WorldWideScience

Sample records for chronic arthritis leads

  1. Retrocalcaneal bursitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenstein-Schainberg, C; Homsi, C; Rodrigues Pereira, R M; Cossermelli, W

    1992-01-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis has been described in various adult rheumatic diseases and septic bursitis unrelated to previous bursal disease has been reported in children. The case is reported here of a girl with juvenile chronic arthritis who developed non-septic retrocalcaneal bursitis; the diagnosis was suggested by a combination of clinical and radiographic studies and was confirmed by ultrasonography. Images PMID:1444631

  2. Orofacial pain, jaw function, and temporomandibular disorders in adult women with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis or persistent juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, M.; Zak, M.; Jensen, B.L.

    2001-01-01

    Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis......Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis...

  3. Chronic arthritis in chikungunya virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Lourdes; Roure, Silvia

    2017-07-24

    Chikungunya virus infection causes arthralgia and arthritis in the acute phase of the disease but, in more than half of the cases, musculoskeletal manifestations can be prolonged over time and, in some cases, become chronic. Although polyarthralgia is the most frequent chronic manifestation, forms with polyarthritis, tenosynovitis and enthesopathy are also common. To analyze the clinical characteristics of patients with persistent articular manifestations after infection with the Chikungunya virus. Report of 3 cases of chronic arthritis after infection with chikungunya virus diagnosed at outpatient care in a university hospital of Catalonia, all of them imported after exposure in areas of epidemic infection between 2013-2015. All three patients had inflammatory joint pain for more than one year after acute disease (3, 2 and 1 years, respectively). In all cases, it appeared as polyarthritis with involvement of small joints of hands and feet (pseudorheumatoid arthritis-like). Laboratory tests showed a slight elevation of acute phase reactants, and analyses for immune markers were negative. Two of the patients required treatment with glucocorticoids and hydroxychloroquine. The course led to slow clinical improvement, but only one of them came to be completely asymptomatic. In the differential diagnosis of chronic polyarthritis, Chikungunya virus disease should also be considered in areas in which it is not endemic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  4. Juvenile chronic arthritis profile in Greek children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracou, C; Constantinidou, N; Constantopoulos, A

    1998-12-01

    Juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) is the commonest autoimmune rheumatic disease in childhood and presents different clinical subtypes. Juvenile chronic arthritis is considered to be of a polygenic nature and its genetic background is still under investigation. The clinical profile of JCA in the Greek population has not been studied completely. This study retrospectively analyzed the clinical and immunological features of JCA in Greek children presented between 1989 and 1994. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-positive or -negative associations in the different clinical subtypes were also detected. The findings of this study were correlated with those reported from other populations. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) anti-ds DNA and anti-extractable nuclear antigen antibodies were estimated by immunofluorescent and ELISA assays. Human leukocyte antigen typing was performed by microlymphocytotoxicity, using immunobeads. The peak ages of JCA onset were between 2 and 5 years and also between 9 and 12 years. There was a high female predominance in pauciarticular and polyarticular groups. The most common disease was pauciarticular (58.7%) followed by systemic (25%) arthritis. The incidence of eye involvement was 12.5% and presented only in the pauciarticular group. Overall, ANA positivity was 53.7%, increasing to 90% in pauciarticular cases associated with chronic uveitis. In the early onset (EOPA) pauciarticular subtype, positive-HLA associations with alleles DR11 and DR8 were shown. In the late onset pauciarticular (LOPA) group only B27 allele was increased. The results of this retrospective study did not reveal major differences between JCA in Greek children compared with other Caucasian series.

  5.  Adiponectin in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, Trine Bay

      Dato 31. januar 2006Title Adiponectin in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritisAuthors:Trine Bay Laurberg,Torkell Ellingsen,Jan Frystyk,Ib Hansen,Anette Jørgensen,Ulrik Tarp,Merete Lund Hetland,Kim Hørslev-Petersen,Nete Hornung,Jørgen Hjelm Poulsen,Allan Flyvbjerg......,Kristian Stengaard-PedersenBackground: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, chronic, autoimmune disease, which affects the joints with inflammation leading to destruction of cartilage and bone. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterised by low level of chronic inflammation, slow...

  6. Chronic lead poisoning in horses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, H.D.; Burau, R.G.

    1973-05-01

    Chronic lead poisoning in horses was manifested as anorexia, loss of body weight, muscular weakness, anemia, laryngeal hemiplegia, and, terminally, inhalation pneumonia. Some deaths were sudden and unexplained. The lead content in liver specimens from 10 horses was greater than that considered indicative of lead intoxication; however, the lead content of blood was equivocal. The most conclusive laboratory finding was increased urine lead concentration after chelation therapy. The concentration of lead in a sample of vegetation considered to be representative of what a horse would eat if he was grazing in the area sampled was 325 ppM (oven-dry basis). It was determined that a 450-kg horse grazing grass of this lead content would consume 2.9 Gm of lead daily (6.4 mg/kg of body weight), an amount considered toxic for horses. Leaching lowered the calcium content of the forage but failed to reduce the lead concentration of the plants significantly, thus opening the possibility that winter rains might have influenced the onset of poisoning. Airborne fallout from a nearby lead smelter was proposed as the primary mode of pasture contamination.

  7. Experience with conservative rehabilitation in patients with juvenile chronic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Shelepina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate a need for conservative rehabilitation treatment in patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA.Material and methods. Data on the principles and procedures of rehabilitation treatment were analyzed in patients with JCA on the basis of 25- year experience. The need for these packages of measures in 1999, 2008, and 2014 was compared. Standard procedures for joints at different sites were described. According to the degree of joint functions, there were rehabilitation treatment packages: corrective, mobilization, and general health-improving.Results and discussion. All patients with juvenile arthritis need rehabilitation (physical, psychological, and social. Comparison of the total number of patients who had received rehabilitation treatment in 1999, 2008, and 2014 showed a small trend towards its reduction. This is due to the smaller number of patients with dysfunctions and to the larger number of those without movement disorders who had received adequate treatment in early periods of the disease. The high percentage of patients having limited joint functions needs a mobilization package. Analysis of the data available in the literature and the authors' experience may lead to the conclusion that all patients with JCA need exercise therapy. The latter is a major procedure for physical rehabilitation and should be included in the standards for adjuvant treatment during basic medical therapy. Emphasis is laid on the importance of the early initiation of treatment to prevent incapacitating deformity at early stages of the disease.

  8. Chronic lead intoxication; Chronische Bleiintoxikation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieseler, B.; Leng, G. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hygiene; Lenz, S.; Schultz, C. [Klinikum Remscheid GmbH, Remscheid (Germany); Wilhelm, M. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hygiene, Sozial- und Umweltmedizin

    1999-02-01

    The case of a female 68 years old patient is described. Here, a chronic lead intoxication was diagnosed after a two year old medical history with increasing attacks of colic-like abdominal pain often described as life-threatening. After repeated hospitalizations and intensive search for the cause of the symptoms, porphyria and anemia was found to be a sign of a chronic lead poisoning. The blood lead concentrations were always about a level of 600 {mu}g/L. The source of exposure could not be found by now. Neither home inspection nor environmental investigations have shown a recent source of lead intake by the patient. However, a possible occupational source of lead exposure at a blast furnace was established by anamnesis for 1952 to 1962. Thus, osteoporosis induced lead mobilisation was suspected. Noticeable are the results of the six abdominal survey radiographies taken during hospitalization within one year; three radiographies were taken following clinical admission and three before discharge of the patient. In comparison, the course shows a chronic relapsing alimentary supply from metallic particles of unknown genesis. The patient was treated with the sodium salt of 2,3-dimercapto-1-propansulfonic acid (DMPS, Dimaval{sup TM}). She was free of complain afterwards. Following therapy, the blood lead concentrations fell under a level of 400 {mu}m/L, but after several weeks the lead level raised up to the original level of 600 {mu}g/L. (orig.) [Deutsch] Es wird eine 68jaehrige Patientin vorgestellt, bei der nach fast zweijaehriger Krankengeschichte, die gekennzeichnet war durch rezidivierende, teils als lebensbedrohlich geschilderte Bauchkoliken, eine chronische Bleiintoxikation diagnostiziert wurde. Erst nach wiederholten stationaeren Krankenhausaufenthalten mit intensiver Suche nach der Krankheitsursache wurden das Krankheitsbild und die Laborwerte durch Zusatzuntersuchungen ergaenzt, so dass sich in der festgestellten Porphyrie und Anaemie die Diagnose der

  9. Juvenile chronic arthritis and coeliac disease in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, EK; HertzbergertenCate, R; vanSuijlekomSmit, LWA; vonBlomberg, BME; Stapel, SO; vanElburg, RM; Mearin, ML

    1996-01-01

    Objective. It has been suggested that juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) is associated with coeliac disease in a frequency of 0.4-2%. In order to investigate the frequency of coeliac disease in cases of JCA and the possibility of underdiagnosis in our area, we screened 62 children with JCA (mean age

  10. Chronic kidney disease in rheumatoid arthritis at Kenyatta National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of chronic kidney disease among patients with rheumatoid arthritis on follow up at the rheumatology outpatient clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital. Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional study. Setting: Rheumatology outpatient clinic at the Kenyatta National Hospital, a public national ...

  11. Towards adoptive cellular therapy of chronic autoimmune arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flierman, Roelof

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a relatively common disease that is characterized by chronic inflammation of joints. The research as described in this thesis focused on the question of whether adoptive cellular therapy is effective in a mouse model of RA. The most generally known type of adoptive

  12. Monoarticular Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namrata; Vogelgesang, Scott A

    2017-05-01

    Monoarticular arthritis is inflammation characterized by joint pain, swelling, and sometimes periarticular erythema. Although chronic causes are seen, the onset is often acute. An infected joint can quickly lead to permanent damage, making it a medical emergency. However, acute gout presenting as monoarticular arthritis is often so uncomfortable it requires urgent attention. Monoarticular crystalline arthritis is common and a septic joint is a medical emergency so it is no surprise that these diagnoses come to mind with complaint of inflammation in 1 joint. However, there are many causes of monoarticular arthritis that clinicians must consider. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Juvenile chronic arthritis and imaging: comparison of different techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cervini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare imaging findings obtained with different techniques in a patient with juvenile chronic arthritis. Methods: The patient was a 12 years-old child with a 7-months history of arthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint of the right foot. The involved area was explored with the following imaging techniques: X-ray, technetium bone scintigraphy, magnetic resonance, gray-scale and power-Doppler ultrasonography. Results: No abnormalities were detected with conventional X-ray. Scintigraphy showed an abnormal uptake of the radionuclide in the first metatarsophalangeal joint of the right foot. Magnetic resonance without contrast revealed clearly evident features of an active process of synovitis. Ultrasonography was able to detect the presence of joint effusion, synovial proliferation, bone erosion of the first metatarsal head. Power-Doppler examination revealed evident signs of soft tissue hyperemia. Conclusions: Comparative assessment of different imaging techniques in this patient with recent-onset juvenile chronic arthritis indicates that high resolution ultrasonography provides the most detailed evaluation of the joint involvement with respect to the other imaging techniques.

  14. Refraction in juvenile chronic arthritis: a long-term follow-up study, with emphasis on myopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fledelius, H; Zak, M; Pedersen, F K

    2001-01-01

    Assessment of refraction anomalies in juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) on a long-term follow-up basis.......Assessment of refraction anomalies in juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) on a long-term follow-up basis....

  15. Does gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA influence the development of chronic inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridges S Louis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have demonstrated a role for spinal p38 MAP kinase (MAPK in the development of chronic inflammation and peripheral arthritis and a role for GABA in the inhibition of p38 MAPK mediated effects. Integrating these data suggests that GABA may play a role in downregulating mechanisms that lead to the production of proinflammatory agents such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and matrix metalloproteinase 3 – agents implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Genetic studies have also associated RA with members of the p38 MAPK pathway. Hypothesis We propose a hypothesis for an inefficient GABA signaling system that results in unchecked proinflammatory cytokine production via the p38 MAPK pathway. This model also supports the need for increasing research in the integration of immunology and neuroscience.

  16. Blood lead levels and chronic blood loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manci, E.A.; Cabaniss, M.L.; Boerth, R.C.; Blackburn, W.R.

    1986-03-01

    Over 90% of lead in blood is bound to the erythrocytes. This high affinity of lead for red cells may mean that chronic blood loss is a significant means for excretion of lead. This study sought correlations between blood lead levels and clinical conditions involving chronic blood loss. During May, June and July, 146 patients with normal hematocrits and red cell indices were identified from the hospital and clinic populations. For each patient, age, race, sex and medical history were noted, and a whole blood sample was analyzed by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Age-and race-matched pairs showed a significant correlation of chronic blood loss with lead levels. Patients with the longest history of blood loss (menstruating women) had the lowest level (mean 6.13 ..mu..g/dl, range 3.6-10.3 ..mu..g/dl). Post-menopausal women had levels (7.29 ..mu..g/dl, 1.2-14 ..mu..g/dl) comparable to men with peptic ulcer disease, or colon carcinoma (7.31 ..mu..g/dl, 5.3-8.6 ..mu..g/dl). The highest levels were among men who had no history of bleeding problems (12.39 ..mu..g/dl, 2.08-39.35 ..mu..g/dl). Chronic blood loss may be a major factor responsible for sexual differences in blood lead levels. Since tissue deposition of environmental pollutants is implicated in diseases, menstruation may represent a survival advantage for women.

  17. Delta sleep instability in children with chronic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Lopes

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the expression of a cyclic alternating pattern (CAP in slow wave sleep (SWS in children with the well-defined chronic syndrome juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Twelve patients (9-17 years of age, 7 girls, with JIA were compared to matched controls by age, pubertal stage and gender. After one night of habituation in the sleep laboratory, sleep measurements were obtained by standard polysomnography with conventional sleep scoring and additional CAP analyses. The sleep parameters of the JIA and control groups were similar for sleep efficiency (91.1 ± 6.7 vs 95.8 ± 4.0, sleep stage in minutes: stage 1 (16.8 ± 8.5 vs 17.8 ± 4.0, stage 2 (251.9 ± 41 vs 262.8 ± 38.1, stage 3 (17.0 ± 6.0 vs 15.1 ± 5.7, stage 4 (61.0 ± 21.7 vs 77.1 ± 20.4, and rapid eye movement sleep (82.0 ± 27.6 vs 99.0 ± 23.9, respectively. JIA patients presented nocturnal disrupted sleep, with an increase in short awakenings, but CAP analyses showed that sleep disruption was present even during SWS, showing an increase in the overall CAP rate (P < 0.01. Overall CAP rate during non-rapid eye movement sleep was significantly higher in pediatric patients who were in chronic pain. This is the first study of CAP in pediatric patients with chronic arthritis showing that CAP analyses can be a powerful tool for the investigation of disturbance of SWS in children, based on sleep EEG visual analysis.

  18. Microbiota and chronic inflammatory arthritis: an interwoven link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamanti, Andrea Picchianti; Manuela Rosado, M; Laganà, Bruno; D'Amelio, Raffaele

    2016-08-04

    Only recently, the scientific community gained insights on the importance of the intestinal resident flora for the host's health and disease. Gut microbiota in fact plays a crucial role in modulating innate and acquired immune responses and thus interferes with the fragile balance inflammation versus tolerance. Correlations between gut bacteria composition and the severity of inflammation have been studied in inflammatory bowel diseases. More recently similar alterations in the gut microbiota have been reported in patients with spondyloarthritis, whereas in rheumatoid arthritis an accumulating body of evidence evokes a pathogenic role for the altered oral microbiota in disease development and course. In the context of dysbiosis it is also important to remember that different environmental factors like stress, smoke and dietary components can induce strong bacterial changes and consequent exposure of the intestinal epithelium to a variety of different metabolites, many of which have an unknown function. In this perspective, and in complex disorders like autoimmune diseases, not only the genetic makeup, sex and immunologic context of the individual but also the structure of his microbial community should be taken into account. Here we provide a review of the role of the microbiota in the onset, severity and progression of chronic inflammatory arthritis as well as its impact on the therapeutic management of these patients. Furthermore we point-out the complex interwoven link between gut-joint-brain and immune system by reviewing the most recent data on the literature on the importance of environmental factors such as diet, smoke and stress.

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid ...

  20. Case report: Chronic arthritis of fetlock joint in the horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toholj Bojan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseases of extremities in horses are the most significant part of the pathology in this species. This paper shows neurectomy as the ultimo ratio in the treatment of chronic arthritis of the fetlock joint in the horse. This disease is characterized by the appearance of exostoses in the area of the fetlock joint which reduces the mobility of the joint and causes pain during movement. The disease was diagnosed in a clinical examination, with a probe of the flexion of the suspected joint, and using diagnostic anesthesia. After data were collected in this way, we opted for neurectomy of the n.palmaris medialis. The operation was performed in general anesthesia. Local anesthesia was also applied as proximal palmar anesthesia. The postoperative course was smooth. Following the withdrawal of the edema and the healing of the wound, the lameness ceased and the usability value of the stallion was restored.

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health- ... Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P.E. Study Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an ...

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine ...

  3. Arthritis mutilans due to chronic tophaceous gout | Akintayo | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Arthritis mutilans is a form of destructive arthritis which is often characterized with severe osteolysis. It is more commonly described in association with the most severe forms of psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis. Case presentation: A 69-year old man presented with a fifteen-year history of recurrent inflammatory ...

  4. Tocilizumab Efficacy in a Patient with Positive Anti-CCP Chronic Lyme Arthritis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hirsch, Julianna; Rosner, Itzhak; Rimar, Doron; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Boulman, Nina; Slobodin, Gleb

    2016-01-01

    .... We present a case of a 48-year-old male, diagnosed with chronic Lyme arthritis, refractory to recurrent and prolonged courses of doxycycline, ceftriaxone, as well as hydroxychloroquine and methotrexate...

  5. Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fast facts: easy-to-read) ¿Qué es la artritis reactiva? Psoriatic Arthritis Overview Questions and Answers about Juvenile Arthritis What Is Juvenile Arthritis? (fast facts, easy-to-read) Esenciales: ¿Qué es la artritis juvenil? Questions and Answers about Ankylosing Spondylitis What ...

  6. Autoimmune priming, tissue attack and chronic inflammation - the three stages of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmdahl, Rikard; Malmström, Vivianne; Burkhardt, Harald

    2014-06-01

    Extensive genome-wide association studies have recently shed some light on the causes of chronic autoimmune diseases and have confirmed a central role of the adaptive immune system. Moreover, better diagnostics using disease-associated autoantibodies have been developed, and treatment has improved through the development of biologicals with precise molecular targets. Here, we use rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as a prototype for chronic autoimmune disease to propose that the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases could be divided into three discrete stages. First, yet unknown environmental challenges seem to activate innate immunity thereby providing an adjuvant signal for the induction of adaptive immune responses that lead to the production of autoantibodies and determine the subsequent disease development. Second, a joint-specific inflammatory reaction occurs. This inflammatory reaction might be clinically diagnosed as the earliest signs of the disease. Third, inflammation is converted to a chronic process leading to tissue destruction and remodeling. In this review, we discuss the stages involved in RA pathogenesis and the experimental approaches, mainly involving animal models that can be used to investigate each disease stage. Although we focus on RA, it is possible that a similar stepwise development of disease also occurs in other chronic autoimmune settings such as multiple sclerosis (MS), type 1 diabetes, and systemic lupus erythematosus. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Local interleukin-12 gene transfer promotes conversion of an acute arthritis to a chronic destructive arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, L.A.B.; Heuvelmans-Jacobs, M.; Lubberts, G.J.H.; Loo, F.A.J. van de; Bakker, A.C.; Helsen, M.M.A.; Richards, C.D.; Berg, W.B. van den

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether local overexpression of interleukin-12 (IL-12), a pleiotropic cytokine that promotes the development of naive T cells into Th1 cells, could aggravate murine streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis, a model of acute arthritis. METHODS: C57BL/6 mice were

  8. Chronic erosive seropositive arthritis in a patient with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L P Ananjeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint syndrome evolution was prospectively followed up in a 49-year-old woman who had serum hepatitis in 1990. When she came to a rheumatologist for the first time in 1999 she complained of occasional joint pain. She did not have joint inflammatory changes at that time but chronic hepatitis С was revealed at the examination. Hepatitis С diagnosis was confirmed by morphological and repeated virological evaluations. During antiviral treatment the pt developed symmetrical polyarthritis involving hand joints. Elevation of cryoglobuline, rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibodies level was revealed. During the next year polyarthritis recurred and later acquired undulatory course with periods of exacerbation and stabilization. Attempts of treatment with sulfasalazine failed due to transaminase elevation. In 2006 ulnar deviation appeared and rheumatoid factor level remained elevated. MRI showed multiple erosions of carpal bones. Considering features of joint syndrome development joint damage in this pt was regarded as arthritis associated with chronic hepatitis C.

  9. Induction of chronic arthritis in rats : the role of intestinal bacteria and bacterial cell wall fragments

    OpenAIRE

    Kool, Jeanette

    1992-01-01

    textabstractRheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, disabling joint disease occurring in about 1% of the population. Women are more often affected than men, and there is a genetic predisposition based on the presence of the HLA-DR4 (Dw4, Dw14, Dwl5) gene or the HLA-DRl gene. Results from investigations in rheumatoid arthritis patients as well as results from experiments in animal models indicate an imponant role for T helper cells in the disease process. The causative agent in rheumatoid arthritis...

  10. Artrite da gota tofácea crônica mimetizando artrite reumatoide Chronic tophaceous gout mimicking rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana F. Sarmento

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A gota é um distúrbio no metabolismo das purinas, usualmente associado à ocorrência de crises recorrentes de artrite nas articulações dos membros inferiores em homens entre 40-50 anos, e com o desenvolvimento de tofos subcutâneos nos pacientes com doença de longa evolução. Casos de pacientes com artrite gotosa crônica que mimetizam quadros de artrite reumatoide e vice-versa são raros. Descrevemos o caso de um paciente de 56 anos, com quadro de artrite poliarticular, simétrica e deformante, comprometendo principalmente as articulações de mãos e punhos, com nódulos subcutâneos difusos pelo corpo, alterações radiográficas atípicas e urolitíase, que, após avaliação clínica e dos exames complementares, recebeu diagnóstico de gota tofácea crônica mutilante mimetizando artrite reumatoide.Gout is a disorder of purine metabolism, usually associated with recurrent bouts of arthritis in the joints of the lower limbs, affecting men 40 to 50 years of age, which leads to the development of subcutaneous tophi in patients with long-lasting disease. Cases of patients with chronic gouty arthritis mimicking rheumatoid arthritis, and vice-versa, are rare. This report describes the case of a 56-year old male with symmetric, deforming, and polyarticular arthritis affecting, specially, the joints of the hands and wrists, with diffuse subcutaneous nodules throughout his body, atypical radiographic findings, and urolithiasis. Following clinical evaluation and additional tests, this patient received a diagnosis of chronic tophaceous gout mimicking mutilating rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of ... Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of ... Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome Center ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis ... Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s ...

  14. Aggressive periodontitis and chronic arthritis: blood mononuclear cell gene expression and plasma protein levels of cytokines and cytokine inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars K; Havemose-Poulsen, Anne; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    inflammation in general, patients with arthritis (juvenile idiopathic arthritis [JIA] and rheumatoid arthritis [RA]) were included. METHODS: The study population consisted of white adults aggressive periodontitis (LAgP; n = 18), generalized aggressive periodontitis......TNF-RI plasma levels in patients with LAgP and RA. CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrated only a few changes in the PBMC expression of various cytokine and cytokine inhibitor genes in aggressive periodontitis and chronic arthritis compared to controls. There were a few similarities among disease groups......-inflammatory cytokines and cytokine receptors in patients with periodontitis and patients with arthritis representing two examples of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as periodontitis and arthritis. To identify possible disease-specific characteristics of subjects with periodontitis relative to subjects with chronic...

  15. Human lead metabolism: Chronic exposure, bone lead and physiological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, David Eric Berkeley

    Exposure to lead is associated with a variety of detrimental health effects. After ingestion or inhalation, lead may be taken up from the bloodstream and retained by bone tissue. X-ray fluorescence was used to make in vivo measurements of bone lead concentration at the tibia and calcaneus for 367 active and 14 retired lead smelter workers. Blood lead levels following a labour disruption were used in conjunction with bone lead readings to examine the endogenous release of lead from bone. Relations between bone lead and a cumulative blood lead index differed depending on time of hiring. This suggests that the transfer of lead from blood to bone has changed over time, possibly as a result of varying exposure conditions. A common polymorphism in the δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD) enzyme may influence the distribution of lead in humans. Blood lead levels were higher for smelter workers expressing the more rare ALAD2 allele. Bone lead concentrations, however, were not significantly different. This implies that a smaller proportion of lead in blood is distributed to tissue for individuals expressing the ALAD2 allele. The O'Flaherty physiological model of lead metabolism was modified slightly and tested with input from the personal exposure histories of smelter workers. The model results were consistent with observation in tern of endogenous exposure to lead and accumulation of lead in cortical bone. Modelling the calcaneus as a trabecular bone site did not reproduce observed trends. variations in lead metabolism between different trabecular sites may therefore be significant. The model does not incorporate a genetic component, and its output did not reflect observed differences in this respect. This result provides further support for the influence of the ALAD polymorphism on lead metabolism. Experimental trials with a digital spectrometer revealed superior energy resolution and count throughput relative to the conventional X-ray fluorescence system. The associated

  16. Robust Therapeutic Efficacy of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2-Cleavable Fas-1-RGD Peptide Complex in Chronic Inflammatory Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Eon Jeong; Kang, Jin Hee; Sa, Keum Hee; Sung, Shijin; Park, Jae Yong; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, In San; Kang, Young Mo

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic agents that are transformable via introducing cleavable linkage by locally enriched MMP-2 within inflamed synovium would enhance therapeutic efficacy on chronic inflammatory arthritis. Transforming growth factor-β-inducible gene-h3 (βig-h3), which consists of four fas-1 domains and an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif, intensifies inflammatory processes by facilitating adhesion and migration of fibroblast-like synoviocyte in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to investigate whether a MMP-2-cleavable peptide complex consisting of a fas-1 domain and an RGD peptide blocks the interaction between βig-h3 and resident cells and leads to the amelioration of inflammatory arthritis. We designed βig-h3-derivatives, including the fourth fas-1 domain truncated for H1 and H2 sequences of mouse (MFK00) and MMP-2-cleavable peptide complex (MFK902). MMP-2 selectivity was examined by treatment with a series of proteases. MFK902 efficacy was determined by the adhesion and migration assay with NIH3T3 cells in vitro and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model using male DBA/1J mice in vivo. The mice were treated intraperitoneally with MFK902 at different dosages. MFK902 was specifically cleaved by active MMP-2 in a concentration-dependent manner, and βig-h3-mediated adhesion and migration were more effectively inhibited by MFK902, compared with RGD or MFK00 peptides. The arthritis activity of murine CIA, measured by clinical arthritis index and incidence of arthritic paws, was significantly ameliorated after treatment with all dosages of MFK902 (1, 10, and 30 mg/kg). MFK902 ameliorated histopathologic deterioration and reduced the expression of inflammatory mediators simultaneously with improvement of clinical features. In addition, a favorable safety profile of MFK902 was demonstrated in vivo. The present study revealed that MMP-2-cleavable peptide complex based on βig-h3 structure is a potent and safe therapeutic agent for chronic

  17. Robust Therapeutic Efficacy of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2-Cleavable Fas-1-RGD Peptide Complex in Chronic Inflammatory Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eon Jeong Nam

    Full Text Available Therapeutic agents that are transformable via introducing cleavable linkage by locally enriched MMP-2 within inflamed synovium would enhance therapeutic efficacy on chronic inflammatory arthritis. Transforming growth factor-β-inducible gene-h3 (βig-h3, which consists of four fas-1 domains and an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD motif, intensifies inflammatory processes by facilitating adhesion and migration of fibroblast-like synoviocyte in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a MMP-2-cleavable peptide complex consisting of a fas-1 domain and an RGD peptide blocks the interaction between βig-h3 and resident cells and leads to the amelioration of inflammatory arthritis.We designed βig-h3-derivatives, including the fourth fas-1 domain truncated for H1 and H2 sequences of mouse (MFK00 and MMP-2-cleavable peptide complex (MFK902. MMP-2 selectivity was examined by treatment with a series of proteases. MFK902 efficacy was determined by the adhesion and migration assay with NIH3T3 cells in vitro and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA model using male DBA/1J mice in vivo. The mice were treated intraperitoneally with MFK902 at different dosages.MFK902 was specifically cleaved by active MMP-2 in a concentration-dependent manner, and βig-h3-mediated adhesion and migration were more effectively inhibited by MFK902, compared with RGD or MFK00 peptides. The arthritis activity of murine CIA, measured by clinical arthritis index and incidence of arthritic paws, was significantly ameliorated after treatment with all dosages of MFK902 (1, 10, and 30 mg/kg. MFK902 ameliorated histopathologic deterioration and reduced the expression of inflammatory mediators simultaneously with improvement of clinical features. In addition, a favorable safety profile of MFK902 was demonstrated in vivo.The present study revealed that MMP-2-cleavable peptide complex based on βig-h3 structure is a potent and safe therapeutic agent for

  18. Fetal Programming in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D.O. de Steenwinkel (Florentien)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease mainly affecting synovial tissues, which can lead to severe morbidity and progressive joint destruction resulting in deformations and disability. Other important outcomes include

  19. Cytotoxic T cells modulate inflammation and endogenous opioid analgesia in chronic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddack-Werncke, Uta; Busch-Dienstfertig, Melanie; González-Rodríguez, Sara; Maddila, Santhosh Chandar; Grobe, Jenny; Lipp, Martin; Stein, Christoph; Müller, Gerd

    2017-02-06

    This study examined the development of chronic pain, a cardinal symptom of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), in mice with antigen- and collagen-induced arthritis (ACIA). Since the role of CD8(+) T cells in arthritis is controversial, we investigated the consequences of CD8-depletion on arthritis development and opioid modulation of pain in this novel model of chronic autoimmune arthritis. Disease severity in control and CD8-depleted animals was determined by histological assessment of knee-joint sections and measurement of autoantibody formation. Pain was evaluated by measuring mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in von Frey and Hargreaves tests, respectively. The production and release of endogenous opioids and inflammatory cytokines was assessed in immunoassays. In ACIA, mice display persistent mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia for more than 2 months after induction of arthritis. The blockade of peripheral opioid receptors with naloxone-methiodide (NLXM) transiently increased thermal hyperalgesia, indicating that endogenous opioid peptides were released in the arthritic joint to inhibit pain. CD8(+) T cell depletion did not affect autoantibody formation or severity of joint inflammation, but serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-17 were increased. The release of opioid peptides from explanted arthritic knee cells and the NLXM effect were significantly reduced in the absence of CD8(+) T cells. We have successfully modeled the development of chronic pain, a hallmark of RA, in ACIA. Furthermore, we detected a yet unknown protective role of CD8(+) T cells in chronic ACIA since pro-inflammatory cytokines rose and opioid peptide release decreased in the absence of these cells.

  20. Septic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the joint — contributes to the damage. Risk factors Risk factors for septic arthritis include: Existing joint problems. Chronic diseases and conditions that affect your joints — such as osteoarthritis, gout, rheumatoid arthritis or lupus — can increase your ...

  1. Induction of chronic arthritis in rats : the role of intestinal bacteria and bacterial cell wall fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Kool (Jeanette)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractRheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, disabling joint disease occurring in about 1% of the population. Women are more often affected than men, and there is a genetic predisposition based on the presence of the HLA-DR4 (Dw4, Dw14, Dwl5) gene or the HLA-DRl gene. Results from investigations

  2. EULAR recommendations for the role of the nurse in the management of chronic inflammatory arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne; van Tubergen, Astrid; Boström, Carina; Braychenko, Elena; Buss, Beate; Felix, José; Firth, Jill; Hammond, Alison; Harston, Benny; Hernandez, Cristina; Huzjak, Masa; Korandová, Jana; Kukkurainen, Marja Leena; Landewé, Robert; Mezieres, Maryse; Milincovic, Marijana; Moretti, Antonella; Oliver, Susan; Primdahl, Jette; Scholte-Voshaar, Marieke; de la Torre-Aboki, Jenny; Waite-Jones, Jennifer; Westhovens, Rene; Zangi, Heidi Andersen; Heiberg, Turid; Hill, Jackie

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The authors aim to develop European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the role of the nurse in the management of patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis, to identify a research agenda and to determine an educational agenda. Methods A task force made up of a

  3. Pharmacology Update on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Major Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherspoon, Deborah; Weatherspoon, Christopher A; Abbott, Brianna

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a brief review and summarizes current therapies for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, major depression, and rheumatoid arthritis. One new pharmaceutical agent is highlighted for each of the topics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Human intestinal flora and the induction of chronic arthritis : studies in an animal model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Severijnen

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe etiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a chronic joint inflammation, is unknown. A microbial involvement is suspected, but no particular microorganism has been incriminated. The human intestinal microflora is an abundant and continuous source of bacterial antigens and may be

  5. Imaging of Posttraumatic Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Septic Arthritis, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, and Cancer Mimicking Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupasov, Andrey; Cain, Usa; Montoya, Simone; Blickman, Johan G

    2017-09-01

    This article focuses on the imaging of 5 discrete entities with a common end result of disability: posttraumatic arthritis, a common form of secondary osteoarthritis that results from a prior insult to the joint; avascular necrosis, a disease of impaired osseous blood flow, leading to cellular death and subsequent osseous collapse; septic arthritis, an infectious process leading to destructive changes within the joint; complex regional pain syndrome, a chronic limb-confined painful condition arising after injury; and cases of cancer mimicking arthritis, in which the initial findings seem to represent arthritis, despite a more insidious cause. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Increased autophagy in fibroblast-like synoviocytes leads to immune enhancement potential in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ru; Zhang, Yingzi; Wang, Lin; Hu, Ji; Wen, Jian; Xue, Leixi; Tang, Mei; Liu, Zhichun; Fu, Jinxiang

    2017-02-28

    The incidence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been reported to be correlated with a disorder of immunregulation. Rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes (RA-FLSs) play an important role in regulating the local immune microenvironment. However, the potential mechanism of RA-FLS in regulating the immnue response is not clearly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the expression of HIF-1α was significantly up-regulated in rheumatoid arthritis tissue which indicated that the hypoxia condition in the microenvironment. We also observed that RA-FLSs demonstrated the potential to up-regulate immune activation. Meanwhile, the level of autophagy increased in RA-FLSs compared with control group. Besides that, the expression of IL-6 was up-regulated not only in RA-FLSs but also in the fibroblasts that treated with hypoxia condition. Accordingly, we found that autophagy inhibitiors could effectively inhibit the immune activation function of RA-FLSs medicated by IL-6. Taken together, the results we demonstrated above indicated that the hypoxia microenvironment could effectively induce the incidence of autophagy and then lead to the immune activation function of RA-FLSs medicated by IL-6.

  7. Influence of physical treatment on disease activity and health status of patients with chronic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustur Dušan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This is an open uncontrolled study about effects of physical treatment on disease activity parameters of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. Objective The aim of the study was to establish if there was any improvement of disease activity parameters after four weeks of physical and spa treatment. METHOD We compared morning stiffness, tender and swollen joint count, body pain level and Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS-28 in patients with rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, and assessed the effect of physical and spa treatment on those parameters. The research encompassed 109 patients: 69 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA group and 40 with psoriatic arthritis (PA group. They were from Norway, staying for four weeks in June-September 2003. The groups served as their own controls - "one group pre-test post test" study. Disease activity measurement was made twice: at the beginning and at the end of treatment. The therapeutic set consisted of mud applications, kinesitherapy, mineral water pool and electrotherapy. Results At the beginning there was no significant difference in observed disease activity parameters between patients with rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis (p>0.05. After four weeks of physical and spa treatment disease activity was significantly reduced in all observed parameters in both groups: morning stiffness (p<0.001 RA+PA, tender joint count (p<0.01 RA+PA, swollen joint count (p<0.01 RA; p<0.05 PA, body pain (p<0.01 RA+PA and DAS-28 score (p<0.01 RA+PA. Conclusion Physical and spa treatment, together with climatic factors in Igalo, lead to a significant reduction of disease activity parameters of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. .

  8. Hypogonadism in chronically lead-poisoned men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunstein, G D; Dahlgren, J; Loriaux, D L

    1978-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis was evaluated in 10 men with occupational lead exposure, 9 of whom had noted a decrease in libido and frequency of intercourse following this exposure. 6 of these men had clinically apparent lead poisoning while 4 were classified as being only lead-exposed. Results of the endocrine evaluation of these patients were compared to those obtained on 9 age and socioeconomically matched control patients. Both lead poisoned and lead-exposed patients had reduced basal serum testosterone levels and normal basal serum testosterone-estradiol-binding globulin capacity, estradiol, LH, FSH, and prolactin levels. Both groups demonstrated an appropriate rise in serum testosterone following hCG stimulation and a normal increment in serum FSH in response to clomiphene citrate and gonadotropin-releasing hormone in comparison to the control group. The lead poisoned patients demonstrated a significantly reduced increment in serum LH after clomiphene citrate and gonadotropin-releasing hormone administration while the lead-exposed patients had normal LH dynamics. Testicular biopsies carried out on the 2 most severely lead-poisoned men showed peritubular fibrosis, oligospermia, and vacuolization of the Sertoli cells. These results suggest that lead poisoning may lead to a pituitary-hypothalamic defect in LH secretion and may also result in direct testicular seminiferous tubular injury.

  9. Chronic arthritis and cardiovascular disease: altered blood parameters give rise to a prothrombotic propensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinsberger, Jilke; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Cosemans, Judith M E M

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis, and to a lesser extent ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, associates with increased morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular complications. We hypothesized that the increased risk of cardiovascular disease is reflected by changes in blood parameters that are compatible with a prothrombotic propensity. To substantiate this notion, we performed an extensive literature search identifying such parameters. A search through PubMed (1970-2013) was done to find primary articles with the following search terms: rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis or synovial fluid. These were combined with keywords reflecting processes of atherothrombosis: atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, coagulation, endothelial, fibrinolysis, mean platelet volume, microparticle, platelet, platelet count and mass, thrombosis, and thrombus. The published studies point to a multitude of blood-related processes that can contribute to a prothrombotic propensity in chronic inflammatory diseases. These include an increase in platelet mass; low-level platelet activation, enforced by interaction with leukocytes and the formation of proinflammatory cytokines; a locally activated endothelium; and an increased coagulant activity. Patient treatment with methotrexate or TNF-α blockers appears to result in normalization of several of these prothrombotic parameters. This analysis provides a first identification of the mechanisms by which inflammatory arthritis can aggravate cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chronic arthritis in children and adolescents in two Indian health service user populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanotte Diane

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High prevalence rates for rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthopathies, and systemic lupus erythematosus have been described in American Indian and Alaskan Native adults. The impact of these diseases on American Indian children has not been investigated. Methods We used International Classification of Diseases-9 (ICD-9 codes to search two Indian Health Service (IHS patient registration databases over the years 1998–2000, searching for individuals 19 years of age or younger with specific ICD-9-specified diagnoses. Crude estimates for disease prevalence were made based on the number of individuals identified with these diagnoses within the database. Results Rheumatoid arthritis (RA / juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA was the most frequent diagnosis given. The prevalence rate for JRA in the Oklahoma City Area was estimated as 53 per 100,000 individuals at risk, while in the Billings Area, the estimated prevalence was nearly twice that, at 115 per 100,000. These rates are considerably higher than those reported in the most recent European studies. Conclusion Chronic arthritis in childhood represents an important, though unrecognized, chronic health challenge within the American Indian population living in the United States.

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and what other conditions are associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of ...

  13. Success rates of first-line antibiotics for culture-negative sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuckpaiwong, Bavornrit; Phoompoung, Saravut

    2014-09-01

    A combination of surgical and medical treatment is normally required for patients with septic arthritis. Antibiotics selected for use on these patients are normally based on tissue culture results. However, in sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis cases, the results of the culture are usually negative as a result of prior treatment. The present study will investigate the incidence of culture-negative septic arthritis and the outcomes based on the use of first-line drug antibiotics for the treatment of sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis. For the present study, the authors retrospectively reviewed medical records of surgically treated septic arthritis cases over the past 10 years at Siriraj Hospital. The patient culture results, the antibiotics used, and the results of treatment were all recorded and analyzed. One hundredfifty-three septic arthritis patients were reviewed. Sixty-two patients were classified as having been diagnosed with either sub-acute or chronic septic arthritis. Thirty-six of 62 patients (58.1%) had a negative culture result. In the culture-positive patients, 42.3% had Streptococcus, 26.9% had Staphylococcus aureus, 11.5% had other gram positive bacteria, 15.4% had gram-negative bacteria, and 3.8% had tuberculus infection. In the culture-negative sub-acute and chronic group (36 of 62), 23 patients received Cefazolin, nine patients received Cloxacillin, and four patients received Clindamycin. Successful results were 69.9%, 66.7% and 75%, respectively. The present study reflects that the incidence ofculture-negative, sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis is approximately 58.1%. The first-line class of antibiotics remains the appropriate antibiotic choice for these patients because they are still effective for treatment of septic arthritis in up to 70% of all cases.

  14. FEATURES OF THE CHRONIC PAIN SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND MEDICAL DIAGNOSTIC TACTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Gromova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to establish features of a chronic pain syndrome disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, to reveal correlation with psychoemotional disorders and to develop the differential approach to maintaining patients. Materials and methods. 101 patients at the age of 60.6 ± 11.8 years, 92 % of women, with reliable rheumatoid arthritis (American College of Rheumatology – ACR, 1987, were examined. The visual analog scale was used for an assessment of pain strength at the moment; the Van Korff’s questionnaire – for determination of pain strength at the moment and retrospectively for the last half a year with an assessment of disadaptation level and disability, ranging of a chronic pain syndrome on classes; the McGill Pain Questionnaire – for the characteristic of touchsensitive and emotional components of pain. Neuropathic pain was revealed by DN4 questionnaire. Anxiety and depression were determined by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Fibromyalgia diagnosed by criteria of ACR, (1990. Results. Pain estimated by various scales and questionnaires varied from moderated to intensive. According to Van Korff’s questionnaire it was characterized by average level of disadaptation and easy disability that corresponded to the second class of chronic pain. The Rank pain index of the McGill Pain Questionnaire touch scale testified that pain was described by a smaller number of definitions on a touch scale than on emotional. This indicates a moderate impact of pain syndrome on a state of mind. Neuropathic pain is diagnosed for 37.3 % of patients with tunnel syndrome, mononeuritis and touch polyneuropathy. The secondary fibromyalgia is revealed for 2 % of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis of high activity. According to HADS anxiety and depression was revealed for 58 and 59 % of patients correspondingly. This demanded psychotherapeutic consultation and additional correction. We proposed the algorithm of diagnostic and

  15. Chronic Heroin Dependence Leading to Adrenal Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Opioids have been the mainstay for pain relief and palliation over a long period of time. They are commonly abused by drug addicts and such dependence usually imparts severe physiologic effects on multiple organ systems. The negative impact of opioids on the endocrine system is poorly understood and often underestimated. We describe a patient who developed severe suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA axis leading to secondary adrenal insufficiency due to long standing abuse of opioids.

  16. A biopsychosocial investigation of pediatric chronic pain with special focus on juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Johanne Jeppesen

    as a chronic pain diagnosis, and the pain is caused by the inflammations in the joint. The amount of pain experienced by a child with JIA may be modulated by psychological, social, and biological factors. The general purpose of the present thesis is twofold. First, the purpose is to investigate biopsychosocial...... factors, which may impact pain experience in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Second, the purpose is to investigate explanatory mechanisms in pediatric chronic pain from a biopsychosocial perspective. The thesis encompasses four different studies based on data collected from two samples...

  17. Suppression of NFAT5-mediated Inflammation and Chronic Arthritis by Novel κB-binding Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jin Han

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and arthritis. However, therapeutic agents inhibiting NFAT5 activity are currently unavailable. To discover NFAT5 inhibitors, a library of >40,000 chemicals was screened for the suppression of nitric oxide, a direct target regulated by NFAT5 activity, through high-throughput screening. We validated the anti-NFAT5 activity of 198 primary hit compounds using an NFAT5-dependent reporter assay and identified the novel NFAT5 suppressor KRN2, 13-(2-fluoro-benzylberberine, and its derivative KRN5. KRN2 inhibited NFAT5 upregulation in macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and repressed the formation of NF-κB p65-DNA complexes in the NFAT5 promoter region. Interestingly, KRN2 selectively suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory genes, including Nos2 and Il6, without hampering high-salt-induced NFAT5 and its target gene expressions. Moreover, KRN2 and KRN5, the latter of which exhibits high oral bioavailability and metabolic stability, ameliorated experimentally induced arthritis in mice without serious adverse effects, decreasing pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Particularly, orally administered KRN5 was stronger in suppressing arthritis than methotrexate, a commonly used anti-rheumatic drug, displaying better potency and safety than its original compound, berberine. Therefore, KRN2 and KRN5 can be potential therapeutic agents in the treatment of chronic arthritis.

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life ...

  19. Incidence of chronic persistent rheumatoid arthritis and the impact of smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anders J; Junker, Peter; Houen, Gunnar

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence of chronic persistent rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a population based cohort of twins and to determine the impact of smoking. METHODS: In a historical cohort study on twins born 1920 to 1982 we identified 157 cases of RA among 45,280 responders (response rate 80......%). Information on smoking was obtained by questionnaire and interview. A mixed effect Poisson regression model was used to estimate incidence rate ratios with age, sex, smoking duration and smoking intensity as covariates. We used the SplitLexis procedure in the Epi R package to study a possible effect of period...

  20. Assessment of bone mineral density in adults with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis: a cross-sectional long-term followup study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zak, M; Hassager, C; Lovell, D J

    1999-01-01

    To assess bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover in adults with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) or persistent JCA, and to identify predictors of reduced BMD.......To assess bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover in adults with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) or persistent JCA, and to identify predictors of reduced BMD....

  1. Vital Signs: Prevalence of Doctor-Diagnosed Arthritis and Arthritis-Attributable Activity Limitation - United States, 2013-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Kamil E; Helmick, Charles G; Boring, Michael; Brady, Teresa J

    2017-03-10

    In the United States, doctor-diagnosed arthritis is a common and disabling chronic condition. Arthritis can lead to severe joint pain and poor physical function, and it can negatively affect quality of life. CDC analyzed 2013-2015 data from the National Health Interview Survey, an annual, nationally representative, in-person interview survey of the health status and behaviors of the noninstitutionalized civilian U.S. adult population, to update previous prevalence estimates of arthritis and arthritis-attributable activity limitations. On average, during 2013-2015, 54.4 million (22.7%) adults had doctor-diagnosed arthritis, and 23.7 million (43.5% of those with arthritis) had arthritis-attributable activity limitations (an age-adjusted increase of approximately 20% in the proportion of adults with arthritis reporting activity limitations since 2002 [p-trend arthritis were 49.3%, 47.1%, and 30.6%, respectively; the prevalences of arthritis-attributable activity limitations among adults with these conditions and arthritis were 54.5% (heart disease), 54.0% (diabetes), and 49.0% (obesity). The prevalence of arthritis is high, particularly among adults with comorbid conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. Furthermore, the prevalence of arthritis-attributable activity limitations is high and increasing over time. Approximately half of adults with arthritis and heart disease, arthritis and diabetes, or arthritis and obesity are limited by their arthritis. Greater use of evidence-based physical activity and self-management education interventions can reduce pain and improve function and quality of life for adults with arthritis and also for adults with other chronic conditions who might be limited by their arthritis.

  2. Evaluation of the therapeutic effect of hydroxyapatite particles labeled with Ho sub 1 sub 6 sub 6 in rats with acute and chronic arthritis

    CERN Document Server

    Mendoza-Lopez, P

    2002-01-01

    with significantly statistical values (p<=0,01). This therapeutic effect was evident too when evaluating the measure of the articular perimeter in acute and chronic arthritis groups through the time with significantly statistical values (p<=0,01). In conclusion the hydroxyapatite particles labeled with Holmium-166 are biologically stable in vivo and have a therapeutic effect in the treatment of acute and chronic arthritis in rats. The therapeutic effect of an intraarticular injection of hydroxyapatite particles labeled with Holmium-166 ( Ho sub 1 sub 6 sub 6 HA) was evaluated. For this evaluation 72 antigen-induced arthritis rats; the arthritis was induced by an intraarticular injection of a suspension of ovoalbumin and Freund's adjuvant complete. The 72 rats were divided in three groups: control group, acute arthritis group and chronic arthritis group. The evaluation of the therapeutic effect was achieved by the measuring of the perimeter of the arthritic knee joint in different days after the intraart...

  3. Lung-Function Trajectories Leading to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Celli, Bartolome; Agustí, Alvar

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is thought to result from an accelerated decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) over time. Yet it is possible that a normal decline in FEV1 could also lead to COPD in persons whose maximally attained FEV1 is less than...

  4. CHRONIC DEVELOPMENTAL LEAD EXPOSURE REDUCES NEUROGENESIS IN ADULT HIPPOCAMPUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHRONIC DEVELOPMENTAL LEAD EXPOSURE REDUCES NEUROGENESIS IN ADULT HIPPOCAMPUS. ME Gilbert1, ME Kelly2, S. Salant3, T Shafer1, J Goodman3 1Neurotoxicology Div, US EPA, RTP, NC, 27711, 2Children's Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, 3Helen Hayes Hospital, Haverstraw, NY, 10993. ...

  5. Short course of glucocorticoids in patients with protracted and chronic gout arthritis. Part I: predictors of therapy efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A Fedorova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To reveal short course of glucocorticoid (GC therapy efficacy predictors in pts with gout arthritis. Material and methods. 59 pts with tophaceous gout (crystal-verified diagnosis and arthritis of three and more joints lasting more than a months in spite of treatment with sufficient doses of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were included. Median age of pts was 56 [48;63], median disease duration - 15,2 years [7,4;20], median swollen joint count at the examination — 8 [5; 11]. The patients were randomized into 2 groups. Methylprednisolone was administered in one of them, betamethasone — in the other. Results, four variants of treatment response were described: full resolution of arthritis — 24 (41%, recurrent exacerbation — 28 (48%, insufficient arthritis resolution — 2 (3% and clinically insignificant (unresponders — 5 (8% pts. Pts in group with arthritis recurrence at the entry were significantly younger than pts with resolved arthritis (52 [47;60] and 59 [52;68] respectively, U-test p=0,02, had more inflamed joints (9 [7,5; 11 ] and 5 [4;9[ respectively, U-test p=0,02, longer duration of last exacerbation (52 [8;52[ and 13 [7,5;52J respectively, U-test p>0,05, higher values of pain, joint index and swelling index (U-test p<0,04. Pts with insufficient arthritis resolution and unresponders had most severe gout course. Conclusion. The study allowed to reveal features which determine efficacy of short course of GC therapy in pts with protracted and chronic gout arthritis: inflamed joint count, duration of the last exacerbation and chronic renal insufficiency. Proposed an algorithm allowing to predict efficacy of GC short course in each pt.

