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Sample records for chronic cyclosporine nephrotoxicity

  1. Nephrotoxicity of cyclosporin A and contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, H.S.; Larsen, S.; Skaarup, P.; Hemmingsen, L.; Dieperink, H.; Golman, K.; Herlev Hospital; Herlev Hospital; Centralsygehuset, Nykoebing Falster; Odense Sygehus; Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus

    1989-01-01

    Urine profiles (albumin, glucose, NAG, LDH, GGT and sodium) were followed for 22 h or 8 days after intravenous injection of diatrizoate, iohexol or saline in 30 adult Wistar rats in which nephrotoxicity was induced by daily peroral administration of 25 mg/kg body weight cyclosporin A over a 14-day period. Another 10 rats which had the vehicle of the cyclosporin A solution (placebo) and saline injected intravenously served as controls. The effect of iohexol and saline on the albumin excretion was similar, whereas diatrizoate increased it significantly. Both contrast media caused significantly increased excretion of all three enzymes. The contrast media had no effect on the excretion of glucose and sodium. Except for the fact that the excretion of NAG was significantly higher following iohexol than following diatrizoate 24 to 46 h after injection no significant differences between the two media were found from 24 h after injection among the rats given cyclosporin A. No contrast medium related changes were found by light microscopy of the kidneys. Neither iohexol nor diatrizoate potentiate acute cyclosporin A nephrotoxicity. (orig.)

  2. Exposure to nerve growth factor worsens nephrotoxic effect induced by Cyclosporine A in HK-2 cells.

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    Donatella Vizza

    Full Text Available Nerve growth factor is a neurotrophin that promotes cell growth, differentiation, survival and death through two different receptors: TrkA(NTR and p75(NTR. Nerve growth factor serum concentrations increase during many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, glomerulonephritis, chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease and, particularly, in renal transplant. Considering that nerve growth factor exerts beneficial effects in the treatment of major central and peripheral neurodegenerative diseases, skin and corneal ulcers, we asked whether nerve growth factor could also exert a role in Cyclosporine A-induced graft nephrotoxicity. Our hypothesis was raised from basic evidence indicating that Cyclosporine A-inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT pathway increases nerve growth factor expression levels. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of nerve growth factor and its receptors in the damage exerted by Cyclosporine A in tubular renal cells, HK-2. Our results showed that in HK-2 cells combined treatment with Cyclosporine A + nerve growth factor induced a significant reduction in cell vitality concomitant with a down-regulation of Cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p21 levels respect to cells treated with Cyclosporine A alone. Moreover functional experiments showed that the co-treatment significantly up-regulated human p21promoter activity by involvement of the Sp1 transcription factor, whose nuclear content was negatively regulated by activated NFATc1. In addition we observed that the combined exposure to Cyclosporine A + nerve growth factor promoted an up-regulation of p75 (NTR and its target genes, p53 and BAD leading to the activation of intrinsic apoptosis. Finally, the chemical inhibition of p75(NTR down-regulated the intrinsic apoptotic signal. We describe two new mechanisms by which nerve growth factor promotes growth arrest and apoptosis in tubular renal cells exposed to Cyclosporine A.

  3. Nephrotoxicity of cyclosporin A in patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Jensen, T; Dieperink, H

    1990-01-01

    Renal function was studied in 18 patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. All were participating in the Canadian-European randomized placebo-controlled cyclosporin trial in newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetic patients, nine being randomized to placebo, and nine to cyclosporin A. During treatment for 12...... corrected for differences in blood glucose control it appeared that in three out of nine patients glomerular filtration rate had not completely returned to the reference range of the placebo group. We conclude that the nephrotoxic side-effects of cyclosporin A treatment for 1 year are reversible. There are...

  4. Identification of novel indicators of cyclosporine A nephrotoxicity in a CD-1 mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, Sein; Slattery, Craig; Ryan, Michael P.; McMorrow, Tara

    2011-01-01

    The calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) is a widely used immunosuppressive agent. However, nephrotoxicity is a serious side effect observed in patients which limits clinical use of CsA. CsA nephrotoxicity is associated with tubulointerstitial injury progressing to nephropathy. This is typically diagnosed by invasive renal biopsy and is often only detected when the disease process is well advanced. Therefore identification of novel, early indicators of CsA nephrotoxicity could be clinically advantageous. This study aimed to establish a murine model of CsA nephrotoxicity and to identify urinary proteins that may indicate the onset of CsA-induced nephropathy using 2-D gel electrophoresis. CsA nephrotoxicity was induced in CD-1 mice by daily CsA administration for 4 weeks. By week 4, elevated serum creatinine and proteinuria were observed after CsA treatment indicating significant renal dysfunction. Decreased cadherin-1, increased α-smooth muscle actin and fibroblast specific protein 1 in kidney tissue indicated disruption of normal tubular architecture. Alterations in podocin and uromodulin were also observed which may indicate damage to other segments of the nephron. Proteomic analysis of urine identified a number of differentially regulated proteins that may be involved in early CsA nephropathy including cadherin 1, superoxide dismutase and vinculin. These findings suggest novel mechanisms of CsA nephrotoxicity and identify novel potential markers of the disease.

  5. Endothelin-1 receptor antagonists protect the kidney against the nephrotoxicity induced by cyclosporine-A in normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caires, A; Fernandes, G S; Leme, A M; Castino, B; Pessoa, E A; Fernandes, S M; Fonseca, C D; Vattimo, M F; Schor, N; Borges, F T

    2017-12-11

    Cyclosporin-A (CsA) is an immunosuppressant associated with acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease. Nephrotoxicity associated with CsA involves the increase in afferent and efferent arteriole resistance, decreased renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Endothelin-1 (ET-1) receptor blockade with bosentan (BOS) and macitentan (MAC) antagonists on altered renal function induced by CsA in normotensive and hypertensive animals. Wistar and genetically hypertensive rats (SHR) were separated into control group, CsA group that received intraperitoneal injections of CsA (40 mg/kg) for 15 days, CsA+BOS and CsA+MAC that received CsA and BOS (5 mg/kg) or MAC (25 mg/kg) by gavage for 15 days. Plasma creatinine and urea, mean arterial pressure (MAP), RBF and renal vascular resistance (RVR), and immunohistochemistry for ET-1 in the kidney cortex were measured. CsA decreased renal function, as shown by increased creatinine and urea. There was a decrease in RBF and an increase in MAP and RVR in normotensive and hypertensive animals. These effects were partially reversed by ET-1 antagonists, especially in SHR where increased ET-1 production was observed in the kidney. Most MAC effects were similar to BOS, but BOS seemed to be better at reversing cyclosporine-induced changes in renal function in hypertensive animals. The results of this work suggested the direct participation of ET-1 in renal hemodynamics changes induced by cyclosporin in normotensive and hypertensive rats. The antagonists of ET-1 MAC and BOS reversed part of these effects.

  6. Endothelin-1 receptor antagonists protect the kidney against the nephrotoxicity induced by cyclosporine-A in normotensive and hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Caires

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyclosporin-A (CsA is an immunosuppressant associated with acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease. Nephrotoxicity associated with CsA involves the increase in afferent and efferent arteriole resistance, decreased renal blood flow (RBF and glomerular filtration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Endothelin-1 (ET-1 receptor blockade with bosentan (BOS and macitentan (MAC antagonists on altered renal function induced by CsA in normotensive and hypertensive animals. Wistar and genetically hypertensive rats (SHR were separated into control group, CsA group that received intraperitoneal injections of CsA (40 mg/kg for 15 days, CsA+BOS and CsA+MAC that received CsA and BOS (5 mg/kg or MAC (25 mg/kg by gavage for 15 days. Plasma creatinine and urea, mean arterial pressure (MAP, RBF and renal vascular resistance (RVR, and immunohistochemistry for ET-1 in the kidney cortex were measured. CsA decreased renal function, as shown by increased creatinine and urea. There was a decrease in RBF and an increase in MAP and RVR in normotensive and hypertensive animals. These effects were partially reversed by ET-1 antagonists, especially in SHR where increased ET-1 production was observed in the kidney. Most MAC effects were similar to BOS, but BOS seemed to be better at reversing cyclosporine-induced changes in renal function in hypertensive animals. The results of this work suggested the direct participation of ET-1 in renal hemodynamics changes induced by cyclosporin in normotensive and hypertensive rats. The antagonists of ET-1 MAC and BOS reversed part of these effects.

  7. Clinical efficiency of cyclosporine in chronic idiopathic urticaria in adults

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    V.I. Petrov

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of cyclosporine and other antihistamines in patients with chronic forms of urticaria resistant to basic first-line therapy. Open randomized controlled study has been performed in parallel groups. 53 patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria ages 18-50 years have been examined. In case of ineffectiveness of previous therapy, patients have been randomized into 2 groups: group I receiving cyclosporine (Sandimmune Neoral ® 2,5 mg/kg/day, group II receiving cetirizine (Zyrtec ® 10 mg/day and ranitidine (Zantac ® 300 mg/day orally. It has been found that the administration of cyclosporine in patients with severe chronic idiopathic urticaria provides a more rapid achievement of clinical effect than the therapy with H1/H2 histamine antagonists. It is confirmed by a significant decrease of total index of severity of illness and major symptoms of skin lesions. This tendency towards normalization of quality of life of patients taking cyclosporine remains during 8 weeks after the medication. Thus administration of cyclosporine can be considered as therapy of choice in patients with chronic idio-pathic urticaria with a severe course and ineffective long-term therapy with antihistamines / systemic corticosteroids

  8. Cyclosporine nephrotoxicity in type 1 diabetic patients. A 7-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Tarnow, L; Nielsen, F S

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate kidney function 7 years after the end of treatment with cyclosporine A (CsA) (initial dosage of 9.3 tapered off to 7.0 mg.kg-1.day-1) in young patients (mean age 20 years) with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes participating in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Cs...... of study medication, two CsA group patients and one control patient were lost to follow-up. One placebo-treated patient developed IgA nephropathy (biopsy proven) and was excluded. Four CsA-treated patients developed persistently elevated UAER > 30 mg/24 h (n = 3 with microalbuminuria), whereas all the 17...... randomly selected CsA-treated patients had a kidney biopsy performed shortly after the CsA treatment was stopped. Interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy and/or arteriolopathy were present in two subjects who both subsequently developed persistent microalbuminuria. CONCLUSIONS: The results of our 7-year...

  9. Murine nephrotoxic nephritis as a model of chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ougaard, M. K.E.; Kvist, P. H.; Jensen, H. E.

    2018-01-01

    Using the nonaccelerated murine nephrotoxic nephritis (NTN) as a model of chronic kidney disease (CKD) could provide an easily inducible model that enables a rapid test of treatments. Originally, the NTN model was developed as an acute model of glomerulonephritis, but in this study we evaluate...... progressive mesangial expansion and significant renal fibrosis within three weeks suggesting CKD development. CD1 and C57BL/6 females showed a similar disease progression, but female mice seemed more susceptible to NTS compared to male mice. The presence of albuminuria, GFR decline, mesangial expansion...

  10. Biodegradable in situ gelling system for subcutaneous administration of ellagic acid and ellagic acid loaded nanoparticles: evaluation of their antioxidant potential against cyclosporine induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, G; Italia, J L; Sonaje, K; Tikoo, K; Ravi Kumar, M N V

    2007-03-12

    Ellagic acid (EA) is a potent antioxidant marketed as a nutritional supplement. Its pharmacological activity has been reported in wide variety of disease models; however its use has been limited owing to its poor biopharmaceutical properties, thereby poor bioavailability. The objective of the current study was to develop chitosan-glycerol phosphate (C-GP) in situ gelling system for sustained delivery of ellagic acid (EA) via subcutaneous route. EA was incorporated in the system employing propylene glycol (PG) and triethanolamine (TEA) as co-solvents; on the other hand EA loaded PLGA nanoparticles (np) were dispersed in the gelling system using water. These in situ gelling systems were thoroughly characterized for mechanical, rheological and swelling properties. These systems are liquid at room temperature and gels at 37 degrees C. The EA C-GP system showed an initial burst release in vitro with about 85% drug released in 12 h followed by a steady release till 160 h, on the other hand EA nanoparticles entrapped in the C-GP system displayed sustained release till 360 h. The histopathological analysis indicates the absence of inflammation on administration, suggesting that these formulations are safe during the studied period. Furthermore, the antioxidant potential of EA C-GP and EA np C-GP gels has been evaluated against cyclosporine induced nephrotoxicity in rats. The data indicates that formulations were effective against cyclosporine induced nephrotoxicity, where the EA C-GP gels showed activity at 10 times lower dose and the EA np C-GP gels at 150 times lower dose when compared to orally given EA. Formulating nanoparticles of EA and incorporating them in C-GP system results in 15 times lowering of dose in comparison EA C-GP gels which is quite significant. Together, these results indicate that the bioavailability of ellagic acid can be improved by subcutaneous formulations administered as simple EA or EA nps.

  11. Chronic pyelonephritis: Modulation of host defenses by cyclosporin A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findon, G.; Miller, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    Chronic experimental pyelonephritis is characterized by a stable level of infection, which persists for many months. Administration of cyclosporin A (CsA) reactivated previously healed renal lesions and caused a marked increase in bacterial numbers in the kidney. Studies were then carried out to compare the effects of CsA, and the nonselective cytodepletive agents irradiation and cyclophosphamide, on both host defenses and the bacteriologic status of chronically infected kidneys. Two different responses were observed. In animals treated with CsA, bacterial numbers increased markedly, although circulating neutrophil numbers were relatively unaffected. This observation was in contrast to the severe ablation of leukocyte numbers and competence needed to achieve an equivalent effect when irradiation and cyclophosphamide were used. One possible explanation for the adverse effect of CsA on the host-parasite balance in chronic pyelonephritis is that CsA affects mediators that control the inflammatory response or induces a qualitative change in a critical cellular defense compartment

  12. Cyclosporine A induces senescence in renal tubular epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jennings, Paul; Koppelstaetter, Christian; Aydin, Sonia; Abberger, Thomas; Wolf, Anna Maria; Mayer, Gert; Pfaller, Walter

    The nephrotoxic potential of the widely used immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine A (CsA) is well recognized. However, the mechanism of renal tubular toxicity is not yet fully elucidated. Chronic CsA nephropathy and renal organ aging share some clinical features, such as renal fibrosis and tubular

  13. Effect of nephrotoxic treatment with gentamicin on rats chronically exposed to uranium.

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    Rouas, Caroline; Stefani, Johanna; Grison, Stéphane; Grandcolas, Line; Baudelin, Cédric; Dublineau, Isabelle; Pallardy, Marc; Gueguen, Yann

    2011-01-11

    Uranium is a radioactive heavy metal with a predominantly chemical toxicity, affecting especially the kidneys and more particularly the proximal tubular structure. Until now, few experimental studies have examined the effect of chronic low-dose exposure to uranium on kidney integrity: these mainly analyse standard markers such as creatinine and urea, and none has studied the effect of additional co-exposure to a nephrotoxic agent on rats chronically exposed to uranium. The aim of the present study is to examine the potential cumulative effect of treating uranium-exposed rats with a nephrotoxic drug. Neither physiological indicators (diuresis and creatinine clearance) nor standard plasma and urine markers (creatinine, urea and total protein) levels were deteriorated when uranium exposure was combined with gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. A histological study confirmed the preferential impact of gentamicin on the tubular structure and showed that uranium did not aggravate the histopathological renal lesions. Finally, the use of novel markers of kidney toxicity, such as KIM-1, osteopontin and kallikrein, provides new knowledge about the nephrotoxicity threshold of gentamicin, and allows us to conclude that under our experimental conditions, low dose uranium exposure did not induce signs of nephrotoxicity or enhance renal sensitivity to another nephrotoxicant. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of nephrotoxic treatment with gentamicin on rats chronically exposed to uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouas, Caroline; Stefani, Johanna; Grison, Stephane; Grandcolas, Line; Baudelin, Cedric; Dublineau, Isabelle; Pallardy, Marc; Gueguen, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Uranium is a radioactive heavy metal with a predominantly chemical toxicity, affecting especially the kidneys and more particularly the proximal tubular structure. Until now, few experimental studies have examined the effect of chronic low-dose exposure to uranium on kidney integrity: these mainly analyse standard markers such as creatinine and urea, and none has studied the effect of additional co-exposure to a nephrotoxic agent on rats chronically exposed to uranium. The aim of the present study is to examine the potential cumulative effect of treating uranium-exposed rats with a nephrotoxic drug. Neither physiological indicators (diuresis and creatinine clearance) nor standard plasma and urine markers (creatinine, urea and total protein) levels were deteriorated when uranium exposure was combined with gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. A histological study confirmed the preferential impact of gentamicin on the tubular structure and showed that uranium did not aggravate the histopathological renal lesions. Finally, the use of novel markers of kidney toxicity, such as KIM-1, osteopontin and kallikrein, provides new knowledge about the nephrotoxicity threshold of gentamicin, and allows us to conclude that under our experimental conditions, low dose uranium exposure did not induce signs of nephrotoxicity or enhance renal sensitivity to another nephrotoxicant.

  15. Possible potassium chlorate nephrotoxicity associated with chronic matchstick ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurlow, John S; Little, Dustin J; Baker, Thomas P; Yuan, Christina M

    2013-06-01

    We present a case of a 48-year-old active duty male soldier with a history of chronic exposure to potassium chlorate, later diagnosed with chronic interstitial nephritis. He reported regular matchstick consumption to prevent chigger (Trombicula autumnalis) bites, amounting to ∼5.8 g of potassium chlorate over 3 years. Potassium chlorate can cause anuric renal failure within days of a toxic dose. Its slow excretion and mechanism of action suggest that renal toxicity may result from lower-dose chronic exposure. This case represents possible sequelae of chronic potassium chlorate ingestion.

  16. Possible potassium chlorate nephrotoxicity associated with chronic matchstick ingestion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurlow, John S.; Little, Dustin J.; Baker, Thomas P.; Yuan, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 48-year-old active duty male soldier with a history of chronic exposure to potassium chlorate, later diagnosed with chronic interstitial nephritis. He reported regular matchstick consumption to prevent chigger (Trombicula autumnalis) bites, amounting to ∼5.8 g of potassium chlorate over 3 years. Potassium chlorate can cause anuric renal failure within days of a toxic dose. Its slow excretion and mechanism of action suggest that renal toxicity may result from lower-dose chronic exposure. This case represents possible sequelae of chronic potassium chlorate ingestion. PMID:26064493

  17. Possible potassium chlorate nephrotoxicity associated with chronic matchstick ingestion*

    OpenAIRE

    Thurlow, John S.; Little, Dustin J.; Baker, Thomas P.; Yuan, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 48-year-old active duty male soldier with a history of chronic exposure to potassium chlorate, later diagnosed with chronic interstitial nephritis. He reported regular matchstick consumption to prevent chigger (Trombicula autumnalis) bites, amounting to ?5.8 g of potassium chlorate over 3 years. Potassium chlorate can cause anuric renal failure within days of a toxic dose. Its slow excretion and mechanism of action suggest that renal toxicity may result from lower-dose ...

  18. Management of a Dog with Poorly Regulated Diabetes Mellitus, Chronic Pancreatitis, and Suspected Atopy with Cyclosporine

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    Jörg M. Steiner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-and-9-months old male neutered Bichon Frise was presented for a second opinion for diabetes mellitus, weight loss, pruritus, and loss of hair. During further work-up, the dog was diagnosed with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and concurrent diagnoses of pancreatitis and atopy were also suspected. Multiple adjustments of insulin therapy did not improve control of diabetes mellitus. Also, a variety of different treatments failed to improve pruritus. The dog was seen by a veterinary dermatologist who further suspected atopy and started treatment with cyclosporine. Pruritus improved and coincidentally serum Spec cPL and fructosamine concentrations normalized after therapy, suggesting the possibility that cyclosporine may have controlled pancreatic inflammation and improved control of diabetes mellitus. This case report would suggest that further research into autoimmunity in dogs with chronic pancreatitis is warranted. Also, a controlled study is needed and in progress before the use of cyclosporine in dogs with chronic pancreatitis or a subgroup thereof can be advocated.

  19. Chronic Kidney Disease and Exposure to Nephrotoxic Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Sarah E.; Bridges, Christy C.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common progressive disease that is typically characterized by the permanent loss of functional nephrons. As injured nephrons become sclerotic and die, the remaining healthy nephrons undergo numerous structural, molecular, and functional changes in an attempt to compensate for the loss of diseased nephrons. These compensatory changes enable the kidney to maintain fluid and solute homeostasis until approximately 75% of nephrons are lost. As CKD continues to progress, glomerular filtration rate decreases, and remaining nephrons are unable to effectively eliminate metabolic wastes and environmental toxicants from the body. This inability may enhance mortality and/or morbidity of an individual. Environmental toxicants of particular concern are arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury. Since these metals are present throughout the environment and exposure to one or more of these metals is unavoidable, it is important that the way in which these metals are handled by target organs in normal and disease states is understood completely. PMID:28498320

  20. Protective Effect of Edaravone Against Cyclosporine-Induced Chronic Nephropathy Through Antioxidant and Nitric Oxide Modulating Pathways in Rats

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    Elahe Sattarinezhad

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cyclosporine A (CsA is an immunosuppressant with therapeutic indications in various immunological diseases; however, its use is associated with chronic nephropathy. Oxidative stress has a crucial role in CsA-induced nephrotoxicity. The present study evaluates the protective effect of edaravone on CsA-induced chronic nephropathy and investigates its antioxidant and nitric oxide modulating property. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=66 were distributed into nine groups, including a control (group 1 (n=7. Eight groups received CsA (15 mg/kg for 28 days while being treated. The groups were categorized as: •\tGroup 2: Vehicle (n=10 •\tGroups 3, 4, and 5: Edaravone (1, 5, and 10 mg/kg (n=7 each •\tGroup 6: Diphenyliodonium chloride, a specific endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS inhibitor (n=7 •\tGroup 7: Aminoguanidine, a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS inhibitor (n=7 •\tGroup 8: Edaravone (10 mg/kg plus diphenyliodonium chloride (n=7 •\tGroup 9: Edaravone (10 mg/kg plus aminoguanidine (n=7 Blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels, malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione reductase enzyme activities were measured using standard kits. Renal histopathological evaluations and measurements of eNOS and iNOS gene expressions by RT-PCR were also performed. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test (SPSS software version 18.0. Results: Edaravone (10 mg/kg significantly attenuated CsA-induced oxidative stress, renal dysfunction, and kidney tissue injury. Aminoguanidine improved the renoprotective effect of edaravone. Edaravone reduced the elevated mRNA level of iNOS, but could not alter the level of eNOS mRNA significantly. Conclusion: Edaravone protects against CsA-induced chronic nephropathy using antioxidant property and probably through inhibiting iNOS gene expression.

  1. Nephrotoxic contaminants in drinking water and urine, and chronic kidney disease in rural Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rango, Tewodros; Jeuland, Marc; Manthrithilake, Herath; McCornick, Peter

    2015-06-15

    Chronic kidney disease of unknown ("u") cause (CKDu) is a growing public health concern in Sri Lanka. Prior research has hypothesized a link with drinking water quality, but rigorous studies are lacking. This study assesses the relationship between nephrotoxic elements (namely arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and uranium (U)) in drinking water, and urine samples collected from individuals with and/or without CKDu in endemic areas, and from individuals without CKDu in nonendemic areas. All water samples - from a variety of source types (i.e. shallow and deep wells, springs, piped and surface water) - contained extremely low concentrations of nephrotoxic elements, and all were well below drinking water guideline values. Concentrations in individual urine samples were higher than, and uncorrelated with, those measured in drinking water, suggesting potential exposure from other sources. Mean urinary concentrations of these elements for individuals with clinically diagnosed CKDu were consistently lower than individuals without CKDu both in endemic and nonendemic areas. This likely stems from the inability of the kidney to excrete these toxic elements via urine in CKDu patients. Urinary concentrations of individuals were also found to be within the range of reference values measured in urine of healthy unexposed individuals from international biomonitoring studies, though these reference levels may not be safe for the Sri Lankan population. The results suggest that CKDu cannot be clearly linked with the presence of these contaminants in drinking water. There remains a need to investigate potential interactions of low doses of these elements (particularly Cd and As) with other risk factors that appear linked to CKDu, prior to developing public health strategies to address this illness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Nephrotoxic contaminants in drinking water and urine, and chronic kidney disease in rural Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rango, Tewodros; Jeuland, Marc; Manthrithilake, Herath; McCornick, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease of unknown (“u”) cause (CKDu) is a growing public health concern in Sri Lanka. Prior research has hypothesized a link with drinking water quality, but rigorous studies are lacking. This study assesses the relationship between nephrotoxic elements (namely arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and uranium (U)) in drinking water, and urine samples collected from individuals with and/or without CKDu in endemic areas, and from individuals without CKDu in nonendemic areas. All water samples – from a variety of source types (i.e. shallow and deep wells, springs, piped and surface water) – contained extremely low concentrations of nephrotoxic elements, and all were well below drinking water guideline values. Concentrations in individual urine samples were higher than, and uncorrelated with, those measured in drinking water, suggesting potential exposure from other sources. Mean urinary concentrations of these elements for individuals with clinically diagnosed CKDu were consistently lower than individuals without CKDu both in endemic and nonendemic areas. This likely stems from the inability of the kidney to excrete these toxic elements via urine in CKDu patients. Urinary concentrations of individuals were also found to be within the range of reference values measured in urine of healthy unexposed individuals from international biomonitoring studies, though these reference levels may not be safe for the Sri Lankan population. The results suggest that CKDu cannot be clearly linked with the presence of these contaminants in drinking water. There remains a need to investigate potential interactions of low doses of these elements (particularly Cd and As) with other risk factors that appear linked to CKDu, prior to developing public health strategies to address this illness. - Highlights: • Drinking water in rural Sri Lanka contains low levels of inorganic nephrotoxicants • Urinary nephrotoxicants are consistent with reference levels from

  3. Nephrotoxic contaminants in drinking water and urine, and chronic kidney disease in rural Sri Lanka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rango, Tewodros, E-mail: tg67@duke.edu [Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Jeuland, Marc [Sanford School of Public Policy and Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Institute of Water Policy, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Manthrithilake, Herath; McCornick, Peter [International Water Management Institute, Colombo (Sri Lanka)

    2015-06-15

    Chronic kidney disease of unknown (“u”) cause (CKDu) is a growing public health concern in Sri Lanka. Prior research has hypothesized a link with drinking water quality, but rigorous studies are lacking. This study assesses the relationship between nephrotoxic elements (namely arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and uranium (U)) in drinking water, and urine samples collected from individuals with and/or without CKDu in endemic areas, and from individuals without CKDu in nonendemic areas. All water samples – from a variety of source types (i.e. shallow and deep wells, springs, piped and surface water) – contained extremely low concentrations of nephrotoxic elements, and all were well below drinking water guideline values. Concentrations in individual urine samples were higher than, and uncorrelated with, those measured in drinking water, suggesting potential exposure from other sources. Mean urinary concentrations of these elements for individuals with clinically diagnosed CKDu were consistently lower than individuals without CKDu both in endemic and nonendemic areas. This likely stems from the inability of the kidney to excrete these toxic elements via urine in CKDu patients. Urinary concentrations of individuals were also found to be within the range of reference values measured in urine of healthy unexposed individuals from international biomonitoring studies, though these reference levels may not be safe for the Sri Lankan population. The results suggest that CKDu cannot be clearly linked with the presence of these contaminants in drinking water. There remains a need to investigate potential interactions of low doses of these elements (particularly Cd and As) with other risk factors that appear linked to CKDu, prior to developing public health strategies to address this illness. - Highlights: • Drinking water in rural Sri Lanka contains low levels of inorganic nephrotoxicants • Urinary nephrotoxicants are consistent with reference levels from

  4. Effects of cyclosporin A on a kidney epithelial cell line (LLC-PK1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, G M; Gandolfi, A J; Nagle, R B

    1987-05-01

    Cyclosporin A (CSA), a potent immunosuppressant with the adverse side effect of nephrotoxicity, inhibited cell growth of pig kidney tubule cells (LLC-PK1) in culture. CSA (10(-5) M) also induced intense cytoplasmic vacuolation and the formation of dense granules. At the same concentration an analogue of CSA, cyclosporin G, had much less effect. This cell line may prove useful for revealing the mechanism of CSA-nephrotoxicity and testing the nephrotoxic potential of new analogues of cyclosporine.

  5. N-acetylcysteine protects rats with chronic renal failure from gadolinium-chelate nephrotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Victor Barbosa Pereira

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Gd-chelate on renal function, iron parameters and oxidative stress in rats with CRF and a possible protective effect of the antioxidant N-Acetylcysteine (NAC. Male Wistar rats were submitted to 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx to induced CRF. An ionic-cyclic Gd (Gadoterate Meglumine was administrated (1.5 mM/KgBW, intravenously 21 days after Nx. Clearance studies were performed in 4 groups of anesthetized animals 48 hours following Gd- chelate administration: 1--Nx (n = 7; 2--Nx+NAC (n = 6; 3--Nx+Gd (n = 7; 4--Nx+NAC+Gd (4.8 g/L in drinking water, initiated 2 days before Gd-chelate administration and maintained during 4 days (n = 6. This group was compared with a control. We measured glomerular filtration rate, GFR (inulin clearance, ml/min/kg BW, proteinuria (mg/24 hs, serum iron (µg/dL; serum ferritin (ng/mL; transferrin saturation (%, TIBC (µg/dL and TBARS (nmles/ml. Normal rats treated with the same dose of Gd-chelate presented similar GFR and proteinuria when compared with normal controls, indicating that at this dose Gd-chelate is not nephrotoxic to normal rats. Gd-chelate administration to Nx-rats results in a decrease of GFR and increased proteinuria associated with a decrease in TIBC, elevation of ferritin serum levels, transferrin oversaturation and plasmatic TBARS compared with Nx-rats. The prophylactic treatment with NAC reversed the decrease in GFR and the increase in proteinuria and all alterations in iron parameters and TBARS induced by Gd-chelate. NAC administration to Nx rat did not modify the inulin clearance and iron kinetics, indicating that the ameliorating effect of NAC was specific to Gd-chelate. These results suggest that NAC can prevent Gd-chelate nephrotoxicity in patients with chronic renal failure.

  6. Effect of cyclosporine therapy in transplanted patients-diagnostic values of tubular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todor Gruev

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of cyclosporine A (CsA into the clinical practice has resulted in a major improvement in the short-term outcomes of solid organ transplantation and treatment of autoimune diseases. Chronic ScA nephrotoxicity has been described in kidneys of recepients of renal and other organ allografts. However, the exact mechanism underlying the development of fibrosis in chronic CsA nephrotoxicity has remained poorly understood. Evaluation with the validation data set showed that noninvasive urine protein differentiation might be a useful diagnostic strategy in nephrology. Over the past decade numerous studies in patients after transplantation have demonstrated that renal tubular cell injury after a toxic insult, results in sloughing of tubular debris and cell into the tubular lumen with eventual obstruction of tubular flow, increased intratubular pressure and backleak of glomerular filtrate out of the tubule. Urinary enzymes and low molecular proteins have been recommended as useful markers for the detection of changes in the kidney tissue in cases after renal transplantation. The aim of our study was to monitor the concentration and eventual nephrotoxic effect of Cyclosporine A using the concentration of low molecular proteins α-1-microglobulin and β−2-microglobulin, serum Cystatin C, as well as the concentration of isoform of GST-α and π.

  7. Cyclosporine Ophthalmic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... used to increase tear production in people with dry eye disease. Cyclosporine is in a class of medications ... Be sure to mention other eye drops for dry eye disease.if you are using artificial tears, instill ...

  8. Dosimetry considerations in the enhanced sensitivity of male Wistar rats to chronic ethylene glycol-induced nephrotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corley, R.A.; Wilson, D.M.; Hard, G.C.; Stebbins, K.E.; Bartels, M.J.; Soelberg, J.J.; Dryzga, M.D.; Gingell, R.; McMartin, K.E.; Snellings, W.M.

    2008-01-01

    Male Wistar rats have been shown to be the most sensitive sex, strain and species to ethylene glycol-induced nephrotoxicity in subchronic studies. A chronic toxicity and dosimetry study was therefore conducted in male Wistar rats administered ethylene glycol via the diet at 0, 50, 150, 300, or 400 mg/kg/day for up to twelve months. Subgroups of animals were included for metabolite analysis and renal clearance studies to provide a quantitative basis for extrapolating dose-response relationships from this sensitive animal model in human health risk assessments. Mortality occurred in 5 of 20 rats at 300 mg/kg/day (days 111-221) and 4 of 20 rats at 400 mg/kg/day (days 43-193), with remaining rats at this dose euthanized early (day 203) due to excessive weight loss. Increased water consumption and urine volume with decreased specific gravity occurred at 300 mg/kg/day presumably due to osmotic diuresis. Calculi (calcium oxalate crystals) occurred in the bladder or renal pelvis at ≥ 300 mg/kg/day. Rats dying early at ≥ 300 mg/kg/day had transitional cell hyperplasia with inflammation and hemorrhage of the bladder wall. Crystal nephropathy (basophilic foci, tubule or pelvic dilatation, birefringent crystals in the pelvic fornix, or transitional cell hyperplasia) affected most rats at 300 mg/kg/day, all at 400 mg/kg/day, but none at ≤ 150 mg/kg/day. No significant differences in kidney oxalate levels, the metabolite responsible for renal toxicity, were observed among control, 50 and 150 mg/kg/day groups. At 300 and 400 mg/kg/day, oxalate levels increased proportionally with the nephrotoxicity score supporting the oxalate crystal-induced nephrotoxicity mode of action. No treatment-related effects on the renal clearance of intravenously infused 3 H-inulin, a marker for glomerular filtration, and 14 C-oxalic acid were observed in rats surviving 12 months of exposure to ethylene glycol up to 300 mg/kg/day. In studies with naive male Wistar and F344 rats (a less sensitive

  9. The protective effect of vildagliptin in chronic experimental cyclosporine A-induced hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sherbeeny, Nagla A; Nader, Manar A

    2016-03-01

    The study examined the effect of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, vildagliptin, in cyclosporine (CsA)-induced hepatotoxicity. Rats were divided into 4 groups treated for 28 days: control (vehicle), vildagliptin (10 mg/kg, orally), CsA (20 mg/kg, s.c.), and CsA-vildagliptin group. Liver function was assessed by measuring serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), gamma glutamyltransferase (γGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and albumin, and histopathological changes of liver were examined. Oxidative stress markers were evaluated. Assessment of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity in hepatic nuclear extract, serum DPP-4, and expression of Bax and Bcl2 were also done. CsA-induced hepatotoxicity was evidenced by increase in serum levels of AST, ALT, and γGT; a decrease in serum albumin; and a significant alteration in hepatic architecture. Also, significant increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione (GSH) levels, increased expression Bax proteins with deceased expression of Bcl2, and increased hepatic activity of NF-κB and serum DPP-4 level were observed upon CsA treatment. Vildagliptin significantly improved all altered parameters induced by CsA administration. Vildagliptin has the potential to protect the liver against CsA-induced hepatotoxicity by reducing oxidative stress, DPP-4 activity, apoptosis, and inflammation.

  10. Long-Term Impact of Cyclosporin Reduction with MMF Treatment in Chronic Allograft Dysfunction: REFERENECE Study 3-Year Follow Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Frimat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcineurin inhibitor (CNI toxicity contributes to chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN. In the 2-year, randomized, study, we showed that 50% cyclosporin (CsA reduction in combination with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF treatment improves kidney function without increasing the risk for graft rejection/loss. To investigate the long-term effect of this regimen, we conducted a follow up study in 70 kidney transplant patients until 5 years after REFERENCE initiation. The improvement of kidney function was confirmed in the MMF group but not in the control group (CsA group. Four graft losses occurred, 2 in each group (graft survival in the MMF group 95.8% and 90.9% in control group. One death occurred in the control group. There was no statistically significant difference in the occurrence of serious adverse events or acute graft rejections. A limitation is the weak proportion of patient still remaining within the control group. On the other hand, REFERENCE focuses on the CsA regimen while opinions about the tacrolimus ones are still debated. In conclusion, CsA reduction in the presence of MMF treatment seems to maintain kidney function and is well tolerated in the long term.

  11. Effect of nephrotoxic drugs on the development of radiation nephropathy after bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, C.A.; Fish, B.L.; Moulder, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is a significant cause of late morbidity in bone marrow transplant patients whose conditioning regimen includes total body irradiation (TBI). Radiation is a major cause of this syndrome (bone marrow transplant nephropathy), but it may not be the only cause. These studies use a rat syngeneic bone marrow transplant model to determine whether nephrotoxic agents used in conjunction with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) could be enhancing or accelerating the development of radiation nephropathy. Rats received 11-17 Gy TBI in six fractions over 3 days followed by syngeneic bone marrow transplant. In conjunction with the bone marrow transplants, animals received either no drugs, cyclosporine, amphotericin, gentamicin, or busulfan. Drugs were given in schedules analogous to their use in clinical bone marrow transplantation. Drug doses were chosen so that the drug regimen alone caused detectable acute nephrotoxicity. Animals were followed for 6 months with periodic renal function tests. Gentamicin had no apparent interactions with TBI. Amphotericin increased the incidence of engraftment failure, but did not enhance radiation nephropathy. Cyclosporin with TBI caused late morbidity that appeared to be due to neurological problems, but did not enhance radiation nephropathy. Busulfan resulted in a significant enhancement of radiation nephropathy. Of the nephrotoxins used in conjunction with bone marrow transplantation only radiation and busulfan were found to be risk factors for bone marrow transplant nephropathy. 34 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Glyphosate, Hard Water and Nephrotoxic Metals: Are They the Culprits Behind the Epidemic of Chronic Kidney Disease of Unknown Etiology in Sri Lanka?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasumana, Channa; Gunatilake, Sarath; Senanayake, Priyantha

    2014-01-01

    The current chronic kidney disease epidemic, the major health issue in the rice paddy farming areas in Sri Lanka has been the subject of many scientific and political debates over the last decade. Although there is no agreement among scientists about the etiology of the disease, a majority of them has concluded that this is a toxic nephropathy. None of the hypotheses put forward so far could explain coherently the totality of clinical, biochemical, histopathological findings, and the unique geographical distribution of the disease and its appearance in the mid-1990s. A strong association between the consumption of hard water and the occurrence of this special kidney disease has been observed, but the relationship has not been explained consistently. Here, we have hypothesized the association of using glyphosate, the most widely used herbicide in the disease endemic area and its unique metal chelating properties. The possible role played by glyphosate-metal complexes in this epidemic has not been given any serious consideration by investigators for the last two decades. Furthermore, it may explain similar kidney disease epidemics observed in Andra Pradesh (India) and Central America. Although glyphosate alone does not cause an epidemic of chronic kidney disease, it seems to have acquired the ability to destroy the renal tissues of thousands of farmers when it forms complexes with a localized geo environmental factor (hardness) and nephrotoxic metals. PMID:24562182

  13. Nigella sativa oil attenuates chronic nephrotoxicity induced by oral sodium nitrite: Effects on tissue fibrosis and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gayyar, Mohammed M H; Hassan, Hanan M; Alyoussef, Abdullah; Abbas, Ahmed; Darweish, Mohamed M; El-Hawwary, Amany A

    2016-03-01

    Sodium nitrite, a food preservative, has been reported to increase oxidative stress indicators such as lipid peroxidation, which can affect different organs including the kidney. Here, we investigated the toxic effects of oral sodium nitrite on kidney function in rats and evaluated potential protective effects of Nigella sativa oil (NSO). Seventy adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received 80 mg/kg sodium nitrite orally in the presence or absence of NSO (2.5, 5, and 10 ml/kg) for 12 weeks. Morphological changes were assessed by hematoxylin and eosin, Mallory trichome, and periodic acid-Schiff staining. Renal tissues were used for measurements of oxidative stress markers, C-reactive protein, cytochrome C oxidase, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, pJNK/JNK, and caspase-3. NSO significantly reduced sodium nitrite-induced elevation in serum urea and creatinine, as well as increasing normal appearance of renal tissue. NSO also prevented reductions in glycogen levels caused by sodium nitrite alone. Moreover, NSO treatment resulted in dose-dependent significant reductions in fibrosis markers after sodium nitrite-induced 3- and 2.7-fold increase in MCP-1 and TGF-beta1, respectively. Finally, NSO partially reduced the elevated caspase-3 and pJNK/JNK. NSO ameliorates sodium nitrite-induced nephrotoxicity through blocking oxidative stress, attenuation of fibrosis/inflammation, restoration of glycogen level, amelioration of cytochrome C oxidase, and inhibition of apoptosis.

  14. Effect of quercetin on metallothionein, nitric oxide synthases and cyclooxygenase-2 expression on experimental chronic cadmium nephrotoxicity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, Ana I.; Vicente-Sanchez, Cesar; Jerkic, Mirjana; Santiago, Jose M.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Penelope D.; Perez-Barriocanal, Fernando; Lopez-Novoa, Jose M.

    2006-01-01

    Inflammation can play a key role in Cd-induced dysfunctions. Quercetin is a potent oxygen free radical scavenger and a metal chelator. Our aim was to study the effect of quercetin on Cd-induced kidney damage and metallothionein expression. The study was performed in Wistar rats that were administered during 9 weeks with either cadmium (1.2 mg Cd/kg/day, s.c.), quercetin (50 mg/kg/day, i.p.) or cadmium + quercetin. Renal toxicity was evaluated by measuring blood urea nitrogen concentration and urinary excretion of enzymes marker of tubular damage. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) renal expression were assessed by Western blot. Renal expression of metallothionein 1 and 2 (MT-1, MT-2) and eNOS mRNA was assessed by Northern blot. Our data demonstrated that Cd-induced renal toxicity was markedly reduced in rats that also received quercetin. MT-1 and MT-2 mRNA levels in kidney were substantially increased during treatment with Cd, being even higher when the animals received Cd and quercetin. Renal eNOS expression was significantly higher in rats receiving Cd and quercetin than in animals receiving Cd alone or in control rats. In the group that received Cd, COX-2 and iNOS expression was markedly higher than in control rats. In the group Cd + quercetin, no changes in COX-2 and iNOS expression were observed compared with the control group. Our results demonstrate that quercetin treatment prevents Cd-induced overexpression of iNOS and COX-2, and increases MT expression. These effects can explain the protection by quercetin of Cd-induced nephrotoxicity

  15. Cisplatin Induced Nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Seifollah Beladi Mousavi

    2014-02-01

    The standard approach to prevent cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is the administration of lower doses of cisplatin in combination with the administration of full intravenous isotonic saline before and after cisplatin administration. Although a number of pharmacologic agents including sodium thiosulfate, N-acetylcysteine, theophylline and glycine have been evaluated for prevention of nephrotoxicity, none have proved to have an established role, thus, additional clinical studies will be required to confirm their probable effects.

  16. Bone scintigraphy and secondary osteomalacia due to nephrotoxicity in a chronic hepatitis B patient treated with tenofovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Martinez, M V; Gallardo, F G; Pirogova, T; García-Samaniego, J

    2014-01-01

    Tenofovir is a nucleotide analogue used for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B and HIV infection. The safety of tenofovir is high but it has been described that tenofovir produces tubular toxicity and Fanconi's syndrome in some HIV-infected patients. To our knowledge this is the first documented case of bone involvement in Fanconi's syndrome in a patient treated with tenofovir for chronic hepatitis B without HIV coinfection. Bone scintigraphy has proven to be very useful for the diagnosis of secondary osteomalacia. Normalization of the bone scan after the withdrawal of the drug and the decline in alkaline phosphatase and phosphate serum levels reinforce the cause-effect relationship. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  17. Oleic acid loading does not add to the nephrotoxic effect of albumin in an amphibian and chronic rat model of kidney injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Timmeren, Mirjan M.; Gross, Marie-Luise; Hanke, Wilfried; Klok, Pieter A.; van Goor, Harry; Stegeman, Coen A.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Under proteinuric conditions, ultrafiltrated albumin can induce an inflammatory and fibrotic response in proximal tubular cells. It is unclear whether albumin per se or compounds bound to albumin are nephrotoxic. Some studies have supported the toxicity of albumin-bound fatty acids;

  18. Renal effects of amino acids and dopamine in renal transplant recipients treated with or without cyclosporin A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J M; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Leyssac, P P

    1996-01-01

    1. The nephrotoxic effects of cyclosporin A may diminish the ability of the transplanted kidney to increase the glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow during infusion of dopamine or amino acids. 2. The present study included 16 renal transplant recipients transplanted for more...... and of dopamine in renal transplant recipients with a good graft function.......-creatinine, 89 +/- 6 mumol/l). The renal response to infusion of dopamine and of amino acids was investigated on two separate days. All clearance measurements were carried out at nadir cyclosporin A blood levels. 3. Effective renal plasma flow increased significantly in the non-cyclosporin A group...

  19. Mefenamic Acid Induced Nephrotoxicity: An Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nazrul Somchit

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are used for the treatment of many joint disorders, inflammation and to control pain. Numerous reports have indicated that NSAIDs are capable of producing nephrotoxicity in human. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate mefenamic acid, a NSAID nephrotoxicity in an animal model. Methods: Mice were dosed intraperitoneally with mefenamic acid either as a single dose (100 or 200 mg/kg in 10% Dimethyl sulfoxide/Palm oil or as single daily doses for 14 days (50 or 100 mg/kg in 10% Dimethyl sulfoxide/Palm oil per day. Venous blood samples from mice during the dosing period were taken prior to and 14 days post-dosing from cardiac puncture into heparinized vials. Plasma blood urea nitrogen (BUN and creatinine activities were measured. Results: Single dose of mefenamic acid induced mild alteration of kidney histology mainly mild glomerular necrosis and tubular atrophy. Interestingly, chronic doses induced a dose dependent glomerular necrosis, massive degeneration, inflammation and tubular atrophy. Plasma blood urea nitrogen was statistically elevated in mice treated with mefenamic acid for 14 days similar to plasma creatinine. Conclusion: Results from this study suggest that mefenamic acid as with other NSAIDs capable of producing nephrotoxicity. Therefore, the study of the exact mechanism of mefenamic acid induced severe nephrotoxicity can be done in this animal model.

  20. Effect of cyclosporine, tacrolimus and sirolimus on cellular senescence in renal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelstaetter, Christian; Kern, Georg; Leierer, Gisela; Mair, Sabine Maria; Mayer, Gert; Leierer, Johannes

    2018-04-01

    In transplantation medicine calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) still represent the backbone of immunosuppressive therapy. The nephrotoxic potential of the CNI Cyclosporine A (CsA) and Tacrolimus (FK506) is well recognized and CNI not only have been linked with toxicity, but also with cellular senescence which hinders parenchymal tissue regeneration and thus may prime kidneys for subsequent insults. To minimize pathological effects on kidney grafts, alternative immunosuppressive agents like mTOR inhibitors or the T-cell co-stimulation blocker Belatacept have been introduced. We compared the effects of CsA, FK506 and Sirolimus on the process of cellular senescence in different human renal tubule cell types (HK2, RPTEC). Telomere length (by real time PCR), DNA synthesis (by BrdU incorporation), cell viability (by Resazurin conversion), gene expression (by RT-PCR), protein (by western blotting), Immuncytochemistry and H 2 O 2 production (by Amplex Red® conversion) were evaluated. DNA synthesis was significantly reduced when cells were treated with cyclosporine but not with tacrolimus and sirolimus. Resazurin conversion was not altered by all three immunosuppressive agents. The gene expression as well as protein production of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 (CDKN1A) but not p16 (CDKN2A) was significantly induced by cyclosporine compared to the other two immunosuppressive agents when determined by western blotting an immuncytochemistry. Relative telomere length was reduced and hydrogen peroxide production increased after treatment with CsA but not with FK506 or sirolimus. In summary, renal tubule cells exposed to CsA show clear signs of cellular senescence where on the contrary the second calcineurin inhibitor FK506 and the mTOR inhibitor sirolimus are not involved in such mechanisms. Chronic renal allograft dysfunction could be in part triggered by cellular senescence induced by immunosuppressive medication and the choice of drug could therefore influence long term outcome

  1. Prevention of cisplatin nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayati Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin has a well-established role in the treatment of broad spectrum of malignancies; however its use is limited because of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity (CIN which can be progressive in more than 50% of cases. The most important risk factors for CIN include higher doses of cisplatin, previous cisplatin chemotherapy, underlying kidney damage and concurrent treatment with other potential nephrotoxin agents, such as aminoglycosides, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, or iodinated contrast media. Different strategies have been offered to diminish or prevent nephrotoxicity of cisplatin. The standard approach for prevention of CIN is the administration of lower doses of cisplatin in combination with full intravenous hydration prior and after cisplatin administration. Cisplatin-induced oxidative stress in the kidney may be prevented by natural antioxidant compounds. The results of this review show that many strategies for prevention of CIN exist, however, attention to the administration of these agent for CIN is necessary.

  2. Cyclosporine in veterinary dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeiro, Brian S

    2013-01-01

    Cyclosporine is an immunomodulatory medication that is efficacious and approved for atopic dermatitis in dogs and allergic dermatitis in cats; it has also been used to successfully manage a variety of immune-mediated dermatoses in dogs and cats. This article reviews the use of cyclosporine in veterinary dermatology including its mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, side effects, and relevant clinical updates. Dermatologic indications including atopic/allergic dermatitis, perianal fistulas, sebaceous adenitis, and other immune-mediated skin diseases are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Iodinated contrast media nephrotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyrier, A.

    1994-01-01

    In the late seventies, iodinated contrast agents (ICA) were considered to be a major cause of acute iatrogenic renal failure. Over the last decade new contrast agents have been synthesized, nonionic and less hyperosmolar. The incidence of acute renal failure due to ICAs, varies from 3.7 to 70% of cases according to the series, with an average figure of 10.2%. The pathophysiology of ICA nephrotoxicity was mainly studied in laboratory animal models. Three main factors are involved in an inducing ICA-mediated decrease in glomerular filtration rate: reduction of the renal plasma flow, a direct cytotoxic effect on renal tubular cells and erythrocyte alteration leading to intra-renal sludge. Excluding dysglobulinemias with urinary excretion of immunoglobulin light chains, which represent a special case of maximum nephrotoxicity, 4 main risk factors of renal toxicity have been identified in nondiabetic subjects: previous renal failure with serum creatinine levels greater than 140 μmol per liter, extracellular dehydration, age over 60 and use of high doses of ICA and/or repeated ICA injections before serum creatinine levels return to baseline. Preventive measures for avoiding ICA nephrotoxicity are threefold: maintain or restore adequate hydration with saline infusion, stop NSAID treatment several days before ICA administration, and allow a 5 day interval before repeating contrast media injections. New, nonionic and moderately hyperosmolar contrast agents appear to be much less nephrotoxic than conventional ICAs in laboratory animals and in high-risk patients. It is advisable to select such contrast media for investigating high-risk patients. This approach was recently substantiated in well designed, randomized clinical studies which included more than 2 000 patients. (author)

  4. Cyclosporine toxicity in immunosuppressed streptozotocin-diabetic nonhuman primates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijkstrom, Martin; Kirchhof, Nicole; Graham, Melanie; Ingulli, Elizabeth; Colvin, Robert B.; Christians, Uwe; Hering, Bernhard J.; Schuurman, Henk-Jan

    2005-01-01

    Streptozotocin (STZ) is widely applied in animal models of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Adverse effects of STZ mainly concern liver and kidney. In nonhuman primates a single 100-150 mg/kg dose invariably induces diabetes with only rare adverse effects. We report one animal with renal failure necessitating sacrifice. Body weight (age) might be a confounding factor, i.e. older animals might be more vulnerable to STZ-related toxicity. We therefore recommended to administer STZ on a mg/m 2 basis and not on a mg/kg basis. In our islet transplantation program nonhuman primates with STZ-induced diabetes received transplants under chronic immunosuppression including calcineurin inhibitors (cyclosporine, tacrolimus), drugs in the rapamycin class affecting growth factor-induced cell proliferation, and the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor antagonist FTY720. Four animals developed renal failure and had to be sacrificed, most likely caused by cyclosporine. Kidney histology was typical for cyclosporine toxicity including thrombotic microangiopathy in glomeruli and fibrinoid necrosis of arteries, and for STZ toxicity including acute tubular necrosis and accumulations of erythroid precursors. This adverse effect was observed at a pharmacologically active cyclosporine exposure. Additionally, six diabetic animals without major adverse effects during cyclosporine or tacrolimus treatment are presented. We conclude that cyclosporine facilitates renal dysfunction in animals with STZ-induced diabetes, presumably related to an increased vulnerability to a toxic insult after STZ administration

  5. Nephrotoxicity of Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauffal, Mary; Gabardi, Steven

    2016-01-01

    The manufacture and sale of natural products constitute a multi-billion dollar industry. Nearly a third of the American population admit to using some form of complementary or alternative medicine, with many using them in addition to prescription medications. Most patients fail to inform their healthcare providers of their natural product use and physicians rarely inquire. Annually, thousands of natural product-induced adverse events are reported to Poison Control Centers nationwide. Natural product manufacturers are not responsible for proving safety and efficacy, as the FDA does not regulate them. However, concerns exist surrounding the safety of natural products. This review provides details on natural products that have been associated with renal dysfunction. We have focused on products that have been associated with direct renal injury, immune-mediated nephrotoxicity, nephrolithiasis, rhabdomyolysis with acute renal injury, hepatorenal syndrome, and common adulterants or contaminants that are associated with renal dysfunction. The potential for natural products to cause renal dysfunction is justifiable. It is imperative that natural product use be monitored closely in all patients. Healthcare practitioners must play an active role in identifying patients using natural products and provide appropriate patient education. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Nephrotoxicity and Chinese Herbal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Xie, Yun; Guo, Maojuan; Rosner, Mitchell H; Yang, Hongtao; Ronco, Claudio

    2018-04-03

    Chinese herbal medicine has been practiced for the prevention, treatment, and cure of diseases for thousands of years. Herbal medicine involves the use of natural compounds, which have relatively complex active ingredients with varying degrees of side effects. Some of these herbal medicines are known to cause nephrotoxicity, which can be overlooked by physicians and patients due to the belief that herbal medications are innocuous. Some of the nephrotoxic components from herbs are aristolochic acids and other plant alkaloids. In addition, anthraquinones, flavonoids, and glycosides from herbs also are known to cause kidney toxicity. The kidney manifestations of nephrotoxicity associated with herbal medicine include acute kidney injury, CKD, nephrolithiasis, rhabdomyolysis, Fanconi syndrome, and urothelial carcinoma. Several factors contribute to the nephrotoxicity of herbal medicines, including the intrinsic toxicity of herbs, incorrect processing or storage, adulteration, contamination by heavy metals, incorrect dosing, and interactions between herbal medicines and medications. The exact incidence of kidney injury due to nephrotoxic herbal medicine is not known. However, clinicians should consider herbal medicine use in patients with unexplained AKI or progressive CKD. In addition, exposure to herbal medicine containing aristolochic acid may increase risk for future uroepithelial cancers, and patients require appropriate postexposure screening. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  7. Patient and physician perspectives on the use of cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion 0.05% for the management of chronic dry eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveney, Tatiana; Asbell, Penny A

    2018-01-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a multifactorial disease of the ocular surface and is one of the most common reasons for patients to visit an eye care provider. Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immune modulating drug that was approved in the US for topical use in the treatment of DED in 2003, which led to a paradigm change in our understanding and treatment of DED, turning attention to control of inflammation for treatment. This review summarizes the literature to date regarding the impact of CsA on the treatment of DED. A special focus is given to the patient and physician perspectives of CsA, including dry eye symptom improvement, medication side effects, and overall patient satisfaction. Studies evaluating CsA in DED have considerable heterogeneity making generalized conclusions about the effect of CsA difficult. However, most studies have demonstrated improvement in at least some symptoms of dry eye in CsA-treated patients. Side effects, most commonly ocular burning on administration of CsA, are common. The literature is sparse regarding long-term follow-up of patients treated with CsA, optimal duration of treatment, and identifying which patients may receive the most benefit from CsA. PMID:29615833

  8. Cumulative and current exposure to potentially nephrotoxic antiretrovirals and development of chronic kidney disease in HIV-positive individuals with a normal baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Lundgren, Jens D; Ross, Michael

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whether or not the association between some antiretrovirals used in HIV infection and chronic kidney disease is cumulative is a controversial topic, especially in patients with initially normal renal function. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between duration...... of exposure to antiretrovirals and the development of chronic kidney disease in people with initially normal renal function, as measured by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). METHODS: In this prospective international cohort study, HIV-positive adult participants (aged ≥16 years) from the D......:A:D study (based in Europe, the USA, and Australia) with first eGFR greater than 90 mL/min per 1·73 m(2) were followed from baseline (first eGFR measurement after Jan 1, 2004) until the occurrence of one of the following: chronic kidney disease; last eGFR measurement; Feb 1, 2014; or final visit plus 6...

  9. EFFECT OF CYCLOSPORINE A ON THE KIDNEY OF RABBIT: A LIGHT AND ULTRASTRUCTURAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Fathy Ahmed Fetouh; Abdelmonem Awad Hegazy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nephrotoxicity is a relatively common problem in patients immunosuppressed with cyclosporine A (CsA) with an incidence reaching up to thirty percent. The present work aimed to study the histological and ultrastructural effects of CsA on the kidney of rabbit. Materials and Methods: Two groups of Egyptian adult rabbits were used for this study (5 rabbits for each). One group was used as a control and the other group (experimental) was treated with CsA in a dose of 15 mg/kg of bod...

  10. HNF4alpha dysfunction as a molecular rational for cyclosporine induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehof, Monika; Borlak, Jürgen

    2011-01-27

    Induction of tolerance against grafted organs is achieved by the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine, a prominent member of the calcineurin inhibitors. Unfortunately, its lifetime use is associated with hypertension and nephrotoxicity. Several mechanism for cyclosporine induced hypertension have been proposed, i.e. activation of the sympathetic nervous system, endothelin-mediated systemic vasoconstriction, impaired vasodilatation secondary to reduction in prostaglandin and nitric oxide, altered cytosolic calcium translocation, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). In this regard the molecular basis for undue RAS activation and an increased signaling of the vasoactive oligopeptide angiotensin II (AngII) remain elusive. Notably, angiotensinogen (AGT) is the precursor of AngII and transcriptional regulation of AGT is controlled by the hepatic nuclear factor HNF4alpha. To better understand the molecular events associated with cyclosporine induced hypertension, we investigated the effect of cyclosporine on HNF4alpha expression and activity and searched for novel HNF4alpha target genes among members of the RAS cascade. Using bioinformatic algorithm and EMSA bandshift assays we identified angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AGTR1), angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE), and angiotensin I converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as genes targeted by HNF4alpha. Notably, cyclosporine represses HNF4alpha gene and protein expression and its DNA-binding activity at consensus sequences to AGT, AGTR1, ACE, and ACE2. Consequently, the gene expression of AGT, AGTR1, and ACE2 was significantly reduced as evidenced by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. While RAS is composed of a sophisticated interplay between multiple factors we propose a decrease of ACE2 to enforce AngII signaling via AGTR1 to ultimately result in vasoconstriction and hypertension. Taken collectively we demonstrate cyclosporine to repress HNF4alpha activity through calcineurin inhibitor mediated inhibition of nuclear

  11. HNF4alpha dysfunction as a molecular rational for cyclosporine induced hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Niehof

    Full Text Available Induction of tolerance against grafted organs is achieved by the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine, a prominent member of the calcineurin inhibitors. Unfortunately, its lifetime use is associated with hypertension and nephrotoxicity. Several mechanism for cyclosporine induced hypertension have been proposed, i.e. activation of the sympathetic nervous system, endothelin-mediated systemic vasoconstriction, impaired vasodilatation secondary to reduction in prostaglandin and nitric oxide, altered cytosolic calcium translocation, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS. In this regard the molecular basis for undue RAS activation and an increased signaling of the vasoactive oligopeptide angiotensin II (AngII remain elusive. Notably, angiotensinogen (AGT is the precursor of AngII and transcriptional regulation of AGT is controlled by the hepatic nuclear factor HNF4alpha. To better understand the molecular events associated with cyclosporine induced hypertension, we investigated the effect of cyclosporine on HNF4alpha expression and activity and searched for novel HNF4alpha target genes among members of the RAS cascade. Using bioinformatic algorithm and EMSA bandshift assays we identified angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AGTR1, angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE, and angiotensin I converting enzyme 2 (ACE2 as genes targeted by HNF4alpha. Notably, cyclosporine represses HNF4alpha gene and protein expression and its DNA-binding activity at consensus sequences to AGT, AGTR1, ACE, and ACE2. Consequently, the gene expression of AGT, AGTR1, and ACE2 was significantly reduced as evidenced by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. While RAS is composed of a sophisticated interplay between multiple factors we propose a decrease of ACE2 to enforce AngII signaling via AGTR1 to ultimately result in vasoconstriction and hypertension. Taken collectively we demonstrate cyclosporine to repress HNF4alpha activity through calcineurin inhibitor mediated inhibition

  12. Nephrotoxicities [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart L. Goldstein

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotoxic medication exposure is nearly ubiquitous in hospitalized patients and represents one of the most common causes of acute kidney injury (AKI in the hospitalized setting. Although provision of medications that are nephrotoxic has led to improved outcomes in terms of treatment of underlying illness, unnecessary nephrotoxic medication exposure can be viewed as a potentially modifiable adverse safety event if AKI can be prevented. The advancements in electronic health record development, standardization of AKI definitions, and the ability to identify AKI risk and development in near real time provide opportunities to reduce harm from nephrotoxicity.

  13. CYCLOSPORINE A IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: CURRENT DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Lvovna Luchikhina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the advent of the new class of medications, such as gene engineering biologicals, the use of traditional essential anti-inflammatory drugs (EAID remains the most important method of pathogenetic therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Apart from methotrexate (MT that is the gold standard of treatment for RA, there are a number of other effective EAIDs, including cyclosporine A (CsA, Sandimmun. The review deals with the practical aspects of using CsA in RA. Particular emphasis is laid on the capacities of combined basic therapy with CsA and MT in early RA and on the use of CsA in patients with concomitant chronic viral diseases (including viral hepatitis C.

  14. Concomitant gentamicin‑induced nephrotoxicity and bilateral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... injections of gentamicin. Coexisting ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity from aminoglycosides can occur, though rare. Adverse effects of aminoglycosides are better prevented by a careful exercise of discretion by prescribers. Keywords: Acute kidney injury, aminoglycosides, co‑occurrence, gentamicin, nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity ...

  15. MR findings of cyclosporine neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Po Song; Ahn, Kook Jin; Ahn, Bo Young; Jung, Hae An; Kim, Hee Je; Lee, Jae Mun

    1998-01-01

    To analyze the MR findings of cyclosporine-induced neurotoxicity in patients receiving high dose of cyclosporine and to suggest the possible pathogenetic mechanism. The cases of seven patients (2 males, 5 females;18-36 years old) who suffered seizures after receiving high-dose cyclosporine for bone marrow transplantation due to diseases such as aplastic anemia or leukemia were retrospectively reviewed. We evaluated the location and pattern of abnormal signal intensity seen on T2 weighted images, the presence of contrast enhancement, and the changes seen on follow-up MR performed at intervals of 12-30 days after initial MR in five of seven patients. We analyzed levels of blood cyclosporine and magnesium, and investigated the presence of hypertension at the sity of the seizure. Locations of the lesions were bilateral(n=3D5), unilateral(n=3D2), parietal(n=3D6), occipital(n=3D6), temporal(n=3D4), and in the frontal lobe(n=3D3). Frontal lesions showed high signal intensities in the borderline ischemic zone of the frontal lobe between the territory of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. In six of the seven patients, cortical and subcortical areas including subcortical U-fibers were seen on T2-weighted images to be involved in the parietooccipital lobes. Only one of the seven showed high signal intensity in the left basal ganglia. All lesions showed high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and iso to low signal intensity on T1-weighted. In five of seven patients there was no definite enhancement, but in the other two, enhancement was slight. In four of seven patients seizures occurred within high therapeutic ranges(250-450ng/ml), while others suffered such attacks at levels below the therapeutic range. After cyclospirine was administered at a reduced dosage or stopped, follow-up MR images showed the complete or near-total disappearance of the abnormal findings previously described. Only two patients had hypertension, and the others normotension. Five of the

  16. Cyclosporine Neoral: A Local Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nampoory Mangalathillam

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclosporine (CsA is an effective immunosuppressant drug. Recently a new oral formulation, Sandimune Neoral (SIM-NOF has been developed to overcome the problems of poor bioavailability, unpredictable blood levels and variable gastro-intestinal absorption seen with the use of traditional Cyclosporine, Sandimune (SIM. We conducted a prospective, open label crossover tolerability, efficacy and safety of SIM-NOF and (2 to compare SIM-NOF with SIM for their bioavailability, absorption pattern and consistence of 12-hour trough levels. Fourteen renal transplant recipients, with stable renal function (serum creatinine stable for more than six immediate previous months and SIM dosages, were randomly selected for the study. Their age mean ± SD 38.2± 11.1 years, ad had completed 3.8± 2.2 years after transplantation. All patients were on triple drug immunosuppression with prednisone, azathioprine and SIM. The study consisted of an initial 12-week period, where SIM was used and cyclosporine 12-hour trough levels were monitored t least every four weeks. This was followed by a run-in period of two weeks, where a 12-hour cyclosporine profiling was done while patients were on SIM. This was followed by a 12-week period, Where SIM-NOF replaced SIM on a 1:1 dose conversion ratio. During this latter period, 12-hour trough levels (at 1,2,3,8 and 12 weeks were measured. The doses of the SIM-NOF were adjusted to maintain blood cyclosporine trough levels at 50-180 μg/ml. On cyclosporine profiling, SIN-NOF showed a predictable and constant absorption profile peaking at two hours in all instances with steady declining levels through the following ten hours. With SIM the levels were unpredictable and erratic. The Tmax for SIM-NOF was 2.0± 0 hours and for SIM 3.7± 1.7 hours (p< 0.0001. The Cmax for SIM- NOF was 2149 and for SIM 1942 (p=0.008. The 12-hour trough studies for SIM-NOF is a superior preparation to SIM in clinical practice. No specific adverse effects were

  17. MR findings of cyclosporine neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Po Song; Ahn, Kook Jin; Ahn, Bo Young; Jung, Hae An; Kim, Hee Je; Lee, Jae Mun [The Catholic Univ. St Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-01

    To analyze the MR findings of cyclosporine-induced neurotoxicity in patients receiving high dose of cyclosporine and to suggest the possible pathogenetic mechanism. The cases of seven patients (2 males, 5 females;18-36 years old) who suffered seizures after receiving high-dose cyclosporine for bone marrow transplantation due to diseases such as aplastic anemia or leukemia were retrospectively reviewed. We evaluated the location and pattern of abnormal signal intensity seen on T2 weighted images, the presence of contrast enhancement, and the changes seen on follow-up MR performed at intervals of 12-30 days after initial MR in five of seven patients. We analyzed levels of blood cyclosporine and magnesium, and investigated the presence of hypertension at the sity of the seizure. Locations of the lesions were bilateral(n=3D5), unilateral(n=3D2), parietal(n=3D6), occipital(n=3D6), temporal(n=3D4), and in the frontal lobe(n=3D3). Frontal lesions showed high signal intensities in the borderline ischemic zone of the frontal lobe between the territory of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. In six of the seven patients, cortical and subcortical areas including subcortical U-fibers were seen on T2-weighted images to be involved in the parietooccipital lobes. Only one of the seven showed high signal intensity in the left basal ganglia. All lesions showed high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and iso to low signal intensity on T1-weighted. In five of seven patients there was no definite enhancement, but in the other two, enhancement was slight. In four of seven patients seizures occurred within high therapeutic ranges(250-450ng/ml), while others suffered such attacks at levels below the therapeutic range. After cyclospirine was administered at a reduced dosage or stopped, follow-up MR images showed the complete or near-total disappearance of the abnormal findings previously described. Only two patients had hypertension, and the others normotension. Five of the

  18. Bone marrow transplantation: Effects of conditioning and cyclosporin prophylaxis on microvascular permeability to a small solute (technetium 99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, A.M. (Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (UK). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology); Vassilarou, D.S.; Hows, J.M. (Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (UK). Dept. of Haematology); Ballardie, F.W. (Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (UK). Dept. of Medicine)

    1991-03-01

    Microvascular permeability to small diffusible solutes has rarely been measured at a clinical level. We have developed a simple non-invasive technique for measuring the permeability surface area (PS) product, which is suitable for clinical use. We illustrate its potential value in six subjects who underwent bone marrow transplantation for chronic myeloid leukaemia. These patients received high-dose cyclosporin A (CyA) for prevention of graft versus host disease (GVHD) and sustained an easily measurable increase in microvascular permeability to technetium 99m diethyl triamine penta-acetic acid ({sup 99m}Tc-DTPA). This was measured as the PS product, which increased from 1.1 (SD 0.3) to 2.2 (0.4) ml/min per 100 ml tissue between baseline and treatment with CyA for prevention of GVHD (P < 0.01). The increase broadly correlated with nephrotoxicity which was measured, from the plasma DTPA clearance, as global glomerular filtration rate (GFR). This decreased from 106 (11.1) to 49 (6.7) ml/min (P < 0.001). These abnormalities, both in PS product and GFR, were sustained for several months, after which they tended to return towards baseline levels. We conclude firstly that this technique has a potential clinical role and secondly that endothelial abnormalities due to CyA deserve further study. (orig.).

  19. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester as a Protective Agent against Nephrotoxicity and/or Oxidative Kidney Damage: A Detailed Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumeyya Akyol

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE, an active component of propolis, has been attracting the attention of different medical and pharmaceutical disciplines in recent years because of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, cytotoxic, antiviral, antifungal, and antineoplastic properties. One of the most studied organs for the effects of CAPE is the kidney, particularly in the capacity of this ester to decrease the nephrotoxicity induced by several drugs and the oxidative injury after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R. In this review, we summarized and critically evaluated the current knowledge regarding the protective effect of CAPE in nephrotoxicity induced by several special medicines such as cisplatin, doxorubicin, cyclosporine, gentamycin, methotrexate, and other causes leading to oxidative renal injury, namely, I/R models and senility.

  20. Cyclosporin versus tacrolimus for liver transplanted patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haddad, E M; McAlister, V C; Renouf, E

    2006-01-01

    Most liver transplant recipients receive either cyclosporin or tacrolimus to prevent rejection. Both drugs inhibit calcineurin phosphatase which is thought to be the mechanism of their anti-rejection effect and principle toxicities. The drugs have different pharmacokinetic profiles and potencies....... Several randomised clinical trials have compared cyclosporin and tacrolimus in liver transplant recipients, but it remains unclear which is superior....

  1. Cyclosporine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Talk to your doctor about the amount of potassium-rich foods such as bananas, prunes, raisins, and orange juice you may have in your diet. Many salt substitutes contain potassium, so talk to your doctor about using them ...

  2. Topical cyclosporine for atopic keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-López, Julio J; López-Alcalde, Jesús; Morcillo Laiz, Rafael; Fernández Buenaga, Roberto; Rebolleda Fernández, Gema

    2012-09-12

    Atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) is a chronic ocular surface non-infectious inflammatory condition that atopic dermatitis patients may suffer at any time point in the course of their dermatologic disease and is independent of its degree of severity. AKC is usually not self resolving and it poses a higher risk of corneal injuries and severe sequelae. Management of AKC should prevent or treat corneal damage. Although topical corticosteroids remain the standard treatment for patients with AKC, prolonged use may lead to complications. Topical cyclosporine A (CsA) may improve AKC signs and symptoms, and be used as a corticosteroid sparing agent. To determine the efficacy and gather evidence on safety from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of topical CsA in patients with AKC. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 6), MEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to July 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to July 2012), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (January 1937 to July 2012), OpenGrey (System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe) (www.opengrey.eu/), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en), the IFPMA Clinical Trials Portal (http://clinicaltrials.ifpma.org/no_cache/en/myportal/index.htm) and Web of Science Conference Proceedings Citation Index- Science (CPCI-S). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 9 July 2012. We also handsearched the following conference proceedings: American Academy of Ophthalmology, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, International Council of Opthalmology and Societas

  3. Antibacterial-induced nephrotoxicity in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanos, V; Cataldi, L

    1999-03-01

    Antibacterials are the primary cause of drug-induced kidney disease in all age groups and these agents bring about renal damage by 2 main mechanisms, namely, direct and immunologically mediated. For some antibacterials (aminoglycosides and vancomycin) nephrotoxicity is very frequent but generally reversible upon discontinuation of the drug. However, the development of acute renal failure with these agents is possible and its incidence in the newborn seems to be increasing. Antibacterials are very often used in the neonatal period especially in very low birthweight neonates. The role of neonatal age in developing nephrotoxicity has still to be defined. Since the traditional laboratory parameters of nephrotoxicity are abnormal only in the presence of substantial renal damage, the identification of early non-invasive markers of the renal damage (urinary microglobulins, enzymes and growth factors) is of importance. Aminoglycosides and glycopeptides are still frequently used, either alone or in combination, despite their low therapeutic index. Numerous factors intervene in bringing about the kidney damage induced by these 2 classes of antibacterials, such as factors related to the antibacterial itself and others related to the associated pathology as well as pharmacological factors. Nephrotoxicity can be caused by the beta-lactams and related compounds. Their potential to cause nephrotoxicity decreases in the order: carbapenems > cephalosporins > penicillins > monobactams. Third generation cephalosporins are frequently used in neonates. However, they are well tolerated compounds at the renal level. The nephrotoxicity of other classes of antibacterials is not discussed either because they are only used in neonates in exceptional circumstances, for example, chloramphenicol and cotrimoxazole (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) or are not associated with significant nephrotoxicity, for example macrolides, clindamicin, quinolones, rifampicin (rifampin) and metronidazole

  4. Cyclosporin in steroid- resistant nephrotic syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-11-11

    Nov 11, 1994 ... steroid-unresponsive and alternative therapies therefore need to be assessed. ..... glomerular sclerosis. No vascular or tubular epithelial lesions ... acute tubular necrosis, and probable cyclosporin toxicity. No renal biopsy ...

  5. Altered Cyclosporine Absorption in a Patient with Ulcerative Colitis, Sclerosing Cholangitis and Pancreatic Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark G Swain

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic insufficiency leading to altered cyclosporine absorption is reported in a 37-year-old man with ulcerative colitis and sclerosing cholangitis. Asymptomatic chronic pancreatitis occurs frequently in patients with ulcerative colitis, and even more commonly when there is coexistent sclerosing cholangitis. However, pancreatic insufficiency has been documented in only one patient previously with ulcerative colitis and sclerosing cholangitis. Pancreatic function testing can help to identify the complex etiology of malabsorption in these patients and is recommended in patients when liver transplantation is contemplated, as pancreatic insufficiency may alter the absorption of cyclosporine.

  6. Compound list: cyclosporine A [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cyclosporine A CSA 00142 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/cyclosporine..._A.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/cyclosporine.../in_vivo/Liver/Single/cyclosporine_A.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosc...iencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/cyclosporine_A.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip... ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/cyclosporine_A.Rat.in_vivo

  7. An integrated view of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Takatoshi; Steyger, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most widely-used drugs to treat cancers. However, its nephrotoxic and ototoxic side-effects remain major clinical limitations. Recent studies have improved our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. While cisplatin binding to DNA is the major cytotoxic mechanism in proliferating (cancer) cells, nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity appear to result from toxic levels of reactive oxygen species and protein dysregulation within various cellular compartments. In this review, we discuss molecular mechanisms of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. We also discuss potential clinical strategies to prevent nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity and their current limitations. PMID:26101797

  8. Oral cyclosporine therapy for refractory severe vernal keratoconjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil S Gokhale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the success of oral cyclosporine therapy in a patient with severe vision-threatening vernal keratoconjunctivitis. A child presented with severe allergy which was not controlled with topical steroids, cyclosporine and mast cell stabilizers. Oral steroids were required repeatedly to suppress inflammation. Child showed a dramatic improvement and stabilization with oral cyclosporine therapy. Oral cyclosporine therapy can be tried in severe vision-threatening allergy refractory to conventional therapy.

  9. Diffusion MR findings in cyclosporin-A induced encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydin, Kubilay; Minareci, Ozenc; Donmez, Fuldem; Tuzun, Umit; Atamer, Tanju

    2004-01-01

    Cyclosporin encephalopathy is a well-known entity, which is clinically characterized by altered mental status, vision problems, focal neurological deficits and seizures. The exact pathophysiology of the cyclosporin encephalopathy has not yet been defined. We report the diffusion-weighted MR imaging and proton MR spectroscopy findings in a case of cyclosporin encephalopathy. The white-matter lesions with reversible restricted diffusion supported the hypothesis of reversible vasospasm induced by the cyclosporin. (orig.)

  10. Production enhancement of Cyclosporin 'A' by Aspergillus terreus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... After fermentation, biomass measurement, Cyclosporin 'A' extraction and analysis was carried out as previously mentioned. Estimation of Cyclosporin 'A'. The following equation was used for the estimation of cyclosporin through chromatograms (Minutza et al., 2009). Area of Sample Peak. Weight of Ref ...

  11. Cisplatin nephrotoxicity: mechanisms and renoprotective strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabla, N; Dong, Z

    2008-05-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most widely used and most potent chemotherapy drugs. However, side effects in normal tissues and organs, notably nephrotoxicity in the kidneys, limit the use of cisplatin and related platinum-based therapeutics. Recent research has shed significant new lights on the mechanism of cisplatin nephrotoxicity, especially on the signaling pathways leading to tubular cell death and inflammation. Renoprotective approaches are being discovered, but the protective effects are mostly partial, suggesting the need for combinatorial strategies. Importantly, it is unclear whether these approaches would limit the anticancer effects of cisplatin in tumors. Examination of tumor-bearing animals and identification of novel renoprotective strategies that do not diminish the anticancer efficacy of cisplatin are essential to the development of clinically applicable interventions.

  12. Adefovir nephrotoxicity in a renal allograft recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adefovir dipivoxil, an oral prodrug of adefovir, is used in the treatment of lamivudine-resistant hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. Nephrotoxicity manifesting as proximal renal tubular dysfunction and acute tubular necrosis (ATN were commonly reported in the past, when higher doses were used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection. However, nephrotoxicity is rare at lower doses that are currently recommended for the treatment of HBV infection. A 31-year-old female was detected to be hepatitis B surface antigen positive months after a kidney transplant. The patient was initiated on lamivudine, but developed resistance after 1 year of treatment, at which time low-dose adefovir was added. The patient developed renal allograft dysfunction after 10 months of starting adefovir. Serum creatinine increased from 1.1 mg/dl to 1.9 mg/dl, along with progressively increasing sub-nephrotic proteinuria. Renal allograft biopsy revealed features of ATN. After discontinuation of adefovir, proteinuria resolved and renal dysfunction improved slowly over the next 2 years. Adefovir-induced nephrotoxicity, although uncommon at lower doses, needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of renal dysfunction and sub-nephrotic proteinuria occurring in patients receiving adefovir for prolonged periods.

  13. Cyclosporine treatment of severe Hidradenitis suppurativa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Marianne D; Zauli, Stefania; Bettoli, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is an overlooked but common disease severely affecting both genders. HS is generally perceived as difficult to treat and although a number of treatments are available, the need for more effective treatment is apparent. Objectives: Cyclosporine A (CsA) has...

  14. Gentamicin Nephrotoxicity in Subclinical Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Donita L.

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the pharmacokinetic disposition of gentamicin and to define the mechanisms which predispose to nephrotoxicity in subclinical renal disease. Subtotally nephrectomized beagle dogs were used as a model for human beings with compromised renal function secondary to a reduced number of functional nephrons. Using ultrastructural morphometry, light microscopy and clinical chemistry data, the model was defined and the nephrotoxic responses of intact dogs administered recommended doses of drug were compared to the response of subtotally nephrectomized dogs administered reduced doses based on each animal's clearance of drug. Lysosomal and mitochondrial morphometric changes suggested mechanisms for increased sensitivity. To determine if increased sensitivity in this model was dependent on altered serum concentrations, variable rate infusions based on individual pharmacokinetic disposition of drug were administered using computer-driven infusion pumps. Identical serum concentration-time profiles were achieved in normal dogs and subtotally nephrectomized dogs, however, toxicity was significantly greater in nephrectomized dogs. The difference in the nephrotoxic response was characterized by administering supratherapeutic doses of drug to dogs. Nephrectomized dogs given a recommended dose of gentamicin became oliguric during the second week of treatment and increasingly uremic after withdrawal of drug. In contrast, intact dogs administered 2 times the recommended dose of gentamicin become only slightly polyuric during week 4 of treatment. The need to individualize dosage regimens based on drug clearance and not serum creatinine nor creatinine clearance alone was substantiated by describing the pharmacokinetic disposition of gentamicin in spontaneously occurring disease states. Four individualized dosage regimens with differing predicted efficacy were then administered to nephrectomized dogs to determine their relative nephrotoxic

  15. Cyclosporine versus tacrolimus: cost-effectiveness analysis for renal transplantation in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Silva, Grazielle Dias; Andrade, Eli Iola Gurgel; Cherchiglia, Mariângela Leal; Costa, Juliana de Oliveira; Almeida, Alessandra Maciel; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the cost-effectiveness of treatment regimens with cyclosporine or tacrolimus, five years after renal transplantation. METHODS This cost-effectiveness analysis was based on historical cohort data obtained between 2000 and 2004 and involved 2,022 patients treated with cyclosporine or tacrolimus, matched 1:1 for gender, age, and type and year of transplantation. Graft survival and the direct costs of medical care obtained from the National Health System (SUS) databases were used as outcome results. RESULTS Most of the patients were women, with a mean age of 36.6 years. The most frequent diagnosis of chronic renal failure was glomerulonephritis/nephritis (27.7%). In five years, the tacrolimus group had an average life expectancy gain of 3.96 years at an annual cost of R$78,360.57 compared with the cyclosporine group with a gain of 4.05 years and an annual cost of R$61,350.44. CONCLUSIONS After matching, the study indicated better survival of patients treated with regimens using tacrolimus. However, regimens containing cyclosporine were more cost-effective. PMID:25741648

  16. Chronic type-I diabetes could not impede the anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of combined postconditioning with ischemia and cyclosporine A in myocardial reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalzadeh, Reza; Azimi, Ako; Alihemmati, Alireza; Yousefi, Bahman

    2017-02-01

    It has been shown that diabetes modifies the myocardial responses to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and to cardioprotective agents. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of combined treatment with ischemic postconditioning (IPostC) and cyclosporine A (CsA) on inflammation and apoptosis of the diabetic myocardium injured by I/R. Eight weeks after induction of diabetes in Wistar rats, hearts were mounted on a Langendorff apparatus and were subsequently subjected to a 30-min regional ischemia followed by 45-min reperfusion. IPostC was induced at the onset of reperfusion, by 3 cycles of 30-s reperfusion/ischemia (R/I). The concentration of creatine kinase (CK), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 were determined; the levels of total and phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (p-GSK3β) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) were quantified by western blotting, and the rate of apoptosis was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Administration of either IPostC or CsA alone in nondiabetic animals significantly reduced CK, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 concentrations, increased the p-GSK3β and Bcl-2, and decreased the level of apoptosis (P GSK3β and Bcl-2 and decreasing apoptosis and inflammation were restored in comparison with nonpostconditioned diabetic hearts. IPostC or CsA failed to affect apoptosis and inflammation and failed to protect the diabetic myocardium against I/R injury. However, combined administration of IPostC and CsA at reperfusion can protect the diabetic myocardium by decreasing the inflammatory response and apoptosis.

  17. Contrast-induced nephrotoxicity: possible synergistic effect of stress hyperglycemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2010-07-01

    Oxidative stress on the renal tubules has been implicated as a mechanism of injury in both stress hyperglycemia and contrast-induced nephrotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the combination of these effects has a synergistic effect on accentuating renal tubular apoptosis and therefore increasing the risk of contrast-induced nephrotoxicity.

  18. Treatment of ocular rosacea:comparative study of topical cyclosporine and oral doxycycline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysegul Arman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To compare the effectiveness of topical cyclosporine A emulsion with that of oral doxycycline for rosacea associated ocular changes and dry eye complaints.METHODS:One hundred and ten patients with rosacea were screened. Thirty-eight patients having rosacea associated eyelid and ocular surface changes and dry eye complaints were included in the study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups:nineteen patients were given topical cyclosporine twice daily and nineteen patients were given oral doxycycline 100 mg twice daily for the first month and once daily for the following two months. Symptom and sign scores, ocular surface disease index questionnarie and tear function tests were evaluated at baseline and monthly for 3mo. Three months after results were compared with that of baseline.RESULTS:Mean values of symptom, eyelid sign and corneal/conjunctival sign scores of each treatment group at baseline and 3mo after treatments were compared and both drugs were found to be effective on rosacea associated ocular changes (P<0.001. Cyclosporine was more effective in symptomatic relief and in the treatment of eyelid signs (P=0.01. There was statistically significant increase in the mean Schirmer score with anesthesia and tear break up time scores in the cyclosporine treatment group compared to the doxycycline treatment group (P<0.05.CONCLUSION:Cyclosporine as a topical drug can be used in the treatment of rosacea associated ocular complications because it is more effective than doxycycline. In addition ocular rosacea as a chronic disease requires long term treatment and doxycycline has various side effects limiting its long term usage.

  19. The Aging Kidney: Increased Susceptibility to Nephrotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinhui; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Parrish, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Three decades have passed since a series of studies indicated that the aging kidney was characterized by increased susceptibility to nephrotoxic injury. Data from these experimental models is strengthened by clinical data demonstrating that the aging population has an increased incidence and severity of acute kidney injury (AKI). Since then a number of studies have focused on age-dependent alterations in pathways that predispose the kidney to acute insult. This review will focus on the mechanisms that are altered by aging in the kidney that may increase susceptibility to injury, including hemodynamics, oxidative stress, apoptosis, autophagy, inflammation and decreased repair. PMID:25257519

  20. Contrast Media: Are There Differences in Nephrotoxicity among Contrast Media?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Iodinated contrast agents are usually classified based upon their osmolality—high, low, and isosmolar. Iodinated contrast agents are also nephrotoxic in some but not all patients resulting in loss of glomerular filtration rate. Over the past 30 years, nephrotoxicity has been linked to osmolality although the precise mechanism underlying such a link has been elusive. Improvements in our understanding of the pathogenesis of nephrotoxicity and prospective randomized clinical trials have attempted to further explore the relationship between osmolality and nephrotoxicity. In this review, the basis for our current understanding that there are little if any differences in nephrotoxic potential between low and isosmolar contrast media will be detailed using data from clinical studies. PMID:24587997

  1. Carvedilol Protects against Cyclosporine Nephropathy in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kotolová

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our experimental work was to study whether carvedilol is able to protect renal tissue from cyclosporine toxic effect in animal model of cyclosporine nephropathy. The study was performed on twenty Wistar rats divided in two experimental groups: control (treated with placebo and carvedilol (treated with p.o. dose 10mg/kg/day in 1 ml solution. Cyclosporine in oral dose of 15 mg/kg/day was administered to all animals during 15 days of experiment. Urine was collected daily for the assessment of diuresis, proteinuria, and determination of urea and creatinine levels. Serum collected at the end of the experiment (day 15 was used for the determination of urea and transferrin levels. The level of renal tissue damage was evaluated by the Jones method for basal membranes, glomeruli and tubuli impregnation, and by the Kossa method for calcium impregnation. For the determination of paranuclear inclusions presence we used chromanilinblue (CAB method. Statistically significant differences between total protein levels in urine on day 7 of the experiment and urea levels in serum at the end of the experiment in the control group and the carvedilol-treated group indicate a protective effect of carvedilol on renal tissue, which is supported also by the results of a histological examination of renal tissue. Significant increase in the serum transferrin level was registered in the carvedilol-treated group and no significant changes were noted in ceruloplasmin serum levels. In conclusion, our pilot study showed that carvedilol has the ability to protect renal tissue from cyclosporine induced nephropathy in rats.

  2. Cyclosporine-related reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarosz, J.M.; Howlett, D.C.; Cox, T.C.S.; Bingham, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    Three patients aged 48, 11 and 40 years, two of whom were recent recipients of renal transplants and one of a bone marrow transplant, developed seizures, with cortical blindness in two cases. All were immunosuppressed with cyclosporine and were hypertensive at the onset of symptoms. MRI showed predominantly posterior signal changes in all three cases. The abnormalities were more conspicuous on fast FLAIR images than on conventional T2-weighted spin-echo images. (orig.). With 4 figs

  3. Treatment of ligneous conjunctivitis with amniotic membrane transplantation and topical cyclosporine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tok, Ozlem Yalcin; Kocaoglu, Fatma Akbas; Tok, Levent; Burcu, Ayse; Ornek, Firdevs

    2012-01-01

    Ligneous conjunctivitis (LC) is a rare form of bilateral chronic recurrent disease in which thick membranes form on the palpebral conjunctiva and other mucosal sites. We report the clinical features and describe the management of two cases. Case 1 was an 8-month-old patient with bilateral membranous conjunctivitis. Case 2 was a 5-year-old patient with unilateral membranous conjunctivitis, esotropia, mechanical ptosis and complicated cataract, and had been treated with a number of medications. Histological investigation of the membrane in both cases showed LC. Treatments with amniotic membrane transplantation and institution of topical cyclosporine have shown good response. There has been complete resolution of the membranes with no recurrence at the end of 40- and 28-month follow-ups, respectively. No treatment related side effects were seen. Thus, it appears that amniotic membrane transplantation and topical cyclosporine are effective alternatives for the treatment of LC. PMID:23202401

  4. Renoprotective effects of antioxidants against cisplatin nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajian Shabnam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotoxicity is the major limitation for the clinical use of cisplatin as an anti-tumoural drug. Intracellular effects of cisplatin cause tubular damage and tubular dysfunction with sodium, potassium, and magnesium wasting. Renoperotective strategies against cisplatin are classified on 8 targets: 1 Decrease of cisplatin uptake by renal cell, 2 Inhibition of cisplatin metabolism, 3 Blocking cell death pathways, 4 Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, 5 Pharmacologic, molecular, and genetic blockade of p53, 6 Inhibition of specific Mitogen-activated protein kinase, 7 Antioxidants usage for renoprotection against cisplatin injury and inhibit of oxidative stress, 8 Suppress of inflammation. The oxidation reactions can produce free radicals, which start chain reactions and subsequently can cause a large number of diseases in humans. Antioxidant from natural products have attracted the physicians’ attentions, nowadays. The natural product antioxidants detoxify reactive oxygen species (ROS in kidneys, without affecting the anticancer efficacy of cisplatin. Hence, antioxidants have potential therapeutic applications.

  5. 76 FR 78815 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Cyclosporine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ..., Inc. The NADA provides for the veterinary prescription use of cyclosporine oral solution, USP.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Angela K.S. Clarke, Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-112), Food... (cyclosporine oral solution, USP (MODIFIED)) by veterinary prescription for the control of feline allergic...

  6. Mechanisms of herb-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, T; Wenner, T; Greten, H J; Efferth, T

    2013-01-01

    Herbal therapies gained much popularity among the general public, but compared to therapies approved by official authorities, toxicological studies are frequently not available for them. Hence, there may be inherent risks and the kidneys may be especially vulnerable to toxic effects. Herbs may induce nephrotoxicity by induction of apoptosis. High oxalate contents in Star fruit (Averrhoa carambola L.) may induce acute nephropathy. Triptolide from Thunder God Vine (Triperygium wilfordii Hook) is a diterpenoid epoxide with induces reactive oxygen species and nephrotubular apoptosis. Cranberry juice is discussed as promoter of kidney stone formation (nephrolithiasis). Abuse of guaifenesin from Roughbark (Guaicum officinale L.) increases stone formation. Aristolochia acids from Aristolochia fangchi Y.C.Wu ex L.D. Chow & S.M. Hwang causes the well-known aristolochic acid nephropathy and carcinogenesis by DNA adduct formation. Carboxyatractyloside from Impila (Callilepsis laureola DC.) inhibits mitochondrial ATP synthesis. Acute allergic interstitial nephritis was diagnosed after intake of Peruvian Cat's claw (Uncaria tomentosa Willd. DC.). Whether or not Willow Bark (Salix alba L.) induces analgesic nephropathwy is a matter of discussion. Other herbal therapies are considered to affect the rennin-angiotensisn-aldosterone (RAA) system Ephedra sinica Stapf with its ingredient ephedrine. Devil's Claw (Harpagophytum procumbens DC. Ex Meisn.) and licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra L.) may inhibit major renal transport processes needed for filtration, secretion, and absorption. Strategies to minimize nephrotoxicity include (1) quality control and standardization of herbal products, (2) research on the molecular modes of action to better understand pathophysiological mechanisms of herbal products as well as (3) clinical trials to demonstrate efficacy and safety.

  7. CYCLOSPORIN A IN THERAPY FOR JUVENILE ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E S Fedorov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes approaches to using cyclosporin A (CsA in juvenile arthritis (JA. It shows the benefits of combination basic therapy with CsA and methotrexate included into a treatment regimen mainly for systemic JA and JA involving the eye (uveitis versus monotherapy with the above drugs. Attention is drawn to that the oral dose of glucocorticoids may be decreased when CsA is incorporated into the treatment regimen. CsA is shown to be of value as the drug of choice for the therapy of such a menacing complication of systemic JA as the macrophage activation syndrome

  8. The protective effect of curcumin against lithium-induced nephrotoxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shaterpour

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lithium is an element which has been used as salts of chloride or carbonate for many years in the treatment of some psychological disorders such as mania, bipolar or schizophrenic diseases. Chronic application of lithium may induce some serious nephropathies such as natriuresis, renal tubular acidosis, tubulointerstitial nephritis progression to progressive chronic kidney disease and hypercalcemia and, most commonly, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Curcumin is an antioxidant derived from Curcuma longa (turmeric or curcuma which has the ability to react directly with reactive species and up-regulation of many cytoprotective and antioxidant proteins. The preventive roles of curcumin in nephropathies were reported, but there was little information on the protective effect of curcumin against lithium-induced nephrotoxicity. In this study, male Wistar rats divided into five groups of six each and were treated as follows: group1; animals were received lithium chloride as 2 mmol/kg, group 2; animals were received normal saline (0, 5%, group 3; animals were received curcumin (200 mg/kg, group 4 animals were received curcumin plus lithium and group 5; animals were received solvent intraperitoneally for three weeks. Then the animals were killed and biochemical parameters of blood were assayed and histopathological assessment was performed. The results have shown that curcumin significantly improved the biochemicals (BUN, creatinine, malondialdehyde. Curcumin prevented significantly the histological parameters that were changed by lithium administration in rats. Our results provide new insights into beneficial usages of curcumin in chronic nephrotoxicity induced by lithium salts.

  9. Hepatotoxic and Nephrotoxic Effects of Petroleum Fumes on Petrol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR SULEIMAN

    Hepatotoxic and Nephrotoxic Effects of Petroleum Fumes on Petrol Attendants in Ibadan, Nigeria. *1A.L. Ogunneye ... inhalation of petrol fumes is associated with adverse effect on the kidney and liver function. ..... neurotoxicity in mice. African ...

  10. Amelioration of Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats by Curcumin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Cisplatin, Oxidative stress, Curcumin, α-Tocopherol, Nephrotoxicity. Tropical ... exerts various side effects in several organs particularly in ... Previous study provides evidence which ..... chemotherapy by cisplatin but further in vivo.

  11. Hypomagnesemia and mild rhabdomyolysis in living related donor renal transplant recipient treated with cyclosporine A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavdar, C; Sifil, A; Sanli, E; Gülay, H; Camsari, T

    1998-12-01

    Since cyclosporine A (CsA) had been used in renal transplant recipients, important improvements in short-term and long-term graft survivals have been detected. In spite of these improvements CsA seems to have several adverse effects. First, CsA leads to nephrotoxicity. Moreover, CsA affects the other organs and systems (skin, liver, nervous system, etc.) and causes, increased risks of infections and malignancies. Hypomagnesemia is one of the side effects of CsA therapy, but it is a rare condition in living related donor renal transplant recipients. It may also cause multi-system dysfunction, especially hypocalcemia and hypokalemia, which cannot be corrected without magnesium therapy. In addition, rhabdomyolysis was detected in animals, but it has not been reported in living related donor renal transplant recipients. In this case report, a living related donor renal transplant recipient who suffered from hypomagnesemia and mild rhabdomyolysis due to CsA therapy will be described and discussed.

  12. Contrast media-associated nephrotoxicity - pathogenenesis and prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erley, C.M.; Duda, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    Contrast media-associated nephrotoxicity continues to be a relevant cause of acute renal failure, especially in patients with pre-existing renal insufficiency. Alterations in renal hemodynamics and direct tubular toxicity by contrast media are the primary factors believed to be responsible for contrast media-associated nephrotoxicity. We review recent insights into the pathogenesis of this complication and summarize prophylactic strategies focussing on hydration, vasoactive pharmacological agents, and prophylactic hemodialysis'. (orig.) [de

  13. Retraction Note: The effects of valsartan on renal glutathione peroxidase expression in alleviation of cyclosporine nephrotoxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Raeisi

    2016-12-01

    As a peer-review multidisciplinary international "Publish Free" and "Access Free" journal, BioImpacts strongly adheres to the "Publication Ethics", and its foremost goal is to preserve the integrity of the scientific reports in the highest standards, therefore the journal takes all issues of publication misconduct seriously.

  14. Treatment of ocular rosacea: comparative study of topical cyclosporine and oral doxycycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arman, Aysegul; Demirseren, Duriye Deniz; Takmaz, Tamer

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of topical cyclosporine A emulsion with that of oral doxycycline for rosacea associated ocular changes and dry eye complaints. One hundred and ten patients with rosacea were screened. Thirty-eight patients having rosacea associated eyelid and ocular surface changes and dry eye complaints were included in the study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: nineteen patients were given topical cyclosporine twice daily and nineteen patients were given oral doxycycline 100 mg twice daily for the first month and once daily for the following two months. Symptom and sign scores, ocular surface disease index questionnarie and tear function tests were evaluated at baseline and monthly for 3mo. Three months after results were compared with that of baseline. Mean values of symptom, eyelid sign and corneal/conjunctival sign scores of each treatment group at baseline and 3mo after treatments were compared and both drugs were found to be effective on rosacea associated ocular changes (Ptreatment of eyelid signs (P=0.01). There was statistically significant increase in the mean Schirmer score with anesthesia and tear break up time scores in the cyclosporine treatment group compared to the doxycycline treatment group (Ptreatment of rosacea associated ocular complications because it is more effective than doxycycline. In addition ocular rosacea as a chronic disease requires long term treatment and doxycycline has various side effects limiting its long term usage.

  15. Generation and characterization of cyclosporine aerosols for administration by inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, M.D.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Wolff, R.K.; Yeh, H.C.; Griffith, B.P.; Burckart, G.J.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    A method was developed for generating aerosols of the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine and a gamma-emitting radiolabel ( 99m Tc) for administration by inhalation. Cyclosporine was dissolved in ethyl alcohol (EtOH) and nebulized with a Love- lace nebulizer operated with 50 psi compressed air. For a cyclosporine concentration of 25 mg/mL, the particle size of the aerosol was 0.7 μm activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD), with 1.8 geometric standard deviation (GSD). The clear solution of EtOH and cyclosporine became a cloudy suspension when a limited amount of saline solution containing a 99m Tc radiolabel was added. This occurred because cyclosporine is hydrophobic. If saline concentrations as high as 6% in EtOH by volume were used, a gummy residue formed in the nebulizer and the particle aerodynamic diameter became unacceptably large (4.7 μm). When the saline concentration was only 3 % (the minimum radiolabel volume needed for gamma camera studies of lung deposition), the suspensions of cyclosporine could be nebulized to give a particle size of 2.2 μm AMAD with 2.1 GSD. The radiolabel was uniformly distributed with the spherical cyclosporine particles. Concentrations and particle size distributions remained constant over 1-h generation periods. These aerosols have been used in inhalation studies with Beagle dogs. (author)

  16. Generalized pustular psoriasis of pregnancy successfully treated with cyclosporine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Debeeka

    2009-01-01

    Two multigravidae aged 27 and 29 years, with previous uneventful pregnancies, second being psoriatic, reported at 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancies, with generalized pustular lesions. Laboratory findings, including serum calcium were normal. Ultrasonography showed normal fetal growth. Histopathology confirmed pustular psoriasis. Patients were put on cyclosporine 3 mg/ kg weight/ day after failure of an initial systemic steroid. Blood pressure, pulse, and fetal heart sounds were recorded every 12 hours, and ultrasonography and blood parameters, biweekly. Cyclosporine was tapered and stopped after delivery of two healthy babies at 38 weeks. We conclude that cyclosporine can be an option in the management of pustular psoriasis of pregnancy or psoriasis with pustulation in pregnancy.

  17. Radioimmunoassay of salivary cyclosporine with use of 125I-labeled cyclosporine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coates, J.E.; Lam, S.F.; McGaw, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    We prepared 125 I-labeled cyclosporine ( 125 I-CS) by modifying the procedure of Mahoney and Orf and characterized it with regards to maximal immunoreactivity (greater than 90%), trichloroacetic acid precipitability (greater than 90%), and stability (90% immunoreactive after five half-lives of 125 I). For a particular preparation of 125 I-CS, we estimated its immunoreaction concentration (50 pmol/L) and the equilibrium constant for its reaction with Sandoz polyclonal antiserum (K = 3.9 X 10(9) L/mol). By substituting 125 I-CS as tracer in the Sandoz radioimmunoassay and by modifying other aspects of the assay, we developed a procedure that is sufficiently sensitive (0.34 micrograms/L) to allow measurement of trough (lowest inter-dose) cyclosporine concentrations in parotid saliva. Of 38 kidney-transplant patients, 35 had measurable concentrations in saliva (mean 8.3, SD 5.2 micrograms/L), and these correlated moderately with paired serum concentrations (r = 0.68, P less than 0.001). We believe that measurement of salivary cyclosporine may offer a simple way of estimating the free fraction of the drug in serum or plasma

  18. Nonalbumin proteinuria predominates in biopsy-proven tenofovir nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sise, Meghan E; Hirsch, Jamie S; Canetta, Pietro A; Herlitz, Leal; Mohan, Sumit

    2015-05-15

    Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) nephrotoxicity is characterized by proximal renal tubular injury and dysmorphic mitochondria resulting in proteinuria, orthoglycemic glycosuria, and other markers of proximal tubular dysfunction. The objective of this study was to determine the pattern of proteinuria in patients with biopsy-proven TDF nephrotoxicity. Retrospective chart review. Patients with biopsy-proven TDF nephrotoxicity were identified and their medical charts and biopsy reports were reviewed. Comparison was made with HIV-infected patients not on TDF who underwent kidney biopsy. We identified 43 biopsy-proven cases of TDF nephrotoxicity; mean age 54.7 ± 0.4 years, 53% men, 42% whites. Thirty-seven cases reported proteinuria by dipstick of which only 60% had at least 2+ proteinuria. Twenty-seven patients had urine protein quantified by either 24-h collection or spot urine protein-to-creatinine ratio; median proteinuria was 1742 mg/day [interquartile range (IQR) 1200-2000 mg] and 1667 mg/g creatinine (IQR 851-1967 mg/g), respectively. Ten patients had concurrent urinary albumin measured, with a median 236 mg/g creatinine (IQR 137-343 mg/g). The mean urine albumin-to-urine protein ratio (uAPR) was 0.17 (IQR 0.14-0.19), confirming that TDF nephrotoxicity is primarily associated with nonalbumin proteinuria. Control cases had a uAPR of 0.65 (IQR 0.55-0.79) P < 0.001. Histopathology showed the predominance of proximal tubular injury with characteristic mitochondrial abnormalities. In the largest published cohort of patients with biopsy-proven TDF nephrotoxicity, we show that low uAPR is a reliable feature of this disease. Because of the predominance of nonalbumin proteinuria, dipstick urinalysis may be unreliable in TDF nephrotoxicity.

  19. Telmisartan attenuates chronic ciclosporin A nephrotoxicity in a pig model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cibulskyte, Donata; Pedersen, Michael; Hørlyck, Arne

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated renal enlargement in pigs treated with ciclosporin A (CsA) 10 mg/kg/day orally for 6 months. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of oral CsA (10 mg/kg/day) for 12 months on kidney structure and function and the potential renoprotective ro...

  20. Combination cyclosporine and (hydroxy)chloroquine in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkmans, B. A.; Landewé, R. B.; van den Borne, B. E.; Breedveld, F. C.

    1999-01-01

    Antimalarials are attractive candidates for combination therapy. In vitro experiments have revealed a synergistic mode of action of cyclosporine and chloroquine which could not, however, be confirmed in a clinical trial

  1. Histopathological Study of Cyclosporine Pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Said Elshama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclosporine is considered one of the common worldwide immunosuppressive drugs that are used for allograft rejection prevention. However, articles that address adverse effects of cyclosporine use on the vital organs such as lung are still few. This study aims to investigate pulmonary toxic effect of cyclosporine in rats by assessment of pulmonary histopathological changes using light and electron microscope examination. Sixty male adult albino rats were divided into three groups; each group consists of twenty rats. The first received physiological saline while the second and third groups received 25 and 40 mg/kg/day of cyclosporine, respectively, by gastric gavage for forty-five days. Cyclosporine reduced the lung and body weight with shrinkage or pyknotic nucleus of pneumocyte type II, degeneration of alveoli and interalveolar septum beside microvilli on the alveolar surface, emphysema, inflammatory cellular infiltration, pulmonary blood vessels congestion, and increase of fibrous tissues in the interstitial tissues and around alveoli with negative Periodic Acid-Schiff staining. Prolonged use of cyclosporine induced pulmonary ultrastructural and histopathological changes with the lung and body weight reduction depending on its dose.

  2. Cyclosporine treatment of steroid-refractory ulcerative colitis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branche, Julien; Cortot, Antoine; Bourreille, Arnaud; Coffin, Benoît; de Vos, Martine; de Saussure, Philippe; Seksik, Philippe; Marteau, Philippe; Lemann, Marc; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2009-07-01

    Cyclosporine is considered a safe and effective treatment of severe steroid-refractory ulcerative colitis (UC). However, few data are available concerning its safety profile in pregnant women. We report here the experience of 5 GETAID centers. In a retrospective study data on patients with severe UC treated with cyclosporine during pregnancy were extracted from medical records of consecutive patients treated between 2001 and 2007. Eight patients (median age 30.5 years old) were identified. At the time of flare-up the median duration of pregnancy was 11.5 weeks of gestation (range 4-25). Seven patients had pancolitis. All patients had more than 3 commonly used clinical and biological severity criteria. Three patients had severe endoscopic lesions and 5 patients had not. All patients received intravenous corticosteroids for at least 7 days before introduction of cyclosporine. Two patients received azathioprine during treatment with cyclosporine. No severe infections or other complications due to treatment were observed. Treatment was effective in 7/8 patients. One patient received infliximab due to cyclosporine therapy failure with a good outcome. No colectomy was performed during pregnancy. Seven pregnancies were conducted to term, but 1 in utero death occurred due to maternal absence of S-protein. Two newborns were premature, including 1 case of hypotrophy. No malformations were observed. In our experience, treatment with cyclosporine for steroid-refractory UC during pregnancy can be considered safe and effective.

  3. [Current research situation of nephrotoxicity of Chinese herbal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xue; Fang, Sai-Nan; Gao, Yu-Xin; Liu, Jian-Ping; Chen, Wei

    2018-02-01

    To provide the basis for the future research on the nephrotoxicity of Chinese herbal medicine through systematic and comprehensive summary of all the Chinese herbal medicines which may lead to nephrotoxicity. Foreign resources included PubMed and Cochrane library, and domestic research resources was China Food and Drug Administration(CDFA) Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring Center database. The databases were searched from establishment to January 1, 2017. There was no limitation on research type. 28 English studies were found, including 97 Chinese herbs or prescriptions with the risk of nephrotoxicity. The following six Chinese herbal medicines with the risk of nephrotoxicity had a large number of studies: aristolochic acid(5 studies), Tripterygium wilfordii(4 studies), Erycibe obtusifolia(2 studies), Rheum palmatum(2 studies), Ephedra sinica(2 studies), and Atractylodes lances(2 studies). The remaining 91 Chinese medicines were reported with risk of nephrotoxicity in only 1 study respectively. CDFA reported 16 Chinese herbal medicines with the risk of nephrotoxicity, including Ganmaoqing Pian(capsule), Zhenju Jiangya Pian, T. wilfordii preparation, Vc-Yinqiao Pian, Chuanhuning injection, Shuanghuanglian injection, Qingkailing injection, Lianbizhi injection, herbal decoction containing Aristolochiae Radix, Guanxin Suhe Wan, Shugan Liqi Wan, Ershiwuwei Songshi Wan, herbal decoction containing Aristolochia Fangchi, herbal granules containing root of Kaempfer Dutchmanspipe, Ganmaotong(tablets), and Longdan Xiegan Wan. Currently, in addition to aristolochic acids, the most reported Chinese herbal medicine with the risk of nephrotoxicity is T. wilfordii preparation. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  4. Nefrotoxicidade por lítio Lithium nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jobson Lopes de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O lítio é amplamente empregado na terapia do transtorno bipolar. Sua toxicidade renal inclui distúrbio na capacidade de concentração urinária e natriurese, acidose tubular renal, nefrite túbulo-intersticial evoluindo para doença renal crônica e hipercalcemia. O efeito adverso mais comum é o diabetes insipidus nefrogênico, que acomete de 20%-40% dos pacientes semanas após o início do tratamento. A nefropatia crônica correlaciona-se com a duração do uso de lítio. A detecção precoce de disfunção renal deve ser feita através de monitoração rigorosa dos pacientes e colaboração entre o psiquiatra e o nefrologista. Recentes trabalhos experimentais e clínicos começam a esclarecer os mecanismos pelos quais o lítio induz alteração da função renal. No presente trabalho, objetivamos revisar a patogênese, a apresentação clínica, os aspectos histopatológicos e o tratamento da nefrotoxicidade induzida pelo lítio.Lithium is widely used in the therapy of bipolar disorder. Its toxicity includes urinary concentration deficit and natriuresis, renal tubular acidosis, tubulointerstitial nephritis which complicates with chronic kidney disease and hypercalcemia. The most common adverse effect is diabetes insipidus, which occurs in 20-40% of patients some weeks after initiation of treatment. Such chronic nephropathy correlates with duration of lithium use. Early detection of renal dysfunction should be achieved by rigorous monitoring of patients and collaboration between the psychiatrist and nephrologist. Recent experimental and clinical studies are now clarifying the mechanisms by which lithium induces renal abnormalities. The aim of this work is to review the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, histopathologic aspects and treatment of lithium nephrotoxicity.

  5. Tissue distribution, disposition, and metabolism of cyclosporine in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, O.; Schreier, E.; Heitz, F.; Maurer, G.

    1987-01-01

    Tissue distribution, disposition, and metabolism of 3 H-cyclosporine were studied in rats after single and repeated oral doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg and after an iv dose of 3 mg/kg. The oral doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg were dissolved in polyethylene glycol 200/ethanol or in olive oil/Labrafil/ethanol. Absorption from both formulations was slow and incomplete, with peak 3 H blood levels at 3-4 hr. Approximately 30% of the radioactive dose was absorbed, which is consistent with oral bioavailability data for cyclosporine. More than 70% of the radioactivity was excreted in feces and up to 15% in urine. Elimination via the bile accounted for 10 and 60% of the oral and iv doses, respectively. Since unchanged cyclosporine predominated in both blood and tissues at early time points, the half-lives of the distribution phases (t 1/2 alpha) of parent drug and of total radioactivity were similar. In blood, kidney, liver, and lymph nodes, t 1/2 alpha of cyclosporine ranged from 6-10 hr. Elimination of radioactivity from the systemic circulation was multiphasic, with a terminal half-life of 20-30 hr. 3 H-Cyclosporine was extensively distributed throughout the body, with highest concentrations in liver, kidney, endocrine glands, and adipose tissue. The concentrations of both total radioactivity and parent drug were greater in tissues than in blood, which is consistent with the high lipid solubility of cyclosporine and some of its metabolites. Skin and adipose tissue were the main storage sites for unchanged cyclosporine. Elimination half-lives were slower for most tissues than for blood and increased with multiple dosing. The amount of unchanged drug was negligible in urine and bile

  6. Cyclosporine Amicellar delivery system for dry eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Han; Cha, Kwang-Ho; Cho, Wonkyung; Park, Junsung; Park, Hee Jun; Sun, Bo Kyung; Hyun, Sang-Min; Hwang, Sung-Joo

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop stable cyclosporine A (CsA) ophthalmic micelle solutions for dry-eye syndrome and evaluate their physicochemical properties and therapeutic efficacy. CsA-micelle solutions (MS-CsA) were created by a simple method with Cremophor EL, ethanol, and phosphate buffer. We investigated the particle size, pH, and osmolarity. In addition, long-term physical and chemical stability for MS-CsA was observed. To confirm the therapeutic efficacy, tear production in dry eye-induced rabbits was evaluated using the Schirmer tear test (STT). When compared to a commercial product, Restasis, MS-CsA demonstrated improvement in goblet-cell density and conjunctival epithelial morphology, as demonstrated in histological hematoxylin and eosin staining. MS-CsA had a smaller particle size (average diameter 14-18 nm) and a narrow size distribution. Physicochemical parameters, such as particle size, pH, osmolarity, and remaining CsA concentration were all within the expected range of 60 days. STT scores significantly improved in MS-CsA treated groups (Pdry eye-induced rabbits thinned with loss of goblet cells. However, after 5 days of treatment with drug formulations, rabbit conjunctivas recovered epithelia and showed a relative increase in the number of goblet cells. The results of this study indicate the potential use of a novel MS for the ophthalmic delivery of CsA in treating dry eyes.

  7. Brown spider dermonecrotic toxin directly induces nephrotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaim, Olga Meiri; Sade, Youssef Bacila; Bertoni da Silveira, Rafael; Toma, Leny; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Chavez-Olortegui, Carlos; Mangili, Oldemir Carlos; Gremski, Waldemiro; Dietrich, Carl Peter von; Nader, Helena B.; Sanches Veiga, Silvio

    2006-01-01

    culture substratum. In addition, dermonecrotic toxin treatment of MDCK cells changed their viability evaluated by XTT and Neutral-Red Uptake methodologies. The present results point to brown spider dermonecrotic toxin cytotoxicity upon renal structures in vivo and renal cells in vitro and provide experimental evidence that this brown spider toxin is directly involved in nephrotoxicity evoked during Loxosceles spider venom accidents

  8. Hepatotoxic and Nephrotoxic Effects of Petroleum Fumes on Petrol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic effects of petroleum fumes on male and female petrol attendants. Investigations had been carried out on thirty (30) adult petrol attendants from different filling stations in Ibadan metropolis of Nigeria with ten (10) healthy adults as control. All the ...

  9. Everolimus and sirolimus in combination with cyclosporine have different effects on renal metabolism in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Bohra

    Full Text Available Enhancement of calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity by sirolimus (SRL is limiting the clinical use of this drug combination. We compared the dose-dependent effects of the structurally related everolimus (EVL and sirolimus (SRL alone, and in combination with cyclosporine (CsA, on the rat kidney. Lewis rats were treated by oral gavage for 28 days using a checkerboard dosing format (0, 3.0, 6.0 and 10.0 CsA and 0, 0.5, 1.5 and 3.0 mg/kg/day SRL or EVL, n = 4/dose combination. After 28 days, oxidative stress, energy charge, kidney histologies, glomerular filtration rates, and concentrations of the immunosuppressants were measured along with (1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS and gas chromatography- mass spectrometry profiles of cellular metabolites in urine. The combination of CsA with SRL led to higher urinary glucose concentrations and decreased levels of urinary Krebs cycle metabolites when compared to controls, suggesting that CsA+SRL negatively impacted proximal tubule metabolism. Unsupervised principal component analysis of MRS spectra distinguished unique urine metabolite patterns of rats treated with CsA+SRL from those treated with CsA+EVL and the controls. SRL, but not EVL blood concentrations were inversely correlated with urine Krebs cycle metabolite concentrations. Interestingly, the higher the EVL concentration, the closer urine metabolite patterns resembled those of controls, while in contrast, the combination of the highest doses of CsA+SRL showed the most significant differences in metabolite patterns. Surprisingly in this rat model, EVL and SRL in combination with CsA had different effects on kidney biochemistry, suggesting that further exploration of EVL in combination with low dose calcineurin inhibitors may be of potential benefit.

  10. TREATMENT OF STEROID DEPENDENT ASTHMATICS WITH LOW DOSES OF CYCLOSPORINE

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    Stanislav Šuškovič

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Asthmatics with glucocorticoid dependent asthma should be treated with systemic steroids. Cyclosporine is in many ways a potent anti-inflammatory drug. Cyclosporine is sometimes very effective in treating asthmatics and could allow us to lower the dose of oral steroid. In some randomized, double blind studies steroid dependent asthmatics were treated 12–36 weeks with cyclosporine in dose 5 mg/kg/day. We tried cyclosporine in steroid dependent asthmatics in shorter course and in lower dose.Methods. 13 steroid dependent asthmatics were in the first four weeks of the study treated by their own drugs (phase 1. Then they were for the next four weeks (phase 2 randomly and in double blind fashion treated with either cyclosporine (mean 1.7 mg/kg/day, SD 0.5, 6 patients – group 1 or by identical placebo (7 patients – group 2. To the patients in the group 2 serum concentration of cyclosporine was measured on the eight day of the study.Results. Morning peak expiratory flow (PEF raised significantly in group 1 (200 L/sec to 247 L/sec or for 23%. Patients in group1 had significantly less episodes of nocturnal asthma (2.2 episodes/night to 1.5 episodes/night or for 32%. In group 2 were not found any changes between first phase and second phase of the study. Steroid consumption did not change in any group. Mean serum concentration of cyclosporine in patients of group1 was 35.7 µg/L. We did not find any adverse effects of cyclosporine or placebo.Conclusions. Cyclosporine could have dangerous side effects, which are dependent on its serum concentration. So it should be administered in the lowest possible dose and for the most possible short period. In our study it was found that it is possible to successfully treat steroid dependent asthmatics with lower daily dose and for shorter time, than was found in other similar studies.

  11. PERSIST: Physician's Evaluation of Restasis® Satisfaction in Second Trial of topical cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion 0.05% for dry eye: a retrospective review

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    Mah F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Francis Mah,1 Mark Milner,2 Samuel Yiu,3 Eric Donnenfeld,4 Taryn M Conway,5 David A Hollander51University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 2The Eye Center, Hamden, CT, 3University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 4Ophthalmic Consultants of Long Island and Connecticut, Rockville Centre, New York, NY, 5Allergan Inc, Irvine, CA, USABackground: Chronic dry eye disease often requires long-term therapy. Tear film alterations in the setting of dry eye may include reduced tear volume as well as an increase in inflammatory cytokines and osmolarity. Topical cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion 0.05% (Restasis®; Allergan Inc, Irvine, CA is indicated to increase tear production in patients with dry eye and reduced tear production presumed to be due to ocular inflammation. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of a second trial of topical cyclosporine in patients with dry eye who were previously considered treatment failures.Materials and methods: This multicenter (three cornea practices retrospective chart review evaluated clinical outcomes in patients with dry eye who received a second trial of cyclosporine after a prior treatment failure, defined as prior discontinuation of topical cyclosporine after less than 12 weeks.Results: Thirty-five patients, most of whom were female (71.4% and Caucasian (62.9%, were identified. Prior discontinuation was most commonly due to burning/stinging (60%. The median duration of second treatment was 10 months (range 1 week to 45 months. Physician education was provided in the second trial in 97.1% of cases. At initiation of the second trial of cyclosporine, 10 (28.6% patients received courses of topical corticosteroids. Physicians reported on a questionnaire that 80% of patients achieved clinical benefit with a second trial of cyclosporine.Conclusion: A repeat trial with topical cyclosporine can achieve clinical success. Direct patient education via the physician and staff may be key to success. Proper patient

  12. Cyclosporine Amicellar delivery system for dry eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Han; Cha, Kwang-Ho; Cho, Wonkyung; Park, Junsung; Park, Hee Jun; Sun, Bo Kyung; Hyun, Sang-Min; Hwang, Sung-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background The objectives of this study were to develop stable cyclosporine A (CsA) ophthalmic micelle solutions for dry-eye syndrome and evaluate their physicochemical properties and therapeutic efficacy. Materials and methods CsA-micelle solutions (MS-CsA) were created by a simple method with Cremophor EL, ethanol, and phosphate buffer. We investigated the particle size, pH, and osmolarity. In addition, long-term physical and chemical stability for MS-CsA was observed. To confirm the therapeutic efficacy, tear production in dry eye-induced rabbits was evaluated using the Schirmer tear test (STT). When compared to a commercial product, Restasis, MS-CsA demonstrated improvement in goblet-cell density and conjunctival epithelial morphology, as demonstrated in histological hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results MS-CsA had a smaller particle size (average diameter 14–18 nm) and a narrow size distribution. Physicochemical parameters, such as particle size, pH, osmolarity, and remaining CsA concentration were all within the expected range of 60 days. STT scores significantly improved in MS-CsA treated groups (P<0.05) in comparison to those of the Restasis-treated group. The number of goblet cells for rabbit conjunctivas after the administration of MS-CsA was 94.83±8.38, a significantly higher result than the 65.17±11.51 seen with Restasis. The conjunctival epithelial morphology of dry eye-induced rabbits thinned with loss of goblet cells. However, after 5 days of treatment with drug formulations, rabbit conjunctivas recovered epithelia and showed a relative increase in the number of goblet cells. Conclusion The results of this study indicate the potential use of a novel MS for the ophthalmic delivery of CsA in treating dry eyes. PMID:27382280

  13. Iodinated contrast media nephrotoxicity. Nephrotoxicite des produits de contraste iodes

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    Meyrier, A. (Hopital Avicenne, 93 - Bobigny (France))

    1994-01-01

    In the late seventies, iodinated contrast agents (ICA) were considered to be a major cause of acute iatrogenic renal failure. Over the last decade new contrast agents have been synthesized, nonionic and less hyperosmolar. The incidence of acute renal failure due to ICAs, varies from 3.7 to 70% of cases according to the series, with an average figure of 10.2%. The pathophysiology of ICA nephrotoxicity was mainly studied in laboratory animal models. Three main factors are involved in an inducing ICA-mediated decrease in glomerular filtration rate: reduction of the renal plasma flow, a direct cytotoxic effect on renal tubular cells and erythrocyte alteration leading to intra-renal sludge. Excluding dysglobulinemias with urinary excretion of immunoglobulin light chains, which represent a special case of maximum nephrotoxicity, 4 main risk factors of renal toxicity have been identified in nondiabetic subjects: previous renal failure with serum creatinine levels greater than 140 [mu]mol per liter, extracellular dehydration, age over 60 and use of high doses of ICA and/or repeated ICA injections before serum creatinine levels return to baseline. Preventive measures for avoiding ICA nephrotoxicity are threefold: maintain or restore adequate hydration with saline infusion, stop NSAID treatment several days before ICA administration, and allow a 5 day interval before repeating contrast media injections. New, nonionic and moderately hyperosmolar contrast agents appear to be much less nephrotoxic than conventional ICAs in laboratory animals and in high-risk patients. It is advisable to select such contrast media for investigating high-risk patients. This approach was recently substantiated in well designed, randomized clinical studies which included more than 2 000 patients. (author).

  14. Evaluation of risk factors for vancomycin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Jin; Lim, Na Ri; Park, Hyo Jung; Yang, Jae Wook; Kim, Min-Ji; Kim, Kyunga; In, Yong Won; Lee, Young Mee

    2018-05-09

    Background Vancomycin is a glycopeptide antibiotic of choice for the treatment of serious infections caused by multi-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. However, vancomycin-associated nephrotoxicity (VAN) often limits its use. Previous data suggested a few risk factors of VAN, including higher mean vancomycin trough level, higher daily doses, old age, long duration of vancomycin therapy, and concomitant nephrotoxins. Objective To evaluate the incidence and risk factors of VAN and determine whether higher vancomycin trough concentrations were associated with a greater risk for VAN. Settings A retrospective, observational, single-center study at the 1960-bed university-affiliated tertiary care hospital (Samsung Medical Center), Seoul, Korea. Method A retrospective analysis of adult patients who received vancomycin parenterally in a tertiary care medical center from March 1, 2013 to June 30, 2013 was performed. We excluded patients with a baseline serum creatinine level > 2 mg/dL and those who had a history of end-stage renal disease and dialysis at baseline. The clinical characteristics were compared between patients with nephrotoxicity and those without nephrotoxicity to identify the risk factors associated with VAN. Main outcome measure Incidence of VAN and VAN-associated risk factors were analyzed. Results Of the 315 vancomycin-treated patients, nephrotoxicity occurred in 15.2% of the patients. In multivariate analysis, higher vancomycin trough concentrations of > 20 mg∕L (OR 9.57, 95% CI 2.49-36.83, p < 0.01) and intensive care unit (ICU) residence (OR 2.86, 95% CI 1.41-5.82, p < 0.01) were independently associated with VAN. Conclusion Our findings suggest that higher vancomycin trough levels and ICU residence might be associated with a greater risk for VAN. More careful monitoring of vancomycin serum trough levels and patient status might facilitate the timely prevention of VAN.

  15. Physicochemical properties of radiographic contrast media, potential nephrotoxicity and prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogstrom, Barry; Ikei, Nobuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) remains a controversial topic. The clinical relevance of changes in laboratory parameters has been challenged; some authors have even suggested that CIN simply reflects natural fluctuations. Other areas of controversy include the pathophysiology of CIN, effectiveness of prophylactic approaches and differences in nephrotoxicity between individual contrast media (CM). The aim of this review is to summarize the current understanding of laboratory findings and explore its relationship to CM toxicity. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Tropisetron attenuates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirak, Mohammad Reza; Rahimian, Reza; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Abbasi, Ata; Razmi, Ali; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaei; Mousavizadeh, Kazem; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2014-09-05

    Nephrotoxicity is one of the most important complications of cisplatin, a potent chemotherapeutic agent used in the treatment of various malignancies. 5-HT3 antagonists are widely used to counteract chemotherapy-induced emesis and new studies reveal that they poses notable anti-inflammatory properties. In current study, we investigated the effects of 5-HT3 antagonists on cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in mice. To identify the underlying mechanism of renal protection by tropisetron, we investigated the probable involvement of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR). A single injection of cisplatin (20mg/kg; i.p) induced nephrotoxicity, 5-HT3 antagonists (tropisetron, granisetron and ondansetron,) were given twice daily for 3 day (3mg/kg; i.p). Finally animals were euthanized and blood sample was collected to measure urea and creatinin level. Also kidneys were removed for histopathological examination and biochemical measurements including glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and inflammatory cytokines. Tropisetron decreased the expression of inflammatory molecules including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and iNOS and improved histopathological damage and renal dysfunction. However other 5-HT3 antagonists, granisetron or ondansetron do not have any elicit effects on biochemical markers and histological damages. Since methyllycaconitine, antagonist of α7nAChR, was unable to reverse the beneficial effect of tropisetron, we concluded that this effect of tropisetron is not mediated by α7nAChR.Our results showed that tropisetron treatment markedly ameliorated the experimental cisplatin induced-nephrotoxicity and this effect might be 5-HT3 receptor and α7nAChR independent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Tacrolimus versus cyclosporin as primary immunosuppression for lung transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Luit; Penninga, Ida Elisabeth Irene; Møller, Christian H

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplantation is a well-accepted treatment for people with most end-stage lung diseases. Although both tacrolimus and cyclosporin are used as primary immunosuppressive agents in lung transplant recipients, it is unclear which of these drugs is better in reducing rejection and death without...

  18. Treatment with cyclosporine A in serpiginous choroiditis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Dragana

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Serpiginous choroiditis is a rare clinical entity. The clinical course of serpiginous choroiditis is very variable, there is no universal marker of treatment success, and even among experts there is debate about what is the most appropriate treatment. The aim of this paper is to describe a case of serpiginous choroiditis treated with Cyclosporine A at a tertiary uveitis referral centre.

  19. Cutaneous papillomatous hyperplasia in cyclosporine-A treated beagles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, W; Sundberg, J P; Lesko, L J; Sauk, J J; McCleary, L B; Hassell, T M

    1989-08-01

    All twelve Beagle dogs undergoing long-term therapy (26 weeks) with the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporine-A (30 mg/kg), developed cutaneous papillomatous hyperplasia. By week 7 all dogs developed generalized lesions distributed over the entire body. These occurred as irregular, oval, sessile, unpigmented, firm masses. The incidence and severity of the skin lesions varied among dogs and anatomic site, with no correlation to the blood level of cyclosporine. Microscopic analysis revealed that the epidermis formed short papillary folds on broad fibrovascular stalks and was hyperkeratotic and acanthotic. Mild hyperplasia of hair follicles and sebaceous glands was also evident. A mild diffuse infiltrate of lymphocytes and plasma cells was present in the papillary dermis. No histopathologic changes typical of papillomavirus infection were identified, nor were papillomavirus group-specific antigens or viral DNA detected. Other cutaneous side effects included hyperkeratosis of footpads, increased growth of hair and nails, and hyperkeratinization of the haired skin of the prepuce. All cutaneous lesions regressed spontaneously within 8 weeks following termination of cyclosporine administration. The hyperplastic lesions may have resulted from the action of cyclosporine via the T-lymphocyte system. Conversely a direct action of this drug on epithelial cells may have stimulated proliferation and keratinization.

  20. Treatment of psoriasis with cyclosporin | Nevin | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 85, No 11 (1995) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Treatment of psoriasis with cyclosporin. R.J. Nevin, E.J. Schulz. Abstract.

  1. Cyclosporine Induces Endothelial Cell Release of Complement-Activating Microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Brandon; Klawitter, Jelena; Goldberg, Ryan; McCullough, James W.; Ferreira, Viviana P.; Cooper, James E.; Christians, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Defective control of the alternative pathway of complement is an important risk factor for several renal diseases, including atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Infections, drugs, pregnancy, and hemodynamic insults can trigger episodes of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in susceptible patients. Although the mechanisms linking these clinical events with disease flares are unknown, recent work has revealed that each of these clinical conditions causes cells to release microparticles. We hypothesized that microparticles released from injured endothelial cells promote intrarenal complement activation. Calcineurin inhibitors cause vascular and renal injury and can trigger hemolytic uremic syndrome. Here, we show that endothelial cells exposed to cyclosporine in vitro and in vivo release microparticles that activate the alternative pathway of complement. Cyclosporine-induced microparticles caused injury to bystander endothelial cells and are associated with complement-mediated injury of the kidneys and vasculature in cyclosporine-treated mice. Cyclosporine-induced microparticles did not bind factor H, an alternative pathway regulatory protein present in plasma, explaining their complement-activating phenotype. Finally, we found that in renal transplant patients, the number of endothelial microparticles in plasma increases 2 weeks after starting tacrolimus, and treatment with tacrolimus associated with increased C3 deposition on endothelial microparticles in the plasma of some patients. These results suggest that injury-associated release of endothelial microparticles is an important mechanism by which systemic insults trigger intravascular complement activation and complement-dependent renal diseases. PMID:24092930

  2. Novel quinolinone-phosphonic acid AMPA antagonists devoid of nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordi, Alex A; Desos, Patrice; Ruano, Elisabeth; Al-Badri, Hashim; Fugier, Claude; Chapman, Astrid G; Meldrum, Brian S; Thomas, Jean-Yves; Roger, Anita; Lestage, Pierre

    2002-10-01

    We reported previously the synthesis and structure-activity relationships (SAR) in a series of 2-(1H)-oxoquinolines bearing different acidic functions in the 3-position. Exploiting these SAR, we were able to identify 6,7-dichloro-2-(1H)-oxoquinoline-3-phosphonic acid compound 3 (S 17625) as a potent, in vivo active AMPA antagonist. Unfortunately, during the course of the development, nephrotoxicity was manifest at therapeutically effective doses. Considering that some similitude exists between S 17625 and probenecid, a compound known to protect against the nephrotoxicity and/or slow the clearance of different drugs, we decided to synthesise some new analogues of S 17625 incorporating some of the salient features of probenecid. Replacement of the chlorine in position 6 by a sulfonylamine led to very potent AMPA antagonists endowed with good in vivo activity and lacking nephrotoxicity potential. Amongst the compounds evaluated, derivatives 7a and 7s appear to be the most promising and are currently evaluated in therapeutically relevant stroke models.

  3. IMRT limits nephrotoxicity after chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trip, Anouk Kirsten; Nijkamp, Jasper; Tinteren, Harm van; Cats, Annemieke; Boot, Henk; Jansen, Edwin Petrus Marianus; Verheij, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This observational study compares the effect of different radiotherapy techniques on late nephrotoxicity after postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer. Patients and methods: Dosimetric parameters were compared between AP–PA, 3D-conformal and IMRT techniques. Renal function was measured by 99m Tc-MAG-3 renography, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the development of hypertension. Mixed effects models were used to compare renal function over time. Results: Eighty-seven patients treated between 2002 and 2010 were included, AP–PA (n = 31), 3D-conformal (n = 25) and IMRT (n = 31), all 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy: 5FU/leucovorin (n = 4), capecitabine (n = 37), and capecitabine/cisplatin (n = 46). Median follow-up time was 4.7 years (range 0.2–8). With IMRT, the mean dose to the left kidney was significantly lower. Left kidney function decreased progressively in the total study population, however with IMRT this occurred at a lower rate. A dose–effect relationship was present between mean dose to the left kidney and the left kidney function. GFR decreased only moderately in time, which was not different between techniques. Six patients developed hypertension, of whom none in the IMRT group. Conclusions: This study confirms progressive late nephrotoxicity in patients treated with postoperative chemoradiotherapy by different techniques for gastric cancer. Nephrotoxicity was less severe with IMRT and should be considered the preferred technique

  4. [Influence of dose regimen on gentamycin nephrotoxicity in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, V C; Tejos, C R; Hosaka, E M; Andrade, S C; Araújo, M; Vattimo, M F

    2001-06-01

    The acute renal failure (ARF), that still presents a right mortality rate (50%) can be defined as an abrupt decline of the glomerular filtration, resultant of ischemic or toxicity event. The drugs nephrotoxicity is one of the most frequent cause (27%) of ARF and it is suggested that the interval of administration of the drug can interfere in this side effect, however the best administration regimen is not very well established. This study evaluated the renal function of rats that received gentamicin (100 mg/kg) in one dose or in two doses (2 x 50 mg/kg), by intraperitoneal infusion. The results obtained in this research, indicated that the single infusion of gentamicin determined smaller nephrotoxicity by the reduction of serum concentration of this drug in 24 hours, decreasing the intracellular accumulation of this gentamicin, which is one of the main cellular mechanisms of this renal injury. The single dose treatment regime, otherwise, shows advantages not only related to the nephrotoxicity effect, but also it is relevant to the cost and safety, which can be rationable factors in the administration of this drug.

  5. IMRT limits nephrotoxicity after chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trip, Anouk Kirsten; Nijkamp, Jasper; van Tinteren, Harm; Cats, Annemieke; Boot, Henk; Jansen, Edwin Petrus Marianus; Verheij, Marcel

    2014-08-01

    This observational study compares the effect of different radiotherapy techniques on late nephrotoxicity after postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer. Dosimetric parameters were compared between AP-PA, 3D-conformal and IMRT techniques. Renal function was measured by (99m)Tc-MAG-3 renography, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the development of hypertension. Mixed effects models were used to compare renal function over time. Eighty-seven patients treated between 2002 and 2010 were included, AP-PA (n=31), 3D-conformal (n=25) and IMRT (n=31), all 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy: 5FU/leucovorin (n=4), capecitabine (n=37), and capecitabine/cisplatin (n=46). Median follow-up time was 4.7 years (range 0.2-8). With IMRT, the mean dose to the left kidney was significantly lower. Left kidney function decreased progressively in the total study population, however with IMRT this occurred at a lower rate. A dose-effect relationship was present between mean dose to the left kidney and the left kidney function. GFR decreased only moderately in time, which was not different between techniques. Six patients developed hypertension, of whom none in the IMRT group. This study confirms progressive late nephrotoxicity in patients treated with postoperative chemoradiotherapy by different techniques for gastric cancer. Nephrotoxicity was less severe with IMRT and should be considered the preferred technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison between swallowing and chewing of garlic on levels of serum lipids, cyclosporine, creatinine and lipid peroxidation in Renal Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorbanihaghjo Amir

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Abstract Hyperlipidemia and increased degree of oxidative stress are among the important risk factors for Atherosclerosis in renal transplant recipients (RTR. The Medical treatment of hyperlipidemia in RTR because of drugs side effects has been problematic, therefore alternative methods such as using of Garlic as an effective material in cholesterol lowering and inhibition of LDL Oxidation has been noted. For evaluation of garlic effect on RTR, 50 renal transplant patients with stable renal function were selected and divided into 2 groups. They took one clove of garlic (1 gr by chewing or swallowing for two months, after one month wash-out period, they took garlic by the other route. Results indicated that although lipid profile, BUN, Cr, serum levels of cyclosporine and diastolic blood pressure did not change, Systolic blood pressure decreased from138.2 to 132.8 mmHg (p=0.001 and Malondialdehyde (MDA decreased from 2.4 to1.7 nmol/ml (p=0.009 by swallowing route, Cholesterol decreased from 205.1 to 195.3 mg/dl (p=0.03, triglyceride decreased from 195.7 to 174.8 mg/dl (p=0.008, MDA decreased from 2.5 to 1.6 nmol/ml (p=0.001, systolic blood pressure decreased from 137.5 to 129.8 mmHg (p=0.001, diastolic blood pressure decreased from 84.6 to 77.6 mmHg (p=0.001 and Cr decreased from 1.51 to 1.44 mg/dl (p=0.03 by chewing route too. However HDL, LDL and cyclosporine serum levels had no significant differences by both of swallowing and chewing routes. We conclude that undamaged garlic (swallowed had no lowering effect on lipid level of serum. But Crushed garlic (chewed reduces cholesterol, triglyceride, MDA and blood pressure. Additionally creatinine reduced without notable decrease in cyclosporine serum levels may be due to cyclosporine nephrotoxicity ameliorating effect of garlic.

  7. Integrated transcriptomic and proteomic evaluation of gentamicin nephrotoxicity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Com, Emmanuelle; Boitier, Eric; Marchandeau, Jean-Pierre; Brandenburg, Arnd; Schroeder, Susanne; Hoffmann, Dana; Mally, Angela; Gautier, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Gentamicin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic, which induces renal tubular necrosis in rats. In the context of the European InnoMed PredTox project, transcriptomic and proteomic studies were performed to provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Male Wistar rats were treated with 25 and 75 mg/kg/day subcutaneously for 1, 3 and 14 days. Histopathology observations showed mild tubular degeneration/necrosis and regeneration and moderate mononuclear cell infiltrate after long-term treatment. Transcriptomic data indicated a strong treatment-related gene expression modulation in kidney and blood cells at the high dose after 14 days of treatment, with the regulation of 463 and 3241 genes, respectively. Of note, the induction of NF-kappa B pathway via the p38 MAPK cascade in the kidney, together with the activation of T-cell receptor signaling in blood cells were suggestive of inflammatory processes in relation with the recruitment of mononuclear cells in the kidney. Proteomic results showed a regulation of 163 proteins in kidney at the high dose after 14 days of treatment. These protein modulations were suggestive of a mitochondrial dysfunction with impairment of cellular energy production, induction of oxidative stress, an effect on protein biosynthesis and on cellular assembly and organization. Proteomic results also provided clues for potential nephrotoxicity biomarkers such as AGAT and PRBP4 which were strongly modulated in the kidney. Transcriptomic and proteomic data turned out to be complementary and their integration gave a more comprehensive insight into the putative mode of nephrotoxicity of gentamicin which was in accordance with histopathological findings. -- Highlights: ► Gentamicin induces renal tubular necrosis in rats. ► The mechanisms of gentamicin nephrotoxicity remain still elusive. ► Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses were performed to study this toxicity in rats. ► Transcriptomic and proteomic

  8. Role of biomarkers of nephrotoxic acute kidney injury in deliberate poisoning and envenomation in less developed countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Fahim; Endre, Zoltan H; Buckley, Nicholas A

    2015-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) has diverse causes and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. In less developed countries (LDC), nephrotoxic AKI (ToxAKI) is common and mainly due to deliberate ingestion of nephrotoxic pesticides, toxic plants or to snake envenomation. ToxAKI shares some pathophysiological pathways with the much more intensively studied ischaemic AKI, but in contrast to ischaemic AKI, most victims are young, previously healthy adults. Diagnosis of AKI is currently based on a rise in serum creatinine. However this may delay diagnosis because of the kinetics of creatinine. Baseline creatinine values are also rarely available in LDC. Novel renal injury biomarkers offer a way forward because they usually increase more rapidly in AKI and are normally regarded as absent or very low in concentration, thereby reducing the need for a baseline estimate. This should increase sensitivity and speed of diagnosis. Specificity should also be increased for urine biomarkers since many originate from the renal tubular epithelium. Earlier diagnosis of ToxAKI should allow earlier initiation of appropriate therapy. However, translation of novel biomarkers of ToxAKI into clinical practice requires better understanding of non-renal factors in poisoning that alter biomarkers and the influence of dose of nephrotoxin on biomarker performance. Further issues are establishing LDC population-based normal ranges and assessing sampling and analytical parameters for low resource settings. The potential role of renal biomarkers in exploring ToxAKI aetiologies for chronic kidney disease of unknown origin (CKDu) is a high research priority in LDC. Therefore, developing more sensitive biomarkers for early diagnosis of nephrotoxicity is a critical step to making progress against AKI and CKDu in the developing world. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Severity of gentamicin's nephrotoxic effect on patients with infective endocarditis: a prospective observational cohort study of 373 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholtz, Kristine; Larsen, Carsten T; Hassager, Christian

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gentamicin is often used to treat infective endocarditis (IE). Gentamicin is highly effective, but its applicability is reduced by its nephrotoxic effect. The aim of this study was to quantify the nephrotoxic effect of gentamicin and the association between the nephrotoxic effect...

  10. Polymyxin B Nephrotoxicity: From Organ to Cell Damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima Fernandes Vattimo

    Full Text Available Polymyxins have a long history of dose-limiting toxicity, but the underlying mechanism of polymyxin B-induced nephrotoxicity is unclear. This study investigated the link between the nephrotoxic effects of polymyxin B on renal metabolic functions and mitochondrial morphology in rats and on the structural integrity of LLC-PK1 cells. Fifteen Wistar rats were divided into two groups: Saline group, rats received 3 mL/kg of 0.9% NaCl intraperitoneally (i.p. once a day for 5 days; Polymyxin B group, rats received 4 mg/kg/day of polymyxin B i.p. once a day for 5 days. Renal function, renal hemodynamics, oxidative stress, mitochondrial injury and histological characteristics were assessed. Cell membrane damage was evaluated via lactate dehydrogenase and nitric oxide levels, cell viability, and apoptosis in cells exposed to 12.5 μM, 75 μM and 375 μM polymyxin B. Polymyxin B was immunolocated using Lissamine rhodamine-polymyxin B in LLC-PK1 cells. Polymyxin B administration in rats reduced creatinine clearance and increased renal vascular resistance and oxidative damage. Mitochondrial damage was confirmed by electron microscopy and cytosolic localization of cytochrome c. Histological analysis revealed tubular dilatation and necrosis in the renal cortex. The reduction in cell viability and the increase in apoptosis, lactate dehydrogenase levels and nitric oxide levels confirmed the cytotoxicity of polymyxin B. The incubation of LLC-PK1 cells resulted in mitochondrial localization of polymyxin B. This study demonstrates that polymyxin B nephrotoxicity is characterized by mitochondrial dysfunction and free radical generation in both LLC-PK1 cells and rat kidneys. These data also provide support for clinical studies on the side effects of polymyxin B.

  11. Actinic prurigo in Scandinavian adolescent successfully treated with cyclosporine A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan C. Sitek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Actinic prurigo is a pruritic sun-induced dermatosis classified among the immunologically mediated photodermatoses. The disease is a well-known entity among Native Americans and in Central and South America, however rare in Caucasians with only a few reports from Australia, Britain and France. We report the first case of actinic prurigo in a Scandinavian patient, responding favorably to systemic treatment with cyclosporine A.

  12. Actinic Prurigo in Scandinavian Adolescent Successfully Treated with Cyclosporine A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitek, Jan C

    2017-03-13

    Actinic prurigo is a pruritic sun-induced dermatosis classified among the immunologically mediated photodermatoses. The disease is a well-known entity among Native Americans and in Central and South America, however rare in Caucasians with only a few reports from Australia, Britain and France. We report the first case of actinic prurigo in a Scandinavian patient, responding favorably to systemic treatment with cyclosporine A.

  13. Metallothionein deficiency aggravates depleted uranium-induced nephrotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Yuhui; Huang, Jiawei; Gu, Ying; Liu, Cong; Li, Hong; Liu, Jing; Ren, Jiong; Yang, Zhangyou; Peng, Shuangqing; Wang, Weidong; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has been widely used in both civilian and military activities, and the kidney is the main target organ of DU during acute high-dose exposures. In this study, the nephrotoxicity caused by DU in metallothionein-1/2-null mice (MT −/−) and corresponding wild-type (MT +/+) mice was investigated to determine any associations with MT. Each MT −/− or MT +/+ mouse was pretreated with a single dose of DU (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) or an equivalent volume of saline. After 4 days of DU administration, kidney changes were assessed. After DU exposure, serum creatinine and serum urea nitrogen in MT −/− mice significantly increased than in MT +/+ mice, with more severe kidney pathological damage. Moreover, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased, and generation of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde increased in MT −/− mice. The apoptosis rate in MT −/− mice significantly increased, with a significant increase in both Bax and caspase 3 and a decrease in Bcl-2. Furthermore, sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) and sodium-phosphate cotransporter (NaPi-II) were significantly reduced after DU exposure, and the change of SGLT was more evident in MT −/− mice. Finally, exogenous MT was used to evaluate the correlation between kidney changes induced by DU and MT doses in MT −/− mice. The results showed that, the pathological damage and cell apoptosis decreased, and SOD and SGLT levels increased with increasing dose of MT. In conclusion, MT deficiency aggravated DU-induced nephrotoxicity, and the molecular mechanisms appeared to be related to the increased oxidative stress and apoptosis, and decreased SGLT expression. - Highlights: • MT −/− and MT +/+ mice were used to evaluate nephrotoxicity of DU. • Renal damage was more evident in the MT −/− mice after exposure to DU. • Exogenous MT also protects against DU-induced nephrotoxicity. • MT deficiency induced more ROS and apoptosis after exposure to

  14. Metallothionein deficiency aggravates depleted uranium-induced nephrotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Yuhui; Huang, Jiawei; Gu, Ying; Liu, Cong; Li, Hong; Liu, Jing; Ren, Jiong; Yang, Zhangyou [State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns and Combined Injury, Institute of Combined Injury, Chongqing Engineering Research Center for Nanomedicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, No. 30 Gaotanyan Street, Shapingba District, Chongqing 400038 (China); Peng, Shuangqing [Evaluation and Research Center for Toxicology, Institute of Disease Control and Prevention, Academy of Military Medical Science, 20 Dongdajie Street, Fengtai District, Beijing 100071 (China); Wang, Weidong, E-mail: wwdwyl@sina.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Li, Rong, E-mail: yuhui_hao@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns and Combined Injury, Institute of Combined Injury, Chongqing Engineering Research Center for Nanomedicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, No. 30 Gaotanyan Street, Shapingba District, Chongqing 400038 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Depleted uranium (DU) has been widely used in both civilian and military activities, and the kidney is the main target organ of DU during acute high-dose exposures. In this study, the nephrotoxicity caused by DU in metallothionein-1/2-null mice (MT −/−) and corresponding wild-type (MT +/+) mice was investigated to determine any associations with MT. Each MT −/− or MT +/+ mouse was pretreated with a single dose of DU (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) or an equivalent volume of saline. After 4 days of DU administration, kidney changes were assessed. After DU exposure, serum creatinine and serum urea nitrogen in MT −/− mice significantly increased than in MT +/+ mice, with more severe kidney pathological damage. Moreover, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased, and generation of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde increased in MT −/− mice. The apoptosis rate in MT −/− mice significantly increased, with a significant increase in both Bax and caspase 3 and a decrease in Bcl-2. Furthermore, sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) and sodium-phosphate cotransporter (NaPi-II) were significantly reduced after DU exposure, and the change of SGLT was more evident in MT −/− mice. Finally, exogenous MT was used to evaluate the correlation between kidney changes induced by DU and MT doses in MT −/− mice. The results showed that, the pathological damage and cell apoptosis decreased, and SOD and SGLT levels increased with increasing dose of MT. In conclusion, MT deficiency aggravated DU-induced nephrotoxicity, and the molecular mechanisms appeared to be related to the increased oxidative stress and apoptosis, and decreased SGLT expression. - Highlights: • MT −/− and MT +/+ mice were used to evaluate nephrotoxicity of DU. • Renal damage was more evident in the MT −/− mice after exposure to DU. • Exogenous MT also protects against DU-induced nephrotoxicity. • MT deficiency induced more ROS and apoptosis after exposure to

  15. Proximal Tubular Injury in Medullary Rays Is an Early Sign of Acute Tacrolimus Nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Cosner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tacrolimus (FK506 is one of the principal immunosuppressive agents used after solid organ transplantations to prevent allograft rejection. Chronic renal injury induced by tacrolimus is characterized by linear fibrosis in the medullary rays; however, the early morphologic findings of acute tacrolimus nephrotoxicity are not well characterized. Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1 is a specific injury biomarker that has been proven to be useful in the diagnosis of mild to severe acute tubular injury on renal biopsies. This study was motivated by a patient with acute kidney injury associated with elevated serum tacrolimus levels in whom KIM-1 staining was present only in proximal tubules located in the medullary rays in the setting of otherwise normal light, immunofluorescent, and electron microscopy. We subsequently evaluated KIM-1 expression in 45 protocol and 39 indicated renal transplant biopsies to determine whether higher serum levels of tacrolimus were associated with acute segment specific injury to the proximal tubule, as reflected by KIM-1 staining in the proximal tubules of the cortical medullary rays. The data suggest that tacrolimus toxicity preferentially affects proximal tubules in medullary rays and that this targeted injury is a precursor lesion for the linear fibrosis seen in chronic tacrolimus toxicity.

  16. Cyclosporine: a novel therapeutic approach for Burning Mouth Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraceno, Rosita; Lorè, Bruno; Pavlidis, Athanasios; Karaiskou, Maria; Arcuri, Claudio; Chimenti, Sergio; Magnato, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical cyclosporine applied as mouthwash in the treatment of burning mouth syndrome (BMS). This was a prospective and pilot study conducted by the Department of Dermatology of the University of Rome Tor Vergata. Patients were treated with cyclosporine topically applied as mouthwash for 4 weeks. Clinical improvement was assessed using a 5 grade clinical evaluation scale and a visual analogue scale from 0 to 10 was also used to evaluate the burning symptoms. Fifteen patients between 22-85 years (61.1±19.3), 11 female and 4 male, with a mean duration of BMS of 12.5 months, completed the study. Five out of 15 patients presented a marked improvement, 6 patients showed a moderate response, 3 patients had a slight improvement and 1 patient did not show any change. The VAS showed a reduction from 8.7 to 3.5. Adverse events were not reported. Cyclosporine mouthwash appeared to be safe and beneficial for reducing the burning sensation in patients with BMS representing an alternative therapy in this condition.

  17. The study of teratogenic effect of Cyclosporine in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostad SN

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of immunosuppressive medication such as Azathioprine, methoterxate and mercaptopurine in treatment of rheumatic disease in women at childbearing age has some risks of teratogeniesis. Cyclosporine is one of the newer medicines, which has been introduced for this disease but little is known about its teratogenicity. This study was designed to investigate the possible teratogenicity of this drug by using cultured rat limb bud cells, which were obtained from rat embryos 13 days after conception. Cells were incubated in trypsin-EDTA solution for 30 min at 37°C and then filtered through 50 µm nylon filters. The resultant cell suspension was cultivated in 1 ml Dulbecco modified Eagle medium (DMEM containing 10% fetal bovine serum and 445 µg/L L-glutamine at 37°C with 5% CO2. After 8 days of culture the differentiated foci extract were measured by staining with 1% alcian blue. To assess the teratogenic effects of cyclosporine, it was placed in the culture well together with the cells. Results showed that the decrease in the expression of the extracellular matrix at dose of 0.01 molar of cyclosporine is due to limb bud cell toxicity rather than inhibition of cell differentiation.

  18. CYCLOSPORINE IN TREATMENT OF SEVERE ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Alekseeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AtD is one of the most widespread types of allergic lesions of skin in children. Increase of severe types of AtD with lesion of big parts of skin, high frequency of exacerbations, presence of concomitant atopic diseases, and inefficiency of standard therapeutic approaches, torpid clinical course and early development of disability, causes an anxiety. Present standard approaches can be ineffective in children with severe clinical course of AtD and they are not able to prevent progression of disease, development of severe exacerbations and child’s disability. One of therapeutic alternatives for these patients is treatment with immunosuppressive agents. The article describes questions of treatment with cyclosporine in systemic therapy of severe resistant forms of AtD in children. Author discusses effectiveness and safety of a drug, formulated rules of treatment of severe AtD with cyclosporine. Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, cyclosporine, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(5:117-120

  19. The Genome of Tolypocladium inflatum: Evolution, Organization, and Expression of the Cyclosporin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushley, Kathryn E.; Raja, Rajani; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Cumbie, Jason S.; Nonogaki, Mariko; Boyd, Alexander E.; Owensby, C. Alisha; Knaus, Brian J.; Elser, Justin; Miller, Daniel; Di, Yanming; McPhail, Kerry L.; Spatafora, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    The ascomycete fungus Tolypocladium inflatum, a pathogen of beetle larvae, is best known as the producer of the immunosuppressant drug cyclosporin. The draft genome of T. inflatum strain NRRL 8044 (ATCC 34921), the isolate from which cyclosporin was first isolated, is presented along with comparative analyses of the biosynthesis of cyclosporin and other secondary metabolites in T. inflatum and related taxa. Phylogenomic analyses reveal previously undetected and complex patterns of homology between the nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) that encodes for cyclosporin synthetase (simA) and those of other secondary metabolites with activities against insects (e.g., beauvericin, destruxins, etc.), and demonstrate the roles of module duplication and gene fusion in diversification of NRPSs. The secondary metabolite gene cluster responsible for cyclosporin biosynthesis is described. In addition to genes necessary for cyclosporin biosynthesis, it harbors a gene for a cyclophilin, which is a member of a family of immunophilins known to bind cyclosporin. Comparative analyses support a lineage specific origin of the cyclosporin gene cluster rather than horizontal gene transfer from bacteria or other fungi. RNA-Seq transcriptome analyses in a cyclosporin-inducing medium delineate the boundaries of the cyclosporin cluster and reveal high levels of expression of the gene cluster cyclophilin. In medium containing insect hemolymph, weaker but significant upregulation of several genes within the cyclosporin cluster, including the highly expressed cyclophilin gene, was observed. T. inflatum also represents the first reference draft genome of Ophiocordycipitaceae, a third family of insect pathogenic fungi within the fungal order Hypocreales, and supports parallel and qualitatively distinct radiations of insect pathogens. The T. inflatum genome provides additional insight into the evolution and biosynthesis of cyclosporin and lays a foundation for further investigations of the role

  20. Cyclosporine therapy in inflammatory bowel disease: short-term and long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurudu, S R; Griffel, L H; Gialanella, R J; Das, K M

    1999-09-01

    Intravenous cyclosporine therapy followed by oral cyclosporine therapy reduce the need for urgent surgery in steroid-refractory inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Our objective is to report short- and long-term results of cyclosporine therapy in IBD patients. Thirteen patients with steroid-refractory IBD, seven patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), and six patients with Crohn's disease (CD) were treated with intravenous cyclosporine (4 mg/kg/day) for a mean period of 11.4+/-2.8 days (range, 4-15 days). Subsequently the patients were started on oral cyclosporine (8 mg/kg/day) and followed for a mean of 10.3+/-10 months (range, 1-30 months). Twelve patients responded to intravenous cyclosporine therapy. One patient with UC developed sepsis on the fourth day of intravenous cyclosporine therapy and needed urgent colectomy. Nine of 12 initial responders (6 patients with UC and 3 patients with CD) relapsed during follow-up despite oral cyclosporine and underwent elective surgery. One patient with CD relapsed 3 months after discontinuation of oral cyclosporine. Only two patients with CD are in long-term remission. There were no long-term side effects in any of the 13 treated patients. In conclusion, intravenous cyclosporine was effective in inducing remission or significant improvement in 12 of 13 patients with steroid-refractory IBD. However, with subsequent oral cyclosporine the remission could be maintained only for a short while. Each of the six patients with UC needed colectomy and three of the five patients with CD had intestinal resection within 12 months despite oral cyclosporine therapy.

  1. CT and MRI findings of cyclosporine-related encephalopathy and hypertensive encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Houjyou, Makoto

    2002-01-01

    We present the MRI and CT findings of one child with cyclosporine-related encephalopathy, and one child with hypertensive encephalopathy following cyclosporine-related encephalopathy. The imaging findings were shown well on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images. Cyclosporine-related encephalopathy was distributed predominantly in the posterior white matter. Hypertensive encephalopathy showed similar changes of CT attenuation, but with wider distribution. These two disorders seem to have the same pathogenesis. (orig.)

  2. A pharmacologically-based array to identify targets of cyclosporine A-induced toxicity in cultured renal proximal tubule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarró, Eduard; Jacobs-Cachá, Conxita; Itarte, Emilio; Meseguer, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms of cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity were generally thought to be hemodynamic in origin; however, there is now accumulating evidence of a direct tubular effect. Although genomic and proteomic experiments by our group and others provided overall information on genes and proteins up- or down-regulated by CsA in proximal tubule cells (PTC), a comprehensive view of events occurring after CsA exposure remains to be described. For this purpose, we applied a pharmacologic approach based on the use of known activities of a large panel of potentially protective compounds and evaluated their efficacy in preventing CsA toxicity in cultured mouse PTC. Our results show that compounds that blocked protein synthesis and apoptosis, together with the CK2 inhibitor DMAT and the PI3K inhibitor apigenin, were the most efficient in preventing CsA toxicity. We also identified GSK3, MMPs and PKC pathways as potential targets to prevent CsA damage. Additionally, heparinase-I and MAPK inhibitors afforded partial but significant protection. Interestingly, antioxidants and calcium metabolism-related compounds were unable to ameliorate CsA-induced cytotoxicity. Subsequent experiments allowed us to clarify the hierarchical relationship of targeted pathways after CsA treatment, with ER stress identified as an early effector of CsA toxicity, which leads to ROS generation, phenotypical changes and cell death. In summary, this work presents a novel experimental approach to characterizing cellular responses to cytotoxics while pointing to new targets to prevent CsA-induced toxicity in proximal tubule cells. Highlights: ► We used a novel pharmacological approach to elucidate cyclosporine (CsA) toxicity. ► The ability of a broad range of compounds to prevent CsA toxicity was evaluated. ► CsA toxicity was monitored using LDH release assay and PARP cleavage. ► Protein synthesis, PI3K, GSK3, MMP, PKC and caspase inhibitors prevented CsA toxicity. ► We also identified ER

  3. A pharmacologically-based array to identify targets of cyclosporine A-induced toxicity in cultured renal proximal tubule cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarró, Eduard, E-mail: eduard.sarro@vhir.org [Departament de Bioquímica i Biologia Molecular, Unitat de Bioquímica de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d' Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain); Jacobs-Cachá, Conxita, E-mail: conxita.jacobs@vhir.org [Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d' Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain); Itarte, Emilio, E-mail: emili.itarte@uab.es [Departament de Bioquímica i Biologia Molecular, Unitat de Bioquímica de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Meseguer, Anna, E-mail: ana.meseguer@vhir.org [Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d' Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Bioquimica i Biologia Molecular, Facultat de Medicina, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2012-01-15

    Mechanisms of cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity were generally thought to be hemodynamic in origin; however, there is now accumulating evidence of a direct tubular effect. Although genomic and proteomic experiments by our group and others provided overall information on genes and proteins up- or down-regulated by CsA in proximal tubule cells (PTC), a comprehensive view of events occurring after CsA exposure remains to be described. For this purpose, we applied a pharmacologic approach based on the use of known activities of a large panel of potentially protective compounds and evaluated their efficacy in preventing CsA toxicity in cultured mouse PTC. Our results show that compounds that blocked protein synthesis and apoptosis, together with the CK2 inhibitor DMAT and the PI3K inhibitor apigenin, were the most efficient in preventing CsA toxicity. We also identified GSK3, MMPs and PKC pathways as potential targets to prevent CsA damage. Additionally, heparinase-I and MAPK inhibitors afforded partial but significant protection. Interestingly, antioxidants and calcium metabolism-related compounds were unable to ameliorate CsA-induced cytotoxicity. Subsequent experiments allowed us to clarify the hierarchical relationship of targeted pathways after CsA treatment, with ER stress identified as an early effector of CsA toxicity, which leads to ROS generation, phenotypical changes and cell death. In summary, this work presents a novel experimental approach to characterizing cellular responses to cytotoxics while pointing to new targets to prevent CsA-induced toxicity in proximal tubule cells. Highlights: ► We used a novel pharmacological approach to elucidate cyclosporine (CsA) toxicity. ► The ability of a broad range of compounds to prevent CsA toxicity was evaluated. ► CsA toxicity was monitored using LDH release assay and PARP cleavage. ► Protein synthesis, PI3K, GSK3, MMP, PKC and caspase inhibitors prevented CsA toxicity. ► We also identified ER

  4. Celecoxib offsets the negative renal influences of cyclosporine via modulation of the TGF-β1/IL-2/COX-2/endothelin ET(B) receptor cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gowelli, Hanan M; Helmy, Maged W; Ali, Rabab M; El-Mas, Mahmoud M

    2014-03-01

    Endothelin (ET) signaling provokes nephrotoxicity induced by the immunosuppressant drug cyclosporine A (CSA). We tested the hypotheses that (i): celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, counterbalances renal derangements caused by CSA in rats and (ii) the COX-2/endothelin ET(B) receptor signaling mediates the CSA-celecoxib interaction. Ten-day treatment with CSA (20 mg/kg/day) significantly increased biochemical indices of renal function (serum urea, creatinine), inflammation (interleukin-2, IL-2) and fibrosis (transforming growth factor-β₁, TGF-β₁). Histologically, CSA caused renal tubular atrophy along with interstitial fibrosis. These detrimental renal effects of CSA were largely reduced in rats treated concurrently with celecoxib (10 mg/kg/day). We also report that cortical glomerular and medullary tubular protein expressions of COX-2 and ET(B) receptors were reduced by CSA and restored to near-control values in rats treated simultaneously with celecoxib. The importance of ET(B) receptors in renal control and in the CSA-celecoxib interaction was further verified by the findings (i) most of the adverse biochemical, inflammatory, and histopathological profiles of CSA were replicated in rats treated with the endothelin ETB receptor antagonist BQ788 (0.1 mg/kg/day, 10 days), and (ii) the BQ788 effects, like those of CSA, were alleviated in rats treated concurrently with celecoxib. Together, the data suggest that the facilitation of the interplay between the TGF-β1/IL-2/COX-2 pathway and the endothelin ET(B) receptors constitutes the cellular mechanism by which celecoxib ameliorates the nephrotoxic manifestations of CSA in rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Administration of cyclosporine by inhalation: A feasibility study in Beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggenburg, B.A.; Hoover, M.D.; Haley, P.J.; Snipes, M.B.; Wolff, R.K.; Yeh, H.C.; Griffith, B.P.; Burckart, J.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Oral cyclosporine inhibits the primary,but-not the secondary immune responses in the lung. These findings suggest that the local administration of cyclosporine by inhalation could be a useful tool for increasing our understanding of lung immunity. Five dogs were each treated with inhaled, oral and intravenous cyclosporine, aerosol vehicle (ethyl alcohol), and no treatment, over a 5-wk period. One treatment per week was given to each dog. A radiolabel, 99m Tc was included in the cyclosporine aerosol to allow visualization of lung distribution of the aerosol. Blood plasma concentrations of cyclosporine were approximately the same at 4 h and were essentially cleared by 24 h for all routes of administration. Aerosol distribution in the lung appeared uniform, based on 99m Tc scintigrams. In a second study, two dogs inhaled cyclosporine once a day for five days, two dogs inhaled the aerosol vehicle, and one dog was not treated. No evidence of acute lung injury, based on cell counts, total protein, alkaline phosphatase, or lactic dehydrogenase levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, was found at 24 h after one or five administrations of cyclosporine. These data indicate that cyclosporine administered by aerosol either once or five times was distributed throughout the lung and was absorbed into the blood without producing an acute inflammatory reaction in the lung. Our results suggest that cyclosporine may be safely given by inhalation for studies of local immune responses in the lung. (author)

  6. Melamine nephrotoxicity: an emerging epidemic in an era of globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Vivek; Grimm, Paul C; Chertow, Glenn M; Pao, Alan C

    2009-04-01

    Recent outbreaks of nephrolithiasis and acute kidney injury among children in China have been linked to ingestion of milk-based infant formula contaminated with melamine. These cases provide evidence in humans for the nephrotoxicity of melamine, which previously had been described only in animals. The consequences of this outbreak are already severe and will likely continue to worsen. Herein we summarize the global impact of the melamine milk contamination, the reemergence of melamine-tainted animal feed, and potential mechanisms of melamine nephrotoxicity. Large-scale epidemiologic studies are necessary to further characterize this disease and to assess its potential long-term sequelae. This epidemic of environmental kidney disease highlights the morbidity associated with adulterated food products available in today's global marketplace and reminds us of the unique vulnerability of the kidney to environmental insults. Melamine is the latest in a growing list of diverse potentially toxic compounds about which nephrologists and other health-care providers responsible for the diagnosis and management of kidney disease must now be aware.

  7. Prevention of chemotherapy-induced nephrotoxicity in children with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ghane Sharbaf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with cancer treated with cytotoxic drugs are frequently at risk of developing renal dysfunction. The cytotoxic drugs that are widely used for cancer treatment in children are cisplatin (CPL, ifosfamide (IFO, carboplatin, and methotrexate (MTX. Mechanisms of anticancer drug-induced renal disorders are different and include acute kidney injury (AKI, tubulointerstitial disease, vascular damage, hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, and intrarenal obstruction. CPL nephrotoxicity is dose-related and is often demonstrated with hypomagnesemia, hypokalemia, and impaired renal function with rising serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels. CPL, mitomycin C, and gemcitabine treatment cause vascular injury and HUS. High-dose IFO, streptozocin, and azacitidine cause renal tubular dysfunction manifested by Fanconi syndrome, rickets, and osteomalacia. AKI is a common adverse effect of MTX, interferon-alpha, and nitrosourea compound treatment. These strategies to reduce the cytotoxic drug-induced nephrotoxicity should include adequate hydration, forced diuresis, and urinary alkalization. Amifostine, sodium thiosulfate, and diethyldithiocarbamate provide protection against CPL-induced renal toxicity.

  8. Hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity of 3-bromopyruvate in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qiong; Sun, Yiming; Jin, Qili; Li, Qixiang; Wang, Qing; Liu, Hao; Zhao, Surong

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity of 3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) in mice. Fifteen nude mice were grafted subcutaneously in the left flank with MDA-MB-231 cells, then all mice were divided into control group (PBS), 3BP group (8 mg/kg), positive group (DNR: 0.8 mg/kg) when tumor volume reached approximately 100 mm3. 28 days later, tumors, livers and kidneys were stored in 4 % formalin solution and stained with hematoxylin and eosin staining. The Kunming mice experiment included control group (PBS), 3BP group (4mg/kg; 8mg/kg; 16mg/kg), positive group (DNR: 0.8 mg/kg). 24 hours later, the blood were used for the determination of hepatic damage serum biomarkers. Livers were stored in 4 % formalin solution for the later detection. 3BP at the dose of 8mg/kg had a good effect on inhibiting tumor growth in nude mice and did not damage liver and kidney tissues. Kunming mice experiment showed 3BP at the dose of 16mg/kg did damage to liver tissues. 3-Bromopyruvate at the dose of suppressing tumor growth did not exhibit hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity in nude mice, and the effect on liver was confirmed in Kunming mice.

  9. Variation of nephrotoxicity biomarkers by urinary storage condition in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Jung-Min; Han, Young-Hwan; Choi, Su-Jeong; Park, Ju-Seong; Jang, Jeong-Jun; Bae, Re-Ji-Na; Lee, Mi Ju; Kim, Myoung Jun; Lee, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Duyeol; Lee, Hye-Young; Park, Sun-Hee; Park, Cheol-Beom; Kang, Jin Seok; Kang, Jong-Koo

    2014-12-01

    Recently, there has been an increase in the use of several nephrotoxicity biomarkers in preclinical experiments. In addition, it has been indicated that the result may have been influenced by secondary factors, such as sample storage condition or storage period. In this study, we have assessed the variation in urinary nephrotoxicity biomarkers as a result of urine storage conditions and storage period of the urine. Urine was sampled from specific pathogen-free Sprague-Dawley rats (19 weeks old), which were housed individually in hanged stainless steel wire mesh cages. Urine was stored at 20℃, at 4℃, or at -70℃ after sampling. The levels of the biomarkers such as beta-2 microglobulin (B2M), cystatin-C (Cys-C), N-acetyl-β- D-glucosaminidase (NAG), micro albumin (MA), micro protein (MP) were measured at 6, 24, 48 and 144 hr after sampling. The B2M level was significantly decreased at 6, 24, 48, and 144 hr compared to 0 hr at -70℃ (p storage conditions. Taken together, B2M and Cys-C levels were modulated by storage temperature and period. For the enhancement of test accuracy, it is suggested that strict protocols be established for samples to minimize the effects of the storage conditions on the detected levels of biomarkers.

  10. Effect of mannitol on acute amphotericin B nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, R; Marin, P; Anicama, H; Quintanilla, A; Levin, M L

    1980-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the value of mannitol as protection against the acute nephrotoxicity of amphotericin B under controlled conditions in a reproducible model of toxicity in the dog. Eleven dogs received amphotericin B, 2.5 mg x kg-1 b. wt. by i.v. infusion over a 4-h period. Six dogs were treated with mannitol, 6.25 g, i.v. every hour and five served as controls. Urinary volume (V), inulin clearance (CIn), p-aminohippurate clearance (CPAH), and Na excretion (UNaV) were measured every hour throughout the experiment. Although a higher urinary output was maintained in mannitol-treated dogs, a progressive decline in renal function was observed in treated and in control dogs. During the 4th h, mannitol-treated dogs showed higher CIn (37.4 vs. 19.7 ml x min-1 and CPAH (95 vs. 54 ml x min-1 than controls. However, statistically the differences were barely significant. The results fail to show that mannitol offers a definite protection against amphotericin B nephrotoxicity.

  11. The protective effect of ebselen on radiocontrast-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgur, Tumay; Tutanc, Murat; Zararsiz, Ismail; Motor, Sedat; Ozturk, Oktay Hasan; Yaldiz, Mehmet; Kurtgoz, Ozgur Yildirim

    2012-01-01

    Radiocontrast-induced nephropathy has become one of the most important causes of renal acute failure. The most effective management of reducing the incidence of contrast nephropathy is to understand and prevent its causes. We aimed to investigate the protective role of ebselen against radiocontrast-induced nephrotoxicity in terms of tissue oxidant/antioxidant parameters and light microscopy in rats. Albino Wistar rats were randomly separated into four groups. The Group 1 rats were treated with sodium chloride as the control group, Group 2 with radiocontrast, Group 3 with radiocontrast plus ebselen, and Group 4 with ebselen alone. After 24 h, the animals over the experimental period were euthanized and blood samples were analyzed for blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (Cr) levels. Kidney sections were analyzed for malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, as well as histopathological changes. In the radiocontrast group, BUN, MDA, and GSH-Px levels increased while SOD activity decreased compared with the control group. These decays were improved by ebselen administration in the radiocontrast group. Significant histological deteriorations were observed in the radiocontrast group. We noted improvement in the histologic findings with ebselen administration. These results indicate that ebselen might produce a protective mechanism against radiocontrast-induced nephrotoxicity.

  12. The impairment of true glomerular filtration rate in long-term cyclosporine-treated pediatric allograft recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDiarmid, S.V.; Ettenger, R.B.; Hawkins, R.A.; Senguttvan, P.; Busuttil, R.W.; Vargas, J.; Berquist, W.E.; Ament, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    We performed indium-111-DTPA plasma clearance studies in 61 pediatric kidney and liver recipients treated with cyclosporine to compare true glomerular filtration rate with calculated GFR (cGFR). The mean true GFR of 61.9 +/- 36.6 ml/min/1.73 m2 indicated renal impairment. The mean cGFR of 85.2 +/- 22.4 ml/min/1.73 m2 was significantly higher (P less than 0.001), and overestimated GFR by 38%. cGFR alone did not accurately reflect the degree of renal dysfunction. A group of 48 pediatric orthotopic liver transplant recipients was studied in more detail: 73% of these patients had a true GFR less than 70 ml/min/1.73 m2, while 85% had a true GFR below 90 ml/min/1.73 m2, the lower limit for normal GFR in children. The mean true GFR for patients treated more than 24 months with CsA was lower (P = 0.02) than patients treated with CsA for 12 to 24 months. OLT patients with normal true GFR (greater than 90 ml/min/1.73 m2) had significantly lower plasma CsA levels, and 50% of patients with a true GFR less than or equal to 50 ml/min/1.73 m2 had hypertension. There was no effect on true GFR of age, liver function, azathioprine use, or peritransplant treatment with other nephrotoxic drugs. We conclude that true GFR is significantly impaired in long-term CsA-treated allograft pediatric recipients. Calculations of GFR underestimate the degree of renal dysfunction. As patients treated greater than 24 months had the lowest true GFRs, the fall in GFR may be progressive

  13. Vitamin E protects against the mitochondrial damage caused by cyclosporin A in LLC-PK1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arriba, G. de; Perez de Hornedo, J.; Ramirez Rubio, S.; Calvino Fernandez, M.; Benito Martinez, S.; Maiques Camarero, M.; Parra Cid, T.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) has nephrotoxic effects known to involve reactive oxygen species (ROS), since antioxidants prevent the kidney damage induced by this drug. Given that mitochondria are among the main sources of intracellular ROS, the aims of our study were to examine the mitochondrial effects of CsA in the porcine renal endothelial cell line LLC-PK1 and the influence of the antioxidant Vitamin E (Vit E). Following the treatment of LLC-PK1 cells with CsA, we assessed the mitochondrial synthesis of superoxide anion, permeability transition pore opening, mitochondrial membrane potential, cardiolipin peroxidation, cytochrome c release and cellular apoptosis, using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy procedures. Similar experiments were done after Vit E preincubation of cells. CsA treatment increased superoxide anion in a dose-dependent way. CsA opened the permeability transition pores, caused Bax migration to mitochondria, and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and cardiolipin content. Also CsA released cytochrome c into cytosol and provoked cellular apoptosis. Vit E pretreatment inhibited the effects that CsA induced on mitochondrial structure and function in LLC-PK1 cells and avoided apoptosis. CsA modifies mitochondrial LLC-PK1 cell physiology with loss of negative electrochemical gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane and increased lipid peroxidation. These features are related to apoptosis and can explain the cellular damage that CsA induces. As Vit E inhibited these effects, our results suggest that they were mediated by an increase in ROS production by mitochondria.

  14. Superior outcome using cyclosporin A alone versus cyclosporin A plus methotrexate for post-transplant immunosuppression in children with acute leukemia undergoing sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Melissa; Steinbach, Daniel; Zintl, Felix; Beck, James; Gruhn, Bernd

    2015-06-01

    The outcome of cyclosporin A (CSA) alone (n = 19) as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis was compared to that of CSA combined with methotrexate (MTX) (n = 43) in children with acute leukemia who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. All respective donors were HLA-identical siblings. All patients received CSA at a dose of 3 mg/kg/day starting on day -1. A CSA level of 80-130 ng/ml was aimed for. The 43 patients in the historical control were given an additional 10 mg/m(2) dosage of MTX on days 1, 3, 6, and 11. Patients who received CSA alone had a significantly reduced cumulative incidence of relapse (5 vs. 40 %; p = 0.002), a significantly increased 5-year event-free survival (84 vs. 35 %; p = 0.001), and a significantly increased 5-year overall survival (84 vs. 42 %; p = 0.004). The incidence of acute GVHD grade II-IV and chronic GVHD in patients in the CSA group was equivalent to the CSA+MTX group (26 vs. 19 %; p = 0.440, and 32 vs. 23 %; p = 0.428). In conclusion, post-transplant immunosuppression consisting of CSA alone is well tolerated and may contribute to a superior outcome.

  15. Dyslipidaemia among renal transplant recipients: cyclosporine versus tacrolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Muhammad Asim; Idrees, Muhammad Khalid; Akhtar, Syed Fazal

    2014-05-01

    To compare new onset dyslipidaemia in live-related renal transplant recipients taking cyclosporine versus tacrolimus after 3 months of therapy. The randomised controlled trial was conducted at the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation (SIUT) Karachi, from September 2010 to April 2011, and included 182 End Stage Renal Disease patients on maintenance haemodialysis with pre-transplant normal lipid profile. The patients, who had live-related renal transplant, were randomly allocated to two equal groups using lottery. Group A received cyclosporine (3 mg/kg) and group B was treated with tacrolimus (0.1 mg/kg). All patients had pre-transplant fasting lipid profile checked when they were on maintenance haemodialysis and 3 months after renal transplantation. Serum fasting lipid profile was collected by taking 5 ml blood by venipuncture after an overnight fast of 9-12 hours. SPSS 10 was used for statistical analyses. Of the 182 patients, 144 (79.1%) were males and 38 (20.9%) were females. The overall mean age was 30.18 +/- 9.57 years, and the mean weight was 54.41 +/- 11.144 kg. Significant difference was not observed between the two groups regarding age and weight of the patients. Dyslipidaemia was found in 115(63.2%) subjects; 61(67%) in group A and 54 (59.3%) in group B. There was no statistical difference (p=0.28) when comparison was done after 3 months of therapy. The occurrence of new onset hyperlipidaemia is similar in renal transplant recipients receiving either cyclosporine or tacrolimus in first 3 months post-transplant, but there is room for more research in this field as dyslipidaemia following successful renal transplantation is a frequent and persistent complication.

  16. Dyslipidaemia among renal transplant recipients: cyclosporine versus tacrolimus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazal, M. A.; Idrees, M. K.; Akhtar, S. F.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare new onset dyslipidaemia in live-related renal transplant recipients taking cyclosporine versus tacrolimus after 3 months of therapy. Methods: The randomised controlled trial was conducted at the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation (SIUT) Karachi, from September 2010 to April 2011, and included 182 End Stage Renal Disease patients on maintenance haemodialysis with pre-transplant normal lipid profile. The patients, who had live-related renal transplant, were randomly allocated to two equal groups using lottery. Group A received cyclosporine (3mg/kg) and group B was treated with tacrolimus (0.1mg/kg). All patients had pre-transplant fasting lipid profile checked when they were on maintenance haemodialysis and 3 months after renal transplantation. Serum fasting lipid profile was collected by taking 5ml blood by venipuncture after an overnight fast of 9-12 hours. SPSS 10 was used for statistical analyses. Results: Of the 182 patients, 144(79.1%) were males and 38(20.9%) were females. The overall mean age was 30.18+-9.57 years, and the mean weight was 54.41+- 11.144kg. Significant difference was not observed between the two groups regarding age and weight of the patients. Dyslipidaemia was found in 115(63.2%) subjects; 61(67%) in group A and 54(59.3%) in group B. There was no statistical difference (p=0.28) when comparison was done after 3 months of therapy. Conclusions: The occurrence of new onset hyperlipidaemia is similar in renal transplant recipients receiving either cyclosporine or tacrolimus in first 3 months post-transplant, but there is room for more research in this field as dyslipidaemia following successful renal transplantation is a frequent and persistent complication. (author)

  17. The calcineurin activity profiles of cyclosporin and tacrolimus are different in stable renal transplant patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed-Nielsen, PB; Karamperis, N; Hojskov, C

    2006-01-01

    Cyclosporin and tacrolimus remain the cornerstone immunosuppressive drugs in organ transplantation. Dosing and monitoring these drugs is based on pharmacokinetic protocols, but measuring a pharmacodynamic parameter, calcineurin phosphatase (CaN) activity, could be a valuable supplement...... in determining optimal doses. Forty stable renal transplant patients were investigated three times in a 6-month period. Blood samples were drawn at 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after oral intake of tacrolimus (FK) or cyclosporin at days 1 and 180. At day 90, one blood sample at trough level (FK) or C2 level (cyclosporin A...... at days 1 and 180 were the same for both drugs. Furthermore, we found that patients treated with tacrolimus or cyclosporin displayed different calcineurin activity profiles. We found that cyclosporin displayed greater calcineurin inhibition than tacrolimus. We have demonstrated that the two drugs exert...

  18. DNA damage response in nephrotoxic and ischemic kidney injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Mingjuan; Tang, Chengyuan [Department of Nephrology, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410011 (China); Ma, Zhengwei [Department of Cellular Biology & Anatomy, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University and Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States); Huang, Shuang [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Dong, Zheng, E-mail: zdong@augusta.edu [Department of Nephrology, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410011 (China); Department of Cellular Biology & Anatomy, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University and Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    DNA damage activates specific cell signaling cascades for DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, senescence, and/or cell death. Recent studies have demonstrated DNA damage response (DDR) in experimental models of acute kidney injury (AKI). In cisplatin-induced AKI or nephrotoxicity, the DDR pathway of ATR/Chk2/p53 is activated and contributes to renal tubular cell apoptosis. In ischemic AKI, DDR seems more complex and involves at least the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family, and p53; however, while ATM may promote DNA repair, p53 may trigger cell death. Targeting DDR for kidney protection in AKI therefore relies on a thorough elucidation of the DDR pathways in various forms of AKI.

  19.  The potential nephrotoxicity of antiretroviral drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Marchewka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available  The intensive studies carried out in many scientific laboratories and the efforts of numerous pharmaceutical companies have led to the development of drugs which are able to effectively inhibitHIV proliferation. At present, a number of antiretroviral agents with different mechanisms of actionare available. Unfortunately, long-term use of antiretroviral drugs, however, does not remainindifferent to the patient and can cause significant side effects.In the present work, the antiretroviral drugs with a nephrotoxicity potential most commonly usedin clinical practice are described. In the review attention has also been focused on the nephropathyresulting from the HIV infection alone and the influence of genetic factors on the occurrenceof pathological changes in the kidney.

  20. Developmental nephrotoxicity of aristolochic acid in a zebrafish model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Yu-Ju; Chen, Yau-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a component of Aristolochia plant extracts which is used as a treatment for different pathologies and their toxicological effects have not been sufficiently studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate AA-induced nephrotoxicity in zebrafish embryos. After soaking zebrafish embryos in AA, the embryos displayed malformed kidney phenotypes, such as curved, cystic pronephric tubes, pronephric ducts, and cases of atrophic glomeruli. The percentages of embryos with malformed kidney phenotypes increased as the exposure dosages of AA increased. Furthermore, AA-treated embryos exhibited significantly reduced glomerular filtration rates (GFRs) in comparison with mock-control littermates (mock-control: 100 ± 2.24% vs. 10 ppm AA treatment for 3–5 h: 71.48 ± 18.84% ∼ 39.41 ± 15.88%), indicating that AA treatment not only caused morphological kidney changes but also induced renal failure. In addition to kidney malformations, AA-treated zebrafish embryos also exhibited deformed hearts, swollen pericardiums, impaired blood circulation and the accumulation(s) of red blood cells. Whole-mount in situ hybridization studies using cmlc2 and wt1b as riboprobes indicated that the kidney is more sensitive than the heart to AA damage. Real-time PCR showed that AA can up-regulate the expression of proinflammatory genes like TNFα, cox2 and mpo. These results support the following conclusions: (1) AA-induced renal failure is mediated by inflammation, which causes circulation dysfunction followed by serious heart malformation; and (2) the kidney is more sensitive than the heart to AA injury. -- Highlights: ► Zebrafish were used to evaluate aristolochic acid (AA)-induced nephrotoxicity. ► AA-treated zebrafish embryos exhibited deformed heart as well as malformed kidney. ► Kidney is more sensitive to AA injury than the heart.

  1. Developmental nephrotoxicity of aristolochic acid in a zebrafish model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yu-Ju; Chen, Yau-Hung, E-mail: yauhung@mail.tku.edu.tw

    2012-05-15

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a component of Aristolochia plant extracts which is used as a treatment for different pathologies and their toxicological effects have not been sufficiently studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate AA-induced nephrotoxicity in zebrafish embryos. After soaking zebrafish embryos in AA, the embryos displayed malformed kidney phenotypes, such as curved, cystic pronephric tubes, pronephric ducts, and cases of atrophic glomeruli. The percentages of embryos with malformed kidney phenotypes increased as the exposure dosages of AA increased. Furthermore, AA-treated embryos exhibited significantly reduced glomerular filtration rates (GFRs) in comparison with mock-control littermates (mock-control: 100 ± 2.24% vs. 10 ppm AA treatment for 3–5 h: 71.48 ± 18.84% ∼ 39.41 ± 15.88%), indicating that AA treatment not only caused morphological kidney changes but also induced renal failure. In addition to kidney malformations, AA-treated zebrafish embryos also exhibited deformed hearts, swollen pericardiums, impaired blood circulation and the accumulation(s) of red blood cells. Whole-mount in situ hybridization studies using cmlc2 and wt1b as riboprobes indicated that the kidney is more sensitive than the heart to AA damage. Real-time PCR showed that AA can up-regulate the expression of proinflammatory genes like TNFα, cox2 and mpo. These results support the following conclusions: (1) AA-induced renal failure is mediated by inflammation, which causes circulation dysfunction followed by serious heart malformation; and (2) the kidney is more sensitive than the heart to AA injury. -- Highlights: ► Zebrafish were used to evaluate aristolochic acid (AA)-induced nephrotoxicity. ► AA-treated zebrafish embryos exhibited deformed heart as well as malformed kidney. ► Kidney is more sensitive to AA injury than the heart.

  2. Cumulative or delayed nephrotoxicity after cisplatin (DDP) treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnarò, P; Ruggeri, E M; Carlini, P; Giovannelli, M; Cognetti, F

    1986-04-30

    The present retrospective study reports data regarding renal toxicity in 115 patients (63 males, 52 females; median age, 56 years) who received cumulative doses of cisplatin (DDP) greater than or equal to 200 mg/m2. DDP was administered alone or in combination at a dose of 50-70 mg/m2 in 91 patients, and at a dose of 100 mg/m2 in 22 patients. Two patients after progression of ovarian carcinoma treated with conventional doses of DDP received 4 and 2 courses, respectively, of high-dose DDP (40 mg/m2 for 5 days) in hypertonic saline. The median number of DDP courses was 6 (range 2-14), and the median cumulative dose was 350 mg/m2 (range, 200-1200). Serum creatinine and urea nitrogen were determined before initiating the treatment and again 13-16 days after each administration. The incidence of azotemia (creatinina levels that exceeded 1.5 mg/dl) was similar before (7.8%) and after (6.1%) DDP doses of 200 mg/m2. Azotemia appears to be related to the association of DDP with other potentially nephrotoxic antineoplastic drugs (methotrexate) more than to the dose per course of DDP. Of 59 patients followed for 2 months or more after discontinuing the DDP treatment, 3 (5.1%) presented creatinine values higher than 1.5 mg/dl. The data deny that the incidence of nephrotoxicity is higher in patients receiving higher cumulative doses of DDP and confirm that increases in serum creatinine levels may occur some time after discontinuation of the drug.

  3. Ameliorative potential of gemfibrozil and silymarin on experimentally induced nephrotoxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Kabel

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: The combination of gemfibrozil and silymarin has protective effects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats better than each of these drugs alone due to anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of the used drugs.

  4. Effect of nettle (Urtica dioica extract on gentamicin induced nephrotoxicity in male rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Abdulkarim Salih

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Therefore, it can be assumed that the nephroprotective effect shown by nettle in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity can reserve intracellular levels of biological pathways and supportively enhance excretion of toxic levels of gentamicin.

  5. Effect of Topical Cyclosporine in grading of Vernal keratoconjunctivitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Krupali Raol

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: To evaluate efficacy of topical aqueous solution of 0.05% cyclosporine in first time diagnosed vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC including palpebral, bulbar and mixed form. Methods: 25 patients of VKC received CsA 0.05% aqueous ophthalmic solution in a dosage of one drop every 12 hours in both eyes for 6 months. Follow up visits (day 1, 2 weeks, 1 month, 2 months, 3 months and 6 months. Five symptoms were evaluated and six clinical signs were charted. Total objective score of 13 or more over atleast 3 variables was included (CART – scoring system. Results: Comparison of 1st Day with 2 weeks score showed no significant effect in the score value (t=0.90, df = 24, p<0.1. 1st Day with 3rd month score showed maximum effect in the score value (t = 35.76, df = 24, p<0.0001. 3rd month with 6th month score showed sustained effect of cyclosporine showing no major change in the score line (t test, t = 1.80, df = 24, p <0.05. Conclusion: Topical application of a 0.05% CsA aqueous solution has been shown to be effective in the treatment of patients with VKC. CsA could be an important alternative to steroid treatment.

  6. Temperature-dependent binding of cyclosporine to an erythrocyte protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, R.P.; Threatte, G.A.; McPherson, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    In this competitive binding assay to measure endogenous binding capacity for cyclosporine (CsA) in erythrocyte lysates, a fixed amount of [ 3 H]CsA plus various concentrations of unlabeled CsA is incubated with aliquots of a test hemolysate. Free CsA is then adsorbed onto charcoal and removed by centrifugation; CsA complexed with a cyclosporine-binding protein (CsBP) remains in the supernate. We confirmed the validity of this charcoal-separation mode of binding analysis by comparison with equilibrium dialysis. Scatchard plot analysis of the results at 4 degrees C yielded a straight line with slope corresponding to a binding constant of 1.9 X 10(7) L/mol and a saturation capacity of approximately 4 mumol per liter of packed erythrocytes. Similar analysis of binding data at 24 degrees C and 37 degrees C showed that the binding constant decreased with increasing temperature, but the saturation capacity did not change. CsBP was not membrane bound but appeared to be freely distributed within erythrocytes. 125 I-labeled CsA did not complex with the erythrocyte CsBP. Several antibiotics and other drugs did not inhibit binding between CsA and CsBP. These findings may explain the temperature-dependent uptake of CsA by erythrocytes in whole blood and suggest that measurement of CsBP in erythrocytes or lymphocytes may help predict therapeutic response or toxicity after administration of CsA

  7. Risk factors for calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity after renal transplantation: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia T

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tianyi Xia, Sang Zhu, Yan Wen, Shouhong Gao, Mingming Li, Xia Tao, Feng Zhang, Wansheng Chen Department of Pharmacy, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Nephrotoxicity of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs is the major concern for long-term allograft survival despite its predominant role in current immunosuppressive regime after renal transplantation. CNI nephrotoxicity is multifactorial with demographic, environmental, and pharmacogenetic flexibility, whereas studies indicating risk factors for CNI nephrotoxicity obtained incomplete or conflicting results.Methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis of risk factors for CNI nephrotoxicity was performed on all retrieved studies through a comprehensive research of network database. Data were analyzed by Review Manager 5.2 with heterogeneity assessed using the Cochrane Q and I2 tests. CNI nephrotoxicity was primarily indicated with protocol biopsy or index-based clinical diagnosis, and the secondary outcome was defined as delayed graft function.Results: Twelve observational studies containing a total of 2,849 cases were identified. Donor age (odds ratio [OR], 1.01; 95% CI, 1.01–1.03; p=0.02, recipient zero-time arteriosclerosis (OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.04–1.99; p=0.03, and CYP3A5*3/*3 genotype (OR, 2.80; 95% CI, 2.63–2.98; p=0.00 were confirmed as risk factors for CNI nephrotoxicity. Subgroup and sensitivity analysis claimed donor age as a significant contributor in Asian and Caucasian areas.Conclusion: Older donor age, recipient zero-time arteriosclerosis, and CYP3A5*3/*3 genotype might add up the risk for CNI nephrotoxicity, which could be interpreted into a robust biomarker system. Keywords: calcineurin inhibitor, transplantation, nephrotoxicity, risk factor, systematic review, meta-analysis

  8. Determination of the effects of levofloxacin on gentamicin induced nephrotoxicity in rabbits: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naeem, U.; Jamal, S.; Waheed, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of levofloxacin on gentamicin induced nephrotoxicity in rabbits. Study Design: Comparative experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: The animal house of Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, and the pathology department of Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from July 2009 to January 2010. Material and Methods: The effects of levofloxacin on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity were evaluated in rabbits. Twenty four rabbits were used in this study which were randomly divided into four groups (n= 6 in each group). Six animals were injected for 15 days with saline (NaCl; 0.9%), six with gentamicin alone at doses of 20 mg/kg of body weight/12 h (intramuscularly), six with combination of gentamicin (20 mg/kg/12 h) with low therapeutic doses of levofloxacin (30 mg/kg/24 h) and the last six were treated with gentamicin and high therapeutic doses of levofloxacin (50 mg/kg/24 h). Levofloxacin was given by intraperitoneal route. Results: Gentamicin induced nephrotoxicity was evaluated by histopathological and serum analysis. The extent of nephrotoxicity was significantly increased when gentamicin was given in combination with levofloxacin both in low and high doses. Conclusion: Levofloxacin enhances gentamicin induced nephrotoxicity and extent of this nephrotoxicity increased with increasing dose of levofloxacin. (author)

  9. Intravenous Vancomycin Associated With the Development of Nephrotoxicity in Patients With Class III Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yookyung Christy; Saw, Stephen; Soliman, Daniel; Bingham, Angela L; Pontiggia, Laura; Hunter, Krystal; Chuang, Linda; Siemianowski, Laura A; Ereshefsky, Benjamin; Hollands, James M

    2017-11-01

    A consensus statement recommends initial intravenous (IV) vancomycin dosing of 15-20 mg/kg every 8- 24 hours, with an optional 25- to 30-mg/kg loading dose. Although some studies have shown an association between weight and the development of vancomycin-associated nephrotoxicity, results have been inconsistent. To evaluate the correlation between incidence of nephrotoxicity associated with weight-based IV vancomycin dosing strategies in nonobese and obese patients. This retrospective cohort study evaluated hospitalized adult patients admitted who received IV vancomycin. Patients were stratified into nonobese (body mass index [BMI] obesity class I and II (BMI 30-39.9kg/m 2 ), and obesity class III (BMI≥40 kg/m 2 ) groups; patients who were overweight but not obese were excluded. Incidence of nephrotoxicity and serum vancomycin trough concentrations were evaluated. Of a total of 62 documented cases of nephrotoxicity (15.1%), 13 (8.7%), 23 (14.3%), and 26 (26.3%) cases were observed in nonobese, obesity class I and II, and obesity class III groups, respectively ( P=0.002). Longer durations of therapy ( P20 mg/L ( Pobesity were 3-times as likely to develop nephrotoxicity when compared with nonobese patients (odds ratio [OR]=2.99; CI=1.12-7.94) and obesity class I and II patients (OR=3.14; CI=1.27-7.75). Obesity and other factors are associated with a higher risk of vancomycin-associated nephrotoxicity.

  10. Prolonged heart xenograft survival using combined total lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knechtle, S.J.; Halperin, E.C.; Saad, T.; Bollinger, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine have profound immunosuppressive properties and permit successful heart allotransplantation. Cyclosporine used alone has not permitted consistently successful transplantation between species in all cases. Total lymphoid irradiation has not been applied to xenotransplantation. The efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation alone and in combination with cyclosporine was examined using an animal model of heart xenotransplantation. Heterotopic heart transplants were performed using inbred Syrian hamsters as donors and Lewis rats as recipients. Total lymphoid irradiation was administered preoperatively over 3 weeks for a total dose of 15 gray. Cyclosporine was started on the day of surgery and was given as a daily intramuscular injection of 2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg/day until rejection was complete. Neither total lymphoid irradiation nor cyclosporine alone markedly prolonged graft survival. However, combined total lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine, 5 or 10 mg/kg/day, dramatically prolonged graft survival to greater than 100 days in most recipients. There were no treatment-related deaths. In conclusion, combined total lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine permit successful long-term survival of heart xenotransplants in this hamster-to-rat model

  11. Relation of magnesium level to cyclosporine and metabolic complications in renal transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi Farrokhlagha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclosporine is the main immunosuppressive drug used for renal transplant reci-pients in order to prevent transplant rejection. Although the drug has increased the survival of patients and grafted organ, it has some side effects independent of its effect on the immune system. This study was done to evaluate the effect of cyclosporine on serum Mg level and its metabolic side effects in renal allograft patients. 157 (62 female and 95 male renal transplant recipients treated with cyclosporine to prevent transplant rejection were included in the study. Clinical and biochemical data along with cyclosporine levels was documented. Mean serum Mg level was 196 ± 0.31 mg/dL and mean serum cyclosporine level was 371 ± 192 µg/dL. Hypomagnesemia was detected in 16 (10.2% with a negative significant correlation with cyclosporine levels, serum creatinine, plasma LDL, fasting Blood sugar and uric acid. In conclusion according to the results of this study there is a significant correlation between cyclosporine and hypomagnesemia. Therefore, routine measurement of serum Mg and its treatment seems necessary to prevent its complications.

  12. Ondansetron can enhance cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity via inhibition of multiple toxin and extrusion proteins (MATEs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qing; Guo, Dong; Dong, Zhongqi; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shiew-Mei; Polli, James E.; Shu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    The nephrotoxicity limits the clinical application of cisplatin. Human organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) and multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs) work in concert in the elimination of cationic drugs such as cisplatin from the kidney. We hypothesized that co-administration of ondansetron would have an effect on cisplatin nephrotoxicity by altering the function of cisplatin transporters. The inhibitory potencies of ondansetron on metformin accumulation mediated by OCT2 and MATEs were determined in the stable HEK-293 cells expressing these transporters. The effects of ondansetron on drug disposition in vivo were examined by conducting the pharmacokinetics of metformin, a classical substrate for OCTs and MATEs, in wild-type and Mate1−/− mice. The nephrotoxicity was assessed in the wild-type and Mate1−/− mice received cisplatin with and without ondansetron. Both MATEs, including human MATE1, human MATE2-K, and mouse Mate1, and OCT2 (human and mouse) were subject to ondansetron inhibition, with much greater potencies by ondansetron on MATEs. Ondansetron significantly increased tissue accumulation and pharmacokinetic exposure of metformin in wild-type but not in Mate1−/− mice. Moreover, ondansetron treatment significantly enhanced renal accumulation of cisplatin and cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity which were indicated by increased levels of biochemical and molecular biomarkers and more severe pathohistological changes in mice. Similar increases in nephrotoxicity were caused by genetic deficiency of MATE function in mice. Therefore, the potent inhibition of MATEs by ondansetron enhances the nephrotoxicity associated with cisplatin treatment in mice. Potential nephrotoxic effects of combining the chemotherapeutic cisplatin and the antiemetic 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT 3 ) receptor antagonists, such as ondansetron, should be investigated in patients. - Highlights: • Nephrotoxicity significantly limits clinical use of the chemotherapeutic cisplatin

  13. Ondansetron can enhance cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity via inhibition of multiple toxin and extrusion proteins (MATEs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qing [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan 410078 (China); Guo, Dong [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan 410078 (China); Dong, Zhongqi [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Wei [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan 410078 (China); Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shiew-Mei [Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Office of Translational Sciences, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Polli, James E. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States); Shu, Yan, E-mail: yshu@rx.umaryland.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2013-11-15

    The nephrotoxicity limits the clinical application of cisplatin. Human organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) and multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs) work in concert in the elimination of cationic drugs such as cisplatin from the kidney. We hypothesized that co-administration of ondansetron would have an effect on cisplatin nephrotoxicity by altering the function of cisplatin transporters. The inhibitory potencies of ondansetron on metformin accumulation mediated by OCT2 and MATEs were determined in the stable HEK-293 cells expressing these transporters. The effects of ondansetron on drug disposition in vivo were examined by conducting the pharmacokinetics of metformin, a classical substrate for OCTs and MATEs, in wild-type and Mate1−/− mice. The nephrotoxicity was assessed in the wild-type and Mate1−/− mice received cisplatin with and without ondansetron. Both MATEs, including human MATE1, human MATE2-K, and mouse Mate1, and OCT2 (human and mouse) were subject to ondansetron inhibition, with much greater potencies by ondansetron on MATEs. Ondansetron significantly increased tissue accumulation and pharmacokinetic exposure of metformin in wild-type but not in Mate1−/− mice. Moreover, ondansetron treatment significantly enhanced renal accumulation of cisplatin and cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity which were indicated by increased levels of biochemical and molecular biomarkers and more severe pathohistological changes in mice. Similar increases in nephrotoxicity were caused by genetic deficiency of MATE function in mice. Therefore, the potent inhibition of MATEs by ondansetron enhances the nephrotoxicity associated with cisplatin treatment in mice. Potential nephrotoxic effects of combining the chemotherapeutic cisplatin and the antiemetic 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT{sub 3}) receptor antagonists, such as ondansetron, should be investigated in patients. - Highlights: • Nephrotoxicity significantly limits clinical use of the chemotherapeutic

  14. Biotransformation and nephrotoxicity of ochratoxin B in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mally, Angela; Keim-Heusler, Heike; Amberg, Alexander; Kurz, Michael; Zepnik, Herbert; Mantle, Peter; Voelkel, Wolfgang; Hard, Gordon C.; Dekant, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Ochratoxin B (OTB), a secondary metabolite of Aspergillus ochraceus, is the nonchlorinated analogue of the mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA), which is one of the most potent renal carcinogens in rodents. Despite the closely related structure, OTB is considered to be of much lower toxicity. OTA is poorly metabolized and slowly eliminated, and this may play an important role in OTA toxicity, carcinogenicity, and organ specificity. Since little is known regarding biotransformation and renal toxicity of OTB, the aim of this study was to investigate biotransformation of OTB in rats and to characterize the nephrotoxicity and cytotoxicity of OTB. Male F344 rats were administered either a single dose of OTB (10 mg/kg bw) or repeated doses (2 mg/kg bw, 5 days/week for 2 weeks) and euthanized 72 h after the last dosing. In proximal tubule cells of animals treated with a single high dose of OTB, a slight increase in mitotic figures was observed, but no treatment-related changes were evident in clinical chemistry, in renal function, and histopathology after repeated administration. Excretion of OTB and metabolites in urine and feces was analyzed using both HPLC with fluorescence detection and LC-MS/MS. Ochratoxin beta, which results from cleavage of the peptide bond, was the major metabolite excreted in urine in addition to small amounts of 4-hydroxy-OTB. In total, 19% of the administered dose was recovered as OTB and ochratoxin beta in urine and feces within 72 h after a single dose. In contrast to OTA, no tissue-specific retention of OTB was evident after single and repeated administration. In LLC-PK1 cells, a renal cell culture system that retains much of the specific features of the proximal tubule, only minor differences in the extent of cytotoxicity of OTA and OTB were observed. At low concentrations (< 25 μM), treatment with OTA was slightly more toxic, whereas reduction in cell viability was similar at concentrations up to 100 μM. In summary, these data suggest that OTA

  15. Cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsions for the treatment of dry eye: a review of the clinical evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Philip; Galor, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Dry eye has gained recognition as a public health problem given its high prevalence, morbidity and cost implications. Although dry eye is common and affects patients’ quality of life, only one medication, cyclosporine 0.05% emulsion, has been approved by the US FDA for its treatment. In this review, we summarize the basic science and clinical data regarding the use of cyclosporine in the treatment of dry eye. Randomized controlled trials showed that cyclosporine emulsion outperformed vehicles in the majority of trials, consistently decreasing corneal staining and increasing Schirmer scores. Symptom improvement was more variable, however, with ocular dryness shown to be the most consistently improved symptom over vehicle. PMID:25960865

  16. Treatment relapsed subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma together HPS by Cyclosporin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren'an Chen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old man was diagnosised subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma (SPTCL through biopsy of a nodule from the anterior chest. After the treatment with prednisone 90 mg 3 weeks and tapered off in 1 month, the disease released, but relapsed together with symptions of hemophagocytic syndrome eight months after the termination of prednisone. CHOEP recipe was given but with unsatisfactory result until cyclosporine was prescribed. Cyclosporine was removed 6 months later. There is no evidence of clinical relapse 1 year later. This case suggest that cyclosporine could be a selectable treatment even in relapsed SPTCL.

  17. Preclinical evaluation of nephroprotective potential of a probiotic formulation LOBUN on Cyclosporine-A induced renal dysfunction in Wistar rats

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    Kambham Venkateswarlu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of present study was to evaluate the nephroprotective effect of probiotic formulation LOBUN on Cyclosporine A (CsA induced renal dysfunction in Wistar rats. CsA (20 mg/kg body weight s.c was administered for 15 days to cause renal dysfunction in Wistar rats. The probiotic formulation LOBUN was administered with the dose of 500 mg/kg body weight (p.o for twice (TGI and thrice a day (TGII. The samples were analyzed for the parameters like blood urine nitrogen (BUN, serum creatinine, serum uric acid, total serum protein and urine proteins, urine potassium, urine sodium. The renal functional and histopathological studies revealed that the oral administration of probiotic formulation LOBUN has provided appreciable renoprotection and possibly alleviated the symptoms of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD at the dose of 500 mg/kg body weight administered thrice a day and also the results were supported by histopathological findings.

  18. Hepatobiliary scanning in cardiac transplant patients maintained on cyclosporine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhekne, R.D.; Long, S.E.; Moore, W.H.; Frazier, O.H.

    1987-01-01

    Many patients receiving cyclosporine (CSA) develop hepatic dysfunction or pancreatitis. The authors reviewed 106 records of cardiac transplant patients maintained on CSA. Eleven patients underwent 16 hepatobiliary scans (HBSs) for abdominal pain and/or abnormal liver function. Of 16 HBSs, ten demonstrated normal gallbladder visualization. Follow-up in all cases confirmed scan findings. Five patients had no gallbladder visualization; confirmation of acute cholecystitis was obtained by surgery in two and by autopsy in three. One patient had previous cholecystectomy. The authors found HPS useful for evaluating acute cholecystitis in patients receiving CSA with or without associated drug-related pancreatitis and hepatic insufficiency and suggest that HBS can assist in the selection of patients for CSA dose adjustment

  19. Herbs with potential nephrotoxic effects according to traditional Persian medicine: Review and assessment of scientific evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolangi, Fatemeh; Memariani, Zahra; Bozorgi, Mahboubeh; Mozaffarpur, Seyyed Ali; Mirzapour, Mohaddeseh

    2018-04-03

    The increased use of herbal remedies particularly in patients with kidney diseases indicated the importance of studies which focused on nephrotoxic plants. The present study aimed to review and assess the kidney-damaging herbs mentioned in the Persian medicine [PM] books. The main PM books were searched for nephrotoxic herbs and their relevant reformers traditionally proposed for preventing renal damage. PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar were investigated for evaluation of the scientific evidence relating to the nephrotoxicity of herbs. A total of 64 plants with kidney damage potential and their reformer medicaments were recorded in 7 sources included in this review. Allium schoenoprasum and Marrubium vulgare were the most repeated and emphasized nephrotoxic plants in PM books, but there was not any relevant scientific evidence. Despite the lack of clinical studies, some evidence was found for 38% of plants that were related to renal damage. The most repeated reformers for reducing the renal side effects mainly consisted of gum tragacanth, gum Arabic, mastic gum, anise, jujube and honey and some evidence was found for their nephroprotective activities. The present study reviewed and assessed the herbs with adverse renal effects in the main PM books. Some evidence was in line with the potential nephrotoxicity of plants and their ‎reformers. Despite the lack of clinical research for evaluation of their renal damage, the herbs may be focused in term of their nephrotoxicity; and there is a need for further studies on the scientific basis of their nephrotoxicity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Protective Effects of Cilastatin against Vancomycin-Induced Nephrotoxicity

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    Blanca Humanes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vancomycin is a very effective antibiotic for treatment of severe infections. However, its use in clinical practice is limited by nephrotoxicity. Cilastatin is a dehydropeptidase I inhibitor that acts on the brush border membrane of the proximal tubule to prevent accumulation of imipenem and toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential protective effect of cilastatin on vancomycin-induced apoptosis and toxicity in cultured renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTECs. Porcine RPTECs were cultured in the presence of vancomycin with and without cilastatin. Vancomycin induced dose-dependent apoptosis in cultured RPTECs, with DNA fragmentation, cell detachment, and a significant decrease in mitochondrial activity. Cilastatin prevented apoptotic events and diminished the antiproliferative effect and severe morphological changes induced by vancomycin. Cilastatin also improved the long-term recovery and survival of RPTECs exposed to vancomycin and partially attenuated vancomycin uptake by RPTECs. On the other hand, cilastatin had no effects on vancomycin-induced necrosis or the bactericidal effect of the antibiotic. This study indicates that cilastatin protects against vancomycin-induced proximal tubule apoptosis and increases cell viability, without compromising the antimicrobial effect of vancomycin. The beneficial effect could be attributed, at least in part, to decreased accumulation of vancomycin in RPTECs.

  1. Coenzyme Q10 treatment ameliorates acute cisplatin nephrotoxicity in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouad, Amr A.; Al-Sultan, Ali Ibrahim; Refaie, Shereen M.; Yacoubi, Mohamed T.

    2010-01-01

    The nephroprotective effect of coenzyme Q10 was investigated in mice with acute renal injury induced by a single i.p. injection of cisplatin (5 mg/kg). Coenzyme Q10 treatment (10 mg/kg/day, i.p.) was applied for 6 consecutive days, starting 1 day before cisplatin administration. Coenzyme Q10 significantly reduced blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels which were increased by cisplatin. Coenzyme Q10 significantly compensated deficits in the antioxidant defense mechanisms (reduced glutathione level and superoxide dismutase activity), suppressed lipid peroxidation, decreased the elevations of tumor necrosis factor-α, nitric oxide and platinum ion concentration, and attenuated the reductions of selenium and zinc ions in renal tissue resulted from cisplatin administration. Also, histopathological renal tissue damage mediated by cisplatin was ameliorated by coenzyme Q10 treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that coenzyme Q10 significantly decreased the cisplatin-induced overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, nuclear factor-κB, caspase-3 and p53 in renal tissue. It was concluded that coenzyme Q10 represents a potential therapeutic option to protect against acute cisplatin nephrotoxicity commonly encountered in clinical practice.

  2. Exopolysaccharide produced by Enterobacter sp. YG4 reduces uranium induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K, Nagaraj; Devasya, Rekha Punchapady; Bhagwath, Arun Ananthapadmanabha

    2016-01-01

    Uranium nephrotoxicity is a health concern with very few treatment options. Bacterial exopolysaccharides (EPS) possess multiple biological activities and appear as prospective candidates for treating uranium nephrotoxicity. This study focuses on the ability of an EPS produced by a bacterial strain Enterobacter sp. YG4 to reduce uranium nephrotoxicity in vivo. This bacterium was isolated from the gut contents of a slug Laevicaulis alte (Férussac). Based on the aniline blue staining reaction and infrared spectral analysis, the EPS was identified as β-glucan and its molecular weight was 11.99×10(6)Da. The EPS showed hydroxyl radical scavenging ability and total antioxidant capacity in vitro. To assess the protection provided by the EPS against uranium nephrotoxicity, a single dose of 2mg/kg uranyl nitrate was injected intraperitoneally to albino Wistar rats. As intervention, the EPS was administered orally (100mg/kg/day) for 4 consecutive days. The rats were sacrificed on the fifth day and analyses were conducted. Increased serum creatinine and urea nitrogen levels and histopathological alterations in kidneys were observed in uranyl nitrate treated animals. All these alterations were reduced with the administration of Enterobacter sp. YG4 EPS, emphasizing a novel approach in treating uranium nephrotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Coenzyme-Q10 on Doxorubicin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats

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    Azza A. K. El-Sheikh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotoxicity is one of the limiting factors for using doxorubicin (Dox as an anticancer chemotherapeutic. Here, we investigated possible protective effect of coenzyme-Q10 (CoQ10 on Dox-induced nephrotoxicity and the mechanisms involved. Two doses (10 and 100 mg/kg of CoQ10 were administered orally to rats for 8 days, in the presence or absence of nephrotoxicity induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of Dox (15 mg/kg at day 4 of the experiment. Our results showed that the low dose of CoQ10 succeeded in reversing Dox-induced nephrotoxicity to control levels (e.g., levels of blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, concentrations of renal reduced glutathione (GSH and malondialdehyde, catalase activity and caspase 3 expression, and renal histopathology. Alternatively, the high dose of CoQ10 showed no superior nephroprotection over the low dose, as there were no significant improvements in renal histopathology, catalase activity, or caspase 3 expression compared to the Dox-treated group. Interestingly, the high dose of CoQ10 alone significantly decreased renal GSH level as well as catalase activity and caused a mild induction of caspase 3 expression compared to control, probably due to a prooxidant effect at this dose of CoQ10. We conclude that CoQ10 protects from Dox-induced nephrotoxicity with a precaution to dosage adjustment.

  4. Pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase protects against cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in mice by two step mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimin; Luo, Xiao; Pan, Hao; Huang, Wei; Wang, Xueping; Wen, Huali; Shen, Kezhen; Jin, Baiye

    2015-09-01

    Cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity is primarily caused by ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) induced proximal tubular cell death. NADPH oxidase is major source of ROS production by cisplatin. Here, we reported that pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase by acetovanillone (obtained from medicinal herb Picrorhiza kurroa) led to reduced cisplatin nephrotoxicity in mice. In this study we used various molecular biology and biochemistry methods a clinically relevant model of nephropathy, induced by an important chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was evident by histological damage from loss of the tubular structure. The damage was also marked by the increase in blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, protein nitration as well as cell death markers such as caspase 3/7 activity and DNA fragmentation. Tubular cell death by cisplatin led to pro-inflammatory response by production of TNFα and IL1β followed by leukocyte/neutrophil infiltration which resulted in new wave of ROS involving more NADPH oxidases. Cisplatin-induced markers of kidney damage such as oxidative stress, cell death, inflammatory cytokine production and nephrotoxicity were attenuated by acetovanillone. In addition to that, acetovanillone enhanced cancer cell killing efficacy of cisplatin. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase can be protective for cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Evaluation of Danazol, Cyclosporine, and Prednisolone as Single Agent or in Combination for Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

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    Kanjaksha Ghosh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The responses of 32 patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH were assessed after the patients were put on various combinations of danazol, prednisolone, and cyclosporine. METHODS: Nineteen males and 13 females aged between 14 and 60 years with confirmed diagnosis of PNH were treated with danazol (4, danazol + cyclosporine (7, cyclosporine (1, and prednisolone + danazol (20. Response to these interventions was assessed regularly. Danazol was added to cyclosporine in patients with aplastic bone marrow after 3 months of cyclocporine use only unless the former therapy was successful. Four patients with aplastic marrow received only danazol because they had renal insufficiency at presentation. Patients were evaluated with regular complete blood count and routine liver and renal function tests. RESULTS: One patient responded to cyclosporine only. Thirteen of 32 patients (40% had complete response, 12/32 patients (37% had partial response leading to freedom from red cell transfusion, and 2/32 (7% had no response. Five patients (16% died due to thrombosis or hemorrhage within 3 months of therapy before their response to therapy could be assessed. The median period of review of the cases was 4 years and 6 months. CONCLUSION: Danazol is a useful addition to PNH therapy both in combination with cyclosporine for hypoplastic PNH and with prednisolone for other forms of PNH, and this therapy could be a good alternative where eculizumab and anti-lymphocyte globulin cannot be used for various reasons.

  6. Topical Use of Olopatadine and Cyclosporine a in Treatment of Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis

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    Zaure Knatova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the efficacy and safety of Olopatadine hydrochloride (0.1% with Cyclosporine A ophthalmic solution (0.05% in treating the signs and symptoms of VKC. Material and Method: Twenty-five patients with VKC were included in a prospective study. One eye of each patient was treated with Olopatadine while the other eye was treated with Cyclosporine A. Subjective symptoms of the patients such as itching, tearing, foreign body sensation, and mucus discharge were recorded and scored. The objective signs, such as the presence of giant papillae on the tarsal conjunctiva, bulbar conjunctival hyperemia, keratitis, limbal hypertrophy, corneal vascularization, and conjunctival cicatrization, were scored. Results: There was no significant difference between the Olopatadine group and the Cyclosporine A group regarding subjective symptoms at the 3rd, 6th, 12th, and 18th month. There was a significant improvement in the subjective symptoms of both groups. No significant difference was seen between the groups with regard to objective signs. A significant improvement was observed in the Cyclosporine group in the late period of the study. Discussion: In long-term therapy of VKC, similar effects were seen regarding improvement in the subjective symptoms during the use of topical Olopatadine and Cyclosporine A. In terms of improvement regarding the objective signs, Cyclosporine A was seen to be more effective in the late period.

  7. Evaluation of oxidative stress in D-serine induced nephrotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orozco-Ibarra, Marisol; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Dolores Javier; Martinez-Martinez, Claudia Maria; Floriano-Sanchez, Esau; Santamaria, Abel; Ramirez, Victoria; Bobadilla, Norma A.; Pedraza-Chaverri, Jose

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that oxidative stress is involved in D-serine-induced nephrotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to assess if oxidative stress is involved in this experimental model using several approaches including (a) the determination of several markers of oxidative stress and the activity of some antioxidant enzymes in kidney and (b) the use of compounds with antioxidant or prooxidant effects. Rats were sacrificed at several periods of time (from 3 to 24 h) after a single i.p. injection of D-serine (400 mg/kg). Control rats were injected with L-serine (400 mg/kg) and sacrificed 24 h after. The following markers were used to assess the temporal aspects of renal damage: (a) urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine in blood serum, (b) kidney injury molecule (KIM-1) mRNA levels, and (c) tubular necrotic damage. In addition, creatinine clearance, proteinuria, and urinary excretion of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) were measured 24 h after D-serine injection. Protein carbonyl content, malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), fluorescent products of lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH) content, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression were measured as markers of oxidative stress in the kidney. Additional experiments were performed using the following compounds with antioxidant or pro-oxidant effects before D-serine injection: (a) α-phenyl-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN), a spin trapping agent; (b) 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrinato iron(III) (FeTPPS), a soluble complex able to metabolize peroxynitrite; (c) aminotriazole (ATZ), a catalase (CAT) inhibitor; (d) stannous chloride (SnCl 2 ), an HO-1 inductor; (e) tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP), an HO inhibitor. In the time-course study, serum creatinine and BUN increased significantly on 15-24 and 20-24 h, respectively, and KIM-1 mRNA levels increased significantly on 6-24 h. Histological analyses revealed tubular necrosis at 12 h. The activity of antioxidant enzymes

  8. Nephrotoxicity of mercapturic acids of three structurally related 2,2-difluoroethylenes in the rat. Indications for different bioactivation mechanisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Commandeur, J.N.M.; Brakenhoff, J.P.G.; de Kanter, F.J.J.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.

    1988-01-01

    The biotransformation and the hepato- and nephrotoxicity of the mercapturic acids (N-acetyl-1-cysteine S-conjugates) of three structurally related 2,2-difluoroethylenes were investigated in vivo in the rat. All mercapturic acids appeared to cause nephrotoxicity, without any measureable effect on the

  9. Microsomal protein synthesis inhibition: an early manifestation of gentamicin nephrotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, W.M.; Mela-Riker, L.M.; Houghton, D.C.; Gilbert, D.N.; Buss, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics achieve bacterial killing by binding to bacterial ribosomes and inhibiting protein synthesis. To examine whether similar mechanisms could be present in renal tubular cells prior to the onset of overt proximal tubular necrosis due to these drugs, we isolated microsomes from Fischer rats given 20 mg/kg gentamicin every 12 h subcutaneously for 2 days and from vehicle-injected controls. Concomitant studies of renal structure, function, and mitochondrial respiration were carried out. [3H]leucine incorporation into renal microsomes of treated animals was reduced by 21.9% (P less than 0.01), whereas brain and liver microsomes from the same animals were unaffected. Gentamicin concentration in the renal microsomal preparation was 56 micrograms/ml, a value 7- to 10-fold above concentrations necessary to inhibit bacterial growth. Conventional renal function studies were normal (blood urea, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance). Treated animals showed only a mild reduction of inulin clearance, 0.71 compared with 0.93 ml.min-1.100 g-1 in controls (P less than 0.05), and an increase in urinary excretion of N-acetylglucosaminidase of 20 compared with 14.8 units/l (P less than 0.05). Renal slice transport of p-aminohippuric acid, tetraethylammonium, and the fractional excretion of sodium were well preserved. There was no evidence, as seen by light microscopy, of proximal tubular necrosis. Mitochondrial cytochrome concentrations were normal and respiratory activities only slightly reduced. Processes similar to those responsible for bacterial killing could be involved in experimental gentamicin nephrotoxicity before overt cellular necrosis

  10. Insuficiência renal aguda nefrotóxica: prevalência, evolução clínica e desfecho Nephrotoxic acute renal failure: prevalence, clinical course and outcome

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    Patrícia S. Pinto

    2009-09-01

    nephrotoxic ARF. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Historical cohort carried out in a tertiary school hospital from February to November, 1997. Patients over 12 years of age, diagnosed with ARF, and followed up by a team of nephrologists were included. The exclusion criteria were as follows: renal transplantation, chronic renal failure, dialysis due to exogenous poisoning, and those transferred to hospital during treatment. RESULTS: Of the 234 patients followed up, 12% had nephrotoxic ARF and 24% multifactorial ARF associated with the use of nephrotoxic drugs. The most prevalent comorbidities were as follows: hypertension, hepatopathy, neoplasias, congestive heart failure, and diabetes mellitus. Fifteen percent of the patients required dialysis, and the most commonly used type was continuous venovenous hemodialysis; 42% of the patients were oliguric; 44.7% died; and 33% recovered renal function. The most prevalent nephrotoxic drugs were antibiotics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and radiographical contrast media. In order of frequency, the nephrotoxic drugs were as follows: vancomycin, aminoglycosides, acyclovir, chemotherapy agents, and radiographical contrast media. In multivariate analysis, hepatopathy was the only statistically significant variable (p = 0.03, CI = 1.08 to 6.49. The comparison of non-nephrotoxic and nephrotoxic ARF showed an increase in mortality proportional to the length of hospitalization. CONCLUSION: Nephrotoxic ARF is common, serious, and must be continuously monitored both in hospital and on an outpatient basis.

  11. Upregulation of AMWAP: a novel mechanism for HDAC inhibitors to protect against cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jinhua; Zhuang, Shougang

    2016-02-01

    Histone deacetylases have been reported to protect against renal tubular damage in several animal models of acute renal injury, including cisplatin nephrotoxicity. However, the mechanism involved is not well defined. In this study, Ranganathan et al. identify activated microglia/macrophage WAP domain protein as the novel mediator of histone deacetylase inhibitor-mediated renal protection in a murine model of cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Activated microglia/macrophage WAP-mediated renal protection is associated with suppression of inflammation and renal epithelial cell apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Klotho ameliorates cyclosporine A-induced nephropathy via PDLIM2/NF-kB p65 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Meihua; Lv, Pengfei; Chen, Guanyu; Wang, Peng; Zuo, Zhongfu; Ren, Lili; Bi, Jing; Yang, Chul-Woo; Mei, Xifan; Han, Donghe

    2017-04-29

    Klotho, an antiaging protein, can extend the lifespan and modulate cellular responses to inflammation and oxidative stress which can ameliorate chronic kidney diseases (CKD). To investigate the molecular mechanism of Klotho on inflammation in cyclosporine A (CsA) induced nephropathy, the mice were transfected with adenovirus mediated Klotho gene and treated with cyclosporine A (CsA; 30 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. Also, primary human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTECs) were treated with soluble Klotho protein and LPS. The results showed that Ad-klotho significantly reduced serum creatinine (Scr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) caused by CsA, and significantly increased creatinine clearance. Tubule interstitial fibrosis score (TIF), renal 8-OHdG excretion, macrophage infiltration and MCP-1 were decreased after Ad-klotho gene transfer. In addition, the overexpression of Klotho led to increase in the expression of PDLIM2, decreased in the amount of NF-kB p65, and inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-6, IL-12) and iNOS. Accordingly, in vitro results showed, Klotho enhanced PDLIM2 expression and reduced NF-kB p65 expression, while PDLIM2 siRNA could block the inhibitory effects of Klotho on expression of NF-kB p65. Secretion of inflammatory cytokines was also inhibited by Klotho treatment, and PDLIM2 siRNA hindered regulatory effects of Klotho on the cytokines. Real-time PCR and Luciferase assay showed that Klotho markedly increased expression of PDLIM2 mRNA and PDLIM2 reporter activity in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that Klotho can modulate inflammation via PDLIM2/NF-kB p65 pathway in CsA-induced nephropathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Topical cyclosporine a treatment in corneal refractive surgery and patients with dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torricelli, Andre A M; Santhiago, Marcony R; Wilson, Steven E

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate preoperative and postoperative dry eye and the effect of cyclosporine A treatment in patients screened for corneal refractive surgery and treated with photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) or LASIK. A consecutive case series of 1,056 patients screened for corneal refractive surgery from 2007 to 2012 was retrospectively analyzed. The level of preoperative and postoperative dry eye and the responsiveness to topical cyclosporine A treatment were assessed. One eye of each patient was randomly selected. A total of 642 eyes progressed to surgery: 524 (81.6%) and 118 (18.4%) underwent LASIK and PRK, respectively. Of 81 (7.7%) diagnosed as having dry eye, 55 were deemed potential candidates and optimized for refractive surgery. Thirty-seven patients with moderate dry eye were treated with topical cyclosporine A prior to surgery (mean duration: 3.2 ± 2.1 months; range: 1 to 12 months). After cyclosporine A treatment, 28 (75.7%) eyes underwent LASIK, 4 (10.8%) eyes underwent PRK, and 5 (13.5%) eyes were not operated on due to failed treatment of dry eye. Postoperative refractive surgery-induced neurotrophic epitheliopathy (LINE in LASIK) was noted in 132 (27.3%) and 12 (11.1%) eyes that underwent LASIK and PRK, respectively. Topical cyclosporine A was prescribed in 79 LASIK-induced and 3 PRK-induced dry eyes. After 12 months or more of cyclosporine A treatment, 5 (6.1%) eyes continued to have dry eye symptoms or signs. Topical cyclosporine A treatment is effective therapy for optimizing patients for refractive surgery and treatment of new onset or worsened dry eye after surgery. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Health claims database study of cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion treatment patterns in dry eye patients

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    Stonecipher KG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Karl G Stonecipher,1 Jenny Chia,2 Ahunna Onyenwenyi,2 Linda Villanueva,2 David A Hollander2 1TLC Laser Eye Centers, Greensboro, NC, 2Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA Background: Dry eye is a multifactorial, symptomatic disease associated with ocular surface inflammation and tear film hyperosmolarity. This study was designed to assess patterns of topical cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion 0.05% (Restasis® use in dry eye patients and determine if there were any differences in use based on whether dry eye is physician-coded as a primary or nonprimary diagnosis. Methods: Records for adult patients with a diagnosis of dry eye at an outpatient visit from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2009 were selected from Truven Health MarketScan® Research Databases. The primary endpoint was percentage of patients with at least one primary versus no primary dry eye diagnosis who filled a topical cyclosporine prescription. Data analyzed included utilization of topical corticosteroids, oral tetracyclines, and punctal plugs. Results: The analysis included 576,416 patients, accounting for 875,692 dry eye outpatient visits: 74.7% were female, 64.2% were ages 40-69 years, and 84.4% had at least one primary dry eye diagnosis. During 2008–2009, 15.9% of dry eye patients with a primary diagnosis versus 6.5% with no primary diagnosis filled at least one cyclosporine prescription. For patients who filled at least one prescription, the mean months’ supply of cyclosporine filled over 12 months was 4.44. Overall, 33.9% of dry eye patients filled a prescription for topical cyclosporine, topical corticosteroid, or oral tetracycline over 2 years. Conclusion: Patients with a primary dry eye diagnosis were more likely to fill a topical cyclosporine prescription. Although inflammation is key to the pathophysiology of dry eye, most patients seeing a physician for dry eye may not receive anti-inflammatory therapies. Keywords: corticosteroids, cyclosporine, dry eye syndromes

  15. Cyclosporine in the Management of Esophageal Lichen Planus

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    M Chaklader

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Lichen planus (LP is an uncommon disorder of unknown etiology, mostly affecting patients in their fifth and sixth decade of life. It is believed to be an autoimmune process involving T cells directed against basal keratinocytes. It affects the skin, nails, oral pharynx and genitals. Esophageal involvement is quite rare and can cause strictures, ulcerations and squamous cell cancer. The present article describes the case of a 54-year-old woman who was referred for assessment of dysphagia that initially occurred with solids, which then progressed to soft foods but spared liquids. The patient reported a weight loss of 9.1 kg. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed and she was subsequently diagnosed with pill esophagitis. At the same time, she was also diagnosed with oral LP, with no involvement of the esophagus. She was treated with a proton pump inhibitor that resolved her gastrointestinal symptoms. The symptoms returned one year later and a repeat esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed white plaques due to LP. She was treated with intermittent glucocorticoids. Diagnosis of esophageal LP is crucial for the proper treatment. Some patients may require systemic immunosuppression and mechanical dilation to prevent weight loss. Surveillance endoscopies should be performed to monitor for squamous cell cancer. Cyclosporine has been used for genital and oral LP, but the present case is the first in which it has been used successfully to treat esophageal LP.

