WorldWideScience

Sample records for chronic care program

  1. Program Implementation in the Prison System: An Organizational Study of the Chronic Care Model Program

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Greg

    2013-01-01

    This study provides evidence of a successful implementation of a not-for-profit operational model within a public setting. The federal government placed a receiver in charge of improving health care within the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. To achieve the receivership's goals, a chronic care model from the not-for-profit sector was selected and implemented to improve the delivery of health care to inmates. The data suggest that operational programs developed outsi...

  2. Identifying potentially cost effective chronic care programs for people with COPD

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    L M G Steuten

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available L M G Steuten1, K M M Lemmens2, A P Nieboer2, H JM Vrijhoef31Maastricht University Medical Centre, School for Care and Public Health Research, Department of Health, Organisation, Policy and Economics, Maastricht, The Netherlands; 2Erasmus University Medical Centre, Institute of Health Policy and Management, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 3Maastricht University Medical Centre, School for Care and Public Health Research, Department of Integrated Care, Maastricht, The NetherlandsObjective: To review published evidence regarding the cost effectiveness of multi-component COPD programs and to illustrate how potentially cost effective programs can be identified.Methods: Systematic search of Medline and Cochrane databases for evaluations of multi-component disease management or chronic care programs for adults with COPD, describing process, intermediate, and end results of care. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers and descriptively summarized.Results: Twenty articles describing 17 unique COPD programs were included. There is little evidence for significant improvements in process and intermediate outcomes, except for increased provision of patient self-management education and improved disease-specific knowledge. Overall, the COPD programs generate end results equivalent to usual care, but programs containing ≥3 components show lower relative risks for hospitalization. There is limited scope for programs to break-even or save money.Conclusion: Identifying cost effective multi-component COPD programs remains a challenge due to scarce methodologically sound studies that demonstrate significant improvements on process, intermediate and end results of care. Estimations of potential cost effectiveness of specific programs illustrated in this paper can, in the absence of ‘perfect data’, support timely decision-making regarding these programs. Nevertheless, well-designed health economic studies are needed to decrease the current decision

  3. Exploring Robust Methods for Evaluating Treatment and Comparison Groups in Chronic Care Management Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Wells, Aaron R.; Hamar, Brent; Bradley, Chastity; Gandy, William M.; Harrison, Patricia L.; Sidney, James A.; Coberley, Carter R.; Rula, Elizabeth Y.; Pope, James E

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of chronic care management (CCM) programs is necessary to determine the behavioral, clinical, and financial value of the programs. Financial outcomes of members who are exposed to interventions (treatment group) typically are compared to those not exposed (comparison group) in a quasi-experimental study design. However, because member assignment is not randomized, outcomes reported from these designs may be biased or inefficient if study groups are not comparable or balanced prior ...

  4. The Impact of a Proactive Chronic Care Management Program on Hospital Admission Rates in a German Health Insurance Society

    OpenAIRE

    Hamar, Brent; Wells, Aaron; Gandy, William; Haaf, Andreas; Coberley, Carter; Pope, James E.; Rula, Elizabeth Y.

    2010-01-01

    Hospital admissions are the source of significant health care expenses, although a large proportion of these admissions can be avoided through proper management of chronic disease. In the present study, we evaluate the impact of a proactive chronic care management program for members of a German insurance society who suffer from chronic disease. Specifically, we tested the impact of nurse-delivered care calls on hospital admission rates. Study participants were insured individuals with corona...

  5. Program evaluation of Sea Mar’s Chronic Care Program for Latino and Caucasian patients with type 2 diabetes: providers and staff perspectives

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    Bond GE

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gail E Bond,1 Laurie Rechholtz,1 Christina Bosa,1 Celine Impert,1,2 Sara Barker21College of Nursing, Seattle University, Seattle WA, USA; 2Sea Mar Community Health Center, Seattle, WA, USAProblem statement: Unprecedented consumption of health care resources in the USA coupled with increasing rates of chronic disease has fueled pursuit of improved models of health care delivery. The Chronic Care Model provides an organizational framework for chronic care management and practice improvement. Sea Mar, a community health care organization in Washington state, implemented the Chronic Care Model, but has not evaluated the outcomes related to provider and staff satisfaction. The specific aim of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Chronic Care Model with the addition of the Chronic Care Coordinator role.Approach: A descriptive method was used, which incorporated quantitative, and qualitative data from providers and clinic staff collected through a Web-based survey consisting of Likert-type questions sent via an electronic link.Results: This evaluation identified the strengths of and barriers to the chronic care model with a focus on provider and staff satisfaction regarding patient care since the addition of the Chronic Care Coordinator role. We found a high appreciation (94% and acceptance of the role; 80% agreed that the Chronic Care Coordinator was well-integrated into clinic operations. Major strengths of the program included more patient education, better follow-up, and improved team communications. Barriers to success included limited provider access, confusion regarding role expectations of the Chronic Care Coordinator, inconsistent communications, and Chronic Care Coordinator turnover.Conclusions/recommendations: Our findings help to validate the importance of community health organizations such as Sea Mar, the utility of the chronic care model, and the potential value for specific roles such as the Chronic Care Coordinator to

  6. Effectiveness of the introduction of a Chronic Care Model-based program for type 2 diabetes in Belgium

    OpenAIRE

    De Maeseneer Jan; Vermeire Etienne; Verbeke Geert; Feyen Luc; Nobels Frank; Bastiaens Hilde; Sunaert Patricia; Willems Sara; De Sutter An

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background During a four-year action research project (2003-2007), a program targeting all type 2 diabetes patients was implemented in a well-defined geographical region in Belgium. The implementation of the program resulted in an increase of the overall Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (ACIC) score from 1.45 in 2003 to 5.5 in 2007. The aim of the follow-up study in 2008 was to assess the effect of the implementation of Chronic Care Model (CCM) elements on the quality of diabetes c...

  7. A successful chronic care program in Al Ain-United Arab Emirates

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    Al Husaini Alhusini I

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cost effective provision of quality care for chronic diseases is a major challenge for health care systems. We describe a project to improve the care of patients with the highly prevalent disorders of diabetes and hypertension, conducted in one of the major cities of the United Arab Emirates. Settings and Methods The project, using the principles of quality assurance cycles, was conducted in 4 stages. The assessment stage consisted of a community survey and an audit of the health care system, with particular emphasis on chronic disease care. The information gleaned from this stage provided feedback to the staff of participating health centers. In the second stage, deficiencies in health care were identified and interventions were developed for improvements, including topics for continuing professional development. In the third stage, these strategies were piloted in a single health centre for one year and the outcomes evaluated. In the still ongoing fourth stage, the project was rolled out to all the health centers in the area, with continuing evaluation. The intervention consisted of changes to establish a structured care model based on the predicted needs of this group of patients utilizing dedicated chronic disease clinics inside the existing primary health care system. These clinics incorporated decision-making tools, including evidence-based guidelines, patient education and ongoing professional education. Results The intervention was successfully implemented in all the health centers. The health care quality indicators that showed the greatest improvement were the documentation of patient history (e.g. smoking status and physical activity; improvement in recording physical signs (e.g. body mass index (BMI; and an improvement in the requesting of appropriate investigations, such as HbA1c and microalbuminurea. There was also improvement in those parameters reflecting outcomes of care, which included HbA1c, blood

  8. Strengthening Health Systems for Chronic Care: Leveraging HIV Programs to Support Diabetes Services in Ethiopia and Swaziland

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    Miriam Rabkin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The scale-up of HIV services in sub-Saharan Africa has catalyzed the development of highly effective chronic care systems. The strategies, systems, and tools developed to support life-long HIV care and treatment are locally owned contextually appropriate resources, many of which could be adapted to support continuity care for noncommunicable chronic diseases (NCD, such as diabetes mellitus (DM. We conducted two proof-of-concept studies to further the understanding of the status of NCD programs and the feasibility and effectiveness of adapting HIV program-related tools and systems for patients with DM. In Swaziland, a rapid assessment illustrated gaps in the approaches used to support DM services at 15 health facilities, despite the existence of chronic care systems at HIV clinics in the same hospitals, health centers, and clinics. In Ethiopia, a pilot study found similar gaps in DM services at baseline and illustrated the potential to rapidly improve the quality of care and treatment for DM by adapting HIV-specific policies, systems, and tools.

  9. Program evaluation of Sea Mar’s Chronic Care Program for Latino and Caucasian patients with type 2 diabetes: providers and staff perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Bond, Gail E; Rechholtz, Laurie; Bosa, Christina; Impert, Celine; Barker, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement Unprecedented consumption of health care resources in the USA coupled with increasing rates of chronic disease has fueled pursuit of improved models of health care delivery. The Chronic Care Model provides an organizational framework for chronic care management and practice improvement. Sea Mar, a community health care organization in Washington state, implemented the Chronic Care Model, but has not evaluated the outcomes related to provider and staff satisfaction. The speci...

  10. Amount of health care and self-care following a randomized clinical trial comparing flexion-distraction with exercise program for chronic low back pain

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    Keenum Michael

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous clinical trials have assessed the percentage of participants who utilized further health care after a period of conservative care for low back pain, however no chiropractic clinical trial has determined the total amount of care during this time and any differences based on assigned treatment group. The objective of this clinical trial follow-up was to assess if there was a difference in the total number of office visits for low back pain over one year after a four week clinical trial of either a form of physical therapy (Exercise Program or a form of chiropractic care (Flexion Distraction for chronic low back pain. Methods In this randomized clinical trial follow up study, 195 participants were followed for one year after a four-week period of either a form of chiropractic care (FD or a form of physical therapy (EP. Weekly structured telephone interview questions regarded visitation of various health care practitioners and the practice of self-care for low back pain. Results Participants in the physical therapy group demonstrated on average significantly more visits to any health care provider and to a general practitioner during the year after trial care (p Conclusion During a one-year follow-up, participants previously randomized to physical therapy attended significantly more health care visits than those participants who received chiropractic care.

  11. Effectiveness of the introduction of a Chronic Care Model-based program for type 2 diabetes in Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Maeseneer Jan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During a four-year action research project (2003-2007, a program targeting all type 2 diabetes patients was implemented in a well-defined geographical region in Belgium. The implementation of the program resulted in an increase of the overall Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (ACIC score from 1.45 in 2003 to 5.5 in 2007. The aim of the follow-up study in 2008 was to assess the effect of the implementation of Chronic Care Model (CCM elements on the quality of diabetes care in a country where the efforts to adapt primary care to a more chronic care oriented system are still at a starting point. Methods A quasi-experimental study design involving a control region with comparable geographical and socio-economic characteristics and health care facilities was used to evaluate the effect of the intervention in the region. In collaboration with the InterMutualistic Agency (IMA and the laboratories from both regions a research database was set up. Study cohorts in both regions were defined by using administrative data from the Sickness Funds and selected from the research database. A set of nine quality indicators was defined based on current scientific evidence. Data were analysed by an institution experienced in longitudinal data analysis. Results In total 4,174 type 2 diabetes patients were selected from the research database; 2,425 patients (52.9% women with a mean age of 67.5 from the intervention region and 1,749 patients (55.7% women with a mean age of 67.4 from the control region. At the end of the intervention period, improvements were observed in five of the nine defined quality indicators in the intervention region, three of which (HbA1c assessment, statin therapy, cholesterol target improved significantly more than in the control region. Mean HbA1c improved significantly in the intervention region (7.55 to 7.06%, but this evolution did not differ significantly (p = 0.4207 from the one in the control region (7.44 to 6

  12. Program evaluation of Sea Mar’s Chronic Care Program for Latino and Caucasian patients with type 2 diabetes: providers and staff perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Bond GE; Rechholtz L; Bosa C; Impert C; Barker S

    2012-01-01

    Gail E Bond,1 Laurie Rechholtz,1 Christina Bosa,1 Celine Impert,1,2 Sara Barker21College of Nursing, Seattle University, Seattle WA, USA; 2Sea Mar Community Health Center, Seattle, WA, USAProblem statement: Unprecedented consumption of health care resources in the USA coupled with increasing rates of chronic disease has fueled pursuit of improved models of health care delivery. The Chronic Care Model provides an organizational framework for chronic care management and practice improvement. Se...

  13. Implementation of a program for type 2 diabetes based on the Chronic Care Model in a hospital-centered health care system: 'the Belgian experience'

    OpenAIRE

    Van Royen Paul; Vermeire Etienne; Wens Johan; Nobels Frank; Snauwaert Boris; Feyen Luc; Bastiaens Hilde; Sunaert Patricia; De Maeseneer Jan; De Sutter An; Willems Sara

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Most research publications on Chronic Care Model (CCM) implementation originate from organizations or countries with a well-structured primary health care system. Information about efforts made in countries with a less well-organized primary health care system is scarce. In 2003, the Belgian National Institute for Health and Disability Insurance commissioned a pilot study to explore how care for type 2 diabetes patients could be organized in a more efficient way in the Bel...

  14. An integrated care program to prevent work disability due to chronic low back pain: a process evaluation within a randomized controlled trial

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    van Mechelen Willem

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past decade, a considerable amount of research has been carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of innovative low back pain (LBP interventions. Although some interventions proved to be effective, they are not always applied in daily practice. To successfully implement an innovative program it is important to identify barriers and facilitators in order to change practice routine. Because usual care is not directly aimed at return to work (RTW, we evaluated an integrated care program, combining a patient-directed and a workplace-directed intervention provided by a multidisciplinary team, including a clinical occupational physician to reduce occupational disability in chronic LBP patients. The aims of this study were to describe the feasibility of the implementation of the integrated care program, to assess the satisfaction and expectations of the involved stakeholders and to describe the needs for improvement of the program. Methods Eligible for this study were patients who had been on sick leave due to chronic LBP. Data were collected from the patients, their supervisors and the involved health care professionals, by means of questionnaires and structured charts, during 3-month follow-up. Implementation, satisfaction and expectations were investigated. Results Of the 40 patients who were eligible to participate in the integrated care program, 37 patients, their supervisors and the health care professionals actually participated in the intervention. Adherence to the integrated care program was in accordance with the protocol, and the patients, their supervisors and the health care professionals were (very satisfied with the program. The role of the clinical occupational physician was of additional value in the RTW process. Time-investment was the only barrier for implementation reported by the multidisciplinary team. Conclusion The implementation of this program will not be influenced by any flaws in its application

  15. Multidisciplinary outpatient care program for patients with chronic low back pain: design of a randomized controlled trial and cost-effectiveness study [ISRCTN28478651

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    Anema Johannes R

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic low back pain (LBP is a major public and occupational health problem, which is associated with very high costs. Although medical costs for chronic LBP are high, most costs are related to productivity losses due to sick leave. In general, the prognosis for return to work (RTW is good but a minority of patients will be absent long-term from work. Research shows that work related problems are associated with an increase in seeking medical care and sick leave. Usual medical care of patients is however, not specifically aimed at RTW. The objective is to present the design of a randomized controlled trial, i.e. the BRIDGE-study, evaluating the effectiveness in improving RTW and cost-effectiveness of a multidisciplinary outpatient care program situated in both primary and outpatient care setting compared with usual clinical medical care for patients with chronic LBP. Methods/Design The design is a randomized controlled trial with an economic evaluation alongside. The study population consists of patients with chronic LBP who are completely or partially sick listed and visit an outpatient clinic of one of the participating hospitals in Amsterdam (the Netherlands. Two interventions will be compared. 1. a multidisciplinary outpatient care program consisting of a workplace intervention based on participatory ergonomics, and a graded activity program using cognitive behavioural principles. 2. usual care provided by the medical specialist, the occupational physician, the patient's general practitioner and allied health professionals. The primary outcome measure is sick leave duration until full RTW. Sick leave duration is measured monthly by self-report during one year. Data on sick leave during one-year follow-up are also requested form the employers. Secondary outcome measures are pain intensity, functional status, pain coping, patient satisfaction and quality of life. Outcome measures are assessed before randomization and 3, 6

  16. Priority interventions to improve the management of chronic non-cancer pain in primary care: a participatory research of the ACCORD program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Lyne; Choinière, Manon; Martin, Elisabeth; Lévesque, Lise; Hudon, Eveline; Bélanger, Danielle; Perreault, Sylvie; Lacasse, Anaïs; Laliberté, Marie-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Purpose There is evidence that the management of chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) in primary care is far from being optimal. A 1-day workshop was held to explore the perceptions of key actors regarding the challenges and priority interventions to improve CNCP management in primary care. Methods Using the Chronic Care Model as a conceptual framework, physicians (n=6), pharmacists (n=6), nurses (n=6), physiotherapists (n=6), psychologists (n=6), pain specialists (n=6), patients (n=3), family members (n=3), decision makers and managers (n=4), and pain researchers (n=7) took part in seven focus groups and five nominal groups. Results Challenges identified in focus group discussions were related to five dimensions: knowledge gap, “work in silos”, lack of awareness that CNCP represents an important clinical problem, difficulties in access to health professionals and services, and patient empowerment needs. Based on the nominal group discussions, the following priority interventions were identified: interdisciplinary continuing education, interdisciplinary treatment approach, regional expert leadership, creation and definition of care paths, and patient education programs. Conclusion Barriers to optimal management of CNCP in primary care are numerous. Improving its management cannot be envisioned without considering multifaceted interventions targeting several dimensions of the Chronic Care Model and focusing on both clinicians and patients. PMID:25995648

  17. Confronting the barriers to chronic care management in Medicare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenson, Robert A; Horvath, Jane

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the ability of the current Medicare program--both traditional fee-for-service and risk-based contracting--to address the needs of beneficiaries with chronic conditions, who represent almost 80 percent of program enrollment. Grounded in indemnity insurance principles, including concerns about "moral hazard," the traditional Medicare program faces difficulty evolving to support of a chronic care model of health care practice. Although capitation may be the most desirable platform to support provision of care to beneficiaries with chronic conditions, the current structural limitations and problems faced in the Medicare+Choice program limit capitation's use at this time. PMID:14527234

  18. Effect of Primary Health Care Orientation on Chronic Care Management

    OpenAIRE

    Schmittdiel, Julie A.; Shortell, Stephen M.; Rundall, Thomas G; Bodenheimer, Thomas; SELBY, Joe V.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE It has been suggested that the best way to improve chronic illness care is through a redesign of primary care emphasizing comprehensive, coordinated care as espoused by the Chronic Care Model (CCM). This study examined the relationship between primary care orientation and the implementation of the CCM in physician organizations.

  19. A primary care, multi-disciplinary disease management program for opioid-treated patients with chronic non-cancer pain and a high burden of psychiatric comorbidity

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    Malone Robert M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic non-cancer pain is a common problem that is often accompanied by psychiatric comorbidity and disability. The effectiveness of a multi-disciplinary pain management program was tested in a 3 month before and after trial. Methods Providers in an academic general medicine clinic referred patients with chronic non-cancer pain for participation in a program that combined the skills of internists, clinical pharmacists, and a psychiatrist. Patients were either receiving opioids or being considered for opioid therapy. The intervention consisted of structured clinical assessments, monthly follow-up, pain contracts, medication titration, and psychiatric consultation. Pain, mood, and function were assessed at baseline and 3 months using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale scale (CESD and the Pain Disability Index (PDI. Patients were monitored for substance misuse. Results Eighty-five patients were enrolled. Mean age was 51 years, 60% were male, 78% were Caucasian, and 93% were receiving opioids. Baseline average pain was 6.5 on an 11 point scale. The average CESD score was 24.0, and the mean PDI score was 47.0. Sixty-three patients (73% completed 3 month follow-up. Fifteen withdrew from the program after identification of substance misuse. Among those completing 3 month follow-up, the average pain score improved to 5.5 (p = 0.003. The mean PDI score improved to 39.3 (p Conclusions A primary care disease management program improved pain, depression, and disability scores over three months in a cohort of opioid-treated patients with chronic non-cancer pain. Substance misuse and depression were common, and many patients who had substance misuse identified left the program when they were no longer prescribed opioids. Effective care of patients with chronic pain should include rigorous assessment and treatment of these comorbid disorders and intensive efforts to insure follow up.

  20. Costs of moderate to severe chronic pain in primary care patients – a study of the ACCORD Program

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    Lalonde L

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lyne Lalonde,1–4 Manon Choinière,3,5 Élisabeth Martin,2,3 Djamal Berbiche,2,3 Sylvie Perreault,1,6 David Lussier7–91Faculty of Pharmacy, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 2Équipe de recherche en soins de première ligne, Centre de santé et de services sociaux de Laval, Laval, QC, Canada; 3Centre de recherche du Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CRCHUM, Montreal, QC, Canada; 4Sanofi Aventis Endowment Chair in Ambulatory Pharmaceutical Care, Université de Montréal and Centre de santé et de services sociaux de Laval, QC, Canada; 5Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 6Sanofi Aventis Endowment Research Chair in Optimal Drug Use, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 7Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 8Division of Geriatric Medicine and Alan-Edwards Centre for Research on Pain, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 9Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, CanadaBackground: The economic burden of chronic noncancer pain (CNCP remains insufficiently documented in primary care.Purpose: To evaluate the annual direct health care costs and productivity costs associated with moderate to severe CNCP in primary care patients taking into account their pain disability.Materials and methods: Patients reporting noncancer pain for at least 6 months, at a pain intensity of 4 or more on a 0 (no pain to 10 (worst possible pain intensity scale, and at a frequency of at least 2 days a week, were recruited from community pharmacies. Patients' characteristics, health care utilization, and productivity losses (absenteeism and presenteeism were documented using administrative databases, pharmacies' renewal charts, telephone, and self-administered questionnaires. Patients were stratified by tertile of pain disability measured by the Brief Pain Inventory questionnaire

  1. [Palliative care needs in advanced chronic illness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripodoro, Vilma A; Rynkiewicz, María C; Llanos, Victoria; Padova, Susana; De Lellis, Silvina; De Simone, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    About 75% of population will die from one or more chronic progressive diseases. From this projection WHO urged countries to devise strategies for strengthening palliative treatment as part of comprehensive care. In Catalonia, Spain, direct measurement of the prevalence of these patients with NECPAL CCOMS-ICO© tool was 1.5% of the population. This tool is an indicative, not dichotomous, quali-quantitative multifactorial evaluation to be completed by the treating physician. In Argentina there is no information on these patients. Our goal was to explore and characterize the proportion of chronically ill patients in palliative care needs, by NECPAL CCOMS-ICO© tool, in an accessible population of the City of Buenos Aires. General hospitals of the Health Region 2 (Piñero, álvarez and Santojanni) and its program areas were surveyed. In Health Region 1, we surveyed the Udaondo gastroenterology hospital. A total of 53 physicians (704 patients) were interviewed. It was identified that 29.5% of these patients were affected by advanced chronic diseases; 72.1% of them were NECPAL positive, younger (median 64) than in others studies, and more than 98% presented high levels of comorbidity. Palliative care demand (31.4%) and needs (52.7%) were recorded. Specific indicators of fragility, progression, severity and kind of chronic disease were described. The main finding was to identify, with an instrument not based on mortality that, in Buenos Aires City, 1 in 3 patients with chronic diseases could die in the next year and had palliative care needs. PMID:27295702

  2. Priority interventions to improve the management of chronic non-cancer pain in primary care: a participatory research of the ACCORD program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalonde L

    2015-04-01

    , difficulties in access to health professionals and services, and patient empowerment needs. Based on the nominal group discussions, the following priority interventions were identified: interdisciplinary continuing education, interdisciplinary treatment approach, regional expert leadership, creation and definition of care paths, and patient education programs. Conclusion: Barriers to optimal management of CNCP in primary care are numerous. Improving its management cannot be envisioned without considering multifaceted interventions targeting several dimensions of the Chronic Care Model and focusing on both clinicians and patients. Keywords: chronic pain, community-based participatory research, health service accessibility, patient-centered care, primary health care

  3. A personalized care plan in chronic care: implementation and evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Jeanny Engels; Marjolein Rebel; Doortje Boshuizen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Implementation and evaluation of a personalized care plan for approximately 350 people with (an increased risk of) cardiovascular disease in ten general practices in the Netherlands. Context The ‘Healthy Vessels’ (‘Vitale Vaten’) care standard of 2009 describes the optimum care for people with (an increased risk of) cardiovascular disease and is based on the Chronic Care Model. New: working with a personalized care plan, with detailed attention for the promotion of self-management and...

  4. Child Care Subsidy Programs

    OpenAIRE

    David Blau

    2000-01-01

    Child care and early education subsidies are an important part of government efforts to increase economic independence and improve development of children in low-income families in the United States. This chapter describes the main subsidy programs in the U.S., discusses economic issues that arise in designing such programs and evaluating their effects, and surveys evidence on the effects of the programs. An important theme of the chapter is the tradeoff between the policy goals of increasing...

  5. Program for the Chronically Ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenherr, Arline; Schnarr, Barbara

    The program for chronically ill students in the Detroit public schools is described. Forms are presented listing needed information and implications for teachers of the following conditions: diabetes, sickle cell anemia, chronic renal failure, congenital heart disease, hemophilia, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, leukemia, and cystic fibrosis. The…

  6. A Meta-Analysis of Health Status, Health Behaviors, and Health Care Utilization Outcomes of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program

    OpenAIRE

    Brady, Teresa J; Murphy, Louise; O’Colmain, Benita J.; Beauchesne, Danielle; Daniels, Brandy; Greenberg, Michael; House, Marnie; Chervin, Doryn

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) is a community-based self-management education program designed to help participants gain confidence (self-efficacy) and skills to better manage their chronic conditions; it has been implemented worldwide. The objective of this meta-analysis was to quantitatively synthesize the results of CDSMP studies conducted in English-speaking countries to determine the program’s effects on health behaviors, physical and psychological healt...

  7. Palliative Care, Hospice, and Advance Care Planning: Views of People Living with HIV and Other Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomka, Jacquelyn; Prince-Paul, Maryjo; Webel, Allison; Daly, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    People living with HIV (PLWH) who survive to older adulthood risk developing multiple chronic medical conditions. Health policymakers recognize the role of early palliative care and advance care planning in improving health quality for at-risk populations, but misperceptions about palliative care, hospice, and advance care planning are common. Before testing a program of early palliative care for PLWH and other chronic conditions, we conducted focus groups to elicit perceptions of palliative care, hospice, and advance care planning in our target population. Overall, participants were unfamiliar with the term palliative care, confused concepts of palliative care and hospice, and/or associated hospice care with dying. Participants misunderstood advance care planning, but valued communication about health care preferences. Accepting palliative care was contingent on distinguishing it from hospice and historical memories of HIV and dying. Provision of high-quality, comprehensive care will require changing public perceptions and individuals' views in this high-risk population. PMID:27053406

  8. Care of Adult Refugees with Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaki, Genji; Ahrenholz, Nicole Chow; Haider, Mahri Z

    2015-09-01

    Refugees share a common experience of displacement from their country of origin, migration, and resettlement in an unfamiliar country. More than 17 million people have fled their home countries due to war, generalized violence, and persecution. US primary care physicians must care for their immediate and long-term medical needs. Challenges include (1) language and cultural barriers, (2) high rates of mental health disorders, (3) higher prevalence of latent infections, and (4) different explanatory models for chronic diseases. This article discusses management strategies for common challenges that arise in the primary care of refugees. PMID:26320045

  9. Illinois: Child Care Collaboration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Illinois Child Care Collaboration Program promotes collaboration between child care and other early care and education providers, including Early Head Start (EHS), by creating policies to ease blending of funds to extend the day or year of existing services. While no funding is provided through the initiative, participating programs may take…

  10. [Chronic pruritus : Care in daily practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ständer, S; Ständer, H F; Steinke, S; Bruland, P; Dugas, M; Augustin, M

    2016-08-01

    Chronic pruritus is a highly prevalent, multifactorial symptom requiring extensive diagnostics, treatment and consideration of accompanying symptoms (reduced quality of life, sleep disorders, psychic factors). Patient care is thus complex and requires consideration of individual treatment goals. Patients indicate their wish for a symptom-free life an explanation of the causes and a trustful physician-patient relationship. The targeted use of questionnaires is thus advisable in order to structurally survey the history, pruritus intensity, quality of life and treatment progression. Nevertheless, there are many administrative and economical hurdles in the health care system to overcome in order to provide patients with chronic pruritus the best possible care, also per the recommended guidelines. The development of specialized centers and training courses for medical practitioners is thus urgently needed. PMID:27316924

  11. Collaborative Chronic Care Networks (C3Ns) to Transform Chronic Illness Care

    OpenAIRE

    Margolis, Peter A; Peterson, Laura E.; Seid, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant gains by pediatric collaborative improvement networks, the overall US system of chronic illness care does not work well. A new paradigm is needed: a Collaborative Chronic Care Network (C3N). A C3N is a network-based production system that harnesses the collective intelligence of patients, clinicians, and researchers and distributes the production of knowledge, information, and know-how over large groups of people, dramatically accelerating the discovery process. A C3N is a...

  12. Using Mobile Health to Support the Chronic Care Model: Developing an Institutional Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Shantanu Nundy; Jonathan J. Dick; Goddu, Anna P.; Patrick Hogan; Lu, Chen-Yuan E.; Solomon, Marla C; Arnell Bussie; Chin, Marshall H; Peek, Monica E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Self-management support and team-based care are essential elements of the Chronic Care Model but are often limited by staff availability and reimbursement. Mobile phones are a promising platform for improving chronic care but there are few examples of successful health system implementation. Program Development. An iterative process of program design was built upon a pilot study and engaged multiple institutional stakeholders. Patients identified having a “human face” to the pilot...

  13. Describing and analysing primary health care system support for chronic illness care in Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory – use of the Chronic Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Allison

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indigenous Australians experience disproportionately high prevalence of, and morbidity and mortality from chronic illness such as diabetes, renal disease and cardiovascular disease. Improving the understanding of how Indigenous primary care systems are organised to deliver chronic illness care will inform efforts to improve the quality of care for Indigenous people. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 12 Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory. Using the Chronic Care Model as a framework, we carried out a mail-out survey to collect information on material, financial and human resources relating to chronic illness care in participating health centres. Follow up face-to-face interviews with health centre staff were conducted to identify successes and difficulties in the systems in relation to providing chronic illness care to community members. Results Participating health centres had distinct areas of strength and weakness in each component of systems: 1 organisational influence – strengthened by inclusion of chronic illness goals in business plans, appointment of designated chronic disease coordinators and introduction of external clinical audits, but weakened by lack of training in disease prevention and health promotion and limited access to Medicare funding; 2 community linkages – facilitated by working together with community organisations (e.g. local stores and running community-based programs (e.g. "health week", but detracted by a shortage of staff especially of Aboriginal health workers working in the community; 3 self management – promoted through patient education and goal setting with clients, but impeded by limited focus on family and community-based activities due to understaffing; 4 decision support – facilitated by distribution of clinical guidelines and their integration with daily care, but limited by inadequate access to and support from specialists; 5 delivery system

  14. A Triage Approach to Managing a Two Year Wait-List in a Chronic Pain Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Clark

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Individuals with chronic pain referred to specialist chronic pain management programs frequently wait months to years for assessment and care. In the authors' pain management program, approximately 600 patients are on the waiting list. An innovative recommendation program to encourage and educate referring physicians to continue active care of pain during this waiting period was developed.

  15. Attitudes of Doctors and Nurses toward the Chronic Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Bonal Ruiz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: the fact that chronic diseases replace traditional causes of morbidity and mortality in a country, or are on a par with major common health problems, demands the development of new strategies to address them. Objective: to explore attitudes of doctors and nurses from the Rolando López Peña Polyclinic toward the Chronic Care Model. Methods: a quantitative and qualitative cross-sectional study was conducted including the 22 family physicians and 26 nurses who provide care to patients with chronic diseases and were at the polyclinic at the time of the study. All were administered a 5 point Likert scale and a focus group interview, which was taped, transcribed and analyzed. Results: the attitudinal results correspond with the actions assessed in each component of the model, being the most common barriers: the lack of awareness and training on the new approaches to care of these patients, work overload created by other programs such as the maternal-child and vector control programs, uncertainties on the effectiveness of patient education and ignorance of the practice guidelines. Conclusions: favorable attitudes toward the introduction of the model to the practice of the family physician and nurse predominated as long as organizational changes are made and the suggestions of these service providers are put into practice with the support of the decision makers of the health sector.

  16. Proactive Office Encounter: A Systematic Approach to Preventive and Chronic Care at Every Patient Encounter

    OpenAIRE

    Kanter, Michael; Martinez, Osvaldo; Lindsay, Gail; Andrews, Kristen; Denver, Cristine

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, Kaiser Permanente's (KP) Southern California Region designed and implemented a systematic in-reach program, the Proactive Office Encounter (POE), to address the growing needs of its three million patients for preventive care and management of chronic disease. The program sought staff from both primary and specialty care departments to proactively identify gaps in care and to assist physicians in closing those gaps. The POE engaged the entire health team in a proactive patient-care ex...

  17. Designing Shared Electronic Records for Chronic Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bansler, Jørgen Peter; Havn, Erling C.; Mønsted, Troels

    This paper reports preliminary findings from an ongoing research project on the development of IT support for communication and information sharing across institutional and professional boundaries within the Danish healthcare system. The project focuses on the treatment of patients with implanted...... ICDs (implantable cardioverter-defibrillator). These are chronic patients who usually see several different healthcare providers on a regular basis. The main findings so far are: (1) Most of the data produced and recorded as part of the care process are context-specific and often difficult to interpret...

  18. Care for chronic illness in Australian general practice – focus groups of chronic disease self-help groups over 10 years: implications for chronic care systems reforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Carmel M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic disease is a major global challenge. However, chronic illness and its care, when intruding into everyday life, has received less attention in Asia Pacific countries, including Australia, who are in the process of transitioning to chronic disease orientated health systems. Aim The study aims to examine experiences of chronic illness before and after the introduction of Australian Medicare incentives for longer consultations and structured health assessments in general practice. Methods Self-help groups around the conditions of diabetes, epilepsy, asthma and cancer identified key informants to participate in 4 disease specific focus groups. Audio taped transcripts of the focus groups were coded using grounded theory methodology. Key themes and lesser themes identified using a process of saturation until the study questions on needs and experiences of care were addressed. Thematic comparisons were made across the 2002/3 and 1992/3 focus groups. Findings At times of chronic illness, there was need to find and then ensure access to 'the right GP'. The 'right GP or specialist' committed to an in-depth relationship of trust, personal rapport and understanding together with clinical and therapeutic competence. The 'right GP', the main specialist, the community nurse and the pharmacist were key providers, whose success depended on interprofessional communication. The need to trust and rely on care providers was balanced by the need for self-efficacy 'to be in control of disease and treatment' and 'to be your own case manager'. Changes in Medicare appeared to have little penetration into everyday perceptions of chronic illness burden or time and quality of GP care. Inequity of health system support for different disease groupings emerged. Diabetes, asthma and certain cancers, like breast cancer, had greater support, despite common experiences of disease burden, and a need for research and support programs. Conclusion Core

  19. Condition based payment: improving care of chronic illness

    OpenAIRE

    DiPiero, Albert; Sanders, David G

    2005-01-01

    Fee-for-service is more than a payment method; it defines the method of care. Fee-for-condition—a payment method that rewards superior results and encourages innovation—could greatly improve care for chronic conditions

  20. HIV/AIDS managed care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, J G

    2000-01-01

    Approximately one-half of all patients with HIV infection who are under care have Medicaid as the third party payor. Unlike Medicare, Medicaid is a state-specific program that has huge variations in reimbursement strategies. Multiple studies have shown that care for persons with AIDS is about $20,000/year, but reimbursement through various state Medicaid programs varies about $100/m/m to $2800/m/m despite the fact that expectations for care are identical. Hopkins has a major commitment to persons with HIV infection with a program that now includes 30 faculty members and a support staff of 170. With the introduction of mandatory managed care for Medicaid recipients in July, 1997, we were confronted with the issue of substantial downsizing with abandonment of over half of our patients, or learning the transition to managed care. This has been a steep learning curve involving negotiations with the state Medicaid office, reorganization of our clinic, careful scrutiny of our database regarding resource utilization and cost, education of providers, and longitudinal collection of new information and integration of the rapid changes in the field. In the process of this transition, we learned that there are precious few resources to provide guidance and that there is a perceived need for assistance by HIV providers throughout the country. Consequently, we have now established the "HIV Managed Care Network" with substantial funding from diverse sources to support education, data collection, and public policy review. It is premature to evaluate performance since most of these activities have just begun, but we expect that this Network will serve as a demonstration model for methods to deal with chronic diseases under managed care. PMID:10881336

  1. Modern community care program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Going into the next millennium do we see nuclear energy? Yes we will see an expanding nuclear sector in the modem community. he modem community that cares for people, health and environment needs nuclear. Energy saves lives. Electricity is efficient use of energy. Energy will be the key to a sustainable society, energy is life. Nuclear energy protects the environment. Nuclear is an integral part of the modern community caring for people, health and environment. The dynamics of the public opinion-forming process and its effects on the nuclear industry are a challenge of the global nuclear industry. Current communications strategy and its consequences are on of the key issues. The nuclear industry must be perceived in certain ways in order to move towards achieving the vision and avoiding the harassment scenario. Each perception goal does not bear the same function within the communications process. As the nuclear industry is oe of the keys to a sustainable society, it must achieve legitimacy in its capacity as an interesting agenda-setter for tackling problems and as an expert. We have to build our communication activities on an open and honest attitude and we have to establish trust and confidence. The nuclear industry must also prove its ability and performance. If this could be achieved there will be an option for the future

  2. Disease management projects and the Chronic CareModel in action: Baseline qualitative research

    OpenAIRE

    Hipple-Walters, Bethany; Adams, Samantha; Nieboer, Anna; Bal, Roland

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Disease management programs, especially those based on the Chronic Care Model (CCM),are increasingly common in the Netherlands. While disease management programs have beenwell-researched quantitatively and economically, less qualitative research has been done. Theoverall aim of the study is to explore how disease management programs are implementedwithin primary care settings in the Netherlands; this paper focuses on the early developmentand implementation stages of fi...

  3. Disease management projects and the Chronic Care Model in action: baseline qualitative research

    OpenAIRE

    Walters Bethany; Adams Samantha A; Nieboer Anna P; Bal Roland

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Disease management programs, especially those based on the Chronic Care Model (CCM), are increasingly common in the Netherlands. While disease management programs have been well-researched quantitatively and economically, less qualitative research has been done. The overall aim of the study is to explore how disease management programs are implemented within primary care settings in the Netherlands; this paper focuses on the early development and implementation stages of f...

  4. Using Mobile Health to Support the Chronic Care Model: Developing an Institutional Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantanu Nundy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Self-management support and team-based care are essential elements of the Chronic Care Model but are often limited by staff availability and reimbursement. Mobile phones are a promising platform for improving chronic care but there are few examples of successful health system implementation. Program Development. An iterative process of program design was built upon a pilot study and engaged multiple institutional stakeholders. Patients identified having a “human face” to the pilot program as essential. Stakeholders recognized the need to integrate the program with primary and specialty care but voiced concerns about competing demands on clinician time. Program Description. Nurse administrators at a university-affiliated health plan use automated text messaging to provide personalized self-management support for member patients with diabetes and facilitate care coordination with the primary care team. For example, when a patient texts a request to meet with a dietitian, a nurse-administrator coordinates with the primary care team to provide a referral. Conclusion. Our innovative program enables the existing health system to support a de novo care management program by leveraging mobile technology. The program supports self-management and team-based care in a way that we believe engages patients yet meets the limited availability of providers and needs of health plan administrators.

  5. Facilitators and barriers of implementing the chronic care model in primary care: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Kadu, Mudathira K; Stolee, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background The Chronic Care Model (CCM) is a framework developed to redesign care delivery for individuals living with chronic diseases in primary care. The CCM and its various components have been widely adopted and evaluated, however, little is known about different primary care experiences with its implementation, and the factors that influence its successful uptake. The purpose of this review is to synthesize findings of studies that implemented the CCM in primary care, in order to identi...

  6. The Prenatal Care at School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Carol H.; Nasso, Jacqueline T.; Swider, Susan; Ellison, Brenda R.; Griswold, Daniel L.; Brooks, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    School absenteeism and poor compliance with prenatal appointments are concerns for pregnant teens. The Prenatal Care at School (PAS) program is a new model of prenatal care involving local health care providers and school personnel to reduce the need for students to leave school for prenatal care. The program combines prenatal care and education…

  7. Adapting chronic care models for diabetes care delivery inlow-and-middle-income countries: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    A contextual review of models for chronic care was doneto develop a context-adapted chronic care model-basedservice delivery model for chronic conditions includingdiabetes. The Philippines was used as the setting ofa low-to-middle-income country. A context-basednarrative review of existing models for chronic carewas conducted. A situational analysis was done at thegrassroots level, involving the leaders and members ofthe community, the patients, the local health system andthe healthcare providers. A second analysis making useof certain organizational theories was done to explore onimproving feasibility and acceptability of organizing carefor chronic conditions. The analyses indicated that carefor chronic conditions may be introduced, consideringthe needs of people with diabetes in particular andthe community in general as recipients of care, andthe issues and factors that may affect the healthcareworkers and the health system as providers of thiscare. The context-adapted chronic care model-basedservice delivery model was constructed accordingly.Key features are incorporation of chronic care in thehealth system's services; assimilation of chronic caredelivery with the other responsibilities of the healthcareworkers but with redistribution of certain tasks; andensuring that the recipients of care experience thewhole spectrum of basic chronic care that includes educationand promotion in the general population, riskidentification, screening, counseling including self-caredevelopment, and clinical management of the chroniccondition and any co-morbidities, regardless of level ofcontrol of the condition. This way, low-to-middle incomecountries can introduce and improve care for chronicconditions without entailing much additional demand ontheir limited resources.

  8. Disease management projects and the Chronic CareModel in action: Baseline qualitative research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Hipple-Walters (Bethany); S.A. Adams (Samantha); A.P. Nieboer (Anna); R.A. Bal (Roland)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Disease management programs, especially those based on the Chronic Care Model (CCM),are increasingly common in the Netherlands. While disease management programs have beenwell-researched quantitatively and economically, less qualitative research has been done. Theoverall aim

  9. The changing nature of chronic care and coproduction of care between primary care professionals and patients with COPD and their informal caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether care delivery in accordance with a care model is associated with co-productive relationships between professionals and COPD patients and their informal caregivers. A co-productive relationship refers to productive patient-professional interaction or shared decision making. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 among 411 patients (out of 981) enrolled in the Dutch COPD care program Kennemer Lucht and 62 professionals treating them (out of 97). Kennemer Lucht COPD involved multicomponent interventions within all six dimensions of the chronic care model (organizational support, community, self-management, decision support, delivery system design, and information and communications technology) to improve the quality of care for patients with COPD. This approach was expected to improve relational coproduction of care between professionals and patients with COPD and their informal caregivers. Results show clearly that the perceived quality of chronic care delivery is related significantly to productive interaction/relational coproduction of care. The strength of the relationship between perceptions of quality of chronic care and relational coproduction among patients is strong (r=0.5; P≤0.001) and among professionals moderate (r=0.4; P≤0.001 relational coproduction with patients and informal caregivers). Furthermore, patients' perceptions of the quality of chronic care were associated with the existence of productive interaction with health care professionals (β=0.7; P≤0.001). The changing nature of chronic care is associated with coproduction of care, leading to the development of more productive relationships between primary care professionals and COPD patients and their informal caregivers. Further research is necessary to determine how best to sustain these developments. PMID:26869783

  10. Specialty Care Use in US Patients with Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saundra H. Glover

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite efforts to eliminate health disparities, racial, ethnic, and geographic groups continue lag behind their counterparts in health outcomes in the United States. The purpose of this study is to determine variation in specialty care utilization by chronic disease status. Data were extracted from the Commonwealth Fund 2006 Health Care Quality Survey (n = 2475. A stratified minority sample design was employed to ensure a representative sample. Logistic regression was used in analyses to predict specialty care utilization in the sample. Poor perceived health, minority status, and lack of insurance was associated with reduced specialty care use and chronic disease diagnosis.

  11. Impact of Chronic Conditions on the Cost of Cancer Care...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in Impact of Chronic Conditions on the Cost of Cancer Care for Medicaid Beneficiaries, published in Volume 2, Issue 4 of the Medicare...

  12. Chronic pain disorders in HIV primary care: clinical characteristics and association with healthcare utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jocelyn M; So, Eric; Jebakumar, Jebakaran; George, Mary Catherine; Simpson, David M; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2016-04-01

    Chronic pain is common in HIV, but incompletely characterized, including its underlying etiologies, its effect on healthcare utilization, and the characteristics of affected patients in the HIV primary care setting. These data are needed to design and justify appropriate clinic-based pain management services. Using a clinical data warehouse, we analyzed one year of data from 638 patients receiving standard-of-care antiretroviral therapy in a large primary care HIV clinic, located in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City. We found that 40% of patients carried one or more chronic pain diagnoses. The most common diagnoses were degenerative musculoskeletal disorders (eg, degenerative spinal disease and osteoarthritis), followed by neuropathic pain and headache disorders. Many patients (16%) had multiple chronic pain diagnoses. Women, older patients, and patients with greater burdens of medical illness, and psychiatric and substance use comorbidities were disproportionately represented among those with chronic pain diagnoses. Controlling for overall health status, HIV patients with chronic pain had greater healthcare utilization including emergency department visits and radiology procedures. In summary, our study demonstrates the high prevalence of chronic pain disorders in the primary care HIV clinic. Colocated interventions for chronic pain in this setting should not only focus on musculoskeletal pain but also account for complex multifaceted pain syndromes, and address the unique biopsychosocial features of this population. Furthermore, because chronic pain is prevalent in HIV and associated with increased healthcare utilization, developing clinic-based pain management programs could be cost-effective. PMID:26683238

  13. Inadequate Palliative Care in Chronic Lung Disease. An Issue of Health Care Inequality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Crystal E; Jecker, Nancy S; Curtis, J Randall

    2016-03-01

    Patients with chronic lung diseases suffer higher symptom burden, lower quality of life, and greater social isolation compared with patients with other diagnoses, such as cancer. These conditions may be alleviated by palliative care, yet palliative care is used less by patients with chronic lung disease compared with patients with cancer. Underuse is due, in part, to poor implementation of primary palliative care and inadequate referral to specialty palliative care. Lack of primary and specialty palliative care in patients with chronic lung disease falls short of the minimum standard of competent health care, and represents a disparity in health care and a social injustice. We invoke the ethical principles of justice and sufficiency to highlight the importance of this issue. We identify five barriers to implementing palliative care in patients with chronic lung disease: uncertainty in prognosis; lack of provider skill to engage in discussions about palliative care; fear of using opioids among patients with chronic lung disease; fear of diminishing hope; and perceived and implicit bias against patients with smoking-related lung diseases. We propose mechanisms for improving implementation of palliative care for patients with chronic lung disease with the goal of enhancing justice in health care. PMID:26730490

  14. Reported barriers to evaluation in chronic care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knai, Cécile; Nolte, Ellen; Brunn, Matthias; Elissen, Arianne; Conklin, Annalijn; Pedersen, Janice Pedersen; Brereton, Laura; Erler, Antje; Frølich, Anne; Flamm, Maria; Fullerton, Birgitte; Jacobsen, Ramune; Krohn, Robert; Saz-Parkinson, Zuleika; Vrijhoef, Bert; Chevreul, Karine; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Farsi, Fadila; Sarría-Santamera, Antonio; Soennichsen, Andreas

    The growing movement of innovative approaches to chronic disease management in Europe has not been matched by a corresponding effort to evaluate them. This paper discusses challenges to evaluation of chronic disease management as reported by experts in six European countries....

  15. Chronic care treatment of obese children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jens-Christian; Gamborg, Michael; Bille, Dorthe S;

    2011-01-01

    Clinically-relevant protocols for the treatment of childhood obesity are lacking. This study report results for a clinic-based structured treatment program for chronic childhood obesity.......Clinically-relevant protocols for the treatment of childhood obesity are lacking. This study report results for a clinic-based structured treatment program for chronic childhood obesity....

  16. The Nordic maintenance care program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmqvist, Stefan; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Maintenance care is a well known concept among chiropractors, although there is little knowledge about its exact definition, its indications and usefulness. As an initial step in a research program on this phenomenon, it was necessary to identify chiropractors' rationale for their use of...... maintenance care. Previous studies have identified chiropractors' choices of case management strategies in response to different case scenarios. However, the rationale for these management strategies is not known. In other words, when presented with both the case, and different management strategies, there...... was consensus on how to match these, but if only the management strategies were provided, would chiropractors be able to define the cases to fit these strategies? The objective with this study was to investigate if there is a common pattern in Finnish chiropractors' case management of patients with...

  17. An intelligent partner system for improving chronic illness care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Deutsch

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic care consists of a sequence of actions to treat a specific clinical disorder over time as a function of the ways in which illness progresses and patients respond to management actions. Outcomes depend on physicians' skills to select the actions best suited for their patients and competent self-management. This paper presents the architecture of an intelligent partner system (IPS, which helps to provide doctors with relevant data and skills and empowers chronically ill patients with the information and confidence to manage their health wisely. The services of this intelligent system are presented as 'therapies' for the information-processing 'pathologies' associated with traditional chronic illness care.

  18. The Chronic Responsibility: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Danish Chronic Care Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravn, Iben M; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Beedholm, Kirsten

    2016-03-01

    This article reports on the results of a Fairclough-inspired critical discourse analysis aiming to clarify how chronically ill patients are presented in contemporary Danish chronic care policies. Drawing on Fairclough's three-dimensional framework for analyzing discourse, and using Dean's concepts of governmentality as an interpretative lens, we analyzed and explained six policies published by the Danish Health and Medicines Authority between 2005 and 2013. The analysis revealed that discourses within the policy vision of chronic care consider chronically ill patients' active role, lifestyle, and health behavior to be the main factors influencing susceptibility to chronic diseases. We argue that this discursive construction naturalizes a division between people who can actively manage responsible self-care and those who cannot. Such discourses may serve the interests of those patients who are already activated, while others remain subjugated to certain roles. For example, they may be labeled as "vulnerable." PMID:25662943

  19. Care production for tuberculosis cases:analysis according to the elements of the Chronic Care Model

    OpenAIRE

    Daiane Medeiros da Silva; Hérika Brito Gomes de Farias; Tereza Cristina Scatena Villa; Lenilde Duarte de Sá; Maria Eugênia Firmino Brunello; Jordana Almeida Nogueira

    2016-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: To analyze the care provided to tuberculosis cases in primary health care services according to the elements of the Chronic Care Model. METHOD: Cross-sectional study conducted in a capital city of the northeastern region of Brazil involving 83 Family Health Strategy professionals.A structured tool adapted to tuberculosis-related care in Brazil was applied.Analysis was based on the development of indicators with capacity to produce care varying between limited and optimum...

  20. Care for chronic illness in Australian general practice – focus groups of chronic disease self-help groups over 10 years: implications for chronic care systems reforms

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Carmel M; Peterson Chris; Robinson Rowena; Sturmberg Joachim P

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic disease is a major global challenge. However, chronic illness and its care, when intruding into everyday life, has received less attention in Asia Pacific countries, including Australia, who are in the process of transitioning to chronic disease orientated health systems. Aim The study aims to examine experiences of chronic illness before and after the introduction of Australian Medicare incentives for longer consultations and structured health assessments in gener...

  1. Health care 2020: reengineering health care delivery to combat chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Richard V; Lavie, Carl J

    2015-04-01

    Chronic disease has become the great epidemic of our times, responsible for 75% of total health care costs and the majority of deaths in the US. Our current delivery model is poorly constructed to manage chronic disease, as evidenced by low adherence to quality indicators and poor control of treatable conditions. New technologies have emerged that can engage patients and offer additional modalities in the treatment of chronic disease. Modifying our delivery model to include team-based care in concert with patient-centered technologies offers great promise in managing the chronic disease epidemic. PMID:25460529

  2. Improving Interprofessional and Coproductive Outcomes of Care for Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Moreo, Kathleen; Greene, Laurence; Sapir, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    In the U.S., suboptimal care quality for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is reflected by high rates of emergency department visits and hospital readmissions, as well as excessive costs. Moreover, a substantial proportion of COPD patients do not receive guideline-directed therapies. In quality improvement (QI) programs, these types of health care problems are commonly addressed through interventions that primarily or exclusively support physicians in aligning their p...

  3. Describing and analysing primary health care system support for chronic illness care in Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory – use of the Chronic Care Model

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart Allison; Dowden Michelle; Robinson Gary; Cunningham Joan; Bailie Ross; Si Damin; Connors Christine; Weeramanthri Tarun

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Indigenous Australians experience disproportionately high prevalence of, and morbidity and mortality from chronic illness such as diabetes, renal disease and cardiovascular disease. Improving the understanding of how Indigenous primary care systems are organised to deliver chronic illness care will inform efforts to improve the quality of care for Indigenous people. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 12 Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territ...

  4. Measuring organizational readiness for knowledge translation in chronic care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouimet Mathieu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge translation (KT is an imperative in order to implement research-based and contextualized practices that can answer the numerous challenges of complex health problems. The Chronic Care Model (CCM provides a conceptual framework to guide the implementation process in chronic care. Yet, organizations aiming to improve chronic care require an adequate level of organizational readiness (OR for KT. Available instruments on organizational readiness for change (ORC have shown limited validity, and are not tailored or adapted to specific phases of the knowledge-to-action (KTA process. We aim to develop an evidence-based, comprehensive, and valid instrument to measure OR for KT in healthcare. The OR for KT instrument will be based on core concepts retrieved from existing literature and validated by a Delphi study. We will specifically test the instrument in chronic care that is of an increasing importance for the health system. Methods Phase one: We will conduct a systematic review of the theories and instruments assessing ORC in healthcare. The retained theoretical information will be synthesized in a conceptual map. A bibliography and database of ORC instruments will be prepared after appraisal of their psychometric properties according to the standards for educational and psychological testing. An online Delphi study will be carried out among decision makers and knowledge users across Canada to assess the importance of these concepts and measures at different steps in the KTA process in chronic care. Phase two: A final OR for KT instrument will be developed and validated both in French and in English and tested in chronic disease management to measure OR for KT regarding the adoption of comprehensive, patient-centered, and system-based CCMs. Discussion This study provides a comprehensive synthesis of current knowledge on explanatory models and instruments assessing OR for KT. Moreover, this project aims to create more

  5. Disease management projects and the Chronic Care Model in action: baseline qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walters Bethany

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disease management programs, especially those based on the Chronic Care Model (CCM, are increasingly common in the Netherlands. While disease management programs have been well-researched quantitatively and economically, less qualitative research has been done. The overall aim of the study is to explore how disease management programs are implemented within primary care settings in the Netherlands; this paper focuses on the early development and implementation stages of five disease management programs in the primary care setting, based on interviews with project leadership teams. Methods Eleven semi-structured interviews were conducted at the five selected sites with sixteen professionals interviewed; all project directors and managers were interviewed. The interviews focused on each project’s chosen chronic illness (diabetes, eating disorders, COPD, multi-morbidity, CVRM and project plan, barriers to development and implementation, the project leaders’ action and reactions, as well as their roles and responsibilities, and disease management strategies. Analysis was inductive and interpretive, based on the content of the interviews. After analysis, the results of this research on disease management programs and the Chronic Care Model are viewed from a traveling technology framework. Results This analysis uncovered four themes that can be mapped to disease management and the Chronic Care Model: (1 changing the health care system, (2 patient-centered care, (3 technological systems and barriers, and (4 integrating projects into the larger system. Project leaders discussed the paths, both direct and indirect, for transforming the health care system to one that addresses chronic illness. Patient-centered care was highlighted as needed and a paradigm shift for many. Challenges with technological systems were pervasive. Project leaders managed the expenses of a traveling technology, including the social, financial, and

  6. Maggot debridement therapy in chronic wound care

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, NG; Leung, GKK; Chan, DCW; Fong, DHF; Leung, JYY

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review the current evidence on the mechanism of actions and clinical applications of maggot debridement therapy. Data sources: Literature search of PubMed and Medline was performed up to January 2007. Study selection: Original and major review articles related to maggot debridement therapy were reviewed. Key words used in the literature search were 'maggot debridement therapy', 'wound healing', and 'chronic wound management'. Data extraction: All relevant English and Chinese art...