  6. Renin aldosterone system and potassium levels in chronic lead intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, J J; Werk, E E; Thrasher, K; Behar, R; Loadholt, C B

    1979-04-01

    Renin activity and aldosterone were evaluated relative to potassium levels and lead intoxication in 33 patients with a history of "moonshine" ingestion. Patients were divided into three groups: I, lead intoxicated with hyperkalemia; II, lead intoxicated without hyperkalemia; and III, not lead intoxicated without hyperkalemia. Those in group I demonstrated suppressed plasma renin activity, baseline and after furosemide, and blunted aldosterone responsiveness to furosemide. Plasma renin activity was not different in groups II and III, whereas aldosterone responsiveness was less in group II than in III. Group I patients tended to be older, had lower creatinine clearances, and six of nine had mild hyperchloremic acidosis. Diabetes and cortisol insufficiency were not present. Chronic lead intoxication due to illicit alcohol ingestion is associated with hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism and hyperkalemia which appear to develop as the lead nephropathy progresses with duration and/or aging.

  7. Extraction of chronically implanted coronary sinus leads active fixation vs passive fixation leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, George H; Sorrentino, Robert A; Exner, Derek V; Merliss, Andrew D; Tobias, Serge M; Martin, David O; Augostini, Ralph; Piccini, Jonathan P; Schaerf, Raymond; Li, Shelby; Miller, Clayton T; Adler, Stuart W

    2016-06-01

    The Medtronic model 4195 (StarFix) left ventricular lead is an active fixation lead that provides additional support within the coronary sinus (CS) via deployable lobes. While this lead has been shown to have excellent stability within the CS, concerns about its extractability have been raised. The aim of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of the extraction of the model 4195 lead vs other Medtronic CS leads in a prospective cohort study. Patients undergoing extraction of this and other CS leads for standard indications were prospectively enrolled and studied. The primary outcomes of interest were the removal success rates and associated complication rates. Patients were followed for a month postprocedure. The overall left ventricular lead extraction success rate was 97.6% (n = 205). Among 40 patients with chronic model 4195 leads, there were 37 successful extractions (92.5%) as compared to 98.8% for the 165 non-4195 leads. However, in 2 of the 3 StarFix lead extraction failures, standard extraction techniques were not used. All 10 of the model 4195 leads that had been implanted for less than 6 months were extracted without incident. In this largest study of CS lead extractions published to date, the overall success rate of the extraction of chronically implanted CS leads is high and the complication rate is similar in these lead models. The extraction of the model 4195 lead is clearly more challenging, but it can be accomplished in high-volume extraction centers with experienced operators. It is recommended that the model 4195 lead be extracted by experienced operators. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Applicability of the EULAR recommendations on the role of the nurse in the management of chronic inflammatory arthritis in Portugal Applicability of the EULAR recommendations on the role of the nurse in the management of chronic inflammatory arthritis in Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbosa, L.; Ramiro, S.; Santos, M. J.; Canas da Silva, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the level of agreement and applicability of the EULAR recommendations for the role of the nurse in the management of chronic inflammatory arthritis in Portugal. Methods: Nurses from all Portuguese rheumatology centers were invited to fill-in a questionnaire addressing the

  9. Lead Toxicity Resulting from Chronic Ingestion of Opium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalili, Mohammad

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old man presented to the emergency department (ED with lower abdominal pain and constipation. He related chronic ingestion of large amounts of opium. Physical examination showed mild abdominal tenderness and gingival discoloration. Diagnostic studies showed a mild hypochromic, microcytic anemia with basophilic stippling of the red blood cells. Abdominal imaging showed no intra-abdominal pathology. A diagnosis of lead toxicity was confirmed through serum lead levels. The patient was put on chelation therapy and his signs and symptoms started to resolve. As a comprehensive search for other sources of lead was unsuccessful, opium adulterants were considered as the culprit. Chemical analysis of the opium confirmed this. Contaminated drugs have been reported as a source of exposure to toxins such as arsenic or lead. While other reports deal with patients from clinics, this report illustrates lead toxicity from ingestion of contaminated opium in the ED.[West J Emerg Med. 2009;10(4:244-246.

  10. Biologic therapy of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanov Nemanja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and juvenile idiopathic/rheumatoid arthritis (JIA are chronic, inflammatory, systemic, auto-immune diseases characterized by chronic arthritis leading to progressive joint erosions. The individual functional and social impact of rheumatoid arthritis is of great importance. Disability and joint damage occur rapidly and early in the course of the disease. The remarkably improved outcomes have been achieved initiating biologic therapy with close monitoring of disease progression. Biologic agents are drugs, usually proteins, which can influence chronic immune dysregulation resulting in chronic arthritis. According to the mechanism of action these drugs include: 1 anti-TNF drugs (etanercept, infiximab, adalimumab; 2 IL-1 blocking drugs (anakinra; 3 IL-6 blocking drugs (tocilizumab; 4 agents blocking selective co-stimulation modulation (abatacept; 5 CD 20 blocking drugs (rituximab. Biologics targeting TNF-alpha with methotrexate have revolutionized the treatment of RA, producing significant improvement in clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes not seen previously. The new concept of rheumatoid arthritis treatment defines early diagnosis, early aggressive therapy with optimal doses of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs and, if no improvement has been achieved during six months, early introduction of biologic drugs. The three-year experience of biologic therapy in Serbia has shown a positive effect on disease outcome.

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis - integrated approach to pathogenesis, treatment and care. New opportunities for management of chronic diseases based on synergetic methodology.

    OpenAIRE

    Sidorov, Pavel; Sovershaeva, Evgeniya

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common chronic systemic autoimmune disease. Chronic and severe course, early disability, social disadaptation as well as the high incidence of psychological problems require the development of an integrated approach to etiopathogenesis, diagnostics, management as well as rehabilitation and preventive care.Theory: We have developed a synergetic bio-psycho-socio-spiritual concept of ontogenesis that is represented by a four-dimensional model c...

  12. [Preference for etanercept pen versus syringe in patients with chronic arthritis. Nurse education workshop].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Diaz, Silvia; Girabent-Farrés, Montserrat; Roig-Vilaseca, Daniel; Reina, Delia; Cerdà, Dacia; González, Marina; Torrente-Segarra, Vicenç; Fíguls, Ramon; Corominas, Hèctor

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study are to evaluate the level of fear of post-injection pain prior to the administration, the difficulty in handling the device, and the level of satisfaction of patients using a pre-filled syringe versus an etanercept pen, as well as to evaluate the usefulness of the training given by nursing staff prior to starting with the pen, and the preferences of patients after using both devices. A prospective study was designed to follow-up a cohort of patients during a 6 months period. The data was collected using questionnaires and analyzed with SPSS 18.00. Rank and McNemar tests were performed. Statistical significance was pre-set at an α level of 0.05. A total of 29 patients were included, of whom 69% female, and with a mean age 52.5±10.9 years. Of these, 48% had rheumatoid arthritis, 28% psoriatic arthritis, 21% ankylosing spondylitis, and 3% undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy. There were no statistically significant differences either with the fear or pain or handling of the device between the syringe and the pen (P=.469; P=.812; P=.169 respectively). At 6 months, 59% of patients referred to being satisfied or very satisfied with the pen. Almost all (93%) found useful or very useful the training given by nursing staff prior to using the pen, and 55% preferred the pen over the pre-filled syringe. The etanercept pen is another subcutaneous device option for patients with chronic arthritis. According to the present study, nursing educational workshops before starting this therapy are recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Rheumatoid arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that causes chronic abnormal inflammation, ...

  14. Analgesic effects of intra-articular botulinum toxin Type B in a murine model of chronic degenerative knee arthritis pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Anderson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie Anderson1,2, Hollis Krug1,2, Christopher Dorman1, Pari McGarraugh1, Sandra Frizelle1, Maren Mahowald1,21Rheumatology Section, Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota; 2Division of Rheumatology and Autoimmune Diseases, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USAObjective: To evaluate the analgesic effectiveness of intra-articular botulinum toxin Type B (BoNT/B in a murine model of chronic degenerative arthritis pain.Methods and materials: Chronic arthritis was produced in adult C57Bl6 mice by intra-articular injection of Type IV collagenase into the left knee. Following induction of arthritis, the treatment group received intra-articular BoNT/B. Arthritic control groups were treated with intra-articular normal saline or sham injections. Pain behavior testing was performed prior to arthritis, after induction of arthritis, and following treatments. Pain behavior measures included analysis of gait impairment (spontaneous pain behavior and joint tenderness evaluation (evoked pain response. Strength was measured as ability to grasp and cling.Results: Visual gait analysis showed significant impairment of gait in arthritic mice that improved 43% after intra-articular BoNT/B, demonstrating a substantial articular analgesic effect. Joint tenderness, measured with evoked pain response scores, increased with arthritis induction and decreased 49.5% after intra-articular BoNT/B treatment. No improvement in visual gait scores or decrease in evoked pain response scores were found in the control groups receiving intra-articular normal saline or sham injections. Intra-articular BoNT/B was safe, and no systemic effects or limb weakness was noted.Conclusions: This study is the first report of intra-articular BoNT/B for analgesia in a murine model of arthritis pain. The results of this study validate prior work using intra-articular neurotoxins in murine models. Our findings show chronic degenerative arthritis

  15. Increased prevalence of late stage T cell activation antigen (VLA-1) in active juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Morling, Niels; Platz, P

    1987-01-01

    in remission, and controls. The prevalence of T suppressor/inducer (CD4+,Leu8+) cells was higher in remission JCA (17%) than in active JCA (11%) and controls (10%). This increase, however, did not reach statistical significance. In conclusion, late stage but not early stage T cell activation antigens were......The presence of activated T cells as judged from the reaction with monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) against (a) a late stage T cell activation antigen (VLA-1), (b) the interleukin 2 (IL2) receptor (CD25), and (c) four different HLA class II molecules (HLA-DR, DRw52, DQ, and DP) was studied in 15...... patients with active juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), 10 patients with JCA in remission, and 11 age matched, healthy controls. In addition, the distribution of T 'helper/inducer' (CD4+), T 'suppressor/inducer' (CD4+, Leu8+), T 'suppressor/cytotoxic' (CD8+), and 'natural killer' (NK) cells (CD16...

  16. Successful total knee arthroplasty in the presence of sporotrichal arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeter, S.; Jackson, R.W.

    2006-01-01

    Articular sporotrichosis, a chronic granulomatous fungal infection, is a rare entity but when present may lead to significant joint destruction. Severe knee arthrosis due to sporotrichal arthritis has traditionally been treated with arthrodesis. Total knee arthroplasty in the presence of

  17. Chronic calcium pyrophosphate crystal inflammatory arthritis induced by extreme hypomagnesemia in short bowel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn Markus

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short bowel syndrome (SBS may induce a plethora of clinical symptoms ranging from underweight to nutrient-, vitamin- and electrolyte deficiencies. The objective of this case report is to illustrate how demanding the management of a 60 year old patient with SBS and recurrent joint attacks was for different medical disciplines. Case presentation The patient with SBS presented with a body mass index of 16.5 kg/m2 after partial jejunoileal resection of the small intestine with a six year long history of recurrent pain attacks in multiple peripheral joints, chronic diarrhoea and food intolerances. Pain attacks occurred 4–5 times a week with a median consumption of 15 mg prednisone per day. The interdisciplinary workup after several gastroenterologic, rheumatologic, radiologic, psychiatric and orthopedic consultations is shown including successful treatment steps. Clinical diagnosis revealed no systemic inflammatory disease, but confirmed extreme hypomagnesemia (0.2 mmol/l after reproducible pathological magnesium resorption tests as causative for chronic calcium pyrophosphate crystal inflammatory arthritis (pseudogout, chondrocalcinosis. Multidisciplinary treatment included application of colchicines, parenteral nutrition and magnesium substitution, antiperistaltic agents and avoidance of intolerant foods. Normalization of magnesium levels and a marked remission of joint attacks were achieved after six months with significant reduction of prednisone to 1.5 mg/day. Conclusion Despite the rarity of this condition, it is important to know that hypomagnesaemia may be associated with calcium pyrophosphate crystal inflammatory arthritis (chondrocalcinosis and that SBS patients may be prone to develop extreme hypomagnesaemia causing recurrent joint attacks without systemic inflammation.

  18. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Foot orthoses in the management of chronic subtalar and talo crural joint pain in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatt, Alfred; Formosa, Cynthia; Otter, Simon

    2016-06-01

    This pilot study investigated whether semi-rigid and soft orthoses had an effect on pain, disability and functional limitation in participants with chronic rheumatoid hindfoot involvement. Participants with chronic hindfoot pain were randomly assigned to 2 groups, commencing either with semi-rigid Subortholene orthoses or soft EVA orthoses. The Foot Function Index and the Ritchie Articular Index were administered pre- and post-intervention, which lasted for 3 months. Following a 2 week washout period, each group was switched over to the other type of orthoses. Nine female participants (mean age 52.2years (SD 9.1); mean weight 71kg (SD 12.64); mean height 160cm (SD 5.18)) with a mean RA duration of 11.7years (SD 7.83), and a mean ankle/subtalar joint pain duration of 5.7years (SD 2.62), completed the programme. Mean improvement in FFI score for both orthoses resulted in the same statistical significance (p=0.001). Statistically significant reduction in pain, disability and functional limitation was observed for both interventions, together with improvement in the Ritchie Articular Index score. Both Subortholene and EVA orthoses significantly reduced pain, disability and functional limitations in participants with chronic ankle/subtalar joint pain in rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve 5 or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  1. Effect of Chronic Lead Intoxication on Risky Behavior in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Mohammadyar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With industrialization of human societies, pollutants like lead have entered in the life cycle, causing harmful effects on body organs. No sufficient studies have been done on the effects of pollutants on behavior. The aim of this study was to investigate possible effects of lead on some measurable behaviors of an animal model. Methods: Forty eight male adult mice were divided into 4 groups of 12 each. Lead acetate was added at concentrations of 0, 5, 50, or 500 ppm to the drinking water of the animals for 4 weeks (28 days. On day 29, animals were placed on an Elevated Plus maze (EPM for 5 min and the time in sec spent was measured on closed arms, open arms and the end 1/3rd of the open arms. Increased time on open arms, particularly the end 1/3rd was considered to reflect an enhanced risk-accepting behavior. Results: In this study, it was shown that lead exposure caused an increased number of entrance (P=0.006 and time spent (P=0.034 by mice on open arms of the EPM. There was a positive correlation between the concentration of lead acetate and those two effects. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that lead poisoning may decrease normal anxiety in mice and increase risky behavior in this species. Clinical studies on human subjects with risky behavior are strongly suggested in order to find a possible relation between chronic exposures to lead as well as plasma concentration of lead with the extent of this kind of behavior.

  2. [Reactive arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloni, V; Fantini, F

    1990-01-01

    The term reactive arthritis was introduced to describe an acute non-purulent arthritis complicating an infection elsewhere in the body. Reactive arthritis can also be classified into HLA-B27 associated and non-associated forms. Rheumatic fever is an example of the HLA-B27 non-associated forms with genetic factors other than HLA-B27 involved. HLA-B27 associated reactive arthritis includes enteric, urogenic and idiopathic arthritides. The bacteria known to trigger post-enteritic reactive arthritis are: Yersinia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, Clostridium difficile and Brucella; those known to trigger post-urethritic reactive arthritis are Chlamydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum, but often the germ remains unidentified. Mechanisms through which susceptibility to reactive arthritis is linked to HLA-B27 antigen are still incompletely understood, but a clue could be cross-reactivity between B27 and a surface antigen of pathogenic germs. The clinical profile of the disease is characterized by an asymmetrical oligoarthritis with involvement particularly of the peripheral joints of the lower limbs. The arthritis generally recovers without sequelae within a few weeks or months. Accompanying features can be the involvement of enthesis and tendon sheets in form of a talalgia or dactylitis. In some cases the arthritis can relapse and chronicize. In some cases, in addition, involvement of the axial skeleton can occur (spondylitis and/or sacroiliitis). Another feature of the disease is the frequent association with typical extra-articular manifestations such as uveitis and muco-cutaneous lesions.

  3. Mechanisms by Which Dehydration May Lead to Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncal-Jimenez, C; Lanaspa, M A; Jensen, T; Sanchez-Lozada, L G; Johnson, R J

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration, a condition that characterizes excessive loss of body water, is well known to be associated with acute renal dysfunction; however, it has largely been considered reversible and to be associated with no long-term effects on the kidney. Recently, an epidemic of chronic kidney disease has emerged in Central America in which the major risk factor seems to be recurrent heat-associated dehydration. This has led to studies investigating whether recurrent dehydration may lead to permanent kidney damage. Three major potential mechanisms have been identified, including the effects of vasopressin on the kidney, the activation of the aldose reductase-fructokinase pathway, and the effects of chronic hyperuricemia. The discovery of these pathways has also led to the recognition that mild dehydration may be a risk factor in progression of all types of chronic kidney diseases. Furthermore, there is some evidence that increasing hydration, particularly with water, may actually prevent CKD. Thus, a whole new area of investigation is developing that focuses on the role of water and osmolarity and their influence on kidney function and health. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Psychological Distress in Out-Patients Assessed for Chronic Pain Compared to Those with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rice

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients diagnosed with chronic pain (CP and rheumatoid arthritis (RA represent two samples with overlapping symptoms, such as experiencing significant pain. Objectives. To compare the level of psychological distress among patients diagnosed CP attending a specialist pain clinic with those attending a specialist RA clinic. Measures. A cross-sectional study was conducted at an academic specialist chronic pain and rheumatology clinic. Participants. 330 participants included a CP group (n=167 and a RA group (n=163 completed a booklet of questionnaires regarding demographic characteristics, duration, and severity of their pain. Psychological and personality variables were compared between the CP and RA participants using a Multivariate Analysis of Covariance (MANCOVA. Results. Level of psychological distress based on the subscales of the DASS (depression, anxiety, and stress, PASS (escape avoidance, cognitive anxiety, fear of pain, and physiological anxiety, and PCS (rumination, magnification, and helplessness was significantly higher in the CP group compared to the RA group. Categorization of individuals based on DASS severity resulted in significant differences in rates of depression and anxiety symptoms between groups, with a greater number of CP participants displaying more severe depressive and anxiety symptoms. Discussion and Conclusions. This study found greater levels of psychological distress among CP individuals referred to an academic pain clinic when compared to RA patients referred to an academic rheumatology clinic.

  5. Gratitude uniquely predicts lower depression in chronic illness populations: A longitudinal study of inflammatory bowel disease and arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirois, Fuschia M; Wood, Alex M

    2017-02-01

    Although gratitude has been identified as a key clinically relevant trait for improving well-being, it is understudied within medical populations. The current study addressed this gap and extended previous and limited cross-sectional research by examining the longitudinal associations of gratitude to depression in 2 chronic illness samples, arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Two chronic illness samples, arthritis (N = 423) and IBD (N = 427), completed online surveys at Time 1 (T1). One hundred sixty-three people with arthritis and 144 people with IBD completed the 6-month follow-up survey (T2). Depression, gratitude, illness cognitions, perceived stress, social support, and disease-related variables were assessed at T1 and T2. At T2, 57.2% of the arthritis sample and 53.4% of the IBD sample met the cut off scores for significant depression. T1 gratitude was negatively associated with depressive symptoms at T1 and T2 in both samples (rs from -.43 to -.50). Regression analyses revealed that T1 gratitude remained a significant and unique predictor of lower T2 depression after controlling for T1 depression, relevant demographic variables, illness cognitions, changes in illness-relevant variables, and another positive psychological construct, thriving, in both samples. As the first investigation of the longitudinal associations of gratitude to psychological well-being in the context of chronic illness, the current study provides important evidence for the relevance of gratitude for health-related clinical populations. Further intervention-based research is warranted to more fully understand the potential benefits of gratitude for adjustment to chronic illness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Hip joint structures assessment in juvenile idiopathic (chronic arthritis with ultrasound TOC \\o "1-5" \\h \\z examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Movsisyan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sonographic (SG examination of hip joints was performed in 100 pts with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA with different forms, activity and duration. SG signs of hip joint inflammation in JCA were identified. SG features in pts with different disease duration, form and activity were revealed. SG changes of clinically unchanged hip joints were noted which may be of important significance for early diagnosis of coxitis. More wide use of arthrosonography in pediatric rheumatology was proved.

  7. Striatal opioid receptor availability is related to acute and chronic pain perception in arthritis: does opioid adaptation increase resilience to chronic pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher A; Matthews, Julian; Fairclough, Michael; McMahon, Adam; Barnett, Elizabeth; Al-Kaysi, Ali; El-Deredy, Wael; Jones, Anthony K P

    2015-11-01

    The experience of pain in humans is modulated by endogenous opioids, but it is largely unknown how the opioid system adapts to chronic pain states. Animal models of chronic pain point to upregulation of opioid receptors (OpR) in the brain, with unknown functional significance. We sought evidence for a similar relationship between chronic pain and OpR availability in humans. Using positron emission tomography and the radiotracer (11)C-diprenorphine, patients with arthritis pain (n = 17) and healthy controls (n = 9) underwent whole-brain positron emission tomography scanning to calculate parametric maps of OpR availability. Consistent with the upregulation hypothesis, within the arthritis group, greater OpR availability was found in the striatum (including the caudate) of patients reporting higher levels of recent chronic pain, as well as regions of interest in the descending opioidergic pathway including the anterior cingulate cortex, thalamus, and periaqueductal gray. The functional significance of striatal changes were clarified with respect to acute pain thresholds: data across patients and controls revealed that striatal OpR availability was related to reduced pain perception. These findings are consistent with the view that chronic pain may upregulate OpR availability to dampen pain. Finally, patients with arthritis pain, compared with healthy controls, had overall less OpR availability within the striatum specifically, consistent with the greater endogenous opioid binding that would be expected in chronic pain states. Our observational evidence points to the need for further studies to establish the causal relationship between chronic pain states and OpR adaptation.

  8. Increased frequency of HLA-DPw2 in pauciarticular onset juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Morling, Niels; Friis, J

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six unrelated Danish patients with pauciarticular Juvenile Chronic Arthritis (PJCA) and 120 controls were typed for HLA-DPw1-w6 and the local specificity CDPHEI with bulk-expanded Primed Lymphocyte Typing (PLT) cells. The frequency of HLA-DPw2 was 52.8% in PJCA patients and 16.7% in controls...... (relative risk, RR = 4.5; P less than 0.001). The antigens HLA-Dw5 and/or Dw8 were present in 50% of the patients and in 21.3% of the controls (RR = 4.2; p less than 10(-3)). DPw2 was not associated (in linkage disequilibrium) with Dw5/w8 in patients or in controls, and the DP and D associations with PJCA...... were independent of each other. However, the combined presence of DPw2 and Dw5 and/or Dw8 gave a significantly higher risk of PJCA than each antigen alone indicating interaction of DP and DR gene products. PJCA is the first disease definitely found to be associated with a DP antigen....

  9. Juvenile chronic arthritis: imaging of the knees and hips before and after intraarticular steroid injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eich, G.F. [Div. of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Univ. Children`s Hospital, Zuerich (Switzerland); Halle, F. [Div. of Immunology and Hematology, Univ. Children`s Hospital, Zuerich (Switzerland); Hodler, J. [Div. of Radiology, Balgrist Orthopedic Univ. Clinic, Zuerich (Switzerland); Seger, R. [Div. of Immunology and Hematology, Univ. Children`s Hospital, Zuerich (Switzerland); Willi, U.V. [Div. of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Univ. Children`s Hospital, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1994-12-01

    Intraarticular steroid therapy in juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) is performed because of high local efficacy with few side effects. Imaging is used for initial evaluation and for monitoring of treatment response. The aim of this study was to compare imaging findings in diseased hips and knees before and after therapy. A prospective study was performed on 10 patients (15 joints) scheduled for intraarticular therapy. Pretherapeutic assessment included clinical work-up, radiographs, ultrasound (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of affected joints. Following therapy, clinical and sonographic examinations were performed at 1 week and 1 month. MRI was repeated at 1 month. MRI and US demonstrated pannus formation and effusion, but differentiation was less distinct on US. Popliteal cysts and lymph nodes were visible in both modalities. MRI additionally revealed articular cartilage loss and subchondral cysts, not shown by US. Epiphyseal overgrowth and osteopenia were best seen radiographically. At present MRI is the best tool to assess the inflammatory changes of the joints in JCA. Initial staging of the joints may be done with plain films and MRI. US is useful to assess effusion and pannus and may be used to monitor treatment response. (orig.)

  10. Obinutuzumab is Effective in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Rheumatoid Arthritis After Rituximab Failure: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachowiez, Curtis; Deodhar, Atul; Kozin, Eliana; Spurgeon, Stephen

    2017-05-10

    BACKGROUND Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia affecting older adults. As such, many of these patients suffer from co-existing disease states, and the provider must take these comorbidities into account when determining a treatment regimen. The widespread use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has drastically changed the treatment landscape of multiple diseases, ranging from leukemia to autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. CASE REPORT We present the case of a patient who had progression of his CLL and rheumatoid symptoms on rituximab therapy, and was subsequently treated with the second-generation anti-CD20 antibody obinutuzumab. Obinutuzumab therapy was associated with simultaneous sustained remission of both disease states, allowing for discontinuation of all other disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), and prolonged remission of his CLL. CONCLUSIONS While anti-CD20 antibodies have a clear role in the treatment of leukemia and inflammatory conditions, the success of obinutuzumab in RA has not been fully evaluated. We present this case as further evidence of the strong role of anti-CD 20 therapy in multiple conditions, and the unique opportunity for control of simultaneous disease states through targeted inhibition of shared common pathways.

  11. Homeopathic drug therapy. Homeopathy in Chikungunya Fever and Post-Chikungunya Chronic Arthritis: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwani, Gyandas G

    2013-07-01

    To observe the effect of homeopathic therapy in Chikungunya Fever (CF) and in Post-Chikungunya Chronic Arthritis (PCCA) in a primary health care setting. A prospective observational study was conducted at Delhi Government Homeopathic Dispensary, Aali Village, New Delhi, India, for a period of 6 months, from 1st October 2010 to 31st March 2011. 126 patients (75 CF, 51 PCCA) were enrolled based on predefined inclusion criteria. A single homeopathic medicine was prescribed for each patient after case taking with the help of Materia Medica and/or Repertory. Results were evaluated on the basis of visual analogue scale and symptom scores. Complete recovery was seen in 84.5% CF cases in a mean time of 6.8 days. 90% cases of PCCA recovered completely in a mean time of 32.5 days. Homeopathic therapy may be effective in CF and PCCA. A randomized controlled trial should be considered. Copyright © 2013 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Health and identity: Self-positioning in adolescent chronic fatigue syndrome and juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Coralie E; van Geelen, Stefan M; van Geel, Rolf; Sinnema, Gerben; van de Putte, Elise M; Hermans, Hubert J M; Kuis, Wietse

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to gain more insight into basic aspects of identity, in relation to adolescent chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In dialogical self theory, identity is regarded as incorporating multiple self-positions, such as 'I as tired', 'I as pessimistic', or 'I as decisive'. Physical and psychosocial impairment might alter the organization of these self-positions. The Personal Position Repertoire procedure, a quantitative method to analyse the prominence of self-positions, the Child Health Questionnaire, assessing health-related functioning, and the Checklist Individual Strength, measuring fatigue, were completed by 42 adolescents with CFS, 37 adolescents with JIA and 23 healthy teenagers. Adolescents with JIA report impaired physical functioning and general health. However, they position themselves very similar to healthy teenagers - i.e. as strong and healthy. While this self-positioning approach might be adequate and sustainable in adolescence, it could prove too strenuous to maintain throughout adult life. Adolescents with CFS, besides indicating severe physical difficulties, also report more psychosocial problems. They position themselves as significantly less strong and more unwell. With this emphasis on positions relating to their illness, there seems to be little room left for stronger positions. It is regarded of clinical importance to address these issues in this crucial developmental period.

  13. DISEASE COPING STYLES IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE OR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. K. Galetskayte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the types of response to illness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD or rheumatoid arthritis (RA.Subjects and methods. The sample consisted of 100 patients (mean age 59.2 ± 14.4 years from University Clinical Hospital One, I.M. Seche nov First Moscow State Medical University, 57 of whom were treated for RA and 43 were for COPD. All the patients were examined by a psychiatrist, a psychologist, and a therapist. The Beck Depression Inventory, SF-36 quality of life questionnaire, and projective psychological tests were also used.Results. Three main types of response to illness were identified. The features of aberrant hypochondria were most common in the patientswith COPD (53.3 % (23/43. In RA, hypochondriacal development as a confrontation with illness was intrinsic to a considerable proportion of patients (42.1 % (24/57. The common response was hypochondriacal neurosis (health anxiety, organ neurotic and omatoautonomic disorders that was encountered in 27 % (27/100 in the patients with COPD or RA and more common in those with RA (29.8 % (17/57. The examination revealed nosogenic depressive reactions in 19.2 % (11/57 of the patients with RA and in 9.3 % (4/43 of those with COPD.Conclusion. The main types of response to somatic illness in the two chronic diseases similar in their impact on quality of life have been investigated, which may be further used to manage this category of patients.

  14. DISEASE COPING STYLES IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE OR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. K. Galetskayte

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the types of response to illness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD or rheumatoid arthritis (RA.Subjects and methods. The sample consisted of 100 patients (mean age 59.2 ± 14.4 years from University Clinical Hospital One, I.M. Seche nov First Moscow State Medical University, 57 of whom were treated for RA and 43 were for COPD. All the patients were examined by a psychiatrist, a psychologist, and a therapist. The Beck Depression Inventory, SF-36 quality of life questionnaire, and projective psychological tests were also used.Results. Three main types of response to illness were identified. The features of aberrant hypochondria were most common in the patientswith COPD (53.3 % (23/43. In RA, hypochondriacal development as a confrontation with illness was intrinsic to a considerable proportion of patients (42.1 % (24/57. The common response was hypochondriacal neurosis (health anxiety, organ neurotic and omatoautonomic disorders that was encountered in 27 % (27/100 in the patients with COPD or RA and more common in those with RA (29.8 % (17/57. The examination revealed nosogenic depressive reactions in 19.2 % (11/57 of the patients with RA and in 9.3 % (4/43 of those with COPD.Conclusion. The main types of response to somatic illness in the two chronic diseases similar in their impact on quality of life have been investigated, which may be further used to manage this category of patients.

  15. Biomarkers for rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheul, M K; Fearon, U; Trouw, L A; Veale, D J

    2015-11-01

    Rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis are systemic inflammatory conditions characterized by a chronic form of arthritis, often leading to irreversible joint damage. Early treatment for patients with rheumatic diseases is required to reduce or prevent joint injury. However, early diagnosis can be difficult and currently it is not possible to predict which individual patient will develop progressive erosive disease or who may benefit from a specific treatment according to their clinical features at presentation. Biomarkers are therefore required to enable earlier diagnosis and predict prognosis in both rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. In this review we will examine the evidence and current status of established and experimental biomarkers in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis for three important purposes; disease diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Blood cell gene expression profiling in subjects with aggressive periodontitis and chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars K; Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Sønder, Søren U

    2008-01-01

    with untreated localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP) or generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP). Differentially expressed genes were validated in groups of subjects with LAgP, GAgP, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and controls. METHODS: Candidate genes were identified...

  17. Zinc protoporphyrin levels, blood lead levels and neurocognitive deficits in Andean children with chronic lead exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, S Allen; Buchanan, Leo H; Ortega, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between blood lead (PbB), zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) levels and performance on a test of auditory memory in Andean children and adolescents with chronic lead (Pb) exposure. PbB and ZPP levels were measured in blood samples from 166 participants (aged 6-16 yrs.) exposed to Pb in a local ceramic glazing cottage industry in Ecuadorian villages. PbB levels and ZPP/heme ratios were analyzed in relation to performance on the Digit Span subtest of the Wechsler IV intelligence scale, a test of auditory memory. Mean PbB level for the study group was 18.0 microg/dL (S.D.: 15.1; range: 3.0-86.0), and the mean ZPP/heme ratio was 105.7 mumol/mol (S.D.: 100.9; range: 36.0-592.0). There was no significant difference in PbB and ZPP levels between the 84 females and the 82 males. The mean Digit Span scale score (DS SS) for the study group was 6.81 (S.D.: 2.95; range: 1.0-17.0), which is below the average score of 10 for the test, with the females performing significantly better than males (t=2.435; p=0.01). Regression analyses revealed statistically significant inverse associations between DS SS and PbB level (r=0.251, p=0.001), and between DS SS and ZPP/heme ratio (r=0.246, p=0.001). Elevated PbB levels, representing acute exposure, and ZPP levels, reflecting chronic Pb exposure in this cohort of Andean inhabitants were associated with poor performance on a test of auditory memory, suggesting that the children and adolescents in the study area have neurocognitive deficits that may affect learning.

  18. Fatigue - an underestimated symptom in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewska-Włodarczyk, Magdalena; Owczarczyk-Saczonek, Agnieszka; Placek, Waldemar

    2017-01-01

    The nature of fatigue is very complex and involves physiological, psychological and social phenomena at the same time, and the mechanisms leading to occurrence and severity of fatigue are still poorly understood. The condition of chronic inflammation associated with psoriatic arthritis can be regarded as a potential factor affecting development of fatigue. Only a few studies so far have focused on the occurrence of fatigue in psoriatic arthritis. The problem of chronic fatigue is underestimated in everyday clinical practice. Identification and analysis of subjective fatigue components in each patient can provide an objective basis for optimal fatigue treatment in daily practice. This review presents a definition of chronic fatigue and describes mechanisms that may be associated with development of fatigue, highlighting the role of chronic inflammation, selected fatigue measurement methods and relations of fatigue occurrence with clinical aspects of psoriatic arthritis.

  19. Unraveling the chronic toxicity of lead: an essential priority for environmental health.

    OpenAIRE

    Todd, A C; Wetmur, J G; Moline, J M; Godbold, J. H.; Levin, S. M.; Landrigan, P J

    1996-01-01

    Although population exposure to lead has declined, chronic lead toxicity remains a major public health problem in the United States affecting millions of children and adults. Important gaps exist in knowledge of the pathophysiology of chronic lead intoxication. These gaps have impeded development of control strategies. To close current gaps in knowledge of chronic lead toxicity, we propose an integrated, multidisciplinary, marker-based research program. This program combines a) direct measure...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Eyes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the eyes? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect the eyes? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects ...

  1. Psychological, behavioural, and social adjustment in children and adolescents with juvenile chronic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huygen, A C; Kuis, W; Sinnema, G

    2000-04-01

    To assess the psychological, behavioural and social adjustment of children (7-11 years) and adolescents (12-16 years) with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA). Higher rates of maladjustment were expected to be found in these patients. Self report questionnaires were used within the context of personal interviews. Family functioning and social support were studied as well. Forty seven patients with JCA, 52 healthy peers and their respective parents participated in the study. Self esteem, perceived competence and body image in patients with JCA were as positive as they were in healthy participants. There were no differences between ill and healthy youngsters with respect to the incidence of psychopathology. Patients with JCA, in general, perceived themselves as socially competent, but they seemed to have somewhat less opportunity or energy to participate in social activities. Children with JCA showed a high level of aspiration to cope with social expectations. This aspiration seemed to be even stronger in case the disease caused more strains, for example, in periods of inflammation and in the systemic onset type. The high level of social adjustment in children with JCA seemed to be supported by highly cohesive family structures. Generally, adolescents with JCA experienced much social support. In contrast with our expectation, children and adolescents with JCA seemeed to cope quite well with the psychological and social consequences of their long term condition. For future studies, it is hypothesised that the high levels of adaptation might imply an enduring psychological strain, which is reflected in an altered function of the autonomic nervous system.

  2. Periodontitis in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective follow-up study in Finnish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Äyräväinen, Leena; Leirisalo-Repo, Marjatta; Kuuliala, Antti; Ahola, Kirsi; Koivuniemi, Riitta; Meurman, Jukka H; Heikkinen, Anna Maria

    2017-01-31

    To investigate the association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis with special emphasis on the role of antirheumatic drugs in periodontal health. Prospective follow-up study. Patients with early untreated RA and chronic active RA were examined at baseline and 16 months later. Controls were examined once. The study was conducted in Finland from September 2005 to May 2014 at the Helsinki University Hospital. Overall, 124 participants were recruited for dental and medical examinations: 53 were patients with early disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) naїve RA (ERA), 28 were patients with chronic RA (CRA) with insufficient response to conventional DMARDs. After baseline examination, patients with ERA started treatment with synthetic DMARDs and patients with CRA with biological DMARDs. Controls were 43 age-matched, gender-matched and community-matched participants. Degree of periodontitis (defined according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Periodontology). Prevalence of periodontal bacteria (analysed from plaque samples), clinical rheumatological status by Disease Activity Score, 28-joint count (DAS28), function by Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and treatment response by European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria. Moderate periodontitis was present in 67.3% of patients with ERA, 64.3% of patients with CRA and 39.5% of control participants (p=0.001). Further, patients with RA had significantly more periodontal findings compared with controls, recorded with common periodontal indexes. In the re-examination, patients with RA still showed poor periodontal health in spite of treatment with DMARDs after baseline examination. The prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis was higher in patients with ERA with periodontal probing depth ≥4 mm compared with patients with CRA and controls. Antirheumatic medication did not seem to affect the results. Moderate periodontitis was more frequent in

  3. Effect Of Chronic Exposure To Low Levels Of Lead On Renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic exposure to lead is associated with adverse effects on renal function in laboratory animals and man. There is controversy concerning the direction of change of renal function parameters following chronic lead intoxication. The renal effects of low-dose lead exposure, as opposed to acute and pharmacological doses, ...

  4. A Review of Persuasive Principles in Mobile Apps for Chronic Arthritis Patients: Opportunities for Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnen, Thijs Willem; Westhovens, Rene; de Vlam, Kurt; Geurts, Luc; Vanden Abeele, Vero

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic arthritis (CA), an umbrella term for inflammatory rheumatic and other musculoskeletal diseases, is highly prevalent. Effective disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs for CA are available, with the exception of osteoarthritis, but require a long-term commitment of patients to comply with the medication regimen and management program as well as a tight follow-up by the treating physician and health professionals. Additionally, patients are advised to participate in physical exercise programs. Adherence to exercises and physical activity programs is often very low. Patients would benefit from support to increase medication compliance as well as compliance to the physical exercise programs. To address these shortcomings, health apps for CA patients have been created. These mobile apps assist patients in self-management of overall health measures, health prevention, and disease management. By including persuasive principles designed to reinforce, change, or shape attitudes or behaviors, health apps can transform into support tools that motivate and stimulate users to achieve or keep up with target behavior, also called persuasive systems. However, the extent to which health apps for CA patients consciously and successfully employ such persuasive principles remains unknown. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the number and type of persuasive principles present in current health apps for CA patients. Methods A review of apps for arthritis patients was conducted across the three major app stores (Google Play, Apple App Store, and Windows Phone Store). Collected apps were coded according to 37 persuasive principles, based on an altered version of the Persuasive System Design taxonomy of Oinas-Kukkonen and Harjuma and the taxonomy of Behavior Change Techniques of Michie and Abraham. In addition, user ratings, number of installs, and price of the apps were also coded. Results We coded 28 apps. On average, 5.8 out of 37 persuasive

  5. Children born by women with rheumatoid arthritis have increased susceptibility for selected chronic diseases – a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jølving, Line Riis; Nielsen, Jan; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

    2018-01-01

    on the Danish health registries and included data on all children born alive in Denmark from January 1st 1989 to December 31st 2013. The cohort comprised 2106 children born by women with RA (exposed), and 1 378 539 children born by women without RA (unexposed). Cox proportional hazard regression models were.......89 (95% CI, 2.06 - 4.05). The HR's for anxiety and personality disorders and chronic lung disease including asthma were in the range of 1.15 - 1.16, but these were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that in utero exposure to maternal RA is associated with an increased risk......OBJECTIVE: Fetal exposure to maternal rheumatoid arthritis (RA) might impact the long-term risk of disease in the offspring. We examined a possible association between maternal RA and 15 selected groups of chronic diseases in the offspring. METHODS: This nationwide cohort study was based...

  6. Sublethal effects of chronic lead ingestion in mallard ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, M.T.; Dieter, M.P.; Locke, L.N.

    1976-01-01

    Mallard drakes (Anas platyrhynchos) fed 1, 5, or 25 ppm lead nitrate were bled and sacrificed at 3-wk intervals. No mortality occurred, and the pathologic lesions usually associated with lead poisoning were not found. Changes in hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration did not occur. After 3-wk ducks fed 25 ppm lead exhibited a 40% inhibition of blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity that persisted through 12 wk exposure. After 12 wk treatment similar enzyme inhibition was present in the ducks fed 5 ppm lead. At 3 wk there was a small accumulation of lead (less than 1 ppm) in the liver and kidneys of ducks fed 25ppm lead; no further increases occurred throughout the exposure. No significant accumulation of lead occurred the the tibiae or wing bones. Groups of ducks fed 5 and 25 ppm diets for 12 wk were placed on clean feed and examined through a 12 wk posttreatment period. After 3 wk on clean diet delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity and lead concentrations in the blood had returned to pretreatment levels. Even though lead concentrations in the blood, soft organs and bone were low, a highly significant negative correlation between blood lead and blood enzyme activity was obtained. This enzyme bioassay should provide a sensitive and precise estimate for monitoring lead in the blood for waterflow.

  7. Arthritis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  8. Does housing chronically homeless adults lead to social integration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Mares, Alvin S; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    Supported housing programs have been successful in helping homeless adults obtain housing. This study examined whether improvements in social integration occur after clients obtain supported housing. Measures of social integration were examined for 550 chronically homeless adults with mental illness who participated in the 11-site Collaborative Initiative to Help End Chronic Homelessness. Social integration was conceptualized as a multidimensional construct of variables in six domains: housing, work, social support, community participation, civic activity, and religious faith. Changes in baseline measures related to the six domains and their interrelationships were examined at six and 12 months after entry into the supported housing program. Chronically homeless adults showed substantial improvements in housing but remained socially isolated and showed limited improvement in other domains of social integration, which were only weakly correlated with one another. More attention is needed to develop rehabilitation interventions in supported housing programs to improve social integration of chronically homeless adults. Because improvements in some domains of social integration were only weakly related, it may be necessary to intervene in multiple domains simultaneously.

  9. Increased risk for chronic comorbid disorders in patients with inflammatory arthritis: a population based study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursum, J.; Nielen, M.M.J.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Peters, M.J.L.; Schellevis, F.G.; Nurmohamed, M.T.; Korevaar, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Studies determining the development of a wide variety of different comorbid disorders in inflammatory arthritis (IA) patients are scarce, however, this knowledge could be helpful in optimising preventive care in IA patients. The aim of this study is to establish the risk that new

  10. Physiotherapy and occupational therapy for juvenile chronic arthritis: custom and practice in five centres in the UK, USA and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, J; Johnson, B; Parkin, A; Southwood, T

    1996-07-01

    Physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely accepted as being of central importance for the treatment of juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA). However, these approaches have rarely been subject to critical scrutiny. The aims of this report are to highlight some of the inter-centre similarities and differences observed in the implementation of physical and occupational therapy for JCA, and to emphasize the need for scientifically controlled research in this area. During a series of visits to several paediatric rheumatology units in the UK, USA and Canada, three aspects of the service were noted: treatment philosophy, physical interventions used for the treatment of JCA and quality-of-life and independence training activities. There was general consensus with the philosophy that early physical intervention was a vital part of the treatment plan for JCA, although all therapists were concerned that compliance with treatment modalities was poor. Differences between units in the approach to acute arthritis, the use of foot orthoses and wrist splints, the treatment of joint contractures and the use of general quality-of-life training activities were noted. Although it was widely recognized that controlled research into the efficacy of physical intervention was needed, no centre had a co-ordinated plan for such investigations.

  11. Clinical experience with the interleukin-1β blocker canakinumab in patients with chronic tophaceous gout: abolishment of arthritis and prevention of exacerbations when allopurinol is used

    OpenAIRE

    M. S. Eliseev; O. V. Zhelyabina; M. V. Mukagova; E. L. Nasonov

    2015-01-01

    The interleukin (IL)-1β inhibitor canakinumab may be effective in relieving an acute gout attack and in preventing an arthritis exacerbation. However, there are insufficient data on the use of this agent to abolish and prevent arthritis in patients who are resistant to another anti-inflammatory therapy.Objective: to evaluate the efficacy of the interleukin (IL)-1β inhibitor canakinumab in patients with chronic tophaceous gout, who are resistant to traditional anti-inflammatory therapy, in ord...

  12. Voluntary ingestion of Cortinarius mushrooms leading to chronic interstitial nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calviño, J; Romero, R; Pintos, E; Novoa, D; Güimil, D; Cordal, T; Mardaras, J; Arcocha, V; Lens, X M; Sanchez-Guisande, D

    1998-01-01

    'Magic mushrooms' ingestion among the drug-using population has become a popular cheap way to get hallucinogenic effects which is not free of complications. One of these is acute renal failure related to Cortinarius genus intake. This one greatly resembles 'magic mushrooms' and confusion is possible for inexperienced collectors. We report the case of a young male ex-drug addict who developed acute tubulointerstitial nephritis after voluntary ingestion of Cortinarius orellanus. The clinical picture was preceded by a long latency period, had an insidious course without any data of hepatoxicity and evolved to a chronic state. Renal biopsy showed nonspecific histopathological findings. In summary, it is important to bear this possibility in mind when facing an acute tubulointerstitial nephritis of unknown origin in a drug-taking patient.

  13. Septic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develop symptoms of septic arthritis. Prevention Preventive (prophylactic) antibiotics may be helpful for people at high risk. Alternative Names Bacterial arthritis; Non-gonococcal bacterial arthritis References ...

  14. Arthritis and Veterans

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-09

    One in three veterans has arthritis. This podcast provides information on how veterans can improve their quality of life with physical activity and other arthritis management strategies.  Created: 11/9/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/9/2015.

  15. Arthritis in Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacre, J E; Huskisson, E C

    1988-03-01

    A 31 year old man with Down's syndrome presented with a 10 year history of an inflammatory polyarthritis resembling juvenile chronic arthritis. This case was similar to those already reported of an arthropathy associated with Down's syndrome but was eventually found to be gout. This emphasised the importance of serum uric acid estimation in patients with Down's syndrome and coexistent arthritis.

  16. Arthritis in Down's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Dacre, J. E.; Huskisson, E C

    1988-01-01

    A 31 year old man with Down's syndrome presented with a 10 year history of an inflammatory polyarthritis resembling juvenile chronic arthritis. This case was similar to those already reported of an arthropathy associated with Down's syndrome but was eventually found to be gout. This emphasised the importance of serum uric acid estimation in patients with Down's syndrome and coexistent arthritis.

  17. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O'Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors overexpressed by cells within chronic inflammatory tissues, leading to increased efficacy and reduced systemic side-effects. This review highlights the research conducted over the past decade on using nanomedicine for potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes some of the major findings and promising opportunities on using nanomedicine to treat this prevalent and chronic disease.

  18. Effects of chronic dietary lead in American kestrels (Falco sparverius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franson, J C; Sileo, L; Pattee, O H; Moore, J F

    1983-04-01

    American kestrels were fed a diet containing 0, 10, or 50 ppm lead (Pb) powder for at least 5 mo. Blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity in birds receiving 50 ppm Pb was as low as 20% of controls but no significant effects were noted in packed cell volume (PCV) or hemoglobin concentration (Hb). Mean liver Pb residues in birds fed 50 ppm Pb were 1.3 and 2.4 ppm (dry wt) for males and females, respectively. Liver Pb residues in birds fed 10 ppm Pb were not significantly greater than controls. There was no significant correlation between blood ALAD activity and blood Pb concentration, no consistent histopathological lesions were noted, and body and organ weights were not affected.

  19. Short-term glucocorticoid administration in patients with protracted and chronic gout arthritis. Part 2 — comparison of different medication forms efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A Fedorova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare efficacy of different glucocorticoid (GC medication forms in protracted and chronic gout arthritis. Material and methods. 59 pts with tophaceous gout (crystal-verified diagnosis and arthritis of three and more joints lasting more than a months in spite of treatment with sufficient doses of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were included. Median age of pts was 56 [48;63], median disease duration — 15,2 years [7,4;20], median swollen joint count at the examination — 8 [5; 11]. The patients were randomized into 2 groups. Methylprednisolone (MP 500 mg/day iv during 2 days and placebo im once was administered in one of them, betamethasone (BM 7 mg im once and placebo iv twice — in the other. Results. Number of pts with full resolution of arthritis, recurrent exacerbation, insufficient arthritis resolution or clinically insignificant response was comparable in both groups. More rapid decrease of pain at moving was achieved during the first 2-3 days after GC administration in pts with full resolution of arthritis (p=0,03 in group receiving MP in comparison with BM. At day 14 joint damage measures did not differ between groups. Conclusion. Efficacy of short-term glucocorticoid administration does not depend on mode of administration and GC medication form (methylprednisolone 500 mg/day iv during 2 days or betamethasone 7 mg im once.

  20. Sensitivity and specificity of criteria for spondyloarthritis in children with late onset pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis as well as their characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joos, R; Dehoorne, J; Hoffman, I; Mielants, H; Verbruggen, G; Elewaut, D

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of criteria designed for spondyloarthritis in a university hospital treated population of children with late onset pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis and a control population. Four sets of criteria especially designed for juvenile patients: Garmisch-Partenkirchen juvenile spondylitis criteria (= Garmisch), SEA (=seronegative enthesopathy and arthritis) syndrome, Enthesitis Related Arthritis (ERA), Atypical spondyloarthritis for children and two sets of criteria for patients without age specification (European spondyloarthropathy Study Group - ESSG and Amor) were evaluated in a cross-sectional way in a group of 43 consecutive patients with late onset pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis (LOPA) seen over a six-month period in the outpatient clinic. These criteria were analysed in 69 patients with other forms of juvenile chronic arthritis as well. The sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each set, as well as positive predictive value and likelihood ratio. The characteristics described in the different sets of criteria were separately evaluated in the LOPA patients and the other patients. For sensitivity, the Garmisch criteria scored the highest value (97.7%). However, sensitivity was significantly lower in two of the juvenile sets (SEA syndrome and Atypical spondyloarthritis), respectively 44.2% and 51.2%, as opposed to the other criteria (>85%; p10 in SEA (30.5), ERA (18.7) and Garmisch (16.8). The negative likelihood ratio (LR-) was LOPA. The SEA syndrome criteria, which were not designed to be classification criteria, being very specific, cannot be used in this patient population to classify a sufficient number of patients. The sensitivity and specificity for the ESSG criteria being similar in these children as in adults suggest they have similar characteristics. The Garmisch-Partenkirchen criteria and/or LOPA definition are major candidates for future research in identifying spondyloarthritis in

  1. Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funded Arthritis Programs Arthritis Basics FAQs Arthritis Types Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Fibromyalgia Gout Childhood Arthritis Management Risk Factors Physical Activity for Arthritis Data and Statistics National ...

