT will play a significant role in transforming primary care practices and chronic disease management. This article shows that EHRs and HIT can be used effectively to manage chronic diseases, that HIT can facilitate communication and reduce efforts related to transitions in care, and that HIT can improve patient safety by increasing the information available to providers and patients, improving disease management and safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Triumph and tragedy: anemia management in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, James E; Szczech, Lynda A

    2008-11-01

    Recent trial data have resulted in a reevaluation of the management of anemia in chronic kidney disease, including the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, intravenous iron, and novel pharmaceuticals. In this review, we evaluate the latest research on anemia management in chronic kidney disease. Clinical trials of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents indicate that targeting the complete correction of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease results in a greater risk of morbidity and mortality despite improved hemoglobin and quality of life. Conversely, intravenous iron has been found effective and relatively well tolerated in treating anemia in chronic kidney disease, even in patients with elevated ferritin. New agents to manage anemia, including long-acting erythropoietin derivatives, are also in active development. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents should be used to target hemoglobin 11-12 g/dl in patients with chronic kidney disease. Intravenous iron may be beneficial for patients with hemoglobin less than 11 g/dl and transferrin saturation less than 25% despite elevated ferritin (500-1200 ng/ml). An upcoming placebo-controlled trial of darbepoetin should help to define the role of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in chronic kidney disease.

  13. [Chronic disease management: mistaken approach in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veras, Renato Peixoto

    2012-12-01

    Lifestyle changes, including unhealthy eating habits and high rates of physical inactivity and stress, along with an increase in life expectancy have been accompanied by increasing rates of chronic non-communicable diseases. Chronic diseases are the main causes of death and disability in Brazil. Chronic disease management is one of the most important challenges facing health managers who are constantly seeking interventions and strategies to reduce costs and hospital admissions and to prevent other conditions. However, most existing models of health care have focused exclusively on disease, but it is a mistaken approach. An integrated approach is required to effectively meet patient needs. The purpose of this article was to further discuss policies and strategies for the development of new models of care for the elderly with an emphasis on prevention and resolution actions.

  14. Alberta's systems approach to chronic disease management and prevention utilizing the expanded chronic care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delon, Sandra; Mackinnon, Blair

    2009-01-01

    Alberta's integrated approach to chronic disease management programming embraces client-centred care, supports self-management and facilitates care across the continuum. This paper presents strategies implemented through collaboration with primary care to improve care of individuals with chronic conditions, evaluation evidence supporting success and lessons learned from the Alberta perspective.

  15. Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Models in Chronic Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southerland, Janet H; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer; Bednarsh, Helene; Mouton, Charles P

    2016-10-01

    Interprofessional collaboration in health has become essential to providing high-quality care, decreased costs, and improved outcomes. Patient-centered care requires synthesis of all the components of primary and specialty medicine to address patient needs. For individuals living with chronic diseases, this model is even more critical to obtain better health outcomes. Studies have shown shown that oral health and systemic disease are correlated as it relates to disease development and progression. Thus, inclusion of oral health in many of the existing and new collaborative models could result in better management of chronic illnesses and improve overall health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mobile technologies and the holistic management of chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Farhaan; Norris, Tony; Stockdale, Rosemary

    2008-12-01

    Ageing populations and unhealthy lifestyles have led to some chronic conditions such as diabetes and heart disease reaching epidemic proportions in many developed nations. This paper explores the potential of mobile technologies to improve this situation. The pervasive nature of these technologies can contribute holistically across the whole spectrum of chronic care ranging from public information access and awareness, through monitoring and treatment of chronic disease, to support for patient carers. A related study to determine the perceptions of healthcare providers to m-health confirmed the view that attitudes were likely to be more important barriers to progress than technology. A key finding concerned the importance of seamless and integrated m-health processes across the spectrum of chronic disease management.

  17. Disease management for chronic skin cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van der Geer-Rutten (Simone)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is a rapidly rising problem. In this thesis we show that an enormous gap exists between the official first primary figures available at cancer registries and the actual burden in a dermatology practice. NMSC needs to be regarded as a chronic

  18. [The German National Disease Management Guideline "Chronic Heart Failure"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbrenner, S; Langer, T; Scherer, M; Störk, S; Ertl, G; Muth, Ch; Hoppe, U C; Kopp, I; Ollenschläger, G

    2012-02-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is an illness mostly affecting elderly people. In Germany CHF is one of the most common causes of death and at the same time one of the most common diagnosis in inpatient care. Due to the expected increase in life expectancy in the next few years experts predict a further step-up of the incidence. Against this background development of a national guideline on chronic heart failure was prioritised and accordingly the National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) Chronic Heart Failure was developed by a multi- and interdisciplinary group. The guideline group comprised experts from all relevant scientific medical societies as well as a patient expert. The National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) on Chronic Heart Failure aims at supporting patients and health care providers with respect to decisions on a specific health care problem by giving recommendations for actions. Recommendations are informed by the best available scientific evidence on this topic.Patients with CHF often suffer from multiple conditions. Due to this fact and the old age patients do have very complex and demanding health care needs. Thus accounting for co-morbidities is paramount in planning and providing health care for theses patients and communication between doctor and patient but also between all health care providers is crucial.Basic treatment strategies in chronic heart failure comprise management of risk factors and prognostic factors as well as appropriate consideration of co-morbidities accompanied by measures empowering patients in establishing a healthy life style and a self-dependant management of their illness.Psycho-social aspects have a very strong influence on patients' acceptance of the disease and their self-management. In addition they have a strong influence on therapy management of the treating physician thus they have to be addressed adequately during the consultation.The National Disease Management Guideline (NDMG) Chronic Heart Failure (CHF

  19. Self-management education and support in chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Patrick T

    2012-06-01

    With the changing health care environment, prevalence of chronic health conditions, and burgeoning challenges of health literacy, obesity, and homelessness, self-management support provides an opportunity for clinicians to enhance effectiveness and, at the same time, to engage patients to participate in managing their own personal care. This article reviews the differences between patient education and self-management and describes easy-to-use strategies that foster patient self-management and can be used by health care providers in the medical setting. It also highlights the importance of linking patients to nonmedical programs and services in the community. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Open source electronic health records and chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwater, Jason C; Kwon, Nancy J; Nathanson, Ashley; Muckle, Alison E; Brown, Alexa; Cornejo, Kerri

    2014-02-01

    To study and report on the use of open source electronic health records (EHR) to assist with chronic care management within safety net medical settings, such as community health centers (CHC). The study was conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago from April to September 2010. The NORC team undertook a comprehensive environmental scan, including a literature review, a dozen key informant interviews using a semistructured protocol, and a series of site visits to CHC that currently use an open source EHR. Two of the sites chosen by NORC were actively using an open source EHR to assist in the redesign of their care delivery system to support more effective chronic disease management. This included incorporating the chronic care model into an CHC and using the EHR to help facilitate its elements, such as care teams for patients, in addition to maintaining health records on indigent populations, such as tuberculosis status on homeless patients. The ability to modify the open-source EHR to adapt to the CHC environment and leverage the ecosystem of providers and users to assist in this process provided significant advantages in chronic care management. Improvements in diabetes management, controlled hypertension and increases in tuberculosis vaccinations were assisted through the use of these open source systems. The flexibility and adaptability of open source EHR demonstrated its utility and viability in the provision of necessary and needed chronic disease care among populations served by CHC.

  1. Cost Analysis of Chronic Disease Self-Management Programmes Being Delivered in South Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Timothy F.; Palmer, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic disease accounts for the majority of healthcare costs. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) has been shown to be effective in reducing the burden of chronic disease. Objectives: The objective of this study was to measure the cost of delivering the Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) in order to…

  2. REJUVENATING CHRONIC DISEASE MANAGEMENT IN MALAYSIAN PRIVATE GENERAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PITERMAN L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid epidemiological transition globally has witnessed a rising prevalence of major chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, obesity, chronic respiratory diseases and cancers over the past 30 years. In Malaysia, these conditions are commonly managed in primary care and published evidence has consistently shown suboptimal management and poor disease control. This in turn, has led to the massive burden of treating complications in secondary care, burden tothe patients and their families with regards to morbidity and premature death, and burden to the country with regards to premature loss of human capital. The crushing burden and escalating health care costs in managing chronic diseases pose a daunting challenge to our primary care system, as we remain traditionally oriented to care for acute, episodic illnesses. This paper re-examines the current evidence supporting the implementation of Wagner Chronic Care Model in primary careglobally; analyses the barriers of implementation of this model in the Malaysian private general practice through SWOT(strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis; and discusses fundamental solutions needed to bridge the gap to achieve better outcomes.

  3. The Empirical Foundations of Telemedicine Interventions for Chronic Disease Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Gary W.; Smith, Brian R.; Alverson, Dale C.; Antoniotti, Nina; Barsan, William G.; Bashshur, Noura; Brown, Edward M.; Coye, Molly J.; Doarn, Charles R.; Ferguson, Stewart; Grigsby, Jim; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Kvedar, Joseph C.; Linkous, Jonathan; Merrell, Ronald C.; Nesbitt, Thomas; Poropatich, Ronald; Rheuban, Karen S.; Sanders, Jay H.; Watson, Andrew R.; Weinstein, Ronald S.; Yellowlees, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The telemedicine intervention in chronic disease management promises to involve patients in their own care, provides continuous monitoring by their healthcare providers, identifies early symptoms, and responds promptly to exacerbations in their illnesses. This review set out to establish the evidence from the available literature on the impact of telemedicine for the management of three chronic diseases: congestive heart failure, stroke, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. By design, the review focuses on a limited set of representative chronic diseases because of their current and increasing importance relative to their prevalence, associated morbidity, mortality, and cost. Furthermore, these three diseases are amenable to timely interventions and secondary prevention through telemonitoring. The preponderance of evidence from studies using rigorous research methods points to beneficial results from telemonitoring in its various manifestations, albeit with a few exceptions. Generally, the benefits include reductions in use of service: hospital admissions/re-admissions, length of hospital stay, and emergency department visits typically declined. It is important that there often were reductions in mortality. Few studies reported neutral or mixed findings. PMID:24968105

  4. Facebook Groups for the Management of Chronic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Stephanie R; Gallagher, Patrick; Freeman, Becky; Gallagher, Robyn

    2018-01-17

    The use of Facebook groups by health care researchers and professionals for chronic disease management, namely type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease, is in its early stages and challenges are emerging. While Facebook groups offer great potential to deliver health support, research of Facebook groups for chronic disease management remains in its infancy, with robust evidence not yet available. Designing Facebook groups that are acceptable to users, health care researchers as well as health care professionals is a challenge, and there is a poor fit with traditional research and evaluation methods. Key recommendations for future research of Facebook groups for chronic disease management include: (1) iterative content development with input from the target patient population; (2) further understanding of the potential role of group "champions"; (3) ensuring the social media policies of health care institutions allow for real time online communication; and (4) utilizing comprehensive evaluation strategies, including the use of process evaluations. ©Stephanie R Partridge, Patrick Gallagher, Becky Freeman, Robyn Gallagher. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 17.01.2018.

  5. Management of Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Kristensen, Søren Lund; Ahlehoff, Ole

    2016-01-01

    An increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been observed in a range of chronic inflammatory diseases (CID), including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The increased risk of CVDs and reduced life expectancy...... considerable interest in recent years. We briefly summarize the current level of evidence of the association between CIDs and CVD and cardiovascular risk management recommendations. Perspectives of ongoing and planned trials are discussed in consideration of potential ways to improve primary and secondary CVD...

  6. Online Patient Education for Chronic Disease Management: Consumer Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Khin Than; Hassan, Naffisah Mohd; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Probst, Yasmine

    2016-04-01

    Patient education plays an important role in chronic disease management. The aim of this study is to identify patients' preferences in regard to the design features of effective online patient education (OPE) and the benefits. A review of the existing literature was conducted in order to identify the benefits of OPE and its essential design features. These design features were empirically tested by conducting survey with patients and caregivers. Reliability analysis, construct validity and regression analysis were performed for data analysis. The results identified patient-tailored information, interactivity, content credibility, clear presentation of content, use of multimedia and interpretability as the essential design features of online patient education websites for chronic disease management.

  7. German disease management guidelines: surgical therapies for chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindermann, J R; Klotz, S; Rahbar, K; Hoffmeier, A; Drees, G

    2010-02-01

    The German Disease Management Guideline "Chronic Heart Failure" intends to guide physicians working in the field of diagnosis and treatment of heart failure. The guideline provides a tool on the background of evidence based medicine. The following short review wants to give insights into the role of some surgical treatment options to improve heart failure, such as revascularization, ventricular reconstruction and aneurysmectomy, mitral valve reconstruction, ventricular assist devices and heart transplantation. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  8. Management of adynamic bone disease in chronic kidney disease: A brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi K. Sista

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO work group released recommendations in 2006 to define the bone-related pathology associated with chronic kidney disease as renal osteodystrophy. In 2009, KDIGO released revised clinical practice guidelines which redefined systemic disorders of bone and mineral metabolism due to chronic kidney disease as chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorders. Conditions under this overarching term include osteitis fibrosa cystica, osteomalacia, and adynamic bone disease. We aim to provide a brief review of the histopathology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, and diagnostic features of adynamic bone disease, focusing on current trends in the management of this complex bone disorder.

  9. Optimizing chronic disease management mega-analysis: economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    As Ontario's population ages, chronic diseases are becoming increasingly common. There is growing interest in services and care models designed to optimize the management of chronic disease. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness and expected budget impact of interventions in chronic disease cohorts evaluated as part of the Optimizing Chronic Disease Management mega-analysis. Sector-specific costs, disease incidence, and mortality were calculated for each condition using administrative databases from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. Intervention outcomes were based on literature identified in the evidence-based analyses. Quality-of-life and disease prevalence data were obtained from the literature. Analyses were restricted to interventions that showed significant benefit for resource use or mortality from the evidence-based analyses. An Ontario cohort of patients with each chronic disease was constructed and followed over 5 years (2006-2011). A phase-based approach was used to estimate costs across all sectors of the health care system. Utility values identified in the literature and effect estimates for resource use and mortality obtained from the evidence-based analyses were applied to calculate incremental costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Given uncertainty about how many patients would benefit from each intervention, a system-wide budget impact was not determined. Instead, the difference in lifetime cost between an individual-administered intervention and no intervention was presented. Of 70 potential cost-effectiveness analyses, 8 met our inclusion criteria. All were found to result in QALY gains and cost savings compared with usual care. The models were robust to the majority of sensitivity analyses undertaken, but due to structural limitations and time constraints, few sensitivity analyses were conducted. Incremental cost savings per patient who received intervention ranged between $15 per diabetic patient with specialized nursing to

  10. Chronic disease management: improving care for people with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Caroline A; Ackerman, Ilana N; Tropea, Joanne

    2014-02-01

    Chronic disease management (CDM) service models are being developed for many conditions; however, there is limited evidence to support their effectiveness in osteoarthritis (OA). A systematic review was undertaken to examine effectiveness, cost effectiveness and barriers to the use of osteoarthritis-chronic disease management (OA-CDM) service models. Thirteen eligible studies (eight randomised controlled trial (RCTs)) were identified. The majority focussed on delivery system design (n = 9) and/or providing self-management support (SMS) (n = 8). Overall, reported model effectiveness varied, and where positive impacts on process or health outcomes were observed, they were of small to moderate effect. There was no information about cost effectiveness. There is some evidence to support the use of collaborative care/multidisciplinary case management models in primary and community care and evidence-based pathways/standardisation of care in hospital settings. Multiple barriers were identified. Future research should focus on identifying the effective components of multi-faceted interventions and evaluating cost-effectiveness to support clinical and policy decision-making. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Primary immunodeficiency disease: a model for case management of chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Janet; Murphy, Elyse; Riley, Patty

    2010-01-01

    Patient-centered chronic care management is a new model for the management of rare chronic diseases such as primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD). This approach emphasizes helping patients become experts on the management of their disease as informed, involved, and interactive partners in healthcare decisions with providers. Because only a few patients are affected by rare illnesses, these patients are forced to become knowledgeable about their disease and therapies and to seek treatment from a healthcare team, which includes physicians and nurse specialists who are equipped to manage the complexity of the disease and its comorbidities. Importantly, therapy for PIDD can be self-administered at home, which has encouraged the transition toward a proactive stance that is at the heart of patient-centered chronic care management. We discuss the evolution of therapy, the issues with the disease, and challenges with its management within the framework of other chronic disease management programs. Suggestions and rationale to move case management of PIDD forward are presented with the intent that sharing our experiences will improve process and better manage outcomes in this patient population. The patient-centered model for the management of PIDD is applicable to the primary care settings, where nurse case managers assist patients through education, support them and their families, and facilitate access to community resources in an approach, which has been described as "guided care." The model also applies specifically to immunology centers where patients receive treatment or instruction on its self-administration at home. Patient-centered management of PIDD, with its emphasis on full involvement of patients in their treatment, has the potential to improve compliance with treatment, and thus patient outcomes, as well as patients' quality of life. The patient-centered model expands the traditional model of chronic disease management, which relies on evidence

  12. Chronic disease management: it's time for transformational change!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttitt, Sarah C; Alvarez, Richard C

    2007-01-01

    The authors of the lead essay present a compelling case for the development and implementation of a national strategy on chronic disease prevention and management (CDPM). The literature demonstrates that the Chronic Care Model can improve quality and reduce costs. Substantial evidence supports the role of health information technologies such as electronic health records (EHRs) in achieving these goals. However, an interoperable pan-Canadian health infostructure does not exist; funding is required to establish this across the continuum of care. An investment of $350 per capita would provide a robust health technology platform to support a national CDPM strategy. Such an investment would deliver annual benefits of $6-$7.6 billion; this could be leveraged to support national healthcare priorities such as CDPM. EHRs will improve decisions about care, reduce system errors and increase efficiency. They will also improve our ability to measure, assess and manage care. We cannot run a high-performing health system without sound data. This was a key step to enabling progress on wait times management. Leadership is required if a national CDPM strategy is to become reality. The authors made a convincing case for the development of a national strategy; we need to turn their words into actionable events to gain necessary momentum.

  13. [Chronic diseases and precarity: obstacles to management and recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikus, Anne-Claire; Deschamps, Jean-Pierre; Boissonnat, Huguette

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted in the Lorraine region concerning the difficulties encountered in the management of chronic diseases in patients in a situation of precarity based on interviews of the patients concerned and general practitioners. Numerous difficulties as well as several facilitating factors were identified. The elements reported by patients and doctors frequently converged: the importance of living conditions, the frequently pejorative attitudes of doctors, administrative complexities. The doctor-patient relationship is the cornerstone of facilitating factors. Patients attach considerable importance to the relationship of confidence developed with their attending physician. They want their doctor to use simple words and avoid making them feel guilty, allowing them to enter into a real healthcare partnership in which they can actively participate in decisions concerning them. On the basis ofthesefindings, thestudy formulated recommendations for improvement of management, essentially concerning administrative measures of social protection and access to care.

  14. Multidisciplinary strategies in the management of early chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ramírez, Héctor R; Cortés-Sanabria, Laura; Rojas-Campos, Enrique; Hernández-Herrera, Aurora; Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M

    2013-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide epidemic especially in developing countries, with clear deficiencies in identification and treatment. Better care of CKD requires more than only economic resources, utilization of health research in policy-making and health systems changes that produce better outcomes. A multidisciplinary approach may facilitate and improve management of patients from early CKD in the primary health-care setting. This approach is a strategy for improving comprehensive care, initiating and maintaining healthy behaviors, promoting teamwork, eliminating barriers to achieve goals and improving the processes of care. A multidisciplinary intervention may include educational processes guided by health professional, use of self-help groups and the development of a CKD management plan. The complex and fragmented care management of patients with CKD, associated with poor outcome, enhances the importance of implementing a multidisciplinary approach in the management of this disease from the early stages. Multidisciplinary strategies should focus on the needs of patients (to increase their empowerment) and should be adapted to the resources and health systems prevailing in each country; its systematic implementation can help to improve patient care and slow the progression of CKD. Copyright © 2013 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chronic Disease Management Programmes: an adequate response to patients’ needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijken, Mieke; Bekkema, Nienke; Boeckxstaens, Pauline; Schellevis, François G.; De Maeseneer, Jan M.; Groenewegen, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background  Inspired by American examples, several European countries are now developing disease management programmes (DMPs) to improve the quality of care for patients with chronic diseases. Recently, questions have been raised whether the disease management approach is appropriate to respond to patient‐defined needs. Objective  In this article we consider the responsiveness of current European DMPs to patients’ needs defined in terms of multimorbidity, functional and participation problems, and self‐management. Method  Information about existing DMPs was derived from a survey among country‐experts. In addition, we made use of international scientific literature. Results  Most European DMPs do not have a solid answer yet to the problem of multimorbidity. Methods of linking DMPs, building extra modules to deal with the most prevalent comorbidities and integration of case management principles are introduced. Rehabilitation, psychosocial and reintegration support are not included in all DMPs, and the involvement of the social environment of the patient is uncommon. Interventions tailored to the needs of specific social or cultural patient groups are mostly not available. Few DMPs provide access to individualized patient information to strengthen self‐management, including active engagement in decision making. Conclusion  To further improve the responsiveness of DMPs to patients’ needs, we suggest to monitor ‘patient relevant outcomes’ that might be based on the ICF‐model. To address the needs of patients with multimorbidity, we propose a generic comprehensive model, embedded in primary care. A goal‐oriented approach provides the opportunity to prioritize goals that really matter to patients. PMID:22712877

  16. The nursing contribution to chronic disease management: a discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Angus; While, Alison

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the nature of the nursing contribution to chronic disease management (CDM) and identifies a number of key nursing activities within CDM both at the individual patient and care system levels. The activities were identified following a detailed review of the literature (160 reports and studies of nursing practice) relating to three tracer disorders: diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and multiple sclerosis. The paper examines these activities collectively to generate models expressing some of the core functions of nursing within CDM. The paper illustrates some of the changing characteristics of nursing roles within CDM. More fundamentally, the paper questions the position of nursing in relation to the technologies that define CDM systems and proposes four levels of contribution: the nurse as technology; the nurse as technologist; the nurse as system engineer; and the nurse as architect. These different levels reflect distinctions in the nature of the nursing gaze and power relations within the health care workforce. The paper also highlights how nurses are failing to develop the evidence for their practice in CDM. The paper concludes that there is a need for some clear principles to guide clinical practice and encourage innovation in CDM. It is argued that the principles should not be rule-bound but define a distinctive nursing gaze that will position the nursing profession within the health care system and in relation to other professions. The gaze should incorporate the needs of the individual patient and the care system that they inhabit.

  17. Chronic disease management: does the disease affect likelihood of care planning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitry, Agnes I; Roughead, Elizabeth E; Ramsay, Emmae N; Ryan, Philip; Caughey, Gillian E; Esterman, Adrian; Shakib, Sepehr; Gilbert, Andrew L; McDermott, Robyn

    2012-11-01

    To compare the demographic, socioeconomic, and medical characteristics of patients who had a General Practitioner Management Plan (GPMP) with those for patients without GPMP. Cohort study of patients with chronic diseases during the time period 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2008 using the Australian Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA) claims database. Of the 88 128 veterans with chronic diseases included in the study, 23 015 (26%) veterans had a GPMP and 11 089 (13%) had a Team Care Arrangement (TCA). Those with a GPMP had a higher number of comorbidities (P<0.001), and a higher use of services such as health assessment and medicine review (P<0.001) than did those without GPMP. Diabetes was associated with a significantly increased use of GPMP compared with all other chronic diseases except heart failure. GPMPs are used in a minority of patients with chronic diseases. Use is highest in people with diabetes.

  18. Smart garments in chronic disease management: progress and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Ajit

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents the progress made developments in the area of Smart Garments for chronic disease management over last 10 years. A large number of health monitoring smart garments and wearable sensors have been manufactured to monitor patient's physiological parameters such as electrocardiogram, blood pressure, body temperature, heart rate, oxygen saturation, while patient is not in hospital. In last few years with the advancement in smartphones and cloud computing it is now possible to send the measure physiological data to any desired location. However there are many challenges in the development of smart garment systems. The two major challenges are development of new lightweight power sources and there is a need for global standardization and a road map for development of smart garments. In this paper we will discuss current state-of-theart smart garments and wearable sensor systems. Also discussed will be the new emerging trends in smart garment research and development.

  19. [The Utilization of Health-Related Applications in Chronic Disease Self-Management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chi-Wen; Chuang, Hui-Wan; Chen, Ting-Yu

    2017-08-01

    The dramatic increase in smartphone usage has spurred the development of many health-related mobile applications (apps). On the other hand, population aging and the associated rise in the incidence of chronic disease is increasing the demand for long-term care. Effective chronic disease self-management has been shown to help patients improve their health condition. Numerous smartphone applications currently support patient self-management of chronic disease, facilitating health management and health promotion. The purpose of the present article was to introduce the definition, contents, and types of health-related apps; to discuss the effectiveness of self-management health-related apps in promoting chronic disease management; and to assess and evaluate these apps. We hope that the present article helps give to healthcare professionals and patients who are willing to manage their diseases a general understanding of health-related apps and their potential to facilitate the self-management of chronic diseases.

  20. Self-Management Skills in Chronic Disease Management: What Role Does Health Literacy Have?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Laura M; Doody, Catherine; Werner, Erik L; Fullen, Brona

    2016-08-01

    Self-management-based interventions can lead to improved health outcomes in people with chronic diseases, and multiple patient characteristics are associated with the development of self-management behaviors. Low health literacy (HL) has been implicated in poorer self-management behaviors and increased costs to health services. However, the mechanisms behind this relationship remain unclear. Therefore, the aim of the current review is to assess the association between HL and patient characteristics related to self-management behaviors (i.e., disease-related knowledge, beliefs, and self-efficacy). The review comprised 3 phases: 1) database searches, 2) eligibility screening, and 3) study quality assessment and strength of evidence. Inclusion criteria specified that a valid HL screening tool was used, that at least one self-management behavior was assessed, and that patients had a chronic condition. An initial search generated a total of 712 articles, of which 31 studies fulfilled the eligibility criteria. A consistent association was found between low HL and poorer disease-related knowledge in respiratory diseases, diabetes, and multiple disease categories. A significant association between low HL and poorer self-efficacy was reported in cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, human immunodeficiency virus, and multiple disease categories. HL was significantly associated with poorer beliefs in respiratory, musculoskeletal, and cardiovascular diseases. The findings from the current review suggest that low HL may affect behaviors necessary for the development of self-management skills. Given that self-management strategies are core components for effective treatment of a range of chronic diseases, low HL poses a considerable health concern. Further research is needed to understand the mediating influence of HL on disease-related knowledge, self-efficacy, and beliefs. From this, HL-sensitive, self-management interventions ought to be devised and implemented. © The Author

  1. National Study of Chronic Disease Self-Management: Age Comparison of Outcome Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ory, Marcia G.; Smith, Matthew Lee; Ahn, SangNam; Jiang, Luohua; Lorig, Kate; Whitelaw, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The adult population is increasingly experiencing one or more chronic illnesses and living with such conditions longer. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) helps participants cope with chronic disease-related symptomatology and improve their health-related quality of life. Nevertheless, the long-term effectiveness of…

  2. Dyslipidemia in patients with chronic kidney disease: etiology and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikolasevic I

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ivana Mikolasevic,1,2 Marta Žutelija,3 Vojko Mavrinac,1 Lidija Orlic 2 1Department of Gastroenterology, 2Department of Nephrology, Dialysis and Kidney Transplantation, UHC Rijeka, 3School of Medicine, Rijeka, Croatia Abstract: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, including those with end-stage renal disease, treated with dialysis, or renal transplant recipients have an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD morbidity and mortality. Dyslipidemia, often present in this patient population, is an important risk factor for CVD development. Specific quantitative and qualitative changes are seen at different stages of renal impairment and are associated with the degree of glomerular filtration rate declining. Patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD have low high-density lipoproteins (HDL, normal or low total cholesterol (TC and low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol, increased triglycerides as well as increased apolipoprotein B (apoB, lipoprotein(a (Lp (a, intermediate- and very-low-density lipoprotein (IDL, VLDL; “remnant particles”, and small dense LDL particles. In patients with nephrotic syndrome lipid profile is more atherogenic with increased TC, LDL, and triglycerides. Lipid profile in hemodialysis (HD patients is usually similar to that in non-dialysis-dependent CKD patients. Patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD have more altered dyslipidemia compared to HD patients, which is more atherogenic in nature. These differences may be attributed to PD per se but may also be associated with the selection of dialytic modality. In renal transplant recipients, TC, LDL, VLDL, and triglycerides are elevated, whereas HDL is significantly reduced. Many factors can influence post-transplant dyslipidemia including immunosuppressive agents. This patient population is obviously at high risk; hence, prompt diagnosis and management are required to improve their clinical outcomes. Various studies have shown statins to be effective in the

  3. Optimal management of bone mineral disorders in chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Andrew L; Nigwekar, Sagar U

    2016-03-01

    The review summarizes recent studies on chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorders, with a focus on new developments in disease management. The term chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder has come to describe an increasingly complex network of alterations in minerals and skeletal disorders that contribute to the significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen in patients with chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. Clinical studies continue to suggest associations with clinical outcomes, yet current clinical trials have failed to support causality. Variability in practice exists as current guidelines for management of mineral bone disorders are often based on weak evidence. Recent studies implicate novel pathways for therapeutic intervention in clinical trials. Mineral bone disorders in chronic kidney disease arise from alterations in a number of molecules in an increasingly complex physiological network interconnecting bone and the cardiovascular system. Despite extensive associations with improved outcomes in a number of molecules, clinical trials have yet to prove causality and there is an absence of new therapies available to improve patient outcomes. Additional clinical trials that can incorporate the complexity of mineral bone disorders, and with the ability to intervene on more than one pathway, are needed to advance patient care.

  4. The South Australia Health Chronic Disease Self-Management Internet Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorig, Kate; Ritter, Philip L.; Plant, Kathryn; Laurent, Diana D.; Kelly, Pauline; Rowe, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of an online chronic disease self-management program for South Australia residents. Method: Data were collected online at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. The intervention was an asynchronous 6-week chronic disease self-management program offered online. The authors measured eight health status measures,…

  5. Chronic Lyme disease: misconceptions and challenges for patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halperin JJ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available John J HalperinDepartment of Neurosciences, Overlook Medical Center, Summit, NJ, USAAbstract: Lyme disease, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, causes both specific and nonspecific symptoms. In untreated chronic infection, specific manifestations such as a relapsing large-joint oligoarthritis can persist for years, yet subside with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Nervous system involvement occurs in 10%–15% of untreated patients and typically involves lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, and/or mononeuritis multiplex; in some rare cases, patients have parenchymal inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Nervous system infection is similarly highly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, including oral doxycycline. Nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, perceived cognitive slowing, headache, and others occur in patients with Lyme disease and are indistinguishable from comparable symptoms occurring in innumerable other inflammatory states. There is no evidence that these nonspecific symptoms reflect nervous system infection or damage, or that they are in any way specific to or diagnostic of this or other tick-borne infections. When these symptoms occur in patients with Lyme disease, they typically also subside after antimicrobial treatment, although this may take time. Chronic fatigue states have been reported to occur following any number of infections, including Lyme disease. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear, although there is no evidence in any of these infections that these chronic posttreatment symptoms are attributable to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi or any other identified organism. Available appropriately controlled studies indicate that additional or prolonged courses of antimicrobial therapy do not benefit patients with a chronic fatigue-like state after appropriately treated Lyme disease. Keywords: Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, chronic, diagnosis, treatment, chronic

  6. Chronic kidney disease management program in Shahreza, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahimi, Hamid; Aghighi, Mohammad; Aghayani, Katayon; Rahimi Foroushani, Abbas

    2014-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a public health problem that needs an integrated program to be detected, monitored, and controlled. This study reports the results of a CKD program designed and implemented in Shahreza, Iran. After initial evaluation of CKD in Shahreza, a CKD management program was developed in the Ministry of Health and the pilot project was started in February 2011 in Shahreza rural areas. The patients at risk, including those with diabetes mellitus and hypertension, were tested with serum creatinine and urine albumin-creatinine ratio. The CKD management program included training, screening, monitoring, and controlling of weight, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, lipids, and vitamin D. This pilot program was organized in the rural population aged over 30 years who were suffering from hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or both, and resulted in the discovery of cases in various stages of CKD. The prevalence of CKD in this high-risk group was 21.5%. Persistent albuminuria and a glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) were 13% and 11%, respectively. The rate of CKD stages 1, 2, 3a, 3b, 4, and 5 were 2.75%, 6.82%, 10.08%, 0.92%, 0.31%, and 0.17% respectively. After 1 year of the program implemented, incidence rate of CKD was 24% and improvement rate was 21%. In diabetic patients, the mean of hemoglobin A1c decreased from 8.5 ± 1.9% to 7.5% ± 1.8%. Integration of CKD programs in primary health care is possible and results in improvement in management of CKD patients.

  7. The chronic care model versus disease management programs: a transaction cost analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, Jennifer; Mark, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The present article applies transaction cost analysis as a framework for better understanding health plans' decisions to improve chronic illness management by using disease management programs versus redesigning care within physician practices.

  8. Novel combined management approaches to patients with diabetes, chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaak, J

    2017-03-01

    Most patients we care for today suffer from more than one chronic disease, and multimorbidity is a rapidly growing challenge. Concomitant cardiovascular disease, renal dysfunction and diabetes represent a large proportion of all patients in cardiology, nephrology and diabetology. These entities commonly overlap due to their negative effects on vascular function and an accelerated atherosclerosis progression. At the same time, a progressive subspecialisation has caused the cardiologist to treat 'only' the heart, nephrologists 'only' the kidneys and endocrinologists' 'only' diabetes. Studies and guidelines follow the same pattern. This often requires patients to visit specialists for each field, with a risk of both under-diagnosis and under-treatment. From the patient's perspective, there is a great need for coordination and facilitation of the care, not only to reduce disease progression but also to improve quality of life. Person-centred integrated clinics for patients with cardiovascular disease, renal dysfunction and diabetes are a promising approach for complex chronic disease management.

  9. Operating a sustainable disease management program for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endicott, Linda; Corsello, Phillip; Prinzi, Michele; Tinkelman, David G; Schwartz, Abby

    2003-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of our nation's most rapidly growing chronic health conditions. It is estimated that over 16 million individuals are diagnosed with COPD (Friedman & Hilleman, 2001). In addition, another 16 million are misdiagnosed as asthma or not diagnosed at all. COPD is a condition that affects the working-age as well as the elderly. Despite the high mortality rate, COPD is a treatable and modifiable condition. Disease management programs (DMPs) for asthma are a common initiative within many health insurance plans and integrated delivery networks. Similar initiatives are not as common for COPD. This article will highlight the National Jewish Medical and Research Center's COPD DMP interventions and outcomes. To outline interventions and operational strategies critical in developing and operating a sustainable and effective disease management program for COPD. Disease Management is an effective model for managing individuals with COPD. Applying a case management model that includes (1) risk-identification and stratification; (2) education and empowerment regarding self-monitoring and management; (3) lifestyle modification; (4) communication and collaboration amongst patients, healthcare providers, and case managers to enhance the treatment plan; (5) providing after-hours support; and (6) monitoring care outcomes is crucial. Applying these interventions in a credible manner will improve the quality of life and quality of care delivered to individuals with mild, moderate, severe, and very severe COPD. Additionally, these interventions can significantly reduce utilization events.

  10. Dietary management of chronic kidney disease: protein restriction and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goraya, Nimrit; Wesson, Donald E

    2012-11-01

    More kidney protective strategies are needed to reduce the burden of complete kidney failure from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinicians sometimes use protein restriction as kidney protection despite its demonstrated lack of effectiveness in the only large-scale study. Small-scale studies support that dietary acid reduction is kidney-protective, including when done with base-inducing foods like fruits and vegetables. We review these studies in light of current kidney-protective recommendations. Animal models of CKD show that acid-inducing dietary protein exacerbates and base-inducing protein ameliorates nephropathy progression, and that increased intake of acid-inducing but not base-inducing dietary protein exacerbates progression. Clinical studies show that dietary acid reduction with Na-based alkali reduces kidney injury and slows nephropathy progression in patients with CKD and reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR); base-inducing fruits and vegetables reduce kidney injury in patients with reduced GFR; and base-inducing fruits and vegetables improve metabolic acidosis in CKD. Protein type rather than amount might more importantly affect nephropathy progression. Base-inducing foods might be another way to reduce dietary acid, a strategy shown in small studies to slow nephropathy progression. Further studies will determine if CKD patients should be given base-inducing food as part of their management.

  11. Biophysical approach to chronic kidney disease management in older patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Foletti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD and its clinical progression are a critical issue in an aging population. Therefore, strategies aimed at preventing and managing the decline of renal function are warranted. Recent evidence has provided encouraging results for the improvement of renal function achieved through an integrated biophysical approach, but prospective studies on the clinical efficacy of this strategy are still lacking. This was an open-label prospective pilot study to investigate the effect of electromagnetic information transfer through the aqueous system on kidney function of older patients affected by stage 1 or 2 CKD. Patients received biophysical therapy every 3 months over a 1-year period. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR values were calculated using the CKD–Epidemiology Collaboration formula, and were recorded at baseline and at the end of treatment. Overall, 58 patients (mean age 74.8 ± 3.7 years were included in the study. At baseline, mean eGFR was 64.6 ± 15.5 mL/min, and it significantly increased to 69.9 ± 15.8 mL/min after 1 year (+5.2 ± 10 mL/min, p<0.0002. The same trend was observed among men (+5.7 ± 10.2 mL/min, p<0.0064 and women (+4.7 ± 9.9 mL/min, p<0.014. When results were analyzed by sex, no difference was found between the 2 groups. Although further and larger prospective studies are needed, our findings suggest that an integrated biophysical approach may be feasible in the management of older patients with early-stage CKD, to reduce and prevent the decline of renal function due to aging or comorbidities.

  12. Patient education for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalantar-Zadeh K

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kamyar Kalantar-ZadehHarold Simmons Center for Kidney Disease Research and Epidemiology, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of California Irvine’s School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, USAObjectives: This review explores the challenges and solutions in educating patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD to lower serum phosphorus while avoiding protein insufficiency and hypercalcemia.Methods: A literature search including terms “hyperphosphatemia,” “patient education,” “food fatigue,” “hypercalcemia,” and “phosphorus–protein ratio” was undertaken using PubMed.Results: Hyperphosphatemia is a strong predictor of mortality in advanced CKD and is remediated via diet, phosphorus binders, and dialysis. Dietary counseling should encourage the consumption of foods with the least amount of inorganic or absorbable phosphorus, low phosphorus-to-protein ratios, and adequate protein content, and discourage excessive calcium intake in high-risk patients. Emerging educational initiatives include food labeling using a “traffic light” scheme, motivational interviewing techniques, and the Phosphate Education Program – whereby patients no longer have to memorize the phosphorus content of each individual food component, but only a “phosphorus unit” value for a limited number of food groups. Phosphorus binders are associated with a clear survival advantage in CKD patients, overcome the limitations associated with dietary phosphorus restriction, and permit a more flexible approach to achieving normalization of phosphorus levels.Conclusion: Patient education on phosphorus and calcium management can improve concordance and adherence and empower patients to collaborate actively for optimal control of mineral metabolism.Keywords: hyperphosphatemia, renal diet, phosphorus binders, educational programs, food fatigue, concordance

  13. Disease management program for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Kathryn L; Dewan, Naresh; Bloomfield, Hanna E; Grill, Joseph; Schult, Tamara M; Nelson, David B; Kumari, Sarita; Thomas, Mel; Geist, Lois J; Beaner, Caroline; Caldwell, Michael; Niewoehner, Dennis E

    2010-10-01

    The effect of disease management for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is not well established. To determine whether a simplified disease management program reduces hospital admissions and emergency department (ED) visits due to COPD. We performed a randomized, adjudicator-blinded, controlled, 1-year trial at five Veterans Affairs medical centers of 743 patients with severe COPD and one or more of the following during the previous year: hospital admission or ED visit for COPD, chronic home oxygen use, or course of systemic corticosteroids for COPD. Control group patients received usual care. Intervention group patients received a single 1- to 1.5-hour education session, an action plan for self-treatment of exacerbations, and monthly follow-up calls from a case manager. We determined the combined number of COPD-related hospitalizations and ED visits per patient. Secondary outcomes included hospitalizations and ED visits for all causes, respiratory medication use, mortality, and change in Saint George's Respiratory Questionnaire. After 1 year, the mean cumulative frequency of COPD-related hospitalizations and ED visits was 0.82 per patient in usual care and 0.48 per patient in disease management (difference, 0.34; 95% confidence interval, 0.15-0.52; P management reduced hospitalizations for cardiac or pulmonary conditions other than COPD by 49%, hospitalizations for all causes by 28%, and ED visits for all causes by 27% (P management program reduced hospitalizations and ED visits for COPD. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00126776).

  14. National disease management plans for key chronic non-communicable diseases in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, C C

    2002-07-01

    In Singapore, chronic, non-communicable diseases, namely coronary heart disease, stroke and cancer, account for more than 60% of all deaths and a high burden of disability and healthcare expenditure. The burden of these diseases is likely to rise with our rapidly ageing population and changing lifestyles, and will present profound challenges to our healthcare delivery and financing systems over the next 20 to 30 years. The containment and optimal management of these conditions require a strong emphasis on patient education and the development of integrated models of healthcare delivery in place of the present uncoordinated, compartmentalised way of delivering healthcare. To meet these challenges, the Ministry of Health's major thrusts are disease control measures which focus mainly on primary prevention; and disease management, which coordinates the national effort to reduce the incidence of these key diseases and their predisposing factors and to ameliorate their long-term impact by optimising control to reduce mortality, morbidity and complications, and improving functional status through rehabilitation. The key initiatives include restructuring of the public sector healthcare institutions into two clusters, each comprising a network of primary health care polyclinics, regional hospitals and tertiary institutions. The functional integration of these healthcare elements within each cluster under a common senior administrative and professional management, and the development of common clinical IT systems will greatly facilitate the implementation of disease management programmes. Secondly, the Ministry is establishing National Disease Registries in coronary heart disease, cancer, stroke, myopia and kidney failure, which will be valuable sources of clinical and outcomes data. Thirdly, in partnership with expert groups, national committees and professional agencies, the Ministry will produce clinical practice guidelines which will assist doctors and healthcare

  15. An environmental scan of policies in support of chronic disease self-management in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddy, C; Mill, K

    2014-02-01

    The evidence supporting chronic disease self-management warrants further attention. Our aim was to identify existing policies, strategies and frameworks that support self-management initiatives. This descriptive study was conducted as an environmental scan, consisting of an Internet search of government and other publicly available websites, and interviews with jurisdictional representatives identified through the Health Council of Canada and academic networking. We interviewed 16 representatives from all provinces and territories in Canada and found 30 publicly available and relevant provincial and national documents. Most provinces and territories have policies that incorporate aspects of chronic disease self-management. Alberta and British Columbia have the most detailed policies. Both feature primary care prominently and are not disease specific. Both also have provincial level implementation of chronic disease self-management programming. Canada's northern territories all lacked specific policies supporting chronic disease self-management despite a significant burden of disease. Engaging patients in self-management of their chronic diseases is important and effective. Although most provinces and territories have policies that incorporate aspects of chronic disease self-management, they were often embedded within other initiatives and/or policy documents framed around specific diseases or populations. This approach could limit the potential reach and effect of self-management.

  16. The value of personal health records for chronic disease management: what do we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenforde, Mark; Jain, Anil; Hickner, John

    2011-05-01

    Electronic personal health records (PHRs) allow patients access to their medical records, self-management tools, and new avenues of communication with their health care providers. They will likely become a valuable component of the primary care Patient-centered Medical Home model. Primary care physicians, who manage the majority of chronic disease, will use PHRs to help patients manage their diabetes and other chronic diseases requiring continuity of care and enhanced information flow between patient and physician. In this brief report, we explore the evidence for the value of PHRs in chronic disease management. We used a comprehensive review of MEDLINE articles published in English between January 2000 and September 2010 on personal health records and related search terms. Few published articles have described PHR programs designed for use in chronic disease management or PHR adoption and attitudes in the context of chronic disease management. Only three prospective randomized trials have evaluated the benefit of PHR use in chronic disease management, all in diabetes care. These trials showed small improvements in some but not all diabetes care measures. All three trials involved additional interventions, making it difficult to determine the influence of patient PHR use in improved outcomes. The evidence remains sparse to support the value of PHR use for chronic disease management. With the current policy focus on meaningful use of electronic and personal health records, it is crucial to investigate and learn from new PHR products so as to maximize the clinical value of this tool.

  17. Outpatient Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Management: Going for the GOLD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellinger, Christina R; Peters, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States with a burden of $50 billion in direct health care costs. The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) defines airflow obstruction as spirometry where the ratio of forced expiratory volume in the first second to forced vital capacity after bronchodilation is less than 0.70. The guidelines also provided graded recommendations on current therapy for COPD. Treatment can be guided based on severity of disease and severity of symptoms. We review the GOLD guidelines to provide an overview of treatment modalities aimed at improving lung function, reducing hospitalization, and reducing mortality. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Using intervention mapping (IM) to develop a self-management program for employees with a chronic disease in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Josephine Engels; F. van Dijk; Yvonne Heerkens; J. van der Gulden; S. Detaille

    2010-01-01

    Employees with a chronic disease often encounter problems at work because of their chronic disease. The current paper describes the development of a self-management programme based on the Chronic Disease Self-Management programme (CDSMP) of Stanford University to help employees with a chronic

  19. Using intervention mapping (IM) to develop a self-management programme for employees with a chronic disease in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detaille, Sarah I.; van der Gulden, Joost W. J.; Engels, Josephine A.; Heerkens, Yvonne F.; van Dijk, Frank J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Employees with a chronic disease often encounter problems at work because of their chronic disease. The current paper describes the development of a self-management programme based on the Chronic Disease Self-Management programme (CDSMP) of Stanford University to help employees with a chronic

  20. Factors influencing self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disler, R T; Gallagher, R D; Davidson, P M

    2012-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a common, chronic and burdensome condition requiring the individual to engage in a range of self-management strategies. The capacity to engage in self-management is dependent on a range of internal (e.g., personal) and external (e.g., health service) factors. This paper seeks to define self-management, identify the determinants which influence the individual's ability to cope and adjust to living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the community, and identify implications for clinical practice and research. Integrative review. Medline, Embase, PubMed, CINAHL, Google Scholar. Integrative review using prospective research questions. Papers were included in the review if they were published in peer reviewed journals and written in English between 2000 and 2010. Articles were accepted for inclusion if they discussed the determinants that influenced self-management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the community. Confirmation of results and discussion themes was validated by specialists in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and complex care. Self-management is less well characterised in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease compared with other chronic conditions. Functional limitation and the need to balance disease management with everyday life are the two key elements that patients face in managing their condition. Provider characteristics, socioeconomic status and health literacy are sparsely discussed yet are known to influence chronic obstructive pulmonary disease self-management. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease self-management must be a key focus internationally as the disease incidence increases. Collaborative care is required between patients and health providers in order facilitate patients in confident management of their condition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management and Prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, GOLD Executive Summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Hurd, Suzanne S; Agusti, Alvar G

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a global health problem and since 2001 the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) has published its strategy document for the diagnosis and management of COPD. This executive summary presents the main contents of the second 5...

  2. Innovative Approaches in Chronic Disease Management: Health Literacy Solutions and Opportunities for Research Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaire, Michael; Gonzalez, Diana Peña; Johnson, Kirby L

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses the need for innovative health literacy solutions to combat extensive chronic disease prevalence and costs. The authors explore the intersection of chronic disease management and health literacy. They provide specific examples of successful health literacy interventions for managing several highly prevalent chronic diseases. This is followed by suggestions on pairing research and practice to support effective disease management programs. In addition, the authors discuss strategies for collection and dissemination of knowledge gained from collaborations between researchers and practitioners. They identify current challenges specific to disseminating information from the health literacy field and offer potential solutions. The chapter concludes with a brief look at future directions and organizational opportunities to integrate health literacy practices to address the need for effective chronic disease management.

  3. [Management of high blood pressure in patients with chronic kidney disease : Summary of recent guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougardy, J M; Leeman, M

    Chronic kidney disease and high blood pressure are two common diseases that mutually maintain during their evolution. In the advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, most pat ients are hypertensive and show signs of vascular disease (coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular or peripheral). Almost one third of the patients with advanced chronic kidney disease exhibit resistant hypertension that requires complex therapeutic management. In chronic kidney disease, antihypertensive treatment is conditioned by comorbidities, but also by proteinuria, which is an independent cardiovascular risk factor in addition to the rate of glomerular filtration rate. The treatment of high blood pressure is a cornerstone of the management of the chronic kidney disease. It limits the risk of cardiovascular events (eg. myocardial infarction, stroke), but also slows the progression of chronic kidney disease. Various recommendations have been recently published on the subject in order to offer assistance to the therapeutic management of hypertension in the patient suffering from chronic kidney disease. The purpose of this article is to highlight these main key elements.

  4. Alberta Healthy Living Program--a model for successful integration of chronic disease management services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrin, Louise; Britten, Judith; Davachi, Shahnaz; Knight, Holly

    2013-08-01

    The most common presentation of chronic disease is multimorbidity. Disease management strategies are similar across most chronic diseases. Given the prevalence of multimorbidity and the commonality in approaches, fragmented single disease management must be replaced with integrated care of the whole person. The Alberta Healthy Living Program, a community-based chronic disease management program, supports adults with, or at risk for, chronic disease to improve their health and well being. Participants gain confidence and skills in how to manage their chronic disease(s) by learning to understand their health condition, make healthy eating choices, exercise safely and cope emotionally. The program includes 3 service pillars: disease-specific and general health patient education, disease-spanning supervised exercise and Better Choices, Better Health(TM) self-management workshops. Services are delivered in the community by an interprofessional team and can be tailored to target specific diverse and vulnerable populations, such as Aboriginal, ethno-cultural and francophone groups and those experiencing homelessness. Programs may be offered as a partnership between Alberta Health Services, primary care and community organizations. Common standards reduce provincial variation in care, yet maintain sufficient flexibility to meet local and diverse needs and achieve equity in care. The model has been implemented successfully in 108 communities across Alberta. This approach is associated with reduced acute care utilization and improved clinical indicators, and achieves efficiencies through an integrated, disease-spanning patient-centred approach. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Using Social Network Analysis to Examine the Effect of Care Management Structure on Chronic Disease Management Communication Within Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Ruland, Sandra; Diaz, Stephanie; Morrato, Elaine H; Jones, Eric

    2018-05-01

    Care management and care managers are becoming increasingly prevalent in primary care medical practice as a means of improving population health and reducing unnecessary care. Care managers are often involved in chronic disease management and associated transitional care. In this study, we examined the communication regarding chronic disease care within 24 primary care practices in Michigan and Colorado. We sought to answer the following questions: Do care managers play a key role in chronic disease management in the practice? Does the prominence of the care manager's connectivity within the practice's communication network vary by the type of care management structure implemented? Individual written surveys were given to all practice members in the participating practices. Survey questions assessed demographics as well as practice culture, quality improvement, care management activities, and communication regarding chronic disease care. Using social network analysis and other statistical methods, we analyzed the communication dynamics related to chronic disease care for each practice. The structure of chronic disease communication varies greatly from practice to practice. Care managers who were embedded in the practice or co-located were more likely to be in the core of the communication network than were off-site care managers. These care managers also had higher in-degree centrality, indicating that they acted as a hub for communication with team members in many other roles. Social network analysis provided a useful means of examining chronic disease communication in practice, and highlighted the central role of care managers in this communication when their role structure supported such communication. Structuring care managers as embedded team members within the practice has important implications for their role in chronic disease communication within primary care.

  6. Formoterol in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paschalis Steiropoulos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Paschalis Steiropoulos, Argyris Tzouvelekis, Demosthenes BourosDepartment of Pneumonology, University Hospital of Alexandroupolis, GreeceAbstract: Bronchodilators represent the hallmark of symptomatic treatment of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD. There are four categories of bronchodilators: anticholinergics, methylxanthines, short-acting β2-agonists, and long-acting β2-agonists such as formoterol. Significant research has been performed to investigate the efficacy, safety and tolerability of formoterol in the therapeutic field of COPD. Formoterol exhibits a rapid onset of bronchodilation similar to that observed with salbutamol, yet its long bronchodilatory duration is comparable to salmeterol. In addition, formoterol presents with a clear superiority in lung function improvement compared with either ipratropium bromide or oral theophylline, while its efficacy improves when administered in combination with ipratropium. Formoterol has been shown to better reduce dynamic hyperinflation, which is responsible for exercise intolerance and dyspnea in COPD patients, compared with other bronchodilators, whereas it exerts synergistic effect with tiotropium. Moreover, formoterol reduces exacerbations, increases days free of use of rescue medication and improves patients’ quality of life and disease symptoms. Formoterol has a favorable safety profile and is better tolerated than theophylline. Collectively, data extracted from multicenter clinical trials support formoterol as a valid therapeutic option in the treatment of COPD.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, formoterol, long-acting β2-agonists

  7. Obesity as a chronic disease: modern medical and lifestyle management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippe, J M; Crossley, S; Ringer, R

    1998-10-01

    The United States is in the midst of an epidemic of obesity involving more than one third of the adult population. The prevalence of obesity increased by 40% between 1980 and 1990. Obesity is a chronic disease with a multifactorial etiology including genetics, environment, metabolism, lifestyle, and behavioral components. A chronic disease treatment model involving both lifestyle interventions and, when appropriate, additional medical therapies delivered by an interdisciplinary team including physicians, dietitians, exercise specialists, and behavior therapists offers the best chance for effective obesity treatment. Lifestyle factors such as proper nutrition, regular physical activity, and changes in eating behaviors should be coordinated by this team. This review addresses the modern epidemic of obesity, the strong association between obesity and comorbidities such as coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. In addition to obesity, the health risks of abdominal obesity and adult weight gain are discussed. The evidence that supports health benefits from modest weight loss (between 5% and 10% of body weight) is evaluated and the 5 key principles of effective obesity therapy are put forward. Obesity is a therapeutic challenge best met by teams of health care professionals, including dietitians and physicians, working together to deliver optimal treatment.

  8. Nutritional management and growth in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Lesley; Jones, Helen

    2013-04-01

    Despite continuing improvements in our understanding of the causes of poor growth in chronic kidney disease, many unanswered questions remain: why do some patients maintain a good appetite whereas others have profound anorexia at a similar level of renal function? Why do some, but not all, patients respond to increased nutritional intake? Is feed delivery by gastrostomy superior to oral and nasogastric routes? Do children who are no longer in the 'infancy' stage of growth benefit from enteral feeding? Do patients with protein energy wasting benefit from increased nutritional input? How do we prevent obesity, which is becoming so prevalent in the developed world? This review will address these issues.

  9. Capitated chronic disease management programs: a new market for pharmaceutical companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, D G

    1995-01-01

    With corporatism of the medical care delivery system, the pharmaceutical industry is searching for new ways to market prescription drug product lines. A new strategy focuses on developing chronic disease management programs. In doing so, pharmaceutical companies work with clinical leaders of HMOs or large physician groups on disease management guidelines to reduce practice pattern variations and improve the quality of patient care. In addition, pharmaceutical companies capitate payment to physicians treating chronic disease patients to give them financial incentives to comply with the disease management guidelines.

  10. Modeling a Mobile Health Management Business Model for Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ying-Li; Chang, Polun

    2016-01-01

    In these decades, chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a global public health problem. Information technology (IT) tools have been used widely to empower the patients with chronic disease (e.g., diabetes and hypertension). It is also a potential application to advance the CKD care. In this project, we analyzed the requirements of a mobile health management system for healthcare workers, patients and their families to design a health management business model for CKD patients.

  11. Challenges in the management of chronic noncommunicable diseases by Indonesian community pharmacists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitasari, Hanni P.; Aslani, Parisa; Krass, Ines

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We explored factors influencing Indonesian primary care pharmacists’ practice in chronic noncommunicable disease management and proposed a model illustrating relationships among factors. Methods: We conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews with pharmacists working in community health centers (Puskesmas, n=5) and community pharmacies (apotek, n=15) in East Java Province. We interviewed participating pharmacists using Bahasa Indonesia to explore facilitators and barriers to their practice in chronic disease management. We audiorecorded all interviews, transcribed ad verbatim, translated into English and analyzed the data using an approach informed by “grounded-theory”. Results: We extracted five emergent themes/factors: pharmacists’ attitudes, Puskesmas/apotek environment, pharmacy education, pharmacy professional associations, and the government. Respondents believed that primary care pharmacists have limited roles in chronic disease management. An unfavourable working environment and perceptions of pharmacists’ inadequate knowledge and skills were reported by many as barriers to pharmacy practice. Limited professional standards, guidelines, leadership and government regulations coupled with low expectations of pharmacists among patients and doctors also contributed to their lack of involvement in chronic disease management. We present the interplay of these factors in our model. Conclusion: Pharmacists’ attitudes, knowledge, skills and their working environment appeared to influence pharmacists’ contribution in chronic disease management. To develop pharmacists’ involvement in chronic disease management, support from pharmacy educators, pharmacy owners, professional associations, the government and other stakeholders is required. Our findings highlight a need for systematic coordination between pharmacists and stakeholders to improve primary care pharmacists’ practice in Indonesia to achieve continuity of care. PMID:26445618

  12. Leveraging electronic health records to support chronic disease management: the need for temporal data views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Lipika; Wright, Adam; Wong, Bang T; Linder, Jeffrey A; Bates, David W

    2011-01-01

    The ageing population worldwide is increasingly acquiring multiple chronic diseases. The complex management of chronic diseases could be improved with electronic health records (EHRs) tailored to chronic disease care, but most EHRs in use today do not adequately support longitudinal data management. A key aspect of chronic disease management is that it takes place over long periods, but the way that most EHRs display longitudinal data makes it difficult to trend changes over time and slows providers as they review each patient's unique course. We present five clinical scenarios illustrating longitudinal data needs in complex chronic disease management. These scenarios may function as example cases for software development. For each scenario, we describe and illustrate improvements in temporal data views. Two potential solutions are visualisation for numerical data and disease-oriented text summaries for non-numerical data. We believe that development and widespread implementation of improved temporal data views in EHRs will improve the efficiency and quality of chronic disease management in primary care.

  13. Disease management projects and the Chronic CareModel in action: Baseline qualitative research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J. Hipple Walters (Bethany); S.A. Adams (Samantha); A.P. Nieboer (Anna); R.A. Bal (Roland)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Disease management programs, especially those based on the Chronic Care Model (CCM),are increasingly common in the Netherlands. While disease management programs have beenwell-researched quantitatively and economically, less qualitative research has been done. Theoverall aim

  14. Operationalizing Surveillance of Chronic Disease Self-Management and Self-Management Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Teresa J; Sacks, Jeffrey J; Terrillion, Albert J; Colligan, Erin M

    2018-04-05

    Sixty percent of US adults have at least one chronic condition, and more than 40% have multiple conditions. Self-management (SM) by the individual, along with self-management support (SMS) by others, are nonpharmacological interventions with few side effects that are critical to optimal chronic disease control. Ruiz and colleagues laid the conceptual groundwork for surveillance of SM/SMS at 5 socio-ecological levels (individual, health system, community, policy, and media). We extend that work by proposing operationalized indicators at each socio-ecologic level and suggest that the indicators be embedded in existing surveillance systems at national, state, and local levels. Without a robust measurement system at the population level, we will not know how far we have to go or how far we have come in making SM and SMS a reality. The data can also be used to facilitate planning and service delivery strategies, monitor temporal changes, and stimulate SM/SMS-related research.