  7. The Chronic Care Model and Diabetes Management in US Primary Care Settings: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Stellefson, Michael; Dipnarine, Krishna; Stopka, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Chronic Care Model (CCM) uses a systematic approach to restructuring medical care to create partnerships between health systems and communities. The objective of this study was to describe how researchers have applied CCM in US primary care settings to provide care for people who have diabetes and to describe outcomes of CCM implementation. Methods We conducted a literature review by using the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, CINAHL, and Health Source: Nursing/Academi...

  8. Improving Chronic Care: Developing and testing disease-management interventions applied in COPD care

    OpenAIRE

    Lemmens, Karin

    2009-01-01

    textabstractDisease management has emerged as a new strategy to enhance quality of care for patients suffering from chronic conditions, and to control health care costs. So far, however, the effects of this strategy remain unclear. The purpose of this thesis was to determine the core elements of disease management and to understand how they operate and interact in order to effectively evaluate disease-management programmes, particularly for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease....

  9. Wound care matrices for chronic leg ulcers: role in therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sano H; Kouraba S; Ogawa R

    2015-01-01

    Hitomi Sano,1 Sachio Kouraba,2 Rei Ogawa11Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan; 2Sapporo Wound Care and Anti-Aging Laboratory, Sapporo, JapanAbstract: Chronic leg ulcers are a significant health care concern. Although deep wounds are usually treated by flap transfers, the operation is invasive and associates with serious complications. Skin grafts may be a less invasive means of covering wounds. However, skin grafts cannot survive o...

  10. Specialty Care Use in US Patients with Chronic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Glover, Saundra H.; Edith Williams; Qiang Cheng,; Rivers, Patrick A; Hassan, Rahnuma M.; Bellinger, Jessica D.

    2010-01-01

    Despite efforts to eliminate health disparities, racial, ethnic, and geographic groups continue lag behind their counterparts in health outcomes in the United States. The purpose of this study is to determine variation in specialty care utilization by chronic disease status. Data were extracted from the Commonwealth Fund 2006 Health Care Quality Survey (n = 2475). A stratified minority sample design was employed to ensure a representative sample. Logistic regression was used in analyses to pr...

  11. Chronic kidney disease: identification and management in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, Simon; Blakeman, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Simon DS Fraser,1 Tom Blakeman2 1Academic Unit of Primary Care and Population Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, University of Southampton, Southampton, 2National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research Greater Manchester, Centre for Primary Care, Institute of Population Health, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important and common noncommunicable condition globally...

  12. Chronic patient care at North West Province clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire van Deventer

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic illnesses are a significant burden to the health services in South Africa. There is a specific national health plan whereby chronically ill patients who are acceptably controlled should be managed at clinic level. The perception has emerged that the management of primary care has not been optimal in the Southern District of the North West Province. This provided the motivation to initiate this research, namely consideration of chronic patient care at clinics in the North West Province of South Africa.Method: A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out at four randomly selected clinics covering four sub-districts in the Southern District (North West Province. This was done using charts and registers at the clinics. Inclusion criteria were patients older than 18, and presenting with the following chronic illnesses: asthma/chronic obstructive airways disease (COAD, hypertension, diabetes and epilepsy. The major focus areas were the regular assessment of the patients, the level of control of the illness and the use of the Essential Drugs List and Standard Treatment Guidelines (EDL/STG.Results: In the cases of all the chronic illnesses it was found that regular assessments were poorly done, with asthma (peak flow measurements being the most poorly done. Control was generally less than 50% for all the illnesses, although the EDL was followed fairly well by the personnel at the clinics.Conclusion: In the light of the burden of chronic illness the results give cause for great concern about the quality of care for chronically ill patients, and reasons were sought for some of the poor results. A subsequent decision was taken to carry out comprehensive quality improvement projects on each of the illnesses over the following five years.

  13. Do telemonitoring projects of heart failure fit the Chronic Care Model?

    OpenAIRE

    Willemse, Evi; Adriaenssens, Jef; Dilles, Tinne; Remmen, Roy

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the characteristics of extramural and transmural telemonitoring projects on chronic heart failure in Belgium. It describes to what extent these telemonitoring projects coincide with the Chronic Care Model of Wagner.Background: The Chronic Care Model describes essential components for high-quality health care. Telemonitoring can be used to optimise home care for chronic heart failure. It provides a potential prospective to change the current care organisation.Methods: This...

  14. Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S

    2012-03-29

    This document describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) meets the requirements and management practices of federal regulation 10 CFR 850, 'Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP).' This revision of the LLNL CBDPP incorporates clarification and editorial changes based on lessons learned from employee discussions, observations and reviews of Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and commercial industry beryllium (Be) safety programs. The information is used to strengthen beryllium safety practices at LLNL, particularly in the areas of: (1) Management of small parts and components; and (2) Communication of program status to employees. Future changes to LLNL beryllium activities and on-going operating experience will be incorporated into the program as described in Section S, 'Performance Feedback.'

  15. Rethinking chronic pain in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanos, Steven; Brodsky, Marina; Argoff, Charles; Clauw, Daniel J; D'Arcy, Yvonne; Donevan, Sean; Gebke, Kevin B; Jensen, Mark P; Lewis Clark, Evelyn; McCarberg, Bill; Park, Peter W; Turk, Dennis C; Watt, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain substantially impacts patient function and quality of life and is a burden to society at large in terms of increased health care utilization and loss of productivity. As a result, there is an increasing recognition of chronic pain as a public health crisis. However, there remains wide variability in clinical practices related to the prevention, assessment, and treatment of chronic pain. Certain fundamental aspects of chronic pain are often neglected including the contribution of the psychological, social, and contextual factors associated with chronic pain. Also commonly overlooked is the importance of understanding the likely neurobiological mechanism(s) of the presenting pain and how they can guide treatment selection. Finally, physicians may not recognize the value of using electronic medical records to systematically capture data on pain and its impact on mood, function, and sleep. Such data can be used to monitor onset and maintenance of treatments effects at the patient level and evaluate costs at the systems level. In this review we explain how these factors play a critical role in the development of a coordinated, evidence-based treatment approach tailored to meet specific needs of the patient. We also discuss some practical approaches and techniques that can be implemented by clinicians in order to enhance the assessment and management of individuals with chronic pain in primary care settings. PMID:27166559

  16. The Role of Technology in Chronic Disease Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Richard V; Bober, Robert M; Lavie, Carl J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic disease represents the epidemic of our time, present in half the adult population and responsible for 86% of United States (US) healthcare costs and 70% of deaths. The major chronic diseases are primarily due to health risk behaviors that are widely communicable across populations. As a nation, the US has performed poorly in managing chronic disease, in large part because of a failed delivery model of care. New opportunities exist as a result of recent advances in home-based wireless devices, apps and wearables, enabling health delivery systems to monitor disease metrics in near real time. These technologies provide a framework for patient engagement and a new model of care delivery utilizing integrated practice units, both of which are needed to navigate the healthcare needs of the 21st century. PMID:26772623

  17. PRIMARY CARE PROBLEMS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Shtegman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate primary care efficacy in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF.Material and methods. Outpatients (n=139 with CHF and 35 primary care physicians were included into the study. The evaluation of drug therapy and patient awareness of the principles of non-drug CHF treatment were performed. An anonymous survey among doctors in terms of current CHF guidelines knowledge, patient information provided by physicians, and doctors’ burnout status was also carried out.Results. Only 39% and 10% of CHF outpatients received target doses of ACE inhibitors/sartans and beta-blockers, respectively. Majority of CHF outpatients and their doctors need in additional education/training. 56% of primary care physicians demonstrated an emotional burnout.Conclusion. Author considers it essential to distribute short pocket-guidelines on CHF management among primary care physicians, and to reduce the load on primary care physicians with simultaneous strengthening of their performance control.

  18. Chronic care management of globesity: promoting healthier lifestyles in traditional and mHealth based settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca eCastelnuovo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and being overweight could be real chronic conditions above all if there are other complications such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia, cancer and various psychosocial and psychopathological disorders,. Due to the multifactorial etiology of obesity, evidence-based interventions to improve weight loss, maintain a healthy weight, and reduce related comorbidities combine different treatment approaches: dietetic, nutritional, physical, behavioral, psychological, and, in some situations, pharmacological and surgical. There are significant limitations in this multidisciplinary chronic care management of obesity, most notably those regarding costs and long-term adherence and efficacy. Programs including eHealth platforms and new technologies could overcome limitations connected to the traditional in-patient chronic care management of obesity, thus providing promising opportunities in enhancing weight reduction and reducing complications in terms of long-term efficacy and effectiveness across clinical, organizational, and economic perspectives.

  19. "What we want": Chronically ill adolescents' preferences and priorities for improving health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L. van Staa (AnneLoes); S. Jedeloo (Susan); H.A. van der Stege (Heleen)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: As important users of health care, adolescents with chronic conditions deserve to be consulted about their experiences and expectations. This study aimed to explore chronically ill adolescents' preferences regarding providers' qualities, and outpatient and inpatient care. Fur

  20. The Nordic maintenance care program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Brandborg-Olsen, Dorthe; Albert, Hanne;

    2013-01-01

    To describe and interpret Danish Chiropractors' perspectives regarding the purpose and rationale for using MC (maintenance care), its content, course and patient characteristics.......To describe and interpret Danish Chiropractors' perspectives regarding the purpose and rationale for using MC (maintenance care), its content, course and patient characteristics....

  1. [Palliative care in non-cancer, chronic, progressive diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radványi, Ildikó; Nagy, Lajos; Balogh, Sándor; Csikós, Ágnes

    2015-10-18

    Malignant and other chronic diseases cause the death of 2.5 million people in Europe annually. It is anticipated that this number will grow due to the aging of the European population. The death of a significant proportion of patients having progressive chronic disease is preceded by an extended end of life stadium. In this stage the patients have severe symptoms and pain that necessitate their symptomatic treatment and palliative care. The assessment of the life expectancy of patients, estimation of the prognosis of their illness and, therefore, selection of patients with a need of intensified palliative care often pose difficulties. This paper provides a summary on the basic elements of "good palliative care". It introduces the most frequent models for the procession of chronic diseases and those indicators that help practicing doctors to recognise easier patients with a need of intensified palliative care, and as a result provides more adequate medical attendance that is better suited to the specific needs of the patients. PMID:26551310

  2. Palliative care provision for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohannes Abebaw

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality in old age. Patients with advanced stage COPD are most likely to be admitted three to four times per year with acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD which are costly to manage. The adverse events of AECOPD are associated with poor quality of life, severe physical disability, loneliness, and depression and anxiety symptoms. Currently there is a lack of palliative care provision for patients with advanced stage COPD compared with cancer patients despite having poor prognosis, intolerable dyspnoea, lower levels of self efficacy, greater disability, poor quality of life and higher levels of anxiety and depression. These symptoms affect patients' quality of life and can be a source of concern for family and carers as most patients are likely to be housebound and may be in need of continuous support and care. Evidence of palliative care provision for cancer patients indicate that it improves quality of life and reduces health care costs. The reasons why COPD patients do not receive palliative care are complex. This partly may relate to prognostic accuracy of patients' survival which poses a challenge for healthcare professionals, including general practitioners for patients with advanced stage COPD, as they are less likely to engage in end-of-life care planning in contrast with terminal disease like cancer. Furthermore there is a lack of resources which constraints for the wider availability of the palliative care programmes in the health care system. Potential barriers may include unwillingness of patients to discuss advance care planning and end-of-life care with their general practitioners, lack of time, increased workload, and fear of uncertainty of the information to provide about the prognosis of the disease and also lack of appropriate tools to guide general practitioners when to refer patients for palliative care. COPD is a chronic

  3. User handbook for the program CARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The program CARE calculates the annual environmental exposure of complex nuclear installations. In the calculation, the real weather conditions and the measured release rates of the nuclides are taken into account. According to their location in the plant, the contributions of the time integrated pollutant concentrations of the individual emitters are superimposed at predefinable receiving points. In the conception of the model for calculating the resultant dose care was taken to ensure that the program is capable of treating both individual emissions and quasi-continuous emissions. The program CARE can therefore be used in the event of accidents. (orig.)

  4. Reciprocal learning and chronic care model implementation in primary care: results from a new scale of learning in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Noël Polly H; Jordan Michelle; McDaniel Reuben R; Lanham Holly; Palmer Ray; Leykum Luci K; Parchman Michael

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Efforts to improve the care of patients with chronic disease in primary care settings have been mixed. Application of a complex adaptive systems framework suggests that this may be because implementation efforts often focus on education or decision support of individual providers, and not on the dynamic system as a whole. We believe that learning among clinic group members is a particularly important attribute of a primary care clinic that has not yet been well-studied in ...

  5. Child Nutrition Programs: Child and Adult Care Food Program. Family Day Care Home Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    This handbook details requirements for family day care homes in Oklahoma for providing child nutrition through the Child and Adult Care Food Program. The handbook includes contact information for state consultants. The basic responsibilities for sponsors of family day care home child nutrition programs are outlined, and the sponsoring organization…

  6. Chronic pain management as a barrier to pediatric palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lindsay A; Meinert, Elizabeth; Baker, Kimberly; Knapp, Caprice

    2013-12-01

    Pain is common as a presenting complaint to outpatient and emergency departments for children, yet pain management represents one of the children's largest unmet needs. A child may present with acute pain for an intermittent issue or may have acute or chronic pain in the setting of chronic illness. The mainstay of treatment for pain uses a stepwise approach for pain management, such as set up by the World Health Organization. For children with life-limiting illnesses, the Institute of Medicine guidelines recommends referral upon diagnosis for palliative care, meaning that the child receives comprehensive services that include pain control in coordination with curative therapies; yet barriers remain. From the provider perspective, pain can be better addressed through a careful assessment of one's own knowledge, skills, and attitudes. The key components of pain management in children are multimodal, regardless of the cause of the pain. PMID:23329083

  7. Intimate Partner Aggression Perpetration in Primary Care Chronic Pain Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Taft, Casey; Schwartz, Sonia; Liebschutz, Jane M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence and correlates of partner aggression perpetration in 597 primary care chronic pain patients. Approximately 30% of participants reported perpetrating low-level aggression, 12% reported injuring their partner, and 5% reported engaging in sexual coercion. Women reported more low-level aggression perpetration than men, and men reported more engagement in sexual coercion than women. Substance use disorders (SUD) were associated with all outcomes, and both aggress...

  8. Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Strategic Plan Federal Initiatives Career Opportunities Contact Us Administration on Aging (AoA) Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program ( ... Section Q Fact Sheet Back to top Funding History Older Americans Act Title VII Chapter 2 (Ombudsman ...

  9. Leveraging HIV platforms to work toward comprehensive primary care in rural Malawi: the Integrated Chronic Care Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroe, Emily B; Kalanga, Noel; Mailosi, Bright; Mwalwanda, Stanley; Kachimanga, Chiyembekezo; Nyangulu, Kondwani; Dunbar, Elizabeth; Kerr, Lila; Nazimera, Lawrence; Dullie, Luckson

    2015-12-01

    This case study describes an integrated chronic care clinic that utilizes a robust HIV program as a platform for NCD screening and treatment. A unique model, the integrated chronic care clinic provides longitudinal care for patients with an array of chronic diseases including HIV and common NCDs, allowing for a single visit for all of a patient's conditions. Set in Malawi's remote Neno District, this clinic structure aims to (1) increase access to care for NCD patients, (2) maximize efficiency given the severe human resource shortages, and (3) replicate strong HIV outcomes for patients with other chronic conditions. The goal is to increase the number of health facilities in Neno capable of fully delivering Malawi's Essential Health Package, the set of cost-effective interventions endorsed by Malawi MOH to reduce burden of disease and leading causes of death. While implementation is ongoing and processes are evolving, this model of healthcare delivery has already improved the accessibility of NCD care by allowing patients to have all of their chronic conditions treated on the same day at their nearest health facility, notably without additional investment of human and financial resources. Currently, 6781 patients on antiretroviral therapy and 721 patients with NCDs are benefitting, including 379 with hypertension, 187 with asthma, 144 with epilepsy, and 76 with diabetes. Among the NCD patient population, 15.1% are HIV-positive. Success hinged largely on several factors, including clear leadership and staff ownership of their specific duties, and a well-defined and uniform patient flow process. Furthermore, deliberate and regular conversations about challenges allowed for constant iteration and improvement of processes. Moving forward, several tasks remain. We are refining the data management process to further consolidate medical records, along with integrating our tracking processes for clients who miss appointments. Additionally, we are exploring opportunities for

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of a Diabetes Pay-For-Performance Program in Diabetes Patients with Multiple Chronic Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Hui-Min; Gu, Song-Mao; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Kao, Hao-Yun; Lin, Yi-Chieh; Chiu, Herng-Chia

    2015-01-01

    Pay for performance (P4P) has been used as a strategy to improve quality for patients with chronic illness. Little was known whether care provided to individuals with multiple chronic conditions in a P4P program were cost-effective. This study investigated cost effectiveness of a diabetes P4P program for caring patients with diabetes alone (DM alone) and diabetes with comorbid hypertension and hyperlipidemia (DMHH) from a single payer perspective in Taiwan. Analyzing data using population-bas...

  11. [The impact of education on chronic wound care improvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novinscak, Tomislav; Filipović, Marinko; Kristofić, Jelena; Toplek, Goran

    2014-10-01

    Although not fully understood, close relationship between health and education ensures unambiguous health and quality of life advantages to educated individuals. Education ensures different thinking and decision making processes and man is enabled to receive information from the external world. Even though the process of education and learning still relies on banking principles and coping of common knowledge, modern and technological society drives the system as well as education opportunities towards the new learning sources. In the developed world, the impact of chronic wounds on health systems is fairly perceived, as well as chronic wound treatment and education. Our health system still neglects the significant impact of chronic wounds on social and economic, individual and community well-being. Recognizing the importance of chronic wounds and implementation of a developed educational system gives us the potential for improving care for chronic wounds, and thus to substantially improve the quality of life of patients. Furthermore, consequent reduction of unnecessary health costs could reallocate substantial resources to other points of interest. PMID:25326984

  12. Managing type 2 diabetes in Soweto-The South African Chronic Disease Outreach Program experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ivor; Schneider, Helen; Shezi, Zodwa; Mdleleni, Golebemang; Gerntholtz, Trevor; Butler, Omar; Manderson, Lenore; Naicker, Sarala

    2009-08-01

    Diabetes (DM) and its resultant complications are a problem worldwide, and especially in developing countries like South Africa (SA). Risk factors associated with DM are potentially modifiable, but DM control is poor. Problems in SA include high prevalence of morbidity from DM and hypertension (HTN), lack of recognition of the importance of chronic kidney disease (CKD), late presentation to health care services, lack of education of health providers and patients, and poor quality of care in primary health care settings (PHC). In response, there has been growing advocacy for prevention strategies and improved support and education for primary health care nurses (PHCNs). A Chronic Disease Outreach Program (CDOP), based on the chronic care model was used to follow patients with DM and HTN, support PHCN, and improve health systems for management in Soweto. A group of 257 DM patients and 186 PHCN were followed over 2 years, with the study including the evaluation of 'functional' and clinical outcomes, diary recordings outlining program challenges, and a questionnaire assessing PHCNs' knowledge and education support, and the value of CDOP. CDOP was successful in supporting PHCNs, detecting patients with advanced disease, and ensuring early referral to a specialist center. It improved early detection and referral of high risk, poorly controlled patients and had an impact on PHCNs' knowledge. Its weaknesses include poor follow up due to poor existing health systems and the programs' inability to integrate into existing chronic disease services. The study also revealed an overworked, poorly supported, poorly educated and frustrated primary health care team. PMID:19640820

  13. Challenges of Change: A Qualitative Study of Chronic Care Model Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Hroscikoski, Mary C.; Solberg, Leif I.; Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn M.; Harper, Peter G.; McGrail, Michael P.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE The Chronic Care Model (CCM) provides a conceptual framework for transforming health care for patients with chronic conditions; however, little is known about how to best design and implement its specifics. One large health care organization that tried to implement the CCM in primary care provided an opportunity to study these issues.

  14. Targeted Screening and Treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease: Lessons Learned from the Kidney Early Evaluation Program

    OpenAIRE

    Vassalotti, Joseph A.; Leslie Gracz-Weinstein; Monica R. Gannon; Wendy Weinstock Brown

    2006-01-01

    The National Kidney Foundation's (NKF) Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP) is a public service program that addresses the gaps in chronic kidney disease (CKD) awareness and care. This free, voluntary, community-based program is designed to screen people at risk of CKD and promote CKD awareness among primary healthcare providers and the public. The primary objective of KEEP is to identify individuals at risk of CKD at a time when appropriate intervention has the potential to markedly slow a...

  15. Seamless health care for chronic diseases in a dual health care system: managed care and the role of family physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A

    1998-01-01

    Neither private nor state run health care systems are perfect. Although there is increasing evidence that Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) provide comparable care at lower cost, HMOs tend to select healthy patients. The dual health care system in Hong Kong spends about 3.9 per cent of GDP, with health indices among the best in the world. Hong Kong still faces the problem of escalating health care expenditure. One should take advantage of the dual health care system to evolve a new paradigm for a primary-led seamless health care service. The Diabetes Centre of a university teaching hospital together with the University of Community and Family Medicine has started a structured shared care programme in diabetes mellitus, involving general practitioners in both the private and public sectors integrating the primary and secondary care, and the private and public sectors. This programme starts to develop an infrastructure for providing quality care at an affordable cost for a large pool of patients with chronic disease. Unlike other "managed care schemes", this one is not run by profit-oriented companies, but by health professionals with an interest in providing best possible care at an affordable cost. The "disease management" approach needs a care delivery system without traditional boundaries; and a continuous improvement process which develops and refines the knowledge base, guidelines and delivery system. PMID:10351265

  16. Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs in Health Care Systems

    OpenAIRE

    MacDougall, Conan; Polk, Ron E.

    2005-01-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship programs in hospitals seek to optimize antimicrobial prescribing in order to improve individual patient care as well as reduce hospital costs and slow the spread of antimicrobial resistance. With antimicrobial resistance on the rise worldwide and few new agents in development, antimicrobial stewardship programs are more important than ever in ensuring the continued efficacy of available antimicrobials. The design of antimicrobial management programs should be based o...

  17. Wound care matrices for chronic leg ulcers: role in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sano H

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hitomi Sano,1 Sachio Kouraba,2 Rei Ogawa11Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan; 2Sapporo Wound Care and Anti-Aging Laboratory, Sapporo, JapanAbstract: Chronic leg ulcers are a significant health care concern. Although deep wounds are usually treated by flap transfers, the operation is invasive and associates with serious complications. Skin grafts may be a less invasive means of covering wounds. However, skin grafts cannot survive on deep defects unless high-quality granulation tissue can first be generated in the defects. Technologies that generate high-quality granulation tissue are needed. One possibility is to use wound care matrices, which are bioengineered skin and soft tissue substitutes. Because they all support the healing process by providing a premade extracellular matrix material, these matrices can be termed “extracellular matrix replacement therapies”. The matrix promotes wound healing by acting as a scaffold for regeneration, attracting host cytokines to the wound, stimulating wound epithelialization and angiogenesis, and providing the wound bed with bioactive components. This therapy has lasting benefits as it not only helps large skin defects to be closed with thin skin grafts or patch grafts but also restores cosmetic appearance and proper function. In particular, since it acts as a layer that slides over the subcutaneous fascia, it provides skin elasticity, tear resistance, and texture. Several therapies and products employing wound care matrices for wound management have been developed recently. Some of these can be applied in combination with negative pressure wound therapy or beneficial materials that promote wound healing and can be incorporated into the matrix. To date, the clinical studies on these approaches suggest that wound care matrices promote spontaneous wound healing or can be used to facilitate skin grafting, thereby avoiding the need to use

  18. Self-care and risk reduction habits in older injection drug users with chronic wounds: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Maria Elisa; Robinowitz, Natanya; Chaulk, Patrick; Johnson, Kristine E.

    2014-01-01

    Background We surveyed a population of injection drug users (IDUs) frequenting the mobile Baltimore City Needle Exchange Program (BNEP) to investigate self-care factors associated with chronic wounds, a significant cause of morbidity especially among older IDUs. Methods Participants ≥18 years old completed a survey regarding chronic wounds (duration ≥8 weeks), injection and hygiene practices. Study staff visually verified the presence of wounds. Participants were categorized into four groups ...

  19. Development of a primary care-based complex care management intervention for chronically ill patients at high risk for hospitalization: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyer Martin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex care management is seen as an approach to face the challenges of an ageing society with increasing numbers of patients with complex care needs. The Medical Research Council in the United Kingdom has proposed a framework for the development and evaluation of complex interventions that will be used to develop and evaluate a primary care-based complex care management program for chronically ill patients at high risk for future hospitalization in Germany. Methods and design We present a multi-method procedure to develop a complex care management program to implement interventions aimed at reducing potentially avoidable hospitalizations for primary care patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or chronic heart failure and a high likelihood of hospitalization. The procedure will start with reflection about underlying precipitating factors of hospitalizations and how they may be targeted by the planned intervention (pre-clinical phase. An intervention model will then be developed (phase I based on theory, literature, and exploratory studies (phase II. Exploratory studies are planned that entail the recruitment of 200 patients from 10 general practices. Eligible patients will be identified using two ways of 'case finding': software based predictive modelling and physicians' proposal of patients based on clinical experience. The resulting subpopulations will be compared regarding healthcare utilization, care needs and resources using insurance claims data, a patient survey, and chart review. Qualitative studies with healthcare professionals and patients will be undertaken to identify potential barriers and enablers for optimal performance of the complex care management program. Discussion This multi-method procedure will support the development of a primary care-based care management program enabling the implementation of interventions that will potentially reduce avoidable

  20. Auditing chronic disease care: Does it make a difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Essel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: An integrated audit tool was developed for five chronic diseases, namely diabetes, hypertension, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and epilepsy. Annual audits have been done in the Western Cape Metro district since 2009. The year 2012 was the first year that all six districts in South Africa’s Western Cape Province participated in the audit process.Aim: To determine whether clinical audits improve chronic disease care in health districts over time.Setting: Western Cape Province, South Africa.Methods: Internal audits were conducted of primary healthcare facility processes and equipment availability as well as a folder review of 10 folders per chronic condition per facility. Random systematic sampling was used to select the 10 folders for the folder review. Combined data for all facilities gave a provincial overview and allowed for comparison between districts. Analysis was done comparing districts that have been participating in the audit process from 2009 to 2010 (‘2012 old’ to districts that started auditing recently (‘2012 new’.Results: The number of facilities audited has steadily increased from 29 in 2009 to 129 in 2012. Improvements between different years have been modest, and the overall provincial average seemed worse in 2012 compared to 2011. However, there was an improvement in the ‘2012 old’ districts compared to the ‘2012 new’ districts for both the facility audit and the folder review, including for eight clinical indicators, with ‘2012 new’ districts being less likely to record clinical processes (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.21–0.31.Conclusion: These findings are an indication of the value of audits to improve care processes over the long term. It is hoped that this improvement will lead to improved patient outcomes.

  1. Wound healing and treating wounds: Chronic wound care and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jennifer G; Higham, Catherine; Broussard, Karen; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, chronic ulcers--including decubitus, vascular, inflammatory, and rheumatologic subtypes--affect >6 million people, with increasing numbers anticipated in our growing elderly and diabetic populations. These wounds cause significant morbidity and mortality and lead to significant medical costs. Preventative and treatment measures include disease-specific approaches and the use of moisture retentive dressings and adjunctive topical therapies to promote healing. In this article, we discuss recent advances in wound care technology and current management guidelines for the treatment of wounds and ulcers. PMID:26979353

  2. Impact Evaluation of a System-Wide Chronic Disease Management Program on Health Service Utilisation: A Propensity-Matched Cohort Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Laurent Billot; Kate Corcoran; Alina McDonald; Gawaine Powell-Davies; Anne-Marie Feyer

    2016-01-01

    The New South Wales Health (NSW Health) Chronic Disease Management Program (CDMP) delivers interventions to adults at risk of hospitalisation for five target chronic conditions that respond well to ambulatory care: diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, and coronary artery disease. The intervention consists of two main components: (1) care coordination across sectors (acute, ambulatory, and community care from both public and private sectors) ...

  3. Co-ordination and management of chronic conditions in Europe : the role of primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gress, S.; Baan, C.A.; Calnan, M.; Dedeu, T.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Howson, H.

    2009-01-01

    Healthcare systems in Europe struggle with inadequate co-ordination of care for people with chronic conditions. Moreover, there is a considerable evidence gap in the treatment of chronic conditions, lack of self-management, variation in quality of care, lack of preventive care, increasing costs for

  4. The family experience of care in chronic situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellato, Roseney; Araújo, Laura Filomena Santos de; Dolina, Janderléia Valéria; Musquim, Cleciene Dos Anjos; Corrêa, Geovana Hagata de Lima Souza Thaines

    2016-06-01

    An essay that aims to reflect on the family experience of care in chronic situation, increasing the understanding of the family as the primary caregiver. It is based on comprehensive approach in studies conducted in three matrix searches from family care experiences. We have taken three axes to organize our reflections: a) conformation of family care in chronic situation, highlighting the multiple costs incurred to the family, which can exhaust the potential of care and establish or increase its vulnerability if it is not backed by networks support and sustenance; b) family rearrangements for the care, giving visibility to care cores in which many loved family members share the care, dynamic, plural and changeable way; c) self care modeling family care, pointing to the range of possibilities of the person taking care of diseased conditions supported by people close to them. We learn that the family takes care of itself in everyday life and in the illness experience, creating networks that can provide you support and sustenance. Thus, professionals in health practices should shape up in a longitudinal and very personal way, by reference to the family care, supporting him in what is his own. Ensaio que tem por objetivo refletir sobre a experiência familiar de cuidado na situação crônica, ampliando a compreensão da família como cuidadora primária. Embasa-se em estudos de abordagem compreensiva realizados em três pesquisas matriciais que abordaram experiências familiares de cuidado. Tomamos três eixos para organizar nossas reflexões: a) conformação do cuidado familiar na situação crônica, destacando os múltiplos custos gerados à família, que podem exaurir seus potenciais de cuidado, instaurando ou ampliando sua vulnerabilidade se não for amparada por redes de apoio e sustentação; b) rearranjos familiares para o cuidado, dando visibilidade aos núcleos de cuidado compartilhados pelos diversos entes familiares, de modo dinâmico, plural e mut

  5. Estudio cualitativo sobre la atención médica a los enfermos crónicos en el Seguro Popular A qualitative study on health care to chronically ill people in Popular Health Insurance program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Eduardo Hernández-Ibarra

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Examinar la atención médica que brinda el Seguro Popular a los enfermos crónicos en México, desde la perspectiva de quienes padecen las enfermedades y también de los profesionales de la salud. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se llevó a cabo un estudio cualitativo en la ciudad de Guadalajara, Jalisco, México, donde se entrevistó a 40 enfermos crónicos y a 14 profesionales sanitarios de primer nivel; posteriormente, se realizó un análisis crítico del discurso. RESULTADOS: El Seguro Popular ha significado ganancias y pérdidas para los participantes. Los enfermos lo valoran positivamente al considerarlo un regalo, mas no un derecho social. Sus carencias económicas y de recursos les impiden acceder a la atención médica, obtener medicamentos y realizarse estudios de laboratorio, también generándose relaciones conflictivas con los profesionales. CONCLUSIÓN: Los propósitos del Seguro Popular distan de lograrse en la atención a los enfermos crónicos. El Seguro tendría que ser objeto de análisis, y otorgar prioridad a la perspectiva de los enfermos y del personal de salud operativo.OBJECTIVE: To examine health care provided to chronically ill people in the Popular Health Insurance (Seguro Popular from the perspective of patients and health professionals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A qualitative study was carried out in Guadalajara, Mexico. 40 chronically ill people, and 14 health professionals of primary health centers participated in the study. Information was gathered using semi-structured interviews; critical discourse analysis was carried out. RESULTS: Seguro Popular has meant gains and losses to participants. Cronically ill people value it positively since it is perceived as a gift, not a social right. Some obstacles impede participants accessing health care, obtaining medications and analysis. Conflictive relations also cause tensions between patients and health professionals. CONCLUSION: The initial goals of Seguro Popular are

  6. Care Coordination/Home Telehealth: the systematic implementation of health informatics, home telehealth, and disease management to support the care of veteran patients with chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darkins, Adam; Ryan, Patricia; Kobb, Rita; Foster, Linda; Edmonson, Ellen; Wakefield, Bonnie; Lancaster, Anne E

    2008-12-01

    Between July 2003 and December 2007, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) introduced a national home telehealth program, Care Coordination/Home Telehealth (CCHT). Its purpose was to coordinate the care of veteran patients with chronic conditions and avoid their unnecessary admission to long-term institutional care. Demographic changes in the veteran population necessitate VHA increase its noninstitutional care (NIC) services 100% above its 2007 level to provide care for 110,000 NIC patients by 2011. By 2011, CCHT will meet 50% of VHA's anticipated NIC provision. CCHT involves the systematic implementation of health informatics, home telehealth, and disease management technologies. It helps patients live independently at home. Between 2003 and 2007, the census figure (point prevalence) for VHA CCHT patients increased from 2,000 to 31,570 (1,500% growth). CCHT is now a routine NIC service provided by VHA to support veteran patients with chronic conditions as they age. CCHT patients are predominantly male (95%) and aged 65 years or older. Strict criteria determine patient eligibility for enrollment into the program and VHA internally assesses how well its CCHT programs meet standardized clinical, technology, and managerial requirements. VHA has trained 5,000 staff to provide CCHT. Routine analysis of data obtained for quality and performance purposes from a cohort of 17,025 CCHT patients shows the benefits of a 25% reduction in numbers of bed days of care, 19% reduction in numbers of hospital admissions, and mean satisfaction score rating of 86% after enrolment into the program. The cost of CCHT is $1,600 per patient per annum, substantially less than other NIC programs and nursing home care. VHA's experience is that an enterprise-wide home telehealth implementation is an appropriate and cost-effective way of managing chronic care patients in both urban and rural settings. PMID:19119835

  7. Knowledge, Attitudes and Beliefs about Chronic Noncancer Pain in Primary Care: a Canadian Survey of Physicians and Pharmacists

    OpenAIRE

    Lyne Lalonde; Vincent Leroux-Lapointe; Manon Choinière; Elisabeth Martin; David Lussier; Djamal Berbiche; Diane Lamarre; Robert Thiffault; Ghaya Jouini; Sylvie Perreault

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care providers’ knowledge, attitudes and beliefs (KAB) regarding chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) are a barrier to optimal management. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate and identify the determinants of the KAB of primary care physicians and pharmacists, and to document clinician preferences regarding the content and format of a continuing education program (CEP). METHOD: Physicians and pharmacists of 486 CNCP patients participated. Physicians completed the original version of the KnowP...

  8. Extending The P4P Agenda, Part 2: How Medicare Can Reduce Waste And Improve The Care Of The Chronically Ill: By targeting Americans with chronic illnesses, Medicare can begin to solidify a strategy of rewarding providers for truly improving care.

    OpenAIRE

    Wennberg, John E.; Fisher, Elliott S; Skinner, Jonathan S.; Bronner, Kristen K

    2007-01-01

    The care of Americans with severe chronic illnesses is disorganized, unnecessarily costly, and undisciplined by sound clinical science. The federal government should invest in a crash program to improve the scientific basis of managing chronic illness, and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) should extend its pay-for-performance (P4P) agenda to ensure that within ten years all Americans with severe chronic illnesses have access to accountable health care organizations providi...

  9. Applicability of the assessment of chronic illness care (ACIC instrument in Germany resulting in a new questionnaire: questionnaire of chronic illness care in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Stephen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Chronic Care Model (CCM is an evidence based, population based approach to improve care for people with chronic conditions. The Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (ACIC instrument is widely used to measure to what extent within a healthcare system the CCM is implemented. The aim of this study was to translate and culturally adapt the ACIC Instrument for the German healthcare system. Methods For translating the ACIC instrument, principles of Good Practice for the Translation and Cultural Adaptation Process by the ISPOR Task Force were followed. Focus groups were additionally conducted with general practitioners to adapt the items culturally. Results The ACIC instrument can not be used in the German healthcare system easily due to a multifaceted understanding of words, different levels of knowledge of the CCM and fundamental differences between health systems. Conclusions As following the CCM leads to benefits for patients with chronic illnesses, measuring to which extent it is implemented is of major interest. A new questionnaire using the CCM as its theoretical basis, sensitive to the healthcare systems of the host country has to be created. Knowledge transfer between countries by using an instrument from a different healthcare system can lead to a completely new questionnaire.

  10. Le «Chronic care model» en médecine de famille en Suisse

    OpenAIRE

    Steurer-Stey, C.; Frei, A; Rosemann, T

    2010-01-01

    The Chronic care model in Swiss primary care The care of patients with chronic disease is one of the most urgent medical challenges of actual society. The chronic care model (CCM) is an organizational, proactive approach for chronic disease in primary care. The system creates practical, supportive, evidence-based interactions between an informed, activated patient and a proactive practice team. CCM identifies six essential elements of high-quality health care : community ; heal...

  11. Developing an active implementation model for a chronic disease management program

    OpenAIRE

    Smidth, Margrethe; Christensen, Morten Bondo; Olesen, Frede; Vedsted, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Introduction and diffusion of new disease management programs in healthcare is usually slow, but active theory-driven implementation seems to outperform other implementation strategies. However, we have only scarce evidence on the feasibility and real effect of such strategies in complex primary care settings where municipalities, general practitioners and hospitals should work together. The Central Denmark Region recently implemented a disease management program for chronic obstru...

  12. A personalized framework for medication treatment management in chronic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutkias, Vassilis G; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Triantafyllidis, Andreas; Malousi, Andigoni; Giaglis, Georgios D; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2010-03-01

    The ongoing efforts toward continuity of care and the recent advances in information and communication technologies have led to a number of successful personal health systems for the management of chronic care. These systems are mostly focused on monitoring efficiently the patient's medical status at home. This paper aims at extending home care services delivery by introducing a novel framework for monitoring the patient's condition and safety with respect to the medication treatment administered. For this purpose, considering a body area network (BAN) with advanced sensors and a mobile base unit as the central communication hub from the one side, and the clinical environment from the other side, an architecture was developed, offering monitoring patterns definition for the detection of possible adverse drug events and the assessment of medication response, supported by mechanisms enabling bidirectional communication between the BAN and the clinical site. Particular emphasis was given on communication and information flow aspects that have been addressed by defining/adopting appropriate formal information structures as well as the service-oriented architecture paradigm. The proposed framework is illustrated via an application scenario concerning hypertension management. PMID:20007042

  13. Patient autonomy in chronic care: solving a paradox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reach G

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gérard Reach Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolic Diseases, Avicenne Hospital AP-HP, and EA 3412, CRNH-IdF, Paris 13 University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny, France Abstract: The application of the principle of autonomy, which is considered a cornerstone of contemporary bioethics, is sometimes in obvious contradiction with the principle of beneficence. Indeed, it may happen in chronic care that the preferences of the health care provider (HCP, who is largely focused on the prevention of long term complications of diseases, differ from those, more present oriented, preferences of the patient. The aims of this narrative review are as follows: 1 to show that the exercise of autonomy by the patient is not always possible; 2 where the latter is not possible, to examine how, in the context of the autonomy principle, someone (a HCP can decide what is good (a treatment for someone else (a patient without falling into paternalism. Actually this analysis leads to a paradox: not only is the principle of beneficence sometimes conflicting with the principle of autonomy, but physician's beneficence may enter into conflict with the mere respect of the patient; and 3 to propose a solution to this paradox by revisiting the very concepts of the autonomous person, patient education, and trust in the patient–physician relationship: this article provides an ethical definition of patient education. Keywords: preference, autonomy, person, reflexivity, empathy, sympathy, patient education, trust, respect, care

  14. Stakeholders’ perception on the organization of chronic care: a SWOT analysis to draft avenues for health care reforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Adequate care for individuals living with chronic illnesses calls for a healthcare system redesign, moving from acute, disease-centered to patient-centered models. The aim of this study was to identify Belgian stakeholders’ perceptions on the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the healthcare system for people with chronic diseases in Belgium. Methods Four focus groups were held with stakeholders from the micro and meso level, in addition to two interviews with stakeholders who could not attend the focus group sessions. Data collection and the discussion were based on the Chronic Care model. Thematic analysis of the transcripts allowed for the identification of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the current health care system with focus on chronic care. Results Informants stressed the overall good quality of the acute health care system and the level of reimbursement of care as an important strength of the current system. In contrast, the lack of integration of care was identified as one of the biggest weaknesses of today’s health care system, along with the unclear definitions of the roles and functions of health professionals involved in care processes. Patient education to support self-management exists for patients with diabetes and/or terminal kidney failure but not for those living with other or multiple chronic conditions. The current overall fee-for-service system is a barrier to integrated care, as are the lack of incentives for integrated care. Attending multidisciplinary meetings, for example, is underfinanced to date. Finally, clinical information systems lack interoperability, which further impedes the information flow across settings and disciplines. Conclusion Our study’s methods allowed for the identification of problematic domains in the health system for people living with chronic conditions. These findings provided useful insights surrounding perceived priorities. This methodology may inspire

  15. 75 FR 80734 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) (63 FR 66940). After considering the comments received, DOE... CFR Part 850 RIN 1992-AA39 Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program AGENCY: Office of Health... beryllium disease prevention program. The Department solicits comment and information on the...

  16. [Care and chronic illness: family caregiver's viewpoint in northeast Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Juliana Maria de Sousa; Nations, Marilyn Kay

    2012-02-01

    The provision of care causes stress in everyday family dynamics leading to physical, mental and emotional complications in caregivers and spouses' loss of liberty and/or overwork. Between March and November 2006, this anthropological research examined family caregiving in the context of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). By means of ethnographic interviews, illness narratives and participant observation, the scope was to describe family reorganization and coexistence with the disease and its evolution, caregiver perceptions about patient difficulties and limitations experienced and strategies employed to tackle their illness. Six low-income family caregivers, living in poor, urban areas in the outskirts of the capital city, Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil, participated in the study. From the Content Analysis, two categories arose: "sharing suffering" and "attitudes and behavior perceived and experienced by caregivers." In-depth narratives revealed marked affection between patients and their family caregivers. Despite poverty, structural violence, unemployment, social prejudice and low salaries endemic in the Northeast of Brazil, the caregivers find effective ways to cope with chronic illness besides creating strategies to diminish suffering caused by the illness. PMID:22267046

  17. A Customizable Model for Chronic Disease Coordination: Lessons Learned From the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managed resources, and 6) relationship building. These elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs. PMID:27032986

  18. A Customizable Model for Chronic Disease Coordination: Lessons Learned From the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voetsch, Karen; Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managed resources, and 6) relationship building. These elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs. PMID:27032986

  19. Effectiveness of Stepped Care for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Randomized Noninferiority Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummers, Marcia; Knoop, Hans; Bleijenberg, Gijs

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In this randomized noninferiority study, the effectiveness and efficiency of stepped care for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) was compared to care as usual. Stepped care was formed by guided self-instruction, followed by cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) if the patient desired it. Care as usual encompassed CBT after a waiting period.…

  20. Patient identified needs for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease versus billed services for care received

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Heins-Nesvold

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Jill Heins-Nesvold1, Angeline Carlson2, Leslie King-Schultz3, Kenneth E Joslyn41American Lung Association of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, USA; 2Data Intelligence Consultants, LLC, Eden Prairie, MN, USA; 3Mayo Medical School, Rochester, MN, USA; 4Medica Health Plan, Minnetonka, MN, USAAbstract: The American Lung Association of Minnesota (ALAMN was granted access to a 2004 administrative claims data from an upper mid-Western, independent practice association model health plan. Claims information, including demographics, prevalence, medication and oxygen therapy, and health care utilization, was extracted for 7,782 patients with COPD who were 40 years of age and older. In addition, ALAMN conducted a survey of 1,911 patients from Minnesota diagnosed with COPD. The survey queried the patients about demographics, treatment, medications, limitations, wants, and needs. This article compares and contrasts the information gained through the health plan administrative claims database with the findings from the COPD patient survey in areas of age, gender, types of provider primarily responsible for COPD care, spirometry use, medication therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, oxygen therapy, and health care utilization. Primary care practitioners provided a majority of the COPD-related care. The claims evidence of spirometry use was 16%–62% of COPD patients had claims evidence of COPD-related medications. 25% of patients reported, and 23% of patients had claims evidence of, a hospitalization during the observation year. 16% of patients reported using pulmonary rehabilitation programs. The results indicate there is an opportunity to improve COPD diagnosis and management.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, oxygen therapy, medication therapy, spirometry, chronic care, assessment

  1. Antimicrobial stewardship programs in health care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Conan; Polk, Ron E

    2005-10-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship programs in hospitals seek to optimize antimicrobial prescribing in order to improve individual patient care as well as reduce hospital costs and slow the spread of antimicrobial resistance. With antimicrobial resistance on the rise worldwide and few new agents in development, antimicrobial stewardship programs are more important than ever in ensuring the continued efficacy of available antimicrobials. The design of antimicrobial management programs should be based on the best current understanding of the relationship between antimicrobial use and resistance. Such programs should be administered by multidisciplinary teams composed of infectious diseases physicians, clinical pharmacists, clinical microbiologists, and infection control practitioners and should be actively supported by hospital administrators. Strategies for changing antimicrobial prescribing behavior include education of prescribers regarding proper antimicrobial usage, creation of an antimicrobial formulary with restricted prescribing of targeted agents, and review of antimicrobial prescribing with feedback to prescribers. Clinical computer systems can aid in the implementation of each of these strategies, especially as expert systems able to provide patient-specific data and suggestions at the point of care. Antibiotic rotation strategies control the prescribing process by scheduled changes of antimicrobial classes used for empirical therapy. When instituting an antimicrobial stewardship program, a hospital should tailor its choice of strategies to its needs and available resources. PMID:16223951

  2. iPeer2Peer program: a pilot feasibility study in adolescents with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahola Kohut, Sara; Stinson, Jennifer N; Ruskin, Danielle; Forgeron, Paula; Harris, Lauren; van Wyk, Margaret; Luca, Stephanie; Campbell, Fiona

    2016-05-01

    Adolescents with chronic pain are often socially isolated, having never met others with chronic pain, and often feel misunderstood by healthy peers. Adolescence is a sensitive period for developing one's sense of self and autonomy, which often occurs in the context of peer relationships. This developmental process is disrupted in adolescents when their chronic pain interferes with their social interactions. Peer mentoring is proposed as a developmentally timely intervention. The aim of this study is to develop and test the feasibility, acceptability, and impact of the iPeer2Peer program. The iPeer2Peer program is a tailored peer mentorship program that provides modeling and reinforcement by peers (trained young adults with chronic pain aged 18-25 years who have learned to successfully manage their pain). This program aimed to enhance self-management of chronic pain in adolescents through 10 Skype video calls over the course of 8 weeks. A pilot randomized controlled trial design using waitlist controls was used in an adolescent chronic pain sample. Twenty-eight adolescents aged 14.8 ± 1.6 years (93% female) completed the trial (intervention: n = 12; control n = 16). Three adolescents completed the intervention after completing their participation in the control arm. The iPeer2Peer program was feasible and acceptable, provided the adolescents were given more time to complete all 10 calls. When compared with controls, adolescents who completed the iPeer2Peer program had significant improvement in self-management skills and their coping efforts were more successful. The iPeer2Peer program is a promising peer mentoring intervention that complements standard care for adolescents with chronic pain. PMID:26808145

  3. Spanning boundaries and creating strong patient relationships to coordinate care are strategies used by experienced chronic condition care coordinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Carolyn; Kendall, Elizabeth; Muenchberger, Heidi

    2012-08-01

    People with complex chronic conditions frequently need to navigate their own way through and around a fragmented and siloed health care system. Care coordination is a defining principle of primary care and is frequently proposed as a solution to this problem. However, care coordination requires more time and effort than primary care physicians alone have the capacity to deliver. Although registered nurses (RNs) are skilled team members who can be included in the delivery of coordinated patient care, any model of care coordination that involves RNs needs to fit within the existing health care delivery system. In this study, which used qualitative techniques based on grounded theory and included face-to-face interviews and open coding and theoretical sampling until data saturation was achieved, and which was one component of a larger action research study, we aimed to gain an understanding of the difference between usual chronic condition care and the work of chronic condition care coordination. The researchers interviewed general practitioners and RNs from various general practice sites who were actively coordinating care. Four unique processes were found to define care coordination implementation, namely: (1) moving beyond usual practice by spanning boundaries; (2) relationship-based care; (3) agreed roles and routines among relevant parties; and (4) committing to chronic condition care coordination. The findings suggested that existing professional and organisational cultures required negotiation before care coordination could be integrated into existing contexts. The challenge, however, seems to be in acknowledging and overcoming professional practice boundaries that define existing care through reflective practice and shared resourcing. PMID:23050573

  4. Ambivalent connections. Improving community mental health care for non-psychotic chronic patients perceived as 'difficult'

    OpenAIRE

    Koekkoek, Bauke

    2011-01-01

    Depression is a widespread psychiatric disorder, which becomes chronic in 25-30% of cases. When psychiatric and psychological treatments are ineffective, chronic depressive patients are often assigned to long-term care which is mostly provided by mental health nurses. Due to factors strongly associated with chronicity (like dependency, demoralization and hopelessness) long-term care is a difficult undertaking both for patients and mental health nurses. Areas in which major problems occur are ...

  5. Day Care: A Program in Search of a Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikales, Gerda

    This report examines current issues relating to day care and challenges many of the policy assumptions that underlie a major public program of subsidized day care for children. A historical perspective of day care is presented and various types of day care are described. The costs and benefits of day care are examined and the relation of day care…

  6. Healthcare professional acceptance of telemonitoring for chronic care patients in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asua José

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A pilot experimentation of a telemonitoring system for chronic care patients is conducted in the Bilbao Primary Care Health Region (Basque Country, Spain. It seems important to understand the factors related to healthcare professionals’ acceptance of this new technology in order to inform its extension to the whole healthcare system. This study aims to examine the psychosocial factors related to telemonitoring acceptance among healthcare professionals and to apply a theory-based instrument. Methods A validated questionnaire, based on an extension of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM, was distributed to a total of 605 nurses, general practitioners and paediatricians. Logistic regression analysis was performed to test the theoretical model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR and their 95% confidence intervals (CI were computed. Results A response rate of 44.3% was achieved. The original TAM model was good at predicting intention to use the telemonitoring system. However, the extended model, that included other theoretical variables, was more powerful. Perceived Usefulness, Compatibility, and Facilitators were the significant predictors of intention. A detailed analysis showed that intention to use telemonitoring was best predicted by healthcare professionals’ beliefs that they would obtain adequate training and technical support and that telemonitoring would require important changes in their practice. Conclusion The extended TAM explained a significant portion of the variance in healthcare professionals' intention to use a telemonitoring system for chronic care patients in primary care. The perception of facilitators in the organisational context is the most important variable to consider for increasing healthcare professionals’ intention to use the new technology.

  7. The Chronic CARe for diAbeTes study (CARAT: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birnbaum Beatrice

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is a major challenge for the health care system and especially for the primary care provider. The Chronic Care Model represents an evidence-based framework for the care for chronically ill. An increasing number of studies showed that implementing elements of the Chronic Care Model improves patient relevant outcomes and process parameters. However, most of these findings have been performed in settings different from the Swiss health care system which is dominated by single handed practices. Methods/Design CARAT is a cluster randomized controlled trial with general practitioners as the unit of randomization (trial registration: ISRCTN05947538. The study challenges the hypothesis that implementing several elements of the Chronic Care Model via a specially trained practice nurse improves the HbA1c level of diabetes type II patients significantly after one year (primary outcome. Furthermore, we assume that the intervention increases the proportion of patients who achieve the recommended targets regarding blood pressure ( Discussion This study challenges the hypothesis that the Chronic Care Model can be easily implemented by a practice nurse focused approach. If our results will confirm this hypothesis the suggestion arises whether this approach should be implemented in other chronic diseases and multimorbid patients and how to redesign care in Switzerland.

  8. The University of California at Los Angeles Alzheimer's and Dementia Care program for comprehensive, coordinated, patient-centered care: Preliminary data

    OpenAIRE

    Reuben, DB; Evertson, LC; Wenger, NS; Serrano, K; Chodosh, J; Ercoli, L.; Tan, ZS

    2013-01-01

    Dementia is a chronic disease that requires medical and social services to provide high-quality care and prevent complications. As a result of time constraints in practice, lack of systems-based approaches, and poor integration of community-based organizations (CBOs), the quality of care for dementia is poorer than that for other diseases that affect older persons. The University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Alzheimer's and Dementia Care (UCLA ADC) program partners with CBOs to provide...