  2. Synovial fluid levels of E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1: relationship to joint inflammation in children with chronic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Bradley J; Nelson, Sarah M; Alario, Anthony J; Miller, Laurie C; Schaller, Jane G

    2002-09-01

    E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 are crucial to the inflammatory response in chronic inflammatory arthritis. Soluble (s) levels of these molecules in sera and synovial fluid (SF) correlate with some clinical parameters and synovial tissue expression of the same molecules in rheumatoid arthritis. Studies of sera from children with chronic inflammatory arthritis corroborate this information; corresponding SF data are relatively lacking. We thus studied SF sE-selectin and sICAM-1 in 28 children with active juvenile rheumatoid arthritis or a spondyloarthropathy. Levels were correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), SF leukocyte counts, duration of disease, and duration of response to concomitant intra-articular corticosteroid injection. Levels were compared according to use of methotrexate and/or sulfasalazine. Synovial fluid sE-selectin correlated with ESR and SF leukocyte counts. There was a trend toward lower sICAM-1 in patients treated with sulfasalazine and/or methotrexate. We conclude that SF levels of sE-selectin accurately reflect intra-synovial inflammation. Soluble ICAM-1 levels may reflect the effects of disease-modifying agents.

  3. Technetium-99m human polyclonal immunoglobulin g studies and conventional bone scans to detect active joint inflammation in chronic rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna, Ll.; Torres, G.; Estorch, M.; Martinez-Duncker, D.; Carrio, I. (Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Diez, C. (Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Rheumatology)

    1992-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic polyarthritis in which active inflammed joints coexist with joints in remission. We performed bone scans ({sup 99m}Tc-DPD) and {sup 99m}Tc human polyclonal immunoglobulin G scans ({sup 99m}Tc-IgG) in 18 patients with rheumatoid arthritis to assess the uptake in actively inflammed joints and in joints in which remission after inflammation had occurred. A quantitative analysis of tracer uptake in each joint was performed on both scans. In 123 joints without current active inflammation, an increased {sup 99m}Tc-DPD uptake was observed (2.31{+-}1.27), whereas no {sup 99m}Tc-IgG uptake was noted (1.18{+-}0.32). Some 78 joints with mild pain or swelling exhibited increased {sup 99m}Tc-DPD uptake (2.48{+-}1.14) and increased {sup 99m}Tc-IgG uptake (1.76{+-}0.50; P<0.001), white 21 joints with moderate to severe pain or swelling exhibited increased {sup 99m}Tc-DPD uptake (2.39{+-}0.93) and increased {sup 99m}Tc-IgG uptake (1.79{+-}0.51; P<0.001). In conclusion, {sup 99m}Tc-IgG scans distinguish between joints with and without active inflammation in chronic rheumatoid arthritis, whereas bone scans do not. Thus, {sup 99m}Tc-IgG scans may be useful in identifying joints with current active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.).

  4. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupa H Bhatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA is the most chronic musculoskeletal disease of pediatric population. The chronic course of disease has a great impact on oral health. Temporomandibular joint is involved in JIA causing limited mouth opening with progressive open bite, retrognathia, microgenia and bird like appearance. Joints of upper and lower extremities are also involved. Effect on upper limb function leads to difficulty with fine motor movements required for brushing and flossing. This increases incidence of caries and periodontal disease in children. The cause of JIA is still poorly understood and none of the available drugs for JIA can cure the disease. However, prognosis has improved as a result of progress in disease classification and management. The dental practitioner should be familiar with the symptoms and oral manifestations of JIA to help manage as multidisciplinary management is essential.

  5. Esophageal cancer associated with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. Could chronic candidiasis lead to esophageal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues-Ferreira, Mauricio; Grumach, Anete Sevciovic; Duarte, Alberto Jose Da Silva; De Moraes-Vasconcelos, Dewton

    2009-03-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is a rare disease associated with immunodeficiency and characterized by persistent and refractory infections of the skin, appendages and mucous membranes caused by members of the genus Candida. Several different disorders are classified under this common denominator, including chronic and recurrent mucocutaneous infections due to Candida spp., which are sometimes linked to autoimmune endocrinopathies. These fungal infections are usually confined to the mucocutaneous surface, with little propensity for systemic disease or septicemia. We describe a patient with CMC who had an esophageal candidiasis refractory to treatment for decades and who developed an epidermoid esophageal cancer. No risk factors such as familiar susceptibility, smoking, alcohol drinking, or living in an endemic area were verified. This case report suggests the participation of nitrosamine compounds produced by chronic Candida infections as a risk factor for esophageal cancer in a patient with autosomal-dominant chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis.

  6. Chronic Stimulation of Renin Cells Leads to Vascular Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Masafumi; Medrano, Silvia; Sequeira-Lόpez, Maria Luisa S; Gómez, R Ariel

    2017-07-01

    Experimental or spontaneous genomic mutations of the renin-angiotensin system or its pharmacological inhibition in early life leads to renal abnormalities, including poorly developed renal medulla, papillary atrophy, hydronephrosis, inability to concentrate the urine, polyuria, polydipsia, renal failure, and anemia. At the core of such complex phenotype is the presence of unique vascular abnormalities: the renal arterioles do not branch or elongate properly and they have disorganized, concentric hypertrophy. This lesion has been puzzling because it is often found in hypertensive individuals whereas mutant or pharmacologically inhibited animals are hypotensive. Remarkably, when renin cells are ablated with diphtheria toxin, the vascular hypertrophy does not occur, suggesting that renin cells per se may contribute to the vascular disease. To test this hypothesis, on a Ren1(c-/-) background, we generated mutant mice with reporter expression (Ren1(c-/-);Ren1(c)-Cre;R26R.mTmG and Ren1(c-/-);Ren1(c)-Cre;R26R.LacZ) to trace the fate of renin(null) cells. To assess whether renin(null) cells maintain their renin promoter active, we used Ren1(c-/-);Ren1(c)-YFP mice that transcribe YFP (yellow fluorescent protein) directed by the renin promoter. We also followed the expression of Akr1b7 and miR-330-5p, markers of cells programmed for the renin phenotype. Contrary to what we expected, renin(null) cells did not die or disappear. Instead, they survived, increased in number along the renal arterial tree, and maintained an active molecular memory of the myoepitheliod renin phenotype. Furthermore, null cells of the renin lineage occupied the walls of the arteries and arterioles in a chaotic, directionless pattern directly contributing to the concentric arterial hypertrophy. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Burden of childhood-onset arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassett Afton L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Juvenile arthritis comprises a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases causing erosive arthritis in children, often progressing to disability. These children experience functional impairment due to joint and back pain, heel pain, swelling of joints and morning stiffness, contractures, pain, and anterior uveitis leading to blindness. As children who have juvenile arthritis reach adulthood, they face possible continuing disease activity, medication-associated morbidity, and life-long disability and risk for emotional and social dysfunction. In this article we will review the burden of juvenile arthritis for the patient and society and focus on the following areas: patient disability; visual outcome; other medical complications; physical activity; impact on HRQOL; emotional impact; pain and coping; ambulatory visits, hospitalizations and mortality; economic impact; burden on caregivers; transition issues; educational occupational outcomes, and sexuality. The extent of impact on the various aspects of the patients', families' and society's functioning is clear from the existing literature. Juvenile arthritis imposes a significant burden on different spheres of the patients', caregivers' and family's life. In addition, it imposes a societal burden of significant health care costs and utilization. Juvenile arthritis affects health-related quality of life, physical function and visual outcome of children and impacts functioning in school and home. Effective, well-designed and appropriately tailored interventions are required to improve transitioning to adult care, encourage future vocation/occupation, enhance school function and minimize burden on costs.

  8. Olfactory recognition memory is disrupted in young mice with chronic low-level lead exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Montoya, Mayra Gisel; Alvarez, Juan Manuel; Sobin, Christina

    2015-07-02

    Chronic developmental lead exposure yielding very low blood lead burden is an unresolved child public health problem. Few studies have attempted to model neurobehavioral changes in young animals following very low level exposure, and studies are needed to identify tests that are sensitive to the neurobehavioral changes that may occur. Mechanisms of action are not yet known however results have suggested that hippocampus/dentate gyrus may be uniquely vulnerable to early chronic low-level lead exposure. This study examined the sensitivity of a novel odor recognition task to differences in pre-adolescent C57BL/6J mice chronically exposed from birth to PND 28, to 0 ppm (control), 30 ppm (low-dose), or 330 ppm (higher-dose) lead acetate (N=33). Blood lead levels (BLLs) determined by ICP-MS ranged from 0.02 to 20.31 μg/dL. Generalized linear mixed model analyses with litter as a random effect showed a significant interaction of BLL×sex. As BLLs increased olfactory recognition memory decreased in males. Among females, non-linear effects were observed at lower but not higher levels of lead exposure. The novel odor detection task is sensitive to effects associated with early chronic low-level lead exposure in young C57BL/6J mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I N Sartika

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is the most common rheumatic condition in children. JRA is defined as persistent arthritis in 1 or more joints for at least 6 weeks, with the onset before age 16 years. The etiology of JRA is unknown. Antigen activated CD4+ T cell stimulate monocytes, macrophages, and synovial fibroblasts to produce the cytokines Interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-? and to secrete matrix metalloproteinases, which lead to chronic inflammation due to infiltration of inflammatory cell, angiogenesis, destruction of cartilage and bone with pannus formation. The 3 major subtypes of JRA are based on the symptoms at disease onset and are designated systemic onset, pauciarticular onset, and polyarticular onset. For all patients, the goals of therapy are to decrease chronic joint pain and suppress the inflammatory process. Poor prognostic have been observed in patients with polyarticular onset, rheumatoid factor, persistent morning stiffness, tenosynovitis, involvement of the small joints, rapid appearance of erosions, active late onset childhood, subcutaneous nodules, or antinuclear antibody.

  10. Pain and microcrystalline arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramonda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcrystals are responsible for some of the most common and complex arthropathies which are often accompanied by intense, severe pain and inflammatory reactions. The main pathogens are crystals of monosodium urate (MSU, responsible for the gout, calcium pyrophosphate (CPP, which deposits also in various clinical forms of arthopathies, and basic calcium phosphate associated with osteoarthritis. In this context, the microcrystal arthritis is characterized by multiple, acute attacks followed by chronic pain, disability, impaired quality of life, and increased mortality. Given their chronic nature, they represent an ever more urgent public health problem. MSU and CPP crystals are also able to activate nociceptors. The pain in mycrocrystalline arthritis (MCA is an expression of the inflammatory process. In the course of these diseases there is an abundant release of inflammatory molecules, including prostaglandins 2 and kinins. Interleukin-1 represents the most important cytokine released during the crystal-induced inflammatory process. Therefore, clinically, pain is the most important component of MCA, which lead to functional impairment and disability in a large proportion of the population. It is fundamental to diagnose these diseases as early as possible, and to this aim, to identify appropriate and specific targets for a timely therapeutic intervention.

  11. Rheumatic patients at work : a study of labour force participations and its determinants in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and juvenile chronic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chorus, A.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis at the University of Maastricht, defended at May 7, 2004, yields several important and new findings with regard to work related quality of life, participation in the labour force and its determinants of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and juvenile

  12. Chronic lead exposure is epidemic in obligate scavenger populations in eastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behmke, Shannon; Fallon, Jesse; Duerr, Adam E; Lehner, Andreas; Buchweitz, John; Katzner, Todd

    2015-06-01

    Lead is a prominent and highly toxic contaminant with important impacts to wildlife. To understand the degree to which wildlife populations are chronically exposed, we quantified lead levels within American black vultures (Coragyps atratus; BLVU) and turkey vultures (Cathartes aura; TUVU), two species that are useful as environmental sentinels in eastern North America. Every individual sampled (n=108) had bone lead levels indicative of chronic exposure to anthropogenic lead (BLVU: x¯=36.99 ± 55.21 mg Pb/kg tissue (±SD); TUVU: x¯=23.02 ± 18.77 mg/kg). Only a few showed evidence of recent lead exposure (BLVU liver: x¯=0.78 ± 0.93 mg/kg; TUVU liver: x¯=0.55 ± 0.34 mg/kg). Isotopic ratios suggested multiple potential sources of lead including ammunition, gasoline, coal-fired power plants, and zinc smelting. Black and turkey vultures range across eastern North America, from Quebec to Florida and individuals may traverse thousands of kilometers annually. The extent to which vultures are exposed suggests that anthropogenic lead permeates eastern North American ecosystems to a previously unrecognized degree. Discovery of an epidemic of chronic lead exposure in such widespread and common species and the failure of soft-tissue sampling to diagnose this pattern has dramatic implications for understanding modern wildlife and human health concerns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Chronic occupational exposure to lead and its impact on oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Said, Khaled F; El-Ghamry, Amina M; Mahdy, Nehad H; El-Bestawy, Nagwa A

    2008-01-01

    Chronic Lead exposure favours the formation of cheilitis, fissures, ulcers and epithelial desquamation of the tongue, palate and other parts of the oral mucous membranes. The tissues of oral cavity may be affected by toxic agents either by direct action as in exposure to sulfuric acid fumes or through systemic exposure as in poisoning with heavy metals e.g. lead.. The Present study aimed to investigate the oral health condition of industrial workers exposed to lead in Alexandria governorate. The samples included all workers chronically exposed to lead fumes or dust in a storage battery plant (400 workers) and working in seven departments where lead exposure was present. These departments were evaluated environmentally for lead in air and their workers for lead in blood. Oral medical examinations were carried out according to the items of WHO sheet designed for oral health survey with some modifications. Results of the present study revealed that chronic exposure to lead significantly affects oral health condition among exposed workers and strongly correlates with increasing level of blood lead among them. It can be concluded that the most common adverse effects of lead on dental health of exposed workers were the significant increase in the prevalence of periodontal diseases (gingivitis and periodontitis expressed as PI) and in the prevalence of decay (caries), missed and filled teeth (expressed as DMFT index) and dental abrasions. Moreover,these findings were found to be related to lead concentration in air in the studied departments and to blood lead level. On the other hand, exposure to lead was found to have insignificant effect on calculus formation (expressed as CI-S) or oral debris (expressed as (DI-S)or both together expressed as (OHI-S).

  14. Association between subchronic and chronic lead exposure and levels of antioxidants and chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrakowski, Michał; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Pawlas, Natalia; Birkner, Ewa; Hudziec, Edyta; Chwalińska, Ewa; Kasperczyk, Sławomir

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to compare the influence of lead on the non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses and the levels of chemokines in workers subchronically and chronically exposed to lead. The study population was divided into three groups. The first group consisted of male workers subchronically exposed to lead for 40 ± 3.2 days, while the second group included male workers chronically exposed to lead. The third group was a control group. The levels of uric acid and bilirubin were significantly higher after a subchronic exposure to lead compared to the baseline by 22 and 35 %, respectively. Similarly, the values of total antioxidant capacity (TAC), total oxidant status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) increased by 15, 50, and 33 %, respectively. At the same time, the levels of thiol groups and albumin decreased by 5 and 8 %, respectively. Additionally, the levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β) were significantly higher after a subchronic exposure to lead compared to the baseline by 34 and 20 %, respectively. Moreover, IL-8 level was significantly higher by 40 % in the group of workers chronically exposed to lead than in the control group, while the level of interferon gamma-induced protein-10 (IP-10) was significantly lower by 28 %. Similar to chronic lead exposure, subchronic exposure to lead is associated with elevated blood levels of uric acid and bilirubin in humans. This probably results in increased TAC value despite thiol depletion. However, the compensatory activation of non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses seems to be insufficient to protect against lead-induced oxidative stress, which may be additively enhanced by the pro-inflammatory action of chemokines, especially IL-8.

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis: diagnosis and treatment with a particular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder targeting diarthrodial synovial lined joints, usually in a symmetric distribution. The lungs, pericardium of the heart, skin, and eyes may be affected in up to twenty percent of patients. If uncontrolled, RA leads to joint destruction, disability,.

  16. Automated radiographic assessment of hands in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauffman, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease leading to severe joint damage, particularly in the wrist, fingers and toes. To prevent irreversible joint damage, it is crucial that RA is treated in an early stage. The effect of treatment methods can differ per patient. Therefore it is

  17. A large chronic pericardial effusion in an ultramarathon runner with anti-CCP positive rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Thomas J; Penfold, Rose; Kluzek, Stefan; Nagra, Navraj S

    2017-06-13

    Pericardial effusions arise as an extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Pericardial effusions are often asymptomatic, particularly in the early phase, but patients are at risk of cardiac tamponade as the effusion progresses. We discuss the case of a 40-year-old male ultramarathon runner with RA who presented with mild pleuritic chest pain and exertional dyspnoea after a recent long-haul flight. Despite a relative tachycardia, his observations were otherwise unremarkable. His blood tests revealed a C-reactive protein (CRP) of 86 mg/L and an anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) titre of 360 units/mL. He was initially diagnosed with a pulmonary embolism; however, a large pericardial effusion was found incidentally on CT pulmonary angiogram with over 1500 mL subsequently drained. The patient's symptoms resolved and CRP normalised 2 weeks later. This unique case illustrates that physically fit patients may physiologically compensate for large pericardial effusions and that arthritic symptoms do not correlate with the severity of extra-articular features in RA. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Inflammatory biomarkers, disease activity index, and self-reported disability may be predictors of chronic arthritis after chikungunya infection: brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda-Delgado, J; Vera-Lastra, O L; Trujillo-Murillo, K; Canseco-Ávila, L M; Sánchez-González, R A; Gómez-Cruz, O; Lugo-Trampe, A; Fernández-Salas, I; Danis-Lozano, R; Contreras-Contreras, A; Mendoza-Torres, A; Domínguez-Arrevillaga, S; Mena-Vela, B A; Ocaña-Sibilla, M; Ramirez-Valdespino, J C; Jara, L J

    2017-03-01

    The chikungunya virus (ChikV) is a reemerging mosquito-borne pathogen that causes disabling chronic arthritis. The relationship between clinical evolution and inflammatory biomarkers in patients with ChikV-induced arthritis has not been fully described. We performed a prospective case series to evaluate the association among joint involvement, self-reported disability, and inflammatory biomarkers. Patients with ChikV infection were followed for 1 year. Joint involvement and self-reported disability were evaluated with disease activity index 28 (DAS-28) and World Health Organization Disablement Assessment Schedule II (WHODAS-II). Interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and rheumatoid factor (RF) were used as biomarkers. Ten patients with mean age 48 ±15.04 years were included. Symptoms at diagnosis were fever, arthralgias, myalgias, rash, arthritis, nausea, vomiting, and back pain. Polyarticular involvement was present in seven cases. At diagnosis, measures were as follows: DAS-28, 5.08±1.11; WHODAS-II score, 72.3±10.3 %; CRP, 5.09±7.23 mg/dL; ESR, 33.5±17.5 mm/h; RF, 64±21.7 IU/mL; and IL-6, 17.6±10.3 pg/mL. Six patients developed subacute and chronic symptoms. During follow-up, DAS-28 index, WHODAS-II score, ESR, and IL-6 were statistically different in patients with subacute and chronic symptoms compared to those who resolved in the acute phase (p arthritis.

  19. The negative bone effects of the disease and of chronic corticosteroid treatment in premenopausal women affected by rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fassio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a well-known extra-articular complication in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The chronic corticosteroid treatment, the functional impairment associated with RA and the disease itself appear to be the most relevant determinants. Most of the previous studies involved postmenopausal women, in whom the estrogenic deficiency might amplify the negative effect towards bone of both RA and corticosteroid therapy. We decided to evaluate bone health in a cohort of premenopausal RA patients. The study population includes 47 premenopausal women attending our outpatient clinic for RA and twice as many healthy age-matched control women selected from the hospital personnel. The bone density at the spine and femoral neck were significantly lower in patients with RA as compared with controls. When spine bone mineral density (BMD values were adjusted for the cumulative glucocorticoid (GC dose alone and for the cumulative GC dose plus body mass index (BMI the mean differences between two groups decreased but they remained statistically significant. We found no difference when the spine BMD was adjusted for cumulative GC dose, BMI and health assessment questionnaire. The difference in femoral neck BMD remained statistically significant also after all the same adjustments. In conclusion, our study shows that a BMD deficiency is frequent also in premenopausal women affected by RA, especially at femoral site and that the main determinants of this bone loss are not only the disease-related weight loss, corticosteroid therapy and functional impairment, but also the systemic effects of the disease itself.

  20. Early chronic lead exposure reduces exploratory activity in young C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Montoya, Mayra Gisel; Sobin, Christina

    2015-07-01

    Research has suggested that chronic low-level lead exposure diminishes neurocognitive function in children. Tests that are sensitive to behavioral effects at lowest levels of lead exposure are needed for the development of animal models. In this study we investigated the effects of chronic low-level lead exposure on exploratory activity (unbaited nose poke task), exploratory ambulation (open field task) and motor coordination (Rotarod task) in pre-adolescent mice. C57BL/6J pups were exposed to 0 ppm (controls), 30 ppm (low-dose) or 230 ppm (high-dose) lead acetate via dams' drinking water administered from birth to postnatal day 28, to achieve a range of blood lead levels (BLLs) from not detectable to 14.84 µg dl(-1) ). At postnatal day 28, mice completed behavioral testing and were killed (n = 61). BLLs were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The effects of lead exposure on behavior were tested using generalized linear mixed model analyses with BLL, sex and the interaction as fixed effects, and litter as the random effect. BLL predicted decreased exploratory activity and no threshold of effect was apparent. As BLL increased, nose pokes decreased. The C57BL/6J mouse is a useful model for examining effects of early chronic low-level lead exposure on behavior. In the C57BL/6J mouse, the unbaited nose poke task is sensitive to the effects of early chronic low-level lead exposure. This is the first animal study to show behavioral effects in pre-adolescent lead-exposed mice with BLL below 5 µg dl(-1). Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Patients' conceptions of their own influence on good treatment response to biological therapy in chronic inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    Biological therapies are common in the treatment of patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIA). However, despite the fact that many patients respond well to their biological therapies, there are still a number of nonresponders. In order to design the best care for patients, it is important to understand how they conceive their own role in their treatment response. To explore how patients with CIA conceive their own influence on a good treatment response to biological therapy. This study had an exploratory and descriptive design with a phenomenographic approach. Interviews were conducted with 25 patients (11 women and 14 men) aged 17-79 years, with CIA who were undergoing biological therapy and who had low disease activity or were in remission. Patients with CIA undergoing biological therapy conceived their own influence on good treatment response in terms of adherence, physical activity, mental attitude, social support, and self-awareness. Adherence was described as the foundation for the patients' own influence on good treatment response. Physical activity, mental attitude, and social support reflected three essential ways of understanding patients' influence on good treatment response where the patients spoke about physical strength, mental strength, and social strength. Self-awareness reflected a comprehensive way of influencing good treatment response in which patients balanced their physical, mental, and social resources in partnership with health care professionals. Patients conceived that they had a responsibility for adhering to the treatment as well as achieving balance in life in order to ensure good treatment response. Self-awareness was essential for maintaining a good treatment response, and this reflected the patients' awareness of the complexity of living their lives with a chronic illness.

  2. Effects of a chronic lead intoxication on the pathophysiological changes in the digestive system and interactions of lead with trace elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Dobrakowski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lead compounds are still the most dangerous poisons. The effects of lead intoxication occur mainly as a result of environmental exposure through lead paints, dust, soil, potable water. Pathophysiology of lead poisoning is still poorly understood, especially gastrointestinal and hepatological aspects. In consequence, the aim of the paper is to present the most important data concerning the effects of chronic lead exposure on the digestive system and the interactions between lead and selected trace elements.

  3. Premature epiphyseal fusion and degenerative arthritis in chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piddo, C. [Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Reed, M.H. [Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Children' s Hospital and the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada); Black, G.B. [Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Children' s Hospital and the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada); F.R.C.S. Section of Orthopedics, Children' s Hospital and the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

    2000-02-01

    A 9-year-old boy was diagnosed with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis affecting multiple sites. During an 8-year follow-up he developed premature closure of a distal radial epiphysis and degenerative changes in the adjacent radiocarpal joint. (orig.)

  4. Coexistence of rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    OpenAIRE

    Tacjana Anna Barczyńska; Małgorzata Węgierska; Paweł Żuchowski; Marta Dura; Joanna Zalewska; Marzena Waszczak; Sławomir Jeka

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are chronic progressive inflammatory diseases, leading to joint damage and reducing the physical fitness of patients. They are among the most common rheumatic diseases. However, their etiology and symptomatology are different. Formerly, AS was often wrongly diagnosed as RA. Today there are no major diagnostic difficulties in differentiation between these diseases, thanks to modern laboratory tests and imaging. However, a problem may ar...

  5. Chronic lead exposure effects in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, W G; Singh, A; McMahon, A; Rice, D C

    1998-01-01

    Although reproductive consequences of high circulating blood lead levels (> or = 60 micrograms/dL) have been reported, potential adverse effects of chronic lead exposure in males that result in low to moderate blood lead levels (10-25 and 26-60 micrograms/dL, respectively) are unknown. Effects of chronic lead exposure to testis ultrastructure were determined in the cynomolgus monkey after oral administration of lead acetate (1500 micrograms/kg BW/day) in a vehicle in the following groups: from birth to 10 years (lifetime), postnatal day 300 to 10 years (postinfancy), and postnatal day 0-400 (infancy); monkeys in the control group received only the vehicle (95% glycerol and 5% distilled water). At age 10 years, circulating lead concentrations in lifetime and postinfancy-dosed monkeys were approximately 35 micrograms/dL, and in control and infancy animals the concentrations were exposure to lead that results in moderate blood lead concentrations induced persistent ultrastructural alterations in the cynomolgus monkey testis. Results of this study on the primate, following extrapolation to humans, could influence further refining of the impact of environmental lead contamination concentrations vis-à-vis the health of children, adults, and aged human beings.

  6. Radio-synovectomy in chronic synovitis of the knee joint in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerbooms, A.M.T.; Buijs, W.C.A.M.; Vandenbroucke, J.P.; Danen, M.; Putte, L.B.A. van de

    1985-05-01

    The influence of intra-articular (i.a.) colloidal /sup 198/Au (5 mCi) or /sup 90/Y-silicate (5 mCi) on synovitis of the knee joint in patients older than 45 years with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), who had been treated since 1970 in our hospital, was investigated. Of the 89 knee joints of 77 patients studied, 65 had no or minimal radiological abnormalities of the knee joint treated (group I), whereas 24 patients had moderate to severe changes (group II). Before and at regular intervals after radio-synovectomy the clinical response was scored using pain, hydrops and warmth as parameters. The results indicated that 1 year after treatment the percentage of knee joints with a favourable response was greater in group II (58% versus 25%, P=0.001). This difference was still present 3 years after treatment. Clinical response showed no correlation with initial inflammatory activity as measured by sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate uptake measurements. However, in group I, those patients with an ESR below 60 mm/h, measured just before radio-synovectomy, more often had a favourable response than those with an ESR in excess of 60 mm/h (P=0.01). No or only slight complications of radio-synovectomy were noted, whereas leakage of radioactivity from the knee joints was minimal. It is concluded that radio-synovectomy is an effective and safe procedure in those patients with rheumatoid synovitis of the knee joint without the presence of significant radiological damage and the absence of active systemic disease.

  7. Short term administration of glucocorticoids in patients with protracted and chronic gout arthritis. Part III – frequency of adverse events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A Fedorova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess frequency of adverse events during short term administration of gluco- corticoid (GC in protracted and chronic gout arthritis. Material and methods. 59 pts with tophaceous gout (crystal-verified diagnosis and arthritis of three and more joints lasting more than a months in spite of treatment with sufficient doses of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were included. Median age of pts was 56 [48;63], median disease duration – 15,2 years [7,4;20], median swollen joint count at the examination – 8 [5;11]. The patients were randomized into 2 groups. Methylprednisolone (MP 500 mg/day iv during 2 days and placebo im once was administered in one of them, betamethasone (BM 7 mg im once and placebo iv twice – in the other. Clinical evaluation of inflamed joints was performed every day. Standard laboratory examination and ECG were done before drug administration, at 3rd, 7th, and 14th day of follow up. Immunoreactive insulin level was evaluated before drug administration and at day 14. Blood pressure (BP was measured every day. Results. After first GC administration BP elevated in 28 (47% pts. In pts not having appropriate BP values BP elevated in 73% of cases. Pts with appropriate BP values showed less frequent BP elevation – 38% (p=0,02. In 8 (13% pts at day 3 after GC administration ECG signs of myocardial blood supply deterioration were revealed. Glucose level elevated in 10 (17% pts and after the second BM administration – in 5 (8% pts. Cholesterol level did not significantly change after 14 days of follow up but in 28 (47% pts it increased in comparison with baseline. Trigliceride level significantly decreased at day 14 from 149 [106; 187] to 108 [66,5; 172] mg/dl (p=0,02. 26 (44% pts had face hyperemia, 4 (7% –42 palpitation and 2 (3,4% – bitter taste. Conclusion. Administration of short course of GC in pts with gout requires monitoring of possible adverse events. Antihypertensive therapy providing appropriate BP

  8. THE USE OF PREPARATIONS BASED ON BACTERIAL LYSATES IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC TONSILLITIS IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolyada T.І.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the therapy of decompensated form of chronic tonsillitis (CT were used as immunomodulatory agents IRS and Ismigen. These bacterial lysates differ in the bacterial setting, the method of preparation (chemical, mechanical and the method of application.Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is one of the important factors that could significantly complicate the therapy of chronic tonsillitis. RA is a chronic immune inflammatory disease that progressively affects connective tissue mostly of the peripheral joints and it has a wide range of extra-articular manifestations. The aim of our study was to explore the dynamics of immunologic indicators during the active disease and treatments in patients with decompensate form of chronic tonsillitis, including tonsillitis complicated with RA. Materials and methods. 33 patients with decompensate form of chronic tonsillitis in active period of disease observed during the study. Patients were divided into the following groups: 24 persons with the decompensate form of CT, 9 persons with the rheumatoid arthritis and 9 persons with the decompensate form of CT complicated with RA in remission stage. The control group consisted of 15 apparently healthy persons. Concentrations of serum IgA, IgM, IgG were determined by the method of radial immune diffusion by Manchini. Levels of sIgA, IFN – γ and rheumatoid factor in the blood serum of patients were evaluated using ELISA test systems of "Vector-best". Patients of group CTD (with decompensate form of chronic tonsillitis were divided into subgroups CTD1 and CTD2, depending on the applied treatment. Both subgroups treated with standard therapy for two weeks and received Derynat during 1 month by 2 drops in each nostril twice a day. After 30 days of the standard therapy beginning the subgroup CTD1 patients received IRS 19 during two weeks, one intranasal inhalation in each nostril 3 times a day. Patients subgroup CTD2 and CTD+RA instead IRS 19 received Ismigen after 30 days of

  9. Cognitive-behavioral therapy: a psychoeducational treatment approach for the American worker with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskin, L F

    1998-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disorder affecting nearly 2.1 million Americans. This condition often leads to chronic pain, inflammation, joint destruction, feelings of helplessness, maladaptive coping, depression and activity limitations. For those individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and chronic arthritic pain, the role of the worker has become difficult to maintain. Research suggests that cognitive-behavioral intervention reduces chronic arthritic pain, decreases disease activity and improves coping skills in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis. To be effective, cognitive-behavioral techniques must be practiced on a regular basis. The literature suggests that the American worker with rheumatoid arthritis would greatly benefit from work-site wellness programs that provide cognitive-behavioral intervention as a 'reasonable accommodation'. Occupational therapy practitioners can help to advance the positive effects of this psychoeducational intervention by providing 'booster treatments' to clients after formal treatment sessions have ceased.

  10. Gonococcal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI); Disseminated gonococcemia; Septic arthritis - gonococcal arthritis ... Gonococcal arthritis is an infection of a joint. It occurs in people who have gonorrhea , which is caused by ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  12. Thumb Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to your thumb joint, such as fractures and sprains. Diseases that change the normal structure and function of cartilage, such as rheumatoid arthritis. Although osteoarthritis is the most common cause of thumb arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis can also affect ...

  13. The skin tissue is adversely affected by TNF-alpha blockers in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis: a 5-year prospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia P. Machado

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the incidence of and the main risk factors associated with cutaneous adverse events in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis following anti-TNF-α therapy. METHODS: A total of 257 patients with active arthritis who were taking TNF-α blockers, including 158 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 87 with ankylosing spondylitis and 12 with psoriatic arthritis, were enrolled in a 5-year prospective analysis. Patients with overlapping or other rheumatic diseases were excluded. Anthropometric, socioeconomic, demographic and clinical data were evaluated, including the Disease Activity Score-28, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index and Psoriasis Area Severity Index. Skin conditions were evaluated by two dermatology experts, and in doubtful cases, skin lesion biopsies were performed. Associations between adverse cutaneous events and clinical, demographic and epidemiological variables were determined using the chi-square test, and logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors. The significance level was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: After 60 months of follow-up, 71 adverse events (73.85/1000 patient-years were observed, of which allergic and immune-mediated phenomena were the most frequent events, followed by infectious conditions involving bacterial (47.1%, parasitic (23.5%, fungal (20.6% and viral (8.8% agents. CONCLUSION: The skin is significantly affected by adverse reactions resulting from the use of TNF-α blockers, and the main risk factors for cutaneous events were advanced age, female sex, a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, disease activity and the use of infliximab.

  14. Therapeutical approach to rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Paraskevi Gourni; Evaggelos Giavasopoulos

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial joints, and loss of the function leading to disability. The ultimate goal in managing RA is to prevent joint damage and to maintain functional ability. Although, οver the past decade, major advances have been made in our understanding of the factors that are crucial in regulating this disease, still the managment of the disease remains difficult.Aim : Τhe aim of the present study was the evaluation ...

  15. Effects of Chronic Lead Acetate Intoxication on Blood Indices of Male Adult Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadhosein Noori Mugahi

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Lead as one of the environmental pollutants can threats the life of living creatures in many ways. In this study, hematological effects of chronic toxicity of the lead acetate in adult male rats through measurement of the lead concentration in the blood of animal’s heart by atomic absorption as well as hematological analyses and differential cell count were investigated. Results showed that lead concentration in the treatment group was significantly higher than that of the control groups (P<0.001, and basophilic stippling, Howell-Jolly bodies, decreased RBC count (anemia, increased leukocyte count (leukocytosis, monocytosis, eosinopenia, neutrophilia, and thrombocytosis were observed in the test group (P<0.001. It is concluded that microcytic hypochromic anemia can be attributed to the interaction of lead with iron and copper metabolism and increased leukocyte count may be linked to the inflammatory effects of lead on lymphatic organs.

  16. Sarcopaenia and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targowski, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    In October 2016 a new independent disease called sarcopaenia (according to ICD-10 classification) appeared. According to the recommendation of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP), sarcopaenia is defined as abnormally low muscle mass plus low skeletal muscle strength or low physical performance. Sarcopaenia, as a primary disease, is mainly observed in older people, but it can also appear in younger adults in the course of many clinical chronic conditions. One of the most frequent chronic diseases associated with chronic inflammation and functional limitation of skeletal system is rheumatoid arthritis. In the present article, current knowledge on the epidemiology of sarcopaenia and its association with rheumatoid arthritis is presented.

  17. Efficacy of Subcutaneous Electrocardiogram Leads for Synchronous Timing During Chronic Counterpulsation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnahan, Stephen R; Koenig, Steven C; Sobieski, Michael A; Schumer, Erin M; Monreal, Gretel; Wang, Yu; Choi, Young; Meuris, Brek J; Tompkins, Landon H; Wu, Zhongjun J; Slaughter, Mark S; Giridharan, Guruprasad A

    Counterpulsation devices (CPDs) require an accurate, reliable electrocardiogram (ECG) waveform for triggering inflation and deflation. Surface electrodes are for short-term use, and transvenous/epicardial leads require invasive implant procedure. A subcutaneous ECG lead configuration was developed as an alternative approach for long-term use with timing mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices. In this study, efficacy testing was completed by simultaneously recording ECG waveforms from clinical-grade epicardial (control) and subcutaneous (test) leads in chronic ischemic heart failure calves implanted with CPD for up to 30 days. Sensitivity and specificity of CPD triggering by R-wave detection was quantified for each lead configuration. The subcutaneous leads provided 98.9% positive predictive value and 98.9% sensitivity compared to the epicardial ECG leads. Lead migration (n = 1) and fracture (n = 1) were observed in only 2 of 40 implanted leads, without adversely impacting triggering efficacy due to lead redundancy. These findings demonstrate the efficacy of subcutaneous ECG leads for long-term CPD timing and potential use as an alternative method for MCS device timing.

  18. PHARMACOECONOMIC ASPECTS OF TREATMENT WITH THE INHIBITORS OF TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR OF THE CHRONIC UVEITIS REFRACTORY TO THE BASIC THERAPY (INCLUDING AN ASSOCIATED WITH JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Rudakova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapy of chronic uveitis refractory to the basic treatment, in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a very complex problem in pediatrics. Substantial progress in this area resulted after the implementation in practice of inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor (TNF, as the most effective in such clinical situation drugs adalimumab and infliximab are considered (although infliximab was not officially approved in JIA. Objective. To estimate the cost effectiveness of TNF inhibitors — adalimumab, and infliximab in chronic uveitis, refractory to the basic therapy (including associated with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Methods. A modeling on the basis of a comparative prospective cohort clinical study was carried out. The analysis was performed by the method «cost–effectiveness» from a position of health and social accounting perspective. Results. It was shown that the frequency and time of remission did not differ when treatment with infliximab (5 mg/kg at 0–2–6 weeks and further once in 6–8 weeks and adalimumab (24 mg/m2 once in 2 weeks. Adalimumab provides a long-term maintenance of remission (no recurrence in 60% of patients within 40 months of observation, whereas 1 year after the treatment with infliximab the frequency of exacerbations was returned to that observed before therapy. The proportion of patients without relapse in the treatment with infliximab for 40 months was 18.8%. Similar results were obtained in a subset of patients with chronic uveitis associated with JIA (with follow-up of 20 months of in a group of infliximab number patients without relapse was 11.1%, with adalimumab therapy — 63.6%. In the general population of patients with refractory chronic uveitis the factor «cost–effectiveness» calculated for a patient with the maintenance of remission for 3 years with adalimumab therapy was in 2,1–2,8 times less than in the treatment with infliximab. In chronic uveitis associated with JIA, the coefficient of

  19. [Chronic transvenous pacemaker/implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads implantation induced pathological changes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhui; Dykoski, Richard; Li, Jianming

    2015-05-01

    Widely pacemaker/implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation is also related to an increasing need for transvenous lead extraction. Understanding the location and extent of pathological changes, including adhesions and fibrous tissue formation along the course of chronic pacemaker/ICD leads, are essential for operators performing lead extraction operations in order to reduce the potential life threatening complications. Three parts are included in the research, pathological examination on 83 extracted pacemaker/ICD leads using excimer laser technique from March 2008 to March 2011, autopsy examination of one died patient during lead extraction for lead-related infective endocarditis, and anatomical analysis on pacemaker/ICD leads from 10 patients died of other non-cardiac causes. Extensive encapsulated fibrous tissue around the leads and extensive adhesion/fibrosis along the course of the leads from venous entry site to the lead/myocardial interface could be detected on transvenous pacemaker/ICD leads. Since the tissue at the junction between superior vena cava (SVC) and right atrium (RA) is very thin, free of pericardium, thus, this is a common place for extensive adhesion/fibrosis and myocardial perforation/tear during lead extraction, which accounted for one death during extraction in our cohort. Extensive adhesion and fibrosis were also observed at the tricuspid valve and subvalvular structures. Leads implanted to the right ventricular apex were close to the epicardial surface and prone to perforation through myocardium. It is common to observe thrombus on the leads or at the interface between leads and myocardial tissue, especially at right atrial appendage (RAA) at the site of lead insertion. Extensive adhesions and fibrosis can be commonly seen along the course of pacemaker/ICD leads, and at SVC to RA junction, the tricuspid valve/subvalvular structures, and RA/RV lead interface. The tissue at SVC to RA junction is very thin, making it

  20. Causality pattern of the blood lead, monoamine oxidase A, and serotonin levels in brass home industry workers chronically exposed to lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Marianti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to analyse the effects of lead (Pb chronic exposure on blood lead levels, Monoamine oxidase A enzyme (MAO A and serotonin levels of brass craftsmen in Pati, Central Java, Indonesia, and to examine the connections among these three variables. The brass home industry area was polluted by lead. Thus, it chronically exposes the workers to lead pollution. Therefore, their blood lead level increased and later raised the level of MAO A and reduced the level of serotonin. Path analysis results show that the path coefficient (ñ of lead effects in decreasing serotonin through MAO A pathway is -0.411. Furthermore, lead effects that directly affect serotonin level without passing through MAO A pathway is -0.391 with residual coefficient (e of 0.572. In conclusion, the increase of blood lead level causes an increase in level of MAO A and drop in the level of serotonin.

  1. Effect of chronic lead intoxication on the distribution and elimination of amoxicillin in goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Ahmed M.; Abu-Basha, Ehab A.; Youssef, Salah A. H.; Amer, Aziza M.; Murphy, Patricia A.; Hauck, Catherine C.; Gehring, Ronette

    2013-01-01

    A study of amoxicillin pharmacokinetics was conducted in healthy goats and goats with chronic lead intoxication. The intoxicated goats had increased serum concentrations of liver enzymes (alanine aminotransferase and γ-glutamyl transferase), blood urea nitrogen, and reactivated δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase compared to the controls. Following intravenous amoxicillin (10 mg/kg bw) in control and lead-intoxicated goats, elimination half-lives were 4.14 and 1.26 h, respectively. The volumes of distribution based on the terminal phase were 1.19 and 0.38 L/kg, respectively, and those at steady-state were 0.54 and 0.18 L/kg, respectively. After intramuscular (IM) amoxicillin (10 mg/kg bw) in lead-intoxicated goats and control animals, the absorption, distribution, and elimination of the drug were more rapid in lead-intoxicated goats than the controls. Peak serum concentrations of 21.89 and 12.19 µg/mL were achieved at 1 h and 2 h, respectively, in lead-intoxicated and control goats. Amoxicillin bioavailability in the lead-intoxicated goats decreased 20% compared to the controls. After amoxicillin, more of the drug was excreted in the urine from lead-intoxicated goats than the controls. Our results suggested that lead intoxication in goats increases the rate of amoxicillin absorption after IM administration and distribution and elimination. Thus, lead intoxication may impair the therapeutic effectiveness of amoxicillin. PMID:23820209

  2. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  3. Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is serious about making sure companies that break the law are held accountable In the past year, EPA ... the health effects of lead in drinking water The law mandates no-lead products for drinking water after ...

  4. Treatment with anti-C5aR mAb leads to early-onset clinical and mechanistic effects in the murine delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Sara M; Nansen, Anneline; Usher, Pernille A; Sondergaard, Bodil-Cecilie; Mackay, Charles R; Friedrichsen, Birgitte; Chang, Chih-Chuan; Tang, Renhong; Skov, Søren; Haase, Claus; Hornum, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Blockade of the complement cascade at the C5a/C5a receptor (C5aR)-axis is believed to be an attractive treatment avenue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of such interventions during the early phases of arthritis remain to be clarified. In this study we use the murine delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA) model to study the very early effects of a blocking, non-depleting anti-C5aR mAb on joint inflammation with treatment synchronised with disease onset, an approach not previously described. The DTHA model is a single-paw inflammatory arthritis model characterised by synchronised and rapid disease onset driven by T-cells, immune complexes and neutrophils. We show that a reduction in paw swelling, bone erosion, cartilage destruction, synovitis and new bone formation is apparent as little as 60 h after administration of a single dose of a blocking, non-depleting anti-mouse C5aR mAb. Importantly, infiltration of neutrophils into the joint and synovium is also reduced following a single dose, demonstrating that C5aR signalling during the early stage of arthritis regulates neutrophil infiltration and activation. Furthermore, the number of T-cells in circulation and in the draining popliteal lymph node is also reduced following a single dose of anti-C5aR, suggesting that modulation of the C5a/C5aR axis results in effects on the T cell compartment in inflammatory arthritis. In summary, these data demonstrate that blockade of C5aR leads to rapid and significant effects on arthritic disease development in a DTHA model strengthening the rationale of C5aR-blockade as a treatment strategy for RA, especially during the early stages of arthritis flare.

  5. Acute and chronic toxicity of lead in water and diet to the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Brunson, E.L.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of waterborne and dietary lead (Pb) exposure on the acute and chronic toxicity of Pb to the amphipod Hyalella azteca. Test solutions were generated by a modified diluter with an extended (24-h) equilibration period. Acute (96-h) toxicity of Pb varied with water hardness in the range of 71 to 275 mg/L as CaCO3, despite similar dissolved Pb concentrations. Acute toxicity was greatest in soft test water, with less than 50% survival at the lowest dissolved Pb concentration (151 ??g/L). Survival also was significantly reduced in medium-hardness water but not in hard test water. In chronic (42-d) studies, amphipods were exposed to waterborne Pb and fed either a control diet or a diet equilibrated with waterborne Pb levels. For animals fed the control diet, the median lethal concentration (LC50) for Pb was 24 ??g/L (as dissolved Pb), and significant reductions in survival occurred at 16 ??g/L. Exposure to Pb-treated diets significantly increased toxicity across a wide range of dissolved Pb concentrations, with a LC50 of 16 ??g/L and significant reductions in growth and reproduction at 3.5 ??g/L. Significant effects on growth and reproduction occurred at dissolved Pb concentrations close to the current U.S. chronic water-quality criterion. Our results suggest that both aqueous- and dietary-exposure pathways contribute significantly to chronic Pb exposure and toxic effects in aquatic biota. ?? 2005 SETAC.

  6. Sub-chronic lead exposure produces β1-adrenoceptor downregulation decreasing arterial pressure reactivity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, Cindy Medici; Simões, Maylla Ronacher; Alonso, Maria Jesus; Salaices, Mercedes; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Fioresi, Mirian

    2017-07-01

    Lead is considered a causative factor for hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. To investigate the effects of sub-chronic lead exposure on blood pressure reactivity and cardiac β 1 -adrenoceptor activity and to evaluate whether the effects found in vitro are similar to those found in vivo. Male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into two groups: control rats (Ct) and rats administered drinking water containing 100ppm lead (Pb) for 30days. Blood pressure in the Pb rats increased starting from the first week of treatment until the end of the study [systolic blood pressure, Ct: 122±4 vs. Pb: 143±3mmHg; diastolic blood pressure, Ct: 63±4 vs. Pb: 84±4mmHg]. The heart rate was also increased (Ct: 299±11 vs. Pb: 365±11bpm), but the pressure reactivity to phenylephrine was decreased. Losartan and hexamethonium exhibited a greater reduction in blood pressure of Pb rats than in the Ct rats. Isoproterenol increased the left ventricular systolic and end-diastolic pressure, and heart rate only in Ct rats, suggesting that lead induced β 1 -adrenoceptor downregulation. Indomethacin reduced the blood pressure and heart rate in the Pb rats, suggesting the involvement of cyclooxygenase-derived products (which are associated with reduced nitric oxide bioavailability) in this process. These findings offer further evidence that the effects of sub-chronic lead exposure in vitro can be reproduced in vivo-even at low concentrations-thus triggering mechanisms for the development of hypertension. Therefore, lead should be considered an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chronic lead exposure reduces doublecortin-expressing immature neurons in young adult guinea pig cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang JuFang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic lead (Pb poisoning remains an environmental risk especially for the pediatric population, and it may affect brain development. Immature neurons expressing doublecortin (DCX+ exist around cortical layer II in various mammals, including adult guinea pigs and humans. Using young adult guinea pigs as an experimental model, the present study explored if chronic Pb exposure affects cortical DCX + immature neurons and those around the subventricular and subgranular zones (SVZ, SGZ. Results Two month-old guinea pigs were treated with 0.2% lead acetate in drinking water for 2, 4 and 6 months. Blood Pb levels in these animals reached 10.27 ± 0.62, 16.25 ± 0.78 and 19.03 ± 0.86 μg/dL at the above time points, respectively, relative to ~3 μg/dL in vehicle controls. The density of DCX + neurons was significantly reduced around cortical layer II, SVZ and SGZ in Pb-treated animals surviving 4 and 6 months relative to controls. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU pulse-chasing studies failed to find cellular colocalization of this DNA synthesis indicator in DCX + cells around layer II in Pb-treated and control animals. These cortical immature neurons were not found to coexist with active caspase-3 or Fluoro-Jade C labeling. Conclusion Chronic Pb exposure can lead to significant reduction in the number of the immature neurons around cortical layer II and in the conventional neurogenic sites in young adult guinea pigs. No direct evidence could be identified to link the reduced cortical DCX expression with alteration in local neurogenesis or neuronal death.

  8. The Level of Selenium and Oxidative Stress in Workers Chronically Exposed to Lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlas, Natalia; Dobrakowski, Michał; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Kozłowska, Agnieszka; Mikołajczyk, Agnieszka; Kasperczyk, Sławomir

    2016-03-01

    The possible beneficial role of selenium (Se) on the oxidative stress induced by lead (Pb) is still unclear in humans. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to explore the associations among the Se levels, chronic Pb exposure, oxidative stress parameters, and parameters characterizing the function of the antioxidant defense system in men who are occupationally exposed to Pb. Based on the median serum Se concentrations, the 324 study subjects were divided into two subgroups: a subgroup with a low Se level (L-Se) and a subgroup with a high Se level (H-Se). The levels of lead (PbB) and zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) in the blood and the delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) level in the urine served as indices of Pb exposure. The PbB level was significantly lower in the H-Se group compared to that in the L-Se group by 6 %. The levels of 8-hydroxyguanosine and lipofuscin (LPS) and the activity of superoxide dismutase were significantly lower in the H-Se group compared to that in the L-Se group by 17, 19, and 11 %, respectively. However, the glutathione level (GSH) and the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase were significantly higher by 9, 23, and 3 %. Spearman correlations showed positive associations between the Se level and GPx activity and GSH level. A lower serum Se level in chronically Pb-exposed subjects is associated with higher Pb blood levels and an elevated erythrocyte LPS level, which reflects the intensity of oxidative stress. Besides, in a group of Pb-exposed subjects with lower serum Se level, depleted GSH pool and decreased activity of GPx in erythrocytes were reported. However, the present results are inadequate to recommend Se supplementation for chronic lead exposure at higher doses than would be included in a normal diet except for selenium deficiency.