  15. Psychometric evaluation of a new instrument to measure disease self-management of the early stage chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiu-Chu; Wu, Chia-Chen; Wu, Li-Min; Chen, Hsing-Mei; Chang, Shu-Chen

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to develop a valid and reliable chronic kidney disease self-management instrument (CKD-SM) for assessing early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours. Enhancing early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management plays a key role in delaying the progression of chronic kidney disease. Healthcare provider understanding of early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours can help develop effective interventions. A valid and reliable instrument for measuring chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours is needed. A cross-sectional descriptive study collected data for principal components analysis with oblique rotation. Mandarin- or Taiwanese-speaking adults with chronic kidney disease (n=252) from two medical centres and one regional hospital in Southern Taiwan completed the CKD-SM. Construct validity was evaluated by exploratory factor analysis. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were estimated by Cronbach's alpha and Pearson correlation coefficients. Four factors were extracted and labelled self-integration, problem-solving, seeking social support and adherence to recommended regimen. The four factors accounted for 60.51% of the total variance. Each factor showed acceptable internal reliability with Cronbach's alpha from 0.77-0.92. The test-retest correlations for the CKD-SM was 0.72. The psychometric quality of the CKD-SM instrument was satisfactory. Research to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis to further validate this new instrument's construct validity is recommended. The CKD-SM instrument is useful for clinicians who wish to identify the problems with self-management among chronic kidney disease patients early. Self-management assessment will be helpful to develop intervention tailored to the needs of the chronic kidney disease population. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Effect Evaluation of a Self-Management Program for Dutch Workers with a Chronic Somatic Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank van Dijk; Josephine Engels; Sarah Detaille; Yvonne Heerkens; Joost van der Gulden

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of a Self-Management Program for workers with a chronic disease. This program is based on the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program of Stanford University, modified for workers with a chronic somatic disease. Methods: In a

  17. Using intervention mapping (IM) to develop a self-management programme for employees with a chronic disease in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detaille, S.I.; van der Gulden, J.W.J.; Engels, J.A.; Heerkens, Y.F.; van Dijk, F.J.H.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Employees with a chronic disease often encounter problems at work because of their chronic disease. The current paper describes the development of a self-management programme based on the Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) of Stanford University to help employees

  18. Using intervention mapping (IM) to develop a self-management programme for employees with a chronic disease in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detaille, S.I.; Gulden, J.W.J. van der; Engels, J.A.; Heerkens, Y.H.; Dijk, F.J. van

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Employees with a chronic disease often encounter problems at work because of their chronic disease. The current paper describes the development of a self-management programme based on the Chronic Disease Self-Management programme (CDSMP) of Stanford University to help employees with a

  19. Managing chronic diseases in the malaysian primary health care - a need for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, As; Taher, Sw

    2008-01-01

    Chronic diseases are the major cause of death and disability in Malaysia, accounted for 71% of all deaths and 69% of the total burden of disease. The WHO in its report Preventing Chronic Disease: A Vital Investment has highlighted the inaction of most governments of the low and middle income countries in tackling the problem urgently, is clear and unacceptable. The acute care paradigm is no longer adequate for the changing pattern of diseases in today's and tomorrow's world. An evolution of primary health care system beyond the acute care model to embrace the concept of caring for long term health problems is imperative in the wake of the rising epidemic of chronic diseases and its crushing burden resulting in escalating healthcare costs. Compelling evidence from around the world showed that there are innovative and cost-effective community-based interventions to reduce the morbidity and mortality attributable to chronic diseases, but these are rarely translated into high quality population-wide chronic disease care. This paper describes the current situation of chronic disease management in the Malaysian primary care setting - to highlight the need for change, discuss the barriers to the implementation of effective chronic disease management programmes in the community, and consider fundamental solutions needed to instigate the change in our setting.

  20. MANAGING CHRONIC DISEASES IN THE MALAYSIAN PRIMARY HEALTH CARE – A NEED FOR CHANGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAHER SW

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases are the major cause of death and disability in Malaysia, accounted for 71% of all deaths and 69% of the total burden of disease. The WHO in its report Preventing Chronic Disease: A Vital Investment has highlighted the inaction of most governments of the low and middle income countries in tackling the problem urgently, is clear and unacceptable. The acute care paradigm is no longer adequate for the changing pattern of diseases in today’s and tomorrow’s world. An evolution of primary health care system beyond the acute care model to embrace the concept of caring for long term health problems is imperative in the wake of the rising epidemic of chronic diseases and its crushing burden resulting in escalating healthcare costs. Compelling evidence from around the world showed that there are innovative and cost-effective community-based interventions to reduce the morbidity and mortality attributable to chronic diseases, but these are rarely translated into high quality population-wide chronic disease care. This paper describes the current situation of chronic disease management in the Malaysian primary care setting - to highlight the need for change, discuss the barriers to the implementation of effective chronic disease management programmes in the community, and consider fundamental solutions needed to instigate the change in our setting.

  1. Attrition in Chronic Disease Self-Management Programs and Self-Efficacy at Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verevkina, Nina; Shi, Yunfeng; Fuentes-Caceres, Veronica Alejandra; Scanlon, Dennis Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Among other goals, the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) is designed to improve self-efficacy of the chronically ill. However, a substantial proportion of the enrollees often leave CDSMPs before completing the program curriculum. This study examines factors associated with program attrition in a CDSMP implemented in a community…

  2. IGEA--a chronic disease management project for people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggini, Marina

    2009-01-01

    Chronic diseases can be prevented and controlled using available knowledge. Moreover, the solutions are not only effective but can be highly cost-effective. Chronic care model and disease management have emerged, in the last decades, as new models of care delivery. The two models share the objective of improving the quality of care for people with chronic diseases while optimizing health care expenditure. In Italy, within the National Prevention Plan, the Italian Centre for Disease Prevention and Control of the Ministry of Health, and the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS) are developing the IGEA project, which defines a comprehensive strategy for implementing a chronic disease management intervention for people with diabetes.

  3. Plant Polyphenolic Antioxidants in Management of Chronic Degenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Das

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available With the over growing global population, degenerative diseases are on rise, despite using modern medicine for its cure. People prefer alternative systems of medicine like natural therapy and polyherbal therapy due to adverse effects of allopathic medication. According to W.H.O. report about 70% of world population relying on natural plant-based therapy. For a suitable, sustainable and cost effective cure use of polyphenolic natural antioxidants may be an appropriate tool. Now a day’s most food and pharmaceutical products contain synthetic antioxidants. But recent data indicating that, long term use of synthetic antioxidants could have carcinogenic effects on human cells. Thus, search for new natural and efficient antioxidants is need of the hour. Phenolic compounds (polyphenols are products of secondary metabolites and constitute one of the most widely distributed groups of substance in plant kingdom with more than 10,000 phenolic structures. Polyphenols are structurally characterized by the presence of one or more aromatic benzene ring compounds with one or more functional hydroxyl groups. Polyphenols are naturally occurring and most abundant antioxidants in human diets found largely in the fruits, vegetables and beverages. Plant flavonoids are the largest and best studied class of polyphenols which include more than 4000 compounds. Numerous studies confirm that, flavonoids exert a protective action on human health and are key components of a healthy and balanced diet. Epidemiological studies and associated meta-analysis correlate and strongly   suggest that, long term consumption of diets rich in plant flavonoids offer protection against development of chronic and degenerative diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases , diabetes , cancer, osteoporosis and neurodegenerative diseases. One of the main reasons for the age related diseases is linked with reduction in cellular oxidative stress. The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS in

  4. Unravelling the Tensions Between Chronic Disease Management and End-of-Life Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Sally; Roberts, Della; Sawatzky, Richard

    2016-01-01

    An increasing appreciation for the burden that chronic conditions represent for people and for societies has triggered an evolving body of popular and professional conceptualizations of the nature of the chronic disease challenge. In this discussion article, we trace the trajectory of thinking about chronic illness care, surfacing underlying assumptions and drivers that have shaped current dominant models of service delivery. We note significant gaps in these conceptualizations, especially with respect to the reality that many chronic conditions are life limiting. Contrasting chronic disease theorizing with the conversations that have arisen around end-of-life care for other kinds of health conditions, we argue for a shift in our thinking to accommodate the implications of life limitation in our service delivery planning. We see significant leadership potential in optimizing the role nurses can play across the chronic disease trajectory by integrating the healthy optimism of self-care management with the profound compassion of a person-centered palliative approach.

  5. Early chronic kidney disease: diagnosis, management and models of care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Olivier J.; O'Donoghue, Donal J.; Ritchie, James; Kanavos, Panos G.; Narva, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a prevalent condition in many countries, and it is estimated that over $1 trillion is spent globally on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) care. There is a clear clinical and economic rationale for designing timely and appropriate health system responses to limit progression from CKD to ESRD. This article reviews the gaps in our knowledge about which early CKD interventions are appropriate, the optimal time to intervene, and what model of care to adopt. The available diagnostic tests exhibit key limitations. Clinical care may improve if early-stage (1–3) CKD with risk for progression towards ESRD is differentiated from early CKD that is unlikely to advance. It is possible that CKD should be re-conceptualized as a part of primary care. Additional research is needed to better understand the risk factors for CKD progression. Systems modelling can be used to evaluate the impact of different care models on CKD outcomes and costs. The US Indian Health Service experience has demonstrated that an integrated, system-wide approach, even in an underfunded system, can produce significant benefits. PMID:26055354

  6. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management, and prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: GOLD executive summary.

    OpenAIRE

    Rabe, K.F.; Hurd, S.; Anzueto, A.; Barnes, P.J.; Buist, S.A.; Calverley, P.; Fukuchi, Y.; Jenkins, C.; Rodriguez-Roisin, R.; Weel, C. van; Zielinski, J.

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains a major public health problem. It is the fourth leading cause of chronic morbidity and mortality in the United States, and is projected to rank fifth in 2020 in burden of disease worldwide, according to a study published by the World Bank/World Health Organization. Yet, COPD remains relatively unknown or ignored by the public as well as public health and government officials. In 1998, in an effort to bring more attention to COPD, its manage...

  7. Using online health communication to manage chronic sorrow: mothers of children with rare diseases speak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Adriana D

    2015-01-01

    Families affected by rare disease experience psychosocial reactions similar to families with prevalent chronic diseases. The ability to respond and manage the condition depends on psychosocial factors. This phenomenological study of 16 mothers of children with Alagille syndrome explored their lived experience in using online health communications to manage their chronic sorrow. Data consisted of semi-structured interviews analyzed using techniques described by van Manen. Analysis yielded four essential themes: connectedness, online triggers, empowerment, and seasons of online use contributed to online communication essential to a rare disease community. Findings suggest mothers need emotional support and help accessing appropriate online resources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Inventory and perspectives of chronic disease management programs in Switzerland: an exploratory survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Peytremann-Bridevaux

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe chronic disease management programs active in Switzerland in 2007, using an exploratory survey. Methods: We searched the internet (Swiss official websites and Swiss web-pages, using Google, a medical electronic database (Medline, reference lists of pertinent articles, and contacted key informants. Programs met our operational definition of chronic disease management if their interventions targeted a chronic disease, included a multidisciplinary team (≥2 healthcare professionals, lasted at least six months, and had already been implemented and were active in December 2007. We developed an extraction grid and collected data pertaining to eight domains (patient population, intervention recipient, intervention content, delivery personnel, method of communication, intensity and complexity, environment, clinical outcomes. Results: We identified seven programs fulfilling our operational definition of chronic disease management. Programs targeted patients with diabetes, hypertension, heart failure, obesity, psychosis and breast cancer. Interventions were multifaceted; all included education and half considered planned follow-ups. The recipients of the interventions were patients, and healthcare professionals involved were physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists and case managers of various backgrounds. Conclusions: In Switzerland, a country with universal healthcare insurance coverage and little incentive to develop new healthcare strategies, chronic disease management programs are scarce. For future developments, appropriate evaluations of existing programs, involvement of all healthcare stakeholders, strong leadership and political will are, at least, desirable.

  9. 78 FR 13376 - Chronic Wasting Disease Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Shenandoah National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... and experience from management actions; and minimize the potential for health and safety issues for...] Chronic Wasting Disease Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Shenandoah National Park AGENCY... National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Council on Environmental Quality regulations, the...

  10. Disease management for chronically ill beneficiaries in traditional Medicare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, David M; Kapp, Mary C; Johnson, Lorraine B; Magno, Linda M

    2009-01-01

    We summarize the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' (CMS's) experience with disease management (DM) in fee-for-service Medicare. Since 1999, the CMS has conducted seven DM demonstrations involving some 300,000 beneficiaries in thirty-five programs. Programs include provider-based, third-party, and hybrid models. Reducing costs sufficient to cover program fees has proved particularly challenging. Final evaluations on twenty programs found three with evidence of quality improvement at or near budget-neutrality, net of fees. Interim monitoring covering at least twenty-one months on the remaining fifteen programs suggests that four are close to covering their fees. Characteristics of the traditional Medicare program present a challenge to these DM models.

  11. Impact of an occupation-based self-management programme on chronic disease management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, Lynn

    2013-02-01

    There is a need for the development and evaluation of occupational therapy interventions enabling participation and contributing to self-management for individuals with multiple chronic conditions. This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility and potential impact of an occupation-based self-management programme for community living individuals with multiple chronic conditions.

  12. Mapping publication status and exploring hotspots in a research field: chronic disease self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Li, Zheng; Arthur, David

    2014-08-01

    To provide insight into the characteristics of chronic disease self-management by mapping publication status and exploring hotspots. Chronic disease is becoming a major public health issue worldwide, highlighting the importance of self-management in this area. Despite the volume and variety of publications, little is known about how 'chronic disease self-management' has developed, since the first publication 40 years ago. Such is the number of publications in the area, that there is a need for a systematic bibliographic examination to enable clinicians and researchers to navigate this literature. A bibliometric analysis of publications was used. Publication status was achieved using BICOMB software, whereas hotspots were identified with Ucinet software. A search of PubMed was conducted for papers published between 1971-2012. By 2011, the number of publications reached 696, a fourfold increase from the previous 10 years, of which 75% came from the USA and UK. There were 1284 journals, which published chronic disease self-management research, involving various disciplines. The research hotspots highlighted various self-management strategies for the following: diabetes; cardiac vascular and pulmonary chronic disease; pain relief for neoplasms; and obesity. Psychological adjustment was a permeating theme in self-management processes as was using internet-based interventions. Self-management in chronic disease publication has been most evident in developed countries. The bibliographic mapping and identification of publication hotspots provides scholars and practitioners with key target journals, as well as a rigorous overview of the field for use in further research, evidence-based practice and health policy development. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. managing hiv as a chronic disease: using interactive data collection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    2004-11-02

    Nov 2, 2004 ... Clinical Director, Reproductive Health Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg ... In the Chronic Care Model described by Ed Wagner,11 this interaction can be ... pharmacists re-enter demographic.

  14. Approaches to daily body condition management in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Terue

    2016-11-01

    To clarify the characteristics of sub-groups of patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease having similar approaches to daily body condition management. Prior literature has shed light on the experience of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and revealed that these patients engage in many activities and try different things in their daily lives to regulate and manage their body condition. The research so far has all been qualitative, comprising mostly interviews, and no quantitative studies have been performed. In this study, cluster analysis was used to show that subgroups of patients with similar characteristics undertake similar approaches to body condition management. Descriptive, correlational study. Invitations to participate in the survey were extended to patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Cluster analysis was performed on the basis of questionnaire scores relating to nine different categories of daily body condition management actions. The characteristics of the body condition management approaches, in each subgroup, were investigated using analysis of variance and multiple comparisons. The cluster analysis produced six subgroups, each defined by the effort expended as part of their body condition management. The subgroups also differed depending on patient age and disease severity. Body condition management approaches taken by patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are overall, comprehensive approaches. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were subgrouped based on their engagement in body conditioning. Relationships between the subgroups and the engagement in body conditioning, age and shortness of breath severity were observed. The care of patient support should be comprehensive and depend on their age and the duration of the disease. In addition, it should be long term and recognise that the patients are living their own respective lives. Such considerations and

  15. Challenges in the management of chronic noncommunicable diseases by Indonesian community pharmacists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puspitasari HP

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We explored factors influencing Indonesian primary care pharmacists’ practice in chronic noncommunicable disease management and proposed a model illustrating relationships among factors. Methods: We conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews with pharmacists working in community health centers (Puskesmas, n=5 and community pharmacies (apotek, n=15 in East Java Province. We interviewed participating pharmacists using Bahasa Indonesia to explore facilitators and barriers to their practice in chronic disease management. We audiorecorded all interviews, transcribed ad verbatim, translated into English and analyzed the data using an approach informed by “grounded-theory”. Results: We extracted five emergent themes/factors: pharmacists’ attitudes, Puskesmas/apotek environment, pharmacy education, pharmacy professional associations, and the government. Respondents believed that primary care pharmacists have limited roles in chronic disease management. An unfavourable working environment and perceptions of pharmacists’ inadequate knowledge and skills were reported by many as barriers to pharmacy practice. Limited professional standards, guidelines, leadership and government regulations coupled with low expectations of pharmacists among patients and doctors also contributed to their lack of involvement in chronic disease management. We present the interplay of these factors in our model. Conclusion: Pharmacists’ attitudes, knowledge, skills and their working environment appeared to influence pharmacists’ contribution in chronic disease management. To develop pharmacists’ involvement in chronic disease management, support from pharmacy educators, pharmacy owners, professional associations, the government and other stakeholders is required. Our findings highlight a need for systematic coordination between pharmacists and stakeholders to improve primary care pharmacists’ practice in Indonesia to achieve continuity of care.

  16. Self-management interventions for chronic disease: a systematic scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Julie; Loyola-Sanchez, Adalberto; Sinclair, Susanne; Harris, Jocelyn; Letts, Lori; MacIntyre, Norma J; Wilkins, Seanne; Burgos-Martinez, Gabriela; Wishart, Laurie; McBay, Cathy; Martin Ginis, Kathleen

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the contributions of physiotherapy and occupational therapy to self-management interventions and the theoretical models used to support these interventions in chronic disease. We conducted two literature searches to identify studies that evaluated self-management interventions involving physiotherapists and occupational therapists in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, EMBASE, AMED (Allied and Complementary Medicine), SPORTdiscus, and REHABDATA databases. Four investigator pairs screened article title and abstract, then full text with inclusion criteria. Selected articles (n = 57) included adults who received a chronic disease self-management intervention, developed or delivered by a physiotherapist and/or an occupational therapist compared with a control group. Four pairs of investigators performed independent reviews of each article and data extraction included: (a) participant characteristics, (b) the self-management intervention, (c) the comparison intervention, (d) outcome measures, construct measured and results. A total of 47 articles reported the involvement of physiotherapy in self-management compared with 10 occupational therapy articles. The type of chronic condition produced different yields: arthritis n = 21 articles; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic pain n = 9 articles each. The theoretical frameworks most frequently cited were social cognitive theory and self-efficacy theory. Physical activity was the predominant focus of the self-management interventions. Physiotherapy programmes included disease-specific education, fatigue, posture, and pain management, while occupational therapists concentrated on joint protection, fatigue, and stress management. Physiotherapists and occupational therapists make moderate contributions to self-management interventions. Most of these interventions are disease-specific and are most frequently based on the principles of behaviour change theories. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. [Psychiatric case management. Chronic Disease Management application experience in a public Mental Health Service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Enrico; Silvestrini, Cristiana; Nicolò, Giuseppe; Pitino, Annalisa; Bernabei, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Aim of this study is to investigate the possible effectiveness of a specific program management needs of patients at high impact health care, case management (CM). The welfare impact is evaluated in terms of the severity of the presented disorder or to other characteristic factors of the individual patient, such as: adherence to the proposed treatments, possible resistance to drug treatment, cognitive structure, the presence of comorbid medical pathologies, abuse/addiction and, more generally, all bio-psycho-social functioning variables that can complicate the treatment of the patient. Twenty five outpatients with chronic schizophrenia (age mean 49,5 yrs) were evaluated through the Camberwell Assessment of Need (CAN20) and Life Skill Profile (LSP) before and after 1 year of CM treatment. General psychopathology was assessed by the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). Demographic data were collected, as well as data related to the severity of the disorder: number of hospitalizations and number of switch in drug treatment in the year before the study. Between T0 and T1 there is a significant improvement on CGI-G, BPRS (total and HOST factor), LSP and CAN TOT in patients treated with CM. Moreover, in CM treated patients a 58% reduction of hospitalizations is noted in the year of study. There is a possible effectiveness of CM in improving patient's clinical and social needs in chronic psychiatric diseases. The CM reduces the number of hospitalizations.

  18. Enhancing chronic disease management: a review of key issues and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willison, Kevin D; Williams, Paul; Andrews, Gavin J

    2007-11-01

    This paper highlights three selected issues and potential strategies towards meeting chronic disease management needs. First, the orientation of the biomedical science model often gives insufficient attention to chronic health care needs. A second issue is that the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) may offer for some an opportunity to enhance their chronic disease management efforts. A third issue is that our understanding of this potential is limited, as many who use CAM do not disclose such use. With reference to proposed solutions/strategies, first, an improved focus to respect patient/client values and goals may encourage people to disclose their use of CAM. Second, a community-based participatory approach shows promise in enhancing communication plus helps integrate CAM within new models of chronic disease management. Lastly, those in public health could help facilitate such an approach plus be a monitor of CAM practices. Overall, this review provides a springboard for further research and practice in CAM and the management of chronic diseases.

  19. Remote patient management: technology-enabled innovation and evolving business models for chronic disease care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coye, Molly Joel; Haselkorn, Ateret; DeMello, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Remote patient management (RPM) is a transformative technology that improves chronic care management while reducing net spending for chronic disease. Broadly deployed within the Veterans Health Administration and in many small trials elsewhere, RPM has been shown to support patient self-management, shift responsibilities to non-clinical providers, and reduce the use of emergency department and hospital services. Because transformative technologies offer major opportunities to advance national goals of improved quality and efficiency in health care, it is important to understand their evolution, the experiences of early adopters, and the business models that may support their deployment.

  20. Chronic disease risk management: Combining genetic testing with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutrigenetics has been used for decades to prevent rare monogenic disorders such as phenylketonuria. Gene-diet interaction can now also be targeted to prevent or reduce the risk of many chronic conditions long before clinical manifestation. This multidisciplinary approach unites conventional medicine with genetics and ...

  1. Impact of traveling to visit friends and relatives on chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgle, Holly E; Roesel, David J; Erickson, Tiffany N; Devine, Emily Beth

    2013-01-01

    Travelers visiting friends and relatives (VFR) are known to be at high risk of acquiring infectious diseases during travel. However, little is known about the impact of VFR travel on chronic diseases. This was a nonrandomized, retrospective observational study. Patients were adult VFR travelers who received care from an internal medical clinic serving immigrants and refugees. The primary objective was to determine the impact of VFR travel on markers of chronic disease management including: blood pressure, glycosylated hemoglobin, body mass index, serum creatinine, and anticoagulation. Of the 110 VFR travelers in our study, N = 48 traveled to Africa and N = 62 traveled to Asia for a mean duration of 59 (range 21-303) days. Of the 433 counseling points discussed at pre-travel visits, 71% were infectious disease prevention, 16% chronic disease related, and 13% travel safety. A total of 63 patients (57%) reported one or more health problems while traveling. Of these, 35 patients (32%) experienced a problem related to a chronic condition. In comparison, 24 (22%) patients experienced an acute infection. Sixty percent of patients were nonadherent to medications during travel. An average increase in diastolic blood pressure of 3.6 mmHg among patients with hypertension was the only statistically significant change in a chronic disease marker when values before and after travel were compared. Subgroup analysis revealed that travel to Africa and nonadherence to medications were also associated with worsening blood pressure control, and patients traveling to Africa experienced a decrease in body mass index. This study identified a high proportion of problems related to chronic conditions experienced during VFR travel, while pre-travel appointments tended to focus on infectious disease prevention. A greater emphasis on medication adherence and chronic disease management during VFR travel is also needed during pre-travel preparations. © 2013 International Society of

  2. Effective behavioral intervention strategies using mobile health applications for chronic disease management: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Ah; Choi, Mona; Lee, Sang A; Jiang, Natalie

    2018-02-20

    Mobile health (mHealth) has continuously been used as a method in behavioral research to improve self-management in patients with chronic diseases. However, the evidence of its effectiveness in chronic disease management in the adult population is still lacking. We conducted a systematic review to examine the effectiveness of mHealth interventions on process measures as well as health outcomes in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to improve chronic disease management. Relevant randomized controlled studies that were published between January 2005 and March 2016 were searched in six databases: PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and Web of Science. The inclusion criteria were RCTs that conducted an intervention using mobile devices such as smartphones or tablets for adult patients with chronic diseases to examine disease management or health promotion. Of the 12 RCTs reviewed, 10 of the mHealth interventions demonstrated statistically significant improvement in some health outcomes. The most common features of mHealth systems used in the reviewed RCTs were real-time or regular basis symptom assessments, pre-programed reminders, or feedbacks tailored specifically to the data provided by participants via mHealth devices. Most studies developed their own mHealth systems including mobile apps. Training of mHealth systems was provided to participants in person or through paper-based instructions. None of the studies reported the relationship between health outcomes and patient engagement levels on the mHealth system. Findings from mHealth intervention studies for chronic disease management have shown promising aspects, particularly in improving self-management and some health outcomes.

  3. Chronic disease self-management support for persons with dementia, in a clinical setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim JE

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Elias Ibrahim,1 Laura J Anderson,1 Aleece MacPhail,2 Janaka Jonathan Lovell,2 Marie-Claire Davis,1 Margaret Winbolt3 1Department of Forensic Medicine, Monash University, Southbank, 2Ballarat Health Services, Ballarat, 3Australian Centre for Evidence Based Aged Care, College of Science, Health and Engineering, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: The burden of chronic disease is greater in individuals with dementia, a patient group that is growing as the population is aging. The cornerstone of optimal management of chronic disease requires effective patient self-management. However, this is particularly challenging in older persons with a comorbid diagnosis of dementia. The impact of dementia on a person’s ability to self-manage his/her chronic disease (eg, diabetes mellitus or heart failure varies according to the cognitive domain(s affected, severity of impairment and complexity of self-care tasks. A framework is presented that describes how impairment in cognitive domains (attention and information processing, language, visuospatial ability and praxis, learning and memory and executive function impacts on the five key processes of chronic disease self-management. Recognizing the presence of dementia in a patient with chronic disease may lead to better outcomes. Patients with dementia require individually tailored strategies that accommodate and adjust to the individual and the cognitive domains that are impaired, to optimize their capacity for self-management. Management strategies for clinicians to counter poor self-management due to differentially impaired cognitive domains are also detailed in the presented framework. Clinicians should work in collaboration with patients and care givers to assess a patient’s current capabilities, identify potential barriers to successful self-management and make efforts to adjust the provision of information according to the patient’s skill set. The increasing prevalence of

  4. Patient and Nurse Experiences in a Rural Chronic Disease Management Program: A Qualitative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davisson, Erica A; Swanson, Elizabeth A

    Rural status confounds chronic disease self-management. The purpose of this qualitative, descriptive study was to evaluate the nurse-led "Living Well" chronic disease management program reporting patient recruitment and retention issues since program initiation in 2013. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) was the guiding framework used to reinforce that interdisciplinary teams must have productive patient interactions for their program(s) to be sustainable. A rural, Midwest county clinic's chronic disease management program. Observations, interviews, and within- and across-case coding were used. Patients' responses were analyzed to identify (1) reasons for recruitment and retention problems and (2) program elements that were viewed as successful or needing improvement. A convenience sample of 6 rural, English-speaking adults (65 years or older, with no severe cognitive impairment) with at least one chronic condition was recruited and interviewed. Themes emerged related to nurse knowledge, availability, and value; peer support; overcoming barriers; adherence enhancement; and family/friends' involvement. Patients reported engagement in self-management activities because of program elements such as support groups and productive nurse-patient interactions. Interdisciplinary communication, commitment, and patient referral processes were identified as reasons for recruitment and retention issues. Findings substantiated that certain elements must be present and improved upon for future rural programs to be successful. Interdisciplinary communication may need to be improved to address recruitment and retention problems. It was clear from patient interviews that the nurse coordinators played a major role in patients' self-management adherence and overall satisfaction with the program. This is important to case management because results revealed the need for programs of this nature that incorporate the vital role of nurse coordinators and align with the CCM value of providing a

  5. Renal function trajectory is more important than chronic kidney disease stage for managing patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosansky, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Management of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) emphasizes a current level of function as calculated from the modification of diet in renal disease glomerulofiltration rate equations (eGFR) and proteinuria for staging of CKD. Change in a patient's eGFR over time (renal function trajectory) is an additional and potentially more important consideration in deciding which patients will progress to the point where they will require renal replacement therapy (RRT). Many patients with CKD 3-5 have stable renal function for years. Proteinuria/albuminuria is a primary determinant of renal trajectory which may be slowed by medications that decrease proteinuria and/or aggressively lower blood pressure. A renal trajectory of >3 ml/min/1.73 m(2)/year may relate to a need for closer renal follow-up and increased morbidity and mortality. Additional CKD population-based studies need to examine the relationship of renal trajectory to: baseline renal function; acute kidney injury episodes; age, race, sex and primary etiologies of renal disease; blood pressure control and therapies; dietary protein intake; blood glucose control in diabetics and the competitive risk of death versus the requirement for renal replacement therapy. In the elderly CKD 4 population with significant comorbidities and slow decline in renal function, the likelihood of death prior to the need for RRT should be considered before placing AV access for dialysis. Prediction models of renal progression must account for the competitive risk of death as well as stable or improved renal function to be clinically useful. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Integrating a mobile health setup in a chronic disease management network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hang; Ireland, Derek; Jayasena, Rajiv; Curmi, Jamie; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Supporting self management of chronic disease in collaboration with primary healthcare has been a national priority in order to mitigate the emerging disease burden on the already strained healthcare system. However, in practice, the uptake of self-management programs and compliance with clinical guidelines remain poor. Time constraints due to work commitments and lack of efficient monitoring tools have been the major barrier to the uptake and compliance. In this paper, we present a newly integrated mobile health system with a clinical chronic disease management network called cdmNet, which has already been validated to facilitate General Practitioners (GPs) to provide collaborative disease management services. The newly integrated solution takes advantage of the latest mobile web and wireless Bluetooth communication techniques to enable patients to record health data entries through ubiquitous mobile phones, and allows the data to be simultaneously shared by multidisciplinary care teams. This integration would enable patients to self-manage their chronic disease conditions in collaboration with GPs and hence, improve the uptake and compliance. Additionally, the proposed integration will provide a useful framework encouraging the translation of innovative mobile health technologies into highly regulated healthcare systems.

  7. Cyber-Management of People with Chronic Disease: A Potential Solution to eHealth Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, E-Liisa; Armstrong, Kylie; Usher, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    The evolving eHealth agenda presents a range of potential opportunities for the management and prevention of chronic disease. This paper identifies issues and barriers to the uptake of eHealth and describes a strategy ("Healthy Outcomes for Australians"[C]-HOFA) for creating a central knowledge filter and cyber space method for tracking…

  8. Self-management education for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monninkhof, E.; van der Valk, P.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; van Herwaarden, C.; Partridge, M.R.; Zielhuis, G.

    2003-01-01

    Background: The idea of self-management is to teach patients how to carry out the activities of daily living optimally in the face of their physiological impairment, and to prevent or decrease the severity of exacerbations by means of life style adaptation. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  9. Self-management education for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monninkhof, E.M.; Valk, P.D.L.P.M. van der; Palen, J.A.M. van der; Herwaarden, C.L.A. van; Partridge, M.R.; Zielhuis, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The idea of self-management is to teach patients how to carry out the activities of daily living optimally in the face of their physiological impairment, and to prevent or decrease the severity of exacerbations by means of life style adaptation. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  10. A consumer health record for supporting the patient-centered management of chronic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Clercq, Paul A.; Hasman, Arie; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To design and implement a shareable consumer health record system to investigate whether the system can assist in the management of chronic diseases. METHODS: A toolkit was designed for constructing the consumer health record system in an evolutionary way. An ethnographic-like approach

  11. A consumer health record for supporting the patient-centered management of chronic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clercq, de P.A.; Hasman, A.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives : To design and implement a shareable consumer health record system to investigate whether the system can assist in the management of chronic diseases. Methods : A toolkit was designed for constructing the consumer health record system in an evolutionary way. An ethnographic-like approach

  12. Emerging models for mobilizing family support for chronic disease management: a structured review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosland, Ann-Marie; Piette, John D

    2010-03-01

    We identify recent models for programmes aiming to increase effective family support for chronic illness management and self-care among adult patients without significant physical or cognitive disabilities. We then summarize evidence regarding the efficacy for each model identified. Structured review of studies published in medical and psychology databases from 1990 to the present, reference review, general Web searches and conversations with family intervention experts. Review was limited to studies on conditions that require ongoing self-management, such as diabetes, chronic heart disease and rheumatologic disease. Programmes with three separate foci were identified: (1) Programmes that guide family members in setting goals for supporting patient self-care behaviours have led to improved implementation of family support roles, but have mixed success improving patient outcomes. (2) Programmes that train family in supportive communication techniques, such as prompting patient coping techniques or use of autonomy supportive statements, have successfully improved patient symptom management and health behaviours. (3) Programmes that give families tools and infrastructure to assist in monitoring clinical symptoms and medications are being conducted, with no evidence to date on their impact on patient outcomes. The next generation of programmes to improve family support for chronic disease management incorporate a variety of strategies. Future research can define optimal clinical situations for family support programmes, the most effective combinations of support strategies, and how best to integrate family support programmes into comprehensive models of chronic disease care.

  13. Impact of information and communication technology on interprofessional collaboration for chronic disease management: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Neil; Vania, Diana; Randall, Glen; Mulvale, Gillian

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Information and communication technology is often lauded as the key to enhancing communication among health care providers. However, its impact on interprofessional collaboration is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which it improves communication and, subsequently, enhances interprofessional collaboration in chronic disease management. Methods A systematic review of academic literature using two electronic platforms: HealthSTAR and Web of Science (core collection and MEDLINE). To be eligible for inclusion in the review, articles needed to be peer-reviewed; accessible in English and focused on how technology supports, or might support, collaboration (through enhanced communication) in chronic disease management. Studies were assessed for quality and a narrative synthesis conducted. Results The searches identified 289 articles of which six were included in the final analysis (three used qualitative methods, two were descriptive and one used mixed methods). Various forms of information and communication technology were described including electronic health records, online communities/learning resources and telehealth/telecare. Three themes emerged from the studies that may provide insights into how communication that facilitates collaboration in chronic disease management might be enhanced: professional conflict, collective engagement and continuous learning. Conclusions The success of technology in enhancing collaboration for chronic disease management depends upon supporting the social relationships and organization in which the technology will be placed. Decision-makers should take into account and work toward balancing the impact of technology together with the professional and cultural characteristics of health care teams.

  14. Effects of a comprehensive self-management programme in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monninkhof, E.M.; Valk, P.D.L.P.M. van der; Palen, J.A.M. van der; Herwaarden, C.L.A. van; Zielhuis, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a comprehensive self-management intervention on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), symptoms and walking distance in patients with stable moderately severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study was part of the overall COPD

  15. A consumer health record for supporting the patient-centered management of chronic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Clercq, Paul A; Hasman, Arie; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R

    Objectives : To design and implement a shareable consumer health record system to investigate whether the system can assist in the management of chronic diseases. Methods : A toolkit was designed for constructing the consumer health record system in an evolutionary way. An ethnographic-like approach

  16. Design of a consumer health record for supporting the patient-centered management of chronic diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Clerq, P.A.; Hasman, A.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.

    2001-01-01

    : Medinfo 2001;10(Pt 2):1445-9 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut Design of a consumer health record for supporting the patient-centered management of chronic diseases. de Clercq PA, Hasman A, Wolffenbuttel BH. Department of Medical Informatics, University of Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

  17. An integrated chronic disease management model: a diagonal approach to health system strengthening in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Ozayr Haroon; Asmall, Shaidah; Freeman, Melvyn

    2014-11-01

    The integrated chronic disease management model provides a systematic framework for creating a fundamental change in the orientation of the health system. This model adopts a diagonal approach to health system strengthening by establishing a service-linked base to training, supervision, and the opportunity to try out, assess, and implement integrated interventions.

  18. Modeling best practices in chronic disease management: the Arthritis Program at Southlake Regional Health Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Lorna; Mierdel, Sandra; Thorne, Carter

    2012-01-01

    Researchers, hospital administrators and governments are striving to define competencies in interprofessional care and education, as well as to identify effective models in chronic disease management. For more than 25 years The Arthritis Program (TAP) at Southlake Regional Health Centre in Newmarket, Ontario, has actively practiced within these two interrelated priorities, which are now at the top of the healthcare agenda in Ontario and Canada. The approximately 135 different rheumatic conditions are the primary cause of long-term disability in Canada, affecting those from youth to the senior years, with an economic burden estimated at $4.4 billion (CAD$) annually, and growing. For the benefit of healthcare managers and their clients with chronic conditions, this article discusses TAP's history and demonstrable success, predicated on an educational model of patient self-management and self-efficacy. Also outlined are TAP's contributions in supporting evidence-based best practices in interprofessional collaboration and chronic disease management; approaches that are arguably understudied and under-practiced. Next steps for TAP include a larger role in empirical research in chronic-disease management and integration of a formal training program to benefit health professionals launching or expanding their interprofessional programs using TAP as the dynamic clinical example.

  19. Outcomes and opportunities: a nurse-led model of chronic disease management in Australian general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, Diann S; Patterson, Elizabeth; Young, Jacqui; Fahey, Paul P; Del Mar, Chris B; Hegney, Desley G; Synnott, Robyn L; Mahomed, Rosemary; Baker, Peter G; Scuffham, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The Australian government's commitment to health service reform has placed general practice at the centre of its agenda to manage chronic disease. Concerns about the capacity of GPs to meet the growing chronic disease burden has stimulated the implementation and testing of new models of care that better utilise practice nurses (PN). This paper reports on a mixed-methods study nested within a larger study that trialled the feasibility and acceptability of a new model of nurse-led chronic disease management in three general practices. Patients over 18 years of age with type 2 diabetes, hypertension or stable ischaemic heart disease were randomised into PN-led or usual GP-led care. Primary outcomes were self-reported quality of life and perceptions of the model's feasibility and acceptability from the perspective of patients and GPs. Over the 12-month study quality of life decreased but the trend between groups was not statistically different. Qualitative data indicate that the PN-led model was acceptable and feasible to GPs and patients. It is possible to extend the scope of PN care to lead the routine clinical management of patients' stable chronic diseases. All GPs identified significant advantages to the model and elected to continue with the PN-led care after our study concluded.

  20. Patients' Acceptance of Smartphone Health Technology for Chronic Disease Management: A Theoretical Model and Empirical Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Kaili; Yu, Ping; Deng, Ning; Liu, Fang; Guan, YingPing; Li, Zhenye; Ji, Yumeng; Du, Ningkai; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong

    2017-12-06

    Chronic disease patients often face multiple challenges from difficult comorbidities. Smartphone health technology can be used to help them manage their conditions only if they accept and use the technology. The aim of this study was to develop and test a theoretical model to predict and explain the factors influencing patients' acceptance of smartphone health technology for chronic disease management. Multiple theories and factors that may influence patients' acceptance of smartphone health technology have been reviewed. A hybrid theoretical model was built based on the technology acceptance model, dual-factor model, health belief model, and the factors identified from interviews that might influence patients' acceptance of smartphone health technology for chronic disease management. Data were collected from patient questionnaire surveys and computer log records about 157 hypertensive patients' actual use of a smartphone health app. The partial least square method was used to test the theoretical model. The model accounted for .412 of the variance in patients' intention to adopt the smartphone health technology. Intention to use accounted for .111 of the variance in actual use and had a significant weak relationship with the latter. Perceived ease of use was affected by patients' smartphone usage experience, relationship with doctor, and self-efficacy. Although without a significant effect on intention to use, perceived ease of use had a significant positive influence on perceived usefulness. Relationship with doctor and perceived health threat had significant positive effects on perceived usefulness, countering the negative influence of resistance to change. Perceived usefulness, perceived health threat, and resistance to change significantly predicted patients' intentions to use the technology. Age and gender had no significant influence on patients' acceptance of smartphone technology. The study also confirmed the positive relationship between intention to use

  1. Patients’ Acceptance of Smartphone Health Technology for Chronic Disease Management: A Theoretical Model and Empirical Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Kaili; Yu, Ping; Liu, Fang; Guan, YingPing; Li, Zhenye; Ji, Yumeng; Du, Ningkai; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic disease patients often face multiple challenges from difficult comorbidities. Smartphone health technology can be used to help them manage their conditions only if they accept and use the technology. Objective The aim of this study was to develop and test a theoretical model to predict and explain the factors influencing patients’ acceptance of smartphone health technology for chronic disease management. Methods Multiple theories and factors that may influence patients’ acceptance of smartphone health technology have been reviewed. A hybrid theoretical model was built based on the technology acceptance model, dual-factor model, health belief model, and the factors identified from interviews that might influence patients’ acceptance of smartphone health technology for chronic disease management. Data were collected from patient questionnaire surveys and computer log records about 157 hypertensive patients’ actual use of a smartphone health app. The partial least square method was used to test the theoretical model. Results The model accounted for .412 of the variance in patients’ intention to adopt the smartphone health technology. Intention to use accounted for .111 of the variance in actual use and had a significant weak relationship with the latter. Perceived ease of use was affected by patients’ smartphone usage experience, relationship with doctor, and self-efficacy. Although without a significant effect on intention to use, perceived ease of use had a significant positive influence on perceived usefulness. Relationship with doctor and perceived health threat had significant positive effects on perceived usefulness, countering the negative influence of resistance to change. Perceived usefulness, perceived health threat, and resistance to change significantly predicted patients’ intentions to use the technology. Age and gender had no significant influence on patients’ acceptance of smartphone technology. The study also

  2. Chronic disease management in Sub-Saharan Africa: whose business is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Alexander; Ekoe, Tetanye; Perone, Nicolas; Slama, Slim; Loutan, Louis

    2009-08-01

    Public health specialists and clinicians alike agree that Humanity faces a global pandemic of chronic diseases in the 21(st) century. In this article we discuss the implications of this pandemic on another global issue, the health workforce. Because both issues are particularly acute in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), we will focus on this region and use Cameroon as a case in point. We first gauge the epidemic of chronic conditions in SSA. We then discuss the implications of chronic conditions for the reshaping of health systems and the health workforce. We conclude by making a strong case for the building up and strengthening the health workforce, insisting on the crucial role of nurses, their training, and involvement in chronic disease management.

  3. Creating a sustainable collaborative consumer health application for chronic disease self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Constance M; McIlwain, Steve; Gray, Oliver; Willson, Bradley; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    2017-07-01

    As the prevalence of chronic diseases increase, there is a need for consumer-centric health informatics applications that assist individuals with disease self-management skills. However, due to the cost of development of these applications, there is also a need to build a disease agnostic architecture so that they could be reused for any chronic disease. This paper describes the architecture of a collaborative virtual environment (VE) platform, LIVE©, that was developed to teach self-management skills and provide social support to those individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, a backend database allows for the application to be easily reused for any chronic disease. We tested its usability in the context of a larger randomized controlled trial of its efficacy. The usability was scored as 'good' by half of the participants in the evaluation. Common errors in the testing and solutions to address initial usability issues are discussed. Overall, LIVE© represents a usable and generalizable platform that will be adapted to other chronic diseases and health needs in future research and applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Guideline-oriented perioperative management of patients with bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakage, Michiaki; Iwasaki, Sohshi; Namiki, Akiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Increased airway hyperresponsiveness is a major concern in the perioperative management of patients with bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Guidelines using evidence-based medicine are continually being updated and published regarding the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of these respiratory disorders. Perioperative management in these patients involves: (1) adequate control of airway hyperresponsiveness, including detection of purulent sputum and infection before surgery; (2) evidence-based control of anesthesia; and (3) the aggressive use of beta-2 adrenergic stimulants and the systemic administration of steroids for the treatment of acute attacks. Good preoperative control, including the use of leukotriene antagonists, can reduce the incidence of life-threatening perioperative complications. Awareness of recent guidelines is thus important in the management of patients with airway hyperresponsiveness. This review covers the most recent guidelines for the perioperative management of patients with bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  5. Patient and Disease Characteristics Associated with Activation for Self-Management in Patients with Diabetes, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Heart Failure and Chronic Renal Disease: A Cross-Sectional Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos-Touwen, Irene; Schuurmans, Marieke; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Korpershoek, Yvonne; Spruit-Bentvelzen, Lotte; Ertugrul-van der Graaf, Inge; de Wit, Niek; Trappenburg, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of chronic disease patients do not respond to self-management interventions, which suggests that one size interventions do not fit all, demanding more tailored interventions. To compose more individualized strategies, we aim to increase our understanding of characteristics associated with patient activation for self-management and to evaluate whether these are disease-transcending. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted in primary and secondary care in patients with type-2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM-II), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) and Chronic Renal Disease (CRD). Using multiple linear regression analysis, we analyzed associations between self-management activation (13-item Patient Activation Measure; PAM-13) and a wide range of socio-demographic, clinical, and psychosocial determinants. Furthermore, we assessed whether the associations between the determinants and the PAM were disease-transcending by testing whether disease was an effect modifier. In addition, we identified determinants associated with low activation for self-management using logistic regression analysis. We included 1154 patients (53% response rate); 422 DM-II patients, 290 COPD patients, 223 HF patients and 219 CRD patients. Mean age was 69.6±10.9. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed 9 explanatory determinants of activation for self-management: age, BMI, educational level, financial distress, physical health status, depression, illness perception, social support and underlying disease, explaining a variance of 16.3%. All associations, except for social support, were disease transcending. This study explored factors associated with varying levels of activation for self-management. These results are a first step in supporting clinicians and researchers to identify subpopulations of chronic disease patients less likely to be engaged in self-management. Increased scientific efforts are needed to explain the greater

  6. Patient and disease characteristics associated with activation for self-management in patients with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic heart failure and chronic renal disease: a cross-sectional survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos-Touwen, Irene; Schuurmans, Marieke; Monninkhof, Evelyn M; Korpershoek, Yvonne; Spruit-Bentvelzen, Lotte; Ertugrul-van der Graaf, Inge; de Wit, Niek; Trappenburg, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of chronic disease patients do not respond to self-management interventions, which suggests that one size interventions do not fit all, demanding more tailored interventions. To compose more individualized strategies, we aim to increase our understanding of characteristics associated with patient activation for self-management and to evaluate whether these are disease-transcending. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted in primary and secondary care in patients with type-2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM-II), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) and Chronic Renal Disease (CRD). Using multiple linear regression analysis, we analyzed associations between self-management activation (13-item Patient Activation Measure; PAM-13) and a wide range of socio-demographic, clinical, and psychosocial determinants. Furthermore, we assessed whether the associations between the determinants and the PAM were disease-transcending by testing whether disease was an effect modifier. In addition, we identified determinants associated with low activation for self-management using logistic regression analysis. We included 1154 patients (53% response rate); 422 DM-II patients, 290 COPD patients, 223 HF patients and 219 CRD patients. Mean age was 69.6±10.9. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed 9 explanatory determinants of activation for self-management: age, BMI, educational level, financial distress, physical health status, depression, illness perception, social support and underlying disease, explaining a variance of 16.3%. All associations, except for social support, were disease transcending. This study explored factors associated with varying levels of activation for self-management. These results are a first step in supporting clinicians and researchers to identify subpopulations of chronic disease patients less likely to be engaged in self-management. Increased scientific efforts are needed to explain the greater

  7. Patient and disease characteristics associated with activation for self-management in patients with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic heart failure and chronic renal disease: a cross-sectional survey study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Bos-Touwen

    Full Text Available A substantial proportion of chronic disease patients do not respond to self-management interventions, which suggests that one size interventions do not fit all, demanding more tailored interventions. To compose more individualized strategies, we aim to increase our understanding of characteristics associated with patient activation for self-management and to evaluate whether these are disease-transcending. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted in primary and secondary care in patients with type-2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM-II, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, Chronic Heart Failure (CHF and Chronic Renal Disease (CRD. Using multiple linear regression analysis, we analyzed associations between self-management activation (13-item Patient Activation Measure; PAM-13 and a wide range of socio-demographic, clinical, and psychosocial determinants. Furthermore, we assessed whether the associations between the determinants and the PAM were disease-transcending by testing whether disease was an effect modifier. In addition, we identified determinants associated with low activation for self-management using logistic regression analysis. We included 1154 patients (53% response rate; 422 DM-II patients, 290 COPD patients, 223 HF patients and 219 CRD patients. Mean age was 69.6±10.9. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed 9 explanatory determinants of activation for self-management: age, BMI, educational level, financial distress, physical health status, depression, illness perception, social support and underlying disease, explaining a variance of 16.3%. All associations, except for social support, were disease transcending. This study explored factors associated with varying levels of activation for self-management. These results are a first step in supporting clinicians and researchers to identify subpopulations of chronic disease patients less likely to be engaged in self-management. Increased scientific efforts are needed to explain

  8. Disease-management partnership functioning, synergy and effectiveness in delivering chronic-illness care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2012-06-01

    This study explored associations among disease-management partnership functioning, synergy and effectiveness in the delivery of chronic-illness care. This study had a cross-sectional design. The study sample consists of 218 professionals (out of 393) participating in 22 disease-management partnerships in various regions of the Netherlands. We assessed the relationships among partnership functioning, synergy and effectiveness in the delivery of chronic-illness care. Partnership functioning was assessed through leadership, resources, administration and efficiency. Synergy was considered the proximal outcome of partnership functioning, which, in turn, influenced the effectiveness of disease-management partnerships [measured with the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (ACIC) survey instrument]. Overall ACIC scores ranged from 3 to 10, indicating basic/intermediate to optimal/comprehensive delivery of chronic-illness care. The results of the regression analysis demonstrate that partnership effectiveness was positively associated with leadership (β = 0.25; P≤ 0.01), and resources (β = 0.31; P≤ 0.001). No significant relationship was found between administration, efficiency and partnership effectiveness. Partnership synergy acted as a mediator for partnership functioning and was statistically significantly associated with partnership effectiveness (β = 0.25; P≤ 0.001). Disease-management partnerships seemed better able to deliver higher levels of chronic-illness care when synergy is created between partners. Synergy was more likely to emerge with boundary-spanning leaders who understood and appreciated partners' different perspectives, could bridge their diverse cultures and were comfortable sharing ideas, resources and power. In addition, the acknowledgement of and ability to use members' resources are valuable in engaging partners' involvement and achieving synergy in disease-management partnerships.

  9. Building chronic disease management capacity in General Practice: The South Australian GP Plus Practice Nurse Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jeffrey; Koehne, Kristy; Verrall, Claire C; Szabo, Natalie; Bollen, Chris; Parker, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    This paper draws on the implementation experience of the South Australian GP Plus Practice Nurse Initiative in order to establish what is needed to support the development of the chronic disease management role of practice nurses. The Initiative was delivered between 2007 and 2010 to recruit, train and place 157 nurses across 147 General Practices in Adelaide. The purpose was to improve chronic disease management in General Practice, by equipping nurses to work as practice nurses who would coordinate care and establish chronic disease management systems. Secondary analysis of qualitative data contained in the Initiative evaluation report, specifically drawing on quarterly project records and four focus groups conducted with practice nurses, practice nurse coordinators and practice nurse mentors. As evidenced by the need to increase the amount of support provided during the implementation of the Initiative, nurses new to General Practice faced challenges in their new role. Nurses described a big learning curve as they dealt with role transition to a new work environment and learning a range of new skills while developing chronic disease management systems. Informants valued the skills development and support offered by the Initiative, however the ongoing difficulties in implementing the role suggested that change is also needed at the level of the Practice. While just over a half of the placement positions were retained, practice nurses expressed concern with having to negotiate the conditions of their employment. In order to advance the role of practice nurses as managers of chronic disease support is needed at two levels. At one level support is needed to assist practice nurses to build their own skills. At the level of the Practice, and in the wider health workforce system, support is also needed to ensure that Practices are organisationally ready to include the practice nurse within the practice team.

  10. Chronic disease management in rural and underserved populations: innovation and system improvement help lead to success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolin, Jane; Gamm, Larry; Kash, Bita; Peck, Mitchell

    2005-03-01

    Successful implementation of disease management (DM) is based on the ability of an organization to overcome a variety of barriers to deliver timely, appropriate care of chronic illnesses. Such programs initiate DM services to patient populations while initiating self-management education among medication-resistant patients who are chronically ill. Despite formidable challenges, rural health care providers have been successful in initiating DM programs and have discovered several ways in which these programs benefit their organizations. This research reports on six DM programs that serve large rural and underserved populations and have demonstrated that DM can be successfully implemented in such areas.

  11. Improving Chronic Disease Self-Management by Older Home Health Patients through Community Health Coaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Dye

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to pilot test a model to reduce hospital readmissions and emergency department use of rural, older adults with chronic diseases discharged from home health services (HHS through the use of volunteers. The study’s priority population consistently experiences poorer health outcomes than their urban counterparts due in part to lower socioeconomic status, reduced access to health services, and incidence of chronic diseases. When they are hospitalized for complications due to poorly managed chronic diseases, they are frequently readmitted for the same conditions. This pilot study examines the use of volunteer community members who were trained as Health Coaches to mentor discharged HHS patients in following the self-care plan developed by their HHS RN; improving chronic disease self-management behaviors; reducing risk of falls, pneumonia, and flu; and accessing community resources. Program participants increased their ability to monitor and track their chronic health conditions, make positive lifestyle changes, and reduce incidents of falls, pneumonia and flu. Although differences in the ED and hospital admission rates after discharge from HHS between the treatment and comparison group (matched for gender, age, and chronic condition were not statistically significant, the treatment group’s rate was less than the comparison group thus suggesting a promising impact of the HC program (90 day: 263 comparison vs. 129 treatment; p = 0.65; 180 day 666.67 vs. 290.32; p = 0.19. The community health coach model offers a potential approach for improving the ability of discharged older home health patients to manage chronic conditions and ultimately reduce emergent care.

  12. Back to Basics: The Effect of Healthy Diet and Exercise on Chronic Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    The increase in obesity rates in the U.S. and other less developed industrial countries have led to a worldwide epidemic of chronic disease states. Increased obesity rates are implicated in the treatment failures for illnesses such as coronary artery disease, diabetes, heart failure, hypertension and cancer. Effective prevention of obesity through diet and exercise contributes to the successful medical management of multiple chronic disease states. Review the last 10 years of literature (2006-2016) on the effects of diet and exercise as they relate to the prevention of chronic disease. Cochran Database of Systematic Reviews and other original articles using the National Center for Biotechnical Information database. The success in management of chronic disease lies in a physician's ability to educate patients and effective utilization of the resources available to that provider. Patient accountability for their individual chronic disease states is a problem related to patient education, patient participation, access to care, and payment resources. Financial, racial, and socioeconomic barriers must be addressed in the creation of an effective plan. Teaching on the importance of diet and exercise needs to occur early in life and be continually reinforced for successful outcomes. In the last 10 years, there has not been a significant study suggesting a single successful model of diet and exercise that can control chronic diseases. Cardiac, diabetic, and cancer patients have reduced hospital admissions, improved diabetic control, and improved quality of life scores related to coordinated diet and exercise programs, however. Patients may be unwilling or unable to be accountable for health care coordination. The development of exercise and obesity prevention policies and the adjustment in financial rewards to health care organizations will have a major impact in implementing these programs over the next 10 years.

  13. [Nutritional Assessment and Management for Patients with Chronic Liver Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Hee

    2018-04-25

    When liver disease is severe, the prognosis can be worse if the patient is malnourished. Adequate nutritional support for patients with liver diseases can improve the patient's condition and prognosis. In the case of liver cirrhosis, malnutrition can occur due to a variety of causes, including poor oral intake, maldigestion, malabsorption, associated renal disease, and metabolic abnormalities. For a nutritional assessment, it is important to check the dietary intake, change in body composition, including anthropometry, and a functional assessment of muscle. Counselling and oral or enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition as in other diseases. If esophageal varices are present, care should be taken when installing a feeding tube, but if there are ascites, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is contraindicated because of the risk of complications. Calories of 30-35 kcal/kg/day and protein from 1.2 to 1.5 g/kg/day are appropriate. Protein restriction is unnecessary unless the hepatic encephalopathy is severe. A late evening snack and branched chain amino acids can be helpful. In the case of cholestasis, the supply of manganese and copper should be restricted. Sarcopenia in patients with liver cirrhosis is also prevalent and associated with the prognosis.