  9. Nurse case management program of chronic pain patients treated with methadone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Louise; Pereira, John Xavier; Shir, Yoram

    2007-09-01

    Methadone treatment in chronic pain patients is still limited owing to misconceptions about addiction, safety, and its unique pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Nevertheless, patients with chronic noncancer pain are frequently treated with methadone at our Pain Centre either as the first opioid of choice, for specific pain conditions, or as a second-line opioid in patients developing tolerance or intractable side effects with other opioids. The aim of this study was to examine whether a nurse case management program of chronic pain patients treated with methadone is feasible and safe in trying to improve patients' care in an ambulatory setting. This program consisted of three phases: initial primary education session, telephone follow-up during methadone titration, and a subsequent maintenance period. The nurse case manager functioned autonomously and when required reported to and consulted the physician. The study included 75 subjects and was done over a nine-month period by completing follow-up questionnaires for every call. Of a total of 194 recorded calls, 41% were unscheduled. Forty-four percent of phone calls resulted in a methadone increase and 11% led to a decrease or cessation of methadone. No patients developed serious morbidity or mortality. Fifty-seven percent of patients were either satisfied or very satisfied with their treatment. A nurse-led case management program of methadone in chronic pain patients can improve patient care in an ambulatory setting. PMID:17723930

  10. Assessment of a primary and tertiary care integrated management model for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiro Meritxell

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in Spain continues to present challenges, and problems are exacerbated when there is a lack of coordinated follow-up between levels of care. This paper sets out the protocol for assessing the impact of an integrated management model for the care of patients with COPD. The new model will be evaluated in terms of 1 improvement in the rational utilization of health-care services and 2 benefits reflected in improved health status and quality of life for patients. Methods/Design A quasi-experimental study of the effectiveness of a COPD management model called COPD PROCESS. The patients in the study cohorts will be residents of neighborhoods served by two referral hospitals in Barcelona, Spain. One area comprises the intervention group (n = 32,248 patients and the other the control group (n = 32,114 patients. The study will include pre- and post-intervention assessment 18 months after the program goes into effect. Analyses will be on two datasets: clinical and administrative data available for all patients, and clinical assessment information for a cohort of 440 patients sampled randomly from the intervention and control areas. The main endpoints will be the hospitalization rates in the two health-care areas and quality-of-life measures in the two cohorts. Discussion The COPD PROCESS model foresees the integrated multidisciplinary management of interventions at different levels of the health-care system through coordinated routine clinical practice. It will put into practice diagnostic and treatment procedures that are based on current evidence, multidisciplinary consensus, and efficient use of available resources. Care pathways in this model are defined in terms of patient characteristics, level of disease severity and the presence or absence of exacerbation. The protocol covers the full range of care from primary prevention to treatment of

  11. Validation of the Danish version of the Patient Assessment of Care for Chronic Conditions questionnaire (PACIC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokolowski, Ineta; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Vedsted, Peter

    Objective: To evaluate the level of chronic care patients must be involved. The Danish version of the 20-item Patient Assessment of Care for Chronic Conditions PACIC questionnaire consisting of 5 scales and an overall summary score measuring patient reported assessment of structured chronic care...... has not been evaluated with regard to psychometric properties. This study aims to assess data quality and internal consistency and to validate the proposed factorial structure. Materials and methods: Setting: Diabetes population receiving chronic care in Denmark. Subjects: A total of 624 patients aged...... same questionnaire is constructed and applied to different countries with diverse cultural backgrounds and health care systems. It is decisive, that translated questionnaires are validated in country they are used....

  12. Distinguishing patients with chronic fatigue from those with chronic fatigue syndrome: a diagnostic study in UK primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Darbishire, L; Ridsdale, L.; Seed, P. T.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) has been defined, but many more patients consult in primary care with chronic fatigue that does not meet the criteria for CFS. General practitioners (GPs) do not generally use the CFS diagnosis, and have some doubt about the validity of CFS as an illness. AIM: To describe the proportion of patients consulting their GP for fatigue that met the criteria for CFS, and to describe the social, psychological, and physical differences between patients with C...

  13. iMHere: A Novel mHealth System for Supporting Self-Care in Management of Complex and Chronic Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Parmanto, Bambang; Pramana, Gede; Yu, Daihua Xie; Fairman, Andrea D.; Dicianno, Brad E.; McCue, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals with chronic conditions are vulnerable to secondary complications that can be prevented with adherence to self-care routines. They benefit most from receiving effective treatments beyond acute care, usually in the form of regular follow-up and self-care support in their living environments. One such population is individuals with spina bifida (SB), the most common permanently disabling birth defect in the United States. A Wellness Program at the University of Pittsburgh...

  14. Edmonton Regional Palliative Care Program: impact on patterns of terminal cancer care

    OpenAIRE

    Bruera, E; Neumann, C M; Gagnon, B.; Brenneis, C; Kneisler, P; Selmser, P; J Hanson

    1999-01-01

    The Edmonton Regional Palliative Care Program was established in July 1995 to measure the access of patients with terminal cancer to palliative care services, decrease the number of cancer-related deaths in acute care facilities and increase the participation of family physicians in the care of terminally ill patients. In this retrospective study the authors compared the pattern of care and site of deaths before establishment of the program (1992/93) and during its second year of operation (1...

  15. CHRONIC DIARRHOEA : AN ETIOLOGICAL AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY AT A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokesh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : The etiology of malabsorption syndrome varies according to the geographical location and age of the patients. Scare data is available regarding the etiology of chronic diarrhoea in India. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To study etiology and epidemiological profile of chronic diarrhoea at a tert iary care center. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 100 patients of chronic diarrhoea were evaluated. RESULTS: Celiac sprue ( 54% remains the commonest cause of chronic diarrhoea followed by Tropical sprue (32%. Crohn’s disease, Intestinal tuberculosis, AIDS, Amyloid osis and Giardiasis. CONCLUSION: Celiac disease, Tropical sprue and Crohn’s disease are common causes of chronic diarrhoea

  16. Comprehensive Child Care Program: Phase 1 - Evaluation Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harachi, Tracy; Anthony, Emily; Bleisner, Siri

    Seattle's Comprehensive Child Care Program (CCCP) (Washington) is made up of a child care subsidy to offset child care costs for working and student families with low incomes, and quality assurance and technical assistance for 150 child care providers, including on-site evaluations, public health consulting, continuing education for providers, and…

  17. Predictive Medicine for Chronic Patients in an Integrated Care Scenario. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease as Use Case

    OpenAIRE

    Cano Franco, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Tesi realitzada a l'Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS) BACKGROUND The epidemics of non-communicable diseases and the need for cost-containment are triggering a profound reshaping of healthcare delivery toward adoption of the Chronic Care model, involving deployment of integrated care services (ICS) with the support of information and communication technologies (ICS-ICT). In this scenario, emerging systems medicine, with a holistic mechanism-based approa...

  18. Adaptive leadership framework for chronic illness: framing a research agenda for transforming care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ruth A; Bailey, Donald E; Wu, Bei; Corazzini, Kirsten; McConnell, Eleanor S; Thygeson, N Marcus; Docherty, Sharron L

    2015-01-01

    We propose the Adaptive Leadership Framework for Chronic Illness as a novel framework for conceptualizing, studying, and providing care. This framework is an application of the Adaptive Leadership Framework developed by Heifetz and colleagues for business. Our framework views health care as a complex adaptive system and addresses the intersection at which people with chronic illness interface with the care system. We shift focus from symptoms to symptoms and the challenges they pose for patients/families. We describe how providers and patients/families might collaborate to create shared meaning of symptoms and challenges to coproduce appropriate approaches to care. PMID:25647829

  19. [Part I. End-stage chronic organ failures: a position paper on shared care planning. The Integrated Care Pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gristina, Giuseppe R; Orsi, Luciano; Carlucci, Annalisa; Causarano, Ignazio R; Formica, Marco; Romanò, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    In Italy the birth rate decrease together with the continuous improvement of living conditions on one hand, and the health care progress on the other hand, led in recent years to an increasing number of patients with chronic mono- or multi-organ failures and in an extension of their life expectancy. However, the natural history of chronic failures has not changed and the inescapable disease's worsening at the end makes more rare remissions, increasing hospital admissions rate and length of stay. Thus, when the "end-stage" get close clinicians have to engage the patient and his relatives in an advance care planning aimed to share a decision making process regarding all future treatments and related ethical choices such as patient's best interests, rights, values, and priorities. A right approach to the chronic organ failures end-stage patients consists therefore of a careful balance between the new powers of intervention provided by the biotechnology and pharmacology (intensive care), both with the quality of remaining life supplied by physicians to these patients (proportionality and beneficence) and the effective resources rationing and allocation (distributive justice). However, uncertainty still marks the criteria used by doctors to assess prognosis of these patients in order to make decisions concerning intensive or palliative care. The integrated care pathway suggested in this position paper shared by nine Italian medical societies, has to be intended as a guide focused to identify end-stage patients and choosing for them the best care option between intensive treatments and palliative care. PMID:24553592

  20. Programming, Care, and Troubleshooting of Cochlear Implants for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley-Williams, Andrea J.; Sladen, Douglas P.; Tharpe, Anne Marie

    2003-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current cochlear implant technology, programming strategies, troubleshooting, and care techniques. It considers: device components, initial stimulation, speech coding strategies, use and care, troubleshooting, and the classroom environment. (Contains references.) (DB)

  1. Undiagnosed mood disorders and sleep disturbances in primary care patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The study aims to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed comorbid mood disorders in patients suffering chronic musculoskeletal pain in a primary care setting and to identify sleep disturbances and other associated factors in these patients, and to compare the use of health services by chronic musculoskeletal pain patients with and without comorbid mood disorders. Design. Cross-sectional study. Subjects. A total of 1,006 patients with chronic musculoskele...

  2. Patient-Assessed Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) scenario in an Indian homeopathic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koley, Munmun; Saha, Subhranil; Ghosh, Shubhamoy; Nag, Goutam; Kundu, Monojit; Mondal, Ramkumar; Purkait, Rajib; Patra, Supratim; Ali, Seikh Swaif

    2016-01-01

    Homeopathy research has focused on chronic conditions; however, the extent to which current homeopathic care is compliant with the Chronic Care Model (CCM) has been sparsely shown. As the Bengali Patient-Assessed Chronic Illness Care (PACIC)-20 was not available, the English questionnaire was translated and evaluated in a government homeopathic hospital in West Bengal, India. The translation was done in six steps, and approved by an expert committee. Face validity was tested by 15 people for comprehension. Test/retest reliability (reproducibility) was tested on 30 patients with chronic conditions. Internal consistency was tested in 377 patients suffering from various chronic conditions. The questionnaire showed acceptable test/retest reliability [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.57-0.75; positive to strong positive correlations; p  0.05); however, monthly household income had a significant influence (p < 0.05) on the subscales except for "delivery system or practice design." Overall, chronic illness care appeared to be quite promising and CCM-compliant. The psychometric properties of the Bengali PACIC-20 were satisfactory, rendering it a valid and reliable instrument for assessing chronic illness care among the patients attending a homeopathic hospital. PMID:26933640

  3. Primary Care Management of Chronic Nonmalignant Pain in Veterans: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Jorge G.; Qadri, S. Sobiya; Nader, Samir; Wang, Jia; Lawler, Timothy; Hagenlocker, Brian; Roos, Bernard A.

    2010-01-01

    Clinicians managing older patients with chronic pain play an important role. This paper explores the attitudes of primary care clinicians (PCPs) toward chronic nonmalignant pain management and their experiences using a clinical decision support system. Our investigation followed a qualitative approach based on grounded theory. Twenty-one PCPs…

  4. Complexity, comorbidity, and health care costs associated with chronic widespread pain in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Espinoza, Enma Marianela; Kostov, Belchin; Salami, Daniel Cararach; Perez, Zoe Herreras; Rosalen, Anna Pereira; Molina, Jacinto Ortiz; Paz, Luis Gonzalez-de; Momblona, Josep Miquel Sotoca; Àreu, Jaume Benavent; Brito-Zerón, Pilar; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Sisó-Almirall, Antoni

    2016-04-01

    The objective was to estimate the prevalence of chronic widespread pain (CWP) and compare the quality-of-life (QoL), cardiovascular risk factors, comorbidity, complexity, and health costs with the reference population. A multicenter case-control study was conducted at 3 primary care centers in Barcelona between January and December 2012: 3048 randomized patients were evaluated for CWP according to the American College of Rheumatology definition. Questionnaires on pain, QoL, disability, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and sleep quality were administered. Cardiovascular risk and the Charlson index were calculated. We compared the complexity of cases and controls using Clinical Risk Groups, severity and annual direct and indirect health care costs. CWP criteria were found in 168 patients (92.3% women, prevalence 5.51% [95% confidence interval: 4.75%-6.38%]). Patients with CWP had worse QoL (34.2 vs 44.1, P Costs were &OV0556;3751 per year in patients with CWP vs &OV0556;1397 in controls (P cost associated with CWP is nearly 3 times higher than that of patients without CWP, controlling for other clinical factors. These findings have implications for disease management and budgetary considerations. PMID:26645546

  5. Models for Designing Long-Term Care Service Plans and Care Programs for Older People

    OpenAIRE

    Shogo Kato; Satoko Tsuru; Yoshinori Iizuka

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of a system for providing appropriate long-term care services for older people is a national issue in Japan, and it will likely become a worldwide issue in the years to come. Under Japanese Long-term Care Insurance System, long-term care is provided based on long-term care programs, which were designed by care providers on the basis of long-term care service plans, which were designed by care managers. However, defined methodology for designing long-term care service plans a...

  6. Self-care 3 months after attending chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient education: a qualitative descriptive analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousing C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Camilla Askov Mousing1, Kirsten Lomborg21School of Health Sciences, Randers School of Nursing, VIA University College, Randers, Denmark; 2Department of Public Health, Nursing Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus, DenmarkPurpose: The authors performed a qualitative descriptive analysis to explore how group patient education influences the self-care of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.Patients and methods: In the period 2009–2010, eleven patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease completed an 8-week group education program in a Danish community health center. The patients were interviewed 3 months after completion of the program.Findings: Patients reported that their knowledge of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease had increased, that they had acquired tools to handle their symptoms, and that the social aspect of patient education had motivated them to utilize their new habits after finishing the course. The data indicate that patients need a period of adjustment (a "ripening period": it took time for patients to integrate new habits and competencies into everyday life. Talking to health care professionals focused the patients' attention on their newly acquired skills and the research interview made them more aware of their enhanced self-care.Conclusion: Patients' self-care may be enhanced through group education, even though the patients are not always able to see the immediate outcome. Some patients may require professional help to implement their newly acquired knowledge and skills in everyday life. A planned dialogue concentrating on self-care in everyday life 3 months after finishing the course may enhance patients' awareness and appraisal of their newly acquired competencies.Keywords: COPD, education program, patient knowledge, patient perspective, patient skills, ripening period

  7. Using Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Mindfulness Techniques in the Management of Chronic Pain in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Norah

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain and its associated syndrome have become increasingly prevalent in primary care. With the increase in narcotic use and subsequent adverse events, primary care physicians often seek safer alternatives to treating this condition. Prescribing narcotics necessitates using methods to screen for high abuse risk and protect against misuse. With the understanding of how chronic pain is related to mental illnesses such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, mindfulness techniques and behavioral therapy can be used to help decrease the dependence on dangerous opioid medications and help patients understand, accept, and cope with their chronic pain. PMID:27262002

  8. Improving Population Health by Incorporating Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Into Value-Based Care Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Ruth; Rushing, Jill; Nelson, Sharon; Rhyne, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Today's health system transformation provides a prime opportunity to leverage the capacity of public health to reduce the burden of chronic disease and injury, improve population health, and contain health care costs. Health care settings and organizations should support public health capacity as a key investment in population health. PMID:27422946

  9. Caring for People with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Perceived Stress Versus Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Joseph R.; Jason, Leonard A.

    1997-01-01

    Examined adult caregivers (N=96) caring for persons with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) on a long-term basis. Results indicate no significant sex difference regarding caregiver stress and satisfaction. The more life satisfaction caregivers reported, the less stress and more satisfaction they experienced in caring for a person with CFS. (RJM)

  10. Low maternal care exacerbates adult stress susceptibility in the chronic mild stress rat model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Kim; Dyrvig, Mads; Bouzinova, Elena V;

    2012-01-01

    In the present study we report the finding that the quality of maternal care, in early life, increased the susceptibility to stress exposure in adulthood, when rats were exposed to the chronic mild stress paradigm. Our results indicate that high, as opposed to low maternal care, predisposed rats ...

  11. The Care Needs of Community-Dwelling Seniors Suffering from Advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Donna M.; Ross, Carolyn; Goodridge, Donna; Davis, Penny; Landreville, Alison; Roebuck, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Aim: This study was undertaken to determine the care needs of Canadian seniors living at home with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Background: COPD is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although hospitalizations for illness exacerbations and end-stage care may be common, most persons with COPD live out…

  12. Development of a diabetes care management curriculum in a family practice residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuovo, Jim; Balsbaugh, Thomas; Barton, Sue; Davidson, Ellen; Fox-Garcia, Jane; Gandolfo, Angela; Levich, Bridget; Seibles, Joann

    2004-01-01

    Improving the quality of care for patients with chronic illness has become a high priority. Implementing training programs in disease management (DM) so the next generation of physicians can manage chronic illness more effectively is challenging. Residency training programs have no specific mandate to implement DM training. Additional barriers at the training facility include: 1) lack of a population-based perspective for service delivery; 2) weak support for self-management of illness; 3) incomplete implementation due to physician resistance or inertia; and 4) few incentives to change practices and behaviors. In order to overcome these barriers, training programs must take the initiative to implement DM training that addresses each of these issues. We report the implementation of a chronic illness management curriculum based on the Improving Chronic Illness Care (ICIC) Model. Features of this process included both patient care and learner objectives. These were: development of a multidisciplinary diabetes DM team; development of a patient registry; development of diabetes teaching clinics in the family practice center (nutrition, general management classes, and one-on-one teaching); development of a group visit model; and training the residents in the elements of the ICIC Model, ie, the community, the health system, self-management support, delivery system design, decision support, and clinical information systems. Barriers to implementing these curricular changes were: the development of a patient registry; buy-in from faculty, residents, clinic leadership, staff, and patients for the chronic care model; the ability to bill for services and maintain clinical productivity; and support from the health system key stakeholders for sustainability. Unique features of each training site will dictate differences in emphasis and structure; however, the core principles of the ICIC Model in enhancing self-management may be generalized to all sites. PMID:15671788

  13. Bridging knowledge to develop an action plan for integrated care for chronic diseases in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiachristas, Apostolos; Lionis, Christos; Yfantopoulos, John

    2015-01-01

    The health, social and economic impact of chronic diseases is well documented in Europe. However, chronic diseases threaten relatively more the 'memorandum and peripheral' Eurozone countries (i.e., Greece, Spain, Portugal and Ireland), which were under heavy recession after the economic crisis in 2009. Especially in Greece, where the crisis was the most severe across Europe, the austerity measures affected mainly people with chronic diseases. As a result, the urgency to tackle the threat of chronic diseases in Greece by promoting public health and providing effective chronic care while flattening the rising health care expenditure is eminent. In many European countries, integrated care is seen as a means to achieve this. The aim of this paper was to support Greek health policy makers to develop an action plan from 2015 onwards, to integrate care by bridging local policy context and needs with knowledge and experience from other European countries. To achieve this aim, we adopted a conceptual framework developed by the World Health Organization on one hand to analyse the status of integrated care in Greece, and on the other to develop an action plan for reform. The action plan was based on an analysis of the Greek health care system regarding prerequisite conditions to integrate care, a clear understanding of its context and successful examples of integrated care from other European countries. This study showed that chronic diseases are poorly addressed in Greece and integrated care is in embryonic stage. Greek policy makers have to realise that this is the opportunity to make substantial reforms in chronic care. Failing to reform towards integrated care would lead to the significant risk of collapse of the Greek health care system with all associated negative consequences. The action plan provided in this paper could support policy makers to make the first serious step to face this challenge. The details and specifications of the action plan can only be decided by

  14. Bridging knowledge to develop an action plan for integrated care for chronic diseases in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos Tsiachristas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The health, social and economic impact of chronic diseases is well documented in Europe. However, chronic diseases threaten relatively more the ‘memorandum and peripheral’ Eurozone countries (i.e., Greece, Spain, Portugal and Ireland, which were under heavy recession after the economic crisis in 2009. Especially in Greece, where the crisis was the most severe across Europe, the austerity measures affected mainly people with chronic diseases. As a result, the urgency to tackle the threat of chronic diseases in Greece by promoting public health and providing effective chronic care while flattening the rising health care expenditure is eminent. In many European countries, integrated care is seen as a means to achieve this.The aim of this paper was to support Greek health policy makers to develop an action plan from 2015 onwards, to integrate care by bridging local policy context and needs with knowledge and experience from other European countries. To achieve this aim, we adopted a conceptual framework developed by the World Health Organization on one hand to analyse the status of integrated care in Greece, and on the other to develop an action plan for reform. The action plan was based on an analysis of the Greek health care system regarding prerequisite conditions to integrate care, a clear understanding of its context and successful examples of integrated care from other European countries. This study showed that chronic diseases are poorly addressed in Greece and integrated care is in embryonic stage.Greek policy makers have to realise that this is the opportunity to make substantial reforms in chronic care. Failing to reform towards integrated care would lead to the significant risk of collapse of the Greek health care system with all associated negative consequences. The action plan provided in this paper could support policy makers to make the first serious step to face this challenge. The details and specifications of the action plan

  15. Perceived Health Status and Utilization of Specialty Care: Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Patients with Chronic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Saundra; Bellinger, Jessica D.; Bae, Sejong; Rivers, Patrick A.; Singh, Karan P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to determine racial and ethnic variations in specialty care utilization based on (a) perceived health status and (b) chronic disease status. Methods: Variations in specialty care utilization, by perceived health and chronic disease status, were examined using the Commonwealth Fund Health Care Quality…

  16. Assessing patient-centered care in patients with chronic health conditions attending chiropractic practice: protocol for a mixed-methods study

    OpenAIRE

    Stuber, Kent Jason; Langweiler, Mark; Mior, Silvano; McCarthy, Peter William

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of chronic health conditions increasingly requires an organized, coordinated, and patient-centered approach to care. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) has been adopted in primary care to improve care delivery for those with chronic health conditions. Chiropractors manage chronic health conditions; however, little is known if such care is patient-centered. The primary aim of this study is to determine to what extent chiropractic patients with chronic health conditions perc...

  17. The Trajectory of Chronic Pain: Can a Community-Based Exercise/Education Program Soften the Ride?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Dubin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The entire primary care record of six patients attending a community-based education/exercise self-management program for chronic noncancer pain (YMCA Pain Exercise/Education Program [Y-PEP] was reviewed. Medical visits, consultations and hospital admissions were coded as related or unrelated to their pain diagnoses. Mood disruption, financial concerns, conflicts with employers/insurers, analgesic doses, medication side effects and major life events were also recorded. The ‘chronic pain trajectory’ resembled a roller coaster with increased health care visits at the time of initial injuries and during ‘crises’ (reinjury, conflict with insurers/employers, failed back-to-work attempts and life events. Visits decreased when conflicts were resolved. Analgesic doses increased during ‘crises’ but did not fall after resolution. After attending Y-PEP, health care use fell for four of six patients and two returned to work. Primary care physicians need to recognize the functional limitations and psychosocial complications experienced by their chronic pain patients. A program such as Y-PEP may promote active self-management strategies resulting in lowered health care use.

  18. Utilisation of podiatry services in Australia under the Medicare Enhanced Primary Care program, 2004-2008

    OpenAIRE

    Menz Hylton B

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In 2004, as an extension of the Enhanced Primary Care (EPC) program, the Australian Government introduced a policy of providing Medicare rebates for allied health services provided to patients with chronic or complex health conditions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the utilisation of podiatry services provided under this scheme between 2004 and 2008. Methods Data pertaining to the Medicare item 10962 for the calendar years 2004-2008 were extracted from the Au...

  19. Effectiveness of self-instructional module on knowledge of self-care management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Manoj Kumar Sharma; Atul Kumar; Mahalingam Venkateshan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a lung disease that makes it hard to breathe and patient education is integral to the care of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), also cornerstone of self-management in chronic illness. This study was aimed to improve the knowledge of COPD patients regarding self-care management of COPD. Methods: Quasi experimental (pre-test and post-test with control group) research design was used. Sixty COPD patients were sele...

  20. Complementary therapy in chronic wound management: a holistic caring case study and praxis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoola, Mercy Mammah

    2003-01-01

    Holistic caring consists of providing care to each aspect of a patient's life through the use of therapeutic caring and complementary or alternative healing modalities. Since nursing consists of caring for the whole person and not just the disease process, consideration of a patient's physical, emotional, social, economic, spiritual, and cultural needs is necessary in dealing with any chronic health problem such as chronic wounds. In this model case studies presentation, the purpose of this article is to discuss the importance of the holistic caring approach and the use of complementary and alternative medicine or therapeutic modalities in chronic wound management. The use or role of theory in practice will also be discussed to emphasize the holistic caring praxis model used in the holistic assessment and holistic plan of care for the cases presented. This article also presents a framework that will help wound care and holistic nurses move from simply the positivist-modernist philosophy to begin to embrace the postmodernist philosophy. PMID:12784899

  1. Caring, chronicity and community: an emergent model of community health services provision for people living with chronic illness

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Denis

    2008-01-01

    Purpose An evaluation of an Integrated Care approach with the aim of exploring the components of the service which contributed to its functioning. Theory There is growing recognition internationally that conventional approaches to the management of chronic illness are not adequately meeting the needs of people with such conditions. This concern is also shared in Ireland and a pilot programme to provide an alternative community based approach was established in Callan, Co. Kilkennny, Ireland f...

  2. Child care and other support programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Latosha; Phillips, Deborah A

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. military has come to realize that providing reliable, high-quality child care for service members' children is a key component of combat readiness. As a result, the Department of Defense (DoD) has invested heavily in child care. The DoD now runs what is by far the nation's largest employer-sponsored child-care system, a sprawling network with nearly 23,000 workers that directly serves or subsidizes care for 200,000 children every day. Child-care options available to civilians typically pale in comparison, and the military's system, embedded in a broader web of family support services, is widely considered to be a model for the nation. The military's child-care success rests on four pillars, write Major Latosha Floyd and Deborah A. Phillips. The first is certification by the military itself, including unannounced inspections to check on safety, sanitation, and general compliance with DoD rules. The second is accreditation by nationally recognized agencies, such as the National Association for the Education of Young Children. The third is a hiring policy that sets educational and other requirements for child-care workers, and the fourth is a pay scale that not only sets wages high enough to discourage the rapid turnover common in civilian child care but also rewards workers for completing additional training. Floyd and Phillips sound a few cautionary notes. For one, demand for military child care continues to outstrip the supply In particular, as National Guard and Reserve members have been activated during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the DoD has sometimes struggled to provide child care for their children. And force reductions and budget cuts are likely to force the military to make difficult choices as it seeks to streamline its child-care services in the years ahead. PMID:25518693

  3. Implementing the chronic care model for frail older adults in the Netherlands: study protocol of ACT (frail older adults: care in transition)

    OpenAIRE

    Muntinga Maaike E; Hoogendijk Emiel O; van Leeuwen Karen M; van Hout Hein PJ; Twisk Jos WR; van der Horst Henriette E; Nijpels Giel; Jansen Aaltje PD

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Care for older adults is facing a number of challenges: health problems are not consistently identified at a timely stage, older adults report a lack of autonomy in their care process, and care systems are often confronted with the need for better coordination between health care professionals. We aim to address these challenges by introducing the geriatric care model, based on the chronic care model, and to evaluate its effects on the quality of life of community-dwelling...

  4. Implementation of a Tool to Modify Behavior in a Chronic Disease Management Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole D. Gillespie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases like diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia continue to be a significant burden on the US health care system. As a result, many healthcare providers are implementing strategies to prevent the incidence of heart disease and other chronic conditions. Among these strategies are proper drug therapy and lifestyle modifications. Behavior change is often the rate-limiting step in the prevention and maintenance of lifestyle modifications. The purpose of this paper is to describe a tool used to guide the progression and assess the effectiveness of a cardiovascular risk reduction program. The tool uses the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change to determine the readiness and confidence to change specific lifestyle behaviors pertinent to cardiovascular health. The tool aids the practitioner in developing a patient-centered plan to implement and maintain lifestyle changes and can be tailored to use in any situation requiring a behavior change on the part of the patient.

  5. Telaprevir: Changing the standard of care of chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Rajani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C is a major public health problem and its burden is expected to increase in the near future. Out of six genotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV identified, genotype 1 is the most prevalent genotype in America and Europe. With peg-interferon alpha and ribavirin dual therapy, sustained virological response (SVR is achieved in less than half of the patients infected with HCV genotype 1. Moreover, this dual therapy also causes many intolerable adverse effects. Telaprevir is an HCV protease inhibitor approved for chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 mono-infection. It is a type of direct acting antiviral drug acting through inhibition of viral non-structural 3/4A protease. It can be safely administered in mild hepatic dysfunction. Due to inhibition of CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein, significant drug-drug interactions are possible with telaprevir. Trials have shown significantly higher SVR rates when telaprevir is added to peg-interferon alpha and ribavirin, particularly in patients with unfavorable prognostic factors. It is approved for use in treatment-naïve and previously treated patients. Rash and anemia are the major troublesome side-effects. Next-generation protease inhibitors may overcome the drawbacks of telaprevir and another approved HCV protease inhibitor - boceprevir. Evidence from small scale studies suggests that telaprevir may be used in conditions like HIV co-infection, post-transplantation and some HCV non-1 genotype infections also. Preliminary data show higher SVR rates with triple therapy even in patients with unfavorable interleukin-28B (IL28B genotype. With development of other direct acting antivirals, it might be possible to treat chronic hepatitis C with interferon-free regimens in future. This article briefly reviews the properties of telaprevir and its status in the context of rapidly evolving aspects of management of chronic hepatitis C.

  6. The injustice of it all: caring for the chronically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaner, Richard M; Bliton, Mark J

    1991-01-01

    ... While Spiegelberg emphasizes these "cosmic" -- perhaps more accurately, ontological -- features of birth and undeserved inequalities, it seems to us not inappropriate to suggest that what Douard terms "outrage" and Annas "instinct" go in the same direction. When impairment occurs without desert, something should be done to help. This is all the more true when, as in cases of chronic affliction that concern Douard or the case of the Siamese twins that fascinates Annas, something helpful can be done. Then, in Spiegelberg's words, what is "undeserved" demands redress. In these terms, each of these authors points to a deeply rooted sense of our common human lot. Or, in Albert Schweitzer's apt phrase, to witness such undeserved misfortune is to awaken "a moral sense that is usually dormant but that on special occasions can be brought to the surface." Chronic illnesses, we suggest -- no less than the "accidents of birth" that concern Spiegelberg -- are just such "special occasions" for awakening that "moral sense" suggested by Douard in his appeal to the "outrage" of doing nothing for, or refusing to help, the chronically ill. PMID:11642945

  7. An eHealth Platform to Manage Chronic Disease in Primary Care: An Innovative Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talboom-Kamp, Esther Pwa; Verdijk, Noortje A; Harmans, Lara M; Numans, Mattijs E; Chavannes, Niels H

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals with chronic illness and multimorbidity is growing due to the rapid ageing of the population and the greater longevity of individuals. This causes an increasing workload in care, which results in a growing need for structural changes of the health care system. In recent years this led to a strong focus on promoting "self-management" in chronically ill patients. Research showed that patients who understand more about their disease, health, and lifestyle have better experiences and health outcomes, and often use less health care resources; the effect is even more when these patients are empowered to and responsible for managing their health and disease. In addition to the skills of patients, health care professionals need to shift to a role of teacher, partner, and professional supervisor of their patients. One way of supervising patients is by the use of electronic health (eHealth), which helps patients manage and control their disease. The application of eHealth solutions can provide chronically ill patients high-quality care, to the satisfaction of both patients and health care professionals, alongside a reduction in health care consumption and costs. PMID:26860333

  8. Evaluation of an Urban Phase of the Specialized Care Program for Diabetes in Iran: Providers′ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Ravaghi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To develop and implement more effective programs of health care delivery to prevent and control diabetes, Iran has developed and implemented the urban phase of the specialized care program for diabetic′s patients. Deeply understanding the views and experiences of various stakeholders in this program can assist policy makers to identify the program′s strengths and weaknesses and enable them to develop action plans. Hence, the present study aimed to evaluate the planning and establishing of this program from the perspective of providers. Methods: A qualitative study was applied using documents review and face-to-face semi-structured interviews with the program leads and relevant executive managers of the local medical universities. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. Results: Three main themes and nine subthemes were explored, including program planning (the content and the strengths, weaknesses, and corrective measures, implementation (executive mechanisms at the university level, establishment of referral system, collaboration between deputies of health and treatment, information dissemination mechanisms, satisfaction measurement and strengths, weaknesses and corrective measures, and result (implementation results. Conclusions: The urban phase of the specialized care program for diabetic′s patients has been a good base to improve continuity of care, which emphasizes on controlling and prevention of occurrence or progression of chronic complications of diabetes. This model can also be used for better management of other chronic disease. However, there are still issues that should be considered and improved such as allocation of guaranteed resources, more trained health professionals, and more evidence based guidelines and protocols, better collaboration among medical universities′ deputies, clearer payment system for program evaluation and better information management system.

  9. Patient perspectives on factors associated with enrollment and retention in chronic disease self-management programs: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paige SR

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Samantha R Paige,1 Michael Stellefson,1 Briana Singh2 1Department of Health Education and Behavior, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 2College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Background: Challenges exist when enrolling and retaining chronic disease patients in self-management programs. Exploring patient perspectives on participating in self-management programs may enhance study enrollment and retention and thereby improve health outcomes. Limited review research has synthesized patient perspectives on intrapersonal and sociocontextual factors influencing participation in chronic disease self-management programs. Objective: To synthesize empirical qualitative research exploring intrapersonal (ie, predisposing and sociocontextual (ie, predisposing, enabling, need factors influencing patient enrollment and retention in chronic disease self-management programs. Method: A systematic literature review was conducted using Garrard’s Matrix Method to retrieve articles published between 1997 and 2015 from electronic databases (PsycINFO, CINAHL, MEDLINE. Andersen’s Behavioral Model of Health Services Use was used to synthesize data according to intrapersonal and sociocontextual factors impacting participation in self-management programs. Results: Thirteen (N=13 qualitative studies met inclusion criteria. Most studies focused on cardiovascular (n=4; 30.76% and chronic lower respiratory (n=3; 23.07% diseases. Predisposing factors such as limited disease-specific knowledge, negative outcome expectations of self-management, and confusion about comorbidity self-care negatively influenced the decision to participate. Enabling factors, including opportunities for social support, positively influenced the decision to participate in self-management programs. Scheduling conflicts negatively influenced patient participation. Beliefs that current health care was sufficient deterred patients from

  10. Temporary services for patients in need of chronic care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Background A project is a temporary endeavour undertaken to create a product or service. Projects are frequently used for the testing and development of new approaches in social work. Projects can receive grants from central, often national or international institutions, and allow for more...... experimentation than work placed within existing institutions. Discussion For socially marginalized groups who need continuing support and care, receiving help in a project means that the clients will have to be transferred to other services when the project ends. There is also a risk that clients will experience...... relating to continuity of services when serving vulnerable patients with a need for continuing care....

  11. Validation of the Spanish Translation of the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Aragones, MD, MSCI

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC survey is a patient-centered instrument for evaluating the quality and patient-centeredness of chronic illness care received according to the Chronic Care Model paradigm. This study validates the Spanish translation of the PACIC in an urban, Spanish-speaking population.MethodsOne hundred Spanish-speaking patients with diabetes completed the translated PACIC and sociodemographic and cultural questionnaires. Test-retest reliability was assessed in a subset of 20 patients who completed the questionnaire 2 to 4 months later. Internal consistency was evaluated with Cronbach α. PACIC score and subscale associations with sociodemographic characteristics were examined.ResultsTest-retest reliability for the overall translated PACIC scale was 0.77. Scores were not associated with patient sociodemographic characteristics, including age, country of birth, years living in the United States, or education level (P >.05.ConclusionThe Spanish translation of the PACIC survey demonstrated high reliability, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability. Scores showed no association with sociodemographic or cultural characteristics. The Spanish version can reliably be used to assess care delivered according to the Chronic Care Model in a heterogeneous Spanish-speaking population.

  12. Quality of integrated chronic care measured by patient survey: identification, selection and application of most appropriate instruments

    OpenAIRE

    Vrijhoef, Hubertus J.M.; Berbee, Rieneke; Wagner, Edward H.; Steuten, Lotte M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective  To identify the most appropriate generic instrument to measure experience and/or satisfaction of people receiving integrated chronic care. Background  Health care is becoming more user-centred and, as a result, the experience of users of care and evaluation of their experience and/or satisfaction is taken more seriously. It is unclear to what extent existing instruments are appropriate in measuring the experience and/or satisfaction of people using integrated chronic care. Methods ...

  13. Relationship between continuity of care and adverse outcomes varies by number of chronic conditions among older adults with diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    DuGoff, Eva H.; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Anderson, Gerard F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Continuity of care is a basic tenant of primary care practice. However, the evidence on the importance of continuity of care for older adults with complex conditions is mixed. Objective: To assess the relationship between measurement of continuity of care, number of chronic conditions, and health outcomes. Design: We analyzed data from a cohort of 1,600 US older adults with diabetes and ≥1 other chronic condition in a private Medicare health plan from July 2010 to December 2011. M...

  14. Identification, summary and comparison of tools used to measure organizational attributes associated with chronic disease management within primary care settings

    OpenAIRE

    Lukewich, Julia; Corbin, Renée; Elizabeth G VanDenKerkhof; Edge, Dana S.; Williamson, Tyler; Tranmer, Joan E.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives Given the increasing emphasis being placed on managing patients with chronic diseases within primary care, there is a need to better understand which primary care organizational attributes affect the quality of care that patients with chronic diseases receive. This study aimed to identify, summarize and compare data collection tools that describe and measure organizational attributes used within the primary care setting worldwide. Methods Systematic search and r...

  15. Implementing a mental health and primary care partnership program in Placer County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nover, Cynthia Helen

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with serious mental illness are at an increased risk for developing co-morbid chronic physical illnesses, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This article is a descriptive piece about an intervention to decrease physical health risks in this population through a partnership effort between a primary care clinic and mental health agency in rural Placer County, California. The project was conducted as a part of the CalMEND Pilot Collaborative to Integrate Primary Care and Mental Health Services, which took place in five California counties in 2010-2011. A description of the program elements, conceptual models, key measures, and the process of program implementation is provided. Benefits were observed in areas of quality assurance, intra- and inter-agency teamwork, and access to adequate primary care for this population. PMID:24483334

  16. Improving Confidence for Self Care in Patients with Depression and Chronic Illnesses

    OpenAIRE

    Ludman, Evette J; Peterson, Do; Katon, Wayne J; Lin, Elizabeth H. B.; Von Korff, Michael; Ciechanowski, Paul; Young, Bessie; Gensichen, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether patients who received a multi-condition collaborative care intervention for chronic illnesses and depression had greater improvement in self-care knowledge and efficacy, and whether greater knowledge and self-efficacy is positively associated with improved target outcomes. A randomized controlled trial with 214 patients with comorbid depression and poorly controlled diabetes and/or coronary heart disease tested a 12-month team-based intervention th...

  17. METHODS TO ANALYSE THE FINANCIAL BURDEN OF THE FAMILIAR CARE OF A PERSON WITH CHRONIC DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Mayorga-Álvarez Jorge Humberto; Montoya-Restrepo Luz Alexandra; Montoya-Restrepo Iván; Sánchez-Herrera Beatriz; Sandoval-Salcedo Natalia María

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: in Colombia, the study of the chronic disease (CD) has been declared as priority of investigation Objective: to determine a methodology for the analysis of the financial burden attributable to the familiar care of a person with CD. Methods: methodological study that proposes a way of analyses of the financial burden of the familiar care of a person with CD. It was developed in four phases: [A] Review of the literature. [B] Development of the survey “Financial c...

  18. Chronic low back pain patient groups in primary care - A cross sectional cluster analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Viniol, Annika; Jegan, Nikita; Hirsch, Oliver; Leonhardt, Corinna; Brugger, Markus; Strauch, Konstantin; Barth, Juergen; Baum, Erika; Becker, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the heterogeneous nature of chronic low back pain (CLBP), it is necessary to identify patient groups and evaluate treatments within these groups. We aimed to identify groups of patients with CLBP in the primary care setting. Methods We performed a k-means cluster analysis on a large data set (n = 634) of primary care patients with CLBP. Variables of sociodemographic data, pain characteristics, psychological status (i.e., depression, anxiety, somatization), and the patient re...

  19. Pathways towards chronic care-focused healthcare systems: evidence from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Goñi, Manuel; Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina; Nuño-Solinís, Roberto; Paolucci, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    Increasing healthcare expenditure is a matter of concern in many countries, particularly in relation to the underlying drivers of such escalation that include ageing, medical innovation, and changes in the burden of disease, such as the growing prevalence of chronic diseases. Most healthcare systems in developed countries have been designed to 'cure' acute episodes, rather than to 'manage' chronic conditions, and therefore they are not suitably or efficiently organized to respond to the changing needs and preferences of users. New models of chronic care provision have been developed to respond to the changing burden of disease and there is already considerable practical experience in several different countries showing their advantages but also the difficulties associated with their implementation. In this paper, we focus on the Spanish experience in terms of policy changes and pilot studies focused on testing the feasibility of moving towards chronic care models. In particular, we discuss a framework that identifies and analyses ten key prerequisites to achieving high performing chronic care-based healthcare systems and apply it to the current Spanish National Health System (NHS). We find that the design of the Spanish NHS already meets some of these pre-requisites. However, other features are still in their early stages of development or are being applied only in limited geographical and clinical contexts. We outline the policies that are being implemented and the pathway that the Spanish NHS is taking to address the crucial challenge of the transition towards an optimal health system focused on chronic care. Given the current evidence and trends, we expect that the pathway for developing a chronicity strategy being followed by the Spanish NHS will significantly transform its current healthcare delivery model in the next few years. PMID:23116631

  20. Interprofessional education in practice: Evaluation of a work integrated aged care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlis, Tanya; Wicks, Alison; Jamieson, Maggie; Haughey, Amy; Grealish, Laurie

    2016-03-01

    Health professional clinical education is commonly conducted in single discipline modes, thus limiting student collaboration skills. Aged care residential facilities, due to the chronic and complex health care needs of residents, provide an ideal placement to provide a collaborative experience. Interprofessional education is widely acknowledged as the pedagogical framework through which to facilitate collaboration. The aim of the evaluation was to assess student attitudes towards collaboration after active involvement in an interprofessional education program. Students studying nursing, occupational therapy, and aged care were invited to complete a version of the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale before and after participating in a three-week pilot interprofessional program. A positive change in student attitudes towards other health professionals and the importance of working in interprofessional teams was reported with significant differences between two statements indicated: Learning with health-care students before qualifications would improve relationships after qualifications; and I learned a lot from the students from the other disciplines. The innovative pilot project was found to enhance student learning in interprofessional teams and the aged care environment. Further development of this and similar interprofessional programs is required to develop sustainable student projects that have health benefits for residents in aged care residential facilities. PMID:26733460

  1. The efficiency of chronic disease care in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldsetzer, Pascal; Ortblad, Katrina; Bärnighausen, Till

    2016-01-01

    The number of people needing chronic disease care is projected to increase in sub-Saharan Africa as a result of expanding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment coverage, rising life expectancies, and lifestyle changes. Using nationally representative data of healthcare facilities, Di Giorgio et al. found that many HIV clinics in Kenya, Uganda, and Zambia appear to have considerable untapped capacity to provide care for additional patients. These findings highlight the potential for increasing the efficiency of clinical processes for chronic disease care at the facility level. Important questions for future research are how estimates of comparative technical efficiency across facilities change, when they are adjusted for quality of care and the composition of patients by care complexity. Looking ahead, substantial research investment will be needed to ensure that we do not forgo the opportunity to learn how efficiency changes, as chronic care is becoming increasingly differentiated by patient type and integrated across diseases and health systems functions.Please see related article: http://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12916-016-0653-z. PMID:27566531

  2. Evaluating a Hygiene Education Program for Child Care Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Cynthia J.; Winnail, Scott D.; Geiger, Brian F.; Artz, Lynn M.; Mason, J. W.

    Children, parents, and child caregivers are vulnerable to several infectious diseases as a result of contact with child care centers. This pilot program, implemented in a rural county in a southeastern state, was designed to enhance knowledge and skills related to improved hygiene practices in a child care setting. The target audience for the…

  3. Extended Care Programs in Catholic Schools: Some Legal Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Mary Angela

    This publication addresses issues concerning the application of the law to extended-day Catholic schools. The first chapter provides an overview of extended care. In the second chapter, sources of the law that are applied to extended care programs are described. Canon law affects Catholic schools. Catholic schools are also subject to four types of…

  4. Day Care Programs: A Part of the Educational Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Jacqueline; Leeper, Sarah H.

    In order to determine the effect of day care center sponsorship on children's development, the authors examined the ways in which programs, objects and materials, and teacher/child interactions affected the preoperational behavior of 4-year-old black children in publicly and privately supported day care centers. A total of 120 4-year-olds (30 from…

  5. The Philadelphia PRIME Program: A Model For Primary Care Education

    OpenAIRE

    Bellini, Lisa M; Asch, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Expanding primary care and ambulatory experiences in internal medicine training programs is limited by insufficient resources devoted to their development and implementation, heavy inpatient service demands and loyalty to the traditional inpatient based training model. Overcoming these barriers is a challenge likely to create new approaches to ambulatory education. The Pilot Education and Ambulatory Care (PACE) program at the Sepulveda VA is one such initiative that represents a multidiscipli...

  6. Shared Care Contributions to Self-Care and Quality of Life in Chronic Cardiac Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebern, Margaret; Brown, Roger; Flatley-Brennan, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    Shared care is an interpersonal interaction system composed of communication, decision making, and reciprocity; it is used by patients and family caregivers (care dyads) to exchange social support. This study's purpose was to describe the contributions of shared care to outcomes for individuals with cardiac disease. A secondary data analysis was used to answer the following questions. What is the association between elements of shared care and patient outcomes? Do dyad perceptions of shared care differentially contribute to patient outcomes? Participants in this study were 93 individuals with a cardiac disease and 93 family caregivers. Composite index structured equation modeling was the analytic tool. Caregiver communication and reciprocity were related to patient mental quality of life. Patient communication and reciprocity were related to their own mental and physical quality of life and self-care confidence. Findings from this study contribute a better understanding of how care dyads are integral to patient outcomes. PMID:26864996

  7. Barriers and facilitators to palliative care of patients with chronic heart failure in Germany: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Köberich

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite its high prevalence, similar symptoms and symptom burden, people suffering from chronic heart failure receive less palliative care than patients with malignant diseases. Internationally, numerous barriers to palliative care of patients with chronic heart failure are known, however, there are no credible data regarding barriers and facilitators to palliative care of people suffering from chronic heart failure available for Germany. Design and Methods. Tripartite study. First part of this study evaluates health care providers’ (physicians and nurses perceived barriers and facilitators to palliative care of patients with chronic heart failure using a qualitative approach. At least 18 persons will be interviewed. In the second part, based on the results of part one, a questionnaire about barriers and facilitators to palliative care of patients with chronic heart failure will be designed and applied to at least 150 physicians and nurses. In the last part a classic Delphi method will be used to develop specific measures to improve the palliative care for chronic heart failure patients. Expected Impact for Public Health. The results of this study will help to understand why patients with heart failure are seldom referred to palliative care and will provide solutions to overcome these barriers. Developed solutions will be the first step to improve palliative care in patients with heart failure in Germany. In addition, the results will help health care providers in other countries to take action to improve palliative care situations for heart failure patients.

  8. Clinical drug development using dynamic biomarkers to enable personalized health care in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bihlet, Asger R; Karsdal, Morten A; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine;

    2015-01-01

    Despite massive investments in development of novel treatments for heterogeneous diseases such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), the resources spent have only benefitted a fraction of the population treated. Personalized Health Care to guide selection of a suitable patient population...

  9. Home Care for Children with Chronic Illnesses and Severe Disabilities: A Bibliography and Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Alice; And Others

    The bibliography and resource guide summarizes relevant research and information on home care for children with disabilities and chronic illnesses, including those with such diagnoses as spina bifida, cerebral palsy, severe mental retardation, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), hemophilia, sickle cell anemia, autism, or failure-to-thrive…

  10. Just regionalisation: rehabilitating care for people with disabilities and chronic illnesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Frank

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regionalised models of health care delivery have important implications for people with disabilities and chronic illnesses yet the ethical issues surrounding disability and regionalisation have not yet been explored. Although there is ethics-related research into disability and chronic illness, studies of regionalisation experiences, and research directed at improving health systems for these patient populations, to our knowledge these streams of research have not been brought together. Using the Canadian province of Ontario as a case study, we address this gap by examining the ethics of regionalisation and the implications for people with disabilities and chronic illnesses. The critical success factors we provide have broad applicability for guiding and/or evaluating new and existing regionalised health care strategies. Discussion Ontario is in the process of implementing fourteen Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs. The implementation of the LHINs provides a rare opportunity to address systematically the unmet diverse care needs of people with disabilities and chronic illnesses. The core of this paper provides a series of composite case vignettes illustrating integration opportunities relevant to these populations, namely: (i rehabilitation and services for people with disabilities; (ii chronic illness and cancer care; (iii senior's health; (iv community support services; (v children's health; (vi health promotion; and (vii mental health and addiction services. For each vignette, we interpret the governing principles developed by the LHINs – equitable access based on patient need, preserving patient choice, responsiveness to local population health needs, shared accountability and patient-centred care – and describe how they apply. We then offer critical success factors to guide the LHINs in upholding these principles in response to the needs of people with disabilities and chronic illnesses. Summary This paper

  11. The chronic care for age-related macular degeneration study (CHARMED): Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Held Ulrike; Wang Mathyas; Woitzek Katja; Frei Anja; Rosemann Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Neovascular age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in people 50 years of age or older in the developed world. As in other chronic diseases, several effective treatments are available, but in clinical daily practice there is an evidence performance gap. The Chronic Care Model represents an evidence-based framework for the care of chronically ill patients and aims at closing that gap. However, no data are available regarding patients ...

  12. [Using eHealth in the Continuity Care of Chronic Kidney Disease: Opportunities and Considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chi; Chang, Polun

    2016-04-01

    Kidney disease is a common complication of chronic diseases among adult and elderly populations. As early-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) is asymptomatic, CKD patients are frequently unaware of their condition and fail to implement requisite self-care in a timely fashion. Furthermore, the shortage of case-management manpower and difficulties in follow-up have led to high incidence rates for CKD worldwide. Integrative and continuous care is key to preventing CKD. How to implement this care effectively is a challenge. However, innovative technologies, online information, and cloud technology are increasingly providing access to good-quality healthcare beyond the traditional limitations of time and location. This environment is not only increasing the participation of patients in their care and collaboration among healthcare team members but is also improving the continuity, accessibility, and promptness of care service in order to promote the effectiveness of disease management. While the primary aim of innovative technologies is to make healthcare more cost-effective, it is also causing disparities in healthcare. Within the high-tech e-healthcare system, the ability of patients to utilize these new services relates directly to their health behaviors and quality of care. Thus, emergent e-healthcare system services should be made as patient-centered as possible in order to maximize the benefits in terms of both cost and patient care. Furthermore, improving the eHealth literacy of patients is crucial to promoting innovative technology within healthcare services. PMID:27026552

  13. Continuity in care trajectories of older chronically ill patients in a battlefield of competing rationales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerholt, Mette; Wagner, L.; Delmar, C.;

    2014-01-01

    perspective in older, chronically ill patients' care as reflected in nursing staff's communication about the patients. DESIGN: Explorative Participatory Action Research (PAR). SETTING: An acute, general medical ward at a Danish university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Hospital and municipality nurses (n = 29......BACKGROUND: Continuity is crucial when caring for older chronically ill patients. Research has shown that the integration of patients' own perspectives on their situation is of utmost importance for continuity and quality of care. Studies have, however, demonstrated a number of problems with health......). Nursing records (n = 12). METHOD: Field studies: observations, interviews, nursing records audits and logs. Data were subject to manifest and latent content analysis. RESULTS: Participants were aware of the importance of ensuring continuity, a comprehensive approach and integration of the patient...

  14. Prediction of chronic critical illness in a general intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio H. Loss

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence, costs, and mortality associated with chronic critical illness (CCI, and to identify clinical predictors of CCI in a general intensive care unit. METHODS: This was a prospective observational cohort study. All patients receiving supportive treatment for over 20 days were considered chronically critically ill and eligible for the study. After applying the exclusion criteria, 453 patients were analyzed. RESULTS: There was an 11% incidence of CCI. Total length of hospital stay, costs, and mortality were significantly higher among patients with CCI. Mechanical ventilation, sepsis, Glasgow score < 15, inadequate calorie intake, and higher body mass index were independent predictors for cci in the multivariate logistic regression model. CONCLUSIONS: CCI affects a distinctive population in intensive care units with higher mortality, costs, and prolonged hospitalization. Factors identifiable at the time of admission or during the first week in the intensive care unit can be used to predict CCI.

  15. The Design of Health Care Management Program for Chinese Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiao Ling

    2008-01-01

    Business education has been booming in China due to the increasing demand of business graduates since China's economic reform. Chinese health care professionals are eager for business education to improve their competencies. The purpose of the study was to investigate the determinants of a successful health care management program for Chinese…

  16. Experiences of Community-Living Older Adults Receiving Integrated Care Based on the Chronic Care Model: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoorenberg, Sophie L. W.; Wynia, Klaske; Fokkens, Andrea S.; Slotman, Karin; Kremer, Hubertus P. H.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrated care models aim to solve the problem of fragmented and poorly coordinated care in current healthcare systems. These models aim to be patient-centered by providing continuous and coordinated care and by considering the needs and preferences of patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the opinions and experiences of community-living older adults with regard to integrated care and support, along with the extent to which it meets their health and social needs. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 older adults receiving integrated care and support through “Embrace,” an integrated care model for community-living older adults that is based on the Chronic Care Model and a population health management model. Embrace is currently fully operational in the northern region of the Netherlands. Data analysis was based on the grounded theory approach. Results Responses of participants concerned two focus areas: 1) Experiences with aging, with the themes “Struggling with health,” “Increasing dependency,” “Decreasing social interaction,” “Loss of control,” and “Fears;” and 2) Experiences with Embrace, with the themes “Relationship with the case manager,” “Interactions,” and “Feeling in control, safe, and secure”. The prospect of becoming dependent and losing control was a key concept in the lives of the older adults interviewed. Embrace reinforced the participants’ ability to stay in control, even if they were dependent on others. Furthermore, participants felt safe and secure, in contrast to the fears of increasing dependency within the standard care system. Conclusion The results indicate that integrated care and support provided through Embrace met the health and social needs of older adults, who were coping with the consequences of aging. PMID:26489096

  17. Experiences of Community-Living Older Adults Receiving Integrated Care Based on the Chronic Care Model: A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie L W Spoorenberg

    Full Text Available Integrated care models aim to solve the problem of fragmented and poorly coordinated care in current healthcare systems. These models aim to be patient-centered by providing continuous and coordinated care and by considering the needs and preferences of patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the opinions and experiences of community-living older adults with regard to integrated care and support, along with the extent to which it meets their health and social needs.Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 older adults receiving integrated care and support through "Embrace," an integrated care model for community-living older adults that is based on the Chronic Care Model and a population health management model. Embrace is currently fully operational in the northern region of the Netherlands. Data analysis was based on the grounded theory approach.Responses of participants concerned two focus areas: 1 Experiences with aging, with the themes "Struggling with health," "Increasing dependency," "Decreasing social interaction," "Loss of control," and "Fears;" and 2 Experiences with Embrace, with the themes "Relationship with the case manager," "Interactions," and "Feeling in control, safe, and secure". The prospect of becoming dependent and losing control was a key concept in the lives of the older adults interviewed. Embrace reinforced the participants' ability to stay in control, even if they were dependent on others. Furthermore, participants felt safe and secure, in contrast to the fears of increasing dependency within the standard care system.The results indicate that integrated care and support provided through Embrace met the health and social needs of older adults, who were coping with the consequences of aging.