  9. Clinical experience with the interleukin-1β blocker canakinumab in patients with chronic tophaceous gout: abolishment of arthritis and prevention of exacerbations when allopurinol is used

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Eliseev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The interleukin (IL-1β inhibitor canakinumab may be effective in relieving an acute gout attack and in preventing an arthritis exacerbation. However, there are insufficient data on the use of this agent to abolish and prevent arthritis in patients who are resistant to another anti-inflammatory therapy.Objective: to evaluate the efficacy of the interleukin (IL-1β inhibitor canakinumab in patients with chronic tophaceous gout, who are resistant to traditional anti-inflammatory therapy, in order to abolish arthritis and to prevent its exacerbations when adjusting the optimal dose of allopurinol.Subjects and methods. An open-labeled prospective study was conducted in 20 patients (mean age, 54.5±12.7 years with chronic tophaceous gout. Serum uric acid (UA levels were 486.3±135.2 μmol/l. The inclusion criteria were crystal-verified gout; arthritis affecting more than 5 joints; inefficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, glucocorticoids (GCs, or colchicine when used for over a month; more than 4 arthritis attacks during year. The exclusion criteria were Stage ≥3 chronic kidney disease, infectious diseases. All the patents received a single subcutaneous injection of canakinumab 150 mg. NSAIDs and/or colchicine was discontinued a day before the injection. The number of swollen and tender joints and visual analogue scale (VAS pain intensity were estimated before and 14 and 120 days after the injection; SF-36v1 and HAQ changes were assessed before and 120 days after the injection. 14 days after the injection, all the patients were given allopurinol, the dosage of which was individually adjusted, by starting on 100 mg/day and subsequently increasing by 100 mg/dayevery 2 weeks (not more than 800 mg/day until the goal UA level (<360 μmol/l was reached.Results. 14 days after canakinumab injection, arthritis was abolished in 8 (40% patients and 3 patients needed to continue NSAID therapy. Following 14 days of the injection

  10. Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Test Safety Alert: Learn about CDC Recommendations Second Informational Call (CDC-RFA-17-1701PPHF17), April 5, 2017, ... CLPPP CAP Healthy Homes Assessment Tools Lead Health Literacy Initiative Refugee Tool Kit Resources Healthy Homes and ...

  11. Impact of lead sub-chronic toxicity on recognition memory and motor activity of Wistar rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzaoui, F Z; Ahami, A O T; Khadmaoui, A

    2009-01-15

    The aim of this research was to investigate the impact of lead nitrate administered in drinking water during 90 days (sub-chronic toxicity), on body weight gain, motor activity, brain lead accumulation and especially on recognition memory of Wistar rats. Two groups of young female Wistar rats were used. Treated rats received 20 mg L(-1) of lead nitrate diluted in drinking water, while control rats received drinking water only, for 3 months. An evolution of body weight, motor activity, object recognition memory and measure of brain lead levels has been evaluated. The body weight was taken weekly, whereas the memory abilities and the motor activity are measured once every fortnight alternatively, by submitting rats to the Open Field (OF) test and to the Novel Object Recognizing (NOR) memory test. The results have shown a non significant effect in gain of body weight. However, a high significance was shown for horizontal activity (pmemory term (p<0.01), at the end of testing period and for brain lead levels (p<0.05) between studied groups.

  12. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the ... physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help ...

  13. Infectious Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arthritis. Prevention There is no known prevention. Smoking cigarettes appears to worsen RA, so it is important to avoid tobacco. Proper early treatment can help prevent further joint damage. Alternative Names RA; Arthritis - rheumatoid Patient Instructions ACL reconstruction - ...

  15. Periodontal and hematological characteristics associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Westergaard, Jytte; Stoltze, Kaj

    2006-01-01

    Periodontitis shares several clinical and pathogenic characteristics with chronic arthritis, and there is some degree of coexistence. The aims of this study were to elucidate whether patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP), juvenile idi...... idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) share periodontal and hematological characteristics distinguishing them from individuals free of diseases....

  16. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibody in patients with wood-smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) without rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigari, Naseh; Moghimi, Nasrin; Shahraki, Farhad Saber; Mohammadi, Shilan; Roshani, Daem

    2015-01-01

    Citrullination, a post-translational modification of proteins, is increased in inflammatory processes and is known to occur in smokers. It can induce anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, the most specific serologic marker for rheumatoid arthritis. Thus far, the incidence of autoimmunity in patients with wood-smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) resulting in anti-CCP production has not been examined. We hypothesise that anti-CCP antibody level in these patients should be higher than that in healthy subjects. A total of 112 non-rheumatoid arthritis patients, including 56 patients with wood-smoke-induced COPD and 56 patients with tobacco-induced COPD, and 56 healthy non-smoker controls were included. The serum anti-CCP antibody levels were measured and compared between the groups and against smoke exposure and clinical characteristics. The mean anti-CCP antibody levels in wood-smoke-induced COPD group were significantly higher than those in tobacco-induced COPD group (p = 0.03) and controls (p = 0.004). Furthermore, 8 (14.2 %) patients with wood-smoke-induced COPD, 4 (7.14 %) with tobacco-induced COPD and 2 (3.57 %) controls exceeded the conventional cut-off of anti-CCP antibody positivity. No relationship was found between the anti-CCP antibody level and age, gender, duration of disease, Pack-years of smoking, and duration of exposure to wood smoke. Moreover, correlations between anti-CCP antibodies and severity of airflow limitation, CAT scores, mMRC scores of dyspnoea, and GOLD staging of COPD severity were not significant. Wood-smoke-induced COPD could significantly increase the anti-CCP antibody level in non-rheumatoid arthritis patients when compared with that in patients with tobacco-induced COPD and healthy controls.

  17. A role for angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.G. Stupack

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic debilitating disease characterized by distinct autoimmune, inflammatory and fibrovascular components which lead to synovial proliferation and joint destruction. However, existing treatments specifically target only autoimmune and inflammatory components despite the fact that neovascularization of the inflamed synovium is a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis. Angiogenesis may contribute to synovial growth, leukocyte recruitment and tissue remodeling, thus potentiating disease progression. Although no therapies currently target angiogenesis, several existing therapies have anti-angiogenic activity. Recent advances in anti-angiogenic strategies in oncology, including the identification of integrin avß3 as a crucial effector of angiogenesis, suggest a means to assess the role of angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis. Synovial endothelial cells have been shown to express integrin avß3, suggesting that these cells may be targeted for angiogenesis inhibition. Prior studies in rat arthritis models have shown benefit after the addition of broad spectrum integrin antagonists. However, formal assessment of integrin-targeted anti-angiogenic activity is now underway. These controlled studies will be important in assessing the efficacy of therapies which target angiogenesis in RA.

  18. Arthritis Pain Reliever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-12-27

    Learn more about the benefits of physical activity and the types and amounts of exercise helpful for people with arthritis.  Created: 12/27/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/27/2011.

  19. Lead users' ideas on core features to support physical activity in rheumatoid arthritis: a first step in the development of an internet service using participatory design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revenäs, Åsa; Opava, Christina H; Åsenlöf, Pernilla

    2014-03-22

    Despite the growing evidence of the benefits of physical activity (PA) in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the majority is not physically active enough. An innovative strategy is to engage lead users in the development of PA interventions provided over the internet. The aim was to explore lead users' ideas and prioritization of core features in a future internet service targeting adoption and maintenance of healthy PA in people with RA. Six focus group interviews were performed with a purposively selected sample of 26 individuals with RA. Data were analyzed with qualitative content analysis and quantification of participants' prioritization of most important content. Six categories were identified as core features for a future internet service: up-to-date and evidence-based information and instructions, self-regulation tools, social interaction, personalized set-up, attractive design and content, and access to the internet service. The categories represented four themes, or core aspects, important to consider in the design of the future service: (1) content, (2) customized options, (3) user interface and (4) access and implementation. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study involving people with RA in the development of an internet service to support the adoption and maintenance of PA.Participants helped identifying core features and aspects important to consider and further explore during the next phase of development. We hypothesize that involvement of lead users will make transfer from theory to service more adequate and user-friendly and therefore will be an effective mean to facilitate PA behavior change.

  20. Arthritis, body mass index, and professional advice to lose weight: implications for clinical medicine and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Chetna; Naimi, Timothy S; Serdula, Mary; Bolen, Julie; Pearson, Karl

    2004-07-01

    Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States. Obesity is a risk factor for arthritis, but the relationship between arthritis and weight has not been well characterized at the population level in the United States. Previous research shows that physicians often fail to advise their obese patients to lose weight. To describe the relationship between body weight and arthritis in the United States, and to assess predictors of efforts to lose weight among obese adults with arthritis, including the impact of professional advice to lose weight. Data from the 2000 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (a population-based survey of U.S. adults) from the 35 states that collected information on weight and height, arthritis, and efforts to lose weight. Arthritis was based on self-report of doctor diagnosis or chronic joint symptoms. Main outcome measures were arthritis and efforts to lose weight among adults with arthritis. Overall, 31.7% of respondents had self-reported arthritis. There was a strong relationship between body weight and arthritis. Specifically, the prevalence of arthritis was 25.9% among normal weight (18.5 to 24.9 body mass index [BMI]) adults; 32.1% among overweight (25 to 29.9 BMI) adults; and 43.5% among obese (>30 BMI) adults. This association persisted after adjusting for other factors (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] for having arthritis among obese individuals compared with healthy weight individuals, 3.6; 95% confidence interval [CI]=3.2-3.8). Among obese adults with arthritis who had a routine checkup within the past 12 months, only 43% were advised to lose weight by a health professional. However, recipients of such advice were more likely to try to lose weight than nonrecipients, and professional advice was the strongest independent predictor of weight loss efforts (AOR=2.8; 95% CI=2.5-3.1). Body mass index (BMI) is an important independent risk factor for self-reported arthritis. Although physicians often fail to advise obese

  1. [Unanticipated endotracheal tube displacement in a short-neck patient with a history of chronic rheumatoid arthritis: a comparison of three kinds of endotracheal tubes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, Itaru; Fukuda, Akiko; Koja, Hiroki; Tomiyama, Hiroshi; Tokumine, Joho; Sugahara, Kazuhiro

    2004-10-01

    Endotracheal tubes are known to have a risk of being displaced at neck extension or flexion or rotation. However, the displacement seldom causes clinical problems. An 74-year-old patient suffering from chronic rheumatoid arthritis underwent debridement in the infected knee under general anesthesia. Mechanical ventilation had to be continued because of poor oxygenation after the operation. She had been intubated with Hi Lo Evac endotracheal tube (HLE) for 3 days, then extubated. However, she again needed mechanical ventilation because of aggravated oxygenation. At that time, Profile cuff siliconised endotracheal tube (PCS) was placed for 3 days. We encountered dangerous displacement of HLE during the first mechanical ventilation, but did not have any clinically dangerous displacement of PCS during the second mechanical ventilation. Therefore, we compared the hardness of the three popular endotracheal tubes. We found the hardness of HLE was higher than the others. This might be one of the reasons for dangerous displacement of the endotracheal tube in our case.

  2. Chronic sleep restriction during development can lead to long-lasting behavioral effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saré, R Michelle; Levine, Merlin; Hildreth, Christine; Picchioni, Dante; Smith, Carolyn Beebe

    2016-03-01

    Sleep abnormalities are highly correlated with neurodevelopmental disorders, and the severity of behavioral abnormalities correlates with the presence of sleep abnormalities. Given the importance of sleep in developmental plasticity, we sought to determine the effects of chronic sleep-restriction during development on subsequent adult behavior. We sleep-restricted developing wild-type mice from P5-P42 for 3h per day by means of gentle handling (n=30) and compared behavioral outputs to controls that were handled 10 min daily (n=33). We assayed activity in the open field, social behavior, repetitive behavior, and anxiety immediately following sleep restriction and after four weeks of recovery. At six weeks of age, immediately following chronic sleep-restriction, mice were less active in an open field arena. Sociability was increased, but repetitive behaviors were unchanged in both males and females. After a 4-week period of recovery, some behavioral abnormalities persisted and some became apparent. Sleep-restricted mice had decreased activity in the beginning of an open field test. Female mice continued to have increased sociability and, in addition, increased preference for social novelty. In contrast, male mice demonstrated decreased sociability with medium effect sizes. Repetitive behavior was decreased in sleep-restricted female mice and increased in males. Measures of anxiety were not affected in the sleep-restricted mice. These results indicate that chronic sleep restriction during development can lead to long-lasting behavioral changes that are modulated by sex. Our study may have implications for a role of disrupted sleep in childhood on the unfolding of neurodevelopmental disorders. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Chronic sleep restriction during development can lead to long-lasting behavioral effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saré, R. Michelle; Levine, Merlin; Hildreth, Christine; Picchioni, Dante; Smith, Carolyn Beebe

    2016-01-01

    Sleep abnormalities are highly correlated with neurodevelopmental disorders, and the severity of behavioral abnormalities correlates with the presence of sleep abnormalities. Given the importance of sleep in developmental plasticity, we sought to determine the effects of chronic sleep-restriction during development on subsequent adult behavior. We sleep-restricted developing wild-type mice from P5-P42 for three hours per day by means of gentle handling (n=30) and compared behavioral outputs to controls that were handled ten min daily (n=33). We assayed activity in the open field, social behavior, repetitive behavior, and anxiety immediately following sleep restriction and after four weeks recovery. At six weeks of age, immediately following chronic sleep-restriction, mice were less active in an open field arena. Sociability was increased, but repetitive behaviors were unchanged in both males and females. After a 4-week period of recovery, some behavioral abnormalities persisted and some became apparent. Sleep-restricted mice had decreased activity in the beginning of an open field test. Female mice continued to have increased sociability and, in addition, increased preference for social novelty. In contrast, male mice demonstrated decreased sociability with medium effect sizes. Repetitive behavior was decreased in sleep-restricted female mice and increased in males. Measures of anxiety were not affected in the sleep-restricted mice. These results indicate that chronic sleep restriction during development can lead to long-lasting behavioral changes that are modulated by sex. Our study may have implications for a role of disrupted sleep in childhood on the unfolding of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:26712276

  4. Automated radiographic assessment of hands in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Kauffman, J A

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease leading to severe joint damage, particularly in the wrist, fingers and toes. To prevent irreversible joint damage, it is crucial that RA is treated in an early stage. The effect of treatment methods can differ per patient. Therefore it is important that disease activity is carefully monitored, such that a treatment can be altered if necessary. In order to visualize joint damage, radiographs of hands and feet are often used. In the pa...

  5. Lead Screening for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease of IKK2 Inhibited by Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-An Tsou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a chronic obstructive lung disease and is frequently found in well-developed countries due to the issue of aging populations. Not all forms of medical treatment are unable to return a patient's limited pulmonary function back to normal and eventually they could require a lung transplant. At this time, COPD is the leading cause of death in the world. Studies surveying I-kappa-B-kinase beta (IKK2 are very relevant to the occurrence and deterioration of the condition COPD. The sinapic acid-4-O-sulfate, kaempferol, and alpha-terpineol were found to be IKK2 inhibitors and helped prevent COPD occurrence and worsening according to a screening of the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM database. The protein-ligand interaction of these three compounds with regard to IKK2 was also done by molecular dynamics. The docking poses, hydrogen bond variation, and hydrophobic interactions found Asp103 and Lys106 are crucial to IKK2 binding areas for IKK2 inhibition. Finally, we found the three compounds that have an equally strong effect in terms of IKK2 binding proven by the TCM database and perhaps these may be an alternative treatment for COPD in the future.

  6. Chronic lead poisoning magnifies bone detrimental effects in an ovariectomized rat model of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching Ming; Terrizzi, Antonela Romina; Bozzini, Clarisa; Piñeiro, Adriana Emilce; Conti, María Inés; Martínez, María Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a persistent environmental contaminant that is mainly stored in bones being an important source of endogenous lead exposure during periods of increased bone resorption as occurs in menopause. As no evidence exists of which bone biomechanical properties are impaired in those elderly women who had been exposed to Pb during their lifetime, the aim of the present study is to discern whether chronic lead poisoning magnifies the deterioration of bone biology that occurs in later stages of life. We investigated the effect of Pb in the femora of ovariectomized (OVX) female Wistar rats who had been intoxicated with 1000 ppm of Pb acetate in drinking water for 8 months. Structural properties were determined using a three-point bending mechanical test, and geometrical and material properties were evaluated after obtaining the load/deformation curve. Areal Bone Mineral Density (BMD) was estimated using a bone densitometer. Femoral histomorphometry was carried out on slices dyed with H&E (Hematoxylin and Eosin). Pb and OVX decreased all structural properties with a higher effect when both treatments were applied together. Medullar and cortical area of femurs under OVX increased, allowing the bone to accommodate its architecture, which was not observed under Pb intoxication. Pb and OVX significantly decreased BMD, showing lead treated ovariectomized rats (PbOVX) animals the lowest BMD levels. Trabecular bone volume per total volume (BV/TV%) was decreased in OVX and PbOVX animals in 54% compared to the control animals (plead intoxication in bone biology in elderly women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Sarcopaenia and rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Targowski

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In October 2016 a new independent disease called sarcopaenia (according to ICD-10 classification appeared. According to the recommendation of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP, sarcopaenia is defined as abnormally low muscle mass plus low skeletal muscle strength or low physical performance. Sarcopaenia, as a primary disease, is mainly observed in older people, but it can also appear in younger adults in the course of many clinical chronic conditions. One of the most frequent chronic diseases associated with chronic inflammation and functional limitation of skeletal system is rheumatoid arthritis. In the present article, current knowledge on the epidemiology of sarcopaenia and its association with rheumatoid arthritis is presented.

  8. Deleterious role of trace elements - Silica and lead in the development of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Starlaine; Mutnuri, Srikanth; Ganguly, Anasuya

    2017-06-01

    Chronic-Kidney-Disease of Unknown-etiology (CKDu) has been reported in developing-countries like Sri-Lanka, India and Central-America without sparing the Indian sub-district (namely Canacona) located in south-Goa. The disease etiology is unlinked to common causes of diabetes and hypertension and assumed to be environmentally induced due to its asymptomatic-nature and occurrence in groundwater relying communities. This study aimed to understand environmental risk-factors underlying CKDu-etiology using Indian sub-district (Canacona) as case-study. Biochemical-analysis of CKDu-affected and non-affected individual's blood and detailed hydro-geochemical analyses of CKDu-affected and non-affected region's groundwater (drinking-water)were conducted. Trace geogenic-element-silica was highly dominant in affected-region's groundwater, thus its nephrotoxic-potential was analysed via in-vitro cytotoxicity-assays on human-kidney-cell-lines. All CKDu-affected-subjects showed increased-levels of serum-urea (52.85 mM),creatinine (941.5 μM),uric-acid (1384.5 μM), normal blood-glucose (4.65 mM), being distinct biomarkers of environmentally-induced CKD-'chronic-tubulo-interstitial-nephritis'. Affected-subjects reported high blood-lead levels (1.48 μM)suggesting direct-nephrotoxicity resulting in impaired blood-clearance and also exhibits indirect-nephrotoxicity by disrupting calcium-homeostasis causing skeletal-disorders and prolonged-consumption of NSAID's (pain-alleviation), indirectly causing renal-damage. Affected-region's groundwater was acidic (pH-5.6), resulting in borderline-lead (9.98 μgL-1) and high-silica (115.5 mgL-1)contamination. Silica's bio-availability (determining its nephrotoxicity) was enhanced at groundwater's acidic-pH and Ca-Mg-deficient-composition (since these cations complex with silica reducing bioavailability). Silica exhibited renal-proximal-tubular-cytotoxicity on long-term exposure comparable with affected-region's groundwater silica

  9. Chronic environmental exposure to lead affects semen quality in a Mexican men population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán-Martínez, Javier; Carranza-Rosales, Pilar; Morales-Vallarta, Mario; A. Heredia-Rojas, José; Bassol-Mayagoitia, Susana; Denys Betancourt-Martínez, Nadia; M. Cerda-Flores, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Male infertility is affected by several factors. Lead is one of the heavy metals more bioavailable than usually modifies the sperm quality in humans. Objective: The aim of this study was to establish the role of lead in semen quality in environmentally exposed men. Materials and Methods: Semen and blood samples were obtained from two groups: the exposed group (EG=20) and the non-exposed group (NEG=27). Two semen aliquots were used, one to evaluate spermatic quality and the other for lead determination. Blood (PbB) and semen lead (PbS) determination was performed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results: The PbB concentration was significantly greater in the EG, 10.10±0.97 µgdL-1 than in the NEG, 6.42±0.38 µgdL-1 (p<0.01), as well as the PbS concentration, with 3.28±0.35 and 1.76±0.14µgdL-1 in the EG and NEG respectively (p=0.043). A significant correlation between PbS and PbB concentration in the EG was found (r=0.573, p=0.038). Overall, the spermatic quality was lower in the EG than in the NEG. Specifically, there were significant differences in the spermatic concentration [EG=43.98±6.26 and NEG=68.78±8.51X106 cellmL-1 (p<0.01)], motility [EG=49±7 and NEG=67±4% (p=0.029)], viability [EG=36.32±3.59 and NEG=72.12±1.91% (p<0.01)] and abnormal morphology [EG=67±18 and NEG=32±12% (p<0.01)]. In the immature germ cells (IGC) concentration differences were found only for A cells (EG=8.1±1.1x100 and NEG=3.2±1.9X100 spermatozoa) (p<0.01) and for Sab cells (EG=3.4±2.2x100 and NEG=1.1±1.0X100 spermatozoa) (p=0.041). Conclusion: These results suggest that chronic environmental exposure to low levels of lead adversely affect the spermatic quality. PMID:24639755

  10. Successful treatment of chronic wound infection in neutropenia and rheumatoid arthritis with filgrastim (rhG-GSF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohlman, J; Höglund, M; Bergmann, S

    1994-09-01

    A 73-year-old woman was diagnosed with seropositive destructive rheumatoid arthritis in 1981. She was treated with cortisone, chloroquine, and cyclophosphamide (Sendoxan) in 1982 and 1984 and contracted severe neutropenia. After that she only received cortisone. During 1991, again low neutrophilic counts were registered, especially granulocytopenia. At first, B-cell lymphoma was suspected, but later Felty's syndrome was established. The patient was treated with high-dose cortisone with some success and had a few minor septic episodes. In May 1992 she contracted a traumatic wound on the back of the lower leg. Conservative treatment resulted in a worsening of the condition and an increased wound area, most likely related to the neutropenic condition. In mid July the patient was hospitalized. Bacterial isolates yielded mixed gram-negative enteric bacteria from the wound. Parenteral antibiotic treatment was started, followed by oral drugs, rhG-CSF (filgrastim) was given subcutaneously once a day, starting 3 days after admission. This resulted in increased numbers of peripheral granulocytes. The ulcer started to heal and by mid August the patient received a transplant with autologous skin grafting. In mid September the wound was completely healed. It is concluded that the combination of antibiotics, skin transplantation, and G-CSF was necessary for the successful result. Actually, the bacterial growth did not call for antibiotics, but it was considered necessary to cover for staphylococci. No worsening of the underlying arthritis was observed.

  11. Review article: moving towards common therapeutic goals in Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, P B; Olivera, P; Emery, P; Moulin, D; Jouzeau, J-Y; Netter, P; Danese, S; Feagan, B; Sandborn, W J; Peyrin-Biroulet, L

    2017-04-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and rheumatoid arthritis are chronic, progressive and disabling conditions that frequently lead to structural tissue damage. Based on strategies originally developed for rheumatoid arthritis, the treatment goal for CD has recently moved from exclusively controlling symptoms to both clinical remission and complete mucosal healing (deep remission), with the final aim of preventing bowel damage and disability. To review the similarities and differences in treatment goals between CD and rheumatoid arthritis. This review examined manuscripts from 1982 to 2016 that discussed and/or proposed therapeutic goals with their supportive evidence in CD and rheumatoid arthritis. Proposed therapeutic strategies to improve outcomes in both rheumatoid arthritis and CD include: (i) evaluation of musculoskeletal or organ damage and disability, (ii) tight control, (iii) treat-to-target, (iv) early intervention and (v) disease modification. In contrast to rheumatoid arthritis, there is a paucity of disease-modification trials in CD. Novel therapeutic strategies in CD based on tight control of objective signs of inflammation are expected to change disease course and patients' lives by halting progression or, ideally, preventing the occurrence of bowel damage. Most of these strategies require validation in prospective studies, whereas several disease-modification trials have addressed these issues in rheumatoid arthritis over the last decade. The recent approval of new drugs in CD such as vedolizumab and ustekinumab should facilitate initiation of disease-modification trials in CD in the near future. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Arthritis in America PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-03-07

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the March 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Many adults in the United States have arthritis. Learn how to reduce the pain of arthritis, as well as manage the condition.  Created: 3/7/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/7/2017.

  13. Cardiovascular involvement in psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. De Gennaro Colonna

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, genetically determined and immunomediated inflammatory skin disease that affects 2-3% of the Caucasian population. A considerable proportion of these patients develop a form of inflammatory arthritis known as psoriatic arthritis (PsA, although the prevalence of this has not been well defined. Patients with PsA have a higher mortality rate than the general population and the risk of mortality is related to disease severity at the time of presentation. Endothelial dysfunction and early atherosclerosis have been found in patients with PsA without any cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors, and experts believe that CVD is one of the leading causes of death, as it is in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Various disease-related mechanisms may be involved in the development of premature vascular damage in both cases, including an increased synthesis of proinflammatory mediators (such as cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules, autoantibodies against endothelial cell components, perturbations in T-cell subsets, genetic polymorphisms, hyperhomocysteinemia, oxidative stress, abnormal vascular repair, and iatrogenic factors. In a recent study of 22 patients with PsA without any signs of CVD, we found that the plasma concentration of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA levels were significantly high and coronary flow reserve (CFR was significantly reduced. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between CFR and plasma ADMA levels in the PsA group. The significant correlation between the reduced CRF and increased ADMA levels suggests that, like patients with early RA, PsA patients suffer from endothelial dysfunction and impaired coronary microcirculation. Active PsA is a risk factor for CVD, and so PsA patients should be screened for subclinical forms of the disease and its risk factors, and an early treatment approach should be adopted.

  14. Genome Engineering for Personalized Arthritis Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar, Shaunak S; Brunger, Jonathan M; Willard, Vincent P; Wu, Chia-Lung; Gersbach, Charles A; Guilak, Farshid

    2017-10-01

    Arthritis represents a family of complex joint pathologies responsible for the majority of musculoskeletal conditions. Nearly all diseases within this family, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis, are chronic conditions with few or no disease-modifying therapeutics available. Advances in genome engineering technology, most recently with CRISPR-Cas9, have revolutionized our ability to interrogate and validate genetic and epigenetic elements associated with chronic diseases such as arthritis. These technologies, together with cell reprogramming methods, including the use of induced pluripotent stem cells, provide a platform for human disease modeling. We summarize new evidence from genome-wide association studies and genomics that substantiates a genetic basis for arthritis pathogenesis. We also review the potential contributions of genome engineering in the development of new arthritis therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Adaptation to Chronic Nutritional Stress Leads to Reduced Dependence on Microbiota in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkosar, Berra; Kolly, Sylvain; van der Meer, Jan R; Kawecki, Tadeusz J

    2017-10-24

    Numerous studies have shown that animal nutrition is tightly linked to gut microbiota, especially under nutritional stress. In Drosophila melanogaster, microbiota are known to promote juvenile growth, development, and survival on poor diets, mainly through enhanced digestion leading to changes in hormonal signaling. Here, we show that this reliance on microbiota is greatly reduced in replicated Drosophila populations that became genetically adapted to a poor larval diet in the course of over 170 generations of experimental evolution. Protein and polysaccharide digestion in these poor-diet-adapted populations became much less dependent on colonization with microbiota. This was accompanied by changes in expression levels of dFOXO transcription factor, a key regulator of cell growth and survival, and many of its targets. These evolutionary changes in the expression of dFOXO targets to a large degree mimic the response of the same genes to microbiota, suggesting that the evolutionary adaptation to poor diet acted on mechanisms that normally mediate the response to microbiota. Our study suggests that some metazoans have retained the evolutionary potential to adapt their physiology such that association with microbiota may become optional rather than essential.IMPORTANCE Animals depend on gut microbiota for various metabolic tasks, particularly under conditions of nutritional stress, a relationship usually regarded as an inherent aspect of animal physiology. Here, we use experimental evolution in fly populations to show that the degree of host dependence on microbiota can substantially and rapidly change as the host population evolves in response to poor diet. Our results suggest that, although microbiota may initially greatly facilitate coping with suboptimal diets, chronic nutritional stress experienced over multiple generations leads to evolutionary adaptation in physiology and gut digestive properties that reduces dependence on the microbiota for growth and survival

  16. Toxicogenomics of water chemistry influence on chronic lead exposure to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mager, Edward M; Wintz, Henri; Vulpe, Chris D; Brix, Kevin V; Grosell, Martin

    2008-05-01

    Establishment of water quality criteria (WQC), intended to protect aquatic life, continues to rely principally on water hardness (i.e. Ca(2+)) for lead (Pb) despite growing evidence that other chemical parameters also strongly influence toxicity. To more clearly define the water chemistry parameters mediating Pb toxicity, we evaluated the effects of hardness as CaSO(4) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as humic acid during chronic (150 days) exposures to the fathead minnow. Measured Pb concentrations ranged from 157+/-5 nM (33+/-1 microg/L) Pb in base water to 177+/-7 (37+/-1 microg/L) and 187+/-7 nM (39+/-1 microg/L) Pb in CaSO(4)- or HA-supplemented water, respectively. Fish were collected at 2, 4, 10, 30, 63, 90 and 150 days of exposure. Traditional toxicological endpoints were examined alongside gene transcription analyses to help clarify the underlying mechanisms of Pb toxicity and to identify candidate molecular markers that might ultimately serve as robust indicators of exposure and effect. Addition of CaSO(4) did not prevent whole body Pb accumulation whereas DOC afforded strong protection (about half the amount accumulated by fish in base water) suggesting that current, hardness-based WQC are likely inaccurate for predicting chronic Pb effects in aquatic systems. Custom-made microarrays were co-hybridized with base water samples+/-Pb up to the 30 days time point. Quantitative PCR was employed to verify gene transcription responses and to extend analysis to the CaSO(4) and HA treatments and the 150 days time point. Identification of four genes by microarray analysis revealed clear Pb-induced responses over time: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glutathione-S-transferase, ferritin and beta-globin. Results obtained by qPCR were in strong agreement with microarray data by regression analysis (r(2)=0.82, slope=1.28). The associated pathways implicated herein for these genes provide further evidence supporting roles for anemia and neurological disorders in

  17. Neurophysiologic and neurocognitive case profiles of Andean patients with chronic environmental lead poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, S Allen; Buchanan, Leo H; Ortega, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    This report presents case profiles of three siblings in a family of lead (Pb) glazing workers living in a Pb-contaminated Andean village who presented with extreme plumbism (blood Pb levels: 47 to 128 microg/dl) from childhood to adolescence. These cases are examples of persons who have chronic Pb poisoning as a result of prolonged occupational and environmental exposure in a Pb-glazing ceramic cottage industry in the study area. Using behavioral and physiological techniques for measuring the integrity of the peripheral and central auditory systems, including otoacoustic emissions, and replicated auditory brainstem electrophysiological potentials, the authors found normal auditory neurosensory function in each patient, thus ruling out hearing impairment as a basis for adverse neurocognitive outcomes. This finding is contrary to the prevailing view regarding the detrimental effects of Pb poisoning on the cochlear and auditory brainstem of children. Performance on tests of visual spatial intelligence and auditory memory/attention was below average in these patients, which may underlie their reported learning disabilities. In two of the cases, there was an improvement in cognitive performance following a lowering of PbB levels from chelation therapy and Pb prevention education, suggesting some level of reversibility of their neurocognitive deficits. Nevertheless, these case profiles suggest that if the patients persist in Pb-glazing activities, in spite of repeated chelation therapy and family counseling, they may continue to be re-intoxicated and remain at risk for learning disabilities and other neurological impairments.

  18. Protective effects of puerarin on experimental chronic lead nephrotoxicity in immature female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Lin, Shuqian; Li, Zifa; Yang, Dubao; Wang, Zhenyong

    2013-02-01

    Puerarin (PU), a natural flavonoid, has been reported to possess anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, female Sprague-Dawley rats received lead (Pb) nitrate (300 mg/L, via drinking water) and/or PU (400 mg/kg/day, orally) to investigate the protective effects of PU on Pb-induced renal damage. Renal toxicity was evaluated by detecting urinary proteins excretion as well as levels of serum urea nitrogen and serum creatinine. Ultrastructural observations and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses were performed on kidney cortex tissues to identify the mitochondrial damage and quantify gene expression levels of cytochrome oxidase submits (COX-I/II/III), respectively. Renal cell damage was assessed by light microscopic examination. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels and antioxidant status in kidney were also evaluated. Animals that received both Pb and PU showed a better renal function than those that received Pb alone, with minor pathological damage. Moreover, PU significantly reduced LPO and markedly restored the enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants levels in kidney of Pb-treated rats, which may be related to its restoring mitochondrial function. Furthermore, PU administration significantly increased urinary Pb excretion and decreased its level in the serum and kidney. In conclusion, these results suggested that PU reduces renal damage induced by chronic Pb administration through its antioxidant properties and chelating ability.

  19. Modulation of SERCA in the chronic phase of adjuvant arthritis as a possible adaptation mechanism of redox imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strosova, Miriam; Karlovska, Jana; Spickett, Corinne M; Orszagova, Zuzana; Ponist, Silvester; Bauerova, Katarina; Mihalova, Danica; Horakova, Lubica

    2009-09-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) is a condition that involves systemic oxidative stress. Unexpectedly, it was found that sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2 +)-ATPase (SERCA) activity was elevated in muscles of rats with AA compared to controls, suggesting possible conformational changes in the enzyme. There was no alteration in the nucleotide binding site but rather in the transmembrane domain according to the tryptophan polar/non-polar fluorescence ratio. Higher relative expression of SERCA, higher content of nitrotyrosine but no increase in phospholipid oxidation in AA SR was found. In vitro treatments of SR with HOCl showed that in AA animals SERCA activity was more susceptible to oxidative stress, but SR phospholipids were more resistant and SERCA could also be activated by phosphatidic acid. It was concluded that increased SERCA activity in AA was due to increased levels of SERCA protein and structural changes to the protein, probably induced by direct and specific oxidation involving reactive nitrogen species.

  20. Chronic oral or intraarticular administration of docosahexaenoic acid reduces nociception and knee edema and improves functional outcomes in a mouse model of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant–induced knee arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Torres-Guzman, Ana M; Morado-Urbina, Carlos E; Alvarado-Vazquez, Perla A; Acosta-Gonzalez, Rosa I; Chávez-Piña, Aracely E; Montiel-Ruiz, Rosa M; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Clinical and preclinical studies have shown that supplementation with ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) reduce joint destruction and inflammation present in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of individual ω-3 PUFAs on chronic arthritic pain have not been evaluated to date. Thus, our aim in this study was to examine whether purified docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, an ω-3 PUFA) reduces spontaneous pain-related behavior and knee edema and improves functional outco...

  1. Efficacy, tolerability and safety of cannabinoids in chronic pain associated with rheumatic diseases (fibromyalgia syndrome, back pain, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis): A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzcharles, M-A; Baerwald, C; Ablin, J; Häuser, W

    2016-02-01

    In the absence of an ideal treatment for chronic pain associated with rheumatic diseases, there is interest in the potential effects of cannabinoid molecules, particularly in the context of global interest in the legalization of herbal cannabis for medicinal use. A systematic search until April 2015 was conducted in Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, www.cannabis-med.org and clinicaltrials.gov for randomized controlled trials with a study duration of at least 2 weeks and at least ten patients per treatment arm with herbal cannabis or pharmaceutical cannabinoid products in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), osteoarthritis (OA), chronic spinal pain, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pain. Outcomes were reduction of pain, sleep problems, fatigue and limitations of quality of life for efficacy, dropout rates due to adverse events for tolerability, and serious adverse events for safety. The methodology quality of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was evaluated by the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. Two RCTs of 2 and 4 weeks duration respectively with nabilone, including 71 FMS patients, one 4-week trial with nabilone, including 30 spinal pain patients, and one 5-week study with tetrahydrocannbinol/cannabidiol, including 58 RA patients were included. One inclusion criterion was pain refractory to conventional treatment in three studies. No RCT with OA patients was found. The risk of bias was high for three studies. The findings of a superiority of cannabinoids over controls (placebo, amitriptyline) were not consistent. Cannabinoids were generally well tolerated despite some troublesome side effects and safe during the study duration. Currently, there is insufficient evidence for recommendation for any cannabinoid preparations for symptom management in patients with chronic pain associated with rheumatic diseases.

  2. Depletion of regulatory T cells leads to an exacerbation of delayedtype hypersensitivity arthritis in C57BL/6 mice that can be counteracted by IL-17 blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Hoffmann, Ute; Bach, Emil

    2016-01-01

    , this approach could be relevant for advancing the understanding of Tregs in inflammatory arthritis. Selective depletion of Tregs was achieved using a Foxp3-DTR-eGFP mouse, which expresses the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under control of the Foxp3 gene. Anti...

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis and the role of oral bacteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Loyola-Rodriguez, Juan Pablo; Martinez-Martinez, Rita Elizabeth; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos; Patiño-Marin, Nuria; Seymour, Gregory J

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease (PD) have shown similar physiopathologic mechanisms such as chronic inflammation with adjacent bone resorption in an immunogenetically susceptible host...

  4. Managing Arthritis (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-10-19

    Arthritis is a common chronic condition among Americans. Early diagnosis and management of arthritis is critical for maintaining quality of life. This podcast discusses importance of early diagnosis and management of arthritis.  Created: 10/19/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 10/19/2017.

  5. JUVENILE ARTHRITIS: CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS AND DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Алексей Николаевич Кожевников

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory joint diseases is the pressing problem of pediatric rheumatology and orthopedics. Juvenile arthritis is the most frequent chronic inflammatory disease of the musculoskeletal system in children and adolescents. Still juvenile arthritis is often misdiagnosed. The article provides current knowledge on juvenile arthritis, its clinical manifestations, as well as diagnostic and treatment strategies, and differential diagnosis.

  6. Cardio-pulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease, characterized by polyarthritis and extraarticular manifestations. The cardiopulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis were studied retrospectively in a cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Methods: This was a retrospective study of all ...

  7. Reactive arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keat, A

    1999-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is one of the spondyloarthropathy family of clinical syndromes. The clinical features are those shared by other members of the spondyloarthritis family, though it is distinguished by a clear relationship with a precipitating infection. Susceptibility to reactive arthritis is closely linked with the class 1 HLA allele B27; it is likely that all sub-types pre-dispose to this condition. The link between HLA B27 and infection is mirrored by the development of arthritis in HLA B27-transgenic rats. In this model, arthritis does not develop in animals maintained in a germ-free environment. Infections of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary and respiratory tract appear to provoke reactive arthritis and a wide range of pathogens has now been implicated. Although mechanistic parallels may exist, reactive arthritis is distinguished from Lyme disease, rheumatic fever and Whipple's disease by virtue of the distinct clinical features and the link with HLA B27. As in these conditions both antigens and DNA of several micro-organisms have been detected in joint material from patients with reactive arthritis. The role of such disseminated microbial elements in the provocation or maintenance of arthritis remains unclear. HLA B27-restricted T-cell responses to microbial antigens have been demonstrated and these may be important in disease pathogenesis. The importance of dissemination of bacteria from sites of mucosal infection and their deposition in joints has yet to be fully understood. The role of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of reactive arthritis is being explored; in some circumstances, both the anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial effects of certain antibiotics appear to be valuable. The term reactive arthritis should be seen as a transitory one, reflecting a concept which may itself be on the verge of replacement, as our understanding of the condition develops. Nevertheless it appropriately describes arthritis that is associated with demonstrable

  8. APLAR rheumatoid arthritis treatment recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Chak Sing; Chia, Faith; Harrison, Andrew; Hsieh, Tsu-Yi; Jain, Rahul; Jung, Seung Min; Kishimoto, Mitsumasa; Kumar, Ashok; Leong, Khai Pang; Li, Zhanguo; Lichauco, Juan Javier; Louthrenoo, Worawit; Luo, Shue-Fen; Nash, Peter; Ng, Chin Teck; Park, Sung-Hwan; Suryana, Bagus Putu Putra; Suwannalai, Parawee; Wijaya, Linda Kurniaty; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Yang, Yue; Yeap, Swan Sim

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory condition that affects approximately 1% of the world's population. There are a wide number of guidelines and recommendations available to support the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis; however, the evidence used for these guidelines is predominantly based on studies in Caucasian subjects and may not be relevant for rheumatoid arthritis patients in the Asia-Pacific region. Therefore, the Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology established a Steering Committee in 2013 to address this issue. The AGREE II instrument and the ADAPTE Collaboration framework were applied to systematically identify, appraise, synthesize, and adapt international rheumatoid arthritis guidelines for use in the Asia-Pacific region. Forty rheumatoid arthritis treatment recommendations, based on evidence and expert opinion, were drafted and are presented in this report. The Asia Pacific of Associations for Rheumatology rheumatoid arthritis treatment recommendations are intended to serve as a reference for best practice management of rheumatoid arthritis in Asia-Pacific, focusing on local issues to ensure the delivery of basic care for these patients, and to improve their outcomes. In addition, the document will serve as a reference for national rheumatology associations in Asia-Pacific for developing guidelines in their respective countries. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. The effect of methotrexate and azathioprine on the serum levels of IgA-a1-antitrypsin complex in juvenile chronic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Lacki

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated the influence of methotrexate (MTX and azathioprine (AZA on the serum levels of the IgA-a1-antitrypsin (IgA-AT complex in patients with the systemic form of juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA. Fifty-six JCA patients (22 treated with MTX, 18 treated with AZA, and 16 not treated with any immunosuppressive agent were enrolled in the study. MTX dosage ranged from 0.3 to 0.5 mg kg-1 week-1, while AZA was given daily at an average dose of 1 mg/kg. MTX was given for 13 months (SD = 7 months whereas AZA for 11 months (SD = 6 months. The average value of the complex was higher in JCA patients than in both control groups (0.74 ± 0.73 U vs 0.37 ± 0.13 U (control children, Pa1-acid-glycoprotein (r = 0.45, Pa1-antichymotrypsin (r = 0.52, Pa1-antitrypsin (r = 0.40, P<0.01 and IgA (r = 0.56, P<0.01 was established

  10. Bilateral Distal Femoral Flexion Deformity After Total Knee Arthroplasty in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Chan Chun-Ming

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune systemic disease with predominant peripheral polyarthritis, often leading to severe joint destruction. This is a case report of an 81-year-old woman with long-standing severe rheumatoid arthritis requiring multiple orthopaedic operations for joint destruction since 2000. These operated joints improved her functional mobility until recently, when she found that her knees were fixed at around 70° of flexion with limited motion. There was chronic progressive flexion deformity of bilateral distal femurs, which was an extremely rare complication of total knee arthroplasty.

  11. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Language Publications Portal en espanol Community Outreach Initiative Menu Menu Close Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Ankylosing Spondylitis ... Media Moderation Policy FOIA Privacy Statement Accessibility Disclaimer Digital Strategy Open Source Data Public Data Listing NIH... ...

  12. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also can cause tender spots where tendons and ligaments join onto bones. This condition, called enthesitis, can ... will help to avoid undue stress on feet, ankles, or knees affected by arthritis. An exercise bike ...

  13. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  14. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein deficiency promotes early onset and the chronic development of collagen-induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Carlsen, Stefan; Nandakumar, Kutty

    2008-01-01

    -collagen II and anti-COMP antibodies as well as serum COMP levels in arthritic and wild-type mice were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: COMP-deficient mice showed a significant early onset and increase in the severity of CIA in the chronic phase, whereas collagen II-antibody titers were...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis | Ally | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Immune-mediated inflammatory disorders include a clinically diverse group of conditions sharing similar pathogenic mechanisms. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, spondyloarthropathy, inflammatory bowel disease and connective tissue diseases are characterised by immune dysregulation and chronic ...

  17. Acute cricoarytenoid arthritis: local periarticular steroid injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, G T; Javaheri, A; Janfaza, P

    1980-01-01

    Acute cricoarytenoid arthritis is a frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis and the most frequent otolaryngologic manifestation of the disease. Over 25% of rheumatoid arthritis cases have discomfort from this problem. Other etiologies can produce cricoarytenoid arthritis. Symptoms range from mild discomfort through hoarseness to complete airway obstruction requiring emergency tracheotomy. Chronic cricoarytenoid arthritis may result in joint ankylosis and vocal fold fixation. Single periarticular triamcinolone injections may bring rapid and dramatic relief of the symptomatology of nonankylosed acute cricoarytenoid arthritis for periods of up to one year if other medical management is adequate. Six cases illustrate the problem and the efficacy of this treatment methodology. Findings, pathology and pertinent literature are discussed. Specific criteria for considering this technique are outlined. This form of therapy has not been described previously.

  18. Chronic early life lead (Pb2+) exposure alters presynaptic vesicle pools in hippocampal synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guariglia, Sara Rose; Stansfield, Kirstie H; McGlothan, Jennifer; Guilarte, Tomas R

    2016-11-02

    Lead (Pb2+) exposure has been shown to impair presynaptic neurotransmitter release in both in vivo and in vitro model systems. The mechanism by which Pb2+ impairs neurotransmitter release has not been fully elucidated. In previous work, we have shown that Pb2+ exposure inhibits vesicular release and reduces the number of fast-releasing sites in cultured hippocampal neurons. We have also shown that Pb2+ exposure inhibits vesicular release and alters the distribution of presynaptic vesicles in Shaffer Collateral - CA1 synapses of rodents chronically exposed to Pb2+ during development. In the present study, we used transmission electron microscopy to examine presynaptic vesicle pools in Mossy Fiber-CA3 synapses and in Perforant Path-Dentate Gyrus synapses of rats to determine if in vivo Pb2+ exposure altered presynaptic vesicle distribution in these hippocampal regions. Data were analyzed using T-test for each experimental endpoint. We found that Pb2+ exposure significantly reduced the number of vesicles in the readily releasable pool and recycling pool in Mossy Fiber-CA3 terminals. In both Mossy Fiber-CA3 terminals and in Perforant Path-Dentate Gyrus terminals, Pb2+ exposure significantly increased vesicle nearest neighbor distance in all vesicular pools (Rapidly Releasable, Recycling and Resting). We also found a reduction in the size of the postsynaptic densities of CA3 dendrites in the Pb2+ exposed group. In our previous work, we have demonstrated that Pb2+ exposure impairs vesicular release in Shaffer Collateral - CA1 terminals of the hippocampus and that the number of docked vesicles in the presynaptic active zone was reduced. Our current data shows that Pb2+ exposure reduces the number of vesicles that are in proximity to release sites in Mossy Fiber- CA3 terminals. Furthermore, Pb2+ exposure causes presynaptic vesicles to be further from one another, in both Mossy Fiber- CA3 terminals and in Perforant Pathway - Dentate Gyrus terminals, which may interfere with

  19. MAPK pathway activation by chronic lead-exposure increases vascular reactivity through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simões, Maylla Ronacher, E-mail: yllars@hotmail.com [Dept. of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitória, ES CEP 29040-091 (Brazil); Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), Madrid (Spain); Aguado, Andrea [Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), Madrid (Spain); Fiorim, Jonaína; Silveira, Edna Aparecida; Azevedo, Bruna Fernandes; Toscano, Cindy Medice [Dept. of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitória, ES CEP 29040-091 (Brazil); Zhenyukh, Olha; Briones, Ana María [Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), Madrid (Spain); Alonso, María Jesús [Dept. of Biochemistry, Physiology and Molecular Genetics, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Alcorcón (Spain); Vassallo, Dalton Valentim [Dept. of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitória, ES CEP 29040-091 (Brazil); Health Science Center of Vitória-EMESCAM, Vitória, ES CEP 29045-402 (Brazil); Salaices, Mercedes, E-mail: mercedes.salaices@uam.es [Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), Madrid (Spain)

    2015-03-01

    Chronic exposure to low lead concentration produces hypertension; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We analyzed the role of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways and MAPK in the vascular alterations induced by chronic lead exposure. Aortas from lead-treated Wistar rats (1st dose: 10 μg/100 g; subsequent doses: 0.125 μg/100 g, intramuscular, 30 days) and cultured aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from Sprague Dawley rats stimulated with lead (20 μg/dL) were used. Lead blood levels of treated rats attained 21.7 ± 2.38 μg/dL. Lead exposure increased systolic blood pressure and aortic ring contractile response to phenylephrine, reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and did not affect sodium nitroprusside relaxation. Endothelium removal and L-NAME left-shifted the response to phenylephrine more in untreated than in lead-treated rats. Apocynin and indomethacin decreased more the response to phenylephrine in treated than in untreated rats. Aortic protein expression of gp91(phox), Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and COX-2 increased after lead exposure. In cultured VSMCs lead 1) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and gene and/or protein levels of NOX-1, NOX-4, Mn-SOD, EC-SOD and COX-2 and 2) activated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and mRNA levels of NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2. Blockade of the ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished lead-induced NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2 expression. Results show that lead activation of the MAPK signaling pathways activates inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2, suggesting a reciprocal interplay and contribution to vascular dysfunction as an underlying mechanisms for lead-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • Lead-exposure increases oxidative stress, COX-2 expression and vascular reactivity. • Lead exposure activates MAPK signaling pathway. • ROS and COX-2 activation by

  20. Prevalence of fractures in women with rheumatoid arthritis and/or systemic lupus erythematosus on chronic glucocorticoid therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rentero, Maria Luz; Amigo, Encarna; Chozas, Nicolas; Fernández Prada, Manuel; Silva-Fernández, Lucia; Abad Hernandez, Miguel Angel; Rodriguez Barrera, Jose Maria; del Pino-Montes, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is associated with an increased risk of fractures. The main objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed vertebral fractures in women chronically using GC therapy for autoimmune disorders. We also determined the prevalence of non-vertebral fractures, and investigated whether factors such as quality-of-life and future fracture risk are associated with vertebral/non-vertebral fractures. Methods This was a multicenter cross-section...

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and ...

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis ...

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Appointments • Support Our Research Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis News ...

  5. Application of (1)H NMR-based serum metabolomic studies for monitoring female patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabek, Adam; Swierkot, Jerzy; Malak, Anna; Zawadzka, Iga; Deja, Stanisław; Bogunia-Kubik, Katarzyna; Mlynarz, Piotr

    2016-01-05

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune-based inflammatory disease that leads to progressive joint degeneration, disability, and an increased risk of cardiovascular complications, which is the main cause of mortality in this population of patients. Although several biomarkers are routinely used in the management of rheumatoid arthritis, there is a high demand for novel biomarkers to further improve the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, stratification of patients, and the prediction of a better response to a specific therapy. In this study, the metabolomics approach was used to provide relevant biomarkers to improve diagnostic accuracy, define prognosis and predict and monitor treatment efficacy. The results indicated that twelve metabolites were important for the discrimination of healthy control and rheumatoid arthritis. Notably, valine, isoleucine, lactate, alanine, creatinine, GPC  APC and histidine relative levels were lower in rheumatoid arthritis, whereas 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, acetate, NAC, acetoacetate and acetone relative levels were higher. Simultaneously, the analysis of the concentration of metabolites in rheumatoid arthritis and 3 months after induction treatment revealed that L1, 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, lysine, L5, acetoacetate, creatine, GPC+APC, histidine and phenylalanine were elevated in RA, whereas leucine, acetate, betaine and formate were lower. Additionally, metabolomics tools were employed to discriminate between patients with different IL-17A genotypes. Metabolomics may provide relevant biomarkers to improve diagnostic accuracy, define prognosis and predict and monitor treatment efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Chronic disease management in rural and underserved populations: innovation and system improvement help lead to success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolin, Jane; Gamm, Larry; Kash, Bita; Peck, Mitchell

    2005-03-01

    Successful implementation of disease management (DM) is based on the ability of an organization to overcome a variety of barriers to deliver timely, appropriate care of chronic illnesses. Such programs initiate DM services to patient populations while initiating self-management education among medication-resistant patients who are chronically ill. Despite formidable challenges, rural health care providers have been successful in initiating DM programs and have discovered several ways in which these programs benefit their organizations. This research reports on six DM programs that serve large rural and underserved populations and have demonstrated that DM can be successfully implemented in such areas.