  14. Disease management projects and the Chronic Care Model in action: baseline qualitative research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Disease management programs, especially those based on the Chronic Care Model (CCM), are increasingly common in the Netherlands. While disease management programs have been well-researched quantitatively and economically, less qualitative research has been done. The overall aim of the study is to explore how disease management programs are implemented within primary care settings in the Netherlands; this paper focuses on the early development and implementation stages of five disease management programs in the primary care setting, based on interviews with project leadership teams. Methods Eleven semi-structured interviews were conducted at the five selected sites with sixteen professionals interviewed; all project directors and managers were interviewed. The interviews focused on each project’s chosen chronic illness (diabetes, eating disorders, COPD, multi-morbidity, CVRM) and project plan, barriers to development and implementation, the project leaders’ action and reactions, as well as their roles and responsibilities, and disease management strategies. Analysis was inductive and interpretive, based on the content of the interviews. After analysis, the results of this research on disease management programs and the Chronic Care Model are viewed from a traveling technology framework. Results This analysis uncovered four themes that can be mapped to disease management and the Chronic Care Model: (1) changing the health care system, (2) patient-centered care, (3) technological systems and barriers, and (4) integrating projects into the larger system. Project leaders discussed the paths, both direct and indirect, for transforming the health care system to one that addresses chronic illness. Patient-centered care was highlighted as needed and a paradigm shift for many. Challenges with technological systems were pervasive. Project leaders managed the expenses of a traveling technology, including the social, financial, and administration involved

  15. Disease management projects and the Chronic Care Model in action: baseline qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Bethany Hipple; Adams, Samantha A; Nieboer, Anna P; Bal, Roland

    2012-05-11

    Disease management programs, especially those based on the Chronic Care Model (CCM), are increasingly common in The Netherlands. While disease management programs have been well-researched quantitatively and economically, less qualitative research has been done. The overall aim of the study is to explore how disease management programs are implemented within primary care settings in The Netherlands; this paper focuses on the early development and implementation stages of five disease management programs in the primary care setting, based on interviews with project leadership teams. Eleven semi-structured interviews were conducted at the five selected sites with sixteen professionals interviewed; all project directors and managers were interviewed. The interviews focused on each project's chosen chronic illness (diabetes, eating disorders, COPD, multi-morbidity, CVRM) and project plan, barriers to development and implementation, the project leaders' action and reactions, as well as their roles and responsibilities, and disease management strategies. Analysis was inductive and interpretive, based on the content of the interviews. After analysis, the results of this research on disease management programs and the Chronic Care Model are viewed from a traveling technology framework. This analysis uncovered four themes that can be mapped to disease management and the Chronic Care Model: (1) changing the health care system, (2) patient-centered care, (3) technological systems and barriers, and (4) integrating projects into the larger system. Project leaders discussed the paths, both direct and indirect, for transforming the health care system to one that addresses chronic illness. Patient-centered care was highlighted as needed and a paradigm shift for many. Challenges with technological systems were pervasive. Project leaders managed the expenses of a traveling technology, including the social, financial, and administration involved. At the sites, project leaders served

  16. Management of adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease: strategic issues for transition care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajro, Pietro; Ferrante, Lorenza; Lenta, Selvaggia; Mandato, Claudia; Persico, Marcello

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the management of children with chronic liver disease have enabled many to survive into adulthood with or without their native livers, so that the most common of these conditions are becoming increasingly common in adult hepatology practice. Because the aetiologies of chronic liver disease in children may vary significantly from those in adulthood, adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease may often present with clinical manifestations unfamiliar to their adulthood physician. Transition of medical care to adult practice requires that the adulthood medical staff (primary physicians and subspecialists) have a comprehensive knowledge of childhood liver disease and their implications, and of the differences in caring for these patients. Pending still unavailable Scientific Society guidelines, this article examines causes, presentation modes, evaluation, management, and complications of the main paediatric-onset chronic liver diseases, and discusses key issues to aid in planning a program of transition from paediatric to adult patients. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Twenty years of telemedicine in chronic disease management – an evidence synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A literature review was conducted to obtain a high-level view of the value of telemedicine in the management of five common chronic diseases (asthma, COPD, diabetes, heart failure, hypertension). A total of 141 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) was identified, in which 148 telemedicine interventions of various kinds had been tested in a total of 37,695 patients. The value of each intervention was categorised in terms of the outcomes specified by the investigators in that trial, i.e. no attempt was made to extract a common outcome from all studies, as would be required for a conventional meta-analysis. Summarizing the value of these interventions shows, first, that most studies have reported positive effects (n = 108), and almost none have reported negative effects (n = 2). This suggests publication bias. Second, there were no significant differences between the chronic diseases, i.e. telemedicine seems equally effective (or ineffective) in the diseases studied. Third, most studies have been relatively short-term (median duration 6 months). It seems unlikely that in a chronic disease, any intervention can have much effect unless applied for a long period. Finally, there have been very few studies of cost-effectiveness. Thus the evidence base for the value of telemedicine in managing chronic diseases is on the whole weak and contradictory. PMID:22674020

  18. Self-management strategies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a first step toward personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrecheguren, Miriam; Bourbeau, Jean

    2018-03-01

    Self-management has gained increased relevance in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. The heterogeneity in self-management interventions has complicated the development of recommendations for clinical practice. In this review, we present the latest findings regarding conceptual definition, effectiveness of self-management interventions and self-management strategies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as a first step toward personalized medicine: what, how and to whom? Self-management interventions have shown benefits in improving health-related quality of life and reducing hospital admissions. Favorable outcomes can only be achieved if patients have an ultimate goal, that is their desired achievements in their life. In the continuum of care, the components of the self-management program will vary to adapt to the condition of the patient (disease severity, comorbidities) and to factors such as patient motivation, confidence (self-efficacy), access to health care, family and social support. A combination of education, case management and patient-centric action plan has shown the best chance of success. The individual patient's needs, own preferences and personal goals should inform the design of any intervention with a behavioral component. A continuous loop process has to be implemented to constantly assess what work and does not work, aiming at achieving the desired outcomes for a given patient.

  19. Economic evaluation of a disease management program for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Naresh A; Rice, Kathryn L; Caldwell, Michael; Hilleman, Daniel E

    2011-06-01

    The data on cost savings with disease management (DM) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is limited. A multicomponent DM program in COPD has recently shown in a large randomized controlled trial to reduce hospitalizations and emergency department visits compared to usual care (UC). The objectives of this study were to determine the cost of implementing the DM program and its impact on healthcare resource utilization costs compared to UC in high-risk COPD patients. This study was a post-hoc economic analysis of a multicenter randomized, adjudicator-blinded, controlled, 1-year trial comparing DM and UC at 5 Midwest region Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical centers. Health-care costs (hospitalizations, ED visits, respiratory medications, and the cost of the DM intervention) were compared in the COPD DM intervention and UC groups. The composite outcome for all hospitalizations or ED visits were 27% lower in the DM group (123.8 mean events per 100 patient-years) compared to the UC group (170.5 mean events per 100 patient-years) (rate ratio 0.73; 0.56-0.90; p < 0.003). The cost of the DM intervention was $241,620 or $650 per patient. The total mean ± SD per patient cost that included the cost of DM in the DM group was 4491 ± 4678 compared to $5084 ± 5060 representing a $593 per patient cost savings for the DM program. The DM intervention program in this study was unique for producing an average cost savings of $593 per patient after paying for the cost of DM intervention.

  20. Impact of chronic kidney disease management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meran, S; Don, K; Shah, N; Donovan, K; Riley, S; Phillips, A O

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of eGFR reporting and publication of national CKD guidelines has led to major challenges in primary and secondary care, leading to an increase in the number of referrals to nephrology clinics. We have shown that introduction of a renal patient care pathway reduces nephrology referrals and enables managed discharges of CKD patients to primary care. The aim of this article is to examine the outcome of patients discharged to primary care to find out if there is an associated risk with increased discharge supported by the patient pathway. The study was carried out within a single NHS Trust covering a population of 560,000. All patients discharged from the trust's renal outpatient clinic between June 2007 and July 2008 were identified. Patient notes and the local laboratory database systems were used to determine the source and timing of tests. A total of 31 new referrals and 57 regular follow-ups were discharged during this period. The median age of discharge was 67.5 years. Most subjects (60%) had CKD stage 3 at the time of discharge. A total of 23% of discharges were categorized as CKD stages 1, 2 or normal and 17% of patients had CKD stage 4. Overall, 93% had stable eGFRs prior to discharge, 77.5% of patients had blood pressure within threshold (140/90 according to UK CKD guidelines) and 97.7% of patients had haemoglobins >10 g/dl. Post-discharge 83% of patients had eGFRs recorded by their general practitioner and 92.6% of these were measured within appropriate time frames as per CKD guidelines. The majority of patients (82%) had either improved or stable eGFR post-discharge and only three patients had a significant decline in their eGFR. These data indicate that selected CKD patients can be appropriately discharged from secondary care and adequately monitored in primary care. Furthermore, we have shown that this was a safe practice for patients.

  1. A stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteleijn, Niek F; Visser, Folkert W; Drenth, Joost P H; Gevers, Tom J G; Groen, Gerbrand J; Hogan, Marie C; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2014-09-01

    Chronic pain, defined as pain existing for >4-6 weeks, affects >60% of patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic disease (ADPKD). It can have various causes, indirectly or directly related to the increase in kidney and liver volume in these patients. Chronic pain in ADPKD patients is often severe, impacting physical activity and social relationships, and frequently difficult to manage. This review provides an overview of pathophysiological mechanisms that can lead to pain and discusses the sensory innervation of the kidneys and the upper abdominal organs, including the liver. In addition, the results of a systematic literature search of ADPKD-specific treatment options are presented. Based on pathophysiological knowledge and evidence derived from the literature an argumentative stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in ADPKD is proposed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  2. CDC Grand Rounds: Improving Medication Adherence for Chronic Disease Management - Innovations and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiman, Andrea B; Ruppar, Todd; Ho, Michael; Garber, Larry; Weidle, Paul J; Hong, Yuling; George, Mary G; Thorpe, Phoebe G

    2017-11-17

    Adherence to prescribed medications is associated with improved clinical outcomes for chronic disease management and reduced mortality from chronic conditions (1). Conversely, nonadherence is associated with higher rates of hospital admissions, suboptimal health outcomes, increased morbidity and mortality, and increased health care costs (2). In the United States, 3.8 billion prescriptions are written annually (3). Approximately one in five new prescriptions are never filled, and among those filled, approximately 50% are taken incorrectly, particularly with regard to timing, dosage, frequency, and duration (4). Whereas rates of nonadherence across the United States have remained relatively stable, direct health care costs associated with nonadherence have grown to approximately $100-$300 billion of U.S. health care dollars spent annually (5,6). Improving medication adherence is a public health priority and could reduce the economic and health burdens of many diseases and chronic conditions (7).

  3. [Quality indicators for National Disease Management Guidelines using the example of the National Disease Management Guideline for "Chronic Heart Failure"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothacker, Monika Judith; Langer, Thomas; Weinbrenner, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Together with an expert committee a structured approach to determining quality indicators for National Disease Management Guidelines has been developed. The key steps of this approach include: introducing guideline authors to the methodology at an early stage of the process of guideline development, pre-selecting recommendations of the guideline which are potentially measurable by means of quality indicators, assessing the potentially measurable quality indicators in written form using five criteria (including their importance for the health care system and clarity of definitions) and approving them in a formal consensus process. For lack of a database these quality indicators must be regarded as preliminary. For the National Disease Management Guideline "Chronic Heart Failure" nine rate-based indicators have been chosen. The indicators correspond to important strong recommendations (grade of recommendation: A) from the fields of diagnosis (two), general therapeutic strategy (two), specific treatment (three), clinical monitoring (one) and co-ordination of care (one). In a second step, the quality indicators have to be validated within a pilot project. The determination and assessment of the potential quality indicators have revealed room for improvement of guideline development. In particular, there is a need for more health care data and for specification of recommendations.

  4. Moderating factors influencing adoption of a mobile chronic disease management system in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhangxiang; Liu, Yongmei; Che, Xiaoling; Chen, Xiaohong

    2018-01-01

    Mobile chronic disease management systems (MCDMS) have become increasingly important in recent years, but in China, challenges remain for their adoption. Existing empirical studies have not completely explored the adoption behavior of potential MCDMS users. This article presents a study in which we investigated factors that influence chronically ill patients in China and their families to adopt or decline to use MCDMS. We applied a research model based on the technology acceptance model (TAM) as well as four contextual constructs (perceived disease threat, perceived risk, initial trust, and technology anxiety) to a survey of 279 potential MCDMS service participants in China. Our key findings include: (1) as consistent with current research, both perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use have positive impact on potential users' MCDMS adoption intention; (2) both perceived disease threat and initial trust have positive impact on MCDMS adoption intention; (3) the impact of perceived risk is negative, and technology anxiety has negative impact on perceived ease of use of MCDMS; (4) young people place more importance on their perceptions of usefulness, ease of operation, and disease threat than middle-aged and older users; (5) family members are more influenced by their perception of ease of use and disease threat than chronically ill patients, while chronically ill patients place more importance on perceived usefulness than family members. This article concludes by discussing the implications of our study for research and practice, as well as limitations and future research directions.

  5. Chronic disease management for depression in US medical practices: results from the Health Tracking Physician Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Waleed; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2011-07-01

    Chronic care model (CCM) envisages a multicomponent systematic remodeling of ambulatory care to improve chronic diseases management. Application of CCM in primary care management of depression has traditionally lagged behind the application of this model in management of other common chronic illnesses. In past research, the use of CCM has been operationalized by measuring the use of evidence-based organized care management processes (CMPs). To compare the use of CMPs in treatment of depression with the use of these processes in treatment of diabetes and asthma and to examine practice-level correlates of this use. Using data from the 2008 Health Tracking Physician Survey, a nationally representative sample of physicians in the United States, we compared the use of 5 different CMPs: written guidelines in English and other languages for self-management, availability of staff to educate patients about self-management, availability of nurse care managers for care coordination, and group meetings of patients with staff. We further examined the association of practice-level characteristics with the use of the 5 CMPs for management of depression. CMPs were more commonly used for management of diabetes and asthma than for depression. The use of CMPs for depression was more common in health maintenance organizations [adjusted odds ratios (AOR) ranging from 2.45 to 5.98 for different CMPs], in practices that provided physicians with feedback regarding quality of care to patients (AOR range, 1.42 to 1.69), and in practices with greater use of clinical information technology (AOR range, 1.06 to 1.11). The application of CMPs in management of depression continues to lag behind other common chronic conditions. Feedbacks on quality of care and expanded use of information technology may improve application of CMPs for depression care in general medical settings.

  6. Evaluation of a nurse-led disease management programme for chronic kidney disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; Chow, Susan Ka Yee; Chan, Tony Moon Fai

    2010-03-01

    Patients with end stage renal failure require dialysis and strict adherence to treatment plans to sustain life. However, non-adherence is a common and serious problem among patients with chronic kidney disease. There is a scarcity of studies in examining the effects of disease management programmes on patients with chronic kidney disease. This paper examines whether the study group receiving the disease management programme have better improvement than the control group, comparing outcomes at baseline (O1), at 7 weeks at the completion of the programme (O2) and at 13 weeks (O3). This is a randomized controlled trial. The outcome measures were non-adherence in diet, fluid, dialysis and medication, quality of life, satisfaction, symptom control, complication control and health service utilisation. There was no significant difference between the control and study group for the baseline measures, except for sleep. Significant differences (padherence, sleep, symptom, staff encouragement, overall health and satisfaction. Sustained effects at O3 were noted in the outcome measures of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) non-adherence degree, sleep, symptom, and effect of kidney disease. Many studies exploring chronic disease management have neglected the group with end stage renal failure and this study fills this gap. This study has employed an innovative model of skill mix using specialist and general nurses and demonstrated patient improvement in diet non-adherence, CAPD non-adherence, aspects of quality of life and satisfaction with care. Redesigning chronic disease management programmes helps to optimize the use of different levels of skills and resources to bring about positive outcomes. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Vitamin D, Phosphate and Fibroblast Growth Factor 23: A role in the pathogenesis and management of Chronic Kidney Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease Mineral and Bone Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Damasiewicz, Matthew John

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined by the presence of proteinuria or decreased kidney function, with a prevalence of 10-15% in the adult population. CKD can progress to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) and is associated with progressive abnormalities of bone and mineral metabolism, defined as CKD mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The use of vitamin D in CKD, the optimal level for initiating treatment and the use of current and novel biomarkers in the management of ...

  8. Efficacy and Safety of Topical Corticosteroids for Management of Oral Chronic Graft versus Host Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Elsaadany, Basma Abdelaleem; Ahmed, Eman Magdy; Aghbary, Sana Maher Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Background. Oral chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) is a major complication in transplantation community, a problem that can be addressed with topical intervention. Topical corticosteroids are the first line of treatment although the choice remains challenging as none of the available treatments is supported by strong clinical evidence. Objective. This systematic review aims to determine the clinical efficacy and safety of topical corticosteroids for the management of the mucosal alter...

  9. Integrating telecare for chronic disease management in the community: What needs to be done?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osbourne Janice

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telecare could greatly facilitate chronic disease management in the community, but despite government promotion and positive demonstrations its implementation has been limited. This study aimed to identify factors inhibiting the implementation and integration of telecare systems for chronic disease management in the community. Methods Large scale comparative study employing qualitative data collection techniques: semi-structured interviews with key informants, task-groups, and workshops; framework analysis of qualitative data informed by Normalization Process Theory. Drawn from telecare services in community and domestic settings in England and Scotland, 221 participants were included, consisting of health professionals and managers; patients and carers; social care professionals and managers; and service suppliers and manufacturers. Results Key barriers to telecare integration were uncertainties about coherent and sustainable service and business models; lack of coordination across social and primary care boundaries, lack of financial or other incentives to include telecare within primary care services; a lack of a sense of continuity with previous service provision and self-care work undertaken by patients; and general uncertainty about the adequacy of telecare systems. These problems led to poor integration of policy and practice. Conclusion Telecare services may offer a cost effective and safe form of care for some people living with chronic illness. Slow and uneven implementation and integration do not stem from problems of adoption. They result from incomplete understanding of the role of telecare systems and subsequent adaption and embeddedness to context, and uncertainties about the best way to develop, coordinate, and sustain services that assist with chronic disease management. Interventions are therefore needed that (i reduce uncertainty about the ownership of implementation processes and that lock together health

  10. Integrating telecare for chronic disease management in the community: What needs to be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Telecare could greatly facilitate chronic disease management in the community, but despite government promotion and positive demonstrations its implementation has been limited. This study aimed to identify factors inhibiting the implementation and integration of telecare systems for chronic disease management in the community. Methods Large scale comparative study employing qualitative data collection techniques: semi-structured interviews with key informants, task-groups, and workshops; framework analysis of qualitative data informed by Normalization Process Theory. Drawn from telecare services in community and domestic settings in England and Scotland, 221 participants were included, consisting of health professionals and managers; patients and carers; social care professionals and managers; and service suppliers and manufacturers. Results Key barriers to telecare integration were uncertainties about coherent and sustainable service and business models; lack of coordination across social and primary care boundaries, lack of financial or other incentives to include telecare within primary care services; a lack of a sense of continuity with previous service provision and self-care work undertaken by patients; and general uncertainty about the adequacy of telecare systems. These problems led to poor integration of policy and practice. Conclusion Telecare services may offer a cost effective and safe form of care for some people living with chronic illness. Slow and uneven implementation and integration do not stem from problems of adoption. They result from incomplete understanding of the role of telecare systems and subsequent adaption and embeddedness to context, and uncertainties about the best way to develop, coordinate, and sustain services that assist with chronic disease management. Interventions are therefore needed that (i) reduce uncertainty about the ownership of implementation processes and that lock together health and social care agencies

  11. Integrating telecare for chronic disease management in the community: what needs to be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Carl R; Finch, Tracy L; Cornford, James; Exley, Catherine; Gately, Claire; Kirk, Sue; Jenkings, K Neil; Osbourne, Janice; Robinson, A Louise; Rogers, Anne; Wilson, Robert; Mair, Frances S

    2011-05-27

    Telecare could greatly facilitate chronic disease management in the community, but despite government promotion and positive demonstrations its implementation has been limited. This study aimed to identify factors inhibiting the implementation and integration of telecare systems for chronic disease management in the community. Large scale comparative study employing qualitative data collection techniques: semi-structured interviews with key informants, task-groups, and workshops; framework analysis of qualitative data informed by Normalization Process Theory. Drawn from telecare services in community and domestic settings in England and Scotland, 221 participants were included, consisting of health professionals and managers; patients and carers; social care professionals and managers; and service suppliers and manufacturers. Key barriers to telecare integration were uncertainties about coherent and sustainable service and business models; lack of coordination across social and primary care boundaries, lack of financial or other incentives to include telecare within primary care services; a lack of a sense of continuity with previous service provision and self-care work undertaken by patients; and general uncertainty about the adequacy of telecare systems. These problems led to poor integration of policy and practice. Telecare services may offer a cost effective and safe form of care for some people living with chronic illness. Slow and uneven implementation and integration do not stem from problems of adoption. They result from incomplete understanding of the role of telecare systems and subsequent adaption and embeddedness to context, and uncertainties about the best way to develop, coordinate, and sustain services that assist with chronic disease management. Interventions are therefore needed that (i) reduce uncertainty about the ownership of implementation processes and that lock together health and social care agencies; and (ii) ensure user centred rather than

  12. Web 2.0 chronic disease self-management for older adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellefson, Michael; Chaney, Beth; Barry, Adam E; Chavarria, Enmanuel; Tennant, Bethany; Walsh-Childers, Kim; Sriram, P S; Zagora, Justin

    2013-02-14

    Participatory Web 2.0 interventions promote collaboration to support chronic disease self-management. Growth in Web 2.0 interventions has led to the emergence of e-patient communication tools that enable older adults to (1) locate and share disease management information and (2) receive interactive healthcare advice. The evolution of older e-patients contributing to Web 2.0 health and medical forums has led to greater opportunities for achieving better chronic disease outcomes. To date, there are no review articles investigating the planning, implementation, and evaluation of Web 2.0 chronic disease self-management interventions for older adults. To review the planning, implementation, and overall effectiveness of Web 2.0 self-management interventions for older adults (mean age ≥ 50) with one or more chronic disease(s). A systematic literature search was conducted using six popular health science databases. The RE-AIM (Reach, Efficacy, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance) model was used to organize findings and compute a study quality score (SQS) for 15 reviewed articles. Most interventions were adopted for delivery by multidisciplinary healthcare teams and tested among small samples of white females with diabetes. Studies indicated that Web 2.0 participants felt greater self-efficacy for managing their disease(s) and benefitted from communicating with health care providers and/or website moderators to receive feedback and social support. Participants noted asynchronous communication tools (eg, email, discussion boards) and progress tracking features (eg, graphical displays of uploaded personal data) as being particularly useful for self-management support. Despite high attrition being noted as problematic, this review suggests that greater Web 2.0 engagement may be associated with improvements in health behaviors (eg, physical activity) and health status (eg, HRQoL). However, few studies indicated statistically significant improvements in medication

  13. Quality of chronic kidney disease management in primary care: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gelder, Vincent A; Scherpbier-De Haan, Nynke D; De Grauw, Wim J C; Vervoort, Gerald M M; Van Weel, Chris; Biermans, Marion C J; Braspenning, Jozé C C; Wetzels, Jack F M

    2016-01-01

    Early detection and appropriate management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary care are essential to reduce morbidity and mortality. To assess the quality of care (QoC) of CKD in primary healthcare in relation to patient and practice characteristics in order to tailor improvement strategies. Retrospective study using data between 2008 and 2011 from 47 general practices (207 469 patients of whom 162 562 were adults). CKD management of patients under the care of their general practitioner (GP) was qualified using indicators derived from the Dutch interdisciplinary CKD guideline for primary care and nephrology and included (1) monitoring of renal function, albuminuria, blood pressure, and glucose, (2) monitoring of metabolic parameters, and alongside the guideline: (3) recognition of CKD. The outcome indicator was (4) achieving blood pressure targets. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was applied to identify associated patient and practice characteristics. Kidney function or albuminuria data were available for 59 728 adult patients; 9288 patients had CKD, of whom 8794 were under GP care. Monitoring of disease progression was complete in 42% of CKD patients, monitoring of metabolic parameters in 2%, and blood pressure target was reached in 43.1%. GPs documented CKD in 31.4% of CKD patients. High QoC was strongly associated with diabetes, and to a lesser extent with hypertension and male sex. Room for improvement was found in all aspects of CKD management. As QoC was higher in patients who received structured diabetes care, future CKD care may profit from more structured primary care management, e.g. according to the chronic care model. Quality of care for chronic kidney disease patients in primary care can be improved. In comparison with guideline advice, adequate monitoring of disease progression was observed in 42%, of metabolic parameters in 2%, correct recognition of impaired renal function in 31%, and reaching blood pressure targets in 43% of chronic

  14. Information system support as a critical success factor for chronic disease management: Necessary but not sufficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Carolyn J; Fortin, Patricia; Maclure, Malcolm; Macgregor, Art; Robinson, Sylvia

    2006-12-01

    Improvement of chronic disease management in primary care entails monitoring indicators of quality over time and across patients and practices. Informatics tools are needed, yet implementing them remains challenging. To identify critical success factors enabling the translation of clinical and operational knowledge about effective and efficient chronic care management into primary care practice. A prospective case study of positive deviants using key informant interviews, process observation, and document review. A chronic disease management (CDM) collaborative of primary care physicians with documented improvement in adherence to clinical practice guidelines using a web-based patient registry system with CDM guideline-based flow sheet. Thirty community-based physician participants using predominantly paper records, plus a project management team including the physician lead, project manager, evaluator and support team. A critical success factor (CSF) analysis of necessary and sufficient pathways to the translation of knowledge into clinical practice. A web-based CDM 'toolkit' was found to be a direct CSF that allowed this group of physicians to improve their practice by tracking patient care processes using evidence-based clinical practice guideline-based flow sheets. Moreover, the information and communication technology 'factor' was sufficient for success only as part of a set of seven direct CSF components including: health delivery system enhancements, organizational partnerships, funding mechanisms, project management, practice models, and formal knowledge translation practices. Indirect factors that orchestrated success through the direct factor components were also identified. A central insight of this analysis is that a comprehensive quality improvement model was the CSF that drew this set of factors into a functional framework for successful knowledge translation. In complex primary care settings environment where physicians have low adoption rates of

  15. Chronic disease self-management education courses: utilization by low-income, middle-aged participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrell, Lindsey N; Kneipp, Shawn M; Ahn, SangNam; Towne, Samuel D; Mingo, Chivon A; Ory, Marcia G; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2017-06-27

    Individuals living in lower-income areas face an increased prevalence of chronic disease and, oftentimes, greater barriers to optimal self-management. Disparities in disease management are seen across the lifespan, but are particularly notable among middle-aged adults. Although evidence-based Chronic Disease Self-management Education courses are available to enhance self-management among members of this at-risk population, little information is available to determine the extent to which these courses are reaching those at greatest risk. The purpose of this study is to compare the extent to which middle-aged adults from lower- and higher-income areas have engaged in CDSME courses, and to identify the sociodemographic characteristics of lower-income, middle aged participants. The results of this study were produced through analysis of secondary data collected during the Communities Putting Prevention to Work: Chronic Disease Self-Management Program initiative. During this initiative, data was collected from 100,000 CDSME participants across 45 states within the United States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Of the entire sample included in this analysis (19,365 participants), 55 people lived in the most impoverished counties. While these 55 participants represented just 0.3% of the total study sample, researchers found this group completed courses more frequently than participants from less impoverished counties once enrolled. These results signal a need to enhance participation of middle-aged adults from lower-income areas in CDSME courses. The results also provide evidence that can be used to inform future program delivery choices, including decisions regarding recruitment materials, program leaders, and program delivery sites, to better engage this population.

  16. Integrating co-morbid depression and chronic physical disease management: identifying and resolving failures in self-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detweiler-Bedell, Jerusha B; Friedman, Michael A; Leventhal, Howard; Miller, Ivan W; Leventhal, Elaine A

    2008-12-01

    Research suggests that treatments for depression among individuals with chronic physical disease do not improve disease outcomes significantly, and chronic disease management programs do not necessarily improve mood. For individuals experiencing co-morbid depression and chronic physical disease, demands on the self-regulation system are compounded, leading to a rapid depletion of self-regulatory resources. Because disease and depression management are not integrated, patients lack the understanding needed to prioritize self-regulatory goals in a way that makes disease and depression management synergistic. A framework in which the management of co-morbidity is considered alongside the management of either condition alone offers benefits to researchers and practitioners and may help improve clinical outcomes.

  17. Self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Time for a paradigm shift?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nici, Linda; Bontly, Thomas D; Zuwallack, Richard; Gross, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, centering on an action plan for the exacerbation and enhanced communication between the patient and health care providers, makes good clinical sense. However, five relatively large trials of self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have had inconsistent results: only two demonstrated reductions in health care utilization and one had to be discontinued prematurely because of increased mortality. Do these discordant findings require a paradigm shift in our concept of self-management? Probably not-but an analysis of the negative studies can give us valuable insights. There are data to support the idea that patients in the trial that showed increased mortality did not self-manage appropriately. Only 4.5% of these patients called in before starting treatment for their exacerbation, the time to initiation of antibiotics or steroids was unsatisfactorily long, and the intervention arm used minimally more prednisone and antibiotics than the control arm. The reasons for a higher mortality will likely never be known, but it is possible that these high-risk patients may have needed earlier assessment by a trained professional, or that self-management led to overconfidence and treatment delays. We clearly need more effective ways to implement self-management and better define which groups of patients stand to benefit (or be harmed) by this intervention. This will require an investment in well-thought-out clinical trials.

  18. The role of disease management programs in the health behavior of chronically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Adams, Samantha A; Walters, Bethany Hipple; Tsiachristas, Apostolos; Bal, Roland; Huijsman, Robbert; Rutten-Van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2014-04-01

    Investigate the effects of disease management program (DMP) implementation on physical activity, smoking, and physical quality of life among chronically ill patients. This study used a mixed-methods approach involving qualitative (35 interviews with project managers) and quantitative (survey of patients from 18 DMPs) data collection. Questionnaire response rates were 51% (2010; 2619/5108) at T0 and 47% (2011; 2191/4693) at T1. Physical activity and the percentage of smokers improved significantly over time, whereas physical quality of life declined. After adjusting for patients' physical quality of life at T0, age, educational level, marital status, and gender, physical activity at T0 (pmanagers reported that DMPs improved patient-professional interaction. The ability to set more concrete targets improved patients' health behaviors. DMPs appear to improve physical activity among chronically ill patients over time. Furthermore, (changes in) health behavior are important for the physical quality of life of chronically ill patients. Redesigning care systems and implementing DMPs based on the chronic care model may improve health behavior among chronically ill patients. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of quality chronic disease management for alcohol and drug dependence on addiction outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Theresa W; Saitz, Richard; Cheng, Debbie M; Winter, Michael R; Witas, Julie; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2012-12-01

    We examined the effect of the quality of primary care-based chronic disease management (CDM) for alcohol and/or other drug (AOD) dependence on addiction outcomes. We assessed quality using (1) a visit frequency based measure and (2) a self-reported assessment measuring alignment with the chronic care model. The visit frequency based measure had no significant association with addiction outcomes. The self-reported measure of care-when care was at a CDM clinic-was associated with lower drug addiction severity. The self-reported assessment of care from any healthcare source (CDM clinic or elsewhere) was associated with lower alcohol addiction severity and abstinence. These findings suggest that high quality CDM for AOD dependence may improve addiction outcomes. Quality measures based upon alignment with the chronic care model may better capture features of effective CDM care than a visit frequency measure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The prevention and management of chronic disease in primary care: recommendations from a knowledge translation meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sara; Ware, Patrick; Visca, Regina; Bareil, Celine; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Desforges, Johanne; Finlayson, Roderick; Fortin, Martin; Gauthier, Josée; Grimard, Dominique; Guay, Maryse; Hudon, Catherine; Lalonde, Lyne; Lévesque, Lise; Michaud, Cecile; Provost, Sylvie; Sutton, Tim; Tousignant, Pierre; Travers, Stella; Ware, Mark; Gogovor, Amede

    2015-10-15

    Seven chronic disease prevention and management programs were implemented across Quebec with funding support from a provincial-private industry funding initiative. Given the complexity of implementing integrated primary care chronic disease management programs, a knowledge transfer meeting was held to share experiences across programs and synthesize common challenges and success factors for implementation. The knowledge translation meeting was held in February 2014 in Montreal, Canada. Seventy-five participants consisting of 15 clinicians, 14 researchers, 31 knowledge users, and 15 representatives from the funding agencies were broken up into groups of 10 or 11 and conducted a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats analysis on either the implementation or the evaluation of these chronic disease management programs. Results were reported back to the larger group during a plenary and recorded. Audiotapes were transcribed and summarized using pragmatic thematic analysis. Strengths to leverage for the implementation of the seven programs include: (1) synergy between clinical and research teams; (2) stakeholders working together; (3) motivation of clinicians; and (4) the fact that the programs are evidence-based. Weaknesses to address include: (1) insufficient resources; (2) organizational change within the clinical sites; (3) lack of referrals from primary care physicians; and (4) lack of access to programs. Strengths to leverage for the evaluation of these programs include: (1) engagement of stakeholders and (2) sharing of knowledge between clinical sites. Weaknesses to address include: (1) lack of referrals; (2) difficulties with data collection; and (3) difficulties in identifying indicators and control groups. Opportunities for both themes include: (1) fostering new and existing partnerships and stakeholder relations; (2) seizing funding opportunities; (3) knowledge transfer; (4) supporting the transformation of professional roles; (5) expand the use of

  1. Opportunities for involving men and families in chronic disease management: a qualitative study from Chiapas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Meredith P; Castro, Maricruz; Peña, Liz; López Hernández, Sergio Hernán; Arreola Camacho, Gabriel; Ramírez-Zea, Manuel; Martínez, Homero

    2015-10-05

    A healthy lifestyle intervention was implemented in primary care health centers in urban parts of Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas, Mexico with an aim of reducing cardiovascular disease risk for patients with type 2 diabetes and/or hypertension. During implementation, research questions emerged. Considerably fewer men participated in the intervention than women, and an opportunity was identified to increase the reach of activities aimed at improving disease self-management through strategies involving family members. A qualitative study was conducted to identify strategies to involve men and engage family members in disease management and risk reduction. Nine men with hypertension and/or type 2 diabetes with limited to no participation in disease self-management and health promotion activities, six families in which at least one family member had a diagnosis of one or both conditions, and nine health care providers from four different government health centers were recruited for the study. Participants took part in semi-structured interviews. During interviews with families, genograms and eco-maps were used to diagram family composition and structure, and capture the nature of patients' relationships to the extended family and community resources. Transcripts were coded and a general inductive analytic approach was used to identify themes related to men's limited participation in health promotion activities, family support and barriers to disease management, and health care providers' recommendations. Participants reported barriers to men's participation in chronic disease management and healthy lifestyle education activities that can be grouped into two categories: internal and external factors. Internal factors are those for which they are able to make the decision on their own and external factors are those that are not related solely to their decision to take part or not. Four primary aspects were identified related to families' relationships with disease: different

  2. Exercise physiologists: essential players in interdisciplinary teams for noncommunicable chronic disease management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soan EJ

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Esme J Soan,1–3 Steven J Street,1,2 Sharon M Brownie,3,4 Andrew P Hills1–31Mater Mothers' Hospital, South Brisbane, 2Mater Research Institute – University of Queensland, South Brisbane, 3Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia; 4Green Templeton College, Oxford University, Oxford, UKAbstract: Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, are a growing public health challenge in Australia, accounting for a significant and increasing cost to the health care system. Management of these chronic conditions is aided by interprofessional practice, but models of care require updating to incorporate the latest evidence-based practice. Increasing research evidence reports the benefits of physical activity and exercise on health status and the risk of inactivity to chronic disease development, yet physical activity advice is often the least comprehensive component of care. An essential but as yet underutilized player in NCD prevention and management is the "accredited exercise physiologist," a specialist in the delivery of clinical exercise prescriptions for the prevention or management of chronic and complex conditions. In this article, the existing role of accredited exercise physiologists in interprofessional practice is examined, and an extension of their role proposed in primary health care settings.Keywords: interdisciplinary team, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, exercise physiology, accredited exercise physiologist

  3. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Heart Failure Self-Management Kits for Outpatient Transitions of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Paul; Joseph, Tina; Hale, Genevieve; Moreau, Cynthia; Seamon, Matthew; Jones, Renee

    2018-03-01

    To develop heart failure (HF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) self-management kits in an accountable care organization (ACO) to facilitate patients' self-care and prevent hospital readmissions. Pharmacists practice in an outpatient-based ACO. They participate in interprofessional office visits with providers and independently manage maintenance pharmacotherapies. Pharmacists collaborate with an interprofessional team within the ACO including physicians, nurses, case managers, and paramedics. Two commonly encountered diseases are chronic COPD and HF. Reducing preventable readmissions for these conditions are important quality benchmarks and cost-saving strategies. Pharmacists were responsible for developing HF and COPD self-management kits containing patient education materials and prescriptions to facilitate self-care. Prior to kit development, pharmacists performed a literature review to determine the presence of previously published findings on these topics. The interprofessional team continually evaluates the successes and limitations of this initiative. Pharmacists developed training and instructions for ACO allied health professionals in an effort to incorporate the self-management kits in clinical practice. The initial literature search revealed no studies describing the intervention of interest. Innovative programs designed to help reduce preventable readmissions are lacking in primary care. Implementation of the self-management kits was accepted by interprofessional ACO leadership and is currently being integrated into allied health workflow. Patients at risk for having an exacerbation of COPD or HF should receive self-management strategies. Prompt therapy prior to exacerbations reduces hospital admissions and readmissions, speeds recovery, and slows disease progression. Pharmacist-facilitated implementation of self-management kits may be developed by interprofessional health care teams.

  4. Using expert judgments to improve chronic wasting disease risk management in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oraby, Tamer; Tyshenko, Michael G; Westphal, Margit; Darshan, Shalu; Croteau, Maxine C; Aspinall, Willy; Elsaadany, Susie; Cashman, Neil; Krewski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTARCT Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a neurodegenerative, protein misfolding disease affecting cervids in North America in epidemic proportions. While the existence of CWD has been known for more than 40 years, risk management efforts to date have not been able to curtail the spread of this condition. An expert elicitation exercise was carried out in May 2011 to obtain the views of international experts on both the etiology of CWD and possible CWD risk management strategies. This study presents the results of the following three components of the elicitation exercise: (1) expert views of the most likely scenarios for the evolution of the CWD among cervid populations in Canada, (2) ranking analyses of the importance of direct and indirect transmission routes, and (3) rating analyses of CWD control measures in farmed and wild cervids. The implications of these findings for the development of CWD risk management strategies are described in a Canadian context.

  5. Developing an active implementation model for a chronic disease management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smidth, Margrethe; Christensen, Morten Bondo; Olesen, Frede; Vedsted, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Introduction and diffusion of new disease management programs in healthcare is usually slow, but active theory-driven implementation seems to outperform other implementation strategies. However, we have only scarce evidence on the feasibility and real effect of such strategies in complex primary care settings where municipalities, general practitioners and hospitals should work together. The Central Denmark Region recently implemented a disease management program for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) which presented an opportunity to test an active implementation model against the usual implementation model. The aim of the present paper is to describe the development of an active implementation model using the Medical Research Council's model for complex interventions and the Chronic Care Model. We used the Medical Research Council's five-stage model for developing complex interventions to design an implementation model for a disease management program for COPD. First, literature on implementing change in general practice was scrutinised and empirical knowledge was assessed for suitability. In phase I, the intervention was developed; and in phases II and III, it was tested in a block- and cluster-randomised study. In phase IV, we evaluated the feasibility for others to use our active implementation model. The Chronic Care Model was identified as a model for designing efficient implementation elements. These elements were combined into a multifaceted intervention, and a timeline for the trial in a randomised study was decided upon in accordance with the five stages in the Medical Research Council's model; this was captured in a PaTPlot, which allowed us to focus on the structure and the timing of the intervention. The implementation strategies identified as efficient were use of the Breakthrough Series, academic detailing, provision of patient material and meetings between providers. The active implementation model was tested in a randomised trial

  6. ICT use for information management in healthcare system for chronic disease patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyniak, Zbigniew M.; Lisiecka-Biełanowicz, Mira

    2013-10-01

    Modern healthcare systems are designed to fulfill needs of the patient, his system environment and other determinants of the treatment with proper support of technical aids. A whole system of care is compatible to the technical solutions and organizational framework based on legal rules. The purpose of this study is to present how can we use Information and Communication Technology (ICT) systemic tools in a new model of patient-oriented care, improving the effectiveness of healthcare for patients with chronic diseases. The study material is the long-term process of healthcare for patients with chronic illness. Basing on the knowledge of the whole circumstances of patient's ecosystem and his needs allow us to build a new ICT model of long term care. The method used is construction, modeling and constant improvement the efficient ICT layer for the patient-centered healthcare model. We present a new constructive approach to systemic process how to use ICT for information management in healthcare system for chronic disease patient. The use of ICT tools in the model for chronic disease can improve all aspects of data management and communication, and the effectiveness of long-term complex healthcare. In conclusion: ICT based model of healthcare can be constructed basing on the interactions of ecosystem's functional parts through information feedback and the provision of services and models as well as the knowledge of the patient itself. Systematic approach to the model of long term healthcare assisted functionally by ICT tools and data management methods will increase the effectiveness of patient care and organizational efficiency.

  7. Can a Self-Management Education Program for Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Improve Quality of Life ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manon Labrecque

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of a self-management program on health-related quality of life (HRQoL and morbidity commonly associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.

  8. Self-management programmes for people living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a call for a reconceptualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, Helga

    2013-03-01

    To synthesise findings from previously published studies on the effectiveness of self-management programmes for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Self-management is a widely valued concept to address contemporary issues of chronic health problems. Yet, findings of self-management programmes for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are indecisive. Literature review of (1) previously published systematic reviews and (2) an integrative literature review. Synthesis of findings from previously published systematic reviews (n = 4) of the effectiveness of self-management programmes for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and an integrated review that was performed on papers published between January 2007-June 2012 (n = 9). Findings demonstrate that there are few studies on the effectiveness of self-management programmes on people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease despite more than a decade of research activities. Outcomes of the studies reveal some increase in health-related quality of life and reduction in use of healthcare resources. The methodological approaches vary, and the sample size is primarily small. Families are not acknowledged. Features of patient-centredness exist in self-management programmes, particularly in the more recent articles. The effectiveness of self-management programmes for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remains indecisive. A reconceptualisation of self-management programmes is called for with attention to a family-centred, holistic and relational care focusing on living with and minimising the handicapping consequences of the health problems in their entirety. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management considerations for the dental team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, J

    2014-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects an estimated 3 million people in the United Kingdom, and is most common among elderly smokers. Patients may present with recurrent coughing of mucoid secretions (chronic bronchitis) or breathlessness caused by destruction of the airways (emphysema). If possible, it is advisable to treat the severely affected patients with them sitting upright in the dental chair as they may find it difficult to breathe when lying in the horizontal position. Periodontal bacteria can be carried into the lung where they can cause respiratory infection; therefore oral hygiene instruction should be emphasised in these patients. The objective of this article is to describe the oral and dental implications of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In particular, there have been a number of recent developments in the management of patients with COPD that have direct relevance to the dentist. The drug regime used in the treatment of patients with COPD can have profound implications for clinical dental practice, manifested as dry mouth or oral candidiasis. There is also increasing evidence of a link between COPD and both gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and periodontal disease.

  10. Chronic Diseases Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plan Templates All Chronic Surveillance Systems Communications Center Social Media Press Room Press Release Archives Multimedia Communication Campaigns Publications Chronic Disease Overview 2016–2017 At A ...

  11. Factors contributing to intervention fidelity in a multi-site chronic disease self-management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Karen M; Burke, Somer Goad; O'Connor, Danielle; Walby, Gary; Shippey, Claire; Pitt, Seraphine; McDermott, Robert J; Forthofer, Melinda S

    2006-10-26

    Disease self-management programs have been a popular approach to reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic disease. Replicating an evidence-based disease management program successfully requires practitioners to ensure fidelity to the original program design. The Florida Health Literacy Study (FHLS) was conducted to investigate the implementation impact of the Pfizer, Inc. Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension Disease Self-Management Program based on health literacy principles in 14 community health centers in Florida. The intervention components discussed include health educator recruitment and training, patient recruitment, class sessions, utilization of program materials, translation of program manuals, patient retention and follow-up, and technical assistance. This report describes challenges associated with achieving a balance between adaptation for cultural relevance and fidelity when implementing the health education program across clinic sites. This balance was necessary to achieve effectiveness of the disease self-management program. The FHLS program was implemented with a high degree of fidelity to the original design and used original program materials. Adaptations identified as advantageous to program participation are discussed, such as implementing alternate methods for recruiting patients and developing staff incentives for participation. Effective program implementation depends on the talent, skill and willing participation of clinic staff. Program adaptations that conserve staff time and resources and recognize their contribution can increase program effectiveness without jeopardizing its fidelity.

  12. Factors contributing to intervention fidelity in a multi-site chronic disease self-management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitt Seraphine

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives Disease self-management programs have been a popular approach to reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic disease. Replicating an evidence-based disease management program successfully requires practitioners to ensure fidelity to the original program design. Methods The Florida Health Literacy Study (FHLS was conducted to investigate the implementation impact of the Pfizer, Inc. Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension Disease Self-Management Program based on health literacy principles in 14 community health centers in Florida. The intervention components discussed include health educator recruitment and training, patient recruitment, class sessions, utilization of program materials, translation of program manuals, patient retention and follow-up, and technical assistance. Results This report describes challenges associated with achieving a balance between adaptation for cultural relevance and fidelity when implementing the health education program across clinic sites. This balance was necessary to achieve effectiveness of the disease self-management program. The FHLS program was implemented with a high degree of fidelity to the original design and used original program materials. Adaptations identified as advantageous to program participation are discussed, such as implementing alternate methods for recruiting patients and developing staff incentives for participation. Conclusion Effective program implementation depends on the talent, skill and willing participation of clinic staff. Program adaptations that conserve staff time and resources and recognize their contribution can increase program effectiveness without jeopardizing its fidelity.

  13. More hostile dyslipidaemia in chronic kidney disease patients on maintenance haemodialysis than on conservative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Teerath Kumar; Dhrolia, Murtaza Fakhruddin; Imtiaz, Salman

    2016-08-01

    To study the pattern of dyslipidaemia in patients with stage-V chronic kidney disease on conservative management and those on maintenance haemodialysis. This comparative observational study was conducted at the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from February to July, 2008, and comprised stage-V chronic kidney disease patients. The patients were divided in two groups. Those who were on conservative management were placed in Group A, and those who were on maintenance haemodialysis were in Group B. Serum total lipid, cholesterol, triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein for both groups were assayed on chemical analyser and low-density lipoprotein was calculated by Friedwald equation. SPSS 17 was used for data analysis. Of the 120 patients, there were 60(50%) in each group. The mean age of patients in Group A was 46.33±14.56 years and in Group B was 43.4±14.1years. Of all, 64(53.3%) were men and 56(46.7%) were women. Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure was 134±19.58mmHg and 83.6±14.14mmHg in Group A and 129±19.7mmHg and 79.7±12.1mmHg in Group B. Mean serum total lipid was significantly higher (pmaintenance haemodialysis was more hostile than those on conservative management, and posed increased risk of coronary heart disease.

  14. Integration of complementary and alternative medicine information and advice in chronic disease management guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Team, Victoria; Canaway, Rachel; Manderson, Lenore

    2011-01-01

    The growing evidence on the benefits and risks of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its high rate of use (69% of Australians) - particularly for chronic or recurrent conditions - means increasing attention on CAM. However, few people disclose CAM use to their GP, and health professionals tend to inadequately discuss CAM-related issues with their patients, partly due to insufficient knowledge. As clinical and non-clinical chronic condition management guidelines are a means to educate primary health care practitioners, we undertook a content analysis of guidelines relevant to two common chronic conditions - cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) - to assess their provision of CAM-related information. Ten current Australian guidelines were reviewed, revealing scant CAM content. When available, the CAM-relevant information was brief, in some cases unclear, inconclusive and lacking in direction to the GP or health care provider. Although we focus on CVD and T2DM, we argue the value of all chronic condition management guidelines integrating relevant evidence-informed information and advice on CAM risks, benefits and referrals, to increase GP awareness and knowledge of appropriate CAM therapies, and potentially to facilitate doctor-client discussion about CAM.

  15. Validation of the shortened Perceived Medical Condition Self-Management Scale in patients with chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Marcus G; Ostini, Remo; Harrington, Magdalena; Cavanaugh, Kerri L; Wallston, Kenneth A

    2018-05-21

    Self-efficacy, or perceived competence, has been identified as an important factor in self-management behaviors and health outcomes in patients with chronic disease. Measures of self-management self-efficacy are currently available for multiple forms of chronic disease. One established measure is the 8-item Perceived Medical Condition Self-Management Scale (PMCSMS). This study investigated the use of the PMCSMS in samples of patients with a chronic disease to develop an abbreviated version of the scale that could be more readily used in clinical contexts or in large population health cohort studies. The PMCSMS was administered as either a generic scale or as a disease-specific scale. The results of analyses using item response theory and classical test theory methods indicated that using 4 items of the scale resulted in similar internal consistency (α = .70-0.90) and temporal stability (test-retest r = .75 after 2 to 4 weeks) to the 8-item PMCSMS (r = .81 after 2 to 4 weeks). The 4 items selected had the greatest discriminability among participants (α parameters = 2.49-3.47). Scores from both versions also demonstrated similar correlations with related constructs such as health literacy (r = .13-0.29 vs. 0.14-0.27), self-rated health (r = .17-0.48 vs. 0.26-0.50), social support (r = .21-0.32 vs. 0.25-0.34), and medication adherence (r = .20-0.24 vs. 0.20-0.25). The results of this study indicate that 4-item PMCSMS scores are equally valid but more efficient, and have the potential to be beneficial for both research and clinical applications. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Engaging general practice nurses in chronic disease self-management support in Australia: insights from a controlled trial in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Julia A E; Courtney-Pratt, Helen; Cameron-Tucker, Helen; Nelson, Mark; Robinson, Andrew; Scott, Jenn; Turner, Paul; Walters, E Haydn; Wood-Baker, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The growing burden of chronic disease will increase the role of primary care in supporting self-management and health behaviour change. This role could be undertaken to some extent by the increased practice nurse workforce that has occurred over recent years. Mixed methods were used to investigate the potential for general practice nurses to adopt this role during a 12-month randomised controlled study of telephone-delivered health mentoring in Tasmanian practices. Nurses (general practice and community health) were trained as health mentors to assist chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients to identify and achieve personal health related goals through action plans. Of 21% of invited practices that responded, 19 were allocated to health mentoring; however, general practice nurses were unable to train as health mentors in 14 (74%), principally due to lack of financial compensation and/or workload pressure. For five general practice nurses trained as health mentors, their roles had previously included some chronic disease management, but training enhanced their understanding and skills of self-management approaches and increased the focus on patient partnership, prioritising patients' choices and achievability. Difficulties that led to early withdrawal of health mentors were competing demands, insufficient time availability, phone calls having lower priority than face-to-face interactions and changing employment. Skills gained were rated as valuable, applicable to all clinical practice and transferable to other health care settings. Although these results suggest that training can enhance general practice nurses' skills to deliver self-management support in chronic disease, there are significant system barriers that need to be addressed through funding models and organisational change.

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and comorbidity: possible implications in the disease management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierluigi Paggiaro

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is becoming the first cause of pulmonary disability and death. Because of the increase in the mean age of the population, COPD is frequently associated with important comorbidities that require medical attention. In the last 10 years many observational studies (large surveys of population or databases of the main health organisations or of General Practitioners in different Countries have extensively documented that many diseases (cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, diabetes, depression, and lung cancer have a higher prevalence in COPD patients than in non-COPD ones (after correction for many confounding factors, such as smoking habit. There are two different views relating the association between COPD and comorbidities. These comorbidities may be just randomly associated with COPD (due to common risk factors including age, but many data support the hypothesis that chronic inflammation derived from airway wall and lung parenchima of COPD patients may “spill over” the systemic circulation and mediate, at least partially, negative effects on other organs or systems. Some comorbidities seem more commonly associated with the functional abnormalities of COPD (like skeletal muscle dysfunction and malnutrition, or osteoporosis, which are related to the inactivity due to dyspnoea, while for others the systemic effect of some cytokines (IL-6,TNFalfa, etc. or mediators (CRP, serum amyloid A, etc. may play a role.Since comorbidities represent major causes of death in COPD patients, and are responsible of poorer quality of life and hospitalisation during COPD exacerbations, their presence requires a new approach, including an interdisciplinary co-operation and the use of specific strategies able to affect the several pulmonary and extra-pulmonary components of the disease. New pharmacologic options (such as roflumilast active on both pulmonary and extra-pulmonary inflammation might be

  18. Developing a framework to generate evidence of health outcomes from social media use in chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merolli, Mark; Gray, Kathleen; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    While there is an abundance of evidence-based practice (EBP) recommendations guiding management of various chronic diseases, evidence suggesting best practice for using social media to improve health outcomes is inadequate. The variety of social media platforms, multiple potential uses, inconsistent definitions, and paucity of rigorous studies, make it difficult to measure health outcomes reliably in chronic disease management. Most published investigations report on an earlier generation of online tools, which are not as user-centered, participatory, engaging, or collaborative, and thus may work differently for health self-management. The challenge to establish a sound evidence base for social media use in chronic disease starts with the need to define criteria and methods to generate and evaluate evidence. The authors' key objective is to develop a framework for research and practice that addresses this challenge. This paper forms part of a larger research project that presents a conceptual framework of how evidence of health outcomes can be generated from social media use, allowing social media to be utilized in chronic disease management more effectively. Using mixed methods incorporating a qualitative literature review, a survey and a pilot intervention, the research closely examines the therapeutic affordances of social media, people with chronic pain (PWCP) as a subset of chronic disease management, valid outcome measurement of patient-reported (health) outcomes (PRO), the individual needs of people living with chronic disease, and finally translation of the combined results to improve evidence-based decision making about social media use in this context. Extensive review highlights various affordances of social media that may prove valuable to understanding social media's effect on individual health outcomes. However, without standardized PRO instruments, we are unable to definitively investigate these effects. The proposed framework that we offer outlines

  19. Self-management interventions including action plans for exacerbations versus usual care in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenferink, Anke; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; van der Valk, Paul; Frith, Peter A.; Zwerink, Marlies; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; van der Palen, J.A.M.; Effing, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    Background  Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) self-management interventions should be structured but personalised and often multi-component, with goals ofmotivating, engaging and supporting the patients to positively adapt their behaviour(s) and develop skills to better manage disease.

  20. Self-management interventions including action plans for exacerbations versus usual care in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenferink, Anke; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; van der Valk, Paul D.L.P.M.; Frith, Peter A.; Zwerink, Marlies; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; van der Palen, Job; Effing-Tijdhof, Tanja W

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) self-management interventions should be structured but personalised and often multi-component, with goals of motivating, engaging and supporting the patients to positively adapt their behaviour(s) and develop skills to better manage disease.

  1. Using intervention mapping (IM to develop a self-management programme for employees with a chronic disease in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heerkens Yvonne F

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Employees with a chronic disease often encounter problems at work because of their chronic disease. The current paper describes the development of a self-management programme based on the Chronic Disease Self-Management programme (CDSMP of Stanford University to help employees with a chronic somatic disease cope with these problems at work. The objective of this article is to present the systematic development and content of this programme. Methods The method of intervention mapping (Bartholomew 2006 was used to tailor the original CDSMP for employees with a chronic somatic disease. This paper describes the process of adjusting the CDSMP for this target group. A needs assessment has been carried out by a literature review and qualitative focus groups with employees with a chronic disease and involved health professionals. On the basis of the needs assessment, the relevant determinants of self-management behaviour at work have been identified for the target population and the objectives of the training have been formulated. Furthermore, techniques have been chosen to influence self-management and the determinants of behaviour and a programme plan has been developed. Results The intervention was designed to address general personal factors such as lifestyle, disease-related factors (for example coping with the disease and work-related personal factors (such as self-efficacy at work. The course consists of six sessions of each two and a half hour and intents to increase the self management and empowerment of employees with a chronic somatic disease. Conclusion Intervention mapping has been found to be a useful tool for tailoring in a systematic way the original CDSMP for employees with a chronic somatic disease. It might be valuable to use IM for the development or adjusting of interventions in occupational health care.

  2. Management and prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: a state of the art review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wedzicha Jadwiga A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are important events in the natural history of this prevalent and devastating condition. This review provides a concise, state of the art summary on prevention and management of exacerbations. Considerable new data underpins evidence in support of many preventative interventions, pharmacological and non-pharmacological, that are now available. Challenges remain in developing new approaches, and delivering those that already exist to the right patient at the right time. Management of an exacerbation remains stepwise according to clinical severity, but there is now additional focus on addressing comorbidities and taking the opportunity at acute events to optimise preventative strategies for the future. Ultimately, exacerbations are heterogeneous events in a heterogeneous disease, and an individualised approach is paramount.

  3. Total management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Katsuya

    2017-08-01

    Patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) often have multiple comorbid conditions that may interact with each other, confound the choice of treatments, and reduce mortality. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most important comorbidities of CVD, which causes serious consequences in patients with ischemic heart disease, stroke, arrhythmia, and heart failure. COPD shares common risk factors such as tobacco smoking and aging with CVD, is associated with less physical activity, and produces systemic inflammation and oxidative stress. Overall, patients with COPD have a 2-3-fold increased risk of CVD as compared to age-matched controls when adjusted for tobacco smoking. Chronic heart failure (HF) is a frequent and important comorbidity which has a significant impact on prognosis in COPD, and vice versa. HF overlaps in symptoms and signs and has a common comorbidity with COPD, so that diagnosis of COPD is difficult in patients with HF. The combination of HF and COPD presents many therapeutic challenges including beta-blockers (BBs) and beta-agonists. Inhaled long-acting bronchodilators including beta2-agonists and anticholinergics for COPD would not worsen HF. Diuretics are relatively safe, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are preferred to treat HF accompanied with COPD. BBs are only relatively contraindicated in asthma, but not in COPD. Low doses of cardioselective BBs should be aggressively initiated in clinically stable patients with HF accompanied with COPD combined with close monitoring for signs of airway obstruction and gradually up-titrated to the maximum tolerated dose. Encouraging appropriate and aggressive treatment for both HF and COPD should be recommended to improve quality of life and mortality in HF patients with COPD. Copyright © 2017 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Understanding the process of patient satisfaction with nurse-led chronic disease management in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Rosemary; St John, Winsome; Patterson, Elizabeth

    2012-11-01

      To investigate the process of patient satisfaction with nurse-led chronic disease management in Australian general practice.   Nurses working in the primary care context of general practice, referred to as practice nurses, are expanding their role in chronic disease management; this is relatively new to Australia. Therefore, determining patient satisfaction with this trend is pragmatically and ethically important. However, the concept of patient satisfaction is not well understood particularly in relation to care provided by practice nurses.   A grounded theory study underpinned by a relativist ontological position and a relativist epistemology.   Grounded theory was used to develop a theory from data collected through in-depth interviews with 38 participants between November 2007-April 2009. Participants were drawn from a larger project that trialled a practice nurse-led, collaborative model of chronic disease management in three Australian general practices. Theoretical sampling, data collection, and analysis were conducted concurrently consistent with grounded theory methods.   Patients undergo a cyclical process of Navigating Care involving three stages, Determining Care Needs, Forming Relationship, and Having Confidence. The latter two processes are inter-related and a feedback loop from them informs subsequent cycles of Determining Care Needs. If any of these steps fails to develop adequately, patients are likely to opt out of nurse-led care.   Navigating Care explains how and why time, communication, continuity, and trust in general practitioners and nurses are important to patient satisfaction. It can be used in identifying suitable patients for practice nurse-led care and to inform the practice and organization of practice nurse-led care to enhance patient satisfaction. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Designing and delivering facilitated storytelling interventions for chronic disease self-management: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucciardi, Enza; Jean-Pierre, Nicole; Karam, Grace; Sidani, Souraya

    2016-07-11

    Little is known about how to develop and deliver storytelling as an intervention to support those managing chronic illnesses. This scoping review aims to describe the core elements of storytelling interventions in order to help facilitate its implementation. A scoping review was conducted in seven databases for articles published up to May 2014 to identify interventions that describe in detail how storytelling was used to support people in disease self-management interventions. Ten articles met all inclusion criteria. Core elements consistently observed across the storytelling interventions were: reflection and interactive meaning-making of experiences; principles of informality and spontaneity; non-directional and non-hierarchical facilitation; development of group norms and conduct to create a community among participants; and both an individual and collective role for participants. Differences were also observed across interventions, such as: the conceptual frameworks that directed the design of the intervention; the type and training of facilitators; intervention duration; and how session topics were selected and stories delivered. Furthermore, evaluation of the intervention and outcome assessment varied greatly across studies. The use of storytelling can be a novel intervention to enhance chronic disease self-management. The core elements identified in the review inform the development of the intervention to be more patient-centred by guiding participants to take ownership of and lead the intervention, which differs significantly from traditional support groups. Storytelling has the potential to provide patients with a more active role in their health care by identifying their specific needs as well as gaps in knowledge and skills, while allowing them to form strong bonds with peers who share similar disease-related experiences. However, measures of impact differed across interventions given the variation in chronic conditions. Our findings can guide future

  6. Impact of mHealth chronic disease management on treatment adherence and patient outcomes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamine, Saee; Gerth-Guyette, Emily; Faulx, Dunia; Green, Beverly B; Ginsburg, Amy Sarah

    2015-02-24

    Adherence to chronic disease management is critical to achieving improved health outcomes, quality of life, and cost-effective health care. As the burden of chronic diseases continues to grow globally, so does the impact of non-adherence. Mobile technologies are increasingly being used in health care and public health practice (mHealth) for patient communication, monitoring, and education, and to facilitate adherence to chronic diseases management. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the effectiveness of mHealth in supporting the adherence of patients to chronic diseases management ("mAdherence"), and the usability, feasibility, and acceptability of mAdherence tools and platforms in chronic disease management among patients and health care providers. We searched PubMed, Embase, and EBSCO databases for studies that assessed the role of mAdherence in chronic disease management of diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and chronic lung diseases from 1980 through May 2014. Outcomes of interest included effect of mHealth on patient adherence to chronic diseases management, disease-specific clinical outcomes after intervention, and the usability, feasibility, and acceptability of mAdherence tools and platforms in chronic disease management among target end-users. In all, 107 articles met all inclusion criteria. Short message service was the most commonly used mAdherence tool in 40.2% (43/107) of studies. Usability, feasibility, and acceptability or patient preferences for mAdherence interventions were assessed in 57.9% (62/107) of studies and found to be generally high. A total of 27 studies employed randomized controlled trial (RCT) methods to assess impact on adherence behaviors, and significant improvements were observed in 15 of those studies (56%). Of the 41 RCTs that measured effects on disease-specific clinical outcomes, significant improvements between groups were reported in 16 studies (39%). There is potential for mHealth tools to

  7. Harnessing collaborative technology to accelerate achievement of chronic disease management objectives for Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Leslee J; Healey, Lindsay; Falk, Will

    2007-01-01

    Morgan and colleagues put forth a call to action for the transformation of the Canadian healthcare system through the adoption of a national chronic disease prevention and management (CDPM) strategy. They offer examples of best practices and national solutions including investment in clinical information technologies to help support improved care and outcomes. Although we acknowledge that the authors propose CDPM solutions that are headed in the right direction, more rapid deployment of solutions that harness the potential of advanced collaborative technologies is required. We provide examples of how technologies that exist today can help to accelerate the achievement of some key CDPM objectives.