  18. Orthopaedic Trauma Care Specialist Program for Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobogean, Gerard; Sprague, Sheila; Furey, Andrew; Pollak, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    The dire challenges faced in Haiti, both preearthquake and postearthquake, highlight the need for developing surgical infrastructure to care for traumatic musculoskeletal injuries. The proposed Orthopaedic Trauma Care Specialist (OTCS) residency program aims to close the critical human resource gap that limits the appropriate care of musculoskeletal trauma in Haiti. The OTCS program is a proposal for a 2-year residency program that will focus primarily on the management of orthopaedic trauma. The proposed program will be a comprehensive approach for implementing affordable and sustainable strategies to improve orthopaedic trauma care. Its curriculum will be tailored to the injuries seen in Haiti, and the treatments that can be delivered within their health care system. Its long-term sustainability will be based on a "train-the-trainers" approach for developing local faculty to continue the program. This proposal outlines the OTCS framework specifically for Haiti; however, this concept is likely applicable to other low- and middle-income environments in a similar need for improved trauma and fracture care. PMID:26356211

  19. METHODS TO ANALYSE THE FINANCIAL BURDEN OF THE FAMILIAR CARE OF A PERSON WITH CHRONIC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayorga-Álvarez Jorge Humberto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: in Colombia, the study of the chronic disease (CD has been declared as priority of investigation Objective: to determine a methodology for the analysis of the financial burden attributable to the familiar care of a person with CD. Methods: methodological study that proposes a way of analyses of the financial burden of the familiar care of a person with CD. It was developed in four phases: [A] Review of the literature. [B] Development of the survey “Financial costs of the care of the chronic non-communicable disease”. [C] Structuring of a proposal of methodological approach for the analysis of the data. [D] Development of final details of the definitive version of the designed methodology by means of its application to the results of the survey of 30 Colombian families Results: according to the literature review and keeping in mind the obtained data by means of the application of the survey “Financial costs of the care of the chronic non-communicable disease”, a methodological proposal of the analysis of the familiar financial burden attributable to the care of a person with CD in Colombia was done and it was named: CARACOL. On having applied the methodology in a pilot study with the information of thirty families, it was found that the costs generates them a major financial burden in terms of health and transportation Conclusion: the CARACOL methodology is an original contribution that could allow analyzing the financial burden attributable to the familiar care of a person with CD from the variation generates in the effective real consumption. Rev.cienc.biomed. 2015;6(1:96-106 KEYWORDS Cost of Illness; health economics; chronic disease; methodology.

  20. Public Health Nutrition: The Accord of Dietitian Providers in Managing Medicare Chronic Care Outpatients in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Cant

    2010-01-01

    Medicare Australia: Chronic Disease Management program subsidizes allied health consultations for eligible outpatients with chronic disease or complex needs. In an evaluation study, private practice dietitians (n = 9) were interviewed to explore their patient management strategies including consultation time-allocation and fees. Time allocation was fee-based. Short first consultations were seen as meeting patients’ needs for low-cost services but were regarded by dietitians as ineffective, ho...

  1. A Predoctoral Program in Dental Care for the Developmentally Disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Fred S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    In 1980, the State University of New York at Stony Brook began a program, integrated into the program of children's dentistry, to train students in care for the developmentally disabled. Management of developmentally disabled patients is provided over three years, and represents an extension of pediatric behavior management. (MSE)

  2. A Care Coordination Program for Substance-Exposed Newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, Jean E.; Caldwell, Donna; Soave, Rosemary; Fontaine, Lynne Andreozzi; Lester, Barry M.

    2011-01-01

    The Vulnerable Infants Program of Rhode Island (VIP-RI) was established as a care coordination program to promote permanency for substance-exposed newborns in the child welfare system. Goals of VIP-RI were to optimize parents' opportunities for reunification and increase the efficacy of social service systems involved with families affected by…

  3. The CareWell-primary care program: design of a cluster controlled trial and process evaluation of a complex intervention targeting community-dwelling frail elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruikes Franca GH

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With increasing age and longevity, the rising number of frail elders with complex and numerous health-related needs demands a coordinated health care delivery system integrating cure, care and welfare. Studies on the effectiveness of such comprehensive chronic care models targeting frail elders show inconclusive results. The CareWell-primary care program is a complex intervention targeting community-dwelling frail elderly people, that aims to prevent functional decline, improve quality of life, and reduce or postpone hospital and nursing home admissions of community dwelling frail elderly. Methods/design The CareWell-primary care study includes a (cost- effectiveness study and a comprehensive process evaluation. In a one-year pragmatic, cluster controlled trial, six general practices are non-randomly recruited to adopt the CareWell-primary care program and six control practices will deliver ‘care as usual’. Each practice includes a random sample of fifty frail elders aged 70 years or above in the cost-effectiveness study. A sample of patients and informal caregivers and all health care professionals participating in the CareWell-primary care program are included in the process evaluation. In the cost-effectiveness study, the primary outcome is the level of functional abilities as measured with the Katz-15 index. Hierarchical mixed-effects regression models / multilevel modeling approach will be used, since the study participants are nested within the general practices. Furthermore, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios will be calculated as costs per QALY gained and as costs weighed against functional abilities. In the process evaluation, mixed methods will be used to provide insight in the implementation degree of the program, patients’ and professionals’ approval of the program, and the barriers and facilitators to implementation. Discussion The CareWell-primary care study will provide new insights into the (cost

  4. [Constructing an ACP Simulation-Situation Communication Training Program for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jui-O; Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2016-06-01

    The aging population and changing lifestyles have lead to the increased general risk of chronic kidney disease. Taiwan currently has the highest incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) of any country or region in the world. Hemodialysis patients must endure comorbidities and face the uncertainties of death. The best way to achieve a good death is for patients to sign advance care planning (ACP). However, the key factors contributing to low ACP signature rates have been the lack of communication skills and related training among medical staffs. This article explores the dilemma of ACP using an example of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and proposes a theory-based approach to develop a theoretical framework for an ACP simulation-situation communication training program that integrates the simulation situation model, PREPARED model, and scaffolding theory. Readers may use this framework to design ACP simulation-situation communication training programs that conform to their own conditions and then test the effectiveness and feasibility of these programs in clinical settings. PMID:27250964

  5. 75 FR 67751 - Medicare Program: Community-Based Care Transitions Program (CCTP) Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... Transitions Program (CCTP) Meeting AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Notice... about the upcoming Community-based Care Transitions Program. The meeting is open to the public, but... will be posted on the CMS Care Transitions Web site at...

  6. Can Physicians Deliver Chronic Medications at the Point of Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacio, Ana; Keller, Vaughn F; Chen, Jessica; Tamariz, Leonardo; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Tanio, Craig

    2016-05-01

    Interventions aimed at improving medication adherence are challenging to integrate into clinical practice. Point-of-care medication delivery systems (POCMDSs) are an emerging approach that may be sustainable. A mixed methods approach was used to evaluate the implementation of a POCMDS in a capitated network of clinics serving vulnerable populations. The analytical approach was informed by the RE-AIM (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance) and CFIR (Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research) theoretical frameworks. Data were obtained through key informant interviews, site visits, patient surveys, and claims data. POCMDS has been implemented in 23 practices in 4 states. Key facilitators were leadership and staff commitment, culture of prevention, and a feasible business model. Of the 426 diabetic patients surveyed, 92% stated that POCMDS helps them, 90% stated that refilling medications is more convenient, 90% reported better understanding of the medications, and 80% stated that POCMDS had improved communication with the physician. POCMDS is a feasible patient-centered intervention that reduces adherence barriers. PMID:25681493

  7. End of life care in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: in search of a good death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Spathis

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Anna Spathis, Sara BoothPalliative Care Service, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, England, UKAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is an incurable, progressive illness that is the fourth commonest cause of death worldwide. Death tends to occur after a prolonged functional decline associated with uncontrolled symptoms, emotional distress and social isolation. There is increasing evidence that the end of life needs of those with advanced COPD are not being met by existing services. Many barriers hinder the provision of good end of life care in COPD, including the inherent difficulties in determining prognosis. This review provides an evidence-based approach to overcoming these barriers, summarising current evidence and highlighting areas for future research. Topics include end of life needs, symptom control, advance care planning, and service development to improve the quality of end of life care.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (MeSH, palliative care (MeSH, dyspnoea (MeSH, advance care planning (MeSH

  8. 76 FR 43254 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ..., 2010, at 75 FR 41793. Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) [Per meal rates in whole or fractions... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2011 Through June 30, 2012 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition...

  9. 75 FR 41793 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ..., 2009, at 74 FR 34295. Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Lunch and Centers Breakfast supper \\1... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2010 Through June 30, 2011 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition...

  10. Quality of Care in Family Planning Program in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-ming XIE; Hong-yan LIU

    2006-01-01

    Objective To sum up the theory of quality care according to the experience of F.P. program in China.Methods The author summarized the QOC theory and draw on its experiences and strength in family planning program in China.Results The theory facilitated the earnest program of the population and family planning program during the tenth five-year plan period, benefited the realization of the innovation of system and mechanism in population and family planning work, and the creation of a nice population environment for the healthy social and economic development in China.Conclusion The development of QOC has displayed a conspicuous theory in China's family planning program.

  11. Selecting, adapting, and sustaining programs in health care systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zullig LL

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Leah L Zullig,1,2 Hayden B Bosworth1–4 1Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 3School of Nursing, 4Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Practitioners and researchers often design behavioral programs that are effective for a specific population or problem. Despite their success in a controlled setting, relatively few programs are scaled up and implemented in health care systems. Planning for scale-up is a critical, yet often overlooked, element in the process of program design. Equally as important is understanding how to select a program that has already been developed, and adapt and implement the program to meet specific organizational goals. This adaptation and implementation requires attention to organizational goals, available resources, and program cost. We assert that translational behavioral medicine necessitates expanding successful programs beyond a stand-alone research study. This paper describes key factors to consider when selecting, adapting, and sustaining programs for scale-up in large health care systems and applies the Knowledge to Action (KTA Framework to a case study, illustrating knowledge creation and an action cycle of implementation and evaluation activities. Keywords: program sustainability, diffusion of innovation, information dissemination, health services research, intervention studies 

  12. Self-perceived symptoms and care needs of patients with severe to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure or chronic renal failure and its consequences for their closest relatives: the research protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schols Jos MGA

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent research shows that the prevalence of patients with very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, congestive heart failure (CHF and chronic renal failure (CRF continues to rise over the next years. Scientific studies concerning self-perceived symptoms and care needs in patients with severe to very severe COPD, CHF and CRF are scarce. Consequently, it will be difficult to develop an optimal patient-centred palliative care program for patients with end-stage COPD, CHF or CRF. The present study has been designed to assess the symptoms, care needs, end-of-life care treatment preferences and communication needs of patients with severe to very severe COPD, CHF or CRF. Additionally, family distress and care giving burden of relatives of these patients will be assessed. Methods/design A cross-sectional comparative and prospective longitudinal study in patients with end-stage COPD, CHF or CRF has been designed. Patients will be recruited by their treating physician specialist. Patients and their closest relatives will be visited at baseline and every 4 months after baseline for a period of 12 months. The following outcomes will be assessed during home visits: self-perceived symptoms and care needs; daily physical functioning; general health status; end-of-life care treatment preferences; end-of-life care communication and care-giver burden of family caregivers. Additionally, end-of-life care communication and prognosis of survival will be assessed with the physician primarily responsible for the management of the chronic organ failure. Finally, if patients decease during the study period, the baseline preferences with regard to life-sustaining treatments will be compared with the real end-of-life care. Discussion To date, the symptoms, care needs, caregiver burden, end-of-life care treatment preferences and communication needs of patients with very severe COPD, CHF or CRF remain unknown. The present study will

  13. 78 FR 45176 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2013 Through June 30, 2014 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service...-risk afterschool care centers, and adult day care centers; the food service payment rates for meals...

  14. Primary care physicians’ perceived barriers and facilitators to conservative care for older adults with chronic kidney disease: design of a mixed methods study

    OpenAIRE

    Tam-Tham, Helen; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Campbell, David; Thomas, Chandra; Quinn, Robert; Fruetel, Karen; King-Shier, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Background Guideline committees have identified the need for research to inform the provision of conservative care for older adults with stage 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD) who have a high burden of comorbidity or functional impairment. We will use both qualitative and quantitative methodologies to provide a comprehensive understanding of barriers and facilitators to care for these patients in primary care. Objectives Our objectives are to (1) interview primary care physicians to determine t...

  15. Impact of a Chronic Disease Management Program on Hospital Admissions and Readmissions in an Australian Population with Heart Disease or Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Hamar, G Brent; Rula, Elizabeth Y.; Wells, Aaron; Coberley, Carter; Pope, James E.; Larkin, Shaun

    2013-01-01

    Chronic disease management programs (CDMPs) were introduced in Australia to reduce unnecessary health care utilization by the growing population with chronic conditions; however, evidence of effectiveness is needed. This study evaluated the impact of a comprehensive CDMP, My Health Guardian (MHG), on rate of hospital admissions, readmissions, and average length of hospital stay (ALOS) for insured individuals with heart disease or diabetes. Primary outcomes were assessed through retrospective ...

  16. Quality of integrated chronic care measured by patient survey: identification, selection and application of most appropriate instruments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijhoef, Hubertus J.M.; Berbee, Rieneke; Wagner, Edward H.; Steuten, Lotte M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective  To identify the most appropriate generic instrument to measure experience and/or satisfaction of people receiving integrated chronic care. Background  Health care is becoming more user-centred and, as a result, the experience of users of care and evaluation of their experience and/or sat

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease involves substantial health-care service and social benefit costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Bach; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Fonager, Kirsten;

    2013-01-01

    cohort study performed in Denmark during 2004-2006 were linked with national register data that identified the costs of social benefits and health-care services. The cohort comprised 546 participants with COPD (forced expiratory volume in the first sec. (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio < 0.......7 following bronchodilator administration] and 3,995 without COPD (in addition, 9,435 invited participants were non-responders and 331 were excluded). The costs were adjusted for gender, age, co-morbidity and educational level. RESULTS: Health care-related costs were 4,779 (2,404- 7,154) Danish kroner (DKK......) higher for participants with COPD than for those without COPD, and 2,882 (556-5,208) DKK higher than for those for non-responders. The higher costs were mainly due to the cost of medicines and inpatient care. The health-care costs increased with disease severity Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive...

  18. Advances in Husbandry Training in Marine Mammal Care Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Brando, Sabrina I. C. A.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to illustrate how the training of marine mammals has facilitated improved marine mammal husbandry practices. The marine mammal community has seen many changes, refinements and improvements in animal care programs since the first marine mammals were brought in captivity in the early 19th century. Cross disciplinary fields such as veterinarian science, psychology, physiology and conservation biology have advanced the knowledge and care of the different species of cetace...

  19. What makes primary care effective for people in poverty living with multiple chronic conditions?: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbeau David

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inverse care law persists: people living in poverty have the greatest needs and face considerable challenges in getting the care they need. Evidence reveals that GPs encounter difficulties in delivering care to poor patients, while many of those patients feel stigmatized by healthcare professionals. Patients living in poverty report negative healthcare experiences and unmet healthcare needs. Indeed, there is a growing recognition in primary care research of the importance of addressing the capabilities and social conditions of the poor when delivering care. Few studies have looked at the factors contributing to effective and "socially responsive" care for people living in poverty. Methods/Design Our study adopts a qualitative ethnographic approach in four healthcare organizations in deprived areas of metropolitan Montreal (Québec, Canada, using patient shadowing techniques and interviews. Data will be collected through fieldwork observations and informal interviews with patients before and after consultations. We will observe medical consultations, care organization activities, and waiting areas and reception of patients. We will conduct a total of 36 individual interviews with 12 GPs and 24 patients. The interviews will be audio-recorded and transcribed for purposes of analysis. The analysis consists of debriefing sessions, coding and interpretive analysis. Discussion This study aims to investigate how positive healthcare interactions between physicians and patients can improve the management of chronic conditions. We hypothesize that factors related to care organization, to healthcare professionals' experience and to patients may enhance the quality of healthcare interactions, which may have positive impacts for preventing and managing chronic conditions. Our study will provide a unique set of data grounded in the perspectives of healthcare professionals and of patients living in poverty.

  20. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) rehabilitation at primary health‐care centres – the KOALA project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Grann, Ove; Larsen, Hanne Bormann;

    2012-01-01

    Background:  Implementation of pulmonary rehabilitation in primary health care in Denmark is a new challenge in the management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Objectives:  To assess the feasibility of introducing a nationwide web-based tool for data recording and...... health-care centres have been invited to participate. We present summary statistics and correlation analyses of the 1699 patients who have been enrolled so far. Results:  Thirty-three municipalities are currently engaged in the KOALA project. Descriptive analyses reveal that 33% of the patients do not...

  1. Assessing patient-centred care for chronic pain: Validation of a new research paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Paul-Savoie, Emilie; Bourgault, Patricia; Gosselin, Emilie; Potvin, Stéphane; Lafrenaye, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is a complex phenomenon resulting from biological, psychological and social factors, and the use of patient-centred care (PCC) appears to be a promising avenue for its treatment. Various methods have been used for measuring PCC in nurses and physicians (caregivers); however, methodological problems have been raised following the observation of real clinical encounters or standardized patient simulations. The development of new strategies is required. OBJECTIVE: To dev...

  2. The Interdisciplinary eHealth Team: Chronic Care for the Future

    OpenAIRE

    Wiecha, John; Pollard, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    An interdisciplinary clinical team is a consistent grouping of people from relevant clinical disciplines, ideally inclusive of the patient, whose interactions are guided by specific team functions and processes to achieve team-defined favorable patient outcomes. Teamwork supported by properly designed eHealth applications could help create more effective systems of care for chronic disease. Given its synchronous and asynchronous communication capacity and information-gathering and -sharing ca...

  3. Psychiatric Morbidity, Pain Perception, and Functional Status of Chronic Pain Patients in Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Rajmohan, V.; Kumar, Suresh K

    2013-01-01

    Context: Psychological factors, such as that exist when we experience pain, can profoundly alter the strength of pain perception. Aim: The study aims to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders, and its association with perception of pain and functional status in chronic patients in palliative care. Materials and Methods: The sample was selected via simple randomisation and post consent were assessed using (1) a semi- structured questionnaire to elicit socio-demographic inform...

  4. Improving the Differential Diagnosis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Price, David B.; Yawn, Barbara P; Rupert C M Jones

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma represent a substantial portion of primary care practice. In adults, differentiating asthma from COPD can be difficult but is important because of the marked differences in treatment, disease progression, and outcomes between the 2 conditions. Currently, clinical COPD is often misdiagnosed or undiagnosed until late in the disease. Earlier diagnosis could markedly reduce morbidity and improve quality of life. Establishing a diagnosis of C...

  5. Chronic morbidity and health care seeking behaviour amongst elderly population in rural areas of Uttarakhand

    OpenAIRE

    Surekha Kishore; Mr. Kapil Sharma; Richa Singh; Bhanu Pratap Singh Gaur; Rachana R Satish; Yatish Bhaskar; Ritu Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ageing is a natural process, always associated with physiological and biological decline. Global population is ageing; the proportion of older persons has been rising steadily, from 7% in 1950 to 11% in 2007, with an expected rise to reach 22 % in 2050. With improving knowledge and awareness the health care seeking behavior has shown an increasingly positive trend. With increasing age, morbidity,   especially those arising from chronic diseases also increases. On the contrary, hea...

  6. Spirometry use: detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the primary care setting

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, T.

    2011-01-01

    Thomas A Barnes1, Len Fromer21Department of Cardiopulmonary Sciences, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 2David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAObjective: To describe a practical method for family practitioners to stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by the use of office spirometry.Methods: This is a review of the lessons learned from evaluations of the use of office spirometry in the primary care setting to identify best practices using the most re...

  7. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure: research and clinical practice in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Chiumeo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and comorbidities, increasing with age, is the challenge that nowadays health care systems are facing to better care treat these patients. For this reason a clinical trial was conducted in the province of Trento by a group of 30 volunteer general practitioners members of SNAMID (Scientific Society for Continuing Medical Education of General Practitioners. The objectives were to identify: i prevalence of COPD in patients (65-98 years in the province of Trento; ii presence and incidence of heart failure (HF in COPD patients; iii early detection of other chronic diseases; and iv improving electronic medical records (EMR as an innovation way of professional care management. From May 2011 to October 2013, 17 doctors completed the two-year work using the EMR. The studied patients were men and women (65-98 years, suffering from COPD; the considered data included: anthropometric information, smoking status, International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9 diagnosis of COPD, HF and chronic diseases, specific blood and instrumental tests. The extracted results were then linked with data of sentinel therapies, collected by the EMR. The database obtained identified patients with COPD or HF not previously recognized with ICD-9 diagnosis. The study identified the sentinel drugs chosen for COPD and HF, excluding other drugs not selective for the study or confusing for a proper statistical evaluation.

  8. Divorce and Childhood Chronic Illness: A Grounded Theory of Trust, Gender, and Third-Party Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Luke T; Coleman, Marilyn; Ganong, Lawrence H; Gayer, Debra

    2016-05-01

    Divorced parents face distinct challenges in providing care for chronically ill children. Children's residence in two households necessitates the development of family-specific strategies to ensure coparents' supervision of regimen adherence and the management of children's health care. Utilizing a risk and resilience perspective, a grounded theory study was conducted with 14 divorced parents of children with chronic illnesses. The importance of trust, gender, and relationships with third-party care providers emerged as key themes related to the development of effective coparenting relationships for maintaining children's health. Divorced parents were best able to support the management of their children's chronic conditions when care providers operated as neutral third parties and intermediaries. Collaborative family care may require health care practitioners to avoid being drawn into contentious inter-parental conflicts. PMID:27021310

  9. Barriers to HIV Care and Treatment Among Participants in a Public Health HIV Care Relinkage Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Jane M.; Katz, David A.; Golden, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Improving patient retention in HIV care and use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) are key steps to improving the HIV care continuum in the US. However, contemporary quantitative data on barriers to care and treatment from population-based samples of persons poorly engaged in care are sparse. We analyzed the prevalence of barriers to clinic visits, ART initiation, and ART continuation reported by 247 participants in a public health HIV care relinkage program in King County, WA. We identified participants using HIV surveillance data (N=188) and referrals from HIV/STD clinics and partner services (N=59). Participants most commonly reported insurance (50%), practical (26–34%), and financial (30%) barriers to care, despite residing in a state with essentially universal access to HIV care. Perceived lack of need for medical care was uncommon (<20%), but many participants (58%) endorsed a perceived lack of need for medication as a reason for not initiating ART. Depression and substance abuse were both highly prevalent (69% and 54%, respectively), and methamphetamine was the most commonly abused substance. Barriers to HIV care and treatment may be amenable to intervention by health department outreach in coordination with existing HIV medical and support services. PMID:25826007

  10. Inventory and perspectives of chronic disease management programs in Switzerland: an exploratory survey.

    OpenAIRE

    Peytremann Bridevaux Isabelle; Burnand Bernard

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe chronic disease management programs active in Switzerland in 2007, using an exploratory survey. METHODS: We searched the internet (Swiss official websites and Swiss web-pages, using Google), a medical electronic database (Medline), reference lists of pertinent articles, and contacted key informants. Programs met our operational definition of chronic disease management if their interventions targeted a chronic disease, included a multidisciplinary team (>/=2 healthcar...

  11. Inventory and perspectives of chronic disease management programs in Switzerland: an exploratory survey

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe chronic disease management programs active in Switzerland in 2007, using an exploratory survey. Methods: We searched the internet (Swiss official websites and Swiss web-pages, using Google), a medical electronic database (Medline), reference lists of pertinent articles, and contacted key informants. Programs met our operational definition of chronic disease management if their interventions targeted a chronic disease, included a multidisciplinary team (≥2 healthcare pr...

  12. “What we want”: chronically ill adolescents’ preferences and priorities for improving health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Staa A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available AnneLoes van Staa1,2, Susan Jedeloo1, Heleen van der Stege1, On Your Own Feet Research Group1,31Expertise Center Transitions of Care, Rotterdam University, 2Institute of Health Policy and Management, Erasmus University Rotterdam, 3Department of Pediatrics, Sophia Children’s Hospital, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The NetherlandsBackground: As important users of health care, adolescents with chronic conditions deserve to be consulted about their experiences and expectations. This study aimed to explore chronically ill adolescents’ preferences regarding providers' qualities, and outpatient and inpatient care. Furthermore, suggestions for improvement of service delivery were collected.Methods: This research was a sequential mixed methods study in adolescents aged 12–19 years with various chronic conditions treated in a university children’s hospital. Methods comprised 31 face-to-face interviews at home, a hospital-based peer research project in which nine adolescents interviewed 34 fellow patients, and a web-based questionnaire (n = 990. Emerging qualitative themes were transformed into questionnaire items.Results: Having “a feeling of trust” and “voice and choice” in the hospital were central to these adolescents. Regarding providers’ qualities, “being an expert” and “being trustworthy and honest” were ranked highest, followed by "being caring and understanding”, "listening and showing respect", and “being focused on me”. Regarding outpatient consultations, preferences were ranked as follows: “answering all questions”; “attending to my and my parents’ needs”; and “clear communication”, while “limited waiting times” and “attractive outpatient surroundings” scored lowest. Regarding hospitalization, adolescents most preferred to “avoid pain and discomfort”, “keep in touch with home”, and “be entertained”, while “being hospitalized with peers” and “being heard

  13. Discontinuity of care for mothers with chronic hepatitis B diagnosed during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbhandari, R; Barton, K; Juncadella, A C; Rubin, A K; Ajayi, T; Wu, Y; Ananthakrishnan, A N; Chung, R T

    2016-07-01

    Assiduous measures are taken to prevent perinatal transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) to infants; it is unclear whether the mothers receive appropriate care for their chronic HBV. We sought to assess the quality of HBV care in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive mothers following pregnancy. HBsAg-positive women (n = 243) who had sought prenatal care at Massachusetts General Hospital were retrospectively identified and charts reviewed. The primary outcome was adherence to the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists guidelines. Over one-third (37%) of women were first diagnosed with HBV infection at a prenatal visit. One-third (32%) did not undergo timely liver function test measurements. HBV DNA was never measured in 26% and was untimely in 34% of patients. One-third (34%) of the women were at high-risk for HCC based on AASLD criteria, yet only 33% of these women underwent timely imaging. Nearly half (49%) never saw a liver specialist for their HBV care. In multivariate analysis, women were 3.7 times more likely to have a timely ALT and 8.1 times more likely to have a timely HBV DNA if they were followed by a liver specialist (P = 0.001, <0.001). We demonstrate remarkably inadequate and discontinuous HBV care for chronically infected mothers following pregnancy. As HBV infection is already being identified prenatally, quality improvement measures encompassing obstetricians, primary care providers and hepatologists are needed to ensure that HBV-infected women are linked to care postpregnancy. PMID:26940754

  14. Implementation of a Targeted Screening Program to Detect Airflow Obstruction Suggestive of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease within a Presurgical Screening Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Robitaille

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Targeted spirometry screening for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD has been studied in primary care and community settings. Limitations regarding availability and quality of testing remain. A targeted spirometry screening program was implemented within a presurgical screening (PSS clinic to detect undiagnosed airways disease and identify patients with COPD/asthma in need of treatment optimization.

  15. Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) in Type 2 Diabetes: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Eindra; Ostini, Remo; Dower, Jo; Donald, Maria; Coll, Joseph R; Williams, Gail M; Doi, Suhail A R

    2016-06-01

    The Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) was designed to measure care congruent with several elements of the chronic care model (CCM), including self-management support and delivery system design. However, support for the a priori 5-subscale structure of the PACIC in previous research has been conflicting. Thus, we aim to investigate psychometric characteristics of the PACIC including the content and stability of its construct over time. A population-based prospective cohort study of patients with type 2 diabetes was conducted in Queensland, Australia, from 2008 (N = 3,761) to 2010 (N = 3,040). Participants completed annually the 20-item PACIC as well as measures of providers' adherence to guideline-recommended self-management support activities. We used exploratory factor analysis to determine its factor structure and examined internal consistency as well as agreement between the PACIC at baseline with repeated measurements at follow-up after 1 and 2 years. We also determined a criterion-related validity using multinomial logistic regression to explore PACIC's association with providers' self-management support. A one-factor structure was deemed optimal according to our findings. High internal consistency and moderate agreement within the scales over time were observed. Higher PACIC scores predicted better providers' self-management support. In conclusion, the PACIC is a reliable, valid, and reproducible instrument for assessment of diabetes care, and we recommend its promotion and use as a single scale rather than subscales as originally proposed. PMID:25380699

  16. Constructing a conflict resolution program for health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter-O'Grady, Tim

    2004-01-01

    Resolving conflict throughout organizations requires a programmatic infrastructure and a committed management team. Leaders must recognize the need to approach conflict by building a format for learning, creating and managing an effective conflict management program. Careful attention to the elements of design and the stages of development can make all the difference in building a sustainable and useful conflict management approach. PMID:15600105

  17. Primary care physicians' attitudes and beliefs towards chronic low back pain: an Asian study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina W S Sit

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain is a serious global health problem. There is substantial evidence that physicians' attitudes towards and beliefs about chronic low back pain can influence their subsequent management of the condition.(1 to evaluate the attitudes and beliefs towards chronic low back pain among primary care physicians in Asia; (2 to study the cultural differences and other factors that are associated with these attitudes and beliefs.A cross sectional online survey was sent to primary care physicians who are members of the Hong Kong College of Family Physician (HKCFP. The Pain Attitudes and Beliefs Scale for Physiotherapist (PABS-PT was used as the questionnaire to determine the biomedical and biopsychosocial orientation of the participants.The mean Biomedical (BM score was 34.8+/-6.1; the mean biopsychosocial (BPS score was 35.6 (+/- 4.8. Both scores were higher than those of European doctors. Family medicine specialists had a lower biomedical score than General practitioners. Physicians working in the public sector tended to have low BM and low BPS scores; whereas physicians working in private practice tended to have high BM and high BPS scores.The lack of concordance in the pain explanatory models used by private and public sector may have a detrimental effect on patients who are under the care of both parties. The uncertain treatment orientation may have a negative influence on patients' attitudes and beliefs, thus contributing to the tension and, perhaps, even ailing mental state of a person with chronic LBP.

  18. Providing Continuity of Care for Chronic Diseases in the Aftermath of Katrina: From Field Experience to Policy Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Arrieta, Martha I.; Foreman, Rachel D.; Crook, Errol D.; Icenogle, Marjorie L.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to elicit challenges and solutions in the provision of health care to those with chronic diseases after Hurricane Katrina in coastal Alabama and Mississippi. In-depth interviews with 30 health and social service providers (key informants) and 4 focus groups with patients with chronic diseases were conducted. Subsequently an advisory panel of key informants was convened. Findings were summarized and key informants submitted additional feedback. The chronic diseases identified...

  19. Preferences for health care and self-management among Dutch adolescents with chronic conditions: a Q-methodological investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jedeloo, S.; Staa, A.L. van; Latour, J.M.; Exel, N.J. van

    2009-01-01

    Adolescents with chronic conditions have to learn to self-manage their health in preparation for transitioning to adult care. Nurses often struggle with how to approach youth with chronic conditions successfully. Little is known about the preferences and attitudes of these young people themselves.

  20. Dutch Chronic Pancreatitis Registry (CARE) : Design and rationale of a nationwide prospective evaluation and follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, U. Ahmed; Issa, Y.; van Goor, H.; van Eijck, C. H.; Nieuwenhuijs, V. B.; Keulemans, Y.; Fockens, P.; Busch, O. R.; Drenth, J. P.; Dejong, C. H.; van Dullemen, H. M.; van Hooft, J. E.; Siersema, P. D.; Spanier, B. W. M.; Poley, J. W.; Poen, A. C.; Timmer, R.; Seerden, T.; Tan, A. C.; Thijs, W. J.; Witteman, B. J. M.; Romkens, T. E. H.; Roeterdink, A. J.; Gooszen, H. G.; Van Santvoort, H. C.; Bruno, M. J.; Boermeester, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic pancreatitis is a complex disease with many unanswered questions regarding the natural history and therapy. Prospective longitudinal studies with long-term follow-up are warranted. Methods: The Dutch Chronic Pancreatitis Registry (CARE) is a nationwide registry aimed at prospecti

  1. Social-Interaction Knowledge Translation for In-Home Management of Urinary Incontinence and Chronic Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Lynn; McWilliam, Carol L; Forbes, Dorothy; Forchuk, Cheryl

    2013-12-01

    Although urinary incontinence (UI) can be managed conservatively, it is a principal reason for the breakdown of in-home family care. This study explored the social interaction processes of knowledge translation (KT) related to how UI management knowledge might be translated within in-home care. In-depth interview data were collected from a theoretical sample of 23 family caregivers, older home care recipients, and home care providers. Constant comparison and Glaser’s analysis criteria were used to create translating knowledge through relating , a substantive theory with 10 subthemes: living with the problem; building experiential knowledge; developing comfort; easing into a working relationship; nurturing mutuality; facilitating knowledge exchange; building confidence; fi ne-tuning knowledge; putting it all together; and managing in-home care. Findings inform both theory and practice of in-home UI KT, illuminating how intersubjectivity and bi-directional relational interactions are essential to translating in-home chronic care knowledge, which is largely tacit and experiential in nature. PMID:24063503

  2. Public Health Nutrition: The Accord of Dietitian Providers in Managing Medicare Chronic Care Outpatients in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn P. Cant

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Medicare Australia: Chronic Disease Management program subsidizes allied health consultations for eligible outpatients with chronic disease or complex needs. In an evaluation study, private practice dietitians (n = 9 were interviewed to explore their patient management strategies including consultation time-allocation and fees. Time allocation was fee-based. Short first consultations were seen as meeting patients’ needs for low-cost services but were regarded by dietitians as ineffective, however longer initial consultations increased cost to patients. No strategy in use was optimal. There is a need for change in Medicare policy to meet the needs of both dietitians and patients in achieving the behaviour change goals of patients.

  3. Integrated Pest Management: A Curriculum for Early Care and Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Childcare Health Program, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Early Care and Education Programs" presents practical information about using integrated pest management (IPM) to prevent and manage pest problems in early care and education programs. This curriculum will help people in early care and education programs learn how to keep pests out of early care and…

  4. Analysing the Costs of Integrated Care: A Case on Model Selection for Chronic Care Purposes

    OpenAIRE

    Carreras, Marc; Sánchez-Pérez, Inma; Ibern, Pere; Coderch, Jordi; Inoriza, José María

    2016-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study is to investigate whether the algorithm proposed by Manning and Mullahy, a consolidated health economics procedure, can also be used to estimate individual costs for different groups of healthcare services in the context of integrated care.Methods: A cross-sectional study focused on the population of the Baix Empordà (Catalonia-Spain) for the year 2012 (N = 92,498 individuals). A set of individual cost models as a function of sex, age and morbidity burd...

  5. Job mobility among parents of children with chronic health conditions: Early effects of the 2010 Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterji, Pinka; Brandon, Peter; Markowitz, Sara

    2016-07-01

    We examine the effects of the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act's (ACA) prohibition of preexisting conditions exclusions for children on job mobility among parents. We use a difference-in-difference approach, comparing pre-post policy changes in job mobility among privately-insured parents of children with chronic health conditions vs. privately-insured parents of healthy children. Data come from the 2004 and 2008 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP). Among married fathers, the policy change is associated with about a 0.7 percentage point, or 35 percent increase, in the likelihood of leaving an employer voluntarily. We find no evidence that the policy change affected job mobility among married and unmarried mothers. PMID:27060524

  6. The ideal of biopsychosocial chronic care: How to make it real? A qualitative study among Dutch stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dijk-de Vries Anneke

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronically ill patients often experience psychosocial problems in everyday life. A biopsychosocial approach is considered to be essential in chronic care. In Dutch primary health care the current biomedically oriented clinical practice may conflict with the biopsychosocial approach. This study is aimed to explore the views of Dutch stakeholders on achieving a biopsychosocial approach to the care of patients with chronic diseases. Methods In a qualitative explorative study design, we held semi-structured interviews with stakeholders, face-to-face or by telephone. Data were analysed using content analysis. Thirty representatives of Dutch patients with chronic illnesses, primary care professionals, policy makers, health inspectorate, health insurers, educational institutes and researchers were interviewed. Results Stakeholders were aware that a systematic biopsychosocial care approach is lacking in current practice. Opportunities for effective change are multidimensional. Achieving a biopsychosocial approach to care relates to active patient participation, the training of professionals, high-quality guidelines, protocols and tools, integrated primary care, research and financial issues. Conclusions Although the principles and importance of the biopsychosocial model have been recognized, the provision of care that starts from the medical, emotional or social needs of individual patients does not fit in easily with the current Dutch health care system. All parties involved need to make a commitment to realize the ideal of biopsychosocial chronic care. Together they need to equip health professionals with skills to understand patients' multifaceted needs and to reward integrated biopsychosocial care. Patients need to be empowered to be active partners in their own care.

  7. Social workers' roles in addressing the complex end-of-life care needs of elders with advanced chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Betty J

    2013-01-01

    This study examined social workers' roles in caring for low-income elders with advanced chronic disease in an innovative, community-based managed care program, from the perspective of elders, family, team members, and social workers. The results are drawn from a larger longitudinal, multimethod case study. Sources of data include survey reports of needs addressed by social workers for 120 deceased elders, five focus groups with interdisciplinary team members, and in-depth interviews with 14 elders and 10 of their family caregivers. A thematic conceptual matrix was developed to detail 32 distinctive social work roles that address divergent needs of elders, family, and team members. Distinctive perceptions of social workers' roles were identified for the different stakeholder groups (i.e., elders, family caregivers, team members, and social workers). Findings from this study may inform supervisors and educators regarding training needs of those preparing to enter the rapidly growing workforce of gerontological social workers who may be called upon to care for elders at the end of life. Training is particularly warranted to help social workers gain the skills needed to more successfully treat symptom management, depression, anxiety, agitation, grief, funeral planning, and spiritual needs that are common to the end of life. PMID:24295099

  8. Implementation and effectiveness of 'care navigation', coordinated management for people with complex chronic illness: rationale and methods of a randomised controlled

    OpenAIRE

    Plant, Natalie; Mallitt, Kylie-Ann; Kelly, Patrick J.; Usherwood, Tim; Gillespie, James; Boyages, Steven; Jan, Stephen; McNab, Justin; Essue, Beverley M.; Gradidge, Kathy; Maranan, Nereus; Ralphs, David; Aspin, Clive; Leeder, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic illness is a significant driver of the global burden of disease and associated health care costs. People living with severe chronic illness are heavy users of acute hospital services; better coordination of their care could potentially improve health outcomes while reducing hospital use. The Care Navigation trial will evaluate an in-hospital coordinated care intervention on health service use and quality of life in chronically ill patients. Methods/Design A randomised contr...

  9. Primary care provider perceptions of intake transition records and shared care with outpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamnik Veronica

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While it is recommended that records are kept between primary care providers (PCPs and specialists during patient transitions from hospital to community care, this communication is not currently standardized. We aimed to assess the transmission of cardiac rehabilitation (CR program intake transition records to PCPs and to explore PCPs' needs in communication with CR programs and for intake transition record content. Method 144 PCPs of consenting enrollees from 8 regional and urban Ontario CR programs participated in this cross-sectional study. Intake transition records were tracked from the CR program to the PCP's office. Sixty-six PCPs participated in structured telephone interviews. Results Sixty-eight (47.6% PCPs received a CR intake transition record. Fifty-eight (87.9% PCPs desired intake transition records, with most wanting it transmitted via fax (n = 52, 78.8%. On a 5-point Likert scale, PCPs strongly agreed that the CR transition record met their needs for providing patient care (4.32 ± 0.61, with 48 (76.2% reporting that it improved their management of patients' cardiac risk. PCPs rated the following elements as most important to include in an intake transition record: clinical status (4.67 ± 0.64, exercise test results (4.61 ± 0.52, and the proposed patient care plan (4.59 ± 0.71. Conclusions Less than half of intake transition records are reaching PCPs, revealing a large gap in continuity of patient care. PCP responses should be used to develop an evidence-based intake transition record, and procedures should be implemented to ensure high-quality transitional care.

  10. Multimorbidity in chronic disease: impact on health care resources and costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Effective and resource-efficient long-term management of multimorbidity is one of the greatest health-related challenges facing patients, health professionals, and society more broadly. The purpose of this review was to provide a synthesis of literature examining multimorbidity and resource utilization, including implications for cost-effectiveness estimates and resource allocation decision making. In summary, previous literature has reported substantially greater, near exponential, increases in health care costs and resource utilization when additional chronic comorbid conditions are present. Increased health care costs have been linked to elevated rates of primary care and specialist physician occasions of service, medication use, emergency department presentations, and hospital admissions (both frequency of admissions and bed days occupied). There is currently a paucity of cost-effectiveness information for chronic disease interventions originating from patient samples with multimorbidity. The scarcity of robust economic evaluations in the field represents a considerable challenge for resource allocation decision making intended to reduce the burden of multimorbidity in resource-constrained health care systems. Nonetheless, the few cost-effectiveness studies that are available provide valuable insight into the potential positive and cost-effective impact that interventions may have among patients with multiple comorbidities. These studies also highlight some of the pragmatic and methodological challenges underlying the conduct of economic evaluations among people who may have advanced age, frailty, and disadvantageous socioeconomic circumstances, and where long-term follow-up may be required to directly observe sustained and measurable health and quality of life benefits. Research in the field has indicated that the impact of multimorbidity on health care costs and resources will likely differ across health systems, regions, disease combinations, and person

  11. Multimorbidity in chronic disease: impact on health care resources and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Effective and resource-efficient long-term management of multimorbidity is one of the greatest health-related challenges facing patients, health professionals, and society more broadly. The purpose of this review was to provide a synthesis of literature examining multimorbidity and resource utilization, including implications for cost-effectiveness estimates and resource allocation decision making. In summary, previous literature has reported substantially greater, near exponential, increases in health care costs and resource utilization when additional chronic comorbid conditions are present. Increased health care costs have been linked to elevated rates of primary care and specialist physician occasions of service, medication use, emergency department presentations, and hospital admissions (both frequency of admissions and bed days occupied). There is currently a paucity of cost-effectiveness information for chronic disease interventions originating from patient samples with multimorbidity. The scarcity of robust economic evaluations in the field represents a considerable challenge for resource allocation decision making intended to reduce the burden of multimorbidity in resource-constrained health care systems. Nonetheless, the few cost-effectiveness studies that are available provide valuable insight into the potential positive and cost-effective impact that interventions may have among patients with multiple comorbidities. These studies also highlight some of the pragmatic and methodological challenges underlying the conduct of economic evaluations among people who may have advanced age, frailty, and disadvantageous socioeconomic circumstances, and where long-term follow-up may be required to directly observe sustained and measurable health and quality of life benefits. Research in the field has indicated that the impact of multimorbidity on health care costs and resources will likely differ across health systems, regions, disease combinations, and person

  12. Improving confidence for self care in patients with depression and chronic illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludman, Evette J; Peterson, Do; Katon, Wayne J; Lin, Elizabeth H B; Von Korff, Michael; Ciechanowski, Paul; Young, Bessie; Gensichen, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether patients who received a multicondition collaborative care intervention for chronic illnesses and depression had greater improvement in self-care knowledge and efficacy, and whether greater knowledge and self-efficacy was positively associated with improved target outcomes. A randomized controlled trial with 214 patients with comorbid depression and poorly controlled diabetes and/or coronary heart disease tested a 12-month team-based intervention that combined self-management support and collaborative care management. At 6 and 12 month outcomes the intervention group showed significant improvements over the usual care group in confidence in ability to follow through with medical regimens important to managing their conditions and to maintain lifestyle changes even during times of stress. Improvements in self care-efficacy were significantly related to improvements in depression, and early improvements in confidence to maintain lifestyle changes even during times of stress explained part of the observed subsequent improvements in depression. PMID:23398269

  13. A First Step on the Journey to High-Quality Chronic Illness Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Edward H

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic Healthcare Collaboration (AHC) conducted a quality improvement initiative to improve chronic disease prevention and management for the four Atlantic provinces and their regional health authorities. Leaders and front-line teams carried out a range of projects, each suited to the needs of that region. This initiative helped build the case for improvement, increased the motivation to change, exposed participants to proven ideas for improvement and supported participating organizations in developing the capacity and culture to test, implement and spread improvements. The AHC also created a politically safe learning community with the potential to support and sustain the work of chronic care improvement over time. In carrying this initiative forward, the greatest challenge will be the magnitude of work to be done. PMID:27009640

  14. Home Visiting Programs: What the Primary Care Clinician Should Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finello, Karen Moran; Terteryan, Araksi; Riewerts, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Responsibilities for primary care clinicians are rapidly expanding ascomplexities in families' lives create increased disparities in health and developmental outcomes for young children. Despite the demands on primary care clinicians to promote health in the context of complex family and community factors, most primary care clinicians are operating in an environment of limited training and a shortage of resources for supporting families. Partnerships with evidence-based home visiting programs for very young children and their families can provide a resource that will help to reduce the impact of adverse early childhood experiences and facilitate health equity. Home visiting programs in the United States are typically voluntary and designed to be preventative in nature, although families are usually offered services based on significant risk criteria since the costs associated with universal approaches have been considered prohibitive. Programs may be funded within the health (physical orbehavioral/mental health), child welfare, early education, or early intervention systems or by private foundation dollars focused primarily on oneof the above systems (e.g., health), with a wide range of outcomes targeted by the programs and funders. Services may be primarily focused on the child, the parent, or parent-child interactions. Services include the development of targeted and individualized intervention strategies, better coaching of parents, and improved modeling of interactions that may assist struggling families. This paper provides a broad overview ofthe history of home visiting, theoretical bases of home visiting programs, key components of evidence-based models, outcomes typically targeted, research on effectiveness, cost information, challenges and benefits of home visiting, and funding/sustainability concerns. Significance for primary care clinicians isdescribed specifically and information relevant for clinicians is emphasized throughout the paper. PMID:26872870

  15. Tennessee Star-Quality Child Care Program: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Tennessee's Star-Quality Child Care Program prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  16. 76 FR 34541 - Child and Adult Care Food Program Improving Management and Program Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-13

    ... improve Program management and integrity in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP), at 67 FR 43447 (June 27, 2002) and at 69 FR 53501 (September 1, 2004). Section 243 of Public Law 106-224, the... rule was issued in proposed form on September 12, 2000 (65 FR 55101). In response to State and...

  17. Stability of Subsidy Participation and Continuity of Care in the Child Care Assistance Program in Minnesota. Minnesota Child Care Choices Research Brief Series. Publication #2014-55

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elizabeth E.; Krafft, Caroline; Tout, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    The Minnesota Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) provides subsidies to help low-income families pay for child care while parents are working, looking for work, or attending school. The program can help make quality child care affordable and is intended both to support employment for low-income families and to support the development and…

  18. Direct costs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among managed care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Anand A Dalal1, Laura Christensen2, Fang Liu3, Aylin A Riedel31US Health Outcomes, GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; 2Health Economics Outcomes Research, i3 Innovus, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 3Health Economics Outcomes Research, i3 Innovus, Eden Prairie, MN, USAPurpose: To estimate patient- and episode-level direct costs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD among commercially insured patients in the US.Methods: In this retrospective claims-based analysis, commercial enrollees with evidence of COPD were grouped into five mutually exclusive cohorts based on the most intensive level of COPD-related care they received in 2006, ie, outpatient, urgent outpatient (outpatient care in addition to a claim for an oral corticosteroid or antibiotic within seven days, emergency department (ED, standard inpatient admission, and intensive care unit (ICU cohorts. Patient-level COPD-related annual health care costs, including patient- and payer-paid costs, were compared among the cohorts. Adjusted episode-level costs were calculated.Results: Of the 37,089 COPD patients included in the study, 53% were in the outpatient cohort, 37% were in the urgent outpatient cohort, 3% were in the ED cohort, and the standard admission and ICU cohorts together comprised 6%. Mean (standard deviation, SD annual COPD-related health care costs (2008 US$ increased across the cohorts (P < 0.001, ranging from $2003 ($3238 to $43,461 ($76,159 per patient. Medical costs comprised 96% of health care costs for the ICU cohort. Adjusted mean (SD episode-level costs were $305 ($310 for an outpatient visit, $274 ($336 for an urgent outpatient visit, $327 ($65 for an ED visit, $9745 ($2968 for a standard admission, and $33,440 for an ICU stay.Conclusion: Direct costs of COPD-related care for commercially insured patients are driven by hospital stays with or without ICU care. Exacerbation prevention resulting in reduced need for inpatient care could lower costs

  19. Evaluation of patients with stroke monitored by home care programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient with a stroke in home treatment, investigating physical capacity, mental status and anthropometric analysis. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Fortaleza/CE, from January to April of 2010. Sixty-one individuals monitored by a home care program of three tertiary hospitals were investigated, through interviews and the application of scales. The majority of individuals encountered were female (59%, elderly, bedridden, with a low educational level, a history of other stroke, a high degree of dependence for basic (73.8% and instrumental (80.3 % activities of daily living, and a low cognitive level (95.1%. Individuals also presented with tracheostomy, gastric feeding and urinary catheter, difficulty hearing, speaking, chewing, swallowing, and those making daily use of various medications. It was concluded that home care by nurses is an alternative for care of those individuals with a stroke.

  20. Improving Self-Care of Patients with Chronic Disease using Online Personal Health Record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Wagholikar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Effective management of chronic diseases such as prostate cancer is important. Research suggests a tendency to use self-care treatment options such as over-the-counter (OTC complementary medications among prostate cancer patients. The current trend in patient-driven recording of health data in an online Personal Health Record (PHR presents an opportunity to develop new data-driven approaches for improving prostate cancer patient care. However, the ability of current online solutions to share patients’ data for better decision support is limited. An informatics approach may improve online sharing of self-care interventions among these patients. It can also provide better evidence to support decisions made during their self-managed care.Aims To identify requirements for an online system and describe a new case-based reasoning (CBR method for improving self-care of advanced prostate cancer patients in an online PHR environment. Method A non-identifying online survey was conducted to understand self-care patterns among prostate cancer patients and to identify requirements for an online information system. The pilot study was carried out between August 2010 and December 2010. A case-base of 52 patients was developed. Results The data analysis showed self-care patterns among the prostate cancer patients. Selenium (55% was the common complementary supplement used by the patients. Paracetamol (about 45% was the commonly used OTC by the patients. Conclusion The results of this study specified requirements for an online case-based reasoning information system. The outcomes of this study are being incorporated in design of the proposed Artificial Intelligence (AI driven patient journey browser system. A basic version of the proposed system is currently being considered for implementation.

  1. Identifying organisational principles and management practices important to the quality of health care services for chronic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Anne

    2012-01-01

    which management practices in the CCM are most efficient and in what combinations. In addition, financial incentives and public reporting of performance are often considered effective at improving the quality of health care services, but this has not yet been definitively proved.......The quality of health care services offered to people suffering from chronic diseases often fails to meet standards in Denmark or internationally. The population consisting of people with chronic diseases is large and accounts for about 70% of total health care expenses. Given that resources are...

  2. Chronic illness and multimorbidity among problem drug users: a comparative cross sectional pilot study in primary care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cullen, Walter

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although multimorbidity has important implications for patient care in general practice, limited research has examined chronic illness and health service utilisation among problem drug users. This study aimed to determine chronic illness prevalence and health service utilisation among problem drug users attending primary care for methadone treatment, to compare these rates with matched \\'controls\\' and to develop and pilot test a valid study instrument. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of patients attending three large urban general practices in Dublin, Ireland for methadone treatment was conducted, and this sample was compared with a control group matched by practice, age, gender and General Medical Services (GMS) status. RESULTS: Data were collected on 114 patients. Fifty-seven patients were on methadone treatment, of whom 52(91%) had at least one chronic illness (other then substance use) and 39(68%) were prescribed at least one regular medication. Frequent utilisation of primary care services and secondary care services in the previous six months was observed among patients on methadone treatment and controls, although the former had significantly higher chronic illness prevalence and primary care contact rates. The study instrument facilitated data collection that was feasible and with minimal inter-observer variation. CONCLUSION: Multimorbidity is common among problem drug users attending general practice for methadone treatment. Primary care may therefore have an important role in primary and secondary prevention of chronic illnesses among this population. This study offers a feasible study instrument for further work on this issue. (238 words).

  3. Chronic illness and multimorbidity among problem drug users: a comparative cross sectional pilot study in primary care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cullen, Walter

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Although multimorbidity has important implications for patient care in general practice, limited research has examined chronic illness and health service utilisation among problem drug users. This study aimed to determine chronic illness prevalence and health service utilisation among problem drug users attending primary care for methadone treatment, to compare these rates with matched \\'controls\\' and to develop and pilot test a valid study instrument. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of patients attending three large urban general practices in Dublin, Ireland for methadone treatment was conducted, and this sample was compared with a control group matched by practice, age, gender and General Medical Services (GMS) status. RESULTS: Data were collected on 114 patients. Fifty-seven patients were on methadone treatment, of whom 52(91%) had at least one chronic illness (other then substance use) and 39(68%) were prescribed at least one regular medication. Frequent utilisation of primary care services and secondary care services in the previous six months was observed among patients on methadone treatment and controls, although the former had significantly higher chronic illness prevalence and primary care contact rates. The study instrument facilitated data collection that was feasible and with minimal inter-observer variation. CONCLUSION: Multimorbidity is common among problem drug users attending general practice for methadone treatment. Primary care may therefore have an important role in primary and secondary prevention of chronic illnesses among this population. This study offers a feasible study instrument for further work on this issue. (238 words).

  4. The Patients Assessment Chronic Illness Care (PACIC questionnaire in The Netherlands: a validation study in rural general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermsen Jan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients with chronic illness receive health care in primary care settings, so a challenge is to provide well-structured chronic care in these settings. Our aim was to develop and test a Dutch version of the PACIC questionnaire, a measure for patient reported structured chronic care. Methods Observational study in 165 patients with diabetes or COPD from four general practices (72% response rate. Patients completed a written questionnaire, which included instruments for assessing chronic illness care (PACIC, evaluations of general practice (Europep, enablement (PEI, and individual characteristics. Results The patients had a mean age of 68.0 years and 47% comprised of women. Twenty-two to 35% of responding patients did not provide answers to specific items in the PACIC. In 11 items the lowest answering category was used by 30% or more of the responders and in 6 items the highest answering category was used by this number of responders. Principal factor analysis identified the previously defined five domains reasonably well. Cronbach's alpha per domain varied from 0.71 to 0.83, and the intraclass coefficient from 0.66 to 0.91. Diabetes patients reported higher presence of structured chronic care for 14 out of the 20 PACIC items. The effect of patient evaluations of general practice on the PACIC score was positive (b = 0.72, p Conclusion A translated and validated Dutch version of the PACIC questionnaire is now available. Further research on its validity is recommended.

  5. Active treatment programs for patients with chronic low back pain: a prospective, randomized, observer-blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendix, A F; Bendix, T; Ostenfeld, S; Bush, E; Andersen

    1995-01-01

    Several new studies have indicated that an active approach to patients with chronic disabling low back pain (LBP) seems effective. Some of these studies emphasize the importance of dealing with the patient's total situation in comprehensive multidisciplinary programs--the bio-psycho-social model. However, these programs are expensive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the rehabilitation outcome from three different active programs in terms of: (1) return-to-work rate, (2) days of sick leave, (3) health-care contacts, (4) pain and disability scores, and (5) staying physically active. The subjects included 132 patients randomized to the study, of whom 123 started one of the treatment programs. They had all had at least 6 months of chronic LBP. The patients were randomized into one of three programs: group 1--a full-time, intensive 3-week multidisciplinary program, including active physical and ergonomic training and psychological pain management, followed by 1 day weekly for the subsequent 3 weeks; group 2--active physical training, twice a week for 6 weeks, for a total of 24h; group 3--psychological pain management combined with active physical training, twice a week for 6 weeks, also for a total of 24h. The results presented here are based on data collected 4 months following treatment, which shows an 86% response rate. The initial examination and the follow-up evaluation were performed by a blinded observer. The results show that 4 months after treatment, the intensive multidisciplinary program is superior to the less intensive programs in terms of return-to-work rate, health-care contacts, pain and disability scores, and staying physically active.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7552649

  6. Frozen in time: life in the face of chronic care cutbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, K

    1999-04-01

    Kathy Cook won the $750 first prize in CMAJ's 7th Annual Amy Chouinard Memorial Essay Contest. The deadline for entries to the contest, which is designed to stimulate interest in medical writing among journalism students, is June 1. Entries should be forwarded to the news and features editor. In her winning essay, Cook explores the frustrations and quality-of-life issues that arise in a chronic care institution that is trying to operate in the midst of serious funding cuts. PMID:10207348

  7. The Effects of a School-Based Atopy Care Program for School-Aged Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hosihn; Lee, Youngjin

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a school-based atopy care program (SACP) for children with atopic dermatitis (AD). The program is administered by health teachers who are also school nurses. The study compared groups using a pre- and post-test design. Participants were children with AD and their parents (98 dyads; 32 in the test group and 66 in the control group) sampled from four elementary schools in Seoul. After completing the SACP, parents in the test group had significantly increased knowledge of AD (p = .04) and a greater sense of parental efficacy (p = .02) when compared with the control group. This study derived guidelines that elementary health teachers can use in practice for school-aged children with AD. We concluded that there is sufficient evidence of effectiveness for the SACP to be used as a model for chronic disease management in school-aged children. PMID:24942774

  8. Implementation of a primary care physician network obesity management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowerman, S; Bellman, M; Saltsman, P; Garvey, D; Pimstone, K; Skootsky, S; Wang, H J; Elashoff, R; Heber, D

    2001-11-01

    Most primary care physicians do not treat obesity, citing lack of time, resources, insurance reimbursement, and knowledge of effective interventions as significant barriers. To address this need, a 10-minute intervention delivered by the primary care physician was coupled with individual dietary counseling sessions delivered by a registered dietitian via telephone with an automated calling system (House-Calls, Mobile, AL). Patients were seen for follow-up by their physician at weeks 4, 12, 24, 36 and 52. A total of 252 patients (202 women and 50 men) were referred by 18 primary care physicians to the program. The comorbid conditions reported for all patients at baseline included low back pain, 29% (n = 72); hypertension, 45% (n = 113); hypercholesterolemia, 41% (n = 104); type 2 diabetes, 10% (n = 26); and sleep apnea, 5% (n = 12). When offered a choice of meal plans based on foods or meal replacements, two-thirds of patients (n = 166) chose to use meal replacements (Ultra Slim-Fast; Slim-Fast Foods Co., West Palm Beach, FL) at least once daily. Baseline weights of subjects averaged 200 +/- 46 lb for women (n = 202) and 237 +/- 45 lb for men (n = 50). Patients completing 6 months in the program lost an average of 19.0 +/- 4.0 lb for women (n = 94) and 15.5 +/- 8.2 lb for men (n = 26). Physicians reported a high degree of satisfaction with the program, suggesting that a brief, effective physician-directed program with nutritionist support by telephone can be implemented in a busy primary care office. PMID:11707560

  9. Reliability of an Interactive Computer Program for Advance Care Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Schubart, Jane R.; Levi, Benjamin H.; Camacho, Fabian; Whitehead, Megan; Farace, Elana; Green, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite widespread efforts to promote advance directives (ADs), completion rates remain low. Making Your Wishes Known: Planning Your Medical Future (MYWK) is an interactive computer program that guides individuals through the process of advance care planning, explaining health conditions and interventions that commonly involve life or death decisions, helps them articulate their values/goals, and translates users' preferences into a detailed AD document. The purpose of this study was to demon...

  10. Current state of chronic wound care in Kazakhstan: focus on topical treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Akhmetova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background — The presence of chronic hard-to-heal wounds significantly affects patients’ quality of life causing pain, discomfort, decrease of mobility and consequently leads to social isolation and depression. This type of wound is more prevalent among older population. It has been estimated that up to 1-2% of the world population have this condition. The treatment of hard-to-heal wounds is expensive and long-term process, and, stresses healthcare systems of every country. Unfortunately, limited information is available about the situation with chronic wounds in Kazakhstan as the statistical data on such patients is not monitored and not registered in this country. Methods — The search was conducted by using available electronic sources, including Google Scholar, PubMed, Web of Sciences, Medline, Wiley Online Library, and Cochrane Library databases as well as hard copy versions of peer-reviewed publications in Russian, Kazakh, and English languages. Results — We have identified and analyzed current situation with wound care in the Republic of Kazakhstan. Research has demonstrated a variety of types of treatments utilized in the country, particularly the treatment of the diabetic foot.It also indicates the lack of statistics on wound care. Conclusions — The review highlights the mechanisms of wound healing process, methods for wound care, and encompasses the information available on wound healing in Republic of Kazakhstan. The article emphasizes the necessity of establishing the systemic monitoring of wound care and formation of electronic database. Apart from that, the importance of developing and manufacturing of domestic novel wound treatments have been also stressed out.

  11. Integrated, Team-Based Chronic Pain Management: Bridges from Theory and Research to High Quality Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Mary A; Kerns, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a significant public health concern. For many, chronic pain is associated with declines in physical functioning and increases in emotional distress. Additionally, the socioeconomic burden associated with costs of care, lost wages and declines in productivity are significant. A large and growing body of research continues to support the biopsychosocial model as the predominant framework for conceptualizing the experience of chronic pain and its multiple negative impacts. The model also informs a widely accepted and empirically supported approach for the optimal management of chronic pain. This chapter briefly articulates the historical foundations of the biopsychosocial model of chronic pain followed by a relatively detailed discussion of an empirically informed, integrated, multimodal and interdisciplinary treatment approach. The role of mental health professionals, especially psychologists, in the management of chronic pain is particularly highlighted. PMID:26900068

  12. Care Burden and Social Support Levels of Caregivers of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göriş, Songül; Klç, Züleyha; Elmal, Ferhan; Tutar, Nuri; Takc, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive study was conducted to determine the care burden and social support levels of caregivers to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The primary caregivers of 112 patients with COPD hospitalized in the chest diseases service of a university hospital were involved in the study. Data of the study were collected by using the Patient and Caregiver Information Form, which was prepared by reviewing the literature, Katz Index of Independence in Activities of Daily Living, Zarit Burden Interview, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. While the care burden mean score of caregivers of patients with COPD was 40.91 ± 20.58, the mean score of Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support was 54.13 ± 18.84. In this study, it was determined that female caregivers, as well as individuals stating that their physical and psychological health was affected and those having difficulty giving care and needing help, had higher levels of care burden, whereas the spouses, as well as individuals with lower levels of income and those stating that their physical and psychological health was affected, had lower levels of social support. PMID:27309411

  13. Getting better at chronic care in remote communities: study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled of community based management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Barbara

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevalence and incidence of diabetes and other common comorbid conditions (hypertension, coronary heart disease, renal disease and chronic lung disease are extremely high among Indigenous Australians. Recent measures to improve quality of preventive care in Indigenous community settings, while apparently successful at increasing screening and routine check-up rates, have shown only modest or little improvements in appropriate care such as the introduction of insulin and other scaled-up drug regimens in line with evidence-based guidelines, together with support for risk factor reduction. A new strategy is required to ensure high quality integrated family-centred care is available locally, with continuity and cultural safety, by community-based care coordinators with appropriate system supports. Methods/design The trial design is open parallel cluster randomised controlled trial. The objective of this pragmatic trial is to test the effectiveness of a model of health service delivery that facilitates integrated community-based, intensive chronic condition management, compared with usual care, in rural and remote Indigenous primary health care services in north Queensland. Participants are Indigenous adults (aged 18–65 years with poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c>=8.5 and at least one other chronic condition. The intervention is to employ an Indigenous Health Worker to case manage the care of a maximum caseload of 30 participants. The Indigenous Health Workers receive intensive clinical training initially, and throughout the study, to ensure they are competent to coordinate care for people with chronic conditions. The Indigenous Health Workers, supported by the local primary health care (PHC team and an Indigenous Clinical Support Team, will manage care, including coordinating access to multidisciplinary team care based on best practice standards. Allocation by cluster to the intervention and control groups is by simple

  14. Low-Educated Women with Chronic Pain Were Less Often Selected to Multidisciplinary Rehabilitation Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Hammarström, Anne; Haukenes, Inger; Fjellman Wiklund, Anncristine; Lehti, Arja; Wiklund, Maria; Evengard, Birgitta; Stålnacke, Britt-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a lack of research about a potential education-related bias in assessment of patients with chronic pain. The aim of this study was to analyze whether low-educated men and women with chronic pain were less often selected to multidisciplinary rehabilitation than those with high education. Methods: The population consisted of consecutive patients (n = 595 women, 266 men) referred during a three-year period from mainly primary health care centers for a multidisciplinary team ...

  15. The chronic care for age-related macular degeneration study (CHARMED: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Held Ulrike

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neovascular age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in people 50 years of age or older in the developed world. As in other chronic diseases, several effective treatments are available, but in clinical daily practice there is an evidence performance gap. The Chronic Care Model represents an evidence-based framework for the care of chronically ill patients and aims at closing that gap. However, no data are available regarding patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Methods/Design CHARMED is a multicenter randomized controlled trial. The study challenges the hypothesis that the implementation of core elements of the Chronic Care Model (patient empowerment, delivering evidence based information, clinical information system, reminder system with structured follow up and frequent monitoring via a specially trained Chronic Care Coach in Swiss centres for neovascular age-related macular degeneration results in better visual acuity (primary outcome and an increased disease specific quality of life (secondary outcome in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration. According to the power calculation, a total sample size of 352 patients is needed (drop out rate of 25%. 14 specialised medical doctors from leading ophtalmologic centres in Switzerland will include 25 patients. In each centre, a Chronic Care Coach will provide disease specific care according to the Chronic Care Model for intervention group. Patients from the control group will be treated as usual. Baseline measurements will be taken in month III - XII, starting in March 2011. Follow-up data will be collected after 6 months and 1 year. Discussion Multiple studies have shown that implementing Chronic Care Model elements improve clinical outcomes as well as process parameters in different chronic diseases as osteoarthritis, depression or e.g. the cardiovascular risk profile of diabetes patients. This

  16. Effectiveness of family training and life skills on caring chronic mental disorders in an Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Dareke

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This research is semi-empirical study which is done to examiningthe effectiveness of family trainings and life skills on Caring Chronic Mental Disorders in Mashhad (Iran. 300 participants has been chosen in randomly from the families of chronic mental disorders who has been admitted in round the clock centers in Mashhad and who had been in waiting list and these participants has been divided to two groups of experiment and control randomly and we introduce family trainings and life skills to experiment group. There was no training to control group. These two groups were tested period to the beginning of trainings and post training with instruments such as California Social Adjustment Questionnaire; Families’ Attitude and Awareness about Life Skills and Family Trainings; Rosenberg Self-Esteem; General Health Questionnaire;and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised. Results indicated that training had no effect on the attitude of families toward taking care of mental disorder, but family member،s attitudetoward mental disorder has been changed. This training has been influential on changing family member،s attitude toward life skills, social adjustment, self esteem, mental health increase and reducing mental disorders.

  17. Measuring health-related quality of life in adults with chronic conditions in primary care settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Carri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe health-related quality of life (HRQOL) conceptual frameworks, critically review 3 commonly used HRQOL scales relevant to adults with chronic conditions in primary care settings, and make recommendations for using HRQOL scales in primary care practice. Data sources Information was accessed regarding HRQOL conceptual and theoretical approaches. A comprehensive search strategy identified 3 commonly used scales that met the review criteria and evidence regarding use of the scales in adults with chronic conditions in community settings. Scale selection Scales were selected if they were designed for clinical use; were easy to administer; were generic and broad in content areas; and contained some individualized items. Scales were critiqued according to content development, theoretical basis, psychometric properties, scoring, feasibility, the concepts being measured, and the number of items that measured an individualized concept. Synthesis Early HRQOL approaches focused on health and functional status while recent approaches incorporate individualized concepts such as the person’s own values and the environment. The abbreviated World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale (WHOQOL-BREF), the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Duke Health Profile were critiqued. All address physical, mental, and social domains, while the WHOQOL-BREF also addresses environment. Psychometric evidence supports use of the SF-36 and WHOQOL-BREF with this population. The SF-36 has the most evidence of responsiveness but has some floor and ceiling effects, while the WHOQOL-BREF does not appear to have floor or ceiling effects but has limited evidence of responsiveness. The WHOQOL-BREF has the highest proportion of individualized items. Conclusion Measurement of HRQOL in adults with chronic conditions can support patient management and contribute to primary care service evaluation. Scales that are based on a broad definition of health and that

  18. Cognitive screening in persons with chronic diseases in primary care: challenges and recommendations for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athilingam, Ponrathi; Visovsky, Constance; Elliott, Amanda F; Rogal, Philip J

    2015-09-01

    An integrative literature review was performed to identify the challenges in current cognitive screening. The aim of the review was to serve as an evaluative resource to guide clinicians in the selection of the best available cognitive screening measures for early assessment of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in people with chronic diseases. The review classified the available cognitive screening measures according to purpose, time to administer, and cognitive domains assessed as: 1) simple/ brief cognitive screening measures, 2) disease specific screening measures, 3) domain specific screening measures, 4) self-administered screening measures, and 5) technology-based screening measures. There is no single optimal cognitive measure for all patient populations and settings. Although disease specific cognitive screening measures are optimal, there is a lack of validated screening measures for many chronic diseases. Technology-based screening measure is a promising avenue for increasing the accessibility of cognitive screening. Future work should focus on translating available screening measures to mobile technology format to enhance the utility in busy primary care settings. Early cognitive screening in persons with chronic disease should enhance appropriate referrals for detailed neurocognitive examination and cognitive interventions to preserve and or minimize cognitive decline. PMID:25794511

  19. Association between chronic low back pain, anxiety and depression in patients at a tertiary care centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the prevalence of anxiety and depression in chronic low back pain population at a tertiary care centre. Methods: The prospective cross-sectional study was conducted using convenience sampling at the Department of Neurosurgery, at Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, from January to June 2010. The prevalence of anxiety and depression in chronic low back pain patients was studied according to specified age and gender groups using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results: Of the 140 patients in the study, 66 (47.14%) were females and 74 (52.85%) were males. The average age of the patients was 43.02+-13.34 years. The average duration of symptoms was 4.29+-3.3 years. Abnormal level of anxiety and depression were found in 77 (55%) and 68 (48.57%) patients respectively. Out of them 54 (38.5%) and 51 (36.4%) were borderline abnormal for anxiety and depression respectively, while 23 (16.4%) and 17 (12.1%) were abnormal for anxiety and depression respectively. Among the males, there were 20 (14.28%) and 23 (16.42%) patients with abnormal levels of the corresponding numbers among the females were 57 (40.71%) and 45 (32.14%). There was a significant association in anxiety (p0.05). Conclusion: Individuals with chronic low back pain were at high risk to experience anxiety and depression. This risk was higher for females. (author)

  20. A cognitive-behavioural program for adolescents with chronic pain - A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Merlijn, Vivian; Hunfeld, Joke; Wouden, Hans; Hazebroek-Kampschreur, Alice; van Suijlekom-Smit, Lisette; Koes, Bart; Passchier, Jan

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the feasibility of a cognitive-behavioural training program for adolescents with chronic pain irrespective of pain localisation. A secondary aim was to give an impression of the effect of the program on pain and quality of life. Eight adolescents (14-18 years) with chronic non-organic pain recruited from the general population (and their parents) participated in this pilot study. The intervention included five group meetings alternate...

  1. Is chronic pelvic pain a comfortable diagnosis for primary care practitioners: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Creed Francis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic pelvic pain (CPP has a prevalence similar to asthma and chronic back pain, but little is known about how general practitioners (GPs and practice nurses manage women with this problem. A clearer understanding of current management is necessary to develop appropriate strategies, in keeping with current health care policy, for the supported self-management of patients with long term conditions. The aim of this study was to explore GPs' and practice nurses' understanding and perspectives on the management of chronic pelvic pain. Methods Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of 21 GPs and 20 practice nurses, in three primary care trusts in the North West of England. Data were analysed using the principles of Framework analysis. Results Analysis suggests that women who present with CPP pose a challenge to GPs and practice nurses. CPP is not necessarily recognized as a diagnostic label and making the diagnosis was achieved only by exclusion. This contrasts with the relative acceptability of labels such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. GPs expressed elements of therapeutic nihilism about the condition. Despite practice nurses taking on increasing responsibilities for the management of patients with long term conditions, respondents did not feel that CPP was an area that they were comfortable in managing. Conclusions The study demonstrates an educational/training need for both GPs and practice nurses. GPs described a number of skills and clinical competencies which could be harnessed to develop a more targeted management strategy. There is potential to develop facilitated self- management for use in this patient group, given that this approach has been successful in patients with similar conditions such as IBS.

  2. Self-care 3 months after attending chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient education: a qualitative descriptive analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousing, Camilla Askov; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    life. Talking to health care professionals focused the patients' attention on their newly acquired skills and the research interview made them more aware of their enhanced self-care. Conclusion: Patients' self-care may be enhanced through group education, even though the patients are not always able to...... see the immediate outcome. Some patients may require professional help to implement their newly acquired knowledge and skills in everyday life. A planned dialogue concentrating on self-care in everyday life 3 months after finishing the course may enhance patients' awareness and appraisal of their......Purpose: The authors performed a qualitative descriptive analysis to explore how group patient education influences the self-care of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Patients and methods: In the period 2009–2010, eleven patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary...

  3. Primary care practice-based care management for chronically ill patients (PraCMan: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN56104508

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldauf Annika

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care management programmes are an effective approach to care for high risk patients with complex care needs resulting from multiple co-occurring medical and non-medical conditions. These patients are likely to be hospitalized for a potentially "avoidable" cause. Nurse-led care management programmes for high risk elderly patients showed promising results. Care management programmes based on health care assistants (HCAs targeting adult patients with a high risk of hospitalisation may be an innovative approach to deliver cost-efficient intensified care to patients most in need. Methods/Design PraCMan is a cluster randomized controlled trial with primary care practices as unit of randomisation. The study evaluates a complex primary care practice-based care management of patients at high risk for future hospitalizations. Eligible patients either suffer from type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic heart failure or any combination. Patients with a high likelihood of hospitalization within the following 12 months (based on insurance data will be included in the trial. During 12 months of intervention patients of the care management group receive comprehensive assessment of medical and non-medical needs and resources as well as regular structured monitoring of symptoms. Assessment and monitoring will be performed by trained HCAs from the participating practices. Additionally, patients will receive written information, symptom diaries, action plans and a medication plan to improve self-management capabilities. This intervention is addition to usual care. Patients from the control group receive usual care. Primary outcome is the number of all-cause hospitalizations at 12 months follow-up, assessed by insurance claims data. Secondary outcomes are health-related quality of life (SF12, EQ5D, quality of chronic illness care (PACIC, health care utilisation and costs, medication adherence (MARS, depression

  4. 76 FR 44573 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service Payment Rates, and Administrative Reimbursement Rates for Sponsoring Organizations of Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2011 Through June 30, 2012 Correction In notice document...

  5. Utilisation of podiatry services in Australia under the Medicare Enhanced Primary Care program, 2004-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menz Hylton B

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2004, as an extension of the Enhanced Primary Care (EPC program, the Australian Government introduced a policy of providing Medicare rebates for allied health services provided to patients with chronic or complex health conditions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the utilisation of podiatry services provided under this scheme between 2004 and 2008. Methods Data pertaining to the Medicare item 10962 for the calendar years 2004-2008 were extracted from the Australian Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS database and cross-tabulated by sex and age. Descriptive analyses were undertaken to assess sex and age differences in the number of consultations provided and to assess for temporal trends over the five-year assessment period. The total cost to Medicare over this period was also determined. Results During the 2004-2008 period, a total of 1,338,044 EPC consultations were provided by podiatrists in Australia. Females exhibited higher utilisation than males (63 versus 37%, and those aged over 65 years accounted for 75% of consultations. There was a marked increase in the number of consultations provided from 2004 to 2008, and the total cost of providing EPC podiatry services during this period was $62.9 M. Conclusion Podiatry services have been extensively utilised under the EPC program by primary care patients, particularly older women, and the number of services provided has increased dramatically between 2004 and 2008. Further research is required to determine whether the EPC program enhances clinical outcomes compared to standard practice.

  6. The Nordic maintenance care program--time intervals between treatments of patients with low back pain: how close and who decides?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandnes, Kjerstin F; Bjørnstad, Charlotte; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte;

    2010-01-01

    The management of chiropractic patients with acute and chronic/persistent conditions probably differs. However, little is known on this subject. There is, for example, a dearth of information on maintenance care (MC). Thus it is not known if patients on MC are coerced to partake in a program of f...

  7. Collaboration Between Oregon’s Chronic Disease Programs and Medicaid to Decrease Smoking Among Medicaid-Insured Oregonians With Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. David Rebanal, MPH

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Environmental tobacco smoke is a leading environmental asthma trigger and has been linked to the development of asthma in children and adults. Smoking cessation and reduced exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke are key components of asthma management. We describe a partnership involving two state agencies and 14 health plans; the goal of the partnership was to decrease smoking and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among Medicaid-insured Oregonians with asthma. Context Oregon’s asthma rate is higher than that of the national population, and approximately one third of Oregonians with asthma smoke. The Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention Program (HPCDP in the Oregon Department of Human Services has collaborated with the Office of Medical Assistance Programs (OMAP to promote preventive care at the population level. Methods Two HPCDP programs — the Oregon Asthma Program and the Oregon Tobacco Prevention and Education Program — worked with OMAP to launch the statewide Asthma–Tobacco Integration Project in 2003. A primary focus of the project is the development of partnerships among health plans, health care providers, and large health care organizations to integrate asthma management and smoking control through systems innovations and provider education. OMAP and its participating health plans also decided to focus cessation efforts on its members with chronic diseases. In addition, HPCDP has collaborated with OMAP to distribute educational tools and information about tobacco’s impact on asthma morbidity to Oregon’s health care providers who serve low-income Oregonians. Consequences The partnership between OMAP and HPCDP program staff members has allowed them to discuss problems, leverage resources, and obtain support for many public health initiatives. In addition, OMAP–HPCDP collaboration on educational workshops and outreach to health care providers has helped convince quality improvement specialists and

  8. [Integration of mental health and chronic non-communicable diseases in Peru: challenges and opportunities for primary care settings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Ipince, Alessandra; Toyama, Mauricio; Benate-Galvez, Ysabel; Galán-Rodas, Edén; Medina-Verástegui, Julio César; Sánchez-Moreno, David; Araya, Ricardo; Miranda, J Jaime

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the relationship between mental health and chronic non-communicable diseases is discussed as well as the possibility to address them in a comprehensive manner in the Peruvian health system. First, the prevalence estimates and the burden of chronic non-communicable diseases and mental disorders worldwide and in Peru are reviewed. Then, the detrimental impact of depression in the early stages as well as the progress of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases is described. Additionally, the gap between access to mental health care in Peru is analyzed. Lastly, the alternatives to reduce the gap are explored. Of these alternatives, the integration of mental health into primary care services is emphasized; as a feasible way to meet the care needs of the general population, and people with chronic diseases in particular, in the Peruvian context. PMID:24718538

  9. Rehabilitation of women from the Middle East living with chronic pain--perceptions from health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Viktoria; Eriksson, Henrik; Christensson, Kyllike; Müllersdorf, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Meeting patients from other countries constitutes a challenge for health care. The purpose of this study was to increase knowledge about tacit understandings of treatment in practice by determining the perceptions of chronic pain and rehabilitation directed to resettled women from the Middle East, from a variety of health care professionals within primary care. Based on the results, we find a need to support and increase knowledge among health care professionals to involve the patient and consider her beliefs, expectations, background, current life situation, and spirituality, and to involve family in rehabilitation. PMID:25513750

  10. Primary care providers' perspective on prescribing opioids to older adults with chronic non-cancer pain: A qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Turner Barbara J; Granieri Evelyn; Papaleontiou Maria; Moore Alison A; Spitz Aerin; Reid M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The use of opioid medications as treatment for chronic non-cancer pain remains controversial. Little information is currently available regarding healthcare providers' attitudes and beliefs about this practice among older adults. This study aimed to describe primary care providers' experiences and attitudes towards, as well as perceived barriers and facilitators to prescribing opioids as a treatment for chronic pain among older adults. Methods Six focus groups were conduct...

  11. History of the Animal Care Program at Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan-Mayberry, Noreen; Bassett, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    NASA has a rich history of scientific research that has been conducted throughout our numerous manned spaceflight programs. This scientific research has included animal test subjects participating in various spaceflight missions, including most recently, Space Shuttle mission STS-131. The Animal Care Program at Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas is multi-faceted and unique in scope compared to other centers within the agency. The animal care program at JSC has evolved from strictly research to include a Longhorn facility and the Houston Zoo's Attwater Prairie Chicken refuge, which is used to help repopulate this endangered species. JSC is home to more than 300 species of animals including home of hundreds of white-tailed deer that roam freely throughout the center which pose unique issues in regards to population control and safety of NASA workers, visitors and tourists. We will give a broad overview of our day to day operations, animal research, community outreach and protection of animals at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  12. Model Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum in an Intensive Care Unit Fellowship Program and Its Impact on Patient Management

    OpenAIRE

    Keith Killu; Victor Coba; Michael Mendez; Subhash Reddy; Tanja Adrzejewski; Yung Huang; Jessica Ede; Mathilda Horst

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study was designed to assess the clinical applicability of a Point-of-Care (POC) ultrasound curriculum into an intensive care unit (ICU) fellowship program and its impact on patient care. Methods. A POC ultrasound curriculum for the surgical ICU (SICU) fellowship was designed and implemented in an urban, academic tertiary care center. It included 30 hours of didactics and hands-on training on models. Minimum requirement for each ICU fellow was to perform 25–50 exams on respec...

  13. Managing severe burn injuries: challenges and solutions in complex and chronic wound care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers AD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Alan D Rogers, Marc G Jeschke Ross Tilley Burn Centre, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Encountered regularly by health care providers across both medical and surgical fields and an increasing socioeconomic burden globally, wound care is severely neglected. Practice is heavily influenced by anecdote rather than evidence-based protocols and industry-biased literature rather than robust randomized controlled trials. Burn units are well placed to address this considerable need, as a result of their infrastructure, their multispecialty staffing, and their need to evolve in light of the declining incidence of major burn injury in developed countries. The aim of this review is to evaluate some of the ideological and practical challenges facing wound practitioners and burn surgeons while managing chronic and complex wounds. It also includes an approach to wound assessment and how to conceptualize and implement dressing strategies and new and existing multimodal therapies. Keywords: negative pressure wound therapy, instillation, antiseptic solutions, dressings, multidisciplinary wound care, stem cells, surgery, autograft, allograft, reconstructive ladder

  14. Implementing the chronic care model for frail older adults in the Netherlands: study protocol of ACT (frail older adults: care in transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntinga Maaike E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care for older adults is facing a number of challenges: health problems are not consistently identified at a timely stage, older adults report a lack of autonomy in their care process, and care systems are often confronted with the need for better coordination between health care professionals. We aim to address these challenges by introducing the geriatric care model, based on the chronic care model, and to evaluate its effects on the quality of life of community-dwelling frail older adults. Methods/design In a 2-year stepped-wedge cluster randomised clinical trial with 6-monthly measurements, the chronic care model will be compared with usual care. The trial will be carried out among 35 primary care practices in two regions in the Netherlands. Per region, practices will be randomly allocated to four allocation arms designating the starting point of the intervention. Participants: 1200 community-dwelling older adults aged 65 or over and their primary informal caregivers. Primary care physicians will identify frail individuals based on a composite definition of frailty and a polypharmacy criterion. Final inclusion criterion: scoring 3 or more on a disability case-finding tool. Intervention: Every 6 months patients will receive a geriatric in-home assessment by a practice nurse, followed by a tailored care plan. Expert teams will manage and train practice nurses. Patients with complex care needs will be reviewed in interdisciplinary consultations. Evaluation: We will perform an effect evaluation, an economic evaluation, and a process evaluation. Primary outcome is quality of life as measured with the Short Form-12 questionnaire. Effect analyses will be based on the “intention-to-treat” principle, using multilevel regression analysis. Cost measurements will be administered continually during the study period. A cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-utility analysis will be conducted comparing mean total costs to functional

  15. Factors contributing to intervention fidelity in a multi-site chronic disease self-management program

    OpenAIRE

    Pitt Seraphine; Shippey Claire; Walby Gary; O'Connor Danielle; Burke Somer; Perrin Karen M; McDermott Robert J; Forthofer Melinda S

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background and objectives Disease self-management programs have been a popular approach to reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic disease. Replicating an evidence-based disease management program successfully requires practitioners to ensure fidelity to the original program design. Methods The Florida Health Literacy Study (FHLS) was conducted to investigate the implementation impact of the Pfizer, Inc. Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension Disease Self-Management Program based o...

  16. A meta-analysis of hypnosis for chronic pain problems: a comparison between hypnosis, standard care, and other psychological interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Tomonori; Fujino, Haruo; Nakae, Aya; Mashimo, Takashi; Sasaki, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hypnosis is regarded as an effective treatment for psychological and physical ailments. However, its efficacy as a strategy for managing chronic pain has not been assessed through meta-analytical methods. The objective of the current study was to conduct a meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of hypnosis for managing chronic pain. When compared with standard care, hypnosis provided moderate treatment benefit. Hypnosis also showed a moderate superior effect as compared to other psychological interventions for a nonheadache group. The results suggest that hypnosis is efficacious for managing chronic pain. Given that large heterogeneity among the included studies was identified, the nature of hypnosis treatment is further discussed. PMID:24256477

  17. Opportunities to diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in routine care in the UK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Rupert C M; Price, David; Ryan, Dermot;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patterns of health-care use and comorbidities present in patients in the period before diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are unknown. We investigated these factors to inform future case-finding strategies. METHODS: We did a retrospective analysis of a clinical......,856 (58%) of 22,286 in the 6-10 years before diagnosis, in 3943 (42%) of 9351 in the 11-15 years before diagnosis; and in 95 (8%) of 1167 in the 16-20 years before diagnosis. Between 1990 and 2009, we noted decreases in the age at diagnosis (0·05 years of age per year, 95% CI 0·03-0·07) and yearly...

  18. What do practitioners think? A qualitative study of a shared care mental health and nutrition primary care program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jann Paquette-Warren

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop an in-depth understanding of a shared care model from primary mental health and nutrition care practitioners with a focus on program goals, strengths, challenges and target population benefits. Design: Qualitative method of focus groups. Setting/Participants: The study involved fifty-three practitioners from the Hamilton Health Service Organization Mental Health and Nutrition Program located in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Method: Six focus groups were conducted to obtain the perspective of practitioners belonging to various disciplines or health care teams. A qualitative approach using both an editing and template organization styles was taken followed by a basic content analysis. Main findings: Themes revealed accessibility, interdisciplinary care, and complex care as the main goals of the program. Major program strengths included flexibility, communication/collaboration, educational opportunities, access to patient information, continuity of care, and maintenance of practitioner and patient satisfaction. Shared care was described as highly dependent on communication style, skill and expertise, availability, and attitudes toward shared care. Time constraint with respect to collaboration was noted as the main challenge. Conclusion: Despite some challenges and variability among practices, the program was perceived as providing better patient care by the most appropriate practitioner in an accessible and comfortable setting.

  19. Children, Food, and Family Day Care: A Manual for Sponsorship of the Child Care Food Program in Licensed Family Day Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Konski, Gerry, Ed.

    This manual provides detailed information on how local non-profit organizations can sponsor licensed family day care homes for participation in the federally funded Child Care Food Program. This program subsidizes the provision of nutritious meals to children who are not in school. The introductory section of the manual answers basic questions…

  20. Primary care physicians’ perspectives on computer-based health risk assessment tools for chronic diseases: a mixed methods study

    OpenAIRE

    Teja Voruganti; Mary Ann O'Brien; Straus, Sharon E; McLaughlin, John R.; Eva Grunfeld

    2015-01-01

    Background Health risk assessment tools compute an individual’s risk of developing a disease. Routine use of such tools by primary care physicians (PCPs) is potentially useful in chronic disease prevention. We sought physicians’ awareness and perceptions of the usefulness, usability and feasibility of performing assessments with computer-based risk assessment tools in primary care settings.Methods Focus groups and usability testing with a computer-based risk assessment tool were conducted wit...

  1. Integrated palliative care in Europe: a qualitative systematic literature review of empirically-tested models in cancer and chronic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Siouta, Naouma; Beek, K.; van der Eerden, M. E.; Preston, N.; Hasselaar, J.G.; Hughes, S; GARRALDA, E.; Centeno, C. (Carlos); Csikos, A.; Groot, M. de; Radbruch, L.; Payne, S; Menten, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Integrated Palliative Care (PC) strategies are often implemented following models, namely standardized designs that provide frameworks for the organization of care for people with a progressive life-threatening illness and/or for their (in)formal caregivers. The aim of this qualitative systematic review is to identify empirically-evaluated models of PC in cancer and chronic disease in Europe. Further, develop a generic framework that will consist of the basis for the design of futu...

  2. Managing Complexity in Chronic Care: An overview of the VA State-of-the-Art (SOTA) Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Kevin B.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The aging of the population and the increasing prevalence of multiple chronic illnesses, along with multiplying options for clinical management, pose great challenges to both the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and the broader US health care system. Developing effective and efficient health care for persons with complex and multiple medical conditions is a national priority. Therefore, research in this area is critically important. In 2006, the VHA Health Services Research a...

  3. A cognitive-behavioural program for adolescents with chronic pain - A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.P.B.M. Merlijn (Vivian); J.A.M. Hunfeld (Joke); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans); A.A.J.M. Hazebroek-Kampschreur (Alice); L.W.A. van Suijlekom-Smit (Lisette); B.W. Koes (Bart); J. Passchier (Jan)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the feasibility of a cognitive-behavioural training program for adolescents with chronic pain irrespective of pain localisation. A secondary aim was to give an impression of the effect of the program on pain and quality of life. Eight adoles

  4. Primary care providers' perspective on prescribing opioids to older adults with chronic non-cancer pain: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Barbara J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of opioid medications as treatment for chronic non-cancer pain remains controversial. Little information is currently available regarding healthcare providers' attitudes and beliefs about this practice among older adults. This study aimed to describe primary care providers' experiences and attitudes towards, as well as perceived barriers and facilitators to prescribing opioids as a treatment for chronic pain among older adults. Methods Six focus groups were conducted with a total of 23 physicians and three nurse practitioners from two academically affiliated primary care practices and three community health centers located in New York City. Focus groups were audiotape recorded and transcribed. The data were analyzed using directed content analysis; NVivo software was used to assist in the quantification of identified themes. Results Most participants (96% employed opioids as therapy for some of their older patients with chronic pain, although not as first-line therapy. Providers cited multiple barriers, including fear of causing harm, the subjectivity of pain, lack of education, problems converting between opioids, and stigma. New barriers included patient/family member reluctance to try an opioid and concerns about opioid abuse by family members/caregivers. Studies confirming treatment benefit, validated tools for assessing risk and/or dosing for comorbidities, improved conversion methods, patient education, and peer support could facilitate opioid prescribing. Participants voiced greater comfort using opioids in the setting of delivering palliative or hospice care versus care of patients with chronic pain, and expressed substantial frustration managing chronic pain. Conclusions Providers perceive multiple barriers to prescribing opioids to older adults with chronic pain, and use these medications cautiously. Establishing the long-term safety and efficacy of these medications, generating improved prescribing methods

  5. Psychiatric morbidity, pain perception, and functional status of chronic pain patients in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Rajmohan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Psychological factors, such as that exist when we experience pain, can profoundly alter the strength of pain perception. Aim: The study aims to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders, and its association with perception of pain and functional status in chronic patients in palliative care. Materials and Methods: The sample was selected via simple randomisation and post consent were assessed using (1 a semi- structured questionnaire to elicit socio-demographic information and medical data (2 Brief Pain Inventory (3 ICD-10 Symptom Checklist (4 ICD-10-Diagnostic Criteria for Research (DCR (5 Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS (6 Covi Anxiety Rating Scale (7 Karnofsky Performance Status Scale. Data was analysed using independent sample t test and chi square test. Results: The psychiatric morbidity was 67% with depression and adjustment disorders being the major diagnosis. There was a significant association between psychiatric morbidity pain variables (P = 0.000. Psychiatric morbidity significantly impaired activity, mood, working, walk, sleep, relationship, and enjoyment. There was no association between aetiology of pain, type of cancer, treatment for primary condition and treatment for pain and psychiatric morbidity. The functional status of cancer patients was also poorer in patients with psychiatric morbidity (P = 0.008. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of psychiatric illness in chronic pain patients of any aetiology. Psychiatric morbidity is associated with increased pain perception, impairment in activity and poor functional status.

  6. A mHealth Application for Chronic Wound Care: Findings of a User Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia R. Friesen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the findings of a user trial of a mHealth application for pressure ulcer (bedsore documentation. Pressure ulcers are a leading iatrogenic cause of death in developed countries and significantly impact quality of life for those affected. Pressure ulcers will be an increasing public health concern as the population ages. Electronic information systems are being explored to improve consistency and accuracy of documentation, improve patient and caregiver experience and ultimately improve patient outcomes. A software application was developed for Android Smartphones and tablets and was trialed in a personal care home in Western Canada. The software application provides an electronic medical record for chronic wounds, replacing nurses’ paper-based charting and is positioned for integration with facility’s larger eHealth framework. The mHealth application offers three intended benefits over paper-based charting of chronic wounds, including: (1 the capacity for remote consultation (telehealth between facilities, practitioners, and/or remote communities, (2 data organization and analysis, including built-in alerts, automatically-generated text-based and graph-based wound histories including wound images, and (3 tutorial support for non-specialized caregivers. The user trial yielded insights regarding the software application’s design and functionality in the clinical setting, and highlighted the key role of wound photographs in enhancing patient and caregiver experiences, enhancing communication between multiple healthcare professionals, and leveraging the software’s telehealth capacities.

  7. Nursing care gestion of chronically ill elderly people. Policlinico 2, year 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmila Carbonell Sanamé

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive prospective study was made to those patients aged more than 60 years who are attended in the Policlinico 2 “Leonilda Tamayo Matos” in Isla de la Juventud during the year 2007. The study population was 1254 and 700 chronically ill elderly people were taken as representative sample, using a simple random sampling. The Mini Mental State Examination and a satisfaction survey was made to old people, all these with their informed consent. The main variables to study were: sex, age, race, civil state, educational level, work, assistance to the Grandparent’s Circle and satisfaction level. There exists a feminine predominance (61% over male, as well as the age group from 60 to 64 years old. Mixed race is the most common one (43%, followed by black (35%. 43% of these elders have secondary studies, and 64% of them are retired. The assistance to the Grandparent’s Circle is good, 338 of all the elders studied (48.2% assist to it. The results were expressed with real numbers and percentages, and were represented in bar and pie charts. There exists a predominance of arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the elders studied. The quality of the nursing cares to the chronically ill old people of the policlinic 2 in 2007 was good.

  8. Caring for patients with chronic kidney disease: a joint opinion of the ambulatory care and the nephrology practice and research networks of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillich, Alan J; Saseen, Joseph J; Dehart, Renee M; Dumo, Peter; Grabe, Darren W; Gilmartin, Cheryl; Hachey, David M; Hudson, Joanna Q; Pruchnicki, Maria C; Joy, Melanie S

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of patients are developing chronic kidney disease (CKD). Appropriate care for patients with CKD must occur in the earliest stages, preferably before CKD progresses to more severe stages. Therefore, recognition and treatment of CKD and its associated complications must occur in primary care settings. Patients with CKD often have comorbid conditions such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, creating specific considerations when treating these diseases. Also, these patients have CKD-related conditions, including anemia and renal osteodystrophy, that are not traditionally evaluated and monitored by the primary care practitioner. Collectively, many opportunities exist for pharmacists who practice in the primary care setting to improve the care of patients with CKD. PMID:15767229

  9. Pharmacotherapeutic management of chronic noncancer pain in primary care: lessons for pharmacists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouini G

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ghaya Jouini,1–3 Manon Choinière,3,4 Elisabeth Martin,2,3 Sylvie Perreault,1,5 Djamal Berbiche,2,3 David Lussier,6–8 Eveline Hudon,2,3,9 Lyne Lalonde1–3,101Faculty of Pharmacy, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; 2Équipe de recherche en soins de première ligne, Centre de santé et de services sociaux de Laval, Laval, Quebec, Canada; 3Centre de recherche du Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CRCHUM, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; 4Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; 5Sanofi-Aventis Endowment Research Chair in Optimal Drug Use, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; 6Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; 7Division of Geriatric Medicine and Alan-Edwards Center for Research on Pain, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; 8Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; 9Department of Family Medicine and Emergency, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; 10Sanofi-Aventis Endowment Research Chair in Ambulatory Pharmaceutical Care, Université de Montréal and Centre de santé et de services sociaux de Laval, Quebec, CanadaPurpose: Describe the pharmacotherapeutic management of primary-care patients with chronic noncancer pain, assess their satisfaction with pain treatment, and identify the determinants of their satisfaction.Methods: A cohort study was conducted in Quebec (Canada. Patients reporting chronic noncancer pain with an average pain intensity of at least 4 on a 0–10 scale (10= worst possible pain and having an active analgesic prescription from a primary-care physician were recruited. They completed a telephone interview and a self-administered questionnaire to document their pain, emotional well-being, satisfaction with treatment, and barriers/beliefs/attitudes about pain and its treatment. Information

  10. Implementation of a Targeted Screening Program to Detect Airflow Obstruction Suggestive of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease within a Presurgical Screening Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Chantal Robitaille; Esther Dajczman; Hirsch, Andrew M; David Small; Pierre Ernst; Dana Porubska; Mark Palayew

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Targeted spirometry screening for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been studied in primary care and community settings. Limitations regarding availability and quality of testing remain. A targeted spirometry screening program was implemented within a presurgical screening (PSS) clinic to detect undiagnosed airways disease and identify patients with COPD/asthma in need of treatment optimization.OBJECTIVE: The present quality assurance study evaluated airflow obstruc...

  11. Grip on challenging behavior: process evaluation of the implementation of a care program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, S.A.; Smalbrugge, M.; Eefsting, J.A.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.; Pot, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Grip on Challenging Behavior care program for managing challenging behavior was implemented in the dementia special care units of 17 Dutch nursing homes. A process evaluation of the implementation of the care program was performed to determine the quality of the implementation and th

  12. Risk Factors Associated with Children Lost to Care in a State Early Childhood Intervention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoni, Peggy P.; Kass, Philip H.

    2010-01-01

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted to identify risk factors associated with children lost to care, and their families, compared to those not lost to care within the California Early Start Program. The cohort included data on 8987 children enrolled in the Early Start Program in 1998. This cohort consisted of 2443 children lost to care, 6363…

  13. 76 FR 21372 - Medicare Program; Solicitation for Proposals for the Medicare Community-Based Care Transitions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... the Medicare Community-Based Care Transitions Program AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services... to participate in the Medicare Community-based Care Transitions Program, which was authorized by... Tiongson, (410) 786-0342 or by e-mail at CareTransitions@cms.hhs.gov . ADDRESSES: Proposals should...

  14. Primary care direct access MRI for the investigation of chronic headache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, T.R., E-mail: timt@nhs.net [Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Evangelou, N. [Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Porter, H. [Nottingham Cripps Health Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Lenthall, R. [Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15

    Aim: To assess the efficacy of a primary-care imaging pathway for neurology outpatients, from inception to deployment, compared with traditional outpatient referral. Materials and methods: After local agreement, guidelines were generated providing pathways for diagnosis and treatment of common causes of headache, highlighting 'red-flag' features requiring urgent neurology referral, and selecting patients for direct magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) referral. In addition, reports were clarified and standardized. To evaluate the efficacy of the access pathway, a retrospective sequential review of 100 MRI investigations was performed comparing general practitioner (GP) referral, with traditional neurology referral plus imaging, acquired before the pathway started. Results: No statistically significant difference in rates of major abnormalities, incidental findings or ischaemic lesions were identified between the two cohorts. Reported patient satisfaction was high, with a cost reduction for groups using the pathway. Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that a defined access pathway for imaging to investigate chronic headache can be deployed appropriately in a primary-care setting.

  15. Home Automated Telemanagement (HAT System to Facilitate Self-Care of Patients with Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Finkelstein

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Successful patient self-management requires a multidisciplinary approach that includes regular patient assessment, disease-specific education, control of medication adherence, implementation of health behavior change models and social support. Existing systems for computer-assisted disease management do not provide this multidisciplinary patient support and do not address treatment compliance issues. We developed the Home Automated Telemanagement (HAT system for patients with different chronic health conditions to facilitate their self-care. The HAT system consists of a home unit, HAT server, and clinician units. Patients at home use a palmtop or a laptop connected with a disease monitor on a regular basis. Each HAT session consists of self-testing, feedback, and educational components. The self-reported symptom data and objective results obtained from disease-specific sensors are automatically sent from patient homes to the HAT server in the hospital. Any web-enabled device can serve as a clinician unit to review patient results. The HAT system monitors self-testing results and patient compliance. The HAT system has been implemented and tested in patients receiving anticoagulation therapy, patients with asthma, COPD and other health conditions. Evaluation results indicated high level of acceptance of the HAT system by the patients and that the system has a positive impact on main clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction with medical care.

  16. A Novice User of Pediatric Emergency Point-of-Care Ultrasonography Avoids Misdiagnosis in a Case of Chronic Abdominal Distention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pe, Marybelle; Dickman, Eitan; Tessaro, Mark

    2016-02-01

    A 13-year-old adolescent girl with chronic abdominal distention was referred to the pediatric emergency department after the outpatient workup suggested moderate ascites. Point-of-care ultrasonography performed by the emergency physicians ruled out ascites, instead demonstrating a well-circumscribed cystic mass subsequently identified as an ovarian mucinous cystadenoma. PMID:26835571

  17. Patient-Centered Medical Home Features and Health Care Expenditures of Medicare Beneficiaries with Chronic Disease Dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpot, Lindsey M; Stockbridge, Erica L; Padrón, Norma A; Pagán, José A

    2016-06-01

    Three out of 4 Medicare beneficiaries have multiple chronic conditions, and managing the care of this growing population can be complex and costly because of care coordination challenges. This study assesses how different elements of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model may impact the health care expenditures of Medicare beneficiaries with the most prevalent chronic disease dyads (ie, co-occurring high cholesterol and high blood pressure, high cholesterol and heart disease, high cholesterol and diabetes, high cholesterol and arthritis, heart disease and high blood pressure). Data from the 2007-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey suggest that increased access to PCMH features may differentially impact the distribution of health care expenditures across health care service categories depending on the combination of chronic conditions experienced by each beneficiary. For example, having no difficulty contacting a provider after regular hours was associated with significantly lower outpatient expenditures for beneficiaries with high cholesterol and diabetes (n = 635; P = 0.038), but it was associated with significantly higher inpatient expenditures for beneficiaries with high blood pressure and high cholesterol (n = 1599; P = 0.015), and no significant differences in expenditures in any category for beneficiaries with high blood pressure and heart disease (n = 1018; P > 0.05 for all categories). However, average total health care expenditures are largely unaffected by implementing the PCMH features considered. Understanding how the needs of Medicare beneficiaries with multiple chronic conditions can be met through the adoption of the PCMH model is important not only to be able to provide high-quality care but also to control costs. (Population Health Management 2016;19:206-211). PMID:26440215

  18. Depression in patients with chronic pain attending a specialised pain treatment centre: prevalence and impact on health care costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Lauren; Hotopf, Matthew; Petkova, Hristina; Matcham, Faith; Simpson, Anna; McCracken, Lance M

    2016-07-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence and impact of depression on health care costs in patients with complex chronic pain. The sample included 1204 patients attending a tertiary pain management service for people with chronic disabling pain, unresponsive to medical treatment. As part of routine care, patients completed a web-based questionnaire assessing mental and physical health, functioning, and service use in the preceding 3 months. Depression was assessed using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Self-report health care utilisation was measured across 4 domains: general practitioner contacts, contacts with secondary/tertiary care doctors, accident and emergency department visits, and days hospitalised. The participation rate was 89%. Seven hundred and thirty-two patients (60.8%; 95% CI 58.0-63.6) met criteria for probable depression, and 407 (33.8%) met the threshold for severe depression. Patients with depression were more likely to be unable to work because of ill health and reported greater work absence, greater pain-related interference with functioning, lower pain acceptance, and more generalised pain. Mean total health care costs per 3-month period were £731 (95% CI £646-£817) for patients with depression, compared with £448 (95% CI £366-£530) for patients without depression. A positive association between severe depression and total health care costs persisted after controlling for key demographic, functional, and clinical covariates using multiple linear regression models. These findings reveal the extent, severity, and impact of depression in patients with chronic pain and make evident a need for action. Effective treatment of depression may improve patient health and functioning and reduce the burden of chronic pain on health care services. PMID:26963849

  19. 76 FR 61103 - Medicare Program; Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... Care initiative (CPC), a multipayer model designed to improve primary care. DATES: Letter of Intent... strengthen free-standing primary care capacity by testing a model of comprehensive, accountable primary care... through the implementation of the Comprehensive Primary Care (CPC) initiative: To collaborate with...

  20. Accuracy of diagnostic registers and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the Devon primary care audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marks Dawn

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines on COPD diagnosis and management encourage primary care physicians to detect the disease at an early stage and to treat patients according to their condition and needs. Problems in guideline implementation include difficulties in diagnosis, using spirometry and the disputed role of reversibility testing. These lead to inaccurate diagnostic registers and inadequacy of administered treatments. This study represents an audit of COPD diagnosis and management in primary care practices in Devon. Methods Six hundred and thirty two patients on COPD registers in primary care practices were seen by a visiting Respiratory Specialist Nurse. Diagnoses were made according to the NICE guidelines. Reversibility testing was carried out either routinely or based on clinical indication in two sub-samples. Dyspnoea was assessed. Data were entered into a novel IT-based software which computed guideline-based treatment recommendations. Current and recommended treatments were compared. Results Five hundred and eighty patients had spirometry. Diagnoses of COPD were confirmed in 422 patients (73%. Thirty nine patients were identified as asthma only, 94 had normal spirometry, 23 were restrictive and 2 had a cardiac disorder. Reversibility testing changed diagnosis of 11% of patients with airflow obstruction, and severity grading in 18%. Three quarters of patients with COPD had been offered practical help with smoking cessation. Short and long-acting anticholinergics and long acting beta-2 agonists had been under-prescribed; in 15–18% of patients they were indicated but not received. Inhaled steroids had been over-prescribed (recommended in 17%; taken by 60%, whereas only 4% of patients with a chronic productive cough were receiving mucolytics. Pulmonary rehabilitation was not available in some areas and was under-used in other areas. Conclusion Diagnostic registers of COPD in primary care contain mistakes leading to inaccurate prevalence

  1. Spirometry in Primary Care: An Analysis of Spirometry Test Quality in a Regional Primary Care Asthma Program

    OpenAIRE

    Licskai, Christopher J; Todd W Sands; Lisa Paolatto; Ivan Nicoletti; Madonna Ferrone

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care office spirometry can improve access to testing and concordance between clinical practice and asthma guidelines. Compliance with test quality standards is essential to implementation.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the quality of spirometry performed onsite in a regional primary care asthma program (RAP) by health care professionals with limited training.METHODS: Asthma educators were trained to perform spirometry during two 2 h workshops and supervised during up to six patien...

  2. An Optometrist-Led Eye Care Program for Older Residents of Retirement Homes and Long-Term Care Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Labreche, Tammy; Stolee, Paul; McLeod, Jordache

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Visual impairment among older adults residing in long-term care (LTC) facilities and retirement homes is common and can have a significant adverse impact on their quality of life. Despite the burden of illness, they frequently receive inadequate eye care. We describe an optometrist-led eye care program serving this population, including a profile of participants and the program’s educational role for optometry students. Methods An optometrist assessed residents of LTC f...

  3. Parents' perspective of their journey caring for a child with chronic neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaughan, Veronica; Logan, Deirdre; Sethna, Navil; Mott, Sandra

    2014-03-01

    When a child has chronic pain, it affects the parents. Their response and how it is factored into their lives and family function was the phenomenon of interest that drove this study. The available literature was sparse, especially when the pain etiology was neuropathic. The purpose of this study was to describe the parents' perception of the pain journey from the initial occurrence of their child's pain through the labyrinth of treatment options to successful outcome, to gain a better understanding of parental beliefs about pain, and to learn how parental attitudes and behaviors relate to children's response to treatment for chronic pain. Qualitative descriptive design was used to better understand the phenomenon from those who were the experts because they had experienced it. Parents whose child was enrolled in a pain rehabilitation program participated in open-ended interviews. The children/adolescents were 8-18 years old and diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome or a related chronic pain condition. During data immersion, the investigators uncovered the pervasive underlying themes of suffering and disempowerment. In addition, the multiple meaning elements were grouped into three categories and supportive subcategories labeled as follows: parent distress, with subcategories schism in parenting, searching, and disabled parenting; and lack of control, with the subcategories family/community, fear, and empowerment. The voices of parents were heard in their description of the exhausting and difficult journey in search of pain relief for their child. Their comments provided insight into how they defined the child's pain and their related parental role. PMID:23219393

  4. Creating and Maintaining a Wellness Environment in Child Care Centers Participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofton, Kristi L.; Carr, Deborah H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study identifies issues associated with creating and maintaining a wellness environment in child care centers (CCCs) participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Methods: Structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with CCC professionals and state agency personnel to develop a survey to assess…

  5. The Role of Social Workers in Spiritual Care to Facilitate Coping With Chronic Illness and Self-Determination in Advance Care Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francoeur, Richard B; Burke, Nancy; Wilson, Alicia M

    2016-01-01

    Spiritual values and beliefs of patients and families influence resilience during chronic illness and shape patient choices during advance care planning. The spiritual needs of Baby Boomers will be more diverse than previous generations, in connection with the questioning, experimental mind-set of this group and the fact that it includes a higher proportion of immigrant populations outside the Judeo-Christian tradition. Social workers are trained explicitly to intervene with diverse populations and are well positioned to offer spiritual support in ways that do not necessarily conform to traditional religions. To the extent of their individual expertise and competence, social workers should assess and provide spiritual care to clients, including those who either are underserved or prefer not to seek assistance from clergy or chaplains because they feel alienated from religious institutions and representatives. They should also be aware of ethical dilemmas in consulting with spiritual care professionals in developing spiritual interventions. Social work education should address clients' humanistic and existential concerns, beliefs and behaviors of the major religions, and forms of nontraditional religious and spiritual experiences; it should also provide experiential opportunities for engaging with grief and earlier advance care planning. There should be attention to different theodical perspectives of the major religions regarding the problem of good and evil, which may preoccupy even clients who no longer participate in organized religion, because these unresolved existential issues may weaken client coping with chronic conditions and may diminish clarity and self-awareness for engaging authentically and effectively in advance care planning. PMID:27187806

  6. Costs and health care resource utilization among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with newly acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin J

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Junji Lin,1 Yunfeng Li,2 Haijun Tian,2 Michael J Goodman,1 Susan Gabriel,2 Tara Nazareth,2 Stuart J Turner,2,3 Stephen Arcona,2 Kristijan H Kahler21Department of Pharmacotherapy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 2Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA; 3Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA Background: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are at increased risk for lung infections and other pathologies (eg, pneumonia; however, few studies have evaluated the impact of pneumonia on health care resource utilization and costs in this population. The purpose of this study was to estimate health care resource utilization and costs among COPD patients with newly acquired pneumonia compared to those without pneumonia. Methods: A retrospective claims analysis using Truven MarketScan® Commercial and Medicare databases was conducted. COPD patients with and without newly acquired pneumonia diagnosed between January 1, 2004 and September 30, 2011 were identified. Propensity score matching was used to create a 1:1 matched cohort. Patient demographics, comorbidities (measured by Charlson Comorbidity Index, and medication use were evaluated before and after matching. Health care resource utilization (ie, hospitalizations, emergency room [ER] and outpatient visits, and associated health care costs were assessed during the 12-month follow-up. Logistic regression was conducted to evaluate the risk of hospitalization and ER visits, and gamma regression models and two-part models compared health care costs between groups after matching. Results: In the baseline cohort (N=467,578, patients with newly acquired pneumonia were older (mean age: 70 versus [vs] 63 years and had higher Charlson Comorbidity Index scores (3.3 vs 2.6 than patients without pneumonia. After propensity score matching, the pneumonia cohort was nine times more likely

  7. Impacto de un programa de atención domiciliaria al enfermo crónico en ancianos: calidad de vida y reingresos hospitalarios Impact of the program home care for the chronically ill for elderly: quality of life and hospital readmissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Claudia Espinel-Bermúdez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar el impacto del programa Atención Domiciliaria al Enfermo Crónico (ADEC comparado con la atención habitual (AH a ancianos con dependencia funcional, derechohabientes del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Cohorte prospectiva a tres meses a partir del egreso hospitalario en dos hospitales de la Ciudad de México. Se ingresaron 130 ancianos con dependencia funcional, 70 insertados al programa ADEC y 60 con atención habitual. Se midió impacto en reingresos hospitalarios y calidad de vida a partir de la escala Perfil de Impacto de la Enfermedad (SIP, por sus siglas en inglés. RESULTADOS: La edad promedio de los ancianos fue de 74 años (61/103 y 60% fueron mujeres. El principal diagnóstico fue enfermedad vascular cerebral (EVC (30.77%. El grupo de ADEC mejoró la calidad de vida en la dimensión psicosocial [46.26 (±13.85 comparado con 29.45 (±16.48 vs. 47.03 (±16.47 a 42.36 (±16.35 p0.05. CONCLUSIONES: El programa mejoró la dimensión psicosocial de calidad de vida.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of the ADEC program (acronym in Spanish as compared with the typical care provided to disabled elderly affiliated with the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospective cohort at three months after discharge from two general hospitals in Mexico City. A total of 130 patients with functional dependency were studied, 70 in the ADEC program and 60 with typical care. Impact was measured using hospital readmissions and quality of life based on the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP. RESULTS: Average age was 74 (61/103 years and 60% were women. The main diagnosis was cerebrovascular disease (30.77%. The quality of life in the psychosocial dimension improved for the ADEC group (from 46.26 (±13.85 to 29.45(±16.48 as compared with 47.03 (±16.47 to 42.36 (±16.35 for those receiving typical care (p0.05. CONCLUSIONS: HC program improved the psychosocial dimension of quality of

  8. A Model for Community-Based Pediatric Oral Heath: Implementation of an Infant Oral Care Program

    OpenAIRE

    RAMOS-GOMEZ, FRANCISCO J.

    2014-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandates risk assessments, preventive care, and evaluations based on outcomes. ACA compliance will require easily accessible, cost-effective care models that are flexible and simple to establish. UCLA has developed an Infant Oral Care Program (IOCP) in partnership with community-based organizations that is an intervention model providing culturally competent perinatal and infant oral care for underserved, low-income, and/or minority children aged 0–5 and their ca...

  9. Protocol and baseline data from The Inala Chronic Disease Management Service evaluation study: a health services intervention study for diabetes care

    OpenAIRE

    Ware Robert S; Jackson Claire L; Askew Deborah A; Russell Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is one of the most disabling chronic conditions worldwide, resulting in significant human, social and economic costs and placing huge demands on health care systems. The Inala Chronic Disease Management Service aims to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of care for patients with type 2 diabetes who have been referred by their general practitioner to a specialist diabetes outpatient clinic. Care is provided by a multidisciplinary, integrated t...

  10. [Part II. Scientific evidence in end-stage chronic organ failure. A position paper on shared care planning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gristina, Giuseppe R; Orsi, Luciano; Carlucci, Annalisa; Causarano, Ignazio R; Formica, Marco; Romanò, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic options related to chronic organ failure are interconnected to the variability of human biological responses and the personal history and choices of the chronically ill patient on one hand, and with the variable human answers to therapies on the other hand. All these aspects may explain the small number and low quality of studies aimed to define the clinical criteria useful in identifying end-stage chronically ill patients, as highlighted through the 2012-2013 Medline survey performed by the task force. These results prevented the grading of scientific evidence. However, taking into account the evidence based medicine definition, the task force believes the clinical reasoning and the individual experience of clinicians as well as the patients and families preferences cannot be replaced "tout court" with a strict methodological research. Accordingly, the working method selected by the task force members was to draw up a set of clinical parameters based on the available scientific literature, submitting it to a peer review process carried out by an expert panel. This paper discusses a set of clinical parameters included in the clinical decision-making algorithm and shared by nine medical societies. For each chronic organ failure these clinical parameters should be intended not as a rigid cutoff system to make a choice between two selected care options (intensive vs palliative), rather as the starting point for a joint and careful consideration regarding the opportunity to adopt the clinical decision-making algorithm care proposed in Part I. PMID:24553593

  11. Development of an Automated Healthcare Kiosk for the Management of Chronic Disease Patients in the Primary Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Grace; Tan, Nicolette; Bahadin, Juliana; Shum, Eugene; Tan, Sze Wee

    2016-07-01

    An increase in the prevalence of chronic disease has led to a rise in the demand for primary healthcare services in many developed countries. Healthcare technology tools may provide the leverage to alleviate the shortage of primary care providers. Here we describe the development and usage of an automated healthcare kiosk for the management of patients with stable chronic disease in the primary care setting. One-hundred patients with stable chronic disease were recruited from a primary care clinic. They used a kiosk in place of doctors' consultations for two subsequent follow-up visits. Patient and physician satisfaction with kiosk usage were measured on a Likert scale. Kiosk blood pressure measurements and triage decisions were validated and optimized. Patients were assessed if they could use the kiosk independently. Patients and physicians were satisfied with all areas of kiosk usage. Kiosk triage decisions were accurate by the 2nd month of the study. Blood pressure measurements by the kiosk were equivalent to that taken by a nurse (p = 0.30, 0.14). Independent kiosk usage depended on patients' language skills and educational levels. Healthcare kiosks represent an alternative way to manage patients with stable chronic disease. They have the potential to replace physician visits and improve access to primary healthcare. Patients welcome the use of healthcare technology tools, including those with limited literacy and education. Optimization of environmental and patient factors may be required prior to the implementation of kiosk-based technology in the healthcare setting. PMID:27240840

  12. Integrating Primary Care in Cancer Survivorship Programs: Models of Care for a Growing Patient Population

    OpenAIRE

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa

    2014-01-01

    The author describes the primary care physician’s role in caring for cancer survivors who are transitioning from oncology settings to primary care settings. Four scenarios are addressed and advantages and disadvantages of each are listed.

  13. Experiences of Community-Living Older Adults Receiving Integrated Care Based on the Chronic Care Model : A Qualitative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoorenberg, Sophie L. W.; Wynia, Klaske; Fokkens, Andrea S.; Slotman, Karin; Kremer, Hubertus P. H.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrated care models aim to solve the problem of fragmented and poorly coordinated care in current healthcare systems. These models aim to be patient-centered by providing continuous and coordinated care and by considering the needs and preferences of patients. The objective of this stu

  14. Comparative Effectiveness of Risk-Stratified Care Management in Reducing Readmissions in Medicaid Adults With Chronic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewner, Sharon; Wu, Yow-Wu Bill; Castner, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Hospitalized adult Medicaid recipients with chronic disease are at risk for rehospitalization within 90 days of discharge, but most research has focused on the Medicare population. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of population-based care management intensity on inpatient readmissions in Medicaid adults with pre-existing chronic disease. Retrospective analyses of 2,868 index hospital admissions from 2012 New York State Medicaid Data Warehouse claims compared 90-day post-discharge utilization in populations with and without transitional care management interventions. High intensity managed care organization interventions were associated with higher outpatient and lower emergency department post-discharge utilization than low intensity fee-for-service management. However, readmission rates were higher for the managed care cases. Shorter time to readmission was associated with managed care, diagnoses that include heart and kidney failure, shorter length of stay for index hospitalization, and male sex; with no relationship to age. This unexpected result flags the need to re-evaluate readmission as a quality indicator in the complex Medicaid population. Quality improvement efforts should focus on care continuity during transitions and consider population-specific factors that influence readmission. Optimum post-discharge utilization in the Medicaid population requires a balance between outpatient, emergency and inpatient services to improve access and continuity. PMID:26730804

  15. Assessing Quality of Life and Medical Care in Chronic Angina: An Internet Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Angina is a clinical syndrome whose recognition relies heavily on self-report, so its identification can be challenging. Most data come from cohorts identified by physicians and nurses at the point of care; however, current widespread access to the Internet makes identification of community cohorts feasible and offers a complementary picture of angina. Objective To describe a population self-identified as experiencing chronic angina by use of an Internet survey. Methods Using email and an Internet portal, we invited individuals with a diagnosis of angina and recent symptoms to complete an Internet survey on treatment and quality of life (QOL). In total, 1147 surveys were received. The main analysis was further limited to those reporting a definite coronary heart disease (CHD) history (N=646, 56% of overall). Results Overall, about 15% reported daily angina and 40% weekly angina. Those with more frequent angina were younger, more often depressed, and reported a shorter time since diagnosis. They also had substantially worse treatment satisfaction, physical function, and overall QOL. Fewer than 40% were on ≥ 2 anti-anginals, even with daily angina. The subjects without a history of definite CHD had unexpectedly low use of antianginal and evidence-based medicines, suggesting either a lack of specificity in the use of self-reported angina to identify patients with CHD or lack of access to care. Conclusions Use of inexpensive electronic tools can identify community-based angina cohorts for clinical research. Limitation to subjects with a definite history of CHD lends diagnostic face validity to the approach; however, other symptomatic individuals are also identified. PMID:27125492

  16. Stepped care for depression and anxiety: from primary care to specialized mental health care: a randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness of a stepped care program among primary care patients with mood or anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seekles Wike

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mood and anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and have a large impact on the lives of the affected individuals. Therefore, optimal treatment of these disorders is highly important. In this study we will examine the effectiveness of a stepped care program for primary care patients with mood and anxiety disorders. A stepped care program is characterized by different treatment steps that are arranged in order of increasing intensity. Methods This study is a randomised controlled trial with two conditions: stepped care and care as usual, whereby the latter forms the control group. The stepped care program consists of four evidence based interventions: (1 Watchful waiting, (2 Guided self-help, (3 Problem Solving Treatment and (4 Medication and/or specialized mental health care. The study population consists of primary care attendees aged 18–65 years. Screeners are sent to all patients of the participating general practitioners. Individuals with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of mental disorders (DSM diagnosis of major depression, dysthymia, panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, or social phobia are included as well as individuals with minor depression and anxiety disorders. Primary focus is the reduction of depressive and anxiety symptoms. Both conditions are monitored at 8, 16 and 24 weeks. Discussion This study evaluates the effectiveness of a stepped care program for patients with depressive and anxiety disorder. If effective, a stepped care program can form a worthwhile alternative for care as usual. Strengths and limitations of this study are discussed. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trails: ISRCTN17831610.

  17. Design and Development of a Telerehabilitation Self-Management Program for Persons with Chronic Lower Limb Swelling and Mobility Limitations: Preliminary Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becky L. Faett

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes design and development of a self-management program, delivered by telerehabilitation (TR, to address the problem of chronic lower limb swelling in persons with limited mobility. The 18.6 million persons with limited mobility in the USA are at increased risk for chronic lower limb swelling and related secondary complications, including cellulitis and skin ulcers. Over time, chronic swelling often progresses to lymphedema, an incurable condition requiring lifelong care. Without successful self-management, lymphedema and its related complications inevitably worsen. Access and adherence to appropriate treatment are challenging for persons with limited mobility. Program development involved a structured process to establish content validity (videos and manuals, readability, suitability, and selection of a TR platform to deliver the educational program. Our goal was to develop a program that would engage patients in self-management skills. The TR software platform chosen, Versatile and Integrated System for Telerehabilitation (VISYTER was designed to facilitate face-to-face delivery of an interactive home-based self-management program via the internet in real time. Results demonstrated validity of the educational program and ease of use with TR. Future plans are to evaluate ability of this approach to promote self-management skills, home monitoring, and improved management of persons with lymphedema and limited mobility.

  18. Information and Communication Technology–Enabled Person-Centered Care for the “Big Five” Chronic Conditions: Scoping Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonse, Lianne WL

    2015-01-01

    Background Person-centered information and communication technology (ICT) could encourage patients to take an active part in their health care and decision-making process, and make it possible for patients to interact directly with health care providers and services about their personal health concerns. Yet, little is known about which ICT interventions dedicated to person-centered care (PCC) and connected-care interactions have been studied, especially for shared care management of chronic diseases. The aim of this research is to investigate the extent, range, and nature of these research activities and identify research gaps in the evidence base of health studies regarding the “big 5” chronic diseases: diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, cancer, and stroke. Objective The objective of this paper was to review the literature and to scope the field with respect to 2 questions: (1) which ICT interventions have been used to support patients and health care professionals in PCC management of the big 5 chronic diseases? and (2) what is the impact of these interventions, such as on health-related quality of life and cost efficiency? Methods This research adopted a scoping review method. Three electronic medical databases were accessed: PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library. The research reviewed studies published between January 1989 and December 2013. In 5 stages of systematic scanning and reviewing, relevant studies were identified, selected, and charted. Then we collated, summarized, and reported the results. Results From the initial 9380 search results, we identified 350 studies that qualified for inclusion: diabetes mellitus (n=103), cardiovascular disease (n=89), chronic respiratory disease (n=73), cancer (n=67), and stroke (n=18). Persons with one of these chronic conditions used ICT primarily for self-measurement of the body, when interacting with health care providers, with the highest rates of use seen in chronic

  19. Towards a wireless patient: chronic illness, scarce care and technological innovation in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Carl; Finch, Tracy; Mair, Frances; Mort, Maggie

    2005-10-01

    'Modernization' is a key health policy objective in the UK. It extends across a range of public service delivery and organizational contexts, and also means there are radical changes in perspective on professional behaviour and practice. New information and communications technologies have been seen as one of the key mechanisms by which these changes can be engendered. In particular, massive investment in information technologies promises the rapid distribution and deployment of patient-centred information across internal organizational boundaries. While the National Health Service (NHS) sits on the edge of a pound sterling 6 billion investment in electronic patient records, other technologies find their status as innovative vehicles for professional behaviour change and service delivery in question. In this paper, we consider the ways that telemedicine and telehealthcare systems have been constructed first as a field of technological innovation, and more recently, as management solutions to problems around the distribution of health care. We use NHS responses to chronic illness as a medium for understanding these shifts. In particular, we draw attention to the shifting definitions of 'innovation' and to the ways that these shifts define a move away from notions of technological advance towards management control. PMID:15893864

  20. Chronic Kidney Disease – Where Next? Predicting Outcomes and Planning Care Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angharad Marks

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available With the introduction of the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative chronic kidney disease (CKD guidelines, CKD has been identified as common, particularly in the elderly. The outcomes for those with CKD can be poor: mortality, initiation of renal replacement therapy, and progressive deterioration in kidney function, with its associated complications. In young people with CKD, the risk of poor outcome is high and the social cost substantial, but the actual number of patients affected is relatively small. In the elderly, the risk of poor outcome is substantially lower, but due to the high prevalence of CKD the actual number of poor outcomes attributable to CKD is higher. Predicting which patients are at greatest risk, and being able to tailor care appropriately, has significant potential benefits. Risk prediction models in CKD are being developed and show promise but thus far have limitations. In this review we describe the pathway for developing and evaluating risk prediction tools, and consider what models we have for CKD prediction and where next.

  1. Latex Allergy, a Special Risk for Patients with Chronic Illness and Health Care Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Zafer Caliskaner

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber latex allergy is a new illness whose prevalence has reached epidemic proportions in highly exposed populations such as health care workers and who has chronic illness. After anaphylactic type reactions due to latex has been shown as case reports. The major risk factors in latex are intense exposure to latex allergens (surgical gloves, catheters, etc, atopy, hand eczema, female gender, history of multiple operations and dental interventions. An association between latex allergy and allergy to various fruits (banana, kiwi, avocado, pineapple, etc has been reported. Latex allergy is responsible for a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms ranging from a mild dermatitis to severe anaphylaxis. In this report, we present that latex related systemic allergic reactions cases; the first one is 24 years old nurse woman who is working at the blood bank in our hospital and the other one is 32 years old woman patient who has repeatative medical examination, and in vitro fertilisation therapy plan and suffered for systemic allergic reaction due to latex gloves which was used in her last concha operations. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(3.000: 265-268

  2. The Early Results of a New Health Care Program Implementation in HBV Screening: an Iranian Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifian, Afsaneh; Naderi, Nostratollah; Sanati, Azar; Mohebi, Seyed Reza; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Golmohamadi, Ali; Nori, Simin; Khanyaghma, Mahsa; Sheikhesmaeili, Farshad; Zali, Mohamad Reza

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND According to the reports of World Health Organization (WHO) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the prevalence of chronic hepatitis B infection in Iran has decreased from 2-7% in 2001 to 1.3-0.8% in children aged 2-14 years. In 2010 the Institute of Medicine recommended more comprehensive screening by primary care physicians (PCPs) for evaluation, vaccination, and management of infected patients for further decrease in the prevalence of chronic HBV infection. Thus, with contribution of the Health Department, we developed a practical flowchart for PCPs to start active screening of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in all visited patients and refer the positive cases for further evaluation and management to Taleghani Hospital. METHODS With collaboration of Health Department of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences), physicians of health centers were asked to screen all their patients for HBsAg. Positive cases were referred to Taleghani Hospital. They were first registered and educated about their disease, life style, and prevention methods. Their first degree families were screened for HBV infection too and were referred for vaccination if needed. According to the results of lab tests, appropriate management was done by a hepatologist. RESULTS Since implementation of this program, we have encountered a significant rise in patient detection (even in high risk groups). Many of them were not aware of their disease and most of those who were aware of their disease were not managed appropriately. Family screening and vaccination were inadequate and need more emphasis. CONCLUSION Although health system is active about screening of HBV infection in high risk populations, it is not perfect. It seems that health system needs to upgrade the screening and management programs of HBV infection. PMID:26609351

  3. Development of an efficient rehabilitation exercise program for functional recovery in chronic ankle instability

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kewwan; Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to construct an integrated rehabilitation exercise program to prevent chronic pain and improve motor ability in cases of ankle injury and re-injury. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-six male soccer players who required functional strength exercises due to repeated ankle injury were the subjects. A 12-week rehabilitation exercise program was constructed with the aim of improving muscle strength in the ankle and dynamic coordination of the lower limb. Mus...

  4. Which Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients Will Be Likely to Attend Consistently a Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program?

    OpenAIRE

    Hassanein, Salwa E; Narsavage, Georgia L.; Williams, Sherrie Dixon; Anthony, Mary K; Gittner, Lisaann S.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, and millions of COPD patients are disabled and unable to work. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) programs are available to assist with disability, but it is not clear who is likely to consistently participate in them. The purpose of this study was to determine which participants were likely to consistently attend a PR program.

  5. Comprehensive Strategy for Serious, Violent, and Chronic Juvenile Offenders: Program Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquent Prevention (Dept. of Justice), Washington, DC.

    This document presents a comprehensive strategy for dealing with serious, violent, and chronic juvenile offenders developed by the United States Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. It notes that the program described can be implemented at the state, county, or local level. The introduction presents statistics on violent…

  6. Investigation of Placement Outcomes 3 Years after a Job Skills Training Program for Chronically Unemployed Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tango, Robert A.; Kolodinsky, Pit

    2004-01-01

    This analysis of chronically unemployed job seekers after they completed a comprehensive job skills training program reveals dynamic interpersonal and intrapersonal characteristics that have an impact on job-finding success. Of primary interest in this study was the relationship between R. B. Cattell's (1988) second-order personality factors and…

  7. Short-term outcomes of a back school program for chronic low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hodselmans, AP; Jaegers, SM; Goeken, LN; Göeken, L.N.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the short-term outcome of a back school program for patients suffering from chronic, nonspecific low back pain (LBP). Design: Quasi-experimental cohort study with a waiting list control group. Setting: Dutch rehabilitation department. Participants: Experimental group (n = 14) pa

  8. Utilization of health care services by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, J A; Ward, A J; Jones, M K C; McMillan, C; Lordan, N

    2003-01-01

    In order to identify healthcare resource use patterns associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), resource utilization (RU) data collection was integrated into a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study of Viozan (sibenadet HCl). This study enrolled patients with symptomatic, smoking-related COPD, randomized to receive sibenadet or placebo for a 52-week treatment period. A questionnaire establishing typical pre-trial, COPD-related RU was completed by each patient. Subsequent data were collected by means of an Interactive Voice Response System (IVRS) at 30-day intervals (14 time points) during the study and in the follow-up period. The IVRS system facilitated data collection and minimized inconvenience to the patient. Compliance with the requirement to record details of the healthcare services during the year-long study was high. No overall trend for lower RU was associated with sibenadet therapy, which correlates with the lack of sustained clinical effect seen in studies conducted concurrently. These data do, however, provide valuable information on RU associated with COPD and insights into adjustments associated with changes in disease course. Physicians were seen to be the most common source of care for patients with COPD and more of the patients with severe COPD (stage III) than mild (stage I) were seen to utilize the most expensive resources (e.g. inpatient hospital care). For those patients who experienced an exacerbation during the trial (irrespective of treatment group), resource use was increased during the periods when an exacerbation was reported when compared with the periods before or after an exacerbation. The proportion of cases attending the physician doubled and with a trip to the Emergency Room (ER) increased approximately ninefold during the reporting period in which the exacerbation occurred compared with the previous month. This study has shown that use of an IVRS, even in elderly patients, is an effective means of

  9. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases: An evolutionary trade-off between acutely beneficial but chronically harmful programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Rainer H; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that during chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs) maladaptations of the immune, nervous, endocrine and reproductive system occur. Maladaptation leads to disease sequelae in CIDs. The ultimate reason of disease sequelae in CIDs remained unclear because clinicians do not consider bodily energy trade-offs and evolutionary medicine. We review the evolution of physiological supersystems, fitness consequences of genes involved in CIDs during different life-history stages, environmental factors of CIDs, energy trade-offs during inflammatory episodes and the non-specificity of CIDs. Incorporating bodily energy regulation into evolutionary medicine builds a framework to better understand pathophysiology of CIDs by considering that genes and networks used are positively selected if they serve acute, highly energy-consuming inflammation. It is predicted that genes that protect energy stores are positively selected (as immune memory). This could explain why energy-demanding inflammatory episodes like infectious diseases must be terminated within 3-8 weeks to be adaptive, and otherwise become maladaptive. Considering energy regulation as an evolved adaptive trait explains why many known sequelae of different CIDs must be uniform. These are, e.g. sickness behavior/fatigue/depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, anorexia, malnutrition, muscle wasting-cachexia, cachectic obesity, insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, alterations of steroid hormone axes, disturbances of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, hypertension, bone loss and hypercoagulability. Considering evolved energy trade-offs helps us to understand how an energy imbalance can lead to the disease sequelae of CIDs. In the future, clinicians must translate this knowledge into early diagnosis and symptomatic treatment in CIDs. PMID:26817483

  10. Effects of a Safe Patient Handling and Mobility Program on Patient Self-Care Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Darragh, Amy R.; Shiyko, Mariya; Margulis, Heather; Campo, Marc

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective cohort study found that patients who received inpatient rehabilitation services with an SPHM program were as likely to achieve at least modified independence in self-care as those who received inpatient rehabilitation services without an SPHM program.

  11. Personalized Primary Care for Older People: An evaluation of a multicomponent nurse-led care program

    OpenAIRE

    Bleijenberg, N.

    2013-01-01

    Providing optimal care for the increasing number of frail older people with complex care needs is a major challenge in primary care. The current approach is reactive and does not meet the needs of older patients, resulting in unnecessary loss of daily functioning, suboptimal quality of life and high health care expenditures. In the Utrecht Proactive Frailty Intervention Trial (U-PROFIT, in Dutch:’ Om U’), we designed and evaluated a strategy for proactive patient-centred primary care of frail...

  12. The ties that bind us: how existing relationships, health and gender shape family care in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice G. Gullick

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD changes family roles and relationship dynamics and the experience of the disease is influenced by family functioning. Merleau- Ponty’s existential philosophy of the body provided the framework for this Heideggerian phenomenological inquiry. Fifteen people with COPD and 14 family members engaged in 58 semi-structured interviews either face-to-face or by telephone. This study identified a difference in the essence of the lived experiences between male and female carers, and between spousal and non-spousal carers in relation to severe COPD. Previous reciprocity framed the level of acceptance of the caring role and perception of care burden. The stories highlight the self-perceived need for women carers to be conscious micro-managers of illness. Male family members would care alongside, lending support and caring in a reactive way as specific needs or crises arose. Caring in COPD required a binding vigilance; a constant need of the carer to monitor the physical and emotional well-being of the sick person that bound them emotionally and cognitively to the task of caring. Carers were the managers of crises and families cared from a perspective of possible death. Family was perceived as the best thing in life. Health professionals should consider the influence of gender, family relationships and the impact of reciprocity when planning support for family caregivers. Further research is required to identify the similarities and differences in family caring between COPD and other chronic illnesses, and to further understand the specific needs of male carers.

  13. Factors contributing to intervention fidelity in a multi-site chronic disease self-management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitt Seraphine

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives Disease self-management programs have been a popular approach to reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic disease. Replicating an evidence-based disease management program successfully requires practitioners to ensure fidelity to the original program design. Methods The Florida Health Literacy Study (FHLS was conducted to investigate the implementation impact of the Pfizer, Inc. Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension Disease Self-Management Program based on health literacy principles in 14 community health centers in Florida. The intervention components discussed include health educator recruitment and training, patient recruitment, class sessions, utilization of program materials, translation of program manuals, patient retention and follow-up, and technical assistance. Results This report describes challenges associated with achieving a balance between adaptation for cultural relevance and fidelity when implementing the health education program across clinic sites. This balance was necessary to achieve effectiveness of the disease self-management program. The FHLS program was implemented with a high degree of fidelity to the original design and used original program materials. Adaptations identified as advantageous to program participation are discussed, such as implementing alternate methods for recruiting patients and developing staff incentives for participation. Conclusion Effective program implementation depends on the talent, skill and willing participation of clinic staff. Program adaptations that conserve staff time and resources and recognize their contribution can increase program effectiveness without jeopardizing its fidelity.

  14. Theme Issue: Marketing Child Care Programs: Why and How.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Mary, Ed.; Caldwell, Bettye M., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Contains seven papers divided into three sections addressing: (1) the application of marketing principles to child care organizations and ways of remedying the negative public image of child care; (2) training child care professionals to develop marketing skills; and (3) successful uses of five basic marketing skills illustrated through four case…

  15. Reliability of an interactive computer program for advance care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubart, Jane R; Levi, Benjamin H; Camacho, Fabian; Whitehead, Megan; Farace, Elana; Green, Michael J

    2012-06-01

    Despite widespread efforts to promote advance directives (ADs), completion rates remain low. Making Your Wishes Known: Planning Your Medical Future (MYWK) is an interactive computer program that guides individuals through the process of advance care planning, explaining health conditions and interventions that commonly involve life or death decisions, helps them articulate their values/goals, and translates users' preferences into a detailed AD document. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that (in the absence of major life changes) the AD generated by MYWK reliably reflects an individual's values/preferences. English speakers ≥30 years old completed MYWK twice, 4 to 6 weeks apart. Reliability indices were assessed for three AD components: General Wishes; Specific Wishes for treatment; and Quality-of-Life values (QoL). Twenty-four participants completed the study. Both the Specific Wishes and QoL scales had high internal consistency in both time periods (Knuder Richardson formula 20 [KR-20]=0.83-0.95, and 0.86-0.89). Test-retest reliability was perfect for General Wishes (κ=1), high for QoL (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.83), but lower for Specific Wishes (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.57). MYWK generates an AD where General Wishes and QoL (but not Specific Wishes) statements remain consistent over time. PMID:22512830

  16. Reliability of an Interactive Computer Program for Advance Care Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Benjamin H.; Camacho, Fabian; Whitehead, Megan; Farace, Elana; Green, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Despite widespread efforts to promote advance directives (ADs), completion rates remain low. Making Your Wishes Known: Planning Your Medical Future (MYWK) is an interactive computer program that guides individuals through the process of advance care planning, explaining health conditions and interventions that commonly involve life or death decisions, helps them articulate their values/goals, and translates users' preferences into a detailed AD document. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that (in the absence of major life changes) the AD generated by MYWK reliably reflects an individual's values/preferences. English speakers ≥30 years old completed MYWK twice, 4 to 6 weeks apart. Reliability indices were assessed for three AD components: General Wishes; Specific Wishes for treatment; and Quality-of-Life values (QoL). Twenty-four participants completed the study. Both the Specific Wishes and QoL scales had high internal consistency in both time periods (Knuder Richardson formula 20 [KR-20]=0.83–0.95, and 0.86–0.89). Test-retest reliability was perfect for General Wishes (κ=1), high for QoL (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.83), but lower for Specific Wishes (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.57). MYWK generates an AD where General Wishes and QoL (but not Specific Wishes) statements remain consistent over time. PMID:22512830

  17. Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or both? Diagnostic labeling and spirometry in primary care patients aged 40 years or more

    OpenAIRE

    Melbye H; Drivenes E; Dalbak LG; Leinan T; Høegh-Henrichsen S; Østrem A

    2011-01-01

    Hasse Melbye1, Elin Drivenes1, Lene G Dalbak2, Tone Leinan1, Svein Høegh-Henrichsen2, Anders Østrem21General Practice Research Unit, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, 2General Practice Research Unit, Department of Health and Society, University of Oslo, NorwayAims: To describe symptoms and lung function in patients registered with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in primary care and to examine how spirometry findings...

  18. Pharmacist-led management of chronic pain in primary care: costs and benefits in a pilot randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Neilson, Aileen R; Bruhn, Hanne; Christine M. Bond; Elliott, Alison M; Smith, Blair H; Hannaford, Philip C; Holland, Richard; Amanda J Lee; Watson, Margaret; Wright, David; McNamee, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore differences in mean costs (from a UK National Health Service perspective) and effects of pharmacist-led management of chronic pain in primary care evaluated in a pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT), and to estimate optimal sample size for a definitive RCT. Design Regression analysis of costs and effects, using intention-to-treat and expected value of sample information analysis (EVSI). Setting Six general practices: Grampian (3); East Anglia (3). Participants 125 pat...

  19. Pharmacist-led management of chronic pain in primary care:results from a randomised controlled exploratory trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bruhn, Hanne; Christine M. Bond; Elliott, Alison M; Hannaford, Philip C; Amanda J Lee; McNamee, Paul; Smith, Blair H; Watson, Margaret C; Holland, Richard; Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare the effectiveness of pharmacist medication review, with or without pharmacist prescribing, with standard care, for patients with chronic pain. Design An exploratory randomised controlled trial. Setting Six general practices with prescribing pharmacists in Grampian (3) and East Anglia (3). Participants Patients on repeat prescribed pain medication (4815) were screened by general practitioners (GPs), and mailed invitations (1397). 196 were randomised and 180 (92%) complete...

  20. Evaluation of Access, a Primary Care Program for Indigent Patients: Inpatient and Emergency Room Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Richard A.; Giancola, Angela; Gast, Andrea; Ho, Janice; Waddell, Rhondda

    2003-01-01

    Evaluated the impact of Accessing Community Care through Eastside Social Services (ACCESS), a program that provided indigent patients with free primary care, on inpatient admissions, emergency room (ER) visits, and subsequent charges. Data on 19 people before and after program enrollment showed significant decreases in ER visits following…

  1. 42 CFR 1001.201 - Conviction relating to program or health care fraud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conviction relating to program or health care fraud... Permissive Exclusions § 1001.201 Conviction relating to program or health care fraud. (a) Circumstance for... misdemeanor relating to fraud, theft, embezzlement, breach of fiduciary responsibility, or other...

  2. An Exploratory Study of the Impacts of an Employer-Supported Child Care Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Taryn W.; Warner, Mildred E.

    2011-01-01

    Although employer-sponsored child care programs have become more common, there is little empirical research on whether these programs affect employees' satisfaction with child care or their work-life balance, and if effects vary across employee characteristics. In this exploratory study, we administered a survey to employees with children at one…

  3. The Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program: What Does the Complaint Reporting System Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netting, F. Ellen; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Long-term care ombudsman programs are charged with resolving complaints and solving problems of elderly persons in long-term care settings. Conducted content analysis of annual ombudsman program reports sent to Administration on Aging from 49 states in 1990. Found substantial variation in documented information at both state and local levels and…

  4. Improving the prevention and management of chronic disease in low-income and middle-income countries: a priority for primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaglehole, Robert; Epping-Jordan, Joanne; Patel, Vikram; Chopra, Mickey; Ebrahim, Shah; Kidd, Michael; Haines, Andy

    2008-09-13

    The burden of chronic diseases, such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and mental disorders is high in low-income and middle-income countries and is predicted to increase with the ageing of populations, urbanisation, and globalisation of risk factors. Furthermore, HIV/AIDS is increasingly becoming a chronic disorder. An integrated approach to the management of chronic diseases, irrespective of cause, is needed in primary health care. Management of chronic diseases is fundamentally different from acute care, relying on several features: opportunistic case finding for assessment of risk factors, detection of early disease, and identification of high risk status; a combination of pharmacological and psychosocial interventions, often in a stepped-care fashion; and long-term follow-up with regular monitoring and promotion of adherence to treatment. To meet the challenge of chronic diseases, primary health care will have to be strengthened substantially. In the many countries with shortages of primary-care doctors, non-physician clinicians will have a leading role in preventing and managing chronic diseases, and these personnel need appropriate training and continuous quality assurance mechanisms. More evidence is needed about the cost-effectiveness of prevention and treatment strategies in primary health care. Research on scaling-up should be embedded in large-scale delivery programmes for chronic diseases with a strong emphasis on assessment. PMID:18790317

  5. Placental programming of chronic diseases, cancer and lifespan: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, D J P; Thornburg, K L

    2013-10-01

    Particular paths of fetal growth are now known to predict a range of disorders in adult life. This is thought to reflect fetal programming, the phenomenon whereby nutrition and other influences during development set the body's organs and systems for life. The thesis of this review is that normal variations in the processes of placental development lead to variations in the supply of nutrients to the fetus and programme a small number of key systems that are linked to later disease. A baby's growth and nutrition depend both on the function of the placenta, reflected in its gross morphology at birth, and on the mother's lifetime nutrition, reflected in her height and weight. In many studies, the effects of placental size and shape on later disease have been examined within different categories of mother's body size. The review shows that variations in gross placental morphology at birth predict a wide range of disorders in later life. Any particular placental phenotype seems to predict a limited number of diseases. Further research into the links between the processes of placentation and the morphology of the placenta at birth is now required. We need to know more about the relative importance of nutrient flow, nutrient balance and the timing of nutritional events in determining disorders in later life. We also need to understand why, compared to other placental mammals, the human placenta is so variable in its morphology and functional capacity. PMID:23916422

  6. A randomized controlled evaluation of an online chronic pain self management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruehlman, Linda S; Karoly, Paul; Enders, Craig

    2012-02-01

    Internet-based educational and therapeutic programs (e-health applications) are becoming increasingly popular for a variety of psychological and physical disorders. We tested the efficacy of an online Chronic Pain Management Program, a comprehensive, fully self-directed and self-paced system that integrates social networking features and self-management tools into an interactive learning environment. Of 305 adult participants (196 women, 109 men), a total of 162 individuals with chronic pain were randomly assigned unsupervised access to the program for approximately 6 weeks; 143 were assigned to the wait-listed control group with treatment as usual. A comprehensive assessment was administered before the study and approximately 7 and 14 weeks thereafter. All recruitment, data collection, and participant involvement took place online. Participation was fully self-paced, permitting the evaluation of program effectiveness under real-world conditions. Intent-to-treat analysis that used linear growth models was used as the primary analytic tool. Results indicated that program utilization was associated with significant decreases in pain severity, pain-related interference and emotional burden, perceived disability, catastrophizing, and pain-induced fear. Further, program use led to significant declines in depression, anxiety, and stress. Finally, as compared to the wait-listed control group, the experimental group displayed a significant increase in knowledge about the principles of chronic pain and its management. Study limitations are considered, including the recognition that not all persons with chronic pain are necessarily good candidates for self-initiated, self-paced, interactive learning. PMID:22133450

  7. Characteristics of physical activity programs in the Brazilian primary health care system

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Angélica de Oliveira Gomes; Eduardo Kokubun; Grégore Iven Mieke; Luiz Roberto Ramos; Michael Pratt; Diana C. Parra; Eduardo Simões; Florindo, Alex A; Mario Bracco; Danielle Cruz; Deborah Malta; Felipe Lobelo; Hallal, Pedro C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of programs that promote physical activity in the public primary care system by region of Brazil, subject to the presence or absence of multidisciplinary primary care teams (NASF). We conducted a cross sectional and population-based telephone survey of the health unit coordinators from 1,251 health care units. Coordinators were asked about the presence and characteristics of physical activity programs. Four out of ten health units repo...

  8. The provision of staff development programs in Virginia adult day care centers

    OpenAIRE

    Hensley, A. Dawn

    1994-01-01

    This study examined a neglected area in long term care and adult day care research: staff development. The specific purposes of this study were to describe the provision of a comprehensive staff development program in adult day care centers in Virginia in order to (a) differentiate those centers providing only the minimum required inservice training from those centers providing more comprehensive staff development programs and (b) define what meaning is placed upon sta...

  9. Monitoring physical functioning as the sixth vital sign: evaluating patient and practice engagement in chronic illness care in a primary care setting--a quasi-experimental design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Julie

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Canada, one in three adults or almost 9 million people report having a chronic condition. Over two thirds of total deaths result from cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and respiratory illness and 77% of persons ≥65 years have at least one chronic condition. Persons with chronic disease are at risk for functional decline; as a result, there is an increased awareness of the significance of functional status as an important health outcome. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patients who receive a multi-component rehabilitation intervention, including online monitoring of function with feedback and self-management workshops, showed less functional decline than case matched controls who did not receive this intervention. In addition, we wanted to determine whether capacity building initiatives within the Family Health Team promote a collaborative approach to Chronic Disease Management. Methods A population-based multi-component rehabilitation intervention delivered to persons with chronic illnesses (≥ 44 yrs (n = 60 was compared to a group of age and sex matched controls (n = 60 with chronic illnesses receiving usual care within a primary healthcare setting. The population-based intervention consisted of four main components: (1 function-based individual assessment and action planning, (2 rehabilitation self-management workshops, (3 on-line self-assessment of function and (4 organizational capacity building. T-tests and chi-square tests were used for continuous and categorical variables respectively in baseline comparison between groups. Results Two MANOVA showed significant between group differences in patient reported physical functioning (Λ = 0.88, F = (2.86 = 5.97. p = 0.004 and for the physical performance measures collectively as the dependent variable (Λ = 0.80, F = (6.93 = 3.68. p = 0.0025. There were no within group differences for the capacity measures. Conclusion It is feasible to monitor

  10. Improving the quality of nurse clinical documentation for chronic patients at primary care clinics: A multifaceted intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozayr H. Mahomed

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deficiencies in record keeping practices have been reported at primary care level in the public health sector in South Africa. These deficiencies have the potential to negatively impact patient health outcomes as the break in information may hinder continuity of care. This disruption in information management has particular relevance for patients with chronic diseases.Objectives: The aim of this study was to establish if the implementation of a structured clinical record (SCR as an adjunct tool to the algorithmic guidelines for chronic disease management improved the quality of clinical records at primary care level.Method: A quasi-experimental study (before and after study with a comparison group was conducted across 30 primary health care clinics (PHCs located in three districts in South Africa. Twenty PHCs that received the intervention were selected as intervention clinics and 10 facilities were selected as comparison facilities. The lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS method was used to determine the number of records required to be reviewed per diagnostic condition per facility.Results: There was a a statistically significant increase in the percentage of clinical records achieving compliance to the minimum criteria from the baseline to six months post-intervention for both HIV patients on antiretroviral treatment and patients with non-communicable diseases (hypertension and diabetes.Conclusions: A multifaceted intervention using a SCR to supplement the educational outreach component (PC 101 training has demonstrated the potential for improving the quality of clinical records for patients with chronic diseases at primary care clinics in South Africa.

  11. Healthcare organization-education partnerships and career ladder programs for health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Janette S; Chuang, Emmeline; Morgan, Jennifer C

    2014-12-01

    Increasing concerns about quality of care and workforce shortages have motivated health care organizations and educational institutions to partner to create career ladders for frontline health care workers. Career ladders reward workers for gains in skills and knowledge and may reduce the costs associated with turnover, improve patient care, and/or address projected shortages of certain nursing and allied health professions. This study examines partnerships between health care and educational organizations in the United States during the design and implementation of career ladder training programs for low-skill workers in health care settings, referred to as frontline health care workers. Mixed methods data from 291 frontline health care workers and 347 key informants (e.g., administrators, instructors, managers) collected between 2007 and 2010 were analyzed using both regression and fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (QCA). Results suggest that different combinations of partner characteristics, including having an education leader, employer leader, frontline management support, partnership history, community need, and educational policies, were necessary for high worker career self-efficacy and program satisfaction. Whether a worker received a wage increase, however, was primarily dependent on leadership within the health care organization, including having an employer leader and employer implementation policies. Findings suggest that strong partnerships between health care and educational organizations can contribute to the successful implementation of career ladder programs, but workers' ability to earn monetary rewards for program participation depends on the strength of leadership support within the health care organization. PMID:25441318

  12. Guideline compliance in chronic heart failure patients with multiple comorbid diseases: evaluation of an individualised multidisciplinary model of care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tam H Ho

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of individualised, reconciled evidence-based recommendations (IRERs and multidisciplinary care in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF on clinical guideline compliance for CHF and common comorbid conditions. DESIGN AND SETTING: A retrospective hospital clinical audit conducted between 1st July 2006 and February 2011. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 255 patients with a diagnosis of CHF who attended the Multidisciplinary Ambulatory Consulting Services (MACS clinics, at the Royal Adelaide Hospital, were included. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Compliance with Australian clinical guideline recommendations for CHF, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus and ischaemic heart disease. RESULTS: Study participants had a median of eight medical conditions (IQR 6-10 and were on an average of 10 (±4 unique medications. Compliance with clinical guideline recommendations for pharmacological therapy for CHF, comorbid atrial fibrillation, diabetes or ischaemic heart disease was high, ranging from 86% for lipid lowering therapy to 98% anti-platelet agents. For all conditions, compliance with lifestyle recommendations was lower than pharmacological therapy, ranging from no podiatry reviews for CHF patients with comorbid diabetes to 75% for heart failure education. Concordance with many guideline recommendations was significantly associated if the patient had IRERs determined, a greater number of recommendations, more clinic visits or if patients participated in a heart failure program. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the high number of comorbid conditions and resulting complexity of the management, high compliance to clinical guideline recommendations was associated with IRER determination in older patients with CHF. Importantly these recommendations need to be communicated to the patient's general practitioner, regularly monitored and adjusted at clinic visits.

  13. Developmentally supportive neonatal care : A study of the Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP) in a Swedish environment

    OpenAIRE

    Westrup, Björn

    2003-01-01

    A family-centred, developmentally supportive approach to newborn intensive care, referred to as the Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP) has attracted considerable interest in recent years. Studies performed in North America have reported that NIDCAP improves short-term growth, decreases the need for respiratory support, decreases the length and cost of hospitalisation, and improves neurodevelopment. The aim of the present study was to ch...

  14. Further Effort is Needed to Improve Management of Chronic Pain in Primary Care. Results from the Arkys Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinocchi, Gaetano; Piccinocchi, Roberto

    2016-04-26

    Treatment of chronic pain is challenging. The Arkys project was initiated in Italy to assist general practitioners (GPs) in the management of chronic pain. The main objective of this study was to determine the usefulness of Arkys for selecting new therapeutic strategies. An online interactive questionnaire for assessing pain and guiding therapeutic decisions was made available to GPs participating to Arkys. The GPs were invited to complete the questionnaire for each patient who presented moderate-severe chronic pain, and to decide on a new analgesic treatment based on the information provided by the questionnaire. Two hundred and forty four GPs participated with a total of 3035 patients. Patients (mean age 68.9 years) had mostly chronic non-cancer pain (87.7%). In 42.3%, pain had neuropathic components. Only 53.6% of patients were in treatment with analgesics (strong opioids, 38.9%; NSAIDs, 32.6%; weak opioids, 25.6%; anti-epileptics, 17.3%; paracetamol, 14.9%). Use of the questionnaire resulted in the prescription of analgesics to all patients and in increased prescription of strong opioids (69.7%). NSAID prescription decreased (12.8%), while anti-epileptics use remained stable. These findings show that current management of chronic pain in primary care is far from optimal and that efforts are needed to educate GPs and improve guideline implementation. PMID:27478585

  15. Further effort is needed to improve management of chronic pain in primary care. Results from the Arkys project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Piccinocchi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of chronic pain is challenging. The Arkys project was initiated in Italy to assist general practitioners (GPs in the management of chronic pain. The main objective of this study was to determine the usefulness of Arkys for selecting new therapeutic strategies. An online interactive questionnaire for assessing pain and guiding therapeutic decisions was made available to GPs participating to Arkys. The GPs were invited to complete the questionnaire for each patient who presented moderate-severe chronic pain, and to decide on a new analgesic treatment based on the information provided by the questionnaire. Two hundred and forty four GPs participated with a total of 3035 patients. Patients (mean age 68.9 years had mostly chronic non-cancer pain (87.7%. In 42.3%, pain had neuropathic components. Only 53.6% of patients were in treatment with analgesics (strong opioids, 38.9%; NSAIDs, 32.6%; weak opioids, 25.6%; anti-epileptics, 17.3%; paracetamol, 14.9%. Use of the questionnaire resulted in the prescription of analgesics to all patients and in increased prescription of strong opioids (69.7%. NSAID prescription decreased (12.8%, while anti-epileptics use remained stable. These findings show that current management of chronic pain in primary care is far from optimal and that efforts are needed to educate GPs and improve guideline implementation.

  16. Personalized Primary Care for Older People: An evaluation of a multicomponent nurse-led care program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, N.

    2013-01-01

    Providing optimal care for the increasing number of frail older people with complex care needs is a major challenge in primary care. The current approach is reactive and does not meet the needs of older patients, resulting in unnecessary loss of daily functioning, suboptimal quality of life and high

  17. Primary and tertiary health professionals’ views on the health-care of patients with co-morbid diabetes and chronic kidney disease – a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Clement; Ilic, Dragan; Teede, Helena; Fulcher, Greg; Gallagher, Martin; Kerr, Peter G; Murphy, Kerry; Polkinghorne, Kevan; Russell, Grant; Usherwood, Timothy; Walker, Rowan; Zoungas, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Background Health-care for co-morbid diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) is often sub-optimal. To improve health-care, we explored the perspectives of general practitioners (GPs) and tertiary health-care professionals concerning key factors influencing health-care of diabetes and CKD. Methods A total of 65 health professionals were purposively sampled from Australia’s 2 largest cities to participate in focus groups and semi-structured interviews. Four focus groups were conducted with GP...

  18. The role of programmed and emergent mechanisms of coordination: How standardized care pathways contribute to coordinate care tasks in hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim

    mechanisms of coordination, this paper finds that standardized work processes such as care pathways should be considered as a bundle of coordination mechanisms—plans and rules, objects, routines, roles and proximity—rather than a mechanism of its own. The bundle builds the accountability, predictability and...... attention to identify and reinforce those underlying mechanisms. This provides solutions to deal with the fundamental challenge of care coordination in hospitals. The research builds on an in-depth, embedded case study of hospital care pathways. Care pathways are particularly interesting because they mirror......Hospitals face substantial coordination challenges. To meet this hospitals more and more use standardized work processes such as care pathways. By drawing on recent coordination theory that increasingly emphasizes the role of lateral and emergent interactions alongside traditional, programmed...

  19. The Team Approach to Home-Based Primary Care: Restructuring Care to Meet Patient, Program, and System Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckrey, Jennifer M.; Soriano, Theresa A.; Hernandez, Cameron R.; DeCherrie, Linda V.; Chavez, Silvia; Zhang, Meng; Ornstein, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Team-based models of care are an important way to meet the complex medical and psychosocial needs of the homebound. As part of a quality improvement project to address patient, program, and system needs, we restructured a portion of our large, physician-led academic home-based primary care practice into a team-based model. With support from an office-based nurse practitioner, a dedicated social worker, and a dedicated administrative assistant, physicians were able to care for a larger number of patients. Hospitalizations, readmissions, and patient satisfaction remained the same while physician panel size increased and physician satisfaction improved. Our Team Approach is an innovative way to improve interdisciplinary, team-based care though practice restructuring and serves as an example of how other practices can approach the complex task of caring for the homebound. PMID:25645568

  20. Overcoming barriers in care for the dying: Theoretical analysis of an innovative program model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Cara L

    2016-08-01

    This article explores barriers to end-of-life (EOL) care (including development of a death denying culture, ongoing perceptions about EOL care, poor communication, delayed access, and benefit restrictions) through the theoretical lens of symbolic interactionism (SI), and applies general systems theory (GST) to a promising practice model appropriate for addressing these barriers. The Compassionate Care program is a practice model designed to bridge gaps in care for the dying and is one example of a program offering concurrent care, a recent focus of evaluation though the Affordable Care Act. Concurrent care involves offering curative care alongside palliative or hospice care. Additionally, the program offers comprehensive case management and online resources to enrollees in a national health plan (Spettell et al., 2009).SI and GST are compatible and interrelated theories that provide a relevant picture of barriers to end-of-life care and a practice model that might evoke change among multiple levels of systems. These theories promote insight into current challenges in EOL care, as well as point to areas of needed research and interventions to address them. The article concludes with implications for policy and practice, and discusses the important role of social work in impacting change within EOL care. PMID:27332743

  1. Practicing Self-Care for Nurses: A Nursing Program Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Cynthia A

    2014-01-01

    Self-care is imperative to personal health, sustenance to continue to care for others, and professional growth. This article briefly reviews stressors common to students and nurses and the importance of practicing self-care to combat stress and promote health in practice. Florida Atlantic University offers a course for all levels of undergraduate nursing students called Caring for Self. The course, supported by principles of Adult Learning Theory, focuses on guiding the nurse to practice and model self-care. The author describes the evolution of this self-care initiative by discussing the needs assessment, course description and strategies, examples of course activities, and an exemplar of student impact. The conclusion offers discussion of challenges and lessons noted by faculty and students. PMID:26824151

  2. Impact of exacerbations on health care cost and resource utilization in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with chronic bronchitis from a predominantly Medicare population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale MK

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Margaret K Pasquale,1 Shawn X Sun,2 Frank Song,1 Heather J Hartnett,1 Stephen A Stemkowski11Competitive Health Analytics, Louisville, KY, USA; 2Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Forest Research Institute, Jersey City, NJ, USABackground: Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD lead to significant increases in resource utilization and cost to the health care system. COPD patients with chronic bronchitis and a history of exacerbations pose an additional burden to the system. This study examined health care utilization and cost among these patients.Methods: For this retrospective analysis, data were extracted from a large national health plan with a predominantly Medicare population. This study involved patients who were aged 40–89 years, had been enrolled continuously for 24 months or more, had at least two separate insurance claims for COPD with chronic bronchitis (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code 491.xx, and had pharmacy claims for COPD maintenance medications between January 1, 2007, and March 31, 2009. Two years of data were examined for each patient; the index date was defined as the first occurrence of COPD. Baseline characteristics were obtained from the first year of data, with health outcomes tracked in the second year. Severe exacerbation was defined by COPD-related hospitalization or death; moderate exacerbation was defined by oral or parenteral corticosteroid use. Adjusted numbers of exacerbations and COPD-related costs per patient were estimated controlling for demographic and clinical characteristics.Results: The final study sample involved 8554 patients; mean age was 70.1 ± 8.6 years and 49.8% of the overall population had exacerbation, 13.9% had a severe exacerbation only, 29.1% had a moderate exacerbation only, and 6.8% had both a severe and moderate exacerbation. COPD-related mean annual costs were $4069 (all figures given in US dollars for the

  3. Telemedicine: an enhanced emergency care program for older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi PY

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Paul Y Takahashi,1 Anupam Chandra,1 Frederick North,1 Jennifer L Pecina,2 Benjavan Upatising,3 Gregory J Hanson11Mayo Clinic Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, 2Mayo Clinic Department of Family Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA; 3Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USAAbstract: Recent changes and consolidations in health care systems have resulted in an increase in new health care delivery models. Telemedicine holds great promise as one of these models. There is a great potential for new patient evaluation and treatment models in emergency care (EC, especially when patients are miles away from a medical team. Evaluations can be performed in a patient's home, a nursing care facility, and in hospitals that focus on advanced subspecialty care. Due to rapid developments in this area, current care models are constantly being evaluated and modified. This review article outlines current telemedicine models for EC and summarizes their potential benefits to patients and the health care system. The review examines the role that the telephone, a fundamental tool of telemedicine, plays in these new models. The review also examines evidence of improved health care outcomes by highlighting the role of telemedicine in reducing hospitalizations. The patient is the primary focus; as a result, this review also examined patient experiences and satisfaction levels regarding telemedicine health care teams. The authors support these technological advances and their potential for information transfer. Health care providers need to continue developing these models by making use of increasing amounts of information. One of the main implementation barriers of these new models in the US and other countries is the issue of payment and reimbursement. Despite this, advancements in EC telemedicine continue.Keywords: telemedicine, emergency care, geriatric, patient evaluation models

  4. Preconception care: screening and management of chronic disease and promoting psychological health

    OpenAIRE

    Lassi, Zohra S; Imam, Ayesha M; Dean, Sohni V; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A large proportion of women around the world suffer from chronic diseases including mental health diseases. In the United States alone, over 12% of women of reproductive age suffer from a chronic medical condition, especially diabetes and hypertension. Chronic diseases significantly increase the odds for poor maternal and newborn outcomes in pregnant women. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence was conducted to ascertain the possible impact of preconceptio...

  5. Associations and Synergistic Effects for Psychological Distress and Chronic Back Pain on the Utilization of Different Levels of Ambulatory Health Care. A Cross-Sectional Study from Austria

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Kathryn; Peersman, Wim; George, Aaron; Dorner, Thomas Ernst

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this analysis was to assess the impact of chronic back pain and psychological distress on the utilization of primary and secondary levels of care in the ambulatory health care sector in Austria - a country without a gatekeeping system. Additionally, we aimed to determine if the joint effect of chronic back pain and psychological distress was higher than the impact of the sum of the two single conditions. The database used for this analysis was the Austrian Health Interview Survey, ...

  6. Preferences and experiences of chronically ill and disabled patients regarding shared decision-making: does the type of care to be decided upon matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Rijken, M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: (1) To describe the importance chronically ill and disabled patients attach to involvement in decision-making when various care types are considered, and (2) to analyse the degree to which these patients are involved in shared decision-making (SDM) regarding these care types, and whether their involvement reflects the importance they attach to SDM. METHODS: The study sample consisted of 812 chronically ill and disabled patients who experienced a situation of decision-making during ...

  7. A train-the-trainer education and promotion program: chronic fatigue syndrome – a diagnostic and management challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hynes Kevin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a complicated illness for providers and patients. Fewer than 20% of persons with CFS have been diagnosed and treated. For providers, compounding the issue are the challenges in making a diagnosis due to the lack of a biomedical marker. Methods The objective of the CFS diagnosis and management curriculum was to instruct core trainers as to the evaluation, diagnosis, and management of CFS. Over a two year period, 79 primary care physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners from diverse regions in the U.S. participated as core trainers in a two day Train-the-Trainer (TTT workshop. As core trainers, the workshop participants were expected to show increases in knowledge, self-efficacy, and management skills with the primary goal of conducting secondary presentations. Results The optimal goal for each core trainer to present secondary training to 50 persons in the health care field was not reached. However, the combined core trainer group successfully reached 2064 primary care providers. Eighty-two percent of core trainers responded "Very good" or "Excellent" in a post-tessurvey of self-efficacy expectation and CFS diagnosis. Data from the Chicago workshops showed significant improvement on the Primary Care Opinion Survey (p Conclusion Data show the workshop was successful in meeting the objectives of increasing CFS knowledge and raising perceived self-efficacy towards making a diagnosis. The CFS TTT program informed an educational provider project by shifting the format for physicians to grand rounds and continuing medical education design while retaining TTT aspects for nurse practitioners and physicians assistants. Evaluations also indicate that secondary trainings may be more readily employed and accepted if administrative barriers are addressed early in the planning phases.

  8. Chronic cough and a normal chest X-ray - a simple systematic approach to exclude common causes before referral to secondary care: a retrospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Richard D; Bothamley, Graham H

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cough is common in the community and can cause significant morbidity. It is not clear how closely treatment guidelines are used in general practice, or how often specialist referral is indicated. We aimed to assess the management of chronic cough in primary care before referral to a cough clinic, and to assess the outcome of managing chronic cough with an approach of simple investigation and empirical treatment trials. Data were extracted from the records of all patients attending a d...

  9. Intervening at the Setting Level to Prevent Behavioral Incidents in Residential Child Care: Efficacy of the CARE Program Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Charles V; Smith, Elliott G; Holden, Martha J; Norton, Catherine I; Nunno, Michael A; Sellers, Deborah E

    2016-07-01

    The current study examined the impact of a setting-level intervention on the prevention of aggressive or dangerous behavioral incidents involving youth living in group care environments. Eleven group care agencies implemented Children and Residential Experiences (CARE), a principle-based program that helps agencies use a set of evidence-informed principles to guide programming and enrich the relational dynamics throughout the agency. All agencies served mostly youth referred from child welfare. The 3-year implementation of CARE involved intensive agency-wide training and on-site consultation to agency leaders and managers around supporting and facilitating day-to-day application of the principles in both childcare and staff management arenas. Agencies provided data over 48 months on the monthly frequency of behavioral incidents most related to program objectives. Using multiple baseline interrupted time series analysis to assess program effects, we tested whether trends during the program implementation period declined significantly compared to the 12 months before implementation. Results showed significant program effects on incidents involving youth aggression toward adult staff, property destruction, and running away. Effects on aggression toward peers and self-harm were also found but were less consistent. Staff ratings of positive organizational social context (OSC) predicted fewer incidents, but there was no clear relationship between OSC and observed program effects. Findings support the potential efficacy of the CARE model and illustrate that intervening "upstream" at the setting level may help to prevent coercive caregiving patterns and increase opportunities for healthy social interactions. PMID:27138932

  10. A bio-psycho-social exercise program (RÜCKGEWINN for chronic low back pain in rehabilitation aftercare - Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeifer Klaus

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is strong, internationally confirmed evidence for the short-term effectiveness of multimodal interdisciplinary specific treatment programs for chronic back pain. However, the verification of long-term sustainability of achieved effects is missing so far. For long-term improvement of pain and functional ability high intervention intensity or high volume seems to be necessary (> 100 therapy hours. Especially in chronic back pain rehabilitation, purposefully refined aftercare treatments offer the possibility to intensify positive effects or to increase their sustainability. However, quality assured goal-conscious specific aftercare programs for the rehabilitation of chronic back pain are absent. Methods/Design This study aims to examine the efficacy of a specially developed bio-psycho-social chronic back pain specific aftercare intervention (RÜCKGEWINN in comparison to the current usual aftercare (IRENA and a control group that is given an educational booklet addressing pain-conditioned functional ability and back pain episodes. Overall rehabilitation effects as well as predictors for compliance to the aftercare programs are analysed. Therefore, a multicenter prospective 3-armed randomised controlled trial is conducted. 456 participants will be consecutively enrolled in inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation and assigned to either one of the three study arms. Outcomes are measured before and after rehabilitation. Aftercare programs are assessed at ten month follow up after dismissal form rehabilitation. Discussion Special methodological and logistic challenges are to be mastered in this trial, which accrue from the interconnection of aftercare interventions to their residential district and the fact that the proportion of patients who take part in aftercare programs is low. The usability of the aftercare program is based on the transference into the routine care and is also reinforced by developed manuals with structured

  11. Trajectories of health care service utilization and differences in patient characteristics among adults with specific chronic pain: analysis of health plan member claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruetsch C

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Charles Ruetsch,1 Joseph Tkacz,1 Peter G Kardel,1 Andrew Howe,2 Helen Pai,2 Bennett Levitan31Health Analytics, LLC, Columbia, Maryland, 2Janssen Research & Development, Raritan, New Jersey, 3Janssen Research & Development, Titusville, New Jersey, USAIntroduction: The lack of consistency surrounding the diagnosis of chronic non-cancer pain, treatment approaches, and patient management suggests the need for further research to better characterize the chronic non-cancer pain population.Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify distinct trajectories of health care service utilization of chronic non-cancer pain patients and describe the characteristic differences between trajectory groups.Patients and methods: This study utilized the MarketScan claims databases. A total of 71,392 patients diagnosed with either low back pain or osteoarthritis between 2006 and 2009 served as the study sample. Each subject's claims data were divided into three time periods around an initial diagnosis date: pre-period, post-Year 1, and post-Year 2. Subjects were categorized as either high (H or low (L cost at each post period, resulting in the creation of four trajectory groups based on the post-Year 1 and 2 cost pattern: H-H, H-L, L-H, and L-L. Multivariate statistical tests were used to predict and discriminate between trajectory group memberships.Results: The H-H, L-H, and H-L groups each utilized significantly greater pre-period high-cost venue services, post-Year 1 outpatient services, and post-Year 1 opioids compared to the L-L group (P <0.001. Additionally, the H-H and L-H groups displayed elevated Charlson comorbidity index scores compared with the L-L group (P <0.001, with each showing increased odds of having both opioid dependence and cardiovascular disease diagnoses (P <0.01.Conclusion: This study identified patient characteristics among chronic pain patients that discriminated between different levels of post-index high-cost venue service

  12. The ephemeral accountable care organization-an unintended consequence of the Medicare shared savings program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H Benjamin; Gowda, Vrushab; Gazelle, G Scott; Pandharipande, Pari V

    2014-02-01

    A fundamental element of health care payment reform under the Affordable Care Act is the development of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). The ACO model employs shared-risk contracts to better align the interests of health care providers and payers with the intent of driving efficiency and quality in care. The Medicare Shared Savings Program is the most popular of the Medicare ACO programs, with over 200 health systems across the nation participating at this time. However, a pitfall in the way that the Medicare Shared Savings Program is structured, specifically the benchmarking and rebasing method, could make it difficult for even top-performing ACOs to achieve sustained success, thereby threatening the long-term viability of the program. In this paper, we present this pitfall to the radiology community as well as potential solutions that can be considered by CMS moving forward. PMID:24360903

  13. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation program: Effect on exercise tolerance and quality of life in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanem Maha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A key component in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients is pulmonary rehabilitation (PR, the corner stone of which is exercise training. Aim: This study aims to evaluate the effect of a two-months, home-based PR program with outpatient supervision every two weeks, on exercise tolerance and health-related quality of life (HRQL using Arabic-translated standardized generic and specific questionnaires in COPD patients recently recovered from acute exacerbation, Design: Randomized clinical trial. Setting and Subjects: A total of 39 COPD patients who recovered from acute exacerbation were randomly allocated either a two-month home-based PR program in addition to standard medical therapy or standard medical therapy alone in the period between July 2008 and March 2009. Methods: Pulmonary function tests (PFTs, six-minute walk distance (6-MWD test, Arabic-translated chronic respiratory disease questionnaire-self administered standardized format (CRQ-SAS and quality of life scale Short Form (SF-36 were compared between 25 patients with moderate to severe COPD who underwent a two-month PR program (group 1 and 14 COPD patients who did not (group 2. Results: Group 1 showed significant improvement in the 6-MWD, and HRQL scores at two months compared with the usual care patients in group 2 (P less than 0.05. Improvement in both CRQ-SAS and SF-36 scores were statistically significant and comparable in group 1. Conclusion: The supervised, post discharge, two-month home-based PR program is an effective non pharmacological intervention in the management of stable patients with COPD. The 6-MWD is a simple, inexpensive and safe test to assess physical and functional capabilities among COPD patients. HRQL can be measured in patients with COPD either by disease-specific tools that have been specifically designed for use in patients with respiratory system disorders or by generic HRQL tools that can be used across

  14. Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease provide a unique opportunity to take care of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Beghé

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (ECOPD identifies the acute phase of COPD. The COPD patient is often frail and elderly with concomitant chronic diseases. This requires the physician not only looks at specific symptoms or organs, but to consider the patient in all his or her complexity.

  15. Life after the Shock! The Impact on Families of Caring for Young Children with Chronic Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Jean

    2004-01-01

    The stresses experienced by most families include limitations on time, conditions of employment, financial burdens and sibling rivalry. For the families of a child with a chronic illness, these stresses are often compounded, making family functioning problematic. Chronic illness is marked by permanency and the need for ongoing vigilance with…

  16. The role of disease management programs in the health behavior of chronically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cramm, Jane; Adams, Samantha; Hipple-Walters, Bethany; Tsiachristas, Apostolos; Bal, Roland; Huijsman, Robbert; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen; Nieboer, Anna

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Objective: Investigate the effects of disease management program (DMP) implementation on physical activity, smoking, and physical quality of life among chronically ill patients. Methods: This study used a mixed-methods approach involving qualitative (35 interviews with project managers) and quantitative (survey of patients from 18 DMPs) data collection. Questionnaire response rates were 51% (2010; 2619/5108) at T0 and 47% (2011; 2191/4693) at T1. Results: Physical...

  17. Chronic care case management for the frail elderly population in the United States: normative, funding and organizational aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Giulio de Belvis

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available

    In the most developed countries, it is necessary to bring about significant changes to health care delivery through the strengthening of prevention, rehabilitation and the integration of the social and healthcare dimensions.

    This means moving the policy focus from “treating” to “taking care” of the sick in a broader and more integrated way, one which is more closely linked to the World Health Organization’s definition of health as physical, psychological and social well-being. This change involves the delivery of care for the elderly. Developed countries are confronting this issue by using different community-based programs to integrate acute and long-term care services for frail elderly individuals with complex health needs.

    The objective of this health policy article is to give an overview of the most recent initiatives on long-term care management for the elderly including normative, funding and organizational issues in the USA, as their public health system largely differs from those of the Western European countries.

    Particular attention is given to the PACE (Program of All Inclusive Care for the Elderly, which applies a comprehensive approach to managing the care of the frail elderly population and would represent a new framework in geriatric care. By incorporating a central core care team to manage the needs of each elderly individual, this approach recognizes the contributing factors that non-traditional health related functions play in the overall health of the individual.

    Although there is a little knowledge of this program, as it covers a very small percentage of the eligible individuals, and it may be difficult to extrapolate to other sectors of the population, PACE offers many lessons that could be applied to more effective integration of care for individuals and lead to better health outcomes.

  18. Effectiveness of a transitional home care program in reducing acute hospital utilization: a quasi-experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Low, Lian Leng; Vasanwala, Farhad Fakhrudin; Ng, Lee Beng; Chen, Cynthia; Lee, Kheng Hock; Tan, Shu Yun

    2015-01-01

    Background Improving healthcare utilization is essential as health systems around the world grapple with the escalating demands for acute hospital resources. Evidence suggests that transitional care programs are effective to improve utilization of healthcare. However, the evidence for transitional care programs that enhance the home medical care model and provide multi-disciplinary patient-centered care is not well established. We evaluated if a transitional home care program operated by the ...

  19. Providing continuity of care for chronic diseases in the aftermath of Katrina: from field experience to policy recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Martha I; Foreman, Rachel D; Crook, Errol D; Icenogle, Marjorie L

    2009-10-01

    This study sought to elicit challenges and solutions in the provision of health care to those with chronic diseases after Hurricane Katrina in coastal Alabama and Mississippi. In-depth interviews with 30 health and social service providers (key informants) and 4 focus groups with patients with chronic diseases were conducted. Subsequently an advisory panel of key informants was convened. Findings were summarized and key informants submitted additional feedback. The chronic diseases identified as medical management priorities by key informants were mental health, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, respiratory illness, end-stage renal disease, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. The most frequently mentioned barrier to providing care was maintaining continuity of medications. Contributing factors were inadequate information (inaccessible medical records, poor patient knowledge) and financial constraints. Implemented or suggested solutions included relaxation of insurance limitations preventing advance prescription refills; better predisaster patient education to improve medical knowledge; promotion of personal health records; support for information technology systems at community health centers, in particular electronic medical records; improved allocation of donated medications/medical supplies (centralized coordination, decentralized distribution); and networking between local responders and external aid. PMID:19865042

  20. Symptoms and impact of symptoms on function and health in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic heart failure in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theander K

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kersti Theander,1,2 Mikael Hasselgren,2,3 Kristina Luhr,4 Jeanette Eckerblad,5 Mitra Unosson,5 Ingela Karlsson1 1Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Science and Technology, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; 2Primary Care Research Unit, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden; 3Department of Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; 4Family Medicine Research Centre, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden; 5Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden Background: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and chronic heart failure (CHF seem to have several symptoms in common that impact health. However, methodological differences make this difficult to compare. Aim: Comparisons of symptoms, impact of symptoms on function and health between patients with COPD and CHF in primary health care (PHC. Method: The study is cross sectional, including patients with COPD (n=437 and CHF (n=388, registered in the patient administrative systems of PHC. The patients received specific questionnaires – the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, the Medical Research Council dyspnea scale, and the Fatigue Impact Scale – by mail and additional questions about psychological and physical health. Results: The mean age was 70±10 years and 78±10 years for patients with COPD and CHF respectively (P=0.001. Patients with COPD (n=273 experienced more symptoms (11±7.5 than the CHF patients (n=211 (10±7.6. The most prevalent symptoms for patients with COPD were dyspnea, cough, and lack of energy. For patients with CHF, the most prevalent symptoms were dyspnea, lack of energy, and difficulty sleeping. Experience of dyspnea, cough, dry mouth, feeling irritable, worrying, and problems with sexual interest or activity were more common in patients with COPD while the experience of swelling of arms or legs was more common among patients with CHF. When controlling for background

  1. Successfully integrating aged care services: A review of the evidence and tools emerging from a long-term care program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Stewart

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Providing efficient and effective aged care services is one of the greatest public policy concerns currently facing governments. Increasing the integration of care services has the potential to provide many benefits including increased access, promoting greater efficiency, and improving care outcomes. There is little research, however, investigating how integrated aged care can be successfully achieved. The PRISMA (Program of Research to Integrate Services for the Maintenance of Autonomy project, from Quebec, Canada, is one of the most systematic and sustained bodies of research investigating the translation and outcomes of an integrated care policy into practice.  The PRISMA research program has run since 1988, yet there has been no independent systematic review of this work to draw out the lessons learnt. Methods: Narrative review of all literature emanating from the PRISMA project between 1988 and 2012. Researchers accessed an online list of all published papers from the program website. The reference lists of papers were hand searched to identify additional literature. Finally, Medline, Pubmed, EMBASE and Google Scholar indexing databases were searched using key terms and author names. Results were extracted into specially designed spread sheets for analysis. Results: 45 journal articles and two books authored or co-authored by the PRISMA team were identified. Research was primarily concerned with: the design, development and validation of screening and assessment tools; and results generated from their application. Both quasi-experimental and cross sectional analytic designs were used extensively. Contextually appropriate expert opinion was obtained using variations on the Delphi Method. Literature analysis revealed the structures, processes and outcomes which underpinned the implementation. PRISMA provides evidence that integrating care for older persons is beneficial to individuals through reducing incidence of functional

  2. 75 FR 21301 - Office of Clinical and Preventive Services; Elder Care Initiative Long-Term Care Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ...-term care services for American Indians and Alaska Native (AI/AN) elders. This program is authorized...). Background The AI/AN elder population is growing rapidly and the AI/AN population as a whole is aging. The... dignity. While families continue to be the backbone of LTC for AI/AN elders, there is well documented...

  3. Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Programs (KP-MCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Research within KP-MCP conducts, publishes, and disseminates high-quality epidemiologic and health services research to improve the health and medical care of Kaiser Permanente members and the society at large.

  4. Communication between Health Care Professionals and Chronic Pain Patients Time to change the "Pain Game".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavand'Homme, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    Patient satisfaction is currently used as a comparative measure to evaluate the quality of health care programs. This seems the best way to evaluate results although an important discordance might exist between patient's perception and doctor's opinion regarding satisfactory outcome after surgery, including that after joint replacement. Pain remains a major cause of dissatisfaction for many patients. To understand the meaning of pain, i.e. "why does pain hurt" in some patients but not in other ones, and to decipher patient's pain expression is a key feature of patient-doctor communication. Questionnaires based on patient's personality traits (integrated and comprehensive reflection of psychological traits) are still underused but might help the doctors to get closer to their patients and understand them better. Besides the source of the relationship, dysfunction should not be attributed only to the person with pain, as the lack of doctors' training to capture and understand the psycho-social dimensions of pain can be pointed out too. Failure to address the psycho-social dimensions of patient's pain and suffering, a skill which relies on patients-doctor communication, represents a major socio-economic problem as it may negatively impact postoperative outcome both in terms of poor management of treatment failure and in term of poor prediction of surgical outcome. PMID:26790800

  5. Security, Dignity, Caring Relationships, and Meaningful Work: Needs Motivating Participation in a Job-Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, David F.; Miller-Dyce, Cherrel; Carlone, David

    2008-01-01

    Researchers asked 17 participants in a job-training program to describe their personal struggles following an economic restructuring. Examined through a critical theoretical lens, findings indicate that the learners enrolled in the program to reclaim security, dignity, meaningful work, and caring relationships. Program planners at community…

  6. Methadone Maintenance and State Medicaid Managed Care Programs

    OpenAIRE

    McCarty, Dennis; Frank, Richard G.; Denmead, Gabrielle C.

    1999-01-01

    Coverage for methadone services in state Medicaid plans may facilitate access to the most effective therapy for heroin dependence. State Medicaid plans were reviewed to assess coverage for methadone services, methadone benefits in managed care, and limitations on methadone treatment. Medicaid does not cover methadone maintenance medication in 25 states (59 percent). Only 12 states (24percent) include methadone services in Medicaid managed care plans. Moreover, two of the 12 states limit cover...

  7. Transitional care programs: who is left behind? A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Piraino, Emily; Heckman, George A; Glenny, Christine; Stolee, Paul

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Older adults are at risk of rehospitalization if their care transitions from hospital-to-home are not properly managed. The objective of this review was to determine if older patient populations recruited for randomized controlled trials of transitional care interventions represented those at greatest risk of rehospitalization following discharge.  Relevant risk factors examined were cognitive impairment, depression, polypharmacy, comorbidity, length of stay, advanced non-malignant...

  8. [Development of a Conceptual Framework for the Assessment of Chronic Care in the Spanish National Health System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espallargues, Mireia; Serra-Sutton, Vicky; Solans-Domènech, Maite; Torrente, Elena; Moharra, Montse; Benítez, Dolors; Robles, Noemí; Domíngo, Laia; Escarrabill Sanglas, Joan

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to develop a conceptual framework for the assessment of new healthcare initiatives on chronic diseases within the Spanish National Health System. A comprehensive literature review between 2002 and 2013, including systematic reviews, meta-analysis, and reports with evaluation frameworks and/or assessment of initiatives was carried out; integrated care initiatives established in Catalonia were studied and described; and semistructured interviews with key stakeholders were performed. The scope and conceptual framework were defined by using the brainstorming approach.Of 910 abstracts identified, a total of 116 studies were included. They referred to several conceptual frameworks and/or assessment indicators at a national and international level. An overall of 24 established chronic care initiatives were identified (9 integrated care initiatives); 10 in-depth interviews were carried out. The proposed conceptual framework envisages: 1)the target population according to complexity levels; 2)an evaluation approach of the structure, processes, and outcomes considering the health status achieved, the recovery process and the maintenance of health; and 3)the dimensions or attributes to be assessed. The proposed conceptual framework will be helpful has been useful to develop indicators and implement them with a community-based and result-oriented approach and a territorial or population-based perspective within the Spanish Health System. This will be essential to know which are the most effective strategies, what are the key elements that determine greater success and what are the groups of patients who can most benefit. PMID:27382930

  9. MICROBIAL SURVEILLANCE OF ACUTE AND CHRONIC DACRYOCYSTITIS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jithendra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Dacryocystitis acute or chronic poses a constant threat to cornea and orbital soft tissue if neglected revealing the importance of the condition. Infection with microbes in these patients can cause severe morbidity. Hence it is important to know the pathogen wise in man agement of the condition. Our study was determined to know the bacterial and fungal etiology of both acute and chronic dacryocystitis and their invitro antibacterial susceptibility and resistance to commonly used antibacterial agents. METHODS : This hospita l based study was conducted during March 2011 to March 2013. Patients with suffering with acute and chronic dacrocystitis were included in the study. Specimens were collected from these patients, processing, isolation, identification and antibiogram of the isolates were done as per standard procedures. RESULTS : A total of 298 patients were included in the study based upon the inclusion criteria. Out of 298 patients 126(42.29% presented with acute dacryocystitis and 172(57.71% were with chronic dacryocysti tis. Single eye involvement was noticed in 184 (61.75% cases and 114 (38.25% presented with involvement of both eyes. Out of 298 cases pure growth was seen in 255(85.57% and 43(14.43% yielded no growth on culture. On observation more percentage of cult ure positivity was noticed in chronic cases (164 of 172, 95.34% and less in acute cases (91 of 126, 72.23% and the difference was also statistically significant. Single isolate was found in 218 cases, two/three isolates were recovered from 37 cases. All cases of polymicrobial growth were observed in chronic dacryocystitis. Staphylococcus aureus as the most common gram positive pathogen (43/77, 55.84% in acute, 34/77, 44.16% in chronic dacryocystitis followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (38/64, 59.37% i n acute, 26/64, 40.63% in chronic dacryocystitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae ( 10/12, 83.34% in acute, 2/12, 16.67% in chronic dacryocystitis and least Micrococcus

  10. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians' 2016 Veterinary Medical Care Guidelines for Spay-Neuter Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brenda; Bushby, Philip A; McCobb, Emily; White, Sara C; Rigdon-Brestle, Y Karla; Appel, Leslie D; Makolinski, Kathleen V; Wilford, Christine L; Bohling, Mark W; Eddlestone, Susan M; Farrell, Kelly A; Ferguson, Nancy; Harrison, Kelly; Howe, Lisa M; Isaza, Natalie M; Levy, Julie K; Looney, Andrea; Moyer, Michael R; Robertson, Sheilah Ann; Tyson, Kathy

    2016-07-15

    As community efforts to reduce the overpopulation and euthanasia of unwanted and unowned cats and dogs have increased, many veterinarians have increasingly focused their clinical efforts on the provision of spay-neuter services. Because of the wide range of geographic and demographic needs, a wide variety of spay-neuter programs have been developed to increase delivery of services to targeted populations of animals, including stationary and mobile clinics, MASH-style operations, shelter services, community cat programs, and services provided through private practitioners. In an effort to promote consistent, high-quality care across the broad range of these programs, the Association of Shelter Veterinarians convened a task force of veterinarians to develop veterinary medical care guidelines for spay-neuter programs. These guidelines consist of recommendations for general patient care and clinical procedures, preoperative care, anesthetic management, surgical procedures, postoperative care, and operations management. They were based on current principles of anesthesiology, critical care medicine, infection control, and surgical practice, as determined from published evidence and expert opinion. They represent acceptable practices that are attainable in spay-neuter programs regardless of location, facility, or type of program. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians envisions that these guidelines will be used by the profession to maintain consistent veterinary medical care in all settings where spay-neuter services are provided and to promote these services as a means of reducing sheltering and euthanasia of cats and dogs. PMID:27379593

  11. Implementation of adolescent family-based substance use prevention programs in health care settings: Comparisons across conditions and programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalborg, Annette E; Miller, Brenda A; Husson, Gail; Byrnes, Hilary F; Bauman, Karl E; Spoth, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The majority of knowledge related to implementation of family-based substance use prevention programs is based on programs delivered in school and community settings. The aim of this study is to examine procedures related to implementation effectiveness and quality of two family-based universal substance use prevention programs delivered in health care settings, the Strengthening Families Program: For Parents and Youth 10-14 (SFP) and Family Matters (FM). These evidence-based programs were delivered as part of a larger random control intervention study designed to assess the influence of program choice vs. assignment on study participation and adolescent substance use outcomes. We also assess the effects of program choice (vs. assignment to program) on program delivery. METHODS: A mixed method case study was conducted to assess procedures used to maximize implementation quality and fidelity of family-based prevention programs delivered in health care settings. Families with an 11 year old child were randomly selected for study participation from health plan membership databases of 4 large urban medical centers in the San Francisco Bay Area. Eligible families were initially randomized to a Choice study condition (families choose SFP or FM) or Assigned study condition (assigned to FM, SFP or control group); 494 ethnically diverse families were selected for participation in study programs. RESULTS: Successful implementation of family prevention programs in health care settings required knowledge of the health care environment and familiarity with established procedures for developing ongoing support and collaboration. Ongoing training of program deliverers utilizing data from fidelity assessment appeared to contribute to improved program fidelity over the course of the study. Families who chose FM completed the program in a shorter period (pprogram activities (p=0.02) compared to families assigned to FM. SFP "choice" families attended more sessions than

  12. National dissemination of chronic disease self-management education programs: an incremental examination of delivery characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Ory, Marcia G; Ahn, SangNam; Kulinski, Kristie P; Jiang, Luohua; Horel, Scott; Lorig, Kate

    2014-01-01

    With a near 20-year developmental history as an evidence-based program, the suite of Chronic Disease Self-Management Education (CDSME) programs were selected in 2010 for grand-scale dissemination in a federally supported initiative to improve the health of older Americans. The primary charge of this national effort was to establish a sustainable program delivery system for empowering American adults with one or more chronic conditions to better manage their health. The current study focused on a series of dissemination and implementation science research questions to: (1) examine the geographic distribution of participation in this initiative across the Unites States; (2) describe workshop characteristics engaged to reach program participants in various settings; and (3) describe personal characteristics of the first 100,000 participants. Each subsequent entering cohort was descriptively examined to indicate whether there was constancy or change in delivery sites and populations reached over time. Findings show a strengthening of the workshop delivery infrastructure in that it took 9.4 months to reach the first 25,000 participants in 853 counties compared to 5.4 months to reach the last 25,000 participants in 1,109 counties. The workshop delivery characteristics and participant characteristics remained relatively consistent across increments of 25,000 participants reached, although general trends were observed for some variables. For example, after reaching the first 25,000 participants, subsequent groups of 25,000 participants were reached more quickly. Additionally, workshops were increasingly delivered in ZIP Codes with higher percentages of families residing below the federal poverty line. As more participants were reached, more participants with chronic conditions were enrolled. This national translational study illustrates the rapid expansion of CDSME programs throughout the United States and capability to reach diverse populations in a variety of

  13. Income level and chronic ambulatory care sensitive conditions in adults: a multicity population-based study in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forastiere Francesco

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A relationship between quality of primary health care and preventable hospitalizations has been described in the US, especially among the elderly. In Europe, there has been a recent increase in the evaluation of Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSC as an indicator of health care quality, but evidence is still limited. The aim of this study was to determine whether income level is associated with higher hospitalization rates for ACSC in adults in a country with universal health care coverage. Methods From the hospital registries in four Italian cities (Turin, Milan, Bologna, Rome, we identified 9384 hospital admissions for six chronic conditions (diabetes, hypertension, congestive heart failure, angina pectoris, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and asthma among 20-64 year-olds in 2000. Case definition was based on the ICD-9-CM coding algorithm suggested by the Agency for Health Research and Quality - Prevention Quality Indicators. An area-based (census block income index was used for each individual. All hospitalization rates were directly standardised for gender and age using the Italian population. Poisson regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between income level (quintiles and hospitalization rates (RR, 95% CI separately for the selected conditions controlling for age, gender and city of residence. Results Overall, the ACSC age-standardized rate was 26.1 per 10.000 inhabitants. All conditions showed a statistically significant socioeconomic gradient, with low income people being more likely to be hospitalized than their well off counterparts. The association was particularly strong for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (level V low income vs. level I high income RR = 4.23 95%CI 3.37-5.31 and for congestive heart failure (RR = 3.78, 95% CI = 3.09-4.62. With the exception of asthma, males were more vulnerable to ACSC hospitalizations than females. The risks were higher among 45-64 year

  14. The Toronto General Hospital Transitional Pain Service: development and implementation of a multidisciplinary program to prevent chronic postsurgical pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz J

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Joel Katz,1–3 Aliza Weinrib,1,2 Samantha R Fashler,2 Rita Katznelzon,1,3 Bansi R Shah,1 Salima SJ Ladak,1 Jiao Jiang,1 Qing Li,1 Kayla McMillan,1 Daniel Santa Mina,5,6 Kirsten Wentlandt,7 Karen McRae,1,3 Diana Tamir,1,3 Sheldon Lyn,1,3 Marc de Perrot,8 Vivek Rao,9 David Grant,10 Graham Roche-Nagle,11 Sean P Cleary,12 Stefan OP Hofer,13 Ralph Gilbert,14 Duminda Wijeysundera,1,3 Paul Ritvo,15 Tahir Janmohamed,16 Gerald O’Leary,1,3 Hance Clarke1,3 1Department of Anesthesia and Pain Management, Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, 2Department of Psychology, York University, 3Department of Anesthesia, University of Toronto, 4Palliative Care, University Health Network, University of Toronto, 5Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, University of Toronto, 6Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education, University of Toronto, 7Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, 8Division of Thoracic Surgery, Toronto General Hospital, 9Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Toronto General Hospital, 10Multiorgan Transplant Program, Toronto General Hospital, 11Division of Vascular Surgery, Toronto General Hospital, 12Division of General Surgery, Toronto General Hospital, 13Division of Plastic Surgery, Toronto General Hospital, 14Division of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Toronto General Hospital, 15Department of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, 16ManagingLife, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP, an often unanticipated result of necessary and even life-saving procedures, develops in 5–10% of patients one-year after major surgery. Substantial advances have been made in identifying patients at elevated risk of developing CPSP based on perioperative pain, opioid use, and negative affect, including depression, anxiety, pain catastrophizing, and posttraumatic stress disorder-like symptoms. The Transitional Pain Service (TPS at

  15. Pilot Program to Improve Self-Management of Patients with Heart Failure by Redesigning Care Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica D. Shaw

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We tested both an educational and a care coordination element of health care to examine if better disease-specific knowledge leads to successful self-management of heart failure (HF. Background. The high utilization of health care resources and poor patient outcomes associated with HF justify tests of change to improve self-management of HF. Methods. This prospective study tested two components of the Chronic Care Model (clinical information systems and self-management support to improve outcomes in the self-management of HF among patients who received intensive education and care coordination during their acute care stay. A postdischarge follow-up phone call assessed their knowledge of HF self-management compared to usual care patients. Results. There were 20 patients each in the intervention and usual care groups. Intervention patients were more likely to have a scale at home, write down their weight, and practice new or different health behaviors. Conclusion. Patients receiving more intensive education knew more about their disease and were better able to self-manage their weight compared to patients receiving standard care.

  16. A systematic review of interventions to enhance access to best practice primary health care for chronic disease management, prevention and episodic care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comino Elizabeth

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although primary health care (PHC is a key component of all health care systems, services are not always readily available, accessible or affordable. This systematic review examines effective strategies to enhance access to best practice processes of PHC in three domains: chronic disease management, prevention and episodic care. Methods An extensive search of bibliographic data bases to identify peer and non-peer reviewed literature was undertaken. Identified papers were screened to identify and classify intervention studies that measured the impact of strategies (singly or in combination on change in use or the reach of services in defined population groups (evaluated interventions. Results The search identified 3,148 citations of which 121 were intervention studies and 75 were evaluated interventions. Evaluated interventions were found in all three domains: prevention (n = 45, episodic care (n = 19, and chronic disease management (n = 11. They were undertaken in a number of countries including Australia (n = 25, USA (n = 25, and UK (n = 15. Study quality was ranked as high (31% of studies, medium (61% and low (8%. The 75 evaluated interventions tested a range of strategies either singly (n = 46 studies or as a combination of two (n = 20 or more strategies (n = 9. Strategies targeted both health providers and patients and were categorised to five groups: practice re-organisation (n = 43 studies, patient support (n = 29, provision of new services (n = 19, workforce development (n = 11, and financial incentives (n = 9. Strategies varied by domain, reflecting the complexity of care needs and processes. Of the 75 evaluated interventions, 55 reported positive findings with interventions using a combination of strategies more likely to report positive results. Conclusions This review suggests that multiple, linked strategies targeting different levels of the health care

  17. 78 FR 29441 - Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... in Federal programs (74 FR 62201). Program integrity efforts can help ensure that limited program... to this proposed rule. (See 57 FR 34352-34413, August 4, 1992; 63 FR 39936-39981, July 24, 1998; 72 FR 27972-27980, May 18, 2007; 72 FR 50889-50900. September 5, 2007) III. Statutory Authority...

  18. Non-disclosure of chronic kidney disease in primary care and the limits of instrumental rationality in chronic illness self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daker-White, Gavin; Rogers, Anne; Kennedy, Anne; Blakeman, Thomas; Blickem, Christian; Chew-Graham, Carolyn

    2015-04-01

    Early detection of long term conditions is predicated on assumptions that lifestyle changes and medications can be used to reduce or manage the risk of condition progression. However, ambiguity remains about the nature and place of diagnostic disclosure to people in newly recognised or asymptomatic 'pre' conditions such as early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). The disclosure of a diagnosis is relevant to instigating strategies which rely on actively engaging patients as self-managers of their own care. Whilst primary care routinely records a diagnosis of early stage CKD, little is known about how patients learn about the fact that they have CKD or how they respond to this. This study aimed to explore patients' experiences of disclosure of CKD in primary care settings. A nested qualitative study of participants recruited to a trial of an intervention for CKD patients in Greater Manchester, UK was undertaken. A purposive sample of 26 patients, with a mean age of 72 years (range 59-89, median 71), were interviewed during 2012. Interview transcripts were analysed using constant comparative techniques. Narrative accounts reflected limited or partial disclosure of CKD; often cast in vague terms as "nothing to worry about". How patients described themselves in terms of participation and their tendencies towards 'active' or 'passive' involvement in consultations emerged as important components of narratives around disclosure. The findings illuminate the ways in which diagnosis is oriented in a context where it is possible to meet the requirements for remuneration under a pay for performance system of primary care, whilst apparently not disclosing a label or a diagnosis to patients. This challenges the presumptions inherent in wider health policy objectives that are increasingly built on the notion of responsible patients and the ethos of the active support of self-management for pre-conditions. PMID:25748112

  19. Sustainable practice improvements: impact of the Comprehensive Advanced Palliative Care Education (CAPCE) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Diane; Hillier, Loretta M; Keat, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes an education program designed to improve palliative care practice through the development of workplace hospice palliative care resources (PCRs), and its impact on knowledge transfer and longer-term changes to clinical practice. Evaluation methods included pre- and post-program questionnaires, and a survey of learners' (n=301) perceptions of program learning strategies. Interviews (n=21) were conducted with a purposeful sample of PCRs and representatives from their work sites. Ratings of the sessions indicated that they were relevant to learners' clinical practice. At follow up, the majority of learners (83%) continued to serve as PCRs. Many positive effects were identified, including enhanced pain and symptom management, staff education, and development of care policies and guidelines. Management support, particularly the prioritization of palliative care and staff development, were factors facilitating sustained implementation. These findings highlight the importance of multimodal learning strategies and supportive work environments in the development of PCRs to enhance palliative care practice. PMID:18251444

  20. The need for physician referral of low-income, chronic disease patients to free community nutrition education programs

    OpenAIRE

    Shawver, Gregory Wayne Jr.

    1998-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of chronic diseases and conditions among older, low-income individuals in the United States. It is well recognized that diet plays an important role in the management and prevention of chronic diseases. Despite this, primary-care physicians often do not provide adequate dietary counseling or appropriate nutrition referrals to this patient population. Two surveys were conducted in Southwest and the western part of Central Virginia, one with 209 family pra...

  1. Demographics and health care seeking behavior of Singaporean women with chronic constipation: implications for therapeutic management

    OpenAIRE

    Gwee KA; Setia S

    2012-01-01

    Kok Ann Gwee1,2, Sajita Setia31Gleneagles Hospital, 2Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore (NUS), 3Janssen, Johnson and Johnson Pte Ltd, SingaporeIntroduction: Chronic constipation is significantly more prevalent in women than men in Singapore. We carried out a survey to study patient demographics, symptom prevalence, healthcare-seeking behavior, and patient satisfaction with available treatment options in women with chronic constipation.Methods: Responses were col...

  2. Spectrum of acute and chronic leukemia at a tertiary care hospital, Haryana, India

    OpenAIRE

    Gajender Singh; Padam Parmar; Sant Prakash Kataria; Sunita Singh; Rajeev Sen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leukemias are primary neoplasms arising from the malignant proliferations of blood cells or their precursors. Leukemias are classified into acute/chronic myeloid and lymphoid subtype. Typing of leukemia is essential for effective therapy because prognosis and survival rate are different for each type and sub-type. Methods: A total of 356 patients diagnosed to have acute/chronic leukemia were included in our study. Only newly diagnosed cases were included in this study and patie...

  3. Lessons Learned while Implementing an HIV/AIDs Care and Treatment Program in Rural Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy D. Moon

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mozambique has severe resource constraints, yet with international partnerships, the nation has placed over 145,000 HIV- infected persons on antiretroviral therapies (ART through May 2009. HIV clinical services are provided at .215 clinical venues in all 11 of Mozambique’s provinces. Friends in Global Health (FGH, affiliated with Vanderbilt University in the United States (US, is a locally licensed non-governmental organization (NGO working exclusively in small city and rural venues in Zambézia Province whose population reaches approximately 4 million persons. Our approach to clinical capacity building is based on: 1 technical assistance to national health system facilities to implement ART clinical services at the district level, 2 human capacity development, and 3 health system strengthening. Challenges in this setting are daunting, including: 1 human resource constraints, 2 infrastructure limitations, 3 centralized care for large populations spread out over large distances, 4 continued high social stigma related to HIV, 5 limited livelihood options in rural areas and 6 limited educational opportunities in rural areas. Sustainability in rural Mozambique will depend on transitioning services from emergency foreign partners to local authorities and continued funding. It will also require “wrap-around” programs that help build economic capacity with agricultural, educational, and commercial initiatives. Sustainability is undermined by serious health manpower and infrastructure limitations. Recent U.S. government pronouncements suggest that the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief will support concurrent community and business development. FGH, with its Mozambican government counterparts, see the evolution of an emergency response to a sustainable chronic disease management program as an essential and logical step. We have presented six key challenges that are essential to address in rural Mozambique

  4. A risk-adjusted approach to comparing the return on investment in health care programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendi, Pedram; Al, Maiwenn J; Zimmermann, Heinz

    2004-09-01

    The league table approach to rank ordering health care programs according to the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is a common method to guide policy makers in setting priorities for resource allocation. In the presence of uncertainty, however, ranking programs is complicated by the degree of variability associated with each program. Confidence intervals for cost-effectiveness ratios may be overlapping. Moreover, confidence intervals may include negative ratios and the interpretation of negative cost-effectiveness ratios is ambiguous. We suggest to rank mutually exclusive health care programs according to their rate of return which is defined as the net monetary benefit over the costs of the program. However, how does a program with a higher expected return but higher uncertainty compare to a program with a lower expected return but lower risk? In the present paper we propose a risk-adjusted measure to compare the return on investment in health care programs. Financing a health care program is treated as an investment in a risky asset. The risky asset is combined with a risk-free asset in order to construct a combined portfolio. The weights attributed to the risk-free and risky assets are chosen in such a manner that all programs under consideration exhibit the same degree of uncertainty. We can then compare the performance of the individual programs by constructing a risk-adjusted league table of expected returns. PMID:15277778

  5. Can a Self-Management Education Program for Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Improve Quality of Life ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manon Labrecque

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of a self-management program on health-related quality of life (HRQoL and morbidity commonly associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.

  6. Transitional care programs: who is left behind? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Piraino

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Older adults are at risk of rehospitalization if their care transitions from hospital-to-home are not properly managed. The objective of this review was to determine if older patient populations recruited for randomized controlled trials of transitional care interventions represented those at greatest risk of rehospitalization following discharge.  Relevant risk factors examined were cognitive impairment, depression, polypharmacy, comorbidity, length of stay, advanced non-malignant diseases, and available social support. DESIGN: Systematic Review. SETTING: Hospital to home. PARTICIPANTS: Older hospitalized adults. MEASUREMENTS: For inclusion, articles were required to focus on hospital-to-home transitions with a self-care component, have components occurring both before and after discharge, and a randomized controlled trial design. Articles were excluded if participants had a mean age under 55 years, or if interventions focused on developmental disabilities, youth, addictions, or case management, or were solely primary-care based. RESULTS:  Following title, abstract, and full review by two authors, 17 articles met inclusion criteria.  Risk factors for rehospitalization were often listed either as exclusion criteria or were not reported at baseline by the studies. One study included patients with all identified risk factors for rehospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that published studies of transitional care interventions do not often include older adults at highest risk of rehospitalization, raising concerns about the generalizability of their results. Studies are needed that evaluate interventions that explicitly address the needs and characteristics of these patients.

  7. Transitional care programs: who is left behind? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Piraino

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Older adults are at risk of rehospitalization if their care transitions from hospital-to-home are not properly managed. The objective of this review was to determine if older patient populations recruited for randomized controlled trials of transitional care interventions represented those at greatest risk of rehospitalization following discharge.  Relevant risk factors examined were cognitive impairment, depression, polypharmacy, comorbidity, length of stay, advanced non-malignant diseases, and available social support.DESIGN: Systematic Review.SETTING: Hospital to home.PARTICIPANTS: Older hospitalized adults.MEASUREMENTS: For inclusion, articles were required to focus on hospital-to-home transitions with a self-care component, have components occurring both before and after discharge, and a randomized controlled trial design. Articles were excluded if participants had a mean age under 55 years, or if interventions focused on developmental disabilities, youth, addictions, or case management, or were solely primary-care based.RESULTS:  Following title, abstract, and full review by two authors, 17 articles met inclusion criteria.  Risk factors for rehospitalization were often listed either as exclusion criteria or were not reported at baseline by the studies. One study included patients with all identified risk factors for rehospitalization.CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that published studies of transitional care interventions do not often include older adults at highest risk of rehospitalization, raising concerns about the generalizability of their results. Studies are needed that evaluate interventions that explicitly address the needs and characteristics of these patients.

  8. Comprehensive dental health care program at an orphanage in Nellore district of Andhra Pradesh

    OpenAIRE

    Dhanya Muralidharan; Nusrath Fareed; Shanthi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Provision of oral health care in India, especially for the underprivileged is limited due to inadequate finances and manpower. Resources of dental colleges in such a scenario can be utilized to provide prevention oriented oral health care. Aim: To improve the oral health status of children at an institute in Nellore district of Andhra Pradesh, India, through prevention based comprehensive dental health care program (CDHP). Design and Setting: A longitudinal institution bas...

  9. Translating an Evidence-based Lifestyle Intervention Program into Primary Care: Lessons Learned

    OpenAIRE

    Blonstein, Andrea C.; Yank, Veronica; Stafford, Randall S.; Wilson, Sandra R.; Rosas, Lisa Goldman; Ma, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is one of the top health priorities in the United States. Primary care physicians are the designated “gatekeepers” for obesity prevention, detection, and treatment. However, they and the current U.S. health care structure and reimbursement systems are often ill-equipped to implement evidence-based obesity care. The Group Lifestyle Balance™ (GLB) program is a group-delivery adaptation of the predominantly one-on-one lifestyle intervention proven efficacious in the Diabetes Prevention P...

  10. An Appraisal of End-of-Life Care in Persons with Chronic Kidney Disease Dying in Hospital Wards

    OpenAIRE

    Noble, Helen; Brown, Joan; Shields, Joanne; Fogarty, Damian; Maxwell, Alexander P.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review end-of-life care provided by renal healthcare professionals to hospital in-patients with chronic kidney disease, and their carers, over a 12-month period in Northern Ireland.METHODS: Retrospective review of 100 patients.RESULTS: Mean age at death was 72 years (19-95) and 56% were male. Eighty three percent of patients had a 'Not For Attempted Resuscitation' order during their last admission and this was implemented in 42%. Less than 20% of all patients died in a hospital ward. ...

  11. Chronic Infections and Management Setting in Drug Addicts of MMT Program in Pinang, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Azhar Syed Sulaiman

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The authors sought to identify the prevalence of blood-borne chronic infections and determine the appropriate management therapy setting among the drug addicts of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT program. The purpose to identify such factor is to know the quality of health of respondents active to MMT program and possibly predict the risk reduction of relapse during the treatment. Methodology: As it was known that government of Malaysia allowed MMT on large scale at 2005, so a year retrospective with six months prospective study (from Jan 2007 to May 2008 was conducted in three methadone clinics of Pinang state, Malaysia. All the registered patients were included in the study and data was collected through special design data collection form by reviewing the medical profiles. Results: Findings showed HIV/AIDS was found in 2.3%, HCV 76.3%, HBV 3.3%, while 37.7% respondents were identified impaired liver function. The risk combination was HCV with impaired liver function identified in 39.5% respondents. None of them receives any supportive management treatment for the current chronic infectious condition. Conclusion: This study highly recommends producing necessary resources for the management treatment of Drug addicts for such chronic infection, as further delay can possibly increase the risk to transmit the infection in the society.

  12. Patient navigator programs, cancer disparities, and the patient protection and affordable care act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Beverly; Chabner, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    Patients in vulnerable population groups suffer disproportionately from cancer. The elimination of cancer disparities is critically important for lessening the burden of cancer. Patient navigator programs have been shown to improve clinical outcomes. Among its provisions relevant to disparities in cancer care, The Patient Protection and Affordability Care Act authorizes continued funding of patient navigator programs. However, given the current economic and political environment, this funding is in jeopardy. This article describes patient navigator programs and summarizes the elements of the health care law that are relevant to these programs. It is vital that the entire oncology community remain committed to leading efforts toward the improvement of cancer care among our most vulnerable patients. PMID:21804070

  13. Impact of a First-Year Student Pharmacist Diabetes Self-Care Education Program

    OpenAIRE

    Morello, Candis M; Neighbors, Melissa; Luu, Linda; Kobayashi, Shawna; Mutrux, Brandon; Best, Brookie M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of a first-year diabetes self-care education program by measuring student pharmacists’ confidence and knowledge retention, and the clinical applicability of the skills learned.

  14. Ceramic material life prediction: A program to translate ANSYS results to CARES/LIFE reliability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonhermann, Pieter; Pintz, Adam

    1994-01-01

    This manual describes the use of the ANSCARES program to prepare a neutral file of FEM stress results taken from ANSYS Release 5.0, in the format needed by CARES/LIFE ceramics reliability program. It is intended for use by experienced users of ANSYS and CARES. Knowledge of compiling and linking FORTRAN programs is also required. Maximum use is made of existing routines (from other CARES interface programs and ANSYS routines) to extract the finite element results and prepare the neutral file for input to the reliability analysis. FORTRAN and machine language routines as described are used to read the ANSYS results file. Sub-element stresses are computed and written to a neutral file using FORTRAN subroutines which are nearly identical to those used in the NASCARES (MSC/NASTRAN to CARES) interface.

  15. Minimally Disruptive Medicine: A Pragmatically Comprehensive Model for Delivering Care to Patients with Multiple Chronic Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Leppin, Aaron L; Victor M Montori; Gionfriddo, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    An increasing proportion of healthcare resources in the United States are directed toward an expanding group of complex and multimorbid patients. Federal stakeholders have called for new models of care to meet the needs of these patients. Minimally Disruptive Medicine (MDM) is a theory-based, patient-centered, and context-sensitive approach to care that focuses on achieving patient goals for life and health while imposing the smallest possible treatment burden on patients’ lives. The MDM Care...

  16. Development of an efficient rehabilitation exercise program for functional recovery in chronic ankle instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kewwan; Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to construct an integrated rehabilitation exercise program to prevent chronic pain and improve motor ability in cases of ankle injury and re-injury. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-six male soccer players who required functional strength exercises due to repeated ankle injury were the subjects. A 12-week rehabilitation exercise program was constructed with the aim of improving muscle strength in the ankle and dynamic coordination of the lower limb. Muscle strength and dynamic coordination were evaluated using the Y Balance Test, and isokinetic muscle strength of ankle dorsiflexion, plantarflexion, inversion, and eversion were measured before and after the 12-week program. [Results] Following 12 weeks of rehabilitation exercise, there were statistically significant improvements in the ratios of dorsiflexor strength to plantarflexor strength, eversion strength, and inversion strength on the left side. The other variables showed no significant changes. [Conclusion] The rehabilitation exercise program for chronic ankle instability helped to reduce pain, and to restore normal joint range of motion, muscle strength and endurance, and functional ability. Active protocols to improve complex functions need to be developed to complement these results. PMID:27313347

  17. 78 FR 27485 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... fiscal year FPL Federal poverty line FQHC Federally qualified health center FR Federal Register FTE Full... CFR Parts 412, 418, 482, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Proposed Fiscal...

  18. 77 FR 4908 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2011-19719 of August 18, 2011 (76 FR 51476), the final rule entitled... Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2012 Rates; Corrections AGENCY: Centers...

  19. 76 FR 5222 - Notice of Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program Open Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Notice of Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program Open Season AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Notice of Federal Long Term Care Insurance Open Season. SUMMARY: The Office of...

  20. Iterations of the SafeCare Model: An Evidence-Based Child Maltreatment Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Anna; Lutzker, John R.

    2008-01-01

    SafeCare is an evidenced-based parenting program for at-risk and maltreating parents that addresses the social and family ecology in which child maltreatment occurs. SafeCare home visitors focus on behavioral skills that are trained to predetermined performance criteria. Recent research has stressed the importance of successful dissemination and…

  1. A randomized controlled trial to evaluate an educational strategy involving community health volunteers in improving self-care in patients with chronic heart failure: Rationale, design and methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Siabani, Soraya; Driscoll, Tim; Davidson, Patricia M; Leeder, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure (CHF) is an increasingly important health problem worldwide. Effective self-care can improve the outcomes and quality of life in patients with CHF. Acknowledging the important role of educational interventions for improving self-care, we sought to assess a new educational strategy involving community health volunteers (CHVs) that could reduce the cost and, hypothetically, increase the effectiveness of self-care education in patients with CHF. Methods/Design In...