  7. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy leading to dramatic improvement in a patient with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and severe pericarditis resistant to steroid pulse therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa-Yashiro, Tomomi; Oki, Eishin; Tsuruga, Kazushi; Nakahata, Tohru; Ito, Etsuro; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2012-05-01

    A 7-year-old Japanese boy with a 4-month history of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (s-JIA) experienced disease flare with spiking fever, exanthema and arthralgia. He then developed progressive dyspnea due to severe pericarditis, and proinflammatory hypercytokinemia was suspected. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was ineffective and echocardiography showed massive pericardial effusion had persisted. Alternatively, subsequent intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy resulted in dramatic resolution of the pericardial effusion, and his general condition significantly improved within a few days. This case report may lend further support the use of IVIG for selected patients with s-JIA and severe pericarditis.

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis; a possible link via citrullination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Smit, M J; Tonckens-Brouwer, Elisabeth; Vissink, A; van Winkelhoff, A J

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and chronic and aggressive periodontitis are chronic inflammatory disorders characterized by deregulation of the host inflammatory response. Increased secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators results in soft and hard tissue destruction of the synovium and periodontium

  9. Vagal influences in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S E; Pfeiffer-Jensen, M; Drewes, A M

    2018-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disease with a prevalence of 0.5-1% in Western populations. Conventionally, it is treated with therapeutic interventions that include corticosteroids, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, and biological agents. RA exerts...

  10. Bone lead as a biological marker in epidemiologic studies of chronic toxicity: conceptual paradigms.

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, H.; Rabinowitz, M; Smith, D.

    1998-01-01

    The skeleton contains the majority of the body's lead burden in both children and adults. The half-life of lead in bone is in the range of years to decades, depending on bone type, metabolic state, and subject age, among other things. Measurement of skeletal lead has benefited greatly from the recent development of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instruments that can make rapid, safe, accurate, and relatively precise measurements of lead in bone. Two types of XRF technologies exist, LXRF and KXRF; t...

  11. Nijmegen breakage syndrome and chronic polyarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Pasic, Srdjan; Cupic, Maja; Jovanovic, Tanja; Djukic, Slobodanka; Kavaric, Maja; Lazarevic, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    We report on pediatric patient with Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), a rare DNA repair disorder characterized by microcephaly, immunodeficiency and predisposition to malignant lymphomas, who developed juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-like polyarthritis. In patients with primary immunodeficiencies (PID), septic arthritis due to pyogenic bacteria or mycoplasmal arthritis are the most common osteoarticular manifestations. In certain PID, chronic, non-infectious arthritis resembling rheumatoi...

  12. Gouty arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthelemy, C.R.; Nakayama, D.A.; Lightfoot, R.W. Jr.; Wortmann, R.L.; Carrera, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    A prospective analysis of 60 patients with gout was undertaken to evaluate the radiographic spectrum of gouty arthritis in patients treated in the era of hypouricemic therapy. Twenty-two of these patients were clinically tophaceous; 36 were considered to have radiographic findings diagnostic of gouty arthritis by strict radiographic criteria. Up to 24% of the patients denied symptoms in joints with radiographic changes of gout; 42% with no evidence of tophi on clinical examination had radiographic changes characteristic of gout. Radiographic assessment can be extremely helpful in the management of gout by documenting the degree and extent of bony involvement, particularly in patients with limited symptoms or without clinical tophi.

  13. Chronic hypoxemia leads to reduced serum IGF-I levels in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, B; Akçoral, A; Saylam, G; Unal, N; Meşe, T; Hüdaoğlu, S; Büyükgebiz, B; Böber, E; Büyükgebiz, A

    2000-04-01

    Cyanotic congenital heart disease in children commonly causes more pronounced growth retardation in comparison with acyanotic congenital heart disease. Chronic hypoxemia has been suggested as the cause of poor growth in these patients, but the relationship between serum IGF-I levels and chronic hypoxemia is unclear. Serum IGF-I concentrations, oxygen saturation and nutritional status were evaluated in 29 patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease, and serum IGF-I levels were compared with a group of 20 well-nourished, age-matched control children to assess the relationship between IGF-I levels and chronic hypoxemia. The nutritional status of each patient was determined by using anthropometric parameters and calorie and protein intake ratios. The patients were divided into malnourished and well-nourished groups (21 and 8 patients, respectively) according to their nutritional status. Serum IGF-I concentrations were measured in the two patient groups and the controls. The malnourished group had the lowest IGF-I levels (48.14 +/- 21.8 ng/ml, pnutritional status (85.5 +/- 30.2 and 107 +/- 19.7 ng/ml, respectively, pcongenital heart disease.

  14. Chronic pain causes a persistent anxiety state leading to increased ethanol intake in CD1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sepúlveda, Marta; Pozo, Oscar J; Marcos, Josep; Valverde, Olga

    2016-02-01

    Mood disorders and chronic pain are closely linked, but limited progress has been made in understanding the role of chronic and neuropathic pain in the aetiopathogenesis of depression. To explore the pathological mechanisms that mediate the association between pain and depressive-like behaviours, we studied the time-dependent effect of neuropathic pain on the development of anxiety-like and despair behaviours in CD1 mice. We analysed behavioural data, neuroinflammation reactions and changes in neurotransmitter (glutamate and serotonin) levels in the mouse prefrontal cortex. Sciatic-operated mice displayed long-lasting anxiety-like and despair behaviours, starting 5 and 20 days after partial sciatic nerve ligation, respectively. Glutamatergic neurotransmission and IL-1β cytokine expression were enhanced in the prefrontal cortex of mice with neuropathic pain. We found no change in serotonin metabolism, cytokine IL-6 or brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. While sciatic-operated mice exposed to intermittent ethanol intake (20% v/v) using the drinking in the dark procedure consumed higher amounts of ethanol than sham-operated mice, thermal allodynia and despair behaviour were not attenuated by ethanol consumption. Our findings reveal an association between glutamatergic neurotransmission and pain-induced mood disorders, and indicate that moderate ethanol consumption does not relieve nociceptive and depressive behaviours associated with chronic pain in mice. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Effects of chronic lead exposure on bone mineral properties in femurs of growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Lloret, Pedro; Lee, Ching Ming; Conti, María Inés; Terrizzi, Antonela Romina; González-López, Santiago; Martínez, María Pilar

    2017-02-15

    Lead exposure has been associated with several defective skeletal growth processes and bone mineral alterations. The aim of the present study is to make a more detailed description of the toxic effects of lead intoxication on bone intrinsic material properties as mineral composition, morphology and microstructural characteristics. For this purpose, Wistar rats were exposed (n=12) to 1000ppm lead acetate in drinking water for 90days while control group (n=8) were treated with sodium acetate. Femurs were examined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and micro-Computed Tomography (μCT). Results showed that femur from the lead-exposed rats had higher carbonate content in bone mineral and (Ca2++Mg2++ Na+)/P ratio values, although no variations were observed in crystal maturity and crystallite size. From morphological analyses, lead exposure rats showed a decreased in trabecular bone surface and distribution while trabecular thickness and cortical area increased. These overall effects indicate a similar mechanism of bone maturation normally associated to age-related processes. These responses are correlated with the adverse actions induced by lead on the processes regulating bone turnover mechanism. This information may explain the osteoporosis diseases associated to lead intoxication as well as the risk of fracture observed in populations exposed to this toxicant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling human methamphetamine exposure in nonhuman primates: chronic dosing in the rhesus macaque leads to behavioral and physiological abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Lisa J; Flynn, Claudia T; Zandonatti, Michelle A; May, Meredith; Parsons, Loren H; Katner, Simon N; Henriksen, Steven J; Fox, Howard S

    2005-02-01

    Acute high dose methamphetamine (METH) dosing regimens are frequently used in animal studies, however, these regimens can lead to considerable toxicity and even death in experimental animals. Acute high dosing regimens are quite distinct from the chronic usage patterns found in many human METH abusers. Furthermore, such doses, especially in nonhuman primates, can result in unexpected death, which is unacceptable, especially when such deaths fail to accurately model effects of human usage. As a model of chronic human METH abuse we have developed a nonlethal chronic METH administration procedure for the rhesus macaque that utilizes an escalating dose protocol. This protocol slowly increases the METH dosage from 0.1 to 0.7 mg/kg b.i.d. over a period of 4 weeks, followed by a period of chronic METH administration at 0.75 mg/kg b.i.d. (= total daily METH administration of 1.5 mg/kg). In parallel to human usage patterns, METH injections were given 20-23 times a month. This regimen produced a number of behavioral and physiological effects including decreased food intake and a significant increase in urinary cortisol excretion.

  17. Dual IL-17A and IL-17F neutralisation by bimekizumab in psoriatic arthritis: evidence from preclinical experiments and a randomised placebo-controlled clinical trial that IL-17F contributes to human chronic tissue inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatt, Sophie; Baeten, Dominique; Baker, Terry; Griffiths, Meryn; Ionescu, Lucian; Lawson, Alastair D G; Maroof, Ash; Oliver, Ruth; Popa, Serghei; Strimenopoulou, Foteini; Vajjah, Pavan; Watling, Mark I L; Yeremenko, Nataliya; Miossec, Pierre; Shaw, Stevan

    2017-12-23

    Interleukin (IL)-17A has emerged as pivotal in driving tissue pathology in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. The role of IL-17F, sharing 50% sequence homology and overlapping biological function, remains less clear. We hypothesised that IL-17F, together with IL-17A, contributes to chronic tissue inflammation, and that dual neutralisation may lead to more profound suppression of inflammation than inhibition of IL-17A alone. Preclinical experiments assessed the role of IL-17A and IL-17F in tissue inflammation using disease-relevant human cells. A placebo-controlled proof-of-concept (PoC) clinical trial randomised patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) to bimekizumab (n=39) or placebo (n=14). Safety, pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of multiple doses (weeks 0, 3, 6 (240 mg/160 mg/160 mg; 80 mg/40 mg/40 mg; 160 mg/80 mg/80 mg and 560 mg/320 mg/320 mg)) of bimekizumab, a humanised monoclonal IgG1 antibody neutralising both IL-17A and IL-17F, were investigated. IL-17F induced qualitatively similar inflammatory responses to IL-17A in skin and joint cells. Neutralisation of IL-17A and IL-17F with bimekizumab more effectively suppressed in vitro cytokine responses and neutrophil chemotaxis than inhibition of IL-17A or IL-17F alone. The PoC trial met both prespecified efficacy success criteria and showed rapid, profound responses in both joint and skin (pooled top three doses vs placebo at week 8: American College of Rheumatology 20% response criteria 80.0% vs 16.7% (posterior probability >99%); Psoriasis Area and Severity Index 100% response criteria 86.7% vs 0%), sustained to week 20, without unexpected safety signals. These data support IL-17F as a key driver of human chronic tissue inflammation and the rationale for dual neutralisation of IL-17A and IL-17F in PsA and related conditions. NCT02141763; Results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No

  18. Subacromial bursitis with giant rice bodies as initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Ramesh; Tan, Justina Wei Lyn; Chau, Cora Yuk Ping; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2012-10-01

    Rice body formation is a nonspecific response to chronic synovial inflammation associated with tuberculous arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative inflammatory arthritis, and even osteoarthritis. Such bodies were termed rice bodies because of their close resemblance to grains of polished white rice. We present a case report of a middle-aged woman with right shoulder subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis with giant rice body formation as her initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis. Her right shoulder symptoms resolved after subacromial and subdeltoid bursectomy and removal of the rice bodies. She subsequently developed inflammatory arthritis of other joints, met the criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, and has been treated medically.

  19. Cross-linking of IgGs bound on circulating neutrophils leads to an activation of endothelial cells: possible role of rheumatoid factors in rheumatoid arthritis-associated vascular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollet-Labelle, Emmanuelle; Vaillancourt, Myriam; Marois, Louis; Newkirk, Marianna M; Poubelle, Patrice E; Naccache, Paul H

    2013-07-31

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by the presence of circulating auto-antibodies, including rheumatoid factors, which recognize the Fc portion of IgGs. The neutrophil is the most abundant circulating leukocyte and it expresses high levels of FcγRs on its surface. The aim of the present study was to examine the capacity of circulating human neutrophils to be activated by rheumatoid factors and the consequences of these events on endothelium. Neutrophil-bound IgGs were cross-linked with anti-human IgGs to mimick the presence of circulating rheumatoid factors and FcγRs-dependent signalling events and functions were examined. The IgG and IgM composition of rheumatoid factors isolated from the serum of RA patients was characterized. Adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells was quantified in response to the addition of rheumatoid factors. Cross-linking of IgGs bound on neutrophils leads to FcγRs-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation, mobilisation of intracellular calcium and the extracellular release of superoxide anions and lysozyme. Incubation of endothelial cells with the supernatant of activated neutrophils increases ICAM-1 expression and IL-8 production by endothelial cells. Finally, rheumatoid factors enhance neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells. Our results show that activation of neutrophils' FcγRs by rheumatoid factors could participate in rheumatoid arthritis-associated vascular damage.

  20. Associations of limbic-affective brain activity and severity of ongoing chronic arthritis pain are explained by trait anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottam, William J; Condon, Laura; Alshuft, Hamza; Reckziegel, Diane; Auer, Dorothee P

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies (fMRI) have transformed our understanding of central processing of evoked pain but the typically used block and event-related designs are not best suited to the study of ongoing pain. Here we used arterial spin labelling (ASL) for cerebral blood flow mapping to characterise the neural correlates of perceived intensity of osteoarthritis (OA) pain and its interrelation with negative affect. Twenty-six patients with painful knee OA and twenty-seven healthy controls underwent pain phenotyping and ASL MRI at 3T. Intensity of OA pain correlated positively with blood flow in the anterior mid-cingulate cortex (aMCC), subgenual cingulate cortex (sgACC), bilateral hippocampi, bilateral amygdala, left central operculum, mid-insula, putamen and the brainstem. Additional control for trait anxiety scores reduced the pain-CBF association to the aMCC, whilst pain catastrophizing scores only explained some of the limbic correlations. In conclusion, we found that neural correlates of reported intensity of ongoing chronic pain intensity mapped to limbic-affective circuits, and that the association pattern apart from aMCC was explained by trait anxiety thus highlighting the importance of aversiveness in the experience of clinical pain.

  1. Chronic lead exposure decreases the vascular reactivity of rat aortas: the role of hydrogen peroxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolini Zuqui Nunes

    Full Text Available We investigated whether exposure to small concentrations of lead alters blood pressure and vascular reactivity. Male Wistar rats were sorted randomly into the following two groups: control (Ct and treatment with 100 ppm of lead (Pb, which was added to drinking water, for 30 days. Systolic blood pressure (BP was measured weekly. Following treatment, aortic ring vascular reactivity was assessed. Tissue samples were properly stored for further biochemical investigation. The lead concentration in the blood reached approximately 8 μg/dL. Treatment increased blood pressure and decreased the contractile responses of the aortic rings to phenylephrine (1 nM-100 mM. Following N-nitro-L arginine methyl ester (L-NAME administration, contractile responses increased in both groups but did not differ significantly between them. Lead effects on Rmax were decreased compared to control subjects following superoxide dismutase (SOD administration. Catalase, diethyldithiocarbamic acid (DETCA, and apocynin increased the vasoconstrictor response induced by phenylephrine in the aortas of lead-treated rats but did not increase the vasoconstrictor response in the aortas of untreated rats. Tetraethylammonium (TEA potentiated the vasoconstrictor response induced by phenylephrine in aortic segments in both groups, but these effects were greater in lead-treated rats. The co-incubation of TEA and catalase abolished the vasodilatory effect noted in the lead group. The present study is the first to demonstrate that blood lead concentrations well below the values established by international legislation increased blood pressure and decreased phenylephrine-induced vascular reactivity. The latter effect was associated with oxidative stress, specifically oxidative stress induced via increases in hydrogen peroxide levels and the subsequent effects of hydrogen peroxide on potassium channels.

  2. Retained Lumbar Bullet: A Case Report of Chronic Lead Toxicity and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Nirma D; Macias-Konstantopoulos, Wendy L

    2016-07-01

    Lead toxicity from retained bullet fragments is difficult to both predict and diagnose, but important to treat early, given the potential severity of disease. Blood lead levels > 25 μg/dL and 40 μg/dL are considered toxic in children and adults, respectively. Symptoms may range from nonspecific constitutional symptoms to seizures and coma. Chelation is the mainstay therapy for lead poisoning and levels to treat depend on patient age, blood lead levels, and the presence of symptoms. CASE  We present the case of a woman with symptoms of severe lead toxicity from 20-year-old retained bullet fragments. She had been seen by multiple providers for evaluation of each symptom, but a unifying diagnosis had not been found. After identifying this complication, she was treated appropriately and more serious complications were prevented. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: We present this case to increase awareness among emergency physicians of lead toxicity in patients with a seemingly unrelated constellation of symptoms and a history of a previous gunshot wound with retained bullet or bullet fragments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mahmood Ally

    inflammatory response are being used successfully to treat a diverse group of other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as psoriasis, spondyloarthropathy, inflammatory bowel disease and connective-tissue disease (CTD).1. Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. A normal immune response requires the innate ...

  4. Dietetic recommendations in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rosa Alhambra-Expósito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease that has a significant effect on patients’ physical, emotional, and social functioning. For decades, patients have used different diets to try to improve the symptoms of RA. The possible benefits of dietary therapy for rheumatoid arthritis are reviewed in this article. Nutritional objectives for RA, are to halt the loss of bone mass, promote healing of bone fractures and improving bone-associated inflammatory disorders and joints. In general, diets low in saturated fat, rich in polyunsaturated fats: omega 3 and omega 6, rich in complex carbohydrates and fiber are recommended.

  5. Comparative oxidative stress, metallothionein induction and organ toxicity following chronic exposure to arsenic, lead and mercury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, S; Flora, G; Bhatnagar, P; Flora, S J S

    2014-06-22

    Globally, arsenic, mercury and lead constitutes as the three most hazardous environmental toxicants perturbing imbalance in pro—oxidant and antioxidant homeostasis. Individual toxicity of these environmental toxicants is well known but there is lack of comparative data on variables indicative of oxidative stress. We thus investigated the effects of chronic exposure to sodium arsenite, mercuric chloride and lead acetate on blood and tissue oxidative stress, metal concentration and metallothionein (MT) contents. Male rats were exposed to sodium arsenite, mercuric chloride and lead acetate (0.05 mg/kg each, orally, once daily) for 6 months. Arsenic, mercury and lead exposure led to a significant inhibition of blood δ—aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity and glutathione level supported by increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS). The level of inhibition was more pronounced in case of lead followed by mercury and arsenic. These metals/ metalloid significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity accompanied by a decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG) levels in blood and tissues. Mercury alone produced a significant induction of hepatic and renal MT concentrations. Serum transaminases, lactate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase activities increased significantly on exposure to arsenic and mercury exposure suggesting liver injury which was less pronounced in case of lead exposure. These biochemical alterations were supported by increased arsenic, mercury and lead concentrations in blood and soft tissues. The present study suggests that exposure to sodium arsenite and mercuric chloride lead to more pronounced oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity while lead acetate caused significant alterations in haem synthesis pathway compared to two other thiol binding metal/metalloid.

  6. Pulmonary strongyloidiasis presenting as chronic bronchitis leading to interlobular septal fibrosis and cured by treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukerjee, Chitta M; Carrick, Jane; Walker, John C; Woods, Robert L

    2003-12-01

    Two patients presented with long-standing chronic bronchitis and exertional dyspnoea of 5 and 3 months' duration, respectively, and had interlobular septal fibrosis on chest high resolution CT. In the past both had lived in areas in which Strongyloides stercoralis was known to be endemic. Serological tests confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary strongyloidiasis, and both patients were treated with anti-helminthic medications, including albendazole and ivermectin. Following this there was complete resolution of both symptomatic and radiological manifestations of their disease. An awareness of the possibility of Strongyloides infection presenting with respiratory symptoms in patients exposed to this parasite is important in the management of such patients.

  7. Should all patients with unexplained anaemia be screened for chronic lead poisoning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawarammana, I B; Dargan, P I; Woodcock, S; Sculley, M; House, I M; Wood, D M; Jones, A L

    2006-11-01

    The global prevalence of lead poisoning is declining. However, the prevalence of lead poisoning in patients with either microcytic or normocytic anaemia is unknown. Blood samples from anaemic patients residing in south-east London without an obvious cause for anaemia had their blood lead concentration (BLC) analysed. A batch of 988 samples was analysed for BLC using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Median haemoglobin was 10.3 g/dL (range: 4.2-10.9) in females, 10.6 g/dL (range: 5.2-11.4) in males and 10.7 g/dL (range: 6.7-10.9) in children. Median BLC was 2.63 microg/dL (0.21-24.0 microg/dL; 95th centile 7.54 microg/dL). Fifteen samples (1.5%) had a BLC > 10.0 microg/dL, five samples (1%) > 15.0 microg/dL and one sample (0.1%) > 20.0 micrg/L. In the 106 children, median BLC was 2.34 microg/dL (0.5-14.5 microg/dL; 95th centile 6.12 microg/ dL). Only one child (14.5 microg/L) had a BLC > 10.0 pg/dL. There was a poor correlation between haemoglobin and BLC (r2 = 0.08). Routine screening for lead poisoning cannot be justified in all patients with unexplained anaemia, unless there is a history or clinical features to suggest lead toxicity. Additionally, we have shown that in this former high-risk area for lead exposure, there is a low point prevalence of significant lead poisoning, even in an anaemic population.

  8. The analysis of QT interval and repolarization morphology of the heart in chronic exposure to lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiełtucki, J; Dobrakowski, M; Pawlas, N; Średniawa, B; Boroń, M; Kasperczyk, S

    2017-10-01

    There are no common recommendations regarding electrocardiographic monitoring in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate whether exposure to lead results in an increase of selected electrocardiography (ECG) pathologies, such as QT interval prolongation and repolarization disorders, in occupationally exposed workers. The study group included 180 workers occupationally exposed to lead compounds. The exposed group was divided according to the median of the mean blood lead level (PbBmean) calculated based on a series of measurements performed during 5-year observation period (35 µg/dl) into two subgroups: low exposure (LE, PbBmean = 20.0-35.0 µg/dl) and high exposure (HE, PbBmean = 35.1-46.4 µg/dl). The control group consisted of 69 healthy workers without occupational exposure to lead. ECG evaluation included the analysis of heart rate (HR), QT interval and repolarization abnormalities. Mean QT interval was significantly greater in the exposed population than in the control group by 2%. In the HE group, mean QT interval was significantly greater than in the control group by 4% and significantly different from those noted in the LE group. Positive correlations between QT interval and lead exposure indices were also reported. Besides, there was a negative correlation between HR and blood lead level. Increased concentration of lead in the blood above 35 μg/dl is associated with the QT interval prolongation, which may trigger arrhythmias when combined with other abnormalities, such as long QT syndrome. Therefore, electrocardiographic evaluation should be a part of a routine monitoring of occupationally exposed populations.

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Appointments • Support Our Research Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis News Psoriatic Arthritis News Ankylosing Spondylitis News ...

  10. Chronic Schistosome Infection Leads to Modulation of Granuloma Formation and Systemic Immune Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven K. Lundy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Schistosome worms have been infecting humans for millennia, but it is only in the last half century that we have begun to understand the complexities of this inter-relationship. As our sophistication about the inner workings of every aspect of the immune system has increased, it has also become obvious that schistosome infections have broad ranging effects on nearly all of the innate and adaptive immune response mechanisms. Selective pressures on both the worms and their hosts, has no doubt led to co-evolution of protective mechanisms, particularly those that favor granuloma formation around schistosome eggs and immune suppression during chronic infection. The immune modulatory effects that chronic schistosome infection and egg deposition elicit have been intensely studied, not only because of their major implications to public health issues, but also due to the emerging evidence that schistosome infection may protect humans from severe allergies and autoimmunity. Mouse models of schistosome infection have been extremely valuable for studying immune modulation and regulation, and in the discovery of novel aspects of immunity. A progression of immune reactions occurs during granuloma formation ranging from innate inflammation, to activation of each branch of adaptive immune response, and culminating in systemic immune suppression and granuloma fibrosis. Although molecular factors from schistosome eggs have been identified as mediators of immune modulation and suppressive functions of T and B cells, much work is still needed to define the mechanisms of the immune alteration and determine whether therapies for asthma or autoimmunity could be developed from these pathways.

  11. Chronic exercise training versus acute endurance exercise in reducing neurotoxicity in rats exposed to lead acetate☆

    OpenAIRE

    Shahandeh, Mohammad; Roshan, Valiollah Dabidi; Hosseinzadeh, Somayeh; Mahjoub, Soleiman; Sarkisian, Vaginak

    2013-01-01

    After intraperitoneal injection of 20 mg/kg lead acetate, rats received 8 weeks of treadmill exercise (15–22 m/min, 25–64 minutes) and/or treadmill exercise at 1.6 km/h until exhaustion. The markers related to neurotoxicity were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. 8 weeks of treadmill exercise significantly increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor level in the hippocampus (P = 0.04) and plasma level of total antioxidant capacity of rats exposed to lead acetate (P < 0.001)...

  12. Arthritis of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    .org Arthritis of the Hand Page ( 1 ) The hand and wrist have multiple small joints that work together to ... a shoelace. When the joints are affected by arthritis, activities of daily living can be difficult. Arthritis ...

  13. Chronic Mild Stress Assay Leading to Early Onset and Propagation of Alzheimer's Disease Phenotype in Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado-Tejedor, Mar; García-Osta, Ana

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive chronic mild stress (CMS) procedure is presented, which consists in the application of unpredictable mild stressors to animal models in a random order for several weeks. This assay can be applied to Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse models, leading to accelerated onset and increased severity of AD phenotypes and signs, including memory deficits and the accumulation of amyloid-β and phospho-tau. These assays open the way towards advanced studies on the influence of sustained mild stress, stress responses and pathways on the onset and propagation of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Chronic Alcohol Abuse Leads to Low Bone Mass with No General Loss of Bone Structure or Bone Mechanical Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, Maiken Parm; Meldgaard, Karoline; Steiniche, Torben

    2017-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse (CAA) has deleterious effects on skeletal health. This study examined the impact of CAA on bone with regard to bone density, structure, and strength. Bone specimens from 42 individuals with CAA and 42 individuals without alcohol abuse were obtained at autopsy. Dual-energy X...... wall thickness of trabecular osteons compared to individuals without alcohol abuse. No significant difference was found for bone strength and structure. Conclusion: CAA leads to low bone mass due to a decrease in bone formation but with no destruction of bone architecture nor a decrease in bone...

  15. Chronic Lead Exposure Increases Blood Pressure and Myocardial Contractility in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioresi, Mirian; Simões, Maylla Ronacher; Furieri, Lorena Barros; Broseghini-Filho, Gilson Brás; Vescovi, Marcos Vinícius A.; Stefanon, Ivanita; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the cardiovascular effects of lead exposure, emphasising its direct action on myocardial contractility. Male Wistar rats were sorted randomly into two groups: control (Ct) and treatment with 100 ppm of lead (Pb) in the drinking water. Blood pressure (BP) was measured weekly. At the end of the treatment period, the animals were anaesthetised and haemodynamic parameters and contractility of the left ventricular papillary muscles were recorded. Blood and tissue samples were properly stored for further biochemical investigations. Statistical analyses were considered to be significant at plead concentrations in the blood reached approximately 13 µg/dL, while the bone was the site of the highest deposition of this metal. BP in the Pb-treated group was higher from the first week of lead exposure and remained at the same level over the next four weeks. Haemodynamic evaluations revealed increases in systolic (Ct: 96±3.79 vs. Pb: 116±1.37 mmHg) and diastolic blood pressure (Ct: 60±2.93 vs. Pb: 70±3.38 mmHg), left ventricular systolic pressure (Ct: 104±5.85 vs. Pb: 120±2.51 mmHg) and heart rate (Ct: 307±10 vs. Pb: 348±16 bpm). Lead treatment did not alter the force and time derivatives of the force of left ventricular papillary muscles that were contracting isometrically. However, our results are suggestive of changes in the kinetics of calcium (Ca++) in cardiomyocytes increased transarcolemmal Ca++ influx, low Ca++ uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum and high extrusion by the sarcolemma. Altogether, these results show that despite the increased Ca++ influx that was induced by lead exposure, the myocytes had regulatory mechanisms that prevented increases in force, as evidenced in vivo by the increased systolic ventricular pressure. PMID:24841481

  16. A Review of Yoga Programs for Four Leading Risk Factors of Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeongra Yang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoga, a form of physical activity, is rapidly gaining in popularity and has many health benefits. Yet healthcare providers have been slow to recognize yoga for its ability to improve health conditions, and few interventions have been developed that take full advantage of its benefits. The purpose of this article is to review published studies using yoga programs and to determine the effect of yoga interventions on common risk factors of chronic diseases (overweight, hypertension, high glucose level and high cholesterol. A systematic search yielded 32 articles published between 1980 and April 2007. The studies found that yoga interventions are generally effective in reducing body weight, blood pressure, glucose level and high cholesterol, but only a few studies examined long-term adherence. Additionally, not enough studies included diverse populations at high risk for diabetes and its related common health problems.

  17. IFN-beta gene deletion leads to augmented and chronic demyelinating experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teige, Ingrid; Treschow, Alexandra; Teige, Anna

    2003-01-01

    Since the basic mechanisms behind the beneficial effects of IFN-beta in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are still obscure, here we have investigated the effects of IFN-beta gene disruption on the commonly used animal model for MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We show that IFN......-beta knockout (KO) mice are more susceptible to EAE than their wild-type (wt) littermates; they develop more severe and chronic neurological symptoms with more extensive CNS inflammation and demyelination. However, there was no discrepancy observed between wt and KO mice regarding the capacity of T cells...... to proliferate or produce IFN-gamma in response to recall Ag. Consequently, we addressed the effect of IFN-beta on encephalitogenic T cell development and the disease initiation phase by passive transfer of autoreactive T cells from KO or wt littermates to both groups of mice. Interestingly, IFN-beta KO mice...

  18. Chronic Hypertension Leads to Neurodegeneration in the TgSwDI Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruyer, Anna; Soplop, Nadine; Strickland, Sidney; Norris, Erin H

    2015-07-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies link vascular disorders, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and stroke, with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hypertension, specifically, is an important modifiable risk factor for late-onset AD. To examine the link between midlife hypertension and the onset of AD later in life, we chemically induced chronic hypertension in the TgSwDI mouse model of AD in early adulthood. Hypertension accelerated cognitive deficits in the Barnes maze test (Phypertension induced hippocampal neurodegeneration at an early age in this mouse line (43% reduction in the dorsal subiculum; P<0.05), establishing this as a useful research model of AD with mixed vascular and amyloid pathologies. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Chronic Oral Capsaicin Exposure During Development Leads to Adult Rats with Reduced Taste Bud Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelian, Jacquelyn M.; Samson, Kaeli K.; Sollars, Suzanne I.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cross-sensory interaction between gustatory and trigeminal nerves occurs in the anterior tongue. Surgical manipulations have demonstrated that the strength of this relationship varies across development. Capsaicin is a neurotoxin that affects fibers of the somatosensory lingual nerve surrounding taste buds, but not fibers of the gustatory chorda tympani nerve which synapse with taste receptor cells. Since capsaicin is commonly consumed by many species, including humans, experimental use of this neurotoxin provides a naturalistic perturbation of the lingual trigeminal system. Neonatal or adults rats consumed oral capsaicin for 40 days and we examined the cross-sensory effect on the morphology of taste buds across development. Methods Rats received moderate doses of oral capsaicin, with chronic treatments occurring either before or after taste system maturation. Tongue morphology was examined either 2 or 50 days after treatment cessation. Edema, which has been previously suggested as a cause of changes in capsaicin-related gustatory function, was also assessed. Results Reductions in taste bud volume occurred 50 days, but not 2 days post-treatment for rats treated as neonates. Adult rats at either time post-treatment were unaffected. Edema was not found to occur with the 5 ppm concentration of capsaicin we used. Conclusions Results further elucidate the cooperative relationship between these discrete sensory systems and highlight the developmentally mediated aspect of this interaction. Implications Chronic exposure to even moderate levels of noxious stimuli during development has the ability to impact the orosensory environment, and these changes may not be evident until long after exposure has ceased. PMID:28083080

  20. [Lead poisoning in children from the industrial region of Silesia--markers of chronic intoxication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada-Cieślar, M; Mazur, B; Buszman, Z; Cieślar, G

    1994-08-01

    In the paper the degree of lead micro-intoxication was assessed in school children from the region of emissions of the Mining-Ironworks Complex "Bolesław" in Bukowno. The study included 323 children of either sex aged from 7 to 14 years. In these children the levels of selected lead intoxication markers were determined--concentration of zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) in the erythrocytes and concentration of delta-amino-laevulinic acid (ALA) in urine. The obtained results were compared with corresponding results in the control group which consisted of 163 children of the same age, living in a control area without exposure to heavy metals. In the studied group in all age subgroups, significantly higher ALA concentrations in urine were observed in comparison to the control group. At the same time, exceeding of upper acceptable range of ALA concentration in the organism was five times more frequent in this group. On the other hand, the concentration of ZnPP in the erythrocytes failed to show any significant differences between the compared groups in any of the analysed age subgroups. On the basis of the obtained results it was demonstrated that the school children living in the region of emissions of the MIC "Bolesław" had biochemical features of long-term lead microintoxication. As it seems, the concentration of ALA in urine is of greater diagnostic value in comparison to the concentration of ZnPP in the erythrocytes in screening examinations in these children.

  1. Systemic application of rhenium-186 hydroxyethylidenediphosphonate ({sup 186}Re HEDP) as an option for the treatment of chronic arthritis and arthropathy[Radiosynoviorthesis]; Systemische Applikation von Rhenium-186 Hydroxyethylidendiphosphonat ({sup 186}Re HEDP) als Therapieoption bei chronischen Arthritiden und Arthropathien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucerius, J.; Biersack, H.J.; Palmedo, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Bonn (Germany); Wallny, T. [Orthopaedische Klinik l, Klinik fuer Orthopaedische Chirurgie, St. Bernhard-Hospital Kamp-Lintfort (Germany); Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Orthopaedie, Universitaetsklinikum Bonn (Germany); Brackmann, H.H. [Inst. fuer experimentelle Haematologie und Transfusionsmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Bonn (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    Chronic arthritis is very common and is associated with a variety of systemic diseases whereas hemophilic arthropathy is one of the most common clinical manifestations of hemophilia, mainly of hemophilia type A. All of these polyarticular diseases are associated with progressive pain and increasing lack of mobility. Therapy is based on conservative treatment such as medication with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, selective therapy strategies such as intraarticular injections of e.g. radioactive substances (radiosynoviorthesis) or surgical interventions. However, in some cases, the disease does not respond to one of these treatment options or cannot be continued due to important side-effects. Systemic application of radioisotopes like {sup 186}Re HEDP has been successfully administered for pain palliation of osseous metastases. Today, only few data exist for systemic therapy with {sup 186}Re HEDP in patients suffering from benign polyarticular disease. In a prospective study with patients suffering from chronic arthritis a single systemic application of {sup 186}Re HEDP led to a reduction of disease activity in six of eight and to a reduction of the number of painful or swollen joints in five of eight included patients. In a further prospective study with 12 patients with hemophilic arthropathy, 19 of 36 (52.7%) most painful joints could be successfully treated with one systemic {sup 186}Re HEDP therapy. Furthermore, a reduction of global pain could be observed in those patients. However, further randomized studies with larger study populations are necessary in order to confirm this promising results. (orig.)

  2. Effect of diet quality on chronic toxicity of aqueous lead to the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, John M.; Ivey, Chris D.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigated the chronic toxicity of aqueous Pb to the amphipod Hyalella azteca (Hyalella) in 42-d tests using 2 different diets: 1) the yeastþcereal leafþtrout pellet (YCT) diet, fed at the uniform low ration used in standard methods for sediment toxicity tests; and 2) a new diet of diatomsþTetraMin flakes (DT), fed at increasing rations over time, that has been optimized for use in Hyalella water-only tests. Test endpoints included survival, weight, biomass, fecundity, and total young. Lethal effects of Pb were similar for the DT and YCT tests (20% lethal concentration [LC20]¼13 mg/L and 15mg/L, respectively, as filterable Pb). In contrast, weight and fecundity endpoints were not significantly affected in the DT test at Pb concentrations up to 63 mg/L, but these endpoints were significantly reduced by Pb in the YCT test—and in a 2005 test in the same laboratory with a diet of conditioned Rabbit Chow (RC-2005). The fecundity and total young endpoints from the YCT and RC-2005 tests were considered unreliable because fecundity in controls did not meet test acceptability criteria, but both of these tests still produced lower Pb effect concentrations (for weight or biomass) than the test with the DT diet. The lowest biotic ligand model–normalized effect concentrations for the 3 tests ranged from 3.7mg/L (weight 20% effect concentration [EC20] for the RC-2005 test) to 8.2 mg/L (total young EC20 for the DT test), values that would rank Hyalella as the second or third most sensitive of 13 genera in a species sensitivity distribution for chronic Pb toxicity. These results demonstrate that toxicity tests with Hyalella fed optimal diets can meet more stringent test acceptability criteria for control performance, but suggest that results of these tests may underestimate sublethal toxic effects of Pb to Hyalella under suboptimal feeding regimes.

  3. Effect of diet quality on chronic toxicity of aqueous lead to the amphipod Hyalella azteca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, John M; Ivey, Chris D; Brumbaugh, William G; Ingersoll, Christopher G

    2016-07-01

    The authors investigated the chronic toxicity of aqueous Pb to the amphipod Hyalella azteca (Hyalella) in 42-d tests using 2 different diets: 1) the yeast + cereal leaf + trout pellet (YCT) diet, fed at the uniform low ration used in standard methods for sediment toxicity tests; and 2) a new diet of diatoms + TetraMin flakes (DT), fed at increasing rations over time, that has been optimized for use in Hyalella water-only tests. Test endpoints included survival, weight, biomass, fecundity, and total young. Lethal effects of Pb were similar for the DT and YCT tests (20% lethal concentration [LC20] = 13 μg/L and 15 μg/L, respectively, as filterable Pb). In contrast, weight and fecundity endpoints were not significantly affected in the DT test at Pb concentrations up to 63 µg/L, but these endpoints were significantly reduced by Pb in the YCT test-and in a 2005 test in the same laboratory with a diet of conditioned Rabbit Chow (RC-2005). The fecundity and total young endpoints from the YCT and RC-2005 tests were considered unreliable because fecundity in controls did not meet test acceptability criteria, but both of these tests still produced lower Pb effect concentrations (for weight or biomass) than the test with the DT diet. The lowest biotic ligand model-normalized effect concentrations for the 3 tests ranged from 3.7 μg/L (weight 20% effect concentration [EC20] for the RC-2005 test) to 8.2 μg/L (total young EC20 for the DT test), values that would rank Hyalella as the second or third most sensitive of 13 genera in a species sensitivity distribution for chronic Pb toxicity. These results demonstrate that toxicity tests with Hyalella fed optimal diets can meet more stringent test acceptability criteria for control performance, but suggest that results of these tests may underestimate sublethal toxic effects of Pb to Hyalella under suboptimal feeding regimes. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1825-1834. Published 2015 Wiley Periodicals Inc

  4. Coexistence of rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tacjana Anna Barczyńska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and ankylosing spondylitis (AS are chronic progressive inflammatory diseases, leading to joint damage and reducing the physical fitness of patients. They are among the most common rheumatic diseases. However, their etiology and symptomatology are different. Formerly, AS was often wrongly diagnosed as RA. Today there are no major diagnostic difficulties in differentiation between these diseases, thanks to modern laboratory tests and imaging. However, a problem may arise when the patient has symptoms typical for both diseases simultaneously. Cases of coexistence of RA with AS – according to our best knowledge – are rare. This study aims to compare our experience in diagnosis and treatment of concomitant RA and AS with the experience of other researchers. Implementation of the proper diagnostic algorithm, allowing for correct diagnosis of both diseases in one patient, may be useful for differential diagnosis of similar cases in the future.

  5. Coexistence of rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczyńska, Tacjana Anna; Węgierska, Małgorzata; Żuchowski, Paweł; Dura, Marta; Zalewska, Joanna; Waszczak, Marzena; Jeka, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are chronic progressive inflammatory diseases, leading to joint damage and reducing the physical fitness of patients. They are among the most common rheumatic diseases. However, their etiology and symptomatology are different. Formerly, AS was often wrongly diagnosed as RA. Today there are no major diagnostic difficulties in differentiation between these diseases, thanks to modern laboratory tests and imaging. However, a problem may arise when the patient has symptoms typical for both diseases simultaneously. Cases of coexistence of RA with AS - according to our best knowledge - are rare. This study aims to compare our experience in diagnosis and treatment of concomitant RA and AS with the experience of other researchers. Implementation of the proper diagnostic algorithm, allowing for correct diagnosis of both diseases in one patient, may be useful for differential diagnosis of similar cases in the future.

  6. Chronic intoxication by methylmercury leads to oxidative damage and cell death in salivary glands of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias-Junior, Paulo Mecenas Alves; Teixeira, Francisco Bruno; Fagundes, Nathalia Carolina Fernandes; Miranda, Giza Hellen Nonato; Oliveira Bittencourt, Leonardo; de Oliveira Paraense, Ricardo Sousa; Silva, Márcia Cristina Freitas; Sagica, Fernanda do Espírito Santo; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano; Crespo-López, Maria Elena; Lima, Rafael Rodrigues

    2017-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is one of the most toxic species of mercury, causing several systemic damages; however, its effect on the salivary glands has rarely been explored to date. This study was aimed at analyzing the mercury deposit, oxidative stress markers, and cell viability in parotid and submandibular rat salivary glands after chronic methylmercury intoxication. Herein, forty male Wistar rats (40 days old) were used in the experiment. The animals of the experimental group were intoxicated by intragastric gavage with MeHg at a dose of 0.04 mg per kg body weight per day for 35 days, whereas the control group received only corn oil, a diluent. After the period of intoxication, the glands were obtained for evaluation of total mercury deposit, cell viability, and the malondialdehyde (MDA) and the nitrite levels. Our results indicated mercury deposits in salivary glands, with a decrease in cell viability, higher levels of MDA in both glands of intoxicated animals, and a higher concentration of nitrite only in the submandibular gland of the mercury group. Thus, the intoxication by MeHg was able to generate deposits and oxidative stress in salivary glands that resulted in a decrease in cell viability in both types of glands.

  7. Chronic arsenic trioxide exposure leads to enhanced aggressiveness via Met oncogene addiction in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryeziu, Kushtrim; Pirker, Christine; Englinger, Bernhard; van Schoonhoven, Sushilla; Spitzwieser, Melanie; Mohr, Thomas; Körner, Wilfried; Weinmüllner, Regina; Tav, Koray; Grillari, Johannes; Cichna-Markl, Margit; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2016-05-10

    As an environmental poison, arsenic is responsible for many cancer deaths. Paradoxically, arsenic trioxide (ATO) presents also a powerful therapy used to treat refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and is intensively investigated for treatment of other cancer types. Noteworthy, cancer therapy is frequently hampered by drug resistance, which is also often associated with enhancement of tumor aggressiveness. In this study, we analyzed ATO-selected cancer cells (A2780ATO) for the mechanisms underlying their enhanced tumorigenicity and aggressiveness. These cells were characterized by enhanced proliferation and spheroid growth as well as increased tumorigenicity of xenografts in SCID mice. Noteworthy, subsequent studies revealed that overexpression of Met receptor was the underlying oncogenic driver of these effects, as A2780ATO cells were characterized by collateral sensitivity against Met inhibitors. This finding was also confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and whole genome gene expression arrays, which revealed that Met overexpression by chronic ATO exposure was based on the transcriptional regulation via activation of AP-1. Finally, it was shown that treatment with the Met inhibitor crizotinib was also effective against A2780ATO cell xenografts in vivo, indicating that targeting of Met presents a promising strategy for the treatment of Met-overexpressing tumors after either arsenic exposure or failure to ATO treatment.

  8. Arthritis: Conventional and Advanced Radiological Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adviye Ergun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arthritides are acute or chronic inflammation of one or more joints. The most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, but there are more than 100 different forms. Right and early diagnosis is extremely important for the prevention of eventual structural and functional disability of the affected joint. Imaging findings, especially those of advanced level imaging, play a major role in diagnosis and monitor the progression of arthritis or its response to therapy. The objective of the review is to discuss the findings of conventional and advanced radiological imaging of most common arthritides and to present a simplified approach for their radiological evaluation.

  9. Factors secreted from dental pulp stem cells show multifaceted benefits for treating experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Jun; Takahashi, Nobunori; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshioka, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Nishikawa, Masaya; Hibi, Hideharu; Ishigro, Naoki; Ueda, Minoru; Furukawa, Koichi; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2016-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by synovial hyperplasia and chronic inflammation, which lead to the progressive destruction of cartilage and bone in the joints. Numerous studies have reported that administrations of various types of MSCs improve arthritis symptoms in animal models, by paracrine mechanisms. However, the therapeutic effects of the secreted factors alone, without the cell graft, have been uncertain. Here, we show that a single intravenous administration of serum-free conditioned medium (CM) from human deciduous dental pulp stem cells (SHED-CM) into anti-collagen type II antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA), a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), markedly improved the arthritis symptoms and joint destruction. The therapeutic efficacy of SHED-CM was associated with an induction of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages in the CAIA joints and the abrogation of RANKL expression. SHED-CM specifically depleted of an M2 macrophage inducer, the secreted ectodomain of sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin-9 (ED-Siglec-9), exhibited a reduced ability to induce M2-related gene expression and attenuate CAIA. SHED-CM also inhibited the RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Collectively, our findings suggest that SHED-CM provides multifaceted therapeutic effects for treating CAIA, including the ED-Siglec-9-dependent induction of M2 macrophage polarization and inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. Thus, SHED-CM may represent a novel anti-inflammatory and reparative therapy for RA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Incorporation of n-3 PUFA and γ-linolenic acid in blood lipids and red blood cell lipids together with their influence on disease activity in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis - a randomized controlled human intervention trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Springer Monika

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aim Marine n-3 fatty acids and γ-linolenic acid both have anti-inflammatory effects and may be useful to help treat inflammatory diseases. The effects of these alone or combined were examined in patients with arthritis in a randomized controlled trial. Design Patients with rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis were randomized into four groups in a double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel designed study. Patients received the respective capsules (1: 3.0 g n-3 LC-PUFA/d; 2: 3.2 g γ-linolenic acid/d; 3: 1.6 g n-3 LC-PUFA + 1.8 g γ-linolenic acid/d; 4: 3.0 g olive oil for a twelve week period. Clinical status was evaluated and blood samples were taken at the beginning and at the end of the period. Differences before and after intervention were tested with paired t-test or with Wilcoxon test for non-normal data distribution. Results 60 patients (54 rheumatoid arthritis, 6 psoriatic arthritis were randomised, 47 finished per protocol. In group 1, the ratio of arachidonic acid (AA/eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA decreased from 6.5 ± 3.7 to 2.7 ± 2.1 in plasma lipids and from 25.1 ± 10.1 to 7.2 ± 4.7 in erythrocyte membranes (p ≤ 0.001. There was no significant influence on AA/EPA ratio due to interventions in group 2-4. In group 2, the intake of γ-linolenic acid resulted in a strong rise of γ-linolenic acid and dihomo-γ-linolenic acid concentrations in plasma lipids, cholesteryl esters, and erythrocyte membranes. The combination of n-3 LC-PUFA and γ-linolenic acid (group 3 led to an increase of γ-linolenic acid and dihomo-γ-linolenic acid concentrations in plasma lipids, cholesteryl esters, and erythrocyte mem-branes. This increase was only half of that in group 2. Conclusions Incorporation of eicosanoid precursor FAs was influenced by an intake of n-3 LC-PUFA and γ-linolenic acid suggesting a possible benefit for therapy of chronic inflammatory diseases. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials NCT01179971

  11. Increased miR-223 expression in T cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis leads to decreased insulin-like growth factor-1-mediated interleukin-10 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, M-C; Yu, C-L; Chen, H-C; Yu, H-C; Huang, H-B; Lai, N-S

    2014-09-01

    We hypothesized that the aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) T cells was involved in the pathogenesis of RA. The expression profile of 270 human miRNAs in T cells from the first five RA patients and five controls were analysed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Twelve miRNAs exhibited potentially aberrant expression in RA T cells compared to normal T cells. After validation with another 22 RA patients and 19 controls, miR-223 and miR-34b were over-expressed in RA T cells. The expression levels of miR-223 were correlated positively with the titre of rheumatoid factor (RF) in RA patients. Transfection of Jurkat cells with miR-223 mimic suppressed insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and transfection with miR-34b mimic suppressed cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) protein expression by Western blotting. The protein expression of IGF-1R but not CREB was decreased in RA T cells. The addition of recombinant IGF-1-stimulated interleukin (IL)-10 production by activated normal T cells, but not RA T cells. The transfection of miR-223 mimic impaired IGF-1-mediated IL-10 production in activated normal T cells. The expression levels of SCD5, targeted by miR-34b, were decreased in RA T cells after microarray analysis. In conclusion, both miR-223 and miR-34b were over-expressed in RA T cells, but only the miR-223 expression levels were correlated positively with RF titre in RA patients. Functionally, the increased miR-223 expression could impair the IGF-1-mediated IL-10 production in activated RA T cells in vivo, which might contribute to the imbalance between proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  12. Multicentric osteolysis with nodulosis, arthritis, and cardiac defect syndrome: loss of MMP2 leads to increased apoptosis with alteration of apoptotic regulators and caspases and embryonic lethality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosig RA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca A Mosig,1 Richard Schulz,2,3 Zamaneh Kassiri,4 Mitchell B Schaffler,5 John A Martignetti1 1Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Pharmacology; 3Department of Pediatrics, 4Department of Physiology, Cardiovascular Research Centre, Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; 5Department of Biomedical Engineering, City College of New York, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Inactivating mutations of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2 cause multicentric osteolysis with nodulosis and arthritis, one of a group of inherited osteolytic and arthritic disorders. We have previously shown that mice lacking Mmp2 share similar syndromic features with the human disorder, and at the cellular level, Mmp2-/- mouse osteoblasts and osteoclasts have reduced numbers and proliferation rates at critical developmental time points. While previously hypothesized, the effect of MMP2 loss on apoptosis has not been examined in this system. We therefore sought to clarify its role in mediating the developmental defects in Mmp2-/- mice using immunohistochemistry, immunoblot analysis, and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. We also explored the effects of MMP2 inhibition in the osteogenic sarcoma cell line SaOS2. Loss of MMP2 resulted in increased apoptosis and caspase activation both in vitro and in vivo. MMP2-deficient cells had increased Fas expression and reduced levels of the key survival signals p-FAK, p-ERK, cFLIP, and Bcl-2. Notably, and in marked contrast to their original characterization, there was a significant increase in the in utero demise of homozygous Mmp2-/- embryos. Specifically, litters from heterozygous crosses consistently yielded nearly 85% fewer than expected homozygous Mmp2-/- pups. Taken together, our findings highlight a new role for MMP2 in preventing apoptosis during development and growth. Keywords

  13. Poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasniqi, Xhevdet; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Gashi, Masar; Berisha, Blerim; Abazi, Flora; Koçinaj, Dardan

    2009-12-18

    We report a case of a 49-year-old patient who developed poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis. The woman presented with constitutional symptoms, arthritis, urinary infection and conjunctivitis. The blood culture was positive for the staphylococcal coagulase negative infection. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were elevated, whereas the rheumatoid factor was negative. Radiographic findings confirmed diagnosis of pleuropneumonia, and one year later of chronic asymmetric sacroileitis. Physicians should be aware of possible reactive arthritis after staphylococcal coagulase negative bacteremia.