  8. Predicting changes in hypertension control using electronic health records from a chronic disease management program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jimeng; McNaughton, Candace D; Zhang, Ping; Perer, Adam; Gkoulalas-Divanis, Aris; Denny, Joshua C; Kirby, Jacqueline; Lasko, Thomas; Saip, Alexander; Malin, Bradley A

    2014-01-01

    Objective Common chronic diseases such as hypertension are costly and difficult to manage. Our ultimate goal is to use data from electronic health records to predict the risk and timing of deterioration in hypertension control. Towards this goal, this work predicts the transition points at which hypertension is brought into, as well as pushed out of, control. Method In a cohort of 1294 patients with hypertension enrolled in a chronic disease management program at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center, patients are modeled as an array of features derived from the clinical domain over time, which are distilled into a core set using an information gain criteria regarding their predictive performance. A model for transition point prediction was then computed using a random forest classifier. Results The most predictive features for transitions in hypertension control status included hypertension assessment patterns, comorbid diagnoses, procedures and medication history. The final random forest model achieved a c-statistic of 0.836 (95% CI 0.830 to 0.842) and an accuracy of 0.773 (95% CI 0.766 to 0.780). Conclusions This study achieved accurate prediction of transition points of hypertension control status, an important first step in the long-term goal of developing personalized hypertension management plans. PMID:24045907

  9. Predicting changes in hypertension control using electronic health records from a chronic disease management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jimeng; McNaughton, Candace D; Zhang, Ping; Perer, Adam; Gkoulalas-Divanis, Aris; Denny, Joshua C; Kirby, Jacqueline; Lasko, Thomas; Saip, Alexander; Malin, Bradley A

    2014-01-01

    Common chronic diseases such as hypertension are costly and difficult to manage. Our ultimate goal is to use data from electronic health records to predict the risk and timing of deterioration in hypertension control. Towards this goal, this work predicts the transition points at which hypertension is brought into, as well as pushed out of, control. In a cohort of 1294 patients with hypertension enrolled in a chronic disease management program at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center, patients are modeled as an array of features derived from the clinical domain over time, which are distilled into a core set using an information gain criteria regarding their predictive performance. A model for transition point prediction was then computed using a random forest classifier. The most predictive features for transitions in hypertension control status included hypertension assessment patterns, comorbid diagnoses, procedures and medication history. The final random forest model achieved a c-statistic of 0.836 (95% CI 0.830 to 0.842) and an accuracy of 0.773 (95% CI 0.766 to 0.780). This study achieved accurate prediction of transition points of hypertension control status, an important first step in the long-term goal of developing personalized hypertension management plans.

  10. Chikungunya Arthritis: Implications of Acute and Chronic Inflammation Mechanisms on Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaid, Ali; Gérardin, Patrick; Taylor, Adam; Mostafavi, Helen; Malvy, Denis; Mahalingam, Suresh

    2018-04-01

    In the past decade, arboviruses-arthropod-borne viruses-have been the focus of public health institutions worldwide following a spate of devastating outbreaks. Chikungunya virus, an arbovirus that belongs to the alphavirus genus, is a reemerging arthritogenic virus that has caused explosive outbreaks since 2006, notably on Réunion Island, and more recently in the Caribbean, South America, India, and Southeast Asia. The severity of arthritic disease caused by chikungunya virus has prompted public health authorities in affected countries to develop specific guidelines to tackle this pathogen. Chikungunya virus disease manifests first as an acute stage of severe joint inflammation and febrile illness, which later progresses to a chronic stage, during which patients may experience debilitating and persisting articular pain for extended periods. This review aims to provide a broad perspective on current knowledge of chikungunya virus pathogenesis by identifying key clinical and experimental studies that have contributed to our understanding of chikungunya virus to date. In addition, the review explores the practical aspects of treatment and management of both acute and chronic chikungunya virus based on clinical experience during chikungunya virus outbreaks. Finally, recent findings on potential therapeutic solutions-from antiviral agents to immunomodulators-are reviewed to provide both viral immunologists and clinical rheumatologists with a balanced perspective on the nature of a reemerging arboviral disease of significant public health concern, and insight into future therapeutic approaches to better address the treatment and management of chikungunya virus. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Chronic disease management in general practice: results from a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darker, C; Martin, C; O'Dowd, T; O'Kelly, F; O'Shea, B

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to provide baseline data on chronic disease management (CDM) provision in Irish general practice (GP). The survey instrument was previously used in a study of primary care physicians in 11 countries, thus allowing international comparisons. The response rate was 72% (380/527).The majority of GPs (240/380; 63%) reported significant changes are needed in our health care system to make CDM work better. Small numbers of routine clinical audits are being performed (95/380; 25%). Irish GPs use evidence based guidelines for treatment of diabetes (267/380; 71%), asthma / COPD (279/380; 74%) and hypertension (297/380; 79%), to the same extent as international counterparts. Barriers to delivering chronic care include increased workload (379/380; 99%), lack of appropriate funding (286/380; 76%), with GPs interested in targeted payments (244/380; 68%). This study provides baseline data to assess future changes in CDM.

  12. Chronic disease management in general practice: results from a national study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Darker, C

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to provide baseline data on chronic disease management (CDM) provision in Irish general practice (GP). The survey instrument was previously used in a study of primary care physicians in 11 countries, thus allowing international comparisons. The response rate was 72% (380\\/527).The majority of GPs (240\\/380; 63%) reported significant changes are needed in our health care system to make CDM work better. Small numbers of routine clinical audits are being performed (95\\/380; 25%). Irish GPs use evidence based guidelines for treatment of diabetes (267\\/380; 71%), asthma \\/ COPD (279\\/380; 74%) and hypertension (297\\/380; 79%), to the same extent as international counterparts. Barriers to delivering chronic care include increased workload (379\\/380; 99%), lack of appropriate funding (286\\/380; 76%), with GPs interested in targeted payments (244\\/380; 68%). This study provides baseline data to assess future changes in CDM.

  13. Social Support: a Key Variable for Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Management in Hispanic Patients with Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa T. Brooks

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases, including rheumatic diseases, can cause immense physical and psychosocial burden for patients. Many Hispanics suffering with arthritis face activity limitations. Social support, or the functional content of relationships, may be important to consider when examining treatment and outcomes for Hispanic individuals. Participants were recruited from an urban community health center (CHC as part of a larger health behavior study. A cross-sectional, descriptive, mixed methods analysis was conducted to explore the role of social support in the sample. Only Hispanic/Latino patients (n = 46 were included in this analysis. Interviews were conducted in both English and Spanish. The majority of the sample (87% perceived some presence of social support in their lives. The two most commonly cited types of social support were emotional and instrumental. The two most common sources of social support were family members other than spouses (52.2% and spouses (32.6%. Body mass index (BMI was significantly correlated with the number of perceived sources of support. The presence or absence and the role of social support in supporting optimal health outcomes should be considered for Hispanics with chronic rheumatic diseases. Involving family members and spouses in the plan of care for this population could facilitate health promotion and chronic disease management.

  14. Understanding the management of early-stage chronic kidney disease in primary care: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeman, Tom; Protheroe, Joanne; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Rogers, Anne; Kennedy, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary care is recognised to have an important role in the delivery of care for people with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, there is evidence that CKD management is currently suboptimal, with a range of practitioner concerns about its management. Aim To explore processes underpinning the implementation of CKD management in primary care. Design and setting Qualitative study in general practices participating in a chronic kidney disease collaborative undertaken as part of the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) for Greater Manchester. Method Semi-structured interviews were conducted with GPs and practice nurses (n = 21). Normalisation Process Theory provided a framework for generation and analysis of the data. Results A predominant theme was anxiety about the disclosure of early-stage CKD with patients. The tensions experienced related to identifying and discussing CKD in older people and patients with stage 3A, embedding early-stage CKD within vascular care, and the distribution of work within the practice team. Participants provided accounts of work undertaken to resolve the difficulties encountered, with efforts having tended to focus on reassuring patients. Analysis also highlighted how anxiety surrounding disclosure influenced, and was shaped by, the organisation of care for people with CKD and associated long-term conditions. Conclusion Offering reassurance alone may be of limited benefit, and current management of early-stage CKD in primary care may miss opportunities to address susceptibility to kidney injury, improve self-management of vascular conditions, and improve the management of multimorbidity. PMID:22520910

  15. Chronic kidney disease risk reduction in a Hispanic population through pharmacist-based disease-state management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Sandra; Soto, Marisa

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of a pharmacist-based disease-state management service to improve the care of indigent, predominately Spanish-speaking patients with diabetes mellitus and common comorbid conditions at high risk for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Patients at high risk for developing CKD who have diabetes at a community health center were placed in a pharmacist-based disease state management service for CKD risk reduction. A residency-trained, bilingual, certified diabetes educator, with a PharmD served as the patient's provider using diagnostic, educational, and therapeutic management services under a medical staff approved collaborative practice agreement. Outcomes were assessed by using national standards of care for disease control and prevention screening. The impact on CKD was shown with a mean A1C decrease of 2% and improvement in the proportion of patients at target goals for blood pressure, A1C, and cholesterol levels and receiving aspirin and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker. A pharmacist-based disease-state management service for CKD risk reduction, care of diabetes, and frequently associated comorbid conditions improved compliance with national standards for diabetes care in a high-risk population.

  16. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth / For Kids / Chronic Kidney Diseases What's ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  17. The self-management experience of patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazian, Shayan; Crnosija, Natalie; Weinger, Katie; Jacobson, Alan M; Park, Joonho; Tanenbaum, Molly L; Gonzalez, Jeffrey S; Mattana, Joseph; Hammock, Amy C

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore views related to the self-management of type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. We conducted three semi-structured focus groups in participants with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Credibility was supported through triangulation of data sources and the use of multiple investigators from different disciplines. Twenty-three adults participated. Three major themes were identified: emotional reactions to health state, the impact of family dynamics on self-management, and the burden of self-management regimens. Family dynamics were found to be a barrier and support to self-management, while complicated self-management regimens were found to be a barrier. Additionally, participants expressed several emotional reactions related to their CKD status, including regret related to having developed CKD and distress related both to their treatment regimens and the future possibility of dialysis. This exploratory study of patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease describes barriers and supports to self-management and emotional reactions to chronic kidney disease status. Future research should confirm these findings in a larger population and should include family members and/or health care providers to help further define problems with self-management in patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Connected health and integrated care: Toward new models for chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouvarda, Ioanna G; Goulis, Dimitrios G; Lambrinoudaki, Irene; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2015-09-01

    The increasingly aging population in Europe and worldwide brings up the need for the restructuring of healthcare. Technological advancements in electronic health can be a driving force for new health management models, especially in chronic care. In a patient-centered e-health management model, communication and coordination between patient, healthcare professionals in primary care and hospitals can be facilitated, and medical decisions can be made timely and easily communicated. Bringing the right information to the right person at the right time is what connected health aims at, and this may set the basis for the investigation and deployment of the integrated care models. In this framework, an overview of the main technological axes and challenges around connected health technologies in chronic disease management are presented and discussed. A central concept is personal health system for the patient/citizen and three main application areas are identified. The connected health ecosystem is making progress, already shows benefits in (a) new biosensors, (b) data management, (c) data analytics, integration and feedback. Examples are illustrated in each case, while open issues and challenges for further research and development are pinpointed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A game plan: Gamification design principles in mHealth applications for chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aaron S; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Seto, Emily

    2016-06-01

    Effective chronic disease management is essential to improve positive health outcomes, and incentive strategies are useful in promoting self-care with longevity. Gamification, applied with mHealth (mobile health) applications, has the potential to better facilitate patient self-management. This review article addresses a knowledge gap around the effective use of gamification design principles, or mechanics, in developing mHealth applications. Badges, leaderboards, points and levels, challenges and quests, social engagement loops, and onboarding are mechanics that comprise gamification. These mechanics are defined and explained from a design and development perspective. Health and fitness applications with gamification mechanics include: bant which uses points, levels, and social engagement, mySugr which uses challenges and quests, RunKeeper which uses leaderboards as well as social engagement loops and onboarding, Fitocracy which uses badges, and Mango Health, which uses points and levels. Specific design considerations are explored, an example of the efficacy of a gamified mHealth implementation in facilitating improved self-management is provided, limitations to this work are discussed, a link between the principles of gaming and gamification in health and wellness technologies is provided, and suggestions for future work are made. We conclude that gamification could be leveraged in developing applications with the potential to better facilitate self-management in persons with chronic conditions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Short-term Evaluation of a Comprehensive Education Program Including Inhaler Training and Disease Management on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Kwang Ha; Chung, Wou Young; Park, Joo Hun; Hwang, Sung Chul; Kim, Tae Eun; Oh, Min Jung; Kang, Dae Ryong; Rhee, Chin Kook; Yoon, Hyoung Kyu; Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Park, Yong Bum; Kim, Sang Ha; Yum, Ho Kee

    2017-10-01

    Proper education regarding inhaler usage and optimal management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is essential for effectively treating patients with COPD. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a comprehensive education program including inhaler training and COPD management. We enlisted 127 patients with COPD on an outpatient basis at 43 private clinics in Korea. The patients were educated on inhaler usage and disease management for three visits across 2 weeks. Physicians and patients were administered a COPD assessment test (CAT) and questionnaires about the correct usage of inhalers and management of COPD before commencement of this program and after their third visit. The outcomes of 127 COPD patients were analyzed. CAT scores (19.6±12.5 vs. 15.1±12.3) improved significantly after this program (pmanagement and the correct technique for using inhalers than those who did not have improved CAT scores (peducation program including inhaler training and COPD management at a primary care setting improved CAT scores and led to patients' better understanding of COPD management. Copyright©2017. The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Vijayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec to FVC (forced vital capacity ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure, hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity, bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia, stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

  2. A Chronic Disease Management Student-Faculty Collaborative Practice: Educating Students on Innovation in Health Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remus, Kristin E; Honigberg, Michael; Tummalapalli, Sri Lekha; Cohen, Laura P; Fazio, Sara; Weinstein, Amy R

    2016-07-01

    In the current transformative health care landscape, it is imperative that clinician educators inspire future clinicians to practice primary care in a dynamic environment. A focus on patient-centered, goal-oriented care for patients with chronic conditions is critical. In 2009, Harvard Medical School founded the Crimson Care Collaborative, a student-faculty collaborative practice (SFCP) network. With the aim of expanding clinical and educational opportunities for medical students and improving patient control of chronic disease (i.e., hypertension, obesity, and diabetes) in an innovative learning environment, in 2012, the authors developed a novel SFCP at their hospital-based academic primary care practice. In this SFCP, students learn to explore patient priorities, provide focused counseling and education, and assist patients with self-management goals during clinical visits. From 2012 to 2014, 250 student volunteers participated in the SFCP as clinicians, innovators, educators, and leaders, with between 80 and 95 medical students engaging each semester. Between January 2012 and March 2014, there were 476 urgent care or chronic disease management visits. Patients with chronic diseases were seen at least twice on average, and by 2014, chronic disease management visits accounted for approximately 74% of visits. Work is under way to create assessment tools to evaluate the practice's educa tional impact and student understanding of the current health care system, develop interdisciplinary care teams, expand efforts in registry management and broaden the patient recruitment scope, further emphasize patient engage ment and retention, and evaluate chronic disease management and patient satisfaction effectiveness.

  3. Management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: criteria for an appropriate hospital discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Candela

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Low adherence with prescribed treatments is very common in chronic diseases and represents a significant barrier to optimal management, with both clinical and economic consequences. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, poor adherence, also in terms of premature discontinuation of therapy or improper use of inhaler devices, leads to increased risk of clinical deterioration. By contrast, adherence to appropriate long-term maintenance therapy is associated with improved quality of life and significantly lower risks of hospitalization and re-hospitalization, resulting in important health benefits for the individual patient and a reduction in costs for the national health services. In considering strategies to improve adherence, three main aspects should be addressed: i patient education; ii pharmacological alternatives and correct use of inhalers; and iii adherence to COPD guidelines for appropriate therapy. In this field, healthcare providers play a critical role in helping patients understand the nature of their disease and its management, explaining the potential benefits and adverse effects of treatment, and teaching or checking the correct inhalation technique. These are important issues for patient management, particularly in the immediate aftermath of hospital discharge, because the high risk of re-admission is mainly due to inadequate treatment. Thus, discharge procedure should be considered a key element in the healthcare continuum from the hospital to primary care. This implies an integrated model of care delivery by all relevant health providers. In this context, we developed a structured COPD discharge form that we hope will improve the management of COPD patients, particularly in the aftermath of hospital discharge.

  4. General practitioners' perspectives on management of early-stage chronic kidney disease: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dipten, Carola; van Berkel, Saskia; de Grauw, Wim J C; Scherpbier-de Haan, Nynke D; Brongers, Bouke; van Spaendonck, Karel; Wetzels, Jack F M; Assendelft, Willem J J; Dees, Marianne K

    2018-06-06

    Guideline adherence in chronic kidney disease management is low, despite guideline implementation initiatives. Knowing general practitioners' (GPs') perspectives of management of early-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the applicability of the national interdisciplinary guideline could support strategies to improve quality of care. Qualitative focus group study with 27 GPs in the Netherlands. Three analysts open-coded and comparatively analysed the data. Mind-mapping sessions were performed after data-saturation. Five themes emerged: defining CKD, knowledge and awareness, patient-physician interaction, organisation of CKD care and value of the guideline. A key finding was the abstractness of the CKD concept. The GPs expressed various perspectives about defining CKD and interpreting estimated glomerular filtration rates. Views about clinical relevance influenced the decision-making, although factual knowledge seems lacking. Striving to inform well enough without creating anxiety and to explain suitably for the intellectual ability of the patient caused tension in the patient-physician interaction. Integration with cardiovascular disease-management programmes was mentioned as a way of implementing CKD care in the future. The guideline was perceived as a rough guide rather than a leading document. CKD is perceived as an abstract rather than a clinical concept. Abstractness plays a role in all formulated themes. Management of CKD patients in primary care is complex and is influenced by physician-bound considerations related to individual knowledge and perception of the importance of CKD. Strategies are needed to improve GPs' understanding of the concept of CKD by education, a holistic approach to guidelines, and integration of CKD care into cardiovascular programmes. Not applicable.

  5. Dental Hygienist-Led Chronic Disease Management System to Control Early Childhood Caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Man Wai; Fida, Zameera

    2016-06-01

    Management of the complex chronic disease of early childhood caries requires a system of coordinated health care interventions which can be led by a dental hygienist and where patient self-care efforts are paramount. Even after receiving costly surgical treatment under general anesthesia in the operating room, many children develop new and recurrent caries after only 6-12 months, a sequela that can be prevented. This article describes the chronic disease management (CDM) of dental caries, a science-based approach that can prevent and control caries. In this article, we (1) introduce the concept of CDM of dental caries, (2) provide evidence that CDM improves oral health outcomes, and (3) propose a dental hygienist-led team-based oral health care approach to CDM. Although we will be describing the CDM approach for early childhood caries, CDM of caries is applicable in children, adolescents, and adults. Early childhood caries disease control requires meaningful engagement of patients and parents by the oral health care team to assist them with making behavioral changes in the unique context of their families and communities. The traditional dentist/hygienist/assistant model needs to evolve to a collaborative partnership between care providers and patients/families. This partnership will be focused on systematic risk assessment and behaviorally based management of the disease itself, with sensitivity toward the familial environment. Early pilot study results demonstrate reductions in the rates of new caries, dental pain, and referral to the operating room compared with baseline rates. Dental hygienists are the appropriate team members to lead this approach because of their expertise in behavior change and prevention. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Computer templates in chronic disease management: ethnographic case study in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglehurst, Deborah; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Roberts, Celia

    2012-01-01

    To investigate how electronic templates shape, enable and constrain consultations about chronic diseases. Ethnographic case study, combining field notes, video-recording, screen capture with a microanalysis of talk, body language and data entry-an approach called linguistic ethnography. Two general practices in England. Ethnographic observation of administrative areas and 36 nurse-led consultations was done. Twenty-four consultations were directly observed and 12 consultations were video-recorded alongside computer screen capture. Consultations were transcribed using conversation analysis conventions, with notes on body language and the electronic record. The analysis involved repeated rounds of viewing video, annotating field notes, transcription and microanalysis to identify themes. The data was interpreted using discourse analysis, with attention to the sociotechnical theory. Consultations centred explicitly or implicitly on evidence-based protocols inscribed in templates. Templates did not simply identify tasks for completion, but contributed to defining what chronic diseases were, how care was being delivered and what it meant to be a patient or professional in this context. Patients' stories morphed into data bytes; the particular became generalised; the complex was made discrete, simple and manageable; and uncertainty became categorised and contained. Many consultations resembled bureaucratic encounters, primarily oriented to completing data fields. We identified a tension, sharpened by the template, between different framings of the patient-as 'individual' or as 'one of a population'. Some clinicians overcame this tension, responding creatively to prompts within a dialogue constructed around the patient's narrative. Despite their widespread implementation, little previous research has examined how templates are actually used in practice. Templates do not simply document the tasks of chronic disease management but profoundly change the nature of this work

  7. National Priority Setting of Clinical Practice Guidelines Development for Chronic Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Heui-Sug; Kim, Dong Ik; Oh, Moo-Kyung

    2015-12-01

    By November 2013, a total of 125 clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been developed in Korea. However, despite the high burden of diseases and the clinical importance of CPGs, most chronic diseases do not have available CPGs. Merely 83 CPGs are related to chronic diseases, and only 40 guidelines had been developed in the last 5 yr. Considering the rate of the production of new evidence in medicine and the worsening burden from chronic diseases, the need for developing CPGs for more chronic diseases is becoming increasingly pressing. Since 2011, the Korean Academy of Medical Sciences and the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have been jointly developing CPGs for chronic diseases. However, priorities have to be set and resources need to be allocated within the constraint of a limited funding. This study identifies the chronic diseases that should be prioritized for the development of CPGs in Korea. Through an objective assessment by using the analytic hierarchy process and a subjective assessment with a survey of expert opinion, high priorities were placed on ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, osteoarthritis, neck pain, chronic kidney disease, and cirrhosis of the liver.

  8. Meta-analysis of self-management education for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurley J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundChronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a common disease frequently associated with high use of health services. Self-management education is a term applied to programs aimed at teaching patients skills that promote the self-efficacy needed to carry out medical regimens specific to control their disease. In COPD, the value of self-management education is not yet clear and a recent trial was terminated early because of excess mortality in the intervention group.ObjectivesThe objective of this meta-analysis was to assess the settings, methods and efficacy of COPD self-management education programs on patient outcomes and healthcare utilization.Selection criteriaRandomized controlled trials of self-management education in patients with COPD were identified. Studies focusing primarily on comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation (education and exercise and studies without usual care as a control group were excluded.Search strategyWe searched PubMed (January 1985 to May 2012 as well as other meta-analysis and reviews.Data collection and analysisTwo reviewers (JH and RAR independently assessed study quality and extracted data. Investigators were contacted for additional information.Main resultsThe reviewers included 3 group comparisons drawn from 12 trials. The studies showed no significant change in mortality, with one study being an outlier compared to the others. However, the meta-analysis revealed a reduction in the probability of hospital admission among patients receiving self-management education compared to those receiving usual care.ConclusionsIt is likely that self-management education is associated with a reduction in hospital admissions with no change in mortality. However, because of heterogeneity in interventions, study populations, follow-up time, and outcome measures, data are still insufficient to formulate clear recommendations regarding the preferred curriculum and delivery method of self-management education programs

  9. Tale of Two Courthouses: A Critique of the Underlying Assumptions in Chronic Disease Self-Management for Aboriginal People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Ellis

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the assumptions that underpin thecommonly implemented Chronic Disease Self-Managementmodels. Namely that there are a clear set of instructions forpatients to comply with, that all health care providers agreewith; and that the health care provider and the patient agreewith the chronic disease self-management plan that wasdeveloped as part of a consultation. These assumptions areevaluated for their validity in the remote health care context,particularly for Aboriginal people. These assumptions havebeen found to lack validity in this context, therefore analternative model to enhance chronic disease care isproposed.

  10. Mobile applications for chronic disease self-management : building a bridge for behavior change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aija Lähdesmäki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background One of the biggest challenges in the future of healthcare is the rising prevalence of chronic, non-communicable diseases. In high-income countries seven out of ten leading risk factors of death are caused by the way people eat, drink or move. Health behavior patterns are considered to account for 40 % of early mortality. If nothing changes, from 2011 until 2030 the cost of chronic disease in the whole world may reach 47 trillion dollars. It is clear that chronic disease care needs to change. Today people with chronic disease spend less than 0,1 % of their time yearly in direct contact with healthcare and guidance. The rest of the time they are under the influence of family, colleagues, acquaintances, media and all the conflicting information from them. Digital elements are emerging in healthcare. Some of these digital elements emerging are mobile applications. Of all the people in Finland, 70 % own a smartphone. These devices are often in the proximity of their owner; in a pocket or a purse, making them easy and fast to use for various purposes. This is why they can also prove to be useful tools for personal healthcare and chronic disease self-management support, for example for recording diet and exercise related values as well as various disease specific values like blood glucose or blood pressure measurements. They also enable two-way interaction with healthcare professionals and patients in their everyday life. This requires well designed applications that affect the patient’s health behavior and are tempting to use. According to research, this is not always the case. Aim The aim of this thesis study was to find out how multipurpose mobile applications intended for chronic disease self-management implement known behavior change techniques in order to change behavior, and to find out how they utilize known gamification features in order to maintain the change. The purpose of this study was to create a new, multidisciplinary

  11. Chronic Disease Management Strategies of Early Childhood Caries: Support from the Medical and Dental Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Burton L; Ng, Man Wai

    2015-01-01

    An Institute of Medicine report places chronic disease management (CDM) as an intervention on a treatment spectrum between prevention and acute care. CDM commonly focuses on conditions in which patient self-care efforts are significant. Framing early childhood caries (ECC) as such a chronic condition invites dentistry to reconsider its approach to caries management and shift gears from a strictly surgical approach to one that also incorporates a medical approach. This paper's purpose was to explore the definition of and concepts inherent in CDM. An explanatory model is introduced to describe the multiple factors that influence ECC-CDM strategies. Reviewed literature suggests that early evidence from ECC-CDM interventions, along with results of pediatric asthma and diabetes CDM, supports CDM of ECC as a valid approach that is independent of both prevention and repair. Early results of ECC-CDM endeavors have demonstrated a reduction in rates of new cavitation, dental pain, and referral to the operating room compared to baseline rates. ECC-CDM strategies hold strong promise to curtail caries activity while complementing dental repair when needed, thereby reducing disease progression and cavity recurrence. Institutionalizing ECC-CDM will both require and benefit from evolving health care delivery and financing systems that reward positive health outcomes.

  12. Sleep Disorders in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Etiology, Impact, and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhiraja, Rohit; Siddiqi, Tauseef A.; Quan, Stuart F.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and may frequently be complicated by sleep disorders. Insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea are commonly encountered in patients with COPD. Nocturnal hypoxemia is also prevalent in COPD may occur despite adequate awake oxygenation and can be especially severe in rapid eye movement sleep. Additionally, several factors—some of them unique to COPD—can contribute to sleep-related hypoventilation. Recognition of hypoventilation can be vital as supplemental oxygen therapy itself can acutely worsen hypoventilation and lead to disastrous consequences. Finally, accruing data establish an association between restless leg syndrome and COPD— an association that may be driven by hypoxemia and/or hypercapnia. Comorbid sleep disorders portend worse sleep quality, diminished quality of life, and multifarious other adverse consequences. The awareness and knowledge regarding sleep comorbidities in COPD has continued to evolve over past many years. There are still several lacunae, however, in our understanding of the etiologies, impact, and therapies of sleep disorders, specifically in patients with COPD. This review summarizes the latest concepts in prevalence, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of diverse sleep disorders in COPD. Citation: Budhiraja R, Siddiqi TA, Quan SF. Sleep disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: etiology, impact, and management. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):259–270. PMID:25700872

  13. A systematic review of chronic disease management interventions in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Rebecca; Dennis, Sarah; Hasan, Iqbal; Slewa, Jan; Chen, Winnie; Tian, David; Bobba, Sangeetha; Zwar, Nicholas

    2018-01-09

    Primary and community care are key settings for the effective management of long term conditions. We aimed to evaluate the pattern of health outcomes in chronic disease management interventions for adults with physical health problems implemented in primary or community care settings. The methods were based on our previous review published in 2006. We performed database searches for articles published from 2006 to 2014 and conducted a systematic review with narrative synthesis using the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care taxonomy to classify interventions and outcomes. The interventions were mapped to Chronic Care Model elements. The pattern of outcomes related to interventions was summarized by frequency of statistically significant improvements in health care provision and patient outcomes. A total of 9589 journal articles were retrieved from database searches and snowballing. After screening and verification, 165 articles that detailed 157 studies were included. There were few studies with Health Care Organization (1.9% of studies) or Community Resources (0.6% of studies) as the primary intervention element. Self-Management Support interventions (45.8% of studies) most frequently resulted in improvements in patient-level outcomes. Delivery System Design interventions (22.6% of studies) showed benefits in both professional and patient-level outcomes for a narrow range of conditions. Decision Support interventions (21.3% of studies) had impact limited to professional-level outcomes, in particular use of medications. The small number of studies of Clinical Information System interventions (8.9%) showed benefits for both professional- and patient-level outcomes. The published literature has expanded substantially since 2006. This review confirms that Self-Management Support is the most frequent Chronic Care Model intervention that is associated with statistically significant improvements, predominately for diabetes and hypertension.

  14. A systematic review of outcomes of chronic disease self-management interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Sandra; Osborne, Richard H

    2013-09-01

    To carry out a systematic review of program outcomes used in the evaluation of group-based self-management interventions aimed at people with arthritis and other chronic conditions. The systematic search was performed across databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. Both between-group and within-group effect sizes (ES) were calculated. Results were interpreted as small (ES ~ 0.2), medium (ES ~ 0.5), or large (ES ~ 0.8) effects. The majority of 18 included trials investigated the effectiveness of arthritis-specific interventions. Across most outcomes, small effects on course participants were shown. While effects on knowledge were large (between-group ES = 0.78), effects on clinical outcomes such as pain (ES = 0.10) were negligible to small. This paper is consistent with other reviews in this area, suggesting that people with arthritis receive only marginal benefits from participating in chronic disease self-management interventions. When looking at the types of outcomes that trials are based on, however, alternative explanations for these results seem probable. As evaluations heavily rely on patient self-report, current approaches to program evaluation may not be sufficient to assess the intended impact of self-management education. An in-depth investigation of the types of outcomes assessed is provided in a separate paper.

  15. Evaluating a Chronic Disease Management Improvement Collaboration: Lessons in Design and Implementation Fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kaye; Amar, Claudia; Elicksen-Jensen, Keesa

    2016-01-01

    For the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI), the Atlantic Healthcare Collaboration (AHC) was a pivotal opportunity to build upon its experience and expertise in delivering regional change management training and to apply and refine its evaluation and performance measurement approach. This paper reports on its evaluation principles and approach, as well as the lessons learned as CFHI diligently coordinated and worked with improvement project (IP) teams and a network of stakeholders to design and undertake a suite of evaluative activities. The evaluation generated evidence and learnings about various elements of chronic disease prevention and management (CDPM) improvement processes, individual and team capacity building and the role and value of CFHI in facilitating tailored learning activities and networking among teams, coaches and other AHC stakeholders.

  16. Update on Pharmaceutical and Minimally Invasive Management Strategies for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokhsara Rafii

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a debilitating pulmonary disorder with systemic effects, and it is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. COPD patients not only develop respiratory limitations, but can also demonstrate systemic wasting, features of depression, and can succumb to social isolation. Smoking cessation is crucial, and pharmacotherapy with bronchodilators is helpful in symptom management. Inhaled corticosteroids may be beneficial in some patients. In addition, pulmonary rehabilitation and palliative care are important components under the right clinical circumstance. This review highlights current guidelines and management strategies for COPD and emphasizes novel pharmacotherapy and minimally invasive (nonsurgical lung-volume reduction interventions that may prove to be of significant benefit in the future.

  17. Hepcidin in chronic kidney disease : not an anaemia management tool, but promising as a cardiovascular biomarker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Weerd, N. C.; Grooteman, M. P. C.; Nube, M. J.; ter Wee, P. M.; Swinkels, D. W.; Gaillard, C. A. J. M.

    Hepcidin is a key regulator of iron homeostasis and plays a role in the pathogenesis of anaemia of chronic disease. Its levels are increased in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) due to diminished renal clearance and an inflammatory state. Increased hepcidin levels in CKD patients are

  18. Physicians' perceptions of capacity building for managing chronic disease in seniors using integrated interprofessional care models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Linda; Heckman, George; McKelvie, Robert; Jong, Philip; D'Elia, Teresa; Hillier, Loretta M

    2015-03-01

    To explore the barriers to and facilitators of adapting and expanding a primary care memory clinic model to integrate care of additional complex chronic geriatric conditions (heart failure, falls, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and frailty) into care processes with the goal of improving outcomes for seniors. Mixed-methods study using quantitative (questionnaires) and qualitative (interviews) methods. Ontario. Family physicians currently working in primary care memory clinic teams and supporting geriatric specialists. Family physicians currently working in memory clinic teams (n = 29) and supporting geriatric specialists(n = 9) were recruited as survey participants. Interviews were conducted with memory clinic lead physicians (n = 16).Statistical analysis was done to assess differences between family physician ratings and geriatric specialist ratings related to the capacity for managing complex chronic geriatric conditions, the role of interprofessional collaboration within primary care, and funding and staffing to support geriatric care. Results from both study methods were compared to identify common findings. Results indicate overall support for expanding the memory clinic model to integrate care for other complex conditions. However, the current primary care structure is challenged to support optimal management of patients with multiple comorbidities, particularly as related to limited funding and staffing resources. Structured training, interprofessional teams, and an active role of geriatric specialists within primary care were identified as important facilitators. The memory clinic model, as applied to other complex chronic geriatric conditions, has the potential to build capacity for high-quality primary care, improve health outcomes,promote efficient use of health care resources, and reduce healthcare costs.

  19. Physicians’ perceptions of capacity building for managing chronic disease in seniors using integrated interprofessional care models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Linda; Heckman, George; McKelvie, Robert; Jong, Philip; D’Elia, Teresa; Hillier, Loretta M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the barriers to and facilitators of adapting and expanding a primary care memory clinic model to integrate care of additional complex chronic geriatric conditions (heart failure, falls, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and frailty) into care processes with the goal of improving outcomes for seniors. Design Mixed-methods study using quantitative (questionnaires) and qualitative (interviews) methods. Setting Ontario. Participants Family physicians currently working in primary care memory clinic teams and supporting geriatric specialists. Methods Family physicians currently working in memory clinic teams (n = 29) and supporting geriatric specialists (n = 9) were recruited as survey participants. Interviews were conducted with memory clinic lead physicians (n = 16). Statistical analysis was done to assess differences between family physician ratings and geriatric specialist ratings related to the capacity for managing complex chronic geriatric conditions, the role of interprofessional collaboration within primary care, and funding and staffing to support geriatric care. Results from both study methods were compared to identify common findings. Main findings Results indicate overall support for expanding the memory clinic model to integrate care for other complex conditions. However, the current primary care structure is challenged to support optimal management of patients with multiple comorbidities, particularly as related to limited funding and staffing resources. Structured training, interprofessional teams, and an active role of geriatric specialists within primary care were identified as important facilitators. Conclusion The memory clinic model, as applied to other complex chronic geriatric conditions, has the potential to build capacity for high-quality primary care, improve health outcomes, promote efficient use of health care resources, and reduce health care costs. PMID:25932482

  20. Nursing clinical practice changes to improve self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilha, J M; Sousa, P A F; Pereira, F M S

    2018-03-01

    To propose nursing clinical practice changes to improve the development of patient self-management. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is one of the main causes of chronic morbidity, loss of quality of life and high mortality rates. Control of the disease's progression, the preservation of autonomy in self-care and maintenance of quality of life are extremely challenging for patients to execute in their daily living. However, there is still little evidence to support nursing clinical practice changes to improve the development of self-management. A participatory action research study was performed in a medicine inpatient department and the outpatient unit of a Portuguese hospital. The sample comprised 52 nurses and 99 patients. For data collection, we used interviews, participant observation and content analysis. The main elements of nursing clinical practice that were identified as a focus for improvement measures were the healthcare model, the organization of healthcare and the documentation of a support decision-making process. The specific guidelines, the provision of material to support decision-making and the optimization of information sharing between professionals positively influenced the change process. This change improved the development of self-management skills related to the awareness of the need for 'change', hope, involvement, knowledge and abilities. The implemented changes have improved health-related behaviours and clinical outcomes. To support self-management development skills, an effective nursing clinical practice change is needed. This study has demonstrated the relevance of a portfolio of techniques and tools to help patients adopt healthy behaviours. The involvement and participation of nurses and patients in the conceptualization, implementation and evaluation of policy change are fundamental issues to improve the quality of nursing care and clinical outcomes. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  1. Diabetes as a case study of chronic disease management with a personalized approach: the role of a structured feedback loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriello, Antonio; Barkai, László; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl; Czupryniak, Leszek; Gomis, Ramon; Harno, Kari; Kulzer, Bernhard; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Némethyová, Zuzana; Owens, David; Schnell, Oliver; Tankova, Tsvetalina; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Vergès, Bruno; Weitgasser, Raimund; Wens, Johan

    2012-10-01

    As non-communicable or chronic diseases are a growing threat to human health and economic growth, political stakeholders are aiming to identify options for improved response to the challenges of prevention and management of non-communicable diseases. This paper is intended to contribute ideas on personalized chronic disease management which are based on experience with one major chronic disease, namely diabetes mellitus. Diabetes provides a pertinent case of chronic disease management with a particular focus on patient self-management. Despite advances in diabetes therapy, many people with diabetes still fail to achieve treatment targets thus remaining at risk of complications. Personalizing the management of diabetes according to the patient's individual profile can help in improving therapy adherence and treatment outcomes. This paper suggests using a six-step cycle for personalized diabetes (self-)management and collaborative use of structured blood glucose data. E-health solutions can be used to improve process efficiencies and allow remote access. Decision support tools and algorithms can help doctors in making therapeutic decisions based on individual patient profiles. Available evidence about the effectiveness of the cycle's constituting elements justifies expectations that the diabetes management cycle as a whole can generate medical and economic benefit. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Validation of the Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease Scale: A Scleroderma Patient-Centered Intervention Network cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riehm, K.E.; Kwakkenbos, C.M.C.; Carrier, M.E.; Bartlett, S.J.; Malcarne, V.L.; Mouthon, L.; Nielson, W.R.; Poiraudeau, S.; Nielsen, K.; Baron, M.; Frech, T.; Hudson, M.; Pope, J.; Sauvé, M.; Suarez-Almazor, M.E.; Wigley, F.M.; Thombs, B.D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Self-management programs for patients with chronic illnesses, including rheumatic diseases, seek to enhance self-efficacy for performing health management behaviors. No measure of self-efficacy has been validated for patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma). The objective of

  3. Advancing the Science of Behavioral Self-Management of Chronic Disease: The Arc of a Research Trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegrante, John P.

    2018-01-01

    This article describes advances in the behavioral self-management of chronic disease from the perspective of a 25-year trajectory of National Institute of Health-funded research in arthritis and cardiopulmonary diseases that has sought to develop a transdisciplinary understanding of how applied behavioral science can be used to improve health…

  4. In-Home Care for Optimizing Chronic Disease Management in the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The emerging attention on in-home care in Canada assumes that chronic disease management will be optimized if it takes place in the community as opposed to the health care setting. Both the patient and the health care system will benefit, the latter in terms of cost savings. Objectives To compare the effectiveness of care delivered in the home (i.e., in-home care) with no home care or with usual care/care received outside of the home (e.g., health care setting). Data Sources A literature search was performed on January 25, 2012, using OVID MEDLINE, OVID MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, OVID EMBASE, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, for studies published from January 1, 2006, until January 25, 2012. Review Methods An evidence-based analysis examined whether there is a difference in mortality, hospital utilization, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), functional status, and disease-specific clinical measures for in-home care compared with no home care for heart failure, atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, chronic wounds, and chronic disease / multimorbidity. Data was abstracted and analyzed in a pooled analysis using Review Manager. When needed, subgroup analysis was performed to address heterogeneity. The quality of evidence was assessed by GRADE. Results The systematic literature search identified 1,277 citations from which 12 randomized controlled trials met the study criteria. Based on these, a 12% reduced risk for in-home care was shown for the outcome measure of combined events including all-cause mortality and hospitalizations (relative risk [RR]: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.80–0.97). Patients receiving in-home care had an average of 1 less unplanned hospitalization (mean difference [MD]: –1.03; 95% CI: –1.53 to –0.53) and an average of 1 less

  5. Evaluation of a self-management programme for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ap; Anderson, Jk; Wallace, Lm; Kennedy-Williams, P

    2014-06-30

    Self-management is becoming an important part of treatment for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We conducted a longitudinal survey of patients with COPD who attended a 7-week group-based lay and clinician co-delivered COPD self-management programme (SMP)to see whether they became more activated, enjoyed better health status, and quality of life, were less psychologically distressed and improved their self-management abilities. The main analysis was a per-protocol analysis (N = 131), which included only patients who attended ≥5 SMP sessions and who returned a 6-month follow-up questionnaires. Changes in the mean values of the patient outcomes were compared over time using paired t tests and general linear model for repeated measures. Patient activation significantly improved 6 months after the SMP (p management abilities (self-monitoring and insight p = 0.03), constructive attitude shift (p = 0.04), skills and technique acquisition, (p management abilities. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Professional commitment to changing chronic illness care: results from disease management programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, Karin; Strating, Mathilde; Huijsman, Robbert; Nieboer, Anna

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate to what extent primary care professionals are able to change their systems for delivering care to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and what professional and organizational factors are associated with the degree of process implementation. Quasi-experimental design with 1 year follow-up after intervention. Three regional COPD management programmes in the Netherlands, in which general practices cooperated with regional hospitals. All participating primary care professionals (n = 52). COPD management programme. Professional commitment, organizational context and degree of process implementation. Professionals significantly changed their systems for delivering care to COPD patients, namely self-management support, decision support, delivery system design and clinical information systems. Associations were found between organizational factors, professional commitment and changes in processes of care. Group culture and professional commitment appeared to be, to a moderate degree, predictors of process implementation. COPD management was effective; all processes improved significantly. Moreover, theoretically expected associations between organizational context and professional factors with the implementation of COPD management were indeed confirmed to some extent. Group culture and professional commitment are important facilitators.

  7. Readiness of Ugandan health services for the management of outpatients with chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katende, David; Mutungi, Gerald; Baisley, Kathy; Biraro, Samuel; Ikoona, Eric; Peck, Robert; Smeeth, Liam; Hayes, Richard; Munderi, Paula; Grosskurth, Heiner

    2015-10-01

    Traditionally, health systems in sub-Saharan Africa have focused on acute conditions. Few data exist on the readiness of African health facilities (HFs) to address the growing burden of chronic diseases (CDs), specifically chronic, non-communicable diseases (NCDs). A stratified random sample of 28 urban and rural Ugandan HFs was surveyed to document the burden of selected CDs by analysing the service statistics, service availability and service readiness using a modified WHO Service Availability and Readiness Assessment questionnaire. Knowledge, skills and practice in the management of CDs of 222 health workers were assessed through a self-completed questionnaire. Among adult outpatient visits at hospitals, 33% were for CDs including HIV vs. 14% and 4% at medium-sized and small health centres, respectively. Many HFs lacked guidelines, diagnostic equipment and essential medicines for the primary management of CDs; training and reporting systems were weak. Lower-level facilities routinely referred patients with hypertension and diabetes. HIV services accounted for most CD visits and were stronger than NCD services. Systems were weaker in lower-level HFs. Non-doctor clinicians and nurses lacked knowledge and experience in NCD care. Compared with higher level HFs, lower-level ones are less prepared and little used for CD care. Health systems in Uganda, particularly lower-level HFs, urgently need improvement in managing common NCDs to cope with the growing burden. This should include the provision of standard guidelines, essential diagnostic equipment and drugs, training of health workers, supportive supervision and improved referral systems. Substantially better HIV basic service readiness demonstrates that improved NCD care is feasible. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. GPs' views on managing advanced chronic kidney disease in primary care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin-Crine, Sarah; Santer, Miriam; Leydon, Geraldine M; Murtagh, Fliss E M; Farrington, Ken; Caskey, Fergus; Rayner, Hugh; Roderick, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a significant part of the GP's workload since the introduction of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines in 2008. Patients with advanced CKD (stages G4 and G5) often have comorbidities, varied disease progression, and are likely to be older. GPs may experience difficulties with management decisions for patients with advanced CKD, including when to refer to nephrology. To explore GPs' views of managing patients with advanced CKD and referral to secondary care. Qualitative study with GPs in four areas of England: London, Bristol, Birmingham, and Stevenage. Semi-structured interviews with 19 GPs. Transcribed interviews were thematically analysed. GPs had little experience of managing patients with advanced CKD, including those on dialysis or having conservative care (treatment without dialysis or a transplant), and welcomed guidance. Some GPs referred patients based on renal function alone and some used wider criteria including age and multimorbidity. GPs reported a tension between national guidance and local advice, and some had learnt from experience that patients were discharged back to primary care. GPs with more experience of managing CKD referred patients later, or sometimes not at all, if there were no additional problems and if dialysis was seen as not in the patient's interests. GPs want guidance on managing older patients with advanced CKD and comorbidities, which better incorporates agreement between local and national recommendations to clarify referral criteria. GPs are not generally aware of conservative care programmes provided by renal units, however, they appear happy to contribute to such care or alternatively, lead conservative management with input from renal teams. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  9. Are Primary Healthcare Organizational Attributes Associated with Patient Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Valérie; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Ehrmann-Feldman, Debbie

    2011-01-01

    Our objective was to explore how individual and primary healthcare (PHC) organizational attributes influence patients' ability in chronic illness self-management. We conducted a cohort study, recruiting 776 adults with chronic disease from 33 PHC settings in the province of Quebec. Organizational data on the PHC clinics were obtained from a prior study. Participants were interviewed at baseline, 6 and 12 months, responding to questionnaires on self-efficacy, health status, socio-demographics, healthcare use and experience of care. Multilevel modelling showed that 52.5% of the variance in self-efficacy occurs at the level of the individual and 4.0% at the organizational level. Controlling for diagnosis, patient factors associated with self-efficacy were self-rated health (B coeff 0.76: CI 0.60; 0.92), concurrent depression (B coeff –1.41: CI 1.96; –0.86) and satisfaction with care (B coeff 0.27: CI 0.15; 0.39). None of the organizational attributes was significantly associated with self-efficacy after adjusting for lower-level variables. Patients generally reported receiving little self-management teaching across organizations. PMID:22548102

  10. Are primary healthcare organizational attributes associated with patient self-efficacy for managing chronic disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Valérie; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Ehrmann-Feldman, Debbie

    2011-05-01

    Our objective was to explore how individual and primary healthcare (PHC) organizational attributes influence patients' ability in chronic illness self-management. We conducted a cohort study, recruiting 776 adults with chronic disease from 33 PHC settings in the province of Quebec. Organizational data on the PHC clinics were obtained from a prior study. Participants were interviewed at baseline, 6 and 12 months, responding to questionnaires on self-efficacy, health status, socio-demographics, healthcare use and experience of care. Multilevel modelling showed that 52.5% of the variance in self-efficacy occurs at the level of the individual and 4.0% at the organizational level. Controlling for diagnosis, patient factors associated with self-efficacy were self-rated health (B coeff 0.76: CI 0.60; 0.92), concurrent depression (B coeff -1.41: CI 1.96; -0.86) and satisfaction with care (B coeff 0.27: CI 0.15; 0.39). None of the organizational attributes was significantly associated with self-efficacy after adjusting for lower-level variables. Patients generally reported receiving little self-management teaching across organizations.

  11. Health literacy and chronic disease management: drawing from expert knowledge to set an agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poureslami, Iraj; Nimmon, Laura; Rootman, Irving; Fitzgerald, Mark J

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the nature and impact of health literacy is a priority in health promotion and chronic disease prevention and treatment. Health literacy comprises the application of a broad set of skills to access, comprehend, evaluate, communicate and act on health information for improved health and well-being. A complex concept, it involves multiple participants and is enacted across a wide variety of contexts. Health literacy's complexity has given rise to challenges achieving a standard definition and developing means to measure all its dimensions. In May 2013, a group of health literacy experts, clinicians and policymakers convened at an Expert Roundtable to review the current state of health literacy research and practice, and make recommendations about refining its definition, expanding its measurement and integrating best practices into chronic disease management. The four-day knowledge exchange concluded that the successful integration of health literacy into policy and practice depends on the development of a more substantial evidence base. A review of the successes and gaps in health literacy research, education and interventions culminated in the identification of key priorities to further the health literacy agenda. The workshop was funded by the UBC Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, Vancouver. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. DIETOS: A dietary recommender system for chronic diseases monitoring and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapito, Giuseppe; Simeoni, Mariadelina; Calabrese, Barbara; Caré, Ilaria; Lamprinoudi, Theodora; Guzzi, Pietro H; Pujia, Arturo; Fuiano, Giorgio; Cannataro, Mario

    2018-01-01

    Use of mobile and web-based applications for diet and weight management is currently increasing. However, the impact of known apps on clinical outcomes is not well-characterized so far. Moreover, availability of food recommender systems providing high quality nutritional advices to both healthy and diet-related chronic diseases users is very limited. In addition, the potentiality of nutraceutical properties of typical regional foods for improving app utility has not been exerted to this end. We present DIETOS, a recommender system for the adaptive delivery of nutrition contents to improve the quality of life of both healthy subjects and patients with diet-related chronic diseases. DIETOS provides highly specialized nutritional advices in different health conditions. DIETOS was projected to provide users with health profile and individual nutritional recommendation. Health profiling was based on user answers to dynamic real-time medical questionnaires. Furthermore, DIETOS contains catalogs of typical foods from Calabria, a southern Italian region. Several Calabrian foods have been inserted because of their nutraceutical properties widely reported in several quality studies. DIETOS includes some well known methods for user profiling (overlay profiling) and content adaptation (content selection) coming from general purpose adaptive web systems. DIETOS has been validated for usability for both patients and specialists and for assessing the correctness of the profiling and recommendation, by enrolling 20 chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients at the Department of Nephrology and Dialysis, University Hospital, Catanzaro (Italy) and 20 age-matched healthy controls. Recruited subjects were invited to register to DIETOS and answer to medical questions to determine their health status. Based on our results, DIETOS has high specificity and sensitivity, allowing to determine a medical-controlled user's health profile and to perform a fine-grained recommendation that is better

  13. The English and Spanish Self-Efficacy to Manage Chronic Disease Scale measures were validated using multiple studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Philip L; Lorig, Kate

    2014-11-01

    Self-efficacy theory, as developed by Bandura, suggests that self-efficacy is an important predictor of future behavior. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program was designed to enhance self-efficacy as one approach to improving health behaviors and outcomes for people with varying chronic diseases. The six-item Self-Efficacy to Manage Chronic Disease Scale (SEMCD) and the four-item Spanish-language version (SEMCD-S) were developed to measure changes in self-efficacy in program participants and have been used in a numerous evaluations of chronic disease self-management programs. This study describes the development of the scales and their psychometric properties. Secondary analyses of questionnaire data from 2,866 participants in six studies are used to quantify and evaluate the SEMCD. Data from 868 participants in two studies are used for the SEMCD-S. Subjects consisted of individuals with various chronic conditions, who enrolled in chronic disease self-management programs (either small group or Internet based). Subjects came from United States, England, Canada, Mexico, and Australia. Descriptive statistics are summarized, reliability tested (Cronbach alpha), and principal component analyses applied to items. Baseline and change scores are correlated with baseline and change scores for five medical outcome variables that have been shown to be associated with self-efficacy measures in past studies. Principal component analyses confirmed the one-dimensional structure of the scales. The SEMCD had means ranging from 4.9 to 6.1 and the SEMCD-S 6.1 and 6.2. Internal consistency was high (Cronbach alpha, 0.88-0.95). The scales were sensitive to change and significantly correlated with health outcomes. The SEMCD and SEMCD-S are reliable and appear to be valid instruments for assessing self-efficacy for managing chronic disease. There was remarkable consistency across a range of studies from varying countries using two languages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All

  14. Understanding interprofessional collaboration in the context of chronic disease management for older adults living in communities: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookey-Bassett, Sue; Markle-Reid, Maureen; Mckey, Colleen A; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori

    2017-01-01

    To report a concept analysis of interprofessional collaboration in the context of chronic disease management, for older adults living in communities. Increasing prevalence of chronic disease among older adults is creating significant burden for patients, families and healthcare systems. Managing chronic disease for older adults living in the community requires interprofessional collaboration across different health and other care providers, organizations and sectors. However, there is a lack of consensus about the definition and use of interprofessional collaboration for community-based chronic disease management. Concept analysis. Electronic databases CINAHL, Medline, HealthStar, EMBASE, PsychINFO, Ageline and Cochrane Database were searched from 2000 - 2013. Rodgers' evolutionary method for concept analysis. The most common surrogate term was interdisciplinary collaboration. Related terms were interprofessional team, multidisciplinary team and teamwork. Attributes included: an evolving interpersonal process; shared goals, decision-making and care planning; interdependence; effective and frequent communication; evaluation of team processes; involving older adults and family members in the team; and diverse and flexible team membership. Antecedents comprised: role awareness; interprofessional education; trust between team members; belief that interprofessional collaboration improves care; and organizational support. Consequences included impacts on team composition and function, care planning processes and providers' knowledge, confidence and job satisfaction. Interprofessional collaboration is a complex evolving concept. Key components of interprofessional collaboration in chronic disease management for community-living older adults are identified. Implications for nursing practice, education and research are proposed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Specialized Nursing Practice for Chronic Disease Management in the Primary Care Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In response to the increasing demand for better chronic disease management and improved health care efficiency in Ontario, nursing roles have expanded in the primary health care setting. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of specialized nurses who have a clinical role in patient care in optimizing chronic disease management among adults in the primary health care setting. Data Sources and Review Methods A literature search was performed using OVID MEDLINE, OVID MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, OVID EMBASE, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database. Results were limited to randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews and were divided into 2 models: Model 1 (nurse alone versus physician alone) and Model 2 (nurse and physician versus physician alone). Effectiveness was determined by comparable outcomes between groups in Model 1, or improved outcomes or efficiency in Model 2. Results Six studies were included. In Model 1, there were no significant differences in health resource use, disease-specific measures, quality of life, or patient satisfaction. In Model 2, there was a reduction in hospitalizations and improved management of blood pressure and lipids among patients with coronary artery disease. Among patients with diabetes, there was a reduction in hemoglobin A1c but no difference in other disease-specific measures. There was a trend toward improved process measures, including medication prescribing and clinical assessments. Results related to quality of life were inconsistent, but patient satisfaction with the nurse-physician team was improved. Overall, there were more and longer visits to the nurse, and physician workload did not change. Limitations There was heterogeneity across patient populations, and in the titles, roles, and scope of practice of the specialized nurses. Conclusions Specialized nurses with

  16. The role of home-based information and communications technology interventions in chronic disease management: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Rekha; Warren, Jim

    2009-06-01

    This article presents a systematic literature review done to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of home-based information and communications technology enabled interventions for chronic disease management, with emphasis on their impact on health outcomes and costs. Relevant articles were retrieved from PubMed and evaluated using quality worksheets with pre-identified inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of the 256 articles retrieved, 27 were found to concord with the study criteria. Evaluation of the identified articles was conducted irrespective of study design, type of home-based intervention or chronic disease involved. The review demonstrates that HBIs applied to chronic disease management improve functional and cognitive patient outcomes and reduce healthcare spending. However, further research is needed to assess benefit in terms of evidence-based outcome indicators (that can provide a basis for meta-analysis), to confirm sustainable cost benefits, and to systematically collect data on physician satisfaction with patient management.

  17. State of the Art Compendium: Canadian Thoracic Society Recommendations for Management of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis E O’Donnell

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a common cause of disability and death in Canada. Moreover, morbidity and mortality from COPD continue to rise, and the economic burden is enormous. The main goal of the Canadian Thoracic Society’s evidence-based guidelines is to optimize early diagnosis, prevention and management of COPD in Canada. The main message of the guidelines is that COPD is a preventable and treatable disease. Targeted spirometry is strongly recommended to expedite early diagnosis in smokers and former smokers who develop respiratory symptoms, and who are at risk for COPD. Smoking cessation remains the single most effective intervention to reduce the risk of COPD and to slow its progression. Education, especially self-management plans, are key interventions in COPD. Therapy should be escalated on an individual basis in accordance with the increasing severity of symptoms and disability. Long-acting anticholinergics and beta-2-agonist inhalers should be prescribed for patients who remain symptomatic despite short-acting bronchodilator therapy. Inhaled steroids should not be used as first line therapy in COPD, but have a role in preventing exacerbations in patients with more advanced disease who suffer recurrent exacerbations. Acute exacerbations of COPD cause significant morbidity and mortality and should be treated promptly with bronchodilators and a short course of oral steroids; antibiotics should be prescribed for purulent exacerbations. Patients with advanced COPD and respiratory failure require a comprehensive management plan that incorporates structured end-of-life care. Management strategies, consisting of combined modern pharmacotherapy and nonpharmacotherapeutic interventions (eg, pulmonary rehabilitation and exercise training can effectively improve symptoms, activity levels and quality of life, even in patients with severe COPD.

  18. Transmission of chronic wasting disease in Wisconsin white-tailed deer: Implications for disease spread and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennelle, Christopher S.; Henaux, Viviane; Wasserberg, Gideon; Thiagarajan, Bala; Rolley, Robert E.; Samuel, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the rate of infection or mode of transmission for wildlife diseases, and the implications of alternative management strategies. We used hunter harvest data from 2002 to 2013 to investigate chronic wasting disease (CWD) infection rate and transmission modes, and address how alternative management approaches affect disease dynamics in a Wisconsin white-tailed deer population. Uncertainty regarding demographic impacts of CWD on cervid populations, human and domestic animal health concerns, and potential economic consequences underscore the need for strategies to control CWD distribution and prevalence. Using maximum-likelihood methods to evaluate alternative multi-state deterministic models of CWD transmission, harvest data strongly supports a frequency-dependent transmission structure with sex-specific infection rates that are two times higher in males than females. As transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are an important and difficult-to-study class of diseases with major economic and ecological implications, our work supports the hypothesis of frequency-dependent transmission in wild deer at a broad spatial scale and indicates that effective harvest management can be implemented to control CWD prevalence. Specifically, we show that harvest focused on the greater-affected sex (males) can result in stable population dynamics and control of CWD within the next 50 years, given the constraints of the model. We also provide a quantitative estimate of geographic disease spread in southern Wisconsin, validating qualitative assessments that CWD spreads relatively slowly. Given increased discovery and distribution of CWD throughout North America, insights from our study are valuable to management agencies and to the general public concerned about the impacts of CWD on white-tailed deer populations.

  19. Smart Devices for Older Adults Managing Chronic Disease: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ben Yb; Lee, Joon

    2017-05-23

    The emergence of smartphones and tablets featuring vastly advancing functionalities (eg, sensors, computing power, interactivity) has transformed the way mHealth interventions support chronic disease management for older adults. Baby boomers have begun to widely adopt smart devices and have expressed their desire to incorporate technologies into their chronic care. Although smart devices are actively used in research, little is known about the extent, characteristics, and range of smart device-based interventions. We conducted a scoping review to (1) understand the nature, extent, and range of smart device-based research activities, (2) identify the limitations of the current research and knowledge gap, and (3) recommend future research directions. We used the Arksey and O'Malley framework to conduct a scoping review. We identified relevant studies from MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and Web of Science databases using search terms related to mobile health, chronic disease, and older adults. Selected studies used smart devices, sampled older adults, and were published in 2010 or after. The exclusion criteria were sole reliance on text messaging (short message service, SMS) or interactive voice response, validation of an electronic version of a questionnaire, postoperative monitoring, and evaluation of usability. We reviewed references. We charted quantitative data and analyzed qualitative studies using thematic synthesis. To collate and summarize the data, we used the chronic care model. A total of 51 articles met the eligibility criteria. Research activity increased steeply in 2014 (17/51, 33%) and preexperimental design predominated (16/50, 32%). Diabetes (16/46, 35%) and heart failure management (9/46, 20%) were most frequently studied. We identified diversity and heterogeneity in the collection of biometrics and patient-reported outcome measures within and between chronic diseases. Across studies, we found 8 self-management supporting strategies and 4 distinct

  20. Overview of the prevalence, impact, and management of depression and anxiety in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagioti M

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Maria Panagioti,1 Charlotte Scott,1 Amy Blakemore,1,2 Peter A Coventry31National Institute for Health Research School for Primary Care Research, Centre for Primary Care, Institute of Population Health, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, 2Department of Psychiatry, Manchester Mental Health and Social Care Trust, Manchester Royal Infirmary, 3National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care – Greater Manchester and Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UKAbstract: More than one third of individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD experience comorbid symptoms of depression and anxiety. This review aims to provide an overview of the burden of depression and anxiety in those with COPD and to outline the contemporary advances and challenges in the management of depression and anxiety in COPD. Symptoms of depression and anxiety in COPD lead to worse health outcomes, including impaired health-related quality of life and increased mortality risk. Depression and anxiety also increase health care utilization rates and costs. Although the quality of the data varies considerably, the cumulative evidence shows that complex interventions consisting of pulmonary rehabilitation interventions with or without psychological components improve symptoms of depression and anxiety in COPD. Cognitive behavioral therapy is also an effective intervention for managing depression in COPD, but treatment effects are small. Cognitive behavioral therapy could potentially lead to greater benefits in depression and anxiety in people with COPD if embedded in multidisciplinary collaborative care frameworks, but this hypothesis has not yet been empirically assessed. Mindfulness-based treatments are an alternative option for the management of depression and anxiety in people with long-term conditions, but their efficacy is unproven in

  1. [Consensus document for the detection and management of chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Górriz, José L; Bover, Jordi; Segura-de la Morena, Julián; Cebollada, Jesús; Escalada, Javier; Esmatjes, Enric; Fácila, Lorenzo; Gamarra, Javier; Gràcia, Silvia; Hernández-Moreno, Julio; Llisterri-Caro, José L; Mazón, Pilar; Montañés, Rosario; Morales-Olivas, Francisco; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel; de Pablos-Velasco, Pedro; de Santiago, Ana; Sánchez-Celaya, Marta; Suárez, Carmen; Tranche, Salvador

    2014-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important global health problem, involving to 10% of the Spanish population, promoting high morbidity and mortality for the patient and an elevate consumption of the total health resources for the National Health System. This is a summary of an executive consensus document of ten scientific societies involved in the care of the renal patient, that actualizes the consensus document published in 2007. The central extended document can be consulted in the web page of each society. The aspects included in the document are: Concept, epidemiology and risk factors for CKD. Diagnostic criteria, evaluation and stages of CKD, albuminuria and glomerular filtration rate estimation. Progression factors for renal damage. Patient remission criteria. Follow-up and objectives of each speciality control. Nephrotoxicity prevention. Cardio-vascular damage detection. Diet, life-style and treatment attitudes: hypertension, dyslipidaemia, hyperglycemia, smoking, obesity, hyperuricemia, anemia, mineral and bone disorders. Multidisciplinary management for Primary Care, other specialities and Nephrology. Integrated management of CKD patient in haemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and renal transplant patients. Management of the uremic patient in palliative care. We hope that this document may be of help for the multidisciplinary management of CKD patients by summarizing the most updated recommendations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Patient perceptions of a remote monitoring intervention for chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Bonnie J; Holman, John E; Ray, Annette; Scherubel, Melody

    2011-04-01

    Use of telecommunications technology to provide remote monitoring for people with chronic disease is becoming increasingly accepted as a means to improve patient outcomes and reduce resource use. The purpose of this project was to evaluate patient perceptions of a nurse-managed remote monitoring intervention to improve outcomes in veterans with comorbid diabetes and hypertension. Postintervention evaluation data were collected using a 12-item questionnaire and an open-ended question. Participants rated the program as generally positive on the questionnaire, but responses to the open-ended question revealed criticisms and suggestions for improvement not captured on the questionnaire. Interviewing participants in these programs may offer richer data for identifying areas for program improvement. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Economic Evaluation of Community-Based Case Management of Patients Suffering From Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sabrina Storgaard; Pedersen, Kjeld Møller; Weinreich, Ulla Møller

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To analyse the cost effectiveness of community-based case management for patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: The study took place in the third largest municipality in Denmark and was conducted as a randomised controlled trial with 12 months...... was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) as cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) from the perspective of the healthcare sector. Costs were valued in British Pounds (£) at price level 2016. Scenario analyses and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted in order to assess uncertainty...... of the ICER estimate. Results: The intervention resulted in a QALY improvement of 0.0146 (95% CI −0.0216; 0.0585), and a cost increase of £494 (95% CI −1778; 2766) per patient. No statistically significant difference was observed either in costs or effects. The ICER was £33,865 per QALY gained. Scenario...

  4. Patient Engagement and Patient-Centred Care in the Management of Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease and Chronic Kidney Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Allan Bear

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this article is to review the current status of patient-centred care (PCC and patient engagement (PE in the management of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD, to identify some of the barriers that exist to the achievement of PCC and PE, and to describe how these barriers can be overcome. Sources of information: The review is based on the professional experience of one of the authors (RB as a Nephrologist and health care consultant, on the MBA thesis of one of the authors (SS and on a review of pertinent internet-based information and published literature. Findings: Evidence exists that, currently, the care of patients with advanced CKD and ESRD is not fully patient-centred or fully supportive of PE. A number of barriers exist, including: conflict with other priorities; lack of training and fear of change; the unequal balance of power between patients and providers; physician culture and behaviour; the fee-for-service model of physician compensation; slow implementation of electronic health records; and, fear of accountability. These barriers can be overcome by committed leadership and the development of an information-based implementation plan. Established Renal Agencies in Canada appear interested in facilitating this work by collaborating in the development of a toolkit of recommended educational resources and preferred implementation practices for use by ESRD Programs. Limitations: A limitation of this review is the absence of a substantial pre-existing literature on this topic. Implications: Receiving care that is patient-centred and that promotes PE benefits patients with serious chronic diseases such as advanced CKD and ESRD. Considerable work is required by ESRD Programs to ensure that such care is provided. Canadian Renal Agencies can play an important role by ensuring that ESRD Programs have access to essential educational material and proven implementation

  5. Can a chronic disease management pulmonary rehabilitation program for COPD reduce acute rural hospital utilization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasekaba, T M; Williams, E; Hsu-Hage, B

    2009-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) imposes a costly burden on healthcare. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is the best practice to better manage COPD to improve patient outcomes and reduce acute hospital care utilization. To evaluate the impact of a once-weekly, eight-week multidisciplinary PR program as an integral part of the COPD chronic disease management (CDM) Program at Kyabram District Health Services. The study compared two cohorts of COPD patients: CDM-PR Cohort (4-8 weeks) and Opt-out Cohort (0-3 weeks) between February 2006 and March 2007. The CDM-PR Program involved multidisciplinary patient education and group exercise training. Nonparametric statistical tests were used to compare acute hospital care utilization 12 months before and after the introduction of CDM-PR. The number of patients involved in the CDM-PR Cohort was 29 (n = 29), and that in the Opt-out Cohort was 24 (n = 24). The CDM-PR Cohort showed significant reductions in cumulative acute hospital care utilization indicators (95% emergency department presentations, 95% inpatient admissions, 99% length of stay; effect sizes = 0.62-0.66, P 0.05). Total costs associated with the hospital care utilization decreased from $130,000 to $7,500 for the CDM-PR Cohort and increased from $77,700 to $101,200 for the Opt-out Cohort. Participation in the CDM-PR for COPD patients can significantly reduce acute hospital care utilization and associated costs in a small rural health service.

  6. Supporting chronic disease self-management: translating policies and principles into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Rosemary; Murphy, Barbara; Worcester, Marian; Daffey, Angela

    2012-01-01

    To support self-management, health professionals need to adopt a client-centred approach and learn to deliver evidence-based behaviour change interventions. This paper reports on the evaluation of 1- and 2-day training programs developed to improve health professionals' capacity to support chronic disease self-management (CDSM). The 321 participants attended one of eighteen supporting CDSM courses held in urban and rural settings. Participants included nurses, allied health professionals, Aboriginal health workers and general practitioners. Data were collected at three time points: before participation; immediately after the training; and, for a sub-sample of 37 participants, 2 months after the training. Results revealed a significant and sustained increase in CDSM self-efficacy following training regardless of participants' gender, age or qualifications. A thematic analysis of the responses concerning intended practice revealed four main areas of intended practice change, namely: use behavioural strategies; improve communication with clients; adopt a client-centred approach; and improve goal setting. The number of practice changes at 2 months reported by a sub-sample of participants ranged from 1 to 20 with a mean of 14 (s.d.=4). The three most common areas of practice change point to the adoption by health professionals of a collaborative approach with chronic disease patients. Lack of staff trained in CDSM was seen as a major barrier to practice change, with lack of support and finance also named as barriers to practice change. Participants identified that increased training, support and awareness of the principles of supporting CDSM would help to overcome barriers to practice change. These results indicate a readiness among health professionals to adopt a more collaborative approach given the skills and the tools to put this approach into practice.

  7. A national surveillance project on chronic kidney disease management in Canadian primary care: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Aminu K; Ronksley, Paul E; Tangri, Navdeep; Singer, Alexander; Grill, Allan; Nitsch, Dorothea; Queenan, John A; Lindeman, Cliff; Soos, Boglarka; Freiheit, Elizabeth; Tuot, Delphine; Mangin, Dee; Drummond, Neil

    2017-08-04

    Effective chronic disease care is dependent on well-organised quality improvement (QI) strategies that monitor processes of care and outcomes for optimal care delivery. Although healthcare is provincially/territorially structured in Canada, there are national networks such as the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network (CPCSSN) as important facilitators for national QI-based studies to improve chronic disease care. The goal of our study is to improve the understanding of how patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are managed in primary care and the variation across practices and provinces and territories to drive improvements in care delivery. The CPCSSN database contains anonymised health information from the electronic medical records for patients of participating primary care practices (PCPs) across Canada (n=1200). The dataset includes information on patient sociodemographics, medications, laboratory results and comorbidities. Leveraging validated algorithms, case definitions and guidelines will help define CKD and the related processes of care, and these enable us to: (1) determine prevalent CKD burden; (2) ascertain the current practice pattern on risk identification and management of CKD and (3) study variation in care indicators (eg, achievement of blood pressure and proteinuria targets) and referral pattern for specialist kidney care. The process of care outcomes will be stratified across patients' demographics as well as provider and regional (provincial/territorial) characteristics. The prevalence of CKD stages 3-5 will be presented as age-sex standardised prevalence estimates stratified by province and as weighted averages for population rates with 95% CIs using census data. For each PCP, age-sex standardised prevalence will be calculated and compared with expected standardised prevalence estimates. The process-based outcomes will be defined using established methods. The CPCSSN is committed to high ethical standards when dealing with

  8. Computer templates in chronic disease management: ethnographic case study in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglehurst, Deborah; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Roberts, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate how electronic templates shape, enable and constrain consultations about chronic diseases. Design Ethnographic case study, combining field notes, video-recording, screen capture with a microanalysis of talk, body language and data entry—an approach called linguistic ethnography. Setting Two general practices in England. Participants and methods Ethnographic observation of administrative areas and 36 nurse-led consultations was done. Twenty-four consultations were directly observed and 12 consultations were video-recorded alongside computer screen capture. Consultations were transcribed using conversation analysis conventions, with notes on body language and the electronic record. The analysis involved repeated rounds of viewing video, annotating field notes, transcription and microanalysis to identify themes. The data was interpreted using discourse analysis, with attention to the sociotechnical theory. Results Consultations centred explicitly or implicitly on evidence-based protocols inscribed in templates. Templates did not simply identify tasks for completion, but contributed to defining what chronic diseases were, how care was being delivered and what it meant to be a patient or professional in this context. Patients’ stories morphed into data bytes; the particular became generalised; the complex was made discrete, simple and manageable; and uncertainty became categorised and contained. Many consultations resembled bureaucratic encounters, primarily oriented to completing data fields. We identified a tension, sharpened by the template, between different framings of the patient—as ‘individual’ or as ‘one of a population’. Some clinicians overcame this tension, responding creatively to prompts within a dialogue constructed around the patient's narrative. Conclusions Despite their widespread implementation, little previous research has examined how templates are actually used in practice. Templates do not simply document the

  9. Overview of Self-Management Resources Used by Canadian Chronic Kidney Disease Clinics: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Maoliosa; Gil, Sarah; Kahlon, Bhavneet; Beanlands, Heather; Straus, Sharon; Herrington, Gwen; Manns, Braden; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2018-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) clinics across Canada provide tailored care for patients with CKD with an aim to slow progression and prevent complications. These clinics provide CKD self-management resources; however, there is limited information about what resources are being used by clinics. We undertook a survey of CKD clinics across Canada to identify self-management resources for adults aged 18 years and over with CKD categories 1 to 5 and not requiring dialysis or transplant. To identify and collate self-management resources (eg, strategies, tools, educational materials) used by CKD clinics across Canada for adults with CKD (categories 1 to 5, not requiring kidney replacement therapy). Self-administered, semistructured electronic survey. Canadian CKD clinics with previously identified contact information. We contacted 57 CKD English-speaking clinics and invited them to complete an online survey. The survey was available from October 2016 to January 2017 and consisted of 17 questions regarding the use and attributes of self-management resources including topic, delivery format, provider, target population, where the intervention was provided, and resource languages. Forty-four clinics (77%) completed the survey. The most common topic was modality education provided in print format, by nurses. The most frequently used resource was the Kidney Foundation of Canada (KFOC) Living With Kidney Disease manual. We also identified that the majority of resources were available in English, targeting both patients and caregivers in the outpatient setting. Our survey included Canadian adult CKD clinics, which may not be generalizability to other settings, such as care of people with CKD in primary care. Adult CKD clinics across Canada provide some similar resources, but also provide many different self-management resources. Even though some of the same resources were used by multiple clinics, the way they were provided them (ie, provider, location, delivery format) varied by

  10. Chronic wasting disease management in ranched elk using rectal biopsy testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Nicholas J; Henderson, Davin M; Wycoff, Sarah; Tennant, Joanne; Hoover, Edward A; Love, Dan; Kline, Ed; Lehmkuhl, Aaron; Thomsen, Bruce

    2018-03-04

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) affecting members of the cervid species, and is one of the few TSEs with an expanding geographic range. Diagnostic limitations, efficient transmission, and the movement of infected animals are important contributing factors in the ongoing spread of disease. Managing CWD in affected populations has proven difficult, relying on population reduction in the case of wild deer and elk, or quarantine and depopulation in farmed cervids. In the present study, we evaluated the effectiveness of managing endemic CWD in a closed elk herd using antemortem sampling combined with both conventional and experimental diagnostic testing, and selective, targeted culling of infected animals. We hypothesized that the real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) assay, a developing amplification assay, would offer greater detection capabilities over immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the identification of infected animals using recto-anal mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (RAMALT). We further sought to develop a better understanding of CWD epidemiology in elk with various PRNP alleles, and predicted that CWD prevalence would decrease with targeted culling. We found that RT-QuIC identified significantly more CWD-positive animals than IHC using RAMALT tissues (121 vs. 86, respectively, out of 553 unique animals), and that longstanding disease presence was associated with an increasing frequency of less susceptible PRNP alleles. Prevalence of CWD increased significantly over the first two years of the study, implying that refinements in our management strategy are necessary to reduce the prevalence of CWD in this herd.

  11. Self-management interventions for adults with chronic kidney disease: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Maoliosa; Kahlon, Bhavneet Kaur; Beanlands, Heather; Straus, Sharon; Ronksley, Paul; Herrington, Gwen; Tong, Allison; Grill, Allan; Waldvogel, Blair; Large, Chantel A; Large, Claire L; Harwood, Lori; Novak, Marta; James, Matthew T; Elliott, Meghan; Fernandez, Nicolas; Brimble, Scott; Samuel, Susan; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2018-03-22

    To systematically identify and describe self-management interventions for adult patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Community-based. Adults with CKD stages 1-5 (not requiring kidney replacement therapy). Self-management strategies for adults with CKD. Using a scoping review, electronic databases and grey literature were searched in October 2016 to identify self-management interventions for adults with CKD stages 1-5 (not requiring kidney replacement therapy). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-RCTs, qualitative and mixed method studies were included and study selection and data extraction were independently performed by two reviewers. Outcomes included behaviours, cognitions, physiological measures, symptoms, health status and healthcare. Fifty studies (19 RCTs, 7 quasi-experimental, 5 observational, 13 pre-post intervention, 1 mixed method and 5 qualitative) reporting 45 interventions were included. The most common intervention topic was diet/nutrition and interventions were regularly delivered face to face. Interventions were administered by a variety of providers, with nursing professionals the most common health professional group. Cognitions (ie, changes in general CKD knowledge, perceived self-management and motivation) were the most frequently reported outcome domain that showed improvement. Less than 1% of the interventions were co-developed with patients and 20% were based on a theory or framework. There was a wide range of self-management interventions with considerable variability in outcomes for adults with CKD. Major gaps in the literature include lack of patient engagement in the design of the interventions, with the majority of interventions not applying a behavioural change theory to inform their development. This work highlights the need to involve patients to co-developed and evaluate a self-management intervention based on sound theories and clinical evidence. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the

  12. Initial diagnosis and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Australia: views from the coal face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereznicki, Bonnie; Walters, Haydn; Walters, Julia; Peterson, Gregory; Bereznicki, Luke

    2017-07-01

    Early diagnosis and management can mitigate the long-term morbidity and mortality of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To gain insights into the initial diagnostic process and early management of COPD by Australian general practitioners (GP). A random sample of Australian GP was invited to complete a postal survey, which assessed familiarity with and use of contemporary practice guidelines, diagnostic criteria and management preferences for COPD. A total of 233 GP completed the survey. While most GP based a COPD diagnosis on smoking history (94.4%), symptoms (91.0%) and spirometry (88.8%), only 39.9% of respondents recorded a formal diagnosis of COPD after the patient's first symptomatic presentation. Tiotropium was the preferred treatment in 77.3% of GP for the initial management of COPD, while only 27.5% routinely recommended pulmonary rehabilitation. GP routinely recorded patients' smoking status and offered smoking cessation advice, but the timing of this advice varied. Less than half of the respondents routinely used COPD management guidelines or tools and resources provided by the Australian Lung Foundation. There is scope for major improvement in GP familiarity with and use of COPD management guidelines and readily available tools and resources. Some systematic issues were highlighted in the Australian primary care setting, such as a reactive and relatively passive and delayed approach to diagnosis, potentially delayed smoking cessation advice and underutilisation of pulmonary rehabilitation. There is an urgent need to devise strategies for improving patient outcomes in COPD using resources that are readily available. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  13. Chronic disease management: time for consultant physicians to take more leadership in system redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, C; Scott, I; Greenberg, P; Sargious, P

    2007-09-01

    There is a need for system redesign to meet the needs of individuals with chronic disease. New models of chronic disease care include team-based paradigms that focus on continuous and patient-centred care. In such models the roles of providers and patients must change. In this article we focus on new roles for consultant physicians, as well as barriers and incentives to these roles.

  14. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease heterogeneity: challenges for health risk assessment, stratification and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Josep; Vargas, Claudia; Cano, Isaac; Selivanov, Vitaly; Barreiro, Esther; Maier, Dieter; Falciani, Francesco; Wagner, Peter; Cascante, Marta; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Kalko, Susana; De Mas, Igor; Tegnér, Jesper; Escarrabill, Joan; Agustí, Alvar; Gomez-Cabrero, David

    2014-11-28

    Heterogeneity in clinical manifestations and disease progression in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) lead to consequences for patient health risk assessment, stratification and management. Implicit with the classical "spill over" hypothesis is that COPD heterogeneity is driven by the pulmonary events of the disease. Alternatively, we hypothesized that COPD heterogeneities result from the interplay of mechanisms governing three conceptually different phenomena: 1) pulmonary disease, 2) systemic effects of COPD and 3) co-morbidity clustering, each of them with their own dynamics. To explore the potential of a systems analysis of COPD heterogeneity focused on skeletal muscle dysfunction and on co-morbidity clustering aiming at generating predictive modeling with impact on patient management. To this end, strategies combining deterministic modeling and network medicine analyses of the Biobridge dataset were used to investigate the mechanisms of skeletal muscle dysfunction. An independent data driven analysis of co-morbidity clustering examining associated genes and pathways was performed using a large dataset (ICD9-CM data from Medicare, 13 million people). Finally, a targeted network analysis using the outcomes of the two approaches (skeletal muscle dysfunction and co-morbidity clustering) explored shared pathways between these phenomena. (1) Evidence of abnormal regulation of skeletal muscle bioenergetics and skeletal muscle remodeling showing a significant association with nitroso-redox disequilibrium was observed in COPD; (2) COPD patients presented higher risk for co-morbidity clustering than non-COPD patients increasing with ageing; and, (3) the on-going targeted network analyses suggests shared pathways between skeletal muscle dysfunction and co-morbidity clustering. The results indicate the high potential of a systems approach to address COPD heterogeneity. Significant knowledge gaps were identified that are relevant to shape strategies aiming at

  15. The impact of body weight management in chronic kidney disease patients with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Ling; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Yang, Mei-Fang; Yang, Wen-Ching; Wu, Ming-Ju; Lin, Tzu-Mei; Chen, Cheng-Hsu

    2013-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and obesity are important public health concerns. Because obesity may initiate and/or accelerate kidney damage, weight control may benefit CKD patients. We examined the influence of dietary management and physical exercise in 38 obese CKD patients with or without target reduction of body weight 3% or more from baseline. After a 2-month lifestyle intervention program, those with target body weight control had significant improvement of blood pressure control, as well as reduced lipid profiles, serum creatinine level (1.1 ± 0.3 vs. 0.8 ± 0.3; P management and exercise were associated with improvements in health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure and lipid control), and renal profiles in obese CKD patients. Supportive individualized programs for lifestyle change could exert beneficial effects, but long-term research with a larger patient population is needed to elucidate the optimal effective combination of dietary management and exercise. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Activating Patients for Sustained Chronic Disease Self-Management: Thinking Beyond Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Cheryl J; Williams, Joel E; Evatt, Janet H

    2016-04-01

    This article describes the impact of an 8-week community program implemented by trained volunteers on the hypertension self-management of 185 patients who were batch randomized to intervention or wait-list control groups. Compared with control group participants, a higher proportion of treatment group participants moved from the cognitive to behavioral stages of motivational readiness for being physically active (P healthy eating habits (P = .001), handling stress well (P = .001), and living an overall healthy lifestyle (P = .003). They also demonstrated a greater average increase in perceived competence for self-management, F(1.134) = 4.957, P = .028, η2 = .036, and a greater increase in mean hypertension-related knowledge, F(1.160) = 16.571, P < .0005, η(2) = .094. Enduring lifestyle changes necessary for chronic disease self-management require that psychosocial determinants of health behavior are instilled, which is typically beyond standard medical practice. We recommend peer-led, community-based programs as a complement to clinical care and support the increasing health system interest in promoting population health beyond clinical walls. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Sustainability of the integrated chronic disease management model at primary care clinics in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmall, Shaidah

    2016-01-01

    Background An integrated chronic disease management (ICDM) model consisting of four components (facility reorganisation, clinical supportive management, assisted self-supportive management and strengthening of support systems and structures outside the facility) has been implemented across 42 primary health care clinics in South Africa with a view to improve the operational efficiency and patient clinical outcomes. Aim The aim of this study was to assess the sustainability of the facility reorganisation and clinical support components 18 months after the initiation. Setting The study was conducted at 37 of the initiating clinics across three districts in three provinces of South Africa. Methods The National Health Service (NHS) Institute for Innovation and Improvement Sustainability Model (SM) self-assessment tool was used to assess sustainability. Results Bushbuckridge had the highest mean sustainability score of 71.79 (95% CI: 63.70–79.89) followed by West Rand Health District (70.25 (95% CI: 63.96–76.53)) and Dr Kenneth Kaunda District (66.50 (95% CI: 55.17–77.83)). Four facilities (11%) had an overall sustainability score of less than 55. Conclusion The less than optimal involvement of clinical leadership (doctors), negative staff behaviour towards the ICDM, adaptability or flexibility of the model to adapt to external factors and infrastructure limitation have the potential to negatively affect the sustainability and scale-up of the model. PMID:28155314

  18. Imaging techniques in the management of chronic kidney disease: current developments and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herget-Rosenthal, Stefan

    2011-05-01

    The measurement of both renal function and structure is critical in clinical nephrology to detect, stage, and monitor chronic kidney disease (CKD). Current imaging modalities especially ultrasound (US), computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide adequate information on structural changes but little on functional impairment in CKD. Although not yet considered first-line procedures for evaluating patients with renal disease, new US and MR imaging techniques may permit the assessment of renal function in the near future. Combined with established imaging techniques, contrast-enhanced US, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, blood oxygen level dependency MRI, or diffusion-weighted imaging may provide rapid, accurate, simultaneous, and noninvasive imaging of the structure of kidneys, macrovascular and microvascular renal perfusion, oxygenation, and glomerular filtration rate. Recent developments in molecular imaging indicate that pathophysiological pathways of renal diseases such as apoptosis, coagulation, fibrosis, and ischemia will be visualized at the tissue level. These major advances in imaging and developments in hardware and software could enable comprehensive imaging of renal structure and function in four dimensions (three dimensions plus time), and imaging is expected to play an increasing role in the management of CKD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Attrition in Chronic Disease Self-Management Programs and self-efficacy at enrollment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verevkina, Nina; Shi, Yunfeng; Fuentes-Caceres, Veronica Alejandra; Scanlon, Dennis Patrick

    2014-12-01

    Among other goals, the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) is designed to improve self-efficacy of the chronically ill. However, a substantial proportion of the enrollees often leave CDSMPs before completing the program curriculum. This study examines factors associated with program attrition in a CDSMP implemented in a community setting. We used data from the Our Pathways to Health program, implemented in Humboldt County, California, from 2008 to 2011. Our conceptual framework is based on Bandura's self-efficacy theory, and we used logistic regression to investigate whether baseline self-efficacy and other members' efficacy are associated with participants dropping out of the CDSMP. Twenty-three percent of the participants did not complete the program similar to previous studies. Lower baseline self-efficacy increased the odds of dropout, but other members' efficacy was not associated with differential odds of dropout. Age, educational difference between the individual and the group, weekday sessions, and social/role activity limitations are also found to be associated with program attrition. Our results suggest that participants with low starting self-efficacy may need extra help to complete the program. Further research is needed to understand how to effectively provide additional support to this group. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  20. Inhalation device options for the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePietro, Michael; Gilbert, Ileen; Millette, Lauren A; Riebe, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic respiratory symptoms and airflow limitation, resulting from abnormalities in the airway and/or damage to the alveoli. Primary care physicians manage the healthcare of a large proportion of patients with COPD. In addition to determining the most appropriate medication regimen, which usually includes inhaled bronchodilators with or without inhaled corticosteroids, physicians are charged with optimizing inhalation device selection to facilitate effective drug delivery and patient adherence. The large variety of inhalation devices currently available present numerous challenges for physicians that include: (1) gaining knowledge of and proficiency with operating different device classes; (2) identifying the most appropriate inhalation device for the patient; and (3) providing the necessary education and training for patients on device use. This review provides an overview of the inhalation device types currently available in the United States for delivery of COPD medications, including information on their successful operation and respective advantages and disadvantages, factors to consider in matching a device to an individual patient, the need for device training for patients and physicians, and guidance for improving treatment adherence. Finally, the review will discuss established and novel tools and technology that may aid physicians in improving education and promoting better adherence to therapy.

  1. Reimbursement for pediatric diabetes intensive case management: a model for chronic diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Joni K; Logan, Kathy J; Hamm, Robert M; Sproat, Scott M; Musser, Kathleen M; Everhart, Patricia D; McDermott, Harrold M; Copeland, Kenneth C

    2004-01-01

    . Differences between participating and nonparticipating groups included age (participants were of younger age), double-parent households (participants were more likely to be from double parent households), and number of medical visits kept (participants kept more follow-up visits). No differences in duration of diabetes, months followed in the program, sex, or ethnicity were observed. Contracting with third-party payers for pediatric diabetes intensive case management services reduces costs by reducing emergency department and inpatient hospital utilizations, likely a result of intensive education and immediate access to the diabetes health care team for crisis management. Such strategies may prove to be cost saving not only for diabetes management but also for managing other costly and personnel-intensive chronic diseases.

  2. Health technologies for the improvement of chronic disease management: a review of the Medical Advisory Secretariat evidence-based analyses between 2006 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitovic, M; Brener, S

    2013-01-01

    As part of ongoing efforts to improve the Ontario health care system, a mega-analysis examining the optimization of chronic disease management in the community was conducted by Evidence Development and Standards, Health Quality Ontario (previously known as the Medical Advisory Secretariat [MAS]). The purpose of this report was to identify health technologies previously evaluated by MAS that may be leveraged in efforts to optimize chronic disease management in the community. The Ontario Health Technology Assessment Series and field evaluations conducted by MAS and its partners between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2011. Technologies related to at least 1 of 7 disease areas of interest (type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, stroke, and chronic wounds) or that may greatly impact health services utilization were reviewed. Only technologies with a moderate to high quality of evidence and associated with a clinically or statistically significant improvement in disease management were included. Technologies related to other topics in the mega-analysis on chronic disease management were excluded. Evidence-based analyses were reviewed, and outcomes of interest were extracted. Outcomes of interest included hospital utilization, mortality, health-related quality of life, disease-specific measures, and economic analysis measures. Eleven analyses were included and summarized. Technologies fell into 3 categories: those with evidence for the cure of chronic disease, those with evidence for the prevention of chronic disease, and those with evidence for the management of chronic disease. The impact on patient outcomes and hospitalization rates of new health technologies in chronic disease management is often overlooked. This analysis demonstrates that health technologies can reduce the burden of illness; improve patient outcomes; reduce resource utilization intensity; be cost

  3. Public health service options for affordable and accessible noncommunicable disease and related chronic disease prevention and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brownie S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sharon Brownie,1,2 Andrew P Hills,3,4 Rachel Rossiter51Workforce and Health Services, Griffith Health, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia; 2Oxford PRAXIS Forum, Green Templeton College, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom; 3Allied Health Research, Mater Research Institute – The University of Queensland and Mater Mothers' Hospital, South Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 4Griffith Health Institute, Griffith Health, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia; 5MMHN and Nurse Practitioner Programs, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Globally, nations are confronted with the challenge of providing affordable health services to populations with increasing levels of noncommunicable and chronic disease. Paradoxically, many nations can both celebrate increases in life expectancy and bemoan parallel increases in chronic disease prevalence. Simply put, despite living longer, not all of that time is spent in good health. Combined with factors such as rising levels of obesity and related noncommunicable disease, the demand for health services is requiring nations to consider new models of affordable health care. Given the level of disease burden, all staff, not just doctors, need to be part of the solution and encouraged to innovate and deliver better and more affordable health care, particularly preventative primary health care services. This paper draws attention to a range of exemplars to encourage and stimulate readers to think beyond traditional models of primary health service delivery. Examples include nurse-led, allied health-led, and student-led clinics; student-assisted services; and community empowerment models. These are reported for the interest of policy makers and health service managers involved in preventative and primary health service redesign initiatives.Keywords: primary health care planning, community health care, nurse-led clinics, allied health personnel

  4. Assessment of a primary and tertiary care integrated management model for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiro Meritxell

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in Spain continues to present challenges, and problems are exacerbated when there is a lack of coordinated follow-up between levels of care. This paper sets out the protocol for assessing the impact of an integrated management model for the care of patients with COPD. The new model will be evaluated in terms of 1 improvement in the rational utilization of health-care services and 2 benefits reflected in improved health status and quality of life for patients. Methods/Design A quasi-experimental study of the effectiveness of a COPD management model called COPD PROCESS. The patients in the study cohorts will be residents of neighborhoods served by two referral hospitals in Barcelona, Spain. One area comprises the intervention group (n = 32,248 patients and the other the control group (n = 32,114 patients. The study will include pre- and post-intervention assessment 18 months after the program goes into effect. Analyses will be on two datasets: clinical and administrative data available for all patients, and clinical assessment information for a cohort of 440 patients sampled randomly from the intervention and control areas. The main endpoints will be the hospitalization rates in the two health-care areas and quality-of-life measures in the two cohorts. Discussion The COPD PROCESS model foresees the integrated multidisciplinary management of interventions at different levels of the health-care system through coordinated routine clinical practice. It will put into practice diagnostic and treatment procedures that are based on current evidence, multidisciplinary consensus, and efficient use of available resources. Care pathways in this model are defined in terms of patient characteristics, level of disease severity and the presence or absence of exacerbation. The protocol covers the full range of care from primary prevention to treatment of

  5. Does community-wide chronic kidney disease management improve patient outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Hugh C; Baharani, Jyoti; Dasgupta, Indranil; Suresh, Vijayan; Temple, Robert M; Thomas, Mark E; Smith, Steve A

    2014-03-01

    The number of patients starting renal replacement therapy (RRT) is increasing in England, as it is worldwide. Improvements in the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) across communities to alter this trend are a public health priority. We have prospectively studied changes in the incidence and modality of treatment for end-stage renal disease following the introduction of a CKD management programme in the West Midlands region of England. Nephrology service to approximately 700 000 adult population of mixed ethnicity in urban and suburban areas, many with social deprivation. The programme was introduced in stages between 2003 and 2006 and comprised primary care education and financial incentives, personal clinical reports written directly to patients following every consultation, routine laboratory estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) reporting, eGFR graph surveillance to identify and monitor patients at risk, multidisciplinary pre-RRT care and conservative care. Prevalent patients: 10 552 with CKD and 8509 without CKD with diabetes. access to nephrology care, trends in RRT incidence and starting modality, place of death without RRT. Incident count was adjusted for changes in the local adult population recorded in national censuses. Ninety-one per cent of patients aged ≥75 years with incident CKD stage 5 were known to a nephrologist. The population-adjusted incident RRT rate peaked in 2005 and then declined; the proportion starting with transplant, peritoneal dialysis or haemodialysis by arterio-venous fistula increased to 63% by 2012 (P = 0.001 versus 2005). Fifty-two per cent of patients receiving planned conservative care without dialysis died out of hospital. Following the introduction of a community-wide systematic CKD management programme, the population-adjusted incidence of RRT reduced, modality of initiation of RRT improved and a majority of patients receiving planned conservative care without dialysis died out of hospital.

  6. Strategies to improve chronic disease management in seven metro Boston community health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndumele, Chima D; Russell, Beverley E; Ayanian, John Z; Landon, Bruce E; Keegan, Thomas; O'Malley, A James; Hicks, Leroi S

    2009-01-01

    The Community, Health Center, and Academic Medicine Partnership Project (CHAMPP) is a partnership between medical researchers, community health centers (CHCs), and a community advisory committee focused on reducing cardiovascular morbidity related to hypertension and diabetes for non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic populations in Boston, Massachusetts. We conducted site visits at seven participating CHCs, located in Boston. The visits were to solicit health center staff opinions about site-specific barriers and enabling factors for optimum preventative cardiovascular care for racial/ethnic minority patients receiving hypertension and diabetes care at their centers. Site visits included a tour of each health center and a series of directed interviews with center personnel. Site visit notes were reviewed to identify themes that emerged during the course of each site visit. A summary matrix was developed for each health center, which included information regarding the most salient and persistent themes of the visit. Site visits uncovered several patient-, provider-, CHC-, and community-based factors that either facilitate or hinder optimal care of chronic disease patients. Commonly referenced barriers included the need for improved patient adherence to provider recommendations; insufficient time for providers to address complex health issues presented by patients and the need for a broader range of healthier food options in surrounding communities. Interactive patient groups and community health workers (CHWs) have been well received when implemented. Recommendations included adopting case management as a part of usual care for chronic disease patients; additionally, widespread implementation of CHWs may to provide a platform for more comprehensive care for patients.

  7. Functional, communicative and critical health literacy of chronic disease patients and their importance for self-management.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.; Waverijn, G.; Rademakers, J.; Vaart, R. van der; Rijken, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To provide insight into the level of health literacy among chronic disease patients in the Netherlands, to identify subgroups with low literacy and to examine the associations between health literacy and self-management. Methods: Self-report questionnaires were sent to a nationwide sample

  8. Patient-centered care in chronic disease management: a thematic analysis of the literature in family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudon, Catherine; Fortin, Martin; Haggerty, Jeannie; Loignon, Christine; Lambert, Mireille; Poitras, Marie-Eve

    2012-08-01

    The objective was to provide a synthesis of the results of the research and discourse lines on main dimensions of patient-centered care in the context of chronic disease management in family medicine, building on Stewart et al.'s model. We developed search strategies for the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases, from 1980 to April 2009. All articles addressing patient-centered care in the context of chronic disease management in family medicine were included. A thematic analysis was performed using mixed codification, based on Stewart's model of patient-centered care. Thirty-two articles were included. Six major themes emerged: (1) starting from the patient's situation; (2) legitimizing the illness experience; (3) acknowledging the patient's expertise; (4) offering realistic hope; (5) developing an ongoing partnership; (6) providing advocacy for the patient in the health care system. The context of chronic disease management brings forward new dimensions of patient-centered care such as legitimizing the illness experience, acknowledging patient expertise, offering hope and providing advocacy. Chronic disease management calls for the adaptation of the family physician's role to patients' fluctuating needs. Literature also suggests the involvement of the family physician in care transitions as a component of patient-centered care. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Approaches to chronic disease management evaluation in use in Europe : A review of current methods and performance measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conklin, A.; Nolte, E.; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: An overview was produced of approaches currently used to evaluate chronic disease management in selected European countries. The study aims to describe the methods and metrics used in Europe as a first to help advance the methodological basis for their assessment. Methods: A common

  10. Health outcomes and related effects of using social media in chronic disease management: a literature review and analysis of affordances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merolli, Mark; Gray, Kathleen; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando

    2013-12-01

    Whilst the future for social media in chronic disease management appears to be optimistic, there is limited concrete evidence indicating whether and how social media use significantly improves patient outcomes. This review examines the health outcomes and related effects of using social media, while also exploring the unique affordances underpinning these effects. Few studies have investigated social media's potential in chronic disease, but those we found indicate impact on health status and other effects are positive, with none indicating adverse events. Benefits have been reported for psychosocial management via the ability to foster support and share information; however, there is less evidence of benefits for physical condition management. We found that studies covered a very limited range of social media platforms and that there is an ongoing propensity towards reporting investigations of earlier social platforms, such as online support groups (OSG), discussion forums and message boards. Finally, it is hypothesized that for social media to form a more meaningful part of effective chronic disease management, interventions need to be tailored to the individualized needs of sufferers. The particular affordances of social media that appear salient in this regard from analysis of the literature include: identity, flexibility, structure, narration and adaptation. This review suggests further research of high methodological quality is required to investigate the affordances of social media and how these can best serve chronic disease sufferers. Evidence-based practice (EBP) using social media may then be considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Periodontal therapy for the management of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunjie; Lv, Zongkai; Shi, Zongdao; Zhu, Ye; Wu, Yafei; Li, Longjiang; Iheozor-Ejiofor, Zipporah

    2014-08-15

    There is an association between chronic periodontitis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, it is not known whether periodontal therapy could prevent or manage CVD in patients with chronic periodontitis. The objective of this systematic review was to investigate the effects of periodontal therapy in preventing the occurrence of, and management or recurrence of, CVD in patients with chronic periodontitis. The electronic databases that were searched were the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 7 April 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 3), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 7 April 2014), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 7 April 2014), CINAHL via EBSCO (1937 to 7 April 2014), OpenGrey (to 7 April 2014), the Chinese BioMedical Literature Database (1978 to April 2014), the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (1994 to April 2014) and the VIP database (1989 to April 2014). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register, the World Health Organization (WHO) Clinical Trials Registry Platform and Sciencepaper Online for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs were considered eligible. Studies were selected if they included patients with a diagnosis of chronic periodontitis and previous CVD (secondary prevention studies) or no CVD (primary prevention studies); patients in the intervention group received active periodontal therapy compared to maintenance therapy, no periodontal treatment or another kind of periodontal treatment in the control group. Two review authors carried out the study identification, data extraction and risk of bias assessment independently and in duplicate. Any discrepancies between the two authors were resolved by discussion or with a third review author. A formal pilot-tested data extraction form was adopted for the data extraction

  12. Implementation of data management and effect on chronic disease coding in a primary care organisation: A parallel cohort observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiver, Michelle; Wintemute, Kimberly; Aliarzadeh, Babak; Martin, Ken; Khan, Shahriar; Jackson, Dave; Leggett, Jannet; Lambert-Lanning, Anita; Siu, Maggie

    2016-10-12

    Consistent and standardized coding for chronic conditions is associated with better care; however, coding may currently be limited in electronic medical records (EMRs) used in Canadian primary care.Objectives To implement data management activities in a community-based primary care organisation and to evaluate the effects on coding for chronic conditions. Fifty-nine family physicians in Toronto, Ontario, belonging to a single primary care organisation, participated in the study. The organisation implemented a central analytical data repository containing their EMR data extracted, cleaned, standardized and returned by the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network (CPCSSN), a large validated primary care EMR-based database. They used reporting software provided by CPCSSN to identify selected chronic conditions and standardized codes were then added back to the EMR. We studied four chronic conditions (diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and dementia). We compared changes in coding over six months for physicians in the organisation with changes for 315 primary care physicians participating in CPCSSN across Canada. Chronic disease coding within the organisation increased significantly more than in other primary care sites. The adjusted difference in the increase of coding was 7.7% (95% confidence interval 7.1%-8.2%, p Data management activities were associated with an increase in standardized coding for chronic conditions. Exploring requirements to scale and spread this approach in Canadian primary care organisations may be worthwhile.

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with lung cancer: prevalence, impact and management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyratos D

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dionisios Spyratos, Eleni Papadaki, Sofia Lampaki, Theodoros Kontakiotis Pulmonary Department, Lung Cancer Oncology Unit, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, G. Papanicolaou Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and lung cancer share a common etiological factor (cigarette smoking and usually coexist in everyday clinical practice. The prevalence of COPD among newly diagnosed patients with lung cancer sometimes exceeds 50%. COPD is an independent risk factor (2–4 times higher than non-COPD subjects for lung cancer development.The presence of emphysema in addition to other factors (e.g., smoking history, age could be incorporated into risk scores in order to define the most appropriate target group for lung cancer screening using low-dose computed tomography. Clinical management of patients with coexistence of COPD and lung cancer requires a multidisciplinary oncology board that includes a pulmonologist. Detailed evaluation (lung function tests, cardiopulmonary exercise test and management (inhaled drugs, smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation of COPD should be taken into account for lung cancer treatment (surgical approach, radiotherapy. Keywords: lung cancer, COPD, coexistence, risk factor, therapy decisions 

  14. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor and Its Role in the Management of Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Kaplan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF plays a crucial role in the response to hypoxia at the cellular, tissue, and organism level. New agents under development to pharmacologically manipulate HIF may provide new and exciting possibilities in the treatment of anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD as well as in multiple other disease states involving ischemia–reperfusion injury. This article provides an overview of recent studies describing current standards of care for patients with anemia in CKD and associated clinical issues, and those supporting the clinical potential for targeting HIF stabilization with HIF prolyl-hydroxylase inhibitors (HIF-PHI in these patients. Additionally, articles reporting the clinical potential for HIF-PHIs in ‘other’ putative therapeutic areas, the tissue and intracellular distribution of HIF- and prolyl-hydroxylase domain (PHD isoforms, and HIF isoforms targeted by the different PHDs, were identified. There is increasing uncertainty regarding the optimal treatment for anemia of CKD with poorer outcomes associated with treatment to higher hemoglobin targets, and the increasing use of iron and consequent risk of iron imbalance. Attainment and maintenance of more physiologic erythropoietin levels associated with HIF stabilization may improve the management of patients resistant to treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and improve outcomes at higher hemoglobin targets.

  15. Australian general practitioners’ current practice for chronic kidney disease (CKD detection and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Ludlow

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Guidelines for early detection of chronic kidney disease (CKD emphasise regular testing of kidney health in high-risk individuals. However, evidence suggests that CKD is not being adequately detected or appropriately managed in primary care. Aims Assess Australian general practitioners’ (GP current practice in relation to CKD detection and management. Methods This was a cross-sectional study utilising a random sample of GPs identified by interrogation of the national online telephone directory, and stratified by geographical location. Data collection occurred between October 2014 and January 2015. Of 2,815 eligible contacts, the final response rate was 23 per cent. Results Of the 656 respondents, over 90 per cent assessed kidney health at least annually in people with diabetes or high blood pressure, and 71 per cent correctly assessed kidney health every 3–6 months in a patient with Stage 3b CKD. The tests most commonly used to assess kidney health were serum creatinine (with eGFR, blood pressure and urine albumin creatinine ratio. The most commonly reported CKD management strategies were ‘blood pressure reduction using pharmacological agents’ (81 per cent and ‘glycaemic control if diabetes present’ (64 per cent. Knowledge testing highlighted that 32 per cent of respondents were not able to correctly identify how to properly assess absolute cardiovascular risk, and this was significantly more common in more experienced GPs (p=0.003. Conclusion The results indicate that Australian GPs are mainly practising in accordance with current guidelines for detection and management of patients with CKD, but with room for improvement in some areas

  16. Chronic kidney disease in an Aboriginal population: A nurse practitioner-led approach to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Elizabeth; Salem, Lesley; Wilson, Sue; O'Neill, Claire; Davis, Kathleen; Bagnulo, Sharif

    2015-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant health problem impacting Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. After age adjustment, the prevalence of kidney disease is 3.7 times higher in Aboriginal people and 7.3 times higher for end-stage kidney disease compared with the wider population. Yet at an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS) with a significant patient population, fewer than expected numbers of Aboriginal patients were identified with CKD. The ACCHS engaged a nurse practitioner to lead a systematic approach to the identification and treatment of CKD. This nurse practitioner-led approach to CKD was developed and implemented at a rural NSW ACCHS, with the support of a partnership formed between the nurse practitioner, the ACCHS, a nephrologist from a referral hospital and a statewide NGO. The primary measure for improvement has been to identify and stage patients with CKD and establish management plans as appropriate. This nurse-led project was established to: (i) identify patients with CKD; (ii) provide access for CKD patients to appropriate services; (iii) commence pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies that enable remission or regression of CKD; and (iv) educate practice GPs and other staff members on CKD clinical guidelines and best practice. The CKD project has improved access to essential health care for vulnerable and at-risk populations, with 187 patients to date having been identified with kidney disease and staged for its severity. The need for strong multi-disciplinary teamwork has been demonstrated with good communication strategies implemented. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  17. Identification and management of chronic kidney disease complications by internal medicine residents: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Varun; Agarwal, Mohit; Ghosh, Amit K; Barnes, Michael A; McCullough, Peter A

    2011-05-01

    Many patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) receive care from primary care physicians. Identification and management of CKD complications in primary care is suboptimal. It is not known if current residency curriculum adequately prepares a future internist in this aspect of CKD care. We performed an online questionnaire survey of internal medicine residents in the United States to determine knowledge of CKD complications and their management. Four hundred seventy-nine residents completed the survey with postgraduate year (PGY) distribution 166 PGY1, 187 PGY2, and 126 PGY3. Most of the residents correctly recognized anemia (91%) and bone disease (82%) as complications at estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m; however, only half of the residents identified coronary artery disease (54%) as a CKD complication. For a patient with estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m, two thirds of the residents would workup for anemia (62%), whereas half of them would check for mineral and bone disorder (56%). With regard to anemia of CKD, less than half of the residents knew the CKD goal hemoglobin level of 11 to 12 g/dL (44%); most would supplement iron stores (86%), whereas fewer would consider nephrology referral (28%). For mineral and bone disorders, many residents would recommend dietary phosphorus restriction (68%) and check 25-hydroxyvitamin D (62%); fewer residents would start 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (40%) or refer to the nephrologist (45%). Residents chose to discontinue angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor for medication-related complication of greater than 50% decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (68%) and potassium greater than 5.5 mEq/L (93%). Mean performance score improved with increasing PGY (PGY1 59.4% ± 17.6%, PGY2 63.6% ± 15.6%, and PGY3 66.2% ± 16.5%; P = 0.002). Our study identified specific gaps in knowledge of CKD complications and management among internal medicine residents. Educational

  18. Psychosocial and nonclinical factors predicting hospital utilization in patients of a chronic disease management program: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Mark W; Weiland, Tracey J; Phillips, Georgina A

    2015-01-01

    Psychosocial factors such as marital status (odds ratio, 3.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.43-8.69; P = .006) and nonclinical factors such as outpatient nonattendances (odds ratio, 2.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-5.23; P = .013) and referrals made (odds ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.35; P = .003) predict hospital utilization for patients in a chronic disease management program. Along with optimizing patients' clinical condition by prescribed medical guidelines and supporting patient self-management, addressing psychosocial and nonclinical issues are important in attempting to avoid hospital utilization for people with chronic illnesses.

  19. Interventions for improving management of chronic non-communicable diseases in Dikgale, a rural area in Limpopo Province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimela, Eric; Alberts, Marianne; Bastiaens, Hilde; Fraeyman, Jesicca; Meulemans, Herman; Wens, Johan; Van Geertruyden, Jeane Pierre

    2018-05-04

    Chronic disease management (CDM) is an approach to health care that keeps people as healthy as possible through the prevention, early detection and management of chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to develop interventions to improve management of chronic diseases in the form of an integrated, evidence-based chronic disease management model in Dikgale, a rural area of Limpopo Province in South Africa. A multifaceted intervention, called 'quality circles' (QCs) was developed to improve the quality and the management of chronic diseases in the Dikgale Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS). These QCs used the findings from previous studies which formed part of the larger project in the study area, namely, the quantitative study using STEPwise survey and qualitative studies using focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews. The findings from previous studies in Dikgale HDSS revealed that an epidemiological transition is occurring. Again, the most widely reported barriers from previous studies in this rural area were: lack of knowledge of NCDs; shortages of medication and shortages of nurses in the clinics, which results in patients having long waiting-time at clinics. Lack of training of health care providers on the management of chronic diseases and the lack of supervision by the district and provincial health managers, together with poor dissemination of guidelines, were contributing factors to the lack of knowledge of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) management among nurses and community health care workers (CHWs). Consideration of all of these findings led to the development of model which focuses on integrating nursing services, CHWs and traditional health practitioners (THPs), including a well-established clinical information system for health care providers. A novel aspect of the model is the inclusion of community ambassadors who are on treatment for NCDs and are, thus, repositories of knowledge who can serve as a bridge between

  20. Canadian Thoracic Society recommendations for management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease – 2007 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Donnell, Denis E; Aaron, Shawn; Bourbeau, Jean; Hernandez, Paul; Marciniuk, Darcy D; Balter, Meyer; Ford, Gordon; Gervais, Andre; Goldstein, Roger; Hodder, Rick; Kaplan, Alan; Keenan, Sean; Lacasse, Yves; Maltais, Francois; Road, Jeremy; Rocker, Graeme; Sin, Don; Sinuff, Tasmin; Voduc, Nha

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major respiratory illness in Canada that is both preventable and treatable. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of this complex condition continues to grow and our ability to offer effective treatment to those who suffer from it has improved considerably. The purpose of the present educational initiative of the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) is to provide up to date information on new developments in the field so that patients with this condition will receive optimal care that is firmly based on scientific evidence. Since the previous CTS management recommendations were published in 2003, a wealth of new scientific information has become available. The implications of this new knowledge with respect to optimal clinical care have been carefully considered by the CTS Panel and the conclusions are presented in the current document. Highlights of this update include new epidemiological information on mortality and prevalence of COPD, which charts its emergence as a major health problem for women; a new section on common comorbidities in COPD; an increased emphasis on the meaningful benefits of combined pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies; and a new discussion on the prevention of acute exacerbations. A revised stratification system for severity of airway obstruction is proposed, together with other suggestions on how best to clinically evaluate individual patients with this complex disease. The results of the largest randomized clinical trial ever undertaken in COPD have recently been published, enabling the Panel to make evidence-based recommendations on the role of modern pharmacotherapy. The Panel hopes that these new practice guidelines, which reflect a rigorous analysis of the recent literature, will assist caregivers in the diagnosis and management of this common condition. PMID:17885691

  1. Factors influencing patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease to opt for conservative management: a practitioner research study

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Sheila; Noble, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Aims and objectives. This study explored decision-making experiences of patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease when opting for conservative management of their renal failure.Background. Dialysis is an invasive treatment, and for some older patients, there is an associated treatment burden of dialysis-related symptoms. An alternative choice is conservative management, but little is known about those who make this decision and how they are supported through the process.Design. Qualitative...

  2. An exploration of mothers' and fathers' views of their identities in chronic-kidney-disease management: parents as students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swallow, Veronica

    2008-12-01

    To explore parents' views of their identities as they learn to manage their child's chronic kidney disease. Parents are expected to participate in management and usually learn necessary skills from the multidisciplinary team. Research highlights the importance of professionals defining parents' management roles in chronic disease; but little is known about parents' views on their own identities as the complex and dynamic process of teaching and learning unfolds around their child's condition. According to positioning theory, identity development is a dynamic and fluid process that occurs during interaction, with each person positioning themselves while simultaneously positioning the other person, yet this concept has not been considered in relation to parents' contributions to disease management. A longitudinal, grounded theory study conducted in a UK Children's Kidney Unit. This paper focuses on one aspect of a larger study exploring family learning in disease management. Six mothers and two fathers of six children with a recently diagnosed chronic kidney disease participated in a total of 21 semi-structured interviews during the 18 months after referral to the unit. Interviews included discussion about the parts they played in relation to professionals during the management process. Findings were interpreted within a framework of positioning theory. Parents participated in teaching/learning/assessment that was both planned (involving allocated clinical lessons and tasks) and spontaneous (in response to current situations), to facilitate their participation. They positioned multidisciplinary team members as teachers as well as professionals, simultaneously positioning themselves as students as well as parents. Parents' clinical duties and obligations are not an automatic part of parenting but become part of the broader process of sharing disease management, this can lead to them assuming the additional identity of a 'student'. Involving parents in ongoing

  3. Approaches to chronic disease management evaluation in use in Europe: a review of current methods and performance measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Annalijn; Nolte, Ellen; Vrijhoef, Hubertus

    2013-01-01

    An overview was produced of approaches currently used to evaluate chronic disease management in selected European countries. The study aims to describe the methods and metrics used in Europe as a first to help advance the methodological basis for their assessment. A common template for collection of evaluation methods and performance measures was sent to key informants in twelve European countries; responses were summarized in tables based on template evaluation categories. Extracted data were descriptively analyzed. Approaches to the evaluation of chronic disease management vary widely in objectives, designs, metrics, observation period, and data collection methods. Half of the reported studies used noncontrolled designs. The majority measure clinical process measures, patient behavior and satisfaction, cost and utilization; several also used a range of structural indicators. Effects are usually observed over 1 or 3 years on patient populations with a single, commonly prevalent, chronic disease. There is wide variation within and between European countries on approaches to evaluating chronic disease management in their objectives, designs, indicators, target audiences, and actors involved. This study is the first extensive, international overview of the area reported in the literature.

  4. Individualized drug dosing using RBF-Galerkin method: Case of anemia management in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirinejad, Hossein; Gaweda, Adam E; Brier, Michael E; Zurada, Jacek M; Inanc, Tamer

    2017-09-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is frequently associated with decreased physical component of quality of life, as well as adverse cardiovascular events. Current treatment methods for renal anemia are mostly population-based approaches treating individual patients with a one-size-fits-all model. However, FDA recommendations stipulate individualized anemia treatment with precise control of the hemoglobin concentration and minimal drug utilization. In accordance with these recommendations, this work presents an individualized drug dosing approach to anemia management by leveraging the theory of optimal control. A Multiple Receding Horizon Control (MRHC) approach based on the RBF-Galerkin optimization method is proposed for individualized anemia management in CKD patients. Recently developed by the authors, the RBF-Galerkin method uses the radial basis function approximation along with the Galerkin error projection to solve constrained optimal control problems numerically. The proposed approach is applied to generate optimal dosing recommendations for individual patients. Performance of the proposed approach (MRHC) is compared in silico to that of a population-based anemia management protocol and an individualized multiple model predictive control method for two case scenarios: hemoglobin measurement with and without observational errors. In silico comparison indicates that hemoglobin concentration with MRHC method has less variation among the methods, especially in presence of measurement errors. In addition, the average achieved hemoglobin level from the MRHC is significantly closer to the target hemoglobin than that of the other two methods, according to the analysis of variance (ANOVA) statistical test. Furthermore, drug dosages recommended by the MRHC are more stable and accurate and reach the steady-state value notably faster than those generated by the other two methods. The proposed method is highly efficient for

  5. Clinical outcome in children with chronic granulomatous disease managed conservatively or with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Theresa; Pearce, Mark S; Cant, Andrew J; Cale, Catherine M; Goldblatt, David; Gennery, Andrew R

    2013-11-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by serious infections and inflammation. It can be managed conservatively with prophylactic antimicrobial agents or curatively with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In the United Kingdom and Ireland there are cohorts of children managed both conservatively and curatively. This study aimed to compare clinical outcomes (mortality and morbidity) in children managed conservatively and curatively. Children were identified from specialist centers and advertising through special interest groups. Clinical data were collected from medical records regarding infections, inflammatory complications and growth, other admissions, and curative treatment. Comparisons were made for patients not undergoing HSCT and patients after HSCT. Seventy-three living children were identified, 59 (80%) of whom were recruited. Five deceased children were also identified. Clinical information was available for 62 children (4 deceased). Thirty (48%) children had undergone HSCT. Children who did not undergo transplantation had 0.71 episodes of infection/admission/surgery per CGD life year (95% CI, 0.69-0.75 events per year). Post-HSCT children had 0.15 episodes of infection/admission/surgery per transplant year (95% CI, 0.09-0.21 events per year). The mean z score for height and body mass index (BMI) for age was significantly better in post-HSCT children. Survival in the non-HSCT group was 90% at age 15 years. Survival in the post-HSCT group was 90%. Children with CGD not undergoing transplantation have more serious infections, episodes of surgery, and admissions compared with post-HSCT children. Children undergoing transplantation have better height for age. Survival is good at the end of the pediatric age range and also after HSCT. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Implementation of Patient-Centered Education for Chronic-Disease Management in Uganda: An Effectiveness Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddharthan, Trishul; Rabin, Tracy; Canavan, Maureen E; Nassali, Faith; Kirchhoff, Phillip; Kalyesubula, Robert; Coca, Steven; Rastegar, Asghar; Knauf, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The majority of non-communicable disease related deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries. Patient-centered care is an essential component of chronic disease management in high income settings. To examine feasibility of implementation of a validated patient-centered education tool among patients with heart failure in Uganda. Mixed-methods, prospective cohort. A private and public cardiology clinic in Mulago National Referral and Teaching Hospital, Kampala, Uganda. Adults with a primary diagnosis of heart failure. PocketDoktor Educational Booklets with patient-centered health education. The primary outcomes were the change in Patient Activation Measure (PAM-13), as well as the acceptability of the PocketDoktor intervention, and feasibility of implementing patient-centered education in outpatient clinical settings. Secondary outcomes included the change in satisfaction with overall clinical care and doctor-patient communication. A total of 105 participants were enrolled at two different clinics: the Mulago Outpatient Department (public) and the Uganda Heart Institute (private). 93 participants completed follow up at 3 months and were included in analysis. The primary analysis showed improved patient activation measure scores regarding disease-specific knowledge, treatment options and prevention of exacerbations among both groups (mean change 0.94 [SD = 1.01], 1.02 [SD = 1.15], and 0.92 [SD = 0.89] among private paying patients and 1.98 [SD = 0.98], 1.93 [SD = 1.02], and 1.45 [SD = 1.02] among public paying patients, pmanagement as well as satisfaction with doctor-patient communication and overall care in Uganda. Our results show that printed booklets are locally appropriate, highly acceptable and feasible to implement in an LMIC outpatient setting across socioeconomic groups.

  7. Potential mechanisms of disease progression and management of advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Elias J.; Hughes, Timothy P.; Cortés, Jorge E.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Despite vast improvements in treatment of Philadelphia chromosome–positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic phase (CP), advanced stages of CML, accelerated phase or blast crisis, remain notoriously difficult to treat. Treatments that are highly effective against CML-CP produce disappointing results against advanced disease. Therefore, a primary goal of therapy should be to maintain patients in CP for as long as possible, by (1) striving for deep, early molecular response to treatment; (2) using tyrosine kinase inhibitors that lower risk of disease progression; and (3) more closely observing patients who demonstrate cytogenetic risk factors at diagnosis or during treatment. PMID:24050507

  8. Current and Potential Support for Chronic Disease Management in the United States: The Perspective of Family and Friends of Chronically Ill Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosland, Ann-Marie; Heisler, Michele; Janevic, Mary; Connell, Cathleen; Langa, Kenneth M.; Kerr, Eve A.; Piette, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Family members and friends can be an important source of self-management support for older adults with chronic diseases. We characterized the U.S. population of potential and current “disease management supporters” for people with chronic illness who are ADL-independent, the help that supporters could provide, and barriers to increasing support. Methods Nationally-representative survey of U.S. adults (N=1,722). Results 44% of respondents (representing 100 million US adults) help a family member or friend with chronic disease management; another 9% (representing 21 million US adults) are willing to start. Most are willing to assist with key tasks such as medication use and communicating with providers, although they feel constrained by privacy concerns and a lack of patient health information. Discussion The majority of U.S. adults already help or would be willing to help one of their family members or friends with chronic illness care. Supporters' specific concerns could be addressed through innovative programs. PMID:23795624

  9. [Management of patients with chronic renal failure during surgical correction of cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iarustovskiĭ, M B; Stupchenko, O S; Abramian, M V; Nazarova, E I; Popok, Z V

    2010-01-01

    End-stage of chronic renal failure (CRF) is frequently associated with cardiac and vascular comorbidities requiring cardiosurgical interventions. Over 9 years, from 2000 to 2009, the A. N. Bakulev Research Center of Cardiovascular Surgery, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, delivered cardiosurgical care to 16 patients aged 20 to 74 years with end-stage CRF. The duration of programmed hemodialysis was 1 to 102 months. The preoperative patient preparation protocol comprised correction of anemia, hypoproteinemia, hypertension, and water-electrolyte and acid-base balances. Five patients underwent endovascular myocardial revascularization; open heart surgery was performed in one patient. Interventions under extracorporeal circulation were made in 10 other patients. Ultrafiltration was intraoperatively carried out. On-line hemodiafiltration was performed following coronary artery stenting. After open operations, renal replacement therapy (first hemodiafiltration, then hemodialysis) as daily sessions was initiated on day 2 and, when the patients were transferred to intensive care units, it was performed by the programmed hemodialysis protocol. There were no fatal outcomes at the follow-up. The key aspects of treatment success achievement and improved quality of life in patients on programmed hemodialysis are the detection of cardiovascular diseases requiring surgery, the timely referral of the patients to a cardiosurgical hospital, the meticulous pre- and perioperative management (correction of anemia, hypoproteinemia, water-electrolyte balance, use of ultrafiltration and the adequate rate of perfusion at the stage of extracorporeal circulation, and daily renal replacement therapy in the postoperative period), and continuity in the work of all specialists.

  10. Sleep disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: etiology, impact, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhiraja, Rohit; Siddiqi, Tauseef A; Quan, Stuart F

    2015-03-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and may frequently be complicated by sleep disorders. Insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea are commonly encountered in patients with COPD. Nocturnal hypoxemia is also prevalent in COPD may occur despite adequate awake oxygenation and can be especially severe in rapid eye movement sleep. Additionally, several factors--some of them unique to COPD--can contribute to sleep-related hypoventilation. Recognition of hypoventilation can be vital as supplemental oxygen therapy itself can acutely worsen hypoventilation and lead to disastrous consequences. Finally, accruing data establish an association between restless leg syndrome and COPD--an association that may be driven by hypoxemia and/or hypercapnia. Comorbid sleep disorders portend worse sleep quality, diminished quality of life, and multifarious other adverse consequences. The awareness and knowledge regarding sleep comorbidities in COPD has continued to evolve over past many years. There are still several lacunae, however, in our understanding of the etiologies, impact, and therapies of sleep disorders, specifically in patients with COPD. This review summarizes the latest concepts in prevalence, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of diverse sleep disorders in COPD. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  11. Etiology and management of dyslipidemia in children with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Mona; Silverstein, Douglas M

    2015-12-01

    Lipids are essential components of cell membranes, contributing to cell fuel, myelin formation, subcellular organelle function, and steroid hormone synthesis. Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) exhibit various co-morbidities, including dyslipidemia. The prevalence of dyslipidemias in children with CKD and ESRD is high, being present in 39-65% of patients. Elevated lipid levels in children without renal disease are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), while the risk for CVD in pediatric CKD/ESRD is unclear. The pathogenesis of dyslipidemia in CKD features various factors, including increased levels of triglycerides, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC-III), decreased levels of cholesterylester transfer protein and high-density lipoproteins, and aberrations in serum very low-density and intermediate-density lipoproteins. If initial risk assessment indicates that a child with advanced CKD has 2 or more co-morbidities for CVD, first-line treatment should consist of non-pharmacologic management such as therapeutic lifestyle changes and dietary counseling. Pharmacologic treatment of dyslipidemia may reduce the incidence of CVD in children with CKD/ESRD, but randomized trials are lacking. Statins are the only class of lipid-lowering drugs currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the pediatric population. FDA-approved pediatric labeling for these drugs is based on results from placebo-controlled trial results, showing 30-50% reductions in baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Although statins are generally well tolerated in adults, a spectrum of adverse events has been reported with their use in both the clinical trial and post-marketing settings.

  12. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: getting it right. Does optimal management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease alter disease progression and improve survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard E

    2014-03-01

    We live in a world where people live longer lives. The standardized mortality rate for many diseases is decreasing. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is not following this trend. Over the last 10 years, interventions for COPD have been developed, but have any changed the prognosis or trajectory of this modern epidemic? We review the most recent and classical literature in order to answer this question. Recent analyses of data have clarified which interventions are effective in COPD and which are not. New studies have defined what is achievable with the current therapies. Only two interventions have been demonstrated to improve survival: smoking cessation and long-term oxygen therapy. Other treatments do reduce exacerbations, improve lung function and improve the patient's quality of life, but do not affect physiological disease progression or mortality. There is much work to do, not only to improve the treatments we have for this disease, but also to diagnose it early, intervene at the right time, reduce the treatment side-effects and most importantly understand the pathophysiology better. Moreover, we are duty bound to look at each patient and review what we are trying to achieve for each one through appropriate phenotyping as well as sometimes taking a more palliative approach.

  13. Benefits of dietary sodium restriction in the management of chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krikken, Jan A.; Laverman, Gozewijn D.; Navis, Gerjan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review To evaluate the role of restricting dietary sodium intake in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its complications. Recent findings A consistent line of evidence shows that high dietary sodium intake is a determinant of therapy resistance to blockade of the

  14. Intermediate Outcomes of a Chronic Disease Self-Management Program for Spanish-Speaking Older Adults in South Florida, 2008–2010

    OpenAIRE

    Michael A. Melchior, PhD; Laura R. Seff, MBA; Elena Bastida, PhD; Ahmed N. Albatineh, PhD; Timothy F. Page, PhD; Richard C. Palmer, DrPH

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence and negative health effects of chronic diseases are disproportionately high among Hispanics, the largest minority group in the United States. Self-management of chronic conditions by older adults is a public health priority. The objective of this study was to examine 6-week differences in self-efficacy, time spent performing physical activity, and perceived social and role activities limitations for participants in a chronic disease self-management program for Span...

  15. Overview of reviews: mechanical interventions for the treatment and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisy, Karolina; White, Heath; Pearson, Alan

    2014-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by a progressive and non-reversible airflow limitation and symptoms of breathlessness, sputum production and cough. COPD is the fourth most common cause of mortality worldwide and represents a significant social and economic burden. As such, effective strategies that might be employed to treat COPD and manage symptoms need to be investigated. This overview aimed to summarize the existing evidence available in the Cochrane Library regarding the use of mechanical interventions used for the treatment and management of COPD. Systematic reviews that included adult participants with diagnosed COPD who received a mechanical intervention were included. Five reviews were included, and due to the heterogeneity of these reviews, direct and indirect comparisons of the effects of the intervention were not possible. Instead, data of the effectiveness of each intervention were extracted and summarized in tables and discussed as a narrative summary. Interventions included non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV), positive airway pressure (PEP) devices and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). Evidence regarding the effectiveness of NPPV was limited, and available data do not support the use of NPPV for patients with stable COPD. NPPV might, however, be of benefit as a weaning strategy for intubated patients and for patients experiencing respiratory failure; however, more research is required. Although PEP devices are considered as a safe airway clearance technique, data do not reveal a clear clinical benefit to their use. NMES is also regarded as safe for patients with COPD, and might also be beneficial in improving exercise tolerance and improving quality of life for patients with COPD. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Pain management at the end of life: A comparative study of cancer, dementia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romem, Anat; Tom, Sarah E; Beauchene, Michelle; Babington, Lynn; Scharf, Steven M; Romem, Ayal

    2015-05-01

    Limited data exist concerning the unique pain characteristics of patients with non-cancer terminal diseases referred for inpatient hospice care. To define the unique pain characteristics of patients admitted to an acute inpatient hospice setting with end-stage dementia or chronic obstructive lung disease (or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and to compare them to patients with end-stage cancer. Retrospective patient chart review. Demographic, physiological, pain parameters, and medication utilization data were extracted. Associations between pain characteristics, medication utilization, and admission diagnoses were assessed. Analyses included descriptive statistics. In total, 146 patients admitted to an acute inpatient hospice between 1 April 2011 and 31 March 2012 with an underlying primary diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 51), dementia (n = 48), or cancer (n = 47). Pain was highly prevalent in all diagnostic groups, with cancer patients experiencing more severe pain on admission. Cancer patients received a significantly higher cumulative opioid dose compared with dementia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Pain control within 24 h of pain onset was achieved in less than half of all patient groups with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients the least likely to achieve pain control. Despite the fact that pain is the most common complaint at the end of life, pain management may be suboptimal for some primary diagnoses. Admission diagnosis is the strongest predictor of pain control. Patient with cancer achieve the best pain control, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients are the least likely to have their pain adequately treated. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. About Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detect CKD: blood pressure, urine albumin and serum creatinine. What causes CKD? The two main causes of chronic kidney disease are diabetes and high blood pressure , which are responsible for up to ...

  18. Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter your blood. They remove wastes and ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  19. Contemporary Management of Coronary Artery Disease and Acute Coronary Syndrome in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chin-Chou; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have emerged as a worldwide public health problem. Due to the remarkably higher incidence and prevalence of this chronic disease in Taiwan than in other countries, CKD/ESRD has contributed to a significant health burden in Taiwan. Patients with CKD/ESRD have an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) compared to the normal population. Patients with ACS alone can present differently than patients with ACS and CKD/ESRD. Also, due to the lower prevalence of chest pain and ST-segment elevation, CKD/ESRD patients were more difficult to diagnose than other patients. Furthermore, whether advances in ACS management with medical therapy and an early invasive approach could improve patient outcomes with CKD/ESRD is not known. The use of antiplatelets such as aspirin and other antithrombotic agents might reduce the incidence of ACS or stroke in CKD patients. However, such use could also increase bleeding risk and even increase the likelihood of mortality, especially in dialysis patients. While recent clinical data suggest the potential benefit of aggressive management with coronary intervention for CAD and ACS in this category of patients, further clinical studies are still indicated for the proper medical strategy and revascularization therapy to improve the outcomes of CAD and ACS in CKD/ESRD patients, both in Taiwan and worldwide. PMID:27122697

  20. An ontology-based approach to patient follow-up assessment for continuous and personalized chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Gou, Ling; Zhou, Tian-Shu; Lin, De-Nan; Zheng, Jing; Li, Ye; Li, Jing-Song

    2017-08-01

    Chronic diseases are complex and persistent clinical conditions that require close collaboration among patients and health care providers in the implementation of long-term and integrated care programs. However, current solutions focus partially on intensive interventions at hospitals rather than on continuous and personalized chronic disease management. This study aims to fill this gap by providing computerized clinical decision support during follow-up assessments of chronically ill patients at home. We proposed an ontology-based framework to integrate patient data, medical domain knowledge, and patient assessment criteria for chronic disease patient follow-up assessments. A clinical decision support system was developed to implement this framework for automatic selection and adaptation of standard assessment protocols to suit patient personal conditions. We evaluated our method in the case study of type 2 diabetic patient follow-up assessments. The proposed framework was instantiated using real data from 115,477 follow-up assessment records of 36,162 type 2 diabetic patients. Standard evaluation criteria were automatically selected and adapted to the particularities of each patient. Assessment results were generated as a general typing of patient overall condition and detailed scoring for each criterion, providing important indicators to the case manager about possible inappropriate judgments, in addition to raising patient awareness of their disease control outcomes. Using historical data as the gold standard, our system achieved a rate of accuracy of 99.93% and completeness of 95.00%. This study contributes to improving the accessibility, efficiency and quality of current patient follow-up services. It also provides a generic approach to knowledge sharing and reuse for patient-centered chronic disease management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. "In this together": Social identification predicts health outcomes (via self-efficacy) in a chronic disease self-management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, James E; Voth, Jennifer; Jaglal, Susan B; Guilcher, Sara J T; Hawker, Gillian; Salbach, Nancy M

    2018-03-05

    Self-management programs are an established approach to helping people cope with the challenges of chronic disease, but the psychological mechanisms underlying their effectiveness are not fully understood. A key assumption of self-management interventions is that enhancing people's self-efficacy (e.g., via the development of relevant skills and behaviours) encourages adaptive health-related behaviors and improved health outcomes. However, the group-based nature of the programs allows for the possibility that identification with other program members is itself a social psychological platform for positive changes in illness-related confidence (i.e., group-derived efficacy) and physical and mental health. The researchers evaluated this hypothesis in a telehealth version of a chronic disease self-management program delivered in 13 rural and remote communities in northern Ontario, Canada (September 2007 to June 2008). Participants were 213 individuals with a self-reported physician diagnosis of chronic lung disease, heart disease, stroke, or arthritis. Measures of social identification, group-derived efficacy, and individual efficacy were administered seven weeks after baseline, and mental and physical health outcomes (health distress, psychological well-being, depression, vitality, pain, role limits, and disability) were assessed at four months. Structural equation modeling indicated that social identification was a positive predictor of group-derived efficacy and (in turn) individual self-efficacy (controlling for baseline), which was significantly associated with better physical and mental health outcomes. The results are consistent with growing evidence of the value of a social identity-based approach in various health and clinical settings. The success of chronic disease self-management programs could be enhanced by attending to and augmenting group identification during and after the program. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Precision Medicine for Hypertension Management in Chronic Kidney Disease: Relevance of SPRINT for Therapeutic Targets in Nondiabetic Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, Marcel; Burns, Kevin D; Hiremath, Swapnil

    2017-05-01

    In this review we evaluate the literature to determine if lower blood pressure (BP) targets are beneficial for patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD). Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD), African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK), and Ramipril Efficacy in Nephropathy-2 (REIN-2), designed to assess the benefit of lower BP on progression of nondiabetic CKD, generally came to the same negative conclusion. They were not designed and powered to assess an effect of lower BP on cardiovascular outcomes. The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) was the first trial designed and powered to address this issue, and showed a clear benefit of a lower targeted and achieved BP. SPRINT did not show any renal benefits from lower BP, and it was not designed to assess this outcome, and it enrolled patients with less "renal risk" per se. A distinguishing feature of SPRINT compared with other large trials is that it highlighted the importance of precise BP measurement methods in defining targets in hypertension treatment. Accordingly, we propose that SPRINT is truly a "game-changing" clinical trial that sets the bar for management of hypertension in select patients with nondiabetic CKD. In these patients, systolic BP target depends critically on the BP measurement method: < 140 mm Hg when derived from 3 readings using a mercury sphygmomanometer after 5 minutes of rest, < 130 mm Hg when calculated from at a minimum of 3 readings using an automated oscillometric device, and < 120 mm Hg when taken using an automated oscillometric device after 5 minutes of unattended rest. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhancing patient engagement in chronic disease self-management support initiatives in Australia: the need for an integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Joanne E; Briggs, Andrew M; Brand, Caroline A; Osborne, Richard H

    2008-11-17

    Although emphasis on the prevention of chronic disease is important, governments in Australia need to balance this with continued assistance to the 77% of Australians reported to have at least one long-term medical condition. Self-management support is provided by health care and community services to enhance patients' ability to care for their chronic conditions in a cooperative framework. In Australia, there is a range of self-management support initiatives that have targeted patients (most notably, chronic disease self-management education programs) and health professionals (financial incentives, education and training). To date, there has been little coordination or integration of these self-management initiatives to enhance the patient-health professional clinical encounter. If self-management support is to work, there is a need to better understand the infrastructure, systems and training that are required to engage the key stakeholders - patients, carers, health professionals, and health care organisations. A coordinated approach is required in implementing these elements within existing and new health service models to enhance uptake and sustainability.

  4. THE IMPACT OF BODY WEIGHT MANAGEMENT IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE PATIENTS WITH OBESITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ling Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD and obesity are important public health concerns. We examined the influence of dietary management and physical exercises on renal function, lipid profiles and exercise tolerance of a group of CKD patients. We enrolled 45 obese patients with CKD from stage 1 to 3b with tailored by regular dietitian consultation, recommendations of adequate daily protein and caloric intake, and physical exercises for body weight (BW reduction. The target was BW reduction ≥ 3%. Thirty eight obese CKD patients completed the study and 24 patients reached the target. Patients who reached the target was significant larger in total body fat decrement than those who failed (3.0% vs 0.5%, p = 0.003. In addition, total muscle mass, especially on trunk and lower limbs (1.2% vs 0%, P = 0.026 was significant decreased in patients who reached the target compared to those who failed. The laboratory data disclosed the significant reduction of Chol (0.7% vs. -19.3%; P = 0.007, LDL-C ( 3.7% vs. -37.6%; P < 0.001, and UA (0% vs. -0.8%; P = 0.025 between the two groups. The cardiorespiratory endurance to complete 800 meters run (375.1 ± 64.7 sec vs. 327.1 ± 84.0 sec; P = 0.001, abdominal muscle strength and endurance by times of sit-ups (13.6 ± 9.1 number/min vs. 19.9 ± 9.2; P = 0.005, and flexibility of the lower back by sit and reach (18.8 ± 10.8 cm vs. 27.8 ± 10.9 cm; P< 0.001 of the patients who reached the target were improved significantly after 2-months of physical exercise training and education.We conclude that combination of dietary management and exercises are effective in improving health-related physical fitness, blood pressure control, dyslipidemia and renal function in overweight or obese CKD patients. Supportive individualized programs for lifestyle change could exert beneficial effects. A longitudinal study with larger sample size is warranted to elucidate the efficacy of combination of dietary management and exercises.

  5. Role of low protein diet in management of different stages of chronic kidney disease - practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bharat V; Patel, Zamurrud M

    2016-10-21

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem and more so in India. With limited availability and high cost of therapy, barely 10 % of patients with incident end stage renal disease (ESRD) cases get treatment in India. Therefore, all possible efforts should be made to retard progression of CKD. This article reviews the role of low protein diet (LPD) in management of CKD subjects and suggests how to apply it in clinical practice. The role of LPD in retarding progression of CKD is well established in animal experimental studies. However, its role in human subjects with CKD is perceived to be controversial based on the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) study. We believe that beneficial effect of LPD could not be appreciated due to shorter duration of follow-up in the MDRD study. Had the study been continued longer, it may have been possible to appreciate beneficial effect of LPD. It is our contention that in all cases of CKD that are slowly progressive, LPD can significantly retard progression of CKD and delay the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT). To be able to apply LPD for a long period, it is important to prescribe LPD at earlier stages (1,2,3) of CKD and not at late stage as recommended by KDIGO guidelines. Many clinicians are concerned about worsening nutritional status and hence reluctant to prescribe LPD. This actually is true for patients with advanced CKD in whom there is spontaneous decrease in calorie and protein intake. In our experience, nutritional status of patients in early stages (1,2,3) of CKD is as good as that of healthy subjects. Prescribing LPD at an early stage is unlikely to worsen status. The role of LPD in retarding progression of CKD is well established in animal experimental studies. Even in human subjects, there is enough evidence to suggest that LPD retards progression of CKD in carefully selected subjects. It should be prescribed to those with good appetite, good nutritional status and a slowly

  6. Surgical Management of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Dilip; Natarajan, Sathima

    2015-10-01

    Advances over the past decade have indicated that a complex interplay between environmental factors, genetic predisposition, alcohol abuse, and smoking lead towards the development of chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a complex disorder that causes significant and chronic incapacity in patients and a substantial burden on the society. Major advances have been made in the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease and the role of genetic predisposition is increasingly coming to the fore. Advances in noninvasive diagnostic modalities now allow for better diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at an early stage of the disease. The impact of these advances on surgical treatment is beginning to emerge, for example, patients with certain genetic predispositions may be better treated with total pancreatectomy versus lesser procedures. Considerable controversy remains with respect to the surgical management of chronic pancreatitis. Modern understanding of the neurobiology of pain in chronic pancreatitis suggests that a window of opportunity exists for effective treatment of the intractable pain after which central sensitization can lead to an irreversible pain syndrome in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Effective surgical procedures exist for chronic pancreatitis; however, the timing of surgery is unclear. For optimal treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis, close collaboration between a multidisciplinary team including gastroenterologists, surgeons, and pain management physicians is needed.

  7. Methods for streamlining intervention fidelity checklists: an example from the chronic disease self-management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, SangNam; Smith, Matthew Lee; Altpeter, Mary; Belza, Basia; Post, Lindsey; Ory, Marcia G

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining intervention fidelity should be part of any programmatic quality assurance (QA) plan and is often a licensure requirement. However, fidelity checklists designed by original program developers are often lengthy, which makes compliance difficult once programs become widely disseminated in the field. As a case example, we used Stanford's original Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) fidelity checklist of 157 items to demonstrate heuristic procedures for generating shorter fidelity checklists. Using an expert consensus approach, we sought feedback from active master trainers registered with the Stanford University Patient Education Research Center about which items were most essential to, and also feasible for, assessing fidelity. We conducted three sequential surveys and one expert group-teleconference call. Three versions of the fidelity checklist were created using different statistical and methodological criteria. In a final group-teleconference call with seven national experts, there was unanimous agreement that all three final versions (e.g., a 34-item version, a 20-item version, and a 12-item version) should be made available because the purpose and resources for administering a checklist might vary from one setting to another. This study highlights the methodology used to generate shorter versions of a fidelity checklist, which has potential to inform future QA efforts for this and other evidence-based programs (EBP) for older adults delivered in community settings. With CDSMP and other EBP, it is important to differentiate between program fidelity as mandated by program developers for licensure, and intervention fidelity tools for providing an "at-a-glance" snapshot of the level of compliance to selected program indicators.

  8. Impact of the Medicare Chronic Disease Management program on the conduct of Australian dietitians' private practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Sarah; Ball, Lauren; Lowe, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    This study explored private practice dietitians' perceptions of the impact of the Australian Chronic Disease Management (CDM) program on the conduct of their private practice, and the care provided to patients. Twenty-five accredited practising dietitians working in primary care participated in an individual semistructured telephone interview. Interview questions focussed on dietitians' perceptions of the proportion of patients receiving care through the CDM program, fee structures, adhering to reporting requirements and auditing. Transcript data were thematically analysed using a process of open coding. Half of the dietitians (12/25) reported that most of their patients (>75%) received care through the CDM program. Many dietitians (19/25) reported providing identical care to patients using the CDM program and private patients, but most (17/25) described spending substantially longer on administrative tasks for CDM patients. Dietitians experienced pressure from doctors and patients to keep their fees low or to bulk-bill patients using the CDM program. One-third of interviewed dietitians (8/25) expressed concern about the potential to be audited by Medicare. Recommendations to improve the CDM program included increasing the consultation length and subsequent rebate available for dietetic consultations, and increasing the number of consultations to align with dietetic best-practice guidelines. The CDM program creates challenges for dietitians working in primary care, including how to sustain the quality of patient-centred care and yet maintain equitable business practices. To ensure the CDM program appropriately assists patients to receive optimal care, further review of the CDM program within the scope of dietetics is required.

  9. Differential effects of professional leaders on health care teams in chronic disease management groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wholey, Douglas R; Disch, Joanne; White, Katie M; Powell, Adam; Rector, Thomas S; Sahay, Anju; Heidenreich, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Leadership by health care professionals is likely to vary because of differences in the social contexts within which they are situated, socialization processes and societal expectations, education and training, and the way their professions define and operationalize key concepts such as teamwork, collaboration, and partnership. This research examines the effect of the nurse and physician leaders on interdependence and encounter preparedness in chronic disease management practice groups. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of complementary leadership by nurses and physicians involved in jointly producing a health care service on care team functioning. The design is a retrospective observational study based on survey data. The unit of analysis is heart failure care groups in U.S. Veterans Health Administration medical centers. Survey and administrative data were collected in 2009 from 68 Veterans Health Administration medical centers. Key variables include nurse and physician leadership, interdependence, psychological safety, coordination, and encounter preparedness. Reliability and validity of survey measures were assessed with exploratory factor analysis and Cronbach alphas. Multivariate analyses tested hypotheses. Professional leadership by nurses and physicians is related to encounter preparedness by different paths. Nurse leadership is associated with greater team interdependence, and interdependence is positively associated with respect. Physician leadership is positively associated with greater psychological safety, respect, and shared goals but is not associated with interdependence. Respect is associated with involvement in learning activities, and shared goals are associated with coordination. Coordination and involvement in learning activities are positively associated with encounter preparedness. By focusing on increasing interdependence and a constructive climate, nurse and physician leaders have the opportunity to increase care coordination

  10. Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Program in myotonic dystrophy: New opportunities for occupational therapists: Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Program dans la dystrophie myotonique : De nouvelles opportunités pour les ergothérapeutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Kateri; Levasseur, Mélanie; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Mathieu, Jean; Gagnon, Cynthia

    2016-06-01

    Chronic disease self-management is a priority in health care. Personal and environmental barriers for populations with neuromuscular disorders might diminish the efficacy of self-management programs, although they have been shown to be an effective intervention in many populations. Owing to their occupational expertise, occupational therapists might optimize self-management program interventions. This study aimed to adapt the Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) for people with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and assess its acceptability and feasibility in this population. Using an adapted version of the Stanford CDSMP, a descriptive pilot study was conducted with 10 participants (five adults with DM1 and their caregivers). A semi-structured interview and questionnaires were used. The Stanford CDSMP is acceptable and feasible for individuals with DM1. However, improvements are required, such as the involvement of occupational therapists to help foster concrete utilization of self-management strategies into day-to-day tasks using their expertise in enabling occupation. Although adaptations are needed, the Stanford CDSMP remains a relevant intervention with populations requiring the application of self-management strategies. © CAOT 2016.

  11. Cost-Effectiveness of Clinical Pharmacy Education on Infection Management Among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease in an Indonesian Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Nasution, Azizah; Sulaiman, SA. Syed; Shafie, A.A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the clinical and economic impacts of clinical pharmacy education (CPE) on infection management among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 4 and 5 in Haji Adam Malik Hospital, Indonesia. Methods A quasi-experimental economic evaluation comparing CPE impact on 6-month CKD mortality was conducted on the basis of payer perspective. The experimental group (n = 63) received care by health care providers who were given CPE on drug-related probl...

  12. The role of community pharmacists in screening and subsequent management of chronic respiratory diseases: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Fathima, Mariam; Naik-Panvelkar, Pradnya; Saini, Bandana; Armour, Carol L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this review was to evaluate the role of community pharmacists in provision of screening with/without subsequent management of undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and uncontrolled asthma. Methods An extensive literature search using four databases (ie. Medline, PubMed, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA) and Scopus) with search terms pharmacy, screening, asthma or COPD was conducted. Searches were limited to the years 2003-2013, those in E...

  13. The role of community pharmacists in screening and subsequent management of chronic respiratory diseases: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Fathima, Mariam; Naik-Panvelkar, Pradnya; Saini, Bandana; Armour, Carol L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this review was to evaluate the role of community pharmacists in provision of screening with/without subsequent management of undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and uncontrolled asthma. Methods: An extensive literature search using four databases (ie. Medline, PubMed, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA) and Scopus) with search terms pharmacy, screening, asthma or COPD was conducted. Searches were limited to the years 2003-2013, those in...

  14. Web 2.0 systems supporting childhood chronic disease management: a pattern language representation of a general architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpka, Toomas; Eriksson, Henrik; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Ekberg, Joakim; Nordfeldt, Sam; Hanberger, Lena

    2008-11-28

    Chronic disease management is a global health concern. By the time they reach adolescence, 10-15% of all children live with a chronic disease. The role of educational interventions in facilitating adaptation to chronic disease is receiving growing recognition, and current care policies advocate greater involvement of patients in self-care. Web 2.0 is an umbrella term for new collaborative Internet services characterized by user participation in developing and managing content. Key elements include Really Simple Syndication (RSS) to rapidly disseminate awareness of new information; weblogs (blogs) to describe new trends, wikis to share knowledge, and podcasts to make information available on personal media players. This study addresses the potential to develop Web 2.0 services for young persons with a chronic disease. It is acknowledged that the management of childhood chronic disease is based on interplay between initiatives and resources on the part of patients, relatives, and health care professionals, and where the balance shifts over time to the patients and their families. Participatory action research was used to stepwise define a design specification in the form of a pattern language. Support for children diagnosed with diabetes Type 1 was used as the example area. Each individual design pattern was determined graphically using card sorting methods, and textually in the form Title, Context, Problem, Solution, Examples and References. Application references were included at the lowest level in the graphical overview in the pattern language but not specified in detail in the textual descriptions. The design patterns are divided into functional and non-functional design elements, and formulated at the levels of organizational, system, and application design. The design elements specify access to materials for development of the competences needed for chronic disease management in specific community settings, endorsement of self-learning through online peer

  15. Web 2.0 systems supporting childhood chronic disease management: A pattern language representation of a general architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekberg Joakim

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic disease management is a global health concern. By the time they reach adolescence, 10–15% of all children live with a chronic disease. The role of educational interventions in facilitating adaptation to chronic disease is receiving growing recognition, and current care policies advocate greater involvement of patients in self-care. Web 2.0 is an umbrella term for new collaborative Internet services characterized by user participation in developing and managing content. Key elements include Really Simple Syndication (RSS to rapidly disseminate awareness of new information; weblogs (blogs to describe new trends, wikis to share knowledge, and podcasts to make information available on personal media players. This study addresses the potential to develop Web 2.0 services for young persons with a chronic disease. It is acknowledged that the management of childhood chronic disease is based on interplay between initiatives and resources on the part of patients, relatives, and health care professionals, and where the balance shifts over time to the patients and their families. Methods Participatory action research was used to stepwise define a design specification in the form of a pattern language. Support for children diagnosed with diabetes Type 1 was used as the example area. Each individual design pattern was determined graphically using card sorting methods, and textually in the form Title, Context, Problem, Solution, Examples and References. Application references were included at the lowest level in the graphical overview in the pattern language but not specified in detail in the textual descriptions. Results The design patterns are divided into functional and non-functional design elements, and formulated at the levels of organizational, system, and application design. The design elements specify access to materials for development of the competences needed for chronic disease management in specific community

  16. Implementation of a Tool to Modify Behavior in a Chronic Disease Management Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole D. Gillespie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases like diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia continue to be a significant burden on the US health care system. As a result, many healthcare providers are implementing strategies to prevent the incidence of heart disease and other chronic conditions. Among these strategies are proper drug therapy and lifestyle modifications. Behavior change is often the rate-limiting step in the prevention and maintenance of lifestyle modifications. The purpose of this paper is to describe a tool used to guide the progression and assess the effectiveness of a cardiovascular risk reduction program. The tool uses the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change to determine the readiness and confidence to change specific lifestyle behaviors pertinent to cardiovascular health. The tool aids the practitioner in developing a patient-centered plan to implement and maintain lifestyle changes and can be tailored to use in any situation requiring a behavior change on the part of the patient.

  17. The role of culture in health literacy and chronic disease screening and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Susan J; Huebner, Cristina; Armin, Julie; Orzech, Kathryn; Orzech, Katherine; Vivian, James

    2009-12-01

    Cultural and language differences and socioeconomic status interact with and contribute to low health literacy, defined as the inability to understand or act on medical/therapeutic instructions. Health literacy is increasingly recognized as an important factor in patient compliance, cancer screening utilization, and chronic disease outcomes. Commendable efforts have been initiated by the American Medical Association and other organizations to address low health literacy among patients. Less work has been done, however, to place health literacy in the broader context of socioeconomic and cultural differences among patients and providers that hinder communication and compliance. This review examines cultural influences on health literacy, cancer screening and chronic disease outcomes. We argue that cultural beliefs around health and illness contribute to an individual's ability to understand and act on a health care provider's instructions. This paper proposes key aspects of the intersection between health literacy and culturally varying beliefs about health which merit further exploration.

  18. Computerized clinical decision support systems for chronic disease management: a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshanov, Pavel S; Misra, Shikha; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Garg, Amit X; Sebaldt, Rolf J; Mackay, Jean A; Weise-Kelly, Lorraine; Navarro, Tamara; Wilczynski, Nancy L; Haynes, R Brian

    2011-08-03

    The use of computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs) may improve chronic disease management, which requires recurrent visits to multiple health professionals, ongoing disease and treatment monitoring, and patient behavior modification. The objective of this review was to determine if CCDSSs improve the processes of chronic care (such as diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of disease) and associated patient outcomes (such as effects on biomarkers and clinical exacerbations). We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid's EBM Reviews database, Inspec, and reference lists for potentially eligible articles published up to January 2010. We included randomized controlled trials that compared the use of CCDSSs to usual practice or non-CCDSS controls. Trials were eligible if at least one component of the CCDSS was designed to support chronic disease management. We considered studies 'positive' if they showed a statistically significant improvement in at least 50% of relevant outcomes. Of 55 included trials, 87% (n = 48) measured system impact on the process of care and 52% (n = 25) of those demonstrated statistically significant improvements. Sixty-five percent (36/55) of trials measured impact on, typically, non-major (surrogate) patient outcomes, and 31% (n = 11) of those demonstrated benefits. Factors of interest to decision makers, such as cost, user satisfaction, system interface and feature sets, unique design and deployment characteristics, and effects on user workflow were rarely investigated or reported. A small majority (just over half) of CCDSSs improved care processes in chronic disease management and some improved patient health. Policy makers, healthcare administrators, and practitioners should be aware that the evidence of CCDSS effectiveness is limited, especially with respect to the small number and size of studies measuring patient outcomes.

  19. Changes in chronic disease management among community health centers (CHCs) in China: Has health reform improved CHC ability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoxin; Shi, Jianwei; Wu, Zhigui; Xie, Huiling; Yu, Yifan; Li, Ping; Liu, Rui; Jing, Limei

    2017-07-01

    Since the 1980s, China has been criticized for its mode of chronic disease management (CDM) that passively provides treatment in secondary and tertiary hospitals but lacks active prevention in community health centers (CHCs). Since there are few systematic evaluations of the CHCs' methods for CDM, this study aimed to analyze their abilities. On the macroperspective, we searched the literature in China's largest and most authoritative databases and the official websites of health departments. Literature was used to analyze the government's efforts in improving CHCs' abilities to perform CDM. At the microlevel, we examined the CHCs' longitudinal data after the New Health Reform in 2009, including financial investment, facilities, professional capacities, and the conducted CDM activities. A policy analysis showed that there was an increasing tendency towards government efforts in developing CDM, and the peak appeared in 2009. By evaluating the reform at CHCs, we found that there was an obvious increase in fiscal and public health subsidies, large-scale equipment, general practitioners, and public health physicians. The benefited vulnerable population in this area also rose significantly. However, rural centers were inferior in their CDM abilities compared with urban ones, and the referral system is still not effective in China. This study showed that CHCs are increasingly valued in managing chronic diseases, especially after the New Health Reform in 2009. However, we still need to improve collaborative management for chronic diseases in the community and strengthen the abilities of CHCs, especially in rural areas. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Diagnosis and management of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Van; Slack, Donald; McCurdy, Michael T; Shah, Nirav G; Gupta, Nachi; Nusbaum, Jeffrey

    2017-10-20

    Acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a clinical diagnosis that is based on changes in dyspnea, cough, and/or sputum production in a COPD patient; however, patients presenting with an acute exacerbation may be undiagnosed or have a variety of comorbid conditions that can complicate diagnosis. This issue presents strategies and algorithms for the early use of evidence-based interventions, including appropriate use of antibiotics, bronchodilators, and corticosteroids, along with noninvasive ventilation with capnography, to minimize morbidity and mortality associated with this disease. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice.].

  1. Self-management programs based on the social cognitive theory for Koreans with chronic disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yeonsoo; Yoo, Hyera

    2012-02-01

    Self-management programs based on social cognitive theory are useful to improve health care outcomes for patients with chronic diseases in Western culture. The purpose of this review is to identify and synthesize published research on the theory to enhance self-efficacy in disease management and examine its applicability to Korean culture regarding the learning strategies used. Ultimately, it was to identify the optimal use of these learning strategies to improve the self-efficacy of Korean patients in self-management of their hypertension and diabetic mellitus. The authors searched the Korean and international research databases from January 2000 to September 2009. Twenty studies were selected and reviewed. The most frequently used learning strategies of social cognitive theory was skill mastery by practice and feedback (N = 13), followed by social or verbal persuasion by group members (N = 7) and, however, observation learning and reinterpretation of symptoms by debriefing or discussion were not used any of the studies. Eight studies used only one strategy to enhance self-efficacy and six used two. A lack of consistency regarding the content and clinical efficacy of the self-efficacy theory-based self-management programs is found among the reviewed studies on enhancing self-efficacy in Koreans with hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Further research on the effectiveness of these theory-based self-management programs for patients with chronic diseases in Korea and other countries is recommended.

  2. Management of Suspected Pemphigus Vulgaris in Elderly Patient with Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu M. Prihanti

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 72 1024x768 Pemphigus vulgaris (PV is a group of vesicobullous disease affecting skin and mucous membranes. PV is associated with autoimmune diseases, characterized by binding of IgG autoantibodies to desmoglein 3. PV lesion is a thin-walled bulla arising on the skin or mucosa. Oral mucous bulla are fragile and easily breakdown, forming irreguler ulcers. There are several factors that trigger PV, including genetic factors, age, drugs and food. This paper aimed to report treatment of suspected pemphigus vulgaris in elderly patient with history of chronic diseases. A 75-year-old woman with 2 months history of bulla formation on skin and history of persistent oral ulceration. Ulcers were covered with fibrin and erosive erythematous on labial, buccal and gingival mucosa. History of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and hepatitis was revealed. Routine complete blood count showed thrombocytopenia. Diagnosis was confirmed by anamnesis, clinical examination and complete blood investigation. PV should be distinguished from other vesicobullous disease. Systemic corticosteroid was given concurrently with hepato-protector, mouthwash, supportive therapy and topical lip cream. Bulla on skin and persistent erosive ulcers of the oral mucosa are the manifestations of PV. Elderly patient with history of chronic diseases showed a complex care of PV requiring more intensive and comprehensive treatment.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v20i1.129

  3. Direct costs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among managed care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Anand A Dalal1, Laura Christensen2, Fang Liu3, Aylin A Riedel31US Health Outcomes, GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; 2Health Economics Outcomes Research, i3 Innovus, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 3Health Economics Outcomes Research, i3 Innovus, Eden Prairie, MN, USAPurpose: To estimate patient- and episode-level direct costs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD among commercially insured patients in the US.Methods: In this retrospective claims-based analysis, commercial enrollees with evidence of COPD were grouped into five mutually exclusive cohorts based on the most intensive level of COPD-related care they received in 2006, ie, outpatient, urgent outpatient (outpatient care in addition to a claim for an oral corticosteroid or antibiotic within seven days, emergency department (ED, standard inpatient admission, and intensive care unit (ICU cohorts. Patient-level COPD-related annual health care costs, including patient- and payer-paid costs, were compared among the cohorts. Adjusted episode-level costs were calculated.Results: Of the 37,089 COPD patients included in the study, 53% were in the outpatient cohort, 37% were in the urgent outpatient cohort, 3% were in the ED cohort, and the standard admission and ICU cohorts together comprised 6%. Mean (standard deviation, SD annual COPD-related health care costs (2008 US$ increased across the cohorts (P < 0.001, ranging from $2003 ($3238 to $43,461 ($76,159 per patient. Medical costs comprised 96% of health care costs for the ICU cohort. Adjusted mean (SD episode-level costs were $305 ($310 for an outpatient visit, $274 ($336 for an urgent outpatient visit, $327 ($65 for an ED visit, $9745 ($2968 for a standard admission, and $33,440 for an ICU stay.Conclusion: Direct costs of COPD-related care for commercially insured patients are driven by hospital stays with or without ICU care. Exacerbation prevention resulting in reduced need for inpatient care could lower costs

  4. Using an electronic self-management tool to support patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD): a CKD clinic self-care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Stephanie W; Jassal, Sarbjit V; Porter, Eveline; Logan, Alexander G; Miller, Judith A

    2013-01-01

    New healthcare delivery models are needed to enhance the patient experience and improve quality of care for individuals with chronic conditions such as kidney disease. One potential avenue is to implement self-management strategies. There is growing evidence that self-management interventions help optimize various aspects of chronic disease management. With the increasing use of information technology (IT) in health care, chronic disease management programs are incorporating IT solutions to support patient self-management practices. IT solutions have the ability to promote key principles of self-management, namely education, empowerment, and collaboration. Positive clinical outcomes have been demonstrated for a number of chronic conditions when IT solutions were incorporated into self-management programs. There is a paucity of evidence for self-management in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Furthermore, IT strategies have not been tested in this patient population to the same extent as other chronic conditions (e.g., diabetes, hypertension). Therefore, it is currently unknown if IT strategies will promote self-management behaviors and lead to improvements in overall patient care. We designed and developed an IT solution called My KidneyCare Centre to support self-management strategies for patients with CKD. In this review, we discuss the rationale and vision of incorporating an electronic self-management tool to support the care of patients with CKD. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Reassessment of radiation therapy for the management of lung cancer in patients with chronic pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, N.; Weinstein, H.

    1983-01-01

    Surgery has remained the mainstay of definitive treatment for lung cancer. Radiation therapy has been advocated when the location of the lung cancer precludes resection or the severity or the cardiopulmonary impairment indicates that the patient cannot withstand the proposed resection. Extended field irradiation has been shown to improve tumor control and survival. However, in patients with chronic pulmonary disease, extended field irradiation may exacerbate pulmonary insufficiency and compromise survival. Between 1975 and 1980, 29 patients with lung cancer and chronic pulmonary disease were treated by involved field irradiation (IFR). This was compared to the experience of 41 patients who had been treated prior to 1975 by extended field irradiation (EFR). The frequency of subjective response and tumor control were comparable in each group. One patient treated by IFR developed a marginal recurrence. Radiation pneumonitis was observed in 7/41 (17%) EFR patients versus 2/29 (7%) IFR. Treatment related death occurred in 2/41 (5%) EFR versus 1/29 (3.3%) IFR. One year disease free survival was 8/41 (19%) EFR versus 12/29 (41%) IFR. Two of 14 (14%) IFR patients at risk five years are alive without evidence of disease

  6. How do primary care doctors in England and Wales code and manage people with chronic kidney disease? Results from the National Chronic Kidney Disease Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Lois G; Cleary, Faye; Wheeler, David C; Caplin, Ben; Nitsch, Dorothea; Hull, Sally A

    2017-10-16

    In the UK, primary care records are electronic and require doctors to ascribe disease codes to direct care plans and facilitate safe prescribing. We investigated factors associated with coding of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in patients with reduced kidney function and the impact this has on patient management. We identified patients meeting biochemical criteria for CKD (two estimated glomerular filtration rates 90 days apart) from 1039 general practitioner (GP) practices in a UK audit. Clustered logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with coding for CKD and improvement in coding as a result of the audit process. We investigated the relationship between coding and five interventions recommended for CKD: achieving blood pressure targets, proteinuria testing, statin prescription and flu and pneumococcal vaccination. Of 256 000 patients with biochemical CKD, 30% did not have a GP CKD code. Males, older patients, those with more severe CKD, diabetes or hypertension or those prescribed statins were more likely to have a CKD code. Among those with continued biochemical CKD following audit, these same characteristics increased the odds of improved coding. Patients without any kidney diagnosis were less likely to receive optimal care than those coded for CKD [e.g. odds ratio for meeting blood pressure target 0.78 (95% confidence interval 0.76-0.79)]. Older age, male sex, diabetes and hypertension are associated with coding for those with biochemical CKD. CKD coding is associated with receiving key primary care interventions recommended for CKD. Increased efforts to incentivize CKD coding may improve outcomes for CKD patients. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  7. The Efficacy of a Nurse-Led Disease Management Program in Improving the Quality of Life for Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong-Cheng; Chen, Yi; Liu, Xia; Wen, Yue; Ma, Deng-Yan; Huang, Yue-Yang; Pu, Li; Diao, Yong-Shu; Yang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    The impacts of nurse-led disease management programs on the quality of life for patients with chronic kidney disease have not been extensively studied. Furthermore, results of the existing related studies are inconsistent. The focus of the proposed meta-analysis is to evaluate the efficacy of nurse-led disease management programs in improving the quality of life for patients with chronic kidney disease. Literature survey was performed to identify the eligible studies from PubMed, Current Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials with predefined terms. The outcome measured was quality of life. This meta-analysis was conducted in line with recommendations from the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Eight studies comprising a total of 1520 patients were included in this meta-analysis, with 766 patients assigned to the nurse-led disease management program. Nurse-led disease management improved the quality of life in terms of symptoms, sleep, staff encouragement, pain, general health perception, energy/fatigue, overall health and mental component summary when evaluated 6 weeks after the beginning of intervention. When evaluated 12 weeks later, the quality of life in terms of symptoms, sleep, staff encouragement, energy/fatigue, and physical component summary was improved. Stratified by the modalities of dialysis, similar results of pooled analyses were observed for patients with peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis, compared with the overall analyses. The results of sensitivity analyses were the same as the primary analyses. The symmetric funnel plot suggested that the possibility of potential publication bias was relatively low. Nurse-led disease management program seems effective to improve some parameters of quality of life for patients with chronic kidney disease. However, the seemingly promising results should be cautiously interpreted and generalized and still need to be confirmed

  8. The Roles of Social Support and Health Literacy in Self-Management Among Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chi; Chang, Li-Chun; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Ho, Ya-Fang; Weng, Shuo-Chun; Tsai, Tzu-I

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the relationships among social support, health literacy, and self-management, and the factors influencing self-management of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Cross-sectional study. A random sample of 410 patients was recruited from nephrology clinics. Data were collected using structured questionnaires and chart reviews from January 2013 to February 2014. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to determine the predictive factors of self-management behaviors and ∆R 2 to determine each variable's explanatory power. Health literacy and social support were positively correlated with self-management behaviors. Furthermore, social support, health literacy, and marital status were significant predictors of self-management behaviors. Social support had a relatively greater explanatory power for self-management behaviors than did health literacy. Particularly, healthcare provider support had the greatest influence on patients' self-management behaviors. Health literacy and social support play independent positive roles in self-management behaviors of patients with CKD, with social support having a particularly dominant role. Further research using a systems approach to improving self-management behaviors is necessary to clarify the role of social support. Health literacy and social support are independently and positively related to self-management. Social support, which is a system-level factor, is a relatively stronger and crucial predictor than is health literacy. Nurses have to refine self-management programs to focus on families and adopt a systems approach to help CKD patients improve their self-management behaviors. © 2018 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  9. Chronic disease management perspectives of colorectal cancer survivors using the Veterans Affairs healthcare system: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullig, Leah L; Goldstein, Karen M; Bosworth, Hayden B; Andrews, Sara M; Danus, Susanne; Jackson, George L; Provenzale, Dawn; Weinberger, Morris; Kelley, Michael J; Voils, Corrine I

    2018-03-09

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the US. CRC survivors may have complex healthcare needs requiring care from both specialists and primary care. Our objective was to understand how CRC survivors perceive their survivorship care, especially management of their cardiovascular-related chronic diseases. We identified patients diagnosed with non-metastatic CRC between 10/1/2007 and 12/31/2015 at Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in North Carolina or Virginia. In 2016, we conducted telephone-based, semi-structured interviews to assess survivors' experiences with cancer survivorship and changes in health priorities. Interviews were conducted until thematic saturation was reached. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded. The 25 participants were, on average, 64 years old and approximately 4 years post-CRC diagnosis at the time of interview; most were white (60%), male (92%), and diagnosed with colon cancer (64%) as opposed to rectal cancer. CRC survivors reported: (1) a shift in focus from surviving cancer to reducing cardiovascular disease risk (e.g., by managing weight); (2) challenges with taking medications for CVD-related conditions; (3) new recognition of the importance of engaging with primary care providers. Experiences with cancer shapes how survivors view their health. Management of cardiovascular-related chronic disease is important to veteran CRC survivors. There is a need to deliver cardiovascular disease risk reduction programs tailored for CRC survivors.

  10. Changing Provider Behavior in the Context of Chronic Disease Management: Focus on Clinical Inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Kim L; Rash, Joshua A; Campbell, Tavis S

    2017-01-06

    Widespread acceptance of evidence-based medicine has led to the proliferation of clinical practice guidelines as the primary mode of communicating current best practices across a range of chronic diseases. Despite overwhelming evidence supporting the benefits of their use, there is a long history of poor uptake by providers. Nonadherence to clinical practice guidelines is referred to as clinical inertia and represents provider failure to initiate or intensify treatment despite a clear indication to do so. Here we review evidence for the ubiquity of clinical inertia across a variety of chronic health conditions, as well as the organizational and system, patient, and provider factors that serve to maintain it. Limitations are highlighted in the emerging literature examining interventions to reduce clinical inertia. An evidence-based framework to address these limitations is proposed that uses behavior change theory and advocates for shared decision making and enhanced guideline development and dissemination.

  11. Chronic Diseases in North-West Tanzania and Southern Uganda. Public Perceptions of Terminologies, Aetiologies, Symptoms and Preferred Management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soori Nnko

    Full Text Available Research has shown that health system utilization is low for chronic diseases (CDs other than HIV. We describe the knowledge and perceptions of CDs identified from rural and urban communities in north-west Tanzania and southern Uganda.Data were collected through a quantitative population survey, a quantitative health facility survey and focus group discussions (FGDs and in-depth interviews (IDIs in subgroups of population survey participants. The main focus of this paper is the findings from the FGDs and IDIs.We conducted 24 FGDs, involving approximately 180 adult participants and IDIs with 116 participants (≥18 years. CDs studied included: asthma/chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD, diabetes, epilepsy, hypertension, cardiac failure and HIV- related disease. The understanding of most chronic conditions involved a combination of biomedical information, gleaned from health facility visits, local people who had suffered from a complaint or knew others who had and beliefs drawn from information shared in the community. The biomedical contribution shows some understanding of the aetiology of a condition and the management of that condition. However, local beliefs for certain conditions (such as epilepsy suggest that biomedical treatment may be futile and therefore work counter to biomedical prescriptions for management.Current perceptions of selected CDs may represent a barrier that prevents people from adopting efficacious health and treatment seeking behaviours. Interventions to improve this situation must include efforts to improve the quality of existing health services, so that people can access relevant, reliable and trustworthy services.

  12. Emotional Intelligence: A Novel Outcome Associated with Wellbeing and Self-Management in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzo, Roberto P; Kirsch, Janae L; Dulohery, Megan M; Abascal-Bolado, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often struggle with diminished autonomy and quality of life. Emotional factors play a crucial role in the well-being of patients with COPD; they are independently associated with critical outcomes such as dyspnea, quality of life, and health care use. Emotional intelligence is the capacity to understand and manage personal thoughts and feelings, as well as to positively influence interpersonal communication and social well-being. Emotional intelligence is a trainable skill that is extensively used in corporate business to improve well-being and performance, and it may also be significant in the self-management of emotions in patients with chronic disease. Importantly, research supports the proposition that emotional intelligence may be developed and learned at any time or any age, and training programs have been associated with increased well-being and better emotional regulation in patients with chronic disease. However, to date, no research has been done to investigate its value in patients with COPD. We aimed to investigate the association between emotional intelligence and two meaningful outcomes in COPD: quality of life and self-management abilities. Participants with moderate to severe COPD completed a disease-specific quality of life tool (Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire), the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire, the Self-Management Abilities Scale, the modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea Scale, and pulmonary function tests, and also provided information about living conditions and self-reported health care use. A total of 310 patients with COPD (mean age, 69 ± 9 yr; 40% female; mean FEV1%, 42.4 ± 15.8) participated in the study. Emotional intelligence was significantly and independently associated with self-management abilities (P emotions, and mastery; P Emotional intelligence may represent an important attribute in COPD, as it is associated with self-management

  13. Severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management with noninvasive ventilation on a general medicine ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirio Fiorino

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent evidence suggests that, with a well-trained staff, severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD with moderate respiratory acidosis (pH > 7.3 can be successfully treated with noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV on a general respiratory care ward. We conducted an open prospective study to evaluate the efficacy of this approach on a general medicine ward. Material and methods: This study population consisted in 27 patients admitted to a general medicine ward (median nurse:patient ratio 1:12 December 1, 2004 May 31, 2006 for acute COPD exacerbation with hypercapnic respiratory failure and acidosis (arterial pH < 7.34, PaC02 > 45 mmHg. All received assist-mode NIMV (average 12 h / day via oronasal masks (inspiratory pressure 10-25 cm H2O, expiratory pressure 4-6 cm H2O to maintain O2 saturation at 90-95%. Treatment was supervised by an experienced pulmonologist, who had also provided specific training in NIMV for medical and nursing staffs (90-day course followed by periodic refresher sessions. Arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, and respiratory rate were continuously monitored during NIMV. Based on baseline arterial pH, the COPD was classified as moderate (7.25-7.34 or severe (< 7.25. Results: In patients with moderate and severe COPD, significant improvements were seen in arterial pH after 2 (p < 0.05 and 24 h (p< 0.05 of NIMV and in the PaC02 after 24 hours (p < 0.05. Four (15% of the 27 patients died during the study hospitalization (in-hospital mortality 15%, in 2 cases due to NIMV failure. For the other 23, mean long-term survival was 14.5 months (95% CI 10.2 to 18.8, and no significant differences were found between the moderate and severe groups. Over half (61% the patients were alive 1 year after admission. Conclusions: NIMV can be a cost-effective option for management of moderate or severe COPD on a general medicine ward. Its proper use requires: close monitoring of ventilated subjects

  14. The role of the sociotype in managing chronic disease: integrating bio-psycho-sociology with systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Elliot M

    2011-10-01

    Attempts have been made to replace the bio-medical approach with that of systems biology, which considers dynamic human behavior (internal factors) for chronic (rather than acute) disease management. They have not yet incorporated the Bio-psycho-social (BPS) model of Engel which adds patients' background and cultural beliefs (external factors) contributing to their susceptibility to, and coping strategies for, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) the increasing domain of global Public Health. The problem is how to include the social determinants of disease in a comprehensive model of care, especially in the management of chronic disease. The concept of "sociotype" is proposed as a framework for understanding the interactions between the social, cultural and environmental inputs that influence the growth, development and life-long behavior of a person, including relationships, lifestyle and coping strategies. Pre-/peri-natal influences on development and subsequent susceptibility to chronic disease are examples of interactions between the sociotype, genotype and phenotype. Disorders of the sociotype, encompassing social determinants (e.g. poverty, education, networking), of disease are major contributors to the increase in NCDs, as well as for mental illness and absenteeism. Thus, people are the product of a threefold cord--genotype, phenotype and sociotype. WHAT NEXT?: Holistic management of patients through the BPS model have to be aligned with the relevant elements of systems biology--context, space, time and robustness--that pertain to the sociotype. Medical curricula should balance basic sciences with disciplines such as psychology, sociology, anthropology and public health that attempt to explain human behavior and the social determinants of disease. This requires methodologies combining qualitative and quantitative research to study simultaneous interactions (and their possible mechanisms) between systems biology and the BPS model. The neologism "sociotype

  15. Investing in Obesity Treatment: Kaiser Permanente's Approach to Chronic Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Adam G; Histon, Trina; Donahoo, W Troy; Hashmi, Shahid; Murali, Sameer; Latare, Peggy; Oliver, Lajune; Slovis, Jennifer; Grall, Sarah; Fisher, David; Solomon, Loel

    2016-09-01

    Kaiser Permanente, an integrated health care delivery system in the USA, takes a "whole systems" approach to the chronic disease of obesity that begins with efforts to prevent it by modifying the environment in communities and schools. Aggressive case-finding and substantial investment in intensive lifestyle modification programs target individuals at high risk of diabetes and other weight-related conditions. Kaiser Permanente regions are increasingly standardizing their approach when patients with obesity require treatment intensification using medically supervised diets, prescription medication to treat obesity, or weight loss surgery.

  16. Computer and mobile technology interventions for self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Catherine; McCann, Margaret; Brady, Anne Marie

    2017-05-23

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by airflow obstruction due to an abnormal inflammatory response of the lungs to noxious particles or gases, for example, cigarette smoke. The pattern of care for people with moderate to very severe COPD often involves regular lengthy hospital admissions, which result in high healthcare costs and an undesirable effect on quality of life. Research over the past decade has focused on innovative methods for developing enabling and assistive technologies that facilitate patient self-management. To evaluate the effectiveness of interventions delivered by computer and by mobile technology versus face-to-face or hard copy/digital documentary-delivered interventions, or both, in facilitating, supporting, and sustaining self-management among people with COPD. In November 2016, we searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register (CAGR), which contains trial reports identified through systematic searches of bibliographic databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, AMED, and PsycINFO, and we handsearched respiratory journals and meeting abstracts. We included randomised controlled trials that measured effects of remote and Web 2.0-based interventions defined as technologies including personal computers (PCs) and applications (apps) for mobile technology, such as iPad, Android tablets, smart phones, and Skype, on behavioural change towards self-management of COPD. Comparator interventions included face-to-face and/or hard copy/digital documentary educational/self-management support. Two review authors (CMcC and MMcC) independently screened titles, abstracts, and full-text study reports for inclusion. Two review authors (CMcC and AMB) independently assessed study quality and extracted data. We expressed continuous data as mean differences (MDs) and standardised mean differences (SMDs) for studies using different outcome measurement scales. We

  17. Chronic granulomatous disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent, life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections of the skin, the airways, the lymph nodes, the liver, the brain and the bones. Frequently found pathogens are Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus species,

  18. Pharmacological management of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetton, Jennifer G; Sorenson, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Both acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are seen more frequently in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) as advances in supportive care improve the survival of critically ill infants as well as those with severe, congenital kidney and urinary tract anomalies. Many aspects of the infant's care, including fluid balance, electrolyte and mineral homeostasis, acid-base balance, and growth and nutrition require close monitoring by and collaboration among neonatologists, nephrologists, dieticians, and pharmacologists. This educational review summarizes the therapies widely used for neonates with AKI and CKD. Use of these therapies is extrapolated from data in older children and adults or based on clinical experience and case series. There is a critical need for more research on the use of therapies in infants with kidney disease as well as for the development of drug delivery systems and preparations scaled more appropriately for these small patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Usability Study of a Computer-Based Self-Management System for Older Adults with Chronic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Da

    2012-01-01

    Background Usability can influence patients’ acceptance and adoption of a health information technology. However, little research has been conducted to study the usability of a self-management health care system, especially one geared toward elderly patients. Objective This usability study evaluated a new computer-based self-management system interface for older adults with chronic diseases, using a paper prototype approach. Methods Fifty older adults with different chronic diseases participated. Two usability evaluation methods were involved: (1) a heuristics evaluation and (2) end-user testing with a think-aloud testing method, audio recording, videotaping, and interviewing. A set of usability metrics was employed to determine the overall system usability, including task incompletion rate, task completion time, frequency of error, frequency of help, satisfaction, perceived usefulness, and perceived ease of use. Interviews were used to elicit participants’ comments on the system design. The quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the qualitative data were analyzed for content. Results The participants were able to perform the predesigned self-management tasks with the current system design and they expressed mostly positive responses about the perceived usability measures regarding the system interface. However, the heuristics evaluation, performance measures, and interviews revealed a number of usability problems related to system navigation, information search and interpretation, information presentation, and readability. Design recommendations for further system interface modifications were discussed. Conclusions This study verified the usability of the self-management system developed for older adults with chronic diseases. Also, we demonstrated that our usability evaluation approach could be used to quickly and effectively identify usability problems in a health care information system at an early stage of the system development

  20. Chronic Wasting Disease: Transmission Mechanisms and the Possibility of Harvest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, Alex; Merrill, Evelyn; Pybus, Margo; Lewis, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    We develop a model of CWD management by nonselective deer harvest, currently the most feasible approach available for managing CWD in wild populations. We use the model to explore the effects of 6 common harvest strategies on disease prevalence and to identify potential optimal harvest policies for reducing disease prevalence without population collapse. The model includes 4 deer categories (juveniles, adult females, younger adult males, older adult males) that may be harvested at different rates, a food-based carrying capacity, which influences juvenile survival but not adult reproduction or survival, and seasonal force of infection terms for each deer category under differing frequency-dependent transmission dynamics resulting from environmental and direct contact mechanisms. Numerical experiments show that the interval of transmission coefficients β where the disease can be controlled is generally narrow and efficiency of a harvest policy to reduce disease prevalence depends crucially on the details of the disease transmission mechanism, in particular on the intensity of disease transmission to juveniles and the potential differences in the behavior of older and younger males that influence contact rates. Optimal harvest policy to minimize disease prevalence for each of the assumed transmission mechanisms is shown to depend on harvest intensity. Across mechanisms, a harvest that focuses on antlered deer, without distinguishing between age classes reduces disease prevalence most consistently, whereas distinguishing between young and older antlered deer produces higher uncertainty in the harvest effects on disease prevalence. Our results show that, despite uncertainties, a modelling approach can determine classes of harvest strategy that are most likely to be effective in combatting CWD. PMID:26963921

  1. COPD-X Australian and New Zealand guidelines for the diagnosis and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: 2017 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ian A; Brown, Juliet L; George, Johnson; Jenkins, Sue; McDonald, Christine F; McDonald, Vanessa M; Phillips, Kirsten; Smith, Brian J; Zwar, Nicholas A; Dabscheck, Eli

    2017-11-20

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by persistent respiratory symptoms and chronic airflow limitation, and is associated with exacerbations and comorbidities. Advances in the management of COPD are updated quarterly in the national COPD guidelines, the COPD-X plan, published by Lung Foundation Australia in conjunction with the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand and available at http://copdx.org.au. Main recommendations: Spirometry detects persistent airflow limitation (post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC COPD patients.Short- and long-acting inhaled bronchodilators and, in more severe disease, anti-inflammatory agents (inhaled corticosteroids) should be considered in a stepwise approach.Given the wide range of inhaler devices available, inhaler technique and adherence should be checked regularly.Smoking cessation is essential, and influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations reduce the risk of exacerbations.A plan of care should be developed with the multidisciplinary team. COPD action plans reduce hospitalisations and are recommended as part of COPD self-management.Exacerbations should be managed promptly with bronchodilators, corticosteroids and antibiotics as appropriate to prevent hospital admission and delay COPD progression.Comorbidities of COPD require identification and appropriate management.Supportive, palliative and end-of-life care are beneficial for patients with advanced disease.Education of patients, carers and clinicians, and a strong partnership between primary and tertiary care, facilitate evidence-based management of COPD. Changes in management as result of the guideline: Spirometry remains the gold standard for diagnosing airflow obstruction and COPD. Non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment should be used in a stepwise fashion to control symptoms and reduce exacerbation risk.

  2. Impact of disease management programs on healthcare expenditures for patients with diabetes, depression, heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Simone R; Heijink, Richard; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Struijs, Jeroen N; Baan, Caroline A

    2011-07-01

    Evaluating the impact of disease management programs on healthcare expenditures for patients with diabetes, depression, heart failure or COPD. Systematic Pubmed search for studies reporting the impact of disease management programs on healthcare expenditures. Included were studies that contained two or more components of Wagner's chronic care model and were published between January 2007 and December 2009. Thirty-one papers were selected, describing disease management programs for patients with diabetes (n=14), depression (n=4), heart failure (n=8), and COPD (n=5). Twenty-one studies reported incremental healthcare costs per patient per year, of which 13 showed cost-savings. Incremental costs ranged between -$16,996 and $3305 per patient per year. Substantial variation was found between studies in terms of study design, number and combination of components of disease management programs, interventions within components, and characteristics of economic evaluations. Although it is widely believed that disease management programs reduce healthcare expenditures, the present study shows that evidence for this claim is still inconclusive. Nevertheless disease management programs are increasingly implemented in healthcare systems worldwide. To support well-considered decision-making in this field, well-designed economic evaluations should be stimulated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Vouchers for chronic disease care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Jennifer J; Segal, Leonie

    2008-08-01

    This paper explores the economic implications of vouchers for chronic disease management with respect to achieving objectives of equity and efficiency. Vouchers as a payment policy instrument for health care services have a set of properties that suggest they may address both demand-side and supply-side issues, and contribute to equity and efficiency. They provide a means whereby health care services can be targeted at selected groups, enabling consumer choice of provider, and encouraging competition in the supply of health services. This analysis suggests that, when structured appropriately, vouchers can support consumers to choose services that will meet their health care needs and encourage competition among providers. Although they may not be appropriate across the entire health care system, there are features of vouchers that make them a potentially attractive option, especially for the management of chronic disease.

  4. Chronic kidney disease and anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sciascia, Savino; Radin, Massimo; Schreiber, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Anticoagulation in patients with impaired kidney function can be challenging since drugs' pharmacokinetics and bioavailability are altered in this setting. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) treated with conventional anticoagulant agents [vitamin K antagonist (VKA), low-molecular weight...... are eliminated via the kidneys pose additional challenges. More recently, two classes of direct oral anticoagulant agents (DOACs) have been investigated for the prevention and management of venous thromboembolic events: the direct factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, and the direct thrombin...

  5. The impact of chronic kidney disease on medication choice and pharmacologic management in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed Raza; Winchester, David E

    2018-05-21

    In the past few years, medical community, including doctors, have become increasingly aware of the fact that chronic kidney disease (CK) and heart failure (HF) have common risk factors which impacts one another in terms of choice of therapy. Areas covered: Management of these two diseases has been a challenge for physicians. The treatment goals for HF patients in CK are very important. They serve as the end-point in using a specific treatment for management and treatment of CK patients hence, decreasing mortality rates. In this review, we discuss the pharmacological approaches to managing patients with HF and CK, discussing current evidence based uptodate management strategies and guidelines in the general population with HF and CK. Expert Commentary: Newer novel drugs targeting specific signaling pathways are approaching the stages of clinical investigation including the direct renin inhibitors. They have been a highly attractive concept for the future in the management of these patients. However, while advances in technology elucidated many aspects of these diseases, many mysteries still remain. With continued research, we can expect more cost- effective and patient-friendly drug therapies to be developed in the near future.

  6. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation on Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) . This recommendation ...

  7. RELATIVE DOSING OF PHOSPHATE BINDERS FOR EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF PHOSPHATE AND PROTEIN INTAKE IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Brian Copley, J; Heise, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing haemodialysis have a maximum recommended dietary phosphate (P) intake of 1000 mg/day and a recommended protein intake of 1.2 g/kg/day. Achieving this level of protein intake is associated with the best patient outcomes. However, protein-containing foods also contain P, and elevated serum P is associated with increased all-cause mortality. It is therefore important to manage the levels of serum P while maintaining adequate levels of nutrition. ...

  8. Participation, Retention, and Utilization of a Web-Based Chronic Disease Self-Management Intervention Among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portz, Jennifer Dickman; LaMendola, Walter F

    2018-05-21

    Web-based self-management (web-based SM) interventions provide a potential resource for older adults to engage in their own chronic disease management. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of age on participation, retention, and utilization of a web-based SM intervention. This study reports the results of a secondary data analysis of the effects of age in a randomized trial of a web-based diabetes SM intervention. Participation, reasons for nonenrollment, retention, reasons for disenrollment, and website utilization were examined by age using discriminant function, survival analysis, and multivariate analysis of variance as appropriate. Website utilization by all participants dropped after 6 months but did not vary significantly with age. Though older adults (>60 of age) were less likely to choose to participate (F = 57.20, p Web-based SM offers a feasible approach for older adults with chronic disease to engage in their health management, but it needs to be improved. Those older adults who passed the rigorous screens for this experiment and chose to participate may have been more likely than younger participants to utilize web-based SM intervention tools. They were more persistent in their use of the web-based SM to try to improve health outcomes and formed definitive opinions about its utility before termination.

  9. Hybrid management of a large atrial septal defect and a patent ductus arteriosus in an infant with chronic lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedra Simone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case wherein a dysmorphic four-month-old infant (weighing 4.5 kgs with an 8 mm atrial septal defect (ASD, a 1.5 mm patent ductus arteriosus (PDA, a 2 mm mid-muscular ventricular septal defect (VSD associated with chronic lung disease, and severe pulmonary hypertension, was successfully managed using a hybrid approach, without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. Through a median sternotomy, the PDA was ligated and the ASD was closed with a 9 mm Amplatzer septal occluder implanted through peratrial access. The VSD was left untouched. Serial echocardiograms showed complete closure of the ASD and PDA, with progressive normalization of the pulmonary artery (PA pressures within three months. The child rapidly gained weight and was weaned from sildenafil and oxygen administration. After 12 months, the VSD closed spontaneously and the child remained well, with normal PA pressures. A hybrid approach without the use of CPB should be considered in the management of infants with congenital heart disease, associated with chronic lung disease and pulmonary hypertension.

  10. Hybrid management of a large atrial septal defect and a patent ductus arteriosus in an infant with chronic lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedra, Simone F; Jatene, Marcelo; Pedra, Carlos AC

    2010-01-01

    We report a case wherein a dysmorphic four-month-old infant (weighing 4.5 kgs) with an 8 mm atrial septal defect (ASD), a 1.5 mm patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), a 2 mm mid-muscular ventricular septal defect (VSD) associated with chronic lung disease, and severe pulmonary hypertension, was successfully managed using a hybrid approach, without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Through a median sternotomy, the PDA was ligated and the ASD was closed with a 9 mm Amplatzer septal occluder implanted through peratrial access. The VSD was left untouched. Serial echocardiograms showed complete closure of the ASD and PDA, with progressive normalization of the pulmonary artery (PA) pressures within three months. The child rapidly gained weight and was weaned from sildenafil and oxygen administration. After 12 months, the VSD closed spontaneously and the child remained well, with normal PA pressures. A hybrid approach without the use of CPB should be considered in the management of infants with congenital heart disease, associated with chronic lung disease and pulmonary hypertension

  11. Hybrid management of a large atrial septal defect and a patent ductus arteriosus in an infant with chronic lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedra, Simone F; Jatene, Marcelo; Pedra, Carlos AC, E-mail: carlosacpedra@hotmail.com [Hospital do Coração da Associação Sanatório Sírio, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-01-01

    We report a case wherein a dysmorphic four-month-old infant (weighing 4.5 kgs) with an 8 mm atrial septal defect (ASD), a 1.5 mm patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), a 2 mm mid-muscular ventricular septal defect (VSD) associated with chronic lung disease, and severe pulmonary hypertension, was successfully managed using a hybrid approach, without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Through a median sternotomy, the PDA was ligated and the ASD was closed with a 9 mm Amplatzer septal occluder implanted through peratrial access. The VSD was left untouched. Serial echocardiograms showed complete closure of the ASD and PDA, with progressive normalization of the pulmonary artery (PA) pressures within three months. The child rapidly gained weight and was weaned from sildenafil and oxygen administration. After 12 months, the VSD closed spontaneously and the child remained well, with normal PA pressures. A hybrid approach without the use of CPB should be considered in the management of infants with congenital heart disease, associated with chronic lung disease and pulmonary hypertension.

  12. Variability of ferritin measurements in chronic kidney disease; implications for iron management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Bradley A; Coyne, Daniel W; Eby, Charles S; Scott, Mitchell G

    2009-01-01

    Serum ferritin levels are a proxy measure of iron stores; and existing guidelines for managing anemia in hemodialysis patients suggest that serum ferritin concentrations should be maintained at >200 ng/ml. The KDOQI recommendations further state there is insufficient evidence advocating routine intravenous iron when ferritin levels exceed 500 ng/ml. Here we determined the interassay differences and short-term intraindividual variability of serum ferritin measurements in patients on chronic hemodialysis to illustrate how these variances may affect treatment decisions. Intermethod variations of up to 150 ng/ml were found comparing six commonly used ferritin assays that evaluated thirteen pools of serum from hemodialysis and nonhemodialysis patients. The intraindividual variability for ferritin in 60 stable hemodialysis patients ranged between 2-62% measured over an initial two-week period and from 3-52% when factored over a six-week period. Our results suggests that single serum ferritin values should not be used to guide clinical decisions regarding treatment of chronic hemodialysis patients with intravenous iron due to significant analytical and intraindividual variability.

  13. [Development of quality of care indicators to support chronic disease management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Marie-dominique; Pomey, Marie-pascale; Del Grande, Claudio; Côté, Brigitte; Tremblay, Éric; Ghorbel, Monia; Hua, Phuong

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a project conducted by the Institut national d'excellence en santé et en services sociaux of Québec to develop quality of care indicators for the management of six chronic illnesses. Indicators were identified through literature searches and analysis of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Interdisciplinary expert panels assessed their validity and the strength of the evidence on which they were based. Representatives of patients (N = 19) and professionals (N = 29) were consulted on their relevance and acceptability. Indicators were categorized according to the Chronic Care Model (CCM). A total of 164 indicators were developed, 126 specific to the illnesses under study and 38 on processes and outcomes generic to the CCM. There was convergence between patients and professionals on the relevance of a majority of indicators. Professionals expressed concerns on the indicators measured by means of patient surveys that they considered to be too subjective. The importance given to CPGs as the main source of indicators resulted in a great number of indicators of the technical quality ofcare. Using the CCM contributed to a broader perspective of quality. The consultation process identified some of the concerns of professionals about indicator measurement, thusguidingfuture implementation initiatives.

  14. Management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: moving beyond the asthma algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Erin; Lazarus, Stephen C

    2009-11-01

    For many years, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was considered a disease of fixed airflow obstruction for which there was no good treatment. Out of desperation and frustration, health care providers extrapolated from asthma to COPD, and standard asthma therapy was adopted without evidence for efficacy. In recent years, we have gained a better understanding of the pathophysiologic differences between asthma and COPD, and prospective controlled trials have provided a rationale for therapy. Smoking cessation is critically important, both as primary prevention and as an effective way to slow the decrease in lung function in patients with established disease. beta(2)-Adrenergic and anticholinergic agonists improve lung function and relieve symptoms in most patients. Tiotropium improves exercise tolerance and quality of life and reduces exacerbations and hospitalizations. The increase in lung function seen with tiotropium is sustained with continued use over at least 3 to 4 years. Inhaled corticosteroids decrease exacerbations and improve quality of life, and their effect seems greatest in patients with lower lung function and in exacerbation-prone patients. There is no evidence that inhaled corticosteroids alone affect mortality, despite the reduction in exacerbations and increased risk of pneumonia. In some patient populations, inhaled fluticasone, salmeterol, or the combination might slow the rate of loss of lung function. Rather than reflexively using effective asthma therapy in the patient with COPD, current and future therapy for COPD is increasingly evidence based and targeted to specific inflammatory pathways that are important in patients with COPD.

  15. Patient-perceived self-management tasks and support needs of people with chronic illness: generic or disease specific?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtum, L. van; Rijken, M.; Heijmans, M.; Groenewegen, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Self-management is widely accepted as an essential component of chronic care. Nevertheless, little is known about patients’ perceptions of self-management. Purpose: This study aims to explore which self-management tasks and support needs people with chronic illness perceive for

  16. The Perceived Medical Condition Self-Management Scale can be applied to patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Marcus G; Wallston, Kenneth A; Green, Jamie A; Beach, Lauren B; Umeukeje, Ebele; Wright Nunes, Julie A; Ikizler, T Alp; Steed, Julia; Cavanaugh, Kerri L

    2017-10-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a major burden on patients and the health care system. Treatment of CKD requires dedicated involvement from both caretakers and patients. Self-efficacy, also known as perceived competence, contributes to successful maintenance of patient's CKD self-management behaviors such as medication adherence and dietary regulations. Despite a clear association between self-efficacy and improved CKD outcomes, there remains a lack of validated self-report measures of CKD self-efficacy. To address this gap, the Perceived Kidney/Dialysis Self-Management Scale (PKDSMS) was adapted from the previously validated Perceived Medical Condition Self-Management Scale. We then sought to validate this using data from two separate cohorts: a cross-sectional investigation of 146 patients with end-stage renal disease receiving maintenance hemodialysis and a longitudinal study of 237 patients with CKD not receiving dialysis. The PKDSMS was found to be positively and significantly correlated with self-management behaviors and medication adherence in both patient cohorts. The PKDSMS had acceptable reliability, was internally consistent, and exhibited predictive validity between baseline PKDSMS scores and self-management behaviors across multiple time points. Thus, the PKDSMS is a valid and reliable measure of CKD patient self-efficacy and supports the development of interventions enhancing perceived competence to improve CKD self-management. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Expectations and needs of patients with a chronic disease toward self-management and eHealth for self-management purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huygens, Martine W J; Vermeulen, Joan; Swinkels, Ilse C S; Friele, Roland D; van Schayck, Onno C P; de Witte, Luc P

    2016-07-08

    Self-management is considered as an essential component of chronic care by primary care professionals. eHealth is expected to play an important role in supporting patients in their self-management. For effective implementation of eHealth it is important to investigate patients' expectations and needs regarding self-management and eHealth. The objectives of this study are to investigate expectations and needs of people with a chronic condition regarding self-management and eHealth for self-management purposes, their willingness to use eHealth, and possible differences between patient groups regarding these topics. Five focus groups with people with diabetes (n = 14), COPD (n = 9), and a cardiovascular condition (n = 7) were conducted in this qualitative research. Separate focus groups were organized based on patients' chronic condition. The following themes were discussed: 1) the impact of the chronic disease on patients' daily life; 2) their opinions and needs regarding self-management; and 3) their expectations and needs regarding, and willingness to use, eHealth for self-management purposes. A conventional content analysis approach was used for coding. Patient groups seem to differ in expectations and needs regarding self-management and eHealth for self-management purposes. People with diabetes reported most needs and benefits regarding self-management and were most willing to use eHealth, followed by the COPD group. People with a cardiovascular condition mentioned having fewer needs for self-management support, because their disease had little impact on their life. In all patient groups it was reported that the patient, not the care professional, should choose whether or not to use eHealth. Moreover, participants reported that eHealth should not replace, but complement personal care. Many participants reported expecting feelings of anxiety by doing measurement themselves and uncertainty about follow-up of deviant data of measurements. In addition

  18. Patient and provider attitudes toward the use of patient portals for the management of chronic disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Clemens Scott; Argueta, Darcy A; Lopez, Lynsey; Nair, Anju

    2015-02-20

    Patient portals provide patients with the tools to better manage and understand their health status. However, widespread adoption of patient portals faces resistance from patients and providers for a number of reasons, and there is limited evidence evaluating the characteristics of patient portals that received positive remarks from patients and providers. The objectives of this systematic review are to identify the shared characteristics of portals that receive favorable responses from patients and providers and to identify the elements that patients and providers believe need improvement. The authors conducted a systematic search of the CINAHL and PubMed databases to gather data about the use of patient portals in the management of chronic disease. Two reviewers analyzed the articles collected in the search process in order remove irrelevant articles. The authors selected 27 articles to use in the literature review. Results of this systematic review conclude that patient portals show significant improvements in patient self-management of chronic disease and improve the quality of care provided by providers. The most prevalent positive attribute was patient-provider communication, which appeared in 10 of 27 articles (37%). This was noted by both patients and providers. The most prevalent negative perceptions are security (concerns) and user-friendliness, both of which occurred in 11 of 27 articles (41%). The user-friendliness quality was a concern for patients and providers who are not familiar with advanced technology and therefore find it difficult to navigate the patient portal. The high cost of installation and maintenance of a portal system, not surprisingly, deters some providers from implementing such technology into their practice, but this was only mentioned in 3 of the 27 articles (11%). It is possible that the incentives for meaningful use assuage the barrier of cost. This systematic review revealed mixed attitudes from patients and their providers

  19. A review of instruments to measure interprofessional collaboration for chronic disease management for community-living older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookey-Bassett, Sue; Markle-Reid, Maureen; McKey, Colleen; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori

    2016-01-01

    It is acknowledged internationally that chronic disease management (CDM) for community-living older adults (CLOA) is an increasingly complex process. CDM for older adults, who are often living with multiple chronic conditions, requires coordination of various health and social services. Coordination is enabled through interprofessional collaboration (IPC) among individual providers, community organizations, and health sectors. Measuring IPC is complicated given there are multiple conceptualisations and measures of IPC. A literature review of several healthcare, psychological, and social science electronic databases was conducted to locate instruments that measure IPC at the team level and have published evidence of their reliability and validity. Five instruments met the criteria and were critically reviewed to determine their strengths and limitations as they relate to CDM for CLOA. A comparison of the characteristics, psychometric properties, and overall concordance of each instrument with salient attributes of IPC found the Collaborative Practice Assessment Tool to be the most appropriate instrument for measuring IPC for CDM in CLOA.

  20. [Management of chronic kidney disease guided by the theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine: an experimental study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ji; Xie, Xi-Sheng; Zhang, Ming-Hua; Mao, Nan; Zhang, Cheng-Long; Xie, Lin-Shen; Cheng, Yuan; Zhang, Zi-Yuan; Fan, Jun-Ming

    2014-01-01

    To determine the impact of Traditional Chinese Medicine on patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A total of 225 CKD patients in an outpatient department were recruited for this study, among whom 170 received regular Western and Chinese medicine treatments (control group) and 55 received treatments guided by the theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine (experimental group). The effectiveness of the treatments was determined through a pre-post comparison. Significant pre-intervention differences in age (P control group. No significant differences between the groups were found in changes of uric acid (P = 0.475), urine protein (P = 0.058), urine red cells (P = 0.577), and urine white cells (P = 0.01). A greater level of increase in estimated glomerular filtration rate was found in the experimental group compared with the control (P theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine can improve renal function through influencing glomerular filtration rate. The effect is more prominent than the regular treatment regime.

  1. Breaking barriers to care: a community of solution for chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jim; Solberg, Bill; Gauger, Michael

    2013-01-01

    For 10 years the Medical College of Wisconsin and Columbia St. Mary's Hospital have joined together in a partnership to work within some of Milwaukee's most impoverished neighborhoods. Beginning simply by providing health care through a free clinic, the partnership soon was confronted with numerous examples of barriers to care being experienced by patients. A community-based participatory action process allowed the local population to give voice to the local realities of barriers to care. Here we combine our anecdotal clinical experience, the neighborhood's input, and an example of a successful program from a low-resource international setting to create a novel approach to treating chronic disease in uninsured populations. This model of care has been successful for 2 reasons. First, the model shows good health outcomes at low cost. Second, solid community partnerships with care providers, churches, and other groups have been formed in support of the model, ensuring its credibility and sustainability.

  2. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... artérielle Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in ... as they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  3. Missed opportunities in primary care: the importance of identifying depression through screening, family history, and chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maradiegue, Ann H; Khan, Fakiha

    2013-02-01

    This study explored the adequacy of depression screening in a community health center. The medical charts of individuals (N = 90) enrolled at a community health center were randomly selected, reviewed, and compared to current standard-of-care guidelines for four elements: family history, screening for depression, control of chronic illnesses, and missed opportunities for preventive care. Family history documentation collected by the providers was limited and 44.4% had no family history. There was no routine depression screening process, although 48.9% of the clients had red flags (warning signals) for depression. Laboratory values used for screening control of chronic disease in the medical records were: fasting glucose levels ⩽100 mg/dL (46%), total cholesterol levels ⩽200 mg/dL (38%), and blood pressure ⩽120/80 mmHg (23%). The results highlight the need to focus on depression screening as part of preventive care and the management of chronic disease in the primary care setting. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. The nature, consequences, and management of neurological disorders in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Bahman; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2018-04-01

    Perhaps no other organ in the body is affected as often and in as many ways as the brain is in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Several factors contribute to the neurological disorders in CKD including accumulation of uremic toxins, metabolic and hemodynamic disorders, oxidative stress, inflammation, and impaired blood brain barrier among others. The neurological disorders in CKD involve both peripheral and central nervous system. The peripheral neurological symptoms of CKD are due to somatic and cranial peripheral neuropathies as well as a myopathy. The central neurological symptoms of CKD are due to the cortical predominantly cortical, or subcortical lesions. Cognitive decline, encephalopathy, cortical myoclonus, asterixis and epileptic seizures are distinct features of the cortical disorders of CKD. Diffuse white matter disease due to ischemia and hypoxia may be an important cause of subcortical encephalopathy. A special and more benign form of subcortical disorder caused by brain edema in CKD is termed posterior reversible encephalopathy. Subcortical pathology especially when it affects the basal ganglia causes a number of movement disorders including Parkinsonism, chorea and dystonia. A stimulus-sensitive reflex myoclonus is believed to originate from the medullary structures. Sleep disorder and restless leg syndrome are common in CKD and have both central and peripheral origin. This article provides an overview of the available data on the nature, prevalence, pathophysiology, consequences and treatment of neurological complications of CKD. © 2017 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  5. The role of exercise training in the management of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, Erin J; Coombes, Jeff S; Isbel, Nicole M

    2015-11-01

    In this review, we summarize recent studies of exercise interventions in chronic kidney disease (CKD), potential benefits, discuss barriers to implementation and make practical recommendations for incorporating exercise training into the care of patients with CKD. Interventions targeting increased fitness and physical activity are effective and may have multiple potential benefits. Recommendations regarding physical activity advice have been incorporated into the recent update of the KDIGO CKD guidelines, which suggest that patients perform 30 min of moderate intensity exercise on most days of the week. Exercise as simple, popular and inexpensive as walking appears to be associated with significant health benefits. More vigorous exercise requires increased supervision but can be safely prescribed to patients with a broad range of comorbidities and may be associated with greater gains in health. Physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle function are low in patients with CKD. A sedentary lifestyle has been associated with increased mortality, morbidity and the risk factors that drive progression of both kidney and cardiac disease. There is much to learn about the benefits of different modalities of exercise but the time has come to routinely prescribe exercise interventions as part of standard nephrological care.

  6. Impact of a chronic disease management program on hospital admissions and readmissions in an Australian population with heart disease or diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamar, G Brent; Rula, Elizabeth Y; Wells, Aaron; Coberley, Carter; Pope, James E; Larkin, Shaun

    2013-04-01

    Chronic disease management programs (CDMPs) were introduced in Australia to reduce unnecessary health care utilization by the growing population with chronic conditions; however, evidence of effectiveness is needed. This study evaluated the impact of a comprehensive CDMP, My Health Guardian (MHG), on rate of hospital admissions, readmissions, and average length of hospital stay (ALOS) for insured individuals with heart disease or diabetes. Primary outcomes were assessed through retrospective comparison of members in MHG (treatment; n=5053) to similar nonparticipating members (comparison; n=23,077) using a difference-in-differences approach with the year before program commencement serving as baseline and the subsequent 12 or 18 months serving as the program periods. All outcomes were evaluated for the total study population and for disease-matched subgroups (heart disease and diabetes). Statistical tests were performed using multivariate regression controlling for age, sex, number of chronic diseases, and past hospitalization status. After both 12 and 18 months, treatment members displayed decreases in admissions (both, P≤0.001) and readmissions (both, P≤0.01), and ALOS after 18 months (P≤0.01) versus the comparison group; magnitude of impact increased over time for these 3 measures. All outcomes for both disease-matched subgroups directionally mirrored the total study group, but the diabetes subgroup did not achieve significance for readmissions or ALOS. Within the treatment group, admissions decreased with increasing care calls to members (12 and 18 months, Phospital admissions and presents a promising approach to reduce the burden associated with hospitalizations in populations with chronic disease.

  7. Management of Hypertension in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qi-Fang; Hoshide, Satoshi; Cheng, Hao-Min; Park, Sungha; Park, Chang-Gyu; Chen, Chen-Huan; Kario, Kazuomi; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is both a cause and consequence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). According to the Chinese national survey in 2007-2010, the prevalence of CKD was much higher in hypertensive patients (18.9%, n=16,691) than in the overall population sample (10.8%, n=47,204). CKD in hypertension confers risks to the kidneys as well as other organs. Probably because of high dietary salt intake, Asian hypertensive patients with CKD show high prevalence of non-dipping and reversed dipping blood pressure pattern, and may have even higher risks of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, out-of-office blood pressure evaluation and comprehensive cardiovascular evaluations are required. Most of current hypertension guidelines recommend intensive antihypertensive treatment in hypertensive patients with CKD. This is probably of particular relevance for cardiovascular prevention in Asia, because stroke, as a major complication of hypertension in Asia, is more closely related to blood pressure than coronary events. Intensive blood pressure control to 130/80 mmHg is often required to prevent CKD progression and cardiovascular complications. The inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are recommended as the first line antihypertensive medications in patients with a glomerular filtration rate higher than 30 ml/min/1.73 m², which may more efficaciously prevent end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. Nonetheless, combination therapy of RAS inhibitors with other classes of antihypertensive drugs, such as calcium-channel blockers, diuretics, etc, is required to control blood pressure to the target. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Clinical Inertia in a Randomized Trial of Telemedicine-Based Chronic Disease Management: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Anna Beth; Okorodudu, Daniel E; Bosworth, Hayden B; Crowley, Matthew J

    2018-01-17

    Treatment nonadherence and clinical inertia perpetuate poor cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor control. Telemedicine interventions may counter both treatment nonadherence and clinical inertia. We explored why a telemedicine intervention designed to reduce treatment nonadherence and clinical inertia did not improve CVD risk factor control, despite enhancing treatment adherence versus usual care. In this analysis of a randomized trial, we studied recipients of the 12-month telemedicine intervention. This intervention comprised two nurse-administered components: (1) monthly self-management education targeting improved treatment adherence; and (2) quarterly medication management facilitation designed to support treatment intensification by primary care (thereby reducing clinical inertia). For each medication management facilitation encounter, we ascertained whether patients met treatment goals, and if not, whether primary care recommended treatment intensification following the encounter. We assessed disease control associated with encounters, where intensification was/was not recommended. We examined 455 encounters across 182 intervention recipients (100% African Americans with type 2 diabetes). Even after accounting for valid reasons for deferring intensification (e.g., treatment nonadherence), intensification was not recommended in 67.5% of encounters in which hemoglobin A1c was above goal, 72.5% in which systolic blood pressure was above goal, and 73.9% in which low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was above goal. In each disease state, treatment intensification was more likely with poorer control. Despite enhancing treatment adherence, this intervention was unsuccessful in countering clinical inertia, likely explaining its lack of effect on CVD risk factors. We identify several lessons learned that may benefit investigators and healthcare systems.

  9. Determining the efficacy of the chronic disease self-management programme and readability of 'living a healthy life with chronic conditions' in a New Zealand setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, J J-Y; Arenhold, F; Braakhuis, A J

    2016-11-01

    Self-management programmes are an increasingly popular way of treating chronic diseases. This study aims to determine the efficacy of the Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) in a New Zealand context by assessing course outcomes and readability of the accompanying reference guide Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Conditions, 4th Edition. This is a cross-sectional pre-post study conducted in Auckland between August 2009 and September 2015, using CDSMP participants' baseline and follow-up Health Education Intervention Questionnaire (heiQ TM ) data. Readability of the guide was assessed using the Gunning Fog Index, Coleman Liau, Flesch Reading Ease, Flesch Kincaid Grade Level and Simplified Measure of Gobbledygook scores. Significant evidence of improvement (P ≤ 0.001) was observed in seven of the eight domains measured by the heiQ TM (Deakin University, Centre for Population Health Research, Melbourne, Vic., Australia). The greatest improvements were seen in skill and technique acquisition (mean change score 0.25, P ≤ 0.001) and self-monitoring and insight (0.18, P ≤ 0.001). There was little evidence of improvement in health service navigation (0.04, P = 0.17). Readability analyses indicate that a person needs to be reading at a minimum of U.S. 8th grade level in order to understand the text, and possibly up to 11th grade. The CDSMP is effective for improving patient self-efficacy in the New Zealand setting. However, adaptation of the programme to support better health service navigation is warranted. The readability of the reference guide is not suitable for this setting and requires further improvement. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  10. Canadian Men's Self-Management of Chronic Diseases: A Literature Analysis of Strategies for Dealing With Risks and Promoting Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, Margareth S; Maheu, Christine; Kolisnyk, Olesya; Mohamed, Mohamed; Guruge, Sepali; Kinslikh, Diana; Christopher, Joneet J; Stevenson, Melissa; SanJose, CaroLine; Sizto, Terry; Byam, Aaron

    2017-07-01

    This article reviews the qualitative research on men's self-management of mental and physical chronic diseases, with emphasis on strategies for dealing with risks and promoting wellness. Using Bardin's method of document analysis, it was focused on the findings of Canadian qualitative studies published in French or English from 2005 to 2011. Boltanski's theory on social uses of the body inspired the analysis. Living with a chronic disease threatens men's sense of masculinity and self-image, as well as their perceived ability to fulfill expected social roles. Social images of men's bodies influence how men express their emotions, attributes, and attitudes, or acknowledge the need for and seek social affirmation. Self-management has been documented in Canadian qualitative literature as a complex phenomenon influenced by the social environment, personal capacities, feelings, perceptions, and potentials. The extent of how all these features interact within the scope of men's mental and physical health and illness experiences was partially revealed in this study. The findings underscore the social invisibility of men's bodies, especially those of men facing social inequities. Attending to principles of social justice can ensure that future research on men's health will amplify the range of men's voices and allow them to be heard. Recommendations address also the international scientific community interested in advancing men's health research, especially in those countries that lack a national men's health policy.

  11. The feasibility and acceptability of nurse-led chronic disease management interventions in primary care: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Catherine; McInnes, Susan; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2018-02-01

    To explore the feasibility and acceptability of nurse-led chronic disease management and lifestyle risk factor reduction interventions in primary care (general practice/family practice). Growing international evidence suggests that interventions delivered by primary care nurses can assist in modifying lifestyle risk factors and managing chronic disease. To date, there has been limited exploration of the feasibility and acceptability of such interventions. Integrative review guided by the work of Whittemore and Knafl (). Database search of CINAHL, Medline and Web of Science was conducted to identify relevant literature published between 2000-2015. Papers were assessed for methodological quality and data abstracted before thematic analysis was undertaken. Eleven papers met the inclusion criteria. Analysis uncovered four themes: (1) facilitators of interventions; (2) barriers to interventions; (3) consumer satisfaction; and (4) primary care nurse role. Literature supports the feasibility and acceptability of nurse-led interventions in primary care for lifestyle risk factor modification. The ongoing sustainability of these interventions rests largely on organizational factors such as funding, educational pathways and professional support of the primary care nursing role. Further robust research around primary care nurse interventions is required to strengthen the evidence base. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto thyroiditis; Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis; Autoimmune thyroiditis; Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis; Lymphadenoid goiter - Hashimoto; Hypothyroidism - Hashimoto; Type 2 polyglandular autoimmune ...

  13. Management of chronic hepatitis Band C

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disorders must be excluded. Serum copper, urinary copper ... storage diseases and a,-antitrypsin deficiency. ... s absent, the specimen should be sent to a centre of excellence for .... Drug-induced chronic liver disease with emphasis on chronic active hepatitis. ..... interferon represent a difficult management problem. Lower.

  14. A novel personal health system with integrated decision support and guidance for the management of chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Stephan; Schäfer, Michael; Bransch, Marco; Brimmers, Peter; Bartolomé, Diego; Baños, Janie; Orr, James; Jones, Dave; Jara, Maximilian; Stockmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    A personal health system platform for the management of patients with chronic liver disease that incorporates a novel approach to integrate decision support and guidance through care pathways for patients and their doctors is presented in this paper. The personal health system incorporates an integrated decision support engine that guides patients and doctors through the management of the disease by issuing tasks and providing recommendations to both the care team and the patient and by controlling the execution of a Care Flow Plan based on the results of tasks and the monitored health status of the patient. This Care Flow Plan represents a formal, business process based model of disease management designed off-line by domain experts on the basis of clinical guidelines, knowledge of care pathways and an organisational model for integrated, patient-centred care. In this way, remote monitoring and treatment are dynamically adapted to the patient's actual condition and clinical symptoms and allow flexible delivery of care with close integration of specialists, therapists and care-givers.

  15. Does Selection and Management of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease In Government Run and Private Hospitals Differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Anoop; Dutt, Aswini Raghavendra; Bangera, Shobith

    2017-08-01

    Globally, incidence of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is rapidly rising with huge burden on the life expectancy of the patients. Regular haemodialysis improves the quality of life in these patients. They get treatment at either government run or private sector hospitals. A difference in disease pattern, comorbidity, patient management and number of access failures can be observed in these set ups. The present study was carried out to find out selection, management and disease pattern of CKD patients admitted for dialysis in government run and private hospital. A cross-sectional study on patients (18-90 years) admitted and undergoing dialysis at government run (N=129) and private hospital (N=182) was undertaken in Karnataka, India. Parameters like comorbidity (diabetes), number of dialysis per week, number of access failures, and follow up visits were compared between these patients. Chi- squared test was used to compare the data. All tests were two-tailed and pgender bias in selection of patients for dialysis between the two hospitals. Similarly, follow-ups with nephrologist, number of dialysis done per week and erythropoietin supplements administered were significantly more among private hospital patients (pprivate hospital. No statistical difference was seen with access failure in both these setups. No bias in management of CKD patient was seen among the two sets of hospitals though available facilities seemed to vary.

  16. The effect of chronic liver disease on venous thromboembolism among medically managed patients in Singapore General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Zhang, Xiao Zhu; Ng, Han Seong; Fong, Jeffrey Chern Hui; Lee, Lai Heng

    2015-09-01

    Chronic liver disease (CLD) has been suggested to be associated with venous thromboembolism (VTE) in western populations. However, little is known about the risk effects of CLD on VTE among Asians. To compute the prevalence of VTE among hospitalised Asian patients, and to evaluate the pattern and scale of risk effects of CLD on VTE occurrence. Retrospective study of hospital discharge database from 2004 to 2011 to identify patients with VTE and CLD using International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 9th Revision, Australian Modification (ICD-9-AM) codes. Of 199904 medically managed inpatients during the 8years, 1744 (0.9%) patients had VTE. Patients with CLD had significant higher prevalence of VTE (non-cirrhosis CLD 1.5%, cirrhosis 2.0%) than patients without CLD (0.8%, pCLD (odds ratio, OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.2-1.7, pCLD, particular liver cirrhosis, increases the risks of VTE in hospitalised Asian patients. As CLD patients are perceived to be at risks of bleeding due to the prolonged clotting times and thrombocytopenia, the results of this study brings attention to opposite end of the haemostatic pendulum in patients with chronic liver disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease 2017 Report: GOLD Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelmeier, Claus F; Criner, Gerard J; Martinez, Fernando J; Anzueto, Antonio; Barnes, Peter J; Bourbeau, Jean; Celli, Bartolome R; Chen, Rongchang; Decramer, Marc; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Frith, Peter; Halpin, David M G; López Varela, M Victorina; Nishimura, Masaharu; Roche, Nicolas; Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Sin, Don D; Singh, Dave; Stockley, Robert; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Agusti, Alvar

    2017-03-01

    This Executive Summary of the Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of COPD (GOLD) 2017 Report focuses primarily on the revised and novel parts of the document. The most significant changes include: 1) the assessment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been refined to separate the spirometric assessment from symptom evaluation. ABCD groups are now proposed to be derived exclusively from patient symptoms and their history of exacerbations; 2) for each of the groups A to D, escalation strategies for pharmacological treatments are proposed; 3) the concept of de-escalation of therapy is introduced in the treatment assessment scheme; 4) nonpharmacologic therapies are comprehensively presented and; 5) the importance of comorbid conditions in managing COPD is reviewed. Copyright ©2017 the American Thoracic Society. Published with permission from the American Thoracic Society. Design and branding are copyright ©ERS 2017.

  18. Use of audiovisual media for education and self-management of patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease – COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Schäfer

    Full Text Available Introduction Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is considered a disease with high morbidity and mortality, even though it is a preventable and treatable disease. Objective To assess the effectiveness of an audiovisual educational material about the knowledge and self-management in COPD. Methods Quasi-experimental design and convenience sample was composed of COPD patients of Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR (n = 42, in advanced stage of the disease, adults of both genders, and with low education. All subjects answered a specific questionnaire before and post-education audiovisual session, to assess their acquired knowledge about COPD. Results Positive results were obtained in the topics: COPD and its consequences, first symptom identified when the disease is aggravated and physical exercise practice. Regarding the second and third symptoms, it was observed that the education session did not improve this learning, as well as the decision facing the worsening of COPD. Conclusion COPD patients showed reasonable knowledge about the disease, its implications and symptomatology. Important aspects should be emphasized, such as identification of exacerbations of COPD and decision facing this exacerbation.

  19. Towards an ontology for data quality in integrated chronic disease management: a realist review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, S T; Rahimi, A; Ray, P; Taggart, J; Dennis, S; de Lusignan, S; Jalaludin, B; Yeo, A E T; Talaei-Khoei, A

    2013-01-01

    Effective use of routine data to support integrated chronic disease management (CDM) and population health is dependent on underlying data quality (DQ) and, for cross system use of data, semantic interoperability. An ontological approach to DQ is a potential solution but research in this area is limited and fragmented. Identify mechanisms, including ontologies, to manage DQ in integrated CDM and whether improved DQ will better measure health outcomes. A realist review of English language studies (January 2001-March 2011) which addressed data quality, used ontology-based approaches and is relevant to CDM. We screened 245 papers, excluded 26 duplicates, 135 on abstract review and 31 on full-text review; leaving 61 papers for critical appraisal. Of the 33 papers that examined ontologies in chronic disease management, 13 defined data quality and 15 used ontologies for DQ. Most saw DQ as a multidimensional construct, the most used dimensions being completeness, accuracy, correctness, consistency and timeliness. The majority of studies reported tool design and development (80%), implementation (23%), and descriptive evaluations (15%). Ontological approaches were used to address semantic interoperability, decision support, flexibility of information management and integration/linkage, and complexity of information models. DQ lacks a consensus conceptual framework and definition. DQ and ontological research is relatively immature with little rigorous evaluation studies published. Ontology-based applications could support automated processes to address DQ and semantic interoperability in repositories of routinely collected data to deliver integrated CDM. We advocate moving to ontology-based design of information systems to enable more reliable use of routine data to measure health mechanisms and impacts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Chronic venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinsky, Claire D; Waldorf, Heidi

    2009-11-01

    Identifying characteristic cutaneous findings is important in determining the appropriate management of certain venous diseases. The health care provider should be familiar with the classic description of patterns and distributions of skin manifestations, such as varicose veins, stasis dermatitis, palpable cord, petechiae, and telangiectasias. In addition to the gross appearance of the skin, a skin biopsy may help elucidate a diagnosis. General treatment and prevention of the underlying venous pathology is essential. Furthermore, specific management of skin findings should include therapy to ameliorate progression of disease and symptomatology when warranted.

  1. Associations between gastro-oesophageal reflux, its management and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Victoria S; Müllerová, Hana; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Patel, Anant; Hurst, John R

    2015-09-01

    To determine factors, overall and by sex, associated with self-reported gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, and to evaluate relationships between GORD, its modification by acid suppression medications (Proton Pump Inhibitors [PPI]/histamine-2 receptor antagonists [H2RA]) and exacerbations of COPD and mortality. Logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with GORD; Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for GORD and risk of exacerbation and death. Among 2135 COPD patients from the ECLIPSE cohort, 547 patients self-reported GORD, with female preponderance; 237 were taking PPI/H2RA. Risk factors for GORD did not differ by sex. When compared to patients who did not report GORD or use of PPI/H2RA, patients with GORD and taking PPI/H2RA had a significantly increased risk of exacerbation (HR = 1.58, 95%CI = 1.35-1.86); risk was also increased for patients reporting GORD only or PPI/H2RA use only (HR = 1.21 [1.04-1.40] and 1.33 [1.08-1.65], respectively). Similar findings were observed for risk of hospitalised exacerbation. GORD was not associated with mortality. GORD in COPD patients is highly prevalent, and risk factors did not differ by sex. Use of PPI/H2RA and self-reported GORD were associated with increased risk of moderate-to-severe and hospitalised exacerbations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. E-Learning Model in Chronic Kidney Disease Management: a Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahimi, Hamid; Zolfaghari, Mitra; Abolhassani, Farid; Rahimi Foroushani, Abass; Mohammadi, Aeen; Rajaee, Farahnaz

    2017-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a challenging health problem. The present study examined impact of self-care education through e-learning on improving kidney function among individuals with CKD. The studied population consisted of CKD patients receiving care at 10 centers for treating noncommunicable diseases in Tehran. Three centers were randomly selected and 39 patients with a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2, minimum education of grade 9, minimum of 2 years of referrals, and computer literacy of the individual or a first-degree relative were included in the study, while 92 patients were assigned into the control group. Changes in GFR were compared after 6 months following an e-learning program for the patients in the intervention group. The mean change in GFR was 7.5 ± 8.9 mL/min/1.73 m2 for the intervention group after the e-learning intervention, while this was -2.3 ± 8.5 mL/min/1.73 m2. The two groups were also significantly different in terms of age, marital status, education level, mean arterial pressure, and serum high-density lipoprotein level, and therefore, multivariable comparison of GFR was made incorporating these factor into the analysis and showed a significant improvement of GFR in the intervention group. According to the results of this study, effects of the e-learning educational intervention on improvement in kidney function and CKD treatment were established.

  3. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabulut, N.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) denote progressive lung diseases characterized by airway obstruction. COPD exhibits specific morphologic changes in the lung parenchyma, central and peripheral airways and pulmonary vasculature. A person with COPD may have either emphysema or chronic bronchitis, but most have both. Some people with COPD may also have an asthma-like or reactive component. Imaging modalities play important role in the detection or exclusion of COPD, distribution and extent of disease processes. Combined inspiratory and expiratory high resolution CT allows phenotyping of COPD (emphysema predominant, airway predominant, or mixed) and quantification of severity. Magnetic resonance imaging enables functional evaluation and demonstrates ventilation defects correlating closely with pulmonary function tests. Imaging techniques are also helpful in guiding the treatment, such as bullectomy in patients with bullous emphysema, lung volume reduction surgery or endoscopic interventions in those with severe emphysema, and smoking cessation and medical treatment designed to stop lung destruction in patients with mild or moderate emphysema or bronchiectasis.

  4. Emotional management and biological markers of dietetic regimen in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Carlo; Aceto, Paola; Luciani, Massimiliano; Fazzari, Erika; Cesari, Valerio; Luciano, Stella; Fortini, Antonio; Berloco, Desiderata; Canulla, Francesco; Bruzzese, Vincenzo; Lai, Silvia

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the association between psychological characteristics and biological markers of adherence in chronic kidney disease patients receiving conservative therapy, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis (PD), or kidney transplantation. Seventy-nine adult patients were asked to complete the following questionnaires: Toronto Alexithymia scale, Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale, and Short Form Health Survey. Biological markers of adherence to treatment were measured. Peritoneal dialysis patients showed a lower capacity to feel pleasure from sensorial experience (p = .011) and a higher values of phosphorus compared to the other patients' groups (p = .0001). The inability to communicate emotions was negatively correlated with hemoglobin levels (r = -(0).69; p = .001) and positively correlated with phosphorus values in the PD patients (r = .45; p = .050). Findings showed higher psychological impairments and a lower adherence to the treatment in PD patients and suggest the implication of emotional competence in adherence to treatment.

  5. Establishing an independent mobile health programme for chronic disease self-management support in Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Piette

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mobile health (m-health work in low and middle-income countries (LMICs mainly consists of pilot programmes with an unclear path to scaling and dissemination. We describe the deployment and testing of an m-health platform for non-communicable disease (NCD self-management support in Bolivia. Methods: 364 primary care patients in La Paz with diabetes or hypertension completed surveys about their use of mobile phones, health and access to care. 165 of those patients then participated in a 12-week demonstration of automated telephone monitoring and self-management support. Weekly Interactive Voice Response (IVR calls were made from a platform established at a university in La Paz, under the direction of the regional health ministry. Results: 37% of survey respondents spoke indigenous languages at home, and 38% had six or fewer years of education. 82% had a mobile phone; half (45% used text messaging with a standard phone, and 9% had a smartphone. Smartphones were least common among patients who were older, spoke indigenous languages, or had less education. IVR programme participants completed 1007 self-management support calls, with an overall response rate of 51%. IVR call completion was lower among older adults, but was not related to patients’ ethnicity, health status or healthcare access. IVR health and self-care reports were consistent with information reported during baseline interviews. Patients’ likelihood of reporting excellent, very good, or good health (versus fair or poor health via IVR increased during programme participation, and was associated with better medication adherence. Patients completing follow-up interviews were satisfied with the programme, with 19/20 (95% reporting that they would recommend it to a friend. Conclusions: By collaborating with LMICs, m-health programmes can be transferred from higher-resource centres to LMICs and implemented in ways that improve access to self-management support among people

  6. Establishing an independent mobile health program for chronic disease self-management support in bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, John D; Valverde, Helen; Marinec, Nicolle; Jantz, Rachel; Kamis, Kevin; de la Vega, Carlos Lazo; Woolley, Timothy; Pinto, Bismarck

    2014-01-01

    Mobile health (m-health) work in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) mainly consists of small pilot programs with an unclear path to scaling and dissemination. We describe the deployment and testing of an m-health platform for non-communicable disease (NCD) self-management support in Bolivia. Three hundred sixty-four primary care patients in La Paz with diabetes or hypertension completed surveys about their use of mobile phones, health and access to care. One hundred sixty-five of those patients then participated in a 12-week demonstration of automated telephone monitoring and self-management support. Weekly interactive voice response (IVR) calls were made from a platform established at a university in La Paz, under the direction of the regional health ministry. Thirty-seven percent of survey respondents spoke indigenous languages at home and 38% had six or fewer years of education. Eighty-two percent had a mobile phone, 45% used text messaging with a standard phone, and 9% had a smartphone. Smartphones were least common among patients who were older, spoke indigenous languages, or had less education. IVR program participants completed 1007 self-management support calls with an overall response rate of 51%. IVR call completion was lower among older adults, but was not related to patients' ethnicity, health status, or healthcare access. IVR health and self-care reports were consistent with information reported during in-person baseline interviews. Patients' likelihood of reporting excellent, very good, or good health (versus fair or poor health) via IVR increased during program participation and was associated with better medication adherence. Patients completing follow-up interviews were satisfied with the program, with 19/20 (95%) reporting that they would recommend it to a friend. By collaborating with LMICs, m-health programs can be transferred from higher-resource centers to LMICs and implemented in ways that improve access to self-management support among

  7. Parkinson’s disease permanent care unit: managing the chronic-palliative interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lökk J

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Johan LökkDepartment of Neurobiology, Caring Sciences, and Society, Karolinska Institutet; Geriatric Department, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, SwedenBackground: Parkinson’s disease (PD eventually leads to severe functional decline and dependence. Specialized care units for PD patients in need of permanent care are lacking.Methods: Patients with severe PD are referred to the PD permanent care unit harboring 30 patients with specialized medical and health care provided by trained staff. Patients need to have intensive medical and care needs, and be no longer able to stay at home or at an ordinary institution. A written and continuously reviewed care plan is made for each patient at admission, with the overriding aim to preserve quality of life and optimize functionality.Results: After five years, the PD permanent care unit has cared for 70 patients (36 men and 34 women with a mean age of 76.6 years and a mean duration of Parkinsonism of 11.8 years. Hoehn and Yahr severity of disease was 3.7, cognition was 25.3 (Mini-Mental State Examination, and the mean daily levodopa dose was 739 mg. The yearly fatality rate was seven, and the mean duration of stay was 26.9 months. Only five patients moved out from the unit.Conclusion: A specially designed and staffed care unit for Parkinsonism patients seems to fill a need for patients and caregivers, as well as for social and health care authorities. This model is sensitive to the changing needs and capacities of patients, ensuring that appropriate services are available in a timely manner. There was a rather short duration of patient stay and remaining life span after admission to the unit. Despite the chronic/palliative state of patients at the PD permanent care unit, there are many therapeutic options, with the overriding objective being to allow the patients to end their days in a professional and comfortable environment.Keywords: Parkinsonism, palliative care, end-stage disease

  8. The role of community pharmacists in screening and subsequent management of chronic respiratory diseases: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima, Mariam; Naik-Panvelkar, Pradnya; Saini, Bandana; Armour, Carol L

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this review was to evaluate the role of community pharmacists in provision of screening with/without subsequent management of undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and uncontrolled asthma. An extensive literature search using four databases (ie. Medline, PubMed, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA) and Scopus) with search terms pharmacy, screening, asthma or COPD was conducted. Searches were limited to the years 2003-2013, those in English and those reporting research with humans. Data retrieval, analysis and result presentation employed a scoping review method. Seventeen articles met the inclusion/exclusion criteria, of which fifteen studies were based on people with asthma and two were based on people with COPD. Only seven asthma studies and one COPD study involved screening followed by subsequent management. More than half of the people screened were found to be poorly controlled and up to 62% of people were identified at high risk for COPD by community pharmacists. The studies varied in the method and type of asthma control assessment/screening, the type of intervention provided and the outcomes measured. The limitations of the reviewed studies included varying definitions of asthma control, different study methodologies, and the lack of long-term follow-up. While many different methods were used for risk assessment and management services by the pharmacists, all the studies demonstrated that community pharmacists were capable of identifying people with poorly controlled asthma and undiagnosed COPD and providing them with suitable interventions. The literature review identified that community pharmacists can play an effective role in screening of people with poorly controlled asthma and undiagnosed COPD along with delivering management interventions. However, there is very little literature available on screening for these chronic respiratory conditions. Future research should focus on development of patient care

  9. The role of community pharmacists in screening and subsequent management of chronic respiratory diseases: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima, Mariam; Naik-Panvelkar, Pradnya; Saini, Bandana; Armour, Carol L.

    Objective The purpose of this review was to evaluate the role of community pharmacists in provision of screening with/without subsequent management of undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and uncontrolled asthma. Methods An extensive literature search using four databases (ie. Medline, PubMed, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA) and Scopus) with search terms pharmacy, screening, asthma or COPD was conducted. Searches were limited to the years 2003-2013, those in English and those reporting research with humans. Data retrieval, analysis and result presentation employed a scoping review method. Results Seventeen articles met the inclusion/exclusion criteria, of which fifteen studies were based on people with asthma and two were based on people with COPD. Only seven asthma studies and one COPD study involved screening followed by subsequent management. More than half of the people screened were found to be poorly controlled and up to 62% of people were identified at high risk for COPD by community pharmacists. The studies varied in the method and type of asthma control assessment/screening, the type of intervention provided and the outcomes measured. The limitations of the reviewed studies included varying definitions of asthma control, different study methodologies, and the lack of long-term follow-up. While many different methods were used for risk assessment and management services by the pharmacists, all the studies demonstrated that community pharmacists were capable of identifying people with poorly controlled asthma and undiagnosed COPD and providing them with suitable interventions. Conclusions The literature review identified that community pharmacists can play an effective role in screening of people with poorly controlled asthma and undiagnosed COPD along with delivering management interventions. However, there is very little literature available on screening for these chronic respiratory conditions. Future research should focus

  10. Development and implementation of an integrated chronic disease model in South Africa: lessons in the management of change through improving the quality of clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Ozayr Haroon; Asmall, Shaidah

    2015-01-01

    South Africa is facing a complex burden of disease arising from a combination of chronic infectious illness and non-communicable diseases. As the burden of chronic diseases (communicable and non-communicable) increases, providing affordable and effective care to the increasing numbers of chronic patients will be an immense challenge. The framework recommended by the Medical Research Council of the United Kingdom for the development and evaluation of complex health interventions was used to conceptualise the intervention. The breakthrough series was utilised for the implementation process. These two frameworks were embedded within the clinical practice improvement model that served as the overarching framework for the development and implementation of the model. The Chronic Care Model was ideally suited to improve the facility component and patient experience; however, the deficiencies in other aspects of the health system building blocks necessitated a hybrid model. An integrated chronic disease management model using a health systems approach was initiated across 42 primary health care facilities. The interventions were implemented in a phased approach using learning sessions and action periods to introduce the planned and targeted changes. The implementation of the integrated chronic disease management model is feasible at primary care in South Africa provided that systemic challenges and change management are addressed during the implementation process.

  11. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program: the experience of frequent users of health care services and peer leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudon, Catherine; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Diadiou, Fatoumata; Bouliane, Danielle; Lambert, Mireille; Hudon, Émilie

    2016-04-01

    Large amount of evidence supports the contribution of the Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) to a global chronic disease management strategy. However, many studies have suggested further exploring of the factors influencing acceptance and completion of participants in this program. This study aimed to describe and examine factors associated with acceptance and completion rates of the CDSMP among frequent users of health care services, and to highlight the experience of patients and peer leaders who facilitated the program. A descriptive design with mixed sequential data was used. Acceptance and completion rates were calculated and their relationship with patient characteristics was examined in regression analysis (n = 167). Interviews were conducted among patients who accepted (n = 11) and refused (n = 13) to participate and with the program coordinator. Focus groups were held with the seven peer leaders who facilitated the program. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Of the 167 patients invited, 60 (36%) accepted to participate in the program. Group format was the most frequent reason to decline the invitation to participate. Twenty-eight participants (47%) completed the program. Participants who dropped out during the program raised different reasons such as poor health and too much heterogeneity among participants. Factors such as location, schedule, content, group composition and facilitation were considered as important elements contributing to the success of the program. The CDSMP could therefore be considered as a self-management support option for this vulnerable clientele, while taking measures to avoid too much heterogeneity among participants to improve completion rates. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Surgical management of secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease--a consensus report of the European Society of Endocrine Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Kerstin; Bartsch, Detlef K; Sancho, Juan J; Guigard, Sebastien; Triponez, Frederic

    2015-12-01

    Despite advances in the medical management of secondary hyperparathyroidism due to chronic renal failure and dialysis (renal hyperparathyroidism), parathyroid surgery remains an important treatment option in the spectrum of the disease. Patients with severe and complicated renal hyperparathyroidism (HPT), refractory or intolerant to medical therapy and patients with specific requirements in prospect of or excluded from renal transplantation may require parathyroidectomy for renal hyperparathyroidism. Present standard and actual controversial issues regarding surgical treatment of patients with hyperparathyroidism due to chronic renal failure were identified, and pertinent literature was searched and reviewed. Whenever applicable, evaluation of the level of evidence concerning diagnosis and management of renal hyperparathyroidism according to standard criteria and recommendation grading were employed. Results were discussed at the 6th Workshop of the European Society of Endocrine Surgeons entitled Hyperparathyroidism due to multiple gland disease: An evidence-based perspective. Presently, literature reveals scant data, especially, no prospective randomized studies to provide sufficient levels of evidence to substantiate recommendations for surgery in renal hyperparathyroidism. Appropriate surgical management of renal hyperparathyroidism involves standard bilateral exploration with bilateral cervical thymectomy and a spectrum of four standardized types of parathyroid resection that reveal comparable outcome results with regard to levels of evidence and recommendation. Specific patient requirements may favour one over the other procedure according to individualized demands. Surgery for patients with renal hyperparathyroidism in the era of calcimimetics continues to play an important role in selected patients and achieves efficient control of hyperparathyroidism. The overall success rate and long-term control of renal hyperparathyroidism and optimal handling of

  13. Drug management in the elderly adult with chronic kidney disease: a review for the primary care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponticelli, Claudio; Sala, Gabriele; Glassock, Richard J

    2015-05-01

    With advancing age, the functional reserve of many organs tends to decrease. In particular, the lean body mass, the levels of serum albumin, the blood flow to the liver, and the glomerular filtration rate are reduced in elderly individuals and can be further impaired by the concomitant presence of acute or chronic kidney disease. Moreover, patients with kidney disease are often affected by comorbid processes and are prescribed multiple medications. The aging process also modifies some drug interactions, including the affinity of some drugs for their receptor, the number of receptors, and the cell responses upon receptor activation. Therefore, older patients with kidney disease are particularly susceptible to the risks of adverse drug reactions. Planning a pharmacological regimen in such patients is confounded by the paucity of information available on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of a large number of drugs commonly used in this group of patients. Finally, many aged patients suffer from unintentional poor compliance. In this review, the problems physicians face in designing safe and effective medication management in elderly individuals are discussed, paying attention to those more frequently used, which may be potentially harmful in patients with kidney disease. The risks of overdosing and underdosing are outlined, and some recommendations to reduce the risk of adverse drug reactions are provided. A review of the literature covering the field of drug management in older patients with kidney disease was performed by selecting those articles published between January 1, 1990, and December 1, 2014, using PubMed as a search engine with the keywords elderly, kidney disease, drugs, drug interaction, and renal function. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Personalised telehealth intervention for chronic disease management: A pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohingamu Mudiyanselage, Shalika; Stevens, Jo; Watts, Jennifer J; Toscano, Julian; Kotowicz, Mark A; Steinfort, Christopher L; Bell, Jennifer; Byrnes, Janette; Bruce, Stephanie; Carter, Sarah; Hunter, Claire; Barrand, Chris; Hayles, Robyn

    2018-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess the impact of home-based telehealth monitoring on health outcomes, quality of life and costs over 12 months for patients with diabetes and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who were identified as being at high risk of readmission to hospital. Methods This pilot study was a randomised controlled trial combined with an economic analysis to examine the outcomes of standard care versus home-based telehealth for people with diabetes and/or COPD who were at risk of hospital readmission within one year. The primary outcomes were (i) hospital admission and length of stay (LOS); and (ii) health-related quality of life (HRQOL); and the secondary outcomes were (i) health-related clinical outcomes; (ii) anxiety and depression scores; and (iii) health literacy. The costs of the intervention and hospitalisations were included. Results A total of 86 and 85 participants were randomised to the intervention and control groups respectively. The difference between groups in hospital LOS was -3.89 (95% confidence interval (CI): -9.40, 1.62) days, and for HRQOL, 0.09 (95% CI: 0.05, 0.14) in favour of the telehealth monitoring group. There was a saving of AUD$6553 (95% CI: -12145, -961) in the cost of hospitalisation over 12 months, which offset the increased cost of tele-monitoring. The intervention group showed an improvement in anxiety, depression and health literacy at 12 months, and in the diabetes group, a reduction in microalbuminuria. Discussion The telehealth monitoring intervention improved patient's health outcomes and quality of life at no additional cost.

  15. Keto-analogues and essential aminoacids and other supplements in the conservative management of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupisti, Adamasco; Bolasco, Piergiorgio

    2017-06-01

    The manipulation of dietary protein intake is the mainstay of nutritional treatment of patients affected by chronic renal insufficiency, with the aim to reduce the burden of uremic toxins in order to decrease uremic toxicity and delay the need for dialysis. Consensus exists regarding the benefit of progressive protein restriction towards delaying the progression of renal failure and the need for dialysis, provided adequate energy supply. Although pivotal, protein restriction is only one aspect of the dietary management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Additional features, though strictly related to proteins, include modifications in sodium, phosphorus and energy intake, as well as in the source (animal or plant derived) of protein and lipids. In addition, supplements play an important role as a means to obtain both beneficial effects and nutritional safety in the renal patient. Essential amino acid and ketoacid mixtures are the most utilized types of supplementation in CKD patients on restricted protein regimens. The essential amino acids plus ketoacid supplementation is mandatory in conjunction with a very low-protein diet in order to assure an adequate essential amino acid supply. It is needed to safely implement a very low protein (and phosphorus) intake, so as to obtain the beneficial effect of a severe protein restriction while preventing malnutrition. Protein-free products and energy supplements are also crucial for the prevention of protein-energy wasting in CKD patients. Calcium, iron, native vitamin D and omega-3 PUFAs are other types of supplementation of potential benefits in the CKD patients on conservative management.

  16. Epoetin zeta in the management of anemia associated with chronic kidney disease, differential pharmacology and clinical utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis-Ajami ML

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mary Lynn Davis-Ajami,1 Jun Wu,2 Katherine Downton,3 Emilie Ludeman,3 Virginia Noxon4 1Organizational Systems and Adult Health, University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2South Carolina College of Pharmacy, University of South Carolina, Greenville, SC, USA; 3Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA; 4Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Outcomes Science, South Carolina College of Pharmacy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA Abstract: Epoetin zeta was granted marketing authorization in October 2007 by the European Medicines Agency as a recombinant human erythropoietin erythropoiesis-stimulating agent to treat symptomatic anemia of renal origin in adult and pediatric patients on hemodialysis and adults on peritoneal dialysis, as well as for symptomatic renal anemia in adult patients with renal insufficiency not yet on dialysis. Currently, epoetin zeta can be administered either subcutaneously or intravenously to correct for hemoglobin concentrations ≤10 g/dL (6.2 mmol/L or with dose adjustment to maintain hemoglobin levels at desired levels not in excess of 12 g/dL (7.5 mmol/L. This review article focuses on epoetin zeta indications in chronic kidney disease, its use in managing anemia of renal origin, and discusses its pharmacology and clinical utility. Keywords: biosimilar, chronic kidney disease, epoetin alfa, erythropoiesis, renal anemia, Retacrit®

  17. The direct and indirect costs of managing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souliotis, Kyriakos; Kousoulakou, Hara; Hillas, Georgios; Tzanakis, Nikos; Toumbis, Michalis; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros

    2017-01-01

    COPD is associated with significant economic burden. The objective of this study was to explore the direct and indirect costs associated with COPD and identify the key cost drivers of disease management in Greece. A Delphi panel of Greek pulmonologists was conducted, which aimed at eliciting local COPD treatment patterns and resource use. Resource use was translated into costs using official health insurance tariffs and Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRGs). In addition, absenteeism and caregiver's costs were recorded in order to quantify indirect COPD costs. The total costs of managing COPD per patient per year were estimated at €4,730, with direct (medical and nonmedical) and indirect costs accounting for 62.5% and 37.5%, respectively. COPD exacerbations were responsible for 32% of total costs (€1,512). Key exacerbation-related cost drivers were hospitalization (€830) and intensive care unit (ICU) admission costs (€454), jointly accounting for 85% of total exacerbation costs. Annual maintenance phase costs were estimated at €835, with pharmaceutical treatment accounting for 77% (€639.9). Patient time costs were estimated at €146 per year. The average number of sick days per year was estimated at 16.9, resulting in productivity losses of €968. Caregiver's costs were estimated at €806 per year. The management of COPD in Greece is associated with intensive resource use and significant economic burden. Exacerbations and productivity losses are the key cost drivers. Cost containment policies should focus on prioritizing treatments that increase patient compliance as these can lead to reduction of exacerbations, longer maintenance phases, and thus lower costs.

  18. Specialized nursing practice for chronic disease management in the primary care setting: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In response to the increasing demand for better chronic disease management and improved health care efficiency in Ontario, nursing roles have expanded in the primary health care setting. To determine the effectiveness of specialized nurses who have a clinical role in patient care in optimizing chronic disease management among adults in the primary health care setting. A literature search was performed using OVID MEDLINE, OVID MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, OVID EMBASE, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database. Results were limited to randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews and were divided into 2 models: Model 1 (nurse alone versus physician alone) and Model 2 (nurse and physician versus physician alone). Effectiveness was determined by comparable outcomes between groups in Model 1, or improved outcomes or efficiency in Model 2. Six studies were included. In Model 1, there were no significant differences in health resource use, disease-specific measures, quality of life, or patient satisfaction. In Model 2, there was a reduction in hospitalizations and improved management of blood pressure and lipids among patients with coronary artery disease. Among patients with diabetes, there was a reduction in hemoglobin A1c but no difference in other disease-specific measures. There was a trend toward improved process measures, including medication prescribing and clinical assessments. Results related to quality of life were inconsistent, but patient satisfaction with the nurse-physician team was improved. Overall, there were more and longer visits to the nurse, and physician workload did not change. There was heterogeneity across patient populations, and in the titles, roles, and scope of practice of the specialized nurses. Specialized nurses with an autonomous role in patient care had comparable outcomes to physicians alone (Model

  19. Impact of chronic kidney disease on long-term ischemic and bleeding outcomes in medically managed patients with acute coronary syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melloni, Chiara; Cornel, Jan H; Hafley, Gail

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: We aimed to study the relationship of chronic kidney disease stages with long-term ischemic and bleeding outcomes in medically managed acute coronary syndrome patients and the influence of more potent antiplatelet therapies on platelet reactivity by chronic kidney disease stage. METHODS...... AND RESULTS: We estimated creatinine clearance for 8953 medically managed acute coronary syndrome patients enrolled in the Targeted Platelet Inhibition to Clarify the Optimal Strategy to Medically Manage Acute Coronary Syndromes trial. Patients were classified by chronic kidney disease stage: normal renal...... function/mild (creatinine clearance >60 mL/min); moderate (creatinine clearance 30-60 mL/min); severe (creatinine clearance event rates through 30 months were evaluated for ischemic (cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction or stroke; primary end point) and bleeding (Global Use...

  20. Understanding differences between caregivers and non-caregivers in completer rates of Chronic Disease Self-Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J; McCallion, P; Ferretti, L A

    2017-06-01

    The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) was developed to advance participants' self-care of chronic illness and may be offered to both individuals with chronic conditions and their caregivers. Previous studies of CDSMP have identified multiple resulting health benefits for participants as well as factors associated with participants' completion rates. This study investigated differences on these issues between caregiving and non-caregiving participants. Secondary analysis using regression analysis to predict the outcome. Baseline data were collected directly from adult (over 18 years) participants of CDSMP workshops in New York State from 2012 to 2015 (n = 2685). Multi-level logistic regression analysis was used to compare the difference on completion of workshops (attended four or more of sessions) and contributing factors with the independent variable of whether participants provided care/assistance to a family member or friends with long-term illness or disability. Additional individual-level variables controlled for in the model were age, gender, race/ethnicity, living arrangement, education, the number of chronic conditions and disabilities; as were workshop-level characteristics of class size, language used, workshop leader experience, location urbanity and delivery site type. Participants who provided care to family or friends were 28% more likely to complete the workshop compared with those who did not (odds ratio = 1.279, P < 0.05). Different factors influenced the completion of CDSMP workshop for caregivers and non-caregivers. People who provide care to others appeared to have stronger motivation to complete the workshops with greater benefits. Agencies offering CDSMP should encourage caregivers to attend. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Establishing an Independent Mobile Health Program for Chronic Disease Self-Management Support in Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, John D.; Valverde, Helen; Marinec, Nicolle; Jantz, Rachel; Kamis, Kevin; de la Vega, Carlos Lazo; Woolley, Timothy; Pinto, Bismarck

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mobile health (m-health) work in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) mainly consists of small pilot programs with an unclear path to scaling and dissemination. We describe the deployment and testing of an m-health platform for non-communicable disease (NCD) self-management support in Bolivia. Methods: Three hundred sixty-four primary care patients in La Paz with diabetes or hypertension completed surveys about their use of mobile phones, health and access to care. One hundred sixty-five of those patients then participated in a 12-week demonstration of automated telephone monitoring and self-management support. Weekly interactive voice response (IVR) calls were made from a platform established at a university in La Paz, under the direction of the regional health ministry. Results: Thirty-seven percent of survey respondents spoke indigenous languages at home and 38% had six or fewer years of education. Eighty-two percent had a mobile phone, 45% used text messaging with a standard phone, and 9% had a smartphone. Smartphones were least common among patients who were older, spoke indigenous languages, or had less education. IVR program participants completed 1007 self-management support calls with an overall response rate of 51%. IVR call completion was lower among older adults, but was not related to patients’ ethnicity, health status, or healthcare access. IVR health and self-care reports were consistent with information reported during in-person baseline interviews. Patients’ likelihood of reporting excellent, very good, or good health (versus fair or poor health) via IVR increased during program participation and was associated with better medication adherence. Patients completing follow-up interviews were satisfied with the program, with 19/20 (95%) reporting that they would recommend it to a friend. Conclusion: By collaborating with LMICs, m-health programs can be transferred from higher-resource centers to LMICs and implemented in ways that

  2. State of the Art Compendium: Canadian Thoracic Society recommendations for the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Denis E; Aaron, Shawn; Bourbeau, Jean; Hernandez, Paul; Marciniuk, Darcy; Balter, Meyer; Ford, Gordon; Gervais, Andre; Goldstein, Roger; Hodder, Rick; Maltais, Francois; Road, Jeremy; McKay, Valoree; Schenkel, Jennifer; Ariel, Annon; Day, Anna; Lacasse, Yves; Levy, Robert; Lien, Dale; Miller, John; Rocker, Graeme; Sinuff, Tasmin; Stewart, Paula; Voduc, Nha; Abboud, Raja; Ariel, Amnon; Becklake, Margo; Borycki, Elizabeth; Brooks, Dina; Bryan, Shirley; Calcutt, Luanne; Chapman, Ken; Choudry, Nozhat; Couet, Alan; Coyle, Steven; Craig, Arthur; Crawford, Ian; Dean, Mervyn; Grossman, Ronald; Haffner, Jan; Heyland, Daren; Hogg, Donna; Holroyde, Martin; Kaplan, Alan; Kayser, John; Lein, Dale; Lowry, Josiah; McDonald, Les; MacFarlane, Alan; McIvor, Andrew; Rea, John; Reid, Darlene; Rouleau, Michel; Samis, Lorelei; Sin, Don; Vandemheen, Katherine; Wedzicha, J A; Weiss, Karl

    2004-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common cause of disability and death in Canada. Moreover, morbidity and mortality from COPD continue to rise, and the economic burden is enormous. The main goal of the Canadian Thoracic Society's evidence-based guidelines is to optimize early diagnosis, prevention and management of COPD in Canada. The main message of the guidelines is that COPD is a preventable and treatable disease. Targeted spirometry is strongly recommended to expedite early diagnosis in smokers and former smokers who develop respiratory symptoms, and who are at risk for COPD. Smoking cessation remains the single most effective intervention to reduce the risk of COPD and to slow its progression. Education, especially self-management plans, are key interventions in COPD. Therapy should be escalated on an individual basis in accordance with the increasing severity of symptoms and disability. Long-acting anticholinergics and beta-2-agonist inhalers should be prescribed for patients who remain symptomatic despite short-acting bronchodilator therapy. Inhaled steroids should not be used as first line therapy in COPD, but have a role in preventing exacerbations in patients with more advanced disease who suffer recurrent exacerbations. Acute exacerbations of COPD cause significant morbidity and mortality and should be treated promptly with bronchodilators and a short course of oral steroids; antibiotics should be prescribed for purulent exacerbations. Patients with advanced COPD and respiratory failure require a comprehensive management plan that incorporates structured end-of-life care. Management strategies, consisting of combined modern pharmacotherapy and nonpharmacotherapeutic interventions (eg, pulmonary rehabilitation and exercise training) can effectively improve symptoms, activity levels and quality of life, even in patients with severe COPD.

  3. The nursing contribution to chronic disease management: a case of public expectation? Qualitative findings from a multiple case study design in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Patricia Mary; Brooks, Fiona; Procter, Susan; Kendall, Sally

    2012-01-01

    The global response to the rise in prevalence of chronic disease is a focus on the way services are managed and delivered, in which nurses are seen as central in shaping patient experience. However, there is relatively little known on how patients perceive the changes to service delivery envisaged by chronic care models. The PEARLE project aimed to explore, identify and characterise the origins, processes and outcomes of effective chronic disease management models and the nursing contributions to the models. Design, settings and participants Case study design of seven sites in England and Wales ensuring a range of chronic disease management models. Participants included over ninety patients and family carers ranging in age from children to older people with conditions such as diabetes, respiratory disease, epilepsy, or coronary heart disease. Semi-structured interviews with patients and family carers. Focus groups were conducted with adolescents and children. A whole systems approach guided data collection and data were thematically analysed. Despite nurses' role and skill development and the shift away from the acute care model, the results suggested that patients had a persisting belief in the monopoly of expertise continuing to exist in the acute care setting. Patients were more satisfied if they saw the nurse as diagnostician, prescriber and medical manager of the condition. Patients were less satisfied when they had been transferred from an established doctor-led to nurse-led service. While nurses within the study were highly skilled, patient perception was guided by the familiar rather than most appropriate service delivery. Most patients saw chronic disease management as a medicalised approach and the nursing contribution was most valued when emulating it. Patients' preferences and expectations of chronic disease management were framed by a strongly biomedical discourse. Perceptions of nurse-led chronic disease management were often shaped by what was

  4. The Teamwork Study: enhancing the role of non-GP staff in chronic disease management in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, D A; Taggart, J; Jayasinghe, U W; Proudfoot, J; Crookes, P; Beilby, J; Powell-Davis, G; Wilson, L A; Harris, M F

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence for a team-based approach in the management of chronic disease in primary health care. However, the standard of care is variable, probably reflecting the limited organisational capacity of health services to provide the necessary structured and organised care for this group of patients. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a structured intervention involving non-GP staff in GP practices on the quality of care for patients with diabetes or cardiovascular disease. A cluster randomised trial was undertaken across 60 GP practices. The intervention was implemented in 30 practices with staff and patients interviewed at baseline and at 12-15 months follow up. The change in team roles was evaluated using a questionnaire completed by practice staff. The quality of care was evaluated using the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care questionnaire. We found that although the team roles of staff improved in the intervention practices and there were significant differences between practices, there was no significant difference between those in the intervention and control groups in patient-assessed quality of care after adjusting for baseline-level score and covariates at the 12-month follow up. Practice team roles were not significantly associated with change in Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care scores. Patients with multiple conditions were more likely to assess their quality of care to be better. Thus, although previous research has shown a cross-sectional association between team work and quality of care, we were unable to replicate these findings in the present study. These results may be indicative of insufficient time for organisational change to result in improved patient-assessed quality of care, or because non-GP staff roles were not sufficiently focussed on the aspects of care assessed. The findings provide important information for researchers when designing similar studies.

  5. Do We Need a Diet Therapy to Manage Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease in the Predialysis Period?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Kushnirenko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the criteria for diagnosis of chronic kidney disease and the feasibility of diet therapy in combination with keto-analogues of essential amino acids at predialysis stage. It is proved that additional administration to the patients with predialysis chronic kidney disease of keto-analogues of essential amino acids enhances the metabolic beneficial effects of low-protein diet, promotes normalization of the amino acid composition of the blood and correction of metabolic acidosis, supports the parameters of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism at an optimum level under reduced protein intake, slowing further progression of chronic kidney disease.

  6. Closing the loop in person-centered care: patient experiences of a chronic kidney disease self-management intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havas K

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Havas,1,2 Clint Douglas,1 Ann Bonner1–3 1School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, 2NHMRC Chronic Kidney Disease Centre for Research Excellence, University of Queensland, 3Kidney Health Service, Metro North Hospital and Health Service, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Purpose: The provision of self-management support (SMS for people with earlier stages (1–4 of chronic kidney disease (CKD can improve patient outcomes and extend time to dialysis. However, attempts to deliver such support have often not taken patient preferences into account. After the development, implementation, and quantitative evaluation of the person-centered CKD-SMS intervention, the aim of this study was to investigate participant experiences and perceptions of the program, as well as to seek suggestions to improve future SMS attempts.Patients and methods: Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted with almost all (63/66 participants in the CKD-SMS. Deductive categories were derived from previous research into self-management from the CKD patient’s perspective, and this was supplemented by categories that emerged inductively during multiple readings of interview transcripts. Content analysis was used to analyze interview data.Results: Participants recognized self-management of CKD as complex and multifaceted. They felt that the CKD-SMS helped them develop skills to engage in necessary self-management tasks, as well as their knowledge about their condition and confidence to take an active role in their healthcare. These participants experience a healthcare environment that is characterized by complexity and inconsistency, and participation in the intervention helped them to navigate it. The benefit of participating in this research to contribute to the scientific literature was also recognized by participants. Overall, participants found the CKD-SMS useful in its current format, and made some suggestions for future interventions

  7. Dissemination of Chronic Disease Self-Management Education (CDSME) Programs in the United States: Intervention Delivery by Rurality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Towne, Samuel D; Herrera-Venson, Angelica; Cameron, Kathleen; Kulinski, Kristie P; Lorig, Kate; Horel, Scott A; Ory, Marcia G

    2017-06-14

    Background : Alongside the dramatic increase of older adults in the United States (U.S.), it is projected that the aging population residing in rural areas will continue to grow. As the prevalence of chronic diseases and multiple chronic conditions among adults continues to rise, there is additional need for evidence-based interventions to assist the aging population to improve lifestyle behaviors, and self-manage their chronic conditions. The purpose of this descriptive study was to identify the geospatial dissemination of Chronic Disease Self-Management Education (CDSME) Programs across the U.S. in terms of participants enrolled, workshops delivered, and counties reached. These dissemination characteristics were compared across rurality designations (i.e., metro areas; non-metro areas adjacent to metro areas, and non-metro areas not adjacent to metro areas). Methods : This descriptive study analyzed data from a national repository including efforts from 83 grantees spanning 47 states from December 2009 to December 2016. Counts were tabulated and averages were calculated. Results : CDSME Program workshops were delivered in 56.4% of all U.S. counties one or more times during the study period. Of the counties where a workshop was conducted, 50.5% were delivered in non-metro areas. Of the 300,640 participants enrolled in CDSME Programs, 12% attended workshops in non-metro adjacent areas, and 7% attended workshops in non-metro non-adjacent areas. The majority of workshops were delivered in healthcare organizations, senior centers/Area Agencies on Aging, and residential facilities. On average, participants residing in non-metro areas had better workshop attendance and retention rates compared to participants in metro areas. Conclusions : Findings highlight the established role of traditional organizations/entities within the aging services network, to reach remote areas and serve diverse participants (e.g., senior centers). To facilitate growth in rural areas

  8. Dissemination of Chronic Disease Self-Management Education (CDSME Programs in the United States: Intervention Delivery by Rurality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Lee Smith

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alongside the dramatic increase of older adults in the United States (U.S., it is projected that the aging population residing in rural areas will continue to grow. As the prevalence of chronic diseases and multiple chronic conditions among adults continues to rise, there is additional need for evidence-based interventions to assist the aging population to improve lifestyle behaviors, and self-manage their chronic conditions. The purpose of this descriptive study was to identify the geospatial dissemination of Chronic Disease Self-Management Education (CDSME Programs across the U.S. in terms of participants enrolled, workshops delivered, and counties reached. These dissemination characteristics were compared across rurality designations (i.e., metro areas; non-metro areas adjacent to metro areas, and non-metro areas not adjacent to metro areas. Methods: This descriptive study analyzed data from a national repository including efforts from 83 grantees spanning 47 states from December 2009 to December 2016. Counts were tabulated and averages were calculated. Results: CDSME Program workshops were delivered in 56.4% of all U.S. counties one or more times during the study period. Of the counties where a workshop was conducted, 50.5% were delivered in non-metro areas. Of the 300,640 participants enrolled in CDSME Programs, 12% attended workshops in non-metro adjacent areas, and 7% attended workshops in non-metro non-adjacent areas. The majority of workshops were delivered in healthcare organizations, senior centers/Area Agencies on Aging, and residential facilities. On average, participants residing in non-metro areas had better workshop attendance and retention rates compared to participants in metro areas. Conclusions: Findings highlight the established role of traditional organizations/entities within the aging services network, to reach remote areas and serve diverse participants (e.g., senior centers. To facilitate growth in rural

  9. Challenges in personalised management of chronic diseases-heart failure as prominent example to advance the care process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner-La Rocca, Hans-Peter; Fleischhacker, Lutz; Golubnitschaja, Olga; Heemskerk, Frank; Helms, Thomas; Hoedemakers, Thom; Allianses, Sandra Huygen; Jaarsma, Tiny; Kinkorova, Judita; Ramaekers, Jan; Ruff, Peter; Schnur, Ivana; Vanoli, Emilio; Verdu, Jose; Zippel-Schultz, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diseases are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Europe, accounting for more than 2/3 of all death causes and 75 % of the healthcare costs. Heart failure is one of the most prominent, prevalent and complex chronic conditions and is accompanied with multiple other chronic diseases. The current approach to care has important shortcomings with respect to diagnosis, treatment and care processes. A critical aspect of this situation is that interaction between stakeholders is limited and chronic diseases are usually addressed in isolation. Health care in Western countries requires an innovative approach to address chronic diseases to provide sustainability of care and to limit the excessive costs that may threaten the current systems. The increasing prevalence of chronic diseases combined with their enormous economic impact and the increasing shortage of healthcare providers are among the most critical threats. Attempts to solve these problems have failed, and future limitations in financial resources will result in much lower quality of care. Thus, changing the approach to care for chronic diseases is of utmost social importance.

  10. Systematic review of management strategies to control chronic wasting disease in wild deer populations in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehlinger, F D; Johnston, A C; Bollinger, T K; Waldner, C L

    2016-08-22

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a contagious, fatal prion disease affecting cervids in a growing number of regions across North America. Projected deer population declines and concern about potential spread of CWD to other species warrant strategies to manage this disease. Control efforts to date have been largely unsuccessful, resulting in continuing spread and increasing prevalence. This systematic review summarizes peer-reviewed published reports describing field-applicable CWD control strategies in wild deer populations in North America using systematic review methods. Ten databases were searched for peer-reviewed literature. Following deduplication, relevance screening, full-text appraisal, subject matter expert review and qualitative data extraction, nine references were included describing four distinct management strategies. Six of the nine studies used predictive modeling to evaluate control strategies. All six demonstrated one or more interventions to be effective but results were dependant on parameters and assumptions used in the model. Three found preferential removal of CWD infected deer to be effective in reducing CWD prevalence; one model evaluated a test and slaughter strategy, the other selective removal of infected deer by predators and the third evaluated increased harvest of the sex with highest prevalence (males). Three models evaluated non-selective harvest of deer. There were only three reports that examined primary data collected as part of observational studies. Two of these studies supported the effectiveness of intensive non-selective culling; the third study did not find a difference between areas that were subjected to culling and those that were not. Seven of the nine studies were conducted in the United States. This review highlights the paucity of evaluated, field-applicable control strategies for CWD in wild deer populations. Knowledge gaps in the complex epidemiology of CWD and the intricacies inherent to prion diseases currently

  11. Quality Improvement Initiatives to Optimize the Management of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Patients With Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digby, Geneviève C; Robinson, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    Patients with lung cancer (LC) frequently have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the optimization of which improves outcomes. A 2014 Queen's University Hospitals audit demonstrated that COPD was underdiagnosed and undertreated in outpatients with LC. We sought to improve the diagnosis and management of COPD in this population. We implemented change using a Define/Measure/Analyze/Improve/Control (DMAIC) improvement cycle. Data were obtained by chart review from the Cancer Care Ontario database and e-Patient System for patients with newly diagnosed LC, including patient characteristics, pulmonary function test (PFT) data, and bronchodilator therapies. Improvement cycle 1 included engaging stakeholders and prioritizing COPD management by respirologists in the Lung Diagnostic Assessment Program. Improvement cycle 2 included physician restructuring and developing a standard work protocol. Data were analyzed monthly and presented on statistical process control P-charts, which assessed differences over time. The χ 2 and McNemar tests assessed for significance between independent and dependent groups, respectively. A total of 477 patients were studied (165 patients at baseline, 166 patients in cycle 1, and 127 patients in cycle 2). There was no change in PFT completion over time, although respirology-managed patients were significantly more likely to undergo a PFT than patients who were not managed by respirology (56.7% v 96.1%; P managed patients with LC with airflow obstruction receiving inhaled bronchodilator significantly increased (baseline, 46.3%; cycle 1, 51.0%; and cycle 2, 74.3%). By cycle 2, patients with airflow obstruction were more likely to receive a long-acting bronchodilator if managed by respirology (74.3% v 44.8%; P = .0009). COPD is underdiagnosed and undertreated in outpatients with LC. A DMAIC quality improvement strategy emphasizing COPD treatment during LC evaluation in the Lung Diagnostic Assessment Program significantly improved COPD

  12. 'The apple doesn't fall far from the tree': the role of parents in chronic disease self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrell-Valente, Joan K; Cabana, Michael D

    2008-12-01

    Medical nonadherence has been termed the "Achilles' heel of modern healthcare." In considering the need to improve medical adherence among chronically ill children, it is necessary to understand parent adherence. Parents have long been acknowledged to be the primary socialization agents in children's development across the various domains of functioning. Through communication of their beliefs, the behavior they model, and direct training, parents exert a powerful influence on the development of children's beliefs and behavior. Adherence may be similarly conceptualized as a socialization process, in which parents influence the development of children's beliefs and behavior regarding their eventual disease self-management. Given this perspective, it is important for clinicians to emphasize the need for parental adherence to a child's treatment regimen. An increased focus on parental adherence will require an investment of time and effort that will pay dividends in the long term.

  13. DIABCARE Quality Network in Europe--a model for quality management in chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwernetz, K

    2001-04-01

    The DIABCARE Q-Net project developed a complete and integrated information technology system to monitor diabetes care, according to the gold standards of the St Vincent Declaration Action Program. This is the first Telematic platform for standardized documentation on medical quality and evaluation across Europe, which will serve as a model for other chronic diseases. Quality development starts from the comparison of diabetes services, based on the key data on diabetes care in the basic information sheet. This is a 141 field form, which is to be completed once a year for each patient under the care of the diabetes team. The system performs an analysis of the local data and compares the data with peer teams by means of telecommunication of anonymous data. These data are collected regionally. At the next level these regional data are compared on a national basis across Europe using dedicated communication lines. National data can be compared transnationally by the use of the Internet and the DIABCARE benchmarking servers. These different lines are used according to the necessary security standards. Medical data are transferred via dedicated lines, aggregated data via the Internet. The architecture follows the open-platform concept in order to allow for heterogeneous technical environments. Already at the start of the project, the necessity for expanding the quality approach to telemedicine methodology was identified and included. For each level, specific programs are available to improve the performance of diabetes care delivery: DIABCARE data as client and DIABCARE server as regional and DIABCARE 'international server' as transnational server. Functioning pilots were established across all levels. The clients have been linked to the servers on a routine basis. According to the open architecture design, the various countries decided on different systems at the entry point: full system--Portugal; fax systems--Italy, Bavaria; implementation into doctor's office systems

  14. Clinical management practices adopted by physiotherapists in India for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A national survey

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    Aripta Jingar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Evidence supports the use of pulmonary rehabilitation in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients both during acute exacerbation and at later stages. It is used in India; but, to date, there has been no study that has investigated the structure of pulmonary rehabilitation programs for COPD patients in India. The recent study aims to determine the current practice patterns of Indian Physiotherapists for COPD patients admitted in Intensive Care Units (ICUs and wards in terms of assessment and treatment. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire-based survey was conducted across India. Questionnaires were distributed to around 800 physiotherapists via E-mail. Physiotherapists with a Master Degree and a specialization in cardiopulmonary science or a minimum of 1 year of experience in treating cardiopulmonary patients were included. The questionnaires addressed assessment measures and treatment techniques given to COPD patients. Results: A total of 342 completed questionnaires were received, yielding a response rate of 43.8%, with a majority of responses from Karnataka, Maharashtra and Gujarat. The assessment and treatment techniques used were almost similar between ICUs and wards. More than 80% of the responders carried out the assessment of certain respiratory impairments in both ICUs and wards. An objective measure of dyspnea was taken by less than 40% of the responders, with little attention given to functional exercise capacity and health-related quality of life. Eighty-five percent of the responders used Dyspnea-relieving strategies and traditional airway clearance techniques in both ICUs and wards. Eighty-three percent of the responders were giving patients in the wards training for upper and lower extremity. Fifty percent were giving strength training in the wards. Conclusion: Whether patients are admitted in ICUs or Wards, the practice pattern adopted by Physiotherapists to treat them vary

  15. Effect of a rehabilitation-based chronic disease management program targeting severe COPD exacerbations on readmission patterns

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    Lalmolda C

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available C Lalmolda,1–3 R Coll-Fernández,4 N Martínez,1 M Baré,5 M Teixidó Colet,5 F Epelde,6 E Monsó1–3 On behalf of the COPD Multidisciplinary Management Group 1Respiratory Diseases Department, Hospital Universitari Parc Tauli, 2Ciber de Enfermedades Respiratorias – Ciberes, 3Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona – UAB, 4Rehabilitation Department, Hospital Universitari Parc Tauli, 5Primary Care Unit Vallés Occidental, Institut Català de la Salut, 6Short Stay Unit, Emergency Service, Hospital Universitari Parc Taulí, Barcelona, Spain Background: Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR is recommended after a severe COPD exacerbation, but its short- and long-term effects on health care utilization have not been fully established. Aims: The aims of this study were to evaluate patient compliance with a chronic disease management (CDM program incorporating home-based exercise training as the main component after a severe COPD exacerbation and to determine its effects on health care utilization in the following year. Materials and methods: COPD patients with a severe exacerbation were included in a case-cohort study at admission. An intervention group participated in a nurse-supervised CDM program during the 2 months after discharge, comprising of home-based PR with exercise components directly supervised by a physiotherapist, while the remaining patients followed usual care.Results: Nineteen of the twenty-one participants (90.5% were compliant with the CDM program and were compared with 29 usual-care patients. Compliance with the program was associated with statistically significant reductions in admissions due to respiratory disease in the following year (median [interquartile range]: 0 [0–1] vs 1 [0–2.5]; P=0.022 and in days of admission (0 [0–7] vs 7 [0–12]; P=0.034, and multiple linear regression analysis confirmed the protective effect of the CDM program (β coefficient -0.785, P=0.014, and R2=0.219.Conclusion: A CDM program incorporating

  16. [Safety and effectiveness of nicotinic acid in the management of patients with chronic renal disease and hyperlipidemia associated to hyperphosphatemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo Valencia, C A; Cruz, J

    2008-01-01

    To establish if the nicotinic acid in patients with chronic renal disease reduce significantly and with security the levels of lipids and serum phosphate in refractory patients to the classical management. Observational study Place: Renal Unity RTS Ltda Caldas Santa Sofìa Hospital. All the patients with chronic renal disease in dialysis therapy to whom the classical treatment for their hyperlipidaemia and hyperphosphatemia didn't manage a satisfactory reduce of their serum levels. It was identified that those patients who in the 3 previous months to the intervention hadn't presented changes in the lipids profile even though they received low fats diet and a lipid lowering therapies (statin o fibric acid derivates). It was determined in them whether they presented levels of serum phosphorus greater than 5.5 mg/dl even though having received nutritional recommendations and treatment with oral phosphate binding agents (Aluminum hydroxide, Calcium salts or Sevelamer). In them it was proceeded to administrate nicotinic acid via oral at night until a doses of 1,000 milligrams was reached (preceded of 100 mgs of acetylsalicylic acid 1 hour before) during a period of 8 months, observing its therapeutical effectivity and security profile to improve the lipids profile and reduce the serum phosphorus. 9 patients complied with the requirements, average time in dialysis 34 months, 3 in hemodialysis and 6 in peritoneal dialysis. All patients started with 500 mgs and 3 months later correctly tolerated the dose of 1,000 mgs. Between the evaluated variables, the most important changes were: the phosphorus reduced reaching a significant value at eight months: initial 6.46+/-0.53, four months 4.37+/-0.63 (p>0.05) and eight months 3.94+/-0.76 (padherence to the medicament 100%. The nicotinic acid is efficient, very well tolerated and economical in comparison with others drugs, which makes it ideal for the treatment of patients with hyperlipidaemia and refractory hyperphosphatemia to

  17. End User and Implementer Experiences of mHealth Technologies for Noncommunicable Chronic Disease Management in Young Adults: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Helen; Campbell, Jared M; Stinson, Jennifer N; Burley, Megan M; Briggs, Andrew M

    2017-12-12

    Chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) such as asthma, diabetes, cancer, and persistent musculoskeletal pain impose an escalating and unsustainable burden on young people, their families, and society. Exploring how mobile health (mHealth) technologies can support management for young people with NCDs is imperative. The aim of this study was to identify, appraise, and synthesize available qualitative evidence on users' experiences of mHealth technologies for NCD management in young people. We explored the perspectives of both end users (young people) and implementers (health policy makers, clinicians, and researchers). A systematic review and meta-synthesis of qualitative studies. Eligibility criteria included full reports published in peer-reviewed journals from January 2007 to December 2016, searched across databases including EMBASE, MEDLINE (PubMed), Scopus, and PsycINFO. All qualitative studies that evaluated the use of mHealth technologies to support young people (in the age range of 15-24 years) in managing their chronic NCDs were considered. Two independent reviewers identified eligible reports and conducted critical appraisal (based on the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument: JBI-QARI). Three reviewers independently, then collaboratively, synthesized and interpreted data through an inductive and iterative process to derive emergent themes across the included data. External validity checking was undertaken by an expert clinical researcher and for relevant content, a health policy expert. Themes were subsequently subjected to a meta-synthesis, with findings compared and contrasted between user groups and policy and practice recommendations derived. Twelve studies met our inclusion criteria. Among studies of end users (N=7), mHealth technologies supported the management of young people with diabetes, cancer, and asthma. Implementer studies (N=5) covered the management of cognitive and communicative disabilities, asthma

  18. The impact of the latest classification system of benign vulvar diseases on the management of women with chronic vulvar pruritus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiymet Handan Kelekci

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The management of women with chronic benign vulvar dermatoses has been one of the most difficult and challenging aspects of women′s healthcare for a long time. Aim: Our aim was to compare the ability to approach the specific diagnosis of nonneoplastic and noninfectious vulva diseases, between the new classification system and the old classification system. Methods: One hundred women with chronic vulvar pruritus were included in the study. After detailed examination of the vulva, all visible lesions were biopsied, with normal skin included. All specimens was sent for dermatopathology and examined simultaneously under a binocular microscope by two pathologists. Specific diagnosis if possible and histopathological findings were classified according to both the 1987 and 2006 International Society for the Study of Vulvar Diseases (ISSVD classifications. The ratios that were able to be approached on the specific diagnosis, with the aid the two classification systems, were compared. Results: Specific clinical diagnosis by both pathological and after using clinicopathological correlation was possible in 69 out of 91 patients (75.8% according to the 1987 ISSVD classification, and in 81 out of 91 patients (89.0% according to the ISSVD 2006 classification system. The difference in the clinical diagnosis ratios between the two classification systems was statistically significant ( P < 0.05. In a subgroup of women without specific diagnosis at the time of pathological examination, clinical diagnosis was made in 28 out of 50 women (56% after using the clinicopathological correlation according to the ISSVD 1987 classification, whereas, specific diagnosis was made in 39 out of 49 (79.6% women after using the clinicopathological correlation according to the ISSVD 2006 classification. The difference was statistically significant in terms of the ratio of the ability to achieve a specific diagnosis ( P < 0.01. Conclusion: ISSVD 2006 classification of

  19. The impact of cognitive impairment on self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Chelsea; Lovell, Janaka; Johnson, Marilyn; Shiell, Kerrie; Ibrahim, Joseph E

    2017-08-01

    To determine the characteristics of persons with cognitive impairment being able to self-manage in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidance this systematic review examined all studies in English from 1st January 2000 to 20 February 2016, describing the relationship between cognition and COPD self-management domains in older community dwelling persons with dementia or cognitive impairment. Of 4474 studies identified, thirteen studies were eligible for inclusion. No studies differentiated populations into recognized dementia subtypes. Study aims were variable; most (n = 7) examined inhaler competency alone. Studies identified a link between worsening cognition and the need for assistance in activities of daily living. Only one study evaluated the impact of cognition on overall self-management and found no association between cognitive impairment and self-rated self-management. Mild degrees of cognitive impairment were associated with reduced symptom recall. Cognitive impairment in COPD was associated with high degrees of inhaler incompetency. Basic cognitive screening tests were able to predict inhaler incompetence with reduced overall cognitive function, dyspraxia, and/or executive function identified as predictors of incompetency. Multiple measures of disability consistently demonstrated that cognitive impairment in COPD significantly increased the need for assistance in many aspects of daily living, treatment adherence, and effective self-management. Given the nature of neuropsychological deficits seen in COPD, dedicated screening tools are required. Future research should investigate the impact of cognitive dysfunction in COPD and identify how to support those that lack capacity to self-manage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Do We Need a Diet Therapy to Manage Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease in the Predialysis Period?

    OpenAIRE

    S.V. Kushnirenko

    2014-01-01

    The article examines the criteria for diagnosis of chronic kidney disease and the feasibility of diet therapy in combination with keto-analogues of essential amino acids at predialysis stage. It is proved that additional administration to the patients with predialysis chronic kidney disease of keto-analogues of essential amino acids enhances the metabolic beneficial effects of low-protein diet, promotes normalization of the amino acid composition of the blood and correction of metabolic acido...

  1. Can chronic disease management programs for patients with type 2 diabetes reduce productivity-related indirect costs of the disease? Evidence from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adepoju, Omolola E; Bolin, Jane N; Ohsfeldt, Robert L; Phillips, Charles D; Zhao, Hongwei; Ory, Marcia G; Forjuoh, Samuel N

    2014-04-01

    The objective was to assess the impacts of diabetes self-management programs on productivity-related indirect costs of the disease. Using an employer's perspective, this study estimated the productivity losses associated with: (1) employee absence on the job, (2) diabetes-related disability, (3) employee presence on the job, and (4) early mortality. Data were obtained from electronic medical records and survey responses of 376 adults aged ≥18 years who were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of type 2 diabetes self-management programs. All study participants had uncontrolled diabetes and were randomized into one of 4 study arms: personal digital assistant (PDA), chronic disease self-management program (CDSMP), combined PDA and CDSMP, and usual care (UC). The human-capital approach was used to estimate lost productivity resulting from 1, 2, 3, and 4 above, which are summed to obtain total productivity loss. Using robust regression, total productivity loss was modeled as a function of the diabetes self-management programs and other identified demographic and clinical characteristics. Compared to subjects in the UC arm, there were no statistically significant differences in productivity losses among persons undergoing any of the 3 diabetes management interventions. Males were associated with higher productivity losses (+$708/year; Pmanagement programs examined in this trial affect indirect productivity losses.

  2. The Green, Amber, Red Delineation of Risk and Need (GARDIAN) management system: a pragmatic approach to optimizing heart health from primary prevention to chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Melinda J; Kok, Simone; Jansen, Kiki; Stewart, Simon

    2013-08-01

    A sustained epidemic of cardiovascular disease and related risk factors is a global phenomenon contributing significantly to premature deaths and costly morbidity. Preventative strategies across the full continuum of life, from a population to individual perspective, are not optimally applied. This paper describes a simple and adaptable 'traffic-light' system we have developed to systematically perform individual risk and need delineation in order to 'titrate' the intensity and frequency of healthcare intervention in a cost-effective manner. The GARDIAN (Green Amber Red Delineation of Risk and Need) system is an individual assessment of risk and need that modulates the frequency and intensity of future healthcare intervention. Individual assessment of risk and need for ongoing intervention and support is determined with reference to three domains: (1) clinical stability, (2) gold-standard management, and (3) a broader, holistic assessment of individual circumstance. This can be applied from a primary prevention, secondary prevention, or chronic disease management perspective. Our experience with applying and validating GARDIAN to titrate healthcare resources according to need has been extensive to date, with >5000 individuals profiled in a host of clinical settings. A series of clinical randomized trials will determine the impact of the GARDIAN system on important indices of healthcare utilization and health status. The GARDIAN model to delineating risk and need for varied intensity of management shows strong potential to cost effectively improve health outcomes for both individuals at risk of heart disease and those with established heart disease.

  3. Team composition and chronic disease management within primary healthcare practices in eastern Ontario: an application of the Measuring Organizational Attributes of Primary Health Care Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukewich, Julia; Edge, Dana S; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth; Williamson, Tyler; Tranmer, Joan

    2018-04-15

    Various organizational-level attributes are being implemented in primary healthcare to improve healthcare delivery. There is a need to describe the distribution and nature of these attributes and explore differences across practices.AimThe aim of this study was to better understand organizational attributes of primary care teams, focusing specifically on team composition, nursing roles, and strategies that support chronic disease management. We employed a cross-sectional survey design. Team composition, nursing roles, availability of health services, and chronic disease management activities were described using the 'Measuring Organizational Attributes of Primary Health Care Survey.'FindingsA total of 76% (n=26 out of 34) of practice locations completed the survey, including family health teams (FHT; n=21) and community health centers (CHC; n=4). Nurse practitioners (NPs) and registered nurses (RNs) were the most common non-physician providers, and CHCs had a greater proportion of non-physician providers than FHTs. There was overlap in roles performed by NPs and RNs, and registered practical nurses engaged in fewer roles compared with NPs and RNs. A greater proportion of FHTs had systematic chronic disease management services for hypertension, depression and Alzheimer's disease compared with CHC practices. The 'Measuring Organizational Attributes of Primary Health Care Survey' was a useful tool to highlight variability in organizational attributes across PHC practices. Nurses are prominent within PHC practices, engaging in a wide range of roles related to chronic disease management, suggesting a need to better understand their contributions to patient care to optimize their roles.

  4. Diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-08-16

    Aug 16, 2007 ... chronic dialysis or transplantation due to significant extrarenal disease, mainly .... including coronary heart disease, silent myocardial ischaemia and left ... diabetics and should be kept in mind: • renal papillary necrosis.

  5. The Fertility Management Experiences of Australian Women with a Non-communicable Chronic Disease: Findings from the Understanding Fertility Management in Contemporary Australia Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Sara; Thananjeyan, Aberaami; Rowe, Heather; Kirkman, Maggie; Jordan, Lynne; McNamee, Kathleen; Bayly, Christine; McBain, John; Sinnott, Vikki; Fisher, Jane

    2018-06-01

    Introduction Despite the considerable and increasing proportion of women of reproductive age with a chronic non-communicable disease (NCD) and the potential adverse implications of many NCDs for childbearing, little is known about the fertility management experiences of women with an NCD, including their contraceptive use, pregnancy experiences and outcomes, and reproductive health care utilisation. The aim of this study was to investigate the fertility management experiences of women with an NCD and draw comparisons with women without an NCD. Method A sample of 18-50 year-old women (n = 1543) was randomly recruited from the Australian electoral roll in 2013. Of these women, 172 women reported a physical, chronic non-communicable disease: diabetes, arthritis, asthma, hypertension, heart disease, thyroid disorders, and cystic fibrosis. Respondents completed an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire. Factors associated with fertility management were identified in multivariable analyses. Results Women who reported having an NCD were significantly more likely than women who did not report an NCD to have ever been pregnant (75.9 vs. 67.5%, p = 0.034), have had an unintended pregnancy (33.47 vs. 25.5%, p = 0.026), and have had an abortion (20.3 vs. 14.2%, p = 0.044); they were less likely to consult a healthcare provider about fertility management (45.0 vs. 54.4%, p = 0.024). Similar proportions were using contraception (48.8 vs. 54.5%, p = 0.138). Conclusion The findings have implications for healthcare providers and women with an NCD and highlight the importance of addressing possible assumptions about the inability of women with an NCD to become pregnant, and ensuring women receive information about suitable methods of contraception and pre-pregnancy care.

  6. Dietary trends and management of hyperphosphatemia among patients with chronic kidney disease: an international survey of renal care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouque, Denis; Cruz Casal, Maria; Lindley, Elizabeth; Rogers, Susan; Pancířová, Jitka; Kernc, Jennifer; Copley, J Brian

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to review the opinions and experiences of renal care professionals to examine dietary trends among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and problems associated with the clinical management of hyperphosphatemia. This was an online survey comprising open and closed questions requesting information on patient dietary trends and the clinical management of hyperphosphatemia. The study was conducted in 4 European countries (the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom). Participants were 84 renal care professionals. This was an online survey. Responder-reported experiences and perceptions of patient dietary trends and hyperphosphatemia management were assessed. Most survey responders (56%) observed an increase in the consumption of processed convenience food, 48% noticed an increase in the consumption of foods rich in phosphorus-containing additives, and 60% believed that there has been a trend of increasing patient awareness of the phosphorus content of food. Patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) were most likely to experience difficulties in following advice on dietary phosphorus restriction (38% of responders estimated that 25-50% of their patients experienced difficulties, and 29% estimated that 51-75% experienced difficulties). Maintaining protein intake and restricting dietary phosphorus were perceived as being equally important by at least half of responders for predialysis patients (56%) and for those undergoing peritoneal dialysis and HD (54% and 50%, respectively). There were international variations in dietary trends and hyperphosphatemia management. Although most responders have observed a trend of increasing awareness of the phosphorus content of food among patients with CKD, the survey results indicate that many patients continue to experience difficulties when attempting to restrict dietary phosphorus. The survey responses reflect the global trend of increasing consumption of processed convenience foods and

  7. Self-management in patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease is associated with incremental benefit in HRQOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbudzi, Edward; Lo, Clement; Ranasinha, Sanjeeva; Kerr, Peter G; Usherwood, Timothy; Cass, Alan; Fulcher, Gregory R; Zoungas, Sophia

    2017-02-01

    There is insufficient and inconsistent data regarding the association between diabetes self-management, the process of facilitating the knowledge, skill, and ability necessary for diabetes self-care, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in people with diabetes and moderate to severe chronic kidney disease (CKD). In a cross sectional study, participation in diabetes self-management assessed by the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA) questionnaire and HRQOL was examined in 308 patients with diabetes and CKD (stages 3 to 5) recruited from outpatient diabetes and renal clinics of 4 public tertiary hospitals. Associations were examined by Pearson correlation coefficients and hierarchical multiple regression after controlling for potential confounders. An examination of trend across the levels of patient participation in self-management was assessed using a non-parametric test for trend. The median age and interquartile range (IQR) of patients were 68 and 14.8years, respectively with 59% of the population being over 65years old and 69.5% male. The median durations of diabetes and CKD were 18years (IQR-17) and 5years (IQR-8) respectively. General diet, exercise and medication taking were positively associated with at least one HRQOL subscale (all pdiabetes specific diet, blood sugar testing and foot checking were not. As levels of participation in self-management activities increased there was a graded increase in mean HRQOL scores across all subscales (p for trend diabetes and moderate to severe CKD, participation in diabetes self-management activities, particularly those focused on general diet, exercise and medication taking, was associated with higher HRQOL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cysts Solitary Kidney Your Kidneys & How They Work Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which the body ... function as well as they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs ...

  9. Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Angela C; Nagler, Evi V; Morton, Rachael L; Masson, Philip

    2017-03-25

    The definition and classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) have evolved over time, but current international guidelines define this condition as decreased kidney function shown by glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of less than 60 mL/min per 1·73 m 2 , or markers of kidney damage, or both, of at least 3 months duration, regardless of the underlying cause. Diabetes and hypertension are the main causes of CKD in all high-income and middle-income countries, and also in many low-income countries. Incidence, prevalence, and progression of CKD also vary within countries by ethnicity and social determinants of health, possibly through epigenetic influence. Many people are asymptomatic or have non-specific symptoms such as lethargy, itch, or loss of appetite. Diagnosis is commonly made after chance findings from screening tests (urinary dipstick or blood tests), or when symptoms become severe. The best available indicator of overall kidney function is GFR, which is measured either via exogenous markers (eg, DTPA, iohexol), or estimated using equations. Presence of proteinuria is associated with increased risk of progression of CKD and death. Kidney biopsy samples can show definitive evidence of CKD, through common changes such as glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, and interstitial fibrosis. Complications include anaemia due to reduced production of erythropoietin by the kidney; reduced red blood cell survival and iron deficiency; and mineral bone disease caused by disturbed vitamin D, calcium, and phosphate metabolism. People with CKD are five to ten times more likely to die prematurely than they are to progress to end stage kidney disease. This increased risk of death rises exponentially as kidney function worsens and is largely attributable to death from cardiovascular disease, although cancer incidence and mortality are also increased. Health-related quality of life is substantially lower for people with CKD than for the general population, and falls as GFR

  10. Attachment in medical care: A review of the interpersonal model in chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Xavier F

    2017-03-01

    Objective Patient-physician interaction is continually examined in an era prioritizing patient-centered approaches, yet elaboration beyond aspects of communication and empathy is lacking. Major chronic conditions would benefit tremendously from understanding interpersonal aspects of patient-physician encounters. This review intends to provide a concise introduction to the interpersonal model of attachment theory and how it informs both the patient-physician interaction and medical outcomes in chronic care. Methods A narrative review of the theoretical, neurobiological, epidemiological, investigational, and clinical literature on attachment theory and its impact on medical outcomes was conducted, utilizing a variety of key words as searched on PubMed database. Studies and reviews included were of a variety of