  16. Cyclosporine/ketoconazole reduces treatment costs for nephrotic syndrome

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    A Iyengar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclosporine A (CyA is an effective agent for the treatment of glucocorticoid-dependent idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (GCDNS, but costs are prohibitive in resource-poor societies. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficacy and safety of reducing the dose of CyA by co-administering ketoconazole. A prospective study targeting children 2-18 years of age with GCDNS in remission with CyA monotherapy was conducted. CyA dose was reduced by 50% and ketoconazole was added at 25% of the recommended therapeutic dose, and the drug levels and therapeutic and adverse effects (AE were monitored. Continued combined therapy after completion of the 4-week trial period was offered. Ten patients (median age 9.5 years, range 3.0-16.0 years were enrolled in the study. At week 4, the CyA dose was 2.2 ± 0.7 mg/kg/day compared with 5.6 ± 0.9 mg/kg/day at enrolment ( P 50% without increased adverse events or drug monitoring needs. This intervention demonstrates how access of patients with limited resources to needed drugs can be improved by interference with physiological drug elimination.

  17. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of morin and cyclosporin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, S.-H.; Hou, Y.-C.; Chao, P.-D.L.

    2005-01-01

    Morin is a flavonoid present in mulberry and herbs. We have reported that morin exerted anti-inflammatory activity on the activated macrophages. Cyclosporin (CsA) is a potent immunosuppressive agent with narrow therapeutic range, which is widely used for the treatments of autoimmune diseases and transplantation rejection. This study aimed to measure the effects of morin on the disposition of CsA in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues, and on the functions of immune cells in mice. CsA (Neoral, 10 mg/kg) was orally administered with and without a concomitant dose of morin (0, 50, 100, 200 mg/kg) to mice once daily for 2 weeks. CsA concentrations in blood, liver, kidney, and spleen were determined by a specific monoclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay. The decreased levels of CsA in tissues were found well correlated to increased doses of morin. The coadministration of 200 mg/kg morin significantly decreased CsA in blood, liver, kidney, and spleen by 33%, 17%, 38%, and 45%, respectively. On the other hand, coadministration of morin decreased dramatically the nitric oxide production by the activated macrophages when compared to CsA treatment alone. Moreover, morin maintained the level of CsA-suppressed T helper 1 (Th1) type cytokine, although the CsA concentration in spleen was markedly reduced. In conclusion, morin coadministration profoundly reduced CsA concentration but did not significantly alter the CsA-suppressed Th1 immune response in mice

  18. Cyclosporin safety in a simplified rat brain tumor implantation model

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    Francisco H. C. Felix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer is the second neurological cause of death. A simplified animal brain tumor model using W256 (carcinoma 256, Walker cell line was developed to permit the testing of novel treatment modalities. Wistar rats had a cell tumor solution inoculated stereotactically in the basal ganglia (right subfrontal caudate. This model yielded tumor growth in 95% of the animals, and showed absence of extracranial metastasis and systemic infection. Survival median was 10 days. Estimated tumor volume was 17.08±6.7 mm³ on the 7th day and 67.25±19.8 mm³ on 9th day post-inoculation. Doubling time was 24.25 h. Tumor growth induced cachexia, but no hematological or biochemical alterations. This model behaved as an undifferentiated tumor and can be promising for studying tumor cell migration in the central nervous system. Dexamethasone 3.0 mg/kg/day diminished significantly survival in this model. Cyclosporine 10 mg/kg/day administration was safely tolerated.

  19. Diverse Effects of Cyclosporine on Hepatitis C Virus Strain Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Naoto; Watashi, Koichi; Hishiki, Takayuki; Goto, Kaku; Inoue, Daisuke; Hijikata, Makoto; Wakita, Takaji; Kato, Nobuyuki; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    2006-01-01

    Recently, a production system for infectious particles of hepatitis C virus (HCV) utilizing the genotype 2a JFH1 strain has been developed. This strain has a high capacity for replication in the cells. Cyclosporine (CsA) has a suppressive effect on HCV replication. In this report, we characterize the anti-HCV effect of CsA. We observe that the presence of viral structural proteins does not influence the anti-HCV activity of CsA. Among HCV strains, the replication of genotype 1b replicons was strongly suppressed by treatment with CsA. In contrast, JFH1 replication was less sensitive to CsA and its analog, NIM811. Replication of JFH1 did not require the cellular replication cofactor, cyclophilin B (CyPB). CyPB stimulated the RNA binding activity of NS5B in the genotype 1b replicon but not the genotype 2a JFH1 strain. These findings provide an insight into the mechanisms of diversity governing virus-cell interactions and in the sensitivity of these strains to antiviral agents. PMID:16611911

  20. Suppression of feline coronavirus replication in vitro by cyclosporin A

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    Tanaka Yoshikazu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV is a member of the feline coronavirus family that causes FIP, which is incurable and fatal in cats. Cyclosporin A (CsA, an immunosuppressive agent that targets the nuclear factor pathway of activated T-cells (NF-AT to bind cellular cyclophilins (CyP, dose-dependently inhibited FIPV replication in vitro. FK506 (an immunosuppressor of the pathway that binds cellular FK506-binding protein (FKBP but not CyP did not affect FIPV replication. Neither cell growth nor viability changed in the presence of either CsA or FK506, and these factors did not affect the NF-AT pathway in fcwf-4 cells. Therefore, CsA does not seem to exert inhibitory effects via the NF-AT pathway. In conclusion, CsA inhibited FIPV replication in vitro and further studies are needed to verify the practical value of CsA as an anti-FIPV treatment in vivo.

  1. Nephrotoxicity of uranium in drinking water from private drilled wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selden, Anders I.; Lundholm, Cecilia; Edlund, Bror; Hoegdahl, Camilla; Ek, Britt-Marie; Bergstroem, Bernt E.; Ohlson, Carl-Goeran

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the association between uranium in drinking water from drilled wells and aspects of kidney function measured by sensitive urine tests. Methods: Three hundred and one of 398 eligible subjects (75.6%) aged 18-74 years with daily drinking water supplies from private drilled wells located in uranium-rich bedrock (exposed group) volunteered to participate along with 153 of 271 local controls (56.4%) who used municipal water. Participants responded to a questionnaire on their water consumption and general health, and provided a morning urine sample and drinking water for analysis. Results: The uranium content of well water samples (n=153) varied considerably (range 100 μg/l), while uranium levels in all samples of municipal water (n=14) were below the limit of quantification (0.2 μg/l). Urinary levels of uranium were more than eight times higher in exposed subjects than in controls (geometric means 38 and 4.3 ng/l, respectively; p 2 =0.66). Levels of albumin, β 2 -microglobulin, protein HC as well as kappa and lambda immunoglobulin chains in urine from exposed and controls were similar. The N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) activity was significantly lower in the exposed group vs. controls, possibly secondary to differential storage duration of samples from the two groups. Even in regression models adjusting for gender, age and smoking no association of uranium in water and the kidney function parameters was observed. Using uranium in urine in the entire study group as a marker of exposure, however, a tendency of exposure-related increases of β 2 -microglobulin, protein HC and kappa chains were noted. This tendency was enhanced after exclusion of subjects with diabetes mellitus from the analysis. Conclusions: Uranium levels in urine were strongly correlated to levels in drinking water from drilled wells. There were no clear signs of nephrotoxicity from uranium in drinking water at levels recorded in this study, but some indications of an

  2. Influence of Overt Diabetes Mellitus on Cyclosporine Pharmacokinetics in a Canine Model

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    Khalid M. Alkharfy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Diabetic patients usually require more medications than their nondiabetic counterparts. This work examined the effect of hyperglycemia on the pharmacokinetic properties of cyclosporine in a diabetic dog model. Main Methods. Diabetes was induced using a streptozotocin/alloxan combination and verified by measuring the serum glucose level. Cyclosporine was administered as a bolus intravenous dose of 5 mg/kg, and blood samples were collected at different time points for determining drug concentrations and biochemical analyses. Results. Diabetic dogs showed a significant increase in total body clearance of cyclosporine compared to healthy controls (0.457 L hr−1Kg−1 versus 0.201 L hr−1Kg−1, =.0019 and a decrease in its biological half-life (9.32 hours versus 22.56 hours, =.0125. In addition, diabetic animals exhibited a higher total cholesterol (7.20±0.62 mmol/L and 5.28±0.36 mmol/L; <.05 as well as more serum low density lipoproteins (4.45±0.72 mmol/L versus 1.06±0.10 mmol/L; <.05. Conclusion. Overt diabetes alters cyclosporine disposition by modulating its clearance. Abnormalities in the lipid profile, among other factors, may contribute to the accelerated metabolic degradation of cyclosporine under hyperglycemic conditions.

  3. Tissue and subcellular localizations of 3H-cyclosporine A in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeckman, L.; Brandt, I.; Appelkvist, E.-L.; Dallner, G.

    1988-01-01

    The tissue and subcellular localizations of 3 H-cyclosporine A after administration to mice were determined with whole-body autoradiography and scintillation counting of lipid extracts of tissues and subcellular fractions. The radioactivity was widely distributed in the body and the pattern of distribution after oral or parenteral administration was the same, except that tissue levels were generatlly lower after oral administration. Pretreatment of the animals with a diet containing cyclosporine A for 30 days before the injection of radioactive cyclosporine A did not change the pattern of distribution substantially. No significant radioactivity was found in the central nervous system, except for the choroidal plexus and the area postrema region of the brain. In pregnant mice no passage of radioactivity from the placentas to fetuses was observed after a single injection. 3 H-cyclosporine A and/or its metabolites showed a high affinity for the lympho-myeloid tissues, with a marked long-term retention in bone marrow and lymph nodes. There was massive excretion in the intestinal tract after parenteral administration, and the liver, bile, pancreas and salivary glands contained high levels of radioactivity. In the kidney radioactivity was confined to the outer zone of the outer kidney medulla. In liver homogenates no quantitatively significant binding of 3 H-cyclosporine A and/or its metabolites to cellular molecules such as proteins, DNA, phospho- or neutral lipids was found. After lipid extraction with organic solvents, almost all radioactivity was recovered in the organic phase. (author)

  4. Early cyclosporin A treatment retards axonal degeneration in an experimental peripheral nerve injection injury model

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    Ibrahim Erkutlu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury to peripheral nerves during injections of therapeutic agents such as penicillin G potassium is common in developing countries. It has been shown that cyclosporin A, a powerful immunosuppressive agent, can retard Wallerian degeneration after peripheral nerve crush injury. However, few studies are reported on the effects of cyclosporin A on peripheral nerve drug injection injury. This study aimed to assess the time-dependent efficacy of cyclosporine-A as an immunosuppressant therapy in an experimental rat nerve injection injury model established by penicillin G potassium injection. The rats were randomly divided into three groups based on the length of time after nerve injury induced by penicillin G potassium administration (30 minutes, 8 or 24 hours. The compound muscle action potentials were recorded pre-injury, early post-injury (within 1 hour and 4 weeks after injury and compared statistically. Tissue samples were taken from each animal for histological analysis. Compared to the control group, a significant improvement of the compound muscle action potential amplitude value was observed only when cyclosporine-A was administered within 30 minutes of the injection injury (P < 0.05; at 8 or 24 hours after cyclosporine-A administration, compound muscle action potential amplitude was not changed compared with the control group. Thus, early immunosuppressant drug therapy may be a good alternative neuroprotective therapy option in experimental nerve injection injury induced by penicillin G potassium injection.

  5. Topical cyclosporin as an alternative treatment for vision threatening blepharokeratoconjunctivitis: a case report

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    Ismail AS

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abdul-Salim Ismail,1,2 Rohana Taharin,2 Zunaina Embong11Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Pulau Pinang, Jalan Resindensi, Pulau Pinang, MalaysiaAbstract: Here, a case of vision threatening blepharokeratoconjunctivitis that responded well to topical cyclosporin is reported. A 9-year-old Malay girl with a history of bilateral blepharokeratoconjunctivitis was regularly treated with lid scrubbing using diluted baby shampoo, fusidic acid gel, and topical steroids as well as an intermittent course of oral doxycycline for the past year. She developed acute onset bilateral eye redness associated with poor vision in her right eye. Both eyes showed marked diffuse hyperemic conjunctiva with corneal vascularization. The presence of corneal vascularization obscured the visual axis in the right eye. The condition did not improve with regular intensive lid hygiene using diluted baby shampoo, fusidic acid gel, and topical steroids. She was started on topical cyclosporin A 0.5% every 6 hours. There was a dramatic regression of corneal vascularization after 3 days on topical cyclosporin, with marked improvement in visual acuity. This is a single case in which cyclosporin improved the status of the ocular surface. A large cohort study is required to justify its effectiveness in treating blepharokeratoconjunctivitis and to test its potential as an alternative immunosuppressive agent in comparison to conventional corticosteroids.Keywords: blepharokeratoconjunctivitis, cyclosporin

  6. Honey feeding protects kidney against cisplatin nephrotoxicity through suppression of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Rania; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Ranganathan, Punithavathi; Mohamed, Riyaz; El-Hamamy, Mahmoud M I; Dessouki, Amina A; Ibrahim, Abdelazim; Ramesh, Ganesan

    2015-08-01

    Cisplatin is a highly effective chemotherapeutic drug used to treat a wide variety of solid tumors. However, its use was limited due its dose-limiting toxicity to the kidney. Currently, there are no therapies available to treat or prevent cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Honey is a naturally occurring complex liquid and widely used in traditional Ayurvedic medicine to treat many illnesses. However, its effect on cisplatin nephrotoxicity is unknown. To determine the role of honey in cisplatin nephrotoxicity, animals were pretreated orally for a week and then cisplatin was administered. Honey feeding was continued for another 3 days. Our results show that animals with cisplatin-induced kidney dysfunction, as determined by increased serum creatinine, which received honey feeding had less kidney dysfunction. Improved kidney function was associated with better preservation of kidney morphology in honey-treated group as compared to the cisplatin alone-treated group. Interestingly, honey feeding significantly reduced cisplatin-induced tubular epithelial cell death, immune infiltration into the kidney as well as cytokine and chemokine expression and excretion as compared to cisplatin treated animals. Western blot analysis shows that cisplatin-induced increase in phosphorylation of NFkB was completely suppressed with honey feeding. In conclusion, honey feeding protects the kidney against cisplatin nephrotoxicity through suppression of inflammation and NFkB activation. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Histone deacetylase mediated silencing of AMWAP expression contributes to cisplatin nephrotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Punithavathi; Hamad, Rania; Mohamed, Riyaz; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Muthusamy, Thangaraju; Ramesh, Ganesan

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury is a serious problem in cancer patients during treatment of solid tumors. Currently, there are no therapies available to treat or prevent cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Since histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition augments cisplatin anti-tumor activity, we tested whether HDAC inhibitors can prevent cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and determined the underlying mechanism. Cisplatin up-regulated the expression of several HDACs in the kidney. Inhibition of HDAC with clinically used trichostatin A suppressed cisplatin-induced kidney injury, inflammation and epithelial cell apoptosis. Moreover, trichostatin A upregulated the novel anti-inflammatory protein, activated microglia/macrophage WAP domain protein (AMWAP), in epithelial cells which was enhanced with cisplatin treatment. Interestingly, HDAC1 and -2 specific inhibitors are sufficient to potently up-regulate AMWAP in epithelial cells. Administration of recombinant AMWAP or its epithelial cell-specific overexpression reduced cisplatin-induced kidney dysfunction. Moreover, AMWAP treatment suppressed epithelial cell apoptosis, and siRNA-based knockdown of AMWAP expression abolished trichostatin A-mediated suppression of epithelial cell apoptosis in vitro. Thus, HDAC-mediated silencing of AMWAP may contribute to cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Hence, HDAC1 and -2 specific inhibitors or AMWAP could be useful therapeutic agents for the prevention of cisplatin nephrotoxicity. PMID:26509586

  8. Nephroprotective, Diuretic and Antioxidant Effects of Some Medicinal Herbs in Gentamicin-Nephrotoxic Rats

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    Mostafa Abbas Shalaby

    2014-02-01

    Conclusion: Aqueous extracts of Petroselinum sativum, Eruca sativa and Curcuma longa produce nephroprotective, diuretic and antioxidant effects in GM - nephrotoxic rats. These herbs may be beneficial for patients who suffer from kidney diseases and those on GM therapy. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2014; 3(1.000: 1-8

  9. Aminoglycosides in septic shock: an overview, with specific consideration given to their nephrotoxic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Alexandre; Gruson, Didier; Bouchet, Stéphane; Clouzeau, Benjamin; Hoang-Nam, Bui; Vargas, Frédéric; Gilles, Hilbert; Molimard, Mathieu; Rogues, Anne-Marie; Moore, Nicholas

    2013-04-01

    Aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity has been reported in patients with sepsis, and several risk factors have been described. Once-daily dosing and shorter treatment have reduced nephrotoxicity risk, and simplified aminoglycoside monitoring. This review focuses on nephrotoxicity associated with aminoglycosides in the subset of patients with septic shock or severe sepsis. These patients are radically different from those with less severe sepsis. They may have, for instance, renal impairment due to the shock per se, sepsis-related acute kidney injury, frequent association with pre-existing risk factors for renal failure such as diabetes, dehydration and other nephrotoxic treatments. In this category of patients, these risk factors might modify substantially the benefit-risk ratio of aminoglycosides. In addition, aminoglycoside administration in critically ill patients with sepsis is complicated by an extreme inter- and intra-individual variability in drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic characteristics: the volume of distribution (Vd) is frequently increased while the elimination constant can be either increased or decreased. Consequently, and although its effect on nephrotoxicity has not been explored, a different administration schedule, i.e. a high-dose once daily (HDOD), and several therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) options have been proposed in these patients. This review describes the historical perspective of these different options, including those applying to subsets of patients in which aminoglycoside administration is even more complex (obese intensive care unit [ICU] patients, patients needing continuous or discontinuous renal replacement therapy [CRRT/DRRT]). A simple linear dose adjustment according to aminoglycoside serum concentration can be classified as low-intensity TDM. Nomograms have also been proposed, based on the maximum (peak) plasma concentration (Cmax) objectives, weight and creatinine clearance. The Sawchuk and Zaske method (based on the

  10. Multisite analytical evaluation of the Abbott ARCHITECT cyclosporine assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallemacq, Pierre; Maine, Gregory T; Berg, Keith; Rosiere, Thomas; Marquet, Pierre; Aimo, Giuseppe; Mengozzi, Giulio; Young, Julianna; Wonigeit, Kurt; Kretschmer, Robert; Wermuth, Bendicht; Schmid, Rainer W

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the analytical performance of the Abbott ARCHITECT Cyclosporine (CsA) immunoassay in 7 clinical laboratories in comparison to liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), Abbott TDx, Cobas Integra 800, and the Dade Dimension Xpand immunoassay. The ARCHITECT assay uses a whole blood specimen, a pretreatment step with organic reagents to precipitate proteins and extract the drug, followed by a 2-step automated immunoassay with magnetic microparticles coated with anti-CsA antibody and an acridinium-CsA tracer. Imprecision testing at the 7 evaluation sites gave a range of total % coefficient of variations of 7.5%-12.2% at 87.5 ng/mL, 6.6%-14.3% at 411 ng/mL, and 5.2%-10.7% at 916 ng/mL. The lower limit of quantification ranged from 12 to 20 ng/mL. Purified CsA metabolites AM1, AM1c, AM4N, AM9, and AM19 were tested in whole blood by the ARCHITECT assay and showed minimal cross-reactivity at all 7 sites. In particular, AM1 and AM9 cross-reactivity in the ARCHITECT assay, ranged from -2.5% to 0.2% and -0.8% to 2.2%, respectively, and was significantly lower than for the TDx assay, in which the values were 3.2% and 16.1%, respectively. Comparable testing of metabolites in the Dade Dimension Xpand assay at 2 evaluation sites showed cross-reactivity to AM4N (6.4% and 6.8%) and AM9 (2.6% and 3.6%) and testing on the Roche Integra 800 showed cross-reactivity to AM1c (2.4%), AM9 (10.7%), and AM19 (2.8%). Cyclosporine International Proficiency Testing Scheme samples, consisting of both pooled specimens from patients receiving CsA therapy as well as whole-blood specimens supplemented with CsA, were tested by the ARCHITECT assay at 6 sites and showed an average bias of -24 to -58 ng/mL versus LC/MSMS CsA and -2 to -37 ng/mL versus AxSYM CsA. Studies were performed with the ARCHITECT CsA assay on patient specimens with the following results: ARCHITECT CsA assay versus LC/MSMS, average bias of 31 ng/mL; ARCHITECT versus the

  11. Development of cyclosporine A microemulsion for parenteral delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yue; Che, Xin; Zhao, Mingyi; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yajun; Schwendeman, Anna; Li, Sanming

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a parenteral microemulsion formulation of cyclosporine A (CyA). The CyA solubility in caprylic capric triglyceride (GTCC), ethyl oleate and soybean oil were determined. The pseudo-ternary diagrams of oil (GTCC), surfactant (Solutol® HS-15), cosurfactants (ethanol/polyethylene glycol 400 [PEG 400] mixture) and water were constructed to identify boundaries for microemulsion existence. The CyA was added at 3, 6 and 9% w/w to the optimal microemulsion composition. Microemulsion particle size, solution viscosity and conductivity were examined. The microemulsion stability and haemolytic potential were examined after dilution in 5% dextrose solution for injection to 1 mg/mL CyA. Microemulsion stability was examined after a three-month storage at 4 and 25 °C. The GTCC was selected as an oil phase for CyA microemulsion based on solubility results. The optimum CyA microemulsion formulation consisted of 2.5% CyA, 9% GTCC, 24% Solutol® HS 15, 8% PEG 400, 4% ethanol and 52.5% water based on weight percent. The average particle sizes of the optimized blank and drug-loaded microemulsions were 68.7 nm and 71.6 nm, respectively and remained unchanged upon 25-fold dextrose dilution. The results of microemulsion physical and CyA chemical were confirmed by a three-month stability study at 4 and 25 °C. In vitro haemolysis studies indicated that CyA microemulsions were well tolerated by erythrocytes. The novel microemulsion formulation of CyA was developed that is suitable for parenteral administration. This new formulation could potentially have less vehicle-associated side effects that current commercial formulation of CyA based on Cremophor® EL and ethanol solution.

  12. Cyclosporine utilization in Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, B.; Sheriff, S.; Ossman, Mohd Imad

    2006-01-01

    The treatment of steroid-resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) imposes one the most perplexing and frustrating problems on nephrologists. Cyclosporine A (CsA) is widely considered as the treatment of choice for steroid-resistant or dependent nephrotic children. We reviewed the clinical outcome in children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) under CsA treatment. A total of 22 children presented with either steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) (14 children), or steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome (SDNS) (8 children) during the period from August 2002 to February 2005; the mean age for both groups was 7.6 years (range: 23 months-15 years). Renal histology showed FSGS in 14 (63%) patients, minimal change disease (MCD) in 4(18%), diffuse mesangial glomerulonphritis (MesGN) in three (13.6%), and membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) in two (6.8%). Treatment with CsA in combination with alternate-day prednisolone induced remission in 15(68%) patients; 9(60%) patients had complete remission and six (40%) partial remission. Seven (50%) patients in SRNS group responded to CsA treatment; two (14.2%) patients had complete remission and 5 (35.7%) had partial remission. Seven ( 87.5%) children in SDNS group had complete remission and one (13.5%) had partial remission. We conclude that this study demonstrates the efficacy of CsA in inducing remission in the steroid dependent is higher than in the steroid resistant nephrotic children. We believe that CsA is probably a good alternative therapy in this population. (author)

  13. Cyclosporine a inhibits apoptosis of rat gingival epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Su; Liu, Peihong; Li, Yanwu; Hou, Lin; Chen, Li; Qin, Chunlin

    2014-08-01

    The use of cyclosporine A (CsA) induces hyperplasia of the gingival epithelium in a site-specific response manner, but the molecular mechanism via which the lesion occurs is unclear. The present research aims to investigate the site-specific effect of CsA on the apoptosis of gingival epithelium associated with gingival hyperplasia. Forty Wistar rats were divided into CsA-treated and non-treated groups. Paraffin-embedded sections of mandibular first molars were selected for hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemistry analyses of bcl-2 and caspase-3, and the staining of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transfer-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL). The area of the whole gingival epithelium and the length of rete pegs were measured, and the number of bcl-2- and caspase-3-positive cells in the longest rete peg were counted. The analysis of variance for factorial designs and Fisher least significant difference test for post hoc analysis were used to determine the significance levels. In CsA-treated rats, bcl-2 expression was significantly upregulated, whereas caspase-3 expression was downregulated, along with a reduced number of TUNEL-positive cells. The site-specific distribution of bcl-2 was consistent with the site-specific hyperplasia of the gingival epithelium in CsA-treated rats. CsA inhibited gingival epithelial apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway and common pathway. The antiapoptotic protein bcl-2 might play a critical role in the pathogenesis of the site-specific hyperplasia of gingival epithelium induced by CsA. There were mechanistic differences in the regulation of apoptosis for cells in the attached gingival epithelium, free gingival epithelium, and junctional epithelium.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of cyclosporin in children with stable renal transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, J C; Earl, J W; Willis, N S; Farquhar, J E; Nath, C E; Knight, J F; Hodson, E M

    2000-12-01

    Fourteen children, aged between 5 and 17 years, with stable renal graft function and stable cyclosporin A (CSA) trough levels (Cmin) were studied. They had been taking CSA 12-hourly since their transplant 1.5-9 years previously, with the average dose of Neoral being 6.4 (range 4.4-8.4) mg/kg per day. CSA whole blood levels were measured at 0, 20, and 40 min, and at 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 6, and 8 h following the morning dose using the Abbott TDx fluorescence polarization immunoassay. The area under the concentration time curve (AUC), clearance adjusted for bioavailability (CL/F), and steady-state volume of distribution adjusted for bioavailability (Vss/F) were determined using model-independent pharmacokinetic analysis. Delay time (Tdel), peak concentration (Cmax), time to peak concentration (Tmax), and Cmin were also determined and correlated with AUC and other parameters. The Tdel in absorption varied from 0.3 to 1.6 (mean 0.73) h, resulting in a similarly variable time to Tmax of 1-2.4 h (mean 1.59). Tmax was related to the age of the patient (Tmax = 0.027 age + 1.41, r2 = 0.56, P < 0.005). The AUC showed good correlation with Cmax (Cmax = 0.25 AUC + 423.32, r2 = 0.96, P < 0.0005). Cmax appears to be a more-suitable measure of exposure to CSA than Cmin. Prediction of Tmax from the age of the child may help to overcome the problem of when to collect blood for peak levels.

  15. Cyclosporin A preferentially attenuates skeletal slow-twitch muscle regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyabara E.H.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcineurin, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, is associated with muscle regeneration via NFATc1/GATA2-dependent pathways. However, it is not clear whether calcineurin preferentially affects the regeneration of slow- or fast-twitch muscles. We investigated the effect of a calcineurin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA, on the morphology and fiber diameter of regenerating slow- and fast-twitch muscles. Adult Wistar rats (259.5 ± 9 g maintained under standard conditions were treated with CsA (20 mg/kg body weight, ip for 5 days, submitted to cryolesion of soleus and tibialis anterior (TA muscles on the 6th day, and then treated with CsA for an additional 21 days. The muscles were removed, weighed, frozen, and stored in liquid nitrogen. Cryolesion did not alter the body weight gain of the animals after 21 days of regeneration (P = 0.001 and CsA significantly reduced the body weight gain (15.5%; P = 0.01 during the same period. All treated TA and soleus muscles showed decreased weights (17 and 29%, respectively, P < 0.05. CsA treatment decreased the cross-sectional area of both soleus and TA muscles of cryoinjured animals (TA: 2108 ± 930 vs 792 ± 640 µm²; soleus: 2209 ± 322 vs 764 ± 439 m²; P < 0.001. Histological sections of both muscles stained with Toluidine blue revealed similar regenerative responses after cryolesion. In addition, CsA was able to minimize these responses, i.e., centralized nuclei and split fibers, more efficiently so in TA muscle. These results indicate that calcineurin preferentially plays a role in regeneration of slow-twitch muscle.

  16. Bioequivalence of a new cyclosporine a formulation to Neoral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Neto, Elias; Kakehashi, Erica; Alves, Cristiane Feres; Pereira, Lilian M; de Castro, Maria Cristina R; de Mattos, Renata Maciel; Sumita, Nairo Massakazu; Romano, Paschoalina; Mendes, Maria Elizabete; Nahas, William Carlos; Ianhez, Luiz Estevam

    2004-02-01

    New cyclosporine A (CsA) formulations must prove their bioequivalence to Neoral, the reference CsA formulation, to allow free prescription for the patients. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics (PK) of a new CsA formulation (Zinograf-ME), produced by Strides-Arcolab, to Neoral and to demonstrate their interchangeability in stable renal transplant recipients. Twelve-hour PK studies were obtained from 18 (13 M/5 F) adult patients (mean age 44.7 +/- 12 years). They received their renal allografts from 13 cadaver and 5 living donors. Before enrollment, all patients were receiving a third generic CsA for a mean of 48 months. Nine patients were also under azathioprine and 9 under mycophenolate mofetil; 17 received prednisone. A single oral dose of either Zinograf or Neoral was administered. The first PK study was performed with one formulation, and 1 week later, a second PK was done with the other formulation. During the washout period, patients continued taking the third CsA formulation. The drug substitution was done milligram-for-milligram. The CsA whole-blood level was measured by TDx immunoassay. Mean +/- SD of area under the curve (AUC), maximum concentration (C(max)), and concentration at the second hour (C2) of Zinograf were not statistically different from those with Neoral (4019 +/- 1466 vs 3971 +/- 1325 ng x h/mL, 998 +/- 376 vs 1021 +/- 356 ng/mL, and 707 +/- 254 vs 734 +/- 229 ng/mL, respectively). In the same way, the Zinograf 90% confidence interval for either C(max) (-123, +77 ng/mL) or AUC (-214, +311 ng.mL/h) were within the Neoral bioequivalence interval for the same parameters (+/-204 ng/mL and +/-794 ng x mL/h, respectively). These data demonstrate that the ZinografME CsA formulation is bioequivalent to Neoral.

  17. Comparative study between dimethyl sulfoxide (dmso), allopurinol and urate oxidase administration in nephrotoxic rats induced with

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heibashy, M.I.A.; El-Nahla, A.M.; Ibrahim, A.I.; Saleh, Sh.Y.A.

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to show whether DMSO, allopurinol and urate oxidase could offer ameliorating effects against abnormal alterations in kidney function tests in gentamicin (GM) induced nephrotoxic rats . Two experiments were carried out, the first one showed that daily injection of 80 mg GM/kg b. wt interapertonealy (I.P) for two weeks induced acute renal failure indicated by significant elevation in serum urea, creatinine, uric acid, potassium, inorganic phosphorus, TBARS and PTH and a significant decline in serum sodium, total and ionized calcium when compared with their corresponding values in saline injected rats. In the second experiment, comparisons were made between GM induced nephrotoxic rats and other nephrotoxic groups received daily pf I.P injection of DMSO (4 ml/kg b.wt), allopurinol (1.5 mg/100 g b.wt) and urate oxidase (10 mg/100 g b.wt) for 30 days after the incidence of nephrotoxicity. At all intervals, 10,20 and 30 days; serum urea, creatinine, uric acid, potassium, inorganic phosphorus, TBARS and PTH in DMSO, allopurinol and urate oxidase treated groups exhibited significant reduction than nephrotoxic untreated rats. During the same intervals, the levels of serum total and ionized calcium showed an opposite trend. serum sodium level did not show any significant difference between all treated groups except after 20 days , it was increased significantly in urate oxidase treated group and after 30 days in both allopurinol and urate oxidase treated groups. in term time intervals, a significant correction was recorded on the level of most measured parameters. in nephritic rats, the administration of DMSO, allopurinol or urate oxidase led to a significant amelioration effects in the kidney function tests and urate oxidase was the best protective.

  18. Preventing or attenuating amphotericin B nephrotoxicity with dopamine receptor agonists: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Karimzadeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotoxicity is generally considered as the most clinically significant and dose-limiting adverse reaction of amphotericin B. Currently, only the clinical effectiveness of salt loading and administering lipid formulations of amphotericin B have been clearly demonstrated to prevent its nephrotoxicity. In this review, we collected the published data related to dopamine receptor agonists in preventing amphotericin B nephrotoxicity. A literature search was conducted by the relevant keywords like ‘‘amphotericin B”, “nephrotoxicity’’, and ‘‘dopamine’’in databases such as Scopus, Medline, Embase and ISI Web of Knowledge. Four relevant articles were considered. Results of all the 3 experimental studies demonstrated that co-administration of dopamine (0.5-10 μg/kg/min as continuous intravenous infusion, SK&F R-105058, a prodrug of fenoldopam (10 mg/kg twice daily, orally or fenoldopam, a relatively selective dopamine receptor type 1 agonist, (0.5 or 1 μg/kg/min as continuous intravenous infusion can at least significantly mitigate the decrease in creatinine clearance caused by amphotericin B. Furthermore, fenoldopam and SK&F R-105058 can also protect against or delay amphotericin B-induced tubular damage. In contrast, the only clinical trial published until now found that simultaneous continuous intravenous infusion of low dose dopamine (3 μg/kg/min had no beneficial effect on the incidence, severity and time onset of developing amphotericin B-induced nephrotoxicity in autologous bone marrow transplant and leukemia patients. Considering the lack of beneficial effects in different settings such as acute kidney injury of any cause, negative results of the only clinical trial, and risk of significant adverse reactions, continuous intravenous infusion of low dose dopamine (1-3 μg/kg/min or selective dopamine receptor type 1 agonists (e.g., fenoldopam currently appears to have no promising clinical role in preventing or attenuating

  19. Optimization of cyclosporin A production by Beauveria nivea in continuous fed-batch fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Huijun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To develop the effective control method for fed-batch culture of cyclosporin A production, we chose fructose, L-valine and (NH42HPO4 as feeding nutrients and compared their productivities in relation to different concentrations. The feeding rate of three kinds of feeding materials was controlled to maintain the suitable residual concentration. The fed-batch fermentation results indicated that the optimal concentrations of fructose, L-valine and (NH42HPO4 were about 20 g/L, 0.5 g/L and 0.6 g/L for cyclosporin A production, respectively. The cultivation of Beauveria nivea could produce cyclosporin A up to 6.2 g/L for 240 hrs through a continuous feeding-rate-controlled-batch process under the optimal feeding conditions.

  20. The calcineurin activity profiles of cyclosporin and tacrolimus are different in stable renal transplant patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed-Nielsen, Pernille Bundgaard; Karamperis, Nikolaos; Jørgensen, Kaj Anker

    2006-01-01

    in determining optimal doses. Forty stable renal transplant patients were investigated three times in a 6-month period. Blood samples were drawn at 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after oral intake of tacrolimus (FK) or cyclosporin at days 1 and 180. At day 90, one blood sample at trough level (FK) or C2 level (cyclosporin A...... significantly different effects on calcineurin activity in renal transplant patients with stable, well-functioning grafts and that tacrolimus-treated patients can maintain good, stable graft function with minimal CaN inhibition.......Cyclosporin and tacrolimus remain the cornerstone immunosuppressive drugs in organ transplantation. Dosing and monitoring these drugs is based on pharmacokinetic protocols, but measuring a pharmacodynamic parameter, calcineurin phosphatase (CaN) activity, could be a valuable supplement...

  1. Health claims database study of cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion treatment patterns in dry eye patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonecipher, Karl G; Chia, Jenny; Onyenwenyi, Ahunna; Villanueva, Linda; Hollander, David A

    2013-01-01

    Background Dry eye is a multifactorial, symptomatic disease associated with ocular surface inflammation and tear film hyperosmolarity. This study was designed to assess patterns of topical cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion 0.05% (Restasis®) use in dry eye patients and determine if there were any differences in use based on whether dry eye is physician-coded as a primary or nonprimary diagnosis. Methods Records for adult patients with a diagnosis of dry eye at an outpatient visit from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2009 were selected from Truven Health MarketScan® Research Databases. The primary endpoint was percentage of patients with at least one primary versus no primary dry eye diagnosis who filled a topical cyclosporine prescription. Data analyzed included utilization of topical corticosteroids, oral tetracyclines, and punctal plugs. Results The analysis included 576,416 patients, accounting for 875,692 dry eye outpatient visits: 74.7% were female, 64.2% were ages 40–69 years, and 84.4% had at least one primary dry eye diagnosis. During 2008–2009, 15.9% of dry eye patients with a primary diagnosis versus 6.5% with no primary diagnosis filled at least one cyclosporine prescription. For patients who filled at least one prescription, the mean months’ supply of cyclosporine filled over 12 months was 4.44. Overall, 33.9% of dry eye patients filled a prescription for topical cyclosporine, topical corticosteroid, or oral tetracycline over 2 years. Conclusion Patients with a primary dry eye diagnosis were more likely to fill a topical cyclosporine prescription. Although inflammation is key to the pathophysiology of dry eye, most patients seeing a physician for dry eye may not receive anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:24179335

  2. Health claims database study of cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion treatment patterns in dry eye patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonecipher, Karl G; Chia, Jenny; Onyenwenyi, Ahunna; Villanueva, Linda; Hollander, David A

    2013-01-01

    Dry eye is a multifactorial, symptomatic disease associated with ocular surface inflammation and tear film hyperosmolarity. This study was designed to assess patterns of topical cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion 0.05% (Restasis®) use in dry eye patients and determine if there were any differences in use based on whether dry eye is physician-coded as a primary or nonprimary diagnosis. Records for adult patients with a diagnosis of dry eye at an outpatient visit from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2009 were selected from Truven Health MarketScan® Research Databases. The primary endpoint was percentage of patients with at least one primary versus no primary dry eye diagnosis who filled a topical cyclosporine prescription. Data analyzed included utilization of topical corticosteroids, oral tetracyclines, and punctal plugs. The analysis included 576,416 patients, accounting for 875,692 dry eye outpatient visits: 74.7% were female, 64.2% were ages 40-69 years, and 84.4% had at least one primary dry eye diagnosis. During 2008-2009, 15.9% of dry eye patients with a primary diagnosis versus 6.5% with no primary diagnosis filled at least one cyclosporine prescription. For patients who filled at least one prescription, the mean months' supply of cyclosporine filled over 12 months was 4.44. Overall, 33.9% of dry eye patients filled a prescription for topical cyclosporine, topical corticosteroid, or oral tetracycline over 2 years. Patients with a primary dry eye diagnosis were more likely to fill a topical cyclosporine prescription. Although inflammation is key to the pathophysiology of dry eye, most patients seeing a physician for dry eye may not receive anti-inflammatory therapies.

  3. Distribution of cyclosporine A in ocular tissues after topical administration of cyclosporine A cationic emulsions to pigmented rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daull, Philippe; Lallemand, Frédéric; Philips, Betty; Lambert, Grégory; Buggage, Ronald; Garrigue, Jean-Sébastien

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the ocular and systemic distribution of cyclosporine A (CsA) in rabbits after the instillation of preservative-free CsA cationic and anionic emulsions. For the single-dose pharmacokinetic (PK) study, rabbits were instilled with 50 μL of the test material. For the multiple-dose PK study, rabbits were instilled twice daily with Restasis or once daily with NOVA22007 for 10 days. At each time point, the cornea, conjunctiva, and whole blood were harvested for CsA quantification. Ocular and systemic distribution were determined after 4 times daily instillations with 50 μL of 3H-CsA cationic and anionic emulsions for 7 days. Restasis was used as a reference in all studies. Single-dose PK data demonstrated that NOVA22007 0.1% and 0.05% delivered higher CsA concentrations to the cornea than Restasis [concentration maximum (C max): 2692, 1372, and 748 ng/g, respectively] and have a better exposition (area under the curve). Conjunctival Cmax values were 1914, 696, and 849 ng/g and area under the curve values were 3984, 2796, and 2515 ng/g · h, for either dose of the cationic emulsions and Restasis, respectively. The multiple-dose PK and the 3H-CsA distribution data demonstrated that the systemic distribution after repeated instillations was low and comparable for all emulsions. These data demonstrate that the CsA cationic emulsions were more effective than Restasis at delivering CsA to target tissues, thus confirming the potential advantage of cationic emulsions over anionic emulsions as vehicle for ocular drug delivery for the treatment of ocular surface diseases.

  4. Cyclosporin-Methotrexate Compared with Cyclosporin-Methotrexate-Methylprednisolone Therapy for the Prophylaxis of Acute Graft-Versus Host Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, N.F.

    2010-01-01

    Acute graft-versus host (GVHD) disease is a common immunologic complication, which occurs in 40-50% of the recipients of allogenic stem cell transplantation (SCT). The role of corticosteroid in the prevention of GVHD is not well established. We report here a study to determine whether the addition of methylprednisolone to the combination of cyclosporine (CSA) and methotrexate (MTX), methylp-rednisolone (MP) for the prophylaxis of acute GVHD would further decrease the incidence of acute GVHD. A group of patients (25 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 12 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) that received CSA/MTX/MP started from 2004 to 2008, were compared to a historical group of patients (19 patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 12 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) that received GVHD prophylaxis in the form of CSA/MTX only from 1999 to 2003). The primary endpoint in this study was the develop-ment of GVHD and the secondary end point was overall and disease free survival. Both groups of patients were matched for age, sex, donor recipient sex, low risk patients and high risk patients. Although the incidence of acute GVHD in the MP -ve group was 35% versus 24% in the MP+ve group, there was no significant difference between them. The overall survival showed a significant difference between the 2 groups (p<0.05). It was 48% for the 2 drug regimen (CSA/MTX) vs. 81% for the three drug regimen (CSA/MTX/MP). There was a significant decrease in the relapse rate in patients on CSA/MTX/MP (p<0.05). In conclusion, the addition of MP (methylprednis-olone) to the combination of CSA/MTX did not affect the incidence of acute GVHD significantly in allogeneic SCT but surprisingly the incidence of survival and relapse was markedly increased and decreased respectively

  5. Cyclosporine induced biochemical remission in childhood autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franulović, Orjena Zaja; Rajacić, Nada; Lesar, Tatjana; Kuna, Andrea Tesija; Morić, Bernardica Valent

    2012-09-01

    The conventional treatment of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in children, which includes prednisone alone or in combination with azathioprine, induces remission in most cases but is often associated with poorly tolerated side effects. To avoid the adverse effects, Alvarez et al. introduced an alternative treatment regimen, using cyclosporine A (CyA) as primary immunosuppression. We carried out a retrospective study to evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of CyA treatment in children and adolescents with AIH treated in our center. During 2000-2010 period, nine children (6 female) aged 5-17.5 years, were diagnosed with AIH according to established international criteria. Following the suggested protocol, CyA was administered orally and when the transaminases tended to normalise, dose was adjusted to lover serum levels. Conversion to low dose of prednisone and azathioprine was started after 6 months, with gradual tapering and discontinuation of CyA. All nine patient had elevated transaminases and gammaglobulin levels, with proven histological changes typical for AIH in 8 patients that underwent liver biopsy (in one patient biopsy was contraindicated due to the prolonged prothrombin time). Serum ANA/SMA autoantibodies were positive in all but one patient, who had positive anti-LKM1. Complete or near complete and persistent normalisation of transaminase activity was observed in 8/9 patients within first 6 to 12 months. In one patient with partial response, an overlap syndrome was established. After ursodeoxycholic acid was added complete remission was observed. All patients had excellent clinical course and histological improvement. During the long-term follow-up (1.5-9 yrs; median 4.5 yrs), biochemical relapse occured in one patient after discontinuation of maintenance corticosteroid dose. Despite registered improvement, none of the patients fulfilled the criteria for therapy discontinuation, so all of them are still receiving maintenance doses of prednisone or azathioprine

  6. Gene Expression Analysis Reveals New Possible Mechanisms of Vancomycin-Induced Nephrotoxicity and Identifies Gene Markers Candidates

    OpenAIRE

    Dieterich, Christine; Puey, Angela; Lyn, Sylvia; Swezey, Robert; Furimsky, Anna; Fairchild, David; Mirsalis, Jon C.; Ng, Hanna H.

    2008-01-01

    Vancomycin, one of few effective treatments against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, is nephrotoxic. The goals of this study were to (1) gain insights into molecular mechanisms of nephrotoxicity at the genomic level, (2) evaluate gene markers of vancomycin-induced kidney injury, and (3) compare gene expression responses after iv and ip administration. Groups of six female BALB/c mice were treated with seven daily iv or ip doses of vancomycin (50, 200, and 400 mg/kg) or saline, and...

  7. Protective Effect of Carvacrol on Renal Functional and Histopathological Changes in Gentamicin-Induced-Nephrotoxicity in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmadvand

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Nephrotoxicity is one of the most important side effects of the use of gentamicin sulphate (GS resulted in reactive oxygen species generation. Antioxidant compounds played effective roles in reduction of renal injuries caused by using of gentamicin. Carvacrol is a strong antioxidant compound. Objectives The aim of this study is to explore the effect of carvacrol inhibition in lesions of gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, 32 male mature Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups of 8; group1: control, group 2 sham received daily carvacrol injection (74 mg/kg for 12 days, group 3 received daily GS injection (100 mg/kg for 12 days, group 4 received daily GS (100 mg/kg and carvacrol (74 mg/kg for 12 days. After 12 days, rats were anaesthetized, blood sample were obtained and kidneys were removed then stained with hematoxylin and eosin method and then were studied histophatologically. Serum creatinine and urea were measured. Results Flow treatment of nephrotoxic animals with carvacrol could significantly inhibit leukocyte infiltration (9.42% and tubular necrosis (38.18% in comparison with the nephrotoxic untreated group. Carvacrol significantly decreased the levels of urea and creatinine in treated group compared with the nephrotoxic untreated group. Conclusions The findings showed that carvacrol alleviates loss of leukocyte infiltration (9.42% and tubular necrosis and exerts beneficial effects on kidney function test in nephrotoxic group.

  8. Inhibition of PKCδ reduces cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity without blocking chemotherapeutic efficacy in mouse models of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabla, Navjotsingh; Dong, Guie; Jiang, Man; Huang, Shuang; Kumar, M. Vijay; Messing, Robert O.; Dong, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used cancer therapy drug that unfortunately has major side effects in normal tissues, notably nephrotoxicity in kidneys. Despite intensive research, the mechanism of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity remains unclear, and renoprotective approaches during cisplatin-based chemotherapy are lacking. Here we have identified PKCδ as a critical regulator of cisplatin nephrotoxicity, which can be effectively targeted for renoprotection during chemotherapy. We showed that early during cisplatin nephrotoxicity, Src interacted with, phosphorylated, and activated PKCδ in mouse kidney lysates. After activation, PKCδ regulated MAPKs, but not p53, to induce renal cell apoptosis. Thus, inhibition of PKCδ pharmacologically or genetically attenuated kidney cell apoptosis and tissue damage, preserving renal function during cisplatin treatment. Conversely, inhibition of PKCδ enhanced cisplatin-induced cell death in multiple cancer cell lines and, remarkably, enhanced the chemotherapeutic effects of cisplatin in several xenograft and syngeneic mouse tumor models while protecting kidneys from nephrotoxicity. Together these results demonstrate a role of PKCδ in cisplatin nephrotoxicity and support targeting PKCδ as an effective strategy for renoprotection during cisplatin-based cancer therapy. PMID:21633170

  9. Management of steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome in children with cyclosporine - a tertiary care centre experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, S.S.H.; Akhtar, N.; Sunbleen, F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the response and adverse effects of cyclosporine in combination with oral steroids for management of idiopathic steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome in pediatric patients. Methodology: It was an observational study conducted at Children Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan from March 2014 to June 2015. Forty normotensive patients of idiopathic steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome between one and twelve years of age with normal renal function were included in the study. Patients were prescribed cyclosporine with prednisolone and were followed to see the response and adverse effects of drugs. Results: Out of 40 patients, 20(50%) were males and 20(50%) females. Mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis was found in 27(67.5%) patients followed by Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in 9(22.5%) patients. Complete response was observed in 32(80%) children while partial response in 8(20%) patients at the end of six months. The most common adverse effects were cushingoid features seen in 26(65%) and cyclosporine related hypertrichosis in 34(85%). Conclusion: Management of idiopathic steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome in children with a combination of cyclosporine and prednisolone provided good results as response to treatment was seen in 80% patients. (author)

  10. Comparison of the efficacy of topical cyclosporine with fluromethalone in treatment of dry eye disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erum, N.; Rasul, A.; Yaqub, A.; Malik, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of 0.05 percent cyclosporine eye drops with 0.1 percentage fluromethalone eye drops on keratoconjunctivitis sicca (dry eye disease). Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Ophthalmology department of HIT Hospital Taxila, from Oct 2014 to May 2015. Material and Methods: The patients with keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) were selected from outpatient and divided in two treatment groups. The dry eye disease was defined according to criteria set by International task force for dry eye disease (ITF). The group I was treated with 0.05 percent cyclosporine drops while group-II was treated with 0.1 percent fluromethalone eye drops three times a day after informed written consent. The patients were followed up after three months and six months. Results: At the start of treatment 94 patients were placed in two treatment groups (n=47 in each group) and all the patients with KCS were graded according to severity following rules set by ITF. There were 46 patients in grade III (severe) KCS and 20 patients in grade IV (very severe) KCS. At the end of study only 24 were in grade II (moderate) KCS and 2 in grade III KCS. Of these only 5 patients in grade II and none in grade III were in treatment group I (cyclosporine). The remaining 19 patients in grade II and 5 patients in grade III KCS belonged to group II (fluromethalone). Conclusion: Cyclosporine eye drops are better than fluromethalone in treatment of keratoconjunctivitis sicca. (author)

  11. Prolonged skin graft survival by administration of anti-CD80 monoclonal antibody with cyclosporin A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossevoort, MA; Lorre, K; Boon, L; van den Hout, Y; de Boer, M; De Waele, P; Jonker, M; VandeVoorde, A

    Costimulation via the B7/CD28 pathway is an important signal for the activation of T cells. Maximal inhibition of T-cell activation and the induction of alloantigen-specific nonresponsiveness in vitro was achieved using anti-CD80 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in combination with cyclosporin A (CsA).

  12. Cyclosporin A levels in suction-blister fluid of patients with psoriasis treated systemically

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinardi, M. M.; van Eendenburg, J. P.; Oosting, J.; van Boxtel, C. J.; de Rie, M. A.; Bos, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Oral cyclosporin A (CyA) is highly effective in the treatment of psoriasis. The long-term use is limited by dose-dependent side-effects, and the local concentration of CyA is a determining factor in treatment. The concentration of CyA in suction-blister fluid (SBF) and in whole blood was assessed

  13. Lack of efficacy of topical cyclosporin A in atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rie, M. A.; Meinardi, M. M.; Bos, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    Since oral cyclosporin A (CsA) has demonstrated its effectiveness in psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, efforts have been made to develop a topical CsA formulation, thus avoiding systemic adverse events. A limited number of publications are available on the use of topical CsA in allergic contact

  14. Cyclosporine and Extracorporeal Photopheresis are Equipotent in Treating Severe Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Poulsen, Johan; Grunnet, Niels

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe atopic dermatitis (AD) is a recurrent and debilitating disease often requiring systemic immunosuppressive treatment. The efficacy of cyclosporine A (CsA) is well proven but potential side effects are concerning. Several reports point at extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) as an ...

  15. Kinetics and dynamics of cyclosporine A in three hepatic cell culture systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellwon, P; Truisi, G L; Bois, Frederic Y; Wilmes, A; Schmidt, T.; Savary, C C; Parmentier, C.C.; Hewitt, P.G.; Schmal, O; Josse, R.; Richert, L.; Guillouzo, A; Mueller, S O; Jennings, P; Testai, E; Dekant, W.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro experiments have a high potential to improve current chemical safety assessment and reduce the number of animals used. However, most studies conduct hazard assessment alone, largely ignoring exposure and kinetic parameters. Therefore, in this study the kinetics of cyclosporine A (CsA) and

  16. Recurrent impetigo herpetiformis with diabetes and hypoalbuminemia successfully treated with cyclosporine, albumin, insulin and metformin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Chembolli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a patient with recurrent impetigo herpetiformis associated with diabetes mellitus, hypoalbuminemia, and hypocalcaemia; who was refractory to corticosteroids. Cyclosporine along with other supportive measures proved to be life-saving with maintenance of pregnancy.

  17. Simple, rapid 125I-labeled cyclosporine double antibody/polyethylene glycol radioimmunoassay used in a pediatric cardiac transplant program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, L.S.; Webb, G.; Imperio, N.C.; Nehlsen-Cannarella, S.L.; Eby, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    We modified the Sandoz cyclosporine radioimmunoassay because of our need for frequent clinical monitoring of cyclosporine drug levels in allo- and xenograft pediatric cardiac transplant patients. With application of a commercially available [ 125 I]cyclosporine label in place of [ 3 H]cyclosporine and a second antibody/polyethylene glycol (PEG) method of separation in place of charcoal separation, we simplified and enhanced the speed and precision of assay performance. Studies of 140 whole blood samples comparing this new method to the [ 3 H]cyclosporine radioimmunoassay (RIA) method of Berk and colleagues yielded a coefficient of correlation of 0.96 (p less than 0.00001) with means of 626 and 667 ng/ml for [ 3 H]RIA and [ 125 I]RIA, respectively, and a regression equation of y = 28 + 1.02x. The major advantages are that total assay time is reduced to approximately 1 h; [ 125 I]cyclosporine label is used, avoiding the problems associated with liquid scintillation counting; and precision is enhanced by separating bound and free fractions with second antibody/PEG. These modifications should provide for greater ease of assay performance and improved clinical utility of cyclosporine monitoring not only in the pediatric but also in the adult transplant patient

  18. Imaging MS in Toxicology: An Investigation of Juvenile Rat Nephrotoxicity Associated with Dabrafenib Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groseclose, M. Reid; Laffan, Susan B.; Frazier, Kendall S.; Hughes-Earle, Angela; Castellino, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    As part of an investigative nephrotoxicity study, kidney tissues from juvenile rats orally administered dabrafenib at different age intervals between postnatal day (PND) 7 to 35 were investigated by MALDI and LDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) to determine the chemical composition of tubular deposits. In the youngest age group (PND 7-13), MALDI IMS demonstrated that a dabrafenib carboxylic acid metabolite was diffusely localized to the regions of tubular deposits (medulla and corticomedullary junction); however, no dabrafenib-related material was detected directly from the deposits. Rather, the LDI IMS analysis determined that the deposits were composed primarily of calcium phosphate. Based on these data, the dabrafenib associated nephrotoxicity, including the formation of tubular deposits, was determined to be age dependent. Furthermore, immature renal function was hypothesized to be responsible for the susceptibility of the youngest pups.

  19. Contrast media-associated nephrotoxicity - pathogenenesis and prevention; Kontrastmittelnephropathie - Pathogenese und Praevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erley, C.M. [Abt. Innere Medizin III, Sektion Nieren- und Hochdruckkrankheiten, Tuebingen Univ. (Germany); Duda, S.H. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    1997-07-01

    Contrast media-associated nephrotoxicity continues to be a relevant cause of acute renal failure, especially in patients with pre-existing renal insufficiency. Alterations in renal hemodynamics and direct tubular toxicity by contrast media are the primary factors believed to be responsible for contrast media-associated nephrotoxicity. We review recent insights into the pathogenesis of this complication and summarize prophylactic strategies focussing on hydration, vasoactive pharmacological agents, and prophylactic hemodialysis`. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Kontrastmittelnephropathie (KMN) stellt insbesondere bei Patienten mit eingeschraenkter Nierenfunktion ein erhebliches medizinisches Problem dar. Die Genese der KMN ist nach wie vor nicht eindeutig geklaert. Neben haemodynamischen Veraenderungen durch die Kontrastmittel spielen tubulotoxische Schaeden eine grosse Rolle. Die vorliegende Uebersicht beschreibt die zur Zeit bekannten pathophysiologischen Vorgaenge bei der KMN und die zur Zeit angewendeten Praeventivmassnahmen. (orig.)

  20. Lithium and nephrotoxicity: Unravelling the complex pathophysiological threads of the lightest metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J; Desmond, M; Berk, M

    2018-04-01

    While lithium remains the most efficacious treatment for bipolar disorder, it can cause significant nephrotoxicity. The molecular mechanisms behind both this process and the development of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus still remain to be fully elucidated but appear to involve alterations in glycogen synthase kinase 3 signalling, G2 cell cycle progression arrest, alterations in inositol and prostaglandin signalling pathways, and dysregulated trafficking and transcription of aquaporin 2 water channels. The end result of this is a tubulointerstitial nephropathy with microcyst formation and relative glomerular sparing, both visible on pathology specimens and increasingly noted on non-invasive imaging. This paper will elucidate on the current evidence pertaining to the pathophysiology of lithium induced nephrotoxicity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of nephroprotective activity of Musa paradisiaca L. in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Khizar; Rizwani, Ghazala H; Zahid, Hina; Qadir, M Imran

    2017-05-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the nephroprotective activity of methanolic extract of different morphological parts (bract, flower, trachea and tracheal fluid) of Musa paradisiaca L. (Family: Musaceae) against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice. Gentamicin produced significant changes in biochemical (increased levels of blood urea nitrogen level, blood urea, and serum creatinine), and histological parameters in mice. Treatment with methanolic extract of bract (100 and 250mg/kg, b.w) and flowering stalk (trachea) (250 and 500mg/kg, b.w) significantly prevented biochemical and histological changes produced by gentamicin toxicity. The extracts of M. paradisiaca (bract and flowering stalk) could contribute a lead to discovery of a new drug for the treatment of drug-induced nephrotoxicity.

  2. Nephrotoxicity Of Polymyxin B: Experimental Study In Cells And Implications For Nursing Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Barros de Moura Neiva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to characterize the cell damage mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of cytotoxicity of polymyxin B in proximal tubular cells (LLC - PK1 and discuss about the nurses interventions to identify at risk patients and consider prevention or treatment of nephrotoxicity acute kidney injury. This is a quantitative experimental in vitro study, in which the cells were exposed to 375μM polymyxin B sulfate concentration. Cell viability was determined by exclusion of fluorescent dyes and morphological method with visualization of apoptotic bodies for fluorescence microscopy. Cells exposed to polymyxin B showed reduced viability, increased number of apoptotic cells and a higher concentration of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. The administration of polymyxin B in vitro showed the need for actions to minimize adverse effects such as nephrotoxicity.

  3. Cyclosporin A-Mediated Activation of Endogenous Neural Precursor Cells Promotes Cognitive Recovery in a Mouse Model of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labeeba Nusrat

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive dysfunction following stroke significantly impacts quality of life and functional independance; yet, despite the prevalence and negative impact of cognitive deficits, post-stroke interventions almost exclusively target motor impairments. As a result, current treatment options are limited in their ability to promote post-stroke cognitive recovery. Cyclosporin A (CsA has been previously shown to improve post-stroke functional recovery of sensorimotor deficits. Interestingly, CsA is a commonly used immunosuppressant and also acts directly on endogenous neural precursor cells (NPCs in the neurogenic regions of the brain (the periventricular region and the dentate gyrus. The immunosuppressive and NPC activation effects are mediated by calcineurin-dependent and calcineurin-independent pathways, respectively. To develop a cognitive stroke model, focal bilateral lesions were induced in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC of adult mice using endothelin-1. First, we characterized this stroke model in the acute and chronic phase, using problem-solving and memory-based cognitive tests. mPFC stroke resulted in early and persistent deficits in short-term memory, problem-solving and behavioral flexibility, without affecting anxiety. Second, we investigated the effects of acute and chronic CsA treatment on NPC activation, neuroprotection, and tissue damage. Acute CsA administration post-stroke increased the size of the NPC pool. There was no effect on neurodegeneration or lesion volume. Lastly, we looked at the effects of chronic CsA treatment on cognitive recovery. Long-term CsA administration promoted NPC migration toward the lesion site and rescued cognitive deficits to control levels. This study demonstrates that CsA treatment activates the NPC population, promotes migration of NPCs to the site of injury, and leads to improved cognitive recovery following long-term treatment.

  4. Relationship of serum magnesium levels and other metabolic indices in renal transplant recipients receiving cyclosporine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi F

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Cyclosporine is one of the main immunosuppressors used for renal transplant recipients, and is given to prevent transplant rejection. Although the drug increases the survival of patients and grafted organs, it has some side effects independent of its effect on the immune system that are usually ignored. In this study, we evaluate the effect of cyclosporine on serum Mg levels and metabolic side effects in renal graft patients."n"n Methods: In this study, we followed 157 renal transplant recipients (62 females and 95 males who were being treated with cyclosporine at a private clinic to prevent transplant rejection. The patients were first physically examined and then blood samples were obtained in order to measure levels of cyclosporine, Mg, creatinine, fasting blood sugar, lipids, calcium, phosphorus, and uric acid levels. We then analyzed the data for correlations between serum Mg levels, cyclosporine and other metabolic complications."n"n Results: The mean levels of Mg and cyclosporine were 196±0.31mg/dl and 371±192 μg/dl, respectively. Hypomagnesemia was detected in 16 patients (10.2%.There was a significant negative correlation (p<0.05 between levels of Mg and cyclosporine levels (r=-0.53, serum

  5. Protective effects of Bombyx mori, quercetin and benazepril against doxorubicin induced cardiotoxicity and nephrotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul S. Nazmi; Shibli J. Ahmad; Krishna K. Pillai; Mohammad Akhtar; Aftab Ahmad; Abul K. Najmi

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the protective effects of Bombyx mori, quercetin and benazepril on doxorubicin (DXR) induced cardiotoxicity and nephrotoxicity in rats. B. mori, quercetin and benazepril were administered for 7 days, and a single intravenous injection of 10 mg/kg body weight of DXR on day five. The animals were sacrificed 48 h after DXR administration. DXR produced a significant elevation in the malondialdehyde (MDA) level and significantly inhibited ...

  6. Protective Effect of Rosemary (Rosmarinus Officinalis) Extract on Naphthalene Induced Nephrotoxicity in Adult Male Albino Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Neveen M. El-Sherif; Noha Mohy Issa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Naphthalene (NA) is a common environmental contaminant and is abundant in tobacco smoke. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is a herb commonly used as a spice and flavoring agents in food processing and is useful in the treatment of many diseases. Aim of the work: To study the nephrotoxicity of NA and to evaluate the possible protective role of rosemary extract in adult male albino rat. Materials and Methods: 25 animals were divided into three groups: Group I (Control group), G...

  7. Enterohepatic disposition of rosuvastatin in pigs and the impact of concomitant dosing with cyclosporine and gemfibrozil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Ebba; Lundahl, Anna; Fridblom, Patrik; Hedeland, Mikael; Bondesson, Ulf; Knutson, Lars; Lennernäs, Hans

    2009-12-01

    The hepatobiliary transport and local disposition of rosuvastatin in pig were investigated, along with the impact of concomitant dosing with two known multiple transport inhibitors; cyclosporine and gemfibrozil. Rosuvastatin (80 mg) was administered as an intrajejunal bolus dose in treatments I, II, and III (TI, TII, and TIII, respectively; n = 6 per treatment). Cyclosporine (300 mg) and gemfibrozil (600 mg) were administered in addition to the rosuvastatin dose in TII and TIII, respectively. Cyclosporine was administered as a 2-h intravenous infusion and gemfibrozil as an intrajejunal bolus dose. In treatment IV (TIV, n = 4) 5.9 mg of rosuvastatin was administered as an intravenous bolus dose. The study was conducted using a pig model, which enabled plasma sampling from the portal (VP), hepatic (VH), and femoral veins and bile from the common hepatic duct. The biliary recoveries of the administered rosuvastatin dose were 9.0 +/- 3.5 and 35.7 +/- 15.6% in TI and TIV, respectively. Rosuvastatin was highly transported into bile as shown by the median AUC(bile)/AUC(VH) ratio in TI of 1770 (1640-11,300). Gemfibrozil did not have an effect on the plasma pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin, most likely because the unbound inhibitor concentrations did not exceed the reported IC(50) values. However, cyclosporine significantly reduced the hepatic extraction of rosuvastatin (TI, 0.89 +/- 0.06; TII, 0.46 +/- 0.13) and increased the AUC(VP) and AUC(VH) by 1.6- and 9.1-fold, respectively. In addition, the biliary exposure and f(e, bile) were reduced by approximately 50%. The strong effect of cyclosporine was in accordance with inhibition of sinusoidal uptake transporters, such as members of the organic anion-transporting polypeptide family, rather than canalicular transporters.

  8. Cyclosporin A promotes mineralization by human cementoblastoma-derived cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzate, Higinio; Alvarez, Marco A; Narayanan, A Sampath

    2005-06-01

    The immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A has been shown to induce cementum deposition in vivo in experimental animals. Using cementoblastoma-derived cells, we have studied whether this drug will be useful to study cementum mineralization and differentiation in vitro. Human cementoblastoma cells and gingival fibroblasts (controls) were cultured and treated with 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 microg/ml of cyclosporin A. Cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT (tetrazolium) assay and cell number, and cell viability was assessed by trypan blue dye exclusion. Induction of mineralization was evaluated by alizarin red S staining to detect mineralized nodules and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to assess the expression of bone differentiation markers alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein and core-binding factor a1 (Cbfa1). Cyclosporin A at 5.0 microg/ml concentration reduced significantly the increase in the number of cementoblastoma cells. A dose-dependent increase in the number of mineralized nodules occurred in cultures of cementoblastoma-derived cells treated with cyclosporin A, and RT-PCR analyses showed significantly higher levels of expression of alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, type I collagen, matrix metalloproteinase-1, osteocalcin, osteopontin, and Cbfa1. Human gingival fibroblast proliferation and cell number were not affected. Mineralized nodules were not detected in gingival fibroblasts and bone specific proteins were not expressed. Presence of cyclosporin A during 14-day culture period appears to suppress the proliferation of cementoblastoma cells and induce the formation mineralized-like tissue by these cells.

  9. A H2S Donor GYY4137 Exacerbates Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H2S is highly involved in inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis and contributes to the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. However, the role of H2S in cisplatin nephrotoxicity is still debatable. Here we investigated the effect of GYY4137, a novel slow-releasing H2S donor, on cisplatin nephrotoxicity in mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with GYY4137 for 72 h prior to cisplatin injection. After cisplatin treatment for 72 h, mice developed obvious renal dysfunction and kidney injury as evidenced by elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN and histological damage. Consistently, these mice also showed increased proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in circulation and/or kidney tissues. Meanwhile, circulating thiobarbituric aid-reactive substances (TBARS and renal apoptotic indices including caspase-3, Bak, and Bax were all elevated. However, application of GYY4137 further aggravated renal dysfunction and kidney structural injury in line with promoted inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptotic response following cisplatin treatment. Taken together, our results suggested that GYY4137 exacerbated cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice possibly through promoting inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptotic response.

  10. Sida rhomboidea.Roxb leaf extract ameliorates gentamicin induced nephrotoxicity and renal dysfunction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thounaojam, Menaka C; Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N; Devkar, Ranjitsinh V; Ramachandran, A V

    2010-10-28

    Sida rhomboidea.Roxb (SR) known as "Mahabala" in Ayurveda and marketed as "Shahadeyi" is used in ethnomedicine to treat ailments such as dysuria and urinary disorders. To evaluate nephroprotective potential of SR against gentamicin (GM) induced nephrotoxicity and renal dysfunction. Nephrotoxicity was induced in rats with GM (100 mg/kg bodyweight (i.p.) for 8 days) and were treated with SR extract (200 and 400 mg/kg bodyweight (p.o.) for 8 days) or 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose (vehicle). Plasma and urine urea and creatinine, renal enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants along with lipid peroxidation were evaluated in various experimental groups. GM treatment induced significant elevation (p<0.05) in plasma and urine urea, creatinine, renal lipid peroxidation along with significant decrement (p<0.05) in renal enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. SR treatment to GM treated rats (GM+SR) recorded significant decrement (p<0.05) in plasma and urine urea and creatinine, renal lipid peroxidation along with significant increment (p<0.05) in renal enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. SR leaf extract ameliorates GM induced nephrotoxicity and renal dysfunction and thus validates its ethnomedicinal use. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Plasma metabolic profiling analysis of nephrotoxicity induced by acyclovir using metabonomics coupled with multivariate data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuxiu; Li, Yubo; Zhou, Huifang; Fan, Simiao; Zhang, Zhenzhu; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yanjun

    2014-08-01

    Acyclovir (ACV) is an antiviral agent. However, its use is limited by adverse side effect, particularly by its nephrotoxicity. Metabonomics technology can provide essential information on the metabolic profiles of biofluids and organs upon drug administration. Therefore, in this study, mass spectrometry-based metabonomics coupled with multivariate data analysis was used to identify the plasma metabolites and metabolic pathways related to nephrotoxicity caused by intraperitoneal injection of low (50mg/kg) and high (100mg/kg) doses of acyclovir. Sixteen biomarkers were identified by metabonomics and nephrotoxicity results revealed the dose-dependent effect of acyclovir on kidney tissues. The present study showed that the top four metabolic pathways interrupted by acyclovir included the metabolisms of arachidonic acid, tryptophan, arginine and proline, and glycerophospholipid. This research proves the established metabonomic approach can provide information on changes in metabolites and metabolic pathways, which can be applied to in-depth research on the mechanism of acyclovir-induced kidney injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Gamma-aminobutyric acid aggravates nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peysepar, Elham; Soltani, Nepton; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Eshraghi-Jazi, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ardeshir

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin (CP) is a major antineoplastic drug for treatment of solid tumors. CP-induced nephrotoxicity may be gender-related. This is while gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system that has renoprotective impacts on acute renal injury. This study was designed to investigate the protective role of GABA against CP-induced nephrotoxicity in male and female rats. Sixty Wistar male and female rats were used in eight experimental groups. Both genders received GABA (50 μg/kg/day; i. p.) for 14 days and CP (2.5 mg/kg/day; i. p.) was added from day 8 to the end of the study, and they were compared with the control groups. At the end of the study, all animals were sacrificed and the serum levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), nitrite, malondialdehyde (MDA), and magnesium (Mg) were measured. The kidney tissue damage was also determined via staining. CP significantly increased the serum levels of Cr and BUN, kidney weight, and kidney tissue damage score in both genders (PGABA did not attenuate these markers in males; even these biomarkers were intensified in females. Serum level of Mg, and testis and uterus weights did not alter in the groups. However, the groups were significantly different in terms of nitrite and MDA levels. It seems that GABA did not improve nephrotoxicity induced by CP-treated rats, and it exacerbated renal damage in female rats.

  13. Study of protective effects of melatonin on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, J.; Khan, W.; Bakhtiar, S.

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the protective effects of melatonin on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rabbits. Study Design: Laboratory based randomized control trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics in collaboration with Clinico Pathologic Laboratory, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from Apr to Jun 2015. Material and Methods: Eighteen rabbits were divided into three groups, each consisting of six rabbits. Baseline serum urea, creatinine, sodium and potassium were measured. Rabbits were weighed for dose calculation. A single dose of cisplatin 10mg/kg was given as I/P injection to the toxic group. The protective group received 5 mg/kg I/P melatonin for three days. Rabbits were sacrificed 72 hours after the cisplatin dose and both kidneys were sent for histopathology. Statistical analysis was carried out by using Microsoft Office Excel 2010 and SPSS version 21. Student's t-test and one way ANOVA, followed by 'Post Hoc Tukey' test was used for biochemical parameters, while Chi Square' test was used for histopathological comparison. Results: Moderate nephrotoxicity (grade-II) was seen in the toxic group, with substantial elevations of serum urea and creatinine (p<0.001), and serum sodium and potassium (p<0.01). Melatonin ameliorated the renal injury. Conclusion: The protective effects of melatonin on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity were due to its antioxidant properties. (author)

  14. Enhancement of Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity by Morphine and Its Attenuation by the Opioid Antagonist Naltrexone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Aminian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotoxicity is a major side effect of cisplatin, a widely used chemotherapy agent. Morphine and other opioids are also used extensively in different types of cancer for the clinical management of pain associated with local or metastatic neoplastic lesions. In addition to its analgesic effects, morphine has also been reported to possess potential immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties. Herein, we investigated the effects of morphine in a rat model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Following administration of a single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg, animals received intraperitoneal injections of morphine (5 mg/kg/day and/or naltrexone (20 mg/kg/day, an opioid antagonist, for 5 days. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was detected by a significant increase in plasma urea and creatinine levels in addition to alterations in kidney tissue morphology. Levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly increased in the renal tissue in cisplatin group. Moreover, glutathione (GSH concentration and superoxide dismutase activity were significantly reduced in renal tissue in cisplatin group compared with control animals. Treatment with morphine aggravated the deleterious effects of cisplatin at clinical, biochemical and histopathological levels; whereas naltrexone diminished the detrimental effects of morphine in animals receiving morphine and cisplatin. Morphine or naltrexone alone had no effect on the mentioned parameters. Our findings indicate that concomitant treatment with morphine might intensify cisplatin-induced renal damage in rats. These findings suggest that morphine and other opioids should be administered cautiously in patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy.

  15. Prevention of mouse-rat brain xenograft rejection by a combination therapy of cyclosporin A, prednisolone and azathioprine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, E B; Poulsen, F R; Zimmer, J

    1995-01-01

    Embryonic mouse hippocampal tissue was grafted as tissue blocks to the hippocampal region of adult rats and the effect of two different immunosuppressive treatments compared. Immunosuppression with cyclosporin A, prednisolone and azathioprine or with cyclosporin A alone was compared with placebo....... Transplants in the trimedication group displayed distinct cell and neuropil layers and only minimal cellular infiltration by leukocyte common antigen-expressing cells, whereas grafts in cyclosporin A- and placebo-treated groups were densely infiltrated. The results are discussed in relation to the need...

  16. Treatment of refractory chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aayushi Mehta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic spontaneous urticaria is a distressing disease encountered frequently in clinical practice. The current mainstay of therapy is the use of second-generation, non-sedating antihistamines. However, in patients who do not respond satisfactorily to these agents, a variety of other drugs are used. This article examines the available literature for frequently used agents including systemic corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, dapsone, sulfasalazine, hydroxychloroquine, H2 antagonists, methotrexate, cyclosporine A, omalizumab, autologous serum therapy, and mycophenolate mofetil, with an additional focus on publications in Indian literature.

  17. Further characterization of a furanocoumarin-free grapefruit juice on drug disposition: studies with cyclosporine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, Mary F; Widmer, Wilbur W; Pusek, Susan N; Beavers, Kimberly L; Criss, Anne B; Snyder, Jennifer; Watkins, Paul B

    2008-04-01

    We previously established furanocoumarins as mediators of the interaction between grapefruit juice (GFJ) and the model CYP3A4 substrate felodipine in healthy volunteers using a GFJ devoid of furanocoumarins. It remains unclear whether furanocoumarins mediate drug-GFJ interactions involving CYP3A4 substrates that are also P-glycoprotein substrates. The effects of furanocoumarin-free GFJ on drug disposition were further characterized by using the dual CYP3A4/P-glycoprotein substrate cyclosporine. By randomized crossover design, 18 healthy volunteers received cyclosporine (5 mg/kg) with 240 mL orange juice (control), GFJ, or furanocoumarin-free GFJ. Blood was collected over 24 h. Juice treatments were separated by > or = 1 wk. The effects of diluted extracts of each juice and of purified furanocoumarins on [3H]cyclosporine translocation in Caco-2 cells were then compared. The median (range) dose-corrected cyclosporine area under the curve and the maximum concentration with GFJ (P or = 0.50), were significantly higher than those with orange juice [15.6 (6.7-33.5) compared with 11.3 (4.8-22.0) x 10(-3) h/L and 3.0 (1.6-5.8) compared with 2.4 (1.1-3.1) mL(-1), respectively]. The median time to reach maximum concentration and terminal elimination half-life were not significantly different between the juices (2-3 and 7-8 h, respectively; P > or = 0.08). Relative to vehicle, the GFJ extract, orange juice extract, and purified furanocoumarins partially increased apical-to-basolateral and decreased basolateral-to-apical [3H]cyclosporine translocation in Caco-2 cells, whereas the furanocoumarin-free GFJ extract had negligible effects. Reanalysis of the clinical juices identified polymethoxyflavones as candidate P-glycoprotein inhibitors in orange juice but not in GFJ. Furanocoumarins mediate, at least partially, the cyclosporine-GFJ interaction in vivo. A plausible mechanism involves the combined inhibition of enteric CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein.

  18. Abbott’s Fluorescence Polarization Immunoassay for Cyclosporine and Metabolites Compared with the Sandoz “Sandimmune” RIA

    OpenAIRE

    Sanghvi, Ajit; Diven, Warren; Seltman, Howard; Starzl, Thomas

    1988-01-01

    A new procedure for measuring cyclosporine in plasma has been introduced by Abbott Laboratories, involving their TDx instrumentation and fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Radioimmunoassay (RIA) and high-performance liquid chromatography are currently the conventional methods for measuring cyclosporine in plasma and whole blood. In an effort to find a method that will decrease the radioactive hazard, the reagent and supply cost, and the labor requirements associated with RIA procedures, w...

  19. Sperm abnormality toxicity due to cyclosporine A and the ameliorative effect of royal jelly in male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza M. Gawish

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The immunosuppressive drug, utilized widely in Egypt, cyclosporine A was studied to evaluate its toxicity in male rats. Animals were divided into a control (untreated, 3 groups treated intraperitoneally with 20, 40 and 60 m/kg cyclosporine A for 5, 10 and 15 days, respectively and 3 groups treated intraperitoneally with 20, 40 and 60 mg/kg of cyclosporine A plus 100 mg/kg royal jelly administrated orally. Toxicity evaluation was carried out using two main endpoints: reproductive study (sperm morphology and count abnormalities and biochemical changes in liver and testis (DNA amounts. The aim of this work is to study the protective role of royal jelly against sperm abnormalities in shape and count, and changes in DNA contents in liver and testis tissue induced in rats when treated by cyclosporine A with different doses (20–40–60 mg/kg/day for 5, 10, and 15 days in male rats and how the royal jelly can repair this changes. Our results showed that sperm abnormalities induced by cyclosporine A included deviation from normal shape in head and tail. Abnormal heads contained amorphous head and banana-shaped head, whereas the abnormal tails included divided and coiled tails. It also induced an insignificant effect on the total sperm counts after 5 days of injection with the drug combined with royal jelly. DNA contents were determined in rat liver and testis cells to illustrate the mutagenic effect of cyclosporine A and how the royal jelly can modulate this effect. From these results we concluded that cyclosporine A toxicity was dose and time dependent and should be administrated under special precautions and medical supervision. Using of royal jelly in combination with cyclosporine A drug decreased its toxic effect, so it's considered as protector.

  20. Neferine reduces cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by enhancing autophagy via the AMPK/mTOR signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Tang, Yuling; Wen, Long; Kong, Xianglong; Chen, Xuelian; Liu, Ping; Zhou, Zhiguo; Chen, Wenhang; Xiao, Chenggen; Xiao, Ping; Xiao, Xiangcheng

    2017-03-11

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents; however, its clinical use is limited by serious side effects of which nephrotoxicity is the most important. Nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin is closely associated with autophagy reduction and caspase activation. In this study, we investigated whether neferine, an autophagy inducer, had a protective effect against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. In an in vitro cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity model, we determined that neferine was able to induce autophagy and that pretreatment with neferine not only attenuated cisplatin-induced cell apoptosis but further activated cell autophagy. This pro-survival effect was abolished by the autophagic flux inhibitor chloroquine. Furthermore, neferine pretreatment activated the AMPK/mTOR pathway; however, pharmacological inhibition of AMPK abolished neferine-mediated autophagy and nephroprotection against cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Collectively, our findings suggest for the first time the possible protective mechanism of neferine, which is crucial for its further development as a potential therapeutic agent for cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of Semen Analysis Parametes Changes after Priscription of Two Immunosuppresive Drugs, Tacrolimus and Cyclosporine in Men Undergoing Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ramouz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: The research objective was to investigate the prevalence of infertility in renal transplant patients receiving immunosuppressive agents and compare the impact of tacrolimus (target of Rapamycin inhibitors (TOR-I and Cyclosporine on spermogram parameters after the transplantation. Material & Methods: In this prospective study, from March 2013 to March 2014, all male patient who underwent renal transplantation and were treated with Tacrolimus or Cyclosporine, were included. Patients’ spermogram was analyzed in terms of sperm count and motility. Results: Average sperm count in patients receiving cyclosporine and tacrolimus before the transplantation was 1.73 × 106 and 2.08 × 106 and after the transplantation was 1.2 × 106 and 1.22 × 106, respectively (P=0.008(P=0.002. Average percentage of the motile sperms of patients treated with Cyclosporine, before the transplantation and start of immunosuppressive course was 45.10%, which decreased to 40.50% at the end of the course. The analysis indicated a significant reduction in sperm motility (P=0.001. Average percentage of the motile sperms of patients receiving Tacrolimus, before the transplantation and start of treatment was 46% that decreased to 38% after the transplantation. This finding presents the significantly reduced sperm motility (P=0.002. Finally, the effective sperm motility in patients treated with Cyclosporine was significantly higher than patients treated with Tacrolimus. Conclusion: Tacrolimus reduces sperms’ motility in renal transplant patients significantly higher than Cyclosporine.

  2. Cyclosporine in the Management of Impetigo Herpetiformis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Patsatsi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old female, gravida 1, para 0, in week 22 of pregnancy, presented with an eruption consisting of annular erythematosquamous plaques with an active polycyclic elevated border comprised of superficial micropustules. Clinical and histological features were typical of impetigo herpetiformis (IH. Systemic steroids resulted in an unstable condition, with no resolution of lesions. Resistance to the above therapeutic scheme served as a stimulus to discuss the use of cyclosporine as a therapeutic option in this condition. Reviewing the limited literature, cyclosporine seems to serve not as a monotherapy in the management of IH but as an additional medication, in order to achieve a stable course of the disease and avoid high doses of systemic steroids.

  3. Cyclosporine in the management of impetigo herpetiformis: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsatsi, Aikaterini; Theodoridis, Theodoros D; Vavilis, Dimitrios; Tzevelekis, Vasilios; Kyriakou, Aikaterini; Kalabalikis, Dimitrios; Sotiriadis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    A 27-year-old female, gravida 1, para 0, in week 22 of pregnancy, presented with an eruption consisting of annular erythematosquamous plaques with an active polycyclic elevated border comprised of superficial micropustules. Clinical and histological features were typical of impetigo herpetiformis (IH). Systemic steroids resulted in an unstable condition, with no resolution of lesions. Resistance to the above therapeutic scheme served as a stimulus to discuss the use of cyclosporine as a therapeutic option in this condition. Reviewing the limited literature, cyclosporine seems to serve not as a monotherapy in the management of IH but as an additional medication, in order to achieve a stable course of the disease and avoid high doses of systemic steroids.

  4. Evaluation of cyclosporine A eye penetration after administration of liposomal or conventional forms in animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nikoofal-Sahlabadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A lot of researches have investigated the effects of topical cyclosporine A on the eye surface layers’ diseases. By now the main limitation in cyclosporine application is the low permeation of the drug into the posterior segments of the eye. The aim of present study was to formulate high permeable dosage form can be beneficial in the topical treatment of the uveitis. To reach higher corneal drug absorption and drug concentration in the posterior segments of the eye, 3 nanoliposomal formulations containing 0.5 mg/ml cyclosporine A were prepared. Liposomal formulations and the commercial product (Restasis® were instilled in the right and left eyes of the rabbits, respectively. The rabbits were killed in the 3, 7, 14 and 28 days of study and the aqueous humor and vitreous were extracted. Mean size of liposomal formulation number 1, number 2 and number 3 were 107.2 ± 0.7, 129.3±0.9 and 144.8±1.8 nm and their zeta potential were -5.0±1.7, -5.5±2.3 and 44.6±6.2 mV, respectively. Results of ocular analysis showed that the liposomal formulations could increase the concentration of the drug in the aqueous and vitreous like Restasis®. But, in contrast with what has been expected the findings of this study implicate nanoliposomal formulations prepared could not make a significant difference in concentration of the drug in aqueous and vitreous humor compared to Restasis® (anionic microemulsion. In conclusion, we can state that liposomes with the same composition as our formulations are not more efficient than microemulsion for cyclosporine as ophthalmic drug delivery.

  5. Correlations between calcineurin phosphatase inhibition and cyclosporine metabolites concentrations in kidney transplant recipients: Implications for immunoassays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj Anker; Karamperis, Nikolaos; Koefoed-Nielsen, Pernille Bundgaard

    2006-01-01

    by inhibiting the enzyme calcineurin phosphatase. Determination of the enzyme's activity is one of the most promising pharmacodynamic markers. It is unknown how calcineurin phosphatase inhibition correlates with various cyclosporine monitoring assays and what is the potential impact of metabolites...... by the enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique (EMIT) and by the polyclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay (pFPIA). Calcineurin phosphatase activity was measured by its ability to dephosphorylate a previously phosphorylated 19-amino acid peptide. We found that calcineurin phosphatase inhibition...

  6. Correlations between calcineurin phosphatase inhibition and cyclosporine metabolites concentrations in kidney transplant recipients: implications for immunoassays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamperis, N; Koefoed-Nielsen, PB; Brahe, P

    2006-01-01

    by inhibiting the enzyme calcineurin phosphatase. Determination of the enzyme's activity is one of the most promising pharmacodynamic markers. It is unknown how calcineurin phosphatase inhibition correlates with various cyclosporine monitoring assays and what is the potential impact of metabolites...... by the enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique (EMIT) and by the polyclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay (pFPIA). Calcineurin phosphatase activity was measured by its ability to dephosphorylate a previously phosphorylated 19-amino acid peptide. We found that calcineurin phosphatase inhibition...

  7. Health claims database study of cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion treatment patterns in dry eye patients

    OpenAIRE

    Stonecipher, Karl G; Chia, Jenny; Onyenwenyi, Ahunna; Villanueva, Linda; Hollander, David A

    2013-01-01

    Karl G Stonecipher,1 Jenny Chia,2 Ahunna Onyenwenyi,2 Linda Villanueva,2 David A Hollander2 1TLC Laser Eye Centers, Greensboro, NC, 2Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA Background: Dry eye is a multifactorial, symptomatic disease associated with ocular surface inflammation and tear film hyperosmolarity. This study was designed to assess patterns of topical cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion 0.05% (Restasis®) use in dry eye patients and determine if there were any differences in use based o...

  8. Tacrolimus Versus Cyclosporine as Primary Immunosuppressant After Renal Transplantation: A Meta-Analysis and Economics Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Yu; You, Ru-Xu; Guo, Min; Zeng, Lu; Zhou, Pu; Zhu, Lan; Xu, Gang; Li, Juan; Liu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Tacrolimus and cyclosporine are the major immunosuppressants for renal transplantation. Several studies have compared these 2 drugs, but the outcomes were not consistent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacoeconomics of cyclosporine and tacrolimus in the treatment of renal transplantation and provide evidence for the selection of essential drugs. Trials were identified through a computerized literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Cochrane Renal Group Specialized Register of randomized controlled trials, and Chinese Biomedical database. Two independent reviewers assessed trials for eligibility and quality and then extracted data. Data were extracted for patient and graft mortality, acute rejection, and adverse events. Dichotomous outcomes were reported as relative risk with 95% confidence intervals. A decision tree model was populated with data from a literature review and used to estimate costs and quality-adjusted life years gained and incremental cost-effectiveness. Altogether, 6137 patients from 27 randomized controlled trials were included. The results of our analysis were that tacrolimus reduced the risks after renal transplantation of patient mortality, graft loss, acute rejection, and hypercholesterolemia. Nevertheless, tacrolimus increased the risk of new-onset diabetes. Pharmacoeconomic analysis showed that tacrolimus represented a more cost-effective treatment than does cyclosporine for the prevention of adverse events following renal transplant. Tacrolimus is an effective and safe immunosuppressive agent and it may be more cost-effective than cyclosporine for the primary prevention of graft rejection in renal transplant recipients. However, new-onset diabetes should be closely monitored during the medication period.

  9. Anthocyanin – Rich Red Dye of Hibiscus Sabdariffa Calyx Modulates Cisplatin-induced Nephrotoxicity and Oxidative Stress in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ademiluyi, Adedayo O.; Oboh, Ganiyu; Agbebi, Oluwaseun J.; Akinyemi, Ayodele J.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the protective effect of dietary inclusion of Hibiscus sabdariffa calyx red dye on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and antioxidant status in rats. Adult male rats were randomly divided into four groups of six animals each. Groups I and II were fed basal diet while groups III and IV were fed diets containing 0.5% and 1% of the dye respectively for 20 days prior to cisplatin administration. Nephrotoxicity was induced by a single dose intraperitoneal administration of cisplatin (7 mg/kg b.w) and the experiment was terminated 3 days after. The kidney and plasma were studied for nephrotoxicity and oxidative stress indices. Cisplatin administration caused a significant (Psabdariffa dye could be attributed to its anthocyanin content. PMID:24711761

  10. The synthesis, structure-toxicity relationship of cisplatin derivatives for the mechanism research of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Wu, Tian-Ming; Li, Hong-Ze; Zuo, Ze-Ping; Zhao, Ying-Lan; Yang, Li

    2017-08-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used antineoplastic drug, while its nephrotoxicity limits the clinical application. Although several mechanisms contributing to nephrotoxicity have been reported, the direct protein targets are unclear. Herein we reported the synthesis of 29 cisplatin derivatives and the structure-toxicity relationship (STR) of these compounds with MTT assay in human renal proximal tubule cells (HK-2) and pig kidney epithelial cells (LLC-PK1). To the best of our knowledge, this study represented the first report regarding the structure-toxicity relationship (STR) of cisplatin derivatives. The potency of biotin-pyridine conjugated derivative 3 met the requirement for target identification, and the preliminary chemical proteomics results suggested that it is a promising tool for further target identification of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Effect of cyclooxygenase inhibitors on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosaka E.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequent use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID in combination with gentamicin poses the additional risk of nephrotoxic renal failure. Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1 is the main enzyme responsible for the synthesis of renal vasodilator prostaglandins, while COX-2 participates predominantly in the inflammatory process. Both are inhibited by non-selective NSAID such as indomethacin. Selective COX-2 inhibitors such as rofecoxib seem to have fewer renal side effects than non-selective inhibitors. The objective of the present study was to determine whether the combined use of rofecoxib and gentamicin can prevent the increased renal injury caused by gentamicin and indomethacin. Male Wistar rats (250-300 g were treated with gentamicin (100 mg/kg body weight, ip, N = 7, indomethacin (5 mg/kg, orally, N = 7, rofecoxib (1.4 mg/kg, orally, N = 7, gentamicin + rofecoxib (100 and 1.4 mg/kg, respectively or gentamicin + indomethacin (100 and 5 mg/kg, respectively, N = 8 for 5 days. Creatinine clearance and alpha-glutathione-S-transferase concentrations were used as markers of renal injury. Animals were anesthetized with ether and sacrificed for blood collection. The use of gentamicin plus indomethacin led to worsened renal function (0.199 ± 0.019 ml/min, as opposed to the absence of a nephrotoxic effect of rofecoxib when gentamicin plus rofexicob was used (0.242 ± 0.011 ml/min. These results indicate that COX-2-selective inhibitors can be used as an alternative treatment to conventional NSAID, especially in situations in which risk factors for nephrotoxicity are present.

  12. Role of Free Radicals and Biotransformation in Trichloronitrobenzene-Induced Nephrotoxicity In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Gary O; Tyree, Connor; Pope, Deborah; Tate, Jordan; Racine, Christopher; Anestis, Dianne K; Brown, Kathleen C; Dial, Mason; Valentovic, Monica A

    2017-05-31

    This study determined the comparative nephrotoxic potential of four trichloronitrobenzenes (TCNBs) (2,3,4-; 2,4,5-; 2,4,6-; and 3,4,5-TCNB) and explored the effects of antioxidants and biotransformation inhibitors on TCNB-induced cytotoxicity in isolated renal cortical cells (IRCC) from male Fischer 344 rats. IRCC were incubated with a TCNB up to 1.0 mM for 15-120 min. Pretreatment with an antioxidant or cytochrome P450 (CYP), flavin monooxygenase (FMO), or peroxidase inhibitor was used in some experiments. Among the four TCNBs, the order of decreasing nephrotoxic potential was approximately 3,4,5- > 2,4,6- > 2,3,4- > 2,4,5-TCNB. The four TCNBs exhibited a similar profile of attenuation of cytotoxicity in response to antioxidant pretreatments. 2,3,4- and 3,4,5-TCNB cytotoxicity was attenuated by most of the biotransformation inhibitors tested, 2,4,5-TCNB cytotoxicity was only inhibited by isoniazid (CYP 2E1 inhibitor), and 2,4,6-TCNB-induced cytotoxicity was inhibited by one CYP inhibitor, one FMO inhibitor, and one peroxidase inhibitor. All of the CYP specific inhibitors tested offered some attenuation of 3,4,5-TCNB cytotoxicity. These results indicate that 3,4,5-TCNB is the most potent nephrotoxicant, free radicals play a role in the TCNB cytotoxicity, and the role of biotransformation in TCNB nephrotoxicity in vitro is variable and dependent on the position of the chloro groups.

  13. Evaluation of therapeutic potential of picrorhiza kurroa glycosidal extract against nimesulide nephrotoxicity: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Picrorhiza kurroa (Pk) is a traditional Ayurvedic herb famous as a potent hepatoprotective agent, only few studies are available on the nephroprotective activity of this herb. The objective of this pilot study was to determine the therapeutic effectiveness of Pk against nimesulide induced toxicity. Methods: This laboratory based experimental study was conducted on mice at National Institute of Health, Islamabad from Dec 2012 to Jan 2013. The mice were divided in to 4 groups. One group was given only PK while the other three groups were given nimesulide in a dosage of 750 mg/kg body weight for 3 days to induce nephrotoxicity and protective effect of Pk was noted by giving 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg pk for 14 days to the two of the nimesulide induced nephrotoxicity groups. Biochemical assessment of kidney was done by measuring serum urea and creatinine. Also histology was done to confirm the findings of biochemical assessment. Results: In our pilot study out of 20 mice, 19 mice survived. Only 1 mouse of nimesulide group died. Mean serum urea of nimesulide group was 60 mg/dl and was decreased to 23 mg/dl and 25 mg/dl by two doses of Pk. Mean creatinine in group 2 was 0.55 mg/dl and was decreased to 0.21 and 0.19 mg/dl by two doses of Pk. Conclusion: Our study shows that nimesulide is a potential nephrotoxic drug and its toxic effects on kidney can be minimized by using glycosidal extract of Pk. (author)

  14. Effect of cyclooxygenase inhibitors on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, E M; Santos, O F P; Seguro, A C; Vattimo, M F F

    2004-07-01

    The frequent use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) in combination with gentamicin poses the additional risk of nephrotoxic renal failure. Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) is the main enzyme responsible for the synthesis of renal vasodilator prostaglandins, while COX-2 participates predominantly in the inflammatory process. Both are inhibited by non-selective NSAID such as indomethacin. Selective COX-2 inhibitors such as rofecoxib seem to have fewer renal side effects than non-selective inhibitors. The objective of the present study was to determine whether the combined use of rofecoxib and gentamicin can prevent the increased renal injury caused by gentamicin and indomethacin. Male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were treated with gentamicin (100 mg/kg body weight, ip, N = 7), indomethacin (5 mg/kg, orally, N = 7), rofecoxib (1.4 mg/kg, orally, N = 7), gentamicin + rofecoxib (100 and 1.4 mg/kg, respectively) or gentamicin + indomethacin (100 and 5 mg/kg, respectively, N = 8) for 5 days. Creatinine clearance and alpha-glutathione-S-transferase concentrations were used as markers of renal injury. Animals were anesthetized with ether and sacrificed for blood collection. The use of gentamicin plus indomethacin led to worsened renal function (0.199 +/- 0.019 ml/min), as opposed to the absence of a nephrotoxic effect of rofecoxib when gentamicin plus rofexicob was used (0.242 +/- 0.011 ml/min). These results indicate that COX-2-selective inhibitors can be used as an alternative treatment to conventional NSAID, especially in situations in which risk factors for nephrotoxicity are present.

  15. Virgin olive oil ameliorates deltamethrin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice: A biochemical and immunohistochemical assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza khalatbary

    Full Text Available Objective: A major class of synthetic pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin (DM, can elicit pathophysiological effects through oxidative stress in non-targeted organisms such as mammals. There is accumulating evidence that virgin olive oil (VOO, a rich source of polyphenolic components, have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic properties. This study aimed to determine the protective and ameliorative effects of VOO against DM-induced nephrotoxicity. Methods & materials: Mice were randomly divided into four equal groups: DM group, DM plus VOO group, VOO group, and vehicle group. Five weeks after gavaging, kidney samples were taken for biochemical assessment of malondialdehyde (MDA, glutathione (GSH and catalase (CAT, and for immunohistochemical assessment of caspase-3, cyclooxygenase-2 (cox-2 and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Results: The MDA level in kidney was increased in the DM group, which was significantly decreased after VOO administration in the DM plus VOO group. The GSH level and CAT activiy in kidney were decreased in the DM group, which were significantly increased after VOO administration in the DM plus VOO group. Greater expression of caspase-3, cox-2, and PARP could be detected in the DM group, which was significantly attenuated in the DM plus VOO group. Also, the histopathological changes which were detected in the DM group attenuated after VOO consumption. Conclusion: Virgin olive oil exerted protective effects against deltamethrin-induced nephrotoxicity, which might be associated with its anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidative properties. Keywords: Deltamethrin, Virgin olive oil, Antioxidant, Apoptosis, Inflammation, Nephrotoxicity

  16. Protective effects of the Morus alba L. leaf extracts on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematbakhsh, M; Hajhashemi, V; Ghannadi, A; Talebi, A; Nikahd, M

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin (CP) as an important anti-tumor drug causes nephrotoxicity mainly by oxidative stress and renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Since flavonoids have high antioxidant activity and probable role in the inhibition of RAS, this study was designed to investigate the protective effect of hydroalcoholic extract and flavonoid fraction of Morus alba leaves on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rat. Extracts of Morus alba leaves were prepared and analyzed Phytochemically. Male rats (160-200 g) were used in this study (n=7-9). Normal group received 0.2 ml normal saline intraperitoneally (i.p.) once daily for ten days. Control animals received CP on the third day and saline in the remaining days. Other groups received either hydroalcoholic extract (200, 400 and 600 mg/kg, i.p.) or flavonoid fraction (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) for two days before CP administration and thereafter until tenth day. Serum concentrations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr) and nitric oxide were measured using standard methods. Also left kidneys were prepared for pathological study. The serum levels of BUN and Cr increased in animals received CP. Hydroalcoholic extract was ineffective in reversing these alterations but flavonoid fraction (50 and 100 mg/kg) significantly inhibited CP-induced increases of BUN and Cr. None of the treatments could affect serum concentration of nitric oxide. Flavonoid fraction could also prevent CP-induced pathological damage of the kidney. It seems that concurrent use of flavonoid fraction of Morus alba with CP can protect kidneys from CP-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:24019816

  17. Nephrotoxicity of uranyl acetate: effect on rat kidney brush border membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, M.; Yaari, A.; Moran, A.; Doshnitzki, Z.; Cohen-Luria, R.

    2006-01-01

    Since the Gulf war exposure to depleted uranium, a known nephrotoxic agent, there is a renewed interest in the toxic effects of uranium in general and its mechanism of nephrotoxicity which is still largely unknown in particular. In order to investigate the mechanism responsible for uranium nephrotoxicity and the therapeutic effect of urine alkalization, we utilized rat renal brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Uranyl acetate (UA) caused a decrease in glucose transport in BBMV. The apparent K i of uranyl was 139±30 μg uranyl/mg protein of BBMV. Uranyl at 140 μg/mg protein of BBMV reduced the maximal capacity of the system to transport glucose [V max 2.2±0.2 and 0.96±0.16 nmol/mg protein for control and uranyl treated BBMV (P m (1.54±0.33 and 1.54±0.51 mM for control, and uranyl treated BBMV, respectively). This reduction in V max is at least partially due to a decrease in the number of sodium-coupled glucose transporters as apparent from the reduction in phlorizin binding to the uranyl treated membranes, V max was reduced from 247±13 pmol/mg protein in control BBMV to 119±3 pmol/mg protein in treated vesicles (P<0.001). The pH of the medium has a profound effect on the toxicity of UA on sodium-coupled glucose transport in BBMV: higher toxicity at neutral pH (around pH 7.0), and practically no toxicity at alkaline pH (7.6). This is the first report showing a direct inhibitory dose and pH dependent effect of uranyl on the glucose transport system in isolated apical membrane from kidney cortex. (orig.)

  18. Possible mechanism of PNS protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinwen; Huang, Zhenguang; Zou, Xiaoqin; Yang, Yufang; Qiu, Yue; Wen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanism of the protective effect of Panax notoginsenosides (PNS) against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity via the hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1)/Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3) pathway of autophagy. The rats underwent intraperitoneal injection with a single dose of cisplatin and a subset of rats were also intraperitoneally injected with 31.35 mg/kg PNS once a day. After 24 h exposure to cisplatin, the concentrations of urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (Scr) were determined. The rat renal tissue was examined using H&E-staining, and the mitochondria of renal tubular epithelial cells were observed using transmission electron microscopy. The expressions of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain (LC)3, autophagy-related gene (Atg)5, Beclin-1 and BNIP3 in rat renal tissue were detected using western blotting. The expression of HIF-1 was detected by immunohistochemistry. The results showed that PNS significantly protected against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, as evidenced by decreasing the concentration of blood BUN and Scr, the attenuation of renal histopathological changes and the mitochondrial damages of renal cells, and the increase of mitochondria autophagosome in renal tubular epithelial cells. Additionally, PNS significantly increased the expression of LC3 and the ratio of LC3II/LC3I in rat renal tissue. Moreover, PNS significantly increased the expression of HIF-1α, BNIP3, Atg5 and Beclin-1 in rat renal tissue. In conclusion, the protective effect of PNS on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was mainly due to its ability to enhancing the mitochondrial autophagy of renal tissue via the HIF-1α/BNIP3 pathway, and here is the first demonstration about it.

  19. Low serum zinc is associated with elevated risk of cadmium nephrotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yu-Sheng, E-mail: Lin.Yu-Sheng@epa.gov [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Ho, Wen-Chao [Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Caffrey, James L. [Integrative Physiology and Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX (United States); Sonawane, Babasaheb [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Background: Despite animal evidence suggests that zinc modulates cadmium nephrotoxicity, limited human data are available. Objective: To test the hypothesis that low serum zinc concentrations may increase the risk of cadmium-mediated renal dysfunction in humans. Methods: Data from 1545 subjects aged 20 or older in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2011–2012 were analyzed. Renal function was defined as impaired when estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) fell below 60 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} and/or the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio surpassed 2.5 in men and 3.5 mg/mmol in women. Results: Within the study cohort, 117 subjects had reduced eGFR and 214 had elevated urinary albumin. After adjusting for potential confounders, subjects with elevated blood cadmium (>0.53 μg/L) were more likely to have a reduced eGFR (odds ratio [OR]=2.21, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.09–4.50) and a higher urinary albumin (OR=2.04, 95% CI: 1.13–3.69) than their low cadmium (<0.18 μg/L) peers. In addition, for any given cadmium exposure, low serum zinc is associated with elevated risk of reduced eGFR (OR=3.38, 95% CI: 1.39–8.28). A similar increase in the odds ratio was observed between declining serum zinc and albuminuria but failed to reach statistical significance. Those with lower serum zinc/blood cadmium ratios were likewise at a greater risk of renal dysfunction (p<0.01). Conclusions: This study results suggest that low serum zinc concentrations are associated with an increased risk of cadmium nephrotoxicity. Elevated cadmium exposure is global public health issue and the assessment of zinc nutritional status may be an important covariate in determining its effective renal toxicity. - Highlights: • Blood cadmium was associated with increased risk of nephrotoxicity. • Low serum zinc may exacerbate risk of cadmium-mediated renal dysfunction. • Both zinc deficiency and elevated cadmium exposure are global public health issues.

  20. 131I-orthoiodohippurate clearance in the detection of cisplatin nephrotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hengst, W.; Wieler, H.; Rabs, U.; Buerger, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    In this study, 26 patients were treated with 20 mg cisplatin (CP)/m 2 body surface daily for 5 days as part of a combination therapy for testicular cancer. Simultaneously a vigorous hyperhydration (3000 ml daily) was applied to reduce the nephrotoxic effect induced by the drug. sup(131I)-orthoiodophippurate clearance values obtained by the modified method of Oberhausen did not show any significant evidence of tubular dysfunction after therapy. These results may have been due to the vigorous hydration as well as to the youth of the patients. (orig.) [de

  1. Tenofovir-related nephrotoxicity: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Christopher W; Steinhaus, Mary C; Szabo, Susan; Dressier, Robert M

    2004-03-01

    Tenofovir is a nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Several cases of renal failure associated with tenofovir therapy recently have been reported. A 54-year-old man with HIV experienced decreasing renal function and Fanconi's syndrome secondary to tenofovir therapy. His condition gradually improved after discontinuation of the drug. The available medical literature for reported cases of tenofovir-related nephrotoxicity indicates that this complication is apparently rare. However, our case report and literature review underscore the importance of monitoring renal function when treating patients with any nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor.

  2. Tribulus terrestris-induced severe nephrotoxicity in a young healthy male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talasaz, Azita Hajhossein; Abbasi, Mohammad-Reza; Abkhiz, Saeed; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin

    2010-11-01

    Herbal medications are being progressively utilized all over the world. Nevertheless, herbal remedies are not without hazards and several cases of adverse reactions have been described. Tribulus terrestris is traditionally used because of its aphrodisiac and antiurolithiatic activities with almost complete inhibition of stone formation. We report a case of T. terrestris-induced hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity in an Iranian male patient who used the plant's extract to prevent kidney stone formation. He presented with seizure and very high serum aminotransferases and creatinine after consuming herbal water for 2 days. Discontinuation of the herbal remedy resulted in improvement in symptoms and normalization of his liver enzymes.

  3. Measurement of cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood: HPLC and radioimmunoassay with a specific monoclonal antibody and 3H- or 125I-labeled ligand compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, B.A.; Daft, M.C.; Koenig, J.W.; Flye, M.W.; Turk, J.W.; Scott, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    We compared cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood as measured by HPLC and by RIA with a monoclonal antibody specific for cyclosporine with 3 H- or 125 I-labeled cyclosporine ligand. The 3 H-RIA kit slightly underestimated cyclosporine concentrations (greater than 600 micrograms/L) in comparison with HPLC. Over a wide range of concentrations, cyclosporine measured with the 125 I-RIA kit correlated well with HPLC (slope = 0.99, n = 301, r = 0.98), observed for samples from recipients of kidney, heart, or liver allografts (respective slopes: 1.01, 0.93, and 1.00). The 125 I-RIA standard curve was linear to 1000 micrograms of cyclosporine per liter. Inter- and intra-assay CVs for 125 I-RIA measurements of cyclosporine were less than or equal to 7%. Evidently, the 125 I-RIA kit involving a monoclonal antibody specific for cyclosporine is equivalent to the HPLC assay and can replace it for therapeutic drug monitoring of cyclosporine therapy

  4. Cyclosporine treatment reduces oxygen free radical generation and oxidative stress in the brain of hypoxia-reoxygenated newborn piglets.

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    Richdeep S Gill

    Full Text Available Oxygen free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. It has previously been shown in traumatic brain injury animal models that treatment with cyclosporine reduces brain injury. However, the potential neuroprotective effect of cyclosporine in asphyxiated neonates has yet to be fully studied. Using an acute newborn swine model of hypoxia-reoxygenation, we evaluated the effects of cyclosporine on the brain, focusing on hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 production and markers of oxidative stress. Piglets (1-4 d, 1.4-2.5 kg were block-randomized into three hypoxia-reoxygenation experimental groups (2 h hypoxia followed by 4 h reoxygenation (n = 8/group. At 5 min after reoxygenation, piglets were given either i.v. saline (placebo, controls or cyclosporine (2.5 or 10 mg/kg i.v. bolus in a blinded-randomized fashion. An additional sham-operated group (n = 4 underwent no hypoxia-reoxygenation. Systemic hemodynamics, carotid arterial blood flow (transit-time ultrasonic probe, cerebral cortical H(2O(2 production (electrochemical sensor, cerebral tissue glutathione (ELISA and cytosolic cytochrome-c (western blot levels were examined. Hypoxic piglets had cardiogenic shock (cardiac output 40-48% of baseline, hypotension (mean arterial pressure 27-31 mmHg and acidosis (pH 7.04 at the end of 2 h of hypoxia. Post-resuscitation cyclosporine treatment, particularly the higher dose (10 mg/kg, significantly attenuated the increase in cortical H(2O(2 concentration during reoxygenation, and was associated with lower cerebral oxidized glutathione levels. Furthermore, cyclosporine treatment significantly attenuated the increase in cortical cytochrome-c and lactate levels. Carotid blood arterial flow was similar among groups during reoxygenation. Conclusively, post-resuscitation administration of cyclosporine significantly attenuates H(2O(2 production and minimizes oxidative stress in newborn piglets following hypoxia-reoxygenation.

  5. Hipertrofia gengival em transplantados renais Cyclosporine induced gingival hyperplasia in kidney transplants

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    Paulo Roberto Torrezan

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os fatores associados ao crescimento gengival excessivo em transplantados renais. MÉTODOS: A pesquisa foi realizada no Hospital Cajuru de Curitiba, no período de abril a outubro de 2002, com a participação de 60 transplantados renais, em uso diário de ciclosporina e com pelo menos um segmento dentário. O protocolo de ensaio foi observacional transversal. O exame odontológico dos indivíduos consistiu da avaliação dos segmentos dentários com verificação do grau de crescimento da gengiva e do índice de placa bacteriana. Todos os participantes preencheram questionário com dados relacionados ao transplante renal, realizaram coleta de material para controle do nível sérico de ciclosporina e foram avaliados quanto ao peso e altura. Na comparação dos resultados de amostras categóricas, utilizou-se o teste do Qui-quadrado e a correlação de classes de Spearman. O teste t foi aplicado na comparação das variáveis contínuas. RESULTADOS: Em pacientes tratados somente com ciclosporina, 47,2% não apresentavam alterações da gengiva, enquanto 52,8% cursaram com crescimento gengival, sendo 30,6% com grau > 2. Nos pacientes tratados com ciclosporina e nifedipina, notou-se que 29,2% tinham gengiva normal e 70,8% apresentaram crescimento gengival, sendo que em 45,8% o comprometimento foi grau > 2. Não foi observada diferença significativa dos resultados entre os gêneros masculino e feminino. Foi encontrada correlação positiva entre o índice de placa bacteriana e o volume gengival (r = 0,3295; pOBJECTIVE: Assess the influence of cyclosporine on the gingival growth of 60 patients with kidney transplant through a research carried out at the Hospital Cajuru in Curitiba, (April to October of 2002. METHODS: Regardless of age, gender, ethnic or social condition, all patients received cyclosporine daily and had, at least, one dental segment. They monthly returned to the Hospital for medical control and for several

  6. Protective Effect of Bauhinia purpurea on Gentamicin-induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, B. V. S.; Neelima, N.; Kasthuri, N.; Umarani, V.; Sudhakar, M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the ethanol extract of leaves of Bauhinia purpurea and unripe pods of Bauhinia purpurea for its protective effects on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Nephrotoxicity was induced in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal administration of gentamicin 100 mg/kg/d for eight days. Effect of concurrent administration of ethanol extract of leaves of Bauhinia purpurea and unripe pods of Bauhinia purpurea at a dose of 300 mg/kg/d given by oral route was determined using serum creatinine, serum uric acid, blood urea nitrogen and serum urea as indicators of kidney damage. The study groups contained six rats in each group. It was observed that the ethanol extract of leaves of Bauhinia purpurea and unripe pods of Bauhinia purpurea significantly protect rat kidneys from gentamicin-induced histopathological changes. Gentamicin-induced glomerular congestion, blood vessel congestion, epithelial desquamation, accumulation of inflammatory cells and necrosis of the kidney cells were found to be reduced in the groups receiving the leaf and unripe pods extract of Bauhinia purpurea along with gentamicin. The extracts also normalized the gentamicin-induced increase in serum creatinine, serum uric acid and blood urea nitrogen levels. This is also evidenced by the histopathological studies. PMID:20502576

  7. Metabolomics approaches for discovering biomarkers of drug-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beger, Richard D.; Sun, Jinchun; Schnackenberg, Laura K.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity are two major reasons that drugs are withdrawn post-market, and hence it is of major concern to both the FDA and pharmaceutical companies. The number of cases of serious adverse effects (SAEs) in marketed drugs has climbed faster than the number of total drug prescriptions issued. In some cases, preclinical animal studies fail to identify the potential toxicity of a new chemical entity (NCE) under development. The current clinical chemistry biomarkers of liver and kidney injury are inadequate in terms of sensitivity and/or specificity, prompting the need to discover new translational specific biomarkers of organ injury. Metabolomics along with genomics and proteomics technologies have the capability of providing translational diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers specific for early stages of liver and kidney injury. Metabolomics has several advantages over the other omics platforms such as ease of sample preparation, data acquisition and use of biofluids collected through minimally invasive procedures in preclinical and clinical studies. The metabolomics platform is reviewed with particular emphasis on applications involving drug-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Analytical platforms for metabolomics, chemometrics for mining metabolomics data and the applications of the metabolomics technologies are covered in detail with emphasis on recent work in the field.

  8. Moringa oleifera Supplemented Diets Prevented Nickel-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Wistar Rats

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    O. S. Adeyemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Moringa oleifera plant has been implicated for several therapeutic potentials. Objective. To evaluate whether addition of M. oleifera to diet has protective effect against nickel-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Methodology. Male Wistar rats were assigned into six groups of five. The rats were given oral exposure to 20 mg/kg nickel sulphate (NiSO4 in normal saline and sustained on either normal diet or diets supplemented with Moringa oleifera at different concentrations for 21 days. 24 hours after cessation of treatments, all animals were sacrificed under slight anesthesia. The blood and kidney samples were collected for biochemical and histopathology analyses, respectively. Results. NiSO4 exposure reduced the kidney-to-body weight ratio in rats and caused significant elevation in the levels of plasma creatinine, urea, and potassium. Also, the plasma level of sodium was decreased by NiSO4 exposure. However, addition of M. oleifera to diets averted the nickel-induced alteration to the level of creatinine and urea. The histopathology revealed damaged renal tubules and glomerular walls caused by NiSO4 exposure. In contrast, the damages were ameliorated by the M. oleifera supplemented diets. Conclusion. The addition of M. oleifera to diet afforded significant protection against nickel-induced nephrotoxicity.

  9. Antioxidant effect of Arabic gum against mercuric chloride-induced nephrotoxicity

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    Gado AM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ali M Gado,1 Badr A Aldahmash21Forensic Medicine and Clinical Toxicology Department, College of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt; 2Medical Laboratory Department, College of Health Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: The effects of Arabic gum (AG against nephrotoxicity of mercury (Hg, an oxidative-stress inducing substance, in rats were investigated. A single dose of mercuric chloride (5 mg/kg intraperitoneal injection induced renal toxicity, manifested biochemically by a significant increase in serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and total nitrate/nitrite production in kidney tissues. In addition, reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase enzymes in renal tissues were significantly decreased. Pretreatment of rats with AG (7.5 g/kg/day per oral administration, starting 5 days before mercuric chloride injection and continuing through the experimental period, resulted in a complete reversal of Hg-induced increase in creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and total nitrate/nitrite to control values. Histopathologic examination of kidney tissues confirmed the biochemical data; pretreatment of AG prevented Hg-induced degenerative changes of kidney tissues. These results indicate that AG is an efficient cytoprotective agent against Hg-induced nephrotoxicity by a mechanism related at least in part to its ability to decrease oxidative and nitrosative stress and preserve the activity of antioxidant enzymes in kidney tissues.Keywords: mercury, acacia gum, oxidative stress, lipid per oxidation, kidney toxicity

  10. Antioxidant effect of Arabic gum against mercuric chloride-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gado, Ali M; Aldahmash, Badr A

    2013-01-01

    The effects of Arabic gum (AG) against nephrotoxicity of mercury (Hg), an oxidative-stress inducing substance, in rats were investigated. A single dose of mercuric chloride (5 mg/kg intraperitoneal injection) induced renal toxicity, manifested biochemically by a significant increase in serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and total nitrate/nitrite production in kidney tissues. In addition, reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase enzymes in renal tissues were significantly decreased. Pretreatment of rats with AG (7.5 g/kg/day per oral administration), starting 5 days before mercuric chloride injection and continuing through the experimental period, resulted in a complete reversal of Hg-induced increase in creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and total nitrate/nitrite to control values. Histopathologic examination of kidney tissues confirmed the biochemical data; pretreatment of AG prevented Hg-induced degenerative changes of kidney tissues. These results indicate that AG is an efficient cytoprotective agent against Hg-induced nephrotoxicity by a mechanism related at least in part to its ability to decrease oxidative and nitrosative stress and preserve the activity of antioxidant enzymes in kidney tissues.

  11. Effect of Honey and Royal Jelly against Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Patients with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osama, Hasnaa; Abdullah, Aya; Gamal, Bassma; Emad, Dina; Sayed, Doha; Hussein, Eman; Mahfouz, Eman; Tharwat, Joy; Sayed, Sally; Medhat, Shrouk; Bahaa, Treza; Abdelrahim, Mohamed E A

    2017-07-01

    Cisplatin constitutes one of the most potent antineoplastic drugs; however, nephrotoxicity limited its eligibility for optimal clinical use. This study was designed to evaluate the role of honey and royal jelly with antioxidant properties in the protection of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury in patients with cancer. Patients with cancer assigned for cisplatin chemotherapy were randomly divided into bee honey and royal jelly groups pretreated before the initiation and during cisplatin chemotherapeutic regimen and control group on cisplatin only. Serum creatinine and urea levels were measured before and after the chemotherapeutic cycle and over 2 cycles. Patients on crude bee honey and royal jelly capsules showed lower serum levels of renal injury products (creatinine and urea) compared to those in the control group. The changes in kidney parameters were significantly (p honey group before and after cisplatin treatment. Royal jelly was found to be effective; however, the difference in creatinine and urea levels before and after chemotherapy was not statistically significant. The use of bee honey and royal jelly as natural compounds is effective in reducing cisplatin nephrotoxicity and may offer a promising chance for clinically meaningful prevention. This study has potentially important implications for the treatment of cisplatin kidney side effects and is considered to be the first to investigate this effect of honey and royal jelly in human subjects. However, due to its small sample size, we recommend further investigation using a larger sample size.

  12. The Effects of Zataria Multiflora Hydroalcoholic Extract on Gentamicin Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats

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    Saeed Hajihashemi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Gentamicin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic that broadly is used to treat gram negative bacteria infections, although it has side effects such as nephrotoxicity. According to antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and vasodilatory properties of Zataria Multiflora, the effects of co-treatment with zataria Multiflora and hydroalcholic extract on gentamicin induced nephrotoxicitj were investigated. Materials and Methods: In this study, male rats of Vistar race were divided into 4 groups: 1.control group, 2. co-treatment with gentamicin and vehicle group, 3. co-treatment with gentamicin and zataria Multifiora extract group, 4. co-treatment with zataria Multiflora extract and normal saline solution group. Zataria Multiflora hydroalcoholic extract was added to drinking water as 800 PPm concentration. They, systolic blood pressure and renal blood flow (RBF were measured. Also, the amounts of urea, creatinine, sodium, potassium and osmolarity were measured in plasma and urine samples Results: In co-treatment group with zataria Multiflora extract, the amounts of urea, creatinine, absolute sodium excretion and relative sodium and potassium excretion and malondialdehyde (MDA that have been inceased in treatment with gentamicin, significantly were reduced. Creatinine clearance, urine osmolarity, RBF and FRAP that was decreased in gentamicin group in compare to control group, significantly increased. Conclusion: Co-treatment prevents nephrotoxicity induced by gentamicin and attenuates oxidative-stress associated renal injury by reducing oxygen free radicals and lipid peroxidation, So it can be effective to cure rats receiving gentamicin.

  13. Effect of Taurine on Cisplatin -Induced Nephrotoxicity and Hepatoxicity in Male Rat

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    Noruzi M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Cisplatin, Platinum co-ordinate complex is a widely used antineaplastic agent for treatment of metastatic tumors. Taurine is an organic acid and an endogenous antioxidant. In this study we investigated the protective effect of taurine as an endogenous antioxidant against cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity and hepatotexicity.Methods: 24 male albino rats (180-220 grams were divided into 4 groups (n=6: (1: saline-treated group (2: cisplatin-treated group (10mg/kg, ip (3: group that received taurine (400mg/kg, ip 1hr before cisplatin (10mg/kg, ip administration (4: taurine (400mg/kg, ip. The animals were killed 7days after treatment and then blood samples were collected.Results: The results of this study indicated that cisplatin significantly increased CRATININ, URE, ALT, AST levels as compared to control group. Moreover, taurine significantly decreased CRATININ, URE, ALT and AST levels compared to cisplatin group.Conclusion: According to this study taurine prevents the incease of Creatinin, BUN, ALT and AST levels assisted by cisplatin, which may be due to its antioxidant properties.Keywords: Cisplatin; Taurine; Hepatoxicity; Nephrotoxicity; Nephrons.

  14. Renoprotective Effects of Total Glucosides from Paeony against Nephrotoxicity Induced by Total Alkaloids from Semen Strychni

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    Mingming Lv

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Semen Strychni have been shown to have therapeutic effect in improving blood circulation, relieving rheumatic pain, and treating cancer. However, Semen Strychni could cause severe nephrotoxicity. The present study was designed to evaluate whether treatment with total glucosides from paeony (TGP has renoprotective effect against nephrotoxicity induced by total alkaloids from Semen Strychni (TAS. The levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN and creatinine (Cr were determined and histopathological changes were also examined to evaluate renal injury. Moreover, a HPLC-MS method was developed and validated to investigate the comparative toxicokinetics of strychnine and brucine in rats plasma after oral administration of TAS and pretreatment with TGP. Results demonstrated that the levels of BUN and Cr were significantly increased (p<0.05 in TAS group, together with tubule epithelium cloudy swelling, degeneration, and glomerular atrophy in rats’ kidneys. The TAS-induced kidney damage was alleviated after pretreatment with TGP. Besides, Tmax of strychnine and brucine were increased and T1/2 of strychnine and brucine were decreased after pretreatment with TGP. The toxicokinetics study showed that pretreatment with TGP could attenuate the absorption of strychnine and brucine, as well as accelerate their elimination. These results suggest that TGP possesses renoprotective effects.

  15. Protective effect of Heliotropium eichwaldi against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Surendra Kr; Goyal, Naveen

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the nephroprotective effect of methanolic extract of Heliotropium eichwaldii (MHE) in mice with cisplatin-induced acute renal damage. Nephrotoxicity was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin (16mg/kg). Swiss albino mice were injected with vehicle, cisplatin, cisplatin plus MHE 200 mg/kg and cisplatin plus MHE 400mg/kg, respectively. MHE was administered for 7 d at a dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg per day orally starting 4 d before cisplatin injection. Animals were sacrificed 3d after treatment and blood as well as kidney tissue was isolated and analyzed. The various parameters such as blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (CRE), malondialdehyde (MDA), and catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were analyzed. MHE treatment significantly reduced BUN and serum CRE levels elevated by cisplatin administration (P<0.05). Also, it significantly attenuated cisplatin-induced increase in MDA level and improved the decreased CAT and SOD activities in renal cortical homogenates (P<0.05). Additionally, histopathological examination and scoring showed that MHE markedly ameliorated cisplatin-induced renal tubular necrosis. MHE can be considered a potential candidate for protection of nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin.

  16. Moringa oleifera Supplemented Diets Prevented Nickel-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Wistar Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, O. S.; Elebiyo, T. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The Moringa oleifera plant has been implicated for several therapeutic potentials. Objective. To evaluate whether addition of M. oleifera to diet has protective effect against nickel-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Methodology. Male Wistar rats were assigned into six groups of five. The rats were given oral exposure to 20 mg/kg nickel sulphate (NiSO4) in normal saline and sustained on either normal diet or diets supplemented with Moringa oleifera at different concentrations for 21 days. 24 hours after cessation of treatments, all animals were sacrificed under slight anesthesia. The blood and kidney samples were collected for biochemical and histopathology analyses, respectively. Results. NiSO4 exposure reduced the kidney-to-body weight ratio in rats and caused significant elevation in the levels of plasma creatinine, urea, and potassium. Also, the plasma level of sodium was decreased by NiSO4 exposure. However, addition of M. oleifera to diets averted the nickel-induced alteration to the level of creatinine and urea. The histopathology revealed damaged renal tubules and glomerular walls caused by NiSO4 exposure. In contrast, the damages were ameliorated by the M. oleifera supplemented diets. Conclusion. The addition of M. oleifera to diet afforded significant protection against nickel-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:25295181

  17. The renoprotective activity of hesperetin in cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in rats: Molecular and biochemical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Dahiya, Vicky; Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Lahkar, Mangala

    2017-05-01

    Nephrotoxicity remain a major life-threatening complication in cancer patients on cisplatin chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the protective effect and possible cellular mechanism of the hesperetin, a naturally-occurring bioflavonoid against cisplatin-induced renal injury in rats. Hesperetin was administered at a dose of 50mg/kg and 100mg/kg orally for 10days and cisplatin (7.5mg/kg, ip) was administered on the 5th day of experiment. Cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity was evidenced by alteration in the level of markers such as blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum albumin and severe histopathological changes in kidney. Cisplatin administration also resulted in significant increase in the tissue oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines. The level of antioxidants enzymes were decreased significantly in the cisplatin administered rats. Hesperetin treatment (50mg/kg and 100mg/kg) normalized the renal function by attenuation of the cisplatin-induced oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and inflammatory cytokines and histopathological alterations. On the basis of these experimental findings our present study postulate that co-administration of hesperetin with cisplatin chemotherapy may be promising preventive approach to limit the major mortal side effect of cisplatin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Haloaniline-induced in vitro nephrotoxicity: effects of 4-haloanilines and 3,5-dihaloanilines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S K; Anestis, D K; Henderson, T T; Rankin, G O

    2000-04-03

    Haloanilines are widely used as chemical intermediates in the manufacture of pesticides, dyes and drugs. The purpose of this study was to examine the in vitro nephrotoxic effects of the four 4-haloaniline and four 3,5-dihaloaniline isomers using renal cortical slices obtained from the kidneys of untreated, male Fischer 344 rats. Renal cortical slices were incubated with a haloaniline hydrochloride (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mM, final concentration) or vehicle for 2 h, and toxicity determined by monitoring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and changes in tissue gluconeogenesis capacity. At the concentrations tested, none of the 4-haloanilines increased LDH release. 4-Bromoaniline reduced gluconeogenesis at the lowest concentration (0.1 mM), but 4-iodoaniline 2.0 mM induced the largest decrease in gluconeogenesis (92% downward arrow). Among the 3,5-dihaloanilines, 3,5-dibromoaniline proved to be the most potent nephrotoxicant and 3,5-difluoroaniline the least potent nephrotoxicant. LDH release was increased by the dibromo (1.0 and 2. 0 mM), dichloro (2.0 mM) and diiodo (2.0 mM) derivatives, but not by 3,5-difluoroaniline. These results demonstrate that 3, 5-dihaloanilines are generally more potent nephrotoxicants in vitro than the 4-haloaniline isomers, and that bromo and iodo substitutions enhanced the nephrotoxic potential of aniline to the greatest degree.

  19. Virgin olive oil ameliorates deltamethrin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice: A biochemical and immunohistochemical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalatbary, Ali Reza; Ahmadvand, Hassan; Ghabaee, Davood Nasiry Zarrin; Malekshah, Abbasali Karimpour; Navazesh, Azam

    2016-01-01

    A major class of synthetic pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin (DM), can elicit pathophysiological effects through oxidative stress in non-targeted organisms such as mammals. There is accumulating evidence that virgin olive oil (VOO), a rich source of polyphenolic components, have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic properties. This study aimed to determine the protective and ameliorative effects of VOO against DM-induced nephrotoxicity. Mice were randomly divided into four equal groups: DM group, DM plus VOO group, VOO group, and vehicle group. Five weeks after gavaging, kidney samples were taken for biochemical assessment of malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT), and for immunohistochemical assessment of caspase-3, cyclooxygenase-2 (cox-2) and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). The MDA level in kidney was increased in the DM group, which was significantly decreased after VOO administration in the DM plus VOO group. The GSH level and CAT activiy in kidney were decreased in the DM group, which were significantly increased after VOO administration in the DM plus VOO group. Greater expression of caspase-3, cox-2, and PARP could be detected in the DM group, which was significantly attenuated in the DM plus VOO group. Also, the histopathological changes which were detected in the DM group attenuated after VOO consumption. Virgin olive oil exerted protective effects against deltamethrin-induced nephrotoxicity, which might be associated with its anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidative properties.

  20. Procarcinogenic effects of cyclosporine A are mediated through the activation of TAK1/TAB1 signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Jianmin; Walsh, Stephanie B.; Verney, Zoe M.; Kopelovich, Levy; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Organ transplant recipients are highly susceptible to early skin cancer development. → CsA-mediated TGFB1-dependent TAK1/TAB1 signaling augments invasive tumor growth. → CsA enhances accumulation of upstream kinases, ZMP, AMPK and IRAK to activate TAK1. → TAK1 mediates enhanced proliferation and reduced apoptosis via CsA-dependent NFκB. -- Abstract: Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immunosuppressive drug commonly used for maintaining chronic immune suppression in organ transplant recipients. It is known that patients receiving CsA manifest increased growth of aggressive non-melanoma skin cancers. However, the underlying mechanism by which CsA augments tumor growth is not fully understood. Here, we show that CsA augments the growth of A431 epidermoid carcinoma xenograft tumors by activating tumor growth factor β-activated kinase1 (TAK1). The activation of TAK1 by CsA occurs at multiple levels by kinases ZMP, AMPK and IRAK. TAK1 forms heterodimeric complexes with TAK binding protein 1 and 2 (TAB1/TAB2) which in term activate nuclear factor κB (NFκB) and p38 MAP kinase. Transcriptional activation of NFκB is evidenced by IKKβ-mediated phosphorylation-dependent degradation of IκB and consequent nuclear translocation of p65. This also leads to enhancement in the expression of its transcriptional target genes cyclin D1, Bcl2 and COX-2. Similarly, activation of p38 leads to enhanced inflammation-related signaling shown by increased phosphorylation of MAPKAPK2 and which in turn phosphorylates its substrate HSP27. Activation of both NFκB and p38 MAP kinase provide mitogenic stimuli to augment the growth of SCCs.

  1. EFFICACY OF DIFFERENT IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE PROTOCOLS WITH CYCLOSPORINE AND METHOTREXATE FOR PATIENTS WITH SYSTEMIC VARIANT OF JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

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    E.I. Alexeeva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides information on efficiency of different protocols of therapy with cyclosporine and methotrexate for patients suffering from severe systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA. it shows that a therapy combining cyclosporine with dosage of 4,4 ± 0,58 mg/kg of body per day and methotrexate with dosage of 8,1 ± 1,07 mg/m2 a week is more efficient than monotherapy with each of the same medications of same dosage. Combined use of immunosuppressants induces remission of articular syndrome and constitutional manifestations, as well as provides normalization of laboratory disease activity indications in more than 50% of cases of long clasting systemic variant of JRA on the average a year after the initiation of treatment. Combining cyclosporine with methotrexat improves the curative action of each of the medications without aggravation of their toxic influence. High efficiency of combining cyclosporine with methotrexate makes enables lowering the dosage of glucocorticoids to be taken orally, as well as not prescribing prednisolone to the severe cases of systemic variant of JRA.Key words: juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, treatment, cyclosporine, methotrexate, combined therapy, children.

  2. Prediction of Clinically Relevant Safety Signals of Nephrotoxicity through Plasma Metabolite Profiling

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    W. B. Mattes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Addressing safety concerns such as drug-induced kidney injury (DIKI early in the drug pharmaceutical development process ensures both patient safety and efficient clinical development. We describe a unique adjunct to standard safety assessment wherein the metabolite profile of treated animals is compared with the MetaMap Tox metabolomics database in order to predict the potential for a wide variety of adverse events, including DIKI. To examine this approach, a study of five compounds (phenytoin, cyclosporin A, doxorubicin, captopril, and lisinopril was initiated by the Technology Evaluation Consortium under the auspices of the Drug Safety Executive Council (DSEC. The metabolite profiles for rats treated with these compounds matched established reference patterns in the MetaMap Tox metabolomics database indicative of each compound’s well-described clinical toxicities. For example, the DIKI associated with cyclosporine A and doxorubicin was correctly predicted by metabolite profiling, while no evidence for DIKI was found for phenytoin, consistent with its clinical picture. In some cases the clinical toxicity (hepatotoxicity, not generally seen in animal studies, was detected with MetaMap Tox. Thus metabolite profiling coupled with the MetaMap Tox metabolomics database offers a unique and powerful approach for augmenting safety assessment and avoiding clinical adverse events such as DIKI.

  3. Xanthohumol attenuates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity through inhibiting NF-κB and activating Nrf2 signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; Yao, Yunyi; Huang, Hui; Hao, Hua; Ying, Mingzhong

    2018-06-12

    Cisplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent that widely used in the treatment of cancer. However, cisplatin has been reported to induce nephrotoxicity by directly inducing inflammatory response and oxidative stress. In this study, we aimed to investigate the protective effects and mechanism of xanthohumol on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The model of nephrotoxicity was induced by intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin and xanthohumol was given intraperitoneally for three consecutive days. The results showed that xanthohumol significantly attenuated kidney histological changes and serum creatinine and BUN production. The levels of TNF-α, IL-1ß and IL-6 in kidney tissues were suppressed by xanthohumol. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and ROS were suppressed by treatment of xanthohumol. The activities of glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased by cisplatin were reversed by xanthohumol. Furthermore, the expression of TLR4 and the activation of NF-κB induced by cisplatin were significantly inhibited by xanthohumol. The expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 were dose-dependently up-regulated by the treatment of xanthohumol. In conclusion, xanthohumol protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by ameliorating inflammatory and oxidative responses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Proteomic approaches in understanding a detected relationship between chemotherapy-induced nephrotoxicity and cell respiration in HK-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Juliana Dinéia; Colucci, Juliana Almada; Sakata, Maísa Mayumi; Cunha, Tatiana Sousa; Arita, Danielle Yuri; Casarini, Dulce Elena

    2011-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a prominent component of the profile of chemotherapeutic agents and to date proteomics has represented the main technique to identify protein profiles in response to xenobiotic exposure. We made use of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight analysis to evaluate chemotoxicity effects of cisplatin (CPT) and carboplatin (CB) on proteins from human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (HK-2). Tandem mass spectrometry analysis showed that ATP synthase subunit α and serine hydroxymethyltransferase were only expressed in HK-2 cells exposed to CPT. Since CPT causes damage in cellular respiration, we suggest that this might be a protective adaptation to CPT-induced nephrotoxicity. Thioredoxin-dependent peroxide reductase disappeared in the CPT group and was upregulated in the CB group, suggesting that CB exposure stimulates preventive apoptotic mechanisms. We suggest a relationship between chemotherapeutic agent-induced nephrotoxicity and cell respiration. The identification of proteins differentially expressed in HK-2 cells, when exposed to CPT and CB, not only supplies important information to understand the molecular action mechanisms, which are triggered by metal-based drugs in cell nephrotoxicity, but also can lead to the design of more effective anticancer drugs. These results provide important insights into the investigation of possible biomarker(s) of toxicity that could eventually reduce the side effects of chemotherapeutic agents. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Protective Effect of Forced Hydration with Isotonic Saline, Potassium Chloride and Magnesium Sulfate on Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity: An Initial Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Seifollah Beladi Mousavi

    2013-12-01

    How to cite this article: Beladi Mousavi SS, Hossainzadeh M, Khanzadeh A, Hayati F, Beladi Mousavi M, Zeraati AA, et al. Protective Effect of Forced Hydration with Isotonic Saline, Potassium Chloride and Magnesium Sulfate on Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity: An Initial Evaluation. Asia Pac J Med Toxicol 2013;2:136-9.

  6. Effect of commercial (vimang and hydroalcoholic extract of Mangifera indica (Mango on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Khajavi Rad

    2011-09-01

    Conclusion: Mango products were able to improve kidney function in an established model of GM-induced nephrotoxicity in the rat. The beneficial effects of Mango on the rat kidney seem to be dose and time-dependent. However, more investigations are needed to elucidate Mango action on GM-induced renal toxicity.

  7. Pre-treatment with cardamonin protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats: Impact on NOX-1, inflammation and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naga, Reem N.

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is an effective anti-cancer drug; however, its clinical use is usually associated with nephrotoxicity as a dose-limiting side effect. Several molecular mechanisms have been found to be involved in this nephrotoxicity such as oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. The aim of this study was to explore the potential nephroprotective effect of cardamonin, a flavone found in Alpinia plant, in a rat model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The possible mechanisms underlying this nephroprotective effect were investigated. Cardamonin was given at two different doses; 10 and 30 mg/kg orally for two weeks, starting one week before giving a single nephrotoxic dose of cisplatin (7 mg/kg). Acute nephrtoxicity was evident by significantly increased blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels. Also, cisplatin increased lipid peroxidation and depleted reduced glutathione level and superoxide dismutase. Additionally, cisplatin showed a marked pro-inflammatory response as evidenced by significant increase in tissue levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, NF-kB, iNOS, ICAM-1 and MCP-1. Pre-treatment with cardamonin significantly attenuated the nephrotoxic effects, oxidative stress and inflammation induced by cisplatin, in a dose-dependent manner. Also, cardamonin decreased caspase-3 expression and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio as compared to cisplatin group. Besides, cradamonin reversed cisplatin-induced decrease in EGF. Furthermore, up-regulation of NOX-1 was found to be involved in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and its expression was significantly reduced by cardamonin. Histopathological examination further confirmed the nephroprotective effect of cardamonin. Moreover, pre-treatment with subtoxic concentration of cardamonin has significantly enhanced cisplatin cytotoxic activity in four different human cancer cell lines; hela, hepG2, PC3 and HCT116 cancer cell lines. In conclusion, these findings suggest that cardamonin improves therapeutic index of cisplatin and that NOX-1 is

  8. Pre-treatment with cardamonin protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats: Impact on NOX-1, inflammation and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Naga, Reem N., E-mail: reemelnaga@hotmail.com

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is an effective anti-cancer drug; however, its clinical use is usually associated with nephrotoxicity as a dose-limiting side effect. Several molecular mechanisms have been found to be involved in this nephrotoxicity such as oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. The aim of this study was to explore the potential nephroprotective effect of cardamonin, a flavone found in Alpinia plant, in a rat model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The possible mechanisms underlying this nephroprotective effect were investigated. Cardamonin was given at two different doses; 10 and 30 mg/kg orally for two weeks, starting one week before giving a single nephrotoxic dose of cisplatin (7 mg/kg). Acute nephrtoxicity was evident by significantly increased blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels. Also, cisplatin increased lipid peroxidation and depleted reduced glutathione level and superoxide dismutase. Additionally, cisplatin showed a marked pro-inflammatory response as evidenced by significant increase in tissue levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, NF-kB, iNOS, ICAM-1 and MCP-1. Pre-treatment with cardamonin significantly attenuated the nephrotoxic effects, oxidative stress and inflammation induced by cisplatin, in a dose-dependent manner. Also, cardamonin decreased caspase-3 expression and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio as compared to cisplatin group. Besides, cradamonin reversed cisplatin-induced decrease in EGF. Furthermore, up-regulation of NOX-1 was found to be involved in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and its expression was significantly reduced by cardamonin. Histopathological examination further confirmed the nephroprotective effect of cardamonin. Moreover, pre-treatment with subtoxic concentration of cardamonin has significantly enhanced cisplatin cytotoxic activity in four different human cancer cell lines; hela, hepG2, PC3 and HCT116 cancer cell lines. In conclusion, these findings suggest that cardamonin improves therapeutic index of cisplatin and that NOX-1 is

  9. The effect of cyclosporin-A on the oral microflora at gingival sulcus of the ferret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, R G; Edwardsson, S; Klinge, B; Attström, R

    1996-09-01

    The effect of cyclosporin-A (CyA) on the dentogingival flora of ferrets with healthy and experimentally induced periodontal breakdown was studied. Five animals were given 10 mg/kg/d CyA. At the start of the experiments (day 0), ligatures were placed around 4 teeth in the right upper and lower jaws; corresponding contralateral teeth on the left side served as control. On days 0 and 28 (end of the experiment), microbiological samples were collected from the gingival sulcus of the experimental and the control teeth and from closely located gingival mucosa membrane. The samples were subjected to viable counts and to darkfield microscopic analyses. On day 0, facultative anaerobic rods, mainly Pasteurella spp, Alcaligenes spp, Corynebacterium spp. and Rothia spp dominated in the viable counts. No anaerobic bacteria were detected in the viable counts. On day 28 spirochetes increased in the experimental gingival sulcus samples and anaerobic bacteria appeared in most of the samples and constituted 40-60% of the total cultivable flora; Fusobacterium necrophorum and Eubacterium spp. predominated in the samples from the experimental sites. The results of the present study were compared with those of our previous investigation of ferrets not medicated with cyclosporin but also subject to experimental ligature periodontitis. Eubacterium spp. were absent in the animals not treated with cyclosporin, while this species was frequently present in the immunosuppressed ferrets. The results indicate that the presence of the large numbers of gram negative rods and of anaerobic bacteria may have enhanced the inflammatory process and further provoked the gingival overgrowth observed.

  10. Efficacy of topical cyclosporine 0.05% eye drops in the treatment of dry eyes

    OpenAIRE

    Haitham Y Al-Nashar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of cyclosporine 0.05% in the treatment of dry-eye disease. Patients and methods A total of 35 eyes of 20 patients with dry-eye disease were included in the present study. Ten patients (20 eyes) had dry eyes associated with systemic rheumatologic disease (Sjögren′s syndrome), five patients (10 eyes) had dry eyes after undergoing laser in-situ keratomileusis, and five patients (five eyes) had dry eyes after cataract...

  11. Cyclosporine A does not prevent second-eye involvement in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leruez, Stéphanie; Verny, Christophe; Bonneau, Dominique; Procaccio, Vincent; Lenaers, Guy; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Reynier, Pascal; Scherer, Clarisse; Prundean, Adriana; Orssaud, Christophe; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Rougier, Marie-Bénédicte; Tilikete, Caroline; Miléa, Dan

    2018-02-17

    Evaluation of the efficacy of oral cyclosporine A as a prophylactic agent in preventing second-eye involvement in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) in a prospective, open-label, non-randomized, multicenter pilot study. Only LHON patients aged 18 years or more, with confirmed primary mitochondrial DNA mutations and strictly unilateral optic neuropathy occurring within 6 months prior to enrolment, were included in the study. All these patients, receiving treatment with oral cyclosporine (Neoral®, Novartis) at 2.5 mg/kg/day, were examined at three-month intervals for a year. The primary endpoint was the best corrected visual acuity in the unaffected eye; the secondary endpoints were the best corrected visual acuity in the first eye affected, the mean visual field defect on automated perimetry, the thickness of the perifoveal retinal ganglion cell inner plexiform layer, and the thickness of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer in both eyes. Among the 24 patients referred to our institution with genetically confirmed LHON, between July 2011 and April 2014, only five patients, four males and one female, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Age at enrolment ranged from 19 to 42 years (mean: 27.2 years; median: 26 years), four patients harbored the m.11778G > A pathogenic variant, and one the m.14484 T > C pathogenic variant. The time-interval between the onset of symptoms and inclusion in the study ranged from 7 to 17 weeks (mean: 11.8 weeks; median: 9 weeks). Despite treatment with oral cyclosporine A, all patients eventually experienced bilateral eye involvement, occurring within 11-65 weeks after the initiation of treatment. Over the study time period, the average best corrected visual acuity worsened in the first eye affected; by the end of the study, both eyes were equally affected. Oral cyclosporine, at 2.5 mg/kg/day, did not prevent second-eye involvement in patients with strictly unilateral Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

  12. Colchicine-induced myoneuropathy in a cyclosporine-treated renal transplant recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungmin Huh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Colchicine is a relatively safe medication that is widely used for both prevention and treatment of gout attack. However, serious adverse events, including myoneuropathy and multiorgan failure, have been reported. We report a case of colchicine-induced myoneuropathy in a female kidney transplant recipient who had been taking cyclosporine. She developed gastrointestinal discomfort and paresthesia 5 days after the initiation of colchicine. She showed signs of myoneuropathy, and hepatic and renal injury. Colchicine toxicity was suspected, and colchicine was discontinued. Her symptoms and laboratory findings improved gradually. Literature was reviewed for previous reports of colchicine-induced myoneuropathy in solid organ transplant recipients.

  13. Evaluation of cyclosporine-sparing effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the treatment of canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M R; Linek, M; Löwenstein, C; Röthig, A; Doucette, K; Thorstensen, K; Mueller, R S

    2016-04-01

    A randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled multicentre trial was conducted in 36 dogs with atopic dermatitis to evaluate the cyclosporine-sparing effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Dogs were stable on their individual cyclosporine dosage and received either a mainly omega-3 fatty acid product with a minor omega-6 fatty acid fraction or placebo, orally for 12 weeks. Dogs were examined every 4 weeks and the Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index (CADESI-03) was determined by a clinician. Pruritus, quality of life, global condition and coat quality were scored by the owner. If the dog's CADESI-03 and/or pruritus score improved by at least 25% compared with the previous visit, the cyclosporine dosage was decreased by approximately 25%. If the scores deteriorated by at least 25%, the cyclosporine dosage was increased by the same percentage. The median daily cyclosporine dosage/kg bodyweight decreased in the active group from 4.1 mg to 2.6 mg and in the placebo group from 3.5 mg to 3.3 mg over the study period. The difference between the two groups was significant (P = 0.009). The improvement in median pruritus score from inclusion to completion was significantly greater in the active group than in the placebo group (P = 0.04). There was no significant difference in CADESI-03 changes between groups (P = 0.38). The results of this study indicate a cyclosporine-sparing effect of a mainly omega-3 fatty acid supplement in dogs with atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Development and validation of a risk score for chronic kidney disease in HIV infection using prospective cohort data from the D:A:D study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Lundgren, Jens D.; Ross, Michael; Law, Matthew; Reiss, Peter; Kirk, Ole; Smith, Colette; Wentworth, Deborah; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Fux, Christoph A.; Moranne, Olivier; Morlat, Phillipe; Johnson, Margaret A.; Ryom, Lene; Lundgren, J. D.; Powderly, B.; Shortman, N.; Moecklinghoff, C.; Reilly, G.; Franquet, X.; Sabin, C. A.; Phillips, A.; Kirk, O.; Weber, R.; Pradier, C.; Law, M.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Dabis, F.; El-Sadr, W. M.; de Wit, S.; Ryom, L.; Kamara, D.; Smith, C.; Mocroft, A.; Tverland, J.; Mansfeld, M.; Nielsen, J.; Raben, D.; Salbøl Brandt, R.; Rickenbach, M.; Fanti, I.; Krum, E.; Hillebregt, M.; Geffard, S.; Sundström, A.; Delforge, M.; Fontas, E.; Torres, F.; McManus, H.; Wright, S.; Kjær, J.; Sjøl, A.; Meidahl, P.; Helweg-Larsen, J.; Schmidt Iversen, J.; Ross, M.; Fux, C. A.; Morlat, P.; Moranne, O.; Kesselring, A. M.; Kamara, D. A.; Friis-Møller, N.; Kowalska, J.; Sabin, C.; Bruyand, M.; Bower, M.; Fätkenheuer, G.; Donald, A.; Grulich, A.; Prins, J. M.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Scherpbier, H. J.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Wit, F. W. M. N.; Godfried, M. H.; van der Poll, T.; Nellen, F. J. B.; Geerlings, S. E.; van Vugt, M.; Pajkrt, D.; Bos, J. C.; Wiersinga, W. J.; van der Valk, M.; Goorhuis, A.; Hovius, J. W.; van Eden, J.; Henderiks, A.; van Hes, A. M. H.; Mutschelknauss, M.; Nobel, H. E.; Pijnappel, F. J. J.; Westerman, A. M.; Jurriaans, S.; Back, N. K. T.; Zaaijer, H. L.; Berkhout, B.; Cornelissen, M. T. E.; Schinkel, C. J.; Thomas, X. V.; de Ruyter Ziekenhuis, Admiraal; van den Berge, M.; Stegeman, A.; Baas, S.; Hage de Looff, L.; Versteeg, D.; Pronk, M. J. H.; Ammerlaan, H. S. M.; Korsten-Vorstermans, E. M. H. M.; de Munnik, E. S.; Jansz, A. R.; Tjhie, J.; Wegdam, M. C. A.; Deiman, B.; Scharnhorst, V.; van der Plas, A.; Weijsenfeld, A. M.; van der Ende, M. E.; de Vries-Sluijs, T. E. M. S.; van Gorp, E. C. M.; Schurink, C. A. M.; Nouwen, J. L.; Verbon, A.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; Bax, H. I.; Hassing, R. J.; van der Feltz, M.; Bassant, N.; van Beek, J. E. A.; Vriesde, M.; van Zonneveld, L. M.; de Oude-Lubbers, A.; van den Berg-Cameron, H. J.; Bruinsma-Broekman, F. B.; de Groot, J.; de Zeeuw-de Man, M.; Broekhoven-Kruijne, M. J.; Schutten, M.; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.; Boucher, C. A. B.; Driessen, G. J. A.; van Rossum, A. M. C.; van der Knaap, L. C.; Visser, E.; Branger, J.; Duijf-van de Ven, C. J. H. M.; Schippers, E. F.; van Nieuwkoop, C.; Brimicombe, R. W.; van Ijperen, J. M.; van der Hut, G.; Franck, P. F. H.; van Eeden, A.; Brokking, W.; Groot, M.; Damen, M.; Kwa, I. S.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; Bouwhuis, J. W.; van den Berg, J. F.; van Hulzen, A. G. W.; van der Bliek, G. L.; Bor, P. C. J.; Bloembergen, P.; Wolfhagen, M. J. H. M.; Ruijs, G. J. H. M.; Gasthuis, Kennemer; van Lelyveld, S. F. L.; Soetekouw, R.; Hulshoff, N.; van der Prijt, L. M. M.; Schoemaker, M.; Bermon, N.; van der Reijden, W. A.; Jansen, R.; Herpers, B. L.; Veenendaal, D.; Kroon, F. P.; Arend, S. M.; de Boer, M. G. J.; Bauer, M. P.; Jolink, H.; Vollaard, A. M.; Dorama, W.; Moons, C.; Claas, E. C. J.; Kroes, A. C. M.; den Hollander, J. G.; Pogany, K.; Kastelijns, M.; Smit, J. V.; Smit, E.; Bezemer, M.; van Niekerk, T.; Pontesilli, O.; Lowe, S. H.; Oude Lashof, A.; Posthouwer, D.; Ackens, R. P.; Schippers, J.; Vergoossen, R.; Weijenberg Maes, B.; Savelkoul, P. H. M.; Loo, I. H.; Weijer, S.; el Moussaoui, R.; Heitmuller, M.; Kortmann, W.; van Twillert, G.; Cohen Stuart, J. W. T.; Diederen, B. M. W.; Pronk, D.; van Truijen-Oud, F. A.; Leyten, E. M. S.; Gelinck, L. B. S.; van Hartingsveld, A.; Meerkerk, C.; Wildenbeest, G. S.; Mutsaers, J. A. E. M.; Jansen, C. L.; van Vonderen, M. G. A.; van Houte, D. P. F.; Dijkstra, K.; Faber, S.; Weel, J.; Kootstra, G. J.; Delsing, C. E.; van der Burg-van de Plas, M.; Heins, H.; Lucas, E.; Brinkman, K.; Frissen, P. H. J.; Blok, W. L.; Schouten, W. E. M.; Bosma, A. S.; Brouwer, C. J.; Geerders, G. F.; Hoeksema, K.; Kleene, M. J.; van der Meché, I. B.; Toonen, A. J. M.; Wijnands, S.; van Ogtrop, M. L.; Koopmans, P. P.; Keuter, M.; van der Ven, A. J. A. M.; ter Hofstede, H. J. M.; Dofferhoff, A. S. M.; van Crevel, R.; Albers, M.; Bosch, M. E. W.; Grintjes-Huisman, K. J. T.; Zomer, B. J.; Stelma, F. F.; Burger, D.; Richter, C.; van der Berg, J. P.; Gisolf, E. H.; ter Beest, G.; van Bentum, P. H. M.; Langebeek, N.; Tiemessen, R.; Swanink, C. M. A.; Veenstra, J.; Lettinga, K. D.; Spelbrink, M.; Sulman, H.; Witte, E.; Peerbooms, P. G. H.; Mulder, J. W.; Vrouenraets, S. M. E.; Lauw, F. N.; van Broekhuizen, M. C.; Paap, H.; Vlasblom, D. J.; Oudmaijer Sanders, E.; Smits, P. H. M.; Rosingh, A. W.; Verhagen, D. W. M.; Geilings, J.; van Kasteren, M. E. E.; Brouwer, A. E.; de Kruijf-van de Wiel, B. A. F. M.; Kuipers, M.; Santegoets, R. M. W. J.; van der Ven, B.; Marcelis, J. H.; Buiting, A. G. M.; Kabel, P. J.; Bierman, W. F. W.; Sprenger, H. G.; Scholvinck, E. H.; van Assen, S.; Wilting, K. R.; Stienstra, Y.; de Groot-de Jonge, H.; van der Meulen, P. A.; de Weerd, D. A.; Niesters, H. G. M.; Riezebos-Brilman, A.; van Leer-Buter, C. C.; Hoepelman, A. I. M.; Schneider, M. M. E.; Mudrikova, T.; Ellerbroek, P. M.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Arends, J. E.; Barth, R. E.; Wassenberg, M. W. M.; van Elst-Laurijssen, D. H. M.; Laan, L. M.; van Oers-Hazelzet, E. E. B.; Patist, J.; Vervoort, S.; Nieuwenhuis, H. E.; Frauenfelder, R.; Schuurman, R.; Verduyn-Lunel, F.; Wensing, A. M. J.; Peters, E. J. G.; van Agtmael, M. A.; Perenboom, R. M.; Bomers, M.; de Vocht, J.; Elsenburg, L. J. M.; Pettersson, A. M.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C. M. J. E.; Ang, C. W.; Geelen, S. P. M.; Wolfs, T. F. W.; Bont, L. J.; Nauta, N.; Bezemer, D. O.; Gras, L.; van Sighem, A. I.; Smit, C.; Zaheri, S.; Kimmel, V.; Tong, Y.; Lascaris, B.; van den Boogaard, R.; Hoekstra, P.; de Lang, A.; Berkhout, M.; Grivell, S.; Jansen, A.; de Groot, L.; van den Akker, M.; Bergsma, D.; Lodewijk, C.; Meijering, R.; Peeck, B.; Raethke, M.; Ree, C.; Regtop, R.; Ruijs, Y.; Schoorl, M.; Tuijn, E.; Veenenberg, L.; Woudstra, T.; Bakker, Y.; de Jong, A.; Broekhoven, M.; Claessen, E.; Rademaker, M. J.; Munjishvili, L.; Kruijne, E.; Tuk, B.; Bonnet, F.; Dupon, M.; Chêne, G.; Breilh, D.; Fleury, H.; Malvy, D.; Mercié, P.; Pellegrin, I.; Neau, D.; Pellegrin, J. L.; Bouchet, S.; Gaborieau, V.; Lacoste, D.; Tchamgoué, S.; Thiébaut, R.; Lawson-Ayayi, S.; Wittkop, L.; Bernard, N.; Hessamfar, M.; Vandenhende, M. A.; Dauchy, F. A.; Dutronc, H.; Longy-Boursier, M.; Duffau, P.; Schmeltz, J. Roger; Pistone, T.; Receveur, M. C.; Cazanave, C.; Ochoa, A.; Vareil, M. O.; Viallard, J. F.; Greib, C.; Lazaro, E.; Lafon, M. E.; Reigadas, S.; Trimoulet, P.; Molimard, M.; Titier, K.; Moreau, J. F.; Haramburu, F.; Miremont-Salamé, G.; Dupont, A.; Gerard, Y.; André, K.; Bonnal, F.; Farbos, S.; Gemain, M. C.; Ceccaldi, J.; de Witte, S.; Courtault, C.; Monlun, E.; Lataste, P.; Meraud, J. P.; Chossat, I.; Blaizeau, M. J.; Conte, V.; Decoin, M.; Delaune, J.; Delveaux, S.; Diarra, F.; D'Ivernois, C.; Frosch, A.; Hannapier, C.; Lenaud, E.; Leleux, O.; Le Marec, F.; Leray, J.; Louis, I.; Palmer, G.; Pougetoux, A.; Sicard, X.; Uwamaliya-Nziyumvira, D. Touchard B.; Petoumenos, K.; Bendall, C.; Moore, R.; Edwards, S.; Hoy, J.; Watson, K.; Roth, N.; Nicholson, J.; Bloch, M.; Franic, T.; Baker, D.; Vale, R.; Carr, A.; Cooper, D.; Chuah, J.; Ngieng, M.; Nolan, D.; Skett, J.; Calvo, G.; Mateu, S.; Domingo, P.; Sambeat, M. A.; Gatell, J.; del Cacho, E.; Cadafalch, J.; Fuster, M.; Codina, C.; Sirera, G.; Vaqué, A.; Clumeck, N.; Necsoi, C.; Gennotte, A. F.; Gerard, M.; Kabeya, K.; Konopnicki, D.; Libois, A.; Martin, C.; Payen, M. C.; Semaille, P.; van Laethem, Y.; Neaton, J.; Bartsch, G.; Thompson, G.; Wentworth, D.; Luskin-Hawk, R.; Telzak, E.; Abrams, D. I.; Cohn, D.; Markowitz, N.; Arduino, R.; Mushatt, D.; Friedland, G.; Perez, G.; Tedaldi, E.; Fisher, E.; Gordin, F.; Crane, L. R.; Sampson, J.; Baxter, J.; Lundgren, J.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Grint, D.; Podlekareva, D.; Peters, L.; Reekie, J.; Fischer, A. H.; Losso, M.; Elias, C.; Vetter, N.; Zangerle, R.; Karpov, I.; Vassilenko, A.; Mitsura, V. M.; Suetnov, O.; Colebunders, R.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Kostov, K.; Begovac, J.; Machala, L.; Jilich, D.; Sedlacek, D.; Kronborg, G.; Benfield, T.; Larsen, M.; Gerstoft, J.; Katzenstein, T.; Hansen, E.; Skinhøj, P.; Pedersen, C.; Ostergaard, L.; Zilmer, K.; Smidt, J.; Ristola, M.; Katlama, C.; Viard, J. P.; Girard, P.-M.; Livrozet, J. M.; Vanhems, P.; Rockstroh, J.; Schmidt, R.; van Lunzen, J.; Degen, O.; Stellbrink, H. J.; Staszewski, S.; Bickel, M.; Kosmidis, J.; Gargalianos, P.; Xylomenos, G.; Perdios, J.; Panos, G.; Filandras, A.; Karabatsaki, E.; Sambatakou, H.; Banhegyi, D.; Mulcahy, F.; Yust, I.; Turner, D.; Burke, M.; Pollack, S.; Hassoun, G.; Maayan, S.; Vella, S.; Esposito, R.; Mazeu, I.; Mussini, C.; Arici, C.; Pristera, R.; Mazzotta, F.; Gabbuti, A.; Vullo, V.; Lichtner, M.; Chirianni, A.; Montesarchio, E.; Gargiulo, M.; Antonucci, G.; Testa, A.; Narciso, P.; Vlassi, C.; Zaccarelli, M.; Lazzarin, A.; Castagna, A.; Gianotti, N.; Galli, M.; Ridolfo, A.; Rozentale, B.; Zeltina, I.; Chaplinskas, S.; Hemmer, R.; Staub, T.; Ormaasen, V.; Maeland, A.; Bruun, J.; Knysz, B.; Gasiorowski, J.; Horban, A.; Bakowska, E.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Flisiak, R.; Boron-Kaczmarska, A.; Pynka, M.; Parczewski, M.; Beniowski, M.; Mularska, E.; Trocha, H.; Jablonowska, E.; Malolepsza, E.; Wojcik, K.; Antunes, F.; Doroana, M.; Caldeira, L.; Mansinho, K.; Maltez, F.; Duiculescu, D.; Rakhmanova, A.; Zakharova, N.; Petersburg, Saint; Buzunova, S.; Jevtovic, D.; Mokráš, M.; Staneková, D.; Tomazic, J.; González-Lahoz, J.; Soriano, V.; Labarga, P.; Medrano, J.; Moreno, S.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Clotet, B.; Jou, A.; Paredes, R.; Tural, C.; Puig, J.; Bravo, I.; Gatell, J. M.; Miró, J. M.; Gutierrez, M.; Mateo, G.; Karlsson, A.; Flamholc, L.; Ledergerber, B.; Francioli, P.; Cavassini, M.; Hirschel, B.; Boffi, E.; Furrer, H.; Battegay, M.; Elzi, L.; Kravchenko, E.; Chentsova, N.; Frolov, V.; Kutsyna, G.; Servitskiy, S.; Krasnov, M.; Barton, S.; Johnson, A. M.; Mercey, D.; Johnson, M. A.; Murphy, M.; Weber, J.; Scullard, G.; Fisher, M.; Leen, C.; Morfeldt, L.; Thulin, G.; Åkerlund, B.; Koppel, K.; Håkangård, C.; Moroni, M.; Angarano, G.; Antinori, A.; Armignacco, O.; Castelli, F.; Cauda, R.; Di Perri, G.; Iardino, R.; Ippolito, G.; Perno, C. F.; von Schloesser, F.; Viale, P.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Girardi, E.; Lo Caputo, S.; Puoti, M.; Andreoni, M.; Ammassari, A.; Balotta, C.; Bonfanti, P.; Bonora, S.; Borderi, M.; Capobianchi, R.; Cingolani, A.; Cinque, P.; de Luca, A.; Di Biagio, A.; Gori, A.; Guaraldi, G.; Lapadula, G.; Madeddu, G.; Maggiolo, F.; Marchetti, G.; Marcotullio, S.; Monno, L.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Rusconi, S.; Cicconi, P.; Formenti, T.; Galli, L.; Lorenzini, P.; Giacometti, A.; Costantini, A.; Santoro, C.; Suardi, C.; Vanino, E.; Verucchi, G.; Minardi, C.; Quirino, T.; Abeli, C.; Manconi, P. E.; Piano, P.; Vecchiet, J.; Falasca, K.; Sighinolfi, L.; Segala, D.; Cassola, G.; Viscoli, G.; Alessandrini, A.; Piscopo, R.; Mazzarello, G.; Mastroianni, C.; Belvisi, V.; Caramma, I.; Castelli, A. P.; Rizzardini, G.; Ridolfo, A. L.; Piolini, R.; Salpietro, S.; Carenzi, L.; Moioli, M. C.; Puzzolante, C.; Abrescia, N.; Guida, M. 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L.; Cohen, Y.; Drora, G.; Eliezer, I.; Godo, O.; Kedem, E.; Magen, E.; Mamorsky, M.; Sthoeger, Z.; Vered, H.; Aiuti, F.; Bechi, M.; Bergamasco, A.; Bertelli, D.; Bruno, R.; Butini, L.; Cagliuso, M.; Carosi, G.; Casari, S.; Chrysoula, V.; Cologni, G.; Conti, V.; Corpolongo, A.; D'Offizi, G.; Gaiottino, F.; Di Pietro, M.; Filice, G.; Francesco, M.; Gianelli, E.; Graziella, C.; Magenta, L.; Martellotta, F.; Maserati, R.; Murdaca, G.; Nardini, G.; Nozza, S.; Puppo, F.; Pogliaghi, M.; Ripamonti, D.; Ronchetti, C.; Rusconi, V.; Sacchi, P.; Silvia, N.; Suter, F.; Tambussi, G.; Uglietti, A.; Vechi, M.; Vergani, B.; Vichi, F.; Vitiello, P.; Iwamoto, A.; Kikuchi, Y.; Miyazaki, N.; Mori, M.; Nakamura, T.; Odawara, T.; Oka, S.; Shirasaka, T.; Tabata, M.; Takano, M.; Ueta, C.; Watanabe, D.; Yamamoto, Y.; Erradey, I.; Himmich, H.; Marhoum El Filali, K.; Blok, W.; van Boxtel, R.; Brinkman H Doevelaar, K.; Grijsen, M.; Juttmann, J.; Ligthart, S.; van der Meulen, P.; Lange, J.; Schrijnders-Gudde, L.; Septer-Bijleveld, E.; Sprenger, H.; Vermeulen, J.; Kvale, D.; Inglot, M.; Rymer, W.; Szymczak, A.; Aldir, M.; Baptista, C.; da Conceicao Vera, J.; dos Santos, C. Raquel A.; Valadas, E.; Vaz Pinto, I.; Chia, E.; Foo, E.; Karim, F.; Lim, P. 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L.; Clifford, D.; Climo, M.; Couey, P.; Cuervo, H.; Deeks, S.; Dennis, M.; Diaz-Linares, M.; Dickerson, D.; Diez, M.; Di Puppo, J.; Dodson, P.; Dupre, D.; Elion, R.; Elliott, K.; El-Sadr, W.; Estes, M.; Fabre, J.; Farrough, M.; Flamm, J.; Follansbee, S.; Foster, C.; Frank, C.; Franz, J.; Frechette, G.; Freidland, G.; Frische, J.; Fuentes, L.; Funk, C.; Geisler, C.; Genther, K.; Giles, M.; Goetz, M.; Gonzalez, M.; Graeber, C.; Graziano, F.; Grice, D.; Hahn, B.; Hamilton, C.; Hassler, S.; Henson, A.; Hopper, S.; John, M.; Johnson, L.; Johnson, R.; Jones, R.; Kahn, J.; Klimas, N.; Kolber, M.; Koletar, S.; Labriola, A.; Larsen, R.; Lasseter, F.; Lederman, M.; Ling, T.; Lusch, T.; MacArthur, R.; Machado, C.; Makohon, L.; Mandelke, J.; Mannheimer, S.; Martínez, M.; Martinez, N.; Mass, M.; Masur, H.; McGregor, D.; McIntyre, D.; McKee, J.; McMullen, D.; Mettinger, M.; Middleton, S.; Mieras, J.; Mildvan, D.; Miller, P.; Miller, T.; Mitchell, V.; Mitsuyasu, R.; Moanna, A.; Mogridge, C.; Moran, F.; Murphy, R.; Nahass, R.; Nixon, D.; O'Brien, S.; Ojeda, J.; Okhuysen, P.; Olson, M.; Osterberger, J.; Owen, W.; Pablovich, S.; Patel, S.; Pierone, G.; Poblete, R.; Potter, A.; Preston, E.; Rappoport, C.; Regevik, N.; Reyelt, M.; Riney, L.; Rodriguez-Barradas, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Rodriguez, J.; Roland, R.; Rosmarin-DeStefano, C.; Rossen, W.; Rouff, J.; Saag, M.; Santiago, S.; Sarria, J.; Wirtz, S.; Schmidt, U.; Scott, C.; Sheridan, A.; Shin, A.; Shrader, S.; Simon, G.; Slowinski, D.; Smith, K.; Spotkov, J.; Sprague, C.; States, D.; Suh, C.; Sullivan, J.; Summers, K.; Sweeton, B.; Tan, V.; Tanner, T.; Temesgen, Z.; Thomas, D.; Thompson, M.; Tobin, C.; Toro, N.; Towner, W.; Upton, K.; Uy, J.; Valenti, S.; van der Horst, C.; Vita, J.; Voell, J.; Walker, J.; Walton, T.; Wason, K.; Watson, V.; Wellons, A.; Weise, J.; White, M.; Whitman, T.; Williams, B.; Williams, N.; Windham, J.; Witt, M.; Workowski, K.; Wortmann, G.; Wright, T.; Zelasky, C.; Zwickl, B.; Dietz, D.; Chesson, C.; Schmetter, B.; Grue, L.; Willoughby, M.; Demers, A.; Dragsted, U. B.; Jensen, K. B.; Jansson, P. O.; Jensen, B. G.; Benfield, T. L.; Darbyshire, J. H.; Babiker, A. G.; Palfreeman, A. J.; Fleck, S. L.; Collaco-Moraes, Y.; Wyzydrag, L.; Cooper, D. A.; Drummond, F. M.; Connor, S. A.; Satchell, C. S.; Gunn, S.; Delfino, M. A.; Merlin, K.; McGinley, C.; Neaton, J. D.; George, M.; Grund, B.; Hogan, C.; Miller, C.; Neuhaus, J.; Roediger, M. P.; Thackeray, L.; Campbell, C.; Lahart, C.; Perlman, D.; Rein, M.; DerSimonian, R.; Brody, B. A.; Daar, E. S.; Dubler, N. N.; Fleming, T. R.; Freeman, D. J.; Kahn, J. P.; Kim, K. M.; Medoff, G.; Modlin, J. F.; Moellering, R.; Murray, B. E.; Robb, M. L.; Scharfstein, D. O.; Sugarman, J.; Tsiatis, A.; Tuazon, C.; Zoloth, L.; Klingman, K.; Lehrman, S.; Belloso, W. H.; Losso, M. H.; Benetucci, J. A.; Bogdanowicz, E. P.; Cahn, P. E.; Casiró, A. D.; Cassetti, I.; Contarelli, J. M.; Corral, J. A.; Crinejo, A.; David, D. O.; Ishida, M. T.; Laplume, H. E.; Lasala, M. B.; Lupo, S. H.; Masciottra, F.; Michaan, M.; Ruggieri, L.; Salazar, E.; Sánchez, M.; Hoy, J. F.; Rogers, G. D.; Allworth, A. M.; Anderson, J. S. C.; Armishaw, J.; Barnes, K.; Chiam, A.; Chuah, J. C. P.; Curry, M. C.; Dever, R. L.; Donohue, W. A.; Doong, N. C.; Dwyer, D. E.; Dyer, J.; Eu, B.; Ferguson, V. W.; French, M. A. H.; Garsia, R. J.; Hudson, J. H.; Jeganathan, S.; Konecny, P.; McCormack, C. L.; McMurchie, M.; Moore, R. J.; Moussa, M. B.; Piper, M.; Read, T.; Roney, J. J.; Shaw, D. R.; Silvers, J.; Smith, D. J.; Street, A. C.; Vale, R. J.; Wendt, N. A.; Wood, H.; Youds, D. W.; Zillman, J.; Tozeau, V.; DeWit, S.; de Roo, A.; Leonard, P.; Lynen, L.; Moutschen, M.; Pereira, L. C.; Souza, T. N. L.; Schechter, M.; Zajdenverg, R.; Almeida, M. M. T. B.; Araujo, F.; Bahia, F.; Brites, C.; Caseiro, M. M.; Casseb, J.; Etzel, A.; Falco, G. G.; Filho, E. C. J.; Flint, S. R.; Gonzales, C. R.; Madruga, J. V. R.; Passos, L. N.; Reuter, T.; Sidi, L. C.; Toscano, A. L. C.; Cherban, E.; Conway, B.; Dufour, C.; Foster, A.; Haase, D.; Haldane, H.; Klein, M.; Lessard, B.; Martel, A.; Martel, C.; Paradis, E.; Schlech, W.; Schmidt, S.; Thompson, B.; Vezina, S.; Wolff Reyes, M. J.; Northland, R.; Hergens, L.; Loftheim, I. R.; Raukas, M.; Justinen, J.; Landman, R.; Abel, S.; Abgrall, S.; Amat, K.; Auperin, L.; Barruet, R.; Benalycherif, A.; Benammar, N.; Bentata, M.; Besnier, J. M.; Blanc, M.; Cabié, A.; Chavannet, P.; Dargere, S.; de la Tribonniere, X.; Debord, T.; Decaux, N.; Delgado, J.; Frixon-Marin, V.; Genet, C.; Gérard, L.; Gilquin, J.; Jeantils, V.; Kouadio, H.; Leclercq, P.; Lelièvre, J.-D.; Levy, Y.; Michon, C. P.; Nau, P.; Pacanowski, J.; Piketty, C.; Salmon, D.; Schmit, J. L.; Serini, M. A.; Tassi, S.; Touam, F.; Verdon, R.; Weinbreck, P.; Yazdanpanah, Y.; Yeni, P.; Bitsch, S.; Bogner, J. R.; Goebel, F. D.; Lehmann, C.; Lennemann, T.; Potthof, A.; Wasmuth, J. C.; Wiedemeyer, K.; Hatzakis, A.; Touloumi, G.; Antoniadou, A.; Daikos, G. L.; Dimitrakaki, A.; Gargalianos-Kakolyris, P.; Giannaris, M.; Karafoulidou, A.; Katsambas, A.; Katsarou, O.; Kontos, A. N.; Kordossis, T.; Lazanas, M. K.; Panagopoulos, P.; Paparizos, V.; Papastamopoulos, V.; Petrikkos, G.; Skoutelis, A.; Tsogas, N.; Bergin, C. J.; Mooka, B.; Mamorksy, M. G.; Agmon-Levin, N.; Karplus, R.; Shahar, E.; Biglino, A.; de Gioanni, M.; Montroni, M.; Raise, E.; Honda, M.; Ishisaka, M.; Caplinskas, S.; Uzdaviniene, V.; Schmit, J. C.; Mills, G. D.; Blackmore, T.; Masters, J. A.; Morgan, J.; Pithie, A.; Brunn, J.; Ormasssen, V.; La Rosa, A.; Guerra, O.; Espichan, M.; Gutierrez, L.; Mendo, F.; Salazar, R.; Knytz, B.; Kwiatkowski, J.; Castro, R. S.; Horta, A.; Miranda, A. C.; Pinto, I. V.; Vera, J.; Vinogradova, E.; Yakovlev, A.; Wood, R.; Orrel, C.; Arnaiz, J. A.; Carrillo, R.; Dalmau, D.; Jordano, Q.; Knobel, H.; Larrousse, M.; Moreno, J. S.; Oretaga, E.; Pena, J. N.; Spycher, R.; Bottone, S.; Christen, A.; Franc, C.; Furrer, H. J.; Gayet-Ageron, A.; Genné, D.; Hochstrasser, S.; Moens, C.; Nüesch, R.; Ruxrungtham, K.; Pumpradit, W.; Dangthongdee, S.; Kiertiburanakul, S.; Klinbuayaem, V.; Mootsikapun, P.; Nonenoy, S.; Piyavong, B.; Prasithsirikul, W.; Raksakulkarn, P.; Gazzard, B. G.; Ainsworth, J. G.; Angus, B. J.; Barber, T. J.; Brook, M. G.; Care, C. D.; Chadwick, D. R.; Chikohora, M.; Churchill, D. R.; Cornforth, D.; Dockrell, D. H.; Easterbrook, P. J.; Fox, P. A.; Gomez, P. A.; Gompels, M. M.; Harris, G. M.; Herman, S.; Jackson, A. G. A.; Jebakumar, S. P. R.; Kinghorn, G. R.; Kuldanek, K. A.; Larbalestier, N.; Lumsden, M.; Maher, T.; Mantell, J.; Muromba, L.; Orkin, C. M.; Peters, B. S.; Peto, T. E. A.; Portsmouth, S. D.; Rajamanoharan, S.; Ronan, A.; Schwenk, A.; Slinn, M. A.; Stroud, C. J.; Thomas, R. C.; Wansbrough-Jones, M. H.; Whiles, H. J.; White, D. J.; Williams, E.; Williams, I. G.; Acosta, E. A.; Adamski, A.; Antoniskis, D.; Aragon, D. R.; Barnett, B. J.; Baroni, C.; Barron, M.; Baxter, J. D.; Beers, D.; Beilke, M.; Bemenderfer, D.; Bernard, A.; Besch, C. L.; Bessesen, M. T.; Bethel, J. T.; Blue, S.; Blum, J. D.; Boarden, S.; Bolan, R. K.; Borgman, J. B.; Brar, I.; Braxton, B. K.; Bredeek, U. F.; Brennan, R.; Britt, D. E.; Bulgin-Coleman, D.; Bullock, D. E.; Campbell, B.; Caras, S.; Carroll, J.; Casey, K. K.; Chiang, F.; Cindrich, R. B.; Clark, C.; Cohen, C.; Coley, J.; Condoluci, D. V.; Contreras, R.; Corser, J.; Cozzolino, J.; Daley, L.; Dandridge, D.; D'Antuono, V.; Darcourt Rizo, J. G.; DeHovitz, J. A.; Dejesus, E.; DesJardin, J.; Dietrich, C.; Dolce, E.; Erickson, D.; Faber, L. L.; Falbo, J.; Farrough, M. J.; Farthing, C. F.; Ferrell-Gonzalez, P.; Flynn, H.; Frank, M.; Freeman, K. F.; French, N.; Fujita, N.; Gahagan, L.; Gilson, I.; Goetz, M. B.; Goodwin, E.; Guity, C. K.; Gulick, P.; Gunderson, E. R.; Hale, C. M.; Hannah, K.; Henderson, H.; Hennessey, K.; Henry, W. K.; Higgins, D. T.; Hodder, S. L.; Horowitz, H. W.; Howe-Pittman, M.; Hubbard, J.; Hudson, R.; Hunter, H.; Hutelmyer, C.; Insignares, M. T.; Jackson, L.; Jenny, L.; Johnson, D. L.; Johnson, G.; Johnson, J.; Kaatz, J.; Kaczmarski, J.; Kagan, S.; Kantor, C.; Kempner, T.; Kieckhaus, K.; Kimmel, N.; Klaus, B. M.; Koeppe, J. R.; Koirala, J.; Kopka, J.; Kostman, J. R.; Kozal, M. J.; Kumar, A.; Lampiris, H.; Lamprecht, C.; Lattanzi, K. M.; Lee, J.; Leggett, J.; Long, C.; Loquere, A.; Loveless, K.; Lucasti, C. J.; MacVeigh, M.; Makohon, L. H.; Markowitz, N. P.; Marks, C.; Martorell, C.; McFeaters, E.; McGee, B.; McIntyre, D. M.; McManus, E.; Melecio, L. G.; Melton, D.; Mercado, S.; Merrifield, E.; Mieras, J. A.; Mogyoros, M.; Moran, F. M.; Murphy, K.; Mutic, S.; Nadeem, I.; Nadler, J. P.; Ognjan, A.; O'Hearn, M.; O'Keefe, K.; Okhuysen, P. C.; Oldfield, E.; Olson, D.; Orenstein, R.; Ortiz, R.; Parpart, F.; Pastore-Lange, V.; Paul, S.; Pavlatos, A.; Pearce, D. D.; Pelz, R.; Peterson, S.; Pitrak, D.; Powers, S. L.; Pujet, H. C.; Raaum, J. W.; Ravishankar, J.; Reeder, J.; Reilly, N. A.; Reyelt, C.; Riddell, J.; Rimland, D.; Robinson, M. L.; Rodriguez, A. E.; Rodriguez-Barradas, M. C.; Rodriguez Derouen, V.; Rosmarin, C.; Rossen, W. L.; Rouff, J. R.; Sampson, J. H.; Sands, M.; Savini, C.; Schrader, S.; Schulte, M. M.; Scott, R.; Seedhom, H.; Sension, M.; Sheble-Hall, A.; Shuter, J.; Slater, L. N.; Slotten, R.; Smith, M.; Snap, S.; States, D. M.; Stringer, G.; Summers, K. K.; Swanson, K.; Sweeton, I. B.; Szabo, S.; Tedaldi, E. M.; Telzak, E. E.; Thompson, M. A.; Thompson, S.; Ting Hong Bong, C.; Vaccaro, A.; Vasco, L. M.; Vecino, I.; Verlinghieri, G. K.; Visnegarwala, F.; Wade, B. H.; Weis, S. E.; Weise, J. A.; Weissman, S.; Wilkin, A. M.; Witter, J. H.; Wojtusic, L.; Wright, T. J.; Yeh, V.; Young, B.; Zeana, C.; Zeh, J.; Savio, E.; Vacarezza, M.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health issue for HIV-positive individuals, associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Development and implementation of a risk score model for CKD would allow comparison of the risks and benefits of adding potentially nephrotoxic antiretrovirals to a

  15. Influence of fluoride on streptozotocin induced diabetic nephrotoxicity in mice: Protective role of Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng & banaba (Lagerstroemia speciosa on mitochondrial oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahaboob P Basha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Chronic fluoride intoxication through drinking water is a serious health problem. Patients with diabetes are known to have impaired renal function and elimination of fluoride from the body is mainly done through kidney. Fluoride toxicity in diabetes patients may aggravate complications. In this study, the influence of fluoride was assessed on streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetes in mice as also the efficacy/protective effective of oral supplementation of ginseng (GE and banaba leaf extracts (BLE. Methods: The efficacy of plant extracts, GE and BLE at doses of 50, 150, 250 mg/kg b.w./day alone and in combination, was tested for a period of 15 days on fluoride treated STZ induced diabetic animals. Results: Fluoride exposure to mice with STZ-induced diabetes produced significant changes in OSI (organo-somatic index, fluoride content, blood glucose, urea, serum creatinine and oxidative stress indices in kidney tissues with evident histological alterations. Among the antioxidant treatments, combination therapy of GE and BLE at 150 mg/kg b.w. significantly normalized the impaired biochemical variables in kidney tissues of fluoride toxicated diabetic mice. Interpretations & conclusions: High fluoride uptake was found to be diabetogenic and further aggravated the renal oxidative damage and thereby the toxicity in mice with STZ induced diabetes mice. GE and BLE exposure individually or in combination at a dose of 150 mg/kg b.w./day for 15 days exhibited protective effects on fluoride toxicated STZ induced nephrotoxicity in mice.

  16. Curcumin ameliorates diclofenac sodium-induced nephrotoxicity in male albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ahmady Y; Gad, Amany M; El-Raouf, Ola M Abd

    2017-10-01

    Exposure to drugs often results in toxicity in the kidney which represents the major control system maintaining homeostasis of the body and thus is especially susceptible to xenobiotics. Nephrotoxicity is a life-threatening side-effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Diclofenac is one of the most frequently prescribed NSAIDs and have been reported to cause multiple organs damage. Curcumin (CUR) exhibits nephroprotective properties. Therefore, rats were divided into four groups; rats of groups 3 and 4 received diclofenac (100 mg/kg, i.m.), whereas rats of groups 2 and 4 received CUR (100 mg/kg, p.o.) for 3 days. Diclofenac revealed a significant increase in urea and creatinine levels and malondialdehyde concentration and marked reduction in catalase activity and reduced glutathione concentration. Histopathologically, diclofenac produced fatty changes and eosinophilic casts were detected in the renal tubules, those were attenuated by administration of CUR prior diclofenac. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Are intravenous injections of contrast media really less nephrotoxic than intra-arterial injections?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyman, Ulf [University of Lund, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Trelleborg (Sweden); Almen, Torsten [Skaane University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences/Medical Radiology, University of Lund, Malmoe (Sweden); Jacobsson, Bo [University of Gothenburg and the Sahlgrenska Academy, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The Queen Silvia Children' s Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden); Aspelin, Peter [Karolinska Institute and University Hospital, Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-06-15

    We oppose the opinion that the intra-arterial administration of iodine-based contrast media (CM) appears to pose a greater risk of contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN) than intravenous administration since (1) in intra-arterial coronary procedures and most other intra-arterial angiographic examinations, CM injections are also intravenous relative to the kidneys, (2) there is a lack of comparative trials studying the risk of CIN between intra-arterial and intravenous procedures with matched risk factors and CM doses, (3) a bias selection of patients with fewer risk factors may explain the seemingly lower rate of CIN after CT in comparison with coronary interventions, (4) the rate of CIN following intra-arterial coronary procedures may also be exaggerated owing to other causes of acute kidney failure, such as haemodynamic instability and microembolisation, (5) roughly the same gram-iodine/GFR ratio ({approx}1:1) as a limit of relatively safe CM doses has preliminarily been found for both intravenous CT and intra-arterial coronary procedures and (6) the substantially higher injected intravenous CM dose rate during CT relative to an intra-arterial coronary procedure might actually pose a higher risk of CIN following CT. Key Points circle Most intra-arterial injections of contrast media are intravenous relative to the kidneys. circle No evidence that intravenous CM injections should be less nephrotoxic than intra-arterial. circle Considerably higher dose rates of CM are used for CT relative to intra-arterial procedures. circle Higher dose rates may pose higher nephrotoxic risk for intravenous based CT studies. (orig.)

  18. The Protective Effects of Sika Deer Antler Protein on Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity

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    Huihai Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study measured the effect of Sika deer (Cervus nippon Temminck antler protein (SDAPR, glycoproteins (SDAG, and polysaccharides (SDAPO on cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in HEK 293 cells, and investigated the effect of SDAPR against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice. Methods: Cell viability was measured by MTT assay. ICR mice were randomly divided into five groups: control, cisplatin with vehicle, and cisplatin with SDAPR at three concentrations: 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg, p.o., 10 d. Cisplatin was injected on 7th day (25 mg/kg, i.p.. Renal function, oxidative stress, levels of inflammatory factors, and expression of apoptosis-related proteins were measured in vivo. Renal tissues were stained with TUNEL and H&E to observe renal cell apoptosis and pathological changes. Results: Pretreatment with SDAPR (125-2000 µg/mL significantly improved cell viability, with an EC50 of approximately 1000 µg/mL. SDAPR also ameliorated cisplatin-induced histopatholo- gic changes, and decreased blood urea nitrogen (BUN and creatinine (Cr (P < 0.05. Western blotting analysis showed SDAPR clearly decreased expression levels of cleaved-caspase-3 and Bax, and increased the expression level of Bcl-2 (P < 0.01. Additionally, SDAPR markedly regulated oxidative stress markers and inflammatory cytokines (P<0.05. TUNEL staining showed decreased apoptosis after SDAPR treatment (P < 0.01. Conclusions: These results indicate that SDAPR can be an effective dietary supplement, to relieve cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by improved antioxidase activity, suppressed inflammation, and inhibited apoptosis in vivo.

  19. Evaluation of novel biomarkers of nephrotoxicity in Cynomolgus monkeys treated with gentamicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, Jean-Charles; Zhou, Xiaobing; Yang, Yi; Gury, Thierry; Qu, Zhe; Palazzi, Xavier; Léonard, Jean-François; Slaoui, Mohamed; Veeranagouda, Yaligara; Guizon, Isabelle; Boitier, Eric; Filali-Ansary, Aziz; Berg, Bart H.J. van den; Poetz, Oliver; Joos, Thomas; Zhang, Tianyi; Wang, Jufeng; Detilleux, Philippe; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Most studies to evaluate kidney safety biomarkers have been performed in rats. This study was conducted in Cynomolgus monkeys in order to evaluate the potential usefulness of novel biomarkers of nephrotoxicity in this species. Groups of 3 males were given daily intramuscular injections of gentamicin, a nephrotoxic agent known to produce lesions in proximal tubules, at dose-levels of 10, 25, or 50 mg/kg/day for 10 days. Blood and 16-h urine samples were collected on Days − 7, − 3, 2, 4, 7, and at the end of the dosing period. Several novel kidney safety biomarkers were evaluated, with single- and multiplex immunoassays and in immunoprecipitation-LC/MS assays, in parallel to histopathology and conventional clinical pathology parameters. Treatment with gentamicin induced a dose-dependent increase in kidney tubular cell degeneration/necrosis, ranging from minimal to mild severity at 10 mg/kg/day, moderate at 25 mg/kg/day, and to severe at 50 mg/kg/day. The results showed that the novel urinary biomarkers, microalbumin, α1-microglobulin, clusterin, and osteopontin, together with the more traditional clinical pathology parameters, urinary total protein and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), were more sensitive than blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (sCr) to detect kidney injury in the monkeys given 10 mg/kg/day gentamicin for 10 days, a dose leading to an exposure which is slightly higher than the desired therapeutic exposure in clinics. Therefore, these urinary biomarkers represent non-invasive biomarkers of proximal tubule injury in Cynomolgus monkeys which may be potentially useful in humans. - Highlights: • Gentamicin induced kidney tubular cell degeneration/necrosis in Cynomolgus monkey • Urinary clusterin and osteopontin were sensitive biomarkers of kidney injury. • Microalbumin and α1-microglobulin in urine were also more sensitive than serum creatinine.

  20. Protective effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Pistacia vera against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Vahid; Amirteimoury, Morteza; Taghipour, Zahra; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Bazmandegan, Gholamreza; Rahnama, Amir; Khajehasani, Fatemeh; Fatemi, Iman

    2017-11-01

    Pistacia vera is a plant of the family Anacardiaceae found in Central and West Asia. P. vera nut (Pistachio) possess multiple pharmacological effects such as antimicrobial, anti-hyperlipidemia, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory. This study is designed to evaluate the protective effect of the hydroalcoholic extract of pistachio on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Nephrotoxicity was induced in rats by intraperitoneal injection of gentamicin (100 mg/kg/day for 7 days). Hydroalcoholic extract of pistachio (10, 50 and 100 mg/kg/p.o) was administered for 7 days. The nephroprotective activity was evaluated by determining creatinine clearance, serum creatinine, urine volume, urine glucose and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels. The kidneys were processed for histopathological examinations and all specimens were examined for morphologic parameters involving tubular degeneration, tubular necrosis and tubule interstitial nephritis. Results showed a significant increase in the levels of serum creatinine, urine volume, urine glucose and BUN and decrease of creatinine clearance by gentamicin (GA) administration. Co-administration with pistachio extract showed reduction in the levels of serum creatinine, urine volume, urine glucose and BUN and increase of creatinine clearance in all doses but the most significant alteration was observed in doses of 100 mg/kg. Also, the nephroprotective effect of the GA was confirmed by the histological examination of the kidneys. The study revealed the nephroprotective effect of the hydroalcoholic extract of pistachio. These findings suggest that pistachio treatment may attenuate renal dysfunction and structural damage through the reduction of oxidative stress and inflammation in the kidney.

  1. The protective role of saffron petal extracts on gentamicininduced nephrotoxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Omidi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Different potentially therapeutic approaches to prevent or attenuate gentamicin sulfate (GM induced nephrotoxicity have been proposed. The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of the saffron petals extracts (Crocus sativus (SPE on male Wistar rats with kidney failure. Rats (40 were randomly assigned into five groups of 8 animals each: i the control group, that received normal saline (0.5 mL/kg; ii the GM group, that received GM (80 mg/kg by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection on a daily basis; iii the GM+SPE group that received the same dose of GM and SPE (40 mg/kg by i.p. injection on a daily basis; iv the GM+2SPE group, that received the same dose of GM and twofold of SPE (80 mg/kg by i.p. injection on a daily basis; whereas v 2SPE+GM group, that received 80 mg/kg of SPE a week before initiating the treatment with GM (prevention group. Significant differences were seen in the concentration of glucose, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, and creatinine between treatment groups and control in the male Wistar rats. GM was observed to cause nephrotoxicity, which was evidenced by an elevation of serum BUN and creatinine levels. The biochemical findings of the current study are concordant with those of histopathologic findings. The results of this study indicate that SPE especially in dose of 40 mg/kg can ameliorate harmful effects of GM on the kidney. The present results may suggest that the SPE have ameliorative effects on kidney failures induced by GM.

  2. Evaluation of novel biomarkers of nephrotoxicity in Cynomolgus monkeys treated with gentamicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, Jean-Charles, E-mail: jean-charles.gautier@sanofi.com [Sanofi R& D, Vitry-sur-Seine (France); Zhou, Xiaobing [National Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs (NCSED), National Institutes for Food and Drug Control, Beijing (China); Yang, Yi [Sanofi R& D, Bridgewater (United States); Gury, Thierry [Sanofi R& D, Vitry-sur-Seine (France); Qu, Zhe [National Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs (NCSED), National Institutes for Food and Drug Control, Beijing (China); Palazzi, Xavier; Léonard, Jean-François; Slaoui, Mohamed; Veeranagouda, Yaligara; Guizon, Isabelle; Boitier, Eric; Filali-Ansary, Aziz [Sanofi R& D, Vitry-sur-Seine (France); Berg, Bart H.J. van den; Poetz, Oliver; Joos, Thomas [Natural and Medical Sciences Institute at the University Tübingen (Germany); Zhang, Tianyi [Frontage Laboratories, Shanghai (China); Wang, Jufeng [National Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs (NCSED), National Institutes for Food and Drug Control, Beijing (China); Detilleux, Philippe [Sanofi R& D, Vitry-sur-Seine (France); Li, Bo, E-mail: libo@nifdc.org.cn [National Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs (NCSED), National Institutes for Food and Drug Control, Beijing (China)

    2016-07-15

    Most studies to evaluate kidney safety biomarkers have been performed in rats. This study was conducted in Cynomolgus monkeys in order to evaluate the potential usefulness of novel biomarkers of nephrotoxicity in this species. Groups of 3 males were given daily intramuscular injections of gentamicin, a nephrotoxic agent known to produce lesions in proximal tubules, at dose-levels of 10, 25, or 50 mg/kg/day for 10 days. Blood and 16-h urine samples were collected on Days − 7, − 3, 2, 4, 7, and at the end of the dosing period. Several novel kidney safety biomarkers were evaluated, with single- and multiplex immunoassays and in immunoprecipitation-LC/MS assays, in parallel to histopathology and conventional clinical pathology parameters. Treatment with gentamicin induced a dose-dependent increase in kidney tubular cell degeneration/necrosis, ranging from minimal to mild severity at 10 mg/kg/day, moderate at 25 mg/kg/day, and to severe at 50 mg/kg/day. The results showed that the novel urinary biomarkers, microalbumin, α1-microglobulin, clusterin, and osteopontin, together with the more traditional clinical pathology parameters, urinary total protein and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), were more sensitive than blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (sCr) to detect kidney injury in the monkeys given 10 mg/kg/day gentamicin for 10 days, a dose leading to an exposure which is slightly higher than the desired therapeutic exposure in clinics. Therefore, these urinary biomarkers represent non-invasive biomarkers of proximal tubule injury in Cynomolgus monkeys which may be potentially useful in humans. - Highlights: • Gentamicin induced kidney tubular cell degeneration/necrosis in Cynomolgus monkey • Urinary clusterin and osteopontin were sensitive biomarkers of kidney injury. • Microalbumin and α1-microglobulin in urine were also more sensitive than serum creatinine.

  3. Effect of normobaric hyperoxia on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Tavafi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Gentamicin sulphate (GS nephrotoxicity seems to be related to the generation of reactive oxygen species. There is evidence that oxygen preconditioning increases the activity of antioxidant enzymes. Materials and Methods: Forty eight female rats were divided into 6 groups (n=8 as follows: group 1 was the control, group 2 received daily GS, groups 3,4 and 5 received oxygen 2 hr/day for 2 days, 4 hr/day for 2 days, 4 hr/day for 4 days, recpectively and then received daily GS, group 6 received oxygen 2 hr/day for 2 days and then received 2 hr oxygen before daily GS injection. Oxygen (with 90% purity used at the flow rate of 4 l/min. GS administred for 8 days (100 mg/kg, IP. Tissue sections prepared from the left kidney, stained with PAS method and then studied hisopathologically and stereologically. The right kidneys were homogenized and the supernatants were prepared. Serum MDA, creatinine and urea, renal  MDA, gluthatione and catalase activity were measured. The data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U test at the significant level of PResults: Oxygen therapy significantly improves serum creatinine and urea, preserve tubular volume density, reduce tubular necrosis in groups 4 and 6 compared to group 2. Oxygen therapy significantly increases renal catalase in groups 4 and 6 compared to group 2.   Conclusion: Pretreatment with normobaric hyperoxia and daily oxygen therapy improved gentamicin nephrotoxicity possibly via inhibition of lipid peroxidation and increasing the renal catalase activity but could not restore any parameter at the same levels as control group.

  4. Chitosan Prevents Gentamicin-Induced Nephrotoxicity via a Carbonyl Stress-Dependent Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu-Kung Chou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminoglycosides are widely used to treat infections; however, their applications are limited by nephrotoxicity. With the increase of antibiotic resistance, the use of aminoglycosides is inevitable. Low-molecular-weight chitosan (LMWC has shown renal protective effects in dialysis patients. However, no study has evaluated LMWC for preventing aminoglycoside-induced nephrotoxicity or determined the mechanisms underlying the renal protective effects. In this study, LMWC (165 or 825 mg/kg/day or metformin (100 mg/kg/day was orally administered for 13 days to rats with nephropathy induced by gentamicin (GM, a kind of aminoglycoside (150 mg/kg/day i.p. for 6 days. Both LMCW doses improved renal function. Serum creatinine levels improved in rats treated with 165 and 825 mg/kg/day LMWC (from 2.14 ± 0.74 mg/dL to 1.26 ± 0.46 mg/dL and 0.69 ± 0.12 mg/dL, resp., P < 0.05. Blood urea nitrogen levels were also improved in these rats (from 73.73 ± 21.13 mg/dL to 58.70 ± 22.71 mg/dL and 28.82 ± 3.84 mg/dL, resp., P < 0.05. Additionally, renal tissue morphology improved after LMWC treatment, and accumulation of renal methylglyoxal, a damage factor associated with carbonyl stress, was reversed. These results show that LMWC prevents GM-induced renal toxicity via a carbonyl stress-dependent pathway.

  5. Effect of Helichrysum plicatum DC. subsp. plicatum ethanol extract on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaydin Yildirim, Betul; Kordali, Saban; Terim Kapakin, Kubra Asena; Yildirim, Fatih; Aktas Senocak, Esra; Altun, Serdar

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible therapeutic or protective effects of Helichrysum plicatum DC. subsp. plicatum ethanol extract (HPE) against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Thirty-six Sprague Dawley male rats weighing between 200 and 250 g were used as live material. They were formed into six groups containing 6 rats each and were allowed to adapt to laboratory conditions for 7 d. Group I: control, 5% DMSO intraperitoneal (i.p.); Group II: HPE 100 mg/(kg·d) i.p.; Group III: HPE 200 mg/(kg·d) i.p.; Group IV: gentamicin as 80 mg/(kg·d) i.p.; Group V: gentamicin as 80 mg/(kg·d) i.p.+HPE 100 mg/(kg·d) i.p.; and Group VI: gentamicin as 80 mg/(kg·d) i.p.+HPE 200 mg/(kg·d) i.p. for 8 d. Following treatment, serum, liver, and kidney tissues were used to assess blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, and lipid peroxidation. Gentamicin significantly increased serum BUN, creatinin, and liver and kidney levels of malondialdehyde (MDA). It also decreased the activity of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Treatment with the HPE 100 mg/kg reversed gentamicin-induced alterations as evidenced by decreased serum BUN and creatinin, liver and kidney oxidant marker, and tubular necrosis as well as by an increase in antioxidant enzymes. It was found that HPE 200 mg/kg significantly increased liver and kidney tissue MDA levels in nephrotoxicity in rats. As a result, these findings support the proposition that HPE in 100 mg/kg dose demonstrates in the kidney and liver as free radicals and scavenger to prevent the toxic effects of gentamicin in both the biochemical and histopathology parameters.

  6. Resveratrol influences platinum pharmacokinetics: A novel mechanism in protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Mostafa A; Abo-Youssef, Amira M; Khalaf, Marwa M; Abo-Saif, Ali A; Saleh, Ibrahim G; Abdelghany, Tamer M

    2018-06-15

    Cisplatin (CP) is a widely used drug in treatment of solid tumors. However, the use of CP was hampered by its serious side effects especially nephrotoxicity. This study aims to investigate the effect of resveratrol (RES) on CP-induced nephrotoxicity, particularly, the effect of RES on CP pharmacokinetics (PKs). Male white albino rats were divided to four group's six rats each. The first group received (1%) tween 80 in normal saline and served as control. The second group received RES (30 mg kg -1 ) per day for 14 consecutive day's i.p. The third and fourth groups were given a single i.p. injection of CP (6 mg kg -1 ) with or without pre-treatment of RES (30 mg kg -1 per day for 14 consecutive days), respectively. Following administration of CP, plasma, urine and kidney platinum concentration were monitored to study PKs of CP. Five days after the CP injection, rats were killed; blood samples were collected; kidneys were dissected; and biochemical, immunohistochemical, and histological examinations were performed. Our results revealed that CP treatment significantly deteriorated kidney functions with subsequent alteration in redox balance of the kidney. On the other hand, RES successfully ameliorated CP-induced kidney injury and recovered normal kidney tissue redox status. Importantly, while RES pre-treatment did not significantly alter the plasma CP level, it dramatically decreased the urine concentration of CP and lowered its accumulation into the kidneys. Moreover, it increased CP plasma half-life (t 1/2 ) with subsequent decrease in its elimination rate constant, indicating an important role of PKs modulation in RES protection against CP-induced renal damage. Taken together, RES may protect the kidney tissue from the deleterious effects of CP through constringe of CP renal accumulation and enhancement of CP-induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Proteomic candidate biomarkers of drug-induced nephrotoxicity in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney Rouse

    Full Text Available Improved biomarkers of acute nephrotoxicity are coveted by the drug development industry, regulatory agencies, and clinicians. In an effort to identify such biomarkers, urinary peptide profiles of rats treated with two different nephrotoxins were investigated. 493 marker candidates were defined that showed a significant response to cis-platin comparing a cis-platin treated cohort to controls. Next, urine samples from rats that received three consecutive daily doses of 150 or 300 mg/kg gentamicin were examined. 557 potential biomarkers were initially identified; 108 of these gentamicin-response markers showed a clear temporal response to treatment. 39 of the cisplatin-response markers also displayed a clear response to gentamicin. Of the combined 147 peptides, 101 were similarly regulated by gentamicin or cis-platin and 54 could be identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Most were collagen type I and type III fragments up-regulated in response to gentamicin treatment. Based on these peptides, classification models were generated and validated in a longitudinal study. In agreement with histopathology, the observed changes in classification scores were transient, initiated after the first dose, and generally persistent over a period of 10-20 days before returning to control levels. The data support the hypothesis that gentamicin-induced renal toxicity up-regulates protease activity, resulting in an increase in several specific urinary collagen fragments. Urinary proteomic biomarkers identified here, especially those common to both nephrotoxins, may serve as a valuable tool to investigate potential new drug candidates for the risk of nephrotoxicity.

  8. Activation of the polyol pathway may contribute to increased risk of radiocontrast agent nephrotoxicity in diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, D.L.; Mann, P.L.; Zager, P.G.; Smith, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The incidence of radiocontrast (RC) agent nephrotoxicity is higher in diabetic than non-diabetic patients. RC nephropathy involves both glomerular and tubular cells. The authors postulate that activation of the polyol pathway contributes to the increased susceptibility of diabetics to RC nephrotoxicity. Mesangial cells modulate GFR by altering the capillary surface area available for filtration. Toxic insult to mesangial cells can impair glomerular function. The present study was performed to determine if mesangial cells isolated from galactose fed rats, the classic model for studying the effects of polyol accumulation, demonstrate increased susceptibility to RC toxicity. A cellular model was developed to study the effects of RC agents on mesangial cells isolated from rats maintained on diets of 50% galactose (MCG) and 50% dextrin (MCD). MCG's and MCD's were plated in 96 well trays at a density of 6.25 x 10 4 cells/ml. Cells were exposed to Hypaque 90 at concentrations of 10 mM to 1 uM for 1, 2, 4 and 24 hrs. Cell viability was determined by fluorescein diacetate/propidium iodide staining. 3H-thymidine incorporation was used to determine cell proliferation rates. Hypaque 90 produced no direct cytotoxicity at any time points or concentrations tested. An increase in cell proliferation was observed 1 hr after exposure to 1 uM to 1mM Hypaque. Higher concentrations blunted cell proliferation rates. Hypaque 90 produced no direct cytotoxicity at any time points or concentrations tested. An increase in cell proliferation was observed 1 hr after exposure to 1 uM to 1mM Hypaque. Higher concentrations blunted cell proliferation. No significant effects on 3H-thymidine incorporation were observed at later time points. The effects on 3H-thymidine incorporation were more pronounced in MCG's than MCD's. Activation of the polyol pathway amplifies the proliferative response of MC to RC agents. This activation may contribute to the risk of RC nephropathy in diabetics

  9. Tiron ameliorates oxidative stress and inflammation in titanium dioxide nanoparticles induced nephrotoxicity of male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Ashraf; Galal, Mona K; Ogaly, Hanan A; Ibrahim, Marwa A; Abd-Elsalam, Reham M; Noshy, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Although the widespread use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO 2 NPs), few studies were conducted on its hazard influence on human health. Tiron a synthetic vitamin E analog was proven to be a mitochondrial targeting antioxidant. The current investigation was performed to assess the efficacy of tiron against TiO 2 NPs induced nephrotoxicity. Eighty adult male rats divided into four different groups were used: group I was the control, group II received TiO2 NPs (100mg\\Kg BW), group III received TiO2 NPs plus tiron (470mg\\kg BW), and group IV received tiron alone. Urea, creatinine and total protein concentrations were measured in serum to assess the renal function. Antioxidant status was estimated by determining the activities of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, malondialdehyde (MDA) level and glutathione concentration in renal tissue. As well as Renal fibrosis was evaluated though measuring of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) expression levels and histopathological examination. TiO 2 NPs treated rats showed marked elevation of renal indices, depletion of renal antioxidant enzymes with marked increase in MDA concentration as well as significant up-regulation in fibrotic biomarkers TGFβ1 and MMP9. Oral administration of tiron to TiO 2 NPs treated rats significantly attenuate the renal dysfunction through decreasing of renal indices, increasing of antioxidant enzymes activities, down-regulate the expression of fibrotic genes and improving the histopathological picture for renal tissue. In conclusion, tiron was proved to attenuate the nephrotoxicity induced by TiO 2 NPs through its radical scavenging and metal chelating potency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Abbreviated kinetic profiles in area-under-the-curve monitoring of cyclosporine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grevel, J; Kahan, B D

    1991-11-01

    Abbreviated kinetic profiles can reduce the number of phlebotomies and drug assays, and thereby the cost of area-under-the-curve (AUC) monitoring. In the present investigation, we used two independent data sets: group 1, 101 AUC profiles from 77 stable renal-transplant patients, which included a 5-h sample in addition to the usual 0-, 2-, 4-, 6-, 10-, 14-, and 24-h samples; and group 2, 100 profiles from 50 stable renal-transplant patients before and after a change in their daily oral dose of cyclosporine. Group I demonstrated a fair correlation between cyclosporine trough concentrations and the AUC calculated from a complete set of seven concentrations (r2 = 0.820 and 0.758 for the 24- and 0-h samples, respectively). Stepwise multiple linear-regression analysis revealed that the abbreviated set of three time points (2, 6, and 14 h) explained 96% of the variance in AUC values calculated from the full set of seven samples; additional time points increased the accuracy only slightly. For group 2, we examined the difference between the observed and the predicted concentrations by linear extrapolation; the error in the observed AUC value, compared with the predicted value calculated from seven time points (-13.2% to -1.2%), was similar to the error from just three time points (-11.5% to 4.5%). Abbreviated AUC profiles involving three time points used with a model equation seem to provide a reliable alternative to full seven-point profiles.

  11. Cyclosporine: A Historical Perspective on Its Role in the Treatment of Noninfectious Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Wendy M

    2017-05-01

    The history of cyclosporine and uveitis is intertwined with the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) animal models and the understanding that T lymphocytes play a major role in the pathogenesis of uveitis. The early studies of CsA in uveitis also demonstrated the power of collaborative efforts in translational research. Dr. Robert Nussenblatt and his colleagues were the first to show that CsA can inhibit EAU. Over many years after the initial CsA experiments, Dr. Nussenblatt's group as well as others continued to study CsA under experimental conditions as well as in clinical trials with human patients. The data and observations from these studies significantly advanced our knowledge of uveitis pathophysiology and demonstrated the value of well-designed masked, controlled treatment trials in uveitis. Dr. Nussenblatt and his collaborators delved into the most significant adverse effect of CsA, renal toxicity, and helped elucidate the pathophysiology of renal injury. They explored adjunctive treatments to improve the efficacy and decrease the toxicity of CsA and also studied other members of the cyclosporine family. Among the immunosuppressives used to treat ocular inflammation, CsA was the first, and remains the only medication comprehensively studied under both experimental and clinical conditions.

  12. Pancreatic islet allograft in spleen with immunosuppression with cyclosporine. Experimental model in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisberg, Jaques; Neff, Charles Benjamin; Waisberg, Daniel Reis; Germini, Demetrius; Gonçalves, José Eduardo; Zanotto, Arnaldo; Speranzini, Manlio Basilio

    2011-01-01

    To study the functional behavior of the allograft with immunosuppression of pancreatic islets in the spleen. Five groups of 10 Mongrel dogs were used: Group A (control) underwent biochemical tests; Group B underwent total pancreatectomy; Group C underwent total pancreatectomy and pancreatic islet autotransplant in the spleen; Group D underwent pancreatic islet allograft in the spleen without immunosuppressive therapy; Group E underwent pancreatic islet allograft in the spleen and immunosuppression with cyclosporine. All of the animals with grafts received pancreatic islets prepared by the mechanical-enzymatic method - stationary collagenase digestion and purification with dextran discontinuous density gradient, implanted in the spleen. The animals with autotransplant and those with allografts with immunosuppression that became normoglycemic showed altered results of intravenous tolerance glucose (p < 0.001) and peripheral and splenic vein plasmatic insulin levels were significantly lower (p < 0.001) in animals that had allografts with immunosuppression than in those with just autotransplants. In the animals with immunosuppression with cyclosporine subjected to allograft of pancreatic islets prepared with the mechanical-enzymatic preparation method (stationary collagenase digestion and purification with dextran discontinuous density gradient), the production of insulin is decreased and the response to intravenous glucose is altered.

  13. Cyclosporine A at reperfusion fails to reduce infarct size in the in vivo rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paulis, Damien; Chiari, Pascal; Teixeira, Geoffrey; Couture-Lepetit, Elisabeth; Abrial, Maryline; Argaud, Laurent; Gharib, Abdallah; Ovize, Michel

    2013-09-01

    We examined the effects on infarct size and mitochondrial function of ischemic (Isch), cyclosporine A (CsA) and isoflurane (Iso) preconditioning and postconditioning in the in vivo rat model. Anesthetized open-chest rats underwent 30 min of ischemia followed by either 120 min (protocol 1: infarct size assessment) or 15 min of reperfusion (protocol 2: assessment of mitochondrial function). All treatments administered before the 30-min ischemia (Pre-Isch, Pre-CsA, Pre-Iso) significantly reduced infarct as compared to control. In contrast, only Post-Iso significantly reduced infarct size, while Post-Isch and Post-CsA had no significant protective effect. As for the postconditioning-like interventions, the mitochondrial calcium retention capacity significantly increased only in the Post-Iso group (+58 % vs control) after succinate activation. Only Post-Iso increased state 3 (+177 and +62 %, for G/M and succinate, respectively) when compared to control. Also, Post-Iso reduced the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production (-46 % vs control) after complex I activation. This study suggests that isoflurane, but not cyclosporine A, can prevent lethal reperfusion injury in this in vivo rat model. This might be related to the need for a combined effect on cyclophilin D and complex I during the first minutes of reperfusion.

  14. Cyclosporine A in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy: Long-Term Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Merlini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Six individuals with Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD and mutations in the genes-encoding collagen VI, aging 5–9, received 3–5 mg/kg of cyclosporine A (CsA daily for 1 to 3.2 years. The primary outcome measure was the muscle strength evaluated with a myometer and expressed as megalimbs. The megalimbs score showed significant improvement (P=0.01 in 5 of the 6 patients. Motor function did not change. Respiratory function deteriorated in all. CsA treatment corrected mitochondrial dysfunction, increased muscle regeneration, and decreased the number of apoptotic nuclei. Results from this study demonstrate that long-term treatment with CsA ameliorates performance in the limbs, but not in the respiratory muscles of UCMD patients, and that it is well tolerated. These results suggest considering a trial of CsA or nonimmunosuppressive cyclosporins, that retains the PTP-desensitizing properties of CsA, as early as possible in UCMD patients when diaphragm is less compromised.

  15. Lipid profile in post renal transplant patients treated with cyclosporine in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suleiman, Bahga; Eltahir, Khalid; Eltahir, Ahmed; ElImam, Mohamed; Elsabigh, Mohamed; Miskeen, Elhadi

    2009-01-01

    Lipid profile abnormality places kidney graft recipients at an increase risk for cardiovascular diseases.This study was undertaken to determine the impact of cyclosporine A (CsA) on lipid profile of transplant patients in Gezira Hospital for Renal Diseases, Medani, Sudan. We studied 78 renal transplant patients with mean age of 42.1 years and mean transplant duration of 3.8 years. Cyclosporine A (CsA), total cholesterol (Tch), triglyceride (TG), HDL cholesterol (HDLch), LDL cholesterol (LDLch), and VLDL cholesterol (VLDLch) were estimated. 62.8% of the patients showed significant lipoprotein abnormalities. Renal allograft recipients showed significantly high levels of TG (p< 0.002), Tch (p< 0.00), LDLch (p< 0.01), and VLDLch (p< 0.05) compared with age and sex matched normal subjects. Increased CsA was reported in females and hypertensive patients. A significant negative correlation was noted between post transplant duration and VLDLch. The study confirms the existence of dyslipidemia in renal transplant patients in our patients. (author)

  16. Lipid profile in post renal transplant patients treated with cyclosporine in Sudan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suleiman, Bahga; Eltahir, Khalid; Eltahir, Ahmed [Dept. of Biochemistry, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Univ. of Gezira (Sudan); ElImam, Mohamed [Faculty of Medicine, Univ. of Gezira (Sudan); Elsabigh, Mohamed [Gezira Hospital for Renal Diseases, Univ. of Gezira (Sudan); Miskeen, Elhadi [Educational Development and Research Centre, Univ. of Gezira (Sudan)

    2009-07-01

    Lipid profile abnormality places kidney graft recipients at an increase risk for cardiovascular diseases.This study was undertaken to determine the impact of cyclosporine A (CsA) on lipid profile of transplant patients in Gezira Hospital for Renal Diseases, Medani, Sudan. We studied 78 renal transplant patients with mean age of 42.1 years and mean transplant duration of 3.8 years. Cyclosporine A (CsA), total cholesterol (Tch), triglyceride (TG), HDL cholesterol (HDLch), LDL cholesterol (LDLch), and VLDL cholesterol (VLDLch) were estimated. 62.8% of the patients showed significant lipoprotein abnormalities. Renal allograft recipients showed significantly high levels of TG (p< 0.002), Tch (p< 0.00), LDLch (p< 0.01), and VLDLch (p< 0.05) compared with age and sex matched normal subjects. Increased CsA was reported in females and hypertensive patients. A significant negative correlation was noted between post transplant duration and VLDLch. The study confirms the existence of dyslipidemia in renal transplant patients in our patients. (author)

  17. The efficacy and nephrotoxicity associated with colistin use in an intensive care unit in Vietnam: Use of colistin in a population of lower body weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Gia Binh

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: A personalized dosing protocol of colistin was effective, with low nephrotoxicity, among critically ill Vietnamese patients with low body weight. Further studies are warranted for assessing the efficacy and toxicity in a larger cohort.

  18. Accurate assessment of long-term nephrotoxicity after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with {sup 177}Lu-octreotate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabet, Amir; Ezziddin, Khaled; Reichman, Karl; Haslerud, Torjan; Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Biersack, Hans-Juergen; Ezziddin, Samer [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Pape, Ulrich-Frank [Charite, University Medicine Berlin, Campus Virchow Clinic, Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Berlin (Germany); Nagarajah, James [University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Renal radiation during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) may result in glomerular damage, a potential reduction of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and ultimately lead to renal failure. While reported PRRT nephrotoxicity is limited to data derived from serum creatinine - allowing only approximate estimates of GFR - the aim of this study is to accurately determine PRRT-induced long-term changes of renal function and associated risk factors according to state-of-the-art GFR measurement. Nephrotoxicity was analysed using {sup 99m}Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) clearance data of 74 consecutive patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP NET) undergoing PRRT with {sup 177}Lu-octreotate. The mean follow-up period was 21 months (range 12-50) with a median of five GFR measurements per patient. The change of GFR was analysed by linear curve fit. Potential risk factors including diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, previous chemotherapy, renal impairment at baseline and cumulative administered activity were analysed regarding potential impact on renal function loss. In addition, Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v3.0 were used to compare nephrotoxicity determined by {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA clearance versus serum creatinine. The alteration in GFR differed widely among the patients (mean -2.1 ± 13.1 ml/min/m{sup 2} per year, relative yearly reduction -1.8 ± 18.9 %). Fifteen patients (21 %) experienced a mild (2-10 ml/min/m{sup 2} per year) and 16 patients (22 %) a significant (>10 ml/min/m{sup 2} per year) decline of GFR following PRRT. However, 11 patients (15 %) showed an increase of >10 ml/min/m{sup 2} per year. Relevant nephrotoxicity according to CTCAE (grade ≥3) was observed in one patient (1.3 %) with arterial hypertension and history of chemotherapy. Nephrotoxicity according to serum creatinine was discordant to that defined by GFR in 15 % of the assessments and led to underestimation in 12 % of

  19. Accurate assessment of long-term nephrotoxicity after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with 177Lu-octreotate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabet, Amir; Ezziddin, Khaled; Reichman, Karl; Haslerud, Torjan; Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Biersack, Hans-Juergen; Ezziddin, Samer; Pape, Ulrich-Frank; Nagarajah, James

    2014-01-01

    Renal radiation during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) may result in glomerular damage, a potential reduction of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and ultimately lead to renal failure. While reported PRRT nephrotoxicity is limited to data derived from serum creatinine - allowing only approximate estimates of GFR - the aim of this study is to accurately determine PRRT-induced long-term changes of renal function and associated risk factors according to state-of-the-art GFR measurement. Nephrotoxicity was analysed using 99m Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) clearance data of 74 consecutive patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP NET) undergoing PRRT with 177 Lu-octreotate. The mean follow-up period was 21 months (range 12-50) with a median of five GFR measurements per patient. The change of GFR was analysed by linear curve fit. Potential risk factors including diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, previous chemotherapy, renal impairment at baseline and cumulative administered activity were analysed regarding potential impact on renal function loss. In addition, Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v3.0 were used to compare nephrotoxicity determined by 99m Tc-DTPA clearance versus serum creatinine. The alteration in GFR differed widely among the patients (mean -2.1 ± 13.1 ml/min/m 2 per year, relative yearly reduction -1.8 ± 18.9 %). Fifteen patients (21 %) experienced a mild (2-10 ml/min/m 2 per year) and 16 patients (22 %) a significant (>10 ml/min/m 2 per year) decline of GFR following PRRT. However, 11 patients (15 %) showed an increase of >10 ml/min/m 2 per year. Relevant nephrotoxicity according to CTCAE (grade ≥3) was observed in one patient (1.3 %) with arterial hypertension and history of chemotherapy. Nephrotoxicity according to serum creatinine was discordant to that defined by GFR in 15 % of the assessments and led to underestimation in 12 % of patients. None of the investigated

  20. Deleterious role of trace elements - Silica and lead in the development of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Starlaine; Mutnuri, Srikanth; Ganguly, Anasuya

    2017-06-01

    Chronic-Kidney-Disease of Unknown-etiology (CKDu) has been reported in developing-countries like Sri-Lanka, India and Central-America without sparing the Indian sub-district (namely Canacona) located in south-Goa. The disease etiology is unlinked to common causes of diabetes and hypertension and assumed to be environmentally induced due to its asymptomatic-nature and occurrence in groundwater relying communities. This study aimed to understand environmental risk-factors underlying CKDu-etiology using Indian sub-district (Canacona) as case-study. Biochemical-analysis of CKDu-affected and non-affected individual's blood and detailed hydro-geochemical analyses of CKDu-affected and non-affected region's groundwater (drinking-water)were conducted. Trace geogenic-element-silica was highly dominant in affected-region's groundwater, thus its nephrotoxic-potential was analysed via in-vitro cytotoxicity-assays on human-kidney-cell-lines. All CKDu-affected-subjects showed increased-levels of serum-urea (52.85 mM),creatinine (941.5 μM),uric-acid (1384.5 μM), normal blood-glucose (4.65 mM), being distinct biomarkers of environmentally-induced CKD-'chronic-tubulo-interstitial-nephritis'. Affected-subjects reported high blood-lead levels (1.48 μM)suggesting direct-nephrotoxicity resulting in impaired blood-clearance and also exhibits indirect-nephrotoxicity by disrupting calcium-homeostasis causing skeletal-disorders and prolonged-consumption of NSAID's (pain-alleviation), indirectly causing renal-damage. Affected-region's groundwater was acidic (pH-5.6), resulting in borderline-lead (9.98 μgL -1 ) and high-silica (115.5 mgL -1 )contamination. Silica's bio-availability (determining its nephrotoxicity) was enhanced at groundwater's acidic-pH and Ca-Mg-deficient-composition (since these cations complex with silica reducing bioavailability). Silica exhibited renal-proximal-tubular-cytotoxicity on long-term exposure comparable with affected-region's groundwater silica

  1. Cyclosporin A and enterohepatic circulation of bile salts in rats : Decreased cholate synthesis but increased intestinal reabsorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, CV; Wolters, H; Plosch, T; Stengelin, S; Stellaard, F; Sauer, PJJ; Verkade, HJ; Kuipers, F

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) has been shown to inhibit synthesis and hepatobiliary transport of bile salts. However, effects of CsA on the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts in vivo are largely unknown. We characterized the effects of CsA on the enterohepatic circulation of cholate, with respect to

  2. Dietary supplementation with lish oil modifies renal reserve filtration capacity in postoperative, cyclosporin A-treated renal transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, J. J. Homan; Bilo, H. J. G.; Donker, A. J. M.; Wilmink, J. M.; Sluiter, W. J.; Tegzess, Adam M.

    The effect of a daily supplementation of 6 g fish oil (30% C20:5 omega-3 = EPA and 20% C22:6 omega-3 = DHA) for 1 month on renal function variables was investigated in a placebo-controlled (6 g coconut oil), prospective, randomized, double-blind study in acute postoperative cyclosporin A

  3. Effect of dietary fish oil on renal function and rejection in cyclosporine-treated recipients of renal transplants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, J. J.; Bilo, H. J.; Donker, J. M.; Wilmink, J. M.; Tegzess, A. M.

    1993-01-01

    Dietary fish oil exerts effects on renal hemodynamics and the immune response that may benefit renal-transplant recipients treated with cyclosporine. To evaluate this possibility, we studied the effect of fish oil on renal function, blood pressure, and the incidence of acute rejection episodes in

  4. Circumvention of cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer by combination of cyclosporin A and low-intensity ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tinghe; Yang, Yan; Zhang, Jiao; He, Haining; Ren, Xueyi

    2015-04-01

    Cisplatin resistance is a challenge in the treatment of ovarian cancer. The aim of this study was to explore if ultrasound can overcome chemoresistance and enhance chemosensitization due to cyclosporin A. Ultrasound and/or cyclosporin A were employed to overcome cisplatin resistance in human ovarian cancer cell line COC1/DDP. Mechanisms were explored from the perspective of: DNA damage, intracellular platinum level, detoxification, and genes related to drug efflux and DNA repair. In vivo therapeutic efficacy was validated in a short-term model (subrenal cell-clot transplantation) in mice and the survival benefit was investigated in an orthotopic cancer model in mice using HO-8910PM cells. The findings were: (i) ultrasound enhanced the effect of cisplatin leading to a lower cell-survival rate (IC50 decreased from 3.19 to 0.35 μg/ml); (ii) ultrasound enhanced cisplatin via direct (increasing the intercellular level of active platinum) and indirect (decreasing the glutathione level, and expression of LRP and ERCC1 genes) mechanisms that intensified cisplatin-induced DNA damage, thus enhancing cell apoptosis and necrosis; (iii) cisplatin followed by ultrasound led to small tumor sizes in the short-term model without exacerbation of the systemic toxicity, and prolonged the survival times in the orthotopic model; and (iv) ultrasound synergized the sensitization due to cyclosporin A in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrated that ultrasound combined with cyclosporin A overcame cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Rat allotransplantation of epigastric microsurgical flaps: a study of rejection and the immunosuppressive effect of cyclosporin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carramaschi Fábio R.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The rejection of allotransplantation of epigastric microsurgical flaps and the effect of immunosuppression have been studied in 58 rats. Three sets of experiments were planned: (1 Wistar Furth isogenic donors and receptors (control set; (2 Brown Norway donors and Wistar Furth receptors (rejection set; and (3 Brown Norway donors and Wistar Furth immunosuppressed receptors (cyclosporin A set. Cyclosporin A (10 mg/kg/d treated rats had a transplantation survival rate of up to 30 days: 83.3% among isogenic animals and 60% among allogeneic. There was 100% rejection by the 9th day after the transplantation in allogeneic non-immunosuppressed rats. Biopsies embedded with historesin were taken from the flap and normal contralateral skin (used as control on the 3rd, 7th, 15th, and 30th days after the surgery. A quantitative study of infiltrating lymphocytes in the flaps, with and without cyclosporin A, was done by evaluating the local inflammatory infiltrate. A significant increase in the number of lymphocytes among the rejection and immunosuppressed groups was seen, as compared to the isogenic set. Local lymphocytosis in allogeneic non-immunosuppressed transplantations reached its highest level on the 3rd day after surgery, before gross findings of rejection, which could only be seen by naked eye on the 5th or 6th day. Therefore, we conclude that cyclosporin A is effective in preserving allogenic transplantation in rats. Biopsies of transplanted areas may contribute to earlier diagnosis of the need for immunosuppressive therapy.

  6. Cyclosporine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Talk to your doctor about the amount of potassium-rich foods such as bananas, prunes, raisins, and orange juice that you may have in your diet. Many salt substitutes contain potassium, so talk to your doctor about using them ...

  7. Tempol, a Superoxide Dismutase Mimetic Agent, Ameliorates Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity through Alleviation of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Lamiaa A.; Shehata, Nagwa I.; Abdelkader, Noha F.; Khattab, Mahmoud M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction is a crucial mechanism by which cisplatin, a potent chemotherapeutic agent, causes nephrotoxicity where mitochondrial electron transport complexes are shifted mostly toward imbalanced reactive oxygen species versus energy production. In the present study, the protective role of tempol, a membrane-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic agent, was evaluated on mitochondrial dysfunction and the subsequent damage induced by cisplatin nephrotoxicity in mice. Methods and Findings Nephrotoxicity was assessed 72 h after a single i.p. injection of cisplatin (25 mg/kg) with or without oral administration of tempol (100 mg/kg/day). Serum creatinine and urea as well as glucosuria and proteinuria were evaluated. Both kidneys were isolated for estimation of oxidative stress markers, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content and caspase-3 activity. Moreover, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity, complexes I–IV activities and mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mNOS) protein expression were measured along with histological examinations of renal tubular damage and mitochondrial ultrastructural changes. Tempol was effective against cisplatin-induced elevation of serum creatinine and urea as well as glucosuria and proteinuria. Moreover, pretreatment with tempol notably inhibited cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and disruption of mitochondrial function by restoring mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, complexes I and III activities, mNOS protein expression and ATP content. Tempol also provided significant protection against apoptosis, tubular damage and mitochondrial ultrastructural changes. Interestingly, tempol did not interfere with the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin against the growth of solid Ehrlich carcinoma. Conclusion This study highlights the potential role of tempol in inhibiting cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity without affecting its antitumor activity via amelioration of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction

  8. Tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic agent, ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity through alleviation of mitochondrial dysfunction in mice.

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    Lamiaa A Ahmed

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is a crucial mechanism by which cisplatin, a potent chemotherapeutic agent, causes nephrotoxicity where mitochondrial electron transport complexes are shifted mostly toward imbalanced reactive oxygen species versus energy production. In the present study, the protective role of tempol, a membrane-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic agent, was evaluated on mitochondrial dysfunction and the subsequent damage induced by cisplatin nephrotoxicity in mice.Nephrotoxicity was assessed 72 h after a single i.p. injection of cisplatin (25 mg/kg with or without oral administration of tempol (100 mg/kg/day. Serum creatinine and urea as well as glucosuria and proteinuria were evaluated. Both kidneys were isolated for estimation of oxidative stress markers, adenosine triphosphate (ATP content and caspase-3 activity. Moreover, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity, complexes I-IV activities and mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mNOS protein expression were measured along with histological examinations of renal tubular damage and mitochondrial ultrastructural changes. Tempol was effective against cisplatin-induced elevation of serum creatinine and urea as well as glucosuria and proteinuria. Moreover, pretreatment with tempol notably inhibited cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and disruption of mitochondrial function by restoring mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, complexes I and III activities, mNOS protein expression and ATP content. Tempol also provided significant protection against apoptosis, tubular damage and mitochondrial ultrastructural changes. Interestingly, tempol did not interfere with the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin against the growth of solid Ehrlich carcinoma.This study highlights the potential role of tempol in inhibiting cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity without affecting its antitumor activity via amelioration of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  9. Celecoxib, but not indomethacin, ameliorates the hypertensive and perivascular fibrotic actions of cyclosporine in rats: Role of endothelin signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.; Helmy, Maged W.; Ali, Rabab M.; El-Gowelli, Hanan M.

    2015-01-01

    The immunosuppressant drug cyclosporine (CSA) is used with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in arthritic conditions. In this study, we investigated whether NSAIDs modify the deleterious hypertensive action of CSA and the role of endothelin (ET) receptors in this interaction. Pharmacologic, protein expression, and histopathologic studies were performed in rats to investigate the roles of endothelin receptors (ET A /ET B ) in the hemodynamic interaction between CSA and two NSAIDs, indomethacin and celecoxib. Tail-cuff plethysmography measurements showed that CSA (20 mg kg −1 day −1 , 10 days) increased systolic blood pressure (SBP) and heart rate (HR). CSA hypertension was associated with renal perivascular fibrosis and divergent changes in immunohistochemical signals of renal arteriolar ET A (increases) and ET B (decreases) receptors. While these effects of CSA were preserved in rats treated concomitantly with indomethacin (5 mg kg −1 day −1 ), celecoxib (10 mg kg −1 day −1 ) abolished the pressor, tachycardic, and fibrotic effects of CSA and normalized the altered renal ET A /ET B receptor expressions. Selective blockade of ET A receptors by atrasentan (5 mg kg −1 day −1 ) abolished the pressor response elicited by CSA or CSA plus indomethacin. Alternatively, BQ788 (ET B receptor blocker, 0.1 mg kg −1 day −1 ) caused celecoxib-sensitive elevations in SBP and potentiated the pressor response evoked by CSA. Together, the improved renovascular fibrotic and endothelin receptor profile (ET A downregulation and ET B upregulation) mediate, at least partly, the protective effect of celecoxib against the hypertensive effect of CSA. Clinically, the use of celecoxib along with CSA in the management of arthritic conditions might provide hypertension-free regimen. - Highlights: • Chronic CSA causes hypertension and renal perivascular fibrosis in rats. • CSA increased and decreased renal ET A and ET B receptor expression, respectively. • CSA

  10. [Successful cyclosporine treatment in 2 patients with refractory CIDP, involving monitoring of both AUC(0-4h) and trough levels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Akiko; Shirai, Shinichi; Horiuchi, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Ikuko; Matsushima, Masaaki; Hirotani, Makoto; Kano, Takahiro; Yabe, Ichiro; Matumoto, Akihisa; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2012-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CYA) treatment has been reported to be probably useful for patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) that is resistant to conventional treatment. Although several studies have shown that appropriate area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) monitoring of CYA levels results in improved outcomes for refractory nephrotic syndrome patients, the importance of using AUC analysis for CIDP remains unclear. In this study, we measured both trough and AUC from 0 to 4 h (AUC(0-4 h)) levels of CYA in 2 patients with CIDP and compared the findings for the clinical parameters. On the basis of the CYA dosing recommendations for patients with nephrotic syndrome, we used a CYA concentration of 150 ng/ml for the trough level and an AUC(0-4 h) value of 2,500 ng/(ml·h). Patient 1 showed a significant increase in grip strength and a prolonged remission period. Patient 2 showed improvement in the modified Rankin scale and manual muscle test (MMT) scores. Monitoring both AUC(0-4 h) and trough levels of CYA seems to be a better option than monitoring the trough level alone because it leads to improved estimation of the efficacy and safety of CYA treatment in the case of CIDP patients.

  11. Sildenafil Ameliorates Gentamicin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats: Role of iNOS and eNOS

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    Mohamed A. Morsy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gentamicin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic, is used for the treatment of serious Gram-negative infections. However, its usefulness is limited by its nephrotoxicity. Sildenafil, a selective phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, was reported to prevent or decrease tissue injury. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential protective effects of sildenafil on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Male Wistar rats were injected with gentamicin (100 mg/kg/day, i.p. for 6 days with and without sildenafil. Sildenafil administration resulted in nephroprotective effect in gentamicin-intoxicated rats as it significantly decreased serum creatinine and urea, urinary albumin, and renal malondialdehyde and nitrite/nitrate levels, with a concomitant increase in renal catalase and superoxide dismutase activities compared to gentamicin-treated rats. Moreover, immunohistochemical examination revealed that sildenafil treatment markedly reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression, while expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS was markedly enhanced. The protective effects of sildenafil were verified histopathologically. In conclusion, sildenafil protects rats against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity possibly, in part, through its antioxidant activity, inhibition of iNOS expression, and induction of eNOS production.

  12. Liquid-chromatographic analysis for cyclosporine with use of a microbore column and small sample volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annesley, T; Matz, K; Balogh, L; Clayton, L; Giacherio, D

    1986-07-01

    This liquid-chromatographic assay requires 0.2 to 0.5 mL of whole blood, avoids the use of diethyl ether, and consumes only 10 to 20% of the solvents used in prior methods. Sample preparation involves an acidic extraction with methyl-t-butyl ether, performed in a 13 X 100 mm disposable glass tube, then a short second extraction of the organic phase with sodium hydroxide. After evaporation of the methyl-t-butyl ether, chromatography is performed on an "Astec" 2.0-mm (i.d.) octyl column. We compared results by this procedure with those by use of earlier larger-scale extractions and their respective 4.6-mm (i.d.) columns; analytical recoveries of cyclosporins A and D were comparable with previous findings and results for patients' specimens were equivalent, but the microbore columns provided greatly increased resolution and sensitivity.

  13. Cyclosporine A-sensitive, cyclophilin B-dependent endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation.

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    Riccardo Bernasconi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIs catalyze cis/trans isomerization of peptide bonds preceding proline residues. The involvement of PPI family members in protein refolding has been established in test tube experiments. Surprisingly, however, no data is available on the involvement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER-resident members of the PPI family in protein folding, quality control or disposal in the living cell. Here we report that the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporine A (CsA selectively inhibits the degradation of a subset of misfolded proteins generated in the ER. We identify cyclophilin B (CyPB as the ER-resident target of CsA that catalytically enhances disposal from the ER of ERAD-L(S substrates containing cis proline residues. Our manuscript presents the first evidence for enzymatic involvement of a PPI in protein quality control in the ER of living cells.

  14. Cyclosporine A-Sensitive, Cyclophilin B-Dependent Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luban, Jeremy; Molinari, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIs) catalyze cis/trans isomerization of peptide bonds preceding proline residues. The involvement of PPI family members in protein refolding has been established in test tube experiments. Surprisingly, however, no data is available on the involvement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident members of the PPI family in protein folding, quality control or disposal in the living cell. Here we report that the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporine A (CsA) selectively inhibits the degradation of a subset of misfolded proteins generated in the ER. We identify cyclophilin B (CyPB) as the ER-resident target of CsA that catalytically enhances disposal from the ER of ERAD-LS substrates containing cis proline residues. Our manuscript presents the first evidence for enzymatic involvement of a PPI in protein quality control in the ER of living cells. PMID:20927389

  15. Monitoring of cyclosporine concentrations by using dry blood-spot samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, A V; Wong, P Y; Sun, C; Oei, L; Elliott, S; Naik, N; Joaquin, B; Uchimaru, D

    1991-01-01

    We modified the Incstar Cyclo Trac SP kit to enable its use with dry blood-spots on filter paper. The recovery ranged from 92 to 106%. Dilution studies have shown excellent linearity and parallelism throughout the range of the assay. Precision is demonstrated by within-assay CV's of 6.6 and 4.3% at 96 and 342 micrograms/L respectively and between-assay CV's of 9.1 and 7.0% at 138 and 506 micrograms/L respectively. A comparison study (n = 209) with whole blood assay gave a correlation coefficient of 0.97, a slope of 1.04, and an intercept of 13.2. Whole blood and dry blood-spot cyclosporine assays on heart, kidney, liver, and lung transplants were also compared.

  16. Efficacy of AZM therapy in patients with gingival overgrowth induced by Cyclosporine A: a systematic review

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    Deli Giorgio

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In daily clinical practice of a dental department it's common to find gingival overgrowth (GO in periodontal patients under treatment with Cyclosporine A (CsA. The pathogenesis of GO and the mechanism of action of Azithromycin (AZM are unclear. A systematic review was conducted in order to evaluate the efficacy of Azithromycin in patients with gingival overgrowth induced by assumption of Cyclosporine A. Methods A bibliographic search was performed using the online databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Central of Register Controlled Trials (CENTRAL in the time period between 1966 and September 2008. Results The literature search retrieved 24 articles; only 5 were Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs, published in English, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A great heterogeneity between proposed treatments and outcomes was found, and this did not allow to conduct a quantitative meta-analysis. The systematic review revealed that a 5-day course of Azithromycin with Scaling and Root Planing reduces the degree of gingival overgrowth, while a 7-day course of metronidazole is only effective on concomitant bacterial over-infection. Conclusion Few RCTs on the efficacy of systemic antibiotic therapy in case of GO were found in the literature review. A systemic antibiotic therapy without plaque and calculus removal is not able to reduce gingival overgrowth. The great heterogeneity of diagnostic data and outcomes is due to the lack of precise diagnostic methods and protocols about GO. Future studies need to improve both diagnostic methods and tools and adequate classification aimed to determine a correct prognosis and an appropriate therapy for gingival overgrowth.

  17. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  18. Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria: Pathogenesis and Treatment Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Allen P

    2017-11-01

    The treatment of chronic spontaneous urticaria begins with antihistamines; however, the dose required typically exceeds that recommended for allergic rhinitis. Second-generation, relatively non-sedating H₁-receptor blockers are typically employed up to 4 times a day. First-generation antihistamines, such as hydroxyzine or diphenhydramine (Atarax or Benadryl), were employed similarly in the past. Should high-dose antihistamines fail to control symptoms (at least 50%), omalizumab at 300 mg/month is the next step. This is effective in 70% of antihistamine-refractory patients. H₂-receptor blockers and leukotriene antagonists are no longer recommended; they add little and the literature does not support significant efficacy. For those patients who are unresponsive to both antihistamines and omalizumab, cyclosporine is recommended next. This is similarly effective in 65%-70% of patients; however, care is needed regarding possible side-effects on blood pressure and renal function. Corticosteroids should not be employed chronically due to cumulative toxicity that is dose and time dependent. Brief courses of steroid e.g., 3-10 days can be employed for severe exacerbations, but should be an infrequent occurrence. Finally, other agents, such as dapsone or sulfasalazine, can be tried for those patients unresponsive to antihistamines, omalizumab, and cyclosporine. Copyright © 2017 The Korean Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Clinical Immunology · The Korean Academy of Pediatric Allergy and Respiratory Disease.

  19. Supercritical fluid-mediated liposomes containing cyclosporin A for the treatment of dry eye syndrome in a rabbit model: comparative study with the conventional cyclosporin A emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karn, Pankaj Ranjan; Kim, Hyun Do; Kang, Han; Sun, Bo Kyung; Jin, Su-Eon; Hwang, Sung-Joo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of cyclosporin (CsA)-encapsulated liposomes with the commercially available CsA emulsion (Restasis) for the treatment of dry eye syndrome in rabbits. Liposomes containing CsA were prepared by the supercritical fluid (SCF) method consisted of phosphatidylcholine from soybean (SCF-S100) and egg lecithins (SCF-EPCS). An in vitro permeation study was carried out using artificial cellulose membrane in Franz diffusion cells. Dry eye syndrome was induced in male albino rabbits and further subdivided into untreated, Restasis-treated, EPCS, and S100-treated groups. Tear formation in the dry-eye-induced rabbits was evaluated using the Schirmer tear test. All formulations were also evaluated by ocular irritation tests using the Draize eye and winking methods with the determination of CsA concentration in rabbit tears. After the treatment, the Schirmer tear test value significantly improved in EPCS-treated (P=0.005) and S100-treated (P=0.018) groups compared to the Restasis-treated group. The AUC₀₋₂₄ h for rabbit's tear film after the administration of SCF-S100 was 32.75±9.21 μg·h/mg which was significantly higher than that of 24.59±8.69 μg·h/mg reported with Restasis. Liposomal CsA formulations used in this study showed lower irritation in rabbit eyes compared with Restasis. These results demonstrate that the novel SCF-mediated liposomal CsA promises a significant improvement in overcoming the challenges associated with the treatment of dry eyes.

  20. Protective effects of piperine on lead acetate induced-nephrotoxicity in rats

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    Sri Agus Sudjarwo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: In this study, we investigated the protective effects of piperine on lead acetate-induced renal damage in rat kidney tissue. Materials and Methods: Forty male rats were divided into 5 groups: negative control (rats were given aquadest daily, positive control (rats were given lead acetate 30 mg/kg BW orally once a day for 60 days, and the treatment group (rats were given piperine 50 mg; 100 mg and 200 mg/kg BW orally once a day for 65 days, and on 5th day, were given lead acetate 30 mg/kg BW one hr after piperine administration for 60 days. On day 65 levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN, creatinine, malondialdehyde (MDA, Superoxide Dismutase (SOD, and Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx were measured. Also, kidney samples were collected for histopathological studies. Results: The results revealed that lead acetate toxicity induced a significant increase in the levels of BUN, creatinine, and MDA; moreover, a significant decrease in SOD and GPx. Lead acetate also altered kidney histopathology (kidney damage, necrosis of tubules compared to the negative control. However, administration of piperine significantly improved the kidney histopathology, decreased the levels of BUN, creatinine, and MDA, and also significantly increased the SOD and GPx in the kidney of lead acetate-treated rats. Conclusion: From the results of this study it was concluded that piperine could be a potent natural herbal product exhibiting nephroprotective effect against lead acetate induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

  1. Nephrotoxicity of Bence-Jones proteins: interference in renal epithelial cell acidification

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    Nicastri A.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the acidification of the endosome-lysosome system of renal epithelial cells after endocytosis of two human immunoglobulin lambda light chains (Bence-Jones proteins, BJP obtained from patients with multiple myeloma. Renal epithelial cell handling of two BJP (neutral and acidic BJP was evaluated by rhodamine fluorescence. Renal cells (MDCK were maintained in culture and, when confluent, were incubated with rhodamine-labeled BJP for different periods of time. Photos were obtained with a fluorescence microscope (Axiolab-Zeiss. Labeling density was determined on slides with a densitometer (Shimadzu Dual-Wavelength Flying-Spot Scanner CS9000. Endocytosis of neutral and acidic BJP was correlated with acidic intracellular compartment distribution using acridine orange labeling. We compared the pattern of distribution after incubation of native neutral and acidic BJP and after complete deglycosylation of BJP by periodate oxidation. The subsequent alteration of pI converted neutral BJP to acidic BJP. There was a significant accumulation of neutral BJP in endocytic structures, reduced lysosomal acidification, and a diffuse pattern of acidification. This pattern was reversed after total deglycosylation and subsequent alteration of the pI to an acidic BJP. We conclude that the physicochemical characteristics of BJP interfere with intracellular acidification, possibly explaining the strong nephrotoxicity of neutral BJP. Lysosomal acidification is fundamental for adequate protein processing and catabolism.

  2. Protective Effects of Intralipid and Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester on Nephrotoxicity Caused by Dichlorvos in Rats

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    Muhammet Murat Celik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The protective effects of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE and intralipid (IL on nephrotoxicity caused by acute Dichlorvos (D toxicity were investigated in this study. Forty-eight Wistar Albino rats were divided into 7 groups as follows: Control, D, CAPE, intralipid, D + CAPE, D + IL, and D + CAPE + IL. When compared to D group, the oxidative stress index (OSI values were significantly lower in Control, CAPE, and D + IL + CAPE groups. When compared to D + IL + CAPE group, the TOS and OSI values were significantly higher in D group (P<0.05. When mitotic cell counts were assessed in the renal tissues, it was found that mitotic cell count was significantly higher in the D group while it was lower in the D + CAPE, D + IL, and D + IL + CAPE groups when compared to the control group (P<0.05. Also, immune reactivity showed increased apoptosis in D group and low profile of apoptosis in the D + CAPE group when compared to the Control group. The apoptosis level was significantly lower in D + IL + CAPE compared to D group (P<0.05 in the kidneys. As a result, we concluded that Dichlorvos can be used either alone or in combination with CAPE and IL as supportive therapy or as facilitator for the therapeutic effect of the routine treatment in the patients presenting with pesticide poisoning.

  3. Effect of acclimation to caging on nephrotoxic response of rats to uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damon, E G; Eidson, A F; Hobbs, C H; Hahn, F F

    1986-02-01

    Animal studies of the toxicity and metabolism of radionuclides and chemicals often require housing of rats in metabolism cages for excreta collection. Response of rats to toxic substances may be affected by environmental factors such as the type of cage used. Dose-response studies were conducted to assess the effects of two types of cages on the nephrotoxic response of rats to uranium from implanted refined uranium ore (yellowcake). The LD50/21 days was 6 mg of uranium ore per kilogram body weight (6 mg U/kg). The 95% confidence limit (C.L.) was 3-8 mg U/kg for rats housed in metabolism cages beginning on the day of implantation (naive rats). However, for rats housed in metabolism cages for 21 days before implantation (acclimated rats) the LD50/21 days was 360 mg U/kg (95% C.L. = 220-650 mg U/kg), which was the same value obtained for rats housed continuously in polycarbonate cages. This significant difference (P less than 0.01) in response of naive rats compared to response of acclimated rats appeared related to a significantly lower water consumption by the naive rats.

  4. Agmatine improves renal function in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

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    El-Kashef, Dalia H; El-Kenawi, Asmaa E; Abdel Rahim, Mona; Suddek, Ghada M; Salem, Hatem A

    2016-03-01

    The present study was designed to explore the possible protective effects of agmatine, a known nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. For this purpose, we quantitatively evaluated gentamicin-induced renal structural and functional alterations using histopathological and biochemical approaches. Furthermore, the effect of agmatine on gentamicin-induced hypersensitivity of urinary bladder rings to acetylcholine (ACh) was evaluated. Twenty-four male Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into 3 groups, namely control, gentamicin (100 mg/kg, i.p.), and gentamicin plus agmatine (40 mg/kg, orally). At the end of the study, all rats were sacrificed and then blood and urine samples and kidneys were taken. Administration of agmatine significantly decreased kidney/body mass ratio, serum creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), renal malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), NO, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) while it significantly increased creatinine clearance and renal superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity when compared with the gentamicin-treated group. Additionally, agmatine ameliorated tissue morphology as evidenced by histological evaluation and reduced the responses of isolated bladder rings to ACh. Our study indicates that agmatine administration with gentamicin attenuates oxidative-stress associated renal injury by reducing oxygen free radicals and lipid peroxidation, restoring NO level and inhibiting inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α.

  5. Benfotiamine enhances antioxidant defenses and protects against cisplatin-induced DNA damage in nephrotoxic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harisa, Gamaleldin I

    2013-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), paraoxonase (PON1), glutathione reductase (GR), and catalase (CAT) activities ratio and their relationship with DNA oxidative damage in rats treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg bwt/day) in the presence and absence of benfotiamine (100 mg/kg/day) for 25 days. Cisplatin-induced renal damage was evidenced by renal dysfunction and elevated oxidative stress markers. SOD activity and levels of nitric oxide, protein carbonyl, malondialdehyde, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine were significantly increased by cisplatin treatment. Moreover, the ratios of GPx/GR, SOD/GPx, SOD/CAT, and SOD/PON1 were significantly increased compared to control. In contrast, glutathione levels were significantly decreased by cisplatin treatment. Simultaneous treatment of rats with cisplatin and benfotiamine ameliorate these variables to values near to those of control rats. This study suggests that benfotiamine can prevent cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by inhibiting formation reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Phellinus rimosus improves mitochondrial energy status and attenuates nephrotoxicity in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rony, K A; Ajith, T A; Kuttikadan, Tony A; Blaze, R; Janardhanan, K K

    2017-09-26

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and increase in reactive oxygen species during diabetes can lead to pathological consequences in kidneys. The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of Phellinus rimosus in the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rat renal mitochondria and the possible mechanism of protection. Phellinus rimosus (50 and 250 mg/kg, p.o) was treated after inducing diabetes by STZ (45 mg/kg, i.p) in rats. The serum samples were subjected to creatinine and urea estimation. Mitochondrial antioxidant status such as mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and reduced glutathione; adenosine triphosphate level; and lipid peroxidation were measured. The activities of Krebs cycle enzymes such as isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase as well as mitochondrial complexes I, III, and IV in kidney mitochondria were also determined. Administration of P. rimosus (250 mg/kg b.wt) once daily for 30 days, significantly (p<0.05) enhanced the activities of Krebs cycle dehydrogenases, mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes, and ATP level. Further, P. rimosus had significantly protected the renal mitochondrial antioxidant status and lipid peroxidation. The results of the study concluded that by limiting the extent of renal mitochondrial damage in the hyperglycemic state, P. rimosus alleviated nephrotoxicity.

  7. Protective effects of Bombyx mori, quercetin and benazepril against doxorubicin induced cardiotoxicity and nephrotoxicity

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    Abdul S. Nazmi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the protective effects of Bombyx mori, quercetin and benazepril on doxorubicin (DXR induced cardiotoxicity and nephrotoxicity in rats. B. mori, quercetin and benazepril were administered for 7 days, and a single intravenous injection of 10 mg/kg body weight of DXR on day five. The animals were sacrificed 48 h after DXR administration. DXR produced a significant elevation in the malondialdehyde (MDA level and significantly inhibited the activity of glutathione (GSH in the heart and the kidney followed by the activity of catalase (CAT in the heart tissue with a significant rise in the serum levels of aspartate transaminase (AST, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, creatinine and a reduction in serum GSH levels indicating acute cardiac toxicity. B. mori, quercetin and benazepril pretreatment significantly reduced the MDA concentration and ameliorated the inhibition of cardiac GSH and CAT activity. B. mori, quercetin and benazepril also significantly improved the serum levels of AST, LDH, BUN, creatinine and GSH in DXR-treated rats. Furthermore, histological examination of the heart sections confirmed the myocardial injury with DXR administration, and the near normal pattern with B. mori, quercetin and benazepril pretreatment. The results provide clear evidence that the B. mori, quercetin and benazepril pretreatments offer significant protection against DXR-induced enzymatic changes in serum, cardiac and renal tissue damage.

  8. Protective effect of selenium on cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity: A double-blind controlled randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Ali; Omidvar, Bita; Parsi, Abazar

    2013-04-01

    Renal injury is common following cisplatin infusion. Some agents have been used to attenuate cisplatin nephrotoxicity. However, except hydration, none of them has been proved to be effective. In this study selenium as an antioxidant supplement was tested on cisplatin induced renal injury. 122 cancerous patients (85 male and 37 female; age range of 14 to 82 years old) were enrolled to receive chemotherapy regimens consisting cisplatin. They were allocated into two groups using a random number list . Investigators, patients and analyzers all, were blinded in allocation by using sealed opaque envelopes. Intervention group received a single 400 mcg selenium tablet and patients in control group took a placebo tablet which was similar with selenium preparation in color, weight, shape and taste. Primary end points were an increase in plasma creatinine above 1.5 mg/dl in men and 1.4mg/dl in women, or increase of plasma creatinine more than 50% from baseline or urine flow rate less than 0.5 ml/kg/h. Creatinine level was measured initially and on the 5th day after cisplatin therapy. There was no difference in cumulative dose of cisplatin between the groups (p=0.54). There were not evidences of acute renal failure (ARF) in cases. While, among placebo group, 7 patients had criteria of acute kidney injury. Conclusions :selenium could probably prevent cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury, when it is added to hydration therapy in cancerous patients.

  9. Mitochondrial Ca2+ influx and efflux rates in guinea pig cardiac mitochondria: low and high affinity effects of cyclosporine A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, An-Chi; Liu, Ting; Cortassa, Sonia; Winslow, Raimond L; O'Rourke, Brian

    2011-07-01

    Ca(2+) plays a central role in energy supply and demand matching in cardiomyocytes by transmitting changes in excitation-contraction coupling to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Matrix Ca(2+) is controlled primarily by the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter and the mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, influencing NADH production through Ca(2+)-sensitive dehydrogenases in the Krebs cycle. In addition to the well-accepted role of the Ca(2+)-triggered mitochondrial permeability transition pore in cell death, it has been proposed that the permeability transition pore might also contribute to physiological mitochondrial Ca(2+) release. Here we selectively measure Ca(2+) influx rate through the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter and Ca(2+) efflux rates through Na(+)-dependent and Na(+)-independent pathways in isolated guinea pig heart mitochondria in the presence or absence of inhibitors of mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (CGP 37157) or the permeability transition pore (cyclosporine A). cyclosporine A suppressed the negative bioenergetic consequences (ΔΨ(m) loss, Ca(2+) release, NADH oxidation, swelling) of high extramitochondrial Ca(2+) additions, allowing mitochondria to tolerate total mitochondrial Ca(2+) loads of >400nmol/mg protein. For Ca(2+) pulses up to 15μM, Na(+)-independent Ca(2+) efflux through the permeability transition pore accounted for ~5% of the total Ca(2+) efflux rate compared to that mediated by the mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (in 5mM Na(+)). Unexpectedly, we also observed that cyclosporine A inhibited mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger-mediated Ca(2+) efflux at higher concentrations (IC(50)=2μM) than those required to inhibit the permeability transition pore, with a maximal inhibition of ~40% at 10μM cyclosporine A, while having no effect on the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter. The results suggest a possible alternative mechanism by which cyclosporine A could affect mitochondrial Ca(2+) load in cardiomyocytes, potentially

  10. Effectiveness and Optical Quality of Topical 3.0% Diquafosol versus 0.05% Cyclosporine A in Dry Eye Patients following Cataract Surgery

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    Jang Hoon Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the effectiveness and optical quality of 3.0% topical diquafosol versus 0.05% cyclosporine A in dry eye patients following cataract surgery. Methods. In total, 40 eyes of 40 patients newly diagnosed with dry eye syndrome 1 week after cataract surgery were randomized to receive either 3.0% diquafosol ophthalmic solution six times daily or 0.05% cyclosporine A twice daily for 3 months. Outcome measures were tear film break-up time (TBUT, results on Schirmer 1 test, ocular surface staining score, the ocular surface disease index (OSDI score, and higher-order aberrations (HOAs. Measurements were taken at baseline and at 1, 2, and 3 months. Results. In the diquafosol group, TBUT showed higher outcomes than the cyclosporine A group at 1 and 3 months. Both groups showed increased scores on Schirmer 1 test. The ocular surface staining score decreased in all periods in both groups. Vertical coma and total HOAs decreased more in the cyclosporine A group than in the diquafosol group at 3 months. Conclusion. Both 3.0% diquafosol and 0.05% cyclosporine A were effective in treating dry eye after cataract surgery. Diquafosol was more effective in increasing the tear secretion, but cyclosporine A was more effective in improving optical aberrations.

  11. Cyclosporine-A therapy-induced multiple bilateral breast and accessory axillary breast fibroadenomas: a case report

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    Darwish Ahmed

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Breast adenoma is common. However, in the setting of post-transplantation immune suppression it may be expressed differently. Case presentation A 35-year-old Sudanese woman, with a history of renal transplantation two and half years prior to presentation, was on a single immune suppression therapy in the form of cyclosporine-A since the transplantation. During a regular follow-up visit, she was noticed to have gingival hypertrophy and bilateral breast and axillary swellings. She underwent successful surgical resection of the bilateral fibroadenomas. Conclusions Cyclosporine-A therapy post renal transplantation is associated with an increased incidence of benign breast changes as fibroadenoma. Regular follow-up and appropriate selection of immunosuppressant therapy are essential in the post transplantation management of these patients.

  12. A survey on the effects of Azithromycin in the treatment of gingival overgrowth induced by Cyclosporin in renal transplant patients

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    Kadkhoda Z.

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Gingival overgrowth is a side effect commonly induced by Cyclosporin treatment. The effects of Azithromycin, a macrolidic antibiotic, has been focused on gingival enlargement treatment induced by cyclosporine in numerous articles. Purpose: The goal of the present study was to survey the effects of systemic Azithromycin in the treatment of gingival overgrowth induced by cyclosporine among renal transplant patients. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study, 18 renal transplant patients (6 females and 12 males with gingival overgrowth were studied. Samples were randomly divided into two groups: case group were treated by systemic Azithromycin and controls were treated by systemic placebo. Periodontal parameters including bleeding on probing (BOP, clinical crown length (CL, periodontal pocket depth (PPD, gingival overgrowth (GOI and stent-IDP (vertical distant between a stent or plate with teeth occlusal planes at least from three of the most anterior contact points to mesial papillae before treatment, two and six weeks after treatment were measured. To analyze the data, Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests were used. Results: Most of the measured indices, among case and control groups, were significantly improved, after two weeks (P<0.05. No statistically significant differences were found between two groups except for BOP index (P<0.05. In other words, more BOP improvement was observed in the case group after six weeks comparing to the control group. Conclusion: Considering the findings of this study, one can assume that the reported effects of Azithromycine on gingival overgrowth, induced by cyclosporine is somehow exaggerated and the effects attributed this medicine is probably inflammation reduction.

  13. Interleukin-6 levels in the conjunctival epithelium of patients with dry eye disease treated with cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, K; Pflugfelder, S C; Ji, Z; Feuer, W J; Stern, M; Reis, B L

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in the conjunctival epithelium of patients with moderate to severe dry eye disease before and after treatment with cyclosporin A ophthalmic emulsion (CsA) or its vehicle. Conjunctival cytology specimens were obtained from a subset of patients enrolled in a 6-month randomized, double-masked clinical trial of the efficacy and safety of topical CsA at baseline and after 3 and 6 months of B.I.D. treatment with 0.05% cyclosporine emulsion (n = 13), 0.1% cyclosporine emulsion (n = 8), or vehicle (n = 10). RNA was extracted and a competitive reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to evaluate the levels of mRNA encoding the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and a housekeeping gene, G3PDH. Levels of IL-6 and G3PDH were measured and compared. There was no change from baseline in the level of G3PDH after 3 or 6 months in any group. IL-6 normalized for G3PDH (IL-6/G3PDH ratio) was not different from baseline at 3 months but showed a significant decrease from baseline in the group treated with 0.05% CsA (p = 0.048) at 6 months. No significant between-group differences were noted and no correlation was observed between the change in IL-6/G3PDH and corneal fluorescein staining. This preliminary, small-cohort study showed a decrease in IL-6 in the conjunctival epithelium of moderate to severe dry eye patients treated with 0.05% CsA for 6 months. The observed decrease suggests that dry eye disease involves immune-mediated inflammatory processes that may be decreased by treatment with topical ophthalmic cyclosporine.

  14. A local application of mesenchymal stem cells and cyclosporine A attenuates immune response by a switch in macrophage phenotype

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájková, M.; Javorková, Eliška; Zajícová, Alena; Trošan, Peter; Holáň, Vladimír; Krulová, Magdaléna

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 5 (2017), s. 1456-1465 ISSN 1932-6254 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0653; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/1568; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12580S; GA MZd(CZ) NT14102 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : mesenchymal stem cells * cyclosporine A * macrophages Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 3.989, year: 2016

  15. ATG-Fresenius S combined with cyclosporine a: an effective immunosuppressive therapy for children with aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cheng-Juan; Gao, Yi-Jin; Tang, Jing-Yan; Zhu, Xiao-Hua; Xue, Hui-Liang; Lu, Feng-Juan; Pan, Ci; Jiang, Hua; Luo, Chang-Ying; Ye, Qi-Dong; Zhou, Min; Chen, Jing

    2014-07-01

    For the first time, we conducted a 2-center retrospective study to show the efficacy of antithymocyte globulin (ATG)-Fresenius S plus cyclosporine treatment of children with severe aplastic anemia. From March 1997 to May 2011, a total of 124 patients (median age, 7.5 y; range, 1.5 to 16 y) from 2 centers with acquired AA treated with an immunosuppressive therapy (IST) regimen, consisting of ATG-Fresenius S (5 mg/kg per day for 5 d) and cyclosporine, were enrolled. The response rate was 55.6%. The median time between IST and response was 6 (0.5 to 18) months. After a median follow-up time of 29 (6 to 153) months, the rates of relapse and clonal evolution were 3.2% and 0.8%, respectively. Overall, 17 patients (13.7%) died in this study: 14 resulted from sepsis, 1 resulted from intracranial hemorrhage, 1 occurred after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and 1 resulted from clonal disease progression. The 5-year overall survival rate for the entire cohort was 74.7%. IST responders had a better survival rate (100%) than nonresponders (70.7%). The use of ATG-Fresenius S plus cyclosporine as a first-line immunosuppressive treatment appeared to be effective for children with severe aplastic anemia in our study. ATG-Fresenius S could be another option in the treatment arsenal, especially in countries where the other ATG products are harder to acquire.

  16. Enhancement of oral bioavailability of cyclosporine A: comparison of various nanoscale drug-delivery systems

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    Wang K

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Kai Wang,1–3 Jianping Qi,1 Tengfei Weng,1,2 Zhiqiang Tian,1 Yi Lu,1 Kaili Hu,4 Zongning Yin,2 Wei Wu1 1School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Smart Drug Delivery of Ministry of Education, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China; 3Tropical Crops Genetic Resources Institute, Hainan Provincial Engineering Research Center for Blumea Balsamifera, Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences, Danzhou, Hainan, People’s Republic of China; 4Murad Research Center for Modernized Chinese Medicine, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: A variety of nanoscale delivery systems have been shown to enhance the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble and poorly permeable drugs. However, the performance of these systems has seldom been evaluated simultaneously. The aim of this study was to compare the bioavailability enhancement effect of lipid-based nanocarriers with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles (NPs to highlight the importance of the lipid composition, with cyclosporine A (CyA as a model drug. CyA-loaded PLGA NPs, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs, and self-microemulsifying drug-delivery systems (SMEDDS were prepared. The particle size of PLGA NPs (182.2±12.8 nm was larger than that of NLCs (89.7±9.0 nm and SMEDDS (26.9±1.9 nm. All vehicles are charged negatively. The entrapment efficiency of PLGA NPs and NLCs was 87.6%±1.6% and 80.3%±0.6%, respectively. In vitro release tests indicated that the cumulative release of CyA was lower than 4% from all vehicles, including Sandimmun Neoral®, according to the dialysis method. Both NLCs and SMEDDS showed high relative oral bioavailability, 111.8% and 73.6%, respectively, after oral gavage administration to beagle dogs, which was not statistically different from commercial Sandimmun Neoral®. However, PLGA NPs

  17. Cyclosporine A and palmitic acid treatment synergistically induce cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yi, E-mail: yi.luo@pfizer.com; Rana, Payal; Will, Yvonne

    2012-06-01

    Immunosuppressant cyclosporine A (CsA) treatment can cause severe side effects. Patients taking immunosuppressant after organ transplantation often display hyperlipidemia and obesity. Elevated levels of free fatty acids have been linked to the etiology of metabolic syndromes, nonalcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis. The contribution of free fatty acids to CsA-induced toxicity is not known. In this study we explored the effect of palmitic acid on CsA-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells. CsA by itself at therapeutic exposure levels did not induce detectible cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. Co-treatment of palmitic acid and CsA resulted in a dose dependent increase in cytotoxicity, suggesting that fatty acid could sensitize cells to CsA-induced cytotoxicity at the therapeutic doses of CsA. A synergized induction of caspase-3/7 activity was also observed, indicating that apoptosis may contribute to the cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that CsA reduced cellular oxygen consumption which was further exacerbated by palmitic acid, implicating that impaired mitochondrial respiration might be an underlying mechanism for the enhanced toxicity. Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) attenuated palmitic acid and CsA induced toxicity, suggesting that JNK activation plays an important role in mediating the enhanced palmitic acid/CsA-induced toxicity. Our data suggest that elevated FFA levels, especially saturated FFA such as palmitic acid, may be predisposing factors for CsA toxicity, and patients with underlying diseases that would elevate free fatty acids may be susceptible to CsA-induced toxicity. Furthermore, hyperlipidemia/obesity resulting from immunosuppressive therapy may aggravate CsA-induced toxicity and worsen the outcome in transplant patients. -- Highlights: ► Palmitic acid and cyclosporine (CsA) synergistically increased cytotoxicity. ► The impairment of mitochondrial functions may contribute to the enhanced toxicity. ► Inhibition of JNK activity attenuated

  18. Resistance to cyclosporin A derives from mutations in hepatitis C virus nonstructural proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masaaki; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Takagi, Asako; Tobita, Yoshimi; Inoue, Kazuaki; Kohara, Michinori

    2014-05-23

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immunosuppressive drug that targets cyclophilins, cellular cofactors that regulate the immune system. Replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is suppressed by CsA, but the molecular basis of this suppression is still not fully understood. To investigate this suppression, we cultured HCV replicon cells (Con1, HCV genotype 1b, FLR-N cell) in the presence of CsA and obtained nine CsA-resistant FLR-N cell lines. We determined full-length HCV sequences for all nine clones, and chose two (clones #6 and #7) of the nine clones that have high replication activity in the presence of CsA for further analysis. Both clones showed two consensus mutations, one in NS3 (T1280V) and the other in NS5A (D2292E). Characterization of various mutants indicated that the D2292E mutation conferred resistance to high concentrations of CsA (up to 2 μM). In addition, the missense mutation T1280V contributed to the recovery of colony formation activity. The effects of these mutations are also evident in two established HCV replicon cell lines-HCV-RMT ([1], genotype 1a) and JFH1 (genotype 2a). Moreover, three other missense mutations in NS5A-D2303H, S2362G, and E2414K-enhanced the resistance to CsA conferred by D2292E; these double or all quadruple mutants could resist approximately 8- to 25-fold higher concentrations of CsA than could wild-type Con1. These four mutations, either as single or combinations, also made Con1 strain resistant to two other cyclophilin inhibitors, N-methyl-4-isoleucine-cyclosporin (NIM811) or Debio-025. Interestingly, the changes in IC50 values that resulted from each of these mutations were the lowest in the Debio-025-treated cells, indicating its highest resistant activity against the adaptive mutation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparation and characterization of solid lipid nanoparticles containing cyclosporine by the emulsification-diffusion method

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    Zaida Urbán-Morlán

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Zaida Urbán-Morlán1, Adriana Ganem-Rondero1, Luz María Melgoza-Contreras2, José Juan Escobar-Chávez1,2, María Guadalupe Nava-Arzaluz1, David Quintanar-Guerrero11División de Estudios de Posgrado (Tecnología Farmacéutica, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Cuautitlán-Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Estado de México, México; 2Departamento de Sistemas Biológicos, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco, Calzada del Hueso, Colonia Villa Quietud, MéxicoAbstract: Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs have been used for carrying different therapeutic agents because they improve absorption and bioavailability. The aim of the study was to prepare lipidic nanoparticles containing cyclosporine (CyA by the emulsification-diffusion method and to study their physicochemical stability. Glyceryl behenate (Compritol® ATO 888 and lauroyl macrogolglycerides (Gelucire® 44/14 were used as carrier materials. Nanoparticles with good stability were obtained with Gelucire®, while it was difficult to obtain stable systems with Compritol®. Systems with Gelucire® were characterized by particle size, Z-potential, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, entrapment efficiency and in vitro release. Particle size and Z-potential were evaluated for at least three months. With a high CyA content (≥60 mg in Gelucire® SLNs, variations in size were greater and particle size also increased over time in all batches; this effect may have been caused by a probable expulsion of the drug due to the lipid’s partial rearrangement. While the Z-potential decreased 10 mV after three months, this effect may be explained by the superficial properties of the drug that make the molecules to be preferably oriented at the solid-liquid interface, causing a change in the net charge of the particle. SEM confirmed size and shape of the nanoparticles. DSC studies evidenced that CyA affects the lipid structure by a mechanism still unknown

  20. Comparison of Protective Effect of Green Tea and Vitamin C Against Cypermethrin Induce Nephrotoxicity in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzoor, S.; Mehboob, K.; Naveed, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Insecticide toxicity is the problem of every person in under developed countries. It is necessary to counteract its effect by natural and cheap remedies like green tea and vitamin C. In this manner common man can also enjoy blessings of life. The current research was performed to compare the protective function of green tea and vitamin C on experimental cypermethrin provoked nephrotoxicity Method: Forty healthy Balb/C mice purchased from National Institute of Health, Islamabad, Pakistan and divided in to four groups (10 each). Group a was control which received only normal diet. Group B, group C and group D were experimental groups which were given Cypermethrin, Cypermethrin with green tea and Cypermethrin with vitamin C respectively. These groups were also given normal diet. After 1 month blood was drawn by intra-cardiac method to assess renal parameters. Results: One month research showed increase in serum urea to 6.8±.48 m.mol/l (n=3.9±.44) while green tea and vitamin C normalize them to 4.0±.83 m.mol/l and 3.4±.33 m.mol/l respectively. Serum creatinine increased to 42.90±3.28 m.mol/l (n=29.50±3.95) while green tea and vitamin C normalize them to 28.80±4.58 m.mol/l and 22.60±2.06 m.mol/l correspondingly. Conclusion The results showed that green tea and vitamin C neutralized toxicity induced by Cypermethrin in mice and their effect is comparable. (author)

  1. Amelioration of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by ethanolic extract of Bauhinia purpurea: An in vivo study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Md Azmat; Khan, Rahat Ali; Nasiruddin, Mohammad; Khan, Aijaz Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Our objective is to study the nephroprotective activity and antioxidant potential of Bauhinia purpurea unripe pods and bark against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Healthy adult albino rats of either sex (150-200 g) were randomly divided into six groups of six animals each Group I (vehicle control) and Group II (negative control). Group III (BBE200) and Group IV (BBE400) were administered the ethanolic extract of Bauhinia purpurea bark in doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg/day p.o., respectively, and Group V (BPE200) and Group VI (BPE400) were administered the ethanolic extract of Bauhinia purpurea unripe pods at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg/day p.o., respectively. All the treatments were given for nine days. Cisplatin in a single dose of 6 mg/kg i.p. was given on the 4 th day to all groups, except the vehicle control group. On the 10 th day, blood and urine were collected for biochemical tests and the rats were sacrificed. The kidney was removed for histology and lipid peroxidation-antioxidant test. Cisplatin caused nephrotoxicity as evidenced by elevated blood urea, serum creatinine and urine glucose, and there was decreased creatinine clearance in Group II as compared with Group I. Administration of BBE and BPE at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg in Group III and Group VI caused a dose-dependant reduction in the rise of blood urea, serum creatinine and urine glucose, and there was a dose-dependant increase in creatinine clearance compared with Group II. There was increased catalase and glutathione and decreased malondialdehyde levels in Group II, while BBE 400 (Group IV) and BPE 400 (Group VI) treatments significantly reversed the changes toward normal values. Histological examination of the kidney revealed protection in Group IV and Group VI compared with Group II. The ethanolic extract of Bauhinia purpurea unripe pods and bark has a nephroprotective activity against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

  2. The effect of sulforaphane on the levels of serum cystatin-c in acetaminophen- induced nephrotoxicity in rats

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    Eda Dokumacioglu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The exposure of living creatures to drugs and chemicals often results in toxicity of liver and kidney. Drugs constitute an important and big part of the commu­nity and hospital-acquired kidney diseases. In this study, we investigated the effect of sulforaphane (SFN on the levels of cystatin-C and lipid peroxidation on acetamino­phen (APAP- induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Methods: Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were separat­ed equally into four experimental groups: control group, SFN group, APAP group, and APAP + SFN group. In the experimental treatment groups APAP was administered oral gavage at 1 g/kg 3 h after SFN treatment in last day and, in the APAP + SFN group, SFN was administered oral gavage at a dose of 500 μg/kg exactly for three days. Rats were euthanized and sacrificed 24 h after APAP ad­ministration. Results: APAP administration showed to significant in­crease in serum BUN, creatinine, urea and LDH concen­trations as compared to the control datas indicating the induction of severe nephrotoxicity (p<0.001. SFN treat­ment significantly decreased the cystatin-C levels and lipid peroxidation compared to APAP group (p<0.05. Conclusion: The present study demonstrate that the at­tachment of SFN to the nephrotoxicity treatment protocol will be beneficial and further studies should be conducted for cystatin C which plays an important role in kidney tox­icity and disease to be routinized as a biomarker.

  3. Parp1 protects against Aag-dependent alkylation-induced nephrotoxicity in a sex-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Jennifer A; Allocca, Mariacarmela; Fake, Kimberly R; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Corrigan, Joshua J; Bronson, Roderick T; Samson, Leona D

    2016-07-19

    Nephrotoxicity is a common toxic side-effect of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents. Although the base excision repair (BER) pathway is essential in repairing DNA alkylation damage, under certain conditions the initiation of BER produces toxic repair intermediates that damage healthy tissues. We have shown that the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase, Aag (a.k.a. Mpg), an enzyme that initiates BER, mediates alkylation-induced whole-animal lethality and cytotoxicity in the pancreas, spleen, retina, and cerebellum, but not in the kidney. Cytotoxicity in both wild-type and Aag-transgenic mice (AagTg) was abrogated in the absence of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp1). Here we report that Parp1-deficient mice expressing increased Aag (AagTg/Parp1-/-) develop sex-dependent kidney failure upon exposure to the alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and suffer increased whole-animal lethality compared to AagTg and wild-type mice. Macroscopic, histological, electron microscopic and immunohistochemical analyses revealed morphological kidney damage including dilated tubules, proteinaceous casts, vacuolation, collapse of the glomerular tuft, and deterioration of podocyte structure. Moreover, mice exhibited clinical signs of kidney disease indicating functional damage, including elevated blood nitrogen urea and creatinine, hypoproteinemia and proteinuria. Pharmacological Parp inhibition in AagTg mice also resulted in sensitivity to MMS-induced nephrotoxicity. These findings provide in vivo evidence that Parp1 modulates Aag-dependent MMS-induced nephrotoxicity in a sex-dependent manner and highlight the critical roles that Aag-initiated BER and Parp1 may play in determining the side-effects of chemotherapeutic alkylating agents.

  4. Histological Evidence of Nephroprotective Effect of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera Root Extract against Gentamicin Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats

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    Sadia Choudhury Shimmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kidney damage can occur due to exposure to nephrotoxic drugs, chemicals, toxins and infectious agents, ultimately leading to renal failure, management of which is a great challenge. So, efforts have been focused on traditional and herbal medicines for the treatment of renal failure. Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera may have free radical scavenging activity and can be used for the prevention and treatment of kidney damage. Objective: To observe the histological evidence of nephroprotective effect of Ashwagandha root against gentamicin induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Materials and Methods: This study was done in the department of Physiology, Sir Salimullah Medical College, Dhaka. A total number of 31 male Wistar albino rats were acclimatized for 14 days. Then, these were divided into two groups, control group consisted of 18 rats (Group A and Ashwagandha pretreated and gentamicin-treated group consisted of 13 rats (Group B. Control group was again subdivided into baseline control and gentamicin-treated control groups (A1 and A2 ─ each group contained 9 rats. All the animals received basal diet for 22 consecutive days. In addition to this, animals of Group A2 received gentamicin subcutaneously (100 mg/kg body weight/day from 15th to 22nd day and animals of Group B received Ashwagandha root extract (500 mg/kg body weight/day orally for 22 consecutive days and gentamicin subcutaneously (100 mg/kg body weight/day from 15th to 22nd day. All the animals were sacrificed on 23rd day. Then kidney samples were collected and histology was done by using standard laboratory procedure. Results: Histological examination of kidney revealed abnormal histological findings in 100% of gentamicin-treated rats. But 92.31% of rats in Ashwagandha pretreated and gentamicin-treated group showed almost normal structure and 7.69% showed mild histological changes. Conclusion: Ashwagandha root may have some nephroprotective effect against gentamicin induced

  5. Effect of Nigella sativa Linn oil on tramadol-induced hepato- and nephrotoxicity in adult male albino rats

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    A. Elkhateeb

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to evaluate the role of Nigella sativa Linn (NsL oil against subacute tramadol-induced hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity as well as oxidative stress in adult male albino rats. Sixty adult male albino rats were divided into four groups. Group I: control group; 30 rats equally subdivided into: Ia; −ve control group, Ib; +ve control group received saline, Ic; +ve control group received corn oil. Group II: 10 rats received NsL oil; 1 mg/kg in 1 ml corn oil/day, group III: 10 rats received tramadol; 30 mg/kg/day, group IV: 10 rats received tramadol + NsL oil in the previous doses. Treatments were given by gavage for 30 days. Then rats were sacrificed and specimens from the livers and kidneys were taken for biochemical and histopathological study. Biochemical data showed elevated liver enzymes; alanine transaminase (ALT, aspartate transaminase (AST, gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT, bilirubin as well as urea and creatinine in tramadol group. A significant increase in hepatic and renal malondialdehyde (MDA and a decrease in glutathione peroxidase (GPx levels were also noticed. Histological analysis of the liver showed vacuolated hepatocyte cytoplasm indicating hydropic degeneration with binucleated cells, apoptotic nuclei, congested central veins, cellular infiltration and hemorrhage. Kidney sections revealed atrophied glomeruli with collapsed tufts and wide Bowman's space, degenerated tubules, hemorrhage and mononuclear cellular infiltration. There was also an increase in area % of collagen fibers in both organs. Concomitant use of NsL oil with tramadol induced partial improvement in the hepato- and nephrotoxic effects. In conclusion, this study suggested that concomitant use of NsL oil with tramadol proved to be capable of ameliorating tramadol-induced hepato- and nephrotoxicity which might be due to its antioxidant potential.

  6. Far infrared radiation promotes rabbit renal proximal tubule cell proliferation and functional characteristics, and protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, I-Ni; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Young, Tai-Horng

    2017-01-01

    Far infrared radiation, a subdivision of the electromagnetic spectrum, is beneficial for long-term tissue healing, anti-inflammatory effects, growth promotion, sleep modulation, acceleration of microcirculation, and pain relief. We investigated if far infrared radiation is beneficial for renal proximal tubule cell cultivation and renal tissue engineering. We observed the effects of far infrared radiation on renal proximal tubules cells, including its effects on cell proliferation, gene and protein expression, and viability. We also examined the protective effects of far infrared radiation against cisplatin, a nephrotoxic agent, using the human proximal tubule cell line HK-2. We found that daily exposure to far infrared radiation for 30 min significantly increased rabbit renal proximal tubule cell proliferation in vitro, as assessed by MTT assay. Far infrared radiation was not only beneficial to renal proximal tubule cell proliferation, it also increased the expression of ATPase Na+/K+ subunit alpha 1 and glucose transporter 1, as determined by western blotting. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we found that far infrared radiation enhanced CDK5R1, GNAS, NPPB, and TEK expression. In the proximal tubule cell line HK-2, far infrared radiation protected against cisplatin-mediated nephrotoxicity by reducing apoptosis. Renal proximal tubule cell cultivation with far infrared radiation exposure resulted in better cell proliferation, significantly higher ATPase Na+/K+ subunit alpha 1 and glucose transporter 1 expression, and significantly enhanced expression of CDK5R1, GNAS, NPPB, and TEK. These results suggest that far infrared radiation improves cell proliferation and differentiation. In HK-2 cells, far infrared radiation mediated protective effects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by reducing apoptosis, as indicated by flow cytometry and caspase-3 assay.

  7. Naringin ameliorates gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity and associated mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis and inflammation in rats: Possible mechanism of nephroprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Bidya Dhar [Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT), Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Tatireddy, Srujana [National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER), Hyderabad 500 037 (India); Koneru, Meghana [Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT), Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Borkar, Roshan M. [National Centre for Mass Spectrometry, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT), Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Kumar, Jerald Mahesh [CSIR-Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB), Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Kuncha, Madhusudana [Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT), Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Srinivas, R. [National Centre for Mass Spectrometry, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT), Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Shyam Sunder, R. [Faculty of Pharmacy, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Sistla, Ramakrishna, E-mail: sistla@iict.res.in [Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT), Hyderabad 500 007 (India)

    2014-05-15

    Gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity has been well documented, although its underlying mechanisms and preventive strategies remain to be investigated. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effect of naringin, a bioflavonoid, on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity and to elucidate the potential mechanism. Serum specific renal function parameters (blood urea nitrogen and creatinine) and histopathology of kidney tissues were evaluated to assess the gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Renal oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants), inflammatory (NF-kB [p65], TNF-α, IL-6 and MPO) and apoptotic (caspase 3, caspase 9, Bax, Bcl-2, p53 and DNA fragmentation) markers were also evaluated. Significant decrease in mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, cytochrome c oxidase and mitochondrial redox activity indicated the gentamicin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Naringin (100 mg/kg) treatment along with gentamicin restored the mitochondrial function and increased the renal endogenous antioxidant status. Gentamicin induced increased renal inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), nuclear protein expression of NF-κB (p65) and NF-κB-DNA binding activity and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were significantly decreased upon naringin treatment. In addition, naringin treatment significantly decreased the amount of cleaved caspase 3, Bax, and p53 protein expression and increased the Bcl-2 protein expression. Naringin treatment also ameliorated the extent of histologic injury and reduced inflammatory infiltration in renal tubules. U-HPLS-MS data revealed that naringin co-administration along with gentamicin did not alter the renal uptake and/or accumulation of gentamicin in kidney tissues. These findings suggest that naringin treatment attenuates renal dysfunction and structural damage through the reduction of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and apoptosis in

  8. Evaluation of body weight-based vancomycin therapy and the incidence of nephrotoxicity: a retrospective study in the northwest of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Mo-Han; Wang, Jing-Wen; Wu, Yin; Chen, Bei-Yu; Yu, Min; Wen, Ai-Dong

    2015-08-01

    To identify specific risk factors of vancomycin-induced nephrotoxicity in China, as the relationship between vancomycin therapy (dosing and trough concentration monitoring) and nephrotoxicity has been the subject of critical debate. The cases of 90 critically ill patients who received vancomycin therapy in Xijing Hospital in the northwest of China between March 2014 and January 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. Vancomycin dosing, blood serum trough concentration, and other independent risk factors associated with nephrotoxicity were evaluated in a multivariable model. Among the 90 critically ill patients, 59 were males; mean age was 46.3 years. The indications for vancomycin use were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-associated pneumonia, central nervous system infection, and bacteremia. Clinical pharmacists prescribed weight-based dosing, ranging from 20 to 45mg/kg/day. Fourteen (15.6%) patients developed nephrotoxicity, with serum creatinine elevated significantly from a mean (standard deviation) of 90.0 (18.8) μmol/l to 133.8 (63.2) μmol/l (p = 0.015). It was found that those with a vancomycin dosage >38mg/kg/day (50.0% vs. 11.3%, p = 0.004) and a vancomycin serum trough concentration >20mg/l (57.1% vs. 12.0%, p = 0.01) were more likely to develop nephrotoxicity. The data from this study indicate that a vancomycin dosage >38mg/kg/day and a serum trough level >20mg/l are both independent factors associated with the development of nephrotoxicity, suggesting that renal function should be monitored closely during vancomycin treatment. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. P2X7 receptor blockade protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice by decreasing the activities of inflammasome components, oxidative stress and caspase-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Fahuan; Cao, Xuejiao [Department of Nephrology, Xinqiao Hospital, PLA, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Zhai, Zhifang [Department of Dermatology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Gang Huang [Department of Medical Genetics, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 430038 (China); Du, Xiang; Wang, Yiqin; Zhang, Jingbo; Huang, Yunjian; Zhao, Jinghong [Department of Nephrology, Xinqiao Hospital, PLA, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Hou, Weiping, E-mail: hwp0518@aliyun.com [Department of Nephrology, Xinqiao Hospital, PLA, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Nephrotoxicity is a common complication of cisplatin chemotherapy and thus limits the use of cisplatin in clinic. The purinergic 2X7 receptor (P2X7R) plays important roles in inflammation and apoptosis in some inflammatory diseases; however, its roles in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity remain unclear. In this study, we first assessed the expression of P2X7R in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in C57BL/6 mice, and then we investigated the changes of renal function, histological injury, inflammatory response, and apoptosis in renal tissues after P2X7R blockade in vivo using an antagonist A-438079. Moreover, we measured the changes of nod-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing proteins (NLRP3) inflammasome components, oxidative stress, and proapoptotic genes in renal tissues in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity after treatment with A-438079. We found that the expression of P2X7R was significantly upregulated in the renal tubular epithelial cells in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity compared with that of the normal control group. Furthermore, pretreatment with A-438079 markedly attenuated the cisplatin-induced renal injury while lightening the histological damage, inflammatory response and apoptosis in renal tissue, and improved the renal function. These effects were associated with the significantly reduced levels of NLRP3 inflammasome components, oxidative stress, p53 and caspase-3 in renal tissues in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. In conclusions, our studies suggest that the upregulated activity of P2X7R might play important roles in the development of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, and P2X7R blockade might become an effective therapeutic strategy for this disease. - Highlights: • The P2X7R expression was markedly upregulated in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. • P2X7R blockade significantly attenuated the cisplatin-induced renal injury. • P2X7R blockade reduced activities of NLRP3 inflammasome components in renal tissue. • P2X7R blockade

  10. Xenograft survival in two species combinations using total-lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knechtle, S.J.; Halperin, E.C.; Bollinger, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) has profound immunosuppressive actions and has been applied successfully to allotransplantation but not xenotransplantation. Cyclosporine (CsA) has not generally permitted successful xenotransplantation of organs but has not been used in combination with TLI. TLI and CsA were given alone and in combination to rats that were recipients of hamster or rabbit cardiac xenografts. Combined TLI and CsA prolonged survival of hamster-to-rat cardiac xenografts from three days in untreated controls to greater than 100 days in most recipients. TLI alone significantly prolonged rabbit to rat xenograft survival with doubling of survival time. However, combined treatment did not significantly prolong rabbit-to-rat cardiac xenograft survival compared with TLI alone. The hamster and rat are phylogenetically closely related. Transplants from hamsters to rat are concordant xenografts since the time course of unmodified rejection is similar to first-set rejection of allografts. Although the rabbit-to-rat transplant is also between concordant species (average survival of untreated controls: 3.2 days) the rabbit and rat are more distantly related. These results suggest that TLI is an effective immunosuppressant when applied to cardiac xenotransplants in these animal models; that the choice of species critically affects xenograft survival when TLI and/or CsA are used for immunosuppression; and that the closely related species combination tested has markedly prolonged (greater than 100 days) survival using combined TLI and CsA

  11. Protective effects of vitamin E on cyclosporineA-induced toxicity in rat testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Sameni

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cyclosporine A (CsA as an immunosuppressive drug which widely used in organ transplantation and autoimmune diseases. This drug is caused many injuries and cell cytotoxic of the body organs such as reproductive organs. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective effects of vitamin E (Vit E against CsA-induced damages in rat testis. Material and Methods: 40 adult male wistar rats were divided into 5 groups: control (without any intervention, placebo (received only pure olive oil, test 1 (CsA+olive oil, 30 mg/kg, test 2 (Vit E, 100 mg/kg and test 3 (CsA+Vit E, with the same dose. All animal received drugs for three weeks daily by oral gavages. Following, the testis were fixed and sections stained with Haematoxylin & Eosin and Trichrome Masson. Then with using a microscope equipped with a scaled ocular micrometer and image analysis software were histomorphometry. Results: This study showed that CsA caused severe degenerative changes in testicular tissue include decreased seminiferous tubules diameter, seminiferous epithelium thickness. Also, the number of spermatogonia, primary spermatocyte, spermatozoa, and sertoli and leydig cells significantly decreased throughout the experiment. These changes are lead to turbulence and atrophy seminiferous epithelium and delay in spermatogenesis. Treatment with vitamin E minimized the adverse effects of CsA on testis structure and spermatogenesis. Conclusion: These results suggest that vitamin E has a protective effect against CsA-induced testicular toxicity in male rat.

  12. Prevention of murine cerebral malaria by low-dose cyclosporin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, G E; Gretener, D; Lambert, P H

    1987-08-01

    The effects of cyclosporin A (CsA) were investigated in an experimental model of cerebral malaria. In this model, Plasmodium berghei ANKA-infected CBA/Ca mice develop a clinically and histologically characterized neurological syndrome which is considered to be the result of immunopathological reactions mediated by L3T4+ T cells. It was shown that CsA displayed a strong protective effect on neurological complications when given at a dose 1 mg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days (Days 4-8), which had no effect on the parasite. Paradoxically, this protection against neurological complications was not seen when parasiticidal doses were used during this limited 5-day period. A similar protective effect was observed with two CsA derivatives, C5-34 and H7-94. The mechanisms by which CsA and the two derivatives could prevent murine cerebral malaria are unknown but can be related to exquisite effects on some lymphocyte functions. In view of these results, it might be conceivable to investigate the benefits of using low doses of CsA in man, in conjunction with the classical antiparasite therapy, for the management of cerebral malaria.

  13. Experimental immunologically mediated aplastic anemia (AA) in mice: cyclosporin A fails to protect against AA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knospe, W.H.; Steinberg, D.; Gratwohl, A.; Speck, B.

    1984-01-01

    Immunologically mediated aplastic anemia (AA) in mice was induced by the i.v. injection of 10(7) lymph node cells (LNC) from H-2k identical but Mls mismatched CBA/J donor mice into previously irradiated (600 rad total body gamma) C3H/HeJ mice. Cyclosporin A (CsA), 25 mg/kg, was administered subcutaneously from day -1 to day 30. Control mice included C3H/HeJ mice which received 600 rad alone, C3H/HeJ mice which received 600 rad plus CsA as above, and C3H/HeJ mice which received 600 rad total body irradiation followed by 10(7) LNC from CBA/J donors. CsA failed to prevent lethal AA. These results suggest that the pathogenetic mechanisms operating in immunologically mediated AA differ from the mechanisms operating in rodents transplanted with allogeneically mismatched marrow or spleen cells which develop graft-versus-host disease. The results are consistent with a non-T cell-dependent mechanism causing the AA

  14. Preparation, characterization and in silico modeling of biodegradable nanoparticles containing cyclosporine A and coenzyme Q10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankola, D D; Ravi Kumar, M N V [Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 27 Taylor Street, Glasgow, G4 0NR (United Kingdom); Durbin, E W [Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Buxton, G A [Department of Sciences, Robert Morris University, 6001 University Boulevard, Moon Township, PA 15108 (United States); Schaefer, J; Bakowsky, U, E-mail: mnvrkumar@strath.ac.uk [Department of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmacy, Philipps Universitt, 35037 Marburg (Germany)

    2010-02-10

    Combination therapy will soon become a reality, particularly for those patients requiring poly-therapy to treat co-existing disease states. This becomes all the more important with the increasing cost, time and complexity of the drug discovery process prompting one to look at new delivery systems to increase the efficacy, safety and patient compliance of existing drugs. Along this line, we attempted to design nano-scale systems for simultaneous encapsulation of cyclosporine A (CsA) and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and model their encapsulation and release kinetics. The in vitro characterization of the co-encapsulated nanoparticles revealed that the surfactant nature, concentration, external phase volume, droplet size reduction method and drug loading concentration can all influence the overall performance of the nanoparticles. The semi-quantitative solubility study indicates the strong influence of CoQ10 on CsA entrapment which was thought to be due to an increase in the lipophilicity of the overall system. The in vitro dissolution profile indicates the influence of CoQ10 on CsA release (64%) to that of individual particles of CsA, where the release is faster and higher (86%) on 18th day. The attempts to model the encapsulation and release kinetics were successful, offering a possibility to use such models leading to high throughput screening of drugs and their nature, alone or in combination for a particular polymer, if chi-parameters are understood.

  15. Prolongation of segmental and pancreaticoduodenal allografts in the primate with total-lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.; Louw, G.; Zuurmond, T.; Els, D.; Du Toit, L.B.; Weideman, A.; Davids, H.; van der Merwe, E.

    1987-09-01

    The prolongation of segmental and pancreaticoduodenal allografts (PDA) by total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and in combination with cyclosporine (CsA) was assessed in a well established total pancreatectomy, diabetic, primate transplantation model. Pancreatic transplantation was performed in 119 pancreatectomized baboons (Papio ursinus). Of a total of 109 allografts performed, 71 were segmental allografts (open duct drainage) and 38 PDA. Of 119 graft recipients, 10 received segmental pancreatic autografts. TLI and CsA administered separately to segmental allograft recipients resulted in modest allograft survival and indefinite graft survival was not observed. 8 of 17 (47%) segmental allograft recipients that received TLI and CsA had graft survival beyond 100 days, indicating highly significant pancreatic allograft survival. All long-term segmental allograft recipients were rendered normoglycemic (plasma glucose less than 8 mmol/L) by this immunosuppressive regimen. In contrast, poor results were observed in PDA recipients treated with TLI and CsA. Mean survival in 18 treated PDA recipients was 23.8 days, 8 survived longer than 20 days (44.4%), and 1 greater than 100 days (5.5%). Despite treatment, early rejection of the duodenum in PDA recipients frequently resulted in necrosis and perforation and contributed to a high morbidity and mortality. This study indicates that, in contrast to the significant prolongation of segmental allografts by TLI and CsA, poor immunosuppression was achieved by this regimen in PDA recipients and was associated with a high morbidity and mortality caused by early rejection of the duodenum.

  16. Prolongation of segmental and pancreaticoduodenal allografts in the primate with total-lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.

    1987-01-01

    The prolongation of segmental and pancreaticoduodenal allografts (PDA) by total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and in combination with cyclosporine (CsA) was assessed in a well established total pancreatectomy, diabetic, primate transplantation model. Pancreatic transplantation was performed in 119 pancreatectomized baboons (Papio ursinus). Of a total of 109 allografts performed, 71 were segmental allografts (open duct drainage) and 38 PDA. Of 119 graft recipients, 10 received segmental pancreatic autografts. TLI and CsA administered separately to segmental allograft recipients resulted in modest allograft survival and indefinite graft survival was not observed. 8 of 17 (47%) segmental allograft recipients that received TLI and CsA had graft survival beyond 100 days, indicating highly significant pancreatic allograft survival. All long-term segmental allograft recipients were rendered normoglycemic (plasma glucose less than 8 mmol/L) by this immunosuppressive regimen. In contrast, poor results were observed in PDA recipients treated with TLI and CsA. Mean survival in 18 treated PDA recipients was 23.8 days, 8 survived longer than 20 days (44.4%), and 1 greater than 100 days (5.5%). Despite treatment, early rejection of the duodenum in PDA recipients frequently resulted in necrosis and perforation and contributed to a high morbidity and mortality. This study indicates that, in contrast to the significant prolongation of segmental allografts by TLI and CsA, poor immunosuppression was achieved by this regimen in PDA recipients and was associated with a high morbidity and mortality caused by early rejection of the duodenum

  17. Elevating bioavailability of cyclosporine a via encapsulation in artificial oil bodies stabilized by caleosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Miles C M; Wang, Jui-Ling; Tzen, Jason T C

    2005-01-01

    To elevate its bioavailability via oral administration, cyclosporine A (CsA), a hydrophobic drug, was either incorporated into olive oil directly or encapsulated in artificial oil bodies (AOBs) constituted with olive oil and phospholipid in the presence or absence of recombinant caleosin purified from Escherichia coli. The bioavailabilities of CsA in these formulations were assessed in Wistar rats in comparison with the commercial formulation, Sandimmun Neoral. Among these tests, CsA-loaded AOBs stabilized by the recombinant caleosin exhibited better bioavailability than the commercial formulation and possessed the highest maximum whole blood concentration (C(max)), 1247.4 +/- 106.8 ng/mL, in the experimental animals 4.3 +/- 0.7 h (t(max)) after oral administration. C(max) and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC(0-24)) were individually increased by 50.8% and 71.3% in the rats fed with caleosin-stabilized AOBs when compared with those fed with the reference Sandimmun Neoral. The results suggest that constitution of AOBs stabilized by caleosin may be a suitable technique to encapsulate hydrophobic drugs for oral administration.

  18. Marrow transplantation for leukemia following fractionated total body irradiation. A comparative trial of methotrexate and cyclosporine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irle, C.; Deeg, H.J.; Buckner, C.D.; Swedish Hospital Medical Center, Seattle, WA; Veterans Administration Hospital, Seattle, WA; Washington Univ., Seattle

    1985-01-01

    Fifty-six patients, 30-47 yr of age, with leukemia in relapse received allogeneic marrow transplants from HLA-identical siblings. All patients were treated with cyclophosphamide (120 mg/kg) and 7 daily fractions of 2.25 Gy of total body irradiation (TBI) for seven consecutive days. Nine patients (16%) are currently alive, free of disease, 324-845 days from transplantation. Actuarial relapse and survival rates at 2 yr were 56% and 9.5% respectively. These data were not remarkably different from those in previous studies using 10 Gy of TBI administered as a single dose. Thirty patients were randomized to receive methotrexate (MTX) and 26 to receive cyclosporine (CSP) as postgrafting prophylaxis for acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Probability of developing significant acute GVHD by day 100 post-transplant was 71% for patients in the MTX group and 45% for patients in the CSP group (p<0.05). Probability of relapse was 37% for patients in the MTX group and 70% for patients in the CSP group (p<0.05). Transplant-related deaths were more frequent in the MTX group and leukemic deaths more frequent in the CSP group although this may have been related to an uneven distribution of high-risk patients. Long term disease-free survival was comparable. (author)

  19. Pulmonary infection in patients with cyclosporine, azathioprine, and corticosteroids after cardiac transplantation; Clinical and radiographic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murayama, Sadayuki; Ikezoe, Junpei; Godwin, J.D.; Marglin, S.I.; Allen, M.D. (University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1991-07-01

    Between November 1985 and November 1989, 54 patients have undergone 55 cardiac transplants, 5 of whom died during operation or one week after transplantation. The remaining 49 patients with a minimum follow-up of 5 months were studied to examine pulmonary infection clinically and radiologically while receiving triple drug immunosuppression consisting of cyclosporine, azathioprine, and prednisolone. Pulmonary infection occurred in 14 patients (29%) with a total of 21 occasions. Causative organisms were identified in 9 occasions, with the most common organism being Cytomegalovirus (CMV). One patient died of pulmonary infection with Aspergillus. Causative organisms occurring in the remaining 12 occasions of pulmonary infection were unknown, which did not lead to death. Because pulmonary infection of unknown organisms rapidly responded to convensional antibiotics, it seemed to have been caused by bacteria. Pulmonary infection of unknown organism occurred 13.2{+-}3.2 months after transplantation, as compared with 3.3{+-}1.0 months in pulmonary infection of known organisms. Chest plain radiographic features fell into four types: (1) interstitial shadow seen in pulmonary infection of CMV, Pneumocystis carinii, or Hemophilia influenza, (2) patchy, and basilar and lobular consolidation shadows in bacterial pneumonia, (3) localized nodular shadow in aspergillosis, and (4) multiple patchy and confluent opacity patterns occurring in herpes simplex viral infection. Pulmonary infection of influenza bacteria for one patient and pulmonary infection of unknown organisms for 4 patients were difficult to identify from pulmonary infection of CMV. (N.K.).

  20. Pulmonary infection in patients with cyclosporine, azathioprine, and corticosteroids after cardiac transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Sadayuki; Ikezoe, Junpei; Godwin, J.D.; Marglin, S.I.; Allen, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    Between November 1985 and November 1989, 54 patients have undergone 55 cardiac transplants, 5 of whom died during operation or one week after transplantation. The remaining 49 patients with a minimum follow-up of 5 months were studied to examine pulmonary infection clinically and radiologically while receiving triple drug immunosuppression consisting of cyclosporine, azathioprine, and prednisolone. Pulmonary infection occurred in 14 patients (29%) with a total of 21 occasions. Causative organisms were identified in 9 occasions, with the most common organism being Cytomegalovirus (CMV). One patient died of pulmonary infection with Aspergillus. Causative organisms occurring in the remaining 12 occasions of pulmonary infection were unknown, which did not lead to death. Because pulmonary infection of unknown organisms rapidly responded to convensional antibiotics, it seemed to have been caused by bacteria. Pulmonary infection of unknown organism occurred 13.2±3.2 months after transplantation, as compared with 3.3±1.0 months in pulmonary infection of known organisms. Chest plain radiographic features fell into four types: (1) interstitial shadow seen in pulmonary infection of CMV, Pneumocystis carinii, or Hemophilia influenza, (2) patchy, and basilar and lobular consolidation shadows in bacterial pneumonia, (3) localized nodular shadow in aspergillosis, and (4) multiple patchy and confluent opacity patterns occurring in herpes simplex viral infection. Pulmonary infection of influenza bacteria for one patient and pulmonary infection of unknown organisms for 4 patients were difficult to identify from pulmonary infection of CMV. (N.K.)

  1. Cyclosporine A administered during reperfusion fails to restore cardioprotection in prediabetic Zucker obese rats in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, R; Heinen, A; Hollmann, M W; Schlack, W; Preckel, B; Weber, N C

    2010-12-01

    Hyperglycaemia blocks sevoflurane-induced postconditioning, and cardioprotection in hyperglycaemic myocardium can be restored by inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). We investigated whether sevoflurane-induced postconditioning is also blocked in the prediabetic heart and if so, whether cardioprotection could be restored by inhibiting mPTP. Zucker lean (ZL) and Zucker obese (ZO) rats were assigned to one of seven groups. Animals underwent 25 min of ischaemia and 120 min of reperfusion. Control (ZL-/ZO Con) animals were not further treated. postconditioning groups (ZL-/ZO Sevo-post) received sevoflurane for 5 min starting 1min prior to the onset of reperfusion. The mPTP inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) was administered intravenously in a concentration of 5 (ZO CsA and ZO CsA+Sevo-post) or 10 mg/kg (ZO CsA10+Sevo-post) 5 min before the onset of reperfusion. At the end of reperfusion, infarct sizes were measured by TTC staining. Blood samples were collected to measure plasma levels of insulin, cholesterol and triglycerides. Sevoflurane postconditioning reduced infarct size in ZL rats to 35±12% (pfailed to restore cardioprotection in the prediabetic but normoglycaemic heart of Zucker obese rats in vivo. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute administration of cyclosporine A does not impair attention or memory performance in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Anna L; Kirchhof, Julia; Füting, Anna; Hütter, Bernd-Otto; Wilde, Benjamin; Witzke, Oliver; Benson, Sven; Hadamitzky, Martin; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2017-06-01

    There is clinical and experimental evidence that treatment with immunosuppressive and antiproliferative drugs such as the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) is associated with mental health problems and neuropsychological disturbances in patients. However, it remains unclear whether and to what extent cognitive functions such as memory and attention processes are affected by the pharmacological treatment. This is partly because of the fact that it is difficult to refer the observed neuropsychological disturbances in patients to the drug itself, to drug-induced immune suppression, or to interaction with other medication or comorbidities. Thus, in a double-blind study with healthy male participants (n=30), we investigated whether short-term intake of therapeutic doses of CsA (4×2.5 mg/kg) affects attention, working memory performance, and anxiety levels, measured with the Tests of Attentional Performance and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. The data indicate that short-term CsA-administration and subsequent suppression in interleukin-2 production are accompanied neither by a decrease in attention or memory performance nor by increased anxiety levels in healthy male volunteers, suggesting that the short-term intake of CsA does not impair cognitive functioning. Further studies in healthy humans are needed to determine neurocognitive functions and mood states after short-term or subchronic treatment with different immunosuppressive and antiproliferative drugs.

  3. Self-assembling colloidal system for the ocular administration of cyclosporine A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luschmann, Christoph; Tessmar, Joerg; Schoeberl, Simon; Strauß, Olaf; Luschmann, Karl; Goepferich, Achim

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we developed a self-assembling micellar system to deliver cyclosporine A (CsA) in an aqueous solution to the cornea. Two nonionic surfactants of the poly(ethylene glycol)-fatty alcohol ether type (Sympatens AS and Sympatens ACS) were characterized in terms of micelle size, shape, and charge, and their encapsulation efficiency for CsA. In an in situ single dose bioavailability study, the corneal CsA levels were determined in an enucleated porcine eye model. A commercial formulation and a 2% CsA olive oil solution served as references. Both surfactants formed spherical micelles with a size of 9 to 12 nm in water. A concentration as low as 0.3% (wt/vol) Sympatens AS was sufficient to entrap therapeutic levels of at least 0.1% (wt/vol) CsA. In the porcine in situ model, exceptionally high drug levels in the cornea were obtained for the micellar CsA solution (1557 ± 407 ngCsA/gcornea). They were significantly higher than those of Restasis (545 ± 137 ngCsA/gcornea) or the olive oil solution (452 ± 142 ngCsA/gcornea). In conclusion, we have shown a promising simple and efficient approach for the application of CsA in an aqueous solution to the cornea to treat inflammatory corneal diseases.

  4. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Ameliorate Cyclosporine A-Induced Hypertension in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasson, Valorie L; Bounds, Kelsey R; Chatterjee, Piyali; Manandhar, Lochana; Pakanati, Abhinandan R; Hernandez, Marcos; Aziz, Bilal; Mitchell, Brett M

    2018-01-01

    The calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) suppresses the immune system but promotes hypertension, vascular dysfunction, and renal damage. CsA decreases regulatory T cells and this contributes to the development of hypertension. However, CsA's effects on another important regulatory immune cell subset, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), is unknown. We hypothesized that augmenting MDSCs would ameliorate the CsA-induced hypertension and vascular and renal injury and dysfunction and that CsA reduces MDSCs in mice. Daily interleukin-33 treatment, which increased MDSC levels, completely prevented CsA-induced hypertension and vascular and renal toxicity. Adoptive transfer of MDSCs from control mice into CsA-treated mice after hypertension was established dose-dependently reduced blood pressure and vascular and glomerular injury. CsA treatment of aortas and kidneys isolated from control mice for 24 hours decreased relaxation responses and increased inflammation, respectively, and these effects were prevented by the presence of MDSCs. MDSCs also prevented the CsA-induced increase in fibronectin in microvascular and glomerular endothelial cells. Last, CsA dose-dependently reduced the number of MDSCs by inhibiting calcineurin and preventing cell proliferation, as other direct calcineurin signaling pathway inhibitors had the same dose-dependent effect. These data suggest that augmenting MDSCs can reduce the cardiovascular and renal toxicity and hypertension caused by CsA. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Reduced bioavailability of cyclosporine A in rats by mung bean seed coat extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiping Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mung bean seed coat (MBSC is a healthcare product in Asian countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an MBSC ethanol extract on the bioavailability of cyclosporine A (CsA in rats. Rats were orally dosed with CsA alone or in combination with MBSC ethanol extracts (500 mg/kg, p.o.. The blood levels of CsA were assayed by liquid chromatography with an electrospray ionization source and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. The everted rat intestinal sac technique was used to determine the influence of MBSC on the absorption of CsA. The results reveal that combined CsA intake with MBSC decreased the Cmax, AUC0-t, t1/2z and MRT0-t values of CsA by 24.96%, 47.28%, 34.73% and 23.58%, respectively (P<0.05, and significantly raised the CL/F by 51.97% (P<0.01. The in vitro results demonstrated that significantly less CsA was absorbed (P<0.05. The overall results indicate that after being concomitantly ingested, MBSC reduced the bioavailability of CsA, at least partially, in the absorption phase.

  6. Bone metabolism in renal transplant patients treated with cyclosporine or sirolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campistol, Josep M; Holt, David W; Epstein, Solomon; Gioud-Paquet, Martine; Rutault, Karine; Burke, James T

    2005-09-01

    Sirolimus is a new immunosuppressive agent used as treatment to prevent acute renal allograft rejection. One of the complications of renal transplantation and subsequent long-term immunosuppression is bone loss associated with osteoporosis and consequent fracture. Two open-label, randomized, phase 2 studies comparing sirolimus versus cyclosporine (CsA) included indices of bone metabolism as secondary end-points. Markers of bone turnover, serum osteocalcin and urinary N-telopeptides, were measured over a 1-year period in 115 patients receiving either CsA or sirolimus as a primary therapy in combination with azathioprine and glucocorticoids (study A) or mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and glucocorticoids (study B). Urinary excretion of N-telopeptides and the concentrations of serum osteocalcin were consistently higher in the CsA-treated patients and significantly different at week 24 for N-telopeptides and at weeks 12, 24, and 52 for osteocalcin. In conclusion, future trials are warranted to test whether a sirolimus-based regimen conserves bone mineral density compared with a CsA-based regimen.

  7. Renal tolerance for iopromide (ultravist) in patients with chronic renal failure. Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golebiowski, M.; Pruszynski, B.

    1993-01-01

    The authors present the renal tolerance for nonionic low-osmotic contrast agent iopromide (ultravist) on the ground of literature and of angiographic examinations in 10 patients with chronic renal failure. One patient only had significant temporary deterioration of renal function. The presented results showed that analyzed agent is less nephrotoxic than high osmolality contrast agents. The use of iopromide is strongly recommended in patients with chronic renal failure. The risk of depression of renal function after administration of contrast material is minimized. (author)

  8. Gene expression analysis reveals new possible mechanisms of vancomycin-induced nephrotoxicity and identifies gene markers candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Christine; Puey, Angela; Lin, Sylvia; Lyn, Sylvia; Swezey, Robert; Furimsky, Anna; Fairchild, David; Mirsalis, Jon C; Ng, Hanna H

    2009-01-01

    Vancomycin, one of few effective treatments against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, is nephrotoxic. The goals of this study were to (1) gain insights into molecular mechanisms of nephrotoxicity at the genomic level, (2) evaluate gene markers of vancomycin-induced kidney injury, and (3) compare gene expression responses after iv and ip administration. Groups of six female BALB/c mice were treated with seven daily iv or ip doses of vancomycin (50, 200, and 400 mg/kg) or saline, and sacrificed on day 8. Clinical chemistry and histopathology demonstrated kidney injury at 400 mg/kg only. Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed that kidney gene expression profiles of all mice treated at 400 mg/kg clustered with those of mice administered 200 mg/kg iv. Transcriptional profiling might thus be more sensitive than current clinical markers for detecting kidney damage, though the profiles can differ with the route of administration. Analysis of transcripts whose expression was changed by at least twofold compared with vehicle saline after high iv and ip doses of vancomycin suggested the possibility of oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in vancomycin-induced toxicity. In addition, our data showed changes in expression of several transcripts from the complement and inflammatory pathways. Such expression changes were confirmed by relative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Finally, our results further substantiate the use of gene markers of kidney toxicity such as KIM-1/Havcr1, as indicators of renal injury.

  9. Involvement of oxidative stress in the mechanism of p,p'-DDT-induced nephrotoxicity in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouani, Neila; Hallegue, Dorsaf; Sakly, Mohsen; Benkhalifa, Moncef; Ben Rhouma, Khémais; Tebourbi, Olfa

    2017-07-01

    The 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl) ethane (p,p'-DDT) is an organochlorine pesticide that persists in the environment and has a risk to human health. We investigated whether p,p'-DDT-induces nephrotoxicity in rats and whether oxidative stress and apoptosis are involved in the pathogenesis of this process. Male rats received the pesticide at doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg for 10 days. Renal damage was evaluated by histopathological examination and serum markers. The oxidative stress was evaluated by lipid peroxidation (LPO), metallothioneins (MTs) and protein carbonyl levels. Antioxidant enzymes were assessed by determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities. Glutathione-dependent enzymes and reducing power in kidney were evaluated by glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities. Renal tubular cells apoptosis was assessed through the TUNEL assay. After 10 days of treatment, an increase of serum creatinine and urea levels occurred, LPO and protein carbonyl levels were increased, while MTs level, SOD and CAT activities were decreased. Besides, the GPx, GR, GST, and GSH activities were decreased. Histological alterations in kidney tissue and intense apoptosis in renal tubular cells were observed. These results suggest that DDT sub-acute treatment causes oxidative stress and apoptosis, which may be the chief mechanisms of DDT-induced nephrotoxicity.

  10. Effect of high saturated free fatty acids feeding on progression of renal failure in rat model of experimental nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid O. Ibraheem

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The current study evaluates the impact of high saturated fat feeding in rat model of experimental nephrotoxicity induced by gentamicin. Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200 g were randomized into four groups; the first one received the standard rodents chow for 8 weeks and was treated as control, the second group (HFDreceived an experimental high fat diet rich in palm kernel oil (40% of Calories as fat for the same period. The third group (HFDG was given 80 mg/kg (body weight/day gentamicin sulphate intraperitoneally during the last 24 days of the feeding period while the fourth group was given gentamicin as above along with the standard rodents chow. Renal function was assessed through measuring serum creatinine, creatinine clearance and absolute and fractional excretion of both sodium and potassium. At the end, rats underwent a surgical procedure for blood pressure measurement. Renal function study showed a stronger nephrotoxicity for HFDG group. Hypertension was observed in HFD group while the pressure declined after gentamicin co-administration. Overall, changing the feeding behavior toward using more SAFFAs for rats injected with gentamicin promotes the progression of renal failure.

  11. Kidney-on-a-Chip: a New Technology for Predicting Drug Efficacy, Interactions, and Drug-induced Nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeonghwan; Kim, Sejoong

    2018-03-08

    The kidneys play a pivotal role in most drug-removal processes and are important when evaluating drug safety. Kidney dysfunction resulting from various drugs is an important issue in clinical practice and during the drug development process. Traditional in vivo animal experiments are limited with respect to evaluating drug efficacy and nephrotoxicity due to discrepancies in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics between humans and animals, and static cell culture experiments cannot fully reflect the actual microphysiological environment in humans. A kidney-on-a-chip is a microfluidic device that allows the culture of living renal cells in 3-dimensional channels and mimics the human microphysiological environment, thus simulating the actual drug filtering, absorption, and secretion process.. In this review, we discuss recent developments in microfluidic culturing technique and describe current and future kidney-on-a-chip applications. We focus on pharmacological interactions and drug-induced nephrotoxicity, and additionally discuss the development of multi-organ chips and their possible applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Evaluation of the Protective Role of Glycine max Seed Extract (Soybean Oil) in Drug-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Experimental Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Anand; Jothivel, Nandhakumar; Das, Saibal; Swapna, A; Albert, Alice Padmini; Barnwal, Preeti; Babu, Dinesh

    2017-09-28

    This study was conducted to evaluate the nephroprotective effect of Glycine max seed extract (soybean oil) against gentamicin- and rifampicin-induced nephrotoxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare its effects with those of vitamin E, which has well-established antioxidant and nephroprotective effects. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats (body weight 150-210 g) were divided into 10 groups. The first five groups were treated for 14 consecutive days with normal saline (5 ml/kg, by mouth [p.o.]); gentamicin (80 mg/kg intraperitoneally [i.p.]); gentamicin (80 mg/kg, i.p.) + vitamin E (250 mg/kg p.o.); gentamicin (80 mg/kg i.p.) + soybean oil (2.5 ml/kg p.o.); and gentamicin (80 mg/kg, i.p.) + soybean oil (5 ml/kg p.o.), respectively. For the next five groups, the same group allocation was done, but gentamicin was replaced with rifampicin (1 g/kg i.p.). Various biomarkers for nephrotoxicity in serum and urine were evaluated along with histopathological examination of kidneys. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was done following Tukey's multiple comparison test; p Soybean oil in both doses significantly (p Soybean oil also showed strong antioxidant effects, causing significant (p Soybean oil demonstrated good nephroprotective activity due to antioxidant effects.

  13. Effect of cyclosporin A administration on the biodistribution and multipinhole {mu}SPECT imaging of [{sup 123}I]R91150 in rodent brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanckaert, P.; Burvenich, I.; Bruyne, S. de; Moerman, L.; Wyffels, L.; Vos, F. de [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent University, Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, Gent (Belgium); Staelens, S. [Ghent University - IBBT, MEDISIP, Faculty of Engineering, Gent (Belgium)

    2009-03-15

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is an efflux protein found amongst other locations in the blood-brain barrier. It is important to investigate the effect of Pgp modulation on clinically used brain tracers, because brain uptake of the tracer can be altered by blocking of the Pgp efflux transporter. The function of Pgp can be blocked with cyclosporin A. We investigated the effect of cyclosporin A administration on the biodistribution of [{sup 123}I]R91150 in rodents, and the effect of Pgp blocking on the quality of multipinhole {mu}SPECT imaging with [{sup 123}I]R91150. The influence of increasing doses of cyclosporin A on the brain uptake of [{sup 123}I]R91150 was investigated in NMRI mice. A biodistribution study with [{sup 123}I]R91150 was performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats pretreated with cyclosporin A and not pretreated. Brain uptake of [{sup 123}I]R91150 after cyclosporin A injection was compared to the brain uptake in untreated animals, and a displacement study with ketanserin was performed in both groups. A multipinhole {mu}SPECT brain imaging study was also performed using a Milabs U-SPECT-II camera in male Sprague-Dawley rats. To exclude the effect of possible metabolites, a metabolite study was also performed. At the highest cyclosporin A dose (50 mg/kg), a sevenfold increase in brain radioactivity concentration was observed in NMRI mice. Also, a dose-response relationship was established between the dose of cyclosporin A and the brain uptake of [{sup 123}I]R91150 in mice. Compared to the control group, a five-fold increase in [{sup 123}I]R91150 radioactivity concentration was observed in the brain of Sprague-Dawley rats after cyclosporin A treatment (50 mg/kg). Radioactivity concentration in the frontal cortex increased from 0.24{+-}0.0092 to 1.58{+-}0.097% injected dose per gram of tissue after treatment with cyclosporin A (at the 1-h time-point). Blood radioactivity concentrations did not increase to the same extent. The cortical activity was displaced by

  14. A novel approach to contrast-induced nephrotoxicity: the melatonergic agent agomelatine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Adem; Diyarbakir, Busra; Kose, Duygu; Özbek-Bilgin, Asli; Topcu, Atilla; Gundogdu, Cemal; Durur-Karakaya, Afak; Bayraktutan, Zafer; Alper, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the potential nephroprotective role of agomelatine in rat renal tissue in cases of contrast-induced nephrotoxicity (CIN). The drug's action on the antioxidant system and proinflammatory cytokines, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, levels of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) and the gene expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) was measured. Tubular necrosis and hyaline and haemorrhagic casts were also histopathologically evaluated. Methods: The institutional ethics and local animal care committees approved the study. Eight groups of six rats were put on the following drug regimens: Group 1: healthy controls, Group 2: GLY (glycerol), Group 3: CM (contrast media—iohexol 10 ml kg−1), Group 4: GLY+CM, Group 5: CM+AGO20 (agomelatine 20 mg kg−1), Group 6: GLY+CM+AGO20, Group 7: CM+AGO40 (agomelatine 40 mg kg−1) and Group 8: GLY+CM+AGO40. The groups were evaluated by one-way analysis of variance and Duncan's multiple comparison test. Results: Agomelatine administration significantly improved the serum levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine, SOD activity, GSH and MDA. The use of agomelatine had substantial downregulatory consequences on TNF-α, NF-κB and IL-6 messenger RNA levels. Mild-to-severe hyaline and haemorrhagic casts and tubular necrosis were observed in all groups, except in the healthy group. The histopathological scores were better in the agomelatine treatment groups. Conclusion: Agomelatine has nephroprotective effects against CIN in rats. This effect can be attributed to its properties of reducing oxidative stress and inhibiting the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (NF-κB, TNF-α and IL-6). Advances in knowledge: CIN is one of the most important adverse effects of radiological procedures. Renal failure, diabetes, malignancy, old age and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use pose the risk of CIN in patients. Several

  15. Effects of royal jelly on genotoxicity and nephrotoxicity induced by valproic acid in albino mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa R. Galaly

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases affecting at least 50 million people worldwide. Valproic acid (VPA is a widely used antiepileptic medication for both generalized and partial seizures of epilepsy. The objective of the study was to investigate the anti-mutagenic and anti-histopathologic effects of royal jelly (RJ on VPA-induced genotoxicity and nephrotoxicity in male albino mice (Mus musculus. 80 Mice were used for 21 days; they were divided into eight groups, (G1 served as normal control group, G2 received VPA (100 mg/kg and (G3–G5 received RJ at doses 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg respectively. While (G6–G8 were administrated RJ simultaneously with VPA. In RJ treated mice at doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg, the kidney sections showed normal histological structure with non significant changes in chromosomal aberrations (CA and mitotic index (MI, while RJ at dose of 200 mg/kg showed mild inflammatory cells infiltration and hyperemic glomeruli but not highly significant changes in CA and MI. The cortex of VPA treated mice revealed congested glomeruli with inflammatory cells infiltration, and marked degeneration of almost structures of the glomeruli including some vacuoles in mesangial cells with dark mesangial substances on the ultrastructure level. Some proximal tubules showed degeneration of microvilli on the apical parts of some cells. Cells of the distal tubules attained obliterated lumen and vacuolated lining epithelium. The results also revealed that valproic acid induced a high frequency of CA in bone marrow cells of mice and MI was significantly decreased indicating bone marrow cytotoxicity. The treatment of mice with RJ at doses 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg for 21 days simultaneously with VPA resulted in abating the histological alterations in renal tissues with significant reduction in chromosomal aberrations, for doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg, and elevation in mitotic index (P < 0.05. RJ at doses 50 and 100 mg/kg appeared

  16. Environmental exposure to low-doses of ionizing radiation. Effects on early nephrotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellés, Montserrat; Gonzalo, Sergio; Serra, Noemí; Esplugas, Roser; Arenas, Meritxell; Domingo, José Luis; Linares, Victoria

    2017-07-01

    mechanisms involved in the internal IR-induced nephrotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Protective Effect of Rosemary (Rosmarinus Officinalis Extract on Naphthalene Induced Nephrotoxicity in Adult Male Albino Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neveen M. El-Sherif

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Naphthalene (NA is a common environmental contaminant and is abundant in tobacco smoke. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis is a herb commonly used as a spice and flavoring agents in food processing and is useful in the treatment of many diseases. Aim of the work: To study the nephrotoxicity of NA and to evaluate the possible protective role of rosemary extract in adult male albino rat. Materials and Methods: 25 animals were divided into three groups: Group I (Control group, Group II (NA treated group received NA at a dose of 200 mg/kg/day dissolved in 5 ml/kg corn oil orally by gastric tube, Group III (protected group received rosemary extract (10 ml/kg/day followed after 60 min by NA at the same previous dose orally by gastric tube. The experiment lasted 30 days. The following parameters were studied: Biochemical assessment of renal function, histological, immunohistochemical, morphometric studies and statistical analysis of the results. Results: NA treatment resulted in a highly significant increase in the mean values of serum urea and creatinine. NA induced histological changes in the form of glomerular congestion. Some glomeruli demonstrated marked mesangial expansion and hence that Bowman's spaces were almost completely obliterated. Shrinkage of renal glomeruli with widening of Bowman's spaces could also be seen. Focal tubular dilatation with appearance of casts inside the tubules was observed. Congested peritubular blood vessels and interstitial hemorrhage were also seen. The medullary region demonstrated vascular congestion and fibrosis. Focal cellular infiltration was presented in the interstitium. The renal cortex of NA treated rats showed a noticeable down regulation in alkaline phosphatase positive immunoreactive cells in some proximal convoluted tubules. NA induced up regulation of positive immunoreaction for inducible nitric oxide synthase in the proximal and distal convoluted tubules as well as in the collecting tubules

  18. Effects of Storage Temperature and Time on Stability of Serum Tacrolimus and Cyclosporine A Levels in Whole Blood by LC-MS/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Kaplan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tacrolimus and cyclosporine A are immunosuppressant drugs with narrow therapeutic windows. The aim of this study was to investigate the stability of tacrolimus and cyclosporin A levels in whole blood samples under different storage conditions. Whole blood samples were obtained from 15 patients receiving tacrolimus and 15 patients receiving cyclosporine A. Samples were immediately analyzed and then stored at different conditions (room temperature (24°C−26°C for 24 hours, +4°C for 24 and 48 hours, and −20°C for one month and then analyzed again. For tacrolimus, there was a significant difference between samples analyzed immediately and those kept 24 hours at room temperature (P=0.005 (percent change 32.89%. However, there were no significant differences between the other groups. For cyclosporine A, there was a significant difference between samples analyzed immediately and those kept 24 hours (P=0.003 (percent change 19.47% and 48 hours (P=0.002 (percent change 15.38% at +4°C and those kept 24 hours at room temperature (P=0.011 (percent change 9.71%. Samples of tacrolimus should be analyzed immediately or stored at either +4°C or −20°C, while samples of cyclosporine A should be analyzed immediately or stored at −20°C.

  19. Abnormalities of the breast in chronic renal failure and renal transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bae Young; Kim, Hak Hee; Choi, Kyu Ho; Park, Seog Hee [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    Manifestations of breast abnormalities in these patients included breast calcifications, duct dilatation, fibrocystic change, rapidly enlarged multiple fibroadenomas, edema, invasive ductal cancer, extensive fibrosis, spontaneous hemorrhage, and Mondor's disease. These interesting cases we experienced are reported. Prolactin, growth hormone, and cortisol are required concurrently for normal development of mammary epithelium. Hormonal profile of chronic renal failure is different to normal person due to decreased renal clearance. The incidence of breast cancer is also increased in CRF. Metastatic soft tissue calcification is well described finding in chronic renal failure related to an increase in serum calcium phosphate product and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Kidney failure alone may increases prolactin level. The possibility of deranged hypothalamic-pituitary control mechanisms do not excluded. Impaired prolactin response to TRH stimulation has also been observed. Methyldopa and tricyclic antidepressants specifically were associated with hyperprolactinemia. Cyclosporin administration may elevate serum prolactin levels with simultaneous down regulation of prolactin receptors. Some populations of lymphocytes and fibroblasts exhibit cyclosporin receptors. Cyclosporin could potentially promote fibroadenomas by direct action, and seems to alter LH secretion.

  20. Abnormalities of the breast in chronic renal failure and renal transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bae Young; Kim, Hak Hee; Choi, Kyu Ho; Park, Seog Hee

    2000-01-01

    Manifestations of breast abnormalities in these patients included breast calcifications, duct dilatation, fibrocystic change, rapidly enlarged multiple fibroadenomas, edema, invasive ductal cancer, extensive fibrosis, spontaneous hemorrhage, and Mondor's disease. These interesting cases we experienced are reported. Prolactin, growth hormone, and cortisol are required concurrently for normal development of mammary epithelium. Hormonal profile of chronic renal failure is different to normal person due to decreased renal clearance. The incidence of breast cancer is also increased in CRF. Metastatic soft tissue calcification is well described finding in chronic renal failure related to an increase in serum calcium phosphate product and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Kidney failure alone may increases prolactin level. The possibility of deranged hypothalamic-pituitary control mechanisms do not excluded. Impaired prolactin response to TRH stimulation has also been observed. Methyldopa and tricyclic antidepressants specifically were associated with hyperprolactinemia. Cyclosporin administration may elevate serum prolactin levels with simultaneous down regulation of prolactin receptors. Some populations of lymphocytes and fibroblasts exhibit cyclosporin receptors. Cyclosporin could potentially promote fibroadenomas by direct action, and seems to alter LH secretion.

  1. Outcome of children with severe acquired aplastic anemia treated with rabbit antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Pereira Garanito

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the outcome of children with severe acquired aplastic anemia treated with rabbit antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine as first-line treatment at this institution. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 26 pediatric patients with aplastic anemia, treated between 1996 and 2011 with rabbit antithymocyte globulin plus cyclosporine. Results: The overall response rate at six months was 34.6% (9/26, and the cumulative incidence of relapse was 26.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4%-66% at 5 years. The cumulative incidence of clonal evolution after immunosuppressive therapy was 8.3% (95% CI: 0.001%-53.7% at five years with both clonal evolutions in non -responders who acquired monosomy 7 karyotype. The overall survival at five years was 73.6% (95% CI: 49.2%-87.5%. Conclusions: The present results confirm the poor response rate with rabbit antithymocyte globulin as first therapy in pediatrics patients, similar to what has been reported for patients of all ages. This confirmation is problematic in Brazil, given the lack of horse antithymocyte globulin in many markets outside the United States. Resumo: Objetivo: Avaliar o resultado de crianças com anemia aplástica grave adquirida tratadas com globulina antitimocítica de coelho e ciclosporina como tratamento inicial em nosso instituto. Métodos: Análise retrospectiva de 26 pacientes pediátricos com anemia aplástica tratados entre 1996 e 2011 com globulina antitimocítica de coelho e ciclosporina. Resultados: A taxa de resposta geral em seis meses foi de 34,6% (9/26, e a incidência acumulada de recorrência foi de 26,5% (intervalo de confiança [IC] de 95%,1,4%-66% em cinco anos. A incidência acumulada de evolução clonal após a terapia imunossupressora foi de 8,3% (IC 95%, 0,001%-53,7% em cinco anos, com ambas as evoluções clonais em pacientes sem resposta que adquiriram o cariótipo com monossomia 7. A sobrevida geral em cinco anos foi de 73,6% (IC 95%, 49

  2. Effects of sirolimus alone or in combination with cyclosporine A on renal ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.J. Pereira

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcineurin inhibitors exacerbate ischemic injury in transplanted kidneys, but it is not known if sirolimus protects or exacerbates the transplanted kidney from ischemic injury. We determined the effects of sirolimus alone or in combination with cyclosporin A (CsA on oxygenated and hypoxic/reoxygenated rat proximal tubules in the following in vitro groups containing 6-9 rats per group: sirolimus (10, 50, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 ηg/mL; CsA (100 µg/mL; sirolimus (50 and 250 ηg/mL + CsA (100 µg/mL; control; vehicle (20% ethanol. For in vivo studies, 3-week-old Wistar rats (150-250 g were submitted to left nephrectomy and 30-min renal artery clamping. Renal function and histological evaluation were performed 24 h and 7 days after ischemia (I in five groups: sham, I, I + SRL (3 mg·kg-1·day-1, po, I + CsA (3 mg·kg-1·day-1, sc, I + SRL + CsA. Sirolimus did not injure oxygenated or hypoxic/reoxygenated proximal tubules and did not potentiate the tubular toxic effects of CsA. Neither drug affected the glomerular filtration rate (GFR at 24 h. GFR was reduced in CsA-treated rats on day 7 (0.5 ± 0.1 mL/min but not in rats receiving sirolimus + CsA (0.8 ± 0.1 mL/min despite the reduction in renal blood flow (3.9 ± 0.5 mL/min. Acute tubular necrosis regeneration was similar for all groups. Sirolimus alone was not toxic and did not enhance hypoxia/reoxygenation injury or CsA toxicity to proximal tubules. Despite its hemodynamic effects, sirolimus protected post-ischemic kidneys against CsA toxicity.

  3. The effect of cyclosporin A on the primary immune response to allogeneic red cells in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G N

    1982-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CSA) has been used in an attempt to suppress the primary immune response of HgA(A)-negative rabbits to A-positive red cells. The immune response was assessed by measuring the survival of a small intravenous (i.v.) dose of 51Cr-labelled A-positive cells and by testing the serum of the immunized rabbits for anti-A. In one experiment, eight A-negative rabbits were given a first i.v. injection of A-positive red cells, and CSA (25 mg/kg/day) in olive oil was given by mouth for 17-34 days. There was no evidence of impaired alloimmunization compared with the responses in control animals treated with olive oil alone. In a second experiment, eight A-negative rabbits were given a first injection of A-positive muscularly (i.m.), and CSA (25 mg/kg/day) in miglyol was given by im.m. injection for 10 days. Six of these rabbits were rendered unresponsive, and the remaining two, who showed impaired survival of the monitoring red cells, produced only low anit-A titres. Seven out of eight controls given i.m. miglyol without CSA responded with good anti-A production. Rabbits that were unresponsive to A-positive red cells responded normally to sheep red blood cells 15 weeks after CSA treatment. Higher serum levels of CSA were found following i.m. administration of the drug but treatment by this route as associated with severe toxicity in some rabbits. PMID:7056563

  4. Congenital nephrotic syndrome may respond to cyclosporine A: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulić Bilsana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNF is manifested at birth or within the first three months of life. The Finnish-type of CNF is caused by the mutation of the NPHS1 gene, which encodes nephrin in the podocyte slit diaphragm. It is a very severe disease, for which immunosuppressive therapy is not advised. Here we describe a patient with CNF who responded to CsA by partial remission. Case outline. A girl aged 2.5 months presented with severe non-syndromic steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. She needed aggressive support including daily albumin infusions and diuretics. Substitution of vitamin D, thyroxin, and anticoagulants were regularly administered. She was also treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, without clear benefits regarding proteinuria. In addition, she received intravenous gamma-globulin replacement therapy and antibiotics during frequent infections. While waiting for the results of genetic analyses and faced with many problems related to daily albumin infusions, infections, and thromboembolic complications, cyclosporine A (CsA was introduced as an alternative to early nephrectomy and consequent renal failure. The patient responded by partial remission and CsA treatment continued at home without the albumin infusions. After almost five years since the beginning of the treatment, the patient’s renal function remains unreduced. Conclusion. Our case demonstrates that CsA can induce partial remission in patients with genetic forms of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome without influencing the glomerular filtration rate. However, its long-term effect and safety should carefully be monitored. [Project of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of Republic of Serbia, Grant No. 175079

  5. Eosinophils, pruritus and psoriasis: effects of treatment with etretinate or cyclosporin-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, R E; Hultsch, T; Lotz, J; Bräutigam, M

    1998-11-01

    The antipsoriatic drugs cyclosporin A (CyA) and etretinate have been found to influence proinflammatory eosinophilic leukocytes and pruritus. We compared the number of blood eosinophils, concentration of serum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), and pruritus in patients with psoriasis treated with either CyA or etretinate. Patients with psoriasis vulgaris were randomly assigned to treatment for 10 weeks with either CyA (n = 21) or etretinate (n = 10). The psoriasis area-and-severity index (PASI-score) and pruritus (according to a 0-3 scale) served as clinical parameters, the blood esosinophil counts (Coulter Counter) and the serum ECP (RIA, Pharmacia) as laboratory parameters. After CyA treatment the PASI-score amounted to 24 +/- 4%, after etretinate to 56 +/- 6% of the initial values (mean +/- SEM). One week after CyA treatment, esosinophils dropped from 190 +/- 21 to 137 +/- 16/microliter (P = 0.038, Wilcoxon test), after 10 weeks to 127 +/- 18/microliter (P = 0.006). By contrast, under etretinate blood eosinophil counts only changed marginally. Before treatment, ECP concentrations of 15.71 +/- 1.30 (CyA) and 15.3 +/- 5.53 micrograms/l (etretinate) were measured (normal range 3-16 micrograms/l), ECP remained constant under both CyA and etretinate or tended to increase after 10 weeks; about 50% of the patients exhibited elevated ECP concentrations. Pruritus diminished more with CyA than etretinate therapy. PASI-scores and pruritus were directly proportional. We conclude that treatment of psoriasis with CyA leads to a rapid drop of blood eosinophils and that the activation state of eosinophils does not decrease after antipsoriatic treatment. Pruritus in psoriasis is coupled to disease severity. The underlying antipsoriatic mechanisms of CyA may be linked to lowering the number of blood eosinophils.

  6. Synergistic inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, tube formation, and sprouting by cyclosporin A and itraconazole.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A Nacev

    Full Text Available Pathological angiogenesis contributes to a number of diseases including cancer and macular degeneration. Although angiogenesis inhibitors are available in the clinic, their efficacy against most cancers is modest due in part to the existence of alternative and compensatory signaling pathways. Given that angiogenesis is dependent on multiple growth factors and a broad signaling network in vivo, we sought to explore the potential of multidrug cocktails for angiogenesis inhibition. We have screened 741 clinical drug combinations for the synergistic inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. We focused specifically on existing clinical drugs since the re-purposing of clinical drugs allows for a more rapid and cost effective transition to clinical studies when compared to new drug entities. Our screen identified cyclosporin A (CsA, an immunosuppressant, and itraconazole, an antifungal drug, as a synergistic pair of inhibitors of endothelial cell proliferation. In combination, the IC(50 dose of each drug is reduced by 3 to 9 fold. We also tested the ability of the combination to inhibit endothelial cell tube formation and sprouting, which are dependent on two essential processes in angiogenesis, endothelial cell migration and differentiation. We found that CsA and itraconazole synergistically inhibit tube network size and sprout formation. Lastly, we tested the combination on human foreskin fibroblast viability as well as Jurkat T cell and HeLa cell proliferation, and found that endothelial cells are selectively targeted. Thus, it is possible to combine existing clinical drugs to synergistically inhibit in vitro models of angiogenesis. This strategy may be useful in pursuing the next generation of antiangiogenesis therapy.

  7. Synergistic inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, tube formation, and sprouting by cyclosporin A and itraconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacev, Benjamin A; Liu, Jun O

    2011-01-01

    Pathological angiogenesis contributes to a number of diseases including cancer and macular degeneration. Although angiogenesis inhibitors are available in the clinic, their efficacy against most cancers is modest due in part to the existence of alternative and compensatory signaling pathways. Given that angiogenesis is dependent on multiple growth factors and a broad signaling network in vivo, we sought to explore the potential of multidrug cocktails for angiogenesis inhibition. We have screened 741 clinical drug combinations for the synergistic inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. We focused specifically on existing clinical drugs since the re-purposing of clinical drugs allows for a more rapid and cost effective transition to clinical studies when compared to new drug entities. Our screen identified cyclosporin A (CsA), an immunosuppressant, and itraconazole, an antifungal drug, as a synergistic pair of inhibitors of endothelial cell proliferation. In combination, the IC(50) dose of each drug is reduced by 3 to 9 fold. We also tested the ability of the combination to inhibit endothelial cell tube formation and sprouting, which are dependent on two essential processes in angiogenesis, endothelial cell migration and differentiation. We found that CsA and itraconazole synergistically inhibit tube network size and sprout formation. Lastly, we tested the combination on human foreskin fibroblast viability as well as Jurkat T cell and HeLa cell proliferation, and found that endothelial cells are selectively targeted. Thus, it is possible to combine existing clinical drugs to synergistically inhibit in vitro models of angiogenesis. This strategy may be useful in pursuing the next generation of antiangiogenesis therapy.

  8. Diagnosis of cardiac allograft rejection with indium-111 labeled platelets in cyclosporin treated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawwaz, R.A.; Iga, C.; Hardy, M.A.; Alderson, P.O.

    1984-01-01

    Rejection of heart transplants remains difficult to diagnose. Indium-111 (In-111) labeled lymphocytes accumulate in rat cardiac allografts when recipients are treated with Cyclosporin (Cy), even in the absence of clinical rejection. This presumably occurs because of the non-specific 'interstitial infiltration' caused by Cy. This study examines the usefulness of In-111 labeled platelets in differentiating experimental cardiac allograft rejection from Cy-induced tissue changes. The authors initially examined the migration patterns of syngeneic In-111 labeled platelets in groups of Lewis recipients of ACI cardiac allografts treated with IM Cy (10mg/kg) for 6-14 days. In addition, 10 control animals were not immunosuppressed, and 10 were treated with Cy but received Lewis cardiac isografts. Syngeneic In-111 platelets were injected IV into each animal 24 hours prior to sacrifice. Three to five rats from each group were killed at 3 ,7, 14, 21 and 28 days after transplantation and the % ID/gm in the transplanted hearts and native hearts were determined and correlated with histopathology. Untreated Lewis recipients rejected ACI hearts in 6.5 +- 0.4 days while Cy prolonged allograft survival in a variable fashion. In-111 platelet accumulation correlated well with the degree of rejection determined independently by histopathology. No significant In-111 platelet accumulation was detected in non-rejecting cardiac transplants or in native hearts in Cy treated or control animals. The results suggest that In-111 labeled platelets will be an effective agent for diagnosis of cardiac rejection, even in the presence of Cy treatment

  9. Cyclosporine-a and bone density around titanium implants: a histometric study in rabbits

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    Celso Eduardo Sakakura

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Cyclosporine A (CsA is an immunosuppressive agent commonly used to prevent organ transplantation rejection. It has been demonstrated that CsA may negatively affect osseointegration around dental implants. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CsA administration on bone density around titanium dental implants. Materials and Methods: Fourteen New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into 2 groups with seven animals each. The test group (CsA received daily subcutaneous injection of CsA (10mg/kg body weight and the control group (CTL received saline solution by the same route of administration. Three days after the beginning of immunosuppressive therapy, one machined dental implant (7.00 mm in lenght and 3.75 mm in diameter was inserted bilaterally at the region of the tibial methaphysis. After 4 and 8 weeks the animals were sacrificed and the histometrical procedures were performed to analyse the bone density around the first four threads of the coronal part of the implant. Results: A significant increase in the bone density was observed from the 4- to the 8 week-period in the control group (37.41% + 14.85 versus 58.23% + 16.38 – p < 0.01. In contrast, bone density consistently decreased in the test group overtime (46.31% + 17.38 versus 16.28 + 5.08 – p <0.05. In the 8-week period, there was a significant difference in bone density between the control and the test groups (58.23 + 16.38 eand16.28 + 5.08 – p= 0.001. Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, long-term CsA administration may reduce bone density around titanium dental implants during the osseointegration process.

  10. An analytical method for cyclosporine using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanduru, Srividya V; Somayaji, Vishwa; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Brocks, Dion R

    2010-02-01

    A liquid chromatographic mass spectrometric (LC-MS) assay has been developed for cyclosporine A (CyA) in rat plasma using amiodarone as internal standard (IS). Rat plasma (100 microL) containing drug and IS were extracted using liquid-liquid extraction with 4 mL of 95:5 ether:methanol. After evaporation of the organic layer the residue was reconstituted with 500 microL of water. Then the aqueous layer was transferred to LC-MS sample vials. A 10 microL volume was injected. The analysis was performed on a C(8) column 3.5 microm (2.1 x 50 mm) heated to 60 degrees C with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile:methanol:0.2% NH(4)OH (60:20:20) at an isocratic flow-rate of 0.2 mL/min. The ions used for quantitation of CyA and IS were m/z 1202.8 and 645.9, with retention times of 3.35 and 4.72 min, respectively. Linear relationships (r(2) > 0.99) were achieved between plasma or blood concentration and peak height ratios (drug:IS) over the concentration range 50-5000 ng/mL. The CV% and mean error were <19%. Based on validation data, the lower limit of quantification for the assay was 50 ng/mL. The reported assay method displayed high measures of linearity, sensitivity, reliability and precision, allowing its applicability in pharmacokinetic studies in rat. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Enhancing the effect of secreted cyclophilin B on immunosuppressive activity of cyclosporine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denys, A; Allain, F; Masy, E; Dessaint, J P; Spik, G

    1998-04-27

    Cyclophilin B (CyPB) is a cyclosporine (CsA)-binding protein, located within intracellular vesicles and secreted in biological fluids. In previous works, we reported that CyPB specifically interacts with the T-cell membrane and potentiates the ability of CsA to inhibit CD3-induced proliferation of T lymphocytes. CyPB levels were measured in plasma from healthy donors and transplant patients. The role of extracellular CyPB on the distribution and activity of CsA was investigated first by studies on the uptake of free and CyPB-complexed drug by blood cells, and second by studies on the inhibitory effects of these two compounds on the CD3-induced proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. A significant increase in plasma CyPB level was observed for CsA-treated patients (13+/-6.4 nM, n=42) in comparison with untreated donors (4.3+/-2.1 nM, n=34). In vitro, extracellular CyPB dose dependently modified CsA distribution between plasma, erythrocyte, and lymphocyte contents, by both retaining the complexed drug extracellularly and promoting its specific accumulation within peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Moreover, the enhanced ability of CyPB-complexed CsA to suppress CD3-induced T-cell proliferation was preserved in the presence of other blood cells, implying specific targeting of the drug to sensitive cells. Furthermore, although a large interindividual variability of sensitivity to the drug was confirmed for 18 individuals, we found that CyPB potentiated the activity of CsA in restoring a high sensitivity to the immunosuppressant. These results suggest that plasma CyPB may contribute to the acceptance and the good maintenance of organ transplantation by enhancing the immunosuppressive activity of CsA through a receptor-mediated incorporation of CyPB-complexed CsA within peripheral blood lymphocytes.

  12. Cyclosporin A significantly improves preeclampsia signs and suppresses inflammation in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bihui; Yang, Jinying; Huang, Qian; Bao, Junjie; Brennecke, Shaun Patrick; Liu, Huishu

    2016-05-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with an increased inflammatory response. Immune suppression might be an effective treatment. The aim of this study was to examine whether Cyclosporin A (CsA), an immunosuppressant, improves clinical characteristics of preeclampsia and suppresses inflammation in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced preeclampsia rat model. Pregnant rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: group 1 (PE) rats each received LPS via tail vein on gestational day (GD) 14; group 2 (PE+CsA5) rats were pretreated with LPS (1.0 μg/kg) on GD 14 and were then treated with CsA (5mg/kg, ip) on GDs 16, 17 and 18; group 3 (PE+CsA10) rats were pretreated with LPS (1.0 μg/kg) on GD 14 and were then treated with CsA (10mg/kg, ip) on GDs 16, 17 and 18; group 4 (pregnant control, PC) rats were treated with the vehicle (saline) used for groups 1, 2 and 3. Systolic blood pressure, urinary albumin, biometric parameters and the levels of serum cytokines were measured on day 20. CsA treatment significantly reduced LPS-induced systolic blood pressure and the mean 24-h urinary albumin excretion. Pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-17, IFN-γ and TNF-α were increased in the LPS treatment group but were reduced in (LPS+CsA) group (Ppreeclampsia signs and attenuated inflammatory responses in the LPS induced preeclampsia rat model which suggests that immunosuppressant might be an alternative management option for preeclampsia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Gamma irradiation of isolated rat islets pretransplantation produces indefinite allograft survival in cyclosporine-treated recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.F.; Lake, S.P.; Chamberlain, J.; Thirdborough, S.; Bassett, P.D.; Mistry, N.; Bell, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    In this study we have examined the use of low-dose gamma-irradiation for the reduction of islet immunogenicity in the strong allogeneic combination of WAG rat islets transplanted into diabetic AUG recipients. First, we determined that gamma-irradiation reduced immunogenicity in vitro by use of a modified MLR with WAG islets as stimulators and AUG splenocytes as responders. We then determined the maximum dose of gamma-irradiation that could be used (250 rads) before islet function was affected. As 250 rads islet pretreatment alone was ineffective in prolonging allograft survival, we combined the pretreatment with a short course (days 0, 1, 2; 30 mg/kg) of cyclosporine. We found that CsA was only effective in significantly prolonging allograft survival when given subcutaneously in olive oil. The CsA treatment alone gave a significantly prolonged survival time for the islet allografts (median, 37 days vs. 6 days for controls), but when combined with the 250 rads islet pretreatment a synergistic effect was seen with 100% becoming long-term survivors (greater than 100 days). The long-term surviving AUG rats from both the CsA alone group and the CsA plus 250 rads pretreated islets group were challenged with WAG dendritic cells (DC). The islets from the 250 rads pretreated group were subsequently rejected (day 6) while the CsA alone group were not affected. The role of low dose gamma-irradiation when combined with CsA treatment of islet graft recipients in inducing specific unresponsiveness will be discussed

  14. Gamma irradiation of isolated rat islets pretransplantation produces indefinite allograft survival in cyclosporine-treated recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, R.F.; Lake, S.P.; Chamberlain, J.; Thirdborough, S.; Bassett, P.D.; Mistry, N.; Bell, P.R.

    1989-06-01

    In this study we have examined the use of low-dose gamma-irradiation for the reduction of islet immunogenicity in the strong allogeneic combination of WAG rat islets transplanted into diabetic AUG recipients. First, we determined that gamma-irradiation reduced immunogenicity in vitro by use of a modified MLR with WAG islets as stimulators and AUG splenocytes as responders. We then determined the maximum dose of gamma-irradiation that could be used (250 rads) before islet function was affected. As 250 rads islet pretreatment alone was ineffective in prolonging allograft survival, we combined the pretreatment with a short course (days 0, 1, 2; 30 mg/kg) of cyclosporine. We found that CsA was only effective in significantly prolonging allograft survival when given subcutaneously in olive oil. The CsA treatment alone gave a significantly prolonged survival time for the islet allografts (median, 37 days vs. 6 days for controls), but when combined with the 250 rads islet pretreatment a synergistic effect was seen with 100% becoming long-term survivors (greater than 100 days). The long-term surviving AUG rats from both the CsA alone group and the CsA plus 250 rads pretreated islets group were challenged with WAG dendritic cells (DC). The islets from the 250 rads pretreated group were subsequently rejected (day 6) while the CsA alone group were not affected. The role of low dose gamma-irradiation when combined with CsA treatment of islet graft recipients in inducing specific unresponsiveness will be discussed.

  15. Proper balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid supplements with topical cyclosporine attenuated contact lens-related dry eye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Chen, Xi; Hao, Jingfang; Yang, Lu

    2016-12-01

    Essential fatty acids had been applied in the treatment of dry eye syndrome (DES), but the effects of different combinations of fatty acids have not been investigated. 360 long-term contact lens wearers were included in this double-blinded study. Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids were combined in different ratios and supplied to the participants that were randomly divided into six groups, and the effects of different essential fatty acids mixture on DES with or without topical cyclosporine were investigated. More than half of long-term contact lens wearers suffered from DES, which were found to be attenuated by oral supplement of properly balanced O3FA and O6FA fatty acid. The topical cyclosporine treatment considerably inhibited the production of cytokines compared to the cyclosporine negative groups, which further relieved DES. Proper balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid combination significantly alleviated contact lens-related DES.

  16. Characterization and in vitro release of cyclosporine-A from poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide implants obtained by solvent/extraction evaporation

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    Juliana Barbosa Saliba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclosporine-A-loaded PLGA implants were developed intended for ocular route. Implants were prepared using solvent extraction/evaporation technique followed by casting of the cake into rods in a heated surface. XRD patterns showed that cyclosporine-A was completely incorporated into PLGA. FTIR and DSC results indicated alterations on drug molecular conformation aiming to reach the most stable thermodynamic conformation at polymer/drug interface. Implants provided controlled/sustained in vitro release of the drug. During the first 7 weeks, the drug release was controlled by the diffusion of the cyclosporine-A; and between 7-23 week period, the drug diffusion and degradation of PLGA controlled the drug release.

  17. [Chronic urticaria in childhood : Rational diagnostics and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, H

    2017-07-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is defined by episodes of urticaria with or without angioedema, which recur daily or nearly daily over more than 6 weeks. Sudden manifestations of CU with or without known causes are termed chronic spontaneous urticaria, which is differentiated from chronic inducible urticaria. The differential diagnoses of CU in childhood range from self-limiting dermatoses to severe systemic diseases. Further targeted steps are taken to detect potential trigger factors or underlying illnesses only if suspicion arises on anamnestic grounds and CU is best treated in accordance with international guidelines. First-line therapy consists of non-sedating H 1 -antihistamines at approved or even higher doses. If symptoms persist, additional treatment with omalizumab, cyclosporine or montelukast can be initiated after careful individual consideration.

  18. Effect of topical 0.05% cyclosporine A on corneal endothelium in patients with dry eye disease

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Rico, Consuelo; Germain, Francisco; Castro-Rebollo, María; Moreno-Salgueiro, Agustín; Teus, Miguel Ángel

    2013-01-01

    AIM:To determine the effect of topical 0.05% cyclosporine A (CsA) on corneal endothelium in patients with dry eye disease.METHODS: Observational, prospective, case series study. Fifty-five eyes of 29 consecutive patients (9 males and 20 females; median age:66.8 years, interquartile range:61-73.2 years) with moderate-severe dry eye disease were evaluated. All patients were treated with topical 0.05% CsA ophthalmic emulsion twice a day in addition to lubricant eyedrops 5 times a day. The follow...

  19. Effects of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors on Hyperglycemia and Blood Cyclosporine Levels in Renal Transplant Patients with Diabetes: A Pilot Study

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    Jaehyun Bae

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors is increasing among renal transplant patients with diabetes. However, the glucose-lowering efficacies of various DPP-4 inhibitors and their effects on blood cyclosporine levels have not been fully investigated. We compared the glucose-lowering efficacies of DPP 4 inhibitors and evaluate their effects on the blood levels of cyclosporine in renal transplant recipients with diabetes.MethodsSixty-five renal allograft recipients who received treatment with DPP-4 inhibitors (vildagliptin, sitagliptin, or linagliptin following kidney transplant were enrolled. The glucose-lowering efficacies of the DPP-4 inhibitors were compared according to the changes in the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c levels after 3 months of treatment. Changes in the trough levels of the cyclosporine were also assessed 2 months after treatment with each DPP-4 inhibitor.ResultsHbA1c significantly decreased in the linagliptin group in comparison with other DPP-4 inhibitors (vildagliptin –0.38%±1.03%, sitagliptin –0.53%±0.95%, and linagliptin –1.40±1.34; P=0.016. Cyclosporine trough levels were significantly increased in the sitagliptin group compared with vildagliptin group (30.62±81.70 ng/mL vs. –24.22±53.54 ng/mL, P=0.036. Cyclosporine trough levels were minimally changed in patients with linagliptin.ConclusionLinagliptin demonstrates superior glucose-lowering efficacy and minimal effect on cyclosporine trough levels in comparison with other DPP-4 inhibitors in kidney transplant patients with diabetes.

  20. The Role of Biotransformation and Oxidative Stress in 3,5-Dichloroaniline (3,5-DCA) Induced Nephrotoxicity in Isolated Renal Cortical Cells from Male Fischer 344 Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Christopher R.; Ferguson, Travis; Preston, Debbie; Ward, Dakota; Ball, John; Anestis, Dianne; Valentovic, Monica; Rankin, Gary O.

    2016-01-01

    Among the mono- and dichloroanilines, 3,5-Dichloroaniline (3,5-DCA) is the most potent nephrotoxicant in vivo and in vitro. However, the role of renal biotransformation in 3,5-DCA induced nephrotoxicity is unknown. The current study was designed to determine the in vitro nephrotoxic potential of 3,5-DCA in isolated renal cortical cells (IRCC) obtained from male Fischer 344 rats, and the role of renal bioactivation and oxidative stress in 3,5-DCA nephrotoxicity. IRCC (~4 million cells/ml) from male rats were exposed to 3,5-DCA (0-1.0 mM) for up to 120 min. In IRCC, 3,5-DCA was cytotoxic at 1.0 mM by 60 min as evidenced by the increased release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), but 120 min was required for 3,5-DCA 0.5 mM to increase LDH release. In subsequent studies, IRCC were exposed to a pretreatment (antioxidant or enzyme inhibitor) prior to exposure to 3,5-DCA (1.0 mM) for 90 min. Cytotoxicity induced by 3,5-DCA was attenuated by pretreatment with inhibitors of flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO; methimazole, N-octylamine), cytochrome P450 (CYP; piperonyl butoxide, metyrapone), or peroxidase (indomethacin, mercaptosuccinate) enzymes. Use of more selective CYP inhibitors suggested that the CYP 2C family contributed to 3,5-DCA bioactivation. Antioxidants (glutathione, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, pyruvate) also attenuated 3,5-DCA nephrotoxicity, but oxidized glutathione levels and the oxidized/reduced glutathione ratios were not increased. These results indicate that 3,5-DCA may be activated via several renal enzyme systems to toxic metabolites, and that free radicals, but not oxidative stress, contribute to 3,5-DCA induced nephrotoxicity in vitro. PMID:26808022

  1. Antioxidantes da dieta como inibidores da nefrotoxicidade induzida pelo antitumoral cisplatina Dietary antioxidants as inhibitors of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusânia Maria Greggi Antunes

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A cisplatina é uma droga antineoplásica altamente efetiva contra vários tipos de cânceres humanos, tais como tumores do testículo e ovário, câncer da cabeça e pescoço e câncer do pulmão. Entretanto, a nefrotoxicidade é um dos principais efeitos colaterais da terapia com a cisplatina. A gravidade da nefrotoxicidade induzida pela cisplatina está relacionada com a concentração de platina nos rins. As evidências mostram que a nefrotoxicidade induzida pela cisplatina é atribuída ao dano oxidativo resultante da geração de radicais livres, e que a administração de antioxidantes é eficiente na inibição destes efeitos colaterais. Uma abordagem alternativa para proteger os roedores dos efeitos colaterais da cisplatina é o uso de conhecidos antioxidantes da dieta. Alguns estudos têm sido realizados para diminuir a peroxidação lipídica e os efeitos citotóxicos induzidos pela cisplatina, com o emprego de antioxidantes da dieta, tais como, selenito de sódio, vitaminas C e E, curcumina e o carotenóide bixina. Nós sugerimos que aqueles antioxidantes da dieta têm efeito nefroprotetor, e que os mecanismos antioxidantes destes compostos deveriam ser explorados durante a quimioterapia com a cisplatina.Cisplatin is a highly effective antineoplastic drug used against several types of human cancers, such as testicular and ovarian tumors; head and neck; and lung cancer. However, nephrotoxicity is one of the most important side-effects of cisplatin therapy. The severity of cisplatin nephrotoxicity is related to platinum concentration in the kidneys. There is a growing amount of evidence that cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is ascribed to oxidative damage resulting from free radical generation and that the administration of antioxidants is efficient in inhibiting these side effects. An alternative approach aiming to protect rodents against cisplatin side-effects is the introduction of known dietary antioxidants. Some studies have been

  2. Pseudotumor cerebral associado ao uso de ciclosporina após transplante renal Pseudotumor cerebri associated with cyclosporin use following renal transplantation

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    Kellen Micheline A. H Costa

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudotumor cerebral (PC é uma síndrome, caracterizada pela presença de hipertensão intracraniana (HIC e sistema ventricular normal. Pacientes submetidos a transplante renal parecem ser mais suscetíveis a desenvolvê-la, devido à terapia com imunossupressores. Ciclosporina (CsA é uma causa rara de PC, pouco descrita na literatura e que deve ser lembrada no diagnóstico diferencial de HIC e papiledema nesses pacientes. Relatamos um caso de um menino de 10 anos, há três anos com enxerto renal, em uso crônico de micofenolato mofetil (MMF, CsA e baixas doses de prednisona que apresentou quadro de cefaleia, vômitos, diplopia e fotofobia. Fundoscopia revelou edema de papila bilateral. Exame do líquor (LCR e de imagem foram normais. Após exclusão de causas secundárias, foi feito diagnóstico de PC devido ao uso crônico de CsA, que, portanto, foi substituída por Sirolimus. O paciente apresentou melhora clínica progressiva, com resolução do papiledema após três mesesPseudotumor cerebri (PC is a syndrome characterized by the presence of intracranial hypertension (ICH and no alteration in the ventricular system. Renal transplanted patients seem more susceptible to develop it due to immunosuppressive therapy. Cyclosporin (CsA is a rare cause of PC, scarcely reported in the literature, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of ICH and papilledema in those patients. We report the case of a 10-year-old boy, with a renal allograft for three years, on chronic use of mycophenolate mophetil (MMF, CsA, and low doses of prednisone. The patient presented with headache, vomiting, diplopia, and photophobia. Funduscopy showed bilateral papilledema. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis and imaging tests were normal. After excluding secondary causes, PC was diagnosed based on the chronic use of CsA, which was then replaced by sirolimus. After that, the patient progressively improved, and the papilledema resolved in three months

  3. Investigations on the nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity of trivalent and hexavalent chromium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartsch, P C; Hildenbrand, S; Kimmel, R; Schmahl, F W

    1998-09-01

    In contrast to trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) compounds, hexavalent chromium ((Cr(VI)) compounds are oxidizing agents capable of directly inducing tissue damage and possessing carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic potency. After oral or dermal absorption of Cr(VI), the kidney is the main target organ for chromium accumulation, which might result in acute tubular necrosis in humans. In contrast, an acute toxic effect of Cr(VI) on the liver has not yet been described. Therefore, we used two established epithelial cell lines from the kidney (Opossum kidney cells) and the liver (Hep G2 cells) to design an in vitro-assay which is able to examine acute toxic effects of chromium compounds. Cells of both cell lines were treated with various concentrations of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ranging from 0.01 micromol/l to 1 mmol/l for 24 h. Thereafter, cell morphology, organization of the intracellular cytoskeleton, number of viable cells and mean cell volume were examined. The results show that Cr(VI), but not Cr(III), has an acute cytotoxic effect and causes a dose-dependent loss in cell viability. The effective dose that caused 50% of cell death was 5 micromol/l for kidney epithelial cells and 50 micromol/l for liver epithelial cells. This means that kidney epithelial cells are 10 times more sensitive towards Cr(VI) treatment than liver epithelial cells and this might explain the known nephrotoxicity in vivo. The loss in cell viability was accompanied by a rounding and detachment of the cells and a marked reduction of intracellular F-actin-containing stress fibers. Microtubules and intermediate-sized filaments were observed to be unaffected. Only in the case of kidney epithelial cells, a dose-dependent cell volume increase was observed after Cr(VI) treatment at concentrations up to 50 micromol/l. At higher concentrations, the cell volume decreased due to the high number of cells undergoing lysis and the appearance of cellular fragments. Various chloride channel blockers with

  4. Attenuation of gentamycin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats by dietary inclusion of ginger (Zingiber officinale) and turmeric (Curcuma longa) rhizomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ademiluyi, Adedayo O; Oboh, Ganiyu; Ogunsuyi, Opeyemi B; Akinyemi, Ayodele J

    2012-10-01

    This study sought to investigate the modulatory effects of dietary inclusion of ginger (Zingiber officinale) and turmeric (Curcuma longa) rhizomes on antioxidant status and renal damage induced by gentamycin in rats. Renal damage was induced in albino rats pretreated with dietary inclusion of ginger and turmeric (2% and 4%) by intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of gentamycin (100 mg/kg body weight) for three days. Assays for renal damage biomarkers (plasma creatinine, plasma urea, blood urea nitrogen and plasma uric acid), malondialdehyde (MDA) content and reduced glutathione (GSH) content as well as renal antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) were carried out. The study revealed significant (p turmeric rhizome (2% and 4%) prior to gentamycin administration significantly (p turmeric rhizomes may protect against gentamycin-induced nephrotoxicity and oxidative stress.

  5. The clinical value of enzyme-multiplied immunoassay technique monitoring the plasma concentrations of cyclosporine A after renal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hui Luo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility and the clinical value of the enzyme-multiplied immunoassay technique (EMIT monitoring of blood concentrations of cyclosporine A (CsA in patients treated with CsA were investigated after kidney transplantation. The validation method was performed to the EMIT determination of CsA blood concentration, the CsA whole blood ‘trough concentrations (C0 of patients in different time periods after renal transplantation were monitored, and combined with the clinical complications, the statistical results were analyzed and compared. EMIT was precise, accurate and stable, also with a high quality control. The mean postoperative blood concentration of CsA was as follows: 12 months, (185.6 ± 28.1ng/mL. The toxic reaction rate of CsA blood concentration within the recommended therapeutic concentration was 14. 1%, significantly lower than that of the none-recommended dose group (37.2% (P < 0.05; the transplantation rejection rate was 4.4%, significantly lower than that of the none-recommended dose group (22.5% (P < 0.05. Using EMIT to monitor the blood concentration of CsA as the routine laboratory method is feasible, and is able to reduce the CsA toxicity and rejection significantly, leading to achieving the desired therapeutic effect. Keywords: enzyme-multiplied immunoassay technique, renal transplantation, cyclosporin A, blood concentration monitoring

  6. Prospective study of rabbit antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine for aplastic anemia from the EBMT Severe Aplastic Anaemia Working Party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Judith C; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Tichelli, Andre; Risitano, Antonio M; Passweg, Jakob R; Killick, Sally B; Warren, Alan J; Foukaneli, Theodora; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Al-Zahrani, H A; Höchsmann, Britta; Schafhausen, Philip; Roth, Alexander; Franzke, Anke; Brummendorf, Tim H; Dufour, Carlo; Oneto, Rosi; Sedgwick, Philip; Barrois, Alain; Kordasti, Shahram; Elebute, Modupe O; Mufti, Ghulam J; Socie, Gerard

    2012-06-07

    Rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG; thymoglobulin, Genzyme) in combination with cyclosporine, as first-line immunosuppressive therapy, was evaluated prospectively in a multicenter, European, phase 2 pilot study, in 35 patients with aplastic anemia. Results were compared with 105 age- and disease severity-matched patients from the European Blood and Marrow Transplant registry, treated with horse ATG (hATG; lymphoglobulin) and cyclosporine. The primary end point was response at 6 months. At 3 months, no patients had achieved a complete response to rATG. Partial response occurred in 11 (34%). At 6 months, complete response rate was 3% and partial response rate 37%. There were 10 deaths after rATG (28.5%) and 1 after subsequent HSCT. Infections were the main cause of death in 9 of 10 patients. The best response rate was 60% for rATG and 67% for hATG. For rATG, overall survival at 2 years was 68%, compared with 86% for hATG (P = .009). Transplant-free survival was 52% for rATG and 76% for hATG (P = .002). On multivariate analysis, rATG (hazard ratio = 3.9, P = .003) and age more than 37 years (hazard ratio = 4.7, P = .0008) were independent adverse risk factors for survival. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00471848.

  7. Outcome of Cyclosporine Monotherapy in Patients of Aplastic Anemia: Experience of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Prakas Kumar; Baul, Suvraneel; Dolai, Tuphan Kanti; De, Rajib; Chakrabarti, Prantar

    2017-03-01

    Immune suppression is a crucial pillar for treatment of aplastic anemia. Cyclosporine monotherapy is an easily available, affordable therapeutic option with good safety profile. This prospective study was conducted over a period of 2 years from June 2012 to July 2014. The diagnosis and response to treatment of aplastic anemia was established as per published criteria. Follow up was done at 3 and 6 months in order to assess the response. 57 patients of acquired aplastic anemia with median age of 37 years (6 to 81 years) were included in the study. 35 (62 %) cases were severe aplastic anemai, 16 (28 %) non severe aplastic anemia and 6 (10 %) were very severe aplastic anemia. At 3 months overall response rate (OR) was 7 (14 %) and at 6 months the OR rate of 11 (19.6 %) was achieved. Transiently raised creatinine, liver function abnormality and gum hypertrophy were the main side effects observed in this cohort. Oral cyclosporine monotherapy at dose of 5 mg/kg/day is a relatively safe treatment option for resource poor patients with aplastic anemia.

  8. Area-under-the-curve monitoring of cyclosporine therapy: Performance of different assay methods and their target concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grevel, J.; Napoli, K.L.; Gibbons, S.; Kahan, B.D.

    1990-01-01

    The measurement of areas under the concentration-time curve (AUC) was recently introduced as an alternative to trough level monitoring of cyclosporine therapy. The AUC is divided by the oral dosing interval to calculate an average concentration. All measurements are performed at clinical steady state. The initial evaluation of AUC monitoring showed advantages over trough level monitoring with concentrations of cyclosporine measured in serum by the polyclonal radioimmunoassay of Sandoz. This assay technique is no longer available and the following assays were performed in parallel during up to 173 AUC determinations in 51 consecutive renal transplant patients: polyclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay of Abbott in serum, specific and nonspecific monoclonal radioimmunoassays using 3 H and 125 I tracers in serum and whole blood, and high performance liquid chromatography in whole blood. Both trough levels and average concentrations at steady state measured by those different techniques were significantly correlated with the oral dose. The best correlation (r2 = 0.54) was shown by average concentrations measured in whole blood by the specific monoclonal radioimmunoassay of Sandoz ( 3 H tracer). This monitoring technique was also associated with the smallest absolute error between repeated observations in the same patient while the oral dose rate remained the same or was changed. Both allegedly specific monoclonal radioimmunoassays (with 3 H and 125 I tracer) measured significantly higher concentrations than the liquid chromatography

  9. Cyclosporine use and male gender are independent determinants of avascular necrosis after kidney transplantation: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachtner, Thomas; Otto, Natalie M; Reinke, Petra

    2018-06-03

    Kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) are at increased risk of avascular necrosis (AVN) due to bone disorder, steroid use and common comorbidities. However, knowledge on risk factors and outcomes of AVN among KTRs in the modern era of immunosuppression remains scarce. We analysed 765 KTRs between 2001 and 2013 for AVN. Cases of symptomatic AVN were diagnosed by hip X-ray, radioisotope bone scan or magnetic resonance imaging. We evaluated risk factors and clinical characteristics of AVN. KTRs showed a constant incidence rate of AVN of 4.1% at 10 years after transplantation. The use of cyclosporine compared with tacrolimus was identified as an independent risk factor, with a rate of 8.0% compared with 2.7% at 10 years (P AVN (P = 0.047). Eighty-three per cent of AVN cases were of the femoral head and treated operatively. None of the operated KTRs experienced complications in the long term. Thirty-three per cent of KTRs had bilateral AVN. Ninety-two per cent of KTRs showed AVN at the allograft side. The decreasing incidence of AVN may be attributed to the replacement of cyclosporine by tacrolimus over the last decade. Our data raise the hypothesis of an ischaemic steal syndrome due to the allograft kidney impacting AVN at the allograft side.

  10. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SOLUBLE OF CD40 LIGAND LEVELS IN HEART RECIPIENTS TREATED WITH CYCLOSPORINE A AND TACROLIMUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Shevchenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble form of CD40L is platelet activating factor, which is a marker of inflammation and thrombosis. Elevated levels of sCD40L before the heart transplantation are associated with the risk of early development of cardiova- scular complications. The study included 54 patients who had received heart transplants. All recipients received a triple heart immu- nosuppressive therapy, including methylprednisolone, mycophenolate mofetil and cyclosporine A (20 recipients or methylprednisolone, mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus (34 recipients. Patients were not differed by age, gender, etiology of heart failure before heart transplantation (p > 0,05. In the first group of transplant recipients, the relative risk of cardiovascular events with high sCD40L levels before transplantation was 3 2 (95% CI 1,4; 12,0. In the second group of recipients, respectively, 2.69 (95% CI 1,1; 8,5. SCD40L level after heart transplan- tation was significantly higher for patients receiving cyclosporine (P < 0.05. Increasing concentrations of sCD40L are associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular complications. 

  11. Assessment of hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic effects of occupational exposure to unleaded gasoline: A study in shiraz petrol stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Neghab

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gasoline is a complex mixture of more than 500 various hydrocarbons. The elimination of lead from petrol has been associated with the production of significant amounts of hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX. The main purpose of this study was to ascertain whether or not exposure to unleaded petrol, under normal working conditions, is associated with any hepatotoxic or nephrotoxic response. .Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study in which 200 subjects with current exposure to unleaded petrol working in Shiraz petrol stations as well as 200 unexposed employees were investigated. Using standard methods, atmospheric concentrations of BTX were measured. Additionally, blood and urine samples were taken from subjects for routine biochemical tests of kidney and liver function. .Results: The geometric means of airborne concentrations of BTX were found to be 0.24, 0.37 and 0.64 ppm, respectively. The result of blood chemistry tests showed that means of direct bilirubin, ALT, AST, urea and plasma creatinine were significantly higher in exposed subjects than in unexposed employees, although all of these parameters were in the normal range. Conversely, serum albumin, total protein and serum concentration of calcium and sodium were significantly lower in petrol station workers than in their unexposed counterparts. .Conclusions: The average exposure of petrol station workers to BTX is lower than the current TLVs for these chemicals. However, clinical significance and long-term results of observed changes in liner and kidney of exposed workers needs more evident in comparison with unexposed group.

  12. Intragastric exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles induced nephrotoxicity in mice, assessed by physiological and gene expression modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have demonstrated that titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) induced nephrotoxicity in animals. However, the nephrotoxic multiple molecular mechanisms are not clearly understood. Methods Mice were exposed to 2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg TiO2 NPs by intragastric administration for 90 consecutive days, and their growth, element distribution, and oxidative stress in kidney as well as kidney gene expression profile were investigated using whole-genome microarray analysis technique. Results Our findings suggest that TiO2 NPs resulted in significant reduction of renal glomerulus number, apoptosis, infiltration of inflammatory cells, tissue necrosis or disorganization of renal tubules, coupled with decreased body weight, increased kidney indices, unbalance of element distribution, production of reactive oxygen species and peroxidation of lipid, protein and DNA in mouse kidney tissue. Furthermore, microarray analysis showed significant alterations in the expression of 1, 246 genes in the 10 mg/kg TiO2 NPs-exposed kidney. Of the genes altered, 1006 genes were associated with immune/inflammatory responses, apoptosis, biological processes, oxidative stress, ion transport, metabolic processes, the cell cycle, signal transduction, cell component, transcription, translation and cell differentiation, respectively. Specifically, the vital up-regulation of Bcl6, Cfi and Cfd caused immune/ inflammatory responses, the significant alterations of Axud1, Cyp4a12a, Cyp4a12b, Cyp4a14, and Cyp2d9 expression resulted in severe oxidative stress, and great suppression of Birc5, Crap2, and Tfrc expression led to renal cell apoptosis. Conclusions Axud1, Bcl6, Cf1, Cfd, Cyp4a12a, Cyp4a12b, Cyp2d9, Birc5, Crap2, and Tfrc may be potential biomarkers of kidney toxicity caused by TiO2 NPs exposure. PMID:23406204

  13. Therapeutic Potential and Molecular Mechanisms of Emblica officinalis Gaertn in countering nephrotoxicity in rats induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Malik

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Emblica officinalis Gaertn. belonging to family Euphorbiaceae is commonly known as Indian gooseberry or Amla in India. It is used as a ‘rejuvenating herb’ in traditional system of Indian medicine. It has been shown to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects. Thus, on the basis of its biological effects, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the protective effect of the dried fruit extract of the E. Officinalis (EO in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats and also to evaluate the mechanism of its nephroprotection. The study was done on male albino Wistar rats. They were divided into 6 groups (n=6 viz. control, cisplatin-control, cisplatin and EO (150, 300 and 600 mg/kg; p.o. respectively in different groups and EO only (600 mg/kg; p.o. only. EO was administered orally to the rats for a period of 10 days and on the 7th day, a single injection of cisplatin (8 mg/kg; i.p. was administered to the cisplatin-control and EO treatment groups. The rats were sacrificed on the 10th day. Cisplatin-control rats had deranged renal function parameters and the kidney histology confirmed the presence of acute tubular necrosis. Furthermore, there were increased oxidative stress, apoptosis and inflammation along with higher expression of MAPK pathway proteins in the rat kidney from the cisplatin-control group. Contrary to this, EO (600 mg/kg significantly normalized renal function, bolstered antioxidant status and ameliorated histological alterations. The inflammation and apoptosis were markedly lower in comparison to cisplatin-control rats. Furthermore, EO (600 mg/kg inhibited MAPK phosphorylation which was instrumental in preserving renal function and morphology. In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrated that EO attenuated cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats through suppression of MAPK induced inflammation and apoptosis.

  14. The ameliorative effects of virgin olive oil and olive leaf extract on amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Gayoum, Abdelgayoum A; Al-Hassan, Abdelrahman A; Ginawi, Ibrahim A; Alshankyty, Ibraheem M

    2015-01-01

    Amikacin is an important antibiotic, and its use is limited because of the induced nephrotoxicity. Thus, search for natural and synthetic agents that can moderate amikacin toxicity never stopped. The present study aims to investigate the possible ameliorative effects of virgin olive oil and olive leaf extract against the amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity in rat. 48 rats were distributed into 6 groups: 1-Animals of control (C) group were injected intraperitoneally (ip) with saline, 2-(AK); injected ip with amikacin {300 mg/kg/day for 12days}, 3-(OO) group: given olive oil {7 ml/kg/day for 16days}, 4-(OOAK) group: given olive oil as in OO and amikacin for 12days, 5-(OL) group: given olive leaf extract {50 mg/kg/day for 16days}, 6-(OLAK) group: given leaf extract as in OL and amikacin for 12days. Animals were fasted and sacrificed. Serum was used for biochemical analysis and kidneys for histopathology. Serum urea and creatinine were significantly ( P  groups. Serum uric acid was reduced in AK by 45.29%. Kidneys from AK showed necrosis, whereas, those from OOAK and OLAK showed mild histology. The serum triglyceride was decreased by 17.8% in OL, by 37.02% in OOAK and by 31.48% in OLAK. The calculated amikacin effect showed a significant positive correlation with urea ( r  = 0.521, P  = 0.0004), and a negative correlation with uric acid ( r  = ⿿ 0.58, P  virgin olive oil and by olive leaf extract. Amikacin did not cause dyslipidemia but reduced serum uric acid.

  15. 3H-cyclosporine internalization and secretion by human fetal pancreatic islets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formby, B.; Walker, L.; Peterson, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Human fetal pancreatic islets were isolated from 16- to 20-week-old fetuses by a collagenase technique and cultured 48 hr in RPMI 1640 containing 10% human adult serum and unlabeled 0 to 5 micrograms cyclosporine A (CsA)/ml. Insulin secretory capacity of human fetal islets was expressed as a fractional stimulatory ratio FSR = F2/F1 of the fractional secretion rates during two successive 1 hr static incubations first with 2 mM glucose (F1) to stabilize secretion followed by maximal stimulus, i.e., 25 mM glucose plus 10 mM L-leucine and 10 mM L-arginine (F2). Unlabeled CsA at the above concentrations had no significant effects on the insulin secretory capacity expressed by FSR-values. Studies of net uptake of 3H-CsA by islets cultured for varying periods up to 40 hr and expressed as picomole 3H-CsA per picomole islet insulin content demonstrated that uptake rate was slow and did not reach isotopic equilibrium over the 40 hr of culture. When isolated fetal islets were cultured for 48 hr in the presence of 3H-CsA and varying concentrations of unlabeled CsA it was found during two successive 1 hr static incubations that fetal islets secrete insulin concomitantly with 3H-CsA following maximal stimulus for secretion. An optimal secretory molar ratio of 3H-CsA to insulin of 4.0 +/- 1.3 (n = 7) was found after islets were cultured 48 hr in the presence of a saturating 2.128 micrograms 3H-CsA per milliliter culture medium. In three successive 30-min static incubations of 3H-CsA loaded islets, first with low glucose, followed by high glucose plus L-arginine and L-leucine, and finally with high glucose plus L-arginine and L-leucine and 10 mM theophylline, the proportional fractional secretion rates of insulin and 3H-CsA were of the same magnitude

  16. Budget impact analysis of conversion from cyclosporine to sirolimus as immunosuppressive medication in renal transplantation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroutan N

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Naghmeh Foroutan,1 Hamid R Rasekh,1 Jamshid Salamzadeh,1 Hamid R Jamshidi,1 Mohsen Nafar2 1Department of Pharmacoeconomics and Pharmaceutical Management, School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, 2Department of Kidney Transplantation, Urinary Nephrology Research Center (UNRC, Shahid Labbafinejad Medical Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine budget impact of conversion from cyclosporine (CsA to sirolimus (SRL in renal transplant therapy (RTT from the perspective of insurance organizations in Iran. Methods: An Excel-based model was developed to determine cost of RTT, comparing current CsA based therapy to an mTOR inhibitor-based therapy regimen. Total cost included both cost of immunosuppressive agents and relative adverse events. The inputs were derived from database of Ministry of Health and insurance organizations, hospital and pharmacy based registries, and available literature that were varied through a one-way sensitivity analysis. According to the model, there were almost 17,000 patients receiving RTT in Iran, out of which about 2,200 patients underwent the operation within the study year. The model was constructed based on the results of a local RCT, in which test and control groups received CsA, SRL, and steroids over the first 3 months posttransplantation and, from the fourth month on, CsA, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF, and steroids were used in the CsA group and SRL, MMF, and steroids were administered in the SRL group, respectively. Results: The estimated cost of RTT with CsA was US$4,850,000 versus US$4,300,000 receiving SRL. These costs corresponded to the cost saving of almost US$550,000 for the payers. Conclusion: To evaluate the financial consequence of adding mTOR inhibitors to the insurers’ formulary, in the present study, a budget impact analysis was conducted on sirolimus. Fewer cases of costly adverse events along with

  17. Influence of Donor and Recipient CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and ABCB1 Genotypes on Clinical Outcomes and Nephrotoxicity in Liver Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debette-Gratien, Marilyne; Woillard, Jean-Baptiste; Picard, Nicolas; Sebagh, Mylène; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique; Sautereau, Denis; Samuel, Didier; Marquet, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the influence of the CYP3A4*22, CYP3A5*3, and ABCB1 exons 12, 21, and 26 polymorphisms in donors and recipients on clinical outcomes and renal function in 170 liver transplant patients on cyclosporin A (CsA) or tacrolimus (Tac). Allelic discrimination assays were used for genotyping. Multivariate time-dependent Cox proportional hazard models, multiple linear regression using the generalized estimating equation and linear mixed-effect models were used for statistical analysis. Expression of CYP3A5 by either or both the donor and the recipient was significantly associated with lower Tac, but not CsA, dose-normalized trough levels. In the whole population, graft loss was only significantly associated with longer exposure to high calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) concentrations (hazard ratio, 6.93; 95% confidence interval, 2.13-22.55), P = 0.00129), whereas in the Tac subgroup, the risk of graft loss was significantly higher in recipient CYP3A5*1 expressers (hazard ratio, 3.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.52-7.58; P = 0.0028). Renal function was significantly associated with: (1) baseline modification of diet in renal disease (β = 0.51 ± 0.05; P < 0.0001); (2) duration of patient follow-up (per visit, β = -0.98 ± 0.22; P < 0.0001); and (3) CNI exposure (per quantile increase, β = -2.42 ± 0.59; P < 0.0001). No genetic factor was associated with patient survival, acute rejection, liver function test results, recurrence of viral or other initial liver disease, or renal function. This study confirms the effect of CYP3A5*3 on tacrolimus dose requirement in liver transplantation and shows unexpected associations between the type of, and exposure to, CNI and either chronic rejection or graft loss. None of the genetic polymorphisms studied had a noticeable impact on renal function degradation at 10 years.

  18. Inhibitory effect of Cyclosporin A and corticosteroids on the production of IFN-gamma and IL-17 by T cells in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.L.; Yang, P.Z.; Lin, X.M.; Ren, X.R.; Zhou, H.Y.; Huang, X.K.; Chi, W.; Kijlstra, A.; Chen, L.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) and corticosteroids are extensively used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases including Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) syndrome. The exact immunosuppressive mechanisms of these drugs are not exactly known. Th1 and Th17 cells are important populations involved in autoimmune

  19. Role of amino acid N-methylation in cyclosporins on ring opening and fragmentation mechanisms during collisionally induced dissociation in an ion trap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuzma, Marek; Jegorov, A.; Hesso, A.; Tornaeus, J.; Sedmera, Petr; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 37, - (2002), s. 292-298 ISSN 1076-5174 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/1255; GA ČR GA203/99/1190 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : cyclosporin * cyclic * peptide Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.781, year: 2002

  20. Combination therapy with cyclosporine and psoralen plus ultraviolet a in the patients with severe alopecia areata: a retrospective study with a self-controlled design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kui Young; Jang, Woo Sun; Son, In Pyeong; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Moo Yeol; Kim, Beom Joon; Kim, Myeung Nam; Ro, Byung In

    2013-02-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is believed to be an organ-specific autoimmune disease in which a mononuclear cell infiltrate develops in and around anagen hair follicles. There is no definitive therapy for AA. We sought to determine whether the combination therapy of cyclosporine and psoralen plus ultraviolet A (PUVA) could be an effective treatment for severe AA. A total of 41 patients with severe AA were treated with oral cyclosporine and topical PUVA. Cyclosporine was given at an initial daily dose of 200 mg for adult and 100 mg for children for periods of up to 16 weeks. Eight-methoxypsoralen (Methoxsalen) was applied topically 20 minutes prior to ultraviolet A (UVA) exposure, and the patients were irradiated with UVA twice a week for 16 weeks. Of the total 41 patients, 2 (7.3%) patients were lost to follow-up, and 1 (2.4%) patient discontinued the treatment due to abdominal discomfort. Six (14.6%) patients were treated for less than 12 weeks. Of remaining 32 patients, 3 (9.4%) showed excellent response, 3 (9.4%) showed good response, 12 (37.5%) showed fair response, and 14 (43.7%) showed poor response. Although limited by its uncontrolled character, this study shows that the combination therapy with cyclosporine and PUVA may be an additional choice for severe and recalcitrant AA.