  14. CD1d-dependent NKT cells play a protective role in acute and chronic arthritis models by ameliorating antigen-specific Th1 responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teige, Anna; Bockermann, Robert; Hasan, Maruf

    2010-01-01

    arthritis in CIA was also worse in the absence of CD1d-dependent NKTs. Elevated levels of Ag-specific IFN-gamma production accompanied these findings rather than changes in IL-17alpha. Depletion of NK1.1(+) cells supported these findings in AIA and CIA. This report provides support for CD1d-dependent NKTs...

  15. Adaptation to Chronic Nutritional Stress Leads to Reduced Dependence on Microbiota in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berra Erkosar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have shown that animal nutrition is tightly linked to gut microbiota, especially under nutritional stress. In Drosophila melanogaster, microbiota are known to promote juvenile growth, development, and survival on poor diets, mainly through enhanced digestion leading to changes in hormonal signaling. Here, we show that this reliance on microbiota is greatly reduced in replicated Drosophila populations that became genetically adapted to a poor larval diet in the course of over 170 generations of experimental evolution. Protein and polysaccharide digestion in these poor-diet-adapted populations became much less dependent on colonization with microbiota. This was accompanied by changes in expression levels of dFOXO transcription factor, a key regulator of cell growth and survival, and many of its targets. These evolutionary changes in the expression of dFOXO targets to a large degree mimic the response of the same genes to microbiota, suggesting that the evolutionary adaptation to poor diet acted on mechanisms that normally mediate the response to microbiota. Our study suggests that some metazoans have retained the evolutionary potential to adapt their physiology such that association with microbiota may become optional rather than essential.

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Appointments • Support Our Research Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid ...

  17. Developing acute-to-chronic toxicity ratios for lead, cadmium, and zinc using rainbow trout, a mayfly, and a midge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebane, C.A.; Hennessy, D.P.; Dillon, F.S.

    2008-01-01

    In order to estimate acute-to-chronic toxicity ratios (ACRs) relevant to a coldwater stream community, we exposed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in 96-h acute and 60+ day early-life stage (ELS) exposures. We also tested the acute and sublethal responses of a mayfly (Baetis tricaudatus) and a midge (Chironomus dilutus, formerly C. tentans) with Pb. We examine the statistical interpretation of test endpoints and the acute-to-chronic ratio concept. Increasing the number of control replicates by 2 to 3x decreased the minimum detectable differences by almost half. Pb ACR estimates mostly increased with increasing acute resistance of the organisms (rainbow trout ACRs choice of test endpoint and statistical analysis influenced ACR estimates by up to a factor of four. When calculated using the geometric means of the no- and lowest-observed effect concentrations, ACRs with rainbow trout and Cd were 0.6 and 0.95; Zn about 1.0; and for Pb 3.3 and 11. The comparable Pb ACRs for the mayfly and Chironomus were 5.2 and 51 respectively. Our rainbow trout ACRs with Pb were about 5-20x lower than earlier reports with salmonids. We suggest discounting previous ACR results that used larger and older fish in their acute tests. ?? 2007 GovernmentEmployee: U.S. Geological Survey.

  18. Chronic exposure of μg/L range Bisphenol A to adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) leading to adipogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Mai Thi; Doan, Thao Thi-Phuong; Nguyen, Cong Thanh; Vo, Diem Thi-Ngoc; Do, Chi Hong-Lan; Le, Nga Phi

    2017-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is known as an endocrine disruptor compound and commonly found in food-packaging plastics and in aquatic environment. It is scientifically concerned that BPA may causes significant health risks to human and aquatic animals. In fact, most of scientific studies have been conducted with BPA-acute toxicity in early stages of animal development, while far lesser researches have been focused on BPA-chronic toxicity in adults. This study was to investigate the chronic effects of environmental 1, 10 and 100 µg/L BPA to four-week-old zebrafishes (Danio rerio) after 60 days of exposure in terms of changing of body morphology, hepatocyte morphology and the transcriptional expression of biomarker gene for lipid metabolism. As a result, significant effects were found in: 1/ the increase of body weight, but not body length; 2/ the increase in the number of vacuolated hepatocytes corresponding to relatively higher glycogen and lipid content; 3/ shifting hepatocyte morphology to basophilic cytoplasm and cytoplasmic and/or nuclear enlargement, but not inflammation signs (macrophages, granuloma, fibrosis/cirrhosis); 4/ the decrease of mRNA level of PPARγ and C/EBPα genes in liver. Our study here indicates that the exposure to μg/L range concentration of BPA leads to adipogensis in adult zebrafishes.

  19. Chronic Alcohol Abuse Leads to Low Bone Mass with No General Loss of Bone Structure or Bone Mechanical Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulhøi, Maiken Parm; Meldgaard, Karoline; Steiniche, Torben; Odgaard, Anders; Vesterby, Annie

    2017-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse (CAA) has deleterious effects on skeletal health. This study examined the impact of CAA on bone with regard to bone density, structure, and strength. Bone specimens from 42 individuals with CAA and 42 individuals without alcohol abuse were obtained at autopsy. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), compression testing, ashing, and bone histomorphometry were performed. Individuals with CAA had significantly lower bone mineral density (BMD) in the femoral neck and significantly lower bone volume demonstrated by thinner trabeculae, decreased extent of osteoid surfaces, and lower mean wall thickness of trabecular osteons compared to individuals without alcohol abuse. No significant difference was found for bone strength and structure. CAA leads to low bone mass due to a decrease in bone formation but with no destruction of bone architecture nor a decrease in bone strength. It is questionable whether this per se increases fracture risk. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Metabolite Space of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    van Wietmarschen, Herman; van der Greef, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Metabolites play numerous roles in the healthy and diseased body, ranging from regulating physiological processes to providing building blocks for the body. Therefore, understanding the role of metabolites is important in elucidating the etiology and pathology of diseases and finding targets for new treatment options. Rheumatoid arthritis is a complex chronic disease for which new disease management strategies are needed. The aim of this review is to bring together and integrate information a...

  1. Periodontal Disease as a Risk Factor for Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sushil; White, Sarahlouise; Bartold, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this systematic review is to identify and synthesise the best available evidence to examine whether periodontal disease is a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown aetiology and has a complex multifactorial pathogenesis affecting joints and other tissues. The natural history of rheumatoid arthritis is poorly defined; its clinical course fluctuates and the prognosis unpredictable. Rheumatoid arthritis affects up to 1-3% of the population, with a 3:1 female preponderance disappearing in older age. There is also evidence of a genetic predisposition to the disease. Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by progressive and irreversible damage of the synovial-lined joints causing loss of joint space, bone and function, leading to deformity. Extracellular matrix degradation is a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis which is responsible for the typical destruction of cartilage, ligaments, tendons, and bone.Rheumatoid arthritis is characteristically a symmetric arthritis (symmetrical swelling of the joints). Articular and periarticular manifestations include joint swelling and tenderness to palpation, with morning stiffness and severe motion impairment in the involved joints. Extra-articular signs can involve pulmonary, cardiovascular, nervous, and reticuloendothelial systems. The clinical presentation of rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis varies, but an insidious onset of pain with symmetric swelling of the small joints is the most frequent finding. Rheumatoid arthritis onset is acute or subacute in about 25% of patients. Early rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by symmetric polyarthritis involving the small joints of the hands and feet with no radiologic changes. Rheumatoid arthritis most frequently affects the metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal and wrist joints. Although any joint, including the cricoarytenoid joint, can be affected, the distal interphalangeal, the

  2. Managing Arthritis (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-10-19

    Arthritis is a common chronic condition among Americans. As the population ages, the number of people with this condition is expected to increase dramatically. In this podcast, Dr. Jennifer Hootman discusses the importance of early diagnosis and management of arthritis.  Created: 10/19/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 10/19/2017.

  3. CDC Vital Signs–Arthritis in America

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-03-07

    This podcast is based on the March 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Many adults in the United States have arthritis. Learn how to reduce the pain of arthritis, as well as manage the condition.  Created: 3/7/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/7/2017.

  4. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis – an update on its diagnosis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common form of chronic arthritis in children and the most common cause of musculoskeletal disability in children. Early diagnosis may be challenging, but it is essential to ensure good outcomes. This review proposes an approach to the investigation and diagnosis of JIA.

  5. Arthritis Awareness (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-05-19

    As the U.S. population ages, so does the frequency of certain chronic diseases, such as arthritis. In this podcast, Dr. Kamil Barbour discusses ways to manage arthritis.  Created: 5/19/2016 by MMWR.   Date Released: 5/19/2016.

  6. Exposure to Candida albicans polarizes a T-cell driven arthritis model towards Th17 responses, resulting in a more destructive arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renoud J Marijnissen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fungal components have been shown very effective in generating Th17 responses. We investigated whether exposure to a minute amount of C. albicans in the arthritic joint altered the local cytokine environment, leading to enhanced Th17 expansion and resulting in a more destructive arthritis. METHODOLOGY: Chronic SCW arthritis was induced by repeated injection with Streptococcus pyogenes (SCW cell wall fragments into the knee joint of C57Bl/6 mice, alone or in combination with the yeast of C. albicans or Zymosan A. During the chronic phase of the arthritis, the cytokine levels, mRNA expression and histopathological analysis of the joints were performed. To investigate the phenotype of the IL-17 producing T-cells, synovial cells were isolated and analyzed by flowcytometry. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Intra-articular injection of either Zymosan A or C. albicans on top of the SCW injection both resulted in enhanced joint swelling and inflammation compared to the normal SCW group. However, only the addition of C. albicans during SCW arthritis resulted in severe chondrocyte death and enhanced destruction of cartilage and bone. Additionally, exposure to C. albicans led to increased IL-17 in the arthritic joint, which was accompanied by an increased synovial mRNA expression of T-bet and RORγT. Moreover, the C. albicans-injected mice had significantly more Th17 cells in the synovium, of which a large population also produced IFN-γ. CONCLUSION: This study clearly shows that minute amounts of fungal components, like C. albicans, are very potent in interfering with the local cytokine environment in an arthritic joint, thereby polarizing arthritis towards a more destructive phenotype.

  7. Mediators of Inflammation-Induced Bone Damage in Arthritis and Their Control by Herbal Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddaraju M. Nanjundaiah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the synovial joints leading to bone and cartilage damage. Untreated inflammatory arthritis can result in severe deformities and disability. The use of anti-inflammatory agents and biologics has been the mainstay of treatment of RA. However, the prolonged use of such agents may lead to severe adverse reactions. In addition, many of these drugs are quite expensive. These limitations have necessitated the search for newer therapeutic agents for RA. Natural plant products offer a promising resource for potential antiarthritic agents. We describe here the cellular and soluble mediators of inflammation-induced bone damage (osteoimmunology in arthritis. We also elaborate upon various herbal products that possess antiarthritic activity, particularly mentioning the specific target molecules. As the use of natural product supplements by RA patients is increasing, this paper presents timely and useful information about the mechanism of action of promising herbal products that can inhibit the progression of inflammation and bone damage in the course of arthritis.

  8. Identification of IκBL as the Second Major Histocompatibility Complex–Linked Susceptibility Locus for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Koichi; Makino, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Takaki, Asumi; Nagatsuka, Yumie; Ota, Masao; Tamiya, Gen; Kimura, Akinori; Bahram, Seiamak; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2002-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease with a complex etiology in which environmental factors within a genetically susceptible host maneuver the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system toward recognition of autoantigens. This ultimately leads to joint destruction and clinical symptomatology. Despite the identification of a number of disease-susceptibility regions across the genome, RA’s major genetic linkage remains with the major histocompatibility complex (M...

  9. Gastrocnemius Contracture in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastifer, James R; Green, Adam

    2017-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease affecting multiple joints of the body. More than 90% of patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis develop foot or ankle pain over the course of their disease. The purpose of the current study was to report ankle dorsiflexion in rheumatoid arthritis patients as well as a control group utilizing a validated measurement instrument. Using a previously validated device, 70 patients presenting with rheumatoid arthritis and 70 controls were measured for ankle range motion and isolated gastrocnemius contractures. Clinical and goniometer measurement of ankle range of motion was also performed. The rheumatoid arthritis group had a mean dorsiflexion of 12.3 degrees compared to a mean of 17.3 degrees in the control group ( P rheumatoid arthritis had less ankle dorsiflexion than the control group. The clinical significance of this study is that it provides evidence that patients with rheumatoid arthritis have decreased ankle dorsiflexion even despite a lack of foot and ankle pain. In light of the high lifetime incidence of foot and ankle pain in these patients, this study provides some evidence that the decreased ankle dorsiflexion may be a contributing factor in foot and ankle pain, but further studies are needed. Level II, prospective cohort study.

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact Us Our ... Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Yoga for Arthritis ... Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this site to learn about Arthritis. Unlike many health education websites, we produce our own content. Additionally, ... Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid ...

  13. Nanomedicine for Intra-Articular Drug Delivery in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mary, Hannah; Del Rincόn, Inmaculada; Cui, Zhengrong

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by chronic inflammation within the joint. Recent developments in the understanding of inflammation have led to an increased interest in the use of nanomedicine in the treatment and diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. The ability of nanomedicine, such as nanoparticles, to permeate into and/or retain within the inflamed joint after intravenous and/or intra-articular administration has proven to be beneficial in improving rheumatoid arthritis therapy while reducing systemic exposure of patients to potentially toxic anti-arthritic drugs. This review aims at explaining the major applications of nanomedicine in rheumatoid arthritis treatment and diagnosis.

  14. Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Matuszewska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement. In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies. RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%. New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33. Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  15. Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Matuszewska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement.In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies. RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%.New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33. Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  16. Psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis: Is all inflammation the same?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Laura C; FitzGerald, Oliver; Helliwell, Philip S; Paul, Carle

    2016-12-01

    To review the pathophysiology, co-morbidities, and therapeutic options for psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis in order to further understand the similarities and differences in treatment paradigms in the management of each disease. New targets for individualized therapeutic decisions are also identified with the aim of improving therapeutic outcome and reducing toxicity. Using the PubMed database, we searched literature published from 2000 to 2015 using combinations of the key words "psoriasis," "psoriatic arthritis," "rheumatoid arthritis," "pathogenesis," "immunomodulation," and "treatment." This was a non-systematic review and there were no formal inclusion and exclusion criteria. Abstracts identified in the search were screened for relevance and articles considered appropriate evaluated further. References within these selected articles were also screened. Information was extracted from 198 articles for inclusion in this report. There was no formal data synthesis. Articles were reviewed and summarized according to disease area (psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis). The pathophysiology of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis involves chronic inflammation mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Dysfunction in integrated signaling pathways affecting different constituents of the immune system result in varying clinical features in the three diseases. Co-morbidities, including cardiovascular disease, malignancies, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are increased. Increased understanding of the immunopathogenesis allowed development of targeted treatments; however, despite a variety of potentially predictive genetic, protein and cellular biomarkers, there is still significant unmet need in these three inflammatory disorders. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Chronic alcohol consumption leads to neurochemical changes in the nucleus accumbens that are not fully reversed by withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Pedro A; Neves, João; Vilela, Manuel; Sousa, Sérgio; Cruz, Catarina; Madeira, M Dulce

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY)- and acetylcholine-containing interneurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) seem to play a major role in the rewarding effects of alcohol. This study investigated the relationship between chronic alcohol consumption and subsequent withdrawal and the expression of NPY and acetylcholine in the NAc, and the possible involvement of nerve growth factor (NGF) in mediating the effects of ethanol. Rats ingesting an aqueous ethanol solution over 6months and rats subsequently deprived from ethanol during 2months were used to estimate the total number and the somatic volume of NPY and cholinergic interneurons, and the numerical density of cholinergic varicosities in the NAc. The tissue content of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and catecholamines were also determined. The number of NPY interneurons increased during alcohol ingestion and returned to control values after withdrawal. Conversely, the number and the size of cholinergic interneurons, and the amount of ChAT were unchanged in ethanol-treated and withdrawn rats, but the density of cholinergic varicosities was reduced by 50% during alcohol consumption and by 64% after withdrawal. The concentrations of dopamine and norepinephrine were unchanged both during alcohol consumption and after withdrawal. The administration of NGF to withdrawn rats significantly increased the number of NPY-immunoreactive neurons, the size of cholinergic neurons and the density of cholinergic varicosities. Present data show that chronic alcohol consumption leads to long-lasting neuroadaptive changes of the cholinergic innervation of the NAc and suggest that the cholinergic system is a potential target for the development of therapeutic strategies in alcoholism and abstinence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Gout Initially Mimicking Rheumatoid Arthritis and Later Cervical Spine Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Araújo Santana Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gout is clinically characterized by episodes of monoarthritis, but if not treated properly, it can lead to a chronic polyarthritis, which may eventually mimic rheumatoid arthritis (RA. We present the case of a 59-year-old man, with a history of symmetrical polyarthritis of the large and small joints with later development of subcutaneous nodules, which was initially misdiagnosed as RA, being treated with prednisone and methotrexate for a long period of time. He complained of occipital pain and paresthesia in his left upper limb, and computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed the presence of an expansive formation in the cervical spine with compression of the medulla. He was admitted for spinal decompressive surgery and the biopsy specimen demonstrated a gouty tophus. Chronic gout can mimic RA and rarely involves the axial skeleton, and thus its correct diagnosis and the implementation of adequate therapy can halt the development of such damaging complications.

  19. Differences in pathophysiology between rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lories, R. J.; Baeten, D. L. P.

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis are common and severe chronic inflammatory skeletal diseases. Recognizing the differences rather than emphasizing similarities is important for a better understanding of the disease processes, the identification of specific therapeutic targets and in

  20. Chronic sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to cadmium, copper, lead, or zinc in laboratory water-only exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Dorman, Rebecca A.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Mebane, Christopher A.; Kunz, James L.; Hardesty, Douglas K.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic toxicity of cadmium, copper, lead, or zinc to white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was evaluated in water-only exposures started with newly hatched larvae or approximately 1-mo-old juveniles. The 20% effect concentration (EC20) for cadmium from the sturgeon tests was higher than the EC20 from the trout tests, whereas the EC20 for copper, lead, or zinc for the sturgeon were lower than those EC20s for the trout. When the EC20s from the present study were included in compiled toxicity databases for all freshwater species, species mean chronic value for white sturgeon was in a relatively low percentile of the species sensitivity distribution for copper (9th percentile) and in the middle percentile for cadmium (55th percentile), zinc (40th percentile), or lead (50th percentile). However, the species mean chronic value for rainbow trout was in a high percentile for copper, lead, and zinc (∼68th–82nd percentile), but in a low percentile for cadmium (23rd percentile). The trout EC20s for each of the 4 metals and the sturgeon EC20s for cadmium or lead were above US Environmental Protection Agency chronic ambient water quality criteria (AWQC) or Washington State chronic water quality standards (WQS), whereas the sturgeon EC20s for copper or zinc were approximately equal to or below the chronic AWQC and WQS. In addition, acute 50% effect concentrations (EC50s) for copper obtained in the first 4 d of the chronic sturgeon test were below the final acute value used to derive acute AWQC and below acute WQS for copper.

  1. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Chang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper.

  2. Cartilage damage and bone erosion are more prominent determinants of functional impairment in longstanding experimental arthritis than synovial inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Hayer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation of articular joints causing bone and cartilage destruction consequently leads to functional impairment or loss of mobility in affected joints from individuals affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Even successful treatment with complete resolution of synovial inflammatory processes does not lead to full reversal of joint functionality, pointing to the crucial contribution of irreversibly damaged structural components, such as bone and cartilage, to restricted joint mobility. In this context, we investigated the impact of the distinct components, including synovial inflammation, bone erosion or cartilage damage, as well as the effect of blocking tumor necrosis factor (TNF on functional impairment in human-TNF transgenic (hTNFtg mice, a chronic inflammatory erosive animal model of RA. We determined CatWalk-assisted gait profiles as objective quantitative measurements of functional impairment. We first determined body-weight-independent gait parameters, including maximum intensity, print length, print width and print area in wild-type mice. We observed early changes in those gait parameters in hTNFtg mice at week 5 – the first clinical signs of arthritis. Moreover, we found further gait changes during chronic disease development, indicating progressive functional impairment in hTNFtg mice. By investigating the association of gait parameters with inflammation-mediated joint pathologies at different time points of the disease course, we found a relationship between gait parameters and the extent of cartilage damage and bone erosions, but not with the extent of synovitis in this chronic model. Next, we observed a significant improvement of functional impairment upon blocking TNF, even at progressed stages of disease. However, blocking TNF did not restore full functionality owing to remaining subclinical inflammation and structural microdamage. In conclusion, CatWalk gait analysis provides a useful tool for quantitative

  3. Forms of Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  5. Arthritis in America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... those without arthritis. Arthritis makes it harder to manage heart disease, diabetes or obesity. About half of ... a healthcare provider’s care. State officials and community leaders can Promote physical activity and disease management educational ...

  6. Arthritis - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arthritis URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arthritis.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  7. Chronic progressive polyarthritis and other symptoms of collagen vascular disease induced by graft-vs-host reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pals, S. T.; Radaszkiewicz, T.; Roozendaal, L.; Gleichmann, E.

    1985-01-01

    The induction of a GVHR in (BALB/c X A)F1 mice by i.v. injection of 80 to 120 X 10(6) BALB/c spleen cells leads to the development of chronic progressive polyarthritis, which shares several of the articular and extra-articular manifestations of human rheumatoid arthritis. The development of these

  8. Posturography in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowska, B; Czerwosz, L; Hallay-Suszek, M; Sadura-Sieklucka, T; Księżopolska-Orłowska, K

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the paper was to investigate the usefulness of posturographic analysis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). RA is a chronic inflammatory disorder responsible for destruction of active and passive components of joints. It is the most common autoimmune disease, and the second most common form of arthritis after OA. OA is a chronic disorder characterized by irreversible changes in the joint structure developing with advancing age. Both diseases lead to the destruction of many parts of the motor system, cause pain, weakness, and damage of ligaments, muscles, bones, and articular cartilage. The etiology of the diseases remains unknown. In the present study, evaluation of body balance in the standing position was performed by means of Pro-Med force plate system. Three posturographic tests were applied: with eyes open, closed, and with the biofeedback--under conscious visual control of body movements. The following posturographic parameters were measured: the radius of sways, the developed area, and the total length of posturograms, and also two directional components of sways: the length of left-right (in frontal plane) and forward-backward (in sagittal plane) motions. The results demonstrate that the biofeedback test is most useful in the evaluation of instability in rheumatic patients; it is more powerful than the other posturographic tests evaluated.

  9. Serum Prolidase Activity in Ankylosing Spondylitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Uçar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to emphasize the collagen turnover in 2 of the most common chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases by evaluating serum prolidase activity (SPA in ankylosing spondylitis (AS and rheumatoid arthritis (RA. 30 patients who met the modified New York Criteria for the classification of AS, 29 patients who met the 2010 Rheumatoid Arthritis Classification Criteria for the classification of RA, and 31 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Serum samples of the patients and the controls were collected and SPA was measured by a spectrophotometric method. The comparison of the SPA in these 3 groups was statistically examined. In both patient groups, the SPA was lower than in the control group. SPA in patients with AS was statistically significantly lower than in the control and RA groups ( P < 0.001/ P = 0.002. No statistically significant difference was found between the RA and the control groups ( P = 0.891. In conclusion, lower SPA is presumably associated with decreased collagen turnover and fibrosis, leading to decreased physical functions in both chronic inflammatory musculoskeletal diseases.

  10. [Influence of chronic lead exposure in rats during the developmental stage on expression of leptin in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, and hippocampus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xue-Mei; Fu, Ya-Wen; Huang, Lai-Rong; Yang, Hui

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the influence of lead exposure in rats during the developmental stage on the expression of leptin in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, and hippocampus, as well as investigating whether leptin is associated with the mechanism of cognitive impairment induced by lead exposure. The rat model of cognitive impairment after chronic lead exposure was established by adding lead acetate into drinking water. According to the concentration of lead acetate in drinking water, the rats were divided into control (0 ppm), low-lead (50 ppm), medium-lead (200 ppm), and high-lead groups (1 000 ppm), with 16 rats in each group. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to measure the content of lead in the plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and hippocampus. ELISA was used to measure the level of leptin in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid. Immunohistochemistry was used to observe the distribution of leptin protein in the hippocampus. Western blot was used for relative quantification of leptin proteins in the hippocampus. Compared with the control group, the lead exposure groups showed significant increases in the content of lead in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and hippocampus (Plead exposure groups showed a slight increase in the protein expression of leptin in the hippocampus (P>0.05). Lead exposure can reduce the levels of leptin in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid in rats, which may be associated with the mechanism of cognitive impairment induced by lead exposure.

  11. Effect of etanercept, infliximab and methotrexate in the treatment of arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Liu, Y; Su, X; Liu, S

    2015-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease with inflammation of the joint, leading to damage of bone and surrounding cartilage. Our study was designed to find the efficacy of etanercept, infliximab and methotrexate in effective therapeutic management against arthritis patients. A total of 315 patients, including both the sexes in the age group of 45-70 years with active rheumatoid arthritis attending Hospital of Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing, China during the period of December 2012 to November 2013 were included in the study. 100 patients with joint pains, but not with rheumatoid arthritis were taken as a control group. All the patients were treated with infliximab, methotrexate and etanercept. In our study, patients responded, 75% to infliximab and etanercept combinations than to methotrexate. The combination therapy also showed a radiological decrease in the joint damage. There is significant when combinations of these drugs were used for the therapy (Petanercept combinations lowered the joint damage and helped in the improvement of the patient's life. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Temporomandibular joint involvement in psoriatic arthritis | Okkesim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psoriasis is a chronic, papulosquamous, and an inflammatory skin disease. It has been found that between 5% and 24% of patients develop psoriatic arthritis (PA) at the same time after or even prior to skin findings. The involvement of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare condition. In this report, a-46-year-old male ...

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis | Ally | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, spondyloarthropathy, inflammatory bowel disease and connective-tissue disease are characterised by immune dysregulation and chronic inflammation. This review will focus on immunopathogenic mechanisms, aspects of early disease, co-morbidity and therapy in RA ...

  14. Biologics in inflammatory and immunomediated arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Michele Maria; Benfaremo, Devis; Gabrielli, Armando

    2017-12-26

    Biologic drugs, introduced in clinical practice almost twenty years ago, represent nowadays a prominent treatment option in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis, such as Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic Arthritis and Spondyloarthritis, that include ankylosing spondylitis and non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis. Several compounds targeting different pathways have been marketed and approved for the treatment of inflammatory arthritis, with a significant impact on the clinical outcomes and the natural history of the diseases. There are currently seven classes of biologics that are available for the treatment of inflammatory arthritis, each inhibiting a different aspect of the immune-driven inflammatory pathway. They include: • Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) inhibitors (infliximab, adalimumab, etanercept, golimumab and certolizumab pegol); • Interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonists (anakinra); • Interleukin-6 (IL-6) inhibition (tocilizumab); • Interleukin-12/23 (IL23) inhibition (ustekinumab); • Interleukin-17 (IL-17) inhibition (secukinumab); • B-cell inhibition (anti-CD20, rituximab); • T-cell costimulation inhibition (anti-CTLA-4, abatacept). In this review, we will focus on the role of biologic drugs in the treatment strategies for inflammatory arthritis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Second cancers and Richter transformation are the leading causes of death in patients with trisomy 12 chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strati, Paolo; Abruzzo, Lynne V; Wierda, William G; O'Brien, Susan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    Trisomy 12 (+12) is detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) analysis in up to 20% of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Patients with +12 are known to have unique features and to carry an intermediate prognosis. In order to better define this large group, we reviewed the characteristics of 250 untreated patients with +12. When compared to 516 untreated patients negative for +12 by FISH, patients with +12 showed a higher incidence of thrombocytopenia, Richter transformation, and second malignant neoplasms (SMN), in addition to the expected increased rate of CD38 positivity and atypical immunophenotype. At a median follow-up of 51 months, 57% of patients needed first-line treatment; median time to first treatment was 38 months, and on multivariate analysis (MVA), it was found to be shorter in patients with advanced Rai stage, palpable splenomegaly, and deletion of 14q by conventional cytogenetic analysis. The overall response rate with first-line treatment was 94%. The median failure-free survival has not been reached, but on MVA, it was found to be shorter in patients whose disease responded in a manner other than complete remission or with FISH negativity for deletion 13q. The median overall survival for the entire group has not been reached, but MVA revealed it to be shorter in patients with an absolute lymphocyte count of > 30 × 10(9)/L or who developed SMN. Eighteen deaths have been observed so far, and Richter transformation and SMN were the leading causes of death (3 and 6, respectively). Patients with +12 CLL show characteristic clinical and biologic features, and may benefit from increased surveillance for second cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Interleukin-22 and rheumatoid arthritis: emerging role in pathogenesis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qiang; Huang, Cheng; Li, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disorder characterized by synovial inflammation and resultant progressive joint damage. It has become increasingly evident that cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of RA. Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is a member of the IL-10 cytokine family. Recent findings suggest that not only the expression of IL-22 is abnormal both in RA patients and in arthritis mice but also the aberrant IL-22 performs significantly in disease onset of RA. In this paper, we focus on the critical role of IL-22 in RA. Hopefully, the information obtained may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis and development of novel therapeutic strategies for this systemic autoimmune disease.

  17. Reduced physical activity in children and adolescents with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis despite satisfactory control of inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Anna-Helene; Nielsen, Susan; Muller, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    PA in childhood. CONCLUSION: Children and adolescents with JIA are less physically active than their healthy peers and less active than recommended for general health by the Danish Health Authorities. This is not explained by pain or objective signs of inflammation. When inflammation has been curbed......BACKGROUND: Vascular health is of concern in patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) since Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) epidemiologically has a well-described association with premature development of atherosclerosis. Chronic inflammation with persisting systemic circulating inflammatory...... proteins may be a cause of vascular damage, but general physical inactivity could be an important contributor. Pain and fatigue are common complaints in patients with JIA and may well lead to an inactive sedentary lifestyle. For this reason we assessed the physical activity (PA) objectively in patients...

  18. Treatment with anti-C5aR mAb leads to early-onset clinical and mechanistic effects in the murine delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Nansen, Anneline; Usher, Pernille A.

    2015-01-01

    Blockade of the complement cascade at the C5a/C5a receptor (C5aR)-axis is believed to be an attractive treatment avenue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of such interventions during the early phases of arthritis remain to be clarified. In this study we use the murine delayed......-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA) model to study the very early effects of a blocking, non-depleting anti-C5aR mAb on joint inflammation with treatment synchronised with disease onset, an approach not previously described. The DTHA model is a single-paw inflammatory arthritis model characterised by synchronised......Ab. Importantly, infiltration of neutrophils into the joint and synovium is also reduced following a single dose, demonstrating that C5aR signalling during the early stage of arthritis regulates neutrophil infiltration and activation. Furthermore, the number of T-cells in circulation and in the draining popliteal...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Alternative Medicine for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Yoga for Arthritis Yoga Poses for Arthritis Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies ... Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis ... website is intended for educational purposes only. Physicians and other health care professionals are encouraged to consult other sources ...

  20. ( sup 99m Tc)diphosphonate uptake and hemodynamics in arthritis of the immature dog knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E.S.; Soballe, K.; Henriksen, T.B.; Hjortdal, V.E.; Buenger, C. (Univ. of Aarhus (Denmark))

    1991-03-01

    The relationship between (99mTc)diphosphonate uptake and bone hemodynamics was studied in canine carrageenan-induced juvenile chronic arthritis. Blood flow was determined with microspheres, plasma and red cell volumes were measured by labeled fibrinogen and red cells, and the microvascular volume and mean transit time of blood were calculated. Normal femoral epiphyses had lower central and higher subchondral blood flow and diphosphonate uptake values. Epiphyseal vascular volume was uniform, resulting in a greater transit time of blood centrally. In arthritis, blood flow and diphosphonate uptake were increased subchondrally and unaffected centrally, while epiphyseal vascular volume was increased throughout, leading to prolonged transit time centrally. The normal metaphyses had low blood flow and diphosphonate uptake values in cancellous bone and very high values in growth plates, but a large vascular volume throughout. The mean transit time therefore was low in growth plates and high in adjacent cancellous bone. Arthritis caused decreased blood flow and diphosphonate uptake in growth plates but increased vascular volume and transit time of blood. Diphosphonate uptake correlated positively with blood flow and plasma volume and negatively with red cell volume in a nonlinear fashion. Thus, changes in diphosphonate uptake and microvascular hemodynamics occur in both epiphyseal and metaphyseal bone in chronic synovitis of the immature knee. The (99mTc)diphosphonate bone scan seems to reflect blood flow, plasma volume, and red cell volume of bone.

  1. Outcome of management of non-gonococcal septic arthritis at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Septic arthritis is an acute bacterial infection of a synovial joint. It is an orthopaedic emergency that can lead to morbidity or mortality if not properly treated. The fundamental issues in the management of septic arthritis include the duration of antibiotic therapy, the mode of joint drainage and the role of physiotherapy. There is ...

  2. Assessment of pulmonary function in rheumatoid arthritis patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abnormalities detected by pulmonary function tests may precede symptoms by years and lead to early diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis in rheumatoid arthritis and hence intervention. Objective: To determine the prevalence of pulmonary function abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis patients attending Rheumatology Clinics in ...

  3. Prevalence of Arthritis and Arthritis-Attributable Activity Limitation by Urban-Rural County Classification - United States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boring, Michael A; Hootman, Jennifer M; Liu, Yong; Theis, Kristina A; Murphy, Louise B; Barbour, Kamil E; Helmick, Charles G; Brady, Terry J; Croft, Janet B

    2017-05-26

    Rural populations in the United States have well documented health disparities, including higher prevalences of chronic health conditions (1,2). Doctor-diagnosed arthritis is one of the most prevalent health conditions (22.7%) in the United States, affecting approximately 54.4 million adults (3). The impact of arthritis is considerable: an estimated 23.7 million adults have arthritis-attributable activity limitation (AAAL). The age-standardized prevalence of AAAL increased nearly 20% from 2002 to 2015 (3). Arthritis prevalence varies widely by state (range = 19%-36%) and county (range = 16%-39%) (4). Despite what is known about arthritis prevalence at the national, state, and county levels and the substantial impact of arthritis, little is known about the prevalence of arthritis and AAAL across urban-rural areas overall and among selected subgroups. To estimate the prevalence of arthritis and AAAL by urban-rural categories CDC analyzed data from the 2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). The unadjusted prevalence of arthritis in the most rural areas was 31.8% (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 31.0%-32.5%) and in the most urban, was 20.5% (95% CI = 20.1%-21.0%). The unadjusted AAAL prevalence among adults with arthritis was 55.3% in the most rural areas and 49.7% in the most urban. Approximately 1 in 3 adults in the most rural areas have arthritis and over half of these adults have AAAL. Wider use of evidence-based interventions including physical activity and self-management education in rural areas might help reduce the impact of arthritis and AAAL.

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Arthritis Yoga Poses for Arthritis Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical ... to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Connect With Us Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease ...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for ... Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information ...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management ... Arthritis Center website is intended for educational purposes only. Physicians and other health care professionals are ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. A ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of ...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five ... was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here. Will You Support the Education of Arthritis Patients? Each year, over 1 million people visit this ... of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, what happens to your ... Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed ... Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic ...

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Connect With ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... receive from your rheumatologist. Click A Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with ...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Yoga for Arthritis Yoga Poses for Arthritis Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... SilverLight? Get it here. Will You Support the Education of Arthritis Patients? Each year, over 1 million ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  20. Impact of sonography in gouty arthritis: Comparison with conventional radiography, clinical examination, and laboratory findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: claudia.schueller-weidekamm@meduniwien.ac.at; Schueller, Gerd [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Aringer, Martin [Department of Rheumatology, Internal Medicine III, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Weber, Michael [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kainberger, Franz [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2007-06-15

    Objective: To explore the typical sonographic features of gray-scale and Power Doppler of acute and chronic gouty arthritis in conjunction with radiographic, clinical, and laboratory findings. Materials and methods: All hand, finger, and toe joints of 19 patients with acute and chronic gout were examined with gray-scale and Power Doppler sonography. The number and size of bone changes detected with sonography was compared to radiographic findings. Vascularization of the synovial tissue was scored on Power Doppler (grades 0-3), and was compared with clinical appearance, including swelling, tenderness, and redness (grades 0-3). Results: In acute gout, mild to moderate echogenic periarticular nodules with sonotransmission and hypervascularization of the edematous surrounding soft tissue were found. In chronic gout, tophaceous nodules completely blocked transmission of US wave, leading to strong reflexion and dorsal shadowing in a minority of cases. No significant difference in the detection of large bone changes (>2 mm) was found between sonography and radiography. However, gray-scale sonography was significantly more sensitive in the detection of small bone changes (p < 0.001). Power Doppler scores were statistically significantly higher than clinical examination scores (p < 0.001). Discussion: Sonography is superior to radiographs in evaluating small bone changes. The inflammatory process in joints can be better detected with Power Doppler sonography than with clinical examination. Typical sonographic appearance of acute and in particular of chronic gout might provide clues on gouty arthritis that adds to the information available from conventional radiography, clinical, and laboratory findings.

  1. rheumatoid arthritis health outcome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2004-12-04

    Dec 4, 2004 ... with the formation of chronic synovitis leading to bone and cartilage damage.1 The most common outcome of the ... (especially coping) were found to be significant predictors of swollen and tender joint status. ... in which patients cope with their disease status, must be considered. Further, it is recommended ...

  2. Tuberculous arthritis mimic arthritis of the Sjoegren's syndrome: findings from sonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yingchou E-mail: r820713@ms13.hinet.net; Hsu Shihwei

    2001-12-01

    A patient with a history of Sjoegren's syndrome developed chronic arthritis of left ankle. It was diagnosed as arthritis of the Sjoegren's syndrome initially. However, joint pain persisted despite corticosteroid therapy. Sonography disclosed a multiloculated cystic lesion with peripheral hyperechoic enhancement around left ankle and extended to Achilles tendon and subcutaneous region. Computed tomography (CT) confirmed the findings. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed increased signal intensity of the lesion after gadonillium enhancement on T1-weighted images. These abnormalities showed inhomogenous high signal intensities on T2-weighted images. Tuberculous arthritis was diagnosed by positive synovial tuberculous culture. Sonography is a valuable tool that offers significant advantages for the initial evaluation of arthritis of the Sjoegren's syndrome and help early suspicious of tuberculous arthritis, because of its cost-effectiveness, superior differentiation between the cyst and solid lesions, convenience for guiding biopsy and drainage.

  3. Association of levels of antibodies against citrullinated cyclic peptides and citrullinated α-enolase in chronic and aggressive periodontitis as a risk factor of Rheumatoid arthritis: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Stefan; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; Dähnrich, Cornelia; Hornig, Nora; Altermann, Wolfgang; Schaller, Hans-Günter; Schulz, Susanne

    2015-08-29

    Periodontal disease could be a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is assumed that the bacterial strain Porphyromonas gingivalis mediates citrullination of host peptides and thereby the generation of RA-associated autoantibodies in genetically predisposed individuals. For that reason non-RA individuals who suffered from generalized aggressive (GAgP, N = 51) and generalized chronic periodontitis (GChP, N = 50) were investigated regarding the occurrence of antibodies against citrullinated cyclic peptides (anti-CCP) and citrullinated α-enolase peptide-1 (anti-CEP-1) in comparison to non-RA non-periodontitis controls (N = 89). Furthermore, putative associations between infections with five periodontopathic bacteria or expression of certain human leucocyte antigens (HLA) to these autoantibodies were investigated. The presence of anti-CCP and anti-CEP-1 in plasma samples was conducted with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Subgingival plaque specimens were taken from the deepest pocket of each quadrant and pooled. For detection of DNA of five periodontopathic bacteria PCR with sequence specific oligonucleotides was carried out. Low resolution HLA typing was carried out with PCR with sequence specific primers. Differences between patients and controls were assessed using Chi square test with Yates correction or Fisher`s exact test if the expected number n in one group was periodontitis and RA should be investigated in further studies.

  4. Ultrasound in Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia; Plagou, Athena; Teh, James

    2017-09-01

    Ultrasound is currently performed in everyday rheumatologic practice. It is used for early diagnosis, to monitor treatment results, and to diagnose remission. The spectrum of pathologies seen in arthritis with ultrasound includes early inflammatory features and associated complications. This article discusses the spectrum of ultrasound features of arthritides seen in rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases in adults, such as Sjögren syndrome, lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Ultrasound findings in spondyloarthritis, osteoarthritis, and crystal-induced diseases are presented. Ultrasound-guided interventions in patients with arthritis are listed, and the advantages and disadvantages of ultrasound are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Regulation of proteoglycan-specific immune responses in arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berlo, S.E.

    2006-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic synovial inflammation. Many cells of the immune system are involved in this chronic inflammatory process. The primary target organs are the joints although as the disease progresses systemic manifestations often also appear.

  6. Stimulation of Mucin, Mucus, and Viscosity during Lubiprostone in Patients with Chronic Constipation may Potentially Lead to Increase of Lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Marek; Sarosiek, Irene; Wallner, Grzegorz; Edlavitch, Stanley A; Sarosiek, Jerzy

    2014-12-18

    The purpose of this clinical trial was to explore whether lubiprostone increases the rate of mucus and mucin secretion and its viscosity in chronic constipation (CC) patients. The secretion of chloride (CS) into the gastrointestinal tract lumen is pivotal in the body's ability to process non-digestible food components. CS sets the optimal rate of hydration for non-digestible food components, their fluidity, and their adequate propulsion along the alimentary tract. Chloride is also instrumental in the secretion of alimentary tract mucus, and the formation of a gel-like, viscous mucus-buffer layer. This layer acts as the first line and vanguard of the mucosal barrier. This barrier is essential in mucosal lubrication and protection. Lubiprostone, a novel chloride channel stimulator ClC-2, is currently approved for the treatment of CC. Its impact on mucus, mucus secretion, and viscosity is not established. A double-blind, crossover trial was approved by the IRBs at the Kansas University Medical Center (Kansas City, KS) (study site) and at the Texas Tech University HSC (El Paso, TX) (analysis site). The study included 20 patients (17 females (F); mean age: 37 years) with symptoms of CC diagnosed according to the Rome III criteria. Patients were randomized to 1 week of therapy with lubiprostone or placebo followed by a 1 week washout and 1 week of the alternative therapy. Gastric juice was collected basally and during stimulation with pentagastrin (6 μg/kg body weight subcutaneously) at the end of weeks 1 and 3. Pentagastrin stimulation mimics food stimulation. The mucus content in gastric juice was assessed gravimetrically. The mucin content was measured after its purification using ultracentrifugation. The viscosity of the gastric secretion was measured using a digital viscometer. In comparison with placebo, the volume of gastric secretion in patients with CC during administration of lubiprostone increased significantly by 50% (86.3 vs. 57.5 ml/h) (Plubiprostone

  7. Optimism and adaptation to chronic disease: the role of optimism in relation to self-care options of type I diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fournier, M.; Ridder, D. de; Bensing, J.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the role of optimistic beliefs in adaptation processes of three chronic diseases different in controllability by self-care. It was expected that optimism towards the future would relate to adaptation independently of the controllability of disease. Optimism regarding one's

  8. Persistent infection with Crohn's disease-associated adherent-invasive Escherichia coli leads to chronic inflammation and intestinal fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Cherrie-Lee N; Reid-Yu, Sarah A; McPhee, Joseph B; Coombes, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract in which alterations to the bacterial community contribute to disease. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli are associated with human Crohn's disease; however, their role in intestinal immunopathology is unclear because of the lack of an animal model compatible with chronic timescales. Here we establish chronic adherent-invasive Escherichia coli infection in streptomycin-treated conventional mice (CD1, DBA/2, C3H, 129e and C57BL/6), enabling the study of host response and immunopathology. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli induces an active T-helper 17 response, heightened levels of proinflammatory cytokines and fibrotic growth factors, with transmural inflammation and fibrosis. Depletion of CD8+ T cells increases caecal bacterial load, pathology and intestinal fibrosis in C57BL/6 mice, suggesting a protective role. Our findings provide evidence that chronic adherent-invasive Escherichia coli infections result in immunopathology similar to that seen in Crohn's disease. With this model, research into the host and bacterial genetics associated with adherent-invasive Escherichia coli-induced disease becomes more widely accessible.

  9. Chronic alterations in growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I signaling lead to changes in mouse tendon structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, R H; Clausen, N M; Schjerling, P

    2014-01-01

    The growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (GH/IGF-I) axis is an important stimulator of collagen synthesis in connective tissue, but the effect of chronically altered GH/IGF-I levels on connective tissue of the muscle-tendon unit is not known. We studied three groups of mice; 1) giant...

  10. Linking traumatic brain injury to chronic traumatic encephalopathy: identification of potential mechanisms leading to neurofibrillary tangle development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon Peter; Turner, Ryan Coddington; Logsdon, Aric Flint; Bailes, Julian Edwin; Huber, Jason Delwyn; Rosen, Charles Lee

    2014-07-01

    Significant attention has recently been drawn to the potential link between head trauma and the development of neurodegenerative disease, namely chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The acute neurotrauma associated with sports-related concussions in athletes and blast-induced traumatic brain injury in soldiers elevates the risk for future development of chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as CTE. CTE is a progressive disease distinguished by characteristic tau neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and, occasionally, transactive response DNA binding protein 43 (TDP43) oligomers, both of which have a predilection for perivascular and subcortical areas near reactive astrocytes and microglia. The disease is currently only diagnosed postmortem by neuropathological identification of NFTs. A recent workshop sponsored by National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke emphasized the need for premortem diagnosis, to better understand disease pathophysiology and to develop targeted treatments. In order to accomplish this objective, it is necessary to discover the mechanistic link between acute neurotrauma and the development of chronic neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders such as CTE. In this review, we briefly summarize what is currently known about CTE development and pathophysiology, and subsequently discuss injury-induced pathways that warrant further investigation. Understanding the mechanistic link between acute brain injury and chronic neurodegeneration will facilitate the development of appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic options for CTE and other related disorders.

  11. Controlling Arthritis (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-11-14

    Arthritis affects more than one in five adults and is the most common cause of disability in the U.S. It occurs often in people with chronic conditions, such as heart disease and diabetes, as well as those who are obese. This podcast discusses arthritis symptoms and how to control the condition.  Created: 11/14/2013 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/14/2013.

  12. Controlling Arthritis (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-11-14

    Arthritis affects more than one in five adults and is the most common cause of disability in the United States. It occurs often in people with chronic conditions, such as heart disease and diabetes, as well as those who are obese. In this podcast, Dr. Kamil Barbour discusses ways to control arthritis.  Created: 11/14/2013 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/14/2013.

  13. Bacillus pumilus Septic Arthritis in a Healthy Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivamurthy, V M; Gantt, Soren; Reilly, Christopher; Tilley, Peter; Guzman, Jaime; Tucker, Lori

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of septic arthritis caused by a Bacillus species, B. pumilus, occurring in a healthy child. This organism rarely causes serious infections and has only been described in newborns and immunocompromised individuals or as a skin infection. This child developed an indolent joint swelling after a minor skin injury, and symptoms were initially thought most consistent with chronic arthritis. The case demonstrates that clinicians should consider joint infection in children presenting with acute monoarticular swelling, even without prominent systemic features.

  14. Niki de Saint Phalle's lifelong dialogue between art and diseases: psychological trauma of sexual abuse, transient selective IgA deficiency, occupational exposure to toxic plastic material, chronic lung disease, rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidler, Henning

    2013-05-01

    The French artist Niki de Saint Phalle (1930-2002) is one of the most famous female painter and sculptor of the 20th century. Her eventful live was full of emotional and physical burdens such as abuse by the father as a adolescent, early separation from family, nervous collapse, turbulent relationship with the artist Jean Tinguely, and last not least serious diseases. The psychological trauma of sexual abuse together with a "nervous breakdown" years later was the start of a life as an artist and is also a key to her art of the early years. She was affected from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and was treated over 20 years with prednisolone and antimalarials leading to a good functional outcome and limited erosions of the wrist joint. Additionally, she had lifelong pulmonary disorders finally leading to death, which she attributed to polyester, the material used for her sculptures. An analysis of medical documents collected by her and provided by treating physicians gives another surprising explanation: selective IgA deficiency with multiple recurrent respiratory infections, asthma, milk intolerance, autoimmune thyroiditis, and RA compatible with hypogammaglobulinemia. Very unique in case of Niki de Saint Phalle is that IgA deficiency was transient. Nevertheless, it may be possible that the occupational exposure with art materials (polystyrene, polyester) has contributed in part or temporarily to her health problems. Altogether, her enormous artistic productivity represents an outstanding example of creative coping with RA and other lifelong health problems. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  15. The circadian clock regulates inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Laura E; Hopwood, Thomas W; Dickson, Suzanna H; Walker, Amy L; Loudon, Andrew S I; Ray, David W; Bechtold, David A; Gibbs, Julie E

    2016-11-01

    There is strong diurnal variation in the symptoms and severity of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, disruption of the circadian clock is an aggravating factor associated with a range of human inflammatory diseases. To investigate mechanistic links between the biological clock and pathways underlying inflammatory arthritis, mice were administered collagen (or saline as a control) to induce arthritis. The treatment provoked an inflammatory response within the limbs, which showed robust daily variation in paw swelling and inflammatory cytokine expression. Inflammatory markers were significantly repressed during the dark phase. Further work demonstrated an active molecular clock within the inflamed limbs and highlighted the resident inflammatory cells, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs), as a potential source of the rhythmic inflammatory signal. Exposure of mice to constant light disrupted the clock in peripheral tissues, causing loss of the nighttime repression of local inflammation. Finally, the results show that the core clock proteins cryptochrome (CRY) 1 and 2 repressed inflammation within the FLSs, and provide novel evidence that a CRY activator has anti-inflammatory properties in human cells. We conclude that under chronic inflammatory conditions, the clock actively represses inflammatory pathways during the dark phase. This interaction has exciting potential as a therapeutic avenue for treatment of inflammatory disease.-Hand, L. E., Hopwood, T. W., Dickson, S. H., Walker, A. L., Loudon, A. S. I., Ray, D. W., Bechtold, D. A., Gibbs, J. E. The circadian clock regulates inflammatory arthritis. © The Author(s).