  2. Evaluating Comparative Effectiveness Research Priorities for Care Coordination in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Community-Based eDelphi Study

    OpenAIRE

    Stellefson, Michael; Alber, Julia; Paige, Samantha; Castro, Daniela; Singh, Briana

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite research supporting the use of care coordination in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), there is relatively little known about the comparative effectiveness of different strategies used to organize care for patients. To investigate the most important COPD care coordination strategies, community-based stakeholder input is needed, especially from medically underserved populations. Web-based platforms are electronic tools now being used to bring together individuals ...

  3. [Chronic dependence on mechanical pulmonary ventilation in pediatric care: a necessary debate for Brazil's Unified Health System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Maria Tereza Fonseca da; Gomes, Maria Auxiliadora; Pinto, Márcia

    2011-10-01

    People with prolonged dependence on mechanical ventilation require permanent care and the use of equipment that can result in longer term hospital internment. This can lead to difficulty of access for patients with acute injuries, as well as personal difficulties and stress with reduced quality of life for their families or caregivers due to such longer hospital internment. This critical review of publications dealing with dependence on mechanical ventilation among children and adolescents aimed at making information organized in a systematic manner available in order to support discussion on the subject. It should be borne in mind that changes in epidemiological profile and growing technological access determine needs such as intensive therapy hospital beds and complex home care for chronic patients, which still have limits of supply and regulatory restrictions in the Brazilian public health system. PMID:22031144

  4. Cost Analysis of a Home-Based Nurse Care Coordination Program

    OpenAIRE

    Marek, Karen Dorman; Stetzer, Frank; Adams, Scott J.; Bub, Linda Denison; Schlidt, Andrea; Colorafi, Karen Jiggins

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether a home-based care coordination program focused on medication self-management would affect the cost of care to the Medicare program and whether the addition of technology, a medication-dispensing machine, would further reduce cost. Design Randomized, controlled, three-arm longitudinal study. Setting Participant homes in a large Midwestern urban area. Participants Older adults identified as having difficulty managing their medications at discharge from Medicare H...

  5. Strengthening preventive care programs: a permanent challenge for healthcare systems; lessons from PREVENIMSS México

    OpenAIRE

    Cantón Sonia; Acosta Benjamín; Reyes Hortensia; Levy Santiago; Pérez-Cuevas Ricardo; Gutiérrez Gonzalo; Muñoz Onofre

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background In 2001, the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) carried out a major reorganization to provide comprehensive preventive care to reinforce primary care services through the PREVENIMSS program. This program divides the population into programmatic age groups that receive specific preventive services: children (0-9 years), adolescents (10-19 years), men (20-59 years), women (20-59 years) and older adults (> = 60 years). The objective of this paper is to describe the i...

  6. Chronic Disease Prevalence and Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors Among US Health Care Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayoub, Elias; Jena, Anupam B

    2015-12-01

    Although health care professionals may be assumed to make healthier lifestyle choices and have better health outcomes than others because of their greater health literacy, little is known about how actual health outcomes of health care professionals compare with those of the overall population. We analyzed how trends in obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and coronary artery disease prevalence as well as several health behaviors (smoking, alcohol use, and exercise) varied between health care professionals and the general US population from 2002 to 2013, using nationally representative data collected by the National Health Interview Survey. We estimated multivariate logistic regressions of each disease and behavior adjusted for age, race, sex, geographic region, and year. Although rates of obesity, diabetes, and hypertension were lower among health care professionals compared with the overall population, disease was still common among health care professionals and increased over time at a rate similar to that of the overall population. For example, obesity prevalence was lower among health care professionals but increased similarly from 2002 to 2013 (health care professionals, 20.5% in 2002 to 22.1% in 2013; other occupations, 28.4% to 31.7%; P=.64 for difference in trend). Diabetes prevalence was modestly lower among health care professionals but increased at a similar rate (health care professionals, 7.4% in 2005 to 8.6% in 2013; other occupations, 8.7% to 9.9%; P=.67 for difference in trend). Similar patterns were noted in hypertension. Coronary artery disease prevalence declined over time among health care professionals but increased for others. Health care professionals reported better health behaviors than others in smoking and physical activity but not in moderate to heavy alcohol use. PMID:26422242

  7. Efficacy of amoxycillin versus amoxycillin/clavulanate in acute exacerbations of chronic pulmonary obstructive disease in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Llor

    2008-10-01

    moderate patients in primary care.Keywords: exacerbation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, randomised controlled trial, amoxycillin, primary care, amoxycillin/clavulanate

  8. From concept to content: assessing the implementation fidelity of a chronic care model for frail, older people who live at home.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntinga, M.E.; Leeuwen, K.M. van; Schellevis, F.G.; Nijpels, G.; Jansen, A.P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Implementation fidelity, the degree to which a care program is implemented as intended, can influence program impact. Since results of trials that aim to implement comprehensive care programs for frail, older people have been conflicting, assessing implementation fidelity alongside these

  9. Shifting chronic disease management from hospitals to primary care in Estonian health system: analysis of national panel data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atun, Rifat; Gurol–Urganci, Ipek; Hone, Thomas; Pell, Lisa; Stokes, Jonathan; Habicht, Triin; Lukka, Kaija; Raaper, Elin; Habicht, Jarno

    2016-01-01

    Background Following independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, Estonia introduced a national insurance system, consolidated the number of health care providers, and introduced family medicine centred primary health care (PHC) to strengthen the health system. Methods Using routinely collected health billing records for 2005–2012, we examine health system utilisation for seven ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) (asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD], depression, Type 2 diabetes, heart failure, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease [IHD]), and by patient characteristics (gender, age, and number of co–morbidities). The data set contained 552 822 individuals. We use patient level data to test the significance of trends, and employ multivariate regression analysis to evaluate the probability of inpatient admission while controlling for patient characteristics, health system supply–side variables, and PHC use. Findings Over the study period, utilisation of PHC increased, whilst inpatient admissions fell. Service mix in PHC changed with increases in phone, email, nurse, and follow–up (vs initial) consultations. Healthcare utilisation for diabetes, depression, IHD and hypertension shifted to PHC, whilst for COPD, heart failure and asthma utilisation in outpatient and inpatient settings increased. Multivariate regression indicates higher probability of inpatient admission for males, older patient and especially those with multimorbidity, but protective effect for PHC, with significantly lower hospital admission for those utilising PHC services. Interpretation Our findings suggest health system reforms in Estonia have influenced the shift of ACSCs from secondary to primary care, with PHC having a protective effect in reducing hospital admissions. PMID:27175280

  10. Modern wound care - practical aspects of non-interventional topical treatment of patients with chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemond, Joachim; Augustin, Matthias; Eming, Sabine A; Goerge, Tobias; Horn, Thomas; Karrer, Sigrid; Schumann, Hauke; Stücker, Markus

    2014-07-01

    The treatment of patients with chronic wounds is becoming increasingly complex. It was therefore the aim of the members of the working group for wound healing (AGW) of the German Society of Dermatology (DDG) to report on the currently relevant aspects of non-interventional, topical wound treatment for daily practice. -Beside necessary procedures, such as wound cleansing and débridement, we describe commonly used wound dressings, their indications and practical use. Modern antiseptics, which are currently used in wound therapy, usually contain polyhexanide or octenidine. Physical methods, such as negative-pressure treatment, are also interesting options. It is always important to objectify and adequately treat pain symptoms which often affect these patients. Modern moist wound therapy may promote healing, reduce complications, and improve the quality of life in patients with chronic wounds. Together with the improvement of the underlying causes, modern wound therapy is an important aspect in the overall treatment regime for patients with chronic wounds. PMID:24813380

  11. Person-Centered Care for Older Adults with Chronic Conditions and Functional Impairment: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Alexis Coulourides; Wilber, Kathleen; Mosqueda, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Person-centered care (PCC) shifts focus away from the traditional biomedical model in favor of embracing personal choice and autonomy for people receiving health services. It has become an important avenue for improving primary care, and older adults remain a priority target for PCC because they are more likely to have complex care needs than younger individuals. Nevertheless, despite a growing body of evidence regarding its use, PCC still lacks an agreed-upon definition. A literature review was conducted to explore extant scholarship on PCC for older adults, assess corresponding definitions of PCC, and identify important elements of quality PCC. Nearly 3,000 articles published between 1990 and 2014 were identified. Excluding search results outside the parameters of this study, the final review comprised 132 nonduplicate sources focused on patient-centered care or PCC in older adults. Fifteen descriptions of PCC were identified, addressing 17 central principles or values. The six most-prominent domains of PCC were holistic or whole-person care, respect and value, choice, dignity, self-determination, and purposeful living. The body of evidence reviewed suggests that PCC is an important area of growing interest. Although multiple definitions and elements of PCC abound-with many commonalities and some overlap-the field would benefit from a consensus definition and list of essential elements to clarify how to operationalize a PCC approach to health care and services for older adults. This work guided the development of a separate American Geriatrics Society expert panel statement presenting a standardized definition and a list of PCC elements for older adults with chronic conditions or functional impairment. PMID:26626408

  12. Use of a care bundle in the emergency department for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a feasibility study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Cormac

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To determine the efficacy and usefulness of a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) care bundle designed for the initial management of acute exacerbations of COPD and to assess whether it improves quality of care and provides better outcomes. Introduction: The level of care provided in the emergency department (ED) for COPD exacerbations varies greatly, and there is a need for a more systematic, consistent, evidence-based quality improvement approach to improve outcomes and costs. Methods: A prospective before and after study was carried out in a university teaching hospital. Fifty consecutive patients were identified in the ED with COPD exacerbations and their management was reviewed. Following the education of ED staff and the implementation of a COPD care bundle, the outcome for 51 consecutive patients was analyzed. This COPD care bundle consisted of ten elements considered essential to the management of COPD exacerbations and was scored 0–10 according to the number of items on the checklist implemented correctly. Results: Following implementation, the mean bundle score out of 10 improved from 4.6 to 7 (P,0.001). There was a significant decrease in the unnecessary use of intravenous corticosteroids from 60% to 32% (P=0.003) and also a marked improvement in the use of oxygen therapy, with appropriate treatment increasing from 76% to 96% (P=0.003). Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism also improved from 54% to 73% (P=0.054). The 30-day readmission rate did not significantly improve. Conclusion: The use of a bundle improves the delivery of care for COPD exacerbations in the ED. There is more appropriate use of therapeutic interventions, especially oxygen therapy and intravenous corticosteroids.

  13. What drives quality improvement in chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary care: process evaluation of the Quality Improvement in Chronic Kidney Disease (QICKD) trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihat, Akin; de Lusignan, Simon; Thomas, Nicola; Tahir, Mohammad Aumran; Gallagher, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study is a process evaluation of the Quality Improvement in Chronic Kidney Disease (QICKD) study, comparing audit-based education (ABE) and sending clinical guidelines and prompts (G&P) with usual practice, in improving systolic blood pressure control in primary care. This evaluation aimed to explore how far clinical staff in participating practices were aware of the intervention, and why change in practice might have taken place. Setting 4 primary care practices in England: 2 received ABE, and 2 G&P. We purposively selected 1 northern/southern/city and rural practice from each study arm (from a larger pool of 132 practices as part of the QICKD trial). Participants The 4 study practices were purposively sampled, and focus groups conducted with staff from each. All staff members were invited to attend. Interventions Focus groups in each of 4 practices, at the mid-study point and at the end. 4 additional trial practices not originally selected for in-depth process evaluation took part in end of trial focus groups, to a total of 12 focus groups. These were recorded, transcribed and analysed using the framework approach. Results 5 themes emerged: (1) involvement in the study made participants more positive about the CKD register; (2) clinicians did not always explain to patients that they had CKD; (3) while practitioners improved their monitoring of CKD, many were sceptical that it improved care and were more motivated by pay-for-performance measures; (4) the impact of study interventions on practice was generally positive, particularly the interaction with specialists, included in ABE; (5) the study stimulated ideas for future clinical practice. Conclusions Improving quality in CKD is complex. Lack of awareness of clinical guidelines and scepticism about their validity are barriers to change. While pay-for-performance incentives are the main driver for change, quality improvement interventions can have a complementary influence. PMID:27053264

  14. Protocol and baseline data from The Inala Chronic Disease Management Service evaluation study: a health services intervention study for diabetes care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ware Robert S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is one of the most disabling chronic conditions worldwide, resulting in significant human, social and economic costs and placing huge demands on health care systems. The Inala Chronic Disease Management Service aims to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of care for patients with type 2 diabetes who have been referred by their general practitioner to a specialist diabetes outpatient clinic. Care is provided by a multidisciplinary, integrated team consisting of an endocrinologist, diabetes nurse educators, General Practitioner Clinical Fellows (general practitioners who have undertaken focussed post-graduate training in complex diabetes care, and allied health personnel (a dietitian, podiatrist and psychologist. Methods/Design Using a geographical control, this evaluation study tests the impact of this model of diabetes care provided by the service on patient outcomes compared to usual care provided at the specialist diabetes outpatient clinic. Data collection at baseline, 6 and 12-months will compare the primary outcome (glycaemic control and secondary outcomes (serum lipid profile, blood pressure, physical activity, smoking status, quality of life, diabetes self-efficacy and cost-effectiveness. Discussion This model of diabetes care combines the patient focus and holistic care valued by the primary care sector with the specialised knowledge and skills of hospital diabetes care. Our study will provide empirical evidence about the clinical effectiveness of this model of care. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12608000010392.

  15. Incremental health care costs for chronic pain in Ontario, Canada: a population-based matched cohort study of adolescents and adults using administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Mary-Ellen; Taddio, Anna; Katz, Joel; Shah, Vibhuti; Krahn, Murray

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about the economic burden of chronic pain and how chronic pain affects health care utilization. We aimed to estimate the annual per-person incremental medical cost and health care utilization for chronic pain in the Ontario population from the perspective of the public payer. We performed a retrospective cohort study using Ontario health care databases and the electronically linked Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) from 2000 to 2011. We identified subjects aged ≥12 years from the CCHS with chronic pain and closely matched them to individuals without pain using propensity score matching methods. We used linked data to determine mean 1-year per-person health care costs and utilization for each group and mean incremental cost for chronic pain. All costs are reported in 2014 Canadian dollars. After matching, we had 19,138 pairs of CCHS respondents with and without chronic pain. The average age was 55 years (SD = 18) and 61% were female. The incremental cost to manage chronic pain was $1742 per person (95% confidence interval [CI], $1488-$2020), 51% more than the control group. The largest contributor to the incremental cost was hospitalization ($514; 95% CI, $364-$683). Incremental costs were the highest in those with severe pain ($3960; 95% CI, $3186-$4680) and in those with most activity limitation ($4365; 95% CI, $3631-$5147). The per-person cost to manage chronic pain is substantial and more than 50% higher than a comparable patient without chronic pain. Costs are higher in people with more severe pain and activity limitations. PMID:26989805

  16. A cognitive-behavioural program for adolescents with chronic pain-a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlijn, Vivian P B M; Hunfeld, Joke A M; van der Wouden, Johannes C; Hazebroek-Kampschreur, Alice A J M; van Suijlekom-Smit, Lisette W A; Koes, Bart W; Passchier, Jan

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the feasibility of a cognitive-behavioural training program for adolescents with chronic pain irrespective of pain localisation. A secondary aim was to give an impression of the effect of the program on pain and quality of life. Eight adolescents (14-18 years) with chronic non-organic pain recruited from the general population (and their parents) participated in this pilot study. The intervention included five group meetings alternated with four telephone contacts (during the self-management weeks) over a period of 9 weeks. The training aimed to change pain behaviour through pain education, relaxation strategies, problem-solving techniques, assertiveness training, cognitive restructuring and by stimulating the adolescent's physical activity level. The training further addresses the social context of pain by inviting parents to attend two meetings for the parents only, and by asking the adolescents to bring a peer to one of the meetings. Adolescents and their parents were positive about the program. Adolescents felt they were more in control of their pain and parents valued the support they experienced in helping their children to master the pain. The training was considered to be feasible in daily life. Further, the preliminary data showed an effect on pain and quality of life in the expected direction. The results underline the need for a definitive study with a larger sample size and a random controlled design. PMID:16257616

  17. Bridging the chronic care gap: HealthOne Mt Druitt, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin McNab

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available HealthOne was part of a state-wide initiative to invest in new community-based facilities for collocating services. The HealthOne Mount Druitt is a virtual hub and spoke organisation established in 2006 in a socially disadvantaged part of Western Sydney based out of a new community health hub. The model is based on ‘virtual’ care planning and aims to improve coordination of care for older people with complex health needs, reduce unnecessary hospitalisations and ensure appropriate referral to community and specialist health services. General practitioner liaison nurses (GPLNs work closely with clients as well as general practitioners (GPs and other health care providers. Primary health care providers reported improved communication and coordination of services, and there have been lower levels of utilisation of the emergency department (ED for patients following enrolment in the programme. HealthOne provides an example of how a virtual organisation together with highly skilled care coordinators can overcome some of the barriers to providing integrated care created by fragmented funding streams and care delivery systems.

  18. Bridging the chronic care gap: HealthOne Mt Druitt, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, Justin; Gillespie, James A

    2015-01-01

    HealthOne was part of a state-wide initiative to invest in new community-based facilities for collocating services. The HealthOne Mount Druitt is a virtual hub and spoke organisation established in 2006 in a socially disadvantaged part of Western Sydney based out of a new community health hub. The model is based on 'virtual' care planning and aims to improve coordination of care for older people with complex health needs, reduce unnecessary hospitalisations and ensure appropriate referral to community and specialist health services. General practitioner liaison nurses (GPLNs) work closely with clients as well as general practitioners (GPs) and other health care providers. Primary health care providers reported improved communication and coordination of services, and there have been lower levels of utilisation of the emergency department (ED) for patients following enrolment in the programme. HealthOne provides an example of how a virtual organisation together with highly skilled care coordinators can overcome some of the barriers to providing integrated care created by fragmented funding streams and care delivery systems. PMID:26417210

  19. Palau assessment for a continuing health care professional development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tai-Ho; Dever, Gregory; Kuartei, Stevenson; Maskarinec, Gregory G

    2007-03-01

    In 2003, the University of Hawai'i Department of Family Medicine and Community Health entered a 4-year cooperative agreement with the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration to establish the "Pacific Association for Clinical Training" (PACT). PACT's goal is to develop effective distance education methods to improve the education and skills of health care professionals in the U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Island nations. To determine the situation existing in 2004, one of PACT's first projects was to perform site visits to each jurisdiction, conducting needs assessments through interviews with key health care professionals, hospital administrators and government officials. This article highlights findings of PACT's Palau assessment. Meant to establish a baseline for future reference, all data were collected in 2004-2005 and have not been updated. PMID:19772140

  20. [Community-based rehabilitation and outpatient care for patients with acquired brain injury and chronic neurological disability in Germany: continuing support for social participation and re-integration in the neurological care system?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, P; Hendrich, A; Kringler, W; Vespo, E

    2012-12-01

    In Germany a number of patients who are suffering from acquired brain injury and chronic neurological disability are either undersupplied or exposed to inappropriate care in their social environment. The number of these patients is increasing due to the changes in the procedures of care and due to demographic factors. While acute medical care and early rehabilitative treatment is accessible throughout the German health care system the necessary multimodal and competent care is rare or absent in the social participative sites such as life and occupational environments of the patients. The complex impairment of the brain, the central organ for sensorial, executive and other cognitive functions of human beings, renders the affected patient an exception in the system of medical and social care - this has only inadequately been considered in the past. The authors explain the necessity to disclose the status of a "human-with acquired-brain damage (Mensch-mit-erworbener-Hirnschädigung, MeH)" explicitly as severely disabled. The paper recommends a number of structural and procedural elements that have proven to overcome the insufficient or inappropriate support in integrating the patients suffering from acquired brain injury and chronic neurological disability in their social environment as well as for a demand-focused support with sustainable rehabilitative and ambulant follow-up procedures. Comparisons with other developed health care systems and international guidelines show that with organizing of early-supported-discharge, community-ambulation, shared-care and community-based-rehabilitation these problems have long since been identified elsewhere. Community-based and resident-oriented concepts have already been systematically implemented. In order to achieve the necessary support for the individual patient, a nation-wide development is necessary in Germany to perform the principles of the German social code and the principles of the Convention on the Rights of

  1. Study protocol of EMPOWER Participatory Action Research (EMPOWER-PAR): a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial of multifaceted chronic disease management strategies to improve diabetes and hypertension outcomes in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Ramli, Anis S; Lakshmanan, Sharmila; Haniff, Jamaiyah; Selvarajah, Sharmini; Tong, Seng F; Bujang, Mohamad-Adam; Abdul-Razak, Suraya; Shafie, Asrul A.; Lee, Verna KM; Abdul-Rahman, Thuhairah H; Daud, Maryam H; Ng, Kien K; Ariffin, Farnaza; Abdul-Hamid, Hasidah; Mazapuspavina, Md-Yasin

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic disease management presents enormous challenges to the primary care workforce because of the rising epidemic of cardiovascular risk factors. The chronic care model was proven effective in improving chronic disease outcomes in developed countries, but there is little evidence of its effectiveness in developing countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the EMPOWER-PAR intervention (multifaceted chronic disease management strategies based on the chr...

  2. The History of the Animal Care Program at NASA Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan-Mayberry, Noreen; Bassett, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Animal Care Program (ACP). Animals have been used early in space exploration to ascertain if it were possible to launch a manned spacecraft. The program is currently involved in many studies that assist in enhancing the scientific knowledge of the effect of space travel. The responsibilities of the ACP are: (1) Organize and supervise animal care operations & activities (research, testing & demonstration). (2) Maintain full accreditation by the International Association for the Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care (AAALAC) (3) Ensure protocol compliance with IACUC recommendations (4) Training astronauts for in-flight animal experiments (5) Maintain accurate & timely records for all animal research testing approved by JSC IACUC (6) Organize IACUC meetings and assist IACUC members (7) Coordinate IACUC review of the Institutional Program for Humane Care and Use of Animals (every 6 mos)

  3. Implementing a Palliative Care Nurse Leadership Fellowship Program in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Julia; Leng, Mhoira; Grant, Liz

    2016-05-01

    Global oncology and palliative care needs are increasing faster than the available capacity to meet these needs. This is particularly marked in sub-Saharan Africa, where healthcare capacity and systems are limited and resources are stretched. Uganda, a country of 35.6 million people in eastern Africa, faces the challenges of a high burden of communicable disease and a rising number of cases of non-communicable disease, including cancer. The vast majority of patients in Uganda are diagnosed with cancer too late for curative treatment to be an option because of factors like poor access to healthcare facilities, a lack of health education, poverty, and delays resulting from seeking local herbal or other traditional remedies. This article describes an innovative model of nurse leadership training in Uganda to improve the delivery of palliative care. The authors believe this model can be applicable to other low- and middle-income countries, where health resources are constrained and care needs are great.
. PMID:27105201

  4. 76 FR 67801 - Medicare Program; Medicare Shared Savings Program: Accountable Care Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... All Inclusive Care for the Elderly PACFs Post-Acute Care Facilities PCMH Patient Centered Medical Home... Condition Category HCPCS Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System HHAs Home Health Agencies HICN Health... within section 3022 of the Affordable Care Act is in section I.B. of the proposed rule (see 76 FR...

  5. Cardiovascular Disease in Chronic Kidney Disease: Data from the Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP)

    OpenAIRE

    McCullough, Peter A.; Steigerwalt, Susan; Tolia, Kirit; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Li, Suying; Norris, Keith C.; Whaley-Connell, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN) are leading joint risk factors for both cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the nationwide KEEP (Kidney Early Evaluation Program) an estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or a urine albumin:creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g (3.4 mg/mmol) defines CKD. Overall in KEEP, the rates of identified CKD and self-reported CVD are 25.7% and 22.1%, respectively. The presence of CKD has been associated with youn...

  6. SCI Hospital in Home Program: Bringing Hospital Care Home for Veterans With Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaris, Linda L; Onyebueke, Mirian; Liebman, Janet; Martin, Allyson

    2016-01-01

    The complex nature of spinal cord injury (SCI) and the level of care required for health maintenance frequently result in repeated hospital admissions for recurrent medical complications. Prolonged hospitalizations of persons with SCI have been linked to the increased risk of hospital-acquired infections and development or worsening pressure ulcers. An evidence-based alternative for providing hospital-level care to patients with specific diagnoses who are willing to receive that level of care in the comfort of their home is being implemented in a Department of Veterans Affairs SCI Home Care Program. The SCI Hospital in Home (HiH) model is similar to a patient-centered interdisciplinary care model that was first introduced in Europe and later tested as part of a National Demonstration and Evaluation Study through Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and School of Public Health. This was funded by the John A. Hartford Foundation and the Department of Veterans Affairs. The objectives of the program are to support veterans' choice and access to patient-centered care, reduce the reliance on inpatient medical care, allow for early discharge, and decrease medical costs. Veterans with SCI who are admitted to the HiH program receive daily oversight by a physician, daily visits by a registered nurse, access to laboratory services, oxygen, intravenous medications, and nursing care in the home setting. In this model, patients may typically access HiH services either as an "early discharge" from the hospital or as a direct admit to the program from the emergency department or SCI clinic. Similar programs providing acute hospital-equivalent care in the home have been previously implemented and are successfully demonstrating decreased length of stay, improved patient access, and increased patient satisfaction. PMID:26938182

  7. Advance Care Planning: Medical Issues to Consider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer or end stage chronic illness accompanied by anorexia (lack of appetite) and cachexia (muscles wasting away ... care and administrative program support. Share this: Twitter Facebook Google Search for: Choosing a Hospice: 16 Questions ...

  8. Hypertensive chronic kidney disease in African Americans: Strategies for improving care

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, David; Agodoa, Lawrence; Norris, Keith C.

    2012-01-01

    African Americans have a disproportionate burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD), which tends to have an earlier onset and a more rapid progression in this population. Many of the factors responsible for the rapid progression of CKD in African Americans are detectable by screening and are modifiable with prompt therapy.

  9. Depression and Chronic Diseases: It Is Time for a Synergistic Mental Health and Primary Care Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Voinov, Boris; Richie, William D.; Bailey, Rahn K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify the growing significance of depression as a global leading cause of years lost to disability and its role as a major independent risk factor in many chronic illnesses. The distinct effects of depression on morbidity and mortality in cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and stroke are investigated, including behavioral factors and plausible biological mechanisms (psychoneuroimmunology of depression).

  10. Catastrophic Health Care Expenditure among Older People with Chronic Diseases in 15 European Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenijevic, Jelena; Pavlova, Milena; Rechel, Bernd; Groot, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is well-known that the prevalence of chronic diseases is high among older people, especially those who are poor. Moreover, chronic diseases can result in catastrophic health expenditure. The relationship between chronic diseases and their financial burden on households is thus double-sided, as financial difficulties can give rise to, and result from, chronic diseases. Our aim was to examine the levels of catastrophic health expenditure imposed by private out-of-pocket payments among older people diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases and cancer in 15 European countries. Methods The SHARE dataset for individuals aged 50+ and their households, collected in 2010–2012 was used. The total number of participants included in this study was N = 51,661. The sample consisted of 43.8% male and 56.2% female participants. The average age was 67 years. We applied an instrumental variable approach for binary instrumented variables known as a treatment-effect model. Results We found that being diagnosed with diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases was associated with catastrophic health expenditure among older people even in comparatively wealthy countries with developed risk-pooling mechanisms. When compared to the Netherlands (the country with the lowest share of out-of-pocket payments as a percentage of total health expenditure in our study), older people diagnosed with diabetes mellitus in Portugal, Poland, Denmark, Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, the Czech Republic and Hungary were more likely to experience catastrophic health expenditure. Similar results were observed for diagnosed cardiovascular diseases. In contrast, cancer was not associated with catastrophic health expenditure. Discussion Our study shows that older people with diagnosed chronic diseases face catastrophic health expenditure even in some of the wealthiest countries in Europe. The effect differs across chronic diseases and countries. This may be due to different socio

  11. A new "loyalty rewards" program in health care customer relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macstravic, Scott

    2006-01-01

    "Loyalty rewards" in sponsored DM and HRM programs can apply to both providers and consumers. Physicians and hospitals can be paid to "loyally" adhere to payers' guidelines for managing diseases and risks. Many payer and their outsourced vendor programs include significant efforts to create collaborations between payer and provider, rather than relying on unilateral efforts. And growing numbers are rewarding providers for their efforts and results achieved. PMID:17590970

  12. Revisiting the concept of ‘chronic disease’ from the perspective of the episode of care model. Does the ratio of incidence to prevalence rate help us to define a problem as chronic?

    OpenAIRE

    Soler, Jean K; Inge Okkes; Sibo Oskam; Kes van Boven; Predag Zivotic; Milan Jevtic; Frank Dobbs; Henk Lamberts

    2013-01-01

    Background This is a study of the epidemiology of acute and chronic episodes of care (EoCs) in the Transition Project in three countries. We studied the duration of EoCs for acute and chronic health problems and the relationship of incidence to prevalence rates for these EoCs.Method The Transition Project databases collect data on all elements of the doctor–patient encounter in family medicine. Family doctors code these elements using the International Classification of Primary Care.We used t...

  13. The impacts of a health belief model-based educational program on adopting self-care behaviors in pemphigus vulgaris patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Roya; Tol, Azar; Moradi, Azita; Baikpour, Masoud; Hossaini, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Since pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a chronic disease and regarding its autoimmune nature, patients need to adopt self-care behaviors. This study aimed to assess the impacts of an educational program based on health belief model (HBM) on adopting self-care behaviors among patients with PV referred to Razi Hospital. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight patients with PV were randomized in an educational intervention study in two groups in 2013–2014. The intervention group attended a 6 months self-care educational program in a specialized outpatient clinic, in addition to the regular care presented for both groups. To collect information about demographic characteristics, PV-related variables, and HBM constructs items, a self-designed questionnaire was used. Data were analyzed by SPSS 20. A P educational program as a tertiary preventive measure on adopting self-care behaviors in patients that can help them achieve self-efficacy in controlling their disease and enhancing their treatment process.

  14. 78 FR 38679 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... Program. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2013-10234 of May 10, 2013 (78 FR 27486... errors. ] III. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2013-10234 of May 10, 2013 (78 FR 27486), make the...-AR53 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

  15. Teaching the Spiritual Dimension of Nursing Care: A Survey of U.S. Baccalaureate Nursing Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmer, Corinne

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 132 baccalaureate nursing programs indicated that the majority include spiritual dimensions in program philosophy and curriculum, but few had definitions of spirituality and nursing care. Content typically addressed patients' spiritual needs, dying, and holism. Respondents were uncertain about faculty preparation to teach about…

  16. 77 FR 45421 - Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing: Continuum of Care Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... prevention. The rule further clarifies how the following activities are considered eligible costs under the... separate homeless assistance programs administered by HUD under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act... Continuum of Care, how to apply for funds under the program, and how to use the funds for projects...

  17. Results of a multidisciplinary program for patients with fibromyalgia implemented in the primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Bloten, H.; Oeseburg, B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. Fibromyalgia is a syndrome of unknown origin with a high prevalence. Multimodal approaches seem to be the treatment of choice in fibromyalgia. A multidisciplinary program was developed and implemented for patients with fibromyalgia in the primary care setting. The program included education

  18. Recruitment & Selection of Staff: A Guide for Managers of Preschool & Child Care Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    Intended for managers of child care programs, this brochure lists the basic components of a clearly defined personnel policy. The guide is based on the personnel practices and experiences of more than 1,200 Head Start programs serving over 442,000 children nationwide. Emphasis is given to staff recruitment, screening, and the selection process.…

  19. Managing severe burn injuries: challenges and solutions in complex and chronic wound care

    OpenAIRE

    Jeschke, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Alan D Rogers, Marc G Jeschke Ross Tilley Burn Centre, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Encountered regularly by health care providers across both medical and surgical fields and an increasing socioeconomic burden globally, wound care is severely neglected. Practice is heavily influenced by anecdote rather than evidence-based protocols and industry-biased lite...

  20. Managing severe burn injuries: challenges and solutions in complex and chronic wound care

    OpenAIRE

    AD Rogers; MG, Jeschke

    2016-01-01

    Alan D Rogers, Marc G Jeschke Ross Tilley Burn Centre, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Encountered regularly by health care providers across both medical and surgical fields and an increasing socioeconomic burden globally, wound care is severely neglected. Practice is heavily influenced by anecdote rather than evidence-based protocols and industry-biased literatu...

  1. Quality Adjustment for Health Care Spending on Chronic Disease: Evidence from Diabetes Treatment, 1999-2009

    OpenAIRE

    Eggleston, Karen N.; Shah, Nilay D.; Smith, Steven A; Berndt, Ernst R.; Newhouse, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    Although US health care expenditures reached 17.6 percent of GDP in 2009, quality measurement in this important service sector remains limited. Studying quality changes associated with 11 years of health care for patients with diabetes, we find that the value of reduced mortality and avoided treatment spending, net of the increase in annual spending, was $9,094 for the average patient. These results suggest that the unit cost of diabetes treatment, adjusting for the value of health outcomes, ...

  2. Self Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Connections Experiences Research Learning Evaluation Print Email Self Care If you are living with a chronic ... help you cope can make a real difference. Self-care techniques are things you can do for ...

  3. Cost-effectiveness of counselling, graded-exercise and usual care for chronic fatigue: evidence from a randomised trial in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabes-Figuera Ramon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatigue is common and has been shown to result in high economic costs to society. The aim of this study is to compare the cost-effectiveness of two active therapies, graded-exercise (GET and counselling (COUN with usual care plus a self-help booklet (BUC for people presenting with chronic fatigue. Methods A randomised controlled trial was conducted with participants consulting for fatigue of over three months’ duration recruited from 31 general practices in South East England and allocated to one of three arms. Outcomes and use of services were assessed at 6-month follow-up. The main outcome measure used in the economic evaluation was clinically significant improvements in fatigue, measured using the Chalder fatigue scale. Cost-effectiveness was assessed using the net-benefit approach and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Results Full economic and outcome data at six months were available for 163 participants; GET = 51, COUN = 58 and BUC = 54. Those receiving the active therapies (GET and COUN had more contacts with care professionals and therefore higher costs, these differences being statistically significant. COUN was more expensive and less effective than the other two therapies. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of GET compared to BUC was equal to £987 per unit of clinically significant improvement. However, there was much uncertainty around this result. Conclusion This study does not provide a clear recommendation about which therapeutic option to adopt, based on efficiency, for patients with chronic fatigue. It suggests that COUN is not cost-effective, but it is unclear whether GET represents value for money compared to BUC. Clinical Trial Registration number at ISRCTN register: 72136156

  4. Online support program for parents of children with a chronic kidney disease using intervention mapping: a development and evaluation protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geense, W.W.; van Gaal, B.G.I.; Knoll, J.L.; Cornelissen, E.A.M.; Schoonhoven, L.; Kok, G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The care for children with a chronic kidney disease (CKD) is complex. Parents of these children may experience high levels of stress in managing their child's disease, potentially leading to negative effects on their child's health outcomes. Although the experienced problems are well kno

  5. A global framework for action to improve the primary care response to chronic non-communicable diseases: a solution to a neglected problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachariah Rony

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although in developing countries the burden of morbidity and mortality due to infectious diseases has often overshadowed that due to chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs, there is evidence now of a shift of attention to NCDs. Discussion Decreasing the chronic NCD burden requires a two-pronged approach: implementation of the multisectoral policies aimed at decreasing population-level risks for NCDs, and effective and affordable delivery of primary care interventions for patients with chronic NCDs. The primary care response to common NCDs is often unstructured and inadequate. We therefore propose a programmatic, standardized approach to the delivery of primary care interventions for patients with NCDs, with a focus on hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronic airflow obstruction, and obesity. The benefits of this approach will extend to patients with related conditions, e.g. those with chronic kidney disease caused by hypertension or diabetes. This framework for a "public health approach" is informed by experience of scaling up interventions for chronic infectious diseases (tuberculosis and HIV. The lessons learned from progress in rolling out these interventions include the importance of gaining political commitment, developing a robust strategy, delivering standardised interventions, and ensuring rigorous monitoring and evaluation of progress towards defined targets. The goal of the framework is to reduce the burden of morbidity, disability and premature mortality related to NCDs through a primary care strategy which has three elements: 1 identify and address modifiable risk factors, 2 screen for common NCDs and 3 and diagnose, treat and follow-up patients with common NCDs using standard protocols. The proposed framework for NCDs borrows the same elements as those developed for tuberculosis control, comprising a goal, strategy and targets for NCD control, a package of interventions for quality care, key operations for

  6. ASSESSMENT OF LIFESTYLE-RELATED RISK FACTORS CONTRIBUTING FOR CHRONIC NON COMMUNICABLE DISEASE IN PATIENTS VISITING RURAL TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahal Prasanna

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Non-communicable diseases remain an area of high public health concern especially in developing countries where growing middle class and ever changing lifestyle have led to the rapid increase in the burden of non-communicable disease. The study aimed to assess various lifestyle and behavioral risk factors contributing for non-communicable chronic disease in patients visiting rural tertiary care hospital. A total of 152 patients were selected and analyzed in the study out of which 49 (32.22% were female and 102 (67.78% were male. The average age of the male patients were found to be 61.79years (SD±9.28 and females were 57.1years (SD±10.3. Majority of patients were from lower socioeconomic and educational status. Various risk factors contributing for chronic non-communicable disease that are identified in the study were advance age i.e. > 40years 142 (93.42%, genetically risk factor 46 (30.26%, poor income status 120 (78.95%, occupational exposure to dust, smoke and irritants 111 (73.03%, high body mass index (BMI75 (49.34%, stress 110 (72.37%, inadequate sleep 5 (3.29%, smoking habit 69 (45.4%, Alcohol consuming habit 63 (41.48%, lack of physical activity 59 (38.81%, rare fruit consuming habit 72 (47.37% and less vegetable consumption i.e. ≤ 1/day were 32 (21.05%. Study concluded that substantially high levels of the various lifestyle and behavioral related risk factors such as poor socioeconomic status, smoking, alcohol consumption, high BMI or obesity, stress etc, were significantly associated in patients with chronic disease.

  7. Readiness to tackle chronicity in Spanish health care organisations: a two-year experience with the Instrumento de Evaluación de Modelos de Atención ante la Cronicidad/Assessment of Readiness for Chronicity in Health Care Organisations instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, José Joaquín; Fernández-Cano, Paloma; Contel, Joan Carlos; Guilabert-Mora, Mercedes; Solas-Gaspar, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The Instrumento de Evaluación de Modelos de Atención ante la Cronicidad/Assessment of Readiness for Chronicity in Health Care Organisations instrument was developed to implement the conceptual framework of the Chronic Care Model in the Spanish national health system. It has been used to assess readiness to tackle chronicity in health care organisations. In this study, we use self-assessments at macro-, meso- and micro-management levels to (a) describe the two-year experience with the Instrumento de Evaluación de Modelos de Atención ante la Cronicidad/Assessment of Readiness for Chronicity in Health Care Organisations tool in Spain and (b) assess the validity and reliability of this instrument. Methods: The results from 55 organisational self-assessments were included and described. In addition to that, the internal consistency, reliability and construct validity of Instrumento de Evaluación de Modelos de Atención ante la Cronicidad/Assessment of Readiness for Chronicity in Health Care Organisations were examined using Cronbach's alpha, the Spearman–Brown coefficient and factorial analysis. Results: The obtained scores reflect opportunities for improvement in all dimensions of the instrument. Cronbach's alpha ranged between 0.90 and 0.95 and the Spearman–Brown coefficient ranged between 0.77 and 0.94. All 27 components converged in a second-order factorial solution that explained 53.8% of the total variance, with factorial saturations for the components of between 0.57 and 0.94. Conclusions: Instrumento de Evaluación de Modelos de Atención ante la Cronicidad/Assessment of Readiness for Chronicity in Health Care Organisations is an instrument that allows health care organisations to perform self-assessments regarding their readiness to tackle chronicity and to identify areas for improvement in chronic care.

  8. [Hygienic aspects with regard to nursing of home care patients with AIDS, chronic diseases and mental handicaps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, H G; Flassak, H; Throm, W

    1995-04-01

    A human handicap is defined as a broad, hard and long lasting restriction of the mental development and the social integration. Groups of handicapped persons can be divided into mentally, psychologically, physically, sensory (blind, deaf) handicapped as well as into multiple disabled and chronically sick persons and those in need of care (old). New groups with demands for aid are among others people suffering from AIDS, psychologically sick (old) and people getting old as well as mentally, physically und multiple handicapped persons, people suffering from cancer, severely ill and dying people. For all handicapped people should be demanded the possibility of living almost normal lives. For all persons directly concerned as well as their families such a normal life should include: the right of self-determination and autonomy, the demand for complex styles of living and nearby care/support, the providing of respective infrastructures such as barrier free living and access to public institutions, access to public transport and homes fitting for handicapped persons, the demand for out-patient treatment by a complex range of various possibilities of support and finally, the providing of alternative forms of living in contrast to the traditional way of life of handicapped people like families or homes. Three important living areas can be derived from these ideas, namely: living conditions, education/professional and working field, social life/social environment. These important living areas require preventive measures, mainly advice and information centres, places to go early recognition and early promotion of handicapped people and those in risk of a handicap (especially children) as well as medical, professional and social rehabilitation or integration. Concerning the spectrum of support, aid and care in the homely area up to now already exists a variety of offers by out-patient services (information services, social units, mobile support services

  9. Health Care Use and Costs for Participants in a Diabetes Disease Management Program, United States, 2007-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy M. Dall, MS

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe Disease Management Association of America identifies diabetes as one of the chronic conditions with the greatest potential for management. TRICARE Management Activity, which administers health care benefits for US military service personnel, retirees, and their dependents, created a disease management program for beneficiaries with diabetes. The objective of this study was to determine whether participation intensity and prior indication of uncontrolled diabetes were associated with health care use and costs for participants enrolled in TRICARE’s diabetes management program.MethodsThis ongoing, opt-out study used a quasi-experimental approach to assess program impact for beneficiaries (n = 37,370 aged 18 to 64 living in the United States. Inclusion criteria were any diabetes-related emergency department visits or hospitalizations, more than 10 diabetes-related ambulatory visits, or more than twenty 30-day prescriptions for diabetes drugs in the previous year. Beginning in June 2007, all participants received educational mailings. Participants who agreed to receive a baseline telephone assessment and telephone counseling once per month in addition to educational mailings were considered active, and those who did not complete at least the baseline telephone assessment were considered passive. We categorized the diabetes status of each participant as “uncontrolled” or “controlled” on the basis of medical claims containing diagnosis codes for uncontrolled diabetes in the year preceding program eligibility. We compared observed outcomes to outcomes predicted in the absence of diabetes management. Prediction equations were based on regression analysis of medical claims for a historical control group (n = 23,818 that in October 2004 met the eligibility criteria for TRICARE’s program implemented June 2007. We conducted regression analysis comparing historical control group patient outcomes after October 2004 with these

  10. Primary care physicians’ perspectives on computer-based health risk assessment tools for chronic diseases: a mixed methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teja Voruganti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Health risk assessment tools compute an individual’s risk of developing a disease. Routine use of such tools by primary care physicians (PCPs is potentially useful in chronic disease prevention. We sought physicians’ awareness and perceptions of the usefulness, usability and feasibility of performing assessments with computer-based risk assessment tools in primary care settings.Methods Focus groups and usability testing with a computer-based risk assessment tool were conducted with PCPs from both university-affiliated and community-based practices. Analysis was derived from grounded theory methodology.Results PCPs (n = 30 were aware of several risk assessment tools although only select tools were used routinely. The decision to use a tool depended on how use impacted practice workflow and whether the tool had credibility. Participants felt that embedding tools in the electronic medical records (EMRs system might allow for health information from the medical record to auto-populate into the tool. User comprehension of risk could also be improved with computer-based interfaces that present risk in different formats.Conclusions In this study, PCPs chose to use certain tools more regularly because of usability and credibility. Despite there being differences in the particular tools a clinical practice used, there was general appreciation for the usefulness of tools for different clinical situations. Participants characterised particular features of an ideal tool, feeling strongly that embedding risk assessment tools in the EMR would maximise accessibility and use of the tool for chronic disease management. However, appropriate practice workflow integration and features that facilitate patient understanding at point-of-care are also essential. 

  11. Case management for patients with chronic systolic heart failure in primary care: The HICMan exploratory randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunz Cornelia U

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic (systolic heart failure (CHF represents a clinical syndrome with high individual and societal burden of disease. Multifaceted interventions like case management are seen as promising ways of improving patient outcomes, but lack a robust evidence base, especially for primary care. The aim of the study was to explore the effectiveness of a new model of CHF case management conducted by doctors' assistants (DAs, equivalent to a nursing role and supported by general practitioners (GPs. Methods This patient-randomised controlled trial (phase II included 31 DAs and employing GPs from 29 small office-based practices in Germany. Patients with CHF received either case management (n = 99 consisting of telephone monitoring and home visits or usual care (n = 100 for 12 months. We obtained clinical data, health care utilisation data, and patient-reported data on generic and disease-specific quality of life (QoL, SF-36 and KCCQ, CHF self-care (EHFScBS and on quality of care (PACIC-5A. To compare between groups at follow-up, we performed analyses of covariance and logistic regression models. Results Baseline measurement showed high guideline adherence to evidence-based pharmacotherapy and good patient self-care: Patients received angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (or angiotensin-2 receptor antagonists in 93.8% and 95%, and betablockers in 72.2% and 84%, and received both in combination in 68% and 80% of cases respectively. EHFScBS scores (SD were 25.4 (8.4 and 25.0 (7.1. KCCQ overall summary scores (SD were 65.4 (22.6 and 64.7 (22.7. We found low hospital admission and mortality rates. EHFScBS scores (-3.6 [-5.7;-1.6] and PACIC and 5A scores (both 0.5, [0.3;0.7/0.8] improved in favour of CM but QoL scores showed no significant group differences (Physical/Mental SF-36 summary scores/KCCQ-os [95%CI]: -0.3 [-3.0;2.5]/-0.1 [-3.4;3.1]/1.7 [-3.0;6.4]. Conclusions In this sample, with little room for improvement regarding evidence

  12. External Validation of a Referral Rule for Axial Spondyloarthritis in Primary Care Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lonneke van Hoeven

    Full Text Available To validate and optimize a referral rule to identify primary care patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP suspected for axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA.Cross-sectional study with data from 19 Dutch primary care practices for development and 38 for validation.Primary care patients aged 18-45 years with CLBP existing more than three months and onset of back pain started before the age of 45 years.The number of axSpA patients according to the ASAS criteria.The referral rule (CaFaSpA referral rule was developed using 364 CLBP patients from 19 primary care practices and contains four easy to use variables; inflammatory back pain, good response to nonsteriodal anti-inflammatory drugs, family history of spondyloarthritis and a back pain duration longer than five years. This referral rule is positive when at least two variables are present. Validation of the CaFaSpA rule was accomplished in 579 primary care CLBP patients from 38 practices from other areas. Performance of the referral rule was assessed by c-statistic and calibration plot. To fit the final referral rule the development and validation datasets were pooled leading to a total study population of 943 primary care participants.The referral rule was validated in 579 patients (41% male, mean age 36 (sd7.0. The percentage of identified axSpA patients was 16% (n=95. External validation resulted in satisfactory calibration and reasonable discriminative ability (c-statistics 0.70 [95% CI, 0.64-0.75]. In the pooled dataset sensitivity and specificity of the referral rule were 75% and 58%.The CaFaSpA referral rule for axSpA consists of four easy to use predictors for primary care physicians and has a good predictive value in this validation study. The referral rule has the potential to be a screening tool for primary care by identifying CLBP patients suspected for axSpA.

  13. The gap between policy and practice: a systematic review of patient-centred care interventions in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, P M; Murtagh, F E M; Ryan, K; Mahon, N G; McAdam, B; McQuillan, R; Ellis-Smith, C; Tracey, C; Howley, C; Raleigh, C; O'Gara, G; Higginson, I J; Daveson, B A

    2015-11-01

    Patient-centred care (PCC) is recommended in policy documents for chronic heart failure (CHF) service provision, yet it lacks an agreed definition. A systematic review was conducted to identify PCC interventions in CHF and to describe the PCC domains and outcomes. Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ASSIA, the Cochrane database, clinicaltrials.gov, key journals and citations were searched for original studies on patients with CHF staged II-IV using the New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification. Included interventions actively supported patients to play informed, active roles in decision-making about their goals of care. Search terms included 'patient-centred care', 'quality of life' and 'shared decision making'. Of 13,944 screened citations, 15 articles regarding 10 studies were included involving 2540 CHF patients. Three studies were randomised controlled trials, and seven were non-randomised studies. PCC interventions focused on collaborative goal setting between patients and healthcare professionals regarding immediate clinical choices and future care. Core domains included healthcare professional-patient collaboration, identification of patient preferences, patient-identified goals and patient motivation. While the strength of evidence is poor, PCC has been shown to reduce symptom burden, improve health-related quality of life, reduce readmission rates and enhance patient engagement for patients with CHF. There is a small but growing body of evidence, which demonstrates the benefits of a PCC approach to care for CHF patients. Research is needed to identify the key components of effective PCC interventions before being able to deliver on policy recommendations. PMID:26435042

  14. Community health centers and primary care access and quality for chronically-ill patients – a case-comparison study of urban Guangdong Province, China

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Leiyu; Lee, De-Chih; Liang, Hailun; Zhang, Luwen; Makinen, Marty; Blanchet, Nathan; Kidane, Ruth; Lindelow, Magnus; Wang, Hong; Wu, Shaolong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Reform of the health care system in urban areas of China has prompted concerns about the utilization of Community Health Centers (CHC). This study examined which of the dominant primary care delivery models, i.e., the public CHC model, the ‘gate-keeper’ CHC model, or the hospital-owned CHC models, was most effective in enhancing access to and quality of care for patients with chronic illness. Methods The case-comparison design was used to study nine health care organizations in Guan...

  15. Developing a Comprehensive Animal Care Occupational Health and Safety Program at a Land-Grant Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodly, Lyndon J; Jarrell, Vickie L; Miller, Monica A; Banks, Maureen C; Anderson, Thomas J; Branson, Katherine A; Woodward, Robert T; Peper, Randall L; Myers, Sara J

    2016-01-01

    The Public Health Service Policy on the Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals and sound ethical practices require institutions to provide safe working environments for personnel working with animals; this mandate is achieved in part by establishing an effective animal care Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP). Land-grant institutions often face unique organizational challenges in fulfilling this requirement. For example, responsibilities for providing health and safety programs often have historically been dispersed among many different divisions scattered around the campus. Here we describe how our institutional management personnel overcame organizational structure and cultural obstacles during the formation of a comprehensive campus-wide animal care OHSP. Steps toward establishing the animal care OHSP included assigning overall responsibility, identifying all stakeholders, creating a leadership group, and hiring a fulltime Animal Care OHSP Specialist. A web-based portal was developed, implemented, and refined over the past 7 y and reflected the unique organizational structures of the university and the needs of our research community. Through this web-based portal, hazards are identified, risks are assessed, and training is provided. The animal care OHSP now provides easy mandatory enrollment, supports timely feedback regarding hazards, and affords enrollees the opportunity to participate in voluntary medical surveillance. The future direction and development of the animal care OHSP will be based on the research trends of campus, identification of emerging health and safety hazards, and ongoing evaluation and refinement of the program. PMID:26817980

  16. Use of pedometer and Internet-mediated walking program in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn L. Moy, MD, MSc

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated an Internet-mediated, pedometer-based program to promote walking in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. First, we assessed the accuracy of the Omron HJ-720ITC pedometer (OMRON Healthcare, Inc; Bannockburn, Illinois in 51 persons with COPD. The Bland-Altman plot showed a median difference of 3 steps (5th and 95th quintiles, -8.0 and 145.0, respectively. We calculated percent difference = ([manual - Omron step counts]/manual step counts × 100. Variability in percent difference occurred at the lowest usual walking speeds. At speeds 80% of the manual step counts in 20 of the 23 persons with walking speed 0.94 m/s. Accuracy is more variable at lower speeds, but the Omron captures more than 80% of manual step counts in most persons. In this preliminary study, an Internet-mediated walking program using the Omron significantly increased step counts in COPD.

  17. Pharmacist Web-Based Training Program on Medication Use in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: Impact on Knowledge, Skills, and Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legris, Marie-eve; Seguin, Noemie Charbonneau; Desforges, Katherine; Sauve, Patricia; Lord, Anne; Bell, Robert; Berbiche, Djamal; Desrochers, Jean-Francois; Lemieux, Jean-Philippe; Morin-Belanger, Claudia; Paradis, Francois Ste-Marie; Lalonde, Lyne

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are multimorbid elderly at high risk of drug-related problems. A Web-based training program was developed based on a list of significant drug-related problems in CKD patients requiring a pharmaceutical intervention. The objectives were to evaluate the impact of the program on community…

  18. Using data from patient interactions in primary care for population level chronic disease surveillance: The Sentinel Practices Data Sourcing (SPDS) project

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Abhijeet; Charlton, Karen E.; Girdo, Lisa; Batterham, Marijka

    2014-01-01

    Background Population health planning within a health district requires current information on health profiles of the target population. Information obtained during primary care interactions may provide a valuable surveillance system for chronic disease burden. The Sentinel Practices Data Sourcing project aimed to establish a sentinel site surveillance system to obtain a region-specific estimate of the prevalence of chronic diseases and mental health disorders within the Illawarra-Shoalhaven ...

  19. Health-Based Capitation Risk Adjustment in Minnesota Public Health Care Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Gifford, Gregory A.; Edwards, Kevan R.; Knutson, David J.

    2004-01-01

    This article documents the history and implementation of health-based capitation risk adjustment in Minnesota public health care programs, and identifies key implementation issues. Capitation payments in these programs are risk adjusted using an historical, health plan risk score, based on concurrent risk assessment. Phased implementation of capitation risk adjustment for these programs began January 1, 2000. Minnesota's experience with capitation risk adjustment suggests that: (1) implementa...

  20. Exercise in clinical cancer care: a call to action and program development description

    OpenAIRE

    Santa Mina, D.; Alibhai, S.M.H.; Matthew, A.G.; Guglietti, C.L.; Steele, J.; Trachtenberg, J; Ritvo, P. G.

    2012-01-01

    A large and convincing body of evidence demonstrates the benefits of exercise for cancer survivors during and after treatment. Based on that literature, more cancer survivors should be offered exercise support and programming. Unfortunately, exercise programs remain an exception rather than the norm in cancer care. Not surprisingly, common barriers to the implementation of exercise programs in oncology include limited resources, expertise, and awareness of benefits on the part of patients and...