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Sample records for chronic clostridium difficile

  1. Clostridium difficile and C. difficile Toxin Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Clostridium difficile and C. difficile Toxin Testing Share this page: ... C. diff; C diff antigen; GDH Formal name: Clostridium difficile Culture; C. difficile Toxin, A and B; C. ...

  2. Clostridium difficile Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Geller, Stephen A.; Fernando Peixoto Ferraz de Campos

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea in Europe and North America and is a serious re-emerging pathogen. Recent outbreaks have led to increasing morbidity and mortality and have been associated with a new strain (BI/NAP1/027) of C. difficile that produces more toxin than historical strains. With the increasing incidence of C. difficile infection, clinicians have also seen a change in the epidemiology with increased infections in previously low-risk populatio...

  3. Empyema Caused by Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, Darren A; Gibb, A. Patrick; Gill, M John

    1999-01-01

    Extraintestinal infections of Clostridium difficile are rare and often associated with underlying disorders. A case of empyema caused by aspiration of C difficile in a patient with carcinoid syndrome and C difficile colitis is described.

  4. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M B F; Olsen, K E P; Nielsen, X C;

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) requires the detection of toxigenic C. difficile or its toxins and a clinical assessment. We evaluated the performance of four nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) detecting toxigenic C. difficile directly from faeces compared to routine...... ribotyping and toxinotyping (TT) were performed on culture-positive samples. In parallel, the samples were analysed by four NAATs; two targeting tcdA or tcdB (illumigene® C. difficile and PCRFast® C. difficile A/B) and two multi-target real-time (RT) PCR assays also targeting cdt and tcdC alleles...... characteristic of epidemic and potentially more virulent PCR ribotypes 027, 066 and 078 (GeneXpert® C. difficile/Epi and an 'in-house RT PCR' two-step algorithm). The multi-target assays were significantly more sensitive compared to routine toxigenic culture (p < 0.05) and significantly more robust to inhibition...

  5. Clostridium difficile Colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Trudel, Judith L.

    2007-01-01

    Clostridium difficile enterocolitis is endemic in most modern hospitals. The spectrum of clinical presentation varies from the asymptomatic carrier state to fulminant colitis with toxic megacolon and perforation. Highly toxigenic and lethal strains of C. difficile have emerged worldwide. Medical treatment consists of discontinuing the precipitating antibiotic, supportive measures and bowel rest, and antibiotic treatment with metronidazole or vancomycin. Surgical treatment may be necessary in ...

  6. Imipenem-induced clostridium difficile diarrhea in a patient with chronic renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Enríquez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An 80-year-old man was diagnosed to have pneumonia and advanced chronic kidney disease. He presented with anuria and hemodialysis, by temporary femoral catheter, was initiated. He was empirically treated with imipenem/cilastatin 500 mg/24 h after hemodialysis. After 10 days of antibiotic intake, he developed severe diarrhea. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile (CD-associated diarrhea was confirmed by detection of the toxins A and B in his stool. Imipenem therapy was discontinued; Vancomycin 500 mg orally every 6 h and 1000 mg per rectum every day was added. After two weeks of this treatment, the patient reported complete resolution of the diarrhea and stool samples were negative for Clostridium toxin. In this case, the most possible cause of CD colitis was considered to be imipenem because of the temporal relationship between exposure to the drug and onset of symptoms.

  7. Clostridium difficile in gnotobiotic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Onderdonk, A B; Cisneros, R L; Bartlett, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    Germfree mice associated with Clostridium difficile developed intestinal disease characterized by polymorphonuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria, diarrhea, and cecal cytotoxin concentrations positive at a 10(-6) dilution. The numbers of viable bacteria never exceeded 10(10) colony-forming units per g (dry weight). Despite the high toxin levels and chronic inflammation over a 30-day period, the mortality rate was low (less than 2%). Daily treatment of these animals with two oral dos...

  8. Behandlingsmuligheder for Clostridium difficile infektion

    OpenAIRE

    Türlü, Ceylan; Coskun, Derya; Amirthananthan, Biveshne

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile er en velkendt årsag til antibiotika- og hospitalsassocieret diarré og pseudomembranøs kolitis. I dag bliver man oftest behandlet for Clostridium difficile infektion med antibiotika, men cirka 20 % af patienter oplever recidiv med Clostridium difficile infektion, uanset valg af antibiotikabehandling. I dette projekt sammenholdes antibiotikabehandling med fækal mikrobiota transplantation for, at undersøge hvilke behandlingsmetoder der er mest effektive til behandling af r...

  9. Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Wiep Klaas; Lyras, Dena; Lacy, D Borden; Wilcox, Mark H; Kuijper, Ed J

    2016-01-01

    Infection of the colon with the Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium difficile is potentially life threatening, especially in elderly people and in patients who have dysbiosis of the gut microbiota following antimicrobial drug exposure. C. difficile is the leading cause of health-care-associated infective diarrhoea. The life cycle of C. difficile is influenced by antimicrobial agents, the host immune system, and the host microbiota and its associated metabolites. The primary mediators of inflammation in C. difficile infection (CDI) are large clostridial toxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), and, in some bacterial strains, the binary toxin CDT. The toxins trigger a complex cascade of host cellular responses to cause diarrhoea, inflammation and tissue necrosis - the major symptoms of CDI. The factors responsible for the epidemic of some C. difficile strains are poorly understood. Recurrent infections are common and can be debilitating. Toxin detection for diagnosis is important for accurate epidemiological study, and for optimal management and prevention strategies. Infections are commonly treated with specific antimicrobial agents, but faecal microbiota transplants have shown promise for recurrent infections. Future biotherapies for C. difficile infections are likely to involve defined combinations of key gut microbiota. PMID:27158839

  10. Clostridium difficile infection

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2011-01-01

    This leaflet provides healthcare patients, their families and carers with comprehensive information on Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infection. It provides some background on the infection�and highlights a range of key factors, including the symptoms to look out for, common causes of contamination, the appropriate course of action should you become infected, and possible treatment options. It also offers advice to visitors and carers on precautions and rules they should follow when in the p...

  11. Clostridium difficile infection

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2011-01-01

    This leaflet provides healthcare patients, their families and carers with comprehensive information on Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infection. It provides some background on the infectionand highlights a range of key factors, including the symptoms to look out for, common causes of contamination, the appropriate course of action should you become infected, and possible treatment options. It also offers advice to visitors and carers on precautions and rules they should follow when in the pr...

  12. Serotyping of Clostridium difficile.

    OpenAIRE

    Toma, S.; Lesiak, G; Magus, M; Lo, H L; Delmée, M.

    1988-01-01

    A total of 246 live Clostridium difficile cultures were serotyped by a slide agglutination technique. Fifteen grouping antisera were produced which serotyped 98% of the cultures (241 of 246). Our results indicated that certain serogroups may have specific pathogenicity. Strains of serogroups A, G, H, K, S1, and S4 were cytotoxigenic and were isolated mainly from adult patients with pseudomembranous colitis or antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Nontoxigenic strains of serogroups D and Cd-5 were i...

  13. Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Geller

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a significant and increasing medical problem, surpassing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as the most common hospital-onset or facility-associated infection, and a key element in the challenging battle against hospital-acquired infections. This Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming colonizes the intestinal tract after antibiotics have altered the normal intestinal flora.

  14. [Oncologic aspects of Clostridium difficile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telekes, András

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is one of the most frequent among cancer patients. Its diagnosis is complicated by the fact that the symptoms of the infection and the side effects of the anticancer treatments could be similar. Chemotherapy itself might facilitate Clostridium difficile infection. Several risk factors are known but Clostridium difficile infection can develop in the absence of these. Neutreopenia is a risk factor for fatal Clostridium difficile infection and also the side effect of chemotherapy. Therefore, if symptoms of the potential infection develop (eg. diarrhoea more than three times a day, fever above 38.5 °C, colitis, rapid increase of serum creatinin) Clostridium difficile infection should be excluded. If the infection is confirmed it should be managed in the most efficient way. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(28), 1110-1116. PMID:27397423

  15. Advanced chronic kidney disease: a strong risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Chul; Seo, Min Young; Lee, Jun Yong; Kim, Ki Tae; Cho, Eunjung; Kim, Myung-Gyu; Jo, Sang-Kyung; Cho, Won-Yong; Kim, Hyoung-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: It has been suggested that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and is associated with increased mortality among patients infected with C. difficile. However, recent studies of the clinical impact of CKD on CDI in Asians are still insufficient. We sought to determine the relationship between CKD and CDI in a Korean population. Methods: This was a single-center, retrospective case-control study. In total, 171 patients with CDI were included as cases and 342 age- and gender-matched patients without CDI were used as controls. We compared the prevalence of CKD in the study sample and identified independent risk factors that could predict the development or prognosis of CDI. Results: Independent risk factors for CDI included stage IV to V CKD not requiring dialysis (odds ratio [OR], 2.90) and end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis (OR, 3.34). Patients with more advanced CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate < 30) and CDI showed higher in-hospital mortality and poorer responses to the initial metronidazole therapy. Conclusions: More advanced CKD is an independent risk factor for CDI and is associated with higher in-hospital mortality and poor treatment responses in CDI patients. Thus, in CKD patients, careful attention should be paid to the occurrence of CDI and its management to improve the outcome of CDI. PMID:26767866

  16. Clostridium difficile Infection: A Rarity in Patients Receiving Chronic Antibiotic Treatment for Crohn’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Abhik; Lichtiger, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Background Prolonged antibiotic use is limited by several adverse effects, one of which is Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of CDI in patients receiving chronic antibiotic treatment for Crohn’s disease (CD). Methods We conducted a retrospective review of 100 patients with CD for which ≥6 months of outpatient antibiotic therapy was prescribed. Data were collected regarding demographics, CD phenotype, treatment history, and CDI. The incidence of CDI in our patient population was calculated and compared with historical controls. Results 100 patients were studied—60% of men, mean age 23.9 years at CD diagnosis. Eighty-two percent had disease involving the ileum, and 33% had disease involving the colon. The mean duration of antibiotic therapy was 39.6 months (range, 6–217 months). The most commonly prescribed classes of antibiotics were fluoroquinolones (84%), penicillins (57%), and cephalosporins (32%). Forty-nine percent of patients were treated with concomitant thiopurines, 45% with budesonide, and 41% with biologics. The overall incidence of CDI was 2%. This incidence of CDI was lower than previously reported for non-CD patients receiving chronic antibiotics for continuous-flow left ventricular assist device infections (12.5%) and orthopedic prosthesis infections (22.2%). Conclusions The incidence of CDI is rare in patients receiving chronic antibiotic treatment for CD, and it seems significantly lower than for non-CD populations reported in the literature. PMID:26650148

  17. Clostridium difficile-associated colitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hull, Mark W.; Beck, Paul L

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the basic microbiology, pathogenesis of disease, and diagnosis of the nosocomial pathogen Clostridium difficile and to examine therapies recommended by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE: was searched using MeSH headings. Controlled trials for therapy were sought, but case-control studies and observational reviews were included. MAIN MESSAGE: Clostridium difficile causes approximately 20% of cases of diarrhea associated with ant...

  18. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    OpenAIRE

    Katherine R Hargreaves; Clokie, Martha R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however, developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarize the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss th...

  19. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    OpenAIRE

    MarthaRebecca JaneClokie

    2014-01-01

    Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarise the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss the...

  20. Clostridium difficile in haematological malignancy.

    OpenAIRE

    Rampling, A.; Warren, R. E.; Bevan, P C; Hoggarth, C E; Swirsky, D; Hayhoe, F G

    1985-01-01

    Twenty patients with haematological malignancies who developed Clostridium difficile bowel infection or colonisation are described. All isolates of C difficile were toxigenic in vitro and faecal cytotoxin (toxin B) was detected in 20/26 episodes. Ten of 20 episodes with detectable faecal cytotoxin were associated with typical antibiotic associated diarrhoea. In the other 10 episodes (nine patients), there was a severe unusual illness which was associated with detection of C difficile. The unu...

  1. Clostridium difficile: Infection and Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Permpoonpattana, Patima

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram positive pathogen of significant importance in the UK, Europe and the USA. No vaccine has been developed and current treatments are focused on hospital management and the use of antibiotics. The disease is spread in hospitals in the spore form and the role of spores in C. difficile infecton is poorly understood. In this project spores of C. difficile have been characterised. The proteins from the outermost layers of the spore were identified and the genes clone...

  2. Genetic Manipulation of Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    Bouillaut, Laurent; McBride, Shonna M; Sorg, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, spore forming, anaerobic, intestinal bacterium and is the most common cause of antibiotic-associated colitis. For many years this organism was considered genetically intractable, but in the past 10 years, multiple methods have been developed or adapted for genetic manipulation of C. difficile. This unit describes the molecular techniques used for genetic modification of this organism, including methods for gene disruption, complementation, plasmid int...

  3. Toxin production in clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Sture

    2004-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a is a Gram potential human pathogen. It causing symptoms ranging from mild C. difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) to severe inflammation of the colon including pseudomembranous colitis and fulminant colitis. Over 300 000 and about 10 000 CDAD episodes are diagnosed annually in the USA and Sweden, respectively. Onset of CDAD is typically associated with antibiotic therapy. These drugs may disrupt the colonization resistance of the colon microflora a...

  4. Clostridium difficile in paediatric populations

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Upton D

    2014-01-01

    An increase in Clostridium difficile infection incidence has been observed among hospitalized children in the United States. The present statement, targeted at clinicians caring for infants and children in community and institutional settings, summarizes the relevant information relating to the role of C difficile in childhood diarrhea and provides recommendations for diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Significant differences between adult and paediatric risk factors and disease are discuss...

  5. Clostridium difficile binary toxin CDT

    OpenAIRE

    Gerding, Dale N.; Johnson, Stuart; Rupnik, Maja; Aktories, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Binary toxin (CDT) is frequently observed in Clostridium difficile strains associated with increased severity of C. difficile infection (CDI). CDT belongs to the family of binary ADP-ribosylating toxins consisting of two separate toxin components: CDTa, the enzymatic ADP-ribosyltransferase which modifies actin, and CDTb which binds to host cells and translocates CDTa into the cytosol. CDTb is activated by serine proteases and binds to lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor. ADP-ribosylatio...

  6. Clostridium difficile Bacteremia, Taiwan1

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Nan-Yao; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2010-01-01

    To determine clinical characteristics and outcome of patients with Clostridium difficile bacteremia (CDB), we identified 12 patients with CDB in 2 medical centers in Taiwan; all had underlying systemic diseases. Five had gastrointestinal diseases or conditions, including pseudomembranous colitis (2 patients); 4 recalled diarrhea, but only 5 had recent exposure to antimicrobial drugs. Ten available isolates were susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin. Five isolates had C. difficile toxin ...

  7. Clostridium difficile and the microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Seekatz, Anna M.; Young, Vincent B.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading health care–associated illness. Both human and animal models have demonstrated the importance of the gut microbiota’s capability of providing colonization resistance against C. difficile. Risk factors for disease development include antibiotic use, which disrupts the gut microbiota, leading to the loss of colonization resistance and subsequent CDI. Identification of the specific microbes capable of restoring this function remains elusive. F...

  8. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea.

    OpenAIRE

    Wight, N.; Curtis, H.; Hyde, J.; Borriello, S P; Mahida, Y R

    1998-01-01

    At our hospital, the number of cases of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea increased from 29 in 1993 to 210 in 1995. The case notes of 110 patients with C difficile-associated diarrhoea during the first 6 months of 1995 were analysed retrospectively. The majority of the patients (106) had received antibiotics before the onset of diarrhoea; 46 had received three or more different antibiotics and 28 had received metronidazole. In 19 patients, the first stool sample after the onset of di...

  9. Biofilm formation by Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    Dapa, Tanja; Unnikrishnan, Meera

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major healthcare-associated disease worldwide. Recurring infections and increasing antibiotic resistance have complicated treatment of CDI. While C. difficile spores are important for transmission and persistence of CDI, other factors such as gut colonization and formation of bacterial communities in the gut may also contribute to pathogenesis and persistence, but have not been well investigated. Recently, we reported that important clinical C. diffi...

  10. Laboratorní diagnostika Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    Jandová, Romana

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile toxin with production is the most common cause of nosocomial enteric infections. It causes inflammatory bowel disease called Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) of varying severity - from trivial diarrhea to life-threatening conditions such as paralytic ileus and toxic megacolon. C.difficile still escapes the attention of the general public and is in the background of other bacteria, such as MRSA. Clostridium difficile is a strictly anaerobic bacterium. It is a gram-po...

  11. Production of Clostridium difficile antitoxin.

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrich, M.; Van Tassell, R L; Libby, J M; Wilkins, T D

    1980-01-01

    We have produced antitoxin to the toxin of Clostridium difficile in rabbits and in goats. Antitoxin dilutions of 1/8,000 and 1/5,120 were capable of neutralizing lethal doses of the toxin in mice and in tissue culture, respectively.

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of Clostridium difficile.

    OpenAIRE

    Shuttleworth, R; Taylor, M.; Jones, D M

    1980-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibilities of 78 strains of Clostridium difficile isolated from patients with and without gastrointestinal symptoms were determined and compared. Strains from patients with symptoms were more likely to show resistance to antibiotics. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains were found to be similar.

  13. Clostridium difficile and acute enterocolitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Price, E H; Wright, V. M.; Walker-Smith, J A; Tabaqchali, S

    1988-01-01

    Clostridium difficile belonging to groups not normally detected in infancy was the only potential pathogen detected in the stools of two infants with severe enterocolitis. Further information regarding the virulence of this organism was obtained by use of a recently introduced typing scheme.

  14. Clostridium difficile Infection in Outpatients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-07

    Dr. Jon Mark Hirshon, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, discusses Clostridium difficile infection in outpatients.  Created: 11/7/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/21/2011.

  15. Key research issues in Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    George Zhanel; Greg Hammond

    2005-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an emerging pathogen that causes C difficile-associated diarrhea, an important nosocomial infection. Control of this infection remains a challenge, and much needs to be determined about the antimicrobial resistance of the organism, antibiotic stewardship, contamination of the patient environment, and various host factors that determine susceptibility or resistance to infection. A national symposium focusing on C difficile infections, the Clostridium difficile Symposiu...

  16. Phospholipid profiles of Clostridium difficile.

    OpenAIRE

    Drucker, D B; Wardle, H. M.; Boote, V.

    1996-01-01

    Phospholipid molecular species present in 32 isolates of Clostridium difficile were examined by fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry in negative-ion mode. This revealed major anions consistent with the expected presence of the following phosphatidylglycerol (PG) analogs: PG(31:2), PG(32:1), PG(33:2), PG(33:1), PG(34:2), and PG(34:1). The major phospholipid molecular species are distinct from those of other bacterial groups examined.

  17. Hypervirulent strains of Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    Cookson, Barry

    2007-01-01

    North America has seen increasing numbers of hospitalised patients and others in nursing homes and the community, with more severe Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea. This is also described in Northern Europe and surveillance systems are being developed or improved to monitor the situation. One strain (ribotype O27) is described in detail and, like other emerging strains, is demonstrating increasing antimicrobial resistance, notably to quinolone antibiotics. However, its association w...

  18. Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile Infection

    OpenAIRE

    DePestel, Daryl D.; David M. Aronoff

    2013-01-01

    There has been dramatic change in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) since the turn of the 21st Century noted by a marked increase in incidence and severity, occurring at a disproportionately higher frequency in older patients. Historically considered a nosocomial infection associated with antibiotic exposure, CDI has now also emerged in the community in populations previously considered low risk. Emerging risk factors and disease recurrence represent continued challeng...

  19. Clostridium difficile causing acute renal failure: Case presentation and review

    OpenAIRE

    Arrich, Jasmin; Sodeck, Gottfried H.; Sengölge, Gürkan; Konnaris, Christoforos; Müllner, Marcus; Laggner, Anton N; Domanovits, Hans

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Clostridium difficile infection is primarily a nosocomial infection but asymptomatic carriers of Clostridium difficile can be found in up to 5% of the general population. Ampicillin, cephalosporins and clindamycin are the antibiotics that are most frequently associated with Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea or colitis. Little is known about acute renal failure as a consequence of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

  20. Intracolonic Vancomycin for Severe Clostridium difficile Colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Peter K.; Huh, Heesun C.; Cohen, Hillel W.; Feinberg, Elyssa J.; Ahmad, Salman; Coyle, Christina; Teperman, Sheldon; Boothe, Hugh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clostridium difficile colitis is associated with increased age, antibiotic usage, and hospitalization. Severe C. difficile colitis refractory to medical therapy may require surgical intervention including subtotal colectomy. We initiated an adjuvant intracolonic vancomycin (ICV) enema protocol for inpatients with severe C. difficile colitis and compared the response to this therapy in patients from the community and nursing homes.

  1. Clostridium difficile and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinelli, Massimo; Strisciuglio, Caterina; Veres, Gabor;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile infection is associated with pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in several ways. We sought to investigate C. difficile infection in pediatric patients with IBD in comparison with a group of children with celiac disease and to evaluate IBD disease course of...... period, stool specimens for C. difficile toxins analysis were collected from 112 children with celiac disease as controls. RESULTS: Clostridium difficile occurrence was significantly higher in patients with IBD compared with patients with celiac disease (7.5% versus 0.8%; P = 0.008). Clostridium...... C. difficile infected patients. METHODS: In this prospective, comparative, multicenter study, 211 pediatric patients with IBD were enrolled from October 2010 to October 2011 and tested for the presence of C. difficile toxins A and B in their stools at 0, 6, and 12 months. During the same study...

  2. Clostridium difficile in Retail Meats

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-16

    Clostridium difficile is a common cause of diarrhea in healthcare settings but little is known about what causes cases in the community. In this podcast, CDC's Dr. L. Clifford McDonald discusses two papers in the May 2009 edition of Emerging Infectious Diseases that explore whether the organism could be found in meat samples purchased in grocery stores in Arizona and Canada.  Created: 4/16/2009 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 4/16/2009.

  3. Two bacteriophages of Clostridium difficile.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahony, D E; Bell, P D; Easterbrook, K. B.

    1985-01-01

    Two temperate bacteriophages of differing morphology and host range were isolated by screening 94 isolates of Clostridium difficile. Phage 41 had a 300-nm flexible tail, whereas phage 56 had a shorter tail with a contractile sheath. Electron microscopy of phage 56 lysates exposed to elevated magnesium concentrations showed small virus-like particles which were 21 nm in diameter. The addition of MgCl2 to semisolid agar overlays enhanced both the titer and plaque size of phage 56. Phage 56 was ...

  4. Clostridium difficile after haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Burgner, D P; Rfidah, H; Beattie, T J; Seal, D V

    1993-01-01

    Six children are described who developed diarrhoea associated with Clostridium difficile during the course of haemolytic uraemic syndrome. The significance of this infection is discussed within the context of the pathophysiology of haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

  5. Polyclonal Antibody Therapies for Clostridium difficile Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Simon

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection has emerged as a growing worldwide health problem. The colitis of Clostridium difficile infection results from the synergistic action of C. difficile secreted toxins A and B upon the colon mucosa. A human monoclonal IgG anti-toxin has demonstrated the ability in combination therapy to reduce mortality in C. difficile challenged hamsters. This antibody is currently in a clinical trial for the treatment of human Clostridium difficile infection. More than one group of investigators has considered using polyclonal bovine colostral antibodies to toxins A and B as an oral passive immunization. A significant proportion of the healthy human population possesses polyclonal antibodies to the Clostridium difficile toxins. We have demonstrated that polyclonal IgA derived from the pooled plasma of healthy donors possesses specificity to toxins A and B and can neutralize these toxins in a cell-based assay. This suggests that secretory IgA prepared from such pooled plasma IgA may be able to be used as an oral treatment for Clostridium difficile infection.

  6. The economic burden of Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    McGlone, S. M.; Bailey, R R; Zimmer, S. M.; Popovich, M. J.; Y. Tian; Ufberg, P.; Muder, R R; Lee, B Y

    2011-01-01

    Although Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is the leading cause of infectious diarrhoea in hospitalized patients, the economic burden of this major nosocomial pathogen for hospitals, third-party payers and society remains unclear. We developed an economic computer simulation model to determine the costs attributable to healthcare-acquired C. difficile infection (CDI) from the hospital, third-party payer and societal perspectives. Sensitivity analyses explored the effects of varying the cos...

  7. Clostridium difficile Infection: A Worldwide Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Kristin E.; Lamont, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, an anaerobic toxigenic bacterium, causes a severe infectious colitis that leads to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Both enhanced bacterial toxins and diminished host immune response contribute to symptomatic disease. C. difficile has been a well-established pathogen in North America and Europe for decades, but is just emerging in Asia. This article reviews the epidemiology, microbiology, pathophysiology, and clinical management of C. difficile. Prompt rec...

  8. Clostridium difficile infection in horses: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Diab, SS; Songer, G; Uzal, FA

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is considered one of the most important causes of diarrhea and enterocolitis in horses. Foals and adult horses are equally susceptible to the infection. The highly resistant spore of C. difficile is the infectious unit of transmission, which occurs primarily via the fecal-oral route, with sources of infection including equine feces, contaminated soil, animal hospitals, and feces of other animals. Two major risk factors for the development of C. difficile associated disea...

  9. Clostridium difficile infections in China ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Ke; Wang, Shixia; Huang, Zuhu; Lu, Shan

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection has become one of the major hospital-associated infections in Western countries in the last two decades. However, there is limited information on the status of C. difficile infection in Chinese healthcare settings. Given the large and increasing elderly population and the well-recognized problem of over-prescribing of broad spectrum antibiotics in China, it is critical to understand the epidemiology and potential risk factors that may contribute ...

  10. Nosocomial empyema caused by Clostridium difficile.

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, A J; Das, S. S.; Tabaqchali, S

    1996-01-01

    Pleural infection with Clostridium difficile is extremely rare. A case of nosocomial empyema following chest drain insertion in a 46 year old man is described. The potential of C difficile to cause extra-intestinal infections should be recognised and its isolation from other sites should not be ignored.

  11. Molecular diagnosis and genotyping of Clostridium difficile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Renate Johanna van den

    2007-01-01

    Clostridium difficile was first discovered in 1935, but it was not until 1977 that this bacterium was found to be associated with pseudomembranous colitis. The disease was considered to be caused by the production of two C. difficile toxins, toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB). TcdA was shown to exhibit

  12. Clostridium difficile infection : epidemiology, complications and recurrences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, Martijn Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming bacterium, the toxin-producing strains of which cause colitis. Risk factors are antibiotics, advanced age and severe comorbidity. C. difficile infection (CDI) has been regarded as mostly a hospital-acquired infection. Preventing relapses is considered the big

  13. Clostridium difficile in poultry and poultry meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains. Toxigenic C. difficile has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer t...

  14. Pseudomembranous Colitis: Not Always Caused by Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek M. Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although classically pseudomembranous colitis is caused by Clostridium difficile, it can result from several etiologies. Certain medications, chemical injury, collagenous colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, ischemia, and other infectious pathogens can reportedly cause mucosal injury and subsequent pseudomembrane formation. We present the case of a middle-aged woman with vascular disease who was incorrectly diagnosed with refractory C. difficile infection due to the presence of pseudomembranes. Further imaging, endoscopy, and careful histopathology review revealed chronic ischemia as the cause of her pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea. This case highlights the need for gastroenterologists to consider non-C. difficile etiologies when diagnosing pseudomembranous colitis.

  15. Clostridium difficile: kahden diagnostisen menetelmän vertailu

    OpenAIRE

    Kalluinen, Marika

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile on anaerobi sauvabakteeri, joka muodostaa itiöitä. Osa kannoista tuottaa toksiineita. Clostridium difficile -bakteerin tuottamat toksiinit ovat suurin syy antibioottihoitoon liittyvään ripuliin ja pseudomembranoottiseen koliittiin eli paksusuolen tulehdukseen. Clostridium difficile -bakteerin aiheuttamaa tautia kutsutaan Clostridium difficile –infektioksi eli CDI:ksi. Joskus tauti voi johtaa jopa kuolemaan. Infektioita esiintyy antibioottihoidon yhteydessä iäkkäillä tai ...

  16. Clostridium difficile infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Czepiel, Jacek; Biesiada, Grażyna; Perucki, William; Mach, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium widely distributed in the human environment. In the last decade the incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection has grown, particularly in Europe and North America, making it one of the more common nosocomial infections. A group particularly susceptible to Clostridium difficile infection are patients with inflammatory bowel disease, especially those with involvement of the colon. This paper presents relevant data on Clostridium difficile infe...

  17. Clostridium difficile recurrences in Stockholm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, Staffan; Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Jorup-Rönström, Christina; Ellström, Kristina; Nord, Carl Erik; Weintraub, Andrej

    2016-04-01

    Sixty-eight hospital-admitted patients with a first episode of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) were included and followed up during 1 year. Faeces samples were collected at 1, 2, 6 and 12 months after inclusion and analyzed for the presence of C. difficile toxin B, genes for toxin A, toxin B, binary toxin and TcdC deletion by PCR. All strains were also PCR-ribotyped and the MICs of the isolates were determined against eight antimicrobial agents. In 68 patients initially included, antibiotics, clinical signs and co-morbidities were analyzed and 56 were evaluable for recurrences. The mean number of different antibiotics given during 3 months prior to inclusion was 2.6 (range 0-6). Six patients had not received any antibiotics and three of them had diagnosed inflammatory bowel disease. Thirty-two patients (57%) had either a microbiological or clinical recurrence, 16 of whom had clinical recurrences that were confirmed microbiologically (13, 23%) or unconfirmed by culture (3, 5%). Twenty-nine patients were positive in at least one of the follow-up tests, 16 had the same ribotype in follow-up tests, i.e. relapse, and 13 a different ribotype, i.e., reinfection. Most common ribotypes were 078/126, 020, 023, 026, 014/077, 001 and 005. No strain of ribotype 027 was found. Strains ribotype 078/126 and 023 were positive for binary toxin and were the strains most prone to cause recurrence. All strains were sensitive to vancomycin and metronidazole. Patients with recurrences were significantly older (p = 0.02) and all patients had a high burden of comorbidities, which could explain the high fatality rate, 26 (38%) patients died during the 1-year follow-up. PMID:26802875

  18. Clostridium difficile--a moving target

    OpenAIRE

    Tillotson, Glenn S.; Tillotson, Joni

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile has been recognized as a pathogen in humans for over 40 years, but in the past decade the incidence has increased and, more importantly, the clinical presentation and consequences have become more serious, with increased morbidity and mortality. The emergence of a new, more pathogenic strain, BI/NAP1/027, has driven these shifts. Treatment of this disease has been with two antibiotics, metronidazole and vancomycin, but increasing recurrence, not uncommon with C. difficil...

  19. Clostridium difficile infection: epidemiology, complications and recurrences

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Martijn Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming bacterium, the toxin-producing strains of which cause colitis. Risk factors are antibiotics, advanced age and severe comorbidity. C. difficile infection (CDI) has been regarded as mostly a hospital-acquired infection. Preventing relapses is considered the biggest challenge in CDI management. In this thesis, we show that CDI occurs in Dutch general practices, often in patients without contact with hospitals. Also, we show that the emerging virulent stra...

  20. Clostridium difficile Infection: New Insights Into Management

    OpenAIRE

    Khanna, Sahil; Pardi, Darrell S.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile was first described as a cause of diarrhea in 1978 and is now among the leading 3 hospital-acquired infections in the United States, along with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci. In the past 2 decades, there has been an increase in the incidence, severity, and recurrence rates of C difficile infection, all of which are associated with poor outcomes. In addition, several novel risk factors and newer treatment methods are emer...

  1. Clostridium difficile in Humans and Food Animals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-06-30

    Clostridium difficile is an antibiotic-resistant bacterium that causes diarrhea and sometimes serious intestinal illnesses. In recent years, C. difficile infections have been increasing in number and severity, including among some people outside healthcare settings. In this podcast, CDC's Dr. Michael Jhung discusses his recent study that looked at a new, increasingly prevalent strain of C. difficile in people and compared it to a strain historically found in animals to see whether the two might be linked. The study is published in the July 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.  Created: 6/30/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 7/3/2008.

  2. Clostridium difficile – an emerging plague

    OpenAIRE

    D. Spînu; Ovidiu Bratu; Popescu, R.; Marcu, D; A. Rădulescu; Dan Mischianu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Clostridium difficile infection stands nowadays as one of the major emerging health problems still underestimated. Only in 2009 the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infection (ESCMID) was able to publish guidelines for this serious disease. Actually the guidelines were updated in 2013 so we can speak of a united action towards the resolution of this healthcare problem. Methods: This is a review article aiming to shed light in various aspects of clostridium dif...

  3. Clostridium difficile Infection: A Re-Emerging Threat

    OpenAIRE

    Honda, Hitoshi; Dubberke, Erik R.

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is an important healthcare-associated infection. The incidence and severity of C. difficile infection are increasing. Recent C. difficile infection outbreaks with high proportions of severe outcomes have been linked to an emerging, hypervirulent strain of C. difficile. Recently recognized risk factors of C. difficile infection include fluoroquinolone exposure and gastric acid suppression. Effective prevention measures for C. difficile infection include contact ...

  4. Clostridium difficile in Retail Ground Meat, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Palacios, Alexander; Staempfli, Henry R.; Duffield, Todd; Weese, J. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Clostridium difficile was isolated from 12 (20%) of 60 retail ground meat samples purchased over a 10-month period in 2005 in Canada. Eleven isolates were toxigenic, and 8 (67%) were classified as toxinotype III. The human health implications of this finding are unclear, but with the virulence of toxinotype III strains further studies are required.

  5. Clostridium difficile Infection Worsens the Prognosis of Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E Negrón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of Clostridium difficile infections among ulcerative colitis (UC patients is well characterized. However, there is little knowledge regarding the association between C difficile infections and postoperative complications among UC patients.

  6. Clostridium difficile infection in Europe: a hospital-based survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Martijn P; Notermans, Daan W; van Benthem, Birgit H B;

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the extent of Clostridium difficile infection in Europe. Our aim was to obtain a more complete overview of C difficile infection in Europe and build capacity for diagnosis and surveillance.......Little is known about the extent of Clostridium difficile infection in Europe. Our aim was to obtain a more complete overview of C difficile infection in Europe and build capacity for diagnosis and surveillance....

  7. Clostridium difficile enteritis in a patient after total proctocolectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Peacock, Oliver; Speake, William; Shaw, Aidan; Goddard, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is associated with antibiotic therapy and usually limited to the colonic mucosa. However, it is also a rare cause of enteritis, with only a few cases reported in the literature. In the present report, the case of a 30-year-old woman with Clostridium difficile enteritis who previously had a panproctocolectomy with end ileostomy for severe ulcerative colitis is described. Previously reported cases of Clostridium difficile enteritis are also reviewed. Previous ant...

  8. Positive regulation of Clostridium difficile toxins.

    OpenAIRE

    Moncrief, J S; Barroso, L A; Wilkins, T D

    1997-01-01

    The toxigenic element of Clostridium difficile VPI 10463 contains a small open reading frame (ORF) immediately upstream of the toxin B gene (G. A. Hammond and J. L. Johnson, Microb. Pathog. 19:203-213, 1995). The deduced amino acid sequence of the ORF, which we have designated txeR, encodes a 22-kDa protein which contains a helix-turn-helix motif with sequence identity to DNA binding regulatory proteins. We used a DNA fragment containing the C. difficile toxin A repeating units (ARU) as a rep...

  9. The Enterotoxicity of Clostridium difficile Toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Hanping Feng; Tor Savidge; Xingmin Sun

    2010-01-01

    The major virulence factors of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) are two large exotoxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB). However, our understanding of the specific roles of these toxins in CDI is still evolving. It is now accepted that both toxins are enterotoxic and proinflammatory in the human intestine. Both purified TcdA and TcdB are capable of inducing the pathophysiology of CDI, although most studies have focused on TcdA. C. difficile toxins exert a wide array of biological activities by act...

  10. Clostridium difficile: from obscurity to superbug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazier, J S

    2008-01-01

    According to the UK media and popular press, Clostridium difficile is now a fully fledged member of that notorious but ill-defined group of microorganisms portrayed to the general public as superbugs. Following the trail blazed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), C. difficile has made the transition from being an obscure anaerobic bacterium, mainly of interest to specialist anaerobic microbiologists, to that of an infamous superbug responsible for outbreaks of hospital-acquired infection that commonly result in serious disease and death. This review tracks the rise in scientific knowledge and public awareness of this organism. PMID:18476496

  11. Antibiotic prescribing policy and Clostridium difficile diarrhoea.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, K A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Broad-spectrum antibiotics, particularly intravenous cephalosporins, are associated with Clostridium difficile diarrhoea. Diarrhoea due to C. difficile is a growing problem in hospitals, especially among elderly patients. AIM: To establish whether changing an antibiotic policy with the aim of reducing the use of injectable cephalosporins leads to a reduction in the incidence of C. difficile diarrhoea in elderly patients. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. METHODS: A group of patients who were subject to the new antibiotic policy from the period following July 2000, were compared with patients who were admitted prior to July 2000 and were not subject to the new policy. Infections, antibiotic prescriptions and mortality rates were determined from case notes, and C. difficle diarrhoea rates from microbiological data. RESULTS: Intravenous cephalosporin use fell from 210 to 28 defined daily doses (p < 0.001) following the change in antibiotic policy, with a corresponding increase in piperacillin-tazobactam (p < 0.001) and moxifloxacin (p < 0.001) use. The new policy led to a significant reduction in C. difficile diarrhoea cases. The relative risk of developing C. difficile infection with the old policy compared to the new policy was 3.24 (95%CI 1.07-9.84, p = 0.03). DISCUSSION: The antibiotic policy was successfully introduced into an elderly care service. It reduced both intravenous cephalosporin use and C. difficile diarrhoea.

  12. Current Status of Clostridium difficile Infection Epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Lessa, Fernanda C.; Gould, Carolyn V; McDonald, L. Clifford

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic changes in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) during recent years, with increases in incidence and severity of disease in several countries, have made CDI a global public health challenge. Increases in CDI incidence have been largely attributed to the emergence of a previously rare and more virulent strain, BI/NAP1/027. Increased toxin production and high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones have made this strain a very successful pathogen in healthcare set...

  13. Comparative proteomic analysis of Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    Chilton, Caroline Hazel

    2011-01-01

    The recent increase in availability of next generation sequencing methodologies has led to extensive analysis of the genome of Clostridium difficile. In contrast, protein expression analysis, crucial to the elucidation of mechanisms of disease, has severely lagged behind. In this study, in-depth proteomic analysis of three strains of varying virulence, demonstrated previously in an animal model, has been undertaken against a background of the sequenced genomes. Strain B-1 is ...

  14. Exploiting Bacteriophages to Tackle Clostridium difficile Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Meader, Emma

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) currently affects around 20,000 people each year, in healthcare institutions and in the community, and will often follow disruption of the gut microbiome. Current treatment strategies call for the use of further antibiotics, of which there is a limited choice. There is a need for additional remedial and prophylactic solutions with greater specificity and low levels of toxicity and resistance. This thesis describes the pathogenesis of CDI...

  15. Clostridium difficile and inflammatory bowel disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Greenfield, C.; Aguilar Ramirez, J R; Pounder, R E; Williams, T.; Danvers, M; Marper, S R; Noone, P

    1983-01-01

    Stools from 109 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (13.4%) contained Clostridium difficile or its toxin, an incidence similar to the stools of 99 control patients with diarrhoea (11.9%), but significantly higher than the stools of 77 control patients with a normal bowel habit (1.4%). Sixty-six per cent of the diarrhoea controls, but only 11% of the inflammatory bowel disease patients, reported recent antibiotic use: however, 67% of inflammatory bowel disease patients were taking sulphas...

  16. Clostridium difficile associated infection, diarrhea and colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Perry Hookman; Jamie S Barkin

    2009-01-01

    A new, hypervirulent strain of Clostridium difficile, called NAP1/BI/027, has been implicated in C. difficile outbreaks associated with increased morbidity and mortality since the early 2000s. The epidemic strain is resistant to fluoroquinolones in vitro, which was infrequent prior to 2001. The name of this strain reflects its characteristics, demonstrated by different typing methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (NAP1), restriction endonuclease analysis (BI) and polymerase chain reaction (027). In 2004 and 2005, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) emphasized that the risk of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) is increased, not only by the usual factors, including antibiotic exposure, but also gastrointestinal surgery/manipulation, prolonged length of stay in a healthcare setting, serious underlying illness, immune-compromising conditions, and aging. Patients on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have an elevated risk, as do peripartum women and heart transplant recipients. Before 2002, toxic megacolon in C. difficile-associated colitis (CDAC), was rare, but its incidence has increased dramatically. Up to twothirds of hospitalized patients may be infected with C. difficile. Asymptomatic carriers admitted to healthcare facilities can transmit the organism to other susceptible patients, thereby becoming vectors. Fulminant colitis is reported more frequently during outbreaks of C. difficile infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). C. difficile infection with IBD carries a higher mortality than without underlying IBD. This article reviews the latest information on C. difficile infection, including presentation, vulnerable hosts and choice of antibiotics, alternative therapies, and probiotics and immunotherapy. We review contact precautions for patients with known or suspected C. difficileassociated disease. Healthcare institutions require accurate and rapid diagnosis for early detection of possible outbreaks, to initiate

  17. Clostridium difficile causing acute renal failure: Case presentation and review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jasmin Arrich; Gottfried H. Sodeck; Gürkan Seng(o)lge; Christoforos Konnaris; Marcus Müllner; Anton N. Laggner; Hans Domanovits

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Clostridium difficile infection is primarily a nosocomial infection but asymptomatic carriers of Clostridium difficile can be found in up to 5% of the general population.Ampicillin, cephalosporins and clindamycin are the antibiotics that are most frequently associated with Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea or colitis. Little is known about acute renal failure as a consequence of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.METHODS: In this case report, we describe the course of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in an 82-yearold patient developing acute renal failure. Stopping the offending agent and symptomatic therapy brought a rapid improvement of diarrhea and acute renal failure, full recovery was gained 18 d after admission. In a systematic review we looked for links between the two conditions.RESULTS: The link between Clostridium difficilr-associated diarrhea and acute renal failure in our patient was most likely volume depletion. However, in experimental studies a direct influence of Clostridium difficile toxins on renal duct cells could be shown.CONCLUSION: Rapid diagnosis, nonspecific supportive treatment and specific antibiotic treatment, especially in the elderly, may lower excess mortality Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea and renal failure being possible complications.

  18. Clostridium difficile is an autotrophic bacterial pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Köpke

    Full Text Available During the last decade, Clostridium difficile infection showed a dramatic increase in incidence and virulence in the Northern hemisphere. This incessantly challenging disease is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial infectious diarrhea and became life-threatening especially among elderly people. It is generally assumed that all human bacterial pathogens are heterotrophic organisms, being either saccharolytic or proteolytic. So far, this has not been questioned as colonization of the human gut gives access to an environment, rich in organic nutrients. Here, we present data that C. difficile (both clinical and rumen isolates is also able to grow on CO2+H2 as sole carbon and energy source, thus representing the first identified autotrophic bacterial pathogen. Comparison of several different strains revealed high conservation of genes for autotrophic growth and showed that the ability to use gas mixtures for growth decreases or is lost upon prolonged culturing under heterotrophic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of C. difficile (heterotrophic growth on various substrates as well as autotrophy could allow the organism in the gut to avoid competition by niche differentiation and contribute to its survival when stressed or in unfavorable conditions that cause death to other bacteria. This may be an important trait for the pathogenicity of C. difficile.

  19. Aerial Dissemination of Clostridium difficile spores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banfield Kathleen R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD is a frequently occurring healthcare-associated infection, which is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality amongst elderly patients in healthcare facilities. Environmental contamination is known to play an important contributory role in the spread of CDAD and it is suspected that contamination might be occurring as a result of aerial dissemination of C. difficile spores. However previous studies have failed to isolate C. difficile from air in hospitals. In an attempt to clarify this issue we undertook a short controlled pilot study in an elderly care ward with the aim of culturing C. difficile from the air. Methods In a survey undertaken during February (two days 2006 and March (two days 2007, air samples were collected using a portable cyclone sampler and surface samples collected using contact plates in a UK hospital. Sampling took place in a six bedded elderly care bay (Study during February 2006 and in March 2007 both the study bay and a four bedded orthopaedic bay (Control. Particulate material from the air was collected in Ringer's solution, alcohol shocked and plated out in triplicate onto Brazier's CCEY agar without egg yolk, but supplemented with 5 mg/L of lysozyme. After incubation, the identity of isolates was confirmed by standard techniques. Ribotyping and REP-PCR fingerprinting were used to further characterise isolates. Results On both days in February 2006, C. difficile was cultured from the air with 23 samples yielding the bacterium (mean counts 53 – 426 cfu/m3 of air. One representative isolate from each of these was characterized further. Of the 23 isolates, 22 were ribotype 001 and were indistinguishable on REP-PCR typing. C. difficile was not cultured from the air or surfaces of either hospital bay during the two days in March 2007. Conclusion This pilot study produced clear evidence of sporadic aerial dissemination of spores of a clone of C

  20. Asymptomatic neonatal colonisation by Clostridium difficile.

    OpenAIRE

    Bolton, R P; Tait, S K; Dear, P R; Losowsky, M. S.

    1984-01-01

    In a prospective survey of infants born in a single maternity unit, asymptomatic faecal colonisation by Clostridium difficile occurred in 31 (47%) of 66 babies who provided a faecal sample during week one of life and at age 14 and 28 days, and in 46 (30.7%) of the total of 150 babies for whom at least one faecal sample was obtained during the month of study. There was no evidence for acquisition of the organism from the mother during delivery and colonisation was unrelated to the means of del...

  1. Blastocystis sp. Infection Mimicking Clostridium Difficile Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Gaby S.; Chaudhari, Shobhana; Shady, Ahmed; Caballes, Ana; Hong, Joe

    2016-01-01

    We report an unusual case of severe diarrhea related to Blastocystis sp. infection in a patient with end stage renal disease on hemodialysis. The patient was admitted due to profuse diarrhea associated with fever and leukocytosis. Pertinent stool work-up such as leukocytes in stool, stool culture, clostridium difficile toxin B PCR, and serology for hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C and cytomegalovirus screening were all negative. Ova and parasite stool examination revealed Blastocystis sp. The patient was given intravenous metronidazole with clinical improvement by day three and total resolution of symptoms by day ten. PMID:27247810

  2. Clostridium difficile outbreaks: prevention and treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez FJ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Fernando J Martinez,1 Daniel A Leffler,2 Ciaran P Kelly21Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 2Department of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI have increased dramatically over the past decade. Its treatment, however, has largely remained the same with the exception of oral vancomycin use as a first-line agent in severe disease. From 1999 to 2004, 20,642 deaths were attributed to CDI in the United States, almost 7 times the rate of all other intestinal infections combined. Worldwide, several major CDI outbreaks have occurred, and many of these were associated with the NAP1 strain. This ‘epidemic’ strain has contributed to the rising incidence and mortality of CDI. The purpose of this article is to review the current management, treatment, infection control, and prevention strategies that are needed to combat this increasingly morbid disease.Keywords: antibiotic, antimicrobial, infectious colitis, pseudomembranous colitis, nosocomial, iatrogenic, toxin, Clostridium difficile

  3. Current status of Clostridium difficile infection epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessa, Fernanda C; Gould, Carolyn V; McDonald, L Clifford

    2012-08-01

    The dramatic changes in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) during recent years, with increases in incidence and severity of disease in several countries, have made CDI a global public health challenge. Increases in CDI incidence have been largely attributed to the emergence of a previously rare and more virulent strain, BI/NAP1/027. Increased toxin production and high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones have made this strain a very successful pathogen in healthcare settings. In addition, populations previously thought to be at low risk are now being identified as having severe CDI. Recent genetic analysis suggests that C. difficile has a highly fluid genome with multiple mechanisms to modify its content and functionality, which can make C. difficile adaptable to environmental changes and potentially lead to the emergence of more virulent strains. In the face of these changes in the epidemiology and microbiology of CDI, surveillance systems are necessary to monitor trends and inform public health actions. PMID:22752867

  4. Suppression of Clostridium difficile by Normal Hamster Cecal Flora and Prevention of Antibiotic-Associated Cecitis

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Kenneth H.; Silva, Joseph; Fekety, F. Robert

    1981-01-01

    Administration of normal cecal homogenates decreased numbers of viable Clostridium difficile and prevented cecitis in antibiotic-challenged hamsters. Cecal anaerobes appeared to suppress C. difficile.

  5. The emergence of 'hypervirulence' in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartman, Stephen T; Heap, John T; Kuehne, Sarah A; Cockayne, Alan; Minton, Nigel P

    2010-08-01

    The impact of Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) in healthcare settings throughout the developed world is considerable in terms of mortality, morbidity, and disease management. The incidence of CDAD has risen dramatically since the turn of this century, concomitant with the emergence of so-called hypervirulent strains which are thought to cause a more severe disease, higher relapse rates, and increased mortality. Pre-eminent amongst hypervirulent strains are those belonging to ribotype 027, which were first reported in Canada in 2003 and shortly thereafter in the UK. Since its arrival in Europe, it has spread rapidly and has now been reported in 16 member states and Switzerland. The physiological factors responsible for the rapid emergence of hypervirulent C. difficile strains remain unclear. It is known that they produce a binary toxin (CDT) in addition to toxins A and B, that they are resistant to fluoroquinolones due to mutations in gyrA, and that they are resistant to erythromycin. Representative strains have been suggested to produce more toxin A and B in the 'laboratory flask' (most likely due to a frameshift mutation in the repressor gene tcdC), to be more prolific in terms of spore formation, and also exhibit increased adherence to human intestinal epithelial cells due to altered surface proteins. However, the contribution of these and other as yet unidentified factors to the rapid spread of certain C. difficile variants (e.g., ribotypes 027 and 078) remains unclear at present. The advent of ClosTron technology means that it is now possible to construct genetically stable isogenic mutants of C. difficile and carry out reverse genetic studies to elucidate the role of specific gene loci in causing disease. The identification of virulence factors using this approach should help lead to the rational development of therapeutic countermeasures against CDAD. PMID:20547099

  6. Flooding and Clostridium difficile infection: a case-crossover analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospttalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community­ associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more ...

  7. Does Doxycycline Protect Against Development of Clostridium difficile Infection?

    OpenAIRE

    Doernberg, Sarah B.; Winston, Lisa G.; Deck, Daniel H.; Chambers, Henry F.

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether doxycycline protects against development of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), we studied a cohort of adult inpatients who received at least one dose of ceftriaxone. Addition of doxycycline was associated with low risk of CDI.

  8. Clostridium difficile Toxin as a Confounding Factor in Enterovirus Isolation

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Nathalie J.; Ho, Helen H.; Dondero, Marjorie E.

    1980-01-01

    A peculiar cytotoxic effect, occasionally encountered in the course of inoculating cell cultures with fecal specimens for routine enterovirus isolation attempts, was shown to be produced by Clostridium difficile toxin.

  9. Rectal bacteriotherapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede, M; Tinggaard, M; Helms, M

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is one of the most common nosocomial infections. Among other alternatives to standard treatment with vancomycin for recurrent infection are faecal microbiota transplantation and rectal bacteriotherapy with a fixed mixture of intestinal bacterial strains isolated from...

  10. Clostridium difficile infection in the community: a zoonotic disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensgens, M.P.; Keessen, E.C.; Squire, M.M.; Riley, T.V.; Koene, M.G.J.; de Boer, E.; Lipman, L.J.A.; Kuijper, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) are traditionally seen in elderly and hospitalized patients who have used antibiotic therapy. In the community, CDIs requiring a visit to a general practitioner are increasingly occurring among young and relatively healthy individuals without known predisposin

  11. Clostridium difficile infections in the community: a zoonotic disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensgens, M.P.M.; Keessen, A.M.; Squire, M.M.; Riley, T.V.; Koene, M.G.J.; Boer, de E.; Lipman, L.J.; Kuijper, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) are traditionally seen in elderly and hospitalized patients who have used antibiotic therapy. In the community, CDIs requiring a visit to a general practitioner are increasingly occurring among young and relatively healthy individuals without known predisposin

  12. Clinical importance of Clostridium difficile finding in hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocić Branislava

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Clostridium difficile infections predominatelly occur among hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the importance of finding the isolate of Clostridium difficile cultured from the stool of hospitalized patients. Material and methods Material consisted of 100 patients with at least one liquid stool samples and control group with form stool. Every patient spent minimum 48h in hospital before the sampling. The material was immediately cultured on mediums for isolation of enteric pathogens, and on selective CCFA medium (Biomedics for Clostridium difficile in anaerobic condition. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile toxin in stool samples was achieved by ELISA-RIDASCREEN Clostridium difficile Toxin A/B test (R-Biopharm. Results One-hundred forty one stool samples of patients in Clinical Center Nis were cultivated and examined for C. difficile. The bacteria was isolated in seven patients from the clinical group. In four (57.14% patients, the presence of C. difficile toxin in stool was established. The bacteria was diagnosed from the stool samples of five patients from the control group, but the toxin was not found in their stool samples. Discussion The results performed at the Institute for Public Health Nis are in accordance with previously published results that all patients with positive findings of Clostridium difficile toxin in stool samples were on antibiotic treatment longer than 14 days. By analyzing the patient's stay in hospital and duration of antibiotic treatment, we observed the statistically significant difference in findings between the patients with CDAD and the patients from the control group with positive bacteria. Conclusion The study confirms the importance of finding Clostridium difficile associated disease in four (4% hospitalized patients.

  13. Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea: Candidate Organisms other than Clostridium Difficile

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Hyun Joo; Shim, Ki-Nam; Jung, Sung-Ae; Choi, Hee Jung; Lee, Mi Ae; Ryu, Kum Hei; Kim, Seong-Eun; Yoo, Kwon

    2008-01-01

    Backgraound/Aims The direct toxic effects of antibiotics on the intestine can alter digestive functions and cause pathogenic bacterial overgrowth leading to antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). Clostridium Difficile (C. Difficile) is widely known to be responsible for 10~20% of AAD cases. However, Klebsiella oxytoca, Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida species might also contribute to AAD. Methods We prospectively analyzed the organisms in stool and colon tissue cultu...

  14. Reactive arthritis induced by recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Marr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile colitis is a common infection that can be difficult to resolve and may result in recurrent infections. Reactive arthritis is a rare presentation of this disease and its treatment is not well differentiated in the literature. We describe a case of reactive arthritis occurring in a patient with a history of recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis while currently receiving a taper of oral vancomycin. His arthritis symptoms resolved with corticosteroids and continued treatment with anticlostridial antibiotics.

  15. Dietary-based gut flora modulation against Clostridium difficile onset

    OpenAIRE

    Gougoulias, C.; Tuohy, K.M.; Gibson, G. R.

    2007-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is a frequent complication of antibiotic therapy in hospitalised patients, which today is attracting more attention than ever and has led to its classification as a 'superbug'. Disruption of the composition of the intestinal microflora following antibiotic treatment is an important prerequisite for overgrowth of C. difficile and the subsequent development of an infection. Treatment options for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and C. difficile-induced colitis inc...

  16. Clostridium difficile Ribotype 027, Toxinotype III, the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Kuijper, Ed J.; Berg, Renate J van den; Debast, Sylvia; Visser, Caroline E; Veenendaal, Dick; Troelstra, Annet; Kooi, Tjallie van der; Hof, Susan van den; Notermans, Daan W.

    2006-01-01

    Outbreaks due to Clostridium difficile polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotype 027, toxinotype III, were detected in 7 hospitals in the Netherlands from April 2005 to February 2006. One hospital experienced at the same time a second outbreak due to a toxin A-negative C. difficile PCR ribotype 017 toxinotype VIII strain. The outbreaks are difficult to control.

  17. Chenodeoxycholate Is an Inhibitor of Clostridium difficile Spore Germination▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sorg, Joseph A.; Sonenshein, Abraham L.

    2008-01-01

    Some cholate derivatives that are normal components of bile can act with glycine to induce the germination of Clostridium difficile spores, but at least one bile component, chenodeoxycholate, does not induce germination. Here we show that chenodeoxycholate inhibits the germination of C. difficile spores in response to cholate and taurocholate.

  18. Clostridium difficile ribotype 027, toxinotype III, the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, Ed J; Berg, Renate J van den; Debast, Sylvia; Visser, Caroline E; Veenendaal, Dick; Troelstra, Annet; Kooi, Tjallie van der; Hof, Susan van den; Notermans, Daan W

    2006-01-01

    Outbreaks due to Clostridium difficile polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotype 027, toxinotype III, were detected in 7 hospitals in the Netherlands from April 2005 to February 2006. One hospital experienced at the same time a second outbreak due to a toxin A-negative C. difficile PCR ribotype 017 t

  19. Isolation of Clostridium difficile from healthy food animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Clostridium difficile-associated disease is increasingly reported and studies indicate that food animals may be sources of human infections. Methods: The presence of C. difficile in 345 swine fecal, 1,325 dairy cattle fecal, and 371 dairy environmental samples were examined. Two isolati...

  20. PREVALENCE OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE IN AN INTEGRATED SWINE OPERATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of Clostridium difficile among different age and production groups of swine in a vertically integrated swine operation in Texas in 2006 and to compare our isolates to other animal and human isolates. Isolation of C. difficile was performed u...

  1. Markers of Intestinal Inflammation, Not Bacterial Burden, Correlate With Clinical Outcomes in Clostridium difficile Infection

    OpenAIRE

    El Feghaly, Rana E.; Stauber, Jennifer L.; Deych, Elena; Gonzalez, Carlos; Tarr, Phillip I.; Haslam, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Fecal inflammatory markers at diagnosis correlate with diarrhea persistence and treatment failure in Clostridium difficile infection, whereas C. difficile fecal bacterial burden does not. C. difficile bacterial concentration decreases similarly in patients treated with metronidazole and vancomycin.

  2. Clostridium difficile Carriage Rate in Outpatients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosain Salari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objective: Closteridium difficile is a gram positive, anaerobic and spore-forming bacillus. Inflammatory bowel disease or IBD includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Inflammation of the intestinal mucosa in these patients can be as a risk factor for colonization of Clostridium difficile. The purpose of this study was to analysis of Clostridium difficile carriage in the IBD outpatients. Materials and methods: Stool specimens were obtained from 50 outpatients with IBD. Stools were cultured on selective media under anaerobic conditions. Filtered extract of bacteria was exposed to HeLa cell culture for analysis of toxin production after identification of Clostridium difficile isolates. Results: The results showed that 3 IBD patients (6% had stool cultures positive for Clostridium difficile. Stool cultures were negative in all patients with Crohn's disease. All 3 patients had ulcerative colitis. Only one isolate was positive for toxin production. Conclusion: The ulcerated colitis than Crohn's patients had higher carriage. In general IBD outpatients carriage rates for Clostridium difficile was low.

  3. Clostridium difficile infection in an Iranian hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalali Mohammad

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality internationally, yet there are important regional differences in the epidemiology and microbiology of disease. Most reports have come from North America and Europe, with limited information from other regions, including the Middle East. Given the changes in the epidemiology of CDI in developed countries, particularly associated with the dissemination of hypervirulent epidemic clones, an understanding of the epidemiology and microbiology of CDI in diverse regions is warranted. This study involved collection of stool samples from individuals with diarrhea at the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences Teaching Hospital, Isfahan, Iran, between October 2010 and March 2011. Selective enrichment culture for C. difficile was performed and isolates were characterised using ribotyping, PCR for the detection of tcdA, tcdB and cdtB genes, and tcdC sequence analysis. Findings Clostridium difficile was isolated from 19/89 (21% stool samples of 17/86 (20% patients. 13/17 (77% cases of CDI were hospital-associated. Patients with CDI were significantly older (43 ± 28y than those with non-CDI diarrhea (24, ± 26y(P = 0.018. All isolates were toxigenic, and possessed genes encoding for toxins A and B. Six (32% of 19 isolates also possessed cdtB. Twelve ribotypes were identified. Ribotype 078/toxinotype V was most common, accounting for 4 (21% of isolates. A single isolate of a different toxinotype V ribotype was identified, as was a toxinotype XXIV isolate. The remaining isolates consisted of 9 different toxinotype 0 ribotypes. Conclusions CDI is an important cause of diarrhea in patients in this hospital. The diversity of ribotypes was striking, and the number of different types suggests the presence of a broad range of strains in the community, the hospital or both. The predominance of toxinotype V strains, which have been associated with community

  4. Outcomes of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis after administration of antibiotics along with probiotic supplement

    OpenAIRE

    Doder Radoslava; Kovačević Nadica; Munćan Dragica; Potkonjak Aleksandar; Tomašev Branka; Ružić Maja

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Clostridium difficile enterocolitis is a potentially fatal disease showing increasing incidence in hospital environment. Therapeutic approach in the management of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis is highly complex, particularly because of its tendency to relapse and reinfection. The study was aimed at investigating the factors influencing the development of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis and outcomes of enterocolitis after administration of standard antimicrobial t...

  5. Clostridium difficile Infection: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, Risk Factors, and Therapeutic Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Goudarzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and mortality rate of Clostridium difficile infection have increased remarkably in both hospital and community settings during the last two decades. The growth of infection may be caused by multiple factors including inappropriate antibiotic usage, poor standards of environmental cleanliness, changes in infection control practices, large outbreaks of C. difficile infection in hospitals, alteration of circulating strains of C. difficile, and spread of hypervirulent strains. Detection of high-risk populations could be helpful for prompt diagnosis and consequent treatment of patients suffering from C. difficile infection. Metronidazole and oral vancomycin are recommended antibiotics for the treatment of initial infection. Current treatments for C. difficile infection consist of supportive care, discontinuing the unnecessary antibiotic, and specific antimicrobial therapy. Moreover, novel approaches include fidaxomicin therapy, monoclonal antibodies, and fecal microbiota transplantation mediated therapy. Fecal microbiota transplantation has shown relevant efficacy to overcome C. difficile infection and reduce its recurrence.

  6. Toxin Synthesis by Clostridium difficile Is Regulated through Quorum Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Darkoh, Charles; DuPont, Herbert L.; Norris, Steven J; Heidi B Kaplan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is dramatically increasing as a cause of antibiotic- and hospital-associated diarrhea worldwide. C. difficile, a multidrug-resistant pathogen, flourishes in the colon after the gut microbiota has been altered by antibiotic therapy. Consequently, it produces toxins A and B that directly cause disease. Despite the enormous public health problem posed by this pathogen, the molecular mechanisms that regulate production of the toxins, which are direct...

  7. Clostridium difficile Brain Empyema after Prolonged Intestinal Carriage

    OpenAIRE

    Gravisse, J.; Barnaud, G.; Hanau-Berçot, B.; Raskine, L; Riahi, J.; Gaillard, J L; Sanson-Le-Pors, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, the most common cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, is occasionally isolated from extraintestinal sites and is usually found as part of a polymicrobial flora. We report a case of brain empyema that occurred after the recurrent intestinal carriage of a nontoxigenic strain of C. difficile. Brain abscess cultures contained both toxigenic and nontoxigenic isolates. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that nontoxigenic isolates from the intestine and from the brain ...

  8. Host Recognition of Clostridium difficile and the Innate Immune Response

    OpenAIRE

    Cowardin, Carrie A.; Petri, William A, Jr

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, spore forming bacillus and the most common cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in the United States. Clinical outcomes of C. difficile infection (CDI) range from asymptomatic colonization to pseudomembranous colitis, sepsis and death. Disease is primarily mediated by the action of the Rho-glucosylating toxins A and B, which induce potent pro-inflammatory signaling within the host. The role of this inflammatory response during infection is just beg...

  9. Flooding and Clostridium difficile Infection: A Case-Crossover Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Cynthia J.; Wade, Timothy J; Hilborn, Elizabeth D.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospitalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community-associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more commonly reported. A case-crossover study was used to assess emergency room (ER) and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection following flood events in Massachusetts from 2003 through 2007. Exposure status was based on...

  10. Toxinotype V Clostridium difficile in humans and food animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhung, Michael A; Thompson, Angela D; Killgore, George E; Zukowski, Walter E; Songer, Glenn; Warny, Michael; Johnson, Stuart; Gerding, Dale N; McDonald, L Clifford; Limbago, Brandi M

    2008-07-01

    Clostridium difficile is a recognized pathogen in neonatal pigs and may contribute to enteritis in calves. Toxinotype V strains have been rare causes of human C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD). We examined toxinotype V in human disease, the genetic relationship of animal and human toxinotype V strains, and in vitro toxin production of these strains. From 2001 through 2006, 8 (1.3%) of 620 patient isolates were identified as toxinotype V; before 2001, 7 (tcdC deletion and most produced binary toxin. Further study is needed to understand the epidemiology of CDAD caused by toxinotype V C. difficile, including the potential of foodborne transmission to humans. PMID:18598622

  11. Clostridium difficile in general practice and community health.

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, T V; Wymer, V.; Bamford, V. W.; Bowman, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The isolation rate for Clostridium difficile in diarrhoeal stools was investigated in patients from general practice and community health centres over a 14-month period. C. difficile or its cytotoxin was detected in specimens from 89 (4.7%) of 1882 patients studied and accounted for 30.3% of all enteropathogenic micro-organisms isolated. Overall C. difficile was second only to Giardia lamblia in frequency. Recovery rates in the different groups of patients surveyed varied from 3.6 to 27.5%. T...

  12. Controversies Surrounding Clostridium difficile Infection in Infants and Young Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maribeth R. Nicholson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a frequent cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in adults and older children. However, as many as 80% of infants can be asymptomatically colonized. The reasons for this have not been well established but are believed to be due to differences in toxin receptors or toxin internalization. Determining which children who test positive for C. difficile warrant treatment is exceedingly difficult, especially in the setting of increased rates of detection and the rising risk of disease in children lacking classic risk factors for C. difficile.

  13. Clostridium difficile-ribotype 027 er en udfordring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Trine Nyboe; Ravn, Pernille; Skinhøj, Ida Elisabeth Gjørup

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Clostridium difficile is the primary infective cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. In 2008, a major outbreak of CD027 took place in North Zealand, Denmark. We described this infection in a single medical department. Patients positive for C. difficile enlisted at Medical...... Department O, Herlev Hospital, in 2009 were included and demographic data were recorded. In total, 69 patients were included, average age 83 years, Charlson Comorbidity Score 4. Of all patients 24 died. Further studies are needed in order to treat and minimize infection with C. difficile....

  14. Infectious Diarrhea: Norovirus and Clostridium difficile in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary B; Rajagopalan, Shobita; Yoshikawa, Thomas T

    2016-08-01

    Norovirus infection usually results in acute gastroenteritis, often with incapacitating nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It is highly contagious and resistant to eradication with alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Appropriate preventative and infection control measures can mitigate the morbidity and mortality associated with norovirus infection. Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of health care-associated diarrhea in the United States. Antibiotic use is by far the most common risk factor for C difficile colonization and infection. Appropriate preventive measures and judicious use of antibiotics can help mitigate the morbidity and mortality associated with C difficile infection. PMID:27394020

  15. Molecular characterization of pathogenic Clostridium difficile strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Over the last years major advances have been made in the field of C. difficile research. Despite the continuous progress of research in C. difficile epidemiology and molecular biology. This thesis shows that the development of molecular based techniques in detecetion and typing of C. difficile could

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolated from food animals on farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium difficile is commonly associated with a spectrum of disease in humans referred to as C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD) and use of antimicrobials is considered a risk factor for development of disease in humans. Clostridium difficile can also inhabit healthy food animals and transmi...

  17. Muricholic acids inhibit Clostridium difficile spore germination and growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Francis

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Clostridium difficile have increased steadily over the past several years. While studies on C. difficile virulence and physiology have been hindered, in the past, by lack of genetic approaches and suitable animal models, newly developed technologies and animal models allow these processes to be studied in detail. One such advance is the generation of a mouse-model of C. difficile infection. The development of this system is a major step forward in analyzing the genetic requirements for colonization and infection. While important, it is equally as important in understanding what differences exist between mice and humans. One of these differences is the natural bile acid composition. Bile acid-mediated spore germination is an important step in C. difficile colonization. Mice produce several different bile acids that are not found in humans. These muricholic acids have the potential to impact C. difficile spore germination. Here we find that the three muricholic acids (α-muricholic acid, β-muricholic acid and ω-muricholic acid inhibit C. difficile spore germination and can impact the growth of vegetative cells. These results highlight an important difference between humans and mice and may have an impact on C. difficile virulence in the mouse-model of C. difficile infection.

  18. Clostridium difficile in mixed populations of animals and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: Since 2003, there has been an emergence of BI/NAP1 strain of Clostridium difficile (Cd) in North American hospitals. The origins of this epidemic strain have yet to be determined. However, PFGE analysis has shown ~80% similarity between this strain and some swine isolates. The objecti...

  19. Clostridium difficile prevalence in an integrated swine operation in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently there has been an epidemic of human disease in North America caused by the bacterium Clostridium difficile (Cd). It appears to be a new strain that is more virulent than previous strains, produces more toxins, and causes more severe disease (McDonald et al., 2005). The origin of the new s...

  20. Clostridium difficile in retail meat and processing plants in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile (Cd) have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains of Cd. Toxigenic Cd has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer ...

  1. Clostridium difficile from healthy food animals: Optimized isolation and prevalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two isolation methods were compared for isolation of Clostridium difficile from food animal feces. The single alcohol shock method (SS) used selective enrichment in cycloserine-cefoxitin fructose broth supplemented with 0.1% sodium taurocholate (TCCFB) followed by alcohol shock and isolation on tryp...

  2. Varied prevalence of Clostridium difficile in an integrated swine operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of Clostridium difficile among different age and production groups of swine in a vertically integrated swine operation in Texas in 2006 and to compare our isolates to other animal and human isolates. Preliminary results are based on 131 C. d...

  3. New advances in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis D Hedge

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Dennis D Hedge, Joe D Strain, Jodi R Heins, Debra K FarverSouth Dakota State University College of Pharmacy, Brookings, SD 57007, USAAbstract: Clostridium difficile infections (CDI have increased in frequency throughout the world. In addition to an increase in frequency, recent CDI epidemics have been linked to a hypervirulent C. difficile strain resulting in greater severity of disease. Although most mild to moderate cases of CDI continue to respond to metronidazole or vancomycin, refractory and recurrent cases of CDI may require alternative therapies. This review provides a brief overview of CDI and summarizes studies involving alternative antibiotics, toxin binders, probiotics, and immunological therapies that can be considered for treatment of acute and recurrent CDI in severe and refractory situations.Keywords: Clostridium difficile, antibiotics, probiotics, immunological therapy

  4. Reclassification of Clostridium difficile as Clostridioides difficile (Hall and O'Toole 1935) Prévot 1938.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Paul A; Citron, Diane M; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Finegold, Sydney M

    2016-08-01

    The recent proposal by Lawson and Rainey (2015) to restrict the genus Clostridium to Clostridium butyricum and related species has ramifications for the members of the genera that fall outside this clade that should not be considered as Clostridium sensu stricto. One such organism of profound medical importance is Clostridioides difficile that is a major cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea and mortality in individuals. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the closest relative of Clostridium difficile is Clostridium mangenotii with a 94.7% similarity value and both are located within the family Peptostreptococcaceae that is phylogenetically far removed from C. butyricum and other members of Clostridium sensu stricto. Clostridium difficile is Clostridium mangenotii each produce abundant H2 gas when grown in PYG broth and also produce a range of straight and branched chain saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with C16:0 as a major product. The cell wall peptidoglycan contains meso-DAP as the diagnostic diamino acid. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses, novel genus Clostridioides gen. nov. is proposed for Clostridium difficile as Clostridioides difficile gen. nov. comb. nov. and that Clostridium mangenotii be transferred to this genus as Clostridioides mangenotii comb. nov. The type species of Clostridioides is Clostridioides difficile. PMID:27370902

  5. Rifaximin therapy for metronidazole-unresponsive Clostridium difficile infection: a prospective pilot trial

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Basu, P.; Dinani, Amreen; Rayapudi, Krishna; Pacana, Tommy; Shah, Niraj James; Hampole, Hemant; Krishnaswamy, N. V.; Mohan, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Background: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a recent epidemic in the United States, particularly in the hospital setting. Oral metronidazole is standard therapy for C. difficile infection, but resistance to metronidazole is becoming a clinical challenge.

  6. The Burden of Clostridium difficile after Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Javier Z; Skovrlj, Branko; Rothenberg, Edward S; Lu, Young; McAnany, Steven; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective database analysis. Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate incidence, comorbidities, and impact on health care resources of Clostridium difficile infection after cervical spine surgery. Methods A total of 1,602,130 cervical spine surgeries from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2002 to 2011 were included. Patients were included for study based on International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedural codes for cervical spine surgery for degenerative spine diagnoses. Baseline patient characteristics were determined. Multivariable analyses assessed factors associated with increased incidence of C. difficile and risk of mortality. Results Incidence of C. difficile infection in postoperative cervical spine surgery hospitalizations is 0.08%, significantly increased since 2002 (p difficile infection were significantly increased in patients with comorbidities such as congestive heart failure, renal failure, and perivascular disease. Circumferential cervical fusion (odds ratio [OR] = 2.93, p difficile infection after degenerative cervical spine surgery. C. difficile infection after cervical spine surgery results in extended length of stay (p difficile after cervical spine surgery is nearly 8% versus 0.19% otherwise (p difficile to be a significant predictor of inpatient mortality (OR = 3.99, p difficile increases the risk of in-hospital mortality and costs approximately $6,830,695 per year to manage in patients undergoing elective cervical spine surgery. Patients with comorbidities such as renal failure or congestive heart failure have increased probability of developing infection after surgery. Accepted antibiotic guidelines in this population must be followed to decrease the risk of developing postoperative C. difficile colitis. PMID:27190732

  7. In vitro inhibition of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens by commercial probiotic strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, A.; Kokotovic, Branko; Permin, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics have gained importance in human and veterinary medicine to prevent and control clostridial enteric disease. Limited information is available on the ability of different probiotic bacteria used in food products to inhibit Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens. The objective of......) on the reference strains of C. difficile and C. perfringens were assessed by an agar well diffusion assay and by a broth culture inhibition assay using cell-free supernatant harvested at different growth phases, with and without pH neutralization. To study growth characteristics, probiotic strains...... effect as seen when supernatant was assessed with and without pH neutralization. Supernatants obtained from 10 probiotic strains inhibited C. difficile only when supernatant was added without pH neutralization. In the broth culture inhibition assay, growth of C. perfringens and C. difficile was inhibited...

  8. Fate of ingested Clostridium difficile spores in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Howerton

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, a major nosocomial complication. The infective form of C. difficile is the spore, a dormant and resistant structure that forms under stress. Although spore germination is the first committed step in CDI onset, the temporal and spatial distribution of ingested C. difficile spores is not clearly understood. We recently reported that CamSA, a synthetic bile salt analog, inhibits C. difficile spore germination in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we took advantage of the anti-germination activity of bile salts to determine the fate of ingested C. difficile spores. We tested four different bile salts for efficacy in preventing CDI. Since CamSA was the only anti-germinant tested able to prevent signs of CDI, we characterized CamSa's in vitro stability, distribution, and cytotoxicity. We report that CamSA is stable to simulated gastrointestinal (GI environments, but will be degraded by members of the natural microbiota found in a healthy gut. Our data suggest that CamSA will not be systemically available, but instead will be localized to the GI tract. Since in vitro pharmacological parameters were acceptable, CamSA was used to probe the mouse model of CDI. By varying the timing of CamSA dosage, we estimated that C. difficile spores germinated and established infection less than 10 hours after ingestion. We also showed that ingested C. difficile spores rapidly transited through the GI tract and accumulated in the colon and cecum of CamSA-treated mice. From there, C. difficile spores were slowly shed over a 96-hour period. To our knowledge, this is the first report of using molecular probes to obtain disease progression information for C. difficile infection.

  9. Pseudomembranous colitis in Clostridium difficile-monoassociated rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Czuprynski, C J; Johnson, W. J.; Balish, E; Wilkins, T

    1983-01-01

    Germfree rats were monoassociated with either a toxin-producing strain of Clostridium difficile (Tox+) or a variant of this strain (ToxR) which produced much less toxin (1/10,000) in vivo and in vitro. Monoassociation of germfree rats with C. difficile Tox+ resulted in mortality (17%) and in pathology to the small and large intestines, livers, and lungs. Cecal filtrates from the Tox+-monoassociated rats were cytotoxic for tissue culture cells. The cytotoxicity of cecal filtrates could be bloc...

  10. Surface Layers of Clostridium difficile Endospores▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Permpoonpattana, Patima; Tolls, Elisabeth H.; Nadem, Ramez; Tan, Sisareuth; Brisson, Alain; Cutting, Simon M.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important human pathogen and one where the primary cause of disease is due to the transmission of spores. We have investigated the proteins found in the outer coat layers of C. difficile spores of pathogenic strain 630 (CD630). Five coat proteins, CotA, CotB, CotCB, CotD, and CotE, were shown to be expressed on the outer coat layers of the spore. We demonstrate that purified spores carry catalase, peroxiredoxin, and chitinase activity and that this activity correla...

  11. Clostridium difficile: the anaerobe that made the grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazier, Jon S

    2012-04-01

    Unlike other anaerobic bacteria of clinical importance, Clostridium difficile has managed to enter into the realm of public awareness. Following the trail blazed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), C. difficile has made the transition from being an obscure anaerobic bacterium, mainly of interest to specialist anaerobic microbiologists, to that of an infamous "superbug" responsible for outbreaks of hospital-acquired infection that commonly result in serious disease and death. This report picks out key moments, particularly in the UK, which tracked the rise in both the public and political awareness of this organism. PMID:22293217

  12. Detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile: comparison of the cell culture neutralization, Xpert C. difficile, Xpert C. difficile/Epi, and Illumigene C. difficile assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancholi, P; Kelly, C; Raczkowski, M; Balada-Llasat, J M

    2012-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most important cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Several laboratory techniques are available to detect C. difficile toxins or the genes that encode them in fecal samples. We evaluated the Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi (Cepheid, CA) that detect the toxin B gene (tcdB) and tcdB, cdt, and a deletion in tcdC associated with the 027/NAP1/BI strain, respectively, by real-time PCR, and the Illumigene C. difficile (Meridian Bioscience, Inc.) that detects the toxin A gene (tcdA) by loop-mediated isothermal amplification in stool specimens. Toxigenic culture was used as the reference method for discrepant stool specimens. Two hundred prospective and fifty retrospective diarrheal stool specimens were tested simultaneously by the cell cytotoxin neutralization assay (CCNA) and the Xpert C. difficile, Xpert C. difficile/Epi, and Illumigene C. difficile assays. Of the 200 prospective stools tested, 10.5% (n = 23) were determined to be positive by CCNA, 17.5% (n = 35) were determined to be positive by Illumigene C. difficile, and 21.5% (n = 43) were determined to be positive by Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi. Of the 50 retrospective stools, previously determined to be positive by CCNA, 94% (n = 47) were determined to be positive by Illumigene C. difficile and 100% (n = 50) were determined to be positive by Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi. Of the 11 discrepant results (i.e., negative by Illumigene C. difficile but positive by Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi), all were determined to be positive by the toxigenic culture. A total of 21% of the isolates were presumptively identified by the Xpert C. difficile/Epi as the 027/NAP1/BI strain. The Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi assays were the most sensitive, rapid, and easy-to use assays for the detection of toxigenic C. difficile in stool specimens. PMID:22278839

  13. Analysis of the pathogenicity locus in Clostridium difficile strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S H; Tang, Y J; Silva, J

    2000-02-01

    The genes for Clostridium difficile toxins A and B (tcdA and tcdB) are part of a 19.6-kb pathogenicity locus (PaLoc) that includes the genes tcdD, tcdE, and tcdC. To determine whether the C. difficile PaLoc is a stable and conserved genetic unit in toxigenic strains, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze 50 toxigenic, 39 nontoxigenic, and 2 toxin-defective isolates. The respective amplicons were identified for tcdA-E in the toxigenic isolates; these were absent in the nontoxigenic isolates. C. difficile P-829 lacked at least a fragment of tcdD, tcdB, tcdE, and tcdC, but tcdA was present. C. difficile 8864 had deletions in the tcdA and tcdC genes. These data suggest that the PaLoc is highly stable in toxigenic C. difficile, nontoxigenic isolates lack the unit, and isolates with a defective PaLoc can still cause clinical disease. Further studies are needed to define the role of individual genes in the pathogenesis of C. difficile-associated diarrhea. PMID:10669352

  14. Flooding and Clostridium difficile Infection: A Case-Crossover Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia J. Lin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospitalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community-associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more commonly reported. A case-crossover study was used to assess emergency room (ER and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection following flood events in Massachusetts from 2003 through 2007. Exposure status was based on whether or not a flood occurred prior to the case/control date during the following risk periods: 0–6 days, 7–13 days, 14–20 days, and 21–27 days. Fixed-effects logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of diagnosis with C. difficile infection following a flood. There were 129 flood events and 1575 diagnoses of C. difficile infection. Among working age adults (19–64 years, ER and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection were elevated during the 7–13 days following a flood (Odds Ratio, OR = 1.69; 95% Confidence Interval, CI: 0.84, 3.37. This association was more substantial among males (OR = 3.21; 95% CI: 1.01–10.19. Associations during other risk periods were not observed (p < 0.05. Although we were unable to differentiate community-associated versus nosocomial infections, a potential increase in C. difficile infections should be considered as more flooding is projected due to climate change.

  15. Optimisation of a method for isolation of Clostridium difficile from faeces

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Angelica

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a pathogen for both humans and animals and is often associated with antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Recently, several human cases of C. difficile-infection with increased mortality and morbidity have been reported. In studies performed in different countries C. difficile has been found in meat. Therefore the question whether C. difficile can be a zoonotic agent has been raised. The aim of this study was to optimize a method for isolation of C. difficile from faeces. W...

  16. Clostridium difficile: emergence of hypervirulence and fluoroquinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, B; Apisarnthanarak, A; Mundy, L M

    2007-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is a well-known cause of sporadic and healthcare-associated diarrhea. Multihospital outbreaks due to a single strain and outbreaks associated with antibiotic selective pressure, especially clindamycin, have been well documented. Severe cases and fatalities from C. difficile are uncommon. The recent global emergence of a hypervirulent strain containing binary toxin (Toxinotype III ribotype 027), with or without deletion in a regulatory gene (tcdC gene), together with high-level resistance to third generation fluoroquinolones, has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Although the defective regulatory gene locus is associated with increased toxin production in vitro, the in vivo significance of this mutation and of the binary toxin remains undefined. To date, treatment strategies have not evolved in response to the emergence of this hypervirulaent strain. We provide a critical, quantitative summary of the evolving clinical and molecular epidemiology of C. difficile along with implications relevant to future treatment strategies. PMID:17885732

  17. DNA-Microarray-based Genotyping of Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    Gawlik, Darius; Slickers, Peter; Engelmann, Ines; Müller, Elke; Lück, Christian; Friedrichs, Anette; Ehricht, Ralf; Monecke, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile can cause antibiotic-associated diarrhea and a possibility of outbreaks in hospital settings warrants molecular typing. A microarray was designed that included toxin genes (tcdA/B, cdtA/B), genes related to antimicrobial resistance, the slpA gene and additional variable genes. Results DNA of six reference strains and 234 clinical isolates from South-Western and Eastern Germany was subjected to linear amplification and labeling with dUTP-linked biotin. Amplicon...

  18. Prevalence of diverticulosis in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; J; Lipp; Odelya; E; Pagovich; David; Rabin; Albert; D; Min; Brett; B; Bernstein

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To re-evaluate the theory that colonic diverticulosis is associated with relapse of Clostridium difficile associated disease (CDAD) in light of data suggesting increasing rates of CDAD infection and relapse.METHODS: Charts were reviewed for patients with recurrent CDAD who had also had a prior colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy. An age and gender matched control group was used to compare the prevalence of diverticulosis.RESULTS: Twenty-two patients met the study criteria, and the prevalence of divert...

  19. Bacteriophage-mediated toxin gene regulation in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govind, Revathi; Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Rolfe, Rial D; Dupuy, Bruno; Fralick, Joe A

    2009-12-01

    Clostridium difficile has been identified as the most important single identifiable cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea and colitis. Virulent strains of C. difficile produce two large protein toxins, toxin A and toxin B, which are involved in pathogenesis. In this study, we examined the effect of lysogeny by PhiCD119 on C. difficile toxin production. Transcriptional analysis demonstrated a decrease in the expression of pathogenicity locus (PaLoc) genes tcdA, tcdB, tcdR, tcdE, and tcdC in PhiCD119 lysogens. During this study we found that repR, a putative repressor gene of PhiCD119, was expressed in C. difficile lysogens and that its product, RepR, could downregulate tcdA::gusA and tcdR::gusA reporter fusions in Escherichia coli. We cloned and purified a recombinant RepR containing a C-terminal six-His tag and documented its binding to the upstream regions of tcdR in C. difficile PaLoc and in repR upstream region in PhiCD119 by gel shift assays. DNA footprinting experiments revealed similarities between the RepR binding sites in tcdR and repR upstream regions. These findings suggest that presence of a CD119-like temperate phage can influence toxin gene regulation in this nosocomially important pathogen. PMID:19776116

  20. Genotypic investigation of Clostridium difficile in Prince Edward Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, H; Abbott, L P; Low, D E; Willey, B; Mulvey, M; Weese, J Scott

    2008-11-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important cause of disease in Canada; however, little information is available about the disease in the Maritime provinces. The objective of the present study was to characterize C difficile isolates obtained from people hospitalized with C difficile infection in Prince Edward Island. One hundred twenty-six C difficile ELISA toxin-positive stool samples were obtained and cultured using an enrichment protocol. C difficile was isolated from 105 of 126 (83%) samples. Twenty-two different ribotypes were identified. The most common ribotype, ribotype W, was a North American pulsotype 2 (NAP2), toxinotype 0 strain, which represented 18% of isolates. The next most common ribotype was a NAP1, toxinotype III strain, which accounted for 11% of isolates. Ribotype 027/NAP1 only accounted for five (4.7%) isolates. Forty-five per cent of isolates possessed genes encoding production of binary toxin. Three different ribotypes, all NAP1, toxinotype III strains, had a frameshift mutation in the tcdC gene (Delta117), while one isolate (ribotype 078, NAP4, toxinotype V) had a truncating mutation (C184T) in the tcdC gene. PMID:19436570

  1. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in an ocelot (Leopardus pardalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; D'elia, Mirella Lauria; de Magalhães Soares, Danielle Ferreira; Cavalcanti, Álvaro Roberto; Leal, Rodrigo Costa; Cavalcanti, Guilherme; Pereira, Pedro Lúcio Lithg; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is to report a case of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in an ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. The animal, a 24-month-old male, was referred to the Centro de Reabilitação de Animais Silvestres (CRAS) with a history of having been run over and tibia and fibula fractures. After a surgery to repair the fractures, the ocelot underwent antibiotic therapy with two doses of sodium cefovecin, during which he presented with diarrhea. A stool sample was positive for A/B toxins by a cytotoxicity assay, and a toxigenic strain of C. difficile was isolated. No other enteropathogens were detected. The association between the history, clinical signs and laboratory exams confirmed the diagnosis of C. difficile-associated diarrhea. The present report confirms C. difficile as a potential pathogen for wild felids and suggests that the C. difficile-associated diarrhea should be considered in diarrhea cases, especially when the clinical signs began after antimicrobial use. PMID:23467074

  2. Development of Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT) for Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pye, Hayley; Kohoutova, Darina; Mosse, Charles A.; Yahioglu, Gokhan; Stamati, Ioanna; Deonarain, Mahendra; Battah, Sinan; Ready, Derren; Allan, Elaine; Mullany, Peter; Lovat, Laurence B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and pseudo membranous colitis in the developed world. The aim of this study was to explore whether Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT) could be used as a novel approach to treating C. difficile infections. Methods PACT utilises the ability of light-activated photosensitisers (PS) to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as free radical species and singlet oxygen, which are lethal to cells. We screened thirteen PS against C. difficile planktonic cells, biofilm and germinating spores in vitro, and cytotoxicity of effective compounds was tested on the colorectal adenocarcinoma cell-line HT-29. Results Three PS were able to kill 99.9% of bacteria in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, both in the planktonic state and in a biofilm, after exposure to red laser light (0.2 J/cm2) without harming model colon cells. The applicability of PACT to eradicate C. difficile germinative spores indirectly was also shown, by first inducing germination with the bile salt taurocholate, followed by PACT. Conclusion This innovative and simple approach offers the prospect of a new antimicrobial therapy using light to treat C. difficile infection of the colon. PMID:26313448

  3. Development of Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT for Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa De Sordi

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and pseudo membranous colitis in the developed world. The aim of this study was to explore whether Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT could be used as a novel approach to treating C. difficile infections.PACT utilises the ability of light-activated photosensitisers (PS to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS such as free radical species and singlet oxygen, which are lethal to cells. We screened thirteen PS against C. difficile planktonic cells, biofilm and germinating spores in vitro, and cytotoxicity of effective compounds was tested on the colorectal adenocarcinoma cell-line HT-29.Three PS were able to kill 99.9% of bacteria in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, both in the planktonic state and in a biofilm, after exposure to red laser light (0.2 J/cm2 without harming model colon cells. The applicability of PACT to eradicate C. difficile germinative spores indirectly was also shown, by first inducing germination with the bile salt taurocholate, followed by PACT.This innovative and simple approach offers the prospect of a new antimicrobial therapy using light to treat C. difficile infection of the colon.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium difficile Belonging to Ribotype 018 and Sequence Type 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccobono, E; Di Pilato, V; Della Malva, N; Meini, S; Ciraolo, F; Torricelli, F; Rossolini, G M

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, belonging to ribotype 018 (RT018), is one of the most prevalent genotypes circulating in hospital settings in Italy. Here, we report the draft genome of C. difficile CD8-15 belonging to RT018, isolated from a patient with fatal C. difficile-associated infection. PMID:27587821

  5. High colonization rate and prolonged shedding of Clostridium difficile in pediatric oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Samuel R; Dolan, Susan A; West, Kelly; Dantes, Raymund B; Epson, Erin; Friedman, Deborah; Littlehorn, Cynthia A; Arms, Lesley E; Walton, Karen; Servetar, Ellen; Frank, Daniel N; Kotter, Cassandra V; Dowell, Elaine; Gould, Carolyn V; Hilden, Joanne M; Todd, James K

    2014-08-01

    Surveillance testing for Clostridium difficile among pediatric oncology patients identified stool colonization in 29% of patients without gastrointestinal symptoms and in 55% of patients with prior C. difficile infection (CDI). A high prevalence of C. difficile colonization and diarrhea complicates the diagnosis of CDI in this population. PMID:24785235

  6. Clostridium difficile Enterocolitis and Reactive Arthritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappella, Michela; Pugliese, Fabrizio; Zucchini, Andrea; Marchetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis, especially in children. We review the 6 pediatric cases published in the English and non-English literature and discuss their clinical presentation, outcome, treatment, and pathophysiology. We also report the seventh case of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis in a 6-year-old boy who was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for 10 days because of an upper respiratory infection. After the antibiotic course, the child developed at the same time diarrhea with positive stool culture for Clostridium difficile and an asymmetric polyarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and metronidazole completely resolved the pain, joint swelling, and diarrhea. After twelve months of follow-up there has been no recurrence. This report confirms the self-limiting course of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis. Clostridium difficile testing in children with gastrointestinal symptoms and acute onset of joint pain should be always considered. PMID:27190666

  7. Clostridium difficile Enterocolitis and Reactive Arthritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Cappella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis, especially in children. We review the 6 pediatric cases published in the English and non-English literature and discuss their clinical presentation, outcome, treatment, and pathophysiology. We also report the seventh case of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis in a 6-year-old boy who was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for 10 days because of an upper respiratory infection. After the antibiotic course, the child developed at the same time diarrhea with positive stool culture for Clostridium difficile and an asymmetric polyarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and metronidazole completely resolved the pain, joint swelling, and diarrhea. After twelve months of follow-up there has been no recurrence. This report confirms the self-limiting course of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis. Clostridium difficile testing in children with gastrointestinal symptoms and acute onset of joint pain should be always considered.

  8. Clostridium difficile in retail baskets, trolleys, conveyor belts, and plastic bags in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Alqumber, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) prevalence on retail surfaces and shoppers plastic bags. Methods: From 20 June to 10 August 2011, in a cross-sectional epidemiological study, 17 supermarkets from 2 cities, Albaha and Altaif, Saudi Arabia were sampled. A total of 800 samples, which comprised 200 samples per surveyed surface, were studied. These included baskets, trolleys, conveyer belts, and outgoing shoppers’ plastic bags. Clostridium difficile strains were isolat...

  9. New rapid identification test for Clostridium difficile.

    OpenAIRE

    Aspinall, S T; Dealler, S. F.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: A set of five tests were developed and tested for their ability to confirm the identity of C difficile colonies within 30 minutes. METHODS: The relevant substrates were incorporated into four filter paper squares attached to a plastic carrier (Diffstrip), five enzymes/products (prolyl aminopeptidase, galactosidase, leucine aminopeptidase, acid phosphatase and indole). The strips were inoculated, incubated for 20 minutes, and reagents added. RESULTS: 96.4% (212 of 220) strains of C diffi...

  10. Fluoroquinolone Resistance and Clostridium difficile, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Zaiß, Henning; Witte, Wolfgang; Nübel, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    We characterized 670 Clostridium diffi cile isolates collected from patients in 84 hospitals in Germany in 2008. PCR ribotyping showed high prevalence of ribotype 001 and restricted dissemination of ribotype 027 strains. Fluoroquinolone resistance and associated gyrase mutations were frequent in various ribotypes, but no resistance to metronidazole or vancomycin was noted.

  11. Rapid molecular characterization of Clostridium difficile and assessment of populations of C. difficile in stool specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewski, Danielle; Hannett, George E; Bopp, Dianna J; Dumyati, Ghinwa K; Halse, Tanya A; Dumas, Nellie B; Musser, Kimberlee A

    2009-07-01

    Our laboratory has developed testing methods that use real-time PCR and pyrosequencing analysis to enable the rapid identification of potential hypervirulent Clostridium difficile strains. We describe a real-time PCR assay that detects four C. difficile genes encoding toxins A (tcdA) and B (tcdB) and the binary toxin genes (cdtA and cdtB), as well as a pyrosequencing assay that detects common deletions in the tcdC gene in less than 4 h. A subset of historical and recent C. difficile isolates (n = 31) was also analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine the circulating North American pulsed-field (NAP) types that have been isolated in New York State. Thirteen different NAP types were found among the 31 isolates tested, 13 of which were NAP type 1 strains. To further assess the best approach to utilizing our conventional and molecular methods, we studied the populations of C. difficile in patient stool specimens (n = 23). Our results indicated that 13% of individual stool specimens had heterogeneous populations of C. difficile when we compared the molecular characterization results for multiple bacterial isolates (n = 10). Direct molecular analysis of stool specimens gave results that correlated well with the results obtained with cultured stool specimens; the direct molecular analysis was rapid, informative, and less costly than the testing of multiple patient stool isolates. PMID:19403775

  12. Characteristics of patients with Clostridium difficile infection in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y-C; Huang, Y-T; Lee, T-F; Lee, N-Y; Liao, C-H; Lin, S-Y; Ko, W-C; Hsueh, P-R

    2013-10-01

    The medical records of 84 patients with stool cultures positive for Clostridium difficile during the period August 2007 to June 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. A case of confirmed (toxigenic)C. difficile infection (CDI) was defined by the presence of symptoms (fever, diarrhoea, abdominal discomfort or distension, ileus) and the presence of toxigenic C. difficile. Patients with compatible clinical symptoms and stool cultures positive for non-toxigenic C. difficile isolates were defined as probable (non-toxigenic) CDI cases. Of these 84 patients, 50 (59.5%) were diagnosed as confirmed CDI and 34 (40.5%) as probable CDI. Thirteen (15.5%) of the 84 patients died during their hospital stay. Usage of proton pump inhibitors was a significant independent risk factor for CDI (OR 3.21, P=0.014). Of the 50 isolates associated with confirmed CDI, seven (8.3%) carried binary toxin genes (cdtAB), and six (7.1%) had a deletion in the tcdC gene. The mortality rate in confirmed CDI patients with isolates exhibiting deletion in the tcdC gene (2/6, 33.3%), those with isolates harbouring binary toxin genes (2/7, 28.6%), and those with isolates containing mutations in gyrA (2/7, 28.6%) and gyrB (1/2, 50%) was higher than the overall mortality rate (10/50, 20%) in patients with confirmed CDI. PMID:23218131

  13. Detection of virulence genes of Clostridium difficile by multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antikainen, Jenni; Pasanen, Tanja; Mero, Sointu; Tarkka, Eveliina; Kirveskari, Juha; Kotila, Saara; Mentula, Silja; Könönen, Eija; Virolainen-Julkunen, Anni-Riitta; Vaara, Martti; Tissari, Päivi

    2009-08-01

    Clostridium difficile strains belonging to the PCR ribotype 027, pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) type NAP1, toxinotype III and restriction endonuclease analysis group BI harbouring mutations in the tcdC gene and possessing binary toxin components A and B have been described to cause epidemics with increased morbidity and mortality. In the present study we developed a conventional multiplex PCR designed to detect selected virulence associated markers of the hypervirulent C. difficile PCR ribotype 027. The multiplex PCR assay detected the major toxins A and B, binary toxin components A and B as well as a possible deletion in the tcdC gene: a characteristic pattern of amplification products for the PCR ribotype 027 strains was detected. This rather simple method was specific for the screening of this hypervirulent C. difficile strain. The correlation between the multiplex PCR and PCR ribotyping methods was excellent. The sensitivity and specificity were 100% in our epidemiological situation. In conclusion, this multiplex PCR was found useful in the preliminary screening for the hypervirulent C. difficile PCR ribotype 027. PMID:19664132

  14. The Regulatory Networks That Control Clostridium difficile Toxin Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle; Peltier, Johann; Dupuy, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic clostridia cause many human and animal diseases, which typically arise as a consequence of the production of potent exotoxins. Among the enterotoxic clostridia, Clostridium difficile is the main causative agent of nosocomial intestinal infections in adults with a compromised gut microbiota caused by antibiotic treatment. The symptoms of C. difficile infection are essentially caused by the production of two exotoxins: TcdA and TcdB. Moreover, for severe forms of disease, the spectrum of diseases caused by C. difficile has also been correlated to the levels of toxins that are produced during host infection. This observation strengthened the idea that the regulation of toxin synthesis is an important part of C. difficile pathogenesis. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the regulators and sigma factors that have been reported to control toxin gene expression in response to several environmental signals and stresses, including the availability of certain carbon sources and amino acids, or to signaling molecules, such as the autoinducing peptides of quorum sensing systems. The overlapping regulation of key metabolic pathways and toxin synthesis strongly suggests that toxin production is a complex response that is triggered by bacteria in response to particular states of nutrient availability during infection. PMID:27187475

  15. Clostridium difficile infection: epidemiology, diagnosis and understanding transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jessica S H; Monaghan, Tanya M; Wilcox, Mark H

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) continues to affect patients in hospitals and communities worldwide. The spectrum of clinical disease ranges from mild diarrhoea to toxic megacolon, colonic perforation and death. However, this bacterium might also be carried asymptomatically in the gut, potentially leading to 'silent' onward transmission. Modern technologies, such as whole-genome sequencing and multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis, are helping to track C. difficile transmission across health-care facilities, countries and continents, offering the potential to illuminate previously under-recognized sources of infection. These typing strategies have also demonstrated heterogeneity in terms of CDI incidence and strain types reflecting different stages of epidemic spread. However, comparison of CDI epidemiology, particularly between countries, is challenging due to wide-ranging approaches to sampling and testing. Diagnostic strategies for C. difficile are complicated both by the wide range of bacterial targets and tests available and the need to differentiate between toxin-producing and non-toxigenic strains. Multistep diagnostic algorithms have been recommended to improve sensitivity and specificity. In this Review, we describe the latest advances in the understanding of C. difficile epidemiology, transmission and diagnosis, and discuss the effect of these developments on the clinical management of CDI. PMID:26956066

  16. First Australian isolation of epidemic Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 027.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Thomas V; Thean, Sarah; Hool, Graham; Golledge, Clayton L

    2009-06-15

    We report the first isolation in Australia of a hypervirulent epidemic strain of Clostridium difficile, PCR ribotype 027. It was isolated from a 43-year-old woman with a permanent ileostomy, who appears to have been infected while travelling in the United States. The isolate was positive for toxin A, toxin B and binary toxin, and resistant to fluoroquinolone antimicrobials, and had characteristic deletions in the tcdC gene. All diagnostic laboratories and health care facilities in Australia should now be on high alert for this organism. PMID:19527210

  17. Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Nancy; Wong, Titus

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is now the leading cause of nosocomial infection. There has been an upsurge of CDI in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD patients with CDI have increased morbidity and mortality. The establishment, proliferation, and recurrence of CDI in IBD patients form a complex interplay of microbial, environmental, and host-susceptibility factors. Different risk factors have been found predisposing IBD patients to CDI. Vancomycin performs better than metronidazole in treating IBD patients with CDI. Fecal microbiota transplantation continues to be a very effective therapy. New therapeutic modalities such as vaccinations and bile salts are currently being investigated. PMID:27137789

  18. Probiotics and Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea and Clostridium difficile Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surawicz, Christina M.

    Diarrhea is a common side effect of antibiotics. Antibiotics can cause diarrhea in 5-25% of individuals who take them but its occurrence is unpredictable. Diarrhea due to antibiotics is called antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). Diarrhea may be mild and resolve when antibiotics are discontinued, or it may be more severe. The most severe form of AAD is caused by overgrowth of Clostridium difficile which can cause severe diarrhea, colitis, pseudomembranous colitis, or even fatal toxic megacolon. Rates of diarrhea vary with the specific antibiotic as well as with the individual susceptibility.

  19. The role of Clostridium difficile in the paediatric and neonatal gut - a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, E A; Miyajima, F; Pirmohamed, M; Carrol, E D

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important nosocomial pathogen in adults. Its significance in children is less well defined, but cases of C. difficile infection (CDI) appear to be increasingly prevalent in paediatric patients. This review aims to summarize reported Clostridium difficile carriage rates across children of different age groups, appraise the relationship between CDI and factors such as method of delivery, type of infant feed, antibiotic use, and co-morbidities, and review factors affecting the gut microbiome in children and the host immune response to C. difficile. Searches of PubMed and Google Scholar using the terms 'Clostridium difficile neonates' and 'Clostridium difficile children' were completed, and reference lists of retrieved publications screened for further papers. In total, 88 papers containing relevant data were included. There was large inter-study variation in reported C. difficile carriage rates. There was an association between CDI and recent antibiotic use, and co-morbidities such as immunosuppression and inflammatory bowel disease. C. difficile was also found in stools of children with diarrhoea attributed to other pathogens (e.g. rotavirus). The role of C. difficile in the paediatric gut remains unclear; is it an innocent bystander in diarrhoeal disease caused by other organisms, or a pathogen causing subclinical to severe symptoms? Further investigation of the development of serological and local host response to C. difficile carriage may shed new light on disease mechanisms. Work is underway on defining a framework for diagnosis and management of paediatric CDI. PMID:27107991

  20. Clostridium difficile: 18 months surveillance at the Niguarda Hospital - Milano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Fanti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is currently one of the most common cause of diarrhea in hospitalized or residents in long term care institutions patients, symptoms of infection ranging from diarrhea to pseudo-membranous colitis and toxic megacolon.The disease is due to the production of enterotoxin A, cytotoxin B or binary toxin. The emergence of hypervirulent new strains showing a tcdC regulatory gene deletion (ribotype 027 has been observed in recent years. Stool or rectal swab specimens were screened using automated real-time multiplex PCR (GeneXpert, Cellbio to detect the presence of toxins producing (B toxin, binary toxin and tcdC gene deletion C. difficile. All positive samples were cultured in order to isolate the causing infection strains.The binary toxin and/or tcdC deletion producing strains were genotyped using Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST. MLST compares the intragenic sequences of seven housekeeping genes and provides a unique combination of alleles; to each combination is then assigned a Sequence Typing (ST. In the period January 2010 – June 2011, 3681 samples from 2234 patients were analyzed. Four hundred seventy-three patients (21.2% were positive for the presence of C. difficile, 34 (7.2% of there were also positive for binary toxin and 3 were positive for the tcdC gene deletion (suspected C. difficile NAP027.All the strains having tcdC gene deletion, showes ST3 typing by MLST method.These strains were isolated during the same period. The three patiens were epidemiologically linked: the patient A was hospitalized in the same room of patient B, while patient C was managed by the same team care of patient A.The spread ofsuch C. difficile strains is at the present very low in Italy. Our data confirm the poor prevalence of ribotype NAP027 and the usefulness of a presumptive diagnosis to implement immediately appropriate control measures.

  1. High mobility group box1 protein is involved in acute inflammation induced by Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ji; Zhang, Bei-Lei; Sun, Chun-Li; Wang, Jun; Li, Shan; Wang, Ju-Fang

    2016-06-01

    High mobility group box1 (HMGB1), as a damage-associated inflammatory factor, contributes to the pathogenesis of numerous chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In this study, we explored the role of HMGB1 in CDI (Clostridium difficile infection) by in vivo and in vitro experiments. Our results showed that HMGB1 might play an important role in the acute inflammatory responses to C. difficile toxin A (TcdA), affect early inflammatory factors, and induce inflammation via the HMGB1-TLR4 pathway. Our study provides the essential information for better understanding the molecular mechanisms of CDI and the potential new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of this infection. PMID:27151296

  2. Nontoxigenic Clostridium difficile Protects Hamsters against Challenge with Historic and Epidemic Strains of Toxigenic BI/NAP1/027 C. difficile

    OpenAIRE

    Nagaro, Kristin J.; Phillips, S. Tyler; Cheknis, Adam K.; Sambol, Susan P.; Zukowski, Walter E.; Johnson, Stuart; Gerding, Dale N.

    2013-01-01

    Nontoxigenic Clostridium difficile (NTCD) has been shown to prevent fatal C. difficile infection in the hamster model when hamsters are challenged with standard toxigenic C. difficile strains. The purpose of this study was to determine if NTCD can prevent C. difficile infection in the hamster model when hamsters are challenged with restriction endonuclease analysis group BI C. difficile strains. Groups of 10 hamsters were given oral clindamycin, followed on day 2 by 106 CFU of spores of NTCD ...

  3. Advances in molecular surveillance of Clostridium difficile in Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobreva, Elina G; Ivanov, Ivan N; Vathcheva-Dobrevska, Rossitza S; Ivanova, Katucha I; Asseva, Galina D; Petrov, Petar K; Kantardjiev, Todor V

    2013-09-01

    The increasing incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in Bulgaria has indicated the need to implement better surveillance approaches. The aim of the present work was to improve the current surveillance of CDI in Bulgaria by introducing innovative methods for identification and typing. One hundred and twenty stool samples obtained from 108 patients were studied over 4 years from which 32 C. difficile isolates were obtained. An innovative duplex EvaGreen real-time PCR assay based on simultaneous detection of the gluD and tcdB genes was developed for rapid C. difficile identification. Four toxigenic profiles were distinguished by PCR: A(+)B(+)CDT(-) (53.1 %, 17/32), A(-)B(+)CDT(-) (28.1 %, 9/32), A(+)B(+)CDT(+) (9.4 %, 3/32) and A(-)B(-)CDT(-) (9.4 %, 3/32). PCR ribotyping and multilocus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA7) were used for molecular characterization of the isolates. In total, nine distinct ribotypes were confirmed and the most prevalent for Bulgarian hospitals was 017 followed by 014/020, together accounting for 44 % of all isolates. Eighteen per cent of the isolates (6/32) did not match any of the 25 reference ribotypes available in this study. Twenty-four MLVA7 genotypes were detected among the clinical C. difficile isolates, distributed as follows: five for 017 ribotype, two for 014/020, 001, 002, 012 and 046 each, and one each for ribotypes 023, 070 and 078. The correlation between the typing methods was significant and allowed the identification of several clonal complexes. These results suggest that most C. difficile cases in the eight Bulgarian hospitals studied were associated with isolates belonging to the outbreak ribotypes 017 and 014/20, which are widely distributed in Europe. The real-time PCR protocol for simultaneous detection of gluD and tcdB proved to be very effective and improved C. difficile identification and confirmation of clinical C. difficile isolates. PMID:23598377

  4. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essenmacher, Alex C.; Khurram, Nazish; Bismack, Gregory T.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis. PMID:26908381

  5. Clostridium difficile infection: a review of current and emerging therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofosu, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) is the most common cause of -healthcare-associated infections in US hospitals. The epidemic strain NAP1/BI/ribotype 027 accounts for outbreaks worldwide, with increasing mortality and severity. CDI is acquired from an endogenous source or from spores in the environment, most easily acquired during the hospital stay. The use of antimicrobials disrupts the intestinal microflora enabling C. difficile to proliferate in the colon and produce toxins. Clinical diagnosis in symptomatic patients requires toxin detection from stool specimens and rarely in combination with stool culture to increase sensitivity. However, stool culture is essential for epidemiological studies. Oral metronidazole is the recommended therapy for milder cases of CDI and oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for more severe cases. Treatment of first recurrence involves the use of the same therapy used in the initial CDI. In the event of a second recurrence oral vancomycin often given in a tapered dose or intermittently, or fidaxomicin may be used. Fecal transplantation is playing an immense role in therapy of recurrent CDI with remarkable results. Fulminant colitis and toxic megacolon warrant surgical intervention. Novel approaches including new antibiotics and immunotherapy against CDI or its toxins appear to be of potential value. PMID:27065726

  6. Quantifying Transmission of Clostridium difficile within and outside Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Margaret A.; Dubberke, Erik R.; Galvani, Alison P.; Townsend, Jeffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    To quantify the effect of hospital and community-based transmission and control measures on Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), we constructed a transmission model within and between hospital, community, and long-term care-facility settings. By parameterizing the model from national databases and calibrating it to C. difficile prevalence and CDI incidence, we found that hospitalized patients with CDI transmit C. difficile at a rate 15 (95% CI 7.2–32) times that of asymptomatic patients. Long-term care facility residents transmit at a rate of 27% (95% CI 13%–51%) that of hospitalized patients, and persons in the community at a rate of 0.1% (95% CI 0.062%–0.2%) that of hospitalized patients. Despite lower transmission rates for asymptomatic carriers and community sources, these transmission routes have a substantial effect on hospital-onset CDI because of the larger reservoir of hospitalized carriers and persons in the community. Asymptomatic carriers and community sources should be accounted for when designing and evaluating control interventions. PMID:26982504

  7. Clostridium difficile infection: a review of current and emerging therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofosu, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) is the most common cause of ­healthcare-associated infections in US hospitals. The epidemic strain NAP1/BI/ribotype 027 accounts for outbreaks worldwide, with increasing mortality and severity. CDI is acquired from an endogenous source or from spores in the environment, most easily acquired during the hospital stay. The use of antimicrobials disrupts the intestinal microflora enabling C. difficile to proliferate in the colon and produce toxins. Clinical diagnosis in symptomatic patients requires toxin detection from stool specimens and rarely in combination with stool culture to increase sensitivity. However, stool culture is essential for epidemiological studies. Oral metronidazole is the recommended therapy for milder cases of CDI and oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for more severe cases. Treatment of first recurrence involves the use of the same therapy used in the initial CDI. In the event of a second recurrence oral vancomycin often given in a tapered dose or intermittently, or fidaxomicin may be used. Fecal transplantation is playing an immense role in therapy of recurrent CDI with remarkable results. Fulminant colitis and toxic megacolon warrant surgical intervention. Novel approaches including new antibiotics and immunotherapy against CDI or its toxins appear to be of potential value. PMID:27065726

  8. CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE INFECTION: RISK FACTORS, DIAGNOSIS AND CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xhelil Koleci

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI has changed over the past decade. In addition to dramatic worldwide increases in incidence, new CDI populations are emerging. These populations include patients with community acquired infections with no previous antibiotic exposure, children, pregnant women and patients with IBD. Diagnosis of CDIs requires the identification of C. difficile toxin A or B in diarrheal stool. Current diagnostic tests, however, remains inadequate and an optimal diagnostic testing algorithm has not yet been defined. Metronidazole and vancomycin are currently first-line agents for CDI treatment. Vancomycine, however, has demonstrated superior efficacy and therefore is the preferred agent in patients with severe infections. As with many antibiotics, the incidence of treatment failure with metronidazole is increasing, thereby emphasizing the need to find alternative treatments. Disease recurrence continues to occur in 20-40% of patients and its treatment remains challenging. In patients who develop fulminant colitis from a CDI, early surgical consultation is essential. Intravenous immunoglobulin and tigecycline have been used in patients with severe refractory disease, however delaying surgery may be associated with worse outcomes. Due to the risk of horizontal transmission of C.difficile infection control measures are necessary. Animals may serve as reservoirs for humans. Ongoing research by human and veterinary scientist into, epidemiology, diagnosis, effective treatment protocols and prevention are essential.

  9. Prevalence and duration of asymptomatic Clostridium difficile carriage among healthy subjects in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdys, Alison L; Nelson, Jemma S; Shutt, Kathleen A; Schlackman, Jessica L; Pakstis, Diana L; Pasculle, A William; Marsh, Jane W; Harrison, Lee H; Curry, Scott R

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies suggested that 7 to 15% of healthy adults are colonized with toxigenic Clostridium difficile. To investigate the epidemiology, genetic diversity, and duration of C. difficile colonization in asymptomatic persons, we recruited healthy adults from the general population in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Participants provided epidemiological and dietary intake data and submitted stool specimens. The presence of C. difficile in stool specimens was determined by anaerobic culture. Stool specimens yielding C. difficile underwent nucleic acid testing of the tcdA gene segment with a commercial assay; tcdC genotyping was performed on C. difficile isolates. Subjects positive for C. difficile by toxigenic anaerobic culture were asked to submit additional specimens. One hundred six (81%) of 130 subjects submitted specimens, and 7 (6.6%) of those subjects were colonized with C. difficile. Seven distinct tcdC genotypes were observed among the 7 C. difficile-colonized individuals, including tcdC genotype 20, which has been found in uncooked ground pork in this region. Two (33%) out of 6 C. difficile-colonized subjects who submitted additional specimens tested positive for identical C. difficile strains on successive occasions, 1 month apart. The prevalence of C. difficile carriage in this healthy cohort is concordant with prior estimates. C. difficile-colonized individuals may be important reservoirs for C. difficile and may falsely test positive for infections due to C. difficile when evaluated for community-acquired diarrhea caused by other enteric pathogens. PMID:24759727

  10. Importance of Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) in Clostridium difficile Colonization In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girinathan, Brintha Parasumanna; Braun, Sterling; Sirigireddy, Apoorva Reddy; Lopez, Jose Espinola; Govind, Revathi

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the principal cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Major metabolic requirements for colonization and expansion of C. difficile after microbiota disturbance have not been fully determined. In this study, we show that glutamate utilization is important for C. difficile to establish itself in the animal gut. When the gluD gene, which codes for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), was disrupted, the mutant C. difficile was unable to colonize and cause disease in a hamster model. Further, from the complementation experiment it appears that extracellular GDH may be playing a role in promoting C. difficile colonization and disease progression. Quantification of free amino acids in the hamster gut during C. difficile infection showed that glutamate is among preferred amino acids utilized by C. difficile during its expansion. This study provides evidence of the importance of glutamate metabolism for C. difficile pathogenesis. PMID:27467167

  11. Cloning and expression of secreted antigens of Clostridium difficile in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Dailey, D C; Schloemer, R H

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of the cloning and expression of Clostridium difficile antigens in Escherichia coli was investigated. The expression of a limited number of cloned clostridial antigens under the control of clostridial promoter elements in E. coli was observed.

  12. Toksisk megacolon sekundært til Clostridium difficile-associeret pseudomembranøs kolitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torsten Bloch; Friis, Mikkel Lønborg; Lehnhoff, Rudolf;

    2008-01-01

    severe colonic dilation, inflammation and oedema consistent with toxic megacolon. Stool samples were positive for Clostridium difficile. Oral vancomycine treatment and colonic decompression were inefficient. Subtotal colectomy was performed after which the condition improved. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-May-5...

  13. Clostridium difficile infection : the role of antibiotics in outbreak control, epidemiology and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debast, Sylvia Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Since a decade, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased progressively in incidence and severity of disease. Currently, CDI is considered the leading cause of nosocomial diarrhoea, associated with an increased duration of hospitalization, healthcare expenses, morbidity and mortality. Thi

  14. Both, toxin A and toxin B, are important in Clostridium difficile infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kuehne, Sarah A; Cartman, Stephen T; Minton, Nigel P.

    2011-01-01

    The bacterium Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of healthcare associated diarrhoea in the developed world and thus presents a major financial burden. The main virulence factors of C. difficile are two large toxins, A and B. Over the years there has been some debate over the respective roles and importance of these two toxins. To address this, we recently constructed stable toxin mutants of C. difficile and found that they were virulent if either toxin A or toxin B was functional. Thi...

  15. Refractory Clostridium difficile Infection Successfully Treated with Tigecycline, Rifaximin, and Vancomycin

    OpenAIRE

    Dominador Lao; Tom Chiang; Eric Gomez

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of Clostridium difficile colitis is on the rise and has become more difficult to manage with standard therapy. Thus, the need for alternative treatments is essential. Tigecycline is a glycylcycline antibiotic that has been shown to be effective against C. difficile through several published case reports and in in vitro studies. We present a case of C. difficile colitis that failed to respond to metronidazole and oral vancomycin therapy, but improved on a combination of rifaximi...

  16. Evaluation of a Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay for Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infections▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lalande, Valérie; Barrault, Laurence; Wadel, Sophie; Eckert, Catherine; Petit, Jean-Claude; Barbut, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    A new assay (illumigene C. difficile; Meridian Bioscience), based on the original loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, was evaluated with 472 unformed stools from patients suspected of Clostridium difficile infection. Compared to the toxigenic culture, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 91.8, 99.1, 91.8, and 99.1% for the illumigene C. difficile assay and 69.4, 100, 100, and 96.6% for the cytotoxicity assay, respectively.

  17. Evaluation of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalande, Valérie; Barrault, Laurence; Wadel, Sophie; Eckert, Catherine; Petit, Jean-Claude; Barbut, Frédéric

    2011-07-01

    A new assay (illumigene C. difficile; Meridian Bioscience), based on the original loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, was evaluated with 472 unformed stools from patients suspected of Clostridium difficile infection. Compared to the toxigenic culture, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 91.8, 99.1, 91.8, and 99.1% for the illumigene C. difficile assay and 69.4, 100, 100, and 96.6% for the cytotoxicity assay, respectively. PMID:21525213

  18. Intestinal Dysbiosis and Depletion of Butyrogenic Bacteria in Clostridium difficile Infection and Nosocomial Diarrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Antharam, Vijay C.; Li, Eric C.; Ishmael, Arif; Sharma, Anuj; Mai, Volker; Rand, Kenneth H.; Wang, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) causes nearly half a million cases of diarrhea and colitis in the United States each year. Although the importance of the gut microbiota in C. difficile pathogenesis is well recognized, components of the human gut flora critical for colonization resistance are not known. Culture-independent high-density Roche 454 pyrosequencing was used to survey the distal gut microbiota for 39 individuals with CDI, 36 subjects with C. difficile-negative nosocomial diarr...

  19. Resistance to Moxifloxacin in Toxigenic Clostridium difficile Isolates Is Associated with Mutations in gyrA

    OpenAIRE

    Ackermann, Grit; Tang, Yajarayma J.; Kueper, Robert; Heisig, Peter; Arne C Rodloff; Silva, Joseph; Cohen, Stuart H.

    2001-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the etiological agent of antibiotic-associated colitis and the most common cause of hospital-acquired infectious diarrhea. Fluoroquinolones such as ciprofloxacin are associated with lower risks of C. difficile-associated diarrhea. In this study, we have analyzed 72 C. difficile isolates obtained from patients with different clinical courses of disease, such as toxic megacolon and relapses; the hospital environment; public places; and horses. They were investigated for...

  20. Hyperimmune Bovine Colostrum as a Novel Therapy to Combat Clostridium difficile Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Sponseller, Jerlyn K.; Steele, Jennifer A.; Schmidt, Diane J.; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Beamer, Gillian; Sun, Xingmin; Tzipori, Saul

    2014-01-01

    Background. Clostridium difficile is a primary cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea that typically develops when gut microbiota is altered. Conventional treatment for C. difficile infection (CDI) is additional antimicrobial administration, which further disrupts normal intestinal microbiota, often resulting in poor treatment outcomes.

  1. In Vivo Selection of Rifamycin-Resistant Clostridium difficile during Rifaximin Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Carman, Robert J.; Boone, James H.; Grover, Harish; Wickham, Kimberly N.; Chen, Li

    2012-01-01

    We report the selection of Clostridium difficile resistant to the rifamycin class of antibiotics in a patient within 32 h of receiving rifaximin for the treatment of recurrent C. difficile diarrhea. Resistance was associated with single nucleotide substitutions within rpoB.

  2. Evaluation of a commercial cytotoxicity assay for detection of Clostridium difficile toxin.

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    A comparative study was performed to determine the accuracy of Clostridium difficile toxin detection. A commercial cytotoxicity assay (Bartels Immunodiagnostic Supply, Bellevue, Wash.) was compared with conventional microcytotoxicity assays, using Vero and MRC-5 cells. The Bartels system was found to be essentially equivalent to conventional cytotoxicity assays currently being performed for routine C. difficile toxin detection.

  3. Are Broad-Spectrum Fluoroquinolones More Likely To Cause Clostridium difficile-Associated Disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Dhalla, Irfan A.; Muhammad M Mamdani; Simor, Andrew E; Kopp, Alex; Rochon, Paula A; Juurlink, David N.

    2006-01-01

    Limited evidence suggests that broad-spectrum fluoroquinolones such as gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin are more likely to cause Clostridium difficile-associated disease than levofloxacin. In a population-based case-control study of outpatients prescribed fluoroquinolones, we found no increased risk of C. difficile-associated disease requiring hospitalization among patients prescribed gatifloxacin or moxifloxacin compared to levofloxacin.

  4. Clostridium difficile is not associated with outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis in the elderly in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Svraka-Latifovic (Sanela); E. Kuijper; E. Duizer (Erwin); D. Bakker; M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe coincidental increase in norovirus outbreaks and Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) raised the question of whether these events could be related, e.g. by enhancing spread by diarrhoeal disease outbreaks. Therefore, we studied the prevalence of C. difficile in outbreaks of viral ga

  5. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in the community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søes, Lillian Marie; Holt, H M; Böttiger, B;

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY To identify risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in Danish patients consulting general practice with gastrointestinal symptoms, a prospective matched case-control study was performed; cases (N = 259) had positive cultures for toxigenic C. difficile and controls (N = 455...

  6. Survey of Clostridium difficile in retail seafood in College Station, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile have increased in hospitals in North America with the emergence of newer, more virulent strains. Toxigenic C. difficile has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer t...

  7. A unique strain of community-acquired Clostridium difficile in severe complicated infection and death of a young adult

    OpenAIRE

    Heslop, Orville D; Roye-Green, Karen; Coard, Kathleen; Mulvey, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is the major cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhoea with the potential risk of progressing to severe clinical outcomes including death. It is not unusual for Clostridium difficile infection to progress to complications of toxic megacolon, bowel perforation and even Gram-negative sepsis following pathological changes in the intestinal mucosa. These complications are however less commonly seen in community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection th...

  8. The potential economic value of screening hospital admissions for Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, S M; Curry, S R; Harrison, L H; Lee, B Y

    2012-11-01

    Asymptomatic Clostridium difficile carriage has a prevalence reported as high as 51-85 %; with up to 84 % of incident hospital-acquired infections linked to carriers. Accurately identifying carriers may limit the spread of Clostridium difficile. Since new technology adoption depends heavily on its economic value, we developed an analytic simulation model to determine the cost-effectiveness screening hospital admissions for Clostridium difficile from the hospital and third party payer perspectives. Isolation precautions were applied to patients testing positive, preventing transmission. Sensitivity analyses varied Clostridium difficile colonization rate, infection probability among secondary cases, contact isolation compliance, and screening cost. Screening was cost-effective (i.e., incremental cost-effectiveness ratio [ICER] ≤ $50,000/QALY) for every scenario tested; all ICER values were ≤ $256/QALY. Screening was economically dominant (i.e., saved costs and provided health benefits) with a ≥10.3 % colonization rate and ≥5.88 % infection probability when contact isolation compliance was ≥25 % (hospital perspective). Under some conditions screening led to cost savings per case averted (range, $53-272). Clostridium difficile screening, coupled with isolation precautions, may be a cost-effective intervention to hospitals and third party payers, based on prevalence. Limiting Clostridium difficile transmission can reduce the number of infections, thereby reducing its economic burden to the healthcare system. PMID:22752150

  9. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R.; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. PMID:27043629

  10. Clostridium difficile infection: New insights into therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachrimanidou, Melina; Sarmourli, Theopisti; Skoura, Lemonia; Metallidis, Symeon; Malisiovas, Nikolaos

    2016-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in healthcare settings and represents a major social and economic burden. The major virulence determinants are large clostridial toxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), encoded within the pathogenicity locus. Traditional therapies, such as metronidazole and vancomycin, frequently lead to a vicious circle of recurrences due to their action against normal human microbiome. New disease management strategies together with the development of novel therapeutic and containment approaches are needed in order to better control outbreaks and treat patients. This article provides an overview of currently available CDI treatment options and discusses the most promising therapies under development. PMID:25955884

  11. Dentists, antibiotics and Clostridium difficile-associated disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beacher, N; Sweeney, M P; Bagg, J

    2015-09-25

    Dentists prescribe significant volumes of antimicrobial drugs within primary care settings. There is good evidence that many of the prescriptions are not justified by current clinical guidance and that that there is considerable misuse of these drugs in dentistry. One of the risks associated with antibiotic administration is Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD), an entity of which many healthcare workers, including dentists, have little knowledge or understanding. This review seeks to identify the extent and nature of the problem and provides an up to date summary of current views on CDAD, with particular reference to community acquired disease. As for all healthcare workers, scrupulous attention to standard infection control procedures and reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing are essential to reduce the risks of CDAD, prevent emergence of further resistant strains of microorganisms and maintain the value of the arsenal of antibiotics currently available to us. PMID:26404991

  12. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea after living donor liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masao Hashimoto; Yasuhiko Sugawara; Sumihito Tamura; Junichi Kaneko; Yuichi Matsui; Junichi Togashi; Masatoshi Makuuchi

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess the incidence and analyze the risk factors for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD)after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in adult.METHODS: The micobiological data and medical records of 242 adult recipients that underwent LDLT at the Tokyo University Hospital were analyzed retrospectively. The independent risk factors for postoperative CDAD were identified.RESULTS: Postoperative CDAD occurred in 11 (5%)patients. Median onset of CDAD was postoperative d 19(range, 5-54). In the multivariate analyses, male gender (odds ratio, 4.56) and serum creatinine (≥ 1.5 mg/dL,odds ratio, 16.0) independently predicted postoperative CDAD.CONCLUSION: CDAD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with postoperative diarrhea after LDLT.

  13. Structural Determinants of Clostridium difficile Toxin A Glucosyltransferase Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruitt, Rory N.; Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Farrow, Melissa A.; Friedman, David B.; Spiller, Ben; Lacy, D. Borden (Vanderbilt)

    2012-03-28

    The principle virulence factors in Clostridium difficile pathogenesis are TcdA and TcdB, homologous glucosyltransferases capable of inactivating small GTPases within the host cell. We present crystal structures of the TcdA glucosyltransferase domain in the presence and absence of the co-substrate UDP-glucose. Although the enzymatic core is similar to that of TcdB, the proposed GTPase-binding surface differs significantly. We show that TcdA is comparable with TcdB in its modification of Rho family substrates and that, unlike TcdB, TcdA is also capable of modifying Rap family GTPases both in vitro and in cells. The glucosyltransferase activities of both toxins are reduced in the context of the holotoxin but can be restored with autoproteolytic activation and glucosyltransferase domain release. These studies highlight the importance of cellular activation in determining the array of substrates available to the toxins once delivered into the cell.

  14. Structural insight into the Clostridium difficile ethanolamine utilisation microcompartment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison C Pitts

    Full Text Available Bacterial microcompartments form a protective proteinaceous barrier around metabolic enzymes that process unstable or toxic chemical intermediates. The genome of the virulent, multidrug-resistant Clostridium difficile 630 strain contains an operon, eut, encoding a bacterial microcompartment with genes for the breakdown of ethanolamine and its utilisation as a source of reduced nitrogen and carbon. The C. difficile eut operon displays regulatory genetic elements and protein encoding regions in common with homologous loci found in the genomes of other bacteria, including the enteric pathogens Salmonella enterica and Enterococcus faecalis. The crystal structures of two microcompartment shell proteins, CD1908 and CD1918, and an uncharacterised protein with potential enzymatic activity, CD1925, were determined by X-ray crystallography. CD1908 and CD1918 display the same protein fold, though the order of secondary structure elements is permuted in CD1908 and this protein displays an N-terminal β-strand extension. These proteins form hexamers with molecules related by crystallographic and non-crystallographic symmetry. The structure of CD1925 has a cupin β-barrel fold and a putative active site that is distinct from the metal-ion dependent catalytic cupins. Thin-section transmission electron microscopy of Escherichia coli over-expressing eut proteins indicates that CD1918 is capable of self-association into arrays, suggesting an organisational role for CD1918 in the formation of this microcompartment. The work presented provides the basis for further study of the architecture and function of the C. difficile eut microcompartment, its role in metabolism and the wider consequences of intestinal colonisation and virulence in this pathogen.

  15. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for the Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Krishna; Safdar, Nasia

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, a major cause of healthcare-associated diarrhea due to perturbation of the normal gastrointestinal microbiome, is responsible for significant morbidity, mortality, and healthcare expenditures. The incidence and severity of C. difficile infection (CDI) is increasing and recurrent disease is common. Recurrent infection can be difficult to manage with conventional antibiotic therapy. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), which involves instillation of stool from a healthy donor into the gastrointestinal tract of the patient, restores the gut microbiome to a healthy state. FMT has emerged as a promising new treatment for CDI. There are limited data on FMT for treatment of primary CDI, but FMT appears safe and effective for recurrent CDI. The safety and efficacy of FMT in patients with severe primary or recurrent CDI has not been established. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who undergo FMT for CDI may be at increased risk of IBD flare and caution should be exercised with use of FMT in that population. The long-term safety of FMT is unknown; thus, rigorously conducted prospective studies are needed. PMID:26344412

  16. Host recognition of Clostridium difficile and the innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, Carrie A; Petri, William A

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, spore forming bacillus and the most common cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in the United States. Clinical outcomes of C. difficile infection (CDI) range from asymptomatic colonization to pseudomembranous colitis, sepsis and death. Disease is primarily mediated by the action of the Rho-glucosylating toxins A and B, which induce potent pro-inflammatory signaling within the host. The role of this inflammatory response during infection is just beginning to be appreciated, with recent data suggesting inflammatory markers correlate closely with disease severity. In addition to the toxins, multiple innate immune signaling pathways have been implicated in establishing an inflammatory response during infection. In intoxication-based models of disease, inflammation typically enhances pathogenesis, while protection from infection seems to require some level of inflammatory response. Thus, the host immune response plays a key role in shaping the course of infection and a balanced inflammatory response which eradicates infection without damaging host tissues is likely required for successful resolution of disease. PMID:25223264

  17. Ridinilazole: a novel therapy for Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Richard J; Tillotson, Glenn; Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Garey, Kevin W; Wilcox, Mark H

    2016-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of infectious healthcare-associated diarrhoea. Recurrent CDI increases disease morbidity and mortality, posing a high burden to patients and a growing economic burden to the healthcare system. Thus, there exists a significant unmet and increasing medical need for new therapies for CDI. This review aims to provide a concise summary of CDI in general and a specific update on ridinilazole (formerly SMT19969), a novel antibacterial currently under development for the treatment of CDI. Owing to its highly targeted spectrum of activity and ability to spare the normal gut microbiota, ridinilazole provides significant advantages over metronidazole and vancomycin, the mainstay antibiotics for CDI. Ridinilazole is bactericidal against C. difficile and exhibits a prolonged post-antibiotic effect. Furthermore, treatment with ridinilazole results in decreased toxin production. A phase 1 trial demonstrated that oral ridinilazole is well tolerated and specifically targets clostridia whilst sparing other faecal bacteria. Phase 2 and 3 trials will hopefully further our understanding of the clinical utility of ridinilazole for the treatment of CDI. PMID:27283730

  18. EPIDEMIOLOGIC INVESTIGATION OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE AND CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS IN HEALTHY HORSES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, Angelika; Arroyo, Luis; Staempfli, Henry;

    Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens are important causes of equine colitis but can also be found in healthy individuals. Epidemiologic information is restricted to cross-sectional studies of fecal shedding with little information on prevalence in gastrointestinal compartments other...... than feces and variability in shedding over time. The objectives were to investigate the presence of C. difficile and C. perfringens in healthy horses over time and assess prevalence in different gastrointestinal compartments. Feces were collected monthly from 25 horses for one year. Ingesta were...... collected from nine GI compartments of a separate group of 15 euthanized horses. Selective enrichment culture was performed, followed by toxin gene detection and ribotyping (C. difficile) and multiplex PCR (C. perfringens). Toxigenic C. difficile was isolated from 15/275 (5.5%) samples from 10/25 (40...

  19. Overdiagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection in the Molecular Test Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polage, Christopher R.; Gyorke, Clare E.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Leslie, Jhansi L.; Chin, David L.; Wang, Susan; Nguyen, Hien H.; Huang, Bin; Tang, Yi-Wei; Lee, Lenora W.; Kim, Kyoungmi; Taylor, Sandra; Romano, Patrick S.; Panacek, Edward A.; Goodell, Parker B.; Solnick, Jay V.; Cohen, Stuart H.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Clostridium difficile is a major cause of health care–associated infection, but disagreement between diagnostic tests is an ongoing barrier to clinical decision making and public health reporting. Molecular tests are increasingly used to diagnose C difficile infection (CDI), but many molecular test-positive patients lack toxins that historically defined disease, making it unclear if they need treatment. OBJECTIVE To determine the natural history and need for treatment of patients who are toxin immunoassay negative and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive (Tox−/PCR+) for CDI. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective observational cohort study at a single academic medical center among 1416 hospitalized adults tested for C difficile toxins 72 hours or longer after admission between December 1, 2010, and October 20, 2012. The analysis was conducted in stages with revisions from April 27, 2013, to January 13, 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Patients undergoing C difficile testing were grouped by US Food and Drug Administration–approved toxin and PCR tests as Tox+/PCR+, Tox−/PCR+, or Tox−/PCR−. Toxin results were reported clinically. Polymerase chain reaction results were not reported. The main study outcomes were duration of diarrhea during up to 14 days of treatment, rate of CDI-related complications (ie, colectomy, megacolon, or intensive care unit care) and CDI-related death within 30 days. RESULTS Twenty-one percent (293 of 1416) of hospitalized adults tested for C difficile were positive by PCR, but 44.7% (131 of 293) had toxins detected by the clinical toxin test. At baseline, Tox−/PCR+ patients had lower C difficile bacterial load and less antibiotic exposure, fecal inflammation, and diarrhea than Tox+/PCR+ patients (P < .001 for all). The median duration of diarrhea was shorter in Tox−/PCR+ patients (2 days; interquartile range, 1-4 days) than in Tox+/PCR+ patients (3 days; interquartile range, 1-6 days) (P = .003) and was

  20. Treatment of relapsing Clostridium difficile infection using fecal microbiota transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathak R

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rahul Pathak,1 Hill Ambrose Enuh,1 Anish Patel,1 Prasanna Wickremesinghe21Department of Internal Medicine, New York Medical College, Internal Medicine Program at Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, NY, USA; 2Department of Gastrointestinal Medicine, New York Medical College, Internal Medicine Program at Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, NY, USABackground: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI has become a global concern over the last decade. In the United States, CDI escalated in incidence from 1996 to 2005 from 31 to 64/100,000. In 2010, there were 500,000 cases of CDI with an estimated mortality up to 20,000 cases a year. The significance of this problem is evident from the hospital costs of over 3 billion dollars annually. Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT was first described in 1958 and since then about 500 cases have been published in literature in various small series and case reports. This procedure has been reported mainly from centers outside of the United States and acceptance of the practice has been difficult. Recently the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA labeled FMT as a biological drug; as a result, guidelines will soon be required to help establish it as a mainstream treatment. More US experience needs to be reported to popularize this procedure here and form guidelines.Method: We did a retrospective review of our series of patients with relapsing CDI who were treated with FMT over a 3-year period. We present our experience with FMT at a community hospital as a retrospective review and describe our procedure.Results: There were a total of 12 patients who underwent FMT for relapsing C. difficile. Only one patient failed to respond and required a second FMT. There were no complications associated with the transplant and all patients had resolution of symptoms within 48 hours of FMT.Conclusion: FMT is a cheap, easily available, effective therapy for recurrent CDI; it can be safely performed in a

  1. Faecal microbiota transplantation for severe Clostridium difficile infection in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubiano, Jason A; Gardiner, Bradley; Kwong, Jason C; Ward, Peter; Testro, Adam G; Charles, Patrick G P

    2013-02-01

    We describe a case of faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) used for severe binary toxin-positive Clostridium difficile infection in an intensive care setting. The patient was admitted to the ICU of a tertiary hospital and failed traditional maximal pharmacological management. Adjunctive therapy with FMT given through gastroscopy resulted in resolution of the C. difficile-related symptoms. Although there is a growing experience with FMT for recurrent C. difficile infection, published evidence in severe disease is very limited. In a landscape of increasingly severe C. difficile infection, adjunctive FMT may be considered a useful early treatment option. PMID:23117471

  2. Faecal excretion of brush border membrane enzymes in patients with clostridium difficile diarrhoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katyal R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To look for the presence of intestinal brush border membrane (BBM enzymes in the faecal samples of patients with Clostridium difficile association. METHODS: One hundred faecal samples were investigated for C.difficile toxin (CDT. Simultaneous assays for faecal excretion of intestinal BBM enzymes viz., disaccharidases, alkaline phosphatase (AP and leucine aminopeptidase (LAP were also done. RESULTS: C.difficile toxin was detected in 25 (25% of the samples with a titre ranging from 10 to 160. No significant difference (p>0.05 was seen between the CDT positive and negative groups with any of the disaccharidases studied. However, significant increase (pC.difficile diarrhoea.

  3. Multicenter evaluation of the Verigene Clostridium difficile nucleic acid assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Karen C; Buchan, Blake W; Tan, Sokha; Stamper, Paul D; Riebe, Katherine M; Pancholi, Preeti; Kelly, Cheryl; Rao, Arundhati; Fader, Robert; Cavagnolo, Robert; Watson, Wendy; Goering, Richard V; Trevino, Ernest A; Weissfeld, Alice S; Ledeboer, Nathan A

    2013-12-01

    The Verigene Clostridium difficile Nucleic Acid test (Verigene CDF test) (Nanosphere, Northbrook, IL) is a multiplex qualitative PCR assay that utilizes a nanoparticle-based array hybridization method to detect C. difficile tcdA and tcdB in fecal specimens. In addition, the assay detects binary toxin gene sequences and the single base pair deletion at nucleotide 117 (Δ 117) in tcdC to provide a presumptive identification of the epidemic strain 027/NAP1/BI (referred to here as ribotype 027). This study compared the Verigene CDF test with anaerobic direct and enriched toxigenic culture on stool specimens from symptomatic patients among five geographically diverse laboratories within the United States. The Verigene CDF test was performed according to the manufacturer's instructions, and the reference methods performed by a central laboratory included direct culture onto cycloserine cefoxitin fructose agar (CCFA) and enriched culture using cycloserine cefoxitin mannitol broth with taurocholate and lysozyme. Recovered isolates were identified as C. difficile using gas liquid chromatography and were tested for toxin using a cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay. Strains belonging to ribotype 027 were determined by PCR ribotyping and bidirectional sequencing for Δ 117 in tcdC. A total of 1,875 specimens were evaluable. Of these, 275 specimens (14.7%) were culture positive by either direct or enriched culture methods. Compared to direct culture alone, the overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for the Verigene CDF test were 98.7%, 87.5%, 42%, and 99.9%, respectively. Compared to combined direct and enriched culture results, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive values of the Verigene CDF test were 90.9%, 92.5%, 67.6%, and 98.3%, respectively. Of the 250 concordantly culture-positive specimens, 59 (23.6%) were flagged as "hypervirulent"; 53 were confirmed as ribotype

  4. Disruption of the Gut Microbiome: Clostridium difficile Infection and the Threat of Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla A. Johanesen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is well recognized as the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, having a significant impact in both health-care and community settings. Central to predisposition to C. difficile infection is disruption of the gut microbiome by antibiotics. Being a Gram-positive anaerobe, C. difficile is intrinsically resistant to a number of antibiotics. Mobile elements encoding antibiotic resistance determinants have also been characterized in this pathogen. While resistance to antibiotics currently used to treat C. difficile infection has not yet been detected, it may be only a matter of time before this occurs, as has been seen with other bacterial pathogens. This review will discuss C. difficile disease pathogenesis, the impact of antibiotic use on inducing disease susceptibility, and the role of antibiotic resistance and mobile elements in C. difficile epidemiology.

  5. Clinical Clostridium difficile: clonality and pathogenicity locus diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Kate E; Griffiths, David; Didelot, Xavier; Evans, Jessica; Vaughan, Alison; Kachrimanidou, Melina; Stoesser, Nicole; Jolley, Keith A; Golubchik, Tanya; Harding, Rosalind M; Peto, Tim E; Fawley, Warren; Walker, A Sarah; Wilcox, Mark; Crook, Derrick W

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in healthcare settings. The major virulence determinants are large clostridial toxins, toxin A (tcdA) and toxin B (tcdB), encoded within the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc). Isolates vary in pathogenicity from hypervirulent PCR-ribotypes 027 and 078 with high mortality, to benign non-toxigenic strains carried asymptomatically. The relative pathogenicity of most toxigenic genotypes is still unclear, but may be influenced by PaLoc genetic variant. This is the largest study of C. difficile molecular epidemiology performed to date, in which a representative collection of recent isolates (n = 1290) from patients with CDI in Oxfordshire, UK, was genotyped by multilocus sequence typing. The population structure was described using NeighborNet and ClonalFrame. Sequence variation within toxin B (tcdB) and its negative regulator (tcdC), was mapped onto the population structure. The 69 Sequence Types (ST) showed evidence for homologous recombination with an effect on genetic diversification four times lower than mutation. Five previously recognised genetic groups or clades persisted, designated 1 to 5, each having a strikingly congruent association with tcdB and tcdC variants. Hypervirulent ST-11 (078) was the only member of clade 5, which was divergent from the other four clades within the MLST loci. However, it was closely related to the other clades within the tcdB and tcdC loci. ST-11 (078) may represent a divergent formerly non-toxigenic strain that acquired the PaLoc (at least) by genetic recombination. This study focused on human clinical isolates collected from a single geographic location, to achieve a uniquely high density of sampling. It sets a baseline of MLST data for future comparative studies investigating genotype virulence potential (using clinical severity data for these isolates), possible reservoirs of human CDI, and the evolutionary origins of hypervirulent strains

  6. Clostridium Difficile and Fecal Microbial Transplant in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvin Sanaie

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Critically-ill patients constitute majority of the patients hospitalized in ICU wards (1, 2. This group of patients demands special considerations and measures of care (3-6. Clostridium difficile infection causes dangerous, painful and persistent diarrhea in critically ill patients. Its treatment consists of enteral metronidazol or vancomycin in combination with IV antibiotics cessation. Recently, probiotics have been considered as an alternative treatment for pseudomembranous colitis. In 1958, fecal microbial transplant was first described from healthy individuals to sick patients to displace pathogenic microbes from the intestine by re-establishing a healthy microbial community. Since then, it has gained value as “express stool treatment” or currently known as “fecal transplant”. Last year, FDA classified stool as drug, which typically requires an Investigational New Drug application (IND. However, in July 2013, the FDA issued guidance stating that it would exercise enforcement discretion for physicians administering FMT to treat patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. Accordingly, considering stool as a tissue product or giving it its own classification, as FDA approved for blood, would keep patients safe, ensure broad access and facilitate research (7.It should be taken into consideration that some complications might accompany fecal microbial transplant such as making patients susceptible for conditions like obesity or autoimmune disorders.Safety and quality assurance starts from pre-enrollment donor screening, donor testing (17 serological and stool-based assays, donor monitoring and process control. The composition of the bacterial community has been shown to change when stored at -80oC compared to the samples stored at -20oC and it has been recommended to store the samples of intestinal content at -20oC before use for bacterial community analysis, instead of the current practice at -80oC (7, 8. However, if

  7. Vitamin D deficiency: A potential risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection

    OpenAIRE

    Youssef D; Grant WB; Peiris AN

    2012-01-01

    Dima Youssef,1 William B Grant,2 Alan N Peiris3,41Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, 2Sunlight, Nutrition and Health Research Center, San Francisco, CA USA; 3Department of Medicine, Mountain Home VAMC, 4Department of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee, USAIn the July 3, 2012 issue of the journal of Risk Management and Healthcare Policy, Martinez et al present a nice review on Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infections.1 The d...

  8. An exploratory study to evaluate Clostridium difficile polymerase chain reaction ribotypes and infection outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolau, David

    2016-01-01

    Abrar K Thabit,1,2 David P Nicolau1,3 1Center for Anti-Infective Research and Development, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT, USA; 2Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT, USA Background: Clostridium difficile infection ranges from mild to severe prolonged diarrhea with systemic symptoms. Previous studies have assessed the correlation of some disease severity parameters to C. difficile ribotypes. Ho...

  9. Microbiota Dynamics in Patients Treated with Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Yang; Garg, Shashank; Girotra, Mohit; Maddox, Cynthia; von Rosenvinge, Erik C.; Dutta, Anand; Dutta, Sudhir; Fricke, W. Florian

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembraneous colitis and is responsible for a large and increasing fraction of hospital-acquired infections. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an alternate treatment option for recurrent C. difficile infection (RCDI) refractory to antibiotic therapy. It has recently been discussed favorably in the clinical and scientific communities and is receiving increasing public attention. However, short- and long-term health co...

  10. Variation in germination of Clostridium difficile clinical isolates correlates to disease severity

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, Paul E.; Kaiser, Alyssa M.; McColm, Sarah A.; Bauer, Jessica M.; Vincent B Young; Aronoff, David M.; Hanna, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, Clostridium difficile infections have been increasing in both number and severity throughout the world. As with other spore forming bacteria, germination is a vital step in the life cycle of this pathogen. Studies have examined differences in sporulation and toxin production among a number of C. difficile clinical isolates; however, few have examined differences in germination and the relationship between this phenotype and disease severity. Here, over 100 C. diffic...

  11. Evaluating risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in adult and pediatric hematopoietic cell transplant recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, Nicole M.; Magaret, Amalia; Stednick, Zach; Morrison, Alex; Butler-Wu, Susan; Zerr, Danielle; Rogers, Karin; Podczervinski, Sara; Cheng, Anqi; Wald, Anna; Pergam, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Background Although hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients are routinely exposed to classic risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), few studies have assessed CDI risk in these high-risk patients, and data are especially lacking for pediatric HCT recipients. We aimed to determine incidence and risk factors for CDI in adult and pediatric allogeneic HCT recipients. Methods CDI was defined as having diarrhea that tested positive for C. difficile via PCR, cytotoxin assay, o...

  12. Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 is not evenly distributed in Hesse, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvand, Mardjan; Bettge-Weller, Gudrun

    2016-08-01

    Clostridium difficile-isolates associated with CDI in different healthcare facilities in Hesse were analysed. The most common ribotypes were 001 (31.1%) and 027 (27.0%). The proportion of ribotype 027 among regional C. difficile-isolates was 10.8% in North Hesse, 17.2% in Middle Hesse, and 33.5% in the Rhine-Main Metropolitan Area. In the latter region, ribotype 027 was the most prevalent ribotype. PMID:27063988

  13. Community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection: an increasing public health threat

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta A; Khanna S

    2014-01-01

    Arjun Gupta, Sahil Khanna Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: There has been a startling shift in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection over the last decade worldwide, and it is now increasingly recognized as a cause of diarrhea in the community. Classically considered a hospital-acquired infection, it has now emerged in populations previously considered to be low-risk and lacking the traditional risk factors for C. difficile i...

  14. Presence and molecular characterization of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens in intestinal compartments of healthy horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, Angelika; Arroyo, Luis Guillermo; Staempfli, Henry Rolf;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens are commonly associated with colitis in equids, but healthy carriers exist. Scarce information is available on the prevalence of Clostridium spp. in gastrointestinal compartments other than faeces in healthy horses, and it is unknown w...

  15. Isolation and Characterization of toxin A-negative, toxin B-positive Clostridium difficile in Dublin, Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Drudy, Denise; Harnedy, N.; Fanning, S; O’Mahony, R.; Kyne, L.

    2006-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of infectious diarrhoea in hospitalised patients. Most pathogenic C. difficile strains produce two toxins, A and B; however, clinically relevant toxin A-negative, toxin Bpositive (A– B+ ) strains of C. difficile that cause diarrhoea and colitis in humans have been isolated worldwide. The aims of this study were to isolate and characterise A– B+ strains from two university hospitals in Dublin, Ireland. Samples positive for C. difficile were identified dai...

  16. A Novel Quantitative Sampling Technique for Detection and Monitoring of Clostridium difficile Contamination in the Clinical Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Shanom; Muzslay, Monika; Wilson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The horizontal transmission of Clostridium difficile in the hospital environment is difficult to establish. Current methods to detect C. difficile spores on surfaces are not quantitative, lack sensitivity, and are protracted. We propose a novel rapid method to detect and quantify C. difficile contamination on surfaces. Sponge swabbing was compared to contact plate sampling to assess the in vitro recovery of C. difficile ribotype 027 contamination (∼100, 101, or 102 CFU of spores) from test su...

  17. Varied prevalence of Clostridium difficile in an integrated swine operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, K N; Harvey, R B; Scott, H M; Hume, M E; Andrews, K; Brawley, A D

    2009-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the prevalence of Clostridium difficile (Cd) among different age and production groups of swine in a vertically integrated swine operation in Texas in 2006 and to compare our isolates to other animal and human isolates. Results are based on 131 Cd isolates from 1008 swine fecal samples and pork trim samples (overall prevalence of 13%). The prevalence (number positive/number tested in production type) of Cd was different between the groups (Pgenes, 129 isolates harbored a 39 base pair deletion in the tcdC gene, 120 isolates were toxinotype V, and all 131 of the isolates were positive for the binary toxin gene cdtB. All isolates were resistant to cefoxitin, ciprofloxacin, and imipenem, whereas all were sensitive to metronidazole, piperacillin/tazobactam, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and vancomycin. The majority of isolates were resistant to clindamycin; resistant or intermediate to ampicillin; and sensitive to tetracycline and chloramphenicol. There was an increased (P

  18. Prospective assessment of two-stage testing for Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, A; Pope, C; Bray, S; Riley, P; Breathnach, A; Krishna, S; Planche, T

    2010-09-01

    Commonly used immunoassays have limitations as stand-alone tests for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). In particular, the specificity of these assays means that these tests generate a relatively large number of false-positive results. We introduced a two-stage regimen for CDI as routine. Unformed stool samples received in our laboratory were initially tested with a Meridian Premier enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and positive samples were retested with reference testing methods (toxigenic culture and cell cytotoxicity assay). Clinicians received diagnostically useful information on the day that the sample arrived in the laboratory, with definitive negative and provisional positive results made available. We reviewed the first 3643 unformed stool specimens of which 158/3643 (4.3%) were provisionally positive by EIA. Of the 158 samples that were EIA positive, 119 were confirmed as being positive by at least one of the reference methods, giving a positive predictive value in this population of 75% (95% confidence interval: 67.6-81.7%). Comparison of the optical density values of the EIA lying between true and false-positive results suggests that the introduction of a second cut-off value would improve diagnostics. A test with two cut-offs would give the following results: 'positive', 'negative' and 'indeterminate result, please perform confirmatory test'. This algorithm was a simple and cost-effective method to immediately improve diagnostics, but there is an urgent need for further research in laboratory diagnosis for CDI. PMID:20638749

  19. Procalcitonin levels associate with severity of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Rao

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a major cause of morbidity and biomarkers that predict severity of illness are needed. Procalcitonin (PCT, a serum biomarker with specificity for bacterial infections, has been little studied in CDI. We hypothesized that PCT associated with CDI severity. DESIGN: Serum PCT levels were measured for 69 cases of CDI. Chart review was performed to evaluate the presence of severity markers and concurrent acute bacterial infection (CABI. We defined the binary variables clinical score as having fever (T >38°C, acute organ dysfunction (AOD, and/or WBC >15,000 cells/mm(3 and expanded score, which included the clinical score plus the following: ICU admission, no response to therapy, colectomy, and/or death. RESULTS: In univariate analysis log10 PCT associated with clinical score (OR 3.13, 95% CI 1.69-5.81, P0.2 ng/mL was 81% sensitive/73% specific for a positive clinical score and had a negative predictive value of 90%. CONCLUSION: An elevated PCT level associated with the presence of CDI severity markers and CDI was unlikely to be severe with a serum PCT level below 0.2 ng/mL. The extent to which PCT changes during CDI therapy or predicts recurrent CDI remains to be quantified.

  20. Survey of Clostridium difficile infection surveillance systems in Europe, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kola, Axel; Wiuff, Camilla; Akerlund, Thomas; van Benthem, Birgit H; Coignard, Bruno; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Weitzel-Kage, Doris; Suetens, Carl; Wilcox, Mark H; Kuijper, Ed J; Gastmeier, Petra

    2016-07-21

    To develop a European surveillance protocol for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), existing national CDI surveillance systems were assessed in 2011. A web-based electronic form was provided for all national coordinators of the European CDI Surveillance Network (ECDIS-Net). Of 35 national coordinators approached, 33 from 31 European countries replied. Surveillance of CDI was in place in 14 of the 31 countries, comprising 18 different nationwide systems. Three of 14 countries with CDI surveillance used public health notification of cases as the route of reporting, and in another three, reporting was limited to public health notification of cases of severe CDI. The CDI definitions published by the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) were widely used, but there were differing definitions to distinguish between community- and healthcare-associated cases. All CDI surveillance systems except one reported annual national CDI rates (calculated as number of cases per patient-days). Only four surveillance systems regularly integrated microbiological data (typing and susceptibility testing results). Surveillance methods varied considerably between countries, which emphasises the need for a harmonised European protocol to allow consistent monitoring of the CDI epidemiology at European level. The results of this survey were used to develop a harmonised EU-wide hospital-based CDI surveillance protocol. PMID:27469420

  1. Characterization of Clostridium difficile isolates from human fecal samples and retail meat from Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Jyotika B; Very, Katherine J; Williams, Jen L; Hegarty, John P; Stewart, David B; Lumadue, Jeanne; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar; Jayarao, Bhushan M

    2014-10-01

    A study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Clostridium difficile and characterize C. difficile isolates from human stool and retail grocery meat samples. Human stool samples (n=317) were obtained from a clinical laboratory and meat samples (n=303) were collected from 8 retail grocery stores from October 2011 through September 2012 from Centre County of Pennsylvania and were examined for C. difficile. C. difficile was isolated from 16.7% of stool samples (n=317) and 6.9%, 11.5%, 14.5%, and 7.8% of beef (n=72), pork (n=78), turkey (n=76), and chicken (n=77) samples, respectively. Six different toxin gene profiles were detected in all human and meat isolates of C. difficile based on the presence or absence of toxin genes tcdA, tcdB, and cdtA and cdtB. Interestingly, 75.6% of the human C. difficile isolates lacked any deletion in the tcdC gene (139-bp), whereas a 39-bp deletion was observed in 61.3% of the C. difficile strains isolated from meat samples. C. difficile from meat samples were more susceptible to clindamycin, moxifloxacin, vancomycin, and metronidazole than C. difficile isolates from human samples. Twenty-five different ribotypes were identified in human and meat C. difficile isolates. In conclusion, significant genotypic and phenotypic differences were observed between human and meat isolates of C. difficile; however, a few C. difficile isolates from meat-in particular ribotypes 078, PA01, PA05, PA16, and PA22 with unique profiles (toxin gene, tcdC gene size and antimicrobial resistance profiles)-were similar to human C. difficile isolates. PMID:25269079

  2. Detection of Clostridium difficile in faeces by direct gas liquid chromatography.

    OpenAIRE

    Levett, P N

    1984-01-01

    Stool specimens examined for the presence of Clostridium difficile and its cytotoxin were screened by gas liquid chromatography for the presence of volatile fatty acids and p-cresol. Twenty seven of 110 (25%) stools yielded C difficile or cytotoxin; iso-valeric acid was detected in 63/110 (57%) and iso-caproic acid in 18/110 (16%) stools. Para-cresol was found in 24/71 (34%) stools examined. Iso-valeric acid was detected in 85% of stools positive for C difficile, whereas iso-caproic acid (41%...

  3. Fæcestransplantation som behandling af Clostridium difficile-infektion, colitis ulcerosa og metabolisk syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Jeppe West; Hansen, Axel Kornerup

    2014-01-01

    Faecal transplantation as a treatment for Clostridium difficile infection, ulcerative colitis and the metabolic syndrome Faecal transplantation as a therapeutic tool is increasingly reported in the scientific literature. Faecal transplantation is currently becoming a treatment for nosocomial......, refractory infections with C. difficile. Furthermore, faecal transplantation has been suggested as a treatment for ulcerative colitis as well as for the metabolic syndrome. In the accumulated literature faecal transplantations appear to be safe, effective and superior to current treatments. Faecal...... transplantation remains a sparsely investigated treatment, however, especially for other diagnoses than C. difficile infection....

  4. Outcomes and Risk Factors Associated with Clostridium difficile Diarrhea in Hospitalized Adult Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Zilio Larentis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection has changed over time. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the characteristics of patients at risk of infection and factors associated with poor prognosis. Objective. To evaluate factors associated with C. difficile infection and with poor prognosis in those with documented C. difficile colitis. Methods. A retrospective case-control study of 75 patients with documented C. difficile colitis and 75 controls with hospital-acquired diarrhea of other causes. Stepwise multiple logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with C. difficile infection among patients with hospital-acquired diarrhea. Results. Previous antibiotic treatment (odds ratio (OR, 13.3; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.40–126.90, abdominal distension (OR, 3.85; 95% CI, 1.35–10.98, and fecal leukocytes (OR, 8.79; 95% CI, 1.41–54.61 are considered as predictors of C. difficile colitis; anorexia was negatively associated with C. difficile infection (OR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.03–0.66. Enteral tube feeding was independently associated with a composite outcome that included in-hospital mortality, intensive care unit admission, and treatment failure (OR, 3.75; 95%CI, 1.24–11.29. Conclusions. Previous antibiotic use and presence of fecal leukocytes in patients with hospital-acquired diarrhea are associated with C. difficile colitis and enteral tube support with complications associated with C. difficile colitis.

  5. Fecal Transplantation using a Nasoenteric Tube during an Initial Episode of Severe Clostridium difficile Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Namki; Kim, Jung Ho; Park, Se Hee; Kim, Sung Bae; Song, In Ji; Ann, Hea Won; Ahn, Jin Young; Kim, Sun Bean; Ku, Nam Su; Lee, Kyungwon; Yong, Dongeun; Kim, June Myung

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection is increasing worldwide, and its severity and resulting mortality are also on the rise. Metronidazole and oral vancomycin remain the treatments of choice, but there are concerns about treatment failure and the appearance of resistant strains. Furthermore, antibiotic therapy results in recurrence rates of at least 20%. Fecal transplantation may be a feasible treatment option for recurrent C. difficile infection; moreover, it may be an early treatment option for severe C. difficile infection. We report a case of severe C. difficile infection treated with fecal transplantation using a nasoenteric tube during an initial episode. This is the first reported case of fecal transplantation using a nasoenteric tube during an initial episode of C. difficile infection in Korea. PMID:27104013

  6. Tracing the Spread of Clostridium difficile Ribotype 027 in Germany Based on Bacterial Genome Sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Steglich

    Full Text Available We applied whole-genome sequencing to reconstruct the spatial and temporal dynamics underpinning the expansion of Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 in Germany. Based on re-sequencing of genomes from 57 clinical C. difficile isolates, which had been collected from hospitalized patients at 36 locations throughout Germany between 1990 and 2012, we demonstrate that C. difficile genomes have accumulated sequence variation sufficiently fast to document the pathogen's spread at a regional scale. We detected both previously described lineages of fluoroquinolone-resistant C. difficile ribotype 027, FQR1 and FQR2. Using Bayesian phylogeographic analyses, we show that fluoroquinolone-resistant C. difficile 027 was imported into Germany at least four times, that it had been widely disseminated across multiple federal states even before the first outbreak was noted in 2007, and that it has continued to spread since.

  7. Prevalence of Clostridium Difficile- Associated Diarrhea in Hospitalized Patients with Nosocomial Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Sadeghifard

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a frequently identified cause of nosocomial gastrointestinal disease. It has been proved to be a causative agent in antibiotic-associated diarrhea, antibiotic-associated colitis, and pseudomembraneous colitis. This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of C.difficile- associated diarrhea in hospitalized patients with nosocomial diarrhea. The 942 hospitalized patients stool samples with nosocomial diarrhea were collected at three hospitals in Tehran from Dec 2002 to Feb 2004.All the stool samples were cultured and in 97 (prevalence: 10.9% samples grew C.difficile that 57 (prevalence: 6.1% isolates were toxigenic by cytotoxicity assay and so 57 patients had C.difficile- associated diarrhea. Results of statistical analysis showed significant difference between the rate of C.difficile associated diarrhea and the patients ages (P<0.05.

  8. Increasing seroprevalence of Clostridium difficile in an adult Danish general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, R V; Linneberg, A; Tvede, M;

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile-associated infections is increasing, but it remains to be defined whether any change in the seroprevalence of C. difficile has also occurred. In a population-based study of the general adult population, 734 subjects, aged 15-69 years, were examined on two...... occasions 8 years apart (1990 and 1998) for the presence of antibodies against C. difficile in serum. The overall seroprevalence of C. difficile increased significantly from 19% in 1990 to 27% in 1998 (P<0.0001). The seroprevalence increased with increasing age in both 1990 and 1998, but the increase was...... about four times higher in 1998 than in 1990. In conclusion, the observed increase in seroprevalence suggests a higher exposure to C. difficile in the general Danish adult population....

  9. International Clostridium difficile animal strain collection and large diversity of animal associated strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janezic, Sandra; Zidaric, Valerija; Pardon, Bart;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Clostridium difficile is an important cause of intestinal infections in some animal species and animals might be a reservoir for community associated human infections. Here we describe a collection of animal associated C. difficile strains from 12 countries based on inclusion criteria......; 10 countries). Conclusions: This results show that although PCR ribotype 078 is often reported as the major animal C. difficile type, especially in pigs, the variability of strains in pigs and other animal hosts is substantial. Most common human PCR ribotypes (014/020 and 002) are also among most...... prevalent animal associated C. difficile strains worldwide. The widespread dissemination of toxigenic C. difficile and the considerable overlap in strain distribution between species furthers concerns about interspecies, including zoonotic, transmission of this critically important pathogen....

  10. An outbreak of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in piglets in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Otávio Silveira Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the substantial role of Clostridium difficile in causing diarrhea in piglets, there have been few reports of the disease caused by this bacterium in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. In this paper, we describe an outbreak of C. difficile-associated diarrhea in a pig farm in Brazil. The diarrhea rate increased in piglets 1-to-7 days old from an average of 2% to approximately 20%. Necropsied piglets showed mesocolon edema, and in a histological evaluation, severe necrotizing neutrophilic colitis was observed. The intestinal contents were positive for the A/B toxins of C. difficile and negative for other tested enteropathogens. The association between the clinical signs, post mortem findings and laboratory exams confirmed the diagnosis of C. difficile-associated diarrhea. The present report confirms C. difficile as a pathogen in swine in Brazil and highlights the need for up to date routine laboratory protocols for the diagnosis of this disease in swine.

  11. Microbiome Data Distinguish Patients with Clostridium difficile Infection and Non-C. difficile-Associated Diarrhea from Healthy Controls

    OpenAIRE

    Schubert, Alyxandria M.; Rogers, Mary A M; Ring, Cathrin; Mogle, Jill; Petrosino, Joseph P.; Young, Vincent B.; Aronoff, David M.; Schloss, Patrick D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibiotic usage is the most commonly cited risk factor for hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infections (CDI). The increased risk is due to disruption of the indigenous microbiome and a subsequent decrease in colonization resistance by the perturbed bacterial community; however, the specific changes in the microbiome that lead to increased risk are poorly understood. We developed statistical models that incorporated microbiome data with clinical and demographic data to better ...

  12. High Mobility Group Box1 Protein Is Involved in Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Induced by Clostridium difficile Toxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ji; Ma, Yi; Sun, Chun-Li; Li, Shan; Wang, Ju-Fang

    2016-01-01

    High Mobility Group Box1 (HMGB1), a damage-associated inflammatory factor, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of numerous chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In this study, the role of the HMGB1 in TcdA-induced ER stress was identified. Clostridium difficile toxin A is one of the major virulence factors of C. difficile infection (CDI) and has been proved to induce apoptotic cell death through ER stress. Our results showed that HMGB1 might play an important role in the TcdA-induced ER stress and unfolded protein response. HMGB1 activated molecular markers and induced the C/EBP homologous protein upregulation (CHOP). This study may provide the essential information for better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in CDI. PMID:27579314

  13. The first case of antibiotic-associated colitis by Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 027 in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tae, Chung Hyun; Jung, Sung-Ae; Song, Hyun Joo; Kim, Seong-Eun; Choi, Hee Jung; Lee, Miae; Hwang, Yusun; Kim, Heejung; Lee, Kyungwon

    2009-06-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a common causative agent of pseudomembranous colitis (PMC). C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) ranges from mild diarrhea to life threatening PMC. Recently, a highly virulent strain of C. difficile polymerase chain reaction ribotype 027 was found in North America, Europe, and Japan. A 52-yr-old woman with anti-tuberculosis medication and neurogenic bladder due to traffic accident experienced five episodes of C. difficile PMC after taking antibiotics for pneumonia along with septic shock and acute renal failure. She was readmitted to the intensive care unit and treated with oral vancomycin with refractory of oral metronidazole, inotropics and probiotics for over 60 days. C. difficile isolated both at the first and the last admission was identified as C. difficile ribotype 027 by ribotyping, toxinotyping, and tcdC gene sequencing, which turned out the same pathogen as the epidemic hypervirulent B1/NAP1 strain. This is the first case of C. difficile PCR ribotype 027 in Korea. After discharge, she was maintained on probiotics and rifaximin for 3 weeks. She had no relapse for 6 months. PMID:19543521

  14. Rifaximin therapy for metronidazole-unresponsive Clostridium difficile infection: a prospective pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick Basu, P.; Dinani, Amreen; Rayapudi, Krishna; Pacana, Tommy; Shah, Niraj James; Hampole, Hemant; Krishnaswamy, N. V.; Mohan, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Background: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a recent epidemic in the United States, particularly in the hospital setting. Oral metronidazole is standard therapy for C. difficile infection, but resistance to metronidazole is becoming a clinical challenge. Methods: We evaluated the efficacy of the nonsystemic oral antibiotic rifaximin for the treatment of metronidazole-resistant C. difficile infection. Twenty-five patients with C. difficile infection were enrolled in the study. All had mild-to-moderate C. difficile infection (5–10 bowel movements a day without sepsis) unresponsive to metronidazole (i.e. stools positive for toxins A and B after oral metronidazole 500 mg three times daily [t.i.d.] for 5 days). After discontinuation of metronidazole, rifaximin 400 mg t.i.d. for 14 days was prescribed. Patients were followed for 56 days and stool was tested for C. difficile using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to assess the effect of treatment. A negative PCR test result was interpreted as a favorable response to rifaximin. Results: Sixteen of 22 patients (73%) were eligible for study inclusion and completed rifaximin therapy experienced eradication of infection (stool negative for C. difficile) immediately after rifaximin therapy and 56 days post-treatment. Three patients (12%) discontinued therapy because of abdominal distention. Rifaximin was generally well tolerated. Conclusions: In conclusion, rifaximin may be considered for treatment of mild-to-moderate C. difficile infection that is resistant to metronidazole. Larger randomized trials are needed to confirm these positive findings. PMID:21180604

  15. Clostridium difficile in ready-to-eat foods in Isfahan and Shahrekord,Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ebrahim; Rahimi; Zahra; Sadat; Afzali; Zcinab; Torki; Baghbadorani

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To determine the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Clostridium difficile(C.difficile) isolated from ready-to-eat foods of Iran.Methods:From January to August 2013,a total of 368 unpacked ieady-to-eat food samples were purchased from randomly selected supermarkets,retail stores and restaurants located in Isfahan and Shahrekord,Iran and were evaluated for the presence of C.difficile.Results:C.difficile spores were detected in 5(1.36%) of the 368 samples.The highest prevalence of C.difficile was found in fasl salad(4.29%).followed by yogurt stew(2%),and olovyeh salad(0.93%).All 140 maccaroni salad and I’alafel sandwich samples were negative for C.difficile.One of the five C.difficile isolates(20%) contained tcdA,tcdB and cdtB toxin genes and four strains(80%) contained tcdA.and tcdB toxin genes.Also,among the five C.difficile isolates,only three strains were found to be toxigenic for toxin A and/or B by ELISA.Isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and metronidazole,but variably resistant to other antimicrobial drugs.Conclusions:This study,combined with studies on other food sources,suggests that widespread contamination of food is common.

  16. The Epidemiology and Economic Burden of Clostridium difficile Infection in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Yun Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection and the associated burden have recently increased in many countries. While the main risk factors for C. difficile infection include old age and antibiotic use, the prevalence of this infection is increasing in low-risk groups. These trends highlight the need for research on C. difficile infection. This study pointed out the prevalence and economic burden of C. difficile infection and uses the representative national data which is primarily from the database of the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service, for 2008–2011. The annual economic cost was measured using a prevalence approach, which sums the costs incurred to treat C. difficile infection. C. difficile infection prevalence was estimated to have increased from 1.43 per 100,000 in 2008 to 5.06 per 100,000 in 2011. Moreover, mortality increased from 69 cases in 2008 to 172 in 2011. The economic cost increased concurrently, from $2.4 million in 2008 to $7.6 million, $10.5 million, and $15.8 million in 2009, 2010, and 2011, respectively. The increasing economic burden of C. difficile infection over the course of the study period emphasizes the need for intervention to minimize the burden of a preventable illness like C. difficile infection.

  17. Identification of risk factors influencing Clostridium difficile prevalence in middle-size dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandelj, Petra; Blagus, Rok; Briski, France; Frlic, Olga; Vergles Rataj, Aleksandra; Rupnik, Maja; Ocepek, Matjaz; Vengust, Modest

    2016-01-01

    Farm animals have been suggested to play an important role in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the community. The purpose of this study was to evaluate risk factors associated with C. difficile dissemination in family dairy farms, which are the most common farming model in the European Union. Environmental samples and fecal samples from cows and calves were collected repeatedly over a 1 year period on 20 mid-size family dairy farms. Clostridium difficile was detected in cattle feces on all farms using qPCR. The average prevalence between farms was 10% (0-44.4%) and 35.7% (3.7-66.7%) in cows and calves, respectively. Bacterial culture yielded 103 C. difficile isolates from cattle and 61 from the environment. Most C. difficile isolates were PCR-ribotype 033. A univariate mixed effect model analysis of risk factors associated dietary changes with increasing C. difficile prevalence in cows (P = 0.0004); and dietary changes (P = 0.004), breeding Simmental cattle (P = 0.001), mastitis (P = 0.003) and antibiotic treatment (P = 0.003) in calves. Multivariate analysis of risk factors found that dietary changes in cows (P = 0.0001) and calves (P = 0.002) increase C. difficile prevalence; mastitis was identified as a risk factor in calves (P = 0.001). This study shows that C. difficile is common on dairy farms and that shedding is more influenced by farm management than environmental factors. Based on molecular typing of C. difficile isolates, it could also be concluded that family dairy farms are currently not contributing to increased CDI incidence. PMID:26968527

  18. Flooding and Health Care Visits for Clostridium Difficile Infection: A Case-Crossover Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floods can contaminate potable water and other resources, thus increasing the potential for fecal-oral transmission of pathogens. Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water and cause acute gastrointestinal illness. It often affects older adults who are hospital...

  19. Effect of a Clostridium difficile Infection Prevention Initiative in Veterans Affairs Acute Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Martin E; Kralovic, Stephen M; Simbartl, Loretta A; Jain, Rajiv; Roselle, Gary A

    2016-06-01

    Rates of clinically confirmed hospital-onset healthcare facility-associated Clostridium difficile infections from July 1, 2012, through March 31, 2015, in 127 acute care Veterans Affairs facilities were evaluated. Quarterly pooled national standardized infection ratios decreased 15% from baseline by the final quarter of the analysis period (P=.01, linear regression). Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:720-722. PMID:26864803

  20. Use of hypochlorite solution to decrease rates of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Kathleen M; Zack, Jeanne; Coopersmith, Craig M; Kollef, Marin; Dubberke, Erik; Warren, David K

    2007-02-01

    An increased rate of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) was noted in 2 intensive care units of a university-affiliated tertiary care facility. One unit instituted enhanced environmental cleaning with a hypochlorite solution in all rooms, whereas the other unit used hypochlorite solution only in rooms of patients with CDAD. The CDAD rates decreased in both units. PMID:17265404

  1. Clostridium difficile PCR Ribotypes from Different Animal Hosts and Different Geographic Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zidaric, V.; Janezic, S.; Indra, A.;

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic sporogenic bacterium traditionally associated with human nosocomial infections, and animals have been recognized as an important potential reservoir for human infections (Rodriguez-Palacios et al., 2013). Ribotype 078 is often reported in animals but according...

  2. Susceptibility of Clostridium difficile Toward Antimicrobial Agents Used as Feed Additives for Food Animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Tvede, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A total of 65 toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains isolated from patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea were tested for susceptibility to avilamycin, flavomycin, monensin, and salinomycin. Except for flavomycin the substances showed in vitro efficacy comparable to reports of the currently...

  3. Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea Caused by Clostridium difficile (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Use ©2016 UpToDate, Inc. Patient education: Antibiotic-associated diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile (Beyond the Basics) Authors ... last updated: Jun 15, 2015. OVERVIEW — Antibiotic-associated diarrhea refers to diarrhea that develops in a person ...

  4. Outbreak of Clostridium difficile 027 in North Zealand, Denmark, 2008-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacci, S; St-Martin, G; Olesen, B;

    2009-01-01

    We report an outbreak of Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 027 in Denmark. The outbreak includes to date 73 cases from the area north of Copenhagen, but there may be related cases elsewhere in Zealand. Most infections are healthcare-associated and in patients who previously received antibiotic...

  5. Recidiverende Clostridium Difficile infektion behandlet med fækal transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløe, Andreas; Leutscher, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of severe Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) poses a clinical challenge. Emerging evidence supports the use of faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). An 81-year-old man was admitted with a third recurrent episode of CDI within two months. Because of clinical deterioration with...

  6. Prophylactic antibiotics for variceal hemorrhage: Clostridium difficile infection still can be a risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naohiro Okano; Kentaro Iwata

    2011-01-01

    Bron et al presented a retrospective study regarding the prophylactic use of antibiotics for variceal hemorrhage. Antibiotics appeared to improve the survival rate of patients without increasing clostridium difficile infection (CDI). We argue against the conclusion of the authors and consider that this result may be simply due to concurrent use of metronidazole, a therapeutic agent against CDI.

  7. Probiotics in Clostridium difficile infection: Reviewing the need for a multistrain probiotic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hell (M.); C. Bernhofer (C.); P. Stalzer (P.); J.M. Kern (J.); H.J.H.M. Claassen (Eric)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn the past two years an enormous amount of molecular, genetic, metabolomic and mechanistic data on the host-bacterium interaction, a healthy gut microbiota and a possible role for probiotics in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been accumulated. Also, new hypervirulent strains o

  8. The value of surgical treatment in abdominal emergencies : fulminant clostridium difficile colitis and severe abdominal trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilden, Gwendolyn Mariëtta

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is a combination of traumatic and non-traumatic events in the abdomen, and the optimization of treatment in both entities. The first part describes the very prevalent infection caused by the bacterium Clostridium difficile. The colitis caused by this infection can be severe and complicat

  9. The challenge of Clostridium difficile infection: Overview of clinical manifestations, diagnostic tools and therapeutic options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, N.; Kiers, D.; Pickkers, P.

    2015-01-01

    The most important infectious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and colitis is Clostridium difficile, which is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming, toxin-producing bacillus. In this overview we will discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients presenting with suspected

  10. Første påvisning af Clostridium difficile type 027 i Danmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søes, Lillian M; Brock, Inger; Torpdahl, Mia;

    2009-01-01

    Increasing rates of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD) with an unusual, severe course have been reported in Canada, USA and several European countries since 2003. A new virulent strain, PCR ribotype 027 (CD027), is associated with this increase. We report the first Danish case of...

  11. Isolation and characterization of Clostridium difficile associated with beef cattle and commercially produced ground beef

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection has recently increased in North American and European countries. This pathogen has been isolated from retail pork, turkey, and beef products and reported associated with human illness. This increase in infections has been attributed to the emergence o...

  12. Prevalence of Clostridium difficile from Commercial Beef Processing Plants in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium difficile-associated disease has recently increased in both illness and relapse rates in North American and European countries. This increase has been attributed to the emergence of a toxigenic strain designated as North America pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type 1 or NAP-1. The NAP-1...

  13. Prevalence of Clostridium difficile in pork and retail meat in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile (Cd) have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains of Cd. Toxigenic Cd has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer ...

  14. The Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile Infection in Children: A Population-Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Khanna, Sahil; Baddour, Larry M.; Huskins, W. Charles; Kammer, Patricia P.; Faubion, William A.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Harmsen, W. Scott; Pardi, Darrell S

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile incidence in children increased significantly from 1991 through 2009. The majority of cases were community-acquired. Severe infection was more common in hospital-acquired than community-acquired cases. There were fewer treatment failures with vancomycin compared to metronidazole.

  15. Increase in Clostridium difficile-related Mortality Rates, United States, 1999-2004

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-01-08

    Deaths related to Clostridium difficile are on the rise in the United States. Matthew Redelings from the Los Angeles County Department of Health discusses the increase and what can be done to prevent this infection.  Created: 1/8/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 1/8/2008.

  16. The Incidence of Nosocomial Toxigenic Clostridium difficile Associated Diarrhea in Tehran Tertiary Medical Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norakhoda Sadeghifard

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhea. It is usually a consequence of antibiotic treatment, But sporadic cases can occur. This study was aimed to determine the frequency of the nosocomial Clostridium difficile (C. difficile associated diarrhea in Tehran University of Medical Sciences hospitals and study of antibacterial susceptibility of isolates. In this study a total of 942 stool samples from patients with nosocomial diarrhea that were hospitalized in Imam Khomeini hospital, Shariati hospital and Children clinical center were collected. The samples were cultured on a selective cycloserine cefoxitin fructose agar (CCFA and incubated in anaerobic conditions, at 37°C for 5 days. Isolates were characterized to species level by conventional biochemical tests. Bacterial cytotoxicity was assayed on tissue culture (vero. Antimicrobial sensitivity of isolated toxigenic C. difficile were investigated by kirby Beuer method (disk diffusion. Our findings show that, of the total patients, 57 toxigenic C. difficile (6.1% were isolated. Results of statistical analysis show significant differences between the rate of isolated toxigenic C. difficile and age group of patients (P

  17. Outcomes of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis after administration of antibiotics along with probiotic supplement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doder Radoslava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Clostridium difficile enterocolitis is a potentially fatal disease showing increasing incidence in hospital environment. Therapeutic approach in the management of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis is highly complex, particularly because of its tendency to relapse and reinfection. The study was aimed at investigating the factors influencing the development of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis and outcomes of enterocolitis after administration of standard antimicrobial therapy combined with probiotic supplement. Material and Methods. A non-comparative prospective observational study encompassed 42 patients (22 males and 20 females diagnosed with Clostridium difficile enterocolitis and treated at the Department of Infectious Diseases in Novi Sad in the period October 2011 - April 2012. Results. Higher incidence of the disease was found in elderly patients (78.6% of them were over 60 years of age, after antimicrobial therapy (83.8%, after hospitalization (83.3% and in comorbid conditions (85.7%. The clinical picture revealed predominantly mild to moderate symptoms. A good clinical response to the standard antimicrobial therapy (metronidazole, vancomycin combined with probiotic given for 10 days was observed in all patients, and the improvement in parameters such as the number and appearance of stools, abdominal distension and pain was recorded. Statistically significant changes in laboratory parameters (leukocyte count, C-reactive protein level were recorded on day 5 after the onset of disease. Recurrent infection after successful therapy was observed in 9.5% of the patients. Conclusion. Administration of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus Rosell-52, Lactobacillus rhamnosus Rosell-11 and Bifidobacterium longum Rosell-175 alongside the standard antimicrobial therapy in the patients with Clostridium difficile enterocolitis demonstrated positive effects on the severity or clinical picture and normalization of laboratory

  18. Prevention of Clostridium difficile infection in hamsters using a non-toxigenic strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto de Oliveira Júnior

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The present study aimed to evaluate five non-toxigenic strains of Clostridium difficile (NTCD in vitro and to select one strain to prevent C. difficile (CDI infection in hamsters ( Mesocricetus auratus . The NTCD strains were evaluated for spore production in vitro, antimicrobial susceptibility and presence of antimicrobial resistance genes. Approximately 107 spores of the selected strain (Z31 were administered by esophageal gavage in hamsters pretreated with 30mg kg-1 of clindamycin. The challenge with a toxigenic strain of C. difficile was conducted at 36 and 72h, and the animals were observed for 28 days. The NTCD strain of C. difficile (Z31 was able to prevent CDI in all animals that received it.

  19. Total synthesis of five lipoteichoic acids of Clostridium difficile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogendorf, Wouter Frederik Johan; Gisch, Nicolas; Schwudke, Dominik;

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of hypervirulent resistant strains have made Clostridium difficile a notorious nosocomial pathogen and has resulted in a renewed interest in preventive strategies, such as vaccines based on (synthetic) cell wall antigens. Recently, the structure of the lipoteichoic acid (LTA) of this...... species has been elucidated. Additionally, this LTA was found to induce the formation of protective antibodies against C. difficile in rabbits and mice. The LTA from C. difficile is isolated as a microheterogenous mixture, differing in size and composition, impeding any structure-activity relationship...... studies. To ensure reliable biological results, pure and well-defined synthetic samples are required. In this work the total synthesis of LTAs from C. difficile with defined chain length is described and the initial biological results are presented....

  20. An update on antibody-based immunotherapies for Clostridium difficile infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussack, Greg; Tanha, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile continues to be one of the most prevalent hospital-acquired bacterial infections in the developed world, despite the recent introduction of a novel and effective antibiotic agent (fidaxomicin). Alternative approaches under investigation to combat the anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria include fecal transplantation therapy, vaccines, and antibody-based immunotherapies. In this review, we catalog the recent advances in antibody-based approaches under development and in the clinic for the treatment of C. difficile infection. By and large, inhibitory antibodies that recognize the primary C. difficile virulence factors, toxin A and toxin B, are the most popular passive immunotherapies under investigation. We provide a detailed summary of the toxin epitopes recognized by various antitoxin antibodies and discuss general trends on toxin inhibition efficacy. In addition, antibodies to other C. difficile targets, such as surface-layer proteins, binary toxin, motility factors, and adherence and colonization factors, are introduced in this review. PMID:27536153

  1. 艰难梭菌核糖体分型及腹泻发病危险因素研究%PCR ribotype profiles of Clostridium difficile and risk factors of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨富英; 李萍; 李永强

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate risk factors of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD), to explore PCR ribotype profiles of Clostridium difficile, and to provide empirical evidence for prevention of CDAD. Methods Among 449 patients suffered from antibiotic-associated diarrhea, 92 of them were diagnosed with CDAD. Risk factors of CDAD were extracted by using Logistic regression analysis. Clostridium difficile grown on Cycloserine-cefoxitin-fructose agar were molecularly typed with PCR ribotyping method. Results Nasogastric tube feeding, multiple chronic diseases, higher APACHE Ⅱ score, high level of serum C reaction protein, and use of third-generation cephalosporin, quinolone or combination of antibiotics increased the odds of CDAD, whereas use of glycopeptide or nitro-inidazole antibiotics decreased the odds of CDAD (P<0. 05,P<0. 01). Twenty strains of Clostridium difficile were classified into 5 ribotypes, and 8 of them were GZ Ⅲ. Conclusion Morbidity of CDAD is high in inpatients, measures which contribute to reducing risk factors should be taken to prevent CDAD.%目的 探讨艰难梭菌相关性腹泻(CDAD)发病危险因素及进行艰难梭菌核糖体分型,为针对性防护提供依据.方法 选取449例抗生素相关性腹泻患者,其中92例诊断为CDAD;采用Logistic回归分析筛选CDAD发病危险因素;厌氧菌培养艰难梭菌再行PCR核糖体分型.结果 CDAD发病的危险因素是鼻饲,多种慢性病,高APACHEⅡ评分,高超敏C反应蛋白,应用第三代头孢菌素、喹诺酮类抗生素及联用抗生素;使用糖肽类、硝基咪唑类抗生素降低CDAD发病(P<0.05,P<0.01).20株艰难梭菌分为5个亚型即GZⅠ~GZⅣ型,其中GZⅢ型8株.结论 住院患者CDAD发病率较高,需针对危险因素进行防护.

  2. Identification and characterization of the surface proteins of Clostridium difficile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several clostridial proteins were detected on the clostridial cell surface by sensitive radioiodination techniques. Two major proteins and six minor proteins comprised the radioiodinated proteins on the clostridial cell surface. Cellular fractionation of surface radiolabeled C. difficile determined that the radioiodinated proteins were found in the cell wall fraction of C. difficile and surprisingly were also present in the clostridial membrane. Furthermore, an interesting phenomenon of disulfide-crosslinking of the cell surface proteins of C. difficile was observed. Disulfide-linked protein complexes were found in both the membrane and cell wall fractions. In addition, the cell surface proteins of C. difficile were found to be released into the culture medium. In attempts to further characterize the clostridial proteins recombinant DNA techniques were employed. In addition, the role of the clostridial cell surface proteins in the interactions of C. difficile with human PMNs was also investigated

  3. Identification and characterization of the surface proteins of Clostridium difficile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dailey, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    Several clostridial proteins were detected on the clostridial cell surface by sensitive radioiodination techniques. Two major proteins and six minor proteins comprised the radioiodinated proteins on the clostridial cell surface. Cellular fractionation of surface radiolabeled C. difficile determined that the radioiodinated proteins were found in the cell wall fraction of C. difficile and surprisingly were also present in the clostridial membrane. Furthermore, an interesting phenomenon of disulfide-crosslinking of the cell surface proteins of C. difficile was observed. Disulfide-linked protein complexes were found in both the membrane and cell wall fractions. In addition, the cell surface proteins of C. difficile were found to be released into the culture medium. In attempts to further characterize the clostridial proteins recombinant DNA techniques were employed. In addition, the role of the clostridial cell surface proteins in the interactions of C. difficile with human PMNs was also investigated.

  4. Clinical importance and representation of toxigenic and non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile cultivated from stool samples of hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Stojanovic

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to fortify the clinical importance and representation of toxigenic and non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile isolated from stool samples of hospitalized patients. This survey included 80 hospitalized patients with diarrhea and positive findings of Clostridium difficile in stool samples, and 100 hospitalized patients with formed stool as a control group. Bacteriological examination of a stool samples was conducted using standard microbiological methods. Stool sample were inoculated directly on nutrient media for bacterial cultivation (blood agar using 5% sheep blood, Endo agar, selective Salmonella Shigella agar, Selenite-F broth, CIN agar and Skirrow's medium, and to selective cycloserine-cefoxitin-fructose agar (CCFA (Biomedics, Parg qe tehnicologico, Madrid, Spain for isolation of Clostridium difficile. Clostridium difficile toxin was detected by ELISA-ridascreen Clostridium difficile Toxin A/B (R-Biopharm AG, Germany and ColorPAC ToxinA test (Becton Dickinson, USA. Examination of stool specimens for the presence of parasites (causing diarrhea was done using standard methods (conventional microscopy, commercial concentration test Paraprep S Gold kit (Dia Mondial, France and RIDA®QUICK Cryptosporidium/Giardia Combi test (R-Biopharm AG, Germany. Examination of stool specimens for the presence of fungi (causing diarrhea was performed by standard methods. All stool samples positive for Clostridium difficile were tested for Rota, Noro, Astro and Adeno viruses by ELISA - ridascreen (R-Biopharm AG, Germany. In this research we isolated 99 Clostridium difficile strains from 116 stool samples of 80 hospitalized patients with diarrhea. The 53 (66.25% of patients with diarrhea were positive for toxins A and B, one (1.25% were positive for only toxin B. Non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile isolated from samples of 26 (32.5% patients. However, other pathogenic microorganisms of intestinal tract cultivated from samples of 16 patients

  5. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant Clostridium difficile flagellar protein FliC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Chandrabali; Eugenis, Ioannis; Sun, Xingmin; Edwards, Adrianne N; McBride, Shonna M; Pride, David T; Kelly, Ciarán P; Ho, David D

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive bacillus and is the leading cause of toxin-mediated nosocomial diarrhea following antibiotic use. C. difficile flagella play a role in colonization, adherence, biofilm formation, and toxin production, which might contribute to the overall virulence of certain strains. Human and animal studies indicate that anti-flagella immune responses may play a role in protection against colonization by C. difficile and subsequent disease outcome. Here we report that recombinant C. difficile flagellin (FliC) is immunogenic and protective in a murine model of C. difficile infection (CDI) against a clinical C. difficile strain, UK1. Passive protection experiments using anti-FliC polyclonal serum in mice suggest this protection to be antibody-mediated. FliC immunization also was able to afford partial protection against CDI and death in hamsters following challenge with C. difficile 630Δerm. Additionally, immunization against FliC does not have an adverse effect on the normal gut flora of vaccinated hamsters as evidenced by comparing the fecal microbiome of vaccinated and control hamsters. Therefore, the use of FliC as a vaccine candidate against CDI warrants further testing. PMID:26839147

  6. Prevalence of human norovirus and Clostridium difficile coinfections in adult hospitalized patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokely, Janelle N; Niendorf, Sandra; Taube, Stefan; Hoehne, Marina; Young, Vincent B; Rogers, Mary AM; Wobus, Christiane E

    2016-01-01

    Objective Human norovirus (HuNoV) and Clostridium difficile are common causes of infectious gastroenteritis in adults in the US. However, limited information is available regarding HuNoV and C. difficile coinfections. Our study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of HuNoV and C. difficile coinfections among adult patients in a hospital setting and disease symptomatology. Study design and setting For a cross-sectional analysis, 384 fecal samples were tested for the presence of C. difficile toxins from patients (n=290), whom the provider suspected of C. difficile infections. Subsequent testing was then performed for HuNoV genogroups I and II. Multinomial logistic regression was performed to determine symptoms more frequently associated with coinfections. Results The final cohort consisted of the following outcome groups: C. difficile (n=196), C. difficile + HuNoV coinfection (n=40), HuNoV only (n=12), and neither (n=136). Coinfected patients were more likely to develop nausea, gas, and abdominal pain and were more likely to seek treatment in the winter season compared with individuals not infected or infected with either pathogen alone. Conclusion Our study revealed that patients with coinfection are more likely to experience certain gastrointestinal symptoms, in particular abdominal pain, suggesting an increased severity of disease symptomatology in coinfected patients. PMID:27418856

  7. Nisin is an effective inhibitor of Clostridium difficile vegetative cells and spore germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Christophe Le; Dridi, Larbi; Bergeron, Michel G; Ouellette, Marc; Fliss, Ismaı L

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most frequently identified enteric pathogen in patients with nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Several clinically isolated C. difficile strains are resistant to antibiotics other than metronidazole and vancomycin. Recently, bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria have been proposed as an alternative or complementary treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of nisin, a bacteriocin produced by several strains of Lactococcus lactis, against clinical isolates of C. difficile. Nisin Z obtained from culture of L. lactis subsp. lactis biovar. diacetylactis was tested along with commercial nisin A. The effect of nisin A on C. difficile spores was also examined. Nisin A and Z both inhibited the growth of all C. difficile isolates, and MICs were estimated at 6.2 μg ml- 1 for nisin Z and 0.8 μg ml- 1 for nisin A. In addition, C. difficile spores were also susceptible to nisin A (25.6 μg ml- 1), which reduced spore viability by 40-50 %. These results suggested that nisin and hence nisin-producing Lactococcus strains could be used to treat C. difficile-associated diarrhoea. PMID:26555543

  8. Development of an ELISA kit using monoclonal antibody to Clostridium difficile toxin A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si-Wu Fu; Ya-Li Zhang; Dian-Yuan Zhou

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To establish an ELISA kit using monoclonal antibodiesagainst Clostridium difficile ( C. difficile) toxin A.METHODS: An indirect sandwich ElISA was described using the purified rabbit monospecific antiserum as capturing antibody. After the polystyrene microtitre plates with 96 fiat-bottomed wells were coated with rabbit antiserum, the wells were blocked with 100 g/L BSA in PBS-T. C. difficiletoxin A or culture filtrates were added to each well and then monoclonal antibodies IgG-horseradish peroxidase conjugate was added as detecting antibody, tetramethylbenzidine was used as substrate and A450 of the stopped reacting product was recorded in an automated plate reader. RESULTS: The tested specimens included culture filtrates of 2 strains of toxigenic C. difficile, 2 strains of non-toxigenic C. difficile, 26 strains of E. coli, 2 strains of S. dysenteriae, 1 strain of Bif infantis, 5 strains of V. cholera, 2 strains ofS. typhi, 7 strains of C. botulinum, 1 strain of toxigenic C. sordllii, and 1 strain of C. butyricum. A total of 47 strains of culture filtrates were all negative except for 2 strains of toxigenic C. difficile. The detective limitation of toxin A was 0.1 ng/mL.CONCLUSION: An ELISA kit with high specificity and excellent sensitivity for the rapid detection of C. difficile toxin A was established. It will be a useful tool for diagnostic test of C. difficile toxin A.

  9. Clostridium difficile heterogeneously impacts intestinal community architecture but drives stable metabolome responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, David; Gosalbes, María J; Ferrari, Rafaela; Pérez-Cobas, Ana E; Hernández, Ester; Oltra, Rosa; Buesa, Javier; Latorre, Amparo; Barbas, Coral; Ferrer, Manuel; Moya, Andrés

    2015-10-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD) is caused by C. difficile toxins A and B and represents a serious emerging health problem. Yet, its progression and functional consequences are unclear. We hypothesised that C. difficile can drive major measurable metabolic changes in the gut microbiota and that a relationship with the production or absence of toxins may be established. We tested this hypothesis by performing metabolic profiling on the gut microbiota of patients with C. difficile that produced (n=6) or did not produce (n=4) toxins and on non-colonised control patients (n=6), all of whom were experiencing diarrhoea. We report a statistically significant separation (P-value classification is associated with differences in the production of distinct molecules with presumptive global importance in the gut environment, disease progression and inflammation. Moreover, although severe impaired metabolite production and biological deficits were associated with the carriage of C. difficile that did not produce toxins, only previously unrecognised selective features, namely, choline- and acetylputrescine-deficient gut environments, characterised the carriage of toxin-producing C. difficile. Additional results showed that the changes induced by C. difficile become marked at the highest level of the functional hierarchy, namely the metabolic activity exemplified by the gut microbial metabolome regardless of heterogeneities that commonly appear below the functional level (gut bacterial composition). We discuss possible explanations for this effect and suggest that the changes imposed by CDAD are much more defined and predictable than previously thought. PMID:25756679

  10. Quantitative real time PCR detection of Clostridium difficile growth inhibition by probiotic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan L Folkers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Probiotic microorganisms are potential treatments for Clostridium difficile diarrheal disease (CDD but better methods are needed to determine the relative potency of probiotic microorganisms against pathogenic organisms in mixed cultures. Aim: Quantify C. difficile in the presence of putative probiotic organisms using molecular methods to determine relative probiotic potency. Materials and Methods: C. difficile strains were cultivated anaerobically. Serial dilutions of Lactobacillus cultures or microbial mixtures from kefir were co-cultured with C. difficile for 48 hours. Bacterial DNA was extracted and qPCR was used to measure C. difficile toxin A gene, on the basis of cycle threshold (Ct number. Results: Strains of Lactobacillus (human and ATCC derived, and mixed cultures from commercial kefir were co-cultured with C. difficile. Lactobacillus and the microbial mixture from kefir were ranked in order of their potency in C. difficile growth inhibition. Conclusions: PCR allows facile quantification of C. difficle in the presence of other. The technique measures relative potency of over-the-counter probiotics and may predict human strains meriting probiotic status.

  11. Quantitative real time PCR detection of Clostridium difficile growth inhibition by probiotic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Essmann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Probiotic microorganisms are potential treatments for Clostridium difficile diarrheal disease (CDD but better methods are needed to determine the relative potency of probiotic microorganisms against pathogenic organisms in mixed cultures. Aim: Quantify C. difficile in the presence of putative probiotic organisms using molecular methods to determine relative probiotic potency. Materials and Methods: C. difficile strains were cultivated anaerobically. Serial dilutions of Lactobacillus cultures or microbial mixtures from kefir were co-cultured with C. difficile for 48 hours. Bacterial DNA was extracted and qPCR was used to measure C. difficile toxin A gene, on the basis of cycle threshold (Ct number. Results: Strains of Lactobacillus (human and ATCC derived, and mixed cultures from commercial kefir were co-cultured with C. difficile. Lactobacillus and the microbial mixture from kefir were ranked in order of their potency in C. difficile growth inhibition. Conclusions: PCR allows facile quantification of C. difficle in the presence of other. The technique measures relative potency of over-the-counter probiotics and may predict human strains meriting probiotic status.

  12. The Nutritional Status of Patients with Clostridium Difficile Associeated Disease and Dietetic Practices Concerning the Management of These Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hickey, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    Background: Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of noscomial infection and is responsible for increased morbidity and mortality (Hookman & Barkin, 2009). There are limited data available on the nutritional status and dietetic management of these patients. Aims: 1. To carry out an observational study to assess the prevalence of the risk of malnutrition in patients with Clostridium difficile associated disease (CDAD) and compare it to a group of patients in the same hospital. 2. To investi...

  13. Metal Ion Activation of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin and Clostridium difficile Toxin B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genth, Harald; Schelle, Ilona; Just, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Lethal Toxin from Clostridium sordellii (TcsL) and Toxin B from Clostridium difficile (TcdB) belong to the family of the “Large clostridial glycosylating toxins.” These toxins mono-O-glucosylate low molecular weight GTPases of the Rho and Ras families by exploiting UDP-glucose as a hexose donor. TcsL is casually involved in the toxic shock syndrome and the gas gangrene. TcdB—together with Toxin A (TcdA)—is causative for the pseudomembranous colitis (PMC). Here, we present evidence for the in vitro metal ion activation of the glucosyltransferase and the UDP-glucose hydrolysis activity of TcsL and TcdB. The following rating is found for activation by divalent metal ions: Mn2+ > Co2+ > Mg2+ >> Ca2+, Cu2+, Zn2+. TcsL and TcdB thus require divalent metal ions providing an octahedral coordination sphere. The EC50 values for TcsL were estimated at about 28 µM for Mn2+ and 180 µM for Mg2+. TcsL and TcdB further require co-stimulation by monovalent K+ (not by Na+). Finally, prebound divalent metal ions were dispensible for the cytopathic effects of TcsL and TcdB, leading to the conclusion that TcsL and TcdB recruit intracellular metal ions for activation of the glucosyltransferase activity. With regard to the intracellular metal ion concentrations, TcsL and TcdB are most likely activated by K+ and Mg2+ (rather than Mn2+) in mammalian target cells. PMID:27089365

  14. Metal Ion Activation of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin and Clostridium difficile Toxin B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Genth

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Lethal Toxin from Clostridium sordellii (TcsL and Toxin B from Clostridium difficile (TcdB belong to the family of the “Large clostridial glycosylating toxins.” These toxins mono-O-glucosylate low molecular weight GTPases of the Rho and Ras families by exploiting UDP-glucose as a hexose donor. TcsL is casually involved in the toxic shock syndrome and the gas gangrene. TcdB—together with Toxin A (TcdA—is causative for the pseudomembranous colitis (PMC. Here, we present evidence for the in vitro metal ion activation of the glucosyltransferase and the UDP-glucose hydrolysis activity of TcsL and TcdB. The following rating is found for activation by divalent metal ions: Mn2+ > Co2+ > Mg2+ >> Ca2+, Cu2+, Zn2+. TcsL and TcdB thus require divalent metal ions providing an octahedral coordination sphere. The EC50 values for TcsL were estimated at about 28 µM for Mn2+ and 180 µM for Mg2+. TcsL and TcdB further require co-stimulation by monovalent K+ (not by Na+. Finally, prebound divalent metal ions were dispensible for the cytopathic effects of TcsL and TcdB, leading to the conclusion that TcsL and TcdB recruit intracellular metal ions for activation of the glucosyltransferase activity. With regard to the intracellular metal ion concentrations, TcsL and TcdB are most likely activated by K+ and Mg2+ (rather than Mn2+ in mammalian target cells.

  15. Neutralization of Clostridium difficile Toxin A with Single-domain Antibodies Targeting the Cell Receptor Binding Domain*

    OpenAIRE

    Hussack, Greg; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi; van Faassen, Henk; Songer, J Glenn; Ng, Kenneth K.-S.; MacKenzie, Roger; Tanha, Jamshid

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of nosocomial infection in North America and a considerable challenge to healthcare professionals in hospitals and nursing homes. The Gram-positive bacterium produces two high molecular weight exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), which are the major virulence factors responsible for C. difficile-associated disease and are targets for C. difficile-associated disease therapy. Here, recombinant single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs), which speci...

  16. Optimized Protocol for Simple Extraction of High-Quality Genomic DNA from Clostridium difficile for Whole-Genome Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Sim, James Heng Chiak; Anikst, Victoria; Lohith, Akshar; Pourmand, Nader; Banaei, Niaz

    2015-01-01

    Successful sequencing of the Clostridium difficile genome requires high-quality genomic DNA (gDNA) as the starting material. gDNA extraction using conventional methods is laborious. We describe here an optimized method for the simple extraction of C. difficile gDNA using the QIAamp DNA minikit, which yielded high-quality sequence reads on the Illumina MiSeq platform.

  17. Rapid detection and presumptive identification of Clostridium difficile by p-cresol production on a selective medium.

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, K D; Rogers, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    A modification of a selective medium for Clostridium difficile is described. The ability of Cl difficile to produce p-cresol from p-hydroxy phenyl acetic acid provides a means for the rapid, sensitive detection and presumptive identification of this species in faecal cultures.

  18. Usefulness of Adjunctive Fecal Calprotectin and Serum Procalcitonin in Individuals Positive for Clostridium difficile Toxin Gene by PCR Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Kristin Y Popiel; Gheorghe, Romina; Eastmond, Jennifer; Miller, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    In 54/64 subjects with nosocomial diarrhea, fecal calprotectin levels correlated with the results of stool samples tested for Clostridium difficile toxin gene by PCR. Fecal calprotectin levels can be used as an adjunctive measure to PCR to support the diagnosis of C. difficile infection.

  19. Usefulness of Adjunctive Fecal Calprotectin and Serum Procalcitonin in Individuals Positive for Clostridium difficile Toxin Gene by PCR Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popiel, Kristin Y; Gheorghe, Romina; Eastmond, Jennifer; Miller, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    In 54/64 subjects with nosocomial diarrhea, fecal calprotectin levels correlated with the results of stool samples tested for Clostridium difficile toxin gene by PCR. Fecal calprotectin levels can be used as an adjunctive measure to PCR to support the diagnosis of C. difficile infection. PMID:26354814

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Clostridium difficile using EUCAST epidemiological cut-off values and disk diffusion correlates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikstrup, L T; Hall, Vanessa Jane; Kahlmeter, G;

    2012-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect ABSTRACT: With the emergence of reduced susceptibility of Clostridium difficile to metronidazole and vancomycin the value of antimicrobial susceptibility testing has increased. The aim of our study was to evaluate disk diffusion for susceptibility testing of C. difficile by ...

  1. Efficacy of Oral Vancomycin in Preventing Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients Treated With Systemic Antimicrobial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hise, Nicholas W; Bryant, Alex M; Hennessey, Erin K; Crannage, Andrew J; Khoury, Jad A; Manian, Farrin A

    2016-09-01

    We compared rates of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in patients receiving or not receiving oral vancomycin prophylaxis with systemic antimicrobial therapy. The incidence of C. difficile infection was significantly lower in patients receiving prophylaxis (4.2% vs 26.6% in those without prophylaxis; odds ratio, 0.12; 95% confidence interval, .04-.4; P < .001). PMID:27318333

  2. TcdC does not significantly repress toxin expression in Clostridium difficile 630ΔErm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Dennis; Smits, Wiep Klaas; Kuijper, Ed J; Corver, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, Clostridium difficile has emerged as an important gut pathogen. Symptoms of C. difficile infection range from mild diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis, sometimes resulting in colectomy or death. The main virulence factors of C. difficile are toxin A and toxin B. Besides the genes encoding these toxins (tcdA and tcdB), the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc) also contains genes encoding a sigma factor (tcdR) and a putative anti-sigma factor (tcdC). The important role of TcdR as a sigma factor for toxin expression is undisputed, whereas the role of TcdC as an anti-sigma factor, inhibiting toxin expression, is currently the subject of debate. To clarify the role of TcdC in toxin expression, we generated an isogenic ClosTron-based mutant of tcdC in Clostridium difficile strain 630Δ Erm (CT::tcdC) and determined the transcription levels of the PaLoc genes and the expression levels of the toxins in the wild type strain and the tcdC mutant strain. We found only minor differences in transcription levels of the PaLoc genes between the wild type and CT::tcdC strains and total toxin levels did not significantly differ either. These results suggest that in C. difficile 630Δerm TcdC is not a major regulator of toxin expression under the conditions tested. PMID:22912837

  3. Clostridium difficile Toxins A and B: Insights into Pathogenic Properties and Extraintestinal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bella, Stefano; Ascenzi, Paolo; Siarakas, Steven; Petrosillo, Nicola; di Masi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has significant clinical impact especially on the elderly and/or immunocompromised patients. The pathogenicity of Clostridium difficile is mainly mediated by two exotoxins: toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB). These toxins primarily disrupt the cytoskeletal structure and the tight junctions of target cells causing cell rounding and ultimately cell death. Detectable C. difficile toxemia is strongly associated with fulminant disease. However, besides the well-known intestinal damage, recent animal and in vitro studies have suggested a more far-reaching role for these toxins activity including cardiac, renal, and neurologic impairment. The creation of C. difficile strains with mutations in the genes encoding toxin A and B indicate that toxin B plays a major role in overall CDI pathogenesis. Novel insights, such as the role of a regulator protein (TcdE) on toxin production and binding interactions between albumin and C. difficile toxins, have recently been discovered and will be described. Our review focuses on the toxin-mediated pathogenic processes of CDI with an emphasis on recent studies. PMID:27153087

  4. Precision microbiome reconstitution restores bile acid mediated resistance to Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffie, Charlie G.; Bucci, Vanni; Stein, Richard R.; McKenney, Peter T.; Ling, Lilan; Gobourne, Asia; No, Daniel; Liu, Hui; Kinnebrew, Melissa; Viale, Agnes; Littmann, Eric; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; Jenq, Robert R.; Taur, Ying; Sander, Chris; Cross, Justin R.; Toussaint, Nora C.; Xavier, Joao B.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tracts of mammals are colonized by hundreds of microbial species that contribute to health, including colonization resistance against intestinal pathogens. Many antibiotics destroy intestinal microbial communities and increase susceptibility to intestinal pathogens. Among these, Clostridium difficile, a major cause of antibiotic-induced diarrhoea, greatly increases morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Which intestinal bacteria provide resistance to C. difficile infection and their in vivo inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. Here we correlate loss of specific bacterial taxa with development of infection, by treating mice with different antibiotics that result in distinct microbiota changes and lead to varied susceptibility to C. difficile. Mathematical modelling augmented by analyses of the microbiota of hospitalized patients identifies resistance-associated bacteria common to mice and humans. Using these platforms, we determine that Clostridium scindens, a bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating intestinal bacterium, is associated with resistance to C. difficile infection and, upon administration, enhances resistance to infection in a secondary bile acid dependent fashion. Using a workflow involving mouse models, clinical studies, metagenomic analyses, and mathematical modelling, we identify a probiotic candidate that corrects a clinically relevant microbiome deficiency. These findings have implications for the rational design of targeted antimicrobials as well as microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutics for individuals at risk of C. difficile infection.

  5. TcdC does not significantly repress toxin expression in Clostridium difficile 630ΔErm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Bakker

    Full Text Available In the past decade, Clostridium difficile has emerged as an important gut pathogen. Symptoms of C. difficile infection range from mild diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis, sometimes resulting in colectomy or death. The main virulence factors of C. difficile are toxin A and toxin B. Besides the genes encoding these toxins (tcdA and tcdB, the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc also contains genes encoding a sigma factor (tcdR and a putative anti-sigma factor (tcdC. The important role of TcdR as a sigma factor for toxin expression is undisputed, whereas the role of TcdC as an anti-sigma factor, inhibiting toxin expression, is currently the subject of debate. To clarify the role of TcdC in toxin expression, we generated an isogenic ClosTron-based mutant of tcdC in Clostridium difficile strain 630Δ Erm (CT::tcdC and determined the transcription levels of the PaLoc genes and the expression levels of the toxins in the wild type strain and the tcdC mutant strain. We found only minor differences in transcription levels of the PaLoc genes between the wild type and CT::tcdC strains and total toxin levels did not significantly differ either. These results suggest that in C. difficile 630Δerm TcdC is not a major regulator of toxin expression under the conditions tested.

  6. [Recent epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a major pathogen for diarrhea in hospitalized patients and because of outbreak of highly virulent strain in EU and US, increased length of hospital stay and increased numbers of severe patients and deaths have become major challenges. In recent years, transmissions through community-acquired or food-borne infections are reported. National surveillance has been already performed overseas. Guidelines for preventing C. difficile infection (CDI) is available, and education activities are promoted for preventing the infection spread. Meanwhile, in Japan, medical hospitals are reporting individual CDI incidence, however, a large-scale research has not been conducted up to the present date and therefore the entire status of CDI including infection of the highly virulent strain has yet to be revealed. This time, we performed a questionnaire-based survey at 2,537 hospitals nationwide between April 15, 2013 and May 31, 2013 to investigate CDI incidence, diagnosis and treatment. Valid responses were obtained from 321 hospitals. Regarding the annual number of CDI patients at all the hospitals, the highest group of hospitals responding "1 to 5 patients a year" was 17.8%, and the second highest group of hospitals responding "no patients a year" was 13.1%. In contrast, there was a group of hospitals with "more than 101 patients a year", which was 3.1%. This indicates that there was the difference in the CDI incidences among hospitals. According to the questionnaire results, a highest group of hospitals responding "0-20%" for CDI patients with serious complication such as toxic megacolon, gastrointestinal perforation, ileus paralytic, bacteremia, sepsis, crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis was 62.6%, and for CDI patients with recurrence more than one, a group of hospitals answering "0 to 20%" was 56.4%, which was the highest. This suggested that there was only a small number of serious CDI patients and recurrence CDI patients in Japan

  7. First isolation of Clostridium difficile PCR-ribotype 027/toxinotype III in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pituch, Hanna; Bakker, Dennis; Kuijper, Ed; Obuch-Woszczatyński, Piotr; Wultańska, Dorota; Nurzyńska, Grazyna; Bielec, Anna; Bar-Andziak, Ewa; Łuczak, Mirosław

    2008-01-01

    Of 175 Clostridium difficile strains isolated from patient hospitalized in one academic hospital in Warsaw between 2005-2006, one isolate belonged to PCR-ribotype 027/toxinotype III. This isolate had tcdA, tcdB, binary toxin genes (cdtA and cdtB), a 18-bp deletion and a 1 bp deletion at 117 position in the tcdC gene. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests revealed high level resistance to erythromycin, moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin. This is a first report of the 027 strain of C. difficile in Poland. PMID:19004250

  8. Clostridium difficile infection: Early history, diagnosis and molecular strain typing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, C; Van Broeck, J; Taminiau, B; Delmée, M; Daube, G

    2016-08-01

    Recognised as the leading cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains high despite efforts to improve prevention and reduce the spread of the bacterium in healthcare settings. In the last decade, many studies have focused on the epidemiology and rapid diagnosis of CDI. In addition, different typing methods have been developed for epidemiological studies. This review explores the history of C. difficile and the current scope of the infection. The variety of available laboratory tests for CDI diagnosis and strain typing methods are also examined. PMID:27238460

  9. Antimicrobial resistance, toxinotype, and genotypic profiling of Clostridium difficile isolates of swine origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Pamela R; Thakur, Siddhartha; Abley, Melanie; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A

    2012-07-01

    The occurrence of Clostridium difficile infections in patients that do not fulfill the classical risk factors prompted us to investigate new risk factors of disease. The goal of this study was to characterize strains and associated antimicrobial resistance determinants of C. difficile isolated from swine raised in Ohio and North Carolina. Genotypic approaches used include PCR detection, toxinotyping, DNA sequencing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) DNA fingerprinting. Thirty-one percent (37/119) of isolates carried both tetM and tetW genes. The ermB gene was found in 91% of isolates that were resistant to erythromycin (68/75). Eighty-five percent (521/609) of isolates were toxin gene tcdB and tcdA positive. A total of 81% (494/609) of isolates were positive for cdtB and carry a tcdC gene (a toxin gene negative regulator) with a 39-bp deletion. Overall, 88% (196/223) of pigs carry a single C. difficile strain, while 12% (27/223) of pigs carried multiple strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of individual pigs found to carry more than one strain type of C. difficile. A significant difference in toxinotype profiles in the two geographic locations was noted, with a significantly (P difficile in swine are toxigenic and often are associated with antimicrobial resistance genes, although they are not resistant to drugs that are used to treat C. difficile infections. PMID:22518873

  10. Investigation of Various Tissue Culture Monolayers Sensitivity in Detection of Clostridium difficile Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Salari

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Backround: Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhea. It is usually a consequence of antibi­otic treatment, but sporadic cases can occur. The purpose of this study was to investigate five tissue culture monolayers sen­sitivity in detection of C. difficile-toxin. Methods: A total of 402 stool samples from patients with nosocomial diarrhea hospitalized in three hospitals of Tehran Uni­versity of Medical Sciences (TUMS were collected. The samples were cultured on a selective cycloserine cefoxitin fructose agar (CCFA and incubated in anaerobic conditions, at 37 °C for 4 days. Isolates were characterized to species level by con­ventional biochemical tests. Bacterial cytotoxicity was assayed on five tissue culture monolayers. Results: Our findings show that of the total patients, 24 toxigenic C. difficile (6% were isolated. All 24 C. difficile toxins showed cytotoxic effect at ³ 1:10 dilution on Hela, Hep2, Vero, McCoy and Mdck cells after 16, 20, 24, 24 and 30 hours, re­spectively. C. difficile toxin showed cytotoxic effect at ³ 1:100 dilutions only on Hela cell monolayer after 48 hours. Conclusion: Hela cell monolayer may be a satisfactory substitute for the detection of C. difficile toxin in clinical specimens.   

  11. Assessment of the potential risk of infection associated with Clostridium difficile from porcine xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, Marwah M; Sutherland, Alistair D; Brown, Derek J; Vesely, Pavel; Crossan, Claire; Scobie, Linda

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous concerns over the potential for transfer of pathogens between species during clinical xenotransplantation, and although current clinical application is limited, porcine xenografts have been previously used to treat patients with severe burns. Donor animals providing the xenografts are sourced from a healthy commercial herd, however, as pigs are a known source of zoonotic agents, a number of diseases are required to be excluded from pigs used for xenotransplantation purposes. Many studies have indicated the relevance of viral zoonoses, however, little has been done with regard to the potential for transfer of pathogens related to health care associated infections. Clostridium difficile is a major cause of neonatal enteritis in pigs and an important feature of this organism is that pigs can be asymptomatic carriers. This study has examined the incidence of C. difficile PCR ribotypes present in healthy donor pigs to determine if pig faeces, and in particular, contamination of skin with faecal matter, is a potential route for the transfer of C. difficile. Animals were found to have human ribotype 017 present in the faecal matter, however, no C. difficile was isolated from skin samples taken from the same animals. In addition, due to the risk factors associated with C. difficile infection, the antimicrobial susceptibility of the C. difficile isolates has been determined. PMID:20042046

  12. Transcriptional analysis of temporal gene expression in germinating Clostridium difficile 630 endospores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Dembek

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of hospital acquired diarrhoea in industrialised countries. Under conditions that are not favourable for growth, the pathogen produces metabolically dormant endospores via asymmetric cell division. These are extremely resistant to both chemical and physical stress and provide the mechanism by which C. difficile can evade the potentially fatal consequences of exposure to heat, oxygen, alcohol, and certain disinfectants. Spores are the primary infective agent and must germinate to allow for vegetative cell growth and toxin production. While spore germination in Bacillus is well understood, little is known about C. difficile germination and outgrowth. Here we use genome-wide transcriptional analysis to elucidate the temporal gene expression patterns in C. difficile 630 endospore germination. We have optimized methods for large scale production and purification of spores. The germination characteristics of purified spores have been characterized and RNA extraction protocols have been optimized. Gene expression was highly dynamic during germination and outgrowth, and was found to involve a large number of genes. Using this genome-wide, microarray approach we have identified 511 genes that are significantly up- or down-regulated during C. difficile germination (p≤0.01. A number of functional groups of genes appeared to be co-regulated. These included transport, protein synthesis and secretion, motility and chemotaxis as well as cell wall biogenesis. These data give insight into how C. difficile re-establishes its metabolism, re-builds the basic structures of the vegetative cell and resumes growth.

  13. Isolation of Clostridium difficile from the environment and contacts of patients with antibiotic-associated colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.H.; Fekety, R.; Batts, D.H.; Brown, D.; Cudmore, M.; Silva, J. Jr.; Waters, D.

    1981-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most important cause of antibiotic-associated colitis, but its epidemiology remains unknown. Using a selective medium for the isolation of C. difficile, cultures were obtained from the environment and contacts of hospitalized patients carrying C. difficile in their stools. In areas where carriers had diarrhea, 85 (9.3%) of 910 cultures of floors and other surfaces, especially those subject to fecal contamination, were positive. In areas where there were no known carriers, only 13 (2.6%) of 497 cultures of similar sites were positive (P less than 0.005). C difficile was isolated from hands and stools of asymptomatic hospital personnel, from sewage and soil, and from the home of a patient. Environmental isolates were toxigenic. C. difficile inoculated onto a floor persisted there for five months. Further studies are needed to document how often floor persisted there for five months. Further studies are needed to document how often C. difficile shed by patients with antibiotic-associated colitis is acquired by other persons and whether isolation precautions are capable of limiting the organism's spread.

  14. A Diagnostic Algorithm for the Detection of Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoldaş, Özlem; Altındiş, Mustafa; Cufalı, Davut; Aşık, Gülşah; Keşli, Recep

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clostridium difficile is a common cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea, which is usually associated with previous antibiotic use. The clinical manifestations of C. difficile infection (CDI) may range from mild diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Clostridium difficile should be considered in diarrhea cases with a history of antibiotic use within the last 8 weeks (community-associated CDI) or with a hospital stay of at least 3 days, regardless of the duration of antibiotic use (hospital-acquired CDI). Aims: This study investigated the frequency of CDI in diarrheic patients and evaluated the efficacy of the triple diagnostic algorithm that is proposed here for C. difficile detection. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: In this study, we compared three methods currently employed for C. difficile detection using 95 patient stool samples: an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for toxin A/B (C. diff Toxin A+B; Diagnostic Automation Inc.; Calabasas, CA, USA), an EIA for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) (C. DIFF CHEK-60TM, TechLab Inc.; Blacksburg, VA, USA), and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay (GeneXpert® C. difficile; Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) that detects C. difficile toxin genes and conventional methods as well. In this study, 50.5% of the patients were male, 50 patients were outpatients, 32 were from inpatient clinics and 13 patients were from the intensive care unit. Results: Of the 95 stool samples tested for GDH, 28 were positive. Six samples were positive by PCR, while nine samples were positive for toxin A/B. The hypervirulent strain NAP-1 and binary toxin was not detected. The rate of occurrence of toxigenic C. difficile was 5.1% in the samples. Cefaclor, ampicillin-sulbactam, ertapenem, and piperacillin-tazobactam were the most commonly used antibiotics by patients preceding the onset of diarrhea. Among the patients who were hospitalized in an intensive care unit for more than 7 days, 83.3% were positive for CDI by PCR screening. If the PCR

  15. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a putative Clostridium difficile surface protein Cwp19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cwp19 is a putatively surface-located protein from Clostridium difficile. A recombinant N-terminal protein (residues 27–401) lacking the signal peptide and the C-terminal cell-wall-binding repeats (PFam04122) was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2 Å resolution. Cwp19 is a putatively surface-located protein from Clostridium difficile. A recombinant N-terminal protein (residues 27–401) lacking the signal peptide and the C-terminal cell-wall-binding repeats (PFam04122) was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2 Å resolution. The crystal appeared to belong to the primitive monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 109.1, b = 61.2, c = 109.2 Å, β = 111.85°, and is estimated to contain two molecules of Cwp19 per asymmetric unit

  16. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea in primary joint arthroplasty in Aneurin Bevan University Health Board South.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocker, O; Abdulkadir, U; Roberts, P

    2016-03-01

    Introduction The choice of perioperative antibiotics to reduce the prevalence of infection after joint arthroplasty should be considered carefully to minimise the risk of nosocomial infections. Dramatic increases in the incidence and severity of healthcare-associated Clostridium difficile infection with Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD) have occurred since 2000. Methods A retrospective audit of patients who underwent total hip and total knee replacement between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2007 was undertaken in Aneurin Bevan University Health Board South (ABHBS). Stool samples from patients who had diarrhoea audit linked joint-replacement patients between 1 July 2010 and 26 June 2013 with infection control-records for CDAD-positive cases. Results In the first audit cycle, 1900 joint procedures were carried out in 1845 patients. There were 4 cases of CDAD audit period, 2591 joint procedures were undertaken in 2400 patients: no cases of CDAD financial savings in antibiotics and nursing hours. PMID:26836055

  17. Nosocomial diarrhea: evaluation and treatment of causes other than Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polage, Christopher R; Solnick, Jay V; Cohen, Stuart H

    2012-10-01

    Diarrhea is common among hospitalized patients but the causes are distinct from those of diarrhea in the community. We review existing data about the epidemiology of nosocomial diarrhea and summarize recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of diarrhea. Clinicians should recognize that most cases of nosocomial diarrhea have a noninfectious etiology, including medications, underlying illness, and enteral feeding. Apart from Clostridium difficile, the frequency of infectious causes such as norovirus and toxigenic strains of Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella oxytoca, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacteroides fragilis remains largely undefined and test availability is limited. Here we provide a practical approach to the evaluation and management of nosocomial diarrhea when tests for C. difficile are negative. PMID:22700831

  18. Diarreia associada ao Clostridium difficile: Casuística de 8 anos

    OpenAIRE

    João Dinis Silva; Nuno Veloso; Rogério Godinho; Isadora Rosa; Lurdes Gonçalves; Isabel Medeiros; Celeste Viveiros

    2012-01-01

    Introdução: O Clostridium difficile é o principal agente da diarreia nosocomial nos países desenvolvidos e a sua incidência, morbilidade e mortalidade têm vindo a aumentar nos últimos anos. Os principais fatores de risco para o desenvolvimento da doença são a antibioterapia prévia, a idade avançada e o tempo de hospitalização. Objetivos: Caracterizar a ocorrência de diarreia associada ao Clostridium difficile na nossa instituição, num período de 8 anos (2000-2008), com análise dos fatores de ...

  19. [Treatment of a severe Clostridium difficile infection with colonic lavages. Report of one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada, Felipe; Castillo, Richard; Villalón, Constanza; Zúñiga, José Miguel; Manterola, Carla; Molina, María Elena; Bellolio, Felipe; Urrejola, Gonzalo

    2015-05-01

    A loop ileostomy with intraoperative anterograde colonic lavage has been described as an alternative to colectomy in the management of cases of Clostridium difficile infection refractory to medical treatment. We report a 69 years old diabetic women admitted with a septic shock. An abdominal CAT scan showed a pan-colitis that seemed to be infectious. A polymerase chain reaction was positive for Clostridium Difficile. Due to the failure to improve after full medical treatment, a derivative loop ileostomy and intra-operatory colonic lavage were performed, leaving a Foley catheter in the proximal colon. In the postoperative period, anterograde colonic instillations of Vancomycin flushes through the catheter were performed every 6 hours. Forty eight hours after surgery, the patient improved. A colonoscopy prior to discharge showed resolution of the pseudomembranous colitis. PMID:26203580

  20. Recent advances in the understanding of antibiotic resistance in Clostridium difficile infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile epidemiology has changed in recent years, with the emergence of highly virulent types associated with severe infections, high rates of recurrences and mortality. Antibiotic resistance plays an important role in driving these epidemiological changes and the emergence of new types. While clindamycin resistance was driving historical endemic types, new types are associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones. Furthermore, resistance to multiple antibiotics is a common feature of the newly emergent strains and, in general, of many epidemic isolates. A reduced susceptibility to antibiotics used for C. difficile infection (CDI) treatment, in particular to metronidazole, has recently been described in several studies. Furthermore, an increased number of strains show resistance to rifamycins, used for the treatment of relapsing CDI. Several mechanisms of resistance have been identified in C. difficile, including acquisition of genetic elements and alterations of the antibiotic target sites. The C. difficile genome contains a plethora of mobile genetic elements, many of them involved in antibiotic resistance. Transfer of genetic elements among C. difficile strains or between C. difficile and other bacterial species can occur through different mechanisms that facilitate their spread. Investigations of the fitness cost in C. difficile indicate that both genetic elements and mutations in the molecular targets of antibiotics can be maintained regardless of the burden imposed on fitness, suggesting that resistances may persist in the C. difficile population also in absence of antibiotic selective pressure. The rapid evolution of antibiotic resistance and its composite nature complicate strategies in the treatment and prevention of CDI. The rapid identification of new phenotypic and genotypic traits, the implementation of effective antimicrobial stewardship and infection control programs, and the development of alternative therapies are needed to prevent and

  1. Environmental Contamination in Households of Patients with Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Megan K; Bobr, Aleh; Kuskowski, Michael A; Johnston, Brian D; Sadowsky, Michael J; Khoruts, Alexander; Johnson, James R

    2016-05-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (R-CDI) is common and difficult to treat, potentially necessitating fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). Although C. difficilespores persist in the hospital environment and cause infection, little is known about their potential presence or importance in the household environment. Households of R-CDI subjects in the peri-FMT period and of geographically matched and age-matched controls were analyzed for the presence ofC. difficile Household environmental surfaces and fecal samples from humans and pets in the household were examined. Households of post-FMT subjects were also examined (environmental surfaces only). Participants were surveyed regarding their personal history and household cleaning habits. Species identity and molecular characteristics of presumptive C. difficile isolates from environmental and fecal samples were determined by using the Pro kit (Remel, USA), Gram staining, PCR, toxinotyping, tcdC gene sequencing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Environmental cultures detected C. difficile on ≥1 surface in 8/8 (100%) peri-FMT households, versus 3/8 (38%) post-FMT households and 3/8 (38%) control households (P= 0.025). The most common C. difficile-positive sites were the vacuum (11/27; 41%), toilet (8/30; 27%), and bathroom sink (5/29; 17%).C. difficile was detected in 3/36 (8%) fecal samples (two R-CDI subjects and one household member). Nine (90%) of 10 households with multiple C. difficile-positive samples had a single genotype present each. In conclusion,C. difficile was found in the household environment of R-CDI patients, but whether it was found as a cause or consequence of R-CDI is unknown. If household contamination leads to R-CDI, effective decontamination may be protective. PMID:26921425

  2. A novel subtyping assay for detection of Clostridium difficile virulence genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angione, Stephanie L; Sarma, Aartik A; Novikov, Aleksey; Seward, Leah; Fieber, Jennifer H; Mermel, Leonard A; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2014-03-01

    This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the application of a novel nucleic acid detection platform to detect Clostridium difficile in subjects presenting with acute diarrheal symptoms. This method amplifies three genes associated with C. difficile infection, including genes and deletions (cdtB and tcdC) associated with hypervirulence attributed to the NAP1/027/BI strain. Amplification of DNA from the tcdB, tcdC, and cdtB genes was performed using a droplet-based sandwich platform with quantitative real-time PCR in microliter droplets to detect and identify the amplified fragments of DNA. The device and identification system are simple in design and can be integrated as a point-of-care test to help rapidly detect and identify C. difficile strains that pose significant health threats in hospitals and other health-care communities. PMID:24434086

  3. Equine colitis X associated with infection by Clostridium difficile NAP1/027.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songer, J Glenn; Trinh, H T; Dial, Sharon M; Brazier, Jon S; Glock, Robert D

    2009-05-01

    A 14-year-old Quarter Horse with a 48-hr history of colic was euthanized after failure to respond to treatment. At necropsy, cecal and colonic mucosae were congested throughout, and there was segmental edema and significant thickening of the intestinal wall. Excessive numbers of mononuclear cells were found in mucosal lamina propria. Submucosal hemorrhage was diffuse and extensive, and Clostridium difficile toxins A and B were detected. Large numbers of C. difficile were isolated, and genetic characterization revealed them to be North American pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type 1, polymerase chain reaction ribotype 027, and toxinotype III. Genes for the binary toxin were present, and toxin negative-regulator tcdC contained an 18-bp deletion. This genotype comprises the current human "epidemic strain," which is associated with human C. difficile-associated disease of greater than historical severity. The diagnosis was peracute typhlocolitis, with lesions and history typical of those attributed to colitis X. PMID:19407094

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolated from animals and humans in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Otávio Silveira Silva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility in Clostridium difficile strains isolated from animals and humans in Brazil. The 54 C. difficile strains used were isolated from stool samples from piglets (n=16, dogs (n=13, humans (n=13, foals (n=8 calves (n=2, an ocelot (n=1 and a maned wolf (n=1. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using the serial plate agar dilution method for penicillin, florfenicol, oxytetracycline, erythromycin, vancomycin, metronidazole and tylosin. The C. difficile strains assessed were susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin. Florfenicol resistance was rarely observed; 52 (96.4% strains were sensitive to this antimicrobial. Five (9.3%, five (9.3%, 14 (25.9% and 20 (37.0% strains were resistant to oxytetracycline, penicillin, tylosin and erythromycin respectively.

  5. Routine disc diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Clostridium difficile and association with PCR ribotype 027

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, H M; Danielsen, T K; Justesen, U S

    2015-01-01

    Reduced susceptibility to metronidazole and vancomycin in Clostridium difficile has been reported, which emphasises the need for simple antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods. The aim of this study was to apply a published disc diffusion method and zone diameter breakpoint correlates to the...... published breakpoint (<23 mm) and five isolates had a vancomycin zone diameter below the published breakpoint (<19 mm), most of which were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotype 027. The total number of PCR ribotype 027 was 29 (1.1 %). Overall, C. difficile PCR ribotype 027 isolates had smaller zone...... diameters than non-027 isolates. The disc diffusion method is very simple and inexpensive, and the published zone diameter breakpoints will detect C. difficile isolates with reduced susceptibility to metronidazole and vancomycin....

  6. Cadazolid: A new hope in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kali, Arunava; Charles, Marie Victor Pravin; Srirangaraj, Srirangaraj

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a potential life-threatening consequence of antibiotic therapy. Although the risk increases with duration of treatment, it can also occur after a short treatment course. In addition to broad-spectrum antibiotics, anti-neoplastic agents, proton pump inhibitors, H2 blockers, and several other drugs have been reported to induce intestinal dysbiosis, which is central to the pathogenesis of CDI. There is an increase in incidence and mortality attributed to ...

  7. Rifaximin disc diffusion test for in vitro susceptibility testing of Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    Huhulescu, Steliana; Sagel, Ulrich; Fiedler, Anita; Pecavar, Verena; Blaschitz, Marion; Wewalka, Guenther; Allerberger, Franz; Indra, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Rifaximin is a rifampicin derivative, poorly absorbed by the gastro-intestinal tract. We studied the in vitro susceptibility to rifamixin of 1082 Clostridium difficile isolates; among these,184 isolates from a strain collection were tested by an in-house rifaximin disc (40 µg) diffusion test, by an in-house rifaximin broth microdilution test, by rifampicin Etest and by rpoB gene sequencing. In the absence of respective CLSI or EUCAST MIC breakpoints for rifaximin and rifampicin against C. dif...

  8. Therapeutic Success of Rifaximin for Clostridium difficile Infection Refractory to Metronidazole and Vancomycin

    OpenAIRE

    Tannous, George; Neff, Guy; Kemmer, Nyingi

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 46-year-old white male with confirmed Clostridium difficile infection for >4 weeks after fluoroquinolone therapy. The patient received two courses of metronidazole 500 mg three times daily (t.i.d.) during which time diarrhea resolved; however, symptoms recurred 14–15 days after treatment termination. He received a 2-week course of vancomycin 125 mg four times daily, with symptoms recurring 10 days after treatment conclusion. The patient then received a pulsed tapering ...

  9. Comparison of Clostridium difficile detection by monolayer and by inhibition of nucleoside uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detection and identification of Clostridium difficile toxin by traditional monolayer assay were compared with results obtained by a new procedure based on toxin-dependent inhibition of target cell uptake of a radioactive nucleoside. A high degree of correlation was noted between the two determinations. Although the new procedure was quantitative and objective, its value is seen at present as a rapid screen that may support results obtained in monolayers and as a potential assay for other, currently unidentified, toxins

  10. Complications of Hospital-Onset Healthcare Facility-Associated Clostridium difficile Infections Among Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Martin E; Kralovic, Stephen M; Simbartl, Loretta A; Whitlock, Judith L; Jain, Rajiv; Roselle, Gary A

    2016-06-01

    Complications within 30 days of a clinically confirmed hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infection diagnosis from July 1, 2012, through June 30, 2015, in 127 acute care Veterans Health Administration facilities were evaluated. Pooled rates for attributable intensive care unit admissions, colectomies, and deaths were 2.7%, 0.5%, and 0.4%, respectively. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:717-719. PMID:26880482

  11. Risk Factors for Recurrence, Complications and Mortality in Clostridium difficile Infection: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Abou Chakra, Claire Nour; Pepin, Jacques; Sirard, Stephanie; Valiquette, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) can lead to complications, recurrence, and death. Numerous studies have assessed risk factors for these unfavourable outcomes, but systematic reviews or meta-analyses published so far were limited in scope or in quality. Methods A systematic review was completed according to PRISMA guidelines. An electronic search in five databases was performed. Studies published until October 2013 were included if risk factors for at least one CDI outcome wer...

  12. Prediction Tools for Unfavourable Outcomes in Clostridium difficile Infection: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Abou Chakra, Claire Nour; Pepin, Jacques; Valiquette, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Context Identifying patients at risk for adverse outcomes of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), including recurrence and death, will become increasingly important as novel therapies emerge, which are more effective than traditional approaches but very expensive. Clinical prediction rules (CPRs) can improve the accuracy of medical decision-making. Several CPRs have been developed for CDI, but none has gained a widespread acceptance. Methods We systematically reviewed studies describing the...

  13. Evaluation of Repetitive Element Sequence-Based PCR as a Molecular Typing Method for Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    Spigaglia, Patrizia; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2003-01-01

    Repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) is a typing method that enables the generation of DNA fingerprinting that discriminates bacterial strains. In this study, we evaluated the applicability of rep-PCR in typing Clostridium difficile clinical isolates. The results obtained by rep-PCR were compared with those obtained by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and PCR ribotyping. A high correspondence between pattern differentiations produced by rep-PCR and PFGE was observed, whereas...

  14. Clostridium difficile Infection and Proton Pump Inhibitor Use in Hospitalized Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Larsen; Aleesha Richman; MacKay, Mark W.; Kody Crowell; E. Kent Korgenski; Ellen Lin; Zobell, Jeffery T.; Raza Patel; Pohl, John F.; Chatfield, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    Children with cystic fibrosis (CF) often take proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which helps improve efficacy of fat absorption with pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. However, PPI use is known to be associated with Clostridium difficile-(C. diff-) associated diarrhea (CDAD). We retrospectively evaluated the incidence of C. diff infection from all pediatric hospital admissions over a 5-year period at a single tertiary children's hospital. We found significantly more C. diff-positive stool tes...

  15. The Effects of PPI Use on Clostridium Difficile Serum Antigen Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güçlü Beriat

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim To evaluate the effects of proton-pump inhibitor (PPI use on distrubtion of intestinal flora  by measuring serum Clostridium Difficile antigen levels before and at the end of a three-months treatment  in patients with Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LFR treatment . Material and Methods The study covers 32 patients with LFR, out of which 24 were female (75% and 8 were male (25%. The mean age of the patients was 34.13 ± 11.59. All patients included in the study were administered Lansoprazole 30 mgr tablets perorally before meals and twice a day for treatment. Reflux Symptom Index (RSI, Reflux Finding Score (RFS, white blood cell count, CRP and serum Clostridium Difficile toxin A, B measurement results were comparatively evaluated through the blood serum samples drawn from the patients before and at the end of the three-months treatment. Results While the mean values of pre-treatment RSI and RFI were 20.81±4.05 and 13.31±3.30 respectively, the mean values were measured to be 3.41±2.37 and 1.50±1.88 respectively following the three-months treatment (p< 0.05. The pre-treatment mean value of serum Clostridium Difficile Ag was 140.56±11.74, while it was seen that the same value became 114.94±10.70 after the three-months treatment (p< 0.05. There was, however, no statistically significant change in the other parameters. Discussion According to the results obtained, it was seen that the treatment with PPI was not cause to  increase Clostridium difficile toxin A, B serum antigen levels. So these drugs could be used in long time therapies confidently. 

  16. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation: Expanding Horizons for Clostridium difficile Infections and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Borody, Thomas J.; Debra Peattie; Mitchell, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) methodology has been progressively refined over the past several years. The procedure has an extensive track record of success curing Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) with remarkably few adverse effects. It achieves similar levels of success whether the CDI occurs in the young or elderly, previously normal or profoundly ill patients, or those with CDI in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). While using FMT to treat CDI, however, we learned that using t...

  17. Clostridium difficile PCR Ribotypes from Different Animal Hosts and Different Geographic Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Zidaric, V.; Janezic, S; Indra, A.; Kokotovic, Branko; Blanco, J.L.; Seyboldt, C; Diaz, C. Rodriguez; Poxton, I R; Perreten, V.; Drigo, I; Jiraskova, A; OCEPEK, M.; Weese, J.S.; Songer, J G; Rupnik, M.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic sporogenic bacterium traditionally associated with human nosocomial infections, and animals have been recognized as an important potential reservoir for human infections (Rodriguez-Palacios et al., 2013). Ribotype 078 is often reported in animals but according to recent studies the overlap between PCR ribotypes found in humans and animals seems to be increasing (Bakker et al., 2010; Gould and Limbago, 2010; Janezic et al., 2012; Keel et al., 2007; Koene e...

  18. Role of Leptin-Mediated Colonic Inflammation in Defense against Clostridium difficile Colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Madan, Rajat; Guo, Xiaoti; Naylor, Caitlin; Buonomo, Erica L.; Mackay, Donald; Noor, Zannatun; Concannon, Patrick; Scully, Kenneth W.; Pramoonjago, Patcharin; Kolling, Glynis L.; Cirle A Warren; Duggal, Priya; William A. Petri

    2014-01-01

    The role of leptin in the mucosal immune response to Clostridium difficile colitis, a leading cause of nosocomial infection, was studied in humans and in a murine model. Previously, a mutation in the receptor for leptin (LEPR) was shown to be associated with susceptibility to infectious colitis and liver abscess due to Entamoeba histolytica as well as to bacterial peritonitis. Here we discovered that European Americans homozygous for the same LEPR Q223R mutation (rs1137101), known to result i...

  19. Induced Sporicidal Activity of Chlorhexidine against Clostridium difficile Spores under Altered Physical and Chemical Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Nerandzic, Michelle M.; Donskey, Curtis J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chlorhexidine is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial commonly used to disinfect the skin of patients to reduce the risk of healthcare-associated infections. Because chlorhexidine is not sporicidal, it is not anticipated that it would have an impact on skin contamination with Clostridium difficile, the most important cause of healthcare-associated diarrhea. However, although chlorhexidine is not sporicidal as it is used in healthcare settings, it has been reported to kill spores of Bacil...

  20. Comparison of Clostridium difficile detection by monolayer and by inhibition of nucleoside uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuhr, J.E.; Trent, D.J.; Collmann, I.R.

    1987-02-01

    Detection and identification of Clostridium difficile toxin by traditional monolayer assay were compared with results obtained by a new procedure based on toxin-dependent inhibition of target cell uptake of a radioactive nucleoside. A high degree of correlation was noted between the two determinations. Although the new procedure was quantitative and objective, its value is seen at present as a rapid screen that may support results obtained in monolayers and as a potential assay for other, currently unidentified, toxins.

  1. Administration of probiotic kefir to mice with Clostridium difficile infection exacerbates disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinler, Jennifer K; Brown, Aaron; Ross, Caná L; Boonma, Prapaporn; Conner, Margaret E; Savidge, Tor C

    2016-08-01

    Lifeway(®) kefir, a fermented milk product containing 12 probiotic organisms, is reported to show promise as an alternative to fecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). We employed a murine CDI model to study the probiotic protective mechanisms and unexpectedly determined that kefir drastically increased disease severity. Our results emphasize the need for further independent clinical testing of kefir as alternative therapy in recurrent CDI. PMID:27180007

  2. Comparison of Whole-Genome Sequencing and Molecular-Epidemiological Techniques for Clostridium difficile Strain Typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Samuel R; Anderson, Lydia J; Kotter, Cassandra V; Littlehorn, Cynthia A; Arms, Lesley E; Dowell, Elaine; Todd, James K; Frank, Daniel N

    2016-09-01

    We analyzed in parallel 27 pediatric Clostridium difficile isolates by repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (RepPCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and whole-genome next-generation sequencing. Next-generation sequencing distinguished 3 groups of isolates that were indistinguishable by RepPCR and 1 isolate that clustered in the same PFGE group as other isolates. PMID:26407257

  3. Clostridium difficile infection in the community: Are proton pump inhibitors to blame?

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Once a nosocomial disease, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) now appears frequently in the community in the absence of exposure to antibiotics. Prior studies have shown that patients with community-acquired CDI are younger, more likely to be female, and have fewer comorbidities compared to patients with hospital-associated CDI. Because most studies of CDI are hospital-based, comparatively little is known about community-acquired CDI. The recent study by Chitnis has received widespread att...

  4. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Six Strategies to Treat Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Lauren Lapointe-Shaw; Tran, Kim L.; Peter C. Coyte; Hancock-Howard, Rebecca L.; Jeff Powis; Poutanen, Susan M.; Susy Hota

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the cost-effectiveness of six treatment strategies for patients diagnosed with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in Canada: 1. oral metronidazole; 2. oral vancomycin; 3.oral fidaxomicin; 4. fecal transplantation by enema; 5. fecal transplantation by nasogastric tube; and 6. fecal transplantation by colonoscopy. Perspective Public insurer for all hospital and physician services. Setting Ontario, Canada. Methods A decision analytic model was used to model costs...

  5. Anstieg der Clostridium difficile-assoziierten Diarrhoe nach Einsatz von Moxifloxacin

    OpenAIRE

    Günther, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    The Clostridium-difficile associated diarrhea has shown a rising incidence in recent years. This has a dramatic medial and economical impact. The main cause for the disease is a recent antibiotic therapy. There have been numerous studies which have established certain antibiotics most potent for causing colitis, eg. Cephalosporins of group II an III, clindamycin and ciprofloxacin. Moxifloxacin was introduced as a new flourochinolon a few years ago. With a high bioavailability it has s...

  6. Clostridium difficile PCR ribotypes 001 and 176 - the common denominator of C. difficile infection epidemiology in the Czech Republic, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutova, Marcela; Matejkova, Jana; Kuijper, Ed J; Drevinek, Pavel; Nyc, Otakar

    2016-07-21

    In 2014, 18 hospitals in the Czech Republic participated in a survey of the incidence of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in the country. The mean CDI incidence was 6.1 (standard deviation (SD):7.2) cases per 10,000 patient bed-days and 37.8 cases (SD: 41.4) per 10,000 admissions. The mean CDI testing frequency was 39.5 tests (SD: 25.4) per 10,000 patient bed-days and 255.8 tests (SD: 164.0) per 10,000 admissions. A total of 774 C. difficile isolates were investigated, of which 225 (29%) belonged to PCR ribotype 176, and 184 isolates (24%) belonged to PCR ribotype 001. Multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) revealed 27 clonal complexes formed by 84% (190/225) of PCR ribotype 176 isolates, and 14 clonal complexes formed by 77% (141/184) of PCR ribotype 001 isolates. Clonal clusters of PCR ribotypes 176 and 001 were observed in 11 and 7 hospitals, respectively. Our data demonstrate the spread of two C. difficile PCR ribotypes within 18 hospitals in the Czech Republic, stressing the importance of standardising CDI testing protocols and implementing mandatory CDI surveillance in the country. PMID:27484171

  7. Detection of Clostridium difficile in small and medium-sized wild Mammals in Southern Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Claire M; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Rousseau, Joyce; Weese, J Scott

    2013-04-01

    We sampled 325 small and medium-sized wild mammals in Ontario, Canada in 2007 and 2010 to determine the prevalence and characteristics of Clostridium difficile in wild mammals living in proximity to captive wildlife and livestock. Clostridium difficile was isolated from five of 109 animals (4.6%) on four of 25 farms (16%), but was not isolated from any of the 216 samples from raccoons (Procyon lotor) living on the grounds of the Toronto Zoo. The positive animals included two raccoons from one beef farm, one raccoon from a different beef farm, one raccoon from a swine farm, and a shrew (Blarina brevicauda) from a dairy farm. None had evidence of gastrointestinal disease. Three of the five isolates were toxinotype variants (II, IV, and XIII) that are rarely identified in humans and domestic animals. The other two were toxinotype 0, a common toxinotype in humans and animals; however, all five isolates were of different ribotypes. None of the recovered ribotypes were recognized as ribotypes present in the authors' reference library of over 3,000 human and domestic animal C. difficile isolates. Neither the public health nor the animal health relevance of these findings is clear. It is not known whether C. difficile is a pathogen of small and medium-sized wild mammals, although the susceptibility of various laboratory species suggests it could cause disease. PMID:23568920

  8. Fidaxomicin in the treatment of colitis due to Clostridium difficile: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Cortese

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI and Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea (CDAD is increasing in Canada, USA, and Europe and represents a considerable clinical problem. Both naïve and hypervirulent strains can be considered as opportunistic bacteria affecting immunocompromised, antibiotic-treated, critical, or subcritical patients with a microbiota disruption. CDI arising is strictly related to antibiotic, single or combined, and/or proton pump inhibitor treatment. CDI can cause a syndrome with systemic involvement and complex treatment, sometimes requiring surgical interventions (e.g. colectomy in fulminant colitis. Antibiotic treatment with metronidazole by mouth is the first choice and generally vancomycin is administered in case of lack of effectiveness. Fidaxomicin is a new macrocyclic antibiotic for C. difficile with microflora-sparing properties. This paper reports our initial experience in 11 patients with non-responder or relapsing CDIs. Fidaxomicin was effective in 10 cases (91%. Only one patient with an active ulcerative colitis did not respond and was treated with fecal-microbiota transplantation. In two patients diarrhea persisted, but just the ulcerative colitis one was C. difficile-related. No adverse events were experienced.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/cmi.v8i1s.956

  9. Progress in studies on Clostridium difficile%艰难梭菌的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周建国; 全琦; 傅思武

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is gram-positive anaerobic bacillus, which can cause Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, and lead to a series of intestinal infection symptoms and associated clinical manifestations. In recent years, the prevalence and severity of CDI has increased, The rising rates of CDI have largely been attributed to the strains resistant to metron-idazole or vancomycin, and the emergence of hypervirulent strain. This paper presents a brief review on Clostridium difficile, concerning its isolation and culture, biological characteristics, pathogenesis and drug resistance mechanisms, clinical manifestations and detection techniques, prevention, domestic infection status and other advances.%艰难梭菌为革兰阳性厌氧芽胞杆菌,可引起艰难梭菌相关性腹泻,导致一系列肠道感染症状和相关临床表现.近年来由于高致病株的出现、菌株耐药性的增加,艰难梭菌感染在全球呈蔓延趋势.本文就艰难梭菌的耐药机制、检测技术、防治及国内感染现状等作一简要综述.

  10. Active and Secretory IgA-Coated Bacterial Fractions Elucidate Dysbiosis in Clostridium difficile Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Andrés; Vázquez-Castellanos, Jorge F.; Artacho, Alejandro; Chen, Xinhua; Kelly, Ciaran

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The onset of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been associated with treatment with wide-spectrum antibiotics. Antibiotic treatment alters the activity of gut commensals and may result in modified patterns of immune responses to pathogens. To study these mechanisms during CDI, we separated bacteria with high cellular RNA content (the active bacteria) and their inactive counterparts by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of the fecal bacterial suspension. The gut dysbiosis due to the antibiotic treatment may result in modification of immune recognition of intestinal bacteria. The immune recognition patterns were assessed by FACS of bacterial fractions either coated or not with intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA). We described the taxonomic distributions of these four bacterial fractions (active versus inactive and SIgA coated versus non-SIgA coated) by massive 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and quantified the proportion of C. difficile toxin genes in the samples. The overall gut microbiome composition was more robustly influenced by antibiotics than by the C. difficile toxins. Bayesian networks revealed that the C. difficile cluster was preferentially SIgA coated during CDI. In contrast, in the CDI-negative group Fusobacterium was the characteristic genus of the SIgA-opsonized fraction. Lactobacillales and Clostridium cluster IV were mostly inactive in CDI-positive patients. In conclusion, although the proportion of C. difficile in the gut is very low, it is able to initiate infection during the gut dysbiosis caused by environmental stress (antibiotic treatment) as a consequence of decreased activity of the protective bacteria. IMPORTANCE C. difficile is a major enteric pathogen with worldwide distribution. Its expansion is associated with broad-spectrum antibiotics which disturb the normal gut microbiome. In this study, the DNA sequencing of highly active bacteria and bacteria opsonized by intestinal secretory immunoglobulin

  11. Characterisation of Clostridium difficile isolates by slpA and tcdC gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joost, Insa; Speck, Katja; Herrmann, Mathias; von Müller, Lutz

    2009-03-01

    The genotyping of Clostridium difficile is generally performed by the analysis of fragment- or amplification-length polymorphism by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotyping. However, sequence-based methods allow typing technique standardisation and data comparison. In the present study 100 C. difficile isolates, obtained from various institutions in the state of Saarland, Germany, were prospectively analyzed by surface layer protein A single locus sequence typing (slpAST). A high proportion (52%) of isolates attributable to ribotype 027 (RT027) was found indicating that the new outbreak strain has become endemic, at least in parts of Germany. RT027 strains displayed characteristic mutations of the potential toxin repressor gene tcdC and antibiotic resistance to macrolides and fluoroquinolones. C. difficile isolates attributable to ribotypes RT001 (27%), RT014/066 (5%), RT078 (4%), to the smz genotype (3%), and to more sporadic genotypes were also identified. Overall, the prevalence of strains with resistance to macrolides or fluoroquinolones was >80%. slpAST allows the comprehensive identification of C. difficile strains by global data comparison, exemplified here by our identification of smz strains previously identified by slpAST of a Japanese outbreak. In conclusion, slpAST appears to be a powerful discriminative tool for the straightforward, standardised genotyping of C. difficile isolates. PMID:19303562

  12. Rapid detection of ermB gene in Clostridium difficile by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Minyi; Liu, Wei; Wang, Pu; Tan, Jiasheng; Zhou, Youlian; Wu, Peiqun; Zhang, Ting; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Ye

    2015-08-01

    Macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance in Clostridium difficile is mostly due to the ermB resistance determinant. Here, we describe a sensitive and rapid molecular method to detect ermB in C. difficile to contribute to the wider epidemiological study. Five sets of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) primers were designed and optimized for rapid detection of ermB. The specificity and sensitivity of the primers for ermB were detected, and the ermB LAMP assay was compared to conventional PCR with 80 clinical isolates of C. difficile. Real-time monitoring of turbidity and chromogenic reaction were used to determine negative and positive results. A total of 26 pathogenic bacterial strains of different species were found to be negative for ermB, which indicated the high specificity of the primers. ermB was detected in 78.8 % (63/80) of the clinical isolates by both LAMP and conventional PCR. The detection limit of LAMP was 36.1  pg DNA μl- 1 and its sensitivity was 10-fold greater than that of conventional PCR. This study is the first report regarding the development and application of the LAMP assay for detection of the ermB gene in C. difficile strains. The developed LAMP method is sensitive, specific and provides a user-friendly visual approach for the rapid detection of ermB-bearing C. difficile. PMID:26272634

  13. Stool therapy may become a preferred treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Dinesh; L'esperance, Heidi E; Vyas, Arpita

    2013-08-01

    Fecal enemas were first reported to successfully treat life threatening enterocolitis in 1958, but fecal therapy to treat Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection has remained esoteric and not well investigated until recently. In the past few years, systematic reviews of case series and case reports of fecal microbiota transplant for recurrent C. difficile infection have become available and validate use of fecal transplant for C. difficile enterocolitis. Methods of fecal transplant reported in the literature include: nasogastric tube, gastroscope, duodenal tube, colonoscopy, rectal tube, and fecal enemas administered at home; no method has been shown to be superior. A recent randomized study published in New England Journal of Medicine found fecal transplant to be superior to oral vancomycin alone in treatment of recurrent C. difficile enterocolitis. The significance of this trial cannot be underestimated as it lends credibility to the idea of intentionally using microbes to combat disease, providing an alternative to the older paradigm of disease eradication through use of antimicrobials. PMID:23922461

  14. Role of leptin-mediated colonic inflammation in defense against Clostridium difficile colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Rajat; Guo, Xiaoti; Naylor, Caitlin; Buonomo, Erica L; Mackay, Donald; Noor, Zannatun; Concannon, Patrick; Scully, Kenneth W; Pramoonjago, Patcharin; Kolling, Glynis L; Warren, Cirle A; Duggal, Priya; Petri, William A

    2014-01-01

    The role of leptin in the mucosal immune response to Clostridium difficile colitis, a leading cause of nosocomial infection, was studied in humans and in a murine model. Previously, a mutation in the receptor for leptin (LEPR) was shown to be associated with susceptibility to infectious colitis and liver abscess due to Entamoeba histolytica as well as to bacterial peritonitis. Here we discovered that European Americans homozygous for the same LEPR Q223R mutation (rs1137101), known to result in decreased STAT3 signaling, were at increased risk of C. difficile infection (odds ratio, 3.03; P = 0.015). The mechanism of increased susceptibility was studied in a murine model. Mice lacking a functional leptin receptor (db/db) had decreased clearance of C. difficile from the gut lumen and diminished inflammation. Mutation of tyrosine 1138 in the intracellular domain of LepRb that mediates signaling through the STAT3/SOCS3 pathway also resulted in decreased mucosal chemokine and cell recruitment. Collectively, these data support a protective mucosal immune function for leptin in C. difficile colitis partially mediated by a leptin-STAT3 inflammatory pathway that is defective in the LEPR Q223R mutation. Identification of the role of leptin in protection from C. difficile offers the potential for host-directed therapy and demonstrates a connection between metabolism and immunity. PMID:24166957

  15. Discovery of LFF571: An Investigational Agent for Clostridium difficile Infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaMarche, Matthew J.; Leeds, Jennifer A.; Amaral, Adam; Brewer, Jason T.; Bushell, Simon M.; Deng, Gejing; Dewhurst, Janetta M.; Ding, Jian; Dzink-Fox, JoAnne; Gamber, Gabriel; Jain, Akash; Lee, Kwangho; Lee, Lac; Lister, Troy; McKenney, David; Mullin, Steve; Osborne, Colin; Palestrant, Deborah; Patane, Michael A.; Rann, Elin M.; Sachdeva, Meena; Shao, Jian; Tiamfook, Stacey; Trzasko, Anna; Whitehead, Lewis; Yifru, Aregahegn; Yu, Donghui; Yan, Wanlin; Zhu, Qingming (Novartis)

    2012-11-09

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a Gram positive, anaerobic bacterium that infects the lumen of the large intestine and produces toxins. This results in a range of syndromes from mild diarrhea to severe toxic megacolon and death. Alarmingly, the prevalence and severity of C. difficile infection are increasing; thus, associated morbidity and mortality rates are rising. 4-Aminothiazolyl analogues of the antibiotic natural product GE2270 A (1) were designed, synthesized, and optimized for the treatment of C. difficile infection. The medicinal chemistry effort focused on enhancing aqueous solubility relative to that of the natural product and previous development candidates (2, 3) and improving antibacterial activity. Structure-activity relationships, cocrystallographic interactions, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy in animal models of infection were characterized. These studies identified a series of dicarboxylic acid derivatives, which enhanced solubility/efficacy profile by several orders of magnitude compared to previously studied compounds and led to the selection of LFF571 (4) as an investigational new drug for treating C. difficile infection.

  16. Evaluation of the Cepheid Xpert Clostridium difficile Epi assay for diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection and typing of the NAP1 strain at a cancer hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babady, N Esther; Stiles, Jeffrey; Ruggiero, Phyllis; Khosa, Perminder; Huang, David; Shuptar, Susan; Kamboj, Mini; Kiehn, Timothy E

    2010-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of health care-associated diarrhea. Accurate and rapid diagnosis is essential to improve patient outcome and prevent disease spread. We compared our two-step diagnostic algorithm, an enzyme immunoassay for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) followed by the cytotoxin neutralization test (CYT) with a turnaround time of 24 to 48 h, versus the Cepheid Xpert C. difficile Epi assay, a PCR-based assay with a turnaround time of tcdC gene and PCR ribotyping. In phase 1, the agreement between the GDH-CYT and the GDH-Xpert PCR was 72%. The sensitivities and specificities of GDH-CYT and GDH-Xpert PCR were 57% and 97% and 100% and 97%, respectively. In phase 2, the agreement between GDH-CYT and Xpert PCR alone was 95%. As in phase 1, sensitivity of the Xpert PCR was higher than that of the GDH-CYT. The correlation between PCR-ribotyping, sequencing, and Xpert PCR for detection of NAP1 strains was excellent (>90%). The excellent sensitivity and specificity and the rapid turnaround time of the Xpert PCR assay as well as its strain-typing capability make it an attractive option for diagnosis of C. difficile infection. PMID:20943860

  17. Potential of lactoferrin to prevent antibiotic-induced Clostridium difficile infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, C. H.; Crowther, G. S.; Śpiewak, K.; Brindell, M.; Singh, G.; Wilcox, M. H.; Monaghan, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a global healthcare problem. Recent evidence suggests that the availability of iron may be important for C. difficile growth. This study evaluated the comparative effects of iron-depleted (1% Fe3+ saturated) bovine apo-lactoferrin (apo-bLf) and iron-saturated (85% Fe3+ saturated) bovine holo-lactoferrin (holo-bLf) in a human in vitro gut model that simulates CDI. Methods Two parallel triple-stage chemostat gut models were inoculated with pooled human faeces and spiked with C. difficile spores (strain 027 210, PCR ribotype 027). Holo- or apo-bLf was instilled (5 mg/mL, once daily) for 35 days. After 7 days, clindamycin was instilled (33.9 mg/L, four times daily) to induce simulated CDI. Indigenous microflora populations, C. difficile total counts and spores, cytotoxin titres, short chain fatty acid concentrations, biometal concentrations, lactoferrin concentration and iron content of lactoferrin were monitored daily. Results In the apo-bLf model, germination of C. difficile spores occurred 6 days post instillation of clindamycin, followed by rapid vegetative cell proliferation and detectable toxin production. By contrast, in the holo-bLf model, only a modest vegetative cell population was observed until 16 days post antibiotic administration. Notably, no toxin was detected in this model. In separate batch culture experiments, holo-bLf prevented C. difficile vegetative cell growth and toxin production, whereas apo-bLf and iron alone did not. Conclusions Holo-bLf, but not apo-bLf, delayed C. difficile growth and prevented toxin production in a human gut model of CDI. This inhibitory effect may be iron independent. These observations suggest that bLf in its iron-saturated state could be used as a novel preventative or treatment strategy for CDI. PMID:26759363

  18. Effect of biotherapeutics on antitoxin IgG in experimentally induced Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Recurrent diarrhoea after successful treatment of primary Clostridium difficile associated disease (CDAD occurs due to bowel flora alterations and failure to mount an effective antibody response. Apart from antibiotics, risk factors include immunosuppressive and acid-suppressive drug administration. Biotherapeutics such as probiotic and epidermal growth factor (EGF may offer potential effective therapy for CDAD. Materials and Methods: The effect of biotherapeutics in mounting an antibody response against C. difficile toxins was studied in BALB/c mice challenged with C. difficile after pre-treatment with ampicillin, lansoprazole or cyclosporin. Sera from sacrificed animals were estimated for antitoxin IgG by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Antitoxin IgG was significantly higher (P0.05 in animals in which C. difficile was given after pre-treatment with cyclosporin compared to those without any pre-treatment, or pre-treatment with antibiotic or lansoprazole. In inter-subgroup comparisons also significant anomaly in production of antitoxin IgG was found. The antitoxin IgG levels were raised in animals administered C. difficile after pre-treatment with ampicillin, but lower in animals administered cyclosporin. High levels of antitoxin IgG were also found in the serum samples of animals receiving lansoprazole and C. difficile. Conclusions: Probiotics showed their beneficial effect by boosting the immune response as seen by production of antitoxin IgG. Oral administration of EGF did not affect the immune response to C. difficile toxins as significant increase was not observed in the serum antitoxin IgG levels in any of the groups investigated.

  19. Genome-wide identification of regulatory RNAs in the human pathogen Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A Soutourina

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is an emergent pathogen, and the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhea. In an effort to understand the role of small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs in C. difficile physiology and pathogenesis, we used an in silico approach to identify 511 sRNA candidates in both intergenic and coding regions. In parallel, RNA-seq and differential 5'-end RNA-seq were used for global identification of C. difficile sRNAs and their transcriptional start sites at three different growth conditions (exponential growth phase, stationary phase, and starvation. This global experimental approach identified 251 putative regulatory sRNAs including 94 potential trans riboregulators located in intergenic regions, 91 cis-antisense RNAs, and 66 riboswitches. Expression of 35 sRNAs was confirmed by gene-specific experimental approaches. Some sRNAs, including an antisense RNA that may be involved in control of C. difficile autolytic activity, showed growth phase-dependent expression profiles. Expression of each of 16 predicted c-di-GMP-responsive riboswitches was observed, and experimental evidence for their regulatory role in coordinated control of motility and biofilm formation was obtained. Finally, we detected abundant sRNAs encoded by multiple C. difficile CRISPR loci. These RNAs may be important for C. difficile survival in bacteriophage-rich gut communities. Altogether, this first experimental genome-wide identification of C. difficile sRNAs provides a firm basis for future RNome characterization and identification of molecular mechanisms of sRNA-based regulation of gene expression in this emergent enteropathogen.

  20. Fidaxomicin inhibits Clostridium difficile toxin A-mediated enteritis in the mouse ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koon, Hon Wai; Ho, Samantha; Hing, Tressia C; Cheng, Michelle; Chen, Xinhua; Ichikawa, Yoshi; Kelly, Ciarán P; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2014-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common, debilitating infection with high morbidity and mortality. C. difficile causes diarrhea and intestinal inflammation by releasing two toxins, toxin A and toxin B. The macrolide antibiotic fidaxomicin was recently shown to be effective in treating CDI, and its beneficial effect was associated with fewer recurrent infections in CDI patients. Since other macrolides possess anti-inflammatory properties, we examined the possibility that fidaxomicin alters C. difficile toxin A-induced ileal inflammation in mice. The ileal loops of anesthetized mice were injected with fidaxomicin (5, 10, or 20 μM), and after 30 min, the loops were injected with purified C. difficile toxin A or phosphate-buffered saline alone. Four hours after toxin A administration, ileal tissues were processed for histological evaluation (epithelial cell damage, neutrophil infiltration, congestion, and edema) and cytokine measurements. C. difficile toxin A caused histologic damage, evidenced by increased mean histologic score and ileal interleukin-1β (IL-1β) protein and mRNA expression. Treatment with fidaxomicin (20 μM) or its primary metabolite, OP-1118 (120 μM), significantly inhibited toxin A-mediated histologic damage and reduced the mean histology score and ileal IL-1β protein and mRNA expression. Both fidaxomicin and OP-1118 reduced toxin A-induced cell rounding in human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts. Treatment of ileal loops with vancomycin (20 μM) and metronidazole (20 μM) did not alter toxin A-induced histologic damage and IL-1β protein expression. In addition to its well known antibacterial effects against C. difficile, fidaxomicin may possess anti-inflammatory activity directed against the intestinal effects of C. difficile toxins. PMID:24890583

  1. Reconsidering the sporulation characteristics of hypervirulent Clostridium difficile BI/NAP1/027.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Burns

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and a major burden to healthcare services worldwide. In recent years, C. difficile strains belonging to the BI/NAP1/027 type have become highly represented among clinical isolates. These so-called 'hypervirulent' strains are associated with outbreaks of increased disease severity, higher relapse rates and an expanded repertoire of antibiotic resistance. Spores, formed during sporulation, play a pivotal role in disease transmission and it has been suggested that BI/NAP1/027 strains are more prolific in terms of sporulation in vitro than 'non-epidemic' C. difficile types. Work in our laboratory has since provided credible evidence to the contrary suggesting that the strain-to-strain variation in C. difficile sporulation characteristics is not type-associated. However, the BI/NAP1/027 type is still widely stated to have an increased rate of sporulation. In this study, we analysed the sporulation rates of 53 C. difficile strains, the largest sample size used to-date in such a study, including 28 BI/NAP1/027 isolates. Our data confirm that significant variation exists in the rate at which different C. difficile strains form spores. However, we clearly show that the sporulation rate of the BI/NAP1/027 type was no higher than that of non-BI/NAP1/027 strains. In addition, we observed substantial variation in sporulation characteristics within the BI/NAP1/027 type. This work highlights the danger of assuming that all strains of one type behave similarly without studying adequate sample sizes. Furthermore, we stress the need for more rigorous experimental procedures in order to quantify C. difficile sporulation more accurately in the future.

  2. Use of Multilocus Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis Genotyping to Determine the Role of Asymptomatic Carriers in Clostridium difficile Transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Curry, Scott R.; Muto, Carlene A.; Schlackman, Jessica L.; Pasculle, A. William; Shutt, Kathleen A.; Marsh, Jane W.; Lee H Harrison

    2013-01-01

    Multilocus variable number of tandem repeats analysis genotyping of Clostridium difficile isolates from screening tests and patients with symptomatic C. difficile infection reveals that asymptomatic carriers and environmental transmission from both carriers and patients with C. difficile infection contribute to new hospital-acquired cases.

  3. Clostridium difficile infection:A new threat%艰难梭菌感染:一种新的威胁

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪玥; 熊志刚; 孙自镛

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important pathogeny of antibiotic -associated diarrhea in hospitalized patients. Recently ,the emergence of hypervirulent clostridium difficile , which result in an increased incidence and severity of clostridium difficile infection ,is becoming a new threat. Diagnosis of clostridium difficile infection can be made according to clinical manifestation and laboratory data . Rationally use of antimicrobial drugs is the most effective way to minimize the risk of infection . Besides, nosocomial infection control measures should be improved to reduce infection.%艰难梭菌是住院患者抗生素相关性腹泻的重要病因.近年来,由于艰难梭菌高毒力株的出现,导致感染人数明 显增多,疾病严重程度增加,已成为一种新的威胁.艰难梭菌感染(clostridium difficile infection,CDI)的诊断应结合临床表现 和实验室检查两方面.合理使用抗菌药物是减少 CDI 最根本有效的方法,另外,应加强院内感染控制措施以控制感染的传 播.

  4. Determination of the extent of Clostridium difficile colonisation and toxin accumulation in sows and neonatal piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grześkowiak, Łukasz; Zentek, Jürgen; Vahjen, Wilfried

    2016-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important spore-forming, opportunistic pathogen in animal husbandry and health care. In pig farming, only neonatal piglets are affected, and diarrhoea and necrotising lesions are common symptoms leading to dehydration and in some cases death. This study aimed at the assessment of the quantitative development of C. difficile colonisation in neonatal piglets by determining the shedding of spores and C. difficile toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB) concentrations in sow (n = 5-6) and piglet pen faeces (n = 5-6) at different time points. Spores were quantified on selective agar plates and toxins using ELISA method. C. difficile was not detected in the faeces of all but one sow during the perinatal period. Faeces of 2- and 4-day-old piglets contained 0.65 log cells/g and 5.88 log cells/g of C. difficile, respectively. Toxins were detected on day 4 at a concentration of 2.13 log ng/g (TcdA) and 2.06 log ng/g (TcdB). On day 6, concentration of C. difficile reached 6.14 log CFU/g and toxins 2.02 log ng/g (TcdA) and 2.20 log ng/g (TcdB). Two-week-old piglets showed 4.72 log CFU/g of C. difficile but toxins could not be detected. At 21 days of age, both C. difficile and toxins were undetectable. The concentration and the prevalence of C. difficile were positively associated with the prevalence of toxins in piglets. A very short time window for colonisation by C. difficile, including toxin-producing strains can be observed in neonatal piglets. The significance for animal health and the risk of a carrier status need to be addressed in future studies. PMID:27108595

  5. Evaluation of the VIDAS glutamate dehydrogenase assay for the detection of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Bo-Moon; Lee, Eun Joo; Moon, Jung Wha; Lee, Seon Yeong

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the performance of the VIDAS GDH assay for the detection of Clostridium difficile. In total, 350 fecal specimens collected from patients clinically suspected of having CDI were analyzed by C. difficile culture and enzyme-linked fluorescent immunoassay (VIDAS GDH); the results were compared with those of toxigenic C. difficile culture (TC), PCR (Xpert C. difficile assay), and toxin AB EIA (VIDAS CDAB). The numbers of culture-positive and culture-negative samples were 108 and 242, respectively. The concordance between the GDH assay and C. difficile culture was 90.3%. With PCR, 12 more samples were found to be positive in GDH-positive/C. difficile culture-negative specimens. Thus, the concordance between GDH assay and C. difficile culture/PCR was 93.7%. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the VIDAS GDH assay were 97.2%, 87.2%, 77.2%, and 98.6%, respectively, based on the C. difficile culture, and 97.5%, 91.7%, 86.0%, and 98.6%, respectively, based on C. difficile culture/PCR. Positivity rates of the GDH assay were partially associated with those of semi-quantitative C. difficile cultures, which were maximized in grade 3 (>100 colony-forming unit [CFU]) compared with grade 1 (<10 CFU). We evaluated the two-step or three-step algorithm using GDH assay as a first step. No toxin EIA-positive case was found among GDH-negative samples, and 60.8% (48/79) were TC- and/or PCR-positive among the GDH-positive/toxin EIA-negative samples. Thus, approximately 25% of the 350 samples required a confirmatory test (TC or PCR) in the GDH-toxin EIA algorithm, whereas only 2.3% of the total samples in GDH-PCR algorithm was discrepant and required another confirmatory test like TC. PMID:27282799

  6. Systemically Administered IgG Anti-Toxin Antibodies Protect the Colonic Mucosa during Infection with Clostridium difficile in the Piglet Model

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Ocean R.; Steele, Jennifer A.; Zhang, Quanshun; Schmidt, Diane J.; Wang, Yuankai; Hamel, Philip E. S.; Beamer, Gillian; Xu, Bingling; Tzipori, Saul

    2014-01-01

    The use of anti-toxin human monoclonal antibodies (HMab) as treatment for C. difficile infection has been investigated in animal models and human clinical trials as an alternative to or in combination with traditional antibiotic therapy. While HMab therapy appears to be a promising option, how systemically administered IgG antibodies protect the colonic mucosa during Clostridium difficile infection is unknown. Using the gnotobiotic piglet model of Clostridium difficile infection, we administe...

  7. IN-VITRO GROWTH CHARACTERISTICS OF COMMERCIAL PROBIOTIC STRAINS AND THEIR POTENTIAL FOR INHIBITION OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE AND CLOSTRDIDUM PERFRINGENS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, Angelika; Kokotovic, Branko; Permin, Anders;

    Probiotics have gained importance in human and veterinary medicine to prevent enteric disease. Little information is available on commercial probiotic strains regarding their growth characteristics and inhibition of equine enteric pathogens such as Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens...... under aerobic conditions was assessed. To evaluate inhibition of C. difficile and C. perfringens sterile supernatant of the probiotic culture was added to BHI inoculated with a standard C. difficile or C. perfringens suspension. Growth was measured spectrophotometrically at 0 and 24h and compared to the...... control (C. difficile or C. perfringens suspension in BHI). At pH 4 12% of strains showed >50% growth and 24% were unable to grow, however did survive. At pH 2 none of the tested strains grew or survived. Eighty eight percent showed >75% growth in 0.15% bile, 60% showed >75% growth in 0.3% bile. Ninety...

  8. Clostridium difficile in piglets in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goldová, Jana; Malinová, A.; Indra, A.; Vítek, L.; Branny, Pavel; Jirásková, Alena

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 2 (2012), s. 159-161. ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB500200901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : clostridium * piglets Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.791, year: 2012

  9. Investigation of toxin gene diversity and antimicrobial resistance of Clostridium difficile strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shanshan; Zhang, Huaping; Zhang, Xinsheng; Wang, Chao; Fan, Guangming; Zhang, Weifeng; Sun, Gang; Chen, Huihong; Zhang, Liming; Li, Zhaoyun

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been previously reported in a number of studies. However, data collected from the Chinese population is limited. In the present study, the diversity of the toxin genes, tcdA and tcdB, of 57 Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) isolates from a Chinese population were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (38 A(+)B(+), 14 A(-)B(+) and 5 A(-)B(-)). Quantitative PCR was used to check the expression of these two genes and it was found that the genes were not expressed by all the strains. The absence of tcdA or tcdB expression in certain strains could be due to the lower expression of tcdD and the higher expression of tcdC, which are positive and negative regulators for these two toxin genes, respectively. In addition, the antimicrobial susceptibilities of 57 isolates were investigated. Therefore, these data would aid in the future prevention of CDI outbreaks and improve the understanding of the infection. PMID:25054021

  10. Characterization of Clostridium difficile strains isolated from patients in Ontario, Canada, from 2004 to 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, H; Willey, B; Low, D E; Staempfli, H R; McGeer, A; Boerlin, P; Mulvey, M; Weese, J S

    2008-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is the bacterium most commonly surmised to cause antimicrobial- and hospital-associated diarrhea in developed countries worldwide, and such infections are thought to be increasing in frequency and severity. A laboratory-based study was carried out to characterize C. difficile strains isolated from persons in Ontario, Canada, during 2004 to 2006 according to toxin type (enterotoxin A, cytotoxin B, and binary toxin [CDT]), tcdC gene characterization, ribotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and toxinotyping. Clostridium difficile was isolated from 1,080/1,152 (94%) samples from 21 diagnostic laboratories. Isolates with toxin profiles A(+) B(+) CDT(-), A(+) B(+) CDT(+), A(-) B(+) CDT(-), and A(-) B(+) CDT(+) accounted for 63%, 34%, 2.4%, and 0.6% of isolates, respectively. Alterations in tcdC were detected in six different ribotypes, including ribotype 027. A total of 39 different ribotypes were identified, with ribotype 027/North American pulsotype 1 (NAP1), an internationally recognized outbreak strain associated with severe disease, being the second most common ribotype (19% of isolates). Transient resistance to metronidazole was identified in 19 (1.8%) isolates. While a large number of ribotypes were found, a few predominated across the province. The high prevalence and wide distribution of ribotype 027/NAP1 are disconcerting in view of the severity of disease associated with it. PMID:18650360

  11. In Vitro Activities of 15 Antimicrobial Agents against 110 Toxigenic Clostridium difficile Clinical Isolates Collected from 1983 to 2004▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hecht, David W.; Galang, Minerva A.; Sambol, Susan P.; Osmolski, James R.; Johnson, Stuart; Gerding, Dale N

    2007-01-01

    The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) is increasing, and standard treatment is not always effective. Therefore, more-effective antimicrobial agents and treatment strategies are needed. We used the agar dilution method to determine the in vitro susceptibility of the following antimicrobials against 110 toxigenic clinical isolates of C. difficile from 1983 to 2004, primarily from the United States: doripenem, meropenem, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, moxiflo...

  12. Method for the typing of Clostridium difficile based on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of [35S]methionine-labeled proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A typing method for Clostridium difficile based on the incorporation of [35S]methionine into cellular proteins, their separation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and their visualization by autoradiography is described. On analysis of the radiolabeled-protein profiles, nine distinct groups were observed (A to E and W to Z). The method, which is simple, reproducible, and readily expandable, has been applied in epidemiological studies to demonstrate cross-infection and hospital acquisition of C. difficile

  13. The protective effect of recombinant Lactococcus lactis oral vaccine on a Clostridium difficile-infected animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xiao-qiang; Zhao, Ya-Gang; Chen, Xue-Qing; Jiang, Bo; SUN, DA-YONG

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral immunization with vaccines may be an effective strategy for prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). However, application of previously developed vaccines for preventing CDI has been limited due to various reasons. Here, we developed a recombinant Lactococcus lactis oral vaccine and evaluated its effect on a C. difficile-infected animal model established in golden hamsters in attempt to provide an alternative strategy for CDI prevention. Methods Recombinant L. lact...

  14. Faecal microbiota characterisation of horses using 16 rdna barcoded pyrosequencing, and carriage rate of clostridium difficile at hospital admission

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina; Taminiau, Bernard; Brévers, Bastien; Avesani, Véronique; Van Broeck, Johan; Leroux, Aurélia; Gallot, Marjorie; Bruwier, Antoine; Amory, Hélène; Delmée, Michel; Daube, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Background The equine faecal microbiota is very complex and remains largely unknown, while interspecies interactions have an important contribution to animal health. Clostridium difficile has been identified as an important cause of diarrhoea in horses. This study provides further information on the nature of the bacterial communities present in horses developing an episode of diarrhoea. The prevalence of C. difficile in hospitalised horses at the time of admission is also reported. Results B...

  15. Clostridium difficile with Moxifloxacin/Clindamycin Resistance in Vegetables in Ohio, USA, and Prevalence Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Rodriguez-Palacios; Sanja Ilic; LeJeune, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    We (i) determined the prevalence of Clostridium difficile and their antimicrobial resistance to six antimicrobial classes, in a variety of fresh vegetables sold in retail in Ohio, USA, and (ii) conducted cumulative meta-analysis of reported prevalence in vegetables since the 1990s. Six antimicrobial classes were tested for their relevance as risk factors for C. difficile infections (CDIs) (clindamycin, moxifloxacin) or their clinical priority as exhaustive therapeutic options (metronidazole...

  16. Correlation between fecal calprotectin levels, disease severity and the hypervirulent ribotype 027 strain in patients with Clostridium difficile infection

    OpenAIRE

    Peretz, Avi; Tkhawkho, Linda; Pastukh, Nina; Brodsky, Diana; Halevi, Chen Namimi; Nitzan, Orna

    2016-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is the most common infectious etiology of nosocomial diarrhea. Fecal calprotectin (fc) is a sensitive marker of intestinal inflammation, found to be associated with enteric bacterial infections and inflammatory bowel disease. Methods We evaluated fc levels using a Chemiluminescent immunoassay method, in hospitalized patients with C. difficile infection (CDI) diagnosed by molecular stool examination and assessed correlation with virulent ribotype 027 strain inf...

  17. Method for the typing of Clostridium difficile based on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabaqchali, S.; O' Farrell, S.; Holland, D.; Silman, R.

    1986-01-01

    A typing method for Clostridium difficile based on the incorporation of (/sup 35/S)methionine into cellular proteins, their separation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and their visualization by autoradiography is described. On analysis of the radiolabeled-protein profiles, nine distinct groups were observed (A to E and W to Z). The method, which is simple, reproducible, and readily expandable, has been applied in epidemiological studies to demonstrate cross-infection and hospital acquisition of C. difficile.

  18. Fecal Bacteriotherapy: A Case Report in an Immunosuppressed Patient with Ulcerative Colitis and Recurrent  Clostridium difficile Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadeel Zainah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of ulcerative colitis (UC and recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI where the patient was on immunomodulatory therapy and had successful CDI eradication after fecal transplantation. This is the first case report in the literature documenting successful C. difficile eradication in an immunosuppressed patient. We feel that fecal transplantation should be studied as a treatment option in these patients.

  19. Clinical Characteristics of Symptomatic Clostridium difficile Infection in Children: Conditions as Infection Risks and Whether Probiotics Is Effective

    OpenAIRE

    Na, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong Mo; Lee, Kyung Suk; Kang, Jung Oak; Oh, Sung Hee; Kim, Yong Joo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the clinical presentations of symptomatic Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in children. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 43 children aged 3 days, and the most frequently prescribed antibiotic was amoxicillin-clavulanate (35.7%). Twenty-eight patients were diagnosed with CDI despite taking probiotic supplements, most commonly Lactobacillus acidophilus (53.6%). The most common symptom was diarrhea (72.1%) at the time CDI was diagnosed. C. difficile...

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolated from food animals on farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thitaram, S N; Frank, J F; Siragusa, G R; Bailey, J S; Dargatz, D A; Lombard, J E; Haley, C A; Lyon, S A; Fedorka-Cray, P J

    2016-06-16

    Clostridium difficile is commonly associated with a spectrum of disease in humans referred to as C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD) and use of antimicrobials is considered a risk factor for development of disease in humans. C. difficile can also inhabit healthy food animals and transmission to humans is possible. As a result of the complexity and cost of testing, C. difficile is rarely tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. A total of 376 C. difficile strains (94 each from swine and dairy feces, and 188 from beef cattle feces) were isolated from healthy food animals on farms during studies conducted by the National Animal Health Monitoring System. Using the Etest (AB Biodisk, Solna, Sweden), samples were tested for susceptibility to nine antimicrobials implicated as risk factors for CDAD (linezolid, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, clindamycin, erythromycin, levofloxacin, metronidazole, rifampicin, and vancomycin). Vancomycin was active against all isolates of C. difficile (MIC90=3.0μg/ml) while almost all isolates (n=369; 98.1%) were resistant to levofloxacin. With the exception of vancomycin, resistance varied by animal species as follows: linezolid (8.5% resistance among swine versus 2.1 and 1.1% resistance among dairy and beef, respectively), clindamycin (56.4% resistance among swine versus 80% and 90.9% resistance among dairy and beef, respectively), and rifampicin (2.1% and 0% resistance among swine and dairy cattle isolates, respectively versus 14.3% resistance among beef isolates). Regardless of species, multiple drug resistance was observed most often to combinations of clindamycin and levofloxacin (n=195; 51.9%) and ampicillin, clindamycin and levofloxacin (n=41; 10.9%). The reason for the variability of resistance between animal species is unknown and requires further research. PMID:27043382

  1. A Role for TLR4 in Clostridium difficile Infection and the Recognition of Surface Layer Proteins.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Anthony

    2011-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is the etiological agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea (AAD) and pseudomembranous colitis in humans. The role of the surface layer proteins (SLPs) in this disease has not yet been fully explored. The aim of this study was to investigate a role for SLPs in the recognition of C. difficile and the subsequent activation of the immune system. Bone marrow derived dendritic cells (DCs) exposed to SLPs were assessed for production of inflammatory cytokines, expression of cell surface markers and their ability to generate T helper (Th) cell responses. DCs isolated from C3H\\/HeN and C3H\\/HeJ mice were used in order to examine whether SLPs are recognised by TLR4. The role of TLR4 in infection was examined in TLR4-deficient mice. SLPs induced maturation of DCs characterised by production of IL-12, TNFα and IL-10 and expression of MHC class II, CD40, CD80 and CD86. Furthermore, SLP-activated DCs generated Th cells producing IFNγ and IL-17. SLPs were unable to activate DCs isolated from TLR4-mutant C3H\\/HeJ mice and failed to induce a subsequent Th cell response. TLR4(-\\/-) and Myd88(-\\/-), but not TRIF(-\\/-) mice were more susceptible than wild-type mice to C. difficile infection. Furthermore, SLPs activated NFκB, but not IRF3, downstream of TLR4. Our results indicate that SLPs isolated from C. difficile can activate innate and adaptive immunity and that these effects are mediated by TLR4, with TLR4 having a functional role in experimental C. difficile infection. This suggests an important role for SLPs in the recognition of C. difficile by the immune system.

  2. Identification of a Novel Lipoprotein Regulator of Clostridium difficile Spore Germination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A Fimlaid

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive spore-forming pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial diarrhea. C. difficile infections are transmitted when ingested spores germinate in the gastrointestinal tract and transform into vegetative cells. Germination begins when the germinant receptor CspC detects bile salts in the gut. CspC is a subtilisin-like serine pseudoprotease that activates the related CspB serine protease through an unknown mechanism. Activated CspB cleaves the pro-SleC zymogen, which allows the activated SleC cortex hydrolase to degrade the protective cortex layer. While these regulators are essential for C. difficile spores to outgrow and form toxin-secreting vegetative cells, the mechanisms controlling their function have only been partially characterized. In this study, we identify the lipoprotein GerS as a novel regulator of C. difficile spore germination using targeted mutagenesis. A gerS mutant has a severe germination defect and fails to degrade cortex even though it processes SleC at wildtype levels. Using complementation analyses, we demonstrate that GerS secretion, but not lipidation, is necessary for GerS to activate SleC. Importantly, loss of GerS attenuates the virulence of C. difficile in a hamster model of infection. Since GerS appears to be conserved exclusively in related Peptostreptococcaeace family members, our results contribute to a growing body of work indicating that C. difficile has evolved distinct mechanisms for controlling the exit from dormancy relative to B. subtilis and other spore-forming organisms.

  3. Global transcriptional control by glucose and carbon regulator CcpA in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Ana; Camiade, Emilie; Monot, Marc; Courtois, Emmanuelle; Barbut, Frédéric; Sernova, Natalia V; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle; Dupuy, Bruno

    2012-11-01

    The catabolite control protein CcpA is a pleiotropic regulator that mediates the global transcriptional response to rapidly catabolizable carbohydrates, like glucose in Gram-positive bacteria. By whole transcriptome analyses, we characterized glucose-dependent and CcpA-dependent gene regulation in Clostridium difficile. About 18% of all C. difficile genes are regulated by glucose, for which 50% depend on CcpA for regulation. The CcpA regulon comprises genes involved in sugar uptake, fermentation and amino acids metabolism, confirming the role of CcpA as a link between carbon and nitrogen pathways. Using combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome sequence analysis, we detected 55 CcpA binding sites corresponding to ∼140 genes directly controlled by CcpA. We defined the C. difficile CcpA consensus binding site (cre(CD) motif), that is, 'RRGAAAANGTTTTCWW'. Binding of purified CcpA protein to 19 target cre(CD) sites was demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. CcpA also directly represses key factors in early steps of sporulation (Spo0A and SigF). Furthermore, the C. difficile toxin genes (tcdA and tcdB) and their regulators (tcdR and tcdC) are direct CcpA targets. Finally, CcpA controls a complex and extended regulatory network through the modulation of a large set of regulators. PMID:22989714

  4. Single fluorophore melting curve analysis for detection of hypervirulent Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angione, Stephanie L; Croote, Derek; Leung, Joshua W; Mermel, Leonard A; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates a novel detection assay able to identify and subtype strains of Clostridium difficile. Primers carefully designed for melting curve analysis amplify DNA from three C. difficile genes, tcdB, tcdC and cdtB, during quantitative (q)PCR. The tcdB gene allows for confirmation of organism presence, whilst the tcdC and cdtB genes allow for differentiation of virulence status, as deletions in the tcdC gene and the concurrent presence of the cdtB gene, which produces binary toxin, are associated with hypervirulence. Following qPCR, subtyping is then achieved by automated, inline melting curve analysis using only a single intercalating dye and verified by microchip electrophoresis. This assay represents a novel means of distinguishing between toxigenic and hypervirulent C. difficile strains NAP1/027/BI and 078 ribotype, which are highly prevalent hypervirulent strains in humans. This methodology can help rapidly detect and identify C. difficile strains that impose a significant health and economic burden in hospitals and other healthcare settings. PMID:26516039

  5. Cwp84, a Clostridium difficile cysteine protease, exhibits conformational flexibility in the absence of its propeptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two structures of Cwp84, a cysteine protease from the S-layer of C. difficile, are presented after propeptide cleavage. They reveal the movement of three loops, two in the active-site groove and one on the surface of the lectin-like domain, exposing a hydrophobic pocket. In recent decades, the global healthcare problems caused by Clostridium difficile have increased at an alarming rate. A greater understanding of this antibiotic-resistant bacterium, particularly with respect to how it interacts with the host, is required for the development of novel strategies for fighting C. difficile infections. The surface layer (S-layer) of C. difficile is likely to be of significant importance to host–pathogen interactions. The mature S-layer is formed by a proteinaceous array consisting of multiple copies of a high-molecular-weight and a low-molecular-weight S-layer protein. These components result from the cleavage of SlpA by Cwp84, a cysteine protease. The structure of a truncated Cwp84 active-site mutant has recently been reported and the key features have been identified, providing the first structural insights into the role of Cwp84 in the formation of the S-layer. Here, two structures of Cwp84 after propeptide cleavage are presented and the three conformational changes that are observed are discussed. These changes result in a reconfiguration of the active site and exposure of the hydrophobic pocket

  6. Cwp84, a Clostridium difficile cysteine protease, exhibits conformational flexibility in the absence of its propeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, William J. [University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG (United Kingdom); Roberts, April K.; Shone, Clifford C. [Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG (United Kingdom); Acharya, K. Ravi, E-mail: bsskra@bath.ac.uk [University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-19

    Two structures of Cwp84, a cysteine protease from the S-layer of C. difficile, are presented after propeptide cleavage. They reveal the movement of three loops, two in the active-site groove and one on the surface of the lectin-like domain, exposing a hydrophobic pocket. In recent decades, the global healthcare problems caused by Clostridium difficile have increased at an alarming rate. A greater understanding of this antibiotic-resistant bacterium, particularly with respect to how it interacts with the host, is required for the development of novel strategies for fighting C. difficile infections. The surface layer (S-layer) of C. difficile is likely to be of significant importance to host–pathogen interactions. The mature S-layer is formed by a proteinaceous array consisting of multiple copies of a high-molecular-weight and a low-molecular-weight S-layer protein. These components result from the cleavage of SlpA by Cwp84, a cysteine protease. The structure of a truncated Cwp84 active-site mutant has recently been reported and the key features have been identified, providing the first structural insights into the role of Cwp84 in the formation of the S-layer. Here, two structures of Cwp84 after propeptide cleavage are presented and the three conformational changes that are observed are discussed. These changes result in a reconfiguration of the active site and exposure of the hydrophobic pocket.

  7. Identification of a novel zinc metalloprotease through a global analysis of Clostridium difficile extracellular proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Cafardi

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a major cause of infectious diarrhea worldwide. Although the cell surface proteins are recognized to be important in clostridial pathogenesis, biological functions of only a few are known. Also, apart from the toxins, proteins exported by C. difficile into the extracellular milieu have been poorly studied. In order to identify novel extracellular factors of C. difficile, we analyzed bacterial culture supernatants prepared from clinical isolates, 630 and R20291, using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The majority of the proteins identified were non-canonical extracellular proteins. These could be largely classified into proteins associated to the cell wall (including CWPs and extracellular hydrolases, transporters and flagellar proteins. Seven unknown hypothetical proteins were also identified. One of these proteins, CD630_28300, shared sequence similarity with the anthrax lethal factor, a known zinc metallopeptidase. We demonstrated that CD630_28300 (named Zmp1 binds zinc and is able to cleave fibronectin and fibrinogen in vitro in a zinc-dependent manner. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified residues important in zinc binding and enzymatic activity. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Zmp1 destabilizes the fibronectin network produced by human fibroblasts. Thus, by analyzing the exoproteome of C. difficile, we identified a novel extracellular metalloprotease that may be important in key steps of clostridial pathogenesis.

  8. DNA detection of Clostridium difficile infection based on real-time resistance measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C; Jiang, D N; Xiang, G M; Luo, F K; Liu, L L; Yu, J C; Pu, X Y

    2013-01-01

    We used a newly developed electrochemical method, real-time resistance measurement, based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), with real-time resistance monitoring and derivative analysis. DNA extracted from specimens was amplified through LAMP reaction. The 2 products of LAMP, DNA and pyrophosphate, both are negative ions; they combine with positive dye (crystal violet) and positive ions (Mg(2+)), which leads to an increase in the resistivity of the reaction liquid. The changes of resistivity were measured in real-time with a specially designed resistance electrode, to detect Clostridium difficile DNA. We found that electrochemical detection of C. difficile could be completed in 0.5-1 h, with a detection limit of 10(2) CFU/mL, with high accuracy (95.0%), sensitivity (91.1%), and specificity (97.3%) compared to PCR methods. C. difficile is commonly associated with antibiotic-induced diarrhea. Due to the difficulty in performing anaerobic culture and cytotoxicity neutralization assays, a simple, rapid, sensitive, and accurate method is preferred. We conclude that real-time resistance measurement is a rapid, sensitive, and stable method for the diagnosis of C. difficile infection that could be applied to gene chips and pocket instruments. PMID:24065671

  9. Spread of epidemic Clostridium difficile NAP1/027 in Latin America: case reports in Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ureña, Diana; Quesada-Gómez, Carlos; Miranda, Erick; Fonseca, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Cavallini, Evelyn

    2014-02-01

    The rate and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) have been linked to the emergence and spread of the hypervirulent toxigenic strain NAP1/027. This strain has been responsible for large outbreaks in healthcare facilities in North America and Europe and most recently in Latin America. This is the first report of the NAP1 strain in Panama. It suggests that the spread of C. difficile NAP1 throughout Latin America could be a possibility as evidenced in the following case reports. Five isolates typed as NAP1 had tcdA, tcdB, binary toxin gene cdtB and tcdC deletion. All isolates were resistant to clindamycin, fluoroquinolones and rifampicin. Under this scenario, surveillance programmes for CDI should be implemented in public health facilities in Latin America and diagnosis of CDI should be considered, especially in patients with predisposing factors. PMID:24287669

  10. Isolation of a toxigenic and clinical genotype of clostridium difficile in retail meats in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Gómez, Carlos; Mulvey, Michael R; Vargas, Pablo; Gamboa-Coronado, María del Mar; Rodríguez, César; Rodríguez-Cavillini, Evelyn

    2013-02-01

    We isolated a regional toxigenic genotype of Clostridium difficile, previously found in human infection in 4 of 200 (2%) samples of retail meats for human consumption: 1 of 67 samples of beef, 2 of 66 of pork, and 1 of 67 of poultry meat. These four isolates were positive for the tcdA and tcdB genes but negative for deletion of the tcdC and cdtB genes. All strains induced cytopathic effects in HeLa cells. However, they were susceptible to some antibiotics to which clinical isolates are often resistant. All strains were susceptible to vancomycin, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, and rifampicin but resistant to clindamycin and ciprofloxacin. This first report of isolation of C. difficile in foodstuff from Latin America lends support to the notion that animal products serve as a reservoir for clinical strains of this pathogen in the community. PMID:23433387

  11. Vitamin D deficiency: A potential risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dima Youssef,1 William B Grant,2 Alan N Peiris3,41Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, 2Sunlight, Nutrition and Health Research Center, San Francisco, CA USA; 3Department of Medicine, Mountain Home VAMC, 4Department of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee, USAIn the July 3, 2012 issue of the journal of Risk Management and Healthcare Policy, Martinez et al present a nice review on Clostridium difficile (C. difficile infections.1 The different manifestations of this challenging disease along with the high cost and burden on the health care system were discussed. While the authors did an admirable job in discussing traditional risk factors, they do not mention vitamin D deficiency.View original paper by Martinez and colleagues.

  12. Eradication of enteric helicobacters in Mongolian gerbils is complicated by the occurrence of Clostridium difficile enterotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, Ingrid L; Taylor, Nancy S; Nambiar, Prashant R; Fox, James G

    2005-06-01

    Outbred Mongolian gerbils from a United States commercial source were examined for colonization with naturally occurring enterohepatic Helicobacter spp. Helicobacter spp. were identified in the cecum and colon by culture and by using genus-specific primers in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Nutritionally balanced triple-antibiotic wafers (containing amoxicillin, metronidazole, and bismuth) used previously to eliminate helicobacter infections in mice were administered in an attempt to eradicate the naturally occurring novel helicobacters in the gerbils. After 7 days of antibiotic treatment, two of the experimental animals died due to Clostridium difficile-associated enterotoxemia. However, at 3 weeks after antibiotic cessation, the surviving three animals had no Helicobacter spp. in the cecum or colon according to PCR analysis. Eradication of Helicobacter spp. using dietary administration of antibiotics was complicated by the presence of toxin-producing C. difficile. An alternate method to develop helicobacter-free gerbils (such as Caesarian rederivation) may be necessary. PMID:16089175

  13. Production and Characterization of Chemically Inactivated Genetically Engineered Clostridium difficile Toxoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidunas, Eugene; Mathews, Antony; Weaver, Michele; Cai, Ping; Koh, Eun Hee; Patel-Brown, Sujata; Yuan, Hailey; Zheng, Zi-Rong; Carriere, Marjolaine; Johnson, J Erik; Lotvin, Jason; Moran, Justin

    2016-07-01

    A recombinant Clostridium difficile expression system was used to produce genetically engineered toxoids A and B as immunogens for a prophylactic vaccine against C. difficile-associated disease. Although all known enzymatic activities responsible for cytotoxicity were genetically abrogated, the toxoids exhibited residual cytotoxic activity as measured in an in vitro cell-based cytotoxicity assay. The residual cytotoxicity was eliminated by treating the toxoids with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide. Mass spectrometry and amino acid analysis of the EDC-inactivated toxoids identified crosslinks, glycine adducts, and β-alanine adducts. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that modifications resulting from the chemical treatment did not appreciably affect recognition of epitopes by both toxin A- and B-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. Compared to formaldehyde-inactivated toxoids, the EDC/N-hydroxysuccinimide-inactivated toxoids exhibited superior stability in solution with respect to reversion of cytotoxic activity. PMID:27233688

  14. Tests for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection: the next generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Karen C

    2011-08-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) causes 25-30% of cases of antibiotic associated diarrhea and most cases of pseudomembranous colitis. Patients presenting with diarrhea after hospitalization for 3 or more days should be tested for C. difficile. There are many options available for testing, each of which has inherent advantages and disadvantages. Most laboratories perform toxin testing using an enzyme immunoassay method. In general these tests have sensitivities ranging from 60 to 70% and specificities of 98%. When using these methods, symptomatic patients with negative tests should be tested by another more sensitive method. Until recently, cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assays (CCNAs) were considered the gold standard in the U.S. A two-step algorithm using an EIA for glutamate dehydrogenase detection followed by testing positives using CCNA, offered an improved alternative until the availability of molecular assays. Although early studies that compared the GDH assay to CCNA demonstrated high sensitivity and negative predictive values, more recent comparisons to toxigenic culture and PCR have shown the sensitivity to be in the mid to high 80's. When testing using a sensitive assay, repeat testing is not cost-effective. Outbreaks caused by a toxin variant epidemic strain have renewed interest in bacterial culture. Toxigenic culture has emerged as the new gold standard against which newer assays should be compared. However, there is no agreed upon standard method for culture performance. At least 4 FDA cleared nucleic acid amplification assays are available to clinical laboratories and several of these have been well evaluated in the literature. Because these assays detect a gene that encodes toxin and not the toxin itself it is important that laboratories test only patients with diarrhea. These molecular assays have been shown to be superior to toxin EIAs, CCNA and 2-step algorithms, but not to toxigenic culture. More studies are needed to assess the

  15. Parameters for the mathematical modelling of Clostridium difficile acquisition and transmission: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eroboghene H Otete

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Mathematical modelling of Clostridium difficile infection dynamics could contribute to the optimisation of strategies for its prevention and control. The objective of this systematic review was to summarise the available literature specifically identifying the quantitative parameters required for a compartmental mathematical model of Clostridium difficile transmission. METHODS: Six electronic healthcare databases were searched and all screening, data extraction and study quality assessments were undertaken in duplicate. Results were synthesised using a narrative approach. RESULTS: Fifty-four studies met the inclusion criteria. Reproduction numbers for hospital based epidemics were described in two studies with a range from 0.55 to 7. Two studies provided consistent data on incubation periods. For 62% of cases, symptoms occurred in less than 4 weeks (3-28 days after infection. Evidence on contact patterns was identified in four studies but with limited data reported for populating a mathematical model. Two studies, including one without clinically apparent donor-recipient pairs, provided information on serial intervals for household or ward contacts, showing transmission intervals of <1 week in ward based contacts compared to up to 2 months for household contacts. Eight studies reported recovery rates of between 75%-100% for patients who had been treated with either metronidazole or vancomycin. Forty-nine studies gave recurrence rates of between 3% and 49% but were limited by varying definitions of recurrence. No study was found which specifically reported force of infection or net reproduction numbers. CONCLUSIONS: There is currently scant literature overtly citing estimates of the parameters required to inform the quantitative modelling of Clostridium difficile transmission. Further high quality studies to investigate transmission parameters are required, including through review of published epidemiological studies where these

  16. Monitoring Clostridium difficile infection in an acute hospital: prevalence or incidence studies?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lavan, A H

    2012-02-15

    BACKGROUND: Surveillance of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is an essential component of a CDI preventative programme. AIMS: The aim of this study was to evaluate two methods of CDI surveillance. METHODS: Prevalence of CDI, antibiotic use and associated co-morbidity was assessed weekly on two wards over 6 weeks. In addition, CDI incidence surveillance was performed on all new CDI cases over a 13-week period. Cases were assessed for CDI risk factors, disease severity, response to treatment and outcome at 6 months. RESULTS: Clostridium difficile infection prevalence was 3.5% (range 2.9-6.1%) on the medical ward and 1.1% (range 0-3.5%) on the surgical ward. Patients on the medical ward were older and more likely to be colonised with MRSA; however, recent antibiotic use was more prevalent among surgical patients. Sixty-one new CDI cases were audited. Patients were elderly (mean age 71 years) with significant co-morbidity (median age adjusted Charlson co-morbidity score 5). CDI ribotypes included 027 (29 cases) 078 (5) and 106 (4). Eight patients developed severe CDI, seven due to 027. Antibiotic use was common with 56% receiving three or more antibiotics in the preceding 8 weeks. Twenty-four patients had died at 6 months, five due to CDI. CONCLUSION: Clostridium difficile infection prevalence gives a broad overview of CDI and points to areas that require more detailed surveillance and requires little time. However, patient-based CDI incidence surveillance provides a more useful analysis of CDI risk factors, disease and outcome for planning preventative programmes and focusing antibiotic stewardship efforts.

  17. First report of Clostridium difficile NAP1/027 in a Mexican hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Camacho-Ortiz

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile NAP1/ribotype 027 is associated with severe disease and high mortality rates. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of NAP1/ribotype 027 among C. difficile isolates in a tertiary care hospital, and review the main clinical data.We included 106 stool samples from 106 patients. Samples were tested for A&B toxins and were cultured on CCFA agar. The genes tcdA, tcdB, tcdC, cdtA, and cdtB were amplified using PCR in clinical isolates. The tcdA 3'-end deletion analysis, PCR-ribotyping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE were also performed. Stool samples that were positive for culture were tested by the GeneXpert C. difficile assay. Clinical data were collected.Thirty-six patients tested positive for A&B toxins; and 22 patients had positive culture for C. difficile, 14 of which tested positive for the A&B toxins and all 22 patients tested positive by the GeneXpert C. difficile assay. Risk factors included an average hospital stay of 16.1 days prior to toxin detection, average antibiotic use for 16.2 days, and a median of 3 antibiotics used. The 30-day crude mortality rate was 8.4%. Six of the 22 patients died, and 3 of those deaths were directly attributed to C. difficile infection. The majority of isolates, 90.9% (20/22, carried genes tcdB, tcdA, cdtA, and cdtB; and these strains carried the corresponding downregulator gene tcdC, with an 18-bp deletion. PFGE was performed on 17 isolates, and one main pattern was observed. Analysis of the ribotyping data showed similar results.The above findings represent the clonal spread of C. difficile in our institution, which mainly includes the NAP1/027 strain. This is the first report of C. difficile ribotype NAP1/027 in Mexico.

  18. Surto de Clostridium difficile – a experiência recente de um hospital distrital

    OpenAIRE

    Pinho, Raquel; Cabezuelo, Lourdes; Mota, Sandra; Gião, Marília; Oleastro, Mónica; Noriega, Elena; Coelho, Marta; Coutinho, Salomé; Faria, Domitília

    2012-01-01

    Introdução e objectivos: A doença associada a Clostridium difficile (DACD) é um problema crescente a nível mundial. Os autores relatam o surto ocorrido no seu hospital, pretendendo contribuir para um melhor conhecimento da epidemiologia desta doença no nosso país. Metodologia: estudo retrospectivo com caracterização demográfica, epidemiológica e clínica dos doentes com DACD diagnosticados de 01/01/12 a 30/09/12. São descritas as medidas adoptadas para controlo do surto. Resultados: No período...

  19. Epidemiology of CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE infection among active duty United States military personnel (1998-2010)

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez, Ramiro L; Riddle, Mark S; Porter, Chad K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile associated disease (CDAD) has risen in incidence and the experience in the US military has not been described. Methods We evaluated the U.S. military’s database and identified CDAD cases and demographic characteristics among affected military personnel from 1998 to 2010. Results 2,423 cases were identified. CDAD incidence was 13.2 cases (95% CI: 12.7-13.7) per 100 K p-yr and increased over study years. CA-CDAD and HA-CDAD incidence was 5.5 (95% CI: 5.2, 5.9) p...

  20. Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Clostridium Difficile Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Meera B.; Avila, Nathaniel P.; Dupont, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has become the most frequently reported health care-associated infection in the United States [1]. As the incidence of CDI rises, so too does the burden it produces on health care and society. In an attempt to decrease the burden of CDI and provide the best outcomes for patients affected by CDI, there have been many recent advancements in the understanding, diagnosis, and management of CDI. In this article, we review the current recommendations regarding CDI testing and treatment strategies. PMID:26918176

  1. A Low Complexity Rapid Molecular Method for Detection of Clostridium difficile in Stool

    OpenAIRE

    McElgunn, Cathal J.; Pereira, Clint R.; Parham, Nicholas J.; Smythe, James E.; Wigglesworth, Michael J.; Smielewska, Anna; Parmar, Surendra A.; Gandelman, Olga A.; Brown, Nicholas M.; Tisi, Laurence C; Curran, Martin D

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe a method for the detection of Clostridium difficile from stool using a novel low-complexity and rapid extraction process called Heat Elution (HE). The HE method is two-step and takes just 10 minutes, no specialist instruments are required and there is minimal hands-on time. A test method using HE was developed in conjunction with Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) combined with the real-time bioluminescent reporter system known as BART targeting the toxin B gene (t...

  2. Results of the mandatory reporting scheme for severe cases of Clostridium difficile infection in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinkauf, Niels; Eckmanns, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Die Inzidenz der Clostridium-difficile-Infektion hat in den letzten Jahren auch in Deutschland stark zugenommen. Eine neue Erregervariante, die in der Vergangenheit bereits in mehreren europäischen Ländern, sowie in Kanada und den U.S.A zu Ausbrüchen mit erhöhter Morbidität und Mortalität geführt hat, breitet sich zunehmend auch hierzulande aus. Um die epidemiologischen Veränderungen erfassen und verfolgen zu können, wurden in Deutschland kürzlich Kriterien für eine Meldepflicht gemä...

  3. Multilocus Sequence Typing Analysis of Human and Animal Clostridium difficile Isolates of Various Toxigenic Types

    OpenAIRE

    Lemee, Ludovic; Dhalluin, Anne; Pestel-Caron, Martine; Lemeland, Jean-François; Pons, Jean-Louis

    2004-01-01

    A multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme was developed to study the genetic relationships and population structure of 72 Clostridium difficile isolates from various hosts, geographic sources, PCR ribotypes, and toxigenic types (determined by PCR targeting tcdA and tcdB genes). MLST was performed by DNA sequence analysis of seven housekeeping genes (aroE, ddl, dutA, tpi, recA, gmk, and sodA). The number of alleles ranged from five (dutA and ddl) to eleven (recA). Allelic profiles allowed the...

  4. Antibiotic prophylaxis in variceal hemorrhage:Timing,effectiveness and Clostridium difficile rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthew; RL; Brown; Graeme; Jones; Kathryn; L; Nash; Mark; Wright; Indra; Neil; Guha

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate if antibiotics administered within 8 h of endoscopy reduce mortality or increase the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection(CDI).METHODS:A 2-year retrospective analysis of all patients who presented with first variceal hemorrhage was undertaken.The primary outcome measure was 28-d mortality.Secondary outcome measures were 28-d rebleeding rates and 28-d incidence of CDI.All patients were admitted to a tertiary liver unit with a consultantled,24-h endoscopy service.Patients received s...

  5. Rifamycin Resistance in Clostridium difficile Is Generally Associated with a Low Fitness Burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Uyen T; Zamora, Idalia; Hevener, Kirk E; Adhikari, Sudip; Wu, Xiaoqian; Hurdle, Julian G

    2016-09-01

    We characterized clinically occurring and novel mutations in the β subunit of RNA polymerase in Clostridium difficile (CdRpoB), conferring rifamycin (including rifaximin) resistance. The Arg505Lys substitution did not impose an in vitro fitness cost, which may be one reason for its dominance among rifamycin-resistant clinical isolates. These observations were supported through the structural modeling of CdRpoB. In general, most mutations lacked in vitro fitness costs, suggesting that rifamycin resistance may in some cases persist in the clinic. PMID:27381389

  6. Current Situation and Future Development of the Vaccine against Clostridium Difficile%艰难梭菌疫苗研究的现状与展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓强; 陈学清

    2011-01-01

    艰难梭菌是引起伪膜性肠炎的致病菌.目前国内外均出现了同时耐两种主要治疗药物——甲硝唑、万古霉素的菌株,疫苗研究是防治艰难梭菌的重要手段.国外研制艰难梭菌疫苗近20年,取得了一定进展,本文将对现有的艰难梭菌疫苗的研究现状进行总结,并对疫苗的发展进行展望.%Clostridium difficile (CD) is the pathogen of pseudomembranous colitis (PMC). Metronidazole and Vancomycin are the major treatment drugs for PMC. However, clostridium difficile has been found to possess multiple-antibiotic resistant genes and clostridium difficile clinical isolates resistant to both Vancomycin and Metronidazole have been reported, which" increase the difficulty for treatment of clostridium difficile in the future. For all these reasons, the study of vaccine against CD is very important. The vaccines against clostridium difficile have been studied in abroad for almost 20 years and great progress has been achieved in the study of clostridium difficile vaccine. In this article we will have a review of the clostridium difficile vaccine.

  7. An exploratory study to evaluate Clostridium difficile polymerase chain reaction ribotypes and infection outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thabit AK

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abrar K Thabit,1,2 David P Nicolau1,3 1Center for Anti-Infective Research and Development, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT, USA; 2Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT, USA Background: Clostridium difficile infection ranges from mild to severe prolonged diarrhea with systemic symptoms. Previous studies have assessed the correlation of some disease severity parameters to C. difficile ribotypes. However, certain clinical parameters of interest have not yet been evaluated.Aim: We conducted an exploratory study to evaluate the correlation of C. difficile ribotypes to parameters not assessed previously, notably days to diarrhea resolution (in terms of days to formed stools and days to less than three stools per day, length of hospital stay, 30-day recurrence rates, and 30-day readmission rates. Additional severity parameters evaluated include leukocytosis, serum creatinine, fever, and nausea/vomiting.Methods: Polymerase chain reaction ribotyping was performed on C. difficile isolates from baseline stool samples of 29 patients. A retrospective chart review was conducted to assess the parameters of interest.Results: The most common ribotypes were 027 (38%, 014/020 (21%, and 106/174 (21%. Numerically, 027 ribotype patients required more days to less than three stools per day versus 014/020 and 106/174 ribotype patients (P=0.2. The three ribotypes were similar regarding time to formed stools, duration of hospitalization, and 30-day readmission rate (P=0.2, 0.6, and 0.8, respectively. Recurrence within 30 days occurred in two patients with 027 and two patients with 014/020 (P=0.6. Leukocytosis and fever were more prominent with 027 than with 014/020 and 106/174 (P=0.04 for both parameters, although the degree of nausea/vomiting did not differ between the three groups (P=0.3. A serum creatinine level ≥1.5 times the premorbid level was seen in only three

  8. Comparison of real-time PCR techniques to cytotoxigenic culture methods for diagnosing Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knetsch, C W; Bakker, D; de Boer, R F; Sanders, I; Hofs, S; Kooistra-Smid, A M D; Corver, J; Eastwood, K; Wilcox, M H; Kuijper, E J

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade, the incidence of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) with a more severe course has increased in Europe and North America. Assays that are capable of rapidly diagnosing CDI are essential. Two real-time PCRs (LUMC and LvI) targeting C. difficile toxin genes (tcdB, and tcdA and tcdB, respectively) were compared with the BD GeneOhm PCR (targeting the tcdB gene), using cytotoxigenic culture as a gold standard. In addition, a real-time PCR targeting the tcdC frameshift mutation at position 117 (Δ117 PCR) was evaluated for detecting toxigenic C. difficile and the presence of PCR ribotype 027 in stool samples. In total, 526 diarrheal samples were prospectively collected and included in the study. Compared with those for cytotoxigenic culture, sensitivity, specificity, positive predicted value (PPV), and negative predicted value (NPV) were for PCR LUMC 96.0%, 88.0%, 66.0%, and 98.9%, for PCR LvI 100.0%, 89.4%, 69.7%, and 100.0%, for PCR Δ117 98.0%, 90.7%, 71.9%, and 99.5%, and for PCR BD GeneOhm 88.3%, 96.9%, 86.5%, and 97.4%. Compared to those with feces samples cultured positive for C. difficile type 027, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the Δ117 PCR were 95.2%, 96.2%, 87.0%, and 98.7%. We conclude that all real-time PCRs can be applied as a first screening test in an algorithm for diagnosing CDI. However, the low PPVs hinder the use of the assays as stand-alone tests. Furthermore, the Δ117 PCR may provide valuable information for minimizing the spread of the epidemic C. difficile PCR ribotype 027. PMID:20980562

  9. Emergence of an outbreak-associated Clostridium difficile variant with increased virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Gómez, Carlos; López-Ureña, Diana; Acuña-Amador, Luis; Villalobos-Zúñiga, Manuel; Du, Tim; Freire, Rosemayre; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; del Mar Gamboa-Coronado, María; Lawley, Trevor D; Moreno, Edgardo; Mulvey, Michael R; de Castro Brito, Gerly Anne; Rodríguez-Cavallini, Evelyn; Rodríguez, César; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of Clostridium difficile infections has increased due to the emergence of epidemic variants from diverse genetic lineages. Here we describe the emergence of a novel variant during an outbreak in a Costa Rican hospital that was associated with severe clinical presentations. This C. difficile variant elicited higher white blood cell counts and caused disease in younger patients than did other strains isolated during the outbreak. Furthermore, it had a recurrence rate, a 30-day attributable disease rate, and disease severity as great as those of the epidemic strain NAP1. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis genotyping indicated that the outbreak strains belong to a previously undescribed variant, designated NAPCR1. Whole-genome sequencing and ribotyping indicated that the NAPCR1 variant belongs to C. difficile ribotype 012 and sequence type 54, as does the reference strain 630. NAPCR1 strains are resistant to fluoroquinolones due to a mutation in gyrA, and they possess an 18-bp deletion in tcdC that is characteristic of the epidemic, evolutionarily distinct, C. difficile NAP1 variant. NAPCR1 genomes contain 10% more predicted genes than strain 630, most of which are of hypothetical function and are present on phages and other mobile genetic elements. The increased virulence of NAPCR1 was confirmed by mortality rates in the hamster model and strong inflammatory responses induced by bacteria-free supernatants in the murine ligated loop model. However, NAPCR1 strains do not synthesize toxin A and toxin B at levels comparable to those in NAP1 strains. Our results suggest that the pathogenic potential of this emerging C. difficile variant is due to the acquisition of hypothetical functions associated with laterally acquired DNA. PMID:25653402

  10. Molecular Characterization of Clostridium difficile Isolates from Human Subjects and the Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Tian Tian

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming, gram-positive, anaerobic bacillus that can cause C. difficile infection (CDI. However, only a few studies on the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of C. difficile in healthy individuals in China have been reported. We employed a spore enrichment culture to screen for C. difficile in the stool samples of 3699 healthy Chinese individuals who were divided into 4 groups: infants younger than 2 years of age and living at home with their parents; children aged 1 to 8 years of age and attending three different kindergarten schools; community-dwelling healthy adult aged 23-60 years old; and healthcare workers aged 28-80 years old. The C. difficile isolates were analyzed for the presence of toxin genes and typed by PCR ribotyping and multilocus sequence typing (MLST. The minimum inhibitory concentration of 8 antimicrobial agents was determined for all of the isolates using the agar dilution method. The intestinal carriage rate in the healthy children was 13.6% and ranged from 0% to 21% depending on age. The carriage rates in the 1654 community-dwelling healthy adults and 348 healthcare workers were 5.5% and 6.3%, respectively. Among the isolates, 226 were toxigenic (225 tcdA+/tcdB+ and 1 tcdA+/tcdB+ ctdA+/ctdB+. Twenty-four ribotypes were found, with the dominant type accounting for 29.7% of the isolates. The toxigenic isolates were typed into 27 MLST genotypes. All of the strains were susceptible to vancomycin, metronidazole, fidaxomicin, and rifaximin. High resistance to levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin at rates of 39.8% and 98.3%, respectively, were observed. ST37 isolates were more resistant to levofloxacin than the other STs. The PCR ribotypes and sequence types from the healthy populations were similar to those from the adult patients.

  11. Molecular Characterization of Clostridium difficile Isolates from Human Subjects and the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian-tian; Zhao, Jian-hong; Yang, Jing; Qiang, Cui-xin; Li, Zhi-rong; Chen, Jing; Xu, Kai-yue; Ciu, Qing-qing; Li, Ru-xin

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming, gram-positive, anaerobic bacillus that can cause C. difficile infection (CDI). However, only a few studies on the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of C. difficile in healthy individuals in China have been reported. We employed a spore enrichment culture to screen for C. difficile in the stool samples of 3699 healthy Chinese individuals who were divided into 4 groups: infants younger than 2 years of age and living at home with their parents; children aged 1 to 8 years of age and attending three different kindergarten schools; community-dwelling healthy adult aged 23–60 years old; and healthcare workers aged 28–80 years old. The C. difficile isolates were analyzed for the presence of toxin genes and typed by PCR ribotyping and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The minimum inhibitory concentration of 8 antimicrobial agents was determined for all of the isolates using the agar dilution method. The intestinal carriage rate in the healthy children was 13.6% and ranged from 0% to 21% depending on age. The carriage rates in the 1654 community-dwelling healthy adults and 348 healthcare workers were 5.5% and 6.3%, respectively. Among the isolates, 226 were toxigenic (225 tcdA+/tcdB+ and 1 tcdA+/tcdB+ ctdA+/ctdB+). Twenty-four ribotypes were found, with the dominant type accounting for 29.7% of the isolates. The toxigenic isolates were typed into 27 MLST genotypes. All of the strains were susceptible to vancomycin, metronidazole, fidaxomicin, and rifaximin. High resistance to levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin at rates of 39.8% and 98.3%, respectively, were observed. ST37 isolates were more resistant to levofloxacin than the other STs. The PCR ribotypes and sequence types from the healthy populations were similar to those from the adult patients. PMID:27011211

  12. Contamination of Australian newborn calf carcasses at slaughter with Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, D R; Putsathit, P; Elliott, B; Riley, T V

    2016-03-01

    In North America and Europe, reports of a genetic overlap between toxigenic strains of Clostridium difficile isolated from humans, livestock and retail meat suggest that food-borne transmission may be occurring. We investigated the prevalence, concentration and genetic diversity of C. difficile on the carcasses (n = 300) and in the faeces (n = 30) of neonatal veal calves at three abattoirs in Australia in 2013. Selective culture (both direct and enrichment) was performed, and all isolates were characterized by PCR for the toxin genes tcdA, tcdB and cdtA/B and by PCR ribotyping. Prevalence of C. difficile was 25.3% (76/300) on carcasses and 60.0% (18/30) in faeces. Multiple PCR ribotypes (RT) were detected, with four binary toxin-positive RTs accounting for 70.3% (71/101) of isolates; 127 (A(+), B(+), CDT(+), 32.7%), 288 (A(-), B(-), CDT(+), 28.7%), 033 (A(-), B(-), CDT(+), 6.9%) and 126 (A(+), B(+), CDT(+), 2.0%). Viable counts of a subset of samples revealed detectable numbers of C. difficile in 66.7% (10/15) of faecal samples (range 2.0 × 10(3) to 2.3 × 10(6) CFU/mL, median count 2.5 × 10(4) CFU/mL) and in 16.7% (25/150) of carcase samples (range 3 to 33 CFU/cm(2), median count 7 CFU/cm(2)). These data further confirm that Australian neonatal veal calf carcasses are contaminated with potentially significant strains of C. difficile at slaughter. PMID:26686811

  13. Molecular Characterization of Clostridium difficile Isolates from Human Subjects and the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian-Tian; Zhao, Jian-Hong; Yang, Jing; Qiang, Cui-Xin; Li, Zhi-Rong; Chen, Jing; Xu, Kai-Yue; Ciu, Qing-Qing; Li, Ru-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming, gram-positive, anaerobic bacillus that can cause C. difficile infection (CDI). However, only a few studies on the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of C. difficile in healthy individuals in China have been reported. We employed a spore enrichment culture to screen for C. difficile in the stool samples of 3699 healthy Chinese individuals who were divided into 4 groups: infants younger than 2 years of age and living at home with their parents; children aged 1 to 8 years of age and attending three different kindergarten schools; community-dwelling healthy adult aged 23-60 years old; and healthcare workers aged 28-80 years old. The C. difficile isolates were analyzed for the presence of toxin genes and typed by PCR ribotyping and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The minimum inhibitory concentration of 8 antimicrobial agents was determined for all of the isolates using the agar dilution method. The intestinal carriage rate in the healthy children was 13.6% and ranged from 0% to 21% depending on age. The carriage rates in the 1654 community-dwelling healthy adults and 348 healthcare workers were 5.5% and 6.3%, respectively. Among the isolates, 226 were toxigenic (225 tcdA+/tcdB+ and 1 tcdA+/tcdB+ ctdA+/ctdB+). Twenty-four ribotypes were found, with the dominant type accounting for 29.7% of the isolates. The toxigenic isolates were typed into 27 MLST genotypes. All of the strains were susceptible to vancomycin, metronidazole, fidaxomicin, and rifaximin. High resistance to levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin at rates of 39.8% and 98.3%, respectively, were observed. ST37 isolates were more resistant to levofloxacin than the other STs. The PCR ribotypes and sequence types from the healthy populations were similar to those from the adult patients. PMID:27011211

  14. Bolaamphiphile-based nanocomplex delivery of phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, John P; Krzeminski, Jacek; Sharma, Arun K; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Weissig, Volkmar; Stewart, David B

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a conceptually appealing alternative to conventional antibiotics, a major challenge toward the successful implementation of antisense treatments for bacterial infections is the development of efficient oligonucleotide delivery systems. Cationic vesicles (bolasomes) composed of dequalinium chloride (“DQAsomes”) have been used to deliver plasmid DNA across the cardiolipin-rich inner membrane of mitochondria. As cardiolipin is also a component of many bacterial membranes, we investigated the application of cationic bolasomes to bacteria as an oligonucleotide delivery system. Antisense sequences designed in silico to target the expression of essential genes of the bacterial pathogen, Clostridium difficile, were synthesized as 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). These antisense gapmers were quantitatively assessed for their ability to block mRNA translation using luciferase reporter and C. difficile protein expression plasmid constructs in a coupled transcription–translation system. Cationic bolaamphiphile compounds (dequalinium derivatives) of varying alkyl chain length were synthesized and bolasomes were prepared via probe sonication of an aqueous suspension. Bolasomes were characterized by particle size distribution, zeta potential, and binding capacities for anionic oligonucleotide. Bolasomes and antisense gapmers were combined to form antisense nanocomplexes. Anaerobic C. difficile log phase cultures were treated with serial doses of gapmer nanocomplexes or equivalent amounts of empty bolasomes for 24 hours. Antisense gapmers for four gene targets achieved nanomolar minimum inhibitory concentrations for C. difficile, with the lowest values observed for oligonucleotides targeting polymerase genes rpoB and dnaE. No inhibition of bacterial growth was observed from treatments at matched dosages of scrambled gapmer nanocomplexes or plain, oligonucleotide-free bolasomes compared to untreated control cultures. We

  15. Multicenter clinical evaluation of the portrait toxigenic C. difficile assay for detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains in clinical stool specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, Blake W; Mackey, Tami-Lea A; Daly, Judy A; Alger, Garrison; Denys, Gerald A; Peterson, Lance R; Kehl, Sue C; Ledeboer, Nathan A

    2012-12-01

    We compared the Portrait Toxigenic C. difficile Assay, a new semiautomated sample-to-result molecular test, to a toxigenic bacterial culture/cell cytotoxin neutralization assay (TBC/CCNA) for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile in 549 stool specimens. Stool specimens were also tested by one of three alternative FDA-cleared molecular tests for toxigenic C. difficile (Xpert C. difficile, Illumigene C. difficile, or GeneOhm Cdiff). The sensitivities and specificities of the molecular tests compared to TBC/CCNA were as follows: 98.2% and 92.8% for the Portrait assay, 100% and 91.7% for the Xpert assay, 93.3% and 95.1% for the Illumigene assay, and 97.4% and 98.5% for the GeneOhm assay, respectively. The majority of Portrait false-positive results (20/31; 64.5%) were also positive for C. difficile by an alternative molecular test, suggesting an increased sensitivity compared to the culture-based "gold standard" method. The Portrait test detected an assay input of 30 CFU in 100% of spiked samples and detected an input of 10 CFU in 96.7% of samples tested. PMID:23015667

  16. Outbreak of Clostridium difficile 027 infection in Vienna, Austria 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indra, A; Huhulescu, S; Fiedler, A; Kernbichler, S; Blaschitz, M; Allerberger, F

    2009-04-30

    From November 2008 to 15 April 2009, 36 isolates of CD027 identified in Austria, all originating from four hospitals in Vienna. All isolates were positive for toxin A, toxin B and the binary toxin, and showed a characteristic 18 bp deletion in the tcdC gene. Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic spore-forming bacterium. Some strains may cause diarrhoea due to formation of toxins. Symptomatic C. difficile infection (CDI) is primarily linked with hospital admission and antibiotic treatment, although antibiotic exposure is neither necessary nor sufficient for CDI [1,2]. In Belgium, for instance, one third of CDI cases reported in the hospital surveillance system are not hospital-associated [3]. Symptoms range from mild diarrhoea to serious manifestations such as pseudomembranous colitis, toxic megacolon or perforation of the colon. C. difficile challenges hygiene standards as it is forms spores. The risk of infection rises with increasing age, underlying disease and immunodeficiency [4]. In recent years, a particularly virulent strain, ribotype 027 (CD027), has emerged in a number of countries, particularly in connection with hospital outbreaks, but also in community-acquired diarrhoea cases [5]. The risk of serious disease and death associated with CD027 exceeds that of other C. difficile strains. The classical CD027 is characterised - among other things - by an increased production of toxins A and B, production of a binary toxin and resistance to newer fluoroquinolones such as moxifloxacin. The first three Austrian cases of CD027 occurred in 2006 and in March 2008 [6,7]. Since August 2006, the Austrian National Reference Centre for C. difficile has ribotyped approximately 2,700 human C. difficile isolates received from all nine Austrian provinces. In recent months, a drastic increase in CD027 cases has been noted, all originating from four hospitals in Vienna. From November 2008 to 15 April 2009, 36 isolates of CD027 were received at the National Reference Centre

  17. The analysis of para-cresol production and tolerance in Clostridium difficile 027 and 012 strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNerney Ruth

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium difficile is the major cause of antibiotic associated diarrhoea and in recent years its increased prevalence has been linked to the emergence of hypervirulent clones such as the PCR-ribotype 027. Characteristically, C. difficile infection (CDI occurs after treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics, which disrupt the normal gut microflora and allow C. difficile to flourish. One of the relatively unique features of C. difficile is its ability to ferment tyrosine to para-cresol via the intermediate para-hydroxyphenylacetate (p-HPA. P-cresol is a phenolic compound with bacteriostatic properties which C. difficile can tolerate and may provide the organism with a competitive advantage over other gut microflora, enabling it to proliferate and cause CDI. It has been proposed that the hpdBCA operon, rarely found in other gut microflora, encodes the enzymes responsible for the conversion of p-HPA to p-cresol. Results We show that the PCR-ribotype 027 strain R20291 quantitatively produced more p-cresol in-vitro and was significantly more tolerant to p-cresol than the sequenced strain 630 (PCR-ribotype 012. Tyrosine conversion to p-HPA was only observed under certain conditions. We constructed gene inactivation mutants in the hpdBCA operon in strains R20291 and 630Δerm which curtails their ability to produce p-cresol, confirming the role of these genes in p-cresol production. The mutants were equally able to tolerate p-cresol compared to the respective parent strains, suggesting that tolerance to p-cresol is not linked to its production. Conclusions C. difficile converts tyrosine to p-cresol, utilising the hpdBCA operon in C. difficile strains 630 and R20291. The hypervirulent strain R20291 exhibits increased production of and tolerance to p-cresol, which may be a contributory factor to the virulence of this strain and other hypervirulent PCR-ribotype 027 strains.

  18. False-Positive Clostridium difficile in Negative-Control Reactions Peak and Then Decrease with Repetitive Refrigeration of Immunoassay

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Palacios, Alexander; Stämpfli, Henry R.; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant false-positive reactions in negative-controls during ELISA testing for Clostridium difficile indicated the potential for false-diagnoses. Experiments with 96-well products showed a maximum peak of false-positive immunoassay reactions with the provided negative-control reagents after 5 refrigeration-to-room temperature cycles (P

  19. The Effect of Various Inulins and Clostridium difficile on the Metabolic Activity of the Human Colonic Microbiota in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuenen, M.H.M.C. van; Meyer, P.D.; Venema, K.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of inulins with different average degree of polymerization (ranging from 3 to 25) on the metabolic activity of the human colonic microbiota with or without the addition of Clostridium difficile was investigated in vitro. The in vitro system used was a dynamic, computer-controlled model

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium difficile Strain IT1118, an Epidemic Isolate Belonging to the Emerging PCR Ribotype 018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasels, François; Barbanti, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 018 has emerged in Italy, South Korea, and Japan, causing severe infections and outbreaks. In this study, we sequenced the genome of IT1118, an Italian clinical isolate, to clarify the molecular features contributing to the success of this epidemic type. PMID:27445391

  1. Comparison of antimicrobial susceptibility among Clostridium difficile isolated from an integrated human and swine population in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium difficile can be a major problem in hospitals because the bacterium primarily affects individuals with an altered gut flora, which largely occurs through prolonged antibiotic use. Proposed sources of increased community-acquired infections are food animals and retail meats. The objecti...

  2. A Multi-Center Prospective Derivation and Validation of a Clinical Prediction Tool for Severe Clostridium difficile Infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Na, Xi

    2015-04-23

    Prediction of severe clinical outcomes in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is important to inform management decisions for optimum patient care. Currently, treatment recommendations for CDI vary based on disease severity but validated methods to predict severe disease are lacking. The aim of the study was to derive and validate a clinical prediction tool for severe outcomes in CDI.

  3. Effects of anti-inflammatory drugs on fever and neutrophilia induced by Clostridium difficile toxin B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Cardoso

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the ability of Clostridium difficile toxin B, isolated from the VPI 10463 strain, to induce fever and neutrophilia in rats. Intravenous injection of toxin B (0.005–0.5 μg/kg evoked a dose-dependent increase in body temperature. The febrile response to 0.5 μg/kg of the toxin started in 2.5 h, peaked at 5 h, and subsided fully within 24 h. Toxin B also induced a dosedependent neutrophilia. Pretreatment with indomethacin (2 mg/kg, i.p. did not affect the neutrophilia induced by toxin B, but significantly reduced the febrile response measured 4 to 8 h after toxin B injection. Dexamethasone (0.5 mg/ kg also markedly diminished the febrile response induced by toxin B. These results show that Clostridium difficile toxin B induced a febrile response susceptible to inhibition by dexamethasone and indomethacin. Furthermore, they suggest that prostaglandins are not involved in the neutrophilia caused by this toxin.

  4. Clostridium Difficile Infection Worsen Outcome of Hospitalized Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Lin, Qian-Yun; Fei, Jia-Xi; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Min-Yi; Jiang, Shuang-Hong; Wang, Pu; Chen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has increased rapidly over the past several decades in North America and Europe. However, the exact global epidemiology remains unclear because of insufficient data from developing countries. A total of 646 hospitalized adult IBD patients were enrolled; and their fresh stool specimens were obtained and used for Clostridium difficile detection. The incidence of CDI in Crohn's disease (CD) patients (12.7%) was significantly lower than that in Ulcerative disease (UC) patients (19.3%). Among the toxin types, A(+)B(+) strain was the most common. Length of stay, hospitalization frequency and bowel surgery rate were significantly higher in the CDI than in the non-CDI group in CD or UC patients. More patients in CDI-CD group were still in active and even clinical moderate or severe CD stage than non-CDI-CD group after 2 years of following-up. Fistula, antibiotics and infliximab usage likely increased the CDI rate in CD patients, Infliximab treatment was considered a risk factor in UC patients. CDI is an exacerbating public health issue that may influence IBD course, increase expenditures, and delay the remission of IBD patients. IBD patients with CDI require urgent attention. PMID:27417996

  5. Septins guide microtubule protrusions induced by actin-depolymerizing toxins like Clostridium difficile transferase (CDT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nölke, Thilo; Schwan, Carsten; Lehmann, Friederike; Østevold, Kristine; Pertz, Olivier; Aktories, Klaus

    2016-07-12

    Hypervirulent Clostridium difficile strains, which are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, produce the actin-ADP ribosylating toxin Clostridium difficile transferase (CDT). CDT depolymerizes actin, causes formation of microtubule-based protrusions, and increases pathogen adherence. Here, we show that septins (SEPT) are essential for CDT-induced protrusion formation. SEPT2, -6, -7, and -9 accumulate at predetermined protrusion sites and form collar-like structures at the base of protrusions. The septin inhibitor forchlorfenuron or knockdown of septins inhibits protrusion formation. At protrusion sites, septins colocalize with the GTPase Cdc42 (cell division control protein 42) and its effector Borg (binder of Rho GTPases), which act as up-stream regulators of septin polymerization. Precipitation and surface plasmon resonance studies revealed high-affinity binding of septins to the microtubule plus-end tracking protein EB1, thereby guiding incoming microtubules. The data suggest that CDT usurps conserved regulatory principles involved in microtubule-membrane interaction, depending on septins, Cdc42, Borgs, and restructuring of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27339141

  6. Therapeutic Success of Rifaximin for Clostridium difficile Infection Refractory to Metronidazole and Vancomycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannous, George; Neff, Guy; Kemmer, Nyingi

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 46-year-old white male with confirmed Clostridium difficile infection for >4 weeks after fluoroquinolone therapy. The patient received two courses of metronidazole 500 mg three times daily (t.i.d.) during which time diarrhea resolved; however, symptoms recurred 14–15 days after treatment termination. He received a 2-week course of vancomycin 125 mg four times daily, with symptoms recurring 10 days after treatment conclusion. The patient then received a pulsed tapering schedule of vancomycin with adjunctive Saccharomyces boulardii. Diarrhea recurred 12 days after treatment completion. He received rifaximin 400 mg t.i.d. while hospitalized for diarrhea-associated complications. Symptoms resolved within 24 h. The patient received a 4-week regimen of rifaximin 400 mg orally t.i.d. after discharge. No further episodes of diarrhea were reported within 6 months after treatment termination. The present case supports the potential benefit of rifaximin for the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. PMID:21060709

  7. Significance of a positive Clostridium difficile toxin test after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahoshi, Yu; Kimura, Shun-Ichi; Nakano, Hirofumi; Harada, Naonori; Kameda, Kazuaki; Ugai, Tomotaka; Wada, Hidenori; Yamasaki, Ryoko; Ishihara, Yuko; Kawamura, Koji; Sakamoto, Kana; Ashizawa, Masahiro; Sato, Miki; Terasako-Saito, Kiriko; Nakasone, Hideki; Kikuchi, Misato; Yamazaki, Rie; Kanda, Junya; Kako, Shinichi; Nishida, Junji; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2016-06-01

    Patients with hematological malignancies show a high prevalence of asymptomatic colonization with Clostridium difficile (CD colonization). Therefore, it is difficult to distinguish CD colonization with diarrhea induced by a conditioning regimen from true Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients. We retrospectively analyzed 308 consecutive patients who underwent a CD toxin A/B enzyme immunoassay test for diarrhea within 100 d after HSCT from November 2007 to May 2014. Thirty patients (9.7%) had positive CD toxin results, and 11 of these had positive results in subsequent tests after an initial negative result. Allogeneic HSCT, total body irradiation, stem cell source, acute leukemia, and the duration of neutropenia were significantly correlated with positive CD toxin results. In a logistic regression model, allogeneic HSCT was identified as a significant risk factor (odds ratio 18.6, p < 0.01). In an analysis limited to within 30 d after the conditioning regimen, the duration of neutropenia was the sole risk factor (odds ratio 10.4, p < 0.01). There were no distinctive clinical features for CDI, including the onset or duration of diarrhea. In conclusion, although CDI may be overdiagnosed in HSCT recipients, it is difficult to clinically distinguish between CDI and CD colonization. PMID:27019071

  8. Current role of surgery for the treatment of fulminant Clostridium difficile colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ming-fei; DING Zhao; ZHAO Jian; JIANG Cong-qing; LIU Zhi-su; QIAN Qun

    2013-01-01

    Objective This review discusses the current status and progress in studies on fulminant Clostridium difficile colitis (FCDC),including the definition,risk factor,diagnostic role of CT,surgical treatment,postoperative mortality,and new therapeutic strategy.Data sources A literature search was conducted mainly in Medline and PubMed published in English between January 2000 and May 2011.The search terms were "fulminant Clostridium difficile colitis","treatment"","surgery" and "mortality".Resulta Recent studies show that the overall mortality rate for FCDC remains high despite early surgical intervention.It has been difficult to identify the real value for surgical intervention in patients with FCDC due to the absence of prospective,randomized studies.Early recognition of patients with FCDC will help a clinician decide the need for treatment in an intensive care setting,multi-disciplinary consultation,and appropriate therapeutic selection.Some studies emphasize the importance of early recognition and emergent surgery at a less severe stage.Monoclonal antibody therapy and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment may be useful for the treatment of FCDC.Conclusions Present studies do not provide strong evidence for guiding the surgical treatment of FCDC; hence,creation of collaborative research networks is crucial in order to undertake large prospective multi-center studies for improvement in overall survival.

  9. Decreased warfarin effects in elder with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection during fidaxomicin therapy: a case report

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    Antonio Riccardo Buonuomo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection is a disease with increasing incidence, particularly in high‑riskpatients such as the elderly, immunocompromised patients, etc.We report an unexpected decrease of International Normalized Ratio (INR response to warfarin during a first recurrence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI treated with fidaxomicin. The patient, an old man who has prosthetic heart valves on anticoagulation therapy with warfarin, was treated with an association of vancomycin plus metronidazole for a first episode of CDI. Patient remained symptom‑free for few days and then he presented with recurrent diarrhea. A retreatment with vancomycin and metronidazole didn’t resolve symptoms of CDI, therefore he underwent fidaxomicin treatment for 10 days, with rapid resolution of diarrhea. In the meantime, warfarin effects diminished, and only with increases of dosage INR therapeutic range was achieved few days after discontinuing fidaxomicin. According to product information, fidaxomicin doesn’t interfere with warfarin. The authors highlight the different plausible mechanisms to explain the association between the unexpected decreased effect of warfarin and factors that could have influenced such event. The frequent update of product information through good pharmacovigilance practices could help clinicians in the management of unexpected events.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/cmi.v9i1.953

  10. Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Management of Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Krishna; Higgins, Peter D R

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major source of morbidity and mortality for the U.S. health care system and frequently complicates the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Patients with IBD are more likely to be colonized with C. difficile and develop active infection than the general population. They are also more likely to have severe CDI and develop subsequent complications such as IBD flare, colectomy, or death. Even after successful initial treatment and recovery, recurrent CDI is common. Management of CDI in IBD is fraught with diagnostic and therapeutic challenges because the clinical presentations of CDI and IBD flare have considerable overlap. Fecal microbiota transplantation can be successful in curing recurrent CDI when other treatments have failed, but may also trigger IBD flare and this warrants caution. New experimental treatments including vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and nontoxigenic strains of C. difficile offer promise but are not yet available for clinicians. A better understanding of the complex relationship between the gut microbiota, CDI, and IBD is needed. PMID:27120571

  11. Clostridium difficile toxin expression is inhibited by the novel regulator TcdC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamouros, Susana; England, Patrick; Dupuy, Bruno

    2007-06-01

    Clostridium difficile, an emerging nosocomial pathogen of increasing clinical significance, produces two large protein toxins that are responsible for the cellular damage associated with the disease. The precise mechanisms by which toxin synthesis is regulated in response to environmental change have yet to be discovered. The toxin genes (tcdA and tcdB) are located in a pathogenicity locus (PaLoc), along with tcdR and tcdC. TcdR is an alternative RNA polymerase sigma factor that directly activates toxin gene expression, while the inverse relationship between expression of tcdR, tcdA and tcdB genes on the one hand and tcdC on the other has led to the suggestion that TcdC somehow interferes with toxin gene expression. This idea is further supported by the finding that many recent C. difficile epidemic strains in which toxin production is increased carry a common tcdC deletion mutation. In this report we demonstrate that TcdC negatively regulates toxin synthesis both in vivo and in vitro. TcdC destabilizes the TcdR-containing holoenzyme before open complex formation, apparently by interaction with TcdR or TcdR-containing RNA polymerase holoenzyme or both. In addition, we show that the hypertoxigenicity phenotype of C. difficile epidemic strains is not due to their common 18 bp in-frame deletion in tcdC. PMID:17542920

  12. Clostridium difficile toxin synthesis is negatively regulated by TcdC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, B; Govind, R; Antunes, A; Matamouros, S

    2008-06-01

    Clostridium difficile toxin synthesis is growth phase-dependent and is regulated by various environmental signals. The toxin genes tcdA and tcdB are located in a pathogenicity locus, which also includes three accessory genes, tcdR, tcdC and tcdE. TcdR has been shown to act as an alternative sigma factor that mediates positive regulation of both the toxin genes and its own gene. The tcdA, tcdB and tcdR genes are transcribed during the stationary growth phase. The tcdC gene, however, is expressed during exponential phase. This expression pattern suggested that TcdC may act as a negative regulator of toxin gene expression. TcdC is a small acidic protein without any conserved DNA-binding motif. It is able to form dimers and its N-terminal region includes a putative transmembrane domain. Genetic and biochemical evidence showed that TcdC negatively regulates C. difficile toxin synthesis by interfering with the ability of TcdR-containing RNA polymerase to recognize the tcdA and tcdB promoters. In addition, the C. difficile NAP1/027 epidemic strains that produce higher levels of toxins have mutations in tcdC. Interestingly, a frameshift mutation at position 117 of the tcdC coding sequence seems to be, at least in part, responsible for the hypertoxigenicity phenotype of these epidemic strains. PMID:18480323

  13. Temporal differential proteomes of Clostridium difficile in the pig ileal-ligated loop model.

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    Tavan Janvilisri

    Full Text Available The impact of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI on healthcare is becoming increasingly recognized as it represents a major cause of nosocomial diarrhea. A rising number of CDI cases and outbreaks have been reported worldwide. Here, we developed the pig ileal-ligated loop model for semi-quantitative analysis comparing temporal differential proteomes in C. difficile following in vivo incubation with in vitro growth using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ. Proteins retrieved from the in vitro cultures and the loop contents after 4, 8, and 12 h in vivo incubation were subjected to in-solution digestion, iTRAQ labeling, two-dimensional liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and statistical analyses. From a total of 1152 distinct proteins identified in this study, 705 proteins were available for quantitative measures at all time points in both biological and technical replicates; 109 proteins were found to be differentially expressed. With analysis of clusters of orthologous group and protein-protein network interactions, we identified the proteins that might play roles in adaptive responses to the host environment, hence enhancing pathogenicity during CDI. This report represents the quantitative proteomic analysis of C. difficile that demonstrates time-dependent protein expression changes under conditions that mimic in vivo infection and identifies potential candidates for diagnostic or therapeutic measures.

  14. Doxycycline and Tigecycline: Two Friendly Drugs with a Low Association with Clostridium Difficile Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Pin Hung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is known to be associated with prior exposure to many classes of antibiotics. Standard therapy for CDI (i.e., metronidazole and vancomycin is associated with high recurrence rates. Although tetracycline derivatives such as tetracycline, doxycycline or tigecycline are not the standard therapeutic choices for CDI, they may serve as an alternative or a component of combination therapy. Previous tetracycline or doxycycline usage had been shown to have less association with CDI development. Tigecycline, a broad-spectrum glycylcycline with potency against many gram-positive or gram-negative pathogens, had been successfully used to treat severe or refractory CDI. The in vitro susceptibility of C. difficile clinical isolates to tigecycline in many studies showed low minimal inhibitory concentrations. Tigecycline can suppress in vitro toxin production in both historical and hypervirulent C. difficile strains and reduce spore production in a dose-dependent manner. Tetracycline compounds such as doxycycline, minocycline, and tigecycline possess anti-inflammatory properties that are independent of their antibiotic activity and may contribute to their therapeutic effect for CDI. Although clinical data are limited, doxycycline is less likely to induce CDI, and tigecycline can be considered one of the therapeutic choices for severe or refractory CDI.

  15. Survey of diagnostic and typing capacity for Clostridium difficile infection in Europe, 2011 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dorp, Sofie M; Notermans, Daan W; Alblas, Jeroen; Gastmeier, Petra; Mentula, Silja; Nagy, Elisabeth; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Ivanova, Katiusha; Fitzpatrick, Fidelma; Barbut, Frédéric; Morris, Trefor; Wilcox, Mark H; Kinross, Pete; Suetens, Carl; Kuijper, Ed J

    2016-07-21

    Suboptimal laboratory diagnostics for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) impedes its surveillance and control across Europe. We evaluated changes in local laboratory CDI diagnostics and changes in national diagnostic and typing capacity for CDI during the European C. difficile Infection Surveillance Network (ECDIS-Net) project, through cross-sectional surveys in 33 European countries in 2011 and 2014. In 2011, 126 (61%) of a convenience sample of 206 laboratories in 31 countries completed a survey on local diagnostics. In 2014, 84 (67%) of these 126 laboratories in 26 countries completed a follow-up survey. Among laboratories that participated in both surveys, use of CDI diagnostics deemed 'optimal' or 'acceptable' increased from 19% to 46% and from 10% to 15%, respectively (p  < 0.001). The survey of national capacity was completed by national coordinators of 31 and 32 countries in 2011 and 2014, respectively. Capacity for any C. difficile typing method increased from 22/31 countries in 2011 to 26/32 countries in 2014; for PCR ribotyping from 20/31 countries to 23/32 countries, and specifically for capillary PCR ribotyping from 7/31 countries to 16/32 countries. While our study indicates improved diagnostic capability and national capacity for capillary PCR ribotyping across European laboratories between 2011 and 2014, increased use of 'optimal' diagnostics should be promoted. PMID:27469624

  16. Clostridium difficile infections in a Shanghai hospital: antimicrobial resistance, toxin profiles and ribotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haihui; Wu, Shi; Wang, Minggui; Zhang, Yingyuan; Fang, Hong; Palmgren, Ann-Chatrin; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2009-04-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has risen markedly since 2003, however data from China are limited. A 1-year study was conducted at the University Hospital Huashan to characterise clinical isolates of C. difficile. Of 74 isolates, 56 were from the first episode of CDI (43 A(+)B(+) and 13 A(-)B(+)), 5 were from recurrences and 13 were toxin-negative. No binary toxin or TcdC deletion was detected. All strains were susceptible to metronidazole, vancomycin, meropenem and piperacillin/tazobactam. Resistance to moxifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, rifampicin and fusidic acid was found in 46.4%, 100%, 60.7%, 71.4%, 71.4%, 35.7%, 25.0% and 17.9% of the isolates, respectively. All moxifloxacin-resistant isolates carried a mutation in either gyrA, gyrB or both. Fourteen different polymerase chain reaction ribotypes were identified, with a specific clone (SH II) accounting for 25% of isolates. No isolates belonged to ribotype 027. The present study is the first systematic survey of clinical C. difficile isolates in China. Further surveillance is required to detect clustering of cases and to monitor the emergence of specific highly virulent clones and resistance. PMID:19097757

  17. Comparison of toxin and spore production in clinically relevant strains of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Prerna; Poxton, Ian R

    2011-05-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of nosocomial diarrhoea. The toxins that it produces (TcdA and TcdB) are responsible for the characteristic pathology of C. difficile infection (CDI), while its spores persist in the environment, causing its widespread transmission. Many different strains of C. difficile exist worldwide and the epidemiology of the strains is ever-changing: in Scotland, PCR ribotype 012 was once prevalent, but currently ribotypes 106, 001 and 027 are endemic. This study aimed to identify the differences among these ribotypes with respect to their growth, and toxin and spore production in vitro. It was observed that the hypervirulent ribotype 027 produces significantly more toxin than the other ribotypes in the exponential and stationary phases of growth. Further, the endemic strains produce significantly more toxins and spores than ribotype 012. Of note was the observation that tcdC expression did not decrease into the stationary phase of growth, implying that it may have a modulatory rather than repressive effect on toxin production. Further, the increased expression of tcdE in ribotype 027 suggests its importance in the release of the toxins. It can thus be concluded that several genotypic and phenotypic traits might synergistically contribute to the hypervirulence of ribotype 027. These observations might suggest a changing trend towards increased virulence in the strains currently responsible for CDI. PMID:21330434

  18. A novel method for imaging the pharmacological effects of antibiotic treatment on Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Bradley T; Bassères, Eugénie; Memariani, Ali; Chang, Long; Alam, M Jahangir; Vickers, Richard J; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A; Garey, Kevin W

    2016-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is a significant cause of nosocomial-acquired infection that results in severe diarrhea and can lead to mortality. Treatment options for C. difficile infection (CDI) are limited, however, new antibiotics are being developed. Current methods for determining efficacy of experimental antibiotics on C. difficile involve antibiotic killing rates and do not give insight into the drug's pharmacologic effects. Considering this, we hypothesized that by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in tandem to drug killing curves, we would be able to determine efficacy and visualize the phenotypic response to drug treatment. To test this hypothesis, supraMIC kill curves were conducted using vancomycin, metronidazole, fidaxomicin, and ridinilazole. Following collection, cells were either plated or imaged using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Consistent with previous reports, we found that the tested antibiotics had significant bactericidal activity at supraMIC concentrations. By SEM imaging and using a semi-automatic pipeline for image analysis, we were able to determine that vancomycin and to a lesser extent fidaxomicin and ridinilazole significantly affected the cell wall, whereas metronidazole, fidaxomicin, and ridinilazole had significant effects on cell length suggesting a metabolic effect. While the phenotypic response to drug treatment has not been documented previously in this manner, the results observed are consistent with the drug's mechanism of action. These techniques demonstrate the versatility and reliability of imaging and measurements that could be applied to other experimental compounds. We believe the strategies laid out here are vital for characterizing new antibiotics in development for treating CDI. PMID:27108094

  19. Update of Clostridium difficile infection due to PCR ribotype 027 in Europe, 2008.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kuijper, E J

    2008-07-31

    Outbreaks of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) with increased severity, high relapse rate and significant mortality have been related to the emergence of a new, hypervirulent C. difficile strain in North America and Europe. This emerging strain is referred to as PCR ribotype 027 (Type 027). Since 2005, individual countries have developed surveillance studies about the spread of type 027.C. difficile Type 027 has been reported in 16 European countries. It has been responsible for outbreaks in Belgium, Germany, Finland, France, Ireland, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Switzerland and the United Kingdom (England, Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland). It has also been detected in Austria, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Hungary, Poland and Spain. Three countries experienced imported patients with CDI due to Type 027 who acquired the infection abroad.The antimicrobial resistance pattern is changing, and outbreaks due to clindamycin-resistant ermB positive Type 027 strains have occurred in three European countries. Ongoing epidemiological surveillance of cases of CDI, with periodic characterisation of the strains involved, is required to detect clustering of cases in time and space and to monitor the emergence of new, highly virulent clones.

  20. Resistance to moxifloxacin in toxigenic Clostridium difficile isolates is associated with mutations in gyrA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, G; Tang, Y J; Kueper, R; Heisig, P; Rodloff, A C; Silva, J; Cohen, S H

    2001-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is the etiological agent of antibiotic-associated colitis and the most common cause of hospital-acquired infectious diarrhea. Fluoroquinolones such as ciprofloxacin are associated with lower risks of C. difficile-associated diarrhea. In this study, we have analyzed 72 C. difficile isolates obtained from patients with different clinical courses of disease, such as toxic megacolon and relapses; the hospital environment; public places; and horses. They were investigated for their susceptibilities to moxifloxacin (MXF), metronidazole (MEO), and vancomycin (VAN). Mutants highly resistant to fluoroquinolones were selected in vitro by stepwise exposure to increasing concentrations of MXF. The resulting mutants were analyzed for the presence of mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of DNA gyrase (gyrA), the production of toxins A and B, and the epidemiological relationship of these isolates. These factors were also investigated using PCR-based methods. All strains tested were susceptible to MEO and VAN. Twenty-six percent of the clinical isolates (19 of 72) were highly resistant to MXF (MIC > or = 16 microg/ml). Fourteen of these 19 strains contained nucleotide changes resulting in amino acid substitutions at position 83 in the gyrA protein. Resistant strains selected in vitro did not contain mutations at that position. These findings indicate that resistance to MXF in a majority of cases may be due to amino acid substitution in the gyrA gene. PMID:11451695

  1. Structural and functional changes in the gut microbiota associated to Clostridium difficile infection

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    Ana Elena Pérez-Cobas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic therapy is a causative agent of severe disturbances in microbial communities. In healthy individuals, the gut microbiota prevents infection by harmful microorganisms through direct inhibition (releasing antimicrobial compounds, competition, or stimulation of the host’s immune defenses. However, widespread antibiotic use has resulted in short- and long-term shifts in the gut microbiota structure, leading to a loss in colonization resistance in some cases. Consequently, some patients develop Clostridium difficile infection (CDI after taking an antibiotic (AB and, at present, this opportunistic pathogen is one of the main causes of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in hospitalized patients. Here, we analyze the composition and functional differences in the gut microbiota of C. difficile infected (CDI versus non-infected patients, both patient groups having been treated with AB therapy. To do so we used 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic 454-based pyrosequencing approaches. Samples were taken before, during and after AB treatment and were checked for the presence of the pathogen. We performed different analyses and comparisons between infected (CD+ versus non-infected (CD- samples, allowing proposing putative candidate taxa and functions that might protect against C. difficile colonization. Most of these potentially protective taxa belonged to the Firmicutes phylum, mainly to the order Clostridiales, while some candidate protective functions were related to aromatic amino acid biosynthesis and stress response mechanisms. We also found that CDI patients showed, in general, lower diversity and richness than non-infected, as well as an overrepresentation of members of the families Bacteroidaceae, Enterococcaceae, Lactobacillaceae and Clostridium clusters XI and XIVa. Regarding metabolic functions, we detected higher abundance of genes involved in the transport and binding of carbohydrates, ions and others compounds as a response to an antibiotic

  2. Comparison of two rapid assays for Clostridium difficile Common antigen and a C difficile toxin A/B assay with the cell culture neutralization assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reller, Megan E; Alcabasa, Romina C; Lema, Clara A; Carroll, Karen C

    2010-01-01

    We compared 3 rapid assays for Clostridium difficile with a cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Of 600 stool samples, 46 were positive for toxigenic C difficile. Both rapid common antigen assays were highly sensitive (91.3%-100%) and, therefore, were appropriate screening tests. The rapid toxin assay had poor sensitivity (61%) but excellent specificity (99.3%). Testing stools for glutamate dehydrogenase (step 1) and those positive with a rapid toxin assay (step 2) would correctly classify 81% of submitted specimens within 2 hours, including during periods of limited staffing (evenings, nights, and weekends). CCNA could then be used as a third step to test rapid toxin-negative samples, thereby providing a final result for the remaining 19% of samples by 48 to 72 hours. The use of rapid assays as outlined could enhance timely diagnosis of C difficile. PMID:20023265

  3. Clostridium difficile infection: main features and occurrence in domestic species in Brazil Infecção por Clostridium difficile: principais características e ocorrência em animais domésticos no Brasil

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    Rodrigo Otávio Silveira Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is an emerging enteropathogen of humans and domestic animals. The bacterium was recently confirmed to be present in foals and dogs in Brazil, with some recent studies suggesting that C. difficile is one of the most important causes of piglet diarrhea in the country. Moreover, some reports also suggest the transmission of this microorganism between animals and humans, raising the possibility that C. difficile is a zoonotic disease. Therefore, the aim of the present review is to describe the main features of C. difficile infection in domestic animals and outline the occurrence of the disease in horses, dogs and pigs in Brazil.Clostridium difficile é considerado um enteropatógeno emergente que acomete humanos e animais domésticos. A presença da doença em equinos e cães já foi relatada no Brasil e trabalhos sugerem que atualmente C. difficile seja um dos principais causadores de diarreia neonatal em suínos no país. Além disso, relatos recentes sugerem a transmissão do agente entre o homem e animais, gerando a hipótese de C. difficile ser um agente zoonótico. Com isso, o presente trabalho tem como objetivo revisar as principais características da doença, além de fornecer dados recentes sobre a ocorrência no Brasil da infecção por C. difficile nas principais espécies de animais domésticos.

  4. Clostridium Difficile Infections (CDI) In Rehabilitation Facilities, 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Rehabilitation hospitals are with inpatient wards for evaluation and restoration of function to patients who have lost function due to acute or chronic pain,...

  5. Isolation and characterization of Clostridium difficile in farm animals from slaughterhouse to retail stage in Isfahan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiari, Zahra; Weese, J Scott; Ezzatpanah, Hamid; Chamani, Mohammad; Shoaei, Parisa; Yaran, Majid; Ataei, Behrooz; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Ansariyan, Akbar; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Jalali, Mohammad

    2015-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of Clostridium difficile in farm animals from slaughterhouse through to retail stage, a total of 750 samples of feces, posteviscerated and washed carcass were collected from cattle, camels, goats, and sheep in Isfahan, Iran. The overall prevalence of C. difficile in feces, posteviscerated and washed carcass were 20 (13.3%), 23 (15.3%), and 11 (7.3%), respectively; while C. difficile was isolated from 79 (26.3%) retail samples. Twenty-nine (3.8%) isolates were toxigenic, with most toxigenic isolates (n = 17, 5.6%) identified from the retail stage. All toxigenic isolates harbored tcdA and tcdB; however, all were negative for cdtB. The 29 isolates were classified into 21 different ribotypes. This study revealed evidence of existence of toxigenic C. difficile in farm animal feces and meat in Iran. PMID:26440207

  6. PCR ribotype prevalence and molecular basis of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) and fluoroquinolone resistance in Irish clinical Clostridium difficile isolates.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Solomon, Katie

    2011-09-01

    Antimicrobial use is recognized as a risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and outbreaks. We studied the relationship between PCR ribotype, antimicrobial susceptibility and the genetic basis of resistance in response to exposure to antimicrobial agents.

  7. Difference in the Cytotoxic Effects of Toxin B from Clostridium difficile Strain VPI 10463 and Toxin B from Variant Clostridium difficile Strain 1470▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Dreger, Stefanie; Gerhard, Ralf; Barth, Holger; Just, Ingo; Genth, Harald

    2007-01-01

    Glucosylation of RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 by Clostridium difficile toxin B from strain VPI 10463 (TcdB) results in actin reorganization (cytopathic effect) and apoptosis (cytotoxic effect). Toxin B from variant C. difficile strain 1470 serotype F (TcdBF) differs from TcdB with regard to substrate proteins, as it glucosylates Rac1 and R-Ras but not RhoA and Cdc42. In this study, we addressed the question of whether the cellular effects of the toxins depend on their protein substrate specificity. Rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells were synchronized using the thymidine double-block technique. We show that cells were most sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of TcdB in S phase, as analyzed in terms of phosphatidyl serine externalization, fragmentation of nuclei, and activation of caspase-3; in contrast, TcdBF induced only a marginal cytotoxic effect, suggesting that inactivation of RhoA (but not of Rac1) was required for the cytotoxic effect. The glucosylation of Rac1 was correlated to the cytopathic effect of either toxin, suggesting a close connection of the two effects. The cytotoxic effect of TcdB was executed by caspase-3, as it was responsive to inhibition by acetyl-Asp-Met-Gln-Asp-aldehyde (Ac-DMQD-CHO), an inhibitor of caspase-3. The viability of TcdB-treated RBL cells was reduced, whereas the viability of TcdBF-treated cells was unchanged, further confirming that inactivation of RhoA is required for the cytotoxic effect. In conclusion, the protein substrate specificity of the glucosylating toxins determines their biological activity. PMID:17145947

  8. Potentially hypervirulent Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 078 lineage isolates in pigs and possible implications for humans in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Chen; Lee, Jen-Jie; Tsai, Bo-Yang; Liu, Yi-Fen; Chen, Chih-Ming; Tien, Ni; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Chen, Ter-Hsin

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is a human and animal pathogen. Recently, the incidence of community-acquired C. difficile infection has increased, and many studies have indicated that C. difficile might be food-borne. The correlation between C. difficile infection in humans and in animals has been a topic of debate. The objective of this study was to determine the genetic relatedness of C. difficile from human and pigs in Taiwan. We investigated the molecular epidemiology of C. difficile in healthy humans and pigs from 2011 to 2015. The isolation rate of C. difficile from pigs in 13 commercial farms was 49% (100/204), and a high proportion of hypervirulent (C. difficile carrying tcdA, tcdB, and cdtA/B genes and a 39-bp deletion in the tcdC gene) ribotype 078 lineage isolates (90%, 90/100; including 078, 126, 127, and 066-like isolates) were identified. In addition, the C. difficile ribotype 127 isolates from pigs typically exhibited moxifloxacin resistance (37/43; 86%). In healthy humans, the isolation rate was 4.3% (3/69), and all healthy human isolates were non-toxigenic. In particular, we compared the porcine isolates with two patient strains (ribotype 127) obtained from two hospitals in central Taiwan. The multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis revealed a high genetic relatedness between ribotype 127 from patients and pigs. This study indicated that isolates of the ribotype 078 lineage, and especially ribotype 127, were widely distributed in pig farms and showed a high frequency of moxifloxacin resistance. The closely related ribotype 127 from patients and pigs may have had a common origin or low diversity. In conclusion, C. difficile ribotype 127 is a noteworthy pathogen in pigs and poses a potential public health threat. PMID:26915500

  9. A Phenotypically Silent vanB2 Operon Carried on a Tn1549-Like Element in Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Daniel R.; Androga, Grace O.; Ballard, Susan A.; Howden, Benjamin P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the last decade, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has reached an epidemic state with increasing incidence and severity in both health care and community settings. Vancomycin is an important first-line therapy for CDI, and the emergence of resistance would have significant clinical consequences. In this study, we describe for the first time a vanB2 vancomycin resistance operon in C. difficile, isolated from an Australian veal calf at slaughter. The operon was carried on an ~42-kb element showing significant homology and synteny to Tn1549, a conjugative transposon linked with the emergence and global dissemination of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Notably, the C. difficile strain did not show any reduced susceptibility to vancomycin in vitro (MIC, 1 mg/liter), possibly as a result of an aberrant vanRB gene. As observed for other anaerobic species of the animal gut microbiota, C. difficile may be a reservoir of clinically important vancomycin resistance genes. IMPORTANCE In an era when the development of new antimicrobial drugs is slow, vancomycin remains the preferred antimicrobial therapy for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), the most important health care-related infection in the world today. The emergence of resistance to vancomycin would have significant consequences in relation to treating patients with CDI. In this paper, we describe for the first time a complete set of vancomycin resistance genes in C. difficile. The genes were very similar to genes found in vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) that were associated with the emergence and global dissemination of this organism. Fortunately, the C. difficile strain did not show any reduced susceptibility to vancomycin in vitro (MIC, 1 mg/liter), possibly because of a small difference in one gene. However, this observation signals that we may be very close to seeing a fully vancomycin-resistant strain of C. difficile. PMID:27536735

  10. Hospital Clostridium difficile Infection Rates and Prediction of Length of Stay in Patients Without C. difficile Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aaron C; Polgreen, Linnea A; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Polgreen, Philip M

    2016-04-01

    BACKGROUND Inpatient length of stay (LOS) has been used as a measure of hospital quality and efficiency. Patients with Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) have longer LOS. OBJECTIVE To describe the relationship between hospital CDI incidence and the LOS of patients without CDI. DESIGN Retrospective cohort analysis. METHODS We predicted average LOS for patients without CDI at both the hospital and patient level using hospital CDI incidence. We also controlled for hospital characteristics (eg, bed size) and patient characteristics (eg, comorbidities, age). SETTING Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 2009-2011. PATIENTS The Nationwide Inpatient Sample includes patients from a 20% sample of all nonfederal US hospitals. RESULTS Inpatient LOS was significantly longer (Pcontrolling for all observable variables, a percentage point increase in the CDI incidence rate at their hospital was also associated with longer LOS (between 0.6 and 1.05 additional days). Hospital CDI incidence had a larger impact on LOS than many other commonly used predictors of LOS. CONCLUSION CDI rates are a predictor of LOS in patients without CDI at an individual and institutional level. CDI rates are easy to measure and report and thus may provide an important marker for hospital efficiency and/or quality. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(4):404-410. PMID:26858126

  11. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Clostridium difficile isolated from feedlot beef cattle upon arrival and mid-feeding period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Marcio C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of indistinguishable strains of Clostridium difficile in humans, food animals and food, as well as the apparent emergence of the food-animal-associated ribotype 078/toxinotype V as a cause of community-associated C. difficile infection have created concerns about the potential for foodborne infection. While studies have reported C. difficile in calves, studies of cattle closer to the age of harvest are required. Four commercial feedlots in Alberta (Canada were enrolled for this study. Fecal samples were collected at the time of arrival and after acclimation ( 71 days on feed. Selective culture for Clostridium difficile was performed, and isolates were characterized by ribotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A logistic regression model was built to investigate the effect of exposure to antimicrobial drugs on the presence of C. difficile. Results Clostridium difficile was isolated from 18 of 539 animals at the time of feedlot arrival (CI = 2.3-6.1 and from 18 of 335 cattle at mid-feeding period (CI = 2.9-13.1. Overall, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of C. difficile shedding on arrival versus mid-feeding period (P = 0.47. No association between shedding of the bacterium and antimicrobial administration was found (P = 0.33. All the isolates recovered were ribotype 078, a toxinotype V strain with genes encoding toxins A, B and CDT. In addition, all strains were classified as NAP7 by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and had the characteristic 39 base pairs deletion and upstream truncating mutation on the tcdC gene. Conclusions It is apparent that C. difficile is carried in the intestinal tracts of a small percentage of feedlot cattle arriving and later in the feeding period and that ribotype 078/NAP7 is the dominant strain in these animals. Herd management practices associated with C. difficile shedding were not identified, however further studies of the potential role of

  12. Comparative Efficacies of Rifaximin and Vancomycin for Treatment of Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea and Prevention of Disease Recurrence in Hamsters▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kokkotou, Efi; Moss, Alan C.; Michos, Athanasios; Espinoza, Daniel; Cloud, Jeffrey W.; Mustafa, Nasima; O'Brien, Michael; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Kelly, Ciarán P.

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated colitis is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients, with high relapse rates following conventional therapy. We sought to determine the efficacy of rifaximin, a novel nonabsorbed antibiotic, in the hamster model of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). Hamsters received clindamycin subcutaneously and 24 h later were infected by gavage with one of two C. difficile strains: a reference strain (VPI 10463) and a current epidemic s...

  13. Presumptive identification of Clostridium difficile by detection of p-cresol in prepared peptone yeast glucose broth supplemented with p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid.

    OpenAIRE

    Sivsammye, G; Sims, H V

    1990-01-01

    Prereduced, anaerobically sterilized peptone yeast glucose broth was supplemented with p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and used for the presumptive identification of Clostridium difficile. Two hundred eighty-two organisms were grown in this medium for 18 h and tested for p-cresol production by gas-liquid chromatography. All 49 stock and reference strains of C. difficile and 19 organisms confirmed as C. difficile produced p-cresol. p-Cresol was not produced by 53 negative control or 161 test organi...

  14. Comparison of the prevalence and genomic characteristics of Clostridium difficile isolated from various production groups in a vertically integrated swine operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of Clostridium difficile among different age and production groups of swine in a vertically integrated swine operation in Texas in 2006. Isolation of C. difficile was performed utilizing an enrichment technique and restrictive media. Prelim...

  15. The vexed relationship between Clostridium difficile and inflammatory bowel disease: an assessment of carriage in an outpatient setting among patients in remission.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Clayton, Evelyn M

    2009-05-01

    Comorbidity with Clostridium difficile may cause diagnostic delay in newly presenting inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, trigger relapse in established disease, confound therapies, and serve as an indicator of an underlying defect in innate immunity. Retrospective analyses have suggested community acquisition; to address this we conducted a prospective analysis of C. difficile carriage in IBD patients using molecular methods specifically in an outpatient setting.

  16. The incidence and clinical symptomatology of Clostridium difficile infections in a community setting in a cohort of Danish patients attending general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søes, Lillian Marie; Holt, H M; Böttiger, B;

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is gradually being recognised as a cause of morbidity in the community. We investigated the incidence and clinical characteristics of CDI in a community setting and characterised the C. difficile strains by toxin gene profiling and polymerase chain reaction...

  17. Enhanced surveillance of Clostridium difficile infection occurring outside hospital, England, 2011 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawley, Warren N; Davies, Kerrie A; Morris, Trefor; Parnell, Peter; Howe, Robin; Wilcox, Mark H

    2016-07-21

    There are limited national epidemiological data for community-associated (CA)-Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs). Between March 2011 and March 2013, laboratories in England submitted to the Clostridium difficile Ribotyping Network (CDRN) up to 10 diarrhoeal faecal samples from successive patients with CA-CDI, defined here as C. difficile toxin-positive diarrhoea commencing outside hospital (or less than 48 hours after hospital admission), including those cases associated with community-based residential care, with no discharge from hospital within the previous 12 weeks. Patient demographics and C. difficile PCR ribotypes were compared for CA-CDIs in our study and presumed healthcare-associated (HA) CDIs via CDRN. Ribotype diversity indices, ranking and relative prevalences were very similar in CA- vs HA-CDIs, although ribotypes 002 (p ≤ 0.0001),020 (p = 0.009) and 056 (p < 0.0001) predominated in CA-CDIs; ribotype 027 (p = 0.01) predominated in HA-CDIs. Epidemic ribotypes 027 and 078 predominated in institutional residents with CDI (including care/nursing homes) compared with people with CDI living at home. Ribotype diversity decreased with increasing age in HA-CDIs, but not in CA-CDIs. Ribotype 078 CA-CDIs were significantly more common in elderly people (3.4% (6/174) vs 8.7% (45/519) in those aged < 65 and ≥ 65 years, respectively; p = 0.019). No antibiotics were prescribed in the previous four weeks in about twofold more CA-CDI vs HAs (38.6% (129/334) vs 20.3% (1,226/6,028); p < 0.0001). We found very similar ribotype distributions in CA- and HA-CDIs, although a few ribotypes significantly predominated in one setting. These national data emphasise the close interplay between, and likely common reservoirs for, CDIs, particularly when epidemic strains are not dominant. PMID:27487436

  18. Diversity of Clostridium difficile PCR ribotypes in Europe: results from the European, multicentre, prospective, biannual, point-prevalence study of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalised patients with diarrhoea (EUCLID), 2012 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Kerrie A; Ashwin, Helen; Longshaw, Christopher M; Burns, David A; Davis, Georgina L; Wilcox, Mark H

    2016-07-21

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the major cause of infective diarrhoea in healthcare environments. As part of the European, multicentre, prospective, biannual, point-prevalence study of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalised patients with diarrhoea (EUCLID), the largest C. difficile epidemiological study of its type, PCR ribotype distribution of C. difficile isolates in Europe was investigated. PCR ribotyping was performed on 1,196 C. difficile isolates from diarrhoeal samples sent to the European coordinating laboratory in 2012-13 and 2013 (from two sampling days) by 482 participating hospitals from 19 European countries. A total of 125 ribotypes were identified, of which ribotypes 027 (19%, n =222), 001/072 (11%, n = 134) and 014/020 (10%, n = 119) were the most prevalent. Distinct regional patterns of ribotype distribution were noted. Of 596 isolates from patients with toxin-positive stools (CDI cases), ribotype 027 accounted for 22% (32/144) of infections in cases aged from 18 to less than 65 years, but the prevalence decreased in those aged ≥ 65 years (14% (59/412)) and further decreased in those aged ≥ 81 years (9% (18/195)). The prevalence of ribotype 027 and 176, but not other epidemic strains, was inversely proportional to overall ribotype diversity (R(2) = 0.717). This study highlights an increased diversity of C. difficile ribotypes across Europe compared with previous studies, with considerable intercountry variation in ribotype distribution. Continuous surveillance programmes are necessary to monitor the changing epidemiology of C. difficile. PMID:27470194

  19. Risk factors for recurrent hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection in a Japanese university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikone M

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mayu Hikone,1 Yusuke Ainoda,1,2 Sayaka Tago,2 Takahiro Fujita,2 Yuji Hirai,2 Kaori Takeuchi,2 Kyoichi Totsuka31Department of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo Metropolitan Bokutoh General Hospital, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo Women's Medical University, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Kitatama Hospital, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a highly prevalent hospital-associated infection. Although most patients respond well to discontinuation of antibiotics, 20%–30% of patients relapse. To initiate early therapeutic measures, the risk factors for recurrent CDI must be identified, although very few Japanese studies have used standard surveillance definitions to identify these risk factors.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with health care facility-onset CDI between August 2011 and September 2013. Patients with diarrhea who were positive for Clostridium difficile (via an enzyme immunoassay were defined as having CDI. Clinical data (eg, demographics, comorbidities, medication, laboratory results, and clinical outcomes were evaluated, and multivariate analysis was used to identify risk factors that were associated with recurrent CDI.Results: Seventy-six health care facility-onset CDI cases were identified, with an incidence rate of 0.8 cases per 10,000 patient-days. Fourteen cases (18.4% were recurrent, with 13 patients having experienced a single recurrent episode and one patient having experienced three recurrent episodes. The 30-day and 90-day mortality rates were 7.9% and 14.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that recurrent patients were more likely to have underlying malignant disease (odds ratio: 7.98; 95% confidence interval: 1.22–52.2; P=0.03 and a history of intensive care unit hospitalization (odds ratio: 49.9; 95% confidence interval: 1.01–2,470; P=0.049.Conclusion: Intensive care unit hospitalization and malignancy are risk factors for recurrent

  20. An exploratory study to evaluate Clostridium difficile polymerase chain reaction ribotypes and infection outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabit, Abrar K; Nicolau, David P

    2016-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection ranges from mild to severe prolonged diarrhea with systemic symptoms. Previous studies have assessed the correlation of some disease severity parameters to C. difficile ribotypes. However, certain clinical parameters of interest have not yet been evaluated. Aim We conducted an exploratory study to evaluate the correlation of C. difficile ribotypes to parameters not assessed previously, notably days to diarrhea resolution (in terms of days to formed stools and days to less than three stools per day), length of hospital stay, 30-day recurrence rates, and 30-day readmission rates. Additional severity parameters evaluated include leukocytosis, serum creatinine, fever, and nausea/vomiting. Methods Polymerase chain reaction ribotyping was performed on C. difficile isolates from baseline stool samples of 29 patients. A retrospective chart review was conducted to assess the parameters of interest. Results The most common ribotypes were 027 (38%), 014/020 (21%), and 106/174 (21%). Numerically, 027 ribotype patients required more days to less than three stools per day versus 014/020 and 106/174 ribotype patients (P=0.2). The three ribotypes were similar regarding time to formed stools, duration of hospitalization, and 30-day readmission rate (P=0.2, 0.6, and 0.8, respectively). Recurrence within 30 days occurred in two patients with 027 and two patients with 014/020 (P=0.6). Leukocytosis and fever were more prominent with 027 than with 014/020 and 106/174 (P=0.04 for both parameters), although the degree of nausea/vomiting did not differ between the three groups (P=0.3). A serum creatinine level ≥1.5 times the premorbid level was seen in only three patients, each infected with a different ribotype. Conclusion Although these data provide a baseline assessment of outcomes to aid in the design of future studies, the diversity of C. difficile ribotypes within the population must be considered, and additional work with other ribotypes

  1. Prevalence and risk factors associated with Clostridium difficile shedding in veal calves in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magistrali, Chiara Francesca; Maresca, Carmen; Cucco, Lucilla; Bano, Luca; Drigo, Ilenia; Filippini, Giovanni; Dettori, Annalisa; Broccatelli, Sayra; Pezzotti, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the prevalence and risk factors of Clostridium difficile shedding in six farms belonging to two companies in Northern Italy. Four hundred and twenty veal calves, randomly selected and individually identified, were sampled three times: at 0-16, 90-120, and 150 days after introduction. C. difficile was isolated at least once from 87 out of the 420 calves (20.7%). The prevalence of shedding was 20.24% at the first sampling and dropped to 0.72% at the second sampling. None of the samples obtained at 150 days tested positive. Sampling of cecal contents and carcass swabs at slaughter was stratified according to the herd of origin of the animals. C. difficile was never isolated at slaughter, excluding a prevalence higher than 3.5% on the basis of previous investigations. Therefore, in this work, the veal calf could not be confirmed as a potential source of C. difficile for the consumer. Eight different ribotypes (RT) have been described, but the vast majority of the isolates (87.8%) belonged to three ribotypes only: RT-078, RT-012 and RT-126, which are also among the most common of the ribotypes detected in humans in Europe. Most isolates, and all the RT-078 isolates, harbored genes coding for toxins A and B, the binary toxin, and showed a deletion in the gene encoding toxin C, suggesting that the veal calf was a reservoir for epidemic hyper-virulent strains. A correlation between age and shedding was found: the odds ratio (OR) ranged from 2.79 for 36-45 days of age to 4.57 for 13-28 days of age. The presence of diarrhea at first sampling was significantly associated with the recovery of C. difficile in feces (OR 3.26). A correlation was found between the administration of antimicrobials and shedding: an increased risk was shown when the number of antimicrobials used was higher than 4 (OR 4.02) or 5-6 (OR 5.83) or when polymyxin E or beta-lactams were administered. PMID:25638401

  2. A Novel Quantitative Sampling Technique for Detection and Monitoring of Clostridium difficile Contamination in the Clinical Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shanom; Muzslay, Monika; Wilson, Peter

    2015-08-01

    The horizontal transmission of Clostridium difficile in the hospital environment is difficult to establish. Current methods to detect C. difficile spores on surfaces are not quantitative, lack sensitivity, and are protracted. We propose a novel rapid method to detect and quantify C. difficile contamination on surfaces. Sponge swabbing was compared to contact plate sampling to assess the in vitro recovery of C. difficile ribotype 027 contamination (∼10(0), 10(1), or 10(2) CFU of spores) from test surfaces (a bed rail, a stainless steel sheet, or a polypropylene work surface). Sponge swab contents were concentrated by vacuum filtration, and the filter membrane was plated onto selective agar. The efficacy of each technique for the recovery of C. difficile from sites in the clinical environment that are touched at a high frequency was evaluated. Contact plates recovered 19 to 32% of the total contamination on test surfaces, whereas sponge swabs recovered 76 to 94% of the total contamination, and contact plates failed to detect C. difficile contamination below a detection limit of 10 CFU/25 cm(2) (0.4 CFU/cm(2)). In use, contact plates failed to detect C. difficile contamination (0/96 contact plates; 4 case wards), while sponge swabs recovered C. difficile from 29% (87/301) of the surfaces tested in the clinical environment. Approximately 74% (36/49) of the area in the vicinity of the patient was contaminated (∼1.34 ± 6.88 CFU/cm(2) C. difficile spores). Reservoirs of C. difficile extended to beyond the areas near the patient: a dirty utility room sink (2.26 ± 5.90 CFU/cm(2)), toilet floor (1.87 ± 2.40 CFU/cm(2)), and chair arm (1.33 ± 4.69 CFU/cm(2)). C. difficile was present on floors in ∼90% of case wards. This study highlights that sampling with a contact plate may fail to detect C. difficile contamination and result in false-negative reporting. Our sponge sampling technique permitted the rapid and quantitative measurement of C. difficile contamination on

  3. Clostridium difficile Infection and Proton Pump Inhibitor Use in Hospitalized Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Pohl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with cystic fibrosis (CF often take proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, which helps improve efficacy of fat absorption with pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. However, PPI use is known to be associated with Clostridium difficile-(C. diff- associated diarrhea (CDAD. We retrospectively evaluated the incidence of C. diff infection from all pediatric hospital admissions over a 5-year period at a single tertiary children's hospital. We found significantly more C. diff-positive stool tests in hospitalized patients with CF compared to patients with no diagnosis of CF. However, use of a PPI was not associated with an increased risk of CDAD in hospitalized CF patients. In summary, C. diff infection is more common in hospitalized pediatric CF patients although PPI use may not be a risk factor for CDAD development in this patient population.

  4. Sporulation properties and antimicrobial susceptibility in endemic and rare Clostridium difficile PCR ribotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidaric, Valerija; Rupnik, Maja

    2016-06-01

    Increased sporulation and antibiotic resistance have been proposed to be associated with certain Clostridium difficile epidemic strains such as PCR ribotype 027. In this study we examined these properties in another widespread PCR ribotype, 014/020, in comparison to prevalent PCR ribotype 002 and a group of rarely represented PCR ribotypes. Highest sporulation was observed in 014/020 strains at 24 h, while after 72 h PCR ribotype 002 and rare PCR ribotypes formed higher total number of spores. PCR ribotype 014/020 strains exhibited slightly higher resistance to tested antimicrobials, followed by group of rare PCR ribotypes and less common PCR ribotype 002. Neither sporulation properties nor antibiotic resistance clearly differed in endemic and rare strains. PMID:27095618

  5. Clostridium difficile suppresses colonic vasoactive intestinal peptide associated with altered motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nassif

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether Clostridium difficile toxin alters colonic tissue levels of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP at the expense of changes in colonic motility in the isolated perfused rabbit left colon. Colonic inflammation was induced by the intracolonic administration of 10−8 M C. difflcile toxin. Strain gauge transducers were sewn onto the serosal surface of the colon to evaluate colonic motility. C. difflcile administration produced histologic changes consistent with epithelial damage. This was associated with an increased production of prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane B2. Tissue levels of VIP but not substance P were significantly reduced. This was associated with an increased number of contractions per minute and an average force of each colonic contraction. These results suggest that tissue levels of VIP are suppressed by C. difflcile and may participate in colonic dysmotility during active inflammation.

  6. [Ulcerous colitis and infection with cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus and clostridium difficile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, C; von Sanden, S; Theilacker, C; Blum, H E

    2008-08-01

    The treatment of severe flares of ulcerative colitis is based on systemic corticosteroids, immunomodulators such as cyclosporine and azathioprine and in some cases TNF-alpha-antagonists, respectively. These immunosuppressed patients are susceptible for infectious pathogens. Here we report the case of a patient with a severe flare of ulcerative colitis that was first treated with systemic corticosteroids combined with immunomodulators and subsequent with infliximab. The patient then experienced an infection with Clostridium difficile and cytomegalovirus of the colon and a Herpes simplex esophagitis, respectively. After specific treatment the patient responded well to the immunosuppressive therapy. This case illustrates that infections have to be considered before systemic treatment of an acute flare of ulcerative colitis is instituted especially in the case of disease activation during immunosuppressive treatment. PMID:18759202

  7. Recent developments on the role of Clostridium difficile in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (CD), specifically its toxins, have been implicated as a risk factor for exacerbation of the inflammatory process in up to 5% of patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. Typical evidence of colonic changes with CD infection, including pseudomembranous exudate, are often not present; however, a severe clinical course may result, including precipitation of toxic colitis and toxic megacolon. Recently, hypervirulent CD strains have been reported raising concern for a more severe disease process in patients with underlying inflammatory bowel disease. Moreover, small bowel involvement or CD enteritis has been increasingly described, usually in those with a history of a prior colectomy or total proctocolectomy for prior severe and extensive inflammatory bowel disease. Finally, refractory or treatment-resistant pouchitis may occur with CD infection.

  8. Reset of a critically disturbed microbial ecosystem: faecal transplant in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Susana; van Nood, Els; Tims, Sebastian; Heikamp-de Jong, Ineke; ter Braak, Cajo J F; Keller, Josbert J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-08-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) can be effectively treated by infusion of a healthy donor faeces suspension. However, it is unclear what factors determine treatment efficacy. By using a phylogenetic microarray platform, we assessed composition, diversity and dynamics of faecal microbiota before, after and during follow-up of the transplantation from a healthy donor to different patients, to elucidate the mechanism of action of faecal infusion. Global composition and network analysis of the microbiota was performed in faecal samples from nine patients with recurrent CDI. Analyses were performed before and after duodenal donor faeces infusion, and during a follow-up of 10 weeks. The microbiota data were compared with that of the healthy donors. All patients successfully recovered. Their intestinal microbiota changed from a low-diversity diseased state, dominated by Proteobacteria and Bacilli, to a more diverse ecosystem resembling that of healthy donors, dominated by Bacteroidetes and Clostridium groups, including butyrate-producing bacteria. We identified specific multi-species networks and signature microbial groups that were either depleted or restored as a result of the treatment. The changes persisted over time. Comprehensive and deep analyses of the microbiota of patients before and after treatment exposed a therapeutic reset from a diseased state towards a healthy profile. The identification of microbial groups that constitute a niche for C. difficile overgrowth, as well as those driving the reinstallation of a healthy intestinal microbiota, could contribute to the development of biomarkers predicting recurrence and treatment outcome, identifying an optimal microbiota composition that could lead to targeted treatment strategies. PMID:24577353

  9. Clinical features of Clostridium difficile infection and molecular characterization of the isolated strains in a cohort of Danish hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søes, L M; Brock, I; Persson, S; Simonsen, J; Pribil Olsen, K E; Kemp, M

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare clinical features of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) to toxin gene profiles of the strains isolated from Danish hospitalized patients. C. difficile isolates were characterized by PCR based molecular typing methods including toxin gene profiling and analysis of deletions and truncating mutations in the toxin regulating gene tcdC. Clinical features were obtained by questionnaire. Thirty percent of the CDI cases were classified as community-acquired. Infection by C. difficile with genes encoding both toxin A, toxin B and the binary toxin was significantly associated with hospital-acquired/healthcare-associated CDI compared to community-acquired CDI. Significantly higher leukocyte counts and more severe clinical manifestations were observed in patients infected by C. difficile containing genes also encoding the binary toxin together with toxin A and B compared to patients infected by C. difficile harbouring only toxin A and B. In conclusion, infection by C. difficile harbouring genes encoding both toxin A, toxin B and the binary toxin were associated with hospital acquisition, higher leukocyte counts and severe clinical disease. PMID:21744281

  10. Changes in Colonic Bile Acid Composition following Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Are Sufficient to Control Clostridium difficile Germination and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarden, Alexa R.; Dosa, Peter I.; DeWinter, Erin; Steer, Clifford J.; Shaughnessy, Megan K.; Johnson, James R.; Khoruts, Alexander; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a highly effective therapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (R-CDI), but its mechanisms remain poorly understood. Emerging evidence suggests that gut bile acids have significant influence on the physiology of C. difficile, and therefore on patient susceptibility to recurrent infection. We analyzed spore germination of 10 clinical C. difficile isolates exposed to combinations of bile acids present in patient feces before and after FMT. Bile acids at concentrations found in patients’ feces prior to FMT induced germination of C. difficile, although with variable potency across different strains. However, bile acids at concentrations found in patients after FMT did not induce germination and inhibited vegetative growth of all C. difficile strains. Sequencing of the newly identified germinant receptor in C. difficile, CspC, revealed a possible correspondence of variation in germination responses across isolates with mutations in this receptor. This may be related to interstrain variability in spore germination and vegetative growth in response to bile acids seen in this and other studies. These results support the idea that intra-colonic bile acids play a key mechanistic role in the success of FMT, and suggests that novel therapeutic alternatives for treatment of R-CDI may be developed by targeted manipulation of bile acid composition in the colon. PMID:26789728

  11. Isolation of toxigenic Clostridium difficile from ready-to-eat salads by multiplex polymerase chain reaction in Isfahan, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamoudy, Mahire; Mirlohi, Maryam; Isfahani, Bahram Nasr; Jalali, Mohammad; Esfandiari, Zahra; Hosseini, Nafiseh Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Since 2003, the incidence of community associated Clostridium difficile infection (CA-CDI) has increased; different types of food have been supposed to be the vectors of C. difficile strains. The purpose of this study is to investigate the occurrence of C. difficile strains in ready-to-eat salads distributed in food services. Materials and Methods: A total of 106 ready-made salad specimens were sampled from different restaurants and food services located in Isfahan, in the center of Iran. Positive isolates of C. difficile were identified and confirmed for the existence of three genes including tpi, tcdA and tcdB by multiplex PCR. Results: A total of six (5.66%) samples were positive for C. difficile strains. Of which, one strain (16.6%) was positive for A and B toxins. Conclusion: The existence of toxigenic C. difficile in ready-made salads could be a caution for public health. Further investigation is required to assess the relationship between the isolated strains in our study and those from diarrheic patients through molecular typing. PMID:26015913

  12. Clostridium difficile infection diagnosis in a paediatric population: comparison of methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, J; Putsathit, P; Knight, D R; Sammels, L; Riley, T V; Keil, A

    2014-09-01

    The increasing incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in paediatric hospitalised populations, combined with the emergence of hypervirulent strains, community-acquired CDI and the need for prompt treatment and infection control, makes the rapid, accurate diagnosis of CDI crucial. We validated commonly used C. difficile diagnostic tests in a paediatric hospital population. From October 2011 to January 2012, 150 consecutive stools were collected from 75 patients at a tertiary paediatric hospital in Perth, Western Australia. Stools were tested using: C. Diff Quik Chek Complete, Illumigene C. difficile, GeneOhm Cdiff, cycloserine cefoxitin fructose agar (CCFA) culture, and cell culture cytotoxin neutralisation assay (CCNA). The reference standard was growth on CCFA or Cdiff Chromagar and PCR on isolates to detect tcdA, tcdB, cdtA, and cdtB. Isolates were PCR ribotyped. The prevalence of CDI was high (43 % of patients). Quik Chek Complete glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) demonstrated a low negative predictive value (NPV) (93 %). Both CCNA and Quik Chek Complete toxin A/B had poor sensitivity (33 % and 29 % respectively). Molecular methods both had 89 % sensitivity. Algorithms using GDH + Illumigene or GeneOhm reduced the sensitivity to 85 % and 83 % respectively. Ribotype UK014/20 predominated. GDH NPV and GeneOhm and Illumigene sensitivities were reduced compared with adult studies. Quik Chek Complete and CCNA cannot reliably detect toxigenic CDI. A GDH first algorithm showed reduced sensitivity. In a high prevalence paediatric population, molecular methods alone are recommended over the use of GDH algorithm or culture and CCNA, as they demonstrate the best test performance characteristics. PMID:24781004

  13. Prospective study of Clostridium difficile infections in Europe with phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of the isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbut, F; Mastrantonio, P; Delmée, M; Brazier, J; Kuijper, E; Poxton, I

    2007-11-01

    A 2-month prospective study of Clostridium difficile infections was conducted in 38 hospitals from 14 different European countries in order to obtain an overview of the phenotypic and genotypic features of clinical isolates of C. difficile during 2005. Of 411 isolates from diarrhoeagenic patients with suspected C. difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD), 354 were toxigenic, of which 86 (24.3%) were toxin-variant strains. Major toxinotypes included toxinotypes 0 (n = 268), V (n = 28), VIII (n = 22) and III (n = 25). MICs of metronidazole, vancomycin, erythromycin, clindamycin, moxifloxacin and tetracycline were determined using the Etest method. All the toxigenic strains were fully-susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin. Resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline and moxifloxacin was found in 44.4%, 46.1%, 9.2% and 37.5% of the isolates, respectively. Sixty-six different PCR ribotypes were characterised, with the 027 epidemic strain accounting for 6.2% of isolates. This strain was positive for binary toxin genes, had an 18-bp deletion in the tcdC gene, and was resistant to both erythromycin and moxifloxacin. The mean incidence of CDAD was 2.45 cases/10 000 patient-days, but this figure varied widely among the participating hospitals. Patients infected with the 027 strain were more likely to have a severe disease (OR 3.29, 95% CI 1.19-9.16, p 0.008) and to have been specifically treated with metronidazole or vancomycin (OR 7.46, 95% CI 1.02-154, p 0.02). Ongoing epidemiological surveillance of cases of CDAD, with periodic characterisation of the strains involved, is required to detect clustering of cases in time and space and to monitor the emergence of specific highly virulent clones. PMID:17850341

  14. In vitro activity of MCB3681 against Clostridium difficile strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Dalhoff, Axel; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2014-08-01

    One hundred fourteen Clostridium difficile strains were collected from 67 patients and analyzed for the presence of C. difficile toxin B by the cell cytotoxoicity neutralization assay, genes for toxin A, toxin B, binary toxin and TcdC deletion by PCR. All strains were also PCR-ribotyped. The MICs of the isolates were determined against MCB3681 and nine other antimicrobial agents by the agar dilution method. All isolates were positive for toxin B as well as for toxin A and B genes. In addition, 13 isolates were positive for the binary toxin genes. Thirty-two different ribotypes were identified. No strain of ribotype 027 was found. All 114 isolates were sensitive to MCB3681 (0.008-0.5 mg/l), cadazolid (0.064-0.5 mg/l), fidaxomicin (0.008-0.125 mg/l), metronidazole (0.125-2 mg/l), vancomycin (0.125-1 mg/l) and tigecycline (0.032-0.25 mg/l). Three isolates were resistant to linezolid (8 mg/l), 12 isolates were resistant to moxifloxacin (8-32 mg/l), 87 isolates were resistant to clindamycin (8-256 mg/l) and 107 isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin (8-256 mg/l). No association between toxins A, B and binary toxin, ribotypes and the sensitivity to MCB3681 could be found. MCB3681 has a potent in vitro activity against C. difficile. PMID:25016084

  15. Older Is Not Wiser, Immunologically Speaking: Effect of Aging on Host Response to Clostridium difficile Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae Hyun; High, Kevin P; Warren, Cirle A

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and a significant burden on the health care system. Aging has been identified in the literature as a risk factor for CDI as well as adverse outcome from CDI. Although this effect of advanced age on CDI could be partially explained by clinical factors associated with aging, biologic factors are important. Innate immune system, responsible for immediate response to acute infections, plays a major role in CDI pathogenesis. Impairment in function of innate immunity with aging, demonstrated in other infection models, may lead to worse outcome with CDI. C. difficile toxin-specific antibody response protects the host against initial and recurrent infections as shown in observational studies and clinical trial. Effect of aging on antibody response to CDI has not been demonstrated, but the results from vaccine studies in other infections suggest a negative effect on humoral immunity from aging. Although intestinal microbiota from healthy people confers resistance to CDI by preventing C. difficile colonization, changes in composition of microbiota with aging may affect that resistance and increase risk for CDI. There are also age-associated changes in physiology, especially of the gastrointestinal tract, that may play a role in CDI risk and outcomes. In this review, we will first discuss the epidemiology of CDI in the elderly people, then the alteration in innate immunity, humoral response, and microbiota that increases susceptibility to CDI and severe disease and lastly, the physiological and functional changes that may modify outcomes of infection. PMID:26809495

  16. Clinical predictors of fulminant colitis in patients with Clostridium difficile infection

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    Mohit Girotra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI can affect up to 8% of hospitalized patients. Twenty-five percent CDI patients may develop C. difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD and 1-3% may progress to fulminant C. difficile colitis (FCDC. Once developed, FCDC has higher rates of complications and mortality. Patients and Methods: A 10-year retrospective review of FCDC patients who underwent colectomy was performed and compared with randomly selected age- and sex-matched non-fulminant CDAD patients at our institution. FCDC (n=18 and CDAD (n=49 groups were defined clinically, radiologically, and pathologically. Univariate analysis was performed using Chi-square and Student′s t test followed by multivariate logistic regression to compute independent predictors. Results: FCDC patients were significantly older (77 ± 13 years, presented with triad of abdominal pain (89%, diarrhea (72%, and distention (39%; 28% had prior CDI and had greater hemodynamic instability. In contrast, CDAD patients were comparatively younger (65 ± 20 years, presented with only 1 or 2 of these 3 symptoms and only 5% had prior CDI. No significant difference was noted between the 2 groups in terms of comorbid conditions, use of antibiotics, or proton pump inhibitor. Leukocytosis was significantly higher in FCDC patients (18.6 ± 15.8/mm 3 vs 10.7 ± 5.2/mm 3 ; P=0.04 and further increased until the point of surgery. Use of antiperistaltic medications was higher in FCDC than CDAD group (56% vs 22%; P=0.01. Conclusions: Our data suggest several clinical and laboratory features in CDI patients, which may be indicative of FCDC. These include old age (>70 years, prior CDI, clinical triad of increasing abdominal pain, distention and diarrhea, profound leukocytosis (>18,000/mm 3 , hemodynamic instability, and use of antiperistaltic medications.

  17. Comparative analysis of Clostridium difficile clinical isolates belonging to different genetic lineages and time periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigaglia, Patrizia; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2004-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that Clostridium difficile strains with variant toxins and those with resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) are increasingly causing severe disease and outbreaks in hospital settings. Here, the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc), the acquisition of binary toxin, and the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of antibiotic resistance of 74 C. difficile clinical strains isolated from symptomatic patients in Italy during different time periods were studied. These strains were found to belong to two different lineages, and those isolated before 1991 were genetically unrelated to the more recent strains. The majority of recent C. difficile strains showed variations in toxin genes and in the toxin negative regulator (tcdC) and had the binary toxin. In 62 % of them, variations in tcdC and the presence of the binary toxin were associated. Five classes of susceptibility/resistance pattern (EC-a to -e) for erythromycin and clindamycin were identified in all strains studied. Most of the recent isolates belonged to EC-d and EC-e and, although erythromycin-resistant in vitro, did not harbour the commonly associated ermB determinant. Interestingly, two strains of the EC-d class were resistant to clindamycin only after induction with subinhibitory concentrations of the antibiotic. A decrease in tetracycline and chloramphenicol MIC values was also observed in the recently isolated strains, associated with less frequent detection of the catD and tetM genes. Two tetM-positive strains were resistant in vitro only after induction with subinhibitory concentrations of the antibiotic. The acquisition of the binary toxin, the possible increase in toxin production due to a mutated negative regulator and a decrease in the fitness cost as a result of lower levels of antibiotic resistance or other mechanisms may have led to the successful establishment of these new phenotypes, with potentially serious clinical implications. PMID:15496392

  18. Kefir-isolated Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis inhibits the cytotoxic effect of Clostridium difficile in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, Patricia Araceli; Carasi, Paula; Serradell, María de los Angeles; De Antoni, Graciela Liliana

    2013-02-01

    Kefir is a dairy product obtained by fermentation of milk with a complex microbial population and several health-promoting properties have been attributed to its consumption. In this work, we tested the ability of different kefir-isolated bacterial and yeast strains (Lactobacillus kefir, Lb. plantarum, Lactococcus lactis subps. lactis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces marxianus) or a mixture of them (MM) to antagonise the cytopathic effect of toxins from Clostridium difficile (TcdA and TcdB). Cell detachment assays and F-actin network staining using Vero cell line were performed. Although incubation with microbial cells did not reduce the damage induced by C. difficile spent culture supernatant (SCS), Lc. lactis CIDCA 8221 and MM supernatants were able to inhibit the cytotoxicity of SCS to Vero cells. Fraction of Lc. lactis CIDCA 8221 supernatant containing components higher than 10 kDa were responsible for the inhibitory activity and heating of this fraction for 15 min at 100 °C completely abrogated this ability. By dot-blot assay with anti-TcdA or anti-TcdB antibodies, concentration of both toxins seems to be reduced in SCS treated with Lc. lactis CIDCA 8221 supernatant. However, protective effect was not affected by treatment with proteases or proteases-inhibitors tested. In conclusion, we demonstrated that kefir-isolated Lc. lactis CIDCA 8221 secreted heat-sensitive products able to protect eukaryotic cells from cytopathic effect of C. difficile toxins in vitro. Our findings provide new insights into the probiotic action of microorganisms isolated from kefir against virulence factors from intestinal pathogens. PMID:23217732

  19. Clinical and microbiologic characteristics of tcdA-negative variant clostridium difficile infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jieun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tcdA-negative variant (A-B+ of Clostridium difficile is prevalent in East Asian countries. However, the risk factors and clinical characteristics of A-B+C. difficile infections (CDI are not clearly documented. The objective of this study was to investigate these characteristics. Methods From September 2008 through January 2010, the clinical characteristics, medication history and treatment outcomes of CDI patients were recorded prospectively. Toxin characterization and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed on stool isolates of C. difficile. Results During the study period, we identified 22 cases of CDI caused by tcdA-negative tcdB-positive (A-B+ strains and 105 cases caused by tcdA-positive tcdB-positive (A+B+ strains. There was no significant difference in disease severity or clinical characteristics between the two groups. Previous use of clindamycin and young age were identified as significant risk factors for the acquisition of A-B+ CDI (OR = 4.738, 95% CI 1.48–15.157, p = 0.009 and OR = 0.966, 95% CI 0.935–0.998, p = 0.038, respectively in logistic regression. Rates of resistance to clindamycin were 100% and 69.6% in the A-B+ and A+B+ isolates, respectively (p = 0.006, and the ermB gene was identified in 17 of 21 A-B+ isolates (81%. Resistance to moxifloxacin was also more frequent in the A-B+ than in the A+B+ isolates (95.2% vs. 63.7%, p = 0.004. Conclusions The clinical course of A-B+ CDI is not different from that of A+B+ CDI. Clindamycin use is a significant risk factor for the acquisition of tcdA-negative variant strains.

  20. Development and evaluation of double locus sequence typing for molecular epidemiological investigations of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanov, M; Magalhaes, B; Terletsky, V; Basset, P; Prod'hom, G; Greub, G; Senn, L; Blanc, D S

    2016-02-01

    Despite the development of novel typing methods based on whole genome sequencing, most laboratories still rely on classical molecular methods for outbreak investigation or surveillance. Reference methods for Clostridium difficile include ribotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, which are band-comparing methods often difficult to establish and which require reference strain collections. Here, we present the double locus sequence typing (DLST) scheme as a tool to analyse C. difficile isolates. Using a collection of clinical C. difficile isolates recovered during a 1-year period, we evaluated the performance of DLST and compared the results to multilocus sequence typing (MLST), a sequence-based method that has been used to study the structure of bacterial populations and highlight major clones. DLST had a higher discriminatory power compared to MLST (Simpson's index of diversity of 0.979 versus 0.965) and successfully identified all isolates of the study (100 % typeability). Previous studies showed that the discriminatory power of ribotyping was comparable to that of MLST; thus, DLST might be more discriminatory than ribotyping. DLST is easy to establish and provides several advantages, including absence of DNA extraction [polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is performed on colonies], no specific instrumentation, low cost and unambiguous definition of types. Moreover, the implementation of a DLST typing scheme on an Internet database, such as that previously done for Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( http://www.dlst.org ), will allow users to easily obtain the DLST type by submitting directly sequencing files and will avoid problems associated with multiple databases. PMID:26581425

  1. Molecular methods to study transcriptional regulation of Clostridium difficile toxin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Ana; Dupuy, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Toxin A (TcdA) and Toxin B (TcdB) are the major virulence factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD). These enterotoxins act by glucosylation of members of the Rho protein family of small GTP-binding proteins. This leads to the disorganization of the host cell actin cytoskeleton (cytopathic effect) and apoptosis (cytotoxic effect). Due to their glucosyltransferase activity, they are referred as "clostridial glucosylating toxins". The severe form of CDAD has been recently correlated to the levels of toxin production. This reinforces the idea that regulation of toxin production is an important part of the C. difficile infection. Genes encoding TcdA (tcdA) and TcdB (tcdB) are present in a pathogenicity locus (PaLoc) that also includes three accessory genes: tcdR, tcdE and tcdC. TcdR is an alternative RNA polymerase sigma factor that positively regulates toxin gene transcription as well as its own. TcdE has high homologies with bacteriophage holin proteins. TcdC negatively regulates toxin synthesis by interfering with the RNA polymerase formed with TcdR. Therefore, TcdR and TcdC constitute specific regulators of toxin gene transcription thereby tightly regulating toxin synthesis. In addition a variety of environmental signals, such as the presence of carbon sources or amino acids in the growth medium, and temperature also regulate toxin synthesis. PMID:20597005

  2. Clostridium difficile: New Insights into the Evolution of the Pathogenicity Locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monot, Marc; Eckert, Catherine; Lemire, Astrid; Hamiot, Audrey; Dubois, Thomas; Tessier, Carine; Dumoulard, Bruno; Hamel, Benjamin; Petit, Amandine; Lalande, Valérie; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Barbut, Frédéric; Dupuy, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The major virulence factors of Clostridium difficile are toxins A and B. These toxins are encoded by tcdA and tcdB genes, which form a pathogenicity locus (PaLoc) together with three additional genes that have been implicated in regulation (tcdR and tcdC) and secretion (tcdE). To date, the PaLoc has always been found in the same location and is replaced in non-toxigenic strains by a highly conserved 75/115 bp non-coding region. Here, we show new types of C. difficile pathogenicity loci through the genome analysis of three atypical clinical strains and describe for the first time a variant strain producing only toxin A (A(+)B(-)). Importantly, we found that the PaLoc integration sites of these three strains are located in the genome far from the usual single known PaLoc integration site. These findings allowed us to propose a new model of PaLoc evolution in which two "Mono-Toxin PaLoc" sites are merged to generate a single "Bi-Toxin PaLoc". PMID:26446480

  3. Clostridium difficile Infections amongst Patients with Haematological Malignancies: A Data Linkage Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimings, Claudia; Joske, David J. L.; Riley, Thomas V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Identify risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and assess CDI outcomes among Australian patients with a haematological malignancy. Methods A retrospective cohort study involving all patients admitted to hospitals in Western Australia with a haematological malignancy from July 2011 to June 2012. Hospital admission data were linked with all hospital investigated CDI case data. Potential risk factors were assessed by logistic regression. The risk of death within 60 and 90 days of CDI was assessed by Cox Proportional Hazards regression. Results There were 2085 patients of whom 65 had at least one CDI. Twenty percent of CDI cases were either community-acquired, indeterminate source or had only single-day admissions in the 28 days prior to CDI. Using logistic regression, having acute lymphocytic leukaemia, neutropenia and having had bacterial pneumonia or another bacterial infection were associated with CDI. CDI was associated with an increased risk of death within 60 and 90 days post CDI, but only two deaths had CDI recorded as an antecedent factor. Ribotyping information was available for 33 of the 65 CDIs. There were 19 different ribotypes identified. Conclusions Neutropenia was strongly associated with CDI. While having CDI is a risk factor for death, in many cases it may not be a direct contributor to death but may reflect patients having higher morbidity. A wide variety of C. difficile ribotypes were found and community-acquired infection may be under-estimated in these patients. PMID:27314498

  4. Comparative transcriptional analysis of clinically relevant heat stress response in Clostridium difficile strain 630.

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    Nigel G Ternan

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is considered to be one of the most important causes of health care-associated infections worldwide. In order to understand more fully the adaptive response of the organism to stressful conditions, we examined transcriptional changes resulting from a clinically relevant heat stress (41 °C versus 37 °C in C. difficile strain 630 and identified 341 differentially expressed genes encompassing multiple cellular functional categories. While the transcriptome was relatively resilient to the applied heat stress, we noted upregulation of classical heat shock genes including the groEL and dnaK operons in addition to other stress-responsive genes. Interestingly, the flagellin gene (fliC was downregulated, yet genes encoding the cell-wall associated flagellar components were upregulated suggesting that while motility may be reduced, adherence--to mucus or epithelial cells--could be enhanced during infection. We also observed that a number of phage associated genes were downregulated, as were genes associated with the conjugative transposon Tn5397 including a group II intron, thus highlighting a potential decrease in retromobility during heat stress. These data suggest that maintenance of lysogeny and genome wide stabilisation of mobile elements could be a global response to heat stress in this pathogen.

  5. Microbiota-Regulated IL-25 Increases Eosinophil Number to Provide Protection during Clostridium difficile Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonomo, Erica L; Cowardin, Carrie A; Wilson, Madeline G; Saleh, Mahmoud M; Pramoonjago, Patcharin; Petri, William A

    2016-07-12

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of hospital-acquired infection in the United States. Host susceptibility and the severity of infection are influenced by disruption of the microbiota and the immune response. However, how the microbiota regulate immune responses to mediate CDI outcome remains unclear. Here, we have investigated the role of the microbiota-linked cytokine IL-25 during infection. Intestinal IL-25 was suppressed during CDI in humans and mice. Restoration of IL-25 reduced CDI-associated mortality and tissue pathology even though equivalent levels of C. difficile bacteria and toxin remained in the gut. IL-25 protection was mediated by gut eosinophils, as demonstrated by an increase in intestinal eosinophils and a loss of IL-25 protection upon eosinophil depletion. These findings support a mechanism whereby the induction of IL-25-mediated eosinophilia can reduce host mortality during active CDI. This work may provide targets for future development of microbial or immune-based therapies. PMID:27346351

  6. Multivalent display of minimal Clostridium difficile glycan epitopes mimics antigenic properties of larger glycans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broecker, Felix; Hanske, Jonas; Martin, Christopher E.; Baek, Ju Yuel; Wahlbrink, Annette; Wojcik, Felix; Hartmann, Laura; Rademacher, Christoph; Anish, Chakkumkal; Seeberger, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic cell-surface glycans are promising vaccine candidates against Clostridium difficile. The complexity of large, highly antigenic and immunogenic glycans is a synthetic challenge. Less complex antigens providing similar immune responses are desirable for vaccine development. Based on molecular-level glycan–antibody interaction analyses, we here demonstrate that the C. difficile surface polysaccharide-I (PS-I) can be resembled by multivalent display of minimal disaccharide epitopes on a synthetic scaffold that does not participate in binding. We show that antibody avidity as a measure of antigenicity increases by about five orders of magnitude when disaccharides are compared with constructs containing five disaccharides. The synthetic, pentavalent vaccine candidate containing a peptide T-cell epitope elicits weak but highly specific antibody responses to larger PS-I glycans in mice. This study highlights the potential of multivalently displaying small oligosaccharides to achieve antigenicity characteristic of larger glycans. The approach may result in more cost-efficient carbohydrate vaccines with reduced synthetic effort. PMID:27091615

  7. [Fecal microbiota transplantation in recurrent Clostridium difficile infections. Framework and pharmaceutical preparation aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, R; Kapel, N; Megerlin, F; Chaumeil, J-C; Barbut, F; Bourlioux, P; Chast, F

    2015-09-01

    The fecal microbiota transplantation consists in introducing a preparation constituted by a dilution of stools of a healthy donor in the digestive tract of a patient recipient, to restore his intestinal physiological balance. This therapeutic approach was the subject of numerous studies showing its efficiency in the treatment of the recurrent infections with Clostridium difficile. The fecal microbiota transplantation has now a high level of clinical evidence, which explains that it appears in various international recommendations. In France, the fecal microbiota transplantation responds to the definition of a medication and can be executed as a pharmaceutical preparation or as an experimental drug for clinical trials under the responsibility of a hospital pharmacy. The objective of this paper is to propose a definition of a framework and to describe the methods of preparation of the fecal microbiota transplantation in the treatment of the recurrent infections with C. difficile and the interactions to consider for hospital pharmacies that do not have technical means to operate this technique. PMID:25825054

  8. Standardised surveillance of Clostridium difficile infection in European acute care hospitals: a pilot study, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dorp, Sofie M; Kinross, Pete; Gastmeier, Petra; Behnke, Michael; Kola, Axel; Delmée, Michel; Pavelkovich, Anastasia; Mentula, Silja; Barbut, Frédéric; Hajdu, Agnes; Ingebretsen, André; Pituch, Hanna; Macovei, Ioana S; Jovanović, Milica; Wiuff, Camilla; Schmid, Daniela; Olsen, Katharina Ep; Wilcox, Mark H; Suetens, Carl; Kuijper, Ed J

    2016-07-21

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains poorly controlled in many European countries, of which several have not yet implemented national CDI surveillance. In 2013, experts from the European CDI Surveillance Network project and from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control developed a protocol with three options of CDI surveillance for acute care hospitals: a 'minimal' option (aggregated hospital data), a 'light' option (including patient data for CDI cases) and an 'enhanced' option (including microbiological data on the first 10 CDI episodes per hospital). A total of 37 hospitals in 14 European countries tested these options for a three-month period (between 13 May and 1 November 2013). All 37 hospitals successfully completed the minimal surveillance option (for 1,152 patients). Clinical data were submitted for 94% (1,078/1,152) of the patients in the light option; information on CDI origin and outcome was complete for 94% (1,016/1,078) and 98% (294/300) of the patients in the light and enhanced options, respectively. The workload of the options was 1.1, 2.0 and 3.0 person-days per 10,000 hospital discharges, respectively. Enhanced surveillance was tested and was successful in 32 of the hospitals, showing that C. difficile PCR ribotype 027 was predominant (30% (79/267)). This study showed that standardised multicountry surveillance, with the option of integrating clinical and molecular data, is a feasible strategy for monitoring CDI in Europe. PMID:27472820

  9. Rapid diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection by multiplex real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbut, F; Monot, M; Rousseau, A; Cavelot, S; Simon, T; Burghoffer, B; Lalande, V; Tankovic, J; Petit, J-C; Dupuy, B; Eckert, C

    2011-10-01

    The gold standards for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) are the cytotoxicity assay and the toxigenic culture. However, both methods are time-consuming and the results are not available before 24-48 h. We developed and evaluated a multiplex in-house real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the simultaneous detection of toxigenic strains of C. difficile and the presumptive identification of the epidemic NAP1/027/BI strain from stools. Amplifications were performed using specific primers for tcdB and tcdC on an ABI Prism 7300 (Applied Biosystems). The detection of amplicons was done using TaqMan probes. The analytical sensitivity of the multiplex real-time PCR for detecting tcdB was estimated to 10 CFU/g of stools. This assay was assessed from 881 consecutive unformed stools from patients suspected of having CDI. The gold standard was the toxigenic culture for the diagnosis of CDI and PCR ribotyping for the identification of the NAP1/027/BI strain. The prevalence of positive toxigenic culture was 9.31%. Compared to the toxigenic culture, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 86.59%, 97.43%, 78.02%, and 98.57%, respectively, for the real-time PCR and 70.73%, 100%, 100%, and 97.08%, respectively, for the cytotoxicity assay. PMID:21487764

  10. Clostridium difficile Infections amongst Patients with Haematological Malignancies: A Data Linkage Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda A Selvey

    Full Text Available Identify risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI and assess CDI outcomes among Australian patients with a haematological malignancy.A retrospective cohort study involving all patients admitted to hospitals in Western Australia with a haematological malignancy from July 2011 to June 2012. Hospital admission data were linked with all hospital investigated CDI case data. Potential risk factors were assessed by logistic regression. The risk of death within 60 and 90 days of CDI was assessed by Cox Proportional Hazards regression.There were 2085 patients of whom 65 had at least one CDI. Twenty percent of CDI cases were either community-acquired, indeterminate source or had only single-day admissions in the 28 days prior to CDI. Using logistic regression, having acute lymphocytic leukaemia, neutropenia and having had bacterial pneumonia or another bacterial infection were associated with CDI. CDI was associated with an increased risk of death within 60 and 90 days post CDI, but only two deaths had CDI recorded as an antecedent factor. Ribotyping information was available for 33 of the 65 CDIs. There were 19 different ribotypes identified.Neutropenia was strongly associated with CDI. While having CDI is a risk factor for death, in many cases it may not be a direct contributor to death but may reflect patients having higher morbidity. A wide variety of C. difficile ribotypes were found and community-acquired infection may be under-estimated in these patients.

  11. Longitudinal study of Clostridium difficile and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli in healthy horses in a community setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, Angelika; Staempfli, H. R.; Arroyo, L. G.;

    2012-01-01

    were to investigate and molecularly characterize isolates of Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Salmonella, collected sequentially over a one year period, and to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profile for E. coli. Fecal samples were collected monthly from 25 adult horses for...... one year. Selective cultures were performed for all above bacteria. C. difficile isolates were characterized via PCR toxin gene profiling and ribotyping. Broth microdilution was performed to assess antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of E. coli. Toxigenic Clostridium difficile was isolated from 15....... Resistance to =1 and = 3 antimicrobials was present in 31/232 (13.4%) and 6/232 (2.6%) respectively. Only two horses shed the same strain of toxigenic C. difficile for more than one month, indicating that shedding is transient. The high number of ribotype 078 is consistent with recent emergence of this...

  12. Evaluation of LIAISON® C. difficile glutamate dehydrogenase and LIAISON® C. difficile toxin A and B in Copan FecalSwabTM samples in a three-step algorithm for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Oggioni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The presumptive laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection is achieved by the means of the detection of a common antigen (glutamate dehydrogenase, GDH in stool, then confirming the positives either by the detection of toxins A and B or by a molecular test for the detection of pathogenicity locus, encoding for the two toxins and for the binary toxin. A fully automated chemiluminescence system for the GDH antigen (LIAISON® C. difficile GDH and for the detection of toxins A and B (LIAISON® C. difficile Toxin A and B (DiaSorin, Gerenzano, Italy allows for the performance of these tests on large numbers of samples in a short time, ensuring the traceability of the data.

  13. Evaluation of 3 automated real-time PCR (Xpert C. difficile assay, BD MAX Cdiff, and IMDx C. difficile for Abbott m2000 assay) for detecting Clostridium difficile toxin gene compared to toxigenic culture in stool specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jaeeun; Lee, Hyeyoung; Park, Kang Gyun; Lee, Gun Dong; Park, Yong Gyu; Park, Yeon-Joon

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the performance of the 3 automated systems (Cepheid Xpert, BD MAX, and IMDx C. difficile for Abbott m2000) detecting Clostridium difficile toxin gene compared to toxigenic culture. Of the 254 stool specimens tested, 87 (48 slight, 35 moderate, and 4 heavy growth) were toxigenic culture positive. The overall sensitivities and specificities were 82.8% and 98.8% for Xpert, 81.6% and 95.8% for BD MAX, and 62.1% and 99.4% for IMDx, respectively. The specificity was significantly higher in IMDx than BD MAX (P= 0.03). All stool samples underwent toxin A/B enzyme immunoassay testing, and of the 254 samples, only 29 samples were positive and 2 of them were toxigenic culture negative. Considering the rapidity and high specificity of the real-time PCR assays compared to the toxigenic culture, they can be used as the first test method for C. difficile infection/colonization. PMID:26081240

  14. Rapid and Simple Method for Detecting the Toxin B Gene of Clostridium difficile in Stool Specimens by Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Haru; Yokoyama, Toshiyuki; Kato, Hideaki; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2005-01-01

    We applied the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay to the detection of the toxin B gene (tcdB) of Clostridium difficile for identification of toxin B (TcdB)-positive C. difficile strains and detection of tcdB in stool specimens. tcdB was detected in all toxin A (TcdA)-positive, TcdB-positive (A+B+) and TcdA-negative, TcdB-positive (A−B+) C. difficile strains but not from TcdA-negative, TcdB-negative strains. Of the 74 stool specimens examined, A+B+ or A−B+ C. difficile was rec...

  15. Lighting Up Clostridium Difficile: Reporting Gene Expression Using Fluorescent Lov Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Anthony M.; Jukes, Caitlin; Candlish, Denise; Irvine, June J.; Spencer, Janice; Fagan, Robert P.; Roe, Andrew J.; Christie, John M.; Fairweather, Neil F.; Douce, Gillian R.

    2016-01-01

    The uses of fluorescent reporters derived from green fluorescent protein have proved invaluable for the visualisation of biological processes in bacteria grown under aerobic conditions. However, their requirement for oxygen has limited their application in obligate anaerobes such as Clostridium difficile. Fluorescent proteins derived from Light, Oxygen or Voltage sensing (LOV) domains have been shown to bridge this limitation, but their utility as translational fusions to monitor protein expression and localisation in a strict anaerobic bacterium has not been reported. Here we demonstrate the utility of phiLOV in three species of Clostridium and its application as a marker of real-time protein translation and dynamics through genetic fusion with the cell division protein, FtsZ. Time lapse microscopy of dividing cells suggests that Z ring assembly arises through the extension of the FtsZ arc starting from one point on the circumference. Furthermore, through incorporation of phiLOV into the flagella subunit, FliC, we show the potential of bacterial LOV-based fusion proteins to be successfully exported to the extracellular environment. PMID:26996606

  16. Clostridium difficile bacteremia and meningitis as a complication of prolonged cephalosporin therapy in a case of staphylococcal pyogenic arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abhrajit Ganguly; Saibal Das; Jayanta Kumar Dey; Somnath Mondal

    2012-01-01

    With increasing incidence of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis, several extra-intestinal manifestations of the organism have been unmasked which include-bacteremia, brain abscess, pericarditis etc. We report a rare and interesting case of C. difficile bacteremia and subsequent meningitis in a 10 year old child. The child was immune competent, which further raises the question about the virulent possibilities of the organism and its implications in the near future. The condition resulted from a prolonged treatment with intravenous (I.V.) cefotaxime for staphylococcal pyogenic arthritis. The child recovered from the septic arthritis but on the 7th day post-admission developed features of bacteremia. The child was later treated with intravenous metronidazole and vancomycin and he was discharged on the 21st day post-admission. No recurrence of symptoms was noted.

  17. Comparison between the two-step and the three-step algorithms for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M O Qutub

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate usefulness of applying either the two-step algorithm (Ag-EIAs and CCNA or the three-step algorithm (all three assays for better confirmation of toxigenic Clostridium difficile. The antigen enzyme immunoassays (Ag-EIAs can accurately identify the glutamate dehydrogenase antigen of toxigenic and nontoxigenic Clostridium difficile. Therefore, it is used in combination with a toxin-detecting assay [cell line culture neutralization assay (CCNA, or the enzyme immunoassays for toxins A and B (TOX-A/BII EIA] to provide specific evidence of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea. Materials and Methods: A total of 151 nonformed stool specimens were tested by Ag-EIAs, TOX-A/BII EIA, and CCNA. All tests were performed according to the manufacturer′s instructions and the results of Ag-EIAs and TOX-A/BII EIA were read using a spectrophotometer at a wavelength of 450 nm. Results: A total of 61 (40.7%, 38 (25.3%, and 52 (34.7% specimens tested positive with Ag-EIA, TOX-A/BII EIA, and CCNA, respectively. Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value for Ag-EIA were 94%, 87%, 96.6%, and 80.3%, respectively. Whereas for TOX-A/BII EIA, the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value were 73.1%, 100%, 87.5%, and 100%, respectively. With the two-step algorithm, all 61 Ag-EIAs-positive cases required 2 days for confirmation. With the three-step algorithm, 37 (60.7% cases were reported immediately, and the remaining 24 (39.3% required further testing by CCNA. By applying the two-step algorithm, the workload and cost could be reduced by 28.2% compared with the three-step algorithm. Conclusions: The two-step algorithm is the most practical for accurately detecting toxigenic Clostridium difficile, but it is time-consuming.

  18. Effective detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile by a two-step algorithm including tests for antigen and cytotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticehurst, John R; Aird, Deborah Z; Dam, Lisa M; Borek, Anita P; Hargrove, John T; Carroll, Karen C

    2006-03-01

    We evaluated a two-step algorithm for detecting toxigenic Clostridium difficile: an enzyme immunoassay for glutamate dehydrogenase antigen (Ag-EIA) and then, for antigen-positive specimens, a concurrent cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Antigen-negative results were > or = 99% predictive of CCNA negativity. Because the Ag-EIA reduced cell culture workload by approximately 75 to 80% and two-step testing was complete in CCNA alone had been performed on all 5,887 specimens. PMID:16517916

  19. Berberine Blocks the Relapse of Clostridium difficile Infection in C57BL/6 Mice after Standard Vancomycin Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, Zhi; Peng, Guoli; Liu, Weihua; Xu, Hufeng; Su, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    Vancomycin is a preferred antibiotic for treating Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and has been associated with a rate of recurrence of CDI of as high as 20% in treated patients. Recent studies have suggested that berberine, an alternative medical therapy for gastroenteritis and diarrhea, exhibits several beneficial effects, including induction of anti-inflammatory responses and restoration of the intestinal barrier function. This study investigated the therapeutic effects of berberine o...

  20. Method for the typing of Clostridium difficile based on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of [35S]methionine-labeled proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Tabaqchali, S.; O'Farrell, S; Holland, D.; Silman, R

    1986-01-01

    A typing method for Clostridium difficile based on the incorporation of [35S]methionine into cellular proteins, their separation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and their visualization by autoradiography is described. On analysis of the radiolabeled-protein profiles, nine distinct groups were observed (A to E and W to Z). The method, which is simple, reproducible, and readily expandable, has been applied in epidemiological studies to demonstrate cross-infection a...

  1. High Molecular Weight Typing with MALDI-TOF MS - A Novel Method for Rapid Typing of Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Rizzardi

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile strains were typed by a newly developed MALDI-TOF method, high molecular weight typing, and compared to PCR ribotyping. Among 500 isolates representing 59 PCR ribotypes a total of 35 high molecular weight types could be resolved. Although less discriminatory than PCR ribotyping, the method is extremely fast and simple, and supports for cost-effective screening of isolates during outbreak situations.

  2. Diagnostic Algorithm Using a Sensitive Broth Culture Method for Detection of Clostridium difficile Toxin from Stool Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Bayardelle

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The two-step glutamate dehydrogenase antigencytotoxicity neutralization assay algorithm has been found to be reliable for the diagnosis of toxigenic Clostridium difficile. However, the high sensitivity of the screening method is compromised by the relative low sensitivity of the second step, the direct cytotoxin neutralization assay (DCNA using a fecal filtrate. The objective of the present study was to compare the DCNA with an indirect cytotoxin neutralization assay (ICNA.

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of loop-mediated isothermal amplification in detection of Clostridium difficile in stool samples: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Chen; Wen-En, Liu; Yang-Ming, Li; Shan, Luo; Yi-Ming, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. More recently, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) has become readily available for the diagnosis of CDI, and many studies have investigated the usefulness of LAMP for rapid and accurate diagnosis of CDI. However, the overall diagnostic accuracy of LAMP for CDI remains unclear. In this meta-analysis, our aim was to establish the overall diagnostic accuracy of LAMP in detection of Clostr...

  4. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in the Clinical Center of Vojvodina, Serbia, in the period 2008 to 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan-Mikić Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD has been recognized as the leading cause of diarrhea worldwide. In the last five years, it has become the leading cause of diarrhea in the Clinical Center of Vojvodina (CCV as well. The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiology and total cost of treatment for all patients with Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea hospitalized at the Infectious Disease Clinic of the CCV; to analyze the costs of treatment with regard to therapeutic approach; to compare the costs of treatment in each year of the investigated period related to the number of patients, and to analyze the outcome of treatment. The study was retrospective, and the data were collected from the medical records of 472 patients with Clostridium difficile diarrhea treated from 2008 to 2012 and analyzed. Of the total 472 patients with CDAD, 54.23% were female and the average age was 65.84. A statistically significant majority of them had been previously treated in other hospitals and a minority in ambulatory settings (395 inpatients vs. 77 outpatients, p=0.000, p<0.05. Of the 395 previously hospitalized patients, most were from the Clinic of Urology of the CCV (58, 14.68%. When comparing therapeutic options, oral vancomycin was significantly more frequently used than other protocols. The average mortality rate during the study period was 6.51%. In this period, total hospital costs related to Clostridium difficile diarrhea in the Infectious Disease Clinic were $636,679.92. Implementation of infection-control measures and a restricted use of antibiotics would result in a great reduction in material costs.

  5. False-Positive Clostridium difficile in Negative-Control Reactions Peak and Then Decrease with Repetitive Refrigeration of Immunoassay

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Palacios, Alexander; Stämpfli, Henry R.; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant false-positive reactions in negative-controls during ELISA testing for Clostridium difficile indicated the potential for false-diagnoses. Experiments with 96-well products showed a maximum peak of false-positive immunoassay reactions with the provided negative-control reagents after 5 refrigeration-to-room temperature cycles (P < 0.001), decreasing thereafter with additional refrigeration cycles. Because repetitive refrigeration causes a peak of false-positives, the use of single neg...

  6. Severity and frequency of community-onset Clostridium difficile infection on an Australian tertiary referral hospital campus

    OpenAIRE

    Penny Clohessy; Juan Merif; Jeffrey John Post

    2014-01-01

    Background: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is increasingly being found in populations without traditional risk factors. We compared the relative frequency, risk factors, severity, and outcomes of community-onset CDI with hospital-acquired infection. Methods: This was a retrospective, observational study of CDI at a tertiary hospital campus in Sydney, Australia. Patients aged 15 years and older with a first episode of CDI from January 1 to December 31, 2011 were included. CDI was def...

  7. Clostridium difficile infection after adult autologous stem cell transplantation: A multicenter study of epidemiology and risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Carolyn D.; Dufresne, Simon F.; Hanna, David B.; Labbé, Annie-Claude; Treadway, Suzanne B.; Neofytos, Dionissios; Bélanger, Sylvie; Huff, Carol Ann; Laverdière, Michel; Marr, Kieren A.

    2013-01-01

    We sought to describe the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) among adult recipients of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto HSCT) within the first year after HSCT in centers with variable epidemiology of hyper-toxigenic strains. A multicenter, retrospective nested case-control study was conducted among 873 auto HSCT recipients at Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH, Baltimore, MD) and Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont (HMR, Montreal, Canada) between 1/2003-12/2008. D...

  8. Reduction of Clostridium Difficile and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus contamination of environmental surfaces after an intervention to improve cleaning methods

    OpenAIRE

    Yadavalli Gopala K; Sethi Ajay K; Rao Agam; Eckstein Elizabeth C; Adams Daniel A; Eckstein Brittany C; Donskey Curtis J

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Contaminated environmental surfaces may play an important role in transmission of some healthcare-associated pathogens. In this study, we assessed the adequacy of cleaning practices in rooms of patients with Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) colonization or infection and examined whether an intervention would result in improved decontamination of surfaces. Methods During a 6-week period, we cultured commonly touche...

  9. Human hypervirulent Clostridium difficile strains exhibit increased sporulation as well as robust toxin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrigan, Michelle; Venugopal, Anilrudh; Mallozzi, Michael; Roxas, Bryan; Viswanathan, V K; Johnson, Stuart; Gerding, Dale N; Vedantam, Gayatri

    2010-10-01

    Toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains produce two toxins (TcdA and TcdB) during the stationary phase of growth and are the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. C. difficile isolates of the molecular type NAP1/027/BI have been associated with severe disease and hospital outbreaks worldwide. It has been suggested that these "hypervirulent" strains produce larger amounts of toxin and that a mutation in a putative negative regulator (TcdC) allows toxin production at all growth phases. To rigorously explore this possibility, we conducted a quantitative examination of the toxin production of multiple hypervirulent and nonhypervirulent C. difficile strains. Toxin gene (tcdA and tcdB) and toxin gene regulator (tcdR and tcdC) expression was also monitored. To obtain additional correlates for the hypervirulence phenotype, sporulation kinetics and efficiency were measured. In the exponential phase, low basal levels of tcdA, tcdB, and tcdR expression were evident in both hypervirulent and nonhypervirulent strains, but contrary to previous assumptions, toxin levels were below the detectable thresholds. While hypervirulent strains displayed robust toxin production during the stationary phase of growth, the amounts were not significantly different from those of the nonhypervirulent strains tested; further, total toxin amounts were directly proportional to tcdA, tcdB, and tcdR gene expression. Interestingly, tcdC expression did not diminish in stationary phase, suggesting that TcdC may have a modulatory rather than a strictly repressive role. Comparative genomic analyses of the closely related nonhypervirulent strains VPI 10463 (the highest toxin producer) and 630 (the lowest toxin producer) revealed polymorphisms in the tcdR ribosome binding site and the tcdR-tcdB intergenic region, suggesting that a mechanistic basis for increased toxin production in VPI 10463 could be increased TcdR translation and read-through transcription of the tcdA and tcdB genes

  10. Fecal Microbiota Therapy for Clostridium difficile Infection: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Fecal microbiota therapy is increasingly being used to treat patients with Clostridium difficile infection. This health technology assessment primarily evaluated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of fecal microbiota therapy compared with the usual treatment (antibiotic therapy). Methods We performed a literature search using Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, CRD Health Technology Assessment Database, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and NHS Economic Evaluation Database. For the economic review, we applied economic filters to these search results. We also searched the websites of agencies for other health technology assessments. We conducted a meta-analysis to analyze effectiveness. The quality of the body of evidence for each outcome was examined according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria. Using a step-wise, structural methodology, we determined the overall quality to be high, moderate, low, or very low. We used a survey to examine physicians’ perception of patients’ lived experience, and a modified grounded theory method to analyze information from the survey. Results For the review of clinical effectiveness, 16 of 1,173 citations met the inclusion criteria. A meta-analysis of two randomized controlled trials found that fecal microbiota therapy significantly improved diarrhea associated with recurrent C. difficile infection versus treatment with vancomycin (relative risk 3.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.85–5.68) (GRADE: moderate). While fecal microbiota therapy is not associated with a significant decrease in mortality compared with antibiotic therapy (relative risk 0.69, 95% CI 0.14–3.39) (GRADE: low), it is associated with a significant increase in adverse events (e.g., short-term diarrhea, relative risk 30.76, 95% CI 4.46–212.44; abdominal cramping, relative risk 14

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Clostridium difficile using EUCAST epidemiological cut-off values and disk diffusion correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikstrup, L T; Danielsen, T K L; Hall, V; Olsen, K E P; Kristensen, B; Kahlmeter, G; Fuursted, K; Justesen, U S

    2012-08-01

    With the emergence of reduced susceptibility of Clostridium difficile to metronidazole and vancomycin the value of antimicrobial susceptibility testing has increased. The aim of our study was to evaluate disk diffusion for susceptibility testing of C. difficile by comparing disk diffusion results with MICs from gradient tests and to propose zone diameter breakpoint correlates for the EUCAST epidemiological cut-off values (ECOFFs) recently published. We tested 211 clinical isolates of C. difficile, from patients with diarrhoea hospitalized at Aarhus and Odense University Hospitals, Denmark. Furthermore, ten clinical isolates of C. difficile from the Anaerobe Reference Laboratory, University Hospital of Wales, with known reduced susceptibility to either metronidazole or vancomycin, were included. Isolates were tested with Etest gradient strips and disk diffusion towards metronidazole, vancomycin and moxifloxacin on Brucella Blood Agar supplemented with hemin and vitamin K. We found an excellent agreement between inhibition zone diameter and MICs. For each MIC value, the inhibition zones varied from 0 to 8 mm, with 93% of values within 6 mm for metronidazole, 95% of values within 4 mm for vancomycin, and 98% of values within 4 mm for moxifloxacin. With proposed zone diameter breakpoints for metronidazole, vancomycin and moxifloxacin of WT ≥ 23 mm, WT ≥ 19 and WT ≥ 20 mm, respectively, we found no very major errors and only major errors below 2%. In conclusion, we suggest that disk diffusion is an option for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of C. difficile. PMID:22672504

  12. Five spontaneous deaths associated with Clostridium difficile in a colony of cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, R M; Chalifoux, L V; Snook, S S; Ausman, L M; Johnson, L D

    1997-10-01

    Clostridium difficile toxin was detected in the feces of five cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus) that died spontaneously over a period of 10 weeks. Deaths occurred subsequent to antibiotic therapy for infectious diarrhea associated with Campylobacter spp. Relevant clinical signs of disease prior to death included weight loss, watery diarrhea, hematochezia, weakness, and sudden collapse. On histologic examination of the colon at necropsy, pseudomembranous colitis was evident in two cases, a lesion consistent with C. difficile lesions in humans. This finding prompted submission of feces for C. difficile toxin analysis from these five cases. Four of the tamarins were from a single room, and the fifth was housed nearby. The proximity of the cases raises the possibility of environmental contamination by resistant C. difficile spores or fecal spread of the organism as reported in hospitals, day-care centers, and nurseries. The relative importance of C. difficile and its potential role as an unrecognized cause of enteric disease secondary to antibiotic therapy in nonhuman primates is discussed. PMID:9355088

  13. Development of microbeads of chicken yolk antibodies against Clostridium difficile toxin A for colonic-specific delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shumin; Xing, Pingping; Guo, Guiping; Liu, Hong; Lin, Donghai; Dong, Chuangchuang; Li, Min; Feng, Dongxiao

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection has increased in Western world in the past 10 years, similar infection rates are also reported in developing countries such as China. Current antibiotics treatments have recurrence rates between 15% and 30%. IgY antibodies against toxin A of C. difficile could protect animal models from the challenge of lethal dose of C. difficile spores. However, IgY is sensitive to the low pH environment of the stomach and proteinases in the intestine. The objective of this study was to prepare colonic-specific delivery system of toxin A antigen-specific IgY to block the recognition of toxin A to the colon mucosa cells. Egg-laying hens were immunized with purified C. difficile toxin A C-terminal domain for 3 times, then egg IgY against the recombinant ToxA-C protein was purified from immunized egg yolk and frozen dried. IgY-loaded microbeads were prepared using mini fluid bed system; the loading efficiency was 21%. The pH and temperature stabilities of the microbeads were assayed. The IgY-loaded microbeads coated with 35% Eudragit S100 had colonic-specific IgY release specificity both in vitro and in vivo, the colonic-specific release of biological active IgY was 87.5% in the rat. Our study provides a new option for the biological treatment C. difficile infection. PMID:25799315

  14. The Bristol Stool Scale and Its Relationship to Clostridium difficile Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Caroff, Daniel A.; Edelstein, Paul H.; Hamilton, Keith; Pegues, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The Bristol stool form scale classifies the relative density of stool samples. In a prospective cohort study, we investigated the associations between stool density, C. difficile assay positivity, hospital-onset C. difficile infection, complications, and severity of C. difficile. We describe associations between the Bristol score, assay positivity, and clinical C. difficile infection.

  15. Research advance in Clostridium difficile vaccine%艰难梭菌疫苗的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈伟; 刘文恩

    2014-01-01

    The risk factors of Clostridium difficile infections increased in recent years , such as the underlying disease, hospitalization duration, age, the use of antibiotics, the use of proton pump inhibitors and so on.The rate of Clostridium difficile infection and recurrence are still high despite the appear of new antibiotics such as rifaximin, nitazoxanide, tigecycline, ramoplanin, fidaxomicin, and non-antimicrobial such as drugs toxin neutralizer chamber , biological therapeutic agents , fecal transplantation , systemic antibody method , intravenous immunoglobulin and so on.The vaccine is the most ideal way of prevention and treatment of Clostridium difficile infection.The research in Clostridium difficile vaccine lasted for nearly 20 years.Except the monoclonal antibody vaccine and toxoid vaccine against toxin A and toxin B have achieved better results in the human , some recombinant vaccines against the toxin receptor and the key pathogenic factor of Clostridium difficile also achieved good effect in animal.%近年来艰难梭菌感染性疾病发病危险因素在增加,如潜在的基础疾病、住院时间、年龄、抗生素的使用、质子泵抑制剂的使用等,尽管出现了利福昔明、硝唑尼特、替加环素、雷莫拉宁、非达霉素等新型抗生素以及腔内毒素中和剂、生物治疗剂、粪便移植、全身抗体方法、静脉注射免疫球蛋白等非抗菌药物,艰难梭菌感染率及复发率仍居高不下,疫苗是防治艰难梭菌感染的最理想的途径和方法。艰难梭菌疫苗的研究已近20年,目前除了针对A毒素与B毒素的单克隆抗体疫苗、类毒素疫苗在人体中取得较好的效果外,一些针对毒素受体及艰难梭菌关键致病因子的基因重组疫苗在动物实验中也取得了良好的防治效果。(中华检验医学杂志,2014,37:430-433)

  16. 艰难梭菌疫苗的研究进展%Research advance in Clostridium difficile vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈伟; 刘文恩

    2014-01-01

    The risk factors of Clostridium difficile infections increased in recent years , such as the underlying disease, hospitalization duration, age, the use of antibiotics, the use of proton pump inhibitors and so on.The rate of Clostridium difficile infection and recurrence are still high despite the appear of new antibiotics such as rifaximin, nitazoxanide, tigecycline, ramoplanin, fidaxomicin, and non-antimicrobial such as drugs toxin neutralizer chamber , biological therapeutic agents , fecal transplantation , systemic antibody method , intravenous immunoglobulin and so on.The vaccine is the most ideal way of prevention and treatment of Clostridium difficile infection.The research in Clostridium difficile vaccine lasted for nearly 20 years.Except the monoclonal antibody vaccine and toxoid vaccine against toxin A and toxin B have achieved better results in the human , some recombinant vaccines against the toxin receptor and the key pathogenic factor of Clostridium difficile also achieved good effect in animal.%近年来艰难梭菌感染性疾病发病危险因素在增加,如潜在的基础疾病、住院时间、年龄、抗生素的使用、质子泵抑制剂的使用等,尽管出现了利福昔明、硝唑尼特、替加环素、雷莫拉宁、非达霉素等新型抗生素以及腔内毒素中和剂、生物治疗剂、粪便移植、全身抗体方法、静脉注射免疫球蛋白等非抗菌药物,艰难梭菌感染率及复发率仍居高不下,疫苗是防治艰难梭菌感染的最理想的途径和方法。艰难梭菌疫苗的研究已近20年,目前除了针对A毒素与B毒素的单克隆抗体疫苗、类毒素疫苗在人体中取得较好的效果外,一些针对毒素受体及艰难梭菌关键致病因子的基因重组疫苗在动物实验中也取得了良好的防治效果。(中华检验医学杂志,2014,37:430-433)

  17. Clostridium difficile-mediated effects on human intestinal epithelia: Modelling host-pathogen interactions in a vertical diffusion chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Nazila V; Kuehne, Sarah A; Minton, Nigel P; Allan, Elaine; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is one of the leading causes of healthcare associated diarrhoea in the developed world. Although the contribution of C. difficile toxins to disease pathogenesis is now well understood, many facets of host-pathogen interactions between the human intestinal epithelia and the C. difficile bacterium that may contribute to asymptomatic carriage and/or clinical disease remain less clear. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that C. difficile strains mediate intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) antimicrobial immunity via toxin dependent and independent means and that the 'anaerobic' environment has a significant impact on bacterial-IEC interactions. Crosstalk between three C. difficile PCR ribotypes (RT) [RT027 (strain R20291), RT012 (strain 630) and RT017 (strains M68 and CF5)] and IEC cell-lines were investigated. All RTs showed significant engagement with human Toll-like receptors (TLR)-5, TLR2-CD14 and TLR2/6 as measured by IL-8 release from TLR-transfected HEK cells. Co-culture studies indicated minimal impact of R20291 and 630 TcdA and TcdB on bacterial adherence to Caco-2 cells. An apical anaerobic environment had a major effect on C. difficile-T84 crosstalk as significantly greater cytokine immunity and trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) dysfunction was recorded when co-cultures were performed in an Ussing chamber system compared to standard 5% CO2 conditions. Overall, this study suggests that anaerobic C. difficile engagement with human IECs is a complex interplay that involves bacterial and toxin-mediated cellular events. PMID:26708704

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibilities and molecular epidemiology of clinical isolates of Clostridium difficile in taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Lee, Tai-Fen; Lee, Nan-Yao; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Lin, Shyr-Yi; Ko, Wen-Chien; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2011-04-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence factors of Clostridium difficile clinical isolates in Taiwan have not previously been reported. One hundred and thirteen isolates were collected from two major teaching hospitals in Taiwan from 2001 to 2009. Molecular typing was performed by an automated repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) method (DiversiLab; Bacterial Barcodes, Inc., Athens, GA) and PCR ribotyping. Detection of tcdA, tcdB, cdtA, and cdtB genes was performed using a multiplex PCR assay, and gyrA and gyrB genes of moxifloxacin-nonsusceptible isolates were sequenced. All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and metronidazole. Ninety-five (84%) isolates were susceptible to moxifloxacin, and the MIC(90) for nemonoxacin was 4 μg/ml. Tigecycline showed favorable antibacterial activity (MIC(90) of 0.06 μg/ml). Thirteen rep-PCR types were identified as a predominant rep-PCR type (type A; non-North American pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type 1 [NAP1], -NAP7, or -NAP8) accounting for 52.2% (59 isolates). Nine of 18 moxifloxacin-nonsusceptible isolates belonged to the rep-PCR type A. The rep-PCR type A and C isolates were distinct from NAP1 (ribotype 027) and NAP8 (ribotype 078) as determined by PCR ribotyping. Seventy-four (65%) isolates harbored tcdA and tcdB, and 15 (13%) harbored cdtAB encoding binary toxin. Eleven isolates had a gene deletion in tcdC, including a 39-bp deletion (9 isolates) and an 18-bp deletion (2). In conclusion, dissemination of a predominant C. difficile clone in southern and northern Taiwan was noted. However, no NAP1 (ribotype 027) isolate could be discovered in this study. PMID:21263053

  19. Fulminant colitis from Clostridium difficile infection, the epidemic strain ribotype 027, in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Itaru; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Tsukimori, Ayaka; Sato, Akihiro; Fukushima, Shinji; Mizuno, Yasutaka; Matsumoto, Tetsuya

    2014-06-01

    In December 2012, a 32-year-old woman with no previous medical history and no previous antibiotic treatment had a fever and diarrhea 2 days after a cesarean section in which cefazolin was used as a prophylactic antimicrobial agent. She was transferred to our hospital 5 days after the cesarean for severe colitis. A rapid test of stool for Clostridium difficile toxin A and B was positive. Although oral vancomycin (0.5-2.0 g/day) and intravenous immunoglobulin (5 g/day) were administered after her transfer, 7 days after admission emergency exploratory surgery was performed because of poor response to therapy. Bowel perforation was noted and a temporary colostomy was created without colectomy. Vancomycin (2.0 g/day) was administered via the colostomy, in addition to a vancomycin enema (2.0 g/day), oral metronidazole (1500 mg/day), and oral vancomycin (2.0 g/day). Three days after the operation, linezolid (1200 mg/day IV) was added. She was treated with antibiotics against C. difficile for a total of 18 days after the operation. The same strain was not isolated from other patients in the same ward. Microbiological analysis of the isolate revealed housekeeping gene (tpi), toxin A gene (tcdA), toxin B gene (tcdB), and binary toxin gene (cdtA and cdtB). DNA sequencing of tcdC revealed a base 117 deletion and contained an 18-bp tcdC deletion. PCR ribotyping showed ribotype 027 patterns. The MIC of moxifloxacin was >32 μg/ml, indicating resistance to fluoroquinolones. This isolate was considered as the epidemic strain. Our case of fulminant colitis is apparently the first case involving the epidemic strain ribotype 027 in Japan. PMID:24726377

  20. CdtR Regulates TcdA and TcdB Production in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Shelley A; Hutton, Melanie L; Rood, Julian I; Cheung, Jackie K; Lyras, Dena

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile is a global health burden and the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea worldwide, causing severe gastrointestinal disease and death. Three well characterised toxins are encoded by this bacterium in two genetic loci, specifically, TcdB (toxin B) and TcdA (toxin A) in the Pathogenicity Locus (PaLoc) and binary toxin (CDT) in the genomically distinct CDT locus (CdtLoc). Toxin production is controlled by regulators specific to each locus. The orphan response regulator, CdtR, encoded within the CdtLoc, up-regulates CDT production. Until now there has been no suggestion that CdtR influences TcdA and TcdB production since it is not carried by all PaLoc-containing strains and CdtLoc is not linked genetically to PaLoc. Here we show that, in addition to CDT, CdtR regulates TcdA and TcdB production but that this effect is strain dependent. Of clinical relevance, CdtR increased the production of TcdA, TcdB and CDT in two epidemic ribotype 027 human strains, modulating their virulence in a mouse infection model. Strains traditionally from animal lineages, notably ribotype 078 strains, are increasingly being isolated from humans and their genetic and phenotypic analysis is critical for future studies on this important pathogen. Here we show that CdtR-mediated toxin regulation did not occur in other strain backgrounds, including a ribotype 078 animal strain. The finding that toxin gene regulation is strain dependent highlights the regulatory diversity between C. difficile isolates and the importance of studying virulence regulation in diverse lineages and clinically relevant strains. Our work provides the first evidence that TcdA, TcdB and CDT production is linked by a common regulatory mechanism and that CdtR may act as a global regulator of virulence in epidemic 027 strains. PMID:27414650