  16. Multi-linear regression analysis, preliminary biotic ligand modeling, and cross species comparison of the effects of water chemistry on chronic lead toxicity in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbaugh, A J; Brix, K V; Mager, E M; De Schamphelaere, K; Grosell, M

    2012-03-01

    The current study examined the chronic toxicity of lead (Pb) to three invertebrate species: the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia, the snail Lymnaea stagnalis and the rotifer Philodina rapida. The test media consisted of natural waters from across North America, varying in pertinent water chemistry parameters including dissolved organic carbon (DOC), calcium, pH and total CO(2). Chronic toxicity was assessed using reproductive endpoints for C. dubia and P. rapida while growth was assessed for L. stagnalis, with chronic toxicity varying markedly according to water chemistry. A multi-linear regression (MLR) approach was used to identify the relative importance of individual water chemistry components in predicting chronic Pb toxicity for each species. DOC was an integral component of MLR models for C. dubia and L. stagnalis, but surprisingly had no predictive impact on chronic Pb toxicity for P. rapida. Furthermore, sodium and total CO(2) were also identified as important factors affecting C. dubia toxicity; no other factors were predictive for L. stagnalis. The Pb toxicity of P. rapida was predicted by calcium and pH. The predictive power of the C. dubia and L. stagnalis MLR models was generally similar to that of the current C. dubia BLM, with R(2) values of 0.55 and 0.82 for the respective MLR models, compared to 0.45 and 0.79 for the respective BLMs. In contrast the BLM poorly predicted P. rapida toxicity (R(2)=0.19), as compared to the MLR (R(2)=0.92). The cross species variability in the effects of water chemistry, especially with respect to rotifers, suggests that cross species modeling of invertebrate chronic Pb toxicity using a C. dubia model may not always be appropriate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis and the biological clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cata, Angelo; D'Agruma, Leonardo; Tarquini, Roberto; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2014-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease of unknown cause and a chronic and progressive inflammatory disorder ensuing in genetically predisposed subjects, characterized by synovitis causing joint destruction, as well as inflammation in body organ systems, leading to anatomical alteration and functional disability. Immune competent cells, deregulated synoviocytes and cytokines play a key role in the pathophysiological mechanisms. The immune system function shows time-related variations related to the influence of the neuroendocrine system and driven by the circadian clock circuitry. Immune processes and symptom intensity in RA are characterized by oscillations during the day following a pattern of circadian rhythmicity. A cross-talk between inflammatory and circadian pathways is involved in RA pathogenesis and underlies the mutual actions of disruption of the circadian clock circuitry on immune system function as well as of inflammation on the function of the biological clock. Modulation of molecular processes and humoral factors mediating in RA the interplay between the biological clock and the immune response and underlying the rhythmic fluctuations of pathogenic processes and symptomatology could represent a promising therapeutic strategy in the future.

  18. Bone Remodelling Markers in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Fardellone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone loss in rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients results from chronic inflammation and can lead to osteoporosis and fractures. A few bone remodeling markers have been studied in RA witnessing bone formation (osteocalcin, serum aminoterminal propeptide of type I collagen (PINP, serum carboxyterminal propeptide of type I collagen (ICTP, bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP, osteocalcin (OC, and bone resorption: C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (I-CTX, N-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (I-NTX, pyridinolines (DPD and PYD, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP. Bone resorption can be seen either in periarticular bone (demineralization and erosion or in the total skeleton (osteoporosis. Whatever the location, bone resorption results from activation of osteoclasts when the ratio between osteoprotegerin and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (OPG/RANKL is decreased under influence of various proinflammatory cytokines. Bone remodeling markers also allow physicians to evaluate the effect of drugs used in RA like biologic agents, which reduce inflammation and exert a protecting effect on bone. We will discuss in this review changes in bone markers remodeling in patients with RA treated with biologics.

  19. A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies of the Association Between Chronic Occupational Exposure to Lead and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, James; Cashman, Neil R.; Little, Julian; Krewski, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The association between occupational exposure to lead and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was examined through systematic review and meta-analyses of relevant epidemiological studies and reported according to PRISMA guidelines. Methods: Relevant studies were searched in multiple bibliographic databases through September 2013; additional articles were tracked through PubMed until submission. All records were screened in DistillerSR, and the data extracted from included articles were synthesized with meta-analysis. Results: The risk of developing ALS among individuals with a history of exposure to lead was almost doubled (odds ratio, 1.81; 95% confidence interval, 1.39 to 2.36) on the basis of nine included case-control studies with specific lead exposure information, with no apparent heterogeneity across included studies (I2 = 14%). The attributable risk of ALS because of exposure to lead was estimated to be 5%. Conclusions: Previous exposure to lead may be a risk factor for ALS. PMID:25479292

  20. Depletion of regulatory T cells leads to an exacerbation of delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis in C57BL/6 mice that can be counteracted by IL-17 blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Marie Atkinson

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rodent models of arthritis have been extensively used in the elucidation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA pathogenesis and are instrumental in the development of therapeutic strategies. Here we utilise delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA, a model in C57BL/6 mice affecting one paw with synchronised onset, 100% penetrance and low variation. We investigate the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs in DTHA through selective depletion of Tregs and the role of IL-17 in connection with Treg depletion. Given the relevance of Tregs in RA, and the possibility of developing Treg-directed therapies, this approach could be relevant for advancing the understanding of Tregs in inflammatory arthritis. Selective depletion of Tregs was achieved using a Foxp3-DTR-eGFP mouse, which expresses the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP under control of the Foxp3 gene. Anti-IL-17 monoclonal antibody (mAb was used for IL-17 blockade. Numbers and activation of Tregs increased in the paw and its draining lymph node in DTHA, and depletion of Tregs resulted in exacerbation of disease as shown by increased paw swelling, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, increased bone remodelling and increased production of inflammatory mediators, as well as increased production of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies. Anti-IL-17 mAb treatment demonstrated that IL-17 is important for disease severity in both the presence and absence of Tregs, and that IL-17 blockade is able to rescue mice from the exacerbated disease caused by Treg depletion and caused a reduction in RANKL, IL-6 and the number of neutrophils. We show that Tregs are important for the containment of inflammation and bone remodelling in DTHA. To our knowledge, this is the first study using the Foxp3-DTR-eGFP mouse on a C57BL/6 background for Treg depletion in an arthritis model, and we here demonstrate the usefulness of the approach to study the role of Tregs and IL-17 in

  1. Depletion of regulatory T cells leads to an exacerbation of delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis in C57BL/6 mice that can be counteracted by IL-17 blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Hoffmann, Ute; Hamann, Alf; Bach, Emil; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Niels Banhos; Kristiansen, Karsten; Serikawa, Kyle; Fox, Brian; Kruse, Kim; Haase, Claus; Skov, Søren; Nansen, Anneline

    2016-04-01

    Rodent models of arthritis have been extensively used in the elucidation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis and are instrumental in the development of therapeutic strategies. Here we utilise delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA), a model in C57BL/6 mice affecting one paw with synchronised onset, 100% penetrance and low variation. We investigate the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in DTHA through selective depletion of Tregsand the role of IL-17 in connection with Tregdepletion. Given the relevance of Tregsin RA, and the possibility of developing Treg-directed therapies, this approach could be relevant for advancing the understanding of Tregsin inflammatory arthritis. Selective depletion of Tregswas achieved using aFoxp3-DTR-eGFPmouse, which expresses the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under control of theFoxp3gene. Anti-IL-17 monoclonal antibody (mAb) was used for IL-17 blockade. Numbers and activation of Tregsincreased in the paw and its draining lymph node in DTHA, and depletion of Tregsresulted in exacerbation of disease as shown by increased paw swelling, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, increased bone remodelling and increased production of inflammatory mediators, as well as increased production of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies. Anti-IL-17 mAb treatment demonstrated that IL-17 is important for disease severity in both the presence and absence of Tregs, and that IL-17 blockade is able to rescue mice from the exacerbated disease caused by Tregdepletion and caused a reduction in RANKL, IL-6 and the number of neutrophils. We show that Tregsare important for the containment of inflammation and bone remodelling in DTHA. To our knowledge, this is the first study using theFoxp3-DTR-eGFPmouse on a C57BL/6 background for Tregdepletion in an arthritis model, and we here demonstrate the usefulness of the approach to study the role of Tregsand IL-17 in arthritis. © 2016. Published by

  2. Obesity or Overweight, a Chronic Inflammatory Status in Male Reproductive System, Leads to Mice and Human Subfertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Fan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is frequently accompanied with chronic inflammation over the whole body and is always associated with symptoms that include those arising from metabolic and vascular alterations. On the other hand, the chronic inflammatory status in the male genital tract may directly impair spermatogenesis and is even associated with male subfertility. However, it is still unclear if the chronic inflammation induced by obesity damages spermatogenesis in the male genital tract. To address this question, we used a high fat diet (HFD induced obese mouse model and recruited obese patients from the clinic. We detected increased levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain containing-3 (NLRP3 in genital tract tissues including testis, epididymis, seminal vesicle, prostate, and serum from obese mice. Meanwhile, the levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG and corticosterone were significantly higher than those in the control group in serum. Moreover, signal factors regulated by TNF-α, i.e., p38, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB, Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, and their phosphorylated status, and inflammasome protein NLRP3 were expressed at higher levels in the testis. For overweight and obese male patients, the increased levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were also observed in their seminal plasma. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between the TNF-α and IL-6 levels and BMI whereas they were inversely correlated with the sperm concentration and motility. In conclusion, impairment of male fertility may stem from a chronic inflammatory status in the male genital tract of obese individuals.

  3. A review of behaviour change theories and techniques used in group based self-management programmes for chronic low back pain and arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Alison; Tully, Mark A; Matthews, James; Hurley, Deirdre A

    2015-12-01

    Medical Research Council (MRC) guidelines recommend applying theory within complex interventions to explain how behaviour change occurs. Guidelines endorse self-management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) and osteoarthritis (OA), but evidence for its effectiveness is weak. This literature review aimed to determine the use of behaviour change theory and techniques within randomised controlled trials of group-based self-management programmes for chronic musculoskeletal pain, specifically CLBP and OA. A two-phase search strategy of electronic databases was used to identify systematic reviews and studies relevant to this area. Articles were coded for their use of behaviour change theory, and the number of behaviour change techniques (BCTs) was identified using a 93-item taxonomy, Taxonomy (v1). 25 articles of 22 studies met the inclusion criteria, of which only three reported having based their intervention on theory, and all used Social Cognitive Theory. A total of 33 BCTs were coded across all articles with the most commonly identified techniques being 'instruction on how to perform the behaviour', 'demonstration of the behaviour', 'behavioural practice', 'credible source', 'graded tasks' and 'body changes'. Results demonstrate that theoretically driven research within group based self-management programmes for chronic musculoskeletal pain is lacking, or is poorly reported. Future research that follows recommended guidelines regarding the use of theory in study design and reporting is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. {sup 166}Ho-chitosan as a radiation synovectomy agent - antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sug Jun; Lee, Soo Yong; Jeon, Dae Geun; Lee, Jong Seok [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    Radiation synovectomy is a noninvasive therapy that has been investigated as an alternative to surgical synovectomy. It has been successfully employed in the treatment of synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory arthropathies. In this study, we developed experimental animal model for radiation synovectomy. A model system in which a single injection of ovalbumin into the knee joints of previously sensitized rabbits consistently produced a chronic arthritis which was histologically similiar to human rheumatoid arthritis. (author). 8 refs., 8 figs

  5. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) plays an important role in immune complex-mediated arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Anne D; Haase, Claus; Cook, Andrew D; Hamilton, John A

    2016-05-01

    Neutrophils are an abundant cell type in many chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, their contribution to the pathology of RA has not been widely studied. A key cytokine involved in neutrophil development and function is granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). In this study we used the K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis (STA) model, mimicking the effector phase of RA, to investigate the importance of G-CSF in arthritis development and its relation to neutrophils. Here, we show for the first time in this model that G-CSF levels are increased both in the serum and in inflamed paws of arthritic mice and importantly that G-CSF blockade leads to a profound reduction in arthritis severity, as well as reduced numbers of neutrophils in blood. Moreover, CXCL1 and CXCL2 levels in the arthritic joints were also lowered. Our data demonstrate that G-CSF is a pivotal driver of the disease progression in the K/BxN STA model and possibly acts in part by regulating neutrophil numbers in the circulation. Therefore, our findings suggest that G-CSF might be a suitable target in RA, and perhaps in other immune complex-driven pathologies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Kinesiotherapy for quality of life, pain and muscle strength of rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus patient. Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Myra, Rafaela Simon; DeMarco, Mariângela; Zanin, Caroline; Wibelinger, Lia Mara

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory, chronic and progressive disease. It impairs joint synovial membranes and may induce bone and cartilage destruction. Many diseases may follow rheumatoid arthritis, including systemic lupus erythematosus, an inflammatory, chronic autoimmune disease with multisystemic manifestations, with periods of remission and exacerbation. This study aimed at reporting kinesiotherapy intervention for quality of life, pain and muscle...

  7. [Arthritis of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibilia, J

    1999-09-01

    Diagnosis of shoulder arthritis should situate the precise location (glenohumeral, acromioclavicular, scapulothoracic) and rapidly determine the cause in order to eliminate the possibility of septic arthritis which requires urgent treatment. Good knowledge of shoulder symptomatology is essential. When there is joint effusion, the fluid should be sampled for rapid analysis (cells, crystals, germs), and the work-up for diagnosis must include clinical and laboratory analyses as well as imaging. Causes are especially microcrystallin arthritis (hydroxyapatite rheumatism, chondrocalcinosis, etc.) and inflammatory rheumatism (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosis spondylitis, etc.). Septic arthritis is much less common but more rapidly destructive, which justifies their consideration whenever suspected. Treatment should be rapidly initiated in acute, particularly septic forms. In other forms, diagnosis guides treatment. Steps should be taken rapidly, both medically and sometimes surgically, to avoid destructive articular and periarticular lesions (rotator cuff).

  8. [Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbiti, Mohammed; Bouhamidi, Bahia; Louzi, Lhoussaine

    2017-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis is rare. It is associated with poor prognosis in terms of mortality and morbidity. We report the case of a 61-year old patient with spontaneous Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis. He suffered from complicated diabetes associated with positive blood cultures and synovial fluid cultures. Patient's evolution was favorable thanks to early diagnosis and initiation of adequate antibiotic therapy. Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis is rare. On that basis we conducted a literature review of cases of Proteus mirabilis pyogenic arthritis to highlight the risk factors, pathogenesis, treatment and evolution of these diseases. Diagnosis is commonly based on microbiological analysis, early articular puncture biopsy is performed before the initiation of antibiotic treatment, direct examination, culture and antibiogram which are useful as guidance for antibiotic therapy. Septic arthritis is a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency; early management of this disease allows total healing without after-effects.

  9. Cross-linking of IgGs bound on circulating neutrophils leads to an activation of endothelial cells: possible role of rheumatoid factors in rheumatoid arthritis-associated vascular dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Rollet-Labelle, Emmanuelle; Vaillancourt, Myriam; Marois, Louis; Newkirk, Marianna M; Poubelle, Patrice E; Naccache, Paul H

    2013-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by the presence of circulating auto-antibodies, including rheumatoid factors, which recognize the Fc portion of IgGs. The neutrophil is the most abundant circulating leukocyte and it expresses high levels of Fc?Rs on its surface. The aim of the present study was to examine the capacity of circulating human neutrophils to be activated by rheumatoid factors and the consequences of these events on endothelium. Methods Neutrophil-bound IgGs were cr...

  10. Proteome Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis Gut Mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Ellingsen, Torkell; Glerup, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory joint disease leading to cartilage damage and ultimately impaired joint function. To gain new insight into the systemic immune manifestations of RA, we characterized the colon mucosa proteome from 11 RA-patients and 10 healthy controls. The biopsies were...

  11. Bone metabolism in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    Bone metabolism in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is reviewed. Two different entities are recognised: 1) a localised periarticular bone loss, due to inflammatory processes and 2) a generalised increased bone turnover, ultimately leading to a loss of axial bone mass. The mechanism of this loss of

  12. Novel therapeutic targets in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenders, M.I.; Berg, W.B. van den

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that leads to inflammation and destruction of synovial joints. Despite the broad spectrum of antirheumatic drugs, this heterogeneous disease is still not well controlled in up to 30% of patients. Here, we discuss two pathways that are regarded as

  13. Administration of interferon-g to pregnant rats reverses the depressed adjuvant-induced arthritis of their chronically Trypanosoma cruzi-infected offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Didoli

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated that administration of interferon gamma (IFN-g to the inbred "l" strain of pregnant rats conferred partial resistance on their offspring to challenge with Trypanosoma cruzi. We now examine if this intervention also modifies the reportedly immunodepressed cellular responses which occur during chronic infection. Offspring were born to mothers undergoing one of the following procedures during gestation: subcutaneous injections of recombinant rat IFN-g, 50,000 IU/rat, five times/week for 3 weeks, which was started on the day of mating (IFN-Mo; infection with 106 trypomastigotes of T. cruzi at 7, 14, and 21 days after mating plus IFN-g treatment as given to the former group (TcIFN-Mo; the same protocol except that physiological saline was injected instead of IFN-g (Tc-Mo; injection of physiological saline only (control-Mo. All offspring groups (N = 8-10/group were infected at weaning and were assessed 90 days later for their adjuvant-induced arthritic response or levels of major T cell subsets in spleen and lymph nodes. TcIFN-Mo and IFN-Mo offspring showed a reestablished arthritic response, which remained within the range seen in controls. Immunolabeling studies on parallel groups of 90-day-infected offspring showed that the inverse CD4/CD8 cell ratio that is usually seen in lymphoid organs from these chronically infected rats (median 0.61 appeared to have recovered in the TcIFN-Mo and IFN-Mo groups (median 1.66 and 1.78, respectively and was not different from uninfected controls (1.96. These studies indicate that early stimulation with IFN-g is able to reverse the immunosuppressive state that is usually present during the chronic period of the experimental infection.

  14. Prevalence and correlates of hepatitis C virus-associated inflammatory arthritis in a population-based cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferucci, Elizabeth D; Choromanski, Tammy L; Varney, Danielle T; Ryan, Holly S; Townshend-Bulson, Lisa J; McMahon, Brian J; Wener, Mark H

    2017-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of hepatitis C virus-associated inflammatory arthritis, to describe its clinical and immunologic correlates, and to identify features that are characteristic of arthritis in chronic hepatitis C. Participants with chronic hepatitis C infection enrolled in a population-based cohort study in Alaska and who had not received anti-viral treatment for hepatitis C were recruited. In a cross-sectional study, we assessed joint symptoms and signs, performed autoantibody and cytokine testing, and abstracted medical records for features of hepatitis C and arthritis. Of the 117 enrolled participants, 8 (6.8%) had hepatitis C-associated arthritis. The participants with arthritis were younger than those without (median age: 45 vs. 52, p = 0.02). Rheumatoid factor was commonly present among patients with hepatitis C-associated arthritis. The only studied autoantibody found more commonly in patients with HCV arthritis than those without arthritis was anti-nuclear antibody (63% vs. 23%, p = 0.026). The only joint symptom significantly more common in hepatitis C arthritis was self-reported joint swelling (75% vs. 26%, p = 0.007). Features of fibromyalgia were more common and functional status was worse in those with arthritis than those without. No cytokines differed in patients with and without arthritis. There were no associations of arthritis or autoantibodies with liver-related outcomes. In this study of a cohort of individuals with chronic HCV infection, HCV-associated arthritis was present in less than 10%. Few serologic features distinguished participants with or without arthritis, but self-reported joint swelling was more common in those with arthritis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self–servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, „Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL–100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL–100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and

  16. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self-servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, "Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL-100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL-100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and can

  17. Osteoporosis diagnostics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Małgorzata Węgierska; Marta Dura; Einat Blumfield; Paweł Żuchowski; Marzena Waszczak; Sławomir Jeka

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic connective tissue disease. The development of comorbidities often occurs in the course of RA. One of them is osteoporosis, which has serious social and economic effects and may contribute to the increase in the degree of disability and premature death of the patient. Due to the young age in which RA disease occurs, densitometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine is the basic examination in osteoporosis diagnostics. In the course of RA, much more frequent...

  18. Conservative rheumoorthopedics: rheumatoid arthritis (part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V P Pavlov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevention and medical treatment of typical arthropathy of the foot, ankle, knee, hip, and shoulder are considered in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The methods of conservative rheumoorthopedics can yield good results at the early stages of RA, the chronic course of the disease requires repeated courses of medical rehabilitative treatment; in severe cases these methods are a preparatory stage for surgical treatment, which enhances the latter's efficiency.

  19. Conservative rheumoorthopedics: rheumatoid arthritis (part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V P Pavlov

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The prevention and medical treatment of typical arthropathy of the foot, ankle, knee, hip, and shoulder are considered in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The methods of conservative rheumoorthopedics can yield good results at the early stages of RA, the chronic course of the disease requires repeated courses of medical rehabilitative treatment; in severe cases these methods are a preparatory stage for surgical treatment, which enhances the latter's efficiency.

  20. Streptococcus gordonii septic arthritis : two cases and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yombi Jean cyr

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite advances in antimicrobial and surgical therapy, septic arthritis remains a rheumatologic emergency that can lead to rapid joint destruction and irreversible loss of function. In adults, Staphylococcus aureus is the most common microorganism isolated from native joints. Streptococcus gordonii is a prominent member of the viridans group of oral bacteria and is among the bacteria most frequently identified as being primary agent of subacute bacterial endocarditis. To the best of our knowledge, Streptococcus gordonii has not yet been described as agent of septic arthritis. Case Presentation We describe here two cases of septic arthritis due to Streptococcus gordonii. It gives us an opportunity to review epidemiology, diagnosis criteria and management of septic arthritis. Conclusion Although implication of S. gordonii as aetiologic agent of subacute endocarditis is well known, this organism is a rare cause of septic arthritis. In this case, the exclusion of associated endocarditis is warranted.

  1. Evaluating and mitigating fracture risk in established rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Matthew B; Saag, Kenneth G

    2015-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are predisposed to systemic bone loss, and they are at an increased risk of fractures. Although there are similarities in the patient demographics between rheumatoid arthritis patients and the general population of osteoporosis patients, there are factors, particularly the use of glucocorticoids, which are specific to rheumatoid arthritis. These factors can lead to an increased risk of bone loss and fracture. Given that fractures are often very debilitating, especially in elderly patients, it is of paramount importance for the practicing rheumatologist to be aware of ways to reduce the risk of fracture in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This review discusses currently available modalities for fracture risk assessment as well as pharmacologic and lifestyle interventions available to treat and prevent bone loss in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. History and diagnostic value of antibodies to citrullinated proteins in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peene, I.; de Rycke, L.; Baeten, D.; Hoffman, I.; Veys, E. M.; de Keyser, F.

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease characterized by the presence of autoantibodies. The best known autoantibody is the rheumatoid factor. Another group of antibodies directed against citrullinated epitopes is proven to be more specific for rheumatoid arthritis. This review

  3. Locomotion and muscle mass measures in a murine model of collagen-induced arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, A.; Hulsman, J.; Garssen, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by chronic poly-arthritis, synovial hyperplasia, erosive synovitis, progressive cartilage and bone destruction accompanied by a loss of body cell mass. This loss of cell mass, known as rheumatoid cachexia, predominates in the skeletal muscle and

  4. Childhood psychosocial stressors and adult onset arthritis : Broad spectrum risk factors and allostatic load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Von Korff, M.; Alonso, J.; Ormel, J.; Angermeyer, M.; Bruffaerts, R.; Fleiz, C.; De Girolamo, G.; Kessler, R.C.; Kovess-Masfety, V.; Posada-Villa, J.; Scott, K.M.; Uda, H.

    Neural, endocrine, and immune stress mediators are hypothesized to increase risks of diverse chronic diseases, including arthritis. Retrospective data from the World Mental Health Surveys (N = 18,309) were employed to assess whether adult onset of arthritis was associated with childhood adversities

  5. Systems biology guided by Chinese medicine reveals new markers for sub-typing rheumatoid arthritis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wietmarschen, H. van; Yuan, K.; Lu, C.; Gao, P.; Wang, J.; Xiao, C.; Yan, X.; Wang, M.; Schroën, J.; Lu, A.; Xu, G.; Greef, J. van der

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Complex chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis have become a major challenge in medicine and for the pharmaceutical industry. New impulses for drug development are needed. OBJECTIVE: A systems biology approach is explored to find subtypes of rheumatoid arthritis patients enabling

  6. A proposal for a study on treatment selection and lifestyle recommendations in chronic inflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Holmskov, Uffe; Bek Sørensen, Signe

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases (CIDs), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (inflammatory bowel diseases, IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritides, hidradenitis suppurativa, and immune-mediated uveitis, are treated with biologics targeting the pro...

  7. A proposal for a study on treatment selection and lifestyle recommendations in chronic inflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Holmskov, Uffe; Sørensen, Signe Bek

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases (CIDs), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (inflammatory bowel diseases, IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritides, hidradenitis suppurativa, and immune-mediated uveitis, are treated with biologics targeting the pro...

  8. A Proposal for a Study on Treatment Selection and Lifestyle Recommendations in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Holmskov, Uffe; Sørensen, Signe Bek

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases (CIDs), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (inflammatory bowel diseases, IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritides, hidradenitis suppurativa, and immune-mediated uveitis, are treated with biologics targeting the pro...

  9. [Radiological diagnostics of cervical rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göttsche, T; Kothe, R; Adam, G; Rüther, W

    2004-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis leads to characteristic findings at the synovial joints, the intervertebral discs and the processes of the cervical spine. Isolated findings are not specific for rheumatoid arthritis. In fact, due to common underlying pathophysiologic changes they also develop in other inflammatory diseases affecting the cervical spine. Therefore, each radiological examination is to be understood and used as a piece in the diagnostic puzzle. Only in conjunction with clinical information does it add to a conclusive diagnosis. Nevertheless certain patterns of findings help in narrowing the list of differential diagnosis. Besides their role in initial diagnosis, radiological examinations are crucial tools in the peri- and post-operative work-up and in the detection of typical complications of rheumatoid arthritis with cervical manifestations, i. e. various instabilities and their consequences, as those have an impact on the therapeutic approach and prognosis.

  10. Epidemiology of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Salvarani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies on psoriatic arthritis have long been hampered by the absence of widely accepted classification criteria. The development of the CASPAR (ClASsification criteria for Psoriatic ARthritis criteria has recently provided the framework for conducting epidemiological studies in psoriatic arthritis using uniform recruitment criteria. However, so far, only a minority of studies have adopted such criteria. In addition to the lack of shared classification criteria, differences in study settings, designs, and ascertainment methods have contributed to yield substantial disparities in the estimates of the incidence (from 3,02 to 23,1 cases per 100,000 people and prevalence (from 49,1 to 420 cases per 100,000 people of psoriatic arthritis around the globe. Overall, the available data suggests that the prevalence of psoriasis in the general population is approximately 2-3%, with about a third of patients with psoriasis having arthritis. Therefore, psoriatic arthritis may affect 0,3- 1,0% of the population, a frequency not dissimilar from that of rheumatoid arthritis. Future epidemiological studies should be carried out in larger numbers of patients diagnosed using consistent criteria.

  11. Dissemination and evaluation of the European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the role of the nurse in the management of chronic inflammatory arthritis: results of a multinational survey among nurses, rheumatologists and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne; Ndosi, Mwidimi; Buss, Beate; Fayet, Françoise; Moretti, Antonella; Ryan, Sarah; Savel, Carine; Scholte-Voshaar, Marieke; de la Torre-Aboki, Jenny; van Tubergen, Astrid

    2014-08-01

    The aims of this study were to disseminate, assess agreement with, assess the application of and identify potential barriers for implementation of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the role of nurses in the management of chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIA) using a survey of nurses, rheumatologists and patients. A Web-based survey was distributed across Europe and the USA using snowball sampling. Levels of agreement and application were assessed using a 0-10 rating scale (0 = none, 10 = full agreement/application). Reasons for disagreement and potential barriers to application of each recommendation were sought. Regional differences with respect to agreement and application were explored. In total, 967 nurses, 548 rheumatologists and 2034 patients from 23 countries participated in the survey. Median level of agreement was high in all three groups, ranging from 8 to 10 per recommendation. Median level of application was substantially lower, ranging from 0 to 8 per recommendation. Agreement and application were lowest in Eastern and Central Europe. The most commonly reported reasons for incomplete agreement were too many other responsibilities (nurses), doubts about knowledge of the nurse (rheumatologists) and fear of losing contact with the rheumatologist (patients). The most commonly reported barriers to the application were time constraints and unavailability of service. Rheumatologists responses suggested that nurses had insufficient knowledge to provide the recommended care. The EULAR recommendations for the role of nurses in the management of CIA have been disseminated among nurses, rheumatologists and patients across Europe and the USA. Agreement with these recommendations is high, but application is lower and differed across regions. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Anti-Arthritic Effect of Chebulanin on Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinglan Zhao

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic degenerative autoimmune disease characterized by persistent inflammation of synovial membranes, which leads to cartilage destruction and bone erosion. To date, there are no effective therapies to slow the progress of this degenerative condition. Here, we evaluate the anti-arthritic effect of chebulanin, an abundant anti-inflammatory agent isolated from Terminalia chebula, in collagen induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice by intragastric administration. Arthritic severity was scored by performing histopathological evaluation of the joints and measuring the expression of inflammatory cytokines and relative enzymes by immunohistochemical staining. In parallel, bone destruction and erosion were confirmed by micro-CT. Our data revealed that chebulanin significantly improved the severity of arthritis. Specifically, the histopathological characteristics of the tissues were improved and expression of TNF-α, IL-6, MMP-3 and COX-2 in the paws and joints of the treated mice decreased in a dose-dependent manner compared with control mice. Furthermore, micro-CT analysis revealed that chebulanin induced a dose-dependent reduction in cartilage destruction and bone erosion. Taken together, our findings suggest that chebulanin suppresses the expression of inflammatory mediators and prevents cartilage destruction and bone erosion in mice. Therefore, chebulanin is a strong therapeutic alternative for the treatment of RA.

  13. [Does telemonitoring lead to health and economic benefits in patients with chronic heart failure? - a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, U; Henschke, C

    2012-12-01

    Chronic heart failure is a severe and common disease combined with high costs for the German health care system. Deficiencies in standard therapy and limited financial capacities of the German health care system necessitate new approaches in the care of chronic heart failure patients.The present study aims to analyse the scientific level of knowledge of clinical, economic and other outcomes of telemonitoring compared with standard therapy for patients with chronic heart failure. Results should provide an evidence base for health-care decision makers.To determine the outcomes, a systematic review was carried out by using the database MEDLINE. In accordance with defined inclusion and exclusion criteria, 10 randomized controlled trials remained. Furthermore, 4 studies of a hand research and the recently published results of one of the largest national studies were included.As a result of the systematic review, there is currently no evidence for the benefits of telemonitoring compared with standard therapy. National studies identified significant improvements or a tendency for improvements in terms of quality of life and costs/cost-effectiveness as well as partly in mortality, hospital duration and medication adherence. International studies diverged in their results. The comparability and validity of the investigated studies are limited due to a low number of national studies, different settings of the telemonitoring programmes, the inclusion of different NYHA classes, the heterogeneity of study endpoints and endpoint-related causes, short observation periods of some studies as well as questionable transferability of international cost-results to the German health care system. Furthermore, differences in standard therapy between national and international studies were identified. None of the international studies performed a comparison between clinical and economic outcomes.With regard to the future prospects of telemonitoring in Germany there is still a need for

  14. Hamster and Murine Models of Severe Destructive Lyme Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Munson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ- deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology.

  15. Hamster and Murine Models of Severe Destructive Lyme Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Erik; Nardelli, Dean T.; Du Chateau, Brian K.; Callister, Steven M.; Schell, Ronald F.

    2012-01-01

    Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ-) deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology. PMID:22461836

  16. Diagnostic Value of Electrocardiographic T Wave Inversion in Lead aVL in Diagnosing Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Chronic Stable Angina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem L. Farhan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The clinical value of T wave inversion in lead aVL in diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD remains unclear. This study aims to investigate the correlation between aVL T wave inversion and CAD in patients with chronic stable angina.Methods: Electrocardiograms (ECGs of 257 consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography were analyzed. All patients had chronic stable angina. All patients with secondary T wave inversion had been excluded (66 patients. The remaining 191 patients constituted the study population. Detailed ECG interpretation and coronary angiographic findings were conducted by experienced cardiologists.Results: T wave inversion in aVL was identified in 89 ECGs (46.8% with definite ischemic Q-ST-T changes in different leads in 97 ECGs (50.8%. Stand alone aVL T wave inversion was found in 27 ECGs (14.1% while ischemic changes in other leads with normal aVL were identified in 36 ECGs (18.8%. The incidence of CAD was 86.3%. Single, two- and multi-vessel CAD were found in 38.8%, 28.5% and 32.7% of cases respectively. The prevalence of left main, left anterior descending, left circumflex and right coronary arteries were 4.7%, 61.2%, 29.3% and 44.5%, respectively. T wave inversion in aVL was found to be the only ECG variable significantly predicting mid segment left anterior descending artery (LAD lesions (Odds Ratio 2.93, 95% Confidence Interval 1.59-5.37, p=0.001.Conclusion: This study provides new information relating to T wave inversion in lead aVL to mid segment LAD lesions. Implication of this simple finding may help in bedside diagnosis of CAD typically mid LAD lesions. However, further studies are needed to corroborate this finding.

  17. Chronic cholecystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute cholecystitis is a painful condition that leads to chronic cholecystitis. It is not clear whether chronic cholecystitis causes any symptoms. Symptoms of acute cholecystis can include: Sharp, cramping, or dull pain ...

  18. IFN-αα induced psoriatic arthritis and HCV-related liver cirrhosis. Therapeutic options and patient’s opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Piga

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in the setting of Psoriatic Arthritis is an additional variable to be considered in the therapeutic approach to the disease because of the complications of an immunosuppressive treatment in the course of a chronic infection and the possible hepatotoxicity of many drugs conventionally used to treat psoriatic arthritis. The case reported explores the therapeutic options in a patient with IFN-α induced psoriatic arthritis, characterised by severe arthritis and psoriasis but also the concomitant presence of HCV chronic hepatitis, in light of the patient’s concerns

  19. Factors Leading to Improved Gait Function in Patients with Subacute or Chronic Central Nervous System Impairments Who Receive Functional Training with the Robot Suit Hybrid Assistive Limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Shigetaka; Kinjo, Yuki; Hokama, Yohei; Sugawara, Kenichi; Tsuchida, Yukio; Tominaga, Daisuke; Ishiuchi, Shogo

    2017-12-01

    The factors that lead to the improvement of gait function in patients with diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) who use a hybrid assistive limb (HAL) are not yet fully understood. The purpose of the present study was to analyze these factors to determine the prognosis of the patients' gait function. Patients whose CNS disease was within 180 days since onset were designated as the subacute-phase patients, and patients whose disease onset had occurred more than 180 days previously were designated as chronic-phase patients. Fifteen subacute-phase patients and 15 chronic-phase patients were given HAL training. The study analyzed how post-training walking independence in these patients was affected by the following factors: age, disease, lesion area, lower limb function, balance, period until the start of training, number of training sessions, additional rehabilitation, higher-order cognitive dysfunction, HAL model, and the use of a non-weight-bearing walking-aid. In subacute-phase patients, walking independence was related to lower limb function (rs = 0.35). In chronic-phase patients, there was a statistically significant correlation between post-training walking independence and balance (rs = 0.78). In addition, in patients with a severe motor dysfunction that was accompanied by inattention and global cognitive dysfunction, little improvement occurred, even with double-leg model training, because they had difficulty wearing the device. The results demonstrated that the factors that improved walking independence post HAL training differed between patients with subacute- and chronic-stage CNS diseases. The findings may serve as valuable information for future HAL training of patients with CNS diseases.

  20. Septic arthritis due to Streptococcus sanguis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandac, Inga; Prkacin, Ingrid; Matovinović, Mirjana Sabljar; Sustercić, Dunja

    2010-06-01

    Septic arthritis may represent a direct invasion of joint space by various microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses and fungi. Although any infectious agent may cause bacterial arthritis, bacterial pathogens are the most significant because of their rapidly destructive nature. We present a case of septic arthritis in a 56-year old male patient due to Streptococcus viridans which is member of the viridans group streptococci. Patient was admitted to Our Hospital presented as fever of unknown origin, losing more than 30 kg of body weight during couple of months, and anemia of chronic disease as paraneoplastic process. He had long history of arterial hypertension and stroke. There was swelling and pain of the right sternoclavicular joint and precordial systolic murmur in physical status. A large diagnostic panel has been made, computerized tomography (CT) of right sternoclavicular joint showed widening of periarticular soft tissue and loss of clavicular corticalis. Cytologic analysis of synovial fluid showed more than 90% of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. There were no crystals on microscopic examination and Gram stain of fluid was negative. Blood cultures were positive for S. sanguis and there was a consideration about possible periodontal disease. Stomatologic examination verified periapical ostitis and extraction of potential cause of infection has been done. Therapy with benzilpenicilline was followed by the gradual improvement of clinical and laboratory parameters. Although viridans group streptococci and Streptococcus sanguis in particular are rare causes of septic arthritis in native joints, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of periodontal disease.

  1. Living with Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... quality of life. The following tips are from occupational therapy practitioners working with people with arthritis. If you want to: Consider these activity tips: Reduce pressure and discomfort in your hands when holding or working with objects. Wrap foam, ...

  2. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Artritis reactiva: Esenciales: hojas informativas de fácil lectura View/Download/Order Publications Reactive Arthritis, Easy-to- ... Media Moderation Policy FOIA Privacy Statement Accessibility Disclaimer Digital Strategy Open Source Data Public Data Listing NIH... ...

  3. MP Joint Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... crack extends into the joint Certain medical conditions ( rheumatoid arthritis , gout and pseudogout , psoriasis, etc.) Infections, often after a cut, puncture or animal bites where bacteria are introduced into the joint and cause rapid ...

  4. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are: Steroid injections: to treat severely swollen joints Oral steroids: to treat multiple swollen joints Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDS): to ease the pain Colchicine: to treat acute arthritis of pseudogout

  5. Sex and Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease also can have an emotional impact on sexual relations. A change in appearance, weight gain or loss, or a decrease in mobility or energy can affect self-esteem and self-image. The person with arthritis may ...

  6. Arthritis and the Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Using drugs, both prescription drugs and illegal street drugs, can induce arthritis. As part of a congenital autoimmune disease syndrome of undetermined origin. Recent research has suggested, for instance, that a ...

  7. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teens With Diabetes Protecting Your Online Identity and Reputation ADHD Medicines Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) KidsHealth > For ... you find foods that have a higher nutritional value to make up for having a poor appetite. ...

  8. Arthritis and the Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because there are so many joints in each foot. The additional weight contributes to the deterioration of cartilage and the development of bone spurs. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA): RA is a major crippling disorder and ...

  9. Radiosynovectomy of the knee joint in chronic arthritis; An easy and useful treatment. Radiosynoviectomie van de knie bij chronische artritis; Een eenvoudige en zinvolle behandeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerbooms, A.M.T.; Putte, L.B.A. van de (Academisch Ziekenhuis St. Radboud, Nijmegen (Nteherlands). Afdeling Reumatologie); Corstens, F.H.M.; Buijs, W.C.A.M. (Academisch Ziekenhuis St. Radboud, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Afdeling Nucleaire Geneeskunde); Bruyn, G.A.W. (Medisch Centrum, Leeuwarden (Netherlands). Afdeling Reumatologie)

    1992-05-09

    185 MBq (5 mCi) colloidal 198-aurothioglucose ({sup 198}Au) or colloidal yttrium-90-silicate ({sup 90}Y) in 10 ml 0.9% NaCl was injected into knee joint cavity after aspiration of joint fluid. After that the patient stayed in bed for 3 days. Clinical examination, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate uptake measurements and radiographs of the knee joints were performed at baseline and during follow-up. Main results, group 1. evaluation after 6 months and after 3 years showed significantly better results in the group of knee joints with no minimal pre-existing radiological abnormalities compared with the group of knee joints with moderate or severe radiological abnormalities (p<0.05). Group 2. 24 months (mean) after treatment with {sup 90}Y, 50% of the treated knees showed clinical improvement of the synovitis. Group 3. a significant reduction of haemarthrotic episodes of all 6 joints treated and a reduction of pain in 4 during a follow-up of 2.5 years.It is concluded that radiosynovectomy is a valuable and simple form of treatment for therapy-resistant chronic synovitis. (author). 20 refs.; 3 tabs.

  10. Chronic depletion of gonadal testosterone leads to blood-brain barrier dysfunction and inflammation in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atallah, Afnan; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina; Grange-Messent, Valérie

    2017-09-01

    A dysfunction in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is associated with many neurological and metabolic disorders. Although sex steroid hormones have been shown to impact vascular tone, endothelial function, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses, there are still no data on the role of testosterone in the regulation of BBB structure and function. In this context, we investigated the effects of gonadal testosterone depletion on the integrity of capillary BBB and the surrounding parenchyma in male mice. Our results show increased BBB permeability for different tracers and endogenous immunoglobulins in chronically testosterone-depleted male mice. These results were associated with disorganization of tight junction structures shown by electron tomography and a lower amount of tight junction proteins such as claudin-5 and ZO-1. BBB leakage was also accompanied by activation of astrocytes and microglia, and up-regulation of inflammatory molecules such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Supplementation of castrated male mice with testosterone restored BBB selective permeability, tight junction integrity, and almost completely abrogated the inflammatory features. The present demonstration that testosterone transiently impacts cerebrovascular physiology in adult male mice should help gain new insights into neurological and metabolic diseases linked to hypogonadism in men of all ages.

  11. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  12. Contralateral transvenous left ventricular lead placement of implantable devices with pre-sternal tunnelling in chronically obstructed subclavian veins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen P. Sadarmin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT is a recognised therapy for the management of severe left ventricular dysfunction, advanced congestive cardiac failure (NYHA III or IV, ventricular dyssynchrony (either broad LBBB or mechanical dyssynchrony on echocardiography and failure of optimal medical therapy to achieve improvement in clinical status. Upgrading right ventricular pacemakers or defibrillators to biventricular devices is common and we describe here, 2 such cases of biventricular upgrade with blocked venous access on the ipsilateral side and successful placement of left ventricular leads following pre-sternal tunnelling from the contralateral side.

  13. Targeting cellular adhesion molecules, chemokines and chemokine receptors in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haringman, Jasper J.; Oostendorp, Roos L.; Tak, Paul P.

    2005-01-01

    The development of specific targeted therapies, such as anti-TNF-alpha treatment, for chronic inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, has significantly improved treatment, although not all patients respond. Targeting cellular adhesion molecules and chemokines/chemokine receptors as

  14. Disease-dependent local IL-10 production ameliorates collagen induced arthritis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henningsson, L.; Eneljung, T.; Jirholt, P.; Tengvall, S.; Lidberg, U.; Berg, W.B. van den; van de Loo, F.A.; Gjertsson, I.

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic destructive autoimmune disease characterised by periods of flare and remission. Today's treatment is based on continuous immunosuppression irrespective of the patient's inflammatory status. When the disease is in remission the therapy is withdrawn but

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Sodhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease.

  16. [New therapies for rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Eva; Maneiro, José Ramón

    2014-11-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial membrane and progressive destruction of the articular cartilage and bone. Advances in the knowledge of disease pathogenesis allowed the identification of novel therapeutic targets such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 or the system JAK/STAT phosphorylation. At present there are 5 TNF antagonists approved for RA. Tocilizumab blocks the pathway of IL-6 and is the only biological with proven efficacy in monotherapy. Rituximab modulates B cell response in RA. Abatacept provided new data on T cell involvement in the pathogenesis of RA. Tofacitinib is the first kinase inhibitor approved for this disease. Biologic drugs have proven efficacy, almost always in combination with methotrexate, and even halt radiographic progression. Monitoring infection is the main precaution in handling these patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Health status of adults with Short Stature: A comparison with the normal population and one well-known chronic disease (Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naess Eva E

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the subjective health status of adults with short stature (ShSt and compare with the general population (GP and one well-known chronic disease, rheumatoid artritis (RA. In addition, to explore the association between age, gender, height, educational level and different aspects of health status of adults with short stature. Methods A questionnaire was mailed to 72 subjects with short stature registered in the database of a Norwegian resource centre for rare disorders, response rate 61% (n = 44, age 16–61. Health status was assessed with SF-36 version 2. Comparison was done with age and gender matched samples from the general population in Norway (n = 264 and from subjects with RA (n = 88. Results The ShSt sample reported statistically significant impaired health status in all SF-36 subscales compared with the GP sample, most in the physical functioning, Mean Difference (MD 34 (95% Confidence Interval (CI 25–44. The ShSt reported poorer health status in mental health, MD 11 (95% CI 4–18 and social functioning, MD 11 (95% CI 2–20 but better in role physical MD 13 (95% CI 1–25 than the RA sample. On the other subscales there were minor difference between the ShSt and the RA sample. Within the short stature group there was a significant association between age and all SF-36 physical subcales, height was significantly associated with physical functioning while level of education was significantly associated with mental health. Conclusion People with short stature reported impaired health status in all SF-36 subscales indicating that they have health problems that influence their daily living. Health status seems to decline with increasing age, and earlier than in the general population.

  18. Renal denervation enhances GABA-ergic input into the PVN leading to blood pressure lowering in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihara, Masaaki; Takesue, Ko; Hirooka, Yoshitaka

    2017-05-01

    Sympathoexcitation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) in the brain controls sympathetic outflow through γ-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic mechanisms. Renal denervation (RDN) exerts a long-term antihypertensive effect in hypertension with CKD; however, the effects of RDN on sympathetic nerve activity and GABA-ergic modulation in the PVN are not clear. We aimed to elucidate whether RDN modulates sympathetic outflow through GABA-ergic mechanisms in the PVN in hypertensive mice with CKD. In 5/6-nephrectomized male Institute of Cancer Research mice (Nx) at 4 weeks after nephrectomy, systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly increased, accompanied by sympathoexcitation. The Nx-mice underwent RDN or sham operation, and the mice were divided into three groups (Control, Nx-Sham, and Nx-RDN). At 2 weeks after RDN, SBP was significantly decreased and urinary sodium excretion was increased in Nx-RDN compared with Nx-Sham. Urinary norepinephrine excretion (uNE) levels did not differ significantly between Nx-RDN and Nx-Sham. At 6 weeks after RDN, SBP continued to decrease and uNE levels also decreased in Nx-RDN compared with Nx-Sham. Bicuculline microinjection into the PVN increased mean arterial pressure and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity in all groups. The pressor responses and change in lumbar sympathetic nerve activity were significantly attenuated in Nx-Sham, but were enhanced in Nx-RDN at 6 weeks after RDN. The findings from the present study indicate that RDN has a prolonged antihypertensive effect and, at least in the late phase, decreases sympathetic nerve activity in association with enhanced GABA-ergic input into the PVN in mice with CKD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High net calcium uptake explains the hypersensitivity of the freshwater pulmonate snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, to chronic lead exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosell, Martin; Brix, Kevin V

    2009-03-09

    Previous studies have shown that freshwater pulmonate snails of the genus Lymnaea are exceedingly sensitive to chronic Pb exposure. An EC20 of influx was significantly inhibited (39%) and corresponding net Ca(2+) flux was significantly reduced from 224 to -23nmolg(-1)h(-1). An 85% increase in Cl(-) influx was also observed, while Na(+) ion transport appeared unaffected. Finally, a marked alkalosis of extracellular fluid was observed with pH increasing from 8.35 in the control to 8.65 in the 18.9microgl(-1) Pb-exposed group. Results based on direct measurement of Ca(2+) influx in 1g snails gave an influx nearly an order of magnitude higher (750nmolg(-1)h(-1)) than in comparably sized fish in similar water chemistry. Under control conditions, specific growth rate in newly hatched snails was estimated at 16.7% per day over the first 38-day post-hatch and whole body Ca(2+) concentrations were relatively constant at approximately 1100nmolg(-1) over this period. Based on these data, it is estimated that newly hatched snails have net Ca(2+) uptake rates on the order of 7600nmolg(-1)h(-1). A model was developed integrating these data and measured inhibition of Ca(2+) influx rates of 13.4% and 38.7% in snails exposed to 2.7 and 18.9microgl(-1)Pb, respectively. The model estimates 45% and 83% reductions in newly hatched snail growth after 30-day exposure in these two Pb-exposed groups. These results compare well with previous direct measurements of 47% and 90% reductions in growth at similar Pb concentrations, indicating the high net Ca(2+) uptake is the controlling factor in observed Pb hypersensitivity.

  20. H Nuclear magnetic resonance based metabonomics data analysis in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Arjmand

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systematic inflammatory disorder that may affect many tissues and organs, but principally attacks synovial joints and it is a common rheumatic disease with many subtypes. Nuclear Magnetic resonance (1H NMR spectrometers with high sensitivity, resolution and dynamic range has permitted the rapid, simultaneous investigation of complex mixtures of endogenous or exogenous components present in biological materials. Metabonomics is the systematic study of chemical finger print resulted from cell reactions and could be used as a new biomarker for early disease diagnosis. In the present investigation, we studied serum metabolic profile in rheumatoid arthritis (RA in order to find out the metabolic finger print pattern of the disease. Materials and methods: In our metabonomics study serum samples were collected from 16 patients with active RA, and from equal number of healthy subjects. They were evaluated during a one-year follow-up with the assessment of disease activity and 1H NMR spectroscopy of sera samples. In all the cases, the presence of active rheumatoid arthritis was shown by an increase in the T1 values of the synovium of the joints. We specified and classified all metabolites using PCA, PLSDA chemometrics methods. Chenomx (Trail Version and ProMetab codes in Matlab software environments were used for our data analysis. Results were compared with the NMR metabolite data bank (www.metabolomics.ca. Anti-CCP, ANA and urea were also analyzed by ElISA and colorimetric methods respectively. Results: The most changes identified in this study were in the biosynthesis pathways of steroid hormones, biotin, fatty acids, amino acids (Leucine, Valin and isoleucine and also linoleic acid. Conclusion: In rheumatoid arthritis disease, the activation of the immune system consumes larg amounts of energy. The main donor of free energy in cells is ATP, which is generated by both glycolysis and oxidative

  1. Recent advances in uveitis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaniemi, Kaisu; Savolainen, Anneli; Karma, Anni; Aho, Kimmo

    2003-01-01

    Chronic scarring-type uveitis is a frequent extra-articular manifestation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It occurs in about 20% of children with this disease, commencing typically within a few years from its onset. The risk of uveitis is greatest in antinuclear antibody-positive girls with early onset oligoarthritis. The classic clinical picture is chronic bilateral anterior uveitis, usually asymptomatic until substantial damage to intraocular structures occurs. In view of the asymptomatic nature of the condition, routine screening of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients 2-4 times a year is crucial to prevent complications. The treatment consists of topical corticosteroids and mydriatics, in severe cases with immunosuppressive agents, and surgical management of complications. Although the prognosis of uveitis is improving, there are cases refractory to standard regimens. Patients in whom uveitis commences prior to the onset of arthritis present a special problem.

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Victoria Ruffing, RN Ms. Ruffing has been a member of the Arthritis Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis ...

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... accept advertising, paid guests posts, or charge for access. That’s where you come in. Your gift will ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Question Physician Corner Rheumatology Conference Rheumatology Rounds Case Rounds Radiology Rounds Pathophysiology of the Rheumatic Diseases ... Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid ...

  5. Arthritis of the hand - Rheumatoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Rheumatoid Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... debilitating when it affects the hands and fingers. Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common forms of ...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Will ...

  7. Arthritis of the hand - Rheumatoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Rheumatoid Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * ... debilitating when it affects the hands and fingers. Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common forms ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will allow you to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: July 9, 2012 ... in seeking it because of something they may have read on this website. Copyright Johns Hopkins Arthritis ...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, what happens ... Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Connect With Us ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact Us Our Faculty Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers You are here: Home / Patient Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis ... website is intended for educational purposes only. Physicians and other health care professionals are encouraged to consult other sources ...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatments are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with ... Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos ...

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any advice you receive from your rheumatologist. Click A Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: ... it here. Your Gift of $75 Will Provide A Full Day of Access to this Site More ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Connect With ...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any advice you receive from your rheumatologist. Click A Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and ... About Victoria Ruffing, RN Ms. Ruffing has been a member of the Arthritis Center since 2000, currently ...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... SilverLight? Get it here. Will You Support the Education of Arthritis Patients? Each year, over 1 million ... site to learn about Arthritis. Unlike many health education websites, we produce our own content. Additionally, we ...

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. She is a critical member of our patient ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  2. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Research Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of ... a project plan to address relevant challenges for rheumatoid arthritis. Read Part 1 on Lupus in MedlinePlus magazine, ...

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of RA is made, what happens to your joints, what treatments are available, what is happening in ... Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist ...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spondylitis News Osteoarthritis News Gout News Osteoporosis News Lupus News Fibromyalgia News Patient Corner Arthritis Drug Information ... Connect With Us Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diseases Our Research Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Research Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education ... Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P.E. Study Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an ...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to learn about Arthritis. Unlike many health education websites, we produce our own content. Additionally, we do ... information contained within the Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center website is intended for educational purposes only. Physicians and ...

  7. Acute and chronic sensitivity of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to cadmium, copper, lead, or zinc in laboratory water-only exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Contributions by Wang, Ning; Calfee, Robin D.; Beahan, Erinn; Brumbaugh, William G.; Dorman, Rebecca A.; Hardesty, Doug K.; Kunz, James L.; Little, Edward E.; Mebane, Christopher A.; Puglis, Holly J.

    2014-01-01

    White sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) are experiencing poor recruitment in the trans boundary reach of the upper Columbia River in eastern Washington State. Limited toxicity data indicated that early life stages of white sturgeon are sensitive to metals. In acute 4-day (d) exposures with larval white sturgeon, previous studies have reported that the 4-day median lethal concentrations (LC50) based on biotic ligand model (BLM) normalization for copper were below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency national recommended acute water-quality criterion. In previously published chronic 66-d exposures starting with newly fertilized eggs of white sturgeon, 20-percent lethal effect concentrations (LC20s) for copper, cadmium, or zinc generally were within a factor of two of the chronic values of the most sensitive fish species in the databases of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality criteria (WQC) for the three metals. However, there were some uncertainties in the chronic exposures previously performed with white sturgeon, including (1) low control survival (37 percent), (2) more control fish tested in each replicate compared to other treatments, (3) limited replication of treatments (n=2), (4) lack of reported growth data (such as dry weight), and (5) wide dilution factors for exposure concentrations (6- to 8-fold dilutions). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency concluded that additional studies are needed to generate more toxicity data to better define lethal and sublethal toxicity thresholds for metals for white sturgeon. The objective of the study was to further evaluate the acute and chronic toxicity of cadmium, copper, lead, or zinc to early life stages of white sturgeon in water-only exposures. Toxicity tests also were performed with commonly tested rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) under similar test conditions to determine the relative sensitivity between white sturgeon and rainbow trout to these metals. Toxicity data generated from

  8. Discordant indigenous and provider frames explain challenges in improving access to arthritis care: a qualitative study using constructivist grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Wilfreda E; Coupal, Stephanie; Jones, C Allyson; Crowshoe, Lynden F J; Marshall, Deborah A; Homik, Joanne; Barnabe, Cheryl

    2014-06-11

    Access to health services is a determinant of population health and is known to be reduced for a variety of specialist services for Indigenous populations in Canada. With arthritis being the most common chronic condition experienced by Indigenous populations and causing high levels of disability, it is critical to resolve access disparities through an understanding of barriers and facilitators to care. The objective of this study was to inform future health services reform by investigating health care access from the perspective of Aboriginal people with arthritis and health professionals. Using constructivist grounded theory methodology we investigated Indigenous peoples' experiences in accessing arthritis care through the reports of 16 patients and 15 healthcare providers in Alberta, Canada. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between July 2012 and February 2013 and transcribed verbatim. The patient and provider data were first analyzed separately by two team members then brought together to form a framework. The framework was refined through further analysis following the multidisciplinary research team's discussions. Once the framework was developed, reports on the patient and provider data were shared with each participant group independently and participants were interviewed to assess validity of the summary. In the resulting theoretical framework Indigenous participants framed their experience with arthritis as 'toughing it out' and spoke of racism encountered in the healthcare setting as a deterrent to pursuing care. Healthcare providers were frustrated by high disease severity and missed appointments, and framed Indigenous patients as lacking 'buy-in'. Constraints imposed by complex healthcare systems contributed to tensions between Indigenous peoples and providers. Low specialist care utilization rates among Indigenous people cannot be attributed to cultural and social preferences. Further, the assumptions made by providers lead to stereotyping and

  9. Radiological (MRI and Biochemical effects of Low Level LASER therapy in chronic Osteo arthritis in Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia: A Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Nambi S

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is one of the degenerative diseases and Low level laser therapy (LLLT has been prescribed as nonoperative treatment in physiotherapy. But the available evidences of finding the radiological and biochemical effectiveness of LLLT are very few. So, the purpose of this study is to find the radiological and biochemical effect of Low level laser therapy (LLLT in the treatment of Osteoarthritis. 34 subjects who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria were divided into two groups (Active Laser group – ALG & Placebo Laser group - PLG with randomized sampling method. ALG was treated with active laser head, whereas PLG treated same like ALG but without emission of energy. Both groups were applied with kinesio tape for 4 weeks. The frequency of the treatment was three times per week for 4 weeks in both groups. Subjects were assessed at baseline, 4th and 8th week. Contact area (mm2 – medial & lateral and cartilage thickness (percentage - medial & lateral was measured by Magnetic resonance image (MRI and CTX-II (μmg/mmol was measured by urine analysis. A statistically significant (p ≤0.05 difference between both groups were noted at the period of 8 week for contact area (lateral and CTX-II and insignificant (p ≥ 0.05 difference in contact area (medial and cartilage thickness (medial & lateral were noted. In conclusion, the low level laser therapy is helpful in modifying the biochemical components and leads to make changes in the cartilage which subsequently improve the quality of life of OA patients.

  10. Multistage electrotherapy delivered through chronically-implanted leads terminates atrial fibrillation with lower energy than a single biphasic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhan, Ajit H; Gutbrod, Sarah R; Li, Wenwen; Lang, Di; Schuessler, Richard B; Efimov, Igor R

    The goal of this study was to develop a low-energy, implantable device-based multistage electrotherapy (MSE) to terminate atrial fibrillation (AF). Previous attempts to perform cardioversion of AF by using an implantable device were limited by the pain caused by use of a high-energy single biphasic shock (BPS). Transvenous leads were implanted into the right atrium (RA), coronary sinus, and left pulmonary artery of 14 dogs. Self-sustaining AF was induced by 6 ± 2 weeks of high-rate RA pacing. Atrial defibrillation thresholds of standard versus experimental electrotherapies were measured in vivo and studied by using optical imaging in vitro. The mean AF cycle length (CL) in vivo was 112 ± 21 ms (534 beats/min). The impedances of the RA-left pulmonary artery and RA-coronary sinus shock vectors were similar (121 ± 11 Ω vs. 126 ± 9 Ω; p = 0.27). BPS required 1.48 ± 0.91 J (165 ± 34 V) to terminate AF. In contrast, MSE terminated AF with significantly less energy (0.16 ± 0.16 J; p < 0.001) and significantly lower peak voltage (31.1 ± 19.3 V; p < 0.001). In vitro optical imaging studies found that AF was maintained by localized foci originating from pulmonary vein-left atrium interfaces. MSE Stage 1 shocks temporarily disrupted localized foci; MSE Stage 2 entrainment shocks continued to silence the localized foci driving AF; and MSE Stage 3 pacing stimuli enabled consistent RA-left atrium activation until sinus rhythm was restored. Low-energy MSE significantly reduced the atrial defibrillation thresholds compared with BPS in a canine model of AF. MSE may enable painless, device-based AF therapy. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic ingestion of cadmium and lead alters the bioavailability of essential and heavy metals, gene expression pathways and genotoxicity in mouse intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Jérôme; Le Clère, Kelly; Daniel, Catherine; Sauty, Mathieu; Nakab, Lauren; Chassat, Thierry; Dewulf, Joëlle; Penet, Sylvie; Carnoy, Christophe; Thomas, Patrick; Pot, Bruno; Nesslany, Fabrice; Foligné, Benoît

    2013-10-01

    Chronic ingestion of environmental heavy metals such as lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) causes various well-documented pathologies in specific target organs following their intestinal absorption and subsequent accumulation. However, little is known about the direct impact of the non-absorbed heavy metals on the small intestine and the colon homeostasis. The aim of our study was to compare the specific bioaccumulation and retention of Cd and Pb and their effect on the essential metal balance in primary organs, with those occurring specifically in the gastrointestinal tract of mice. Various doses of Cd (5, 20 and 100 mg l(-1)) and Pb (100 and 500 mg l(-1)) chloride salts were provided in drinking water for subchronic to chronic exposures (4, 8 and 12 weeks). In contrast to a clear dose- and time-dependent accumulation in target organs, results showed that intestines are poor accumulators for Cd and Pb. Notwithstanding, changes in gene expression of representative intestinal markers revealed that the transport-, oxidative- and inflammatory status of the gut epithelium of the duodenum, ileum and colon were specifically affected by both heavy metal species. Additionally, in vivo comet assay used to evaluate the impact of heavy metals on DNA damage showed clear genotoxic activities of Cd, on both the upper and distal parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Altogether, these results outline the resilience of the gut which balances the various effects of chronic Cd and Pb in the intestinal mucosa. Collectively, it provides useful information for the risk assessment of heavy metals in gut homeostasis and further disease's susceptibility.

  12. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  13. Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Y. Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis. In addition to skin and joint involvement, there is increasing evidence suggesting that patients with PsA also have an increase in risk of clinical and subclinical cardiovascular diseases, mostly due to accelerating atherosclerosis. Both conventional and nonconventional cardiovascular risk factors contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk in PsA. Chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in PsA, acting independently and/or synergistically with the conventional risk factors. In this paper, we discuss the current literature indicating that patients with PsA are at risk of cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Osteoporosis diagnostics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Węgierska, Małgorzata; Dura, Marta; Blumfield, Einat; Żuchowski, Paweł; Waszczak, Marzena; Jeka, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic connective tissue disease. The development of comorbidities often occurs in the course of RA. One of them is osteoporosis, which has serious social and economic effects and may contribute to the increase in the degree of disability and premature death of the patient. Due to the young age in which RA disease occurs, densitometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine is the basic examination in osteoporosis diagnostics. In the course of RA, much more frequently than in healthy persons of the same age, osteoporotic fractures of vertebral bodies occur, which hinder a correct assessment in the DXA test. Rheumatoid arthritis patients often undergo computed tomography (CT) examination of the abdominal cavity for other medical indications than suspected spinal injury. Then, CT examination may also serve for the assessment of bone density, especially in patients with osteoporotic fractures.

  15. Osteoporosis diagnostics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Węgierska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic systemic connective tissue disease. The development of comorbidities often occurs in the course of RA. One of them is osteoporosis, which has serious social and economic effects and may contribute to the increase in the degree of disability and premature death of the patient. Due to the young age in which RA disease occurs, densitometry (DXA of the lumbar spine is the basic examination in osteoporosis diagnostics. In the course of RA, much more frequently than in healthy persons of the same age, osteoporotic fractures of vertebral bodies occur, which hinder a correct assessment in the DXA test. Rheumatoid arthritis patients often undergo computed tomography (CT examination of the abdominal cavity for other medical indications than suspected spinal injury. Then, CT examination may also serve for the assessment of bone density, especially in patients with osteoporotic fractures.

  16. Modulation of monocyte/macrophage-derived cytokine and chemokine profile by persistent Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection leads to chronic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Mavromara

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available HCV infection presents a major public health problem, with more than 170 million people infected worldwide. Chronicity and persistence of infection constitute the hallmark of the disease. Although HCV is a hepatotropic virus, subsets of immune cells have been found to be permissive to infection and viral replication. Peripheral blood monocytes, attracted to the site of infection and differentiated into macrophages, and resident hepatic macrophages, known as Kupffer cells, are important mediators of innate immunity, through production of several chemokines and cytokines in addition to their phagocytic activity. HCV proteins have been shown to modulate the cytokine and chemokine production profile of monocytes/macrophages, as it is suggested by both in vitro and clinical studies. This modified expression profile appears crucial for the establishment of aberrant inflammation that leads to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  17. Th17 cytokines and arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.W. Lubberts (Erik)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractTh17 cells are implicated in human autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), although it has not been established whether this persistent destructive arthritis is driven by Th1 and/or Th17 cells. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) contributes to the pathogenesis of arthritis as has

  18. Causes and consequences of fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Patricia

    2017-05-01

    To review current information on the causes, treatments, and consequences of fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis. Disease activity (inflammation, pain, joint symptoms) is associated with greater fatigue. However, disease activity per se accounts for only a small portion of fatigue, and rheumatoid arthritis medications that reduce disease activity have small effects on fatigue. Instead, factors outside the direct effects of rheumatoid arthritis, such as obesity, physical inactivity, sleep disturbance, and depression, explain the majority of variation in fatigue. Some of these factors may be indirect effects of disease (e.g. pain can lead to sleep disturbance). Rheumatoid arthritis has significant effects on the quality of life of individuals with rheumatoid arthritis. The most effective approaches to reducing rheumatoid arthritis fatigue appear to be behavioral, such as increasing physical activity, or cognitive, such as cognitive behavioral interventions. Fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis appears to be largely because of factors outside the direct effects of the disease, such as behavioral and psychological factors. In spite of the tremendous impact of fatigue on patient health and quality of life, effective treatments remain elusive, but existing data show that behavioral and cognitive approaches may be most effective.

  19. [Cardiovascular risk factors in psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebrov, A P; Nikitina, N M; Gaĭdukova, I Z

    2011-01-01

    To study the role of conventional and new factors of cardiovascular risk in development of atherosclerosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PA). Sixty patients with psoriatic arthritis, 414 RA patients and 79 healthy controls entered the trial. All of them had no manifestations of cardiovascular diseases. Screening was made of the leading risk factors of cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular complications, thickness of the complex intima-media (TIM) of the carotid arteries, vascular wall stiffness were measured, vasoregulatory function of the endothelium, markers of endothelial damage were examined. Patients with psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis were found to have increased TIM of the carotid arteries, high incidence of atherosclerotic plaques, increased stiffness, damage of the vascular wall, affected endothelial vasoregulation. These alterations were associated with high arthritis activity, systemic manifestations, seropositivity by rheumatoid factor (in RA), presence of entesitis, uveitis and dactilitis (in psoriatic arthritis), dislipidemia, arterial hypertension (AH). To determine cardiovascular risk in patients with arthritis, it is necessary to consider not only standard risk factors (dislipidemia and AH), but also severity of systemic inflammation, arterial stiffness, endothelial damage and ability of the vascular wall to relax reflecting endothelial dysfunction.

  20. An examination of self-report physical activity and its relationship with psychological factors in inflammatory arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Larkin, Louise

    2012-01-01

    peer-reviewed Background: In???ammatory arthritis (IA) is the term given to a group of chronic in???ammatory rheumatic diseases that primarily include rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Physical activity (PA), defined as any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that results in energy expenditure (EE), is important for everyone, including people with RA and PsA. Despite the importance of including PA in the management of these two inflammatory conditions decrea...

  1. The Role of Health Literacy and Social Networks in Arthritis Patients' Health Information-Seeking Behavior: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, Janette; Mullan, Judy; Worsley, Anthony; Pai, Nagesh

    2012-01-01

    Background. Patients engage in health information-seeking behaviour to maintain their wellbeing and to manage chronic diseases such as arthritis. Health literacy allows patients to understand available treatments and to critically appraise information they obtain from a wide range of sources. Aims. To explore how arthritis patients' health literacy affects engagement in arthritis-focused health information-seeking behaviour and the selection of sources of health information available through ...

  2. Prediction of Response to Targeted Treatment in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijbrandts, C. A.; Tak, P. P.

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune syndrome presenting with chronic inflammation of the joints. Patients with the same diagnosis can present with different phenotypes. In some patients severe joint inflammation and early joint destruction are observed, whereas a milder phenotype can be seen in

  3. A Toolbox for Personalized Medicine of Methotrexate Therapy in Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.F.J. de Rotte (Maurits)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease. It is characterized by swelling and pain of the joints, uncontrolled proliferation of synovial tissue and multisystem co-morbidities like cardiovascular disease and thyroid disease. RA mainly affects the

  4. Impaired dendritic cell proinflammatory cytokine production in psoriatic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenink, M.H.; Santegoets, K.C.M.; Butcher, J.; Bon, L. van; Lamers-Karnebeek, F.B.G.; Berg, W.B. van den; Riel, P.L. van; McInnes, I.B.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) remains poorly understood. The underlying chronic inflammatory immune response is thought to be triggered by unknown environmental factors potentially arising from a defective immune function. We undertook this study to determine whether an

  5. Biomarkers For Rheumatoid Arthritis In Textile Workers And The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease of unknown origin. There was an evidence of increased rate of RA in textile workers, and was higher among women. Fifty two textile workers (have worked for more than two years) and sixty two control subjects of both sexes were ...

  6. Sleep Disturbances in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis | Abbasi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Sleep problems are frequent in chronic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The present study was conducted to determine frequency of sleep disturbances and their relations with disease severity. METHODS: The present case-control study was performed on 100 rheumatoid patients who were referred ...

  7. Incident Heart Failure in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Usman; Egeberg, Alexander; Ahlehoff, Ole

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with a wide range of comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease, but its association with heart failure (HF) is not fully clear. We investigated the risk of incident HF in a nationwide cohort of patients with RA...

  8. Chronic Adolescent Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Treatment of Male Mice Leads to Long-Term Cognitive and Behavioral Dysfunction, Which Are Prevented by Concurrent Cannabidiol Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michelle; Mills, Sierra; Winstone, Joanna; Leishman, Emma; Wager-Miller, Jim; Bradshaw, Heather; Mackie, Ken

    2017-01-01

    influence behavioral outcomes. Conclusion: These data suggest that chronic exposure to THC during adolescence leads to some of the behavioral abnormalities common in schizophrenia. Interestingly, CBD appeared to antagonize all THC-induced behavioral abnormalities. These findings support the hypothesis that adolescent THC use can impart long-term behavioral deficits; however, cotreatment with CBD prevents these deficits.

  9. Streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis and adjuvant arthritis in F344----Lewis and in Lewis----F344 bone marrow chimeras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Bruggen, M.C.; van den Broek, M.F.; van den Berg, W.B. (University Hospital Nijmegen, (Netherlands))

    1991-09-01

    Streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis and adjuvant arthritis (AA) are rat models for chronic, erosive polyarthritis. Both models can be induced in susceptible Lewis rats, whereas F344 rats are resistant. In AA as well as in SCW arthritis, antigen-specific T lymphocytes have been demonstrated to be crucial for chronic disease. In this communication the authors describe their studies to probe the cellular mechanism responsible for the difference in susceptibility of Lewis and F344, using bone marrow chimeras. By transplanting bone marrow cells from F344 into lethally irradiated Lewis recipients, Lewis rats were rendered resistant to SCW arthritis induction. F344 rats reconstituted with Lewis bone marrow, i.e., Lewis----F344 chimeras, develop an arthritis upon SCW injection. For AA comparable results were obtained. These data suggest that both resistance and susceptibility to bacterium-induced chronic arthritis are mediated by hemopoietic/immune cells and that the recipiental environment does not influence the susceptibility to chronic joint inflammation.

  10. Orofacial symptoms related to temporomandibular joint arthritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: smallest detectable difference in self-reported pain intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoustrup, Peter; Kristensen, Kasper D; Verna, Carlalberta; Küseler, Annelise; Herlin, Troels; Pedersen, Thomas K

    2012-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may lead to mandibular growth disturbances and interfere with optimal joint and muscle function. Orofacial symptoms are common clinical findings in relation to TMJ arthritis in adolescence. Knowledge about their clinical manifestation is important for TMJ arthritis diagnosis, treatment choice, and outcome evaluation. The aim of our prospective observational study was to evaluate and describe the frequency, the main complaints, and the localization of TMJ arthritis-related orofacial symptoms. The smallest detectable differences (SDD) for minimal, average, and maximal pain were estimated. Thirty-three patients with JIA and arthritis-related orofacial symptoms in relation to 55 affected TMJ were included in our questionnaire study (mean age 14.11 yrs). Calculation of the SDD was based on a duplicate assessment 45 min after the first questionnaire was completed. The majority of the patients had common orofacial symptoms during mastication and maximal mouth opening procedures. Persistent orofacial symptoms were rare. The TMJ area in combination with the masseter muscle region was the orofacial region where symptoms were most common. The SDD for minimal, average, and maximal pain were between 10 and 14 mm on a visual analog scale. Our study offers new knowledge about TMJ arthritis-related orofacial symptoms that may aid diagnosis and clinical decision-making. We suggest that TMJ arthritis-related orofacial symptoms could be understood as products of the primary TMJ inflammation in combination with secondary myogenic and functional issues.

  11. Chronic exposure to a glyphosate-containing pesticide leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and increased reactive oxygen species production in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Denise C; Todt, Callie E; Burchfield, Shelbie L; Pressley, Aireal S; Denney, Rachel D; Snapp, Isaac B; Negga, Rekek; Traynor, Wendy L; Fitsanakis, Vanessa A

    2017-11-20

    Glyphosate-containing herbicides are among the most widely-used in the world. Although glyphosate itself is relatively non-toxic, growing evidence suggests that commercial herbicide formulations may lead to increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial inhibition. In order to assess these mechanisms in vivo, we chronically (24h) exposed Caenorhabditis elegans to various concentrations of the glyphosate-containing herbicide TouchDown (TD). Following TD exposure, we evaluated the function of specific mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. Initial oxygen consumption studies demonstrated inhibition in mid- and high-TD concentration treatment groups compared to controls. Results from tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester and ATP assays indicated reductions in the proton gradient and ATP levels, respectively. Additional studies were designed to determine whether TD exposure resulted in increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Data from hydrogen peroxide, but not superoxide or hydroxyl radical, assays showed statistically significant increases in this specific ROS. Taken together, these data indicate that exposure of Caenorhabditis elegans to TD leads to mitochondrial inhibition and hydrogen peroxide production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Psychometric properties of the Chinese version of Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale-8 (ASES-8) in a rheumatoid arthritis population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Cui; Li, Miao-Miao; Yuan, Ji-Qing; Cui, Xue-Jun; Shi, Bao-Xin

    2017-05-01

    The Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale-8 (ASES-8) is a valid tool to measure patients' arthritis-specific self-efficacy. However, evidence about reliability and validity of the ASES-8 in Chinese arthritis patients is lacking. This study aimed to culturally adapt and test the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the ASES-8. Chinese ASES-8 was translated from original English version using translation and back-translation procedures. Validation survey was then conducted in a university-affiliated hospital by a set of questionnaires comprised Chinese ASES-8, pain-VAS, The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Fatigue (FACIT-F), and Short Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) physical functioning subscale. A convenience sample of 134 patients with rheumatoid arthritis was recruited from the department of rheumatology. Validity was assessed by Pearson's correlation analysis and exploratory factor analysis. Reliability was assessed using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Cronbach's alpha. Exploratory factor analysis extracted one dimension that explained of the 71.35% variation. Significant negative correlations were found between the ASES-8 and pain-VAS, HADS-D, HADS-A scores (r -0.487 to -0.656, p rheumatoid arthritis. This disease-specific scale is particularly valuable for use among patients with rheumatoid arthritis from the Chinese population.

  13. Imaging in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Østergaard, Mikkel; Terslev, Lene

    2015-01-01

    resonance imaging (MRI); other modalities such as computed tomography are not used routinely. Imaging is an integral part of management of PsA. In this article, we provide an overview of the status, virtues, and limitations of imaging modalities in PsA, focusing on radiography, US, and MRI.......Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by arthritis and often enthesitis in patients with psoriasis, presenting a wide range of manifestations in various patterns. Imaging procedures are primarily conventional radiography, ultrasonography (US), and magnetic...

  14. Experiments on the induction of an acute lead effect in chronically exposed rabbits by means of mobilisation. Versuche zur Erzeugung einer akuten Bleiwirkung bei chronisch bleiexponierten Kaninchen durch Mobilisierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detering, R.

    1986-06-26

    The possibility of an acute lead action by mobilisation of lead from body deposits was studied in chronically lead-exposed male rabbits by measuring specific lead-sensitive parameters. 11 and 35 male rabbits were given different amounts of lead with the drinking water for a period of 5 and 6 months in two different experiment sequences. By various procedures it was tried to influence the calcium metabolism of the animals to mobilize the lead deposits in the bone. The following measurements were used as parameters of lead action: 1. The activity of the delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D) in red blood cells. 2. The reactivated part by glutathion (ALA-D-GSH). 3. The concentration of free porphyrines (FEP) in red blood cells. The results of this research show a possible evidence about an acute lead action caused by mobilisation of lead from body deposits.

  15. Chronic Pain and Complementary Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Complementary and alternative medications for chronic pelvic pain. Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America. 2014;41( ... a systematic review of their effects on clinical outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis. British Journal of Nutrition. 2012; ...

  16. National and state medical expenditures and lost earnings attributable to arthritis and other rheumatic conditions--United States, 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-12

    Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States, potentially limiting affected persons from walking a few blocks or climbing a flight of stairs. Using Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) data, CDC analyzed national and state-specific direct costs (i.e., medical expenditures) and indirect costs (i.e., lost earnings) attributable to arthritis and other rheumatic conditions (AORC) in the United States during 2003. This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that, in 2003, the total cost of AORC in the United States was approximately 128 billion dollars (80.8 billion dollars in direct and 47.0 billion dollars in indirect costs), equivalent to 1.2% of the 2003 U.S. gross domestic product. Total costs attributable to AORC, by state/area, ranged from 225.5 million dollars in the District of Columbia to 12.1 billion dollars in California. Total costs attributable to AORC have increased substantially since 1997, and that increase is expected to continue because of the aging of the population and increases in obesity and physical inactivity. These findings signal the need for broader implementation of effective public health interventions, such as arthritis and chronic disease self-management programs, which can reduce medical expenditures among persons with AORC.

  17. Modified Huo-Luo-Xiao-Ling Dan Suppresses Adjuvant Arthritis by Inhibiting Chemokines and Matrix-Degrading Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddaraju M. Nanjundaiah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the joints that can lead to deformities and disability. The prolonged use of conventionally used drugs is associated with severe adverse reactions. Therefore, safer and less expensive therapeutic products are continually being sought. Huo-Luo-Xiao-Ling dan (HLXL, a traditional Chinese herbal mixture, and its modified versions possess anti-arthritic activity. In this paper, we examined the influence of modified HLXL on two of the key mediators of arthritic inflammation and tissue damage, namely, chemokines and matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs in the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA model of RA. We treated arthritic Lewis rats with HLXL (2.3 g/kg by daily gavage beginning at the onset of AA. The control rats received the vehicle. At the peak phase of AA, rats were sacrificed and their draining lymph node cells (LNC and spleen adherent cells (SAC were tested. The HLXL-treated rats showed a significant reduction in the levels of chemokines (RANTES, MCP-1, MIP-1α, and GRO/KC, MMPs (MMP 2 and 9, as well as cytokines (IL-6 and IL-17 that induce them, compared to the control vehicle-treated rats. Thus, HLXL controls arthritis in part by suppressing the mediators of immune pathology, and it might offer a promising alternative/adjunct treatment for RA.

  18. Molecular aspects of rheumatoid arthritis: role of environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shu; Momohara, Shigeki; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2008-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, chronic inflammatory disease that affects 0.5-1% of the population. RA causes progressive joint destruction that leads to the restriction of activities of daily living and deterioration of quality of life. Although the pathogenesis of RA has not yet been fully elucidated, it is considered to be a complex, multifarious disease that is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Genetic influences that contribute to RA susceptibility have been demonstrated both in studies of twins and families, as well as in genome-wide linkage scans, and it is estimated that genetic factors are responsible for 50-60% of the risk of developing RA. Thus, environmental factors may explain the remaining risk of developing RA. A large variety of environmental factors such as infectious agents, smoking, sex hormones, pregnancy etc. have been extensively studied previously. Understanding of how these factors contribute to the development of RA may lead to the better understanding of pathogenesis of RA.

  19. Associations Between Arthritis and Change in Physical Function in U.S. Retirees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Nancy A; Barbour, Kamil E; Helmick, Charles G; Zack, Matthew M; Al Snih, Soham

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine among retirees: the associations of arthritis with limitations in physical functions, and whether these associations changed differently with age for those with arthritis versus without arthritis. We identified retirees from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative longitudinal panel study of U.S. adults ≥51 years old. We calculated incidence density ratios (IDRs) using Poisson regression modeling with generalized estimating equations to estimate the associations between arthritis and limitations in four physical function measures (large muscle tasks, mobility, activities of daily living, and instrumental activities of daily living) adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, education, total household income, depression, obesity, smoking, chronic conditions, physical activity, and cohort status. We examined interaction effects between arthritis and age to determine if the rate of change in physical function differed by arthritis status across age. Over 8 years (2004-2012), significantly more retirees with arthritis had limitations with large muscle tasks (IDR 2.1: 95% confidence interval 1.6, 2.8), mobility (IDR 1.6: 1.2, 2.2), activities of daily living (IDR 2.2: 1.0, 4.7), and instrumental activities of daily living (IDR 3.7: 1.9, 7.4) than retirees without arthritis. Retirees with arthritis did not develop limitations in mobility, activities of daily living, and instrumental activities of daily living at a different rate as they aged compared to those without arthritis. Arthritis was associated with a greater prevalence of physical function limitations. Preventing limitations caused by arthritis is a key strategy to prevent disability in retirees. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. The Human and Economic Burden of Difficult-to-Treat Gouty Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Voshaar, Antonius H.; Bardin, Thomas; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2015-01-01

    Gouty arthritis, one of the most painful and common forms of adult arthritis, is caused by monosodium urate crystal deposits in joints, most often in the lower extremities. Crystals trigger an inflammatory response leading to acute flares characterized by a rapid onset of pain, warmth, swelling, and

  1. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor will take ask you questions about your child’s symptoms, find out whether other family members have had similar problems, and do a ... of arthritis. A physical therapist will explain the importance of certain ... to your child's specific condition. The therapist may recommend range-of- ...

  2. Which patients improve the most from arthritis rehabilitation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagel, Sofia; Lindqvist, Elisabet; Petersson, Ingemar F

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in arthritis rehabilitation performed by multidisciplinary teams in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis. Predictors of change in health-related quality of life and the proportion of patients with clinical improvement were...... = 0.000) or fatigue (b 0.02, p = 0.000) at admission predicted improved HRQoL. Change in medication during rehabilitation (b 0.08, p = 0.013) was associated with greater improvement in HRQoL. These EQ-5D findings were supported by SF-36 findings. Positive minimal important differences were noted in 46...

  3. Bacillus pumilus Septic Arthritis in a Healthy Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Shivamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of septic arthritis caused by a Bacillus species, B. pumilus, occurring in a healthy child. This organism rarely causes serious infections and has only been described in newborns and immunocompromised individuals or as a skin infection. This child developed an indolent joint swelling after a minor skin injury, and symptoms were initially thought most consistent with chronic arthritis. The case demonstrates that clinicians should consider joint infection in children presenting with acute monoarticular swelling, even without prominent systemic features.

  4. Linkage Between Periodontal Disease and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The past decades have significantly widened the perspectives of the chronic oral infectious disease known as periodontitis. The disease is regarded as a bacterial infection resulting in low-grade inflammation of the periodontal tissues, and both the associated release of pro-inflammatory mediators...... and the presence of bacteria in the periodontal pockets, which, as the result of daily procedures, may spread after penetration of the vasculature, are possible mediators of systemic consequences. The present chapter deals with the possible association of periodontitis with rheumatoid arthritis, which may possess...

  5. IMAGING OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D'Angelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Imaging of psoriatic arthritis (PsA is important for two reasons: the differential diagnosis from other arthritides and the assessment of structural damage that can be inhibited by the new drugs such as the anti-TNFα agents. Plain film radiographic findings of peripheral arthritis have been important in elaborating the concept of PsA as a separate disease entity. Characteristic aspects of psoriatic peripheral arthritis help the differentiation from rheumatoid arthritis. High-resolution ultrasonography (US, US combined with power Doppler (PDUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be used to image joint synovitis of PsA. Radiologic features of spondylitis associated with psoriasis are similar to spondylitis associated with reactive arthritis and differ from those of primary ankylosing spondylitis (AS and the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease. MRI is very sensitive for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis. There have been no MRI studies on the spine of patients with PsA. In primary AS bone oedema in the vertebral bodies is an indicator of active disease and can ameliorate during anti-TNFα therapy. Historically, plain film radiography have played a pivotal role in defining enthesitis lesions of SpA. However, entheseal bone changes appear late. US and MRI have proved to be a highly sensitive and non invasive tools. Recent US and MRI studies on both finger and toe dactylitis have established that dactylitis is due to flexor tenosynovitis and marked adjacent soft tissue swelling with a variable degree of small joint synovitis. There is no evidence of enthesitis of the insertion of the flexor digitorum tendons and of the attachment of the caspsule of the digit joints. Key words: Enthesitis, dactylitis, spondyloarthritis, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, imaging

  6. An investigation to identify potential risk factors associated with common chronic diseases among the older population in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enemona Emmanuel Adaji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, chronic diseases are the leading cause of death and their prevalence has constantly increased over the last decade. Objective: This study aimed to identify risk factors associated with common chronic diseases among people aged 50 years and over in India. Materials and Methods: Data from Wave 1 of the 2007/2008 Indian Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE was used to investigate the association between lifestyle choices and chronic diseases using logistic regression. Result: The fully adjusted model showed that significant independent risk factors for angina included area of residence, being diagnosed with diabetes, chronic lung disease (CLD [highest odds ratio (OR 4.77, 95% confidence interval (CI: 2.95-7.70] and arthritis. For arthritis, risk factors included having underlying diabetes, CLD diagnosis, or angina (highest OR 2.32, 95% CI: 1.63-3.31. Risk factors associated with CLD included arthritis, angina (highest OR 4.76, 95% CI: 2.94-7.72, alcohol use, and tobacco use. Risk factors associated with diabetes included level of education, area of residence, socioeconomic status, angina (highest OR 3.59, 95% CI: 2.44-5.29, CLD, arthritis, stroke, and vegetable consumption. Finally, risk factors associated with stroke included diabetes and angina (highest OR 3.34, 95% CI: 1.72-6.50. The presence of any other comorbidity was significantly associated with all five chronic diseases studied. Conclusion: The results show that within the older population, the contribution of lifestyle risk factors to the common chronic diseases investigated in this study was limited. Our findings showed that the major health issue within the study population was multimorbidity.

  7. Polymorphisms within the IL-1 gene cluster: effects on cytokine profiles in peripheral blood and whole blood cell cultures of patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Sørensen, Lars Korsbaek; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of cytokines have been associated with the susceptibility, severity, and clinical outcome of inflammatory diseases, such as periodontitis and chronic arthritis. An important question to address is how interleukin (IL)-1 polymorphisms affect the cytokine profiles of patients...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Lungs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the lungs? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Although rheumatoid arthritis primarily affects joints, it sometimes causes lung disease ...

  9. Sea urchin spine arthritis of the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takuro; Soma, Tamotsu; Gaman, Keiko; Usui, Masamichi; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2008-03-01

    Although rare, hand injury caused by puncture with the sea urchin spine can result in serious complications. To emphasize its clinical significance, this article describes a group of patients who sustained chronic granulomatous arthritis induced by puncture with sea urchin spine (designated sea urchin spine arthritis). Five patients who developed sea urchin spine arthritis of the hand after puncture with sea urchin spine were treated at our hospitals. All lesions involved the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint (4 index fingers and 1 middle finger). Patients experienced pain, swelling, and discomfort around the site of puncture immediately after the injury. These initial symptoms subsided within a few days, and secondary symptoms including fusiform swelling, limited motion, and mild pain of the PIP joint appeared from 1 to 2 months later. Laboratory tests of inflammation and blood cell counts were negative. Plain radiographs showed soft tissue swelling and osteolysis but no visible spine. Thorough synovectomy of the PIP joint was performed, and the granulation tissue around the joint was also removed. No microorganism was identified from tissue culture or polymerase chain reaction in any of the 5 patients. At a mean follow-up of 21 months, 2 patients exhibited essentially normal active motion of the affected PIP joint, whereas the remaining 3 patients had diminished range of motion. Diagnosis of sea urchin spine arthritis can be made by history of sea urchin spine injury, a symptom-free period before the development of synovitis, and the absence of laboratory test abnormalities. Neither antibiotics nor nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents are effective. Undertaken early enough, thorough synovectomy might avoid complications and obtain favorable results. Therapeutic IV.

  10. Ibrutinib downregulates a subset of miRNA leading to upregulation of tumor suppressors and inhibition of cell proliferation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, L M; Wang, W; Herman, S E M; Saba, N S; Anastas, V; Barber, E; Corrigan-Cummins, M; Farooqui, M; Sun, C; Sarasua, S M; Zhao, Z; Abousamra, N K; Elbaz, O; Abdelghaffar, H A; Wiestner, A; Calvo, K R

    2017-02-01

    The lymph node (LN) is the site of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cell activation and proliferation. Aberrant microRNA (miRNA) expression has been shown to have a role in CLL pathogenesis; however, a comparison of miRNA expression between CLL cells in the LN and the peripheral blood (PB) has previously not been reported. On the basis of the analysis of 17 paired LN and PB samples from CLL patients, we identify a panel of miRNAs that are increased in LN CLL cells correlating with an activation phenotype. When evaluated in CLL cells from 38 patients pre and post treatment with ibrutinib, a subset of these miRNAs (miR-22, miR-34a, miR-146b and miR-181b) was significantly decreased in response to ibrutinib. A concomitant increase in putative miRNA target transcripts (ARID1B, ARID2, ATM, CYLD, FOXP1, HDAC1, IBTK, PTEN and SMAD4) was also observed. Functional studies confirmed targets of ibrutinib-responsive miRNAs to include messenger RNA transcripts of multiple tumor suppressors. Knockdown of endogenous miR-34a and miR146b resulted in increased transcription of tumor suppressors and inhibition of cell proliferation. These findings demonstrate that ibrutinib downregulates the expression of a subset of miRNAs related to B-cell activation leading to increased expression of miRNA targets including tumor suppressors and a reduction in cell proliferation.

  11. Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion: a key mechanism leading to vascular cognitive impairment and dementia. Closing the translational gap between rodent models and human vascular cognitive impairment and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncombe, Jessica; Kitamura, Akihiro; Hase, Yoshiki; Ihara, Masafumi; Kalaria, Raj N; Horsburgh, Karen

    2017-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that vascular risk factors contribute to neurodegeneration, cognitive impairment and dementia. While there is considerable overlap between features of vascular cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), it appears that cerebral hypoperfusion is the common underlying pathophysiological mechanism which is a major contributor to cognitive decline and degenerative processes leading to dementia. Sustained cerebral hypoperfusion is suggested to be the cause of white matter attenuation, a key feature common to both AD and dementia associated with cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). White matter changes increase the risk for stroke, dementia and disability. A major gap has been the lack of mechanistic insights into the evolution and progress of VCID. However, this gap is closing with the recent refinement of rodent models which replicate chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. In this review, we discuss the relevance and advantages of these models in elucidating the pathogenesis of VCID and explore the interplay between hypoperfusion and the deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) protein, as it relates to AD. We use examples of our recent investigations to illustrate the utility of the model in preclinical testing of candidate drugs and lifestyle factors. We propose that the use of such models is necessary for tackling the urgently needed translational gap from preclinical models to clinical treatments. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  12. Comparison of Two Assays to Determine Anti-Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies in Rheumatoid Arthritis in relation to Other Chronic Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases: Assaying Anti-Modified Citrullinated Vimentin Antibodies Adds Value to Second-Generation Anti-Citrullinated Cyclic Peptides Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Lizette Díaz-Toscano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA plays a relevant role in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. To date, it is still unclear if the use of several tests for these autoantibodies in the same patient offers additional value as compared to performing only one test. Therefore, we evaluated the performance of using two assays for ACPA: second-generation anti-citrullinated cyclic peptides antibodies (anti-CCP2 and anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin (anti-MCV antibodies for the diagnosis of RA. We compared three groups: RA (n=142, chronic inflammatory disease (CIRD, n=86, and clinically healthy subjects (CHS, n=56 to evaluate sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios (LR of these two assays for the presence of RA. A lower frequency of positivity for anti-CCP2 was found in RA (66.2% as compared with anti-MCV (81.0%. When comparing RA versus other CIRD, sensitivity increased when both assays were performed. This strategy of testing both assays had high specificity and LR+. We conclude that adding the assay of anti-MCV antibodies to the determination of anti-CCP2 increases the sensitivity for detecting seropositive RA. Therefore, we propose the use of both assays in the initial screening of RA in longitudinal studies, including early onset of undifferentiated arthritis.

  13. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging for inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Chamberland, David; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, affecting 46 million of the population in the U.S. Rendering new optical contrast in articular tissues at high spatial and temporal resolution, emerging photoacoustic imaging (PAI) combined with more established ultrasound (US) imaging technologies provides unique opportunities for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to capturing peripheral bone and soft tissue images, PAI has the capability to quantify hemodynamic properties including regional blood oxygenation and blood volume, both abnormal in synovial tissues affected by arthritis. Therefore, PAI, especially when performed together with US, should be of considerable help for further understanding the pathophysiology of arthritis as well as assisting in therapeutic decisions, including assessing the efficacy of new pharmacological therapies. In this paper, we will review our recent work on the development of PAI for application to the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. We will present the imaging results from a home-built imaging system and another one based on a commercial US. The performance of PAI in evaluating pharmacological therapy on animal model of arthritis will be shown. Moreover, our resent work on PAI and US dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo will also be presented.

  14. K/BxN serum transfer arthritis as a model for human inflammatory arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Deen Christensen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis (STA model is a murine model in which the immunological mechanisms occurring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and other arthritides can be studied. To induce K/BxN STA, serum from arthritic transgenic K/BxN mice is transferred to naive mice and manifestations of arthritis occur a few days later. The inflammatory response in the model is driven by autoantibodies against the ubiquitously expressed self-antigen, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI, leading to the formation of immune complexes that drive the activation of different innate immune cells such as neutrophils, macrophages and possibly mast cells. The pathogenesis further involves a range of immune mediators including cytokines, chemokines, complement factors, Toll-like receptors, Fc receptors, and integrins, as well as factors involved in pain and bone erosion. Hence, even though the K/BxN STA model mimics only the effector phase of RA, it still involves a wide range of relevant disease mediators. Additionally, as a murine model for arthritis, the K/BxN STA model has some obvious advantages. Firstly, it has a rapid and robust onset of arthritis with 100% incidence in genetically identical animals. Secondly, it can be induced in a wide range of strain backgrounds and can therefore also be induced in gene-deficient strains to study the specific importance of disease mediators. Even though G6PI might not be an essential autoantigen, for example, in RA, the K/BxN STA model is a useful tool to understand how autoantibodies in general drive the progression of arthritis by interacting with downstream components of the innate immune system. Finally, the model has also proven useful as a model wherein arthritic pain can be studied. Taken together, these features make the K/BxN STA model a relevant one for RA and it is a potentially valuable tool especially for the pre-clinical screening of new therapeutic targets for RA and perhaps other forms of inflammatory

  15. Arthritis and suicide attempts: findings from a large nationally representative Canadian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Ramzan, Natasha; Baird, Stephanie L

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the odds of suicide attempts among those with arthritis compared with those without and to see what factors attenuate this association and (2) to identify which factors are associated with suicide attempts among adults with arthritis. Secondary data analysis of the nationally representative 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey-Mental Health (CCHS-MH) was performed. For objective 1, those with and without arthritis were included (n = 21,744). For objective 2, only individuals who had arthritis (n = 4885) were included. A series of binary logistic regression analyses of suicide attempts were conducted for each objective, with adjustments for socio-demographics, childhood adversities, lifetime mental health and chronic pain. After full adjustment for the above listed variables, the odds of suicide attempts among adults with arthritis were 1.46. Among those with arthritis, early adversities alone explained 24 % of the variability in suicide attempts. After full adjustment, the odds of suicide attempts among those with arthritis were significantly higher among those who had experienced childhood sexual abuse (OR = 3.77), chronic parental domestic violence (OR = 3.97) or childhood physical abuse (1.82), those who had ever been addicted to drugs or alcohol (OR = 1.76) and ever had a depressive disorder (OR = 3.22) or an anxiety disorder (OR = 2.34) and those who were currently in chronic pain (OR = 1.50). Younger adults with arthritis were more likely to report having attempted suicide. Future prospective research is needed to uncover plausible mechanisms through which arthritis and suicide attempts are linked.

  16. The Mediating Role of Dysfunctional Coping in the Relationship between Beliefs about the Disease and the Level of Depression in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziarko, Michal; Mojs, Ewa; Piasecki, Bartosz; Samborski, Wlodzimierz

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most severe chronic diseases. In many cases it leads to disability and results in a decreased quality of life and increased levels of anxiety and depression. The problem that needs to be addressed is the following: which mental processes lead to increased levels of depression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis? Methods. 210 patients with rheumatoid arthritis hospitalized in rheumatology wards took part in the research. They filled in illness perception questionnaires (IPQ-R) and questionnaires for testing strategies of handling stress (Mini-COPE) and the level of depression (CES-D). Results. The observed correlation coefficients indicate that several elements of the perception of one's disease moderately contribute to a high level of depression. Moreover, frequent use of dysfunctional coping strategies contributed to high levels of depression. Dysfunctional coping was moderately linked to depression. Conclusion. The conducted analyses confirmed the links between the beliefs about the disease and levels of depression and showed that the use of dysfunctional coping strategies mediates the relationship between the following elements of the representation of the disease: illness coherence, emotional representation, psychological attribution, risk factors, and the level of depression. PMID:24574899

  17. The Mediating Role of Dysfunctional Coping in the Relationship between Beliefs about the Disease and the Level of Depression in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Ziarko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most severe chronic diseases. In many cases it leads to disability and results in a decreased quality of life and increased levels of anxiety and depression. The problem that needs to be addressed is the following: which mental processes lead to increased levels of depression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis? Methods. 210 patients with rheumatoid arthritis hospitalized in rheumatology wards took part in the research. They filled in illness perception questionnaires (IPQ-R and questionnaires for testing strategies of handling stress (Mini-COPE and the level of depression (CES-D. Results. The observed correlation coefficients indicate that several elements of the perception of one’s disease moderately contribute to a high level of depression. Moreover, frequent use of dysfunctional coping strategies contributed to high levels of depression. Dysfunctional coping was moderately linked to depression. Conclusion. The conducted analyses confirmed the links between the beliefs about the disease and levels of depression and showed that the use of dysfunctional coping strategies mediates the relationship between the following elements of the representation of the disease: illness coherence, emotional representation, psychological attribution, risk factors, and the level of depression.

  18. DISASTROUS/HAZARDOUS ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCE EXPLOITATION: MASS LEAD-POISONING AND MORTALITY OF CHRONICALLY-POOR ARTISANAL GOLD MINERS’ CHILDREN IN NORTHERN NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. INGWE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Disastrous/hazardous environmental resource exploitation: mass lead-poisoning and mortality of chronically-poor artisanal gold miners’ children in northern Nigeria.The claim that poverty is one of three motivations of the nearly half a decade-long terrorist war waged by Northern Nigeria’s Islamic-sectarians, Boko Haram, call to question the extent to which sociological aspects of the critical social theory -emphasizing participation of various strata of the population in the rational society have been fulfilled in the sub-national region. The presentation of over 90 percent of Nigeria’s population (total: about 170 million classified as poor (earning/spending less than US$2 a day, vulnerable to socio-economic hazards, -with poverty in northern Nigeria reportedly surpassing levels in the rest of Nigeria’s federation makes questioning of geographers’ political-economic perspectives of critical social theoretical equally urgent. One of many dimensions of this challenge is its indication of Northern Nigeria’s leadership’s failure to seriously apply public resources towards resolving social welfare problems at both central and sub-national regional scales since the attainment of independence in 1960. The recent resort to insurgency represents mistakes of political gladiators during the post-independence era (over 50 years to properly manage natural resources –including solid minerals in northern Nigeria and the rest of the country. Here, we undertake a discourse of hazards (risks and vulnerabilities and disasters associated with recent resort of northern Nigeria’s poor to artisanal/unregulated mining of gold in northern Nigerian communities: cases of deleterious consequences (deaths, illnesses, etc., of this alternative “livelihood” of coping with socio-economic challenges posed by chronic poverty, unemployment, under-employment, among other adversities in the sub-national region were also highlighted. Government’s failure to

  19. Pharmacological Value of Murine Delayed-type Hypersensitivity Arthritis: A Robust Mouse Model of Rheumatoid Arthritis in C57BL/6 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Nansen, Anneline

    2017-02-01

    In this MiniReview, we summarize the body of knowledge on the delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA) model, a recently developed arthritis model with 100% incidence, low variation and synchronized onset in C57BL/6 (B6) mice, and compare it to other murine arthritis models. It is desirable to have robust arthritis models in B6 mice, as many transgene strains are bred on this background. However, several of the most widely used mouse model of arthritis cannot be induced in B6 mice without the drawback of lower incidence, reduced severity and higher variation, if at all. DTHA is induced by modifying a classical methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA)-induced DTH response by administering a cocktail of anti-type II collagen antibodies (anti-CII) between immunization and challenge. Arthritis affects one, predefined paw in which acute inflammation and severe arthritis rapidly develop and peak after 4-7 days. Disease is self-resolving over the course of around 3 weeks. Disease manifestations resemble those seen in other arthritis models and include bone erosion, cartilage destruction, oedema, pannus and new bone formation. Induction of DTHA is dependent on CD4(+) T cells while B cells are dispensable. The DTHA model is set apart from other murine arthritis models in that it can be induced in B6 mice with 100% incidence and with high and consistent severity. This is the clearest advantage of the model, as the mechanisms of disease and clinical manifestations can be found in other arthritis models. The model holds potential for future modifications that may improve the lack of chronicity. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Patients with Rheumatoid ... Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome ...