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Sample records for chronic amputated nerves

  1. Early interfaced neural activity from chronic amputated nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshitija Garde

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive inflammation, currently limit their long-term use. Here we demonstrate that enticement of peripheral nerve regeneration through a non-obstructive multi-electrode array, after either acute or chronic nerve amputation, offers a viable alternative to obtain early neural recordings and to enhance long-term interfacing of nerve activity. Non restrictive electrode arrays placed in the path of regenerating nerve fibers allowed the recording of action potentials as early as 8 days post-implantation with high signal-to-noise ratio, as long as 3 months in some animals, and with minimal inflammation at the nerve tissue-metal electrode interface. Our findings suggest that regenerative on-dependent multi-electrode arrays of open design allow the early and stable interfacing of neural activity from amputated peripheral nerves and might contribute towards conveying full neural control and sensory feedback to users of robotic prosthetic devices. .

  2. Early Interfaced Neural Activity from Chronic Amputated Nerves

    OpenAIRE

    Garde, Kshitija; Keefer, Edward; Botterman, Barry; Galvan, Pedro; Romero, Mario I.

    2009-01-01

    Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive i...

  3. Early interfaced neural activity from chronic amputated nerves

    OpenAIRE

    Kshitija Garde; Barry Botterman; Pedro Galvan

    2009-01-01

    Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive i...

  4. The successful use of peripheral nerve blocks for femoral amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, B.; Melchiors, J.; Borglum, J.; Jensen, K.; Bech, B; Melchiors, J; Børglum, J; Jensen, K; Jensen, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    We present a case report of four patients with severe cardiac insufficiency where peripheral nerve blocks guided by either nerve stimulation or ultrasonography were the sole anaesthetic for above-knee amputation. The patients were breathing spontaneously and remained haemodynamically stable during...... surgery. Thus, use of peripheral nerve blocks for femoral amputation in high-risk patients seems to be the technique of choice that can lower perioperative risk....

  5. Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of illnesses and disabilities Your health Everyday living Parenting Your rights Women veterans with disabilities Caregiver support ... partially cut off due to an accident or violence. With surgical amputation, a limb or part of ...

  6. Prosthetic ambulation in a paraplegic patient with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J C; Park, C; Kim, D Y; Choi, Y S; Kim, Y K; Seong, Y J

    2000-08-01

    Great importance and caution should be placed on prosthetic fitting for a paraplegic patient with an anesthetic residual limb if functional ambulation is to be achieved. The combination of paraplegia with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy is a complex injury that makes the rehabilitation process difficult. This article describes a case of L2 paraplegia with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy on the right side. Following the rehabilitation course, the patient independently walked using a walker at indoor level with a transfemoral prosthesis with ischial containment socket, polycentric knee assembly, endoskeletal shank and multiaxis foot assembly and a knee ankle foot orthosis on the sound side. The difficulties of fitting a functional prosthesis to an insensate limb and the rehabilitation stages leading to functional ambulation are reviewed. PMID:10992814

  7. Chronic kidney disease predicts long-term mortality after major lower extremity amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Assi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite low peri-operative mortality after major lower extremity amputation, long-term mortality remains substantial. Metabolic syndrome is increasing in incidence and prevalence at an alarming rate in the USA. Aim: This study was to determine whether metabolic syndrome predicts outcome after major lower extremity amputation. Patients and Methods: A retrospective review of charts between July 2005 and June 2010. Results: Fifty-four patients underwent a total of 60 major lower extremity amputations. Sixty percent underwent below-knee amputation and 40% underwent above-knee amputation. The 30-day mortality was 7% with no difference in level (below-knee amputation, 8%; above-knee amputation, 4%; P = 0.53. The mean follow-up time was 39.7 months. The 5-year survival was 54% in the whole group, and was independent of level of amputation (P = 0.24 or urgency of the procedure (P = 0.51. Survival was significantly decreased by the presence of underlying chronic kidney disease (P = 0.04 but not by other comorbidities (history of myocardial infarction, P = 0.79; metabolic syndrome, P = 0.64; diabetes mellitus, P = 0.56. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is not associated with increased risk of adverse outcomes after lower extremity amputation. However, patients with chronic kidney disease constitute a sub-group of patients at higher risk of postoperative long-term mortality and may be a group to target for intervention.

  8. Treatment of phantom limb pain by cryoneurolysis of the amputated nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moesker, Albert A; Karl, Helen W; Trescot, Andrea M

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiology of phantom limb pain (PLP) is multifactorial. It probably starts in the periphery and is amplified and modified in the central nervous system. A small group of patients with PLP were questioned as to the portion of the phantom limb affected by pain (e.g., "great toe," "thumb"). In the stump, the corresponding amputated nerve was located with a nerve stimulator. With correct placement and stimulation, the PLP could then be reproduced or exacerbated. A small dose of local anesthesia was then injected, resulting in the disappearance of the PLP. If a peripheral nerve injection gave temporary relief, our final treatment was cryoanalgesia at this location. Evaluation of 5 patients, followed for at least 2.5 years, yielded the following results: 3 patients had excellent results (100%, 95%, and 90% decrease in complaints, respectively), 1 patient had an acceptable result (40% decrease), and 1 patient had only a 20% decrease in pain. Although both central and peripheral components are likely involved in PLP, treatment of a peripheral pain locus with cryoanalgesia should be considered. We propose the identification of a peripheral etiology may help match patients to an appropriate therapy, and cryoanalgesia may result in long-term relief of PLP. PMID:23279331

  9. Increased slow transport in axons of regenerating newt limbs after a nerve conditioning lesion made prior to amputation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of this study shows that axonal density is constant in the limb stump of the next proximal to the area of traumatic nerve degeneration caused by limb amputation. The results of the second part of this work reveal that a nerve conditioning lesion made two weeks prior to amputation is associated with accelerated limb regeneration and that this accelerated limb regeneration is accompanied by an earlier arrival of axons. This is the first demonstration of naturally occurring limb regeneration being enhanced. In this study SCb cytoskeletal proteins were identified and measured using SDS-PAGE and liquid scintillation counting. Proteins were measured at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after 35S-methionine injection and the normal rate of SCb transport determined to be 0.19 mm/day. A single axotomy does not enhance the rate of SCb transport but does increase the amount of labeled SCb proteins that are transported. When a conditioning lesion is employed prior to limb amputation and SCb proteins are measured at 7, 14, and 21 days after injection, there is a twofold acceleration in the rate of SCb transport and an increase in the amount of SCb proteins transported in conditioned axons

  10. Tophaceous gout in an amputation stump in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Christine B.; Mohana-Borges, Aurea; Pathria, Mini [Department of Radiology, UCSD and VAHCS, 3350 La Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Gout is a common rheumatologic disorder that can have an unusual clinical presentation. This case report describes the development of a gouty tophus at a site of remote traumatic forearm amputation in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). It further addresses the imaging characteristics of tophaceous gout as well as the differential diagnostic considerations as regards both the imaging findings and the clinical presentation. (orig.)

  11. Tophaceous gout in an amputation stump in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gout is a common rheumatologic disorder that can have an unusual clinical presentation. This case report describes the development of a gouty tophus at a site of remote traumatic forearm amputation in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). It further addresses the imaging characteristics of tophaceous gout as well as the differential diagnostic considerations as regards both the imaging findings and the clinical presentation. (orig.)

  12. Vascular surgery, microsurgery and supramicrosurgery for treatment of chronic diabetic foot ulcers to prevent amputations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Schirmer

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Diabetic foot ulcers occur in approximately 2,5% of patients suffering from diabetes and may lead to major infections and amputation. Such ulcers are responsible for a prolonged period of hospitalization and co- morbidities caused by infected diabetic foot ulcers. Small, superficial ulcers can be treated by special conservative means. However, exposed bones or tendons require surgical intervention in order to prevent osteomyelitis. In many cases reconstructive surgery is necessary, sometimes in combination with revascularization of the foot. There are studies on non surgical treatment of the diabetic foot ulcer. Most of them include patients, classified Wagner 1-2 without infection. Patients presenting Wagner 3D and 4D however are at a higher risk of amputation. The evolution of microsurgery has extended the possibilities of limb salvage. Perforator based flaps can minimize the donorsite morbidity. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 41 patients were treated with free tissue transfer for diabetic foot syndrome and chronic defects. 44 microvascular flaps were needed. The average age of patients was 64.3 years. 18 patients needed revascularization. 3 patients needed 2 microvascular flaps. In 6 cases supramicrosurgical technique was used. RESULTS: There were 2 flap losses leading to amputation. 4 other patients required amputation within 6 months postoperatively due to severe infection or bypass failure. Another 4 patients died within one year after reconstruction. The remaining patients were ambulated. DISCUSSION: Large defects of the foot can be treated by free microvascular myocutaneous or fasciocutaneous tissue transfer. If however, small defects, exposing bones or tendons, are not eligible for local flaps, small free microvascular flaps can be applied. These flaps cause a very low donor site morbidity. Arterialized venous flaps are another option for defect closure. Amputation means reduction of quality of life and can lead to an increased

  13. Facial nerve canal dehiscence in chronic otitis media without cholesteatoma

    OpenAIRE

    Nomiya, Shigenobu; Kariya, Shin; Nomiya, Rie; MORITA, NORIMASA; Nishizaki, Kazunori; Paparella, Michael M.; Cureoglu, Sebahattin

    2013-01-01

    The information on incidence of the facial nerve canal dehiscence in chronic otitis media is important for surgeons. The purpose of this study is to disclose the histopathologic findings of facial nerve canal dehiscence in human temporal bones with chronic otitis media. We divided the human temporal bones into two groups (age 4 years, and under 4 years of age). We evaluated the incidence and the area of the facial nerve canal dehiscence in chronic otitis media under light microscopy. Age-matc...

  14. Unmyelinated nerve fiber degeneration in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosboom, WMJ; Van den Berg, LH; Dieks, HJG; Plante, E; Veldman, H; Franssen, H; Wokke, JHJ

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether unmyelinated nerve fibers escape degeneration as one might expect in an immune response exclusively directed at myelin, we performed a morphometric examination of unmyelinated axons and myelinated nerve fibers in sural nerve biopsy specimens of 14 patients with a chronic inflamm

  15. Microchannel-based regenerative scaffold for chronic peripheral nerve interfacing in amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Akhil; Tahilramani, Mayank; Bentley, John T; Gore, Russell K; Millard, Daniel C; Mukhatyar, Vivek J; Joseph, Anish; Haque, Adel S; Stanley, Garrett B; English, Arthur W; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2015-02-01

    Neurally controlled prosthetics that cosmetically and functionally mimic amputated limbs remain a clinical need because state of the art neural prosthetics only provide a fraction of a natural limb's functionality. Here, we report on the fabrication and capability of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and epoxy-based SU-8 photoresist microchannel scaffolds to serve as viable constructs for peripheral nerve interfacing through in vitro and in vivo studies in a sciatic nerve amputee model where the nerve lacks distal reinnervation targets. These studies showed microchannels with 100 μm × 100 μm cross-sectional areas support and direct the regeneration/migration of axons, Schwann cells, and fibroblasts through the microchannels with space available for future maturation of the axons. Investigation of the nerve in the distal segment, past the scaffold, showed a high degree of organization, adoption of the microchannel architecture forming 'microchannel fascicles', reformation of endoneurial tubes and axon myelination, and a lack of aberrant and unorganized growth that might be characteristic of neuroma formation. Separate chronic terminal in vivo electrophysiology studies utilizing the microchannel scaffolds with permanently integrated microwire electrodes were conducted to evaluate interfacing capabilities. In all devices a variety of spontaneous, sensory evoked and electrically evoked single and multi-unit action potentials were recorded after five months of implantation. Together, these findings suggest that microchannel scaffolds are well suited for chronic implantation and peripheral nerve interfacing to promote organized nerve regeneration that lends itself well to stable interfaces. Thus this study establishes the basis for the advanced fabrication of large-electrode count, wireless microchannel devices that are an important step towards highly functional, bi-directional peripheral nerve interfaces. PMID:25522974

  16. Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Amputated Limbs Suffering from Phantom Pain: A Comparative Study with Non-Phantom Chronic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Hadi Kazemi; Shahin Ghassemi; Seyed Mohammad Fereshtehnejad; Afshin Amini; Pier Hossein Kolivand; Taher Doroudi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Phantom limb pain (PLP) is approximately a common condition after limb amputation, which potentially affects the quality of life. We aimed to evaluate anxiety and depression in patients with amputated limbs suffering from PLP and to compare these psychological dysfunctions with that of patients with non-phantom chronic pain. Methods : A total number of 16 male amputees with PLP and 24 male age-matched patients with non-phantom chronic pain were recruited in this study, which wa...

  17. Preoperative determination of the level of amputation in chronic arterial occlusion. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two quantitative methods of blood flow measuring, venous occlusion plethysmography and 133Xe muscle clearance, were compared with regard to their suitability in determining the level of amputation preoperatively. The examinations were performed in 38 patients and 20 healthy control subjects. In differentiation between stump healing and distinctive disturbances of wound healing after lower leg amputation the best results could be obtained by the 133Xe clearance test (p 133Xe clearance ischemia test and venous occlusion plethysmography. Blood flow measurements are in connection with clinical data auxiliaries in determining the level of amputation. Their application as absolute determinants seems to be not sensible. Considerable scattering of the measured values reduce the usefulness of the two methods. (author)

  18. Amputation - traumatic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traumatic amputation is the loss of a body part -- usually a finger, toe, arm, or leg -- that occurs as ... If an accident or trauma results in complete amputation (the body part is totally severed), the part ...

  19. Vascular Surgery, Microsurgery and Supramicrosurgery for Treatment of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers to Prevent Amputations

    OpenAIRE

    Schirmer, Steffen; Ritter, Ralf-Gerhard; Fansa, Hisham

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic foot ulcers occur in approximately 2,5% of patients suffering from diabetes and may lead to major infections and amputation. Such ulcers are responsible for a prolonged period of hospitalization and co- morbidities caused by infected diabetic foot ulcers. Small, superficial ulcers can be treated by special conservative means. However, exposed bones or tendons require surgical intervention in order to prevent osteomyelitis. In many cases reconstructive surgery is necessar...

  20. Establishing a cat model of chronic optic nerve compression injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Yu; Shaoji Yuan; Rongwei Zhang; Yicheng Lu; Meiqing Lou

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:An animal model of chronic optic nerve injury is necessary to further understand the pathological mechanisms involved.OBJECTIVE:To establish a stabilized,chronic,optic nerve crush model,which is similar to the clinical situation to explore histopathological and optic electrophysiological changes involved in this injury.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:A randomized and controlled animal trial was performed at Shanghai Institute of Neurosurgery from May to October 2004.MATERIALS:A BAL3XRAY undetachable balloon and Magic-BD catheter were provided by BLAT,France;JX-2000 biological signal processing system by Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA,China;inverted phase contrast microscopy by Olympus,Japan.METHODS:A total of twenty normal adult cats were randomly assigned to control (n = 5) and model (n = 15) groups,according to different doses of contrast agent injected through balloons as follows:0.2 mL injection,0.25 mL injection,and 0.35 mL injection,with each group containing 5 animals.Imitating the clinical pterion approach,the optic nerves were exposed using micro-surgical methods.An engorged undetachable balloon was implanted beneath the nerve and connected to a catheter.Balloon size was controlled with a contrast agent injection (0.1 mL/10 min) to form an occupying lesion model similar to sellar tumors.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:The visually evoked potential examination was used to study optical electrophysiology changes in pre-post chronic optical nerve injury.Ultrastructural pathological changes to the optic nerve were analyzed by electron microscopy.RESULTS:During the early period (day 11 after modeling),visually evoked potential demonstrated no significant changes.In the late period (day 51 after modeling),recorded VEP demonstrated that P1 wave latency was prolonged and P1 wave amplitude was obviously reduced.Following injury,the endoneurium,myelin sheath,lamella,axolemma,and axon appeared disordered.CONCLUSION:Results demonstrated that the chronic

  1. Secondary chronic cluster headache due to trigeminal nerve root compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjåset, Christer; Russell, M B; Russell, M Bjørn

    2010-12-01

    A 50-year-old woman had a gradual onset of chronic headache located in the right temporal region and a burning sensation in the root of the tongue which over a year evolved into chronic cluster headache with a milder chronic headache in-between the severe cluster headache attacks. A cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve root on the pain side. Neurosurgery microvascular decompression relieved the patient's chronic cluster headache, the chronic intermittent headache and the burning tongue sensation. The effect was persistent at a 1 year follow-up. Patients with atypical symptoms of cluster headache should be examined with cerebral MRI angiography of arteries and veins to exclude symptomatic causes. PMID:20384588

  2. Oxygen supplementation facilitating successful prosthetic fitting and rehabilitation of a patient with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease following trans-tibial amputation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Sat

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Dysvascular amputations are increasingly performed in patients with underlying cardiac and pulmonary disorders. A limb prosthesis is rarely offered to patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease because of their inability to achieve the high energy expenditure required for prosthetic ambulation. We describe a case of successful prosthetic fitting and rehabilitation of a patient with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with the aid of oxygen supplementation. Case presentation A 67-year-old aboriginal woman with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypercapnic respiratory failure underwent right trans-tibial (below the knee amputation for severe foot gangrene. An aggressive rehabilitation program of conditioning exercises and gait training utilizing oxygen therapy was initiated. She was custom-fitted with a right trans-tibial prosthesis. A rehabilitation program improved her strength, endurance and stump contracture, and she was able to walk for short distances with the prosthesis. The motion analysis studies showed a cadence of 73.5 steps per minute, a velocity of 0.29 meters per second and no difference in right and left step time and step length. Conclusion This case report illustrates that patients with significant severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease can be successfully fitted with limb prostheses and undergo rehabilitation using supplemental oxygen along with optimization of their underlying comorbidities. Despite the paucity of published information in this area, prosthesis fitting and rehabilitation should be considered in patients who have undergone amputation and have severe chronic obstructive disease.

  3. Restoring motor control and sensory feedback in people with upper extremity amputations using arrays of 96 microelectrodes implanted in the median and ulnar nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. S.; Wark, H. A. C.; Hutchinson, D. T.; Warren, D. J.; O'Neill, K.; Scheinblum, T.; Clark, G. A.; Normann, R. A.; Greger, B.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. An important goal of neuroprosthetic research is to establish bidirectional communication between the user and new prosthetic limbs that are capable of controlling >20 different movements. One strategy for achieving this goal is to interface the prosthetic limb directly with efferent and afferent fibres in the peripheral nervous system using an array of intrafascicular microelectrodes. This approach would provide access to a large number of independent neural pathways for controlling high degree-of-freedom prosthetic limbs, as well as evoking multiple-complex sensory percepts. Approach. Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs, 96 recording/stimulating electrodes) were implanted for 30 days into the median (Subject 1-M, 31 years post-amputation) or ulnar (Subject 2-U, 1.5 years post-amputation) nerves of two amputees. Neural activity was recorded during intended movements of the subject’s phantom fingers and a linear Kalman filter was used to decode the neural data. Microelectrode stimulation of varying amplitudes and frequencies was delivered via single or multiple electrodes to investigate the number, size and quality of sensory percepts that could be evoked. Device performance over time was assessed by measuring: electrode impedances, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), stimulation thresholds, number and stability of evoked percepts. Main results. The subjects were able to proportionally, control individual fingers of a virtual robotic hand, with 13 different movements decoded offline (r = 0.48) and two movements decoded online. Electrical stimulation across one USEA evoked >80 sensory percepts. Varying the stimulation parameters modulated percept quality. Devices remained intrafascicularly implanted for the duration of the study with no significant changes in the SNRs or percept thresholds. Significance. This study demonstrated that an array of 96 microelectrodes can be implanted into the human peripheral nervous system for up to 1 month durations. Such an

  4. Optic Nerve Injury in a Patient with Chronic Allergic Conjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribhi Hazin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Manipulation of the optic nerve can lead to irreversible vision changes. We present a patient with a past medical history of skin allergy and allergic conjunctivitis (AC who presented with insidious unexplained unilateral vision loss. Physical exam revealed significant blepharospasm, mild lid edema, bulbar conjunctival hyperemia, afferent pupillary defect, and slight papillary hypertrophy. Slit lamp examination demonstrated superior and inferior conjunctival scarring as well as superior corneal scarring but no signs of external trauma or neurological damage were noted. Conjunctival cultures and cytologic evaluation demonstrated significant eosinophilic infiltration. Subsequent ophthalmoscopic examination revealed optic nerve atrophy. Upon further questioning, the patient admitted to vigorous itching of the affected eye for many months. Given the presenting symptoms, history, and negative ophthalmological workup, it was determined that the optic nerve atrophy was likely secondary to digital pressure from vigorous itching. Although AC can be a significant source of decreased vision via corneal ulceration, no reported cases have ever described AC-induced vision loss of this degree from vigorous itching and chronic pressure leading to optic nerve damage. Despite being self-limiting in nature, allergic conjunctivitis should be properly managed as extreme cases can result in mechanical compression of the optic nerve and compromise vision.

  5. Use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for chronic pruritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Ali, Basma Mourad; Hegab, Doaa Salah; El Saadany, Hanan Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Pruritus is a distressing symptom in many dermatological as well as systemic conditions, and it is sometimes very chronic and relapsing. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is an inexpensive form of analgesia that could also ameliorate itching. This study aimed to evaluate TENS efficacy in patients with pruritus due to some types of chronic eczema, and in patients with chronic hepatic disease. Ten patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), 20 patients with lichen simplex chronicus (LSC), and 16 patients with chronic liver disease having chronic distressing pruritus received three sessions of TENS weekly for 12 sessions, and the effect on the visual analogue scale (VAS) scores was recorded after 2 weeks of therapy, at treatment end, and after an additional month for follow up. There was a statistically significant decline in the mean VAS score for studied groups at weeks 2 and 4 of therapy compared to baseline, but the improvement was more significant in patients with AD, and LSC (p < 0.001 for both) than in those with chronic liver disease (p < 0.01) who also showed an early re-elevation of VAS score on follow up. TENS therapy holds promise as a palliative, alternative, safe and inexpensive treatment for patients with some chronic pruritic conditions. PMID:25973931

  6. Pain Management in Four-Limb Amputation: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Nafisseh S; Warner, Matthew A; Moeschler, Susan M; Hoelzer, Bryan C

    2015-09-01

    Acute pain following amputation can be challenging to treat due to multiple underlying mechanisms and variable clinical responses to treatment. Furthermore, poorly controlled preoperative pain is a risk factor for developing chronic pain. Evidence suggests that epidural analgesia and peripheral nerve blockade may decrease the severity of residual limb pain and the prevalence of phantom pain after lower extremity amputation. We present the perioperative analgesic management of a patient with gangrene of the bilateral upper and lower extremities as a result of septic shock and prolonged vasopressor administration who underwent four-limb amputation in a single procedure. A multimodal analgesic regimen was utilized, including titration of preoperative opioid and neuropathic pain agents, perioperative intravenous, epidural and peripheral nerve catheter infusions, and postoperative oral medication titration. More than 8 months postoperatively, the patient has satisfactory pain control with no evidence for phantom limb pain. To our knowledge, there have been no publications to date concerning analgesic regimens in four-limb amputation. PMID:26011696

  7. Supratrochlear and Supraorbital Nerve Stimulation for Chronic Headache: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Stephanie Wrobel; Nahas, Stephanie J

    2015-07-01

    Chronic daily headache accounts for a significant socioeconomic burden due to decreased productivity, work absenteeism, multiple office and ER visits, and hospital admissions for pain control. Associated comorbidities add to this cost. Current traditional medical therapies may fail to provide adequate relief leading to the search for and use of other therapeutic modalities such as innovative medical devices. It is in this setting of the urgent demand for better pain control and to assimilate chronic headache sufferers back into society that a variety of neuromodulatory approaches have been emerging. This review aims to familiarize the reader with current literature regarding supraorbital and supratrochlear nerve stimulation for chronic headache, point out the advantages of this approach, address unanswered questions about this subject, and highlight future directions. PMID:26049769

  8. Peripheral nerve pathology in patients with severely affected complex regional pain syndrome type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Bodde, Marlies I.; van den Dungen, Johannes; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is a chronic pain syndrome with no clinical evidence of nerve injury; however, recently, changes in muscle tissue have been found in case of CRPS-I. Our aim was to search for histological changes in peripheral nerves of amputated limbs from patients wit

  9. Foot amputation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amputation - foot - discharge; Trans-metatarsal amputation - discharge ... You have had a foot amputation. You may have had an accident, or your foot may have had an infection or disease and doctors could ...

  10. Arnold’s nerve cough reflex: evidence for chronic cough as a sensory vagal neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Nicole M; Gibson, Peter G; Birring, Surinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Arnold’s nerve ear-cough reflex is recognised to occur uncommonly in patients with chronic cough. In these patients, mechanical stimulation of the external auditory meatus can activate the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (Arnold’s nerve) and evoke reflex cough. This is an example of hypersensitivity of vagal afferent nerves, and there is now an increasing recognition that many cases of refractory or idiopathic cough may be due to a sensory neuropathy of the vagus nerve. We present two cas...

  11. Arnold’s nerve cough reflex: evidence for chronic cough as a sensory vagal neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Peter G.; Birring, Surinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Arnold’s nerve ear-cough reflex is recognised to occur uncommonly in patients with chronic cough. In these patients, mechanical stimulation of the external auditory meatus can activate the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (Arnold’s nerve) and evoke reflex cough. This is an example of hypersensitivity of vagal afferent nerves, and there is now an increasing recognition that many cases of refractory or idiopathic cough may be due to a sensory neuropathy of the vagus nerve. We present two cases where the cause of refractory chronic cough was due to sensory neuropathy associated with ear-cough reflex hypersensitivity. In both cases, the cough as well as the Arnold’s nerve reflex hypersensitivity were successfully treated with gabapentin, a treatment that has previously been shown to be effective in the treatment of cough due to sensory laryngeal neuropathy (SLN). PMID:25383210

  12. Diagnostic value of sural nerve biopsy in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Molenaar, D.S.M.; Vermeulen, M.; Haan

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the additional diagnostic value of sural nerve biopsy of 64 patients in whom chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) was considered, as sural nerve biopsy is recommended in the research criteria of an ad hoc subcommittee to diagnose CIDP.
METHODS—Firstly, the additional diagnostic value of sural nerve biopsy was analysed with multivariate logistic re- gression. Six clinical features (remitting course, symmetric sensorimotor neurop...

  13. Silent intratemporal facial nerve schwannoma associated with Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media: A rare presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Phaniendra, V.; Pratinidhi, Santosh K.; I V Renuka

    2007-01-01

    Facial palsy is a common manifestation of intratemporal facial nerve schwannoma. Review of English literature describes intratemporal facial nerve schwannoma presenting as vertigo, tinnitus (without facial palsy) which were diagnosed on CT scan or MRI of temporal bone. We are presenting two cases of asymptomatic facial nerve schwannoma without facial palsy presenting only as Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media (CSOM), which were diagnosed incidentally during surgery.

  14. A rare cause of chronic sciatic pain: Schwannoma of the sciatic nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Rhanim, Abdelkarim; El Zanati, Rachid; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Berrada, Mohammed Saleh; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

    2013-01-01

    Schwannomas are common, benign tumors of the shelth of peripheral nerves. Sciatic schwannomas are rare. Their symptomatology usually mimics sciatic pain due to a herniated disc, which can delay the diagnosis. If there is no lumbar pain and lumbar MRI is normal, the sciatic nerve must be clinically and radiologically examined all along its course. We report a case of sciatic nerve schwannoma presenting with chronic sciatica which was diagnosed and monitored radiologically for several years bef...

  15. Long term clinical outcome of peripheral nerve stimulation in patients with chronic peripheral neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calenbergh, F. Van; Gybels, J.; Laere, K. Van;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic neuropathic pain after injury to a peripheral nerve is known to be resistant to treatment. Peripheral nerve stimulation is one of the possible treatment options, which is, however, not performed frequently. In recent years we have witnessed a renewed interest for PNS. The aim ...

  16. Diffuse spinal and intercostal nerve involvement in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguz, B.; Oguz, K.K.; Cila, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ. Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Tan, E. [Dept. of Neurology, Hacettepe Univ. Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    2003-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an uncommon demyelinating disorder with a relapsing and remitting or continuously progressive course. Hypertrophic nerve roots, sometimes associated with gadolinium enhancement, has been reported more commonly in lumbar spine and less commonly in the brachial plexus and cervical roots; however, diffuse involvement of intercostal nerves bilaterally has never been reported previously. We present MRI findings which include diffuse enlargement and mild enhancement of roots and extraforaminal segments of nerves in all segments except a short segment between T12-L2 as well as all the intercostal nerves in a case of CIPD with a 10-year history. (orig.)

  17. Diffuse spinal and intercostal nerve involvement in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an uncommon demyelinating disorder with a relapsing and remitting or continuously progressive course. Hypertrophic nerve roots, sometimes associated with gadolinium enhancement, has been reported more commonly in lumbar spine and less commonly in the brachial plexus and cervical roots; however, diffuse involvement of intercostal nerves bilaterally has never been reported previously. We present MRI findings which include diffuse enlargement and mild enhancement of roots and extraforaminal segments of nerves in all segments except a short segment between T12-L2 as well as all the intercostal nerves in a case of CIPD with a 10-year history. (orig.)

  18. Experimental chronic entrapment of the sciatic nerve in adult hamsters: an ultrastructural and morphometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prinz R.A.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Entrapment neuropathy is a group of clinical disorders involving compression of a peripheral nerve and interference with nerve function mostly through traction injury. We have investigated the chronic compression of peripheral nerves as an experimental procedure for detecting changes in ultrastructural nerve morphology. Adult hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus, N = 30 were anesthetized with a 25% pentobarbital solution and received a cuff around the right sciatic nerve. Left sciatic nerves were not operated (control group. Animals survived for varying times (up to 15 weeks, after which they were sacrificed and both sciatic nerves were immediately fixed with a paraformaldehyde solution. Experimental nerves were divided into segments based upon their distance from the site of compression (proximal, entrapment and distal. Semithin and ultrathin sections were obtained and examined by light and electron microscopy. Ultrastructural changes were qualitatively described and data from semithin sections were morphometrically analyzed both in control and in compressed nerves. We observed endoneurial edema along with both perineurial and endoneurial thickening and also the existence of whorled cell-sparse structures (Renaut bodies in the subperineurial space of compressed sciatic nerves. Morphometric analyses of myelinated axons at the compression sites displayed a remarkable increase in the number of small axons (up to 60% in comparison with the control axonal number. The distal segment of compressed nerves presented a distinct decrease in axon number (up to 40% comparatively to the control group. The present experimental model of nerve entrapment in adult hamsters was shown to promote consistent histopathologic alterations analogous to those found in chronic compressive neuropathies.

  19. Occipital nerve stimulation in medically intractable, chronic cluster headache. The ICON study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrink, Leopoldine A; Teernstra, Onno Pm; Haan, Joost;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: About 10% of cluster headache patients have the chronic form. At least 10% of this chronic group is intractable to or cannot tolerate medical treatment. Open pilot studies suggest that occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) might offer effective prevention in these patients. Controlled...

  20. Efficacy of regional renal nerve blockade in patients with chronic refractory heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Qi-ming; FEN Yi; LU Jing; MA Gen-shan

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased renal sympathetic nerve activity can result in diuretic resistance in patients with chronic congestive heart failure.We investigated the effect of regional renal nerve blockade on the patients with chronic refractory heart failure and diuretic resistance.Methods Eighteen patients with chronic refractory heart failure were enrolled (mean age (64±11) years).The patients were randomly divided into two groups (renal nerve blockade group and standard therapy group,n=9 each).Renal nerve blockade was performed by percutaneous injection of local anaesthetic under computed tomographic guidance.Heart rate,mean arterial blood pressure,plasma and urine electrolytes,neurohormones,factional excretion of sodium (FENa),24-hour urine volume were monitored at baseline and the first 24 hours after therapy.Dyspnea and oedema were also evaluated.The major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE),plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were compared between the two groups during the 3-12 months follow-up period.Results No complication was observed during the acute phase of renal nerve blockade.After renal nerve blockade,the 24-hour urine volume and FENa were significantly increased,while the level of plasma rennin,angiotensin Ⅱ,aldosterone,BNP and atrial natriuretic peptide as well as dyspnea and oedema were significantly reduced in renal nerve blockade group compared with baseline and standard therapy group.During three to 12 months of follow-up,the rate of MACE and plasma BNP level were significantly lower,while LVEF was significantly higher in renal nerve blockade group than those in standard therapy group.Conclusion Regional renal nerve blockade may be a safe and effective treatment for patients with chronic refractory heart failure.

  1. Chronic migraine headache prevention with noninvasive vagus nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Anne H.; Lipton, Richard B.; Grosberg, Brian M.; Cady, Roger K.; Dorlas, Stefanie; Simmons, Kristy A.; Mullin, Chris; Liebler, Eric J.; Goadsby, Peter J.; Saper, Joel R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and tolerability of noninvasive vagus nerve stimulation (nVNS) for the prevention of chronic migraine (CM) attacks. Methods: In this first prospective, multicenter, double-blind, sham-controlled pilot study of nVNS in CM prophylaxis, adults with CM (≥15 headache d/mo) entered the baseline phase (1 month) and were subsequently randomized to nVNS or sham treatment (2 months) before receiving open-label nVNS treatment (6 months). The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability. Efficacy endpoints in the intent-to-treat population included change in the number of headache days per 28 days and acute medication use. Results: Fifty-nine participants (mean age, 39.2 years; mean headache frequency, 21.5 d/mo) were enrolled. During the randomized phase, tolerability was similar for nVNS (n = 30) and sham treatment (n = 29). Most adverse events were mild/moderate and transient. Mean changes in the number of headache days were −1.4 (nVNS) and −0.2 (sham) (Δ = 1.2; p = 0.56). Twenty-seven participants completed the open-label phase. For the 15 completers initially assigned to nVNS, the mean change from baseline in headache days after 8 months of treatment was −7.9 (95% confidence interval −11.9 to −3.8; p < 0.01). Conclusions: Therapy with nVNS was well-tolerated with no safety issues. Persistent prophylactic use may reduce the number of headache days in CM; larger sham-controlled studies are needed. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01667250. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with CM, nVNS is safe, is well-tolerated, and did not significantly change the number of headache days. This pilot study lacked the precision to exclude important safety issues or benefits of nVNS. PMID:27412146

  2. Nerve sonography in multifocal motor neuropathy and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Druzhinin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative ultrasound characteristics (USC of the median, ulnar nerve at different levels and the spinal nerves in patients with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN; n=13; 40,4 ± 12,6 years old and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP; n = 7; 47,3 ± 11,2 year old did not reveal statistical difference in cross sectional area (CSA between analyzed groups. Patients with MMN have more pronounced asymmetry of CSA in comparison with CIDP patients which have a symmetrical pattern of diffuse nerve involvement. Quantitative USC has shown to be not informative enough in differentiation of MMN and CIDP. The qualitative analysis (QA according to 3 described types of nerve changes has shown that CIDP is characterized by the prevalence of type 3 pattern (85.8 % while MMN – by type 2 (69.2 %. The sensitivity and specificity of proposed QA patterns in nerve USC need to be analyzed in additional investigations. 

  3. Diffusion tensor imaging of peripheral nerve in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical feasibility of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for the evaluation of peripheral nerves in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Using a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging scanner, we obtained DTI scans of the tibial nerves of 10 CIDP patients and 10 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. We prepared fractional anisotropy (FA) maps, measured the FA values of tibial nerves, and compared these values in the two study groups. In nine patients, we also performed tibial nerve conduction studies and analyzed the correlation between the FA values and parameters of the nerve conduction study. The tibial nerve FA values in CIDP patients (median 0.401, range 0.312-0.510) were significantly lower than those in healthy volunteers (median 0.530, range 0.469-0.647) (Mann-Whitney test, p < 0.01). They were significantly correlated with the amplitude of action potential (Spearman correlation coefficient, p = 0.04, r = 0.86) but not with nerve conduction velocity (p = 0.79, r = 0.11). Our preliminary data suggest that the noninvasive DTI assessment of peripheral nerves may provide useful information in patients with CIDP. (orig.)

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging of peripheral nerve in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakuda, Takako; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Tanitame, Keizo; Takasu, Miyuki; Date, Shuji; Awai, Kazuo [Hiroshima University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Ochi, Kazuhide; Ohshita, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Masayasu [Hiroshima University, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Therapeutics, Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Hiroshima (Japan); Kohriyama, Tatsuo [Department of Neurology, Hiroshima City Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Ito, Katsuhide [Department of Radiology, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi, Hiroshima-ken (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical feasibility of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for the evaluation of peripheral nerves in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Using a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging scanner, we obtained DTI scans of the tibial nerves of 10 CIDP patients and 10 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. We prepared fractional anisotropy (FA) maps, measured the FA values of tibial nerves, and compared these values in the two study groups. In nine patients, we also performed tibial nerve conduction studies and analyzed the correlation between the FA values and parameters of the nerve conduction study. The tibial nerve FA values in CIDP patients (median 0.401, range 0.312-0.510) were significantly lower than those in healthy volunteers (median 0.530, range 0.469-0.647) (Mann-Whitney test, p < 0.01). They were significantly correlated with the amplitude of action potential (Spearman correlation coefficient, p = 0.04, r = 0.86) but not with nerve conduction velocity (p = 0.79, r = 0.11). Our preliminary data suggest that the noninvasive DTI assessment of peripheral nerves may provide useful information in patients with CIDP. (orig.)

  5. Electrical neurostimulation for chronic pain: on selective relay of sensory neural activities in myelinated nerve fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Sacré, Pierre; Sarma, Sridevi V.; Guan, Yun; Anderson, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain affects about 100 million adults in the US. Despite their great need, neuropharmacology and neurostimulation therapies for chronic pain have been associated with suboptimal efficacy and limited long-term success, as their mechanisms of action are unclear. Yet current computational models of pain transmission suffer from several limitations. In particular, dorsal column models do not include the fundamental underlying sensory activity traveling in these nerve fibers. We developed ...

  6. 糖尿病足截肢患者股神经中小窝蛋白1的表达及意义%Expression and significance of caveolin-1 in femoral nerve of diabetic foot amputation patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁敏; 褚月颉; 徐俊; 章鸣放; 赵凤云; 王鹏华

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression and significance of caveolin-1 in femoral nerve of diabetic patients with foot amputation. Methods Forty patients with foot amputation were assigned to 3 groups according to their duration of type 2 diabetes: group A ( <6 years=, group B (6-10 years), and group C ( >10 years). Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) stain and Weil's stain were used to examine the femoral nerve. Silver staining was used to observe the axons and to count the nerve fiber density. The expression of caveolin-1 in Schwann cells of femoral nerve was tested by immunohistochemisty. Results There were evident progressive pathological changes in femoral nerve in the 3 groups. The variance of nerve fiber density in the 3 groups reached statistical significance ( P<0. 05 =, the nerve fiber density showed negative correlation with HbA1C( r =-0. 792, P<0. 01 = and duration ( r=-0.592, P<0. 01 =. The expression of caveolin-1 in Schwann cells of femoral nerve was positive in all the 3 groups and the variance with statistical significance (P<0. 01 ), it was negatively correlated with HbA1C (r=-0. 762, P<0. 01 )and duration (r=-0. 532, P<0. 01 ), and it was positively correlated with nerve fiber density (r=0. 721, P<0.01 ), the partial correlation coefficient of caveolin-1 and HbA1Cwas-0. 505 ( P<0. 01 ).Conclusion In patients with diabetic foot amputation, caveolin-1 may play a role in the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and diabetic foot.%目的 探讨糖尿病足截肢患者股神经雪旺氏细胞中小窝蛋白1的表达及意义.方法 40例糖尿病足截肢患者根据2型糖尿病病程分为A(<6年),B(6~10年),C(>10年)3组.HE、Weil氏染色观察股神经病理学改变,银染法进行轴突染色并计数股神经纤维密度.应用免疫组化染色检测雪旺氏细胞中小窝蛋白1的表达.结果 3组股神经均存在明显的病理改变,随着病程延长病变加重.3组间股神经纤维密

  7. A Case Study Of Dietary Deficiency On Peripheral Nerve Functions In Chronic Alcoholic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbind Kumar Choudhary

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alcoholic neuropathy is most likely result of dietary deficiency rather than direct neurotoxic effect of alcohol. A male alcoholic patient aged 34- years old with clear clinical sign of peripheral neuropathy was examined after his habit of six years chronic alcoholic drinking. Conduction velocities latencies and nerve action potential amplitudes was measured from median radial common peroneal and sural nerves on respective upper and lower limb and the results showed that there was decrease in conduction velocity of common peroneal and posterior tibial in lower limbs. However sensory nerve conduction SNCV of sural nerve right and left was normal in lower limb. Based on the results observed in our study we conclude that the combination of vitamin B12 uridine and cytidine can be safe and effective in the treatment of patients presenting alcoholic polyneuropathy. So the prognosis of alcoholic peripheral neuropathy is good and independent of age provided that intake of alcohol is withdrawn completely.

  8. Substitution of natural sensory input by artificial neurostimulation of an amputated trigeminal nerve does not prevent the degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic circuits projecting to the somatosensory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fivos Panetsos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral deafferentation downregulates acetylcholine (ACh synthesis in sensory cortices. However the responsible neural circuits and processes are not known. We irreversibly transected the rat infraorbital nerve and implanted neuroprosthetic microdevices for proximal stump stimulation, and assessed cytochrome-oxidase and choline- acetyl-transferase (ChAT in somatosensory, auditory and visual cortices; estimated the number and density of ACh-neurons in the magnocellular basal nucleus (MBN; and localized down-regulated ACh-neurons in basal forebrain using retrograde labeling from deafferented cortices. Here we show that nerve transection, causes down regulation of MBN cholinergic neurons. Stimulation of the cut nerve reverses the metabolic decline but does not affect the decrease in cholinergic fibers in cortex or cholinergic neurons in basal forebrain. Artifical stimulation of the nerve also has no affect of ACh-innervation of other cortices. Cortical ChAT depletion is due to loss of corticopetal MBN ChAT-expressing neurons. MBN ChAT downregulation is not due to decrease neither of afferent activity nor to failure of trophic support. Basalocortical ACh circuits are sensory specific, ACh is provided to each sensory cortex "on demand" by dedicated circuits. Our data support the existence of a modality-specific cortex-MBN-cortex circuit for cognitive information processing.

  9. Plasticity of Urinary Bladder Reflexes Evoked by Stimulation of Pudendal Afferent Nerves after Chronic Spinal Cord Injury in Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Tai, Changfeng; Chen, Mang; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Liu, Hailong; Roppolo, James R.; de Groat, William C.

    2010-01-01

    Bladder reflexes evoked by stimulation of pudendal afferent nerves (PudA-to-Bladder reflex) were studied in normal and chronic spinal cord injured (SCI) adult cats to examine the reflex plasticity. Physiological activation of pudendal afferent nerves by tactile stimulation of the perigenital skin elicits an inhibitory PudA-to-Bladder reflex in normal cats, but activates an excitatory reflex in chronic SCI cats. However, in both normal and chronic SCI cats electrical stimulation applied to the...

  10. Nerve sonography in multifocal motor neuropathy and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    D. S. Druzhinin; Naumova, E. S.; S. S. Nikitin

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative ultrasound characteristics (USC) of the median, ulnar nerve at different levels and the spinal nerves in patients with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN; n=13; 40,4 ± 12,6 years old) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP; n = 7; 47,3 ± 11,2 year old) did not reveal statistical difference in cross sectional area (CSA) between analyzed groups. Patients with MMN have more pronounced asymmetry of CSA in comparison with CIDP patients which have a symmetrical p...

  11. The incidence of symptomatic neuroma in amputation and neurorrhaphy patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Avoort, D. J. J. C.; Hovius, S. E. R.; Selles, R. W.; van Neck, J. W.; Coert, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The incidence of symptomatic neuroma in finger nerve injuries varies widely in the literature. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the incidence of symptomatic neuroma after repair of digital nerve injuries (neurorrhaphy) and after amputation of one or more fingers. We also determined

  12. The Renal Nerves in Chronic Heart Failure: Afferent and Efferent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Marie Schiller

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The function of the renal nerves has been an area of scientific and medical interest for many years. The recent advent of a minimally invasive catheter-based method of renal denervation has renewed excitement in understanding the afferent and efferent actions of the renal nerves in multiple diseases. While hypertension has been the focus of much this work, less attention has been given to the role of the renal nerves in the development of chronic heart failure (CHF. Recent studies from our laboratory and those of others implicate an essential role for the renal nerves in the development and progression of CHF. Using a rabbit tachycardia model of CHF and surgical unilateral renal denervation, we provide evidence for both renal efferent and afferent mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CHF. Renal denervation prevented the decrease in renal blood flow observed in CHF while also preventing increases in Angiotensin-II receptor protein in the microvasculature of the renal cortex. Renal denervation in CHF also reduced physiological markers of autonomic dysfunction including an improvement in arterial baroreflex function, heart rate variability, and decreased resting cardiac sympathetic tone. Taken together, the renal sympathetic nerves are necessary in the pathogenesis of CHF via both efferent and afferent

  13. Chronic Migraine Is Associated With Reduced Corneal Nerve Fiber Density and Symptoms of Dry Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinard, Krista I.; Smith, A. Gordon; Singleton, J. Robinson; Lessard, Margaret K.; Katz, Bradley J.; Warner, Judith E.A.; Crum, Alison V.; Mifflin, Mark D.; Brennan, Kevin C.; Digre, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Background We used in vivo corneal confocal microscopy to investigate structural differences in the sub-basal corneal nerve plexus in chronic migraine patients and a normal population. We used a validated questionnaire and tests of lacrimal function to determine the prevalence of dry eye in the same group of chronic migraine patients. Activation of the trigeminal system is involved in migraine. Corneal nociceptive sensation is mediated by trigeminal axons that synapse in the gasserian ganglion and the brainstem, and serve nociceptive, protective, and trophic functions. Noninvasive imaging of the corneal sub-basal nerve plexus is possible with in vivo corneal confocal microscopy. Methods For this case–control study, we recruited chronic migraine patients and compared them with a sex- and age-similar group of control subjects. Patients with peripheral neuropathy, a disease known to be associated with a peripheral neuropathy, or prior corneal or intraocular surgery were excluded. Participants underwent in vivo corneal confocal microscopy using a Heidelberg Retinal Tomography III confocal microscope with a Rostock Cornea Module. Nerve fiber length, nerve branch density, nerve fiber density, and tortuosity coefficient were measured using established methodologies. Migraine participants underwent testing of basal tear production with proparacaine, corneal sensitivity assessment with a cotton-tip applicator, measurement of tear break-up time, and completion of a validated dry eye questionnaire. Results A total of 19 chronic migraine patients and 30 control participants completed the study. There were no significant differences in age or sex. Nerve fiber density was significantly lower in migraine patients compared with controls (48.4 ± 23.5 vs 71.0 ± 15.0 fibers/mm2, P fiber length was decreased in the chronic migraine group compared with the control group, but this difference was not statistically significant (21.5 ± 11.8 vs 26.8 ± 5.9 mm/mm2, P < .084). Nerve

  14. MR diffusion tensor imaging of optic nerve in patients with primary chronic angle-closure glaucoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the value of MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of optic nerve in the estimation of optic nerve changes of primary chronic angle-closure glaucoma (PCACG). Methods: Twenty-five patients with PCACG including monocular involvement in 4 patients and binocular involvement in 21 patients and involving 46 eyes in which 24 right eyes and 22 1eft eyes, and 20 normal volunteers were enrolled.Conventional MRI and DTI were performed on all subjects using Magnetom Tim 3.0 T MRI. Fractional anisotropy(FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivities (λ ∥) and radial diffusivities (λ ⊥) were measured and then compared between patients group and control group and between left eyes and right eyes. Two independent samples t-test and paired t-test were used. Results: On conventional MRI, thinner optic nerve with vaginal cavity widened slightly was found in 8 optic nerves of 6 patients.The value of FA, λ∥, λ⊥ and MD of 24 right optic nerves in patient group was(0.27 ± 0.09) × 10-3, (2.30 ±0.26) × 10-3, (1.55 ± 0.35) × 10-3, and (1.80 ± 0.31) × 10-3 mm2/s respectively and that of 22 left optic nerves was (0.24 ± 0.09) × 10-3,(2.25 ± 0.41) × 10-3,(1.61 ± 0.46) × 10-3, and (1.82 ±0.47) × 10-3 mm2/s respectively. The FA of optic nerve in patient group was lower than that of control group (P<0.05), while the mean λ∥, λ ⊥ and MD values was obviously higher than control group (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between right and left optic nerves in patient group (P>0.05). Conclusions: DTI could detect abnormality and provide information about the pathological process of optic nerve in patients with PCACG. (authors)

  15. Chronic Posttraumatic Dislocation of Radial Head With Ulnar Nerve Entrapment in a Child: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiangyu; Wang, Wei; Yu, Shiyang; Yan, Hede; Zhan, Yulin; Fan, Cunyi

    2016-06-01

    We present an unusual case of chronic posttraumatic anteromedial dislocation of radial head with direct ulnar nerve entrapment in a child. Ulnar nerve decompression, open reduction of the radial head, and annular ligament reconstruction using a palmaris longus tendon graft were performed, and a satisfactory functional outcome was achieved at the 15-month follow-up. Through a review of literature, we conclude that early diagnosis and management for radial head dislocation are recommended to avoid nerve symptoms. Besides, open reduction and annular ligament reconstruction with a palmaris longus tendon graft would be an alternative surgery during chronic phase. PMID:27171922

  16. Role of TRPM8 in dorsal root ganglion in nerve injury-induced chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Lin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic neuropathic pain is an intractable pain with few effective treatments. Moderate cold stimulation can relieve pain, and this may be a novel train of thought for exploring new methods of analgesia. Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8 ion channel has been proposed to be an important molecular sensor for cold. Here we investigate the role of TRPM8 in the mechanism of chronic neuropathic pain using a rat model of chronic constriction injury (CCI to the sciatic nerve. Results Mechanical allodynia, cold and thermal hyperalgesia of CCI rats began on the 4th day following surgery and maintained at the peak during the period from the 10th to 14th day after operation. The level of TRPM8 protein in L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG ipsilateral to nerve injury was significantly increased on the 4th day after CCI, and reached the peak on the 10th day, and remained elevated on the 14th day following CCI. This time course of the alteration of TRPM8 expression was consistent with that of CCI-induced hyperalgesic response of the operated hind paw. Besides, activation of cold receptor TRPM8 of CCI rats by intrathecal application of menthol resulted in the inhibition of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and the enhancement of cold hyperalgesia. In contrast, downregulation of TRPM8 protein in ipsilateral L5 DRG of CCI rats by intrathecal TRPM8 antisense oligonucleotide attenuated cold hyperalgesia, but it had no effect on CCI-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Conclusions TRPM8 may play different roles in mechanical allodynia, cold and thermal hyperalgesia that develop after nerve injury, and it is a very promising research direction for the development of new therapies for chronic neuroapthic pain.

  17. Cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DongFuhui

    2004-01-01

    The cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome is named that, the cutaneous nerve's functional disorder caused by some chronic entrapment, moreover appears a series of nerve's feeling obstacle,vegetative nerve function obstacle, nutrition obstacle, even motor function obstacle in various degree.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with intracranial findings and enhancing, thickened cranial and spinal nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by chronically progressive or relapsing symmetric sensorimotor involvement. We describe the imaging findings in our patient. Magnetic resonance imaging showed presence of an intracranial white matter lesion and enhancing, thickened cranial and spinal nerves. This disorder has been described very infrequently in the radiology literature

  19. Multiple Crush Concept Applied to Multiple Nerves in Leprous Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellon, A Lee

    2016-04-01

    There is a large reservoir of leprosy patients, no longer contagious, due to multidrug therapy, who are considered cured and are becoming increasingly disabled due to progressive chronic nerve entrapment in the upper and lower extremities. After a review of the history of understanding leprous neuropathy, an approach is outlined based on the approach taken to relieve pain and restore sensation that prevents ulcers and amputations in diabetics with neuropathy and superimposed nerve compressions. The results of the first application of this approach in an indigenous area for leprosy, Guayaquil, Ecuador, is discussed with implications for international care of this neglected patient population. PMID:27013412

  20. [Morphological changes of peripheral nerve rats under chronic micromercurialism and its pharmacological correction in different terms after injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamalо S.N.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Search for new pharmacological agents that activate processes of traumatized nerve regeneration at the condition of mercurial intoxication remains urgent. Objective. The aim of this study was a comparative morphometric analysis of rat peripheral nerve under micromercurialism using antioxidant drug without pharmacotherapy. Methods. Experimental model of sciatic nerve trauma under conditions of chronic micromercurialism was investigated in experiments on two groups of white rats. Micromercurialism was modeled by intraperitoneal injection of mercuric chloride during 10 weeks before sciatic nerve trauma. The rats of the first group received no pharmacological drugs in postoperative period. The second group of animals received 100 μg/kg solution of Thiotriazolinum intraperitoneally daily during 2 weeks after operation. The morphological organization and morphometric data of regenerative neuroma and adjoining parts (proximal and distal of sciatic nerve were studied in 6 and 12 weeks after damage using morphometric and statistic methods. Results. Basing on the results of the second group of animals the average angle of axon deviation from the axis of the nerve in the neuroma sufficiently decreases and distribution density of neuron fibers in distal part increases comparing with the first group. Conclusion. Taken together these data evidence that Thiotriazolinum improves the process of traumatized nerve regeneration. Citation: Shamalо SN. [Morphological changes of peripheral nerve rats under chronic micromercurialism and its pharmacological correction in different terms after injury]. Morphologia. 2015;9(3:95-8. Ukrainian.

  1. Diabetic Complications and Amputation Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Text Size Print Bookmark Diabetic Complications and Amputation Prevention People with diabetes are prone to having ... complication is so severe that surgery, and occasionally amputation, may become necessary. Poor blood flow. In diabetes, ...

  2. Chronic demyelination in mouse peripheral nerve produced by lysophosphatidyl choline and X-irradiation: ultrastructural observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of X-irradiation on demyelination and remyelination were studied in the peripheral nerve of the mouse. Three days after injection of lysophosphatidyl choline into one sciatic nerve, a 20 Gy dose of X-rays was administered to the hind limb. At survival times ranging from 4 days to 6 months after injection, the nerves were examined by light and electron microscopy. Removal of myelin debris was retarded and remyelination delayed or prevented. The myelin sheaths which did form were thin and the configuration of Schmidt-Lanterman incisures and nodes of Ranvier was abnormal. Some of the chronically demyelinated fibres formed focal node-like complexes; patches of finely granular material coated the inner aspect of the axolemma, the external surface was covered by slender processes of Schwann cell cytoplasm, and an electron-dense lamina was present in the enlarged periaxonal space. Elsewhere demyelinated axons and their ensheathing Schwann cells were separated by gap junctions or transverse bands. These findings indicate that the morphological differentiation of structures thought to be characteristic of nodes of Ranvier can take place in the absence of remyelination. (author)

  3. Chronic vagus nerve stimulation in Crohn's disease: a 6-month follow-up pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaz, B; Sinniger, V; Hoffmann, D; Clarençon, D; Mathieu, N; Dantzer, C; Vercueil, L; Picq, C; Trocmé, C; Faure, P; Cracowski, J-L; Pellissier, S

    2016-06-01

    The vagus nerve (VN) is a link between the brain and the gut. The VN is a mixed nerve with anti-inflammatory properties through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by its afferents and by activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway through its efferents. We have previously shown that VN stimulation (VNS) improves colitis in rats and that the vagal tone is blunted in Crohn's disease (CD) patients. We thus performed a pilot study of chronic VNS in patients with active CD. Seven patients under VNS were followed up for 6 months with a primary endpoint to induce clinical remission and a secondary endpoint to induce biological (CRP and/or fecal calprotectin) and endoscopic remission and to restore vagal tone (heart rate variability). Vagus nerve stimulation was feasible and well-tolerated in all patients. Among the seven patients, two were removed from the study at 3 months for clinical worsening and five evolved toward clinical, biological, and endoscopic remission with a restored vagal tone. These results provide the first evidence that VNS is feasible and appears as an effective tool in the treatment of active CD. PMID:26920654

  4. Peripheral Nerve Ultrasonography in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: Correlations with Clinical and Neurophysiological Data

    OpenAIRE

    Aristide Merola; Michela Rosso; Alberto Romagnolo; Erdita Peci; Dario Cocito

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This cross-sectional study analyzes the pattern of ultrasound peripheral nerve alterations in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) at different stages of functional disability. Material and Methods. 22 CIDP and 10 MMN patients and a group of 70 healthy controls were evaluated with an ultrasound scan of the median, ulnar, peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves. Results were correlated with clinical disabilit...

  5. A Descriptive Study of 100 Patients Undergoing Palliative Nerve Blocks for Chronic Intractable Headache and Neck Ache

    OpenAIRE

    Rothbart, Peter; Fiedler, Katherine; Gale, George D; Nussbaum, David; Hendlerb, Nelson

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain whether repeated (palliative) nerve blocks over a long period of time provide benefit to patients with chronic intractable headache and neck ache.SUBJECTS AND METHODS: One hundred patients who were receiving repeated nerve blocks as part of their pain management regimen completed a structured interview questionnaire. The patients had all been investigated and received a diagnosis of cervicogenic headache. Changes in pain rating, depression rating, anxiety rating, activ...

  6. Epidemiology of leg amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebskov, L B; Schroeder, T V; Holstein, P E

    1994-01-01

    The number of amputations performed for vascular disease in Denmark has decreased from 1777 (34.5 per 100,000 population) in 1983 to 1288 (25.0 per 100,000) in 1990, a reduction of 28 per cent. This decline coincided with an increase in vascular surgical activity of up to 100 per cent, including ...

  7. Prevention of ulceration, amputation, and reduction of hospitalization: outcomes of a prospective multicenter trial of tibial neurolysis in patients with diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellon, A Lee; Muse, Vickie L; Nickerson, D Scott; Akre, Thomas; Anderson, Sharon R; Barrett, Steve L; Biddinger, Kent R; Bregman, Peter J; Bullard, Bryan P; Dauphinee, Damien M; DeJesus, James M; DeJesus, Ramon A; Ducic, Ivica; Dunkerly, Jeffery; Galina, Michael R; Hung, Virginia; Ichtertz, Dolf R; Kutka, Michael F; Jacoby, Richard P; Johnson, J Barry; Mader, David W; Maloney, Christopher T; Mancuso, Peter J; Martin, R Craig; Martin, Rick F; McDowel, Brian A; Rizzo, Vito J; Rose, Michael; Rosson, Gedge D; Shafiroff, Bruce B; Steck, Jerome K; Stolarski, Raymond G; Swier, Patrick; Wellens-Bruschayt, Tatiana A; Wilke, Bronwyn; Williams, Eric H; Wood, Michael A; Wood, William A; Younes, Michael P; Yuksel, Fuat

    2012-05-01

    This is the first multicenter prospective study of outcomes of tibial neurolysis in diabetics with neuropathy and chronic compression of the tibial nerve in the tarsal tunnels. A total of 38 surgeons enrolled 628 patients using the same technique for diagnosis of compression, neurolysis of four medial ankle tunnels, and objective outcomes: ulceration, amputation, and hospitalization for foot infection. Contralateral limb tibial neurolysis occurred in 211 patients for a total of 839 operated limbs. Kaplan-Meier proportional hazards were used for analysis. New ulcerations occurred in 2 (0.2%) of 782 patients with no previous ulceration history, recurrent ulcerations in 2 (3.8%) of 57 patients with a previous ulcer history, and amputations in 1 (0.2%) of 839 at risk limbs. Admission to the hospital for foot infections was 0.6%. In patients with diabetic neuropathy and chronic tibial nerve compression, neurolysis can result in prevention of ulceration and amputation, and decrease in hospitalization for foot infection. PMID:22411624

  8. 阴茎背神经离断术联合α1受体阻断药治疗早泄的疗效%Clinical observation of treatment of premature ejaculation by dorsal penile nerve amputation surgery combined with a-adrenergic receptor blocker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张水文; 徐野; 周国萍; 秦似龙; 李建华; 郭军红

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨阴茎背神经离断术联合高选择性α1受体阻断药治疗早泄的疗效.方法 对89例早泄患者随机分为3组:单纯药物治疗组、单纯阴茎背神经离断组、联合治疗组,每组给予相应治疗,观察阴道内射精潜伏期的变化.结果 联合治疗组阴道内射精潜伏期(160.4±57.7 s)较单纯药物α1受体阻断药治疗组(64.3±23.2 s)和单纯阴茎背神经离断组(106.5±41.4 s)明显延长(P<0.01).结论 阴茎背神经离断术联合高选择性α1受体阻断药治疗早泄效果明显.%Objective To investigate the efficacy of treating premature ejaculation with a highly selective at - adrenergic receptor blocker in combination with dorsal penile nerve amputation surgery. Methods 89 patients with premature ejaculation were randomly divided into three groups; simple drug treatment group, simple dorsal penile nerve transection group, the combined treatment group. Patients in each group were given appropriate treatment to observe changes in ejaculation latency. Results The ejaculatory latency of combined therapy group was significantly prolonged (P <0. 01) compared with the simple drug treatment group and the dorsal penile nerve transection group. Conclusion Dorsal penile nerve amputation surgery combined with at - adrenergic receptor blocker is an effective treatment of premature ejaculation.

  9. TUNEL-positive cells in the surgical border of an amputation due to infected diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker-Méndez, C; Guzmán-Aguilar, R M; Hernández-Cueto, M A; Huerta-Yepez, S; Jarillo-Luna, R A; González-Veyrand, E; González-Bonilla, C R

    2012-02-01

    Diabetic infected foot is the outcome of progressive vascular and neurological damage caused by persistent chronic hyperglycemia. Due to acute hypoxia and infection, the tissues develop extensive necrosis and gangrene, which often require amputation. The decision regarding the level of amputation relies mainly on the personal experience of the surgeon who must identify the healthy tissue without necrosis. However, tissue cells under stress may succumb before clear evidence of necrosis is present. In this study, dying cells with DNA damage were identified in the necrotic lesions and surgical borders of amputations. Therefore, the main purpose of this study was to identify apoptosis in the surgical borders of amputations required to treat infected diabetic foot. Apoptosis was identified by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated bio-dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) in the superficial and deep tissues of wounds, and in the surgical borders of 10 consecutive adult patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) who underwent amputation due to infected diabetic foot. The severity of the disease was classified by the Acute Physiological and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score on admission, and laboratory data were collected and bacteriological cultures were obtained from the lesions. The ankle/arm blood pressure index was measured, the blood flow in the affected limb was evaluated by high-resolution ultrasonography and color Doppler and pulse oximetry were performed during surgery. A total of 5 males and 5 females, aged 45-84 years (58.8 ± 14.1), were included. The APACHE II score was 2-18 points (8 ± 5.7). A total of 9 patients developed sepsis and 2 succumbed. A total of 5 patients required above-ankle amputation, and 5 required toe disarticulation. The ankle/arm blood pressure index ranged from 0.23-0.85 (0.51 ± 0.23). Apoptotic cells were found in ulcers and abscesses, and in areas without necrosis. In the surgical borders of the amputations

  10. Feasibility and Safety of Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation Paired with Notched Music Therapy for the Treatment of Chronic Tinnitus

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Hyun Joon; Kwak, Min Young; An, Yong-Hwi; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Yun Jin; Kim, Hyo Jung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives A recent study demonstrated that tinnitus could be eliminated by vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) paired with notched sounds in a rat tinnitus model. The aims of this clinical study were to investigate the effects and safety of transcutaneous VNS (tVNS) by patch-type electrode paired with notched music for treating chronic tinnitus. Subjects and Methods Thirty patients with refractory chronic tinnitus for >12 months were included in this study. A patch-type electrode wa...

  11. Reactive microglia after taste nerve injury: comparison to nerve injury models of chronic pain [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/wh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianna L Bartel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The chorda tympani (CT, which innervates taste buds on the anterior portion of the tongue, is susceptible to damage during inner ear surgeries. Injury to the CT causes a disappearance of taste buds, which is concurrent with significant microglial responses at central nerve terminals in the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS. The resulting taste disturbances that can occur may persist for months or years, long after the nerve and taste buds have regenerated. These persistent changes in taste sensation suggest alterations in central functioning and may be related to the microglial responses. This is reminiscent of nerve injuries that result in chronic pain, where microglial reactivity is essential in maintaining the altered sensation (i.e., pain. In these models, methods that diminish microglial responses also diminish the corresponding pain behavior. Although the CT nerve does not contain nociceptive pain fibers, the microglial reactivity after CT damage is similar to that described in pain models. Therefore, methods that decrease microglial responses in pain models were used here to test if they could also affect microglial reactivity after CT injury. Treatment with minocycline, an antibiotic that dampens pain responsive microglia, was largely ineffective in diminishing microglial responses after CT injury. In addition, signaling through the toll-like 4 receptor (TLR4 does not seem to be required after CT injury as blocking or deleting TLR4 had no effect on microglial reactivity. These results suggest that microglial responses following CT injury rely on different signaling mechanisms than those described in nerve injuries resulting in chronic pain.

  12. Effect of Pulsed Radiofrequency on Rat Sciatic Nerve Chronic Constriction Injury: A Preliminary Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duo-Yi Li; Lan Meng; Nan Ji; Fang Luo

    2015-01-01

    Background:Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) application to the dorsal root ganglia can reduce neuropathic pain (NP) in animal models,but the effect of PRF on damaged peripheral nerves has not been examined.We investigated the effect of PRF to the rat sciatic nerve (SN) on pain-related behavior and SN ultrastructure following chronic constriction injury (CCI).Methods:The analgesic effect was measured by hindpaw mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and thermal withdrawal latency (TWL).Twenty rats with NP induced by ligating the common SN were then randomly divided into a PRF treatment group and a sham group.The contralateral SN served as a control.The MWT and TWL were determined again 2,4,6,8,10,12,and 14 days after the PRF or sham treatment.On day 14,ipsilateral and contralateral common SNs were excised and examined by electron microscopy.Results:Ipsilateral MWT was significantly reduced and TWL significantly shorter compared to the contralateral side 14 days after CCI (both P =0.000).In the PRF group,MWT was significantly higher and TWL significantly longer 14 days after the PRF treatment compared to before PRF treatment (both P =0.000),while no such difference was observed in the sham group (P > 0.05).Electron microscopy revealed extensive demyelination and collagen fiber formation in the ipsilateral SN of sham-treated rats but sparse demyelination and some nerve fiber regrowth in the PRF treatment group.Conclusions:Hyperalgesia is relieved,and ultrastructural damage ameliorated after direct PRF treatment to the SN in the CCI rat model of NP.

  13. Effect of Pulsed Radiofrequency on Rat Sciatic Nerve Chronic Constriction Injury: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duo-Yi Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF application to the dorsal root ganglia can reduce neuropathic pain (NP in animal models, but the effect of PRF on damaged peripheral nerves has not been examined. We investigated the effect of PRF to the rat sciatic nerve (SN on pain-related behavior and SN ultrastructure following chronic constriction injury (CCI. Methods: The analgesic effect was measured by hindpaw mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT and thermal withdrawal latency (TWL. Twenty rats with NP induced by ligating the common SN were then randomly divided into a PRF treatment group and a sham group. The contralateral SN served as a control. The MWT and TWL were determined again 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 days after the PRF or sham treatment. On day 14, ipsilateral and contralateral common SNs were excised and examined by electron microscopy. Results: Ipsilateral MWT was significantly reduced and TWL significantly shorter compared to the contralateral side 14 days after CCI (both P = 0.000. In the PRF group, MWT was significantly higher and TWL significantly longer 14 days after the PRF treatment compared to before PRF treatment (both P = 0.000, while no such difference was observed in the sham group (P > 0.05. Electron microscopy revealed extensive demyelination and collagen fiber formation in the ipsilateral SN of sham-treated rats but sparse demyelination and some nerve fiber regrowth in the PRF treatment group. Conclusions: Hyperalgesia is relieved, and ultrastructural damage ameliorated after direct PRF treatment to the SN in the CCI rat model of NP.

  14. Long-Lasting Cranial Nerve III Palsy as a Presenting Feature of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Spataro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP in which an adduction deficit and ptosis in the left eye presented several years before the polyneuropathy. A 52-year-old man presented with a 14-year history of unremitting diplopia, adduction deficit, and ptosis in the left eye. At the age of 45 a mild bilateral foot drop and impaired sensation in the four limbs appeared, with these symptoms showing a progressive course. The diagnostic workup included EMG/ENG which demonstrated reduced conduction velocity with bilateral and symmetrical sensory and motor involvement. Cerebrospinal fluid studies revealed a cytoalbuminologic dissociation. A prolonged treatment with corticosteroids allowed a significant improvement of the limb weakness. Diplopia and ptosis remained unchanged. This unusual form of CIDP presented as a long-lasting isolated cranial nerve palsy. A diagnostic workup for CIDP should therefore be performed in those patients in which an isolated and unremitting cranial nerve palsy cannot be explained by common causes.

  15. Mechanosensitivity of the median nerve in patients with chronic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaberzadeh, Shapour; Zoghi, Maryam

    2013-04-01

    The aim was to investigate the relationship between the effects of median nerve strain during the elbow extension component of the upper limb neurodynamic test 1 (ULNT1) and the evoked musculoskeletal changes. 11 patients with chronic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and 11 matched asymptomatic controls participated in the study. In all subjects, elbow extension was carried out in both ULNT1 and neutral positions of the shoulder and arm. From these two starting positions a KIN-COM(®) dynamometer carried out passive elbow extension while EMG activity of 10 arm and shoulder muscles, elbow-flexor resistive torque and elbow extension ROM were measured concurrently. The result showed that, in the ULNT1 position, increased EMG activity of the involved muscles, increased elbow extension resistive torque and pain responses occurred much earlier in the range of elbow extension in the CTS group compared to healthy controls. These findings demonstrated increased mechanosensitivity of the median nerve in CTS patients compared to healthy controls. PMID:23561861

  16. Acute electromyostimulation decreases muscle sympathetic nerve activity in patients with advanced chronic heart failure (EMSICA Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Labrunée

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Muscle passive contraction of lower limb by neuromuscular electrostimulation (NMES is frequently used in chronic heart failure (CHF patients but no data are available concerning its action on sympathetic activity. However, Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS is able to improve baroreflex in CHF. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effect of TENS and NMES compared to Sham stimulation on sympathetic overactivity as assessed by Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity (MSNA. METHODS: We performed a serie of two parallel, randomized, double blinded and sham controlled protocols in twenty-two CHF patients in New York Heart Association (NYHA Class III. Half of them performed stimulation by TENS, and the others tested NMES. RESULTS: Compare to Sham stimulation, both TENS and NMES are able to reduce MSNA (63.5 ± 3.5 vs 69.7 ± 3.1 bursts / min, p < 0.01 after TENS and 51.6 ± 3.3 vs 56.7 ± 3.3 bursts / min, p < 0, 01 after NMES. No variation of blood pressure, heart rate or respiratory parameters was observed after stimulation. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that sensory stimulation of lower limbs by electrical device, either TENS or NMES, could inhibit sympathetic outflow directed to legs in CHF patients. These properties could benefits CHF patients and pave the way for a new non-pharmacological approach of CHF.

  17. [Coping psychologically with amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, M

    2009-02-01

    An amputation is a "tragic event" in someone's biography which causes a dramatic change in the outer appearance, the loss of mobility, independence and self esteem. The following article is about how people learn to cope with this difficult situation; with the practical problems of everyday life as well as their emotional problems. It is important for the amputees to go through the different stages of mourning: The first stage is the rejection of the situation. Repression and denial of the loss protects the patient from emotional overstrain. Confrontation is the next step: emotionally as well as mentally. "How could it happen?", (understanding the reasons why ...) "What will my future be like?", "How will I cope?" (ability of coping) "Why did it happen to me?" (sense) The last stage of coping with the amputation is to accept and deal with the new situation and to build up new self-confidence. A successful process of coping leads to a new identity. If a person fails to adapt to the new situation, he will develop an inferiority complex and fall into a depression. He might also try to look for culprit and blame the situation on someone else. About two thirds of all amputees don't cope with their amputation and become depressive. 15% develop symptoms of anxiety. Therefore it is important to offer help. The patients should get together in self helping groups and talk about their experiences and problems. If they need more intensive and individual help, they should have the opportunity to contact a psychologist. During the process of coping with their amputation the patients often alternate between optimistic and pessimistic moods. Sometimes they fall back into a negative and resigned state of mind. This is natural and part of the process as long as they find their own way to a positive attitude and view of life. PMID:19259934

  18. Peripheral nerve injury is associated with chronic, reversible changes in global DNA methylation in the mouse prefrontal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maral Tajerian

    Full Text Available Changes in brain structure and cortical function are associated with many chronic pain conditions including low back pain and fibromyalgia. The magnitude of these changes correlates with the duration and/or the intensity of chronic pain. Most studies report changes in common areas involved in pain modulation, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC, and pain-related pathological changes in the PFC can be reversed with effective treatment. While the mechanisms underlying these changes are unknown, they must be dynamically regulated. Epigenetic modulation of gene expression in response to experience and environment is reversible and dynamic. Epigenetic modulation by DNA methylation is associated with abnormal behavior and pathological gene expression in the central nervous system. DNA methylation might also be involved in mediating the pathologies associated with chronic pain in the brain. We therefore tested a whether alterations in DNA methylation are found in the brain long after chronic neuropathic pain is induced in the periphery using the spared nerve injury modal and b whether these injury-associated changes are reversible by interventions that reverse the pathologies associated with chronic pain. Six months following peripheral nerve injury, abnormal sensory thresholds and increased anxiety were accompanied by decreased global methylation in the PFC and the amygdala but not in the visual cortex or the thalamus. Environmental enrichment attenuated nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity and reversed the changes in global PFC methylation. Furthermore, global PFC methylation correlated with mechanical and thermal sensitivity in neuropathic mice. In summary, induction of chronic pain by peripheral nerve injury is associated with epigenetic changes in the brain. These changes are detected long after the original injury, at a long distance from the site of injury and are reversible with environmental manipulation. Changes in brain structure and

  19. Treatment of Idiopathic Chronic Orchialgia with Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS:A Preliminary Result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekrem Akdeniz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Unilateral or bilateral testicular pain lasting more than 3 months is called as chronic orchialgia. Aproximately 25-50% of chronic orchialgia is idiopatic origin. This study aimed the effectiveness of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS therapy due to Idiopathic Chronic Orchialgia (ICO. Methods: Five patients were included into this study with ICO that diagnosed with physical examination, urine analyses, urinary system x-ray film, and scrotal doppler ultrasound. Medical history revealed that multiple conservative therapy attempts failed to alleviate the pain. Two of the patients had right sided ICO. Traditional TENS device is placed to the most painful points. TENS applied 3 times in a week with duration 30 minutes for 4 weeks. Before and after TENS application, patients were evaluated by using Visual Analog Scale (VAS at first and third months. Results: Median age of patients was 26.20±2.38 (22-30. Mean VAS value was 6.52 ± 0.89 before the procedure. After 1 month VAS value was 3.82 ± 0.83 (p0.05. None of the patients needed any analgesics after during the one month. No complications, hyperemia or hypoesthesia of the scrotal or penile skin, occurred after the procedure. Conclusion: TENS reduces pain by increasing endorphin release in the spinal cord dorsal horn. TENS is very effective method for first 1 month in patients with ICO but its effect reduces by the time. There is no standard therapeutic protocol for idiopathic chronic orchialgia. Therefore TENS may be an alternative for patients who do not benefit from medical therapy and do not want invasive procedures. Short-term use of TENS and low number of the patients are the limitations of this study. Randomized, placebo-controlled, and longer follow-up period studies are needed to better assess the efficacy of TENS for ICO.

  20. Transcutaneous Neuromodulation at Posterior Tibial Nerve and ST36 for Chronic Constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to investigate the effects and possible mechanisms of transcutaneous neuromodulation (TN in patients with chronic constipation. Twelve patients were recruited. The treatment consisted of 2-week TN and 2-week sham-TN which was performed in a crossover design. Bowel habit diary, Patient Assessment of Constipation Symptom (PAC-SYM, Patient Assessment of Constipation Quality of Life (PAC-QOL, and anorectal motility were evaluated. Electrocardiogram was recorded for the assessment of autonomic function during acute TN therapy. It was found that (1 TN improved the frequency of spontaneous defecation. After 2-week TN therapy, 83% patients had more than 3 times bowel movements per week which was significantly different from sham-TN (P=0.01. (2 TN improved PAC-SYM and PAC-QOL scores (P<0.001, resp.. (3 TN significantly decreased the threshold volume to elicit RAIR (P<0.05, ameliorated rectal sensory threshold (P=0.04, and maximum tolerance (P=0.04. (4 TN, but not sham-TN, increased the vagal activity (P=0.01 versus baseline and decreased the sympathetic activity (P=0.01, versus baseline. It was concluded that needleless TN at posterior tibial nerve and ST36 using a watch-size stimulator is effective in chronic constipation, and the effect was possibly mediated via the autonomic mechanism.

  1. Peripheral Nerve Ultrasonography in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: Correlations with Clinical and Neurophysiological Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristide Merola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This cross-sectional study analyzes the pattern of ultrasound peripheral nerve alterations in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN at different stages of functional disability. Material and Methods. 22 CIDP and 10 MMN patients and a group of 70 healthy controls were evaluated with an ultrasound scan of the median, ulnar, peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves. Results were correlated with clinical disability scales and nerve conduction studies. Results. Patients with intermediate functional impairment showed relatively larger cross-sectional areas than subjects with either a milder (p<0.05 or more severe impairment (p<0.05, both in CIDP and in MMN. In addition, MMN was associated with greater side-to-side intranerve variability (p<0.05, while higher cross-sectional areas were observed in CIDP (p<0.05 and in nerve segments with predominantly demyelinating features (p<0.05. Higher CSA values were observed in nerves with demyelinating features versus axonal damage (p<0.05 for CIDP; p<0.05 for MMN. Discussion and Conclusions. Greater extent of quantitative and qualitative US alterations was observed in patients at intermediate versus higher functional disability and in nerves with demyelinating versus axonal damage. CIDP and MMN showed differential US aspects, with greater side-to-side intranerve variability in MMN and higher cross-sectional areas in CIDP.

  2. Sural nerve biopsy in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: Are supportive pathologic criteria useful in diagnosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Girish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : According to American Academy of Neurology (AAN criteria, demonstration of demyelination in the sural nerve by teased fiber or ultrastructure is considered mandatory for diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies (CIDP. In resource-restricted settings where these techniques are not freely available, it is useful to determine the utility of ′supportive′ pathologic criteria (subperineurial edema, inflammation, onion bulb formation, and demyelination proposed by AAN for diagnosis of CIDP. Settings and Design : Tertiary care hospital, retrospective study. Patients and Methods : Forty-six patients with idiopathic CIDP (32 with progressive course and 14 with relapsing-remitting course satisfying AAN clinical and electrophysiologic criteria evaluated between January 1991 and August 2004 were reviewed. Frequency of specific pathological alterations such as demyelination, inflammation, onion bulb formation, and axonal changes in sural nerve biopsies was evaluated. Statistical Analysis : SPSS statistical package was used to calculate mean, range, and standard deviation. Student′s t test, chi-square test, and ANOVA were used for determining statistical significance. Results and Conclusion : Reduction in myelinated fiber density was most frequent (93.5%, followed by demyelination (82.8%, inflammation (58.7%, and onion bulb formation (28.3%. Endoneurial inflammation was frequent in the relapsing-remitting form and epineurial inflammation and axonal changes in those with progressive course. Greater disability at presentation, poor response to immunomodulation, and lower CSF protein levels was seen in those with axonal pathology. Pathological abnormalities were demonstrable in all (100%, whereas electrophysiological abnormalities were detected in 90.8%, suggesting that supportive histologic AAN criteria are helpful in diagnosis of CIDP.

  3. Quadriceps strength assessed by magnetic stimulation of femoral nerve in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Chun-rong; CHEN Rong-chang

    2011-01-01

    Background Skeletal muscle dysfunction is one of important systemic manifestations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is associated with mortality in patients with COPD, thus quantifying its strength is of great clinical interest and of particular value. Quadriceps maximal volitional contraction (MVC) is often used for the routine measurements of this muscle's strength; while twitch tension (TwQ) evoked by magnetic stimulation of the femoral nerve has been employed for measurement of quadriceps strength non-volitionally. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and severity of skeletal muscle dysfunction in COPD patients by measurement of quadriceps strength with volitional and non-volitional techniques, and to probe into some methodological issues. Methods We recruited 71 COPD patients and 60 control subjects. Quadriceps strength was measured with both maximality of TwQ and MVC force. The reproducibility for TwQ and MVC was investigated using within-occasion variability from three repeated maneuvers. Results Maximal TwQ was achieved in 121 participants at a mean of 90% of the stimulator's maximum output. The mean maxmality of TwQ was decrease by about 44%-47% in COPD patients as compared with controls (P<0.05), so was MVC. There was a significant correlation between quadriceps TwQ and MVC, and the mean ratio of TwQ/MVC was 0.29 in controls and 0.33 in patients. The coefficient of variation showed that TwQ yielded lower within-occasion variability than MVC in both groups. Conclusions Quadriceps strength is commonly and substantially impaired in patients with COPD, in terms of MVC as well as TwQ. The magnetic stimulation of the femoral nerve presents a higher reproducibility and is a better technique for measurement of quadriceps strength for the general population, especially for those who are too unwell to perform a full MVC; while it may not be applied to subjects who are over-weighted.

  4. Peripheral Nerve Ultrasonography in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: Correlations with Clinical and Neurophysiological Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merola, Aristide; Rosso, Michela; Romagnolo, Alberto; Peci, Erdita; Cocito, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This cross-sectional study analyzes the pattern of ultrasound peripheral nerve alterations in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) at different stages of functional disability. Material and Methods. 22 CIDP and 10 MMN patients and a group of 70 healthy controls were evaluated with an ultrasound scan of the median, ulnar, peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves. Results were correlated with clinical disability scales and nerve conduction studies. Results. Patients with intermediate functional impairment showed relatively larger cross-sectional areas than subjects with either a milder (p CIDP and in MMN. In addition, MMN was associated with greater side-to-side intranerve variability (p CIDP (p CIDP; p CIDP and MMN showed differential US aspects, with greater side-to-side intranerve variability in MMN and higher cross-sectional areas in CIDP. PMID:27313890

  5. Anxiety and depression in patients with amputated limbs suffering from phantom pain: A comparative study with non-phantom chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Kazemi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion : Our results indicate that depression and anxiety are not more common in PLP patients, whereas they are more prevalent in subjects with non-phantom chronic pain. These lower levels of anxiety and depression in PLP compared with chronic pain is a new finding that needs to be evaluated further, which may lead to new insights into the pathogenesis of phantom pain in further studies.

  6. The pain drawing as an instrument for identifying cervical spine nerve involvement in chronic whiplash-associated disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhoff, Gabriella; Landén Ludvigsson, Maria; Peterson, Gunnel; Bertilson, Bo Christer; Elf, Madeleine; Peolsson, Anneli

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a standardized assessment of pain drawing with regard to clinical signs of cervical spine nerve root involvement. Design This cross-sectional study included data collected in a randomized controlled study. Patients: Two hundred and sixteen patients with chronic (≥6 months) whiplash-associated disorders, grade 2 or 3, were included in this study. Methods The validity, sensitivity, and specificity of a standardized pain drawing assessment for determining nerve root involvement were analyzed, compared to the clinical assessment. In addition, we analyzed the interrater reliability with 50 pain drawings. Results Agreement was poor between the standardized pain drawing assessment and the clinical assessment (kappa =0.11, 95% CI: −0.03 to 0.20). Sensitivity was high (93%), but specificity was low (19%). Interrater reliability was good (kappa =0.64, 95% CI: 0.53 to 0.76). Conclusion: The standardized pain drawing assessment of nerve root involvement in chronic whiplash-associated disorders was not in agreement with the clinical assessment. Further research is warranted to optimize the utilization of a pain/discomfort drawing as a supportive instrument for identifying nerve involvement in cervical spinal injuries.

  7. Severity and patterns of blood-nerve barrier breakdown in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: correlations with clinical subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumitaka Shimizu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP is currently classified into clinical subtypes, including typical and atypical forms (multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM and distal acquired demyelinating symmetric neuropathy (DADS. The aim of this study was to elucidate the patterns and severity of breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier (BNB in each CIDP subtype. METHODS: We evaluated the effects of sera obtained from patients with typical CIDP, MADSAM and DADS and control subjects on the expression levels of tight junction proteins and transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER value in human peripheral nerve microvascular endothelial cells (PnMECs. RESULTS: The sera obtained from the patients with the three clinical phenotypes of CIDP decreased the amount of claudin-5 protein levels and TEER values in the PnMECs. In addition, the sera obtained from typical CIDP patients more prominently reduced claudin-5 protein levels and TEER values in the PnMECs than did that obtained from the MADSAM and DADS patients. Furthermore, the severity of BNB disruption after exposure to the sera was associated with higher Hughes grade, lower MRC score, more pronounced slowing of motor nerve conduction in the median nerve and higher frequency of abnormal temporal dispersion. CONCLUSIONS: Sera derived from typical CIDP patients destroy the BNB more severely than those from MADSAM or DADS patients. The extent of BNB disruption in the setting of CIDP is associated with clinical disability and demyelination in the nerve trunk. These observations may explain the phenotypical differences between CIDP subtypes.

  8. Laparoscopic Uterine Nerve Ethanol Neurolysis (LUNEN in Patients with Chronic Pelvic Pain

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    Seyhan Sönmez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the efficacy of laparoscopic uterine nerve ethanol neurolysis (LUNEN for pain man­agement in patients with chronic pelvic pain (CPP. Methods: LUNEN, as a chemical neurolysis procedure, was performed on 22 subjects, and these were com­pared with 20 controls that had a diagnostic laparoscopy alone. Pre-treatment and postoperative 6th month Visual Analogue Scale (VAS scores were estimated and a sub­jective pain evaluation questioning patients’ satisfaction about pain relief in the 6th month after surgery was also performed. Results: A total of 31 (73.8% out of 42 CPP patients had a laparoscopic pelvic pathology. Preoperative VAS scores were similar in the groups; however, the mean postop­erative VAS score was significantly lower in the LUNEN group than in the control group (3.18 ± 2.88 vs. 5.35 ± 3.09; p=0.02. In the LUNEN group, the number of pa­tients who stated that their pain was relieved partially or completely was also significantly higher than in the con­trol group (82% vs. 40%, p=0.019. Conclusion: LUNEN is a feasible, safe and effective sur­gical alternative to traditional surgical methods in patients suffering from CPP. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (1: 7-13

  9. Effects of chronic aluminum exposure on learning and memory and brain-derived nerve growth factor in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘宝龙

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of chronic aluminum exposure on the learning and memory abilities and brain-derived nerve growth factor (BDNF) in SpragueDawley (SD) rats.Methods Thirty-two male SD rats were randomly and equally divided into 4 groups:control group and high-,middle-,and low-dose exposure groups.The rats in high-,middle-,and low-dose expo-

  10. Ameliorative potential of Butea monosperma on chronic constriction injury of sciatic nerve induced neuropathic pain in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Venkata R.K. Thiagarajan; Palanichamy Shanmugam; Uma M. Krishnan; Arunachalam Muthuraman; Nirmal Singh

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative role of ethanolic extract from leaves of Butea monosperma in chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve induced neuropathic pain in rats. Hot plate, acetone drop, paw pressure, Von Frey hair and tail immersion tests were performed to assess the degree of thermal hyperalgesia, cold chemical allodynia, mechanical hyperalgesia & allodynia in the left hind paw and tail thermal hyperalgesia. Further on, thiobarbituric acid reac...

  11. Inactivation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves reduces pulmonary remodeling in guinea pigs with chronic allergic pulmonary inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    C.M. Prado; G.Z. da Rocha; E.A. Leick-Maldonado; C.M. Starling; V.L. Capelozzi; M. A. Martins; I.F.L.C. Tibério

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary remodeling is an important feature of asthma physiopathology that can contribute to irreversible changes in lung function. Although neurokinins influence lung inflammation, their exact role in the extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling remains to be determined. Our objective was to investigate whether inactivation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves modulates pulmonary ECM remodeling in animals with chronic lung inflammation. After 14 days of capsaicin (50 mg/kg, sc) or vehicle administrat...

  12. Intraoperative and pathological findings of intramedullary amputation neuroma associated with spinal ependymoma

    OpenAIRE

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Tsunetoshi, Kenzo; Kodera, Toshiaki; Kitai, Ryuhei; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Amputation neuromas typically arise in injured peripheral nerves; rarely, however, they arise in the spinal cord. We report a rare case of intramedullary amputation neuroma associated with ependymoma in the cervical spinal cord. A 73-year-old woman presented with a 5-year history of progressive gait disturbance. Neurological examination revealed complete motor deficit of her hands and legs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine revealed an enhancing mass within the spinal cord at t...

  13. Replantation vs revision amputation in single digit zone II amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Diwany, M; Odobescu, A; Bélanger-Douet, M; Berbiche, D; Arsenault, J; Bou-Merhi, J; Harris, P G; Danino, A M

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the functional outcomes of zone II amputations treated with either replantation or revision amputation at our institution to better aid patients in their decision making process regarding these treatment options. We conducted a comparative retrospective study. All cases of single digit amputations received at our replantation center between 2007 and 2011 were screened for single digit zone II injuries. These patients were stratified based on the treatment received: replantation vs revision amputation. Patients were called and invited to participate in the research project. Those who accepted to enter the study were asked to complete the Quick-DASH, the Beck Depression Inventory-short form, and a custom made questionnaire. There were seventeen patients with single digit zone II replantation and fourteen patients with similar injuries who underwent revision amputation and agreed to take part in the study. Our data revealed that the duration of sick leave, occupation after injury, professional and social reintegration, discontinued activities, and self-confidence were not statistically different between the two groups. The average hospital stay and the follow-up period of replanted individuals were longer. The replantation group did not have higher levels of pain or cold intolerance, and the global functional and esthetic satisfaction levels were similar between the two groups. Also, Beck Depression Inventory and Quick-DASH scores were not statistically different. Yet, significantly more patients in the replantation group would opt to repeat the replantation than revised patients would opt for revision amputation. From a functional viewpoint, our study suggests that revision amputation is not superior to replantation in zone II single digit amputations. This is valuable information that should be given to patients when deciding on the treatment process and to insure a proper informed consent. PMID:25858276

  14. Decompression–Avulsion of the Auriculotemporal Nerve for Treatment of Migraines and Chronic Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanniec, Kyle; Borsting, Emily; Amirlak, Bardia

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Surgical decompression of peripheral branches of the trigeminal and occipital nerves has been shown to alleviate migraine symptoms. Site II surgery involves decompression of the zygomaticotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve by the technique developed by Guyuron. Failure of site II surgery may occur secondary to an inability to recognize a second temporal trigger: site V, the auriculotemporal nerve. A direct approach for site V has been used with no clear description in the literature. Herein, we describe a safe and efficient method for auriculotemporal nerve decompression during the Guyuron endoscopic approach. Close attention to all temporal sites is necessary to avoid potential failure of migraine decompression surgery. PMID:27200240

  15. Behavioral and cellular consequences of high-electrode count Utah Arrays chronically implanted in rat sciatic nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wark, H. A. C.; Mathews, K. S.; Normann, R. A.; Fernandez, E.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Before peripheral nerve electrodes can be used for the restoration of sensory and motor functions in patients with neurological disorders, the behavioral and histological consequences of these devices must be investigated. These indices of biocompatibility can be defined in terms of desired functional outcomes; for example, a device may be considered for use as a therapeutic intervention if the implanted subject retains functional neurons post-implantation even in the presence of a foreign body response. The consequences of an indwelling device may remain localized to cellular responses at the device-tissue interface, such as fibrotic encapsulation of the device, or they may affect the animal more globally, such as impacting behavioral or sensorimotor functions. The objective of this study was to investigate the overall consequences of implantation of high-electrode count intrafascicular peripheral nerve arrays, High Density Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (HD-USEAs; 25 electrodes mm-2). Approach. HD-USEAs were implanted in rat sciatic nerves for one and two month periods. We monitored wheel running, noxious sensory paw withdrawal reflexes, footprints, nerve morphology and macrophage presence at the tissue-device interface. In addition, we used a novel approach to contain the arrays in actively behaving animals that consisted of an organic nerve wrap. A total of 500 electrodes were implanted across all ten animals. Main results. The results demonstrated that chronic implantation (⩽8 weeks) of HD-USEAs into peripheral nerves can evoke behavioral deficits that recover over time. Morphology of the nerve distal to the implantation site showed variable signs of nerve fiber degeneration and regeneration. Cytology adjacent to the device-tissue interface also showed a variable response, with some electrodes having many macrophages surrounding the electrodes, while other electrodes had few or no macrophages present. This variability was also seen along the length

  16. Tetanus following replantation of an amputated finger: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashida Kenji

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Tetanus is an infectious disease caused by tetanus toxin produced by Clostridium tetani and induces severe neurological manifestations. We treated a patient who developed tetanus during hospitalization for replantation of an amputated finger. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published case report of such an entity. Case presentation A 49-year-old Japanese man had an amputation of his right middle finger at the distal interphalangeal joint region in an accident at work. His middle finger was successfully replanted, but his fingertip was partially necrotized because of crushing and so additional reconstruction with a reverse digital arterial flap was performed 15 days after the injury. Tetanus developed 21 days after replantation of the middle finger, but symptoms remitted via rapid diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions In replantation after finger trauma with exposure of nerve and blood vessel bundles, concern over injuring nerves and blood vessels may prevent irrigation and debridement from being performed sufficiently; these treatments may have been insufficiently performed in this patient. It is likely that the replanted middle finger partially adhered, and Clostridium tetani colonized the partially necrotized region. Even when there is only limited soil contamination, administration of tetanus toxoid and anti-tetanus immunoglobulin is necessary when the fingers are injured outdoors and the finger nerves and blood vessels are exposed. The drugs should be administered just after replantation if the finger has been amputated. However, if clinicians pay attention to the possibility of tetanus development, treatment can be rapidly initiated.

  17. Electrophysiological evaluation of nerve function in inferior alveolar nerve injury: relationship between nerve action potentials and histomorphometric observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, M; Sasaki, K; Shibahara, T

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury by determining degrees of nerve disturbance using the sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV). Crush and partial and complete nerve amputation injuries were applied to the IAN of rabbits, then SNAPs and histomorphometric observations were recorded at 1, 5, and 10 weeks. For crush injury, most nerves were smaller in diameter at 5 weeks than at 1 week, however after 10 weeks, extensive nerve regeneration was observed. The SNAP showed a decrease in SCV at weeks 1 and 5, followed by an increase at week 10. For partial nerve amputation, small to medium-sized nerve fibres were observed at weeks 1 and 5, then larger nerves were seen at week 10. Minimal changes in SCV were observed at weeks 1 and 5, however SCV increased at week 10. For complete nerve amputation, nerve fibres were sparse at week 1, but gradual nerve regeneration was observed at weeks 5 and 10. SNAPs were detectable from week 10, however the SCV was extremely low. This study showed SCV to be an effective factor in the evaluation of nerve injury and regeneration. PMID:26433750

  18. Fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for treatment of chronic low back and lower extremity pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gozani SN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Shai N Gozani NeuroMetrix, Inc., Waltham, MA, USA Objective: The objective of this study was to determine if fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (FS-TENS is effective in treating chronic low back and lower extremity pain. Background: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is widely used for treatment of chronic pain. General-purpose transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation devices are designed for stimulation anywhere on the body and often cannot be used while the user is active or sleeping. FS-TENS devices are designed for placement at a pre-determined location, which enables development of a wearable device for use over extended time periods. Methods: Study participants with chronic low back and/or lower extremity pain self-administered an FS-TENS device for 60 days. Baseline, 30-, and 60-day follow-up data were obtained through an online questionnaire. The primary outcome measure was the patient global impression of change. Pain intensity and interference were assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Changes in use of concomitant pain medications were evaluated with a single-item global self-rating. Results: One hundred and thirty participants were enrolled, with 88 completing the 60-day follow-up questionnaire. Most participants (73.9% were 50 years of age or older. At baseline, low back pain was identified by 85.3%, lower extremity pain by 71.6%, and upper extremity pain by 62.5%. Participants reported widespread pain, at baseline, with a mean of 3.4 (standard deviation 1.1 pain sites. At the 60-day follow-up, 80.7% of participants reported that their chronic pain had improved and they were classified as responders. Baseline characteristics did not differentiate non-responders from responders. There were numerical trends toward reduced pain interference with walking ability and sleep, and greater pain relief in responders. There was a large difference in use of concomitant pain medications, with 80

  19. Direct conscious telemetry recordings demonstrate increased renal sympathetic nerve activity in rats with chronic kidney disease

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    Ibrahim M Salman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with sympathetic hyperactivity and impaired blood pressure control reflex responses, yet direct evidence demonstrating these features of autonomic dysfunction in conscious animals is still lacking. Here we measured renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA and mean arterial pressure (MAP using telemetry-based recordings in a rat model of CKD, the Lewis Polycystic Kidney (LPK rat, and assessed responses to chemoreflex activation and acute stress. Male LPK and Lewis control animals (total n=16 were instrumented for telemetric recording of RSNA and MAP. At 12–13 weeks-of-age, resting RSNA and MAP, sympathetic and haemodynamic responses to both peripheral (hypoxia: 10% O2 and central chemoreflex (hypercapnia: 7% CO2 activation and acute stress (open-field exposure, were measured. As indicators of renal function, urinary protein (UPro and creatinine (Ucr levels were assessed. LPK rats had higher resting RSNA (1.2±0.1 vs. 0.6±0.1 µV, p<0.05 and MAP (151±8 vs. 97±2 mmHg, p<0.05 compared to Lewis. MAP was negatively correlated with Ucr (r=-0.80, p=0.002 and positively correlated with RSNA (r=0.66, p=0.014, with multiple linear regression modeling indicating the strongest correlation was with Ucr. RSNA and MAP responses to activation of the central chemoreflex and open-field stress were reduced in the LPK relative to the Lewis (all p<0.05. This is the first description of dual conscious telemetry recording of RSNA and MAP in a genetic rodent model of CKD. Elevated RSNA is likely a key contributor to the marked hypertension in this model, while attenuated RSNA and MAP responses to central chemoreflex activation and acute stress in the LPK indicate possible deficits in the neural processing of autonomic outflows evoked by these sympathoexcitatory pathways.

  20. Blockage of the neurokinin 1 receptor and capsaicin-induced ablation of the enteric afferent nerves protect SCID mice against T-cell-induced chronic colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Kristensen, Nanna Ny; Fernandez, Carmen de Felipe; Claesson, Mogens H

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The neurotransmitter substance P (SP) released by, and the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV1), expressed by afferent nerves, have been implicated in mucosal neuro-immune-regulation. To test if enteric afferent nerves are of importance for the development of chronic colitis......, we examined antagonists for the high-affinity neurokinin 1 (NK-1) SP receptor and the TRPV1 receptor agonist capsaicin in a T-cell transfer model for chronic colitis. METHODS: Chronic colitis was induced in SCID mice by injection of CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. The importance of NK-1 signaling and TRPV1...

  1. Feasibility of Human Amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells in Alleviation of Neuropathic Pain in Chronic Constrictive Injury Nerve Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Yi Chiang

    Full Text Available The neurobehavior of neuropathic pain by chronic constriction injury (CCI of sciatic nerve is very similar to that in humans, and it is accompanied by a profound local inflammation response. In this study, we assess the potentiality of human amniotic fluid derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAFMSCs for alleviating the neuropathic pain in a chronic constriction nerve injury model.This neuropathic pain animal model was conducted by four 3-0 chromic gut ligatures loosely ligated around the left sciatic nerve in Sprague-Dawley rats. The intravenous administration of hAFMSCs with 5x105 cells was conducted for three consecutive days.The expression IL-1β, TNF-α and synaptophysin in dorsal root ganglion cell culture was remarkably attenuated when co-cultured with hAFMSCs. The significant decrease of PGP 9.5 in the skin after CCI was restored by administration of hAFMSCs. Remarkably increased expression of CD 68 and TNF-α and decreased S-100 and neurofilament expression in injured nerve were rescued by hAFMSCs administration. Increases in synaptophysin and TNF-α over the dorsal root ganglion were attenuated by hAFMSCs. Significant expression of TNF-α and OX-42 over the dorsal spinal cord was substantially attenuated by hAFMSCs. The increased amplitude of sensory evoked potential as well as expression of synaptophysin and TNF-α expression was alleviated by hAFMSCs. Human AFMSCs significantly improved the threshold of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia as well as various parameters of CatWalk XT gait analysis.Human AFMSCs administration could alleviate the neuropathic pain demonstrated in histomorphological alteration and neurobehavior possibly through the modulation of the inflammatory response.

  2. Chronic recording of regenerating VIIIth nerve axons with a sieve electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensinger, A. F.; Anderson, D. J.; Buchko, C. J.; Johnson, M. A.; Martin, D. C.; Tresco, P. A.; Silver, R. B.; Highstein, S. M.

    2000-01-01

    A micromachined silicon substrate sieve electrode was implanted within transected toadfish (Opsanus tau) otolith nerves. High fidelity, single unit neural activity was recorded from seven alert and unrestrained fish 30 to 60 days after implantation. Fibrous coatings of genetically engineered bioactive protein polymers and nerve guide tubes increased the number of axons regenerating through the electrode pores when compared with controls. Sieve electrodes have potential as permanent interfaces to the nervous system and to bridge missing connections between severed or damaged nerves and muscles. Recorded impulses might also be amplified and used to control prosthetic devices.

  3. Variants in genes belonging to the fibroblast growth factor family are associated with lower extremity amputation in non-Hispanic whites: Findings from the chronic renal insufficiency cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Jayanta; Mitra, Nandita; Townsend, Raymond R; Fischer, Michael; Schelling, Jeffrey R; Margolis, David J

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes is the major risk factor for nontraumatic lower extremity amputation (LEA). The role of genetic polymorphisms in predisposing diabetics to impaired wound healing leading to LEA has not been sufficiently explored. We investigated the association between a set of genes belonging to the angiogenesis/wound repair pathway with LEA in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort, a study of adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) that includes a subgroup with diabetes. This study was performed on 3,772 Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort participants who were genotyped on the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array chip. A total of 1,017 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 22 genes belonging to the angiogenesis/would repair pathway were investigated. LEA was determined from patient self-report. The association between genetic variants and LEA status was examined using logistic regression and additive genetic models after stratifying the cohort by race/ethnicity and diabetic status. Unadjusted analyses as well as analyses adjusted for age, sex, estimated glomerular filtration rate, body mass index, peripheral vascular disease, hemoglobin A1c, and population stratification were performed. In non-Hispanic white participants with diabetes, rs11938826 and rs1960669, both intronic SNPs in the gene basic fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), were significantly associated with LEA in covariate-adjusted analysis (OR: 2.83 (95% CI: 1.73, 4.62); p-value: 0.000034; Bonferroni adjusted p-value: 0.0006) and (OR: 2.61 (95% CI: 1.48, 4.61); p-value: 0.00095; Bonferroni adjusted p-value: 0.02). In the same subgroup, rs10883688, an FGF8 SNP of unknown functional effect, was also associated with LEA (OR: 1.72 (95% Confidence Interval: 1.14, 2.6); p-value: 0.00999; Bonferroni adjusted p-value: 0.04). No statistically significant associations were identified in the other ethnic groups. In conclusion, variant/s in FGF2 and FGF8 may predispose diabetics with CKD to LEA. Dysregulation of the FGF2 gene

  4. Transforming Growth Factor-β Promotes Axonal Regeneration After Chronic Nerve Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Wale A R

    2016-04-01

    When spinal cord injury (SCI) occurs, injured cells must survive and regenerate to close gaps caused by the injury and to create functional motor units. After peripheral nerve injury, Wallerian degeneration in the distal nerve stump creates a neurotrophic and growth-supportive environment for injured neurons and axons via Schwann cells and secreted cytokines/neurotrophins. In both SCI and peripheral nerve injury, injured motor and sensory neurons must regenerate axons, eventually reaching and reinnervating target tissue (SDC Figure 1, http://links.lww.com/BRS/B116). This process is often unsuccessful after SCI, and the highly complex anatomy of branching axons and nerves in the peripheral nervous system leads to slow recovery of function, even with careful and appropriate techniques. PMID:27015069

  5. The Effect of Alternating Current Iontophoresis on Rats with the Chronic Constriction Injury to the Infraorbital Nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Masahiko Shimada; Haruhisa Fukayama; Masahiro Umino; Yoko Yamazaki

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of AC iontophoresis on rats with the chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the infraorbital nerve by animal experiments. CCI model rats were divided into four groups, namely, rats that received general anesthesia for 60 min except AC IOP (CCI: n = 5), AC IOP with 0.9% physiological saline for 60 min (CCI + saline AC IOP: n = 5), AC IOP with 4% lidocaine hydrochloride for 60 min (CCI + lidocaine AC IOP: n = 5), and attachment of two electrodes soaked with ...

  6. Phantom pain after eye amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie L R; Prause, Jan U; Toft, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the quality of phantom pain, its intensity and frequency following eye amputation. Possible triggers and relievers of phantom pain are investigated. Methods: The hospital database was searched using surgery codes for patients who received ocular evisceration, enucleation...... conducted by a trained interviewer. Results: Of the 173 patients in the study, 39 experienced phantom pain. The median age of patients who had experienced phantom pain was 45 years (range: 19–88). Follow-up time from eye amputation to participation in the investigation was 4 years (range: 2–46). Phantom...... scale, ranging from 0 to 100, was 36 (range: 1–89). One-third of the patients experienced phantom pain every day. Chilliness, windy weather and psychological stress/fatigue were the most commonly reported triggers for pain. Conclusions: Phantom pain after eye amputation is relatively common. The pain...

  7. Isolation and characterisation of T lymphocytes from sural nerve biopsies in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Smith, A.; Gaston, J S; Barber, P. C.; Winer, J B

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterise cultured T lymphocytes from nerve biopsies in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). METHODS: Sural nerve biopsies, obtained from six patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome, four with CIDP, and six controls with other neuropathies, were cultured with 20 U/ml recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) for eight weeks. Flow cytometry was used to determine the phenotype of cultured T lymphocytes. Their proliferative re...

  8. MRI of the cervical nerve roots in the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: a single-institution, retrospective case–control study

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Kanta; Mori, Nobuyuki; Yokota, Yusuke; Suenaga, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Objective To systematically evaluate the usefulness of assessing the cervical nerve roots by MRI for the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Design Single-institution, retrospective case–control study. Setting A regional referral hospital. Participants We retrospectively enrolled 15 consecutive patients with CIDP who satisfied the European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society (EFNS/PNS) typical and definite criteria and under...

  9. Occipital peripheral nerve stimulation in the management of chronic intractable occipital neuralgia in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Calvillo Octavio; Skaribas Ioannis; Delikanaki-Skaribas Evangelia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Occipital peripheral nerve stimulation is an interventional pain management therapy that provides beneficial results in the treatment of refractory chronic occipital neuralgia. Herein we present a first-of-its-kind case study of a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 and bilateral occipital neuralgia treated with occipital peripheral nerve stimulation. Case presentation A 42-year-old Caucasian woman presented with bilateral occipital neuralgia refractory to various conv...

  10. Assessment of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in children with chronic heart failure using quantitative iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in children with chronic heart failure was examined by quantitative iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial imaging in 33 patients aged 7.5±6.1 years (range 0-18 years), including 8 with cardiomyopathy, 15 with congenital heart disease, 3 with anthracycrine cardiotoxicity, 3 with myocarditis, 3 with primary pulmonary hypertension and 1 with Pompe's disease. Anterior planar images were obtained 15 min and 3 hr after the injection of iodine-123 MIBG. The cardiac iodine-123 MIBG uptake was assessed as the heart to upper mediastinum uptake activity ratio of the delayed image (H/M) and the cardiac percentage washout rate (%WR). The severity of chronic heart failure was class I (no medication) in 8 patients, class II (no symptom with medication) in 9, class III (symptom even with medication) in 10 and class IV (late cardiac death) in 6. H/M was 2.33±0.22 in chronic heart failure class I, 2.50±0.34 in class II, 1.95±0.61 in class III, and 1.39±0.29 in class IV (p<0.05). %WR was 24.8±12.8% in chronic heart failure class I, 23.3±10.2% in class II, 49.2±24.5% in class III, and 66.3±26.5% in class IV (p<0.05). The low H/M and high %WR were proportionate to the severity of chronic heart failure. Cardiac iodine-123 MIBG showed cardiac adrenergic neuronal dysfunction in children with severe chronic heart failure. Quantitative iodine-123 MIBG myocardial imaging is clinically useful as a predictor of therapeutic outcome and mortality in children with chronic heart failure. (author)

  11. Risk Factors for Foot Amputation in Patients Hospitalized for Diabetic Foot Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrone Quilici, Maria Teresa; Del Fiol, Fernando de Sá; Franzin Vieira, Alexandre Eduardo; Toledo, Maria Inês

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and quantify risk factors for amputation in diabetic patients hospitalized for foot infections. This cross-sectional study comprised 100 patients with diabetic infectious complications in the lower limbs. The variables investigated were related to diabetes, infection, and treatment compliance. Multiple Cox regression analysis was performed to identify the variables independently associated with the outcome of amputation. The most prevalent chronic complications were neuropathy and hypertension. Most patients presented with a neuroischemic foot (86%). The Morisky test showed that 72% were not compliant with diabetes treatment. Regarding patient outcome, 61% progressed to amputation, 14% to debridement, and 9% to revascularization. The results showed a 42% higher risk for progression to amputation in patients with previous use of antimicrobials. Also, the amputation risk was 26% higher for those less compliant with diabetes treatment. An increase of one point in the Wagner ulcer classification criteria corresponded to a 65% increase in the risk of amputation. Undergoing conservative, nonsurgical procedures prior to admission provided a 63% reduction in the risk of amputation. Knowledge of these factors is critical to enable multidisciplinary teams to develop treatment plans for these patients so as to prevent the need for amputation. PMID:26998493

  12. Pain Management: Post-Amputation Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain Management Post-Amputation Pain Volume 8 · Issue 2 · March/April 1998 Text size Larger text Smaller text Java Required Print page Save and share ... by G. Edward Jeffries, MD, FACS Post-Amputation Pain Post-amputation pain is one of the most ...

  13. 38 CFR 4.68 - Amputation rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amputation rule. 4.68... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.68 Amputation rule. The combined rating for disabilities of an extremity shall not exceed the rating for the amputation at the elective level,...

  14. 抽脂结合腓肠神经内侧头离断术在小腿塑形中的应用%Application of liposuction combined with the amputation of sural nerve medial head in calf shaping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常文超; 孙肇晟; 张敬德

    2013-01-01

    目的:探索抽脂结合腓肠神经内侧头离断在改善小腿外形的临床疗效.方法:通过腘窝皮肤皱襞处取3 ~ 5cm横切口,抽取脂肪结合离断腓肠神经内侧头,使皮下脂肪容积减少和腓肠肌内侧头失神经萎缩,达到小腿塑形的目的.测量并记录小腿周径和外形的变化.结果:本组14例患者行皮下抽脂结合离断腓肠神经内侧支术后,小腿最大周径缩小(3.5±1.5) cm.小腿内径曲线变得平缓.抽脂结合离断腓肠神经内侧头术后,患者休息2~3天后可下床行走,早期有轻度不适,适应2天后症状基本消失.随访半年,站立、行走等日常活动未受影响.结论:抽脂结合离断腓肠神经内侧头术,可缩小小腿容积,改善小腿外形,方法简便、安全,效果明显,同时不影响患者的日常功能活动.%Objective Explore the curative clinical effect about liposuction combined with dividing the caput mediale of the sural nerve to improve the appearance of the crus.Methods Take the 3~5cm transverse incision on the skin folds of popliteal fossa,extract fat combined with dividing the caput mediale of the sural nerve to reach the goal of the reduction of subcutaneous fat and caput mediale of gastrocnemius nerve atrophy.Measure and record changes in circumference and shape of the calf.Result This group of 14 patients who underwent subcutaneous liposuction combined with medial branch away from the sural nerve,postoperative the largest circumference of calf reduces (3.5±1.5)cm.The inside diameter curve of the calf flattens.Patients can walk normally after the rest for 2~3days after surgery,when they underwent liposuction combining with medial branch away from the sural nerve,they will have mild discomfort in the early stage,the symptoms will disappear after 2days.Follow-up for six months,standing,walking and other daily activities were not affected.Conclusion Liposuction and medial branch being away from the sural nerve can cause the

  15. A diagnosis challenge-L4 nerve root compression as the initial presentation of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Alexianu, Marilena; Bastian, Alexandra; Sapira, Violeta; Herţea, Cristina; Cojocaru, M

    2012-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 65-year-old woman who was admitted for paraparesis and paresthesias in the inferior limbs. The neurological examination revealed the difficulty in extension of the right foot and of the right toe, accompanied by paresthesias located in the anterolateral area of the right leg, dorsum and plantar area of the foot, the reduction of the right knee jerk, and of the ankle tendon jerk both sides. The vertebro-spinal MRI showed lumbar canal stenosis with L4 intraforaminal compression on the right, and L2-L3 on the left. CSF examination revealed mild increase in protein concentration. The morphological picture of the sural nerve biopsy was compatible with a chronic inflammatory neuropathy and severe muscular lesions of neurogenic origin were observed on right gastrocnemius muscle biopsy. The diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) was established. Solu-medrol (0.5 g/d)-5 days, then medrol (prednisolone) was done, followed by improving of the symptomatology. For the relapse of the disease intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG)-0.4 g/kg/d-5 days was the elective treatment. Six months later she presented a new relapse. IVIG were administered with the remission of the sensitive symptoms. A chronic treatment with medrol was recommended. The diagnosis of L4 disc herniation was obvious in the studied case, but the electroneurographic examination brought extra data for the associated diagnosis of CIDP whose onset was asymmetrical and initially paucisymptomatic. Neither the electroneurographic examination nor the CSF examination were total relevant for CIDP, imposing the sural nerve biopsy. The diagnosis of CIDP involves a team-work composed of neurologist, electroneurophysiologist and neuropathologist. PMID:23610977

  16. Minor amputations for diabetic foot salvage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Y. Habel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Foot ulceration in diabetic patients is a frequent complication of diabetes mellitus (DM, necessitating hospitalization for control of infection, wound care and glycemic control. These patients are at risk for potential loss of the involved limb as well as for future loss of the contralateral limb. Diabetic foot is the consequence of peripheral neuropathy complicated by infrapopliteal peripheral vascular disease. Most of the patients present with chronic plantar ulceration and with cellulitis or an abscess. In a significant number of patients, it is observed that the frequency of life or limb threatening infection is less with an intact skin cover. Limb salvage employs the use of culture specific antibiotics, sharp debridement or a minor amputation, wound care and/or skin cover as the situation demands.

  17. Replantation of traumatic limb amputation above the elbow: a report of 4 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz Karimian

    2014-02-01

    Conclusion: Transplantation of the amputated limb can be done in spite of limited resources. Any delay in repairing damaged nerves will result great reduction of final organs’ performance. A limb, made from the own body, always take precedence to prosthesis, even when the efficiency is low.

  18. Distal amputations for the diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Nather

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Minor amputations in diabetic patients with foot complications have been well studied in the literature but controversy still remains as to what constitutes successful or non-successful limb salvage. In addition, there is a lack of consensus on the definition of a minor or distal amputation and a major or proximal amputation for the diabetic population. In this article, the authors review the existing literature to evaluate the efficacy of minor amputations in this selected group of patients in terms of diabetic limb salvage and also propose several definitions regarding diabetic foot amputations.

  19. Sensory cortical re-mapping following upper-limb amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Yao; Albert Chen; Todd Kuiken; Carolina Carmona; Julius Dewald

    2015-01-01

    This case study demonstrates the change of sensory cortical representations of the residual parts of the arm in an individual who underwent a trans-humeral amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation (TR). As a relatively new surgical technique, TR restores a direct neural connection from amputated sensorimotor nerves to specific target muscles. This method has been successfully applied to upper-limb and lower-limb amputees, and has shown effectiveness in regaining control signals via th...

  20. ROLE OF PSYCHOLOGICAL PROBLEMS IN EFFICACY OF TRANSCUTANEOUS ELECTRICAL NERVE STIMU-LATION IN PATIENTS SUFFERING FROM CHRONIC PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Mirzamani

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients afflicted with chronic pain have both physical and psychological problems. This research investigated the impact of the psychological factors in the treatment results of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS in the patients afflicted with chronic diseases. The subjects were 37 individuals (20 males and 17 females with the mean age of 46 who had referred to two centers of physiotherapy treatment to receive TENS treatment process. Subjects were suffering from chronic pain in upper part of their body, hands and legs. The subjects were tested and screened psychologically by PDQ4+, MPQ, MPI, and BDI questionnaires. On the basis of the personality disorder and the intensity of the depression, they were divided into two groups: 1 patients with psychological symptoms (n = 14; and 2 patients without psychological symptoms (n = 23. In order to study the rate of the pain intensity reduction in both groups, the MPQ questionnaire was used in three stages (before beginning, in the middle and at the end of the treatment. Also, the MPI questionnaire was used in order to review the inter-personal problems, the interference of the pain in life, daily performance and the rate of social support. Results showed that in each group, the pain intensity had significantly reduced as a result of the impact of TENS treatment and the psychological factors did not have meaningful impacts. Also there was statistically significant correlation between the rate of social support of the family members and the reduction of pain intensity.

  1. Development of Phantom Limb Pain after Femoral Nerve Block

    OpenAIRE

    Sadiah Siddiqui; Anthony N. Sifonios; Vanny Le; Martinez, Marc E.; Eloy, Jean D.; Andrew G. Kaufman

    2014-01-01

    Historically, phantom limb pain (PLP) develops in 50–80% of amputees and may arise within days following an amputation for reasons presently not well understood. Our case involves a 29-year-old male with previous surgical amputation who develops PLP after the performance of a femoral nerve block. Although there have been documented cases of reactivation of PLP in amputees after neuraxial technique, there have been no reported events associated with femoral nerve blockade. We base our discussi...

  2. Replantation of ring avulsion amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabapathy R

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Replantation of ring avulsion injuries is a challenge because of the long segment damage to the vessels and intrinsic damage caused to soft tissues at the proximal edge of the amputation. Eight patients with total ring avulsion amputations underwent microsurgical replantation in the period 1994 to 2002. Arterial repair was done by direct vessel suture in three patients, interposition vein grafts in two and cross anastomosis of the digital arteries in three patients. Venous anastomosis was carried out by mobilization and direct suture in seven patients and vessel transfer from the adjacent finger in one patient. Seven of the eight replantations were successful, while one patient had a partial failure. At a minimum follow-up of one year, these patients showed good functional and cosmetic recovery. All successful patients were happy with the outcome and none have requested for amputation, even those whose results were not functionally adequate. However, in addition to technical factors, it is important to evaluate the patient's motivation to undergo not only the long surgery, but also multiple secondary procedures and regular supervised physiotherapy. We also describe a simple method which prevents the soft tissues inside the degloved digit from becoming wrapped around the K wire during bony fixation, thus making one step of this technically challenging procedure a little easier.

  3. A quantitative evaluation of gross versus histologic neuroma formation in a rabbit forelimb amputation model: potential implications for the operative treatment and study of neuromas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuiken Todd A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical treatment of neuromas involves excision of neuromas proximally to the level of grossly "normal" fascicles; however, proximal changes at the axonal level may have both functional and therapeutic implications with regard to amputated nerves. In order to better understand the retrograde "zone of injury" that occurs after nerve transection, we investigated the gross and histologic changes in transected nerves using a rabbit forelimb amputation model. Methods Four New Zealand White rabbits underwent a forelimb amputation with transection and preservation of the median, radial, and ulnar nerves. After 8 weeks, serial sections of the amputated nerves were then obtained in a distal-to-proximal direction toward the brachial plexus. Quantitative histomorphometric analysis was performed on all nerve specimens. Results All nerves demonstrated statistically significant increases in nerve cross-sectional area between treatment and control limbs at the distal nerve end, but these differences were not observed 10 mm more proximal to the neuroma bulb. At the axonal level, an increased number of myelinated fibers were seen at the distal end of all amputated nerves. The number of myelinated fibers progressively decreased in proximal sections, normalizing at 15 mm proximally, or the level of the brachial plexus. The cross-sectional area of myelinated fibers was significantly decreased in all sections of the treatment nerves, indicating that atrophic axonal changes proceed proximally at least to the level of the brachial plexus. Conclusions Morphologic changes at the axonal level extend beyond the region of gross neuroma formation in a distal-to-proximal fashion after nerve transection. This discrepancy between gross and histologic neuromas signifies the need for improved standardization among neuroma models, while also providing a fresh perspective on how we should view neuromas during peripheral nerve surgery.

  4. Chronic Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation Protects Against Seizures, Cognitive Impairments, Hippocampal Apoptosis, and Inflammatory Responses in Epileptic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian-Qian; Zhu, Li-Jun; Wang, Xian-Hong; Zuo, Jian; He, Hui-Yan; Tian, Miao-Miao; Wang, Lei; Liang, Gui-Ling; Wang, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS) has recently been demonstrated effective in the treatment of epilepsy and mood disorders. Here, we aim to determine the effects of TNS on epileptogenesis, cognitive function, and the associated hippocampal apoptosis and inflammatory responses. Rats were injected with pilocarpine to produce status epilepticus (SE) and the following chronic epilepsy. After SE induction, TNS treatment was conducted for 4 consecutive weeks. A pilocarpine re-injection was then used to induce a seizure in the epileptic rats. The hippocampal neuronal apoptosis induced by seizure was assessed by TUNEL staining and inflammatory responses by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The spontaneous recurrent seizure (SRS) number was counted through video monitoring, and the cognitive function assessed through Morris Water Maze (MWM) test. TNS treatment attenuated the SRS attacks and improved the cognitive impairment in epileptic rats. A pilocarpine re-injection resulted in less hippocampal neuronal apoptosis and reduced level of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and microglial activation in epileptic rats with TNS treatment in comparison to the epileptic rats without TNS treatment. It is concluded that TNS treatment shortly after SE not only protected against the chronic spontaneous seizures but also improved cognitive impairments. These antiepileptic properties of TNS may be related to its attenuating effects on hippocampal apoptosis and pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:26973056

  5. Chronic pain syndrome at tunnel neuropathies of peripheral nerves. integrative approaches to therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yemelyanov A. Y.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Painful chronic tunnel syndrome is almost always connected with asthenia and a various degree of anxiety and depressive syndrome. The goal of the research is to investigate prevalence and expressiveness of depressive and astheniс disorders in patients with chronic tunnel pain syndrome and to fnd accommodation of choice. 54 patients with chronic painful tunnel syndrome (35 (64,8 % male, 19 (35,2 % female, mean age 39,7+10,9 years have been examined and treated. Different acupuncture methods in complex treatment were accompanied by a positive dynamics of both subjective and objective clinical neurological and psychological symptoms. Anxiety have been revealed in 79,6 % of patients, depressive syndrome — in 57,3 % of patients, asthenia — in 85,2 % of patients. Acupuncture is tolerable, compare and have not got backside effects. Inclusion of acupuncture in complex treatment chronic tunnel pain syndrome allows to reduce a pain syndrome and asthenia, to normalize psychological condition of the patient.

  6. Chronic pure radiculopathy in patient with organizing epidural hematoma around C8 nerve root

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang-Hyuk; Jeon, Sang-ho; Cho, Jae-lim; Chong, Hung-tae; Kim, Dong-Jun; Kim, Moon-Chan; Eun, Jong-Pil

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneously occurring spinal epidural hematomas are uncommon clinical findings, and the chronic form is the rarest and its most frequent location is the lumbar spine. Pure radicular involvement is far less frequent than myelopathy. We report a case of progressive radiculopathy in a 52-year-old man with spontaneously occurring cervical epidural hematoma (SCEH). The patient had left hand weakness and numbness for 4 months. MRI scan showed small space-occupying lesion around left 8th cervical ...

  7. Pulsed Radiofrequency of Lumbar Dorsal Root Ganglion for Chronic Postamputation Phantom Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Imani, Farnad; Gharaei, Helen; Rezvani, Mehran

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain following lower-limb amputation is now a well-known neuropathic, chronic-pain syndrome that usually presents as a combination of phantom and stump pain. Controlling these types of neuropathic pain is always complicated and challenging. If pharmacotherapy does not control the patient’s pain, interventional procedures have to be taken. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) on the dorsal root ganglia at the L4 and L5 nerve roots to i...

  8. Sensación de miembro fantasma y dolor de miembro residual tras 50 años de la amputación Chronic phantom sensation and residual limb pain 50 years after amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Olarra

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Introducción El dolor del miembro residual o dolor de muñón es aquel que aparece en la parte todavía existente de la extremidad amputada. Paciente: Presentamos el caso de un paciente varón de 74 años con antecedentes de amputación supracondílea postraumática del miembro inferior izquierdo, que desarrolló dolor de miembro residual y sensación de miembro fantasma 50 años después de la amputación sin una causa que Justificara su aparición. El tratamiento con antidepresivos tricíclicos (amitriptilina, anticonvulsivantes (gabapentina y tramadol permitió un buen control del dolor. Conclusiones: La existencia de una matriz neuronal determinada genéticamente pero modulada durante la vida por los impulsos nerviosos (nociceptivos, crearía una memoria somato-sensorial que sería responsable de la aparición del dolor de miembro fantasma.Background and objective: Residual limb pain or stump pain is defined as pain in the remaining part of an amputated limb. Patient: We present the case of a 74-year-old male patient with a history of posttraumatic transfemoral (above knee amputation of the left lower limb who developed residual limb pain and phantom limb sensation 50 years after amputation without a clear etiology. Treatment with tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline, anticonvulsivants (gabapentin and opioids (tramadol, provided a satisfactory control of pain. Conclusions: The existence of a neuromatrix initially determined genetically and later sculpted by sensory inputs (continuous nociceptive stimulation, could create what is known as the somatosensorial memory, responsible for the development of phantom limb pain.

  9. Amputations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the workplace? Yes. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has the following standards in Title 29 ... gov. U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration 2002

  10. Transcriptional repression of the M channel subunit Kv7.2 in chronic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Kirstin; Ooi, Lezanne; Dalle, Carine; Robertson, Brian; Wood, Ian C; Gamper, Nikita

    2011-04-01

    Neuropathic pain is a severe health problem for which there is a lack of effective therapy. A frequent underlying condition of neuropathic pain is a sustained overexcitability of pain-sensing (nociceptive) sensory fibres. Therefore, the identification of mechanisms for such abnormal neuronal excitability is of utmost importance for understanding neuropathic pain. Despite much effort, an inclusive model explaining peripheral overexcitability is missing. We investigated transcriptional regulation of the Kcnq2 gene, which encodes the Kv7.2 subunit of membrane potential-stabilizing M channel, in peripheral sensory neurons in a model of neuropathic pain-partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL). We show that Kcnq2 is the major Kcnq gene transcript in dorsal root ganglion (DRG); immunostaining and patch-clamp recordings from acute ganglionic slices verified functional expression of Kv7.2 in small-diameter nociceptive DRG neurons. Neuropathic injury induced substantial downregulation of Kv7.2 expression. Levels of repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST), which is known to suppress Kcnq2 expression, were upregulated in response to neuropathic injury identifying the likely mechanism of Kcnq2 regulation. Behavioural experiments demonstrated that neuropathic hyperalgesia following PSNL developed faster than the downregulation of Kcnq2 expression could be detected, suggesting that this transcriptional mechanism may contribute to the maintenance rather than the initiation of neuropathic pain. Importantly, the decrease in the peripheral M channel abundance could be functionally compensated by peripherally applied M channel opener flupirtine, which alleviated neuropathic hyperalgesia. Our work suggests a novel mechanism for neuropathic overexcitability and brings focus on M channels and REST as peripheral targets for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:21345591

  11. Changes in peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in chronic glaucoma and non-glaucoma patients after phacoemulsification cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia P. Perdana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Phacoemulsification is a common cataract operation nowadays. During phacoemulsification, variation in intraocular pressure (IOP may occur, which might change the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness. This study was aimed to evaluate the change in peripapillary RNFL thickness and mean deviation (MD of visual field after phacoemulsification in chronic primary glaucoma and non-glaucoma patients. Methods: Cohort prospective study was done on 26 patients (13 chronic glaucoma eyes and 13 non-glaucoma eyes who underwent phacoemulsification. The changes in peripapillary RNFL thickness and MD of visual field were measured as the primary outcome. Comparison between pre- and post-surgery was analyzed with paired t-test, while unpaired t-test was used for comparison between groups.Results: There were no significant changes in RNFL thickness on both groups. Average RNFL thickness in glaucoma group before and after phacoemulsification were 94.9±20.0 μm and 99.1±21.3 μm, respectively (p>0.05. Average RNFL thickness in non-glaucoma group were 100.2±11.1 μm and 101.7±6.8 μm, respectively (p>0.05. Glaucoma patients yielded decreasing mean deviation (MD of visual field, but it was not statistically significant (p=0.071. In contrast, the MD of visual field after surgery was significantly increased in non-glaucoma group (p=0.005.Conclusion: Phacoemulsification tended to increase peripapillary RNFL thickness in glaucoma or non-glaucoma patients. The visual field tended to decrease in glaucoma patients, but was significantly increased in non-glaucoma patients.

  12. The effect of alternating current iontophoresis on rats with the chronic constriction injury to the infraorbital nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yoko; Umino, Masahiro; Fukayama, Haruhisa; Shimada, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of AC iontophoresis on rats with the chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the infraorbital nerve by animal experiments. CCI model rats were divided into four groups, namely, rats that received general anesthesia for 60 min except AC IOP (CCI: n = 5), AC IOP with 0.9% physiological saline for 60 min (CCI + saline AC IOP: n = 5), AC IOP with 4% lidocaine hydrochloride for 60 min (CCI + lidocaine AC IOP: n = 5), and attachment of two electrodes soaked with 4% lidocaine hydrochloride to the facial skin for 60 min (CCI + attach lidocaine: n = 5). In the CCI + lidocaine AC IOP group, an elevated withdrawal threshold was observed after AC IOP, and the duration of efficacy was longer compared with that in the CCI + saline AC IOP and CCI + attached lidocaine groups. A significant decrease in the number of Fos-like immunoreactive (LI) cells was observed in the CCI + lidocaine AC IOP group compared with that in the CCI group. These findings suggest that the effect of CCI + lidocaine AC IOP group may be caused by active permeation of lidocaine into the facial skin and electrical stimulation of the trigeminal nucleus. PMID:22675357

  13. Scintigraphic Evaluation of the Stump Region After Extremity Amputation and the Effect of Scintigraphy on Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadic, Murat; Atilgan, Hasan Ikbal; Baskin, Aylin; Cinar, Alev; Koca, Gokhan; Demirel, Koray; Comak, Aylin; Ozyurt, Sinem; Yildirim, Sule; Korkmaz, Meliha

    2016-01-01

    Background We evaluated the stump region with scintigraphy and compared the correlation of treatment modalities and scintigraphic results. Methods Sixty-eight cases with extremity amputation were included in the study. Amputation applied cases underwent four-phase Tc-99m hydroxymethylene diphosphonate scintigraphy. Groups were performed according to the scanning time after amputation and amputation regions. After scintigraphic evaluation, results were recorded into five groups: osteomyelitis, soft-tissue infection, reactive changes secondary to surgery, chronic osteomyelitis, and normal. Post-surgical treatment modalities of the patients were determined and compared with scintigraphic results. Results In the scintigraphic evaluation of stump regions of the 68 amputated cases, 34 patients had acute osteomyelitis, one had chronic osteomyelitis, 16 had soft-tissue infection, and eight had changes secondary to the surgery. Nine of 68 cases had normal scintigraphic features. In the scintigraphic evaluation, 43 patients took antibiotic treatment and 16 had surgery. There was a strong correlation between scintigraphic results and treatment approach (P < 0.0001, r = 0.803) by means of preferred therapy and effectiveness of the therapy according to the scintigraphic results. Scintigraphy need increases with age after amputation and a negative correlation between patient age and scintigraphic need was found (P < 0.02, r = -0.339). There was no pathology in the follow-up in the cases that were scintigraphically normal. Conclusion Bone scintigraphy is a cost-effective, non-invasive, and efficient method that directs treatment in the evaluation of the stump region after amputation. PMID:26858796

  14. CT scanning in patients with amputated legs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT scanning after above-knee amputation and below-knee amputation helps to determine the calcium salt content of the examined bones, and to differentiate changes in the surrounding soft parts. By comaring the sides, it is quite easy to detect osteoporotic changes shortly after amputation which would otherwise remain undetected by X-ray film examination. It is equally easy to verify muscular changes, whereas characteristic changes in density allow to determine the share of vacant fat in muscular atrophy. Initial examinations proved the usefulness of CT diagnosis for early detection of dystrophic osseous and muscular changes and also show the possibilities of early therapy control of dystrophy treatment. (orig.)

  15. Blindness, Diabetes, and Amputation: Alleviation of Depression and Pain through Thermal Biofeedback Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, W. E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A 39-year-old man who was blind, diabetic, and had a double amputation with chronic renal failure and peripheral vascular disease was treated with thermal biofeedback to reduce his depression through increased self-control, to minimize pain, and to facilitate healing of a pregangrenous hand. On treatment discharge, his mental and physical states…

  16. Electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve in conscious rats overcomes the attenuation of the baroreflex in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Tomás O C Teixeira; Lataro, Renata M; Castania, Jaci A; Durand, Marina T; Silva, Carlos A A; Patel, Kaushik P; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Helio C

    2016-04-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is characterized by autonomic dysfunction combined with baroreflex attenuation. The hypotensive and bradycardic responses produced by electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) were examined in conscious CHF and control male Wistar rats (12-13 wk old). Furthermore, the role of parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system in mediating the cardiovascular responses to baroreflex activation was evaluated by selective β1-adrenergic and muscarinic receptor antagonists. CHF was induced by myocardial infarction. After 6 wk, the subjects were implanted with electrodes for ADN stimulation. Twenty-four hours later, electrical stimulation of the ADN was applied for 20 s using five different frequencies (5, 15, 30, 60, and 90 Hz), while the arterial pressure was recorded by a catheter implanted into the femoral artery. Electrical stimulation of the ADN elicited progressive and similar hypotensive and bradycardic responses in control (n= 12) and CHF (n= 11) rats, while the hypotensive response was not affected by methylatropine. Nevertheless, the reflex bradycardia was attenuated by methylatropine in control, but not in CHF rats. Atenolol did not affect the hypotensive or bradycardic response in either group. The ADN function was examined under anesthesia through electroneurographic recordings. The arterial pressure-ADN activity relationship was attenuated in CHF rats. In conclusion, despite the attenuation of baroreceptor function in CHF rats, the electrical stimulation of the ADN elicited a stimulus-dependent hypotension and bradycardia of similar magnitude as observed in control rats. Therefore, electrical activation of the aortic baroreflex overcomes both the attenuation of parasympathetic function and the sympathetic overdrive. PMID:26843582

  17. Arterial baroreceptor reflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity following chronic myocardial infarction in male, female, and ovariectomized female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Whalley, Gillian A; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Malpas, Simon C; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2015-07-15

    There is controversy regarding whether the arterial baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in heart failure is altered. We investigated the impact of sex and ovarian hormones on changes in the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA following a chronic myocardial infarction (MI). Renal SNA and arterial pressure were recorded in chloralose-urethane anesthetized male, female, and ovariectomized female (OVX) Wistar rats 6-7 wk postsham or MI surgery. Animals were grouped according to MI size (sham, small and large MI). Ovary-intact females had a lower mortality rate post-MI (24%) compared with both males (38%) and OVX (50%) (P < 0.05). Males and OVX with large MI, but not small MI, displayed an impaired ability of the arterial baroreflex to inhibit renal SNA. As a result, the male large MI group (49 ± 6 vs. 84 ± 5% in male sham group) and OVX large MI group (37 ± 3 vs. 75 ± 5% in OVX sham group) displayed significantly reduced arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA (P < 0.05). In ovary-intact females, arterial baroreflex control of normalized renal SNA was unchanged regardless of MI size. In males and OVX there was a significant, positive correlation between left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction and arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA, but not absolute renal SNA, that was not evident in ovary-intact females. The current findings demonstrate that the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA post-MI is preserved in ovary-intact females, and the state of left ventricular dysfunction significantly impacts on the changes in the arterial baroreflex post-MI. PMID:25994953

  18. Diabetic foot resulting in amputation: our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Patel

    2014-02-01

    Conclusions: Foot ulceration in diabetic patients is a resource consuming, disabling morbidity that often is the first step towards lower extremity amputation. Prevention is the best treatment. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(1.000: 210-214

  19. CHRONIC DIETARY EXPOSURE WITH INTERMITTENT SPIKE DOSES OF CHLORPYRIFOS FALLS TO ALTER SOMATOSENSORY EVOKED POTENTIALS, COMPOUND NERVE ACTION POTENTIALS, OR NERVE CONDUCTION VELOCITY IN RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human exposure to pesticides is often characterized by chronic low level exposure with intermittent spiked higher exposures. Cholinergic transmission is involved in sensory modulation in the cortex and cerebellum, and therefore may be altered following chlorpyrifos (CPF) exposure...

  20. Effect of Intrathecal Transplantation of Adrenal Medullary Tissue on the Sciatic Nerve Regeneration Following Chronic Constriction Injury in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Manaheji

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It has been demonstrated that the adrenal medullary transplants into the spinal subarachnoid space can alleviate neuropathic pain behaviors. The aim of the present study was to test the possibility that histological changes of the sciatic nerve in a neuropathic model as well as sensory dysfunction are repaired by adrenal medullary transplantation. Material and Methods: Left sciatic nerve was ligated in three groups of rats by 4 loose ligatures (CCI. After one week of nerve constriction, rats of first group were implanted with adrenal medullary tissue (CCI + adrenal medulla and rats of the second group with striated muscle at the level of L1-L2 (CCI + muscle. The third group received only left ligature (CCI and in the fourth group the sciatic nerve was exposed and then muscle and skin sutured (sham. Behavioral assessment was evaluated before surgery and 2, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, 28, 42, and 56 days after the onset of experiment. According to behavioral results, 4 rats in each group were anesthetized and then the distal part of sciatic nerve were isolated and prepared for histological quantitative investigation of nerve regeneration. Results: The results showed that CCI was accompanied with hyperalgesia and morphological changes in the distal part of sciatic nerve. In animals with adrenal medullary transplantation, not only hyperalgesia was markedly reduced or even eliminated, but also the number of myelinated fibers in the distal segment of nerve increased to nearly normal. Conclusions: Our findings showed that the implantation of adrenal medullary tissue might have caused regeneration of ligated nerves as well as alleviation of pain behavior.

  1. Dermatological changes of amputation stump

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    Arora P

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatological changes of stumps of 174 amputees are presented. The commonest dermatological change recorded at the site of amputation stump was hyperpigmentation in 46 (26.4% followed by callosities in 32 (18.3%, scaling in 29 (16.7%, cutaneous atrophy in 20 (11.5%, lichenification in 19(10.9%, traumatic ulcer and bacterial infections in 18 (10.3% each, hypertrophic scar in 14 (8.1%, hypopigmentation and corns in 13 (7.4% each, verrucous hypertrophy of stump in 12 (6.9%, dermatophytic infection in 5(2.9%, stump oedema and phantom limb in 4 (2.3% each, intertriginous dermatitis in 3( 1.7%, allergic contact dermatitis (resin and frictional eczema in 2(1.1% each. Epidermoid cyst, keloid formation, anaesthesia, gangrene and cutaneous horn were recorded in 1 (0.6% each. Atrophy (epidermal and derma, anaesthesia, alopecia and elephantiasis of the stump have not been documented in the literature earlier.

  2. Delayed functional expression of neuronal chemokine receptors following focal nerve demyelination in the rat: a mechanism for the development of chronic sensitization of peripheral nociceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monahan Patrick E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal and clinical studies have revealed that focal peripheral nerve axon demyelination is accompanied by nociceptive pain behavior. C-C and C-X-C chemokines and their receptors have been strongly implicated in demyelinating polyneuropathies and persistent pain syndromes. Herein, we studied the degree to which chronic nociceptive pain behavior is correlated with the neuronal expression of chemokines and their receptors following unilateral lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC-induced focal demyelination of the sciatic nerve in rats. Results Focal nerve demyelination increased behavioral reflex responsiveness to mechanical stimuli between postoperative day (POD 3 and POD28 in both the hindpaw ipsilateral and contralateral to the nerve injury. This behavior was accompanied by a bilateral increase in the numbers of primary sensory neurons expressing the chemokine receptors CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR4 by POD14, with no change in the pattern of CXCR3 expression. Significant increases in the numbers of neurons expressing the chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2, Regulated on Activation, Normal T Expressed and Secreted (RANTES/CCL5 and interferon γ-inducing protein-10 (IP-10/CXCL10 were also evident following nerve injury, although neuronal expression pattern of stromal cell derived factor-1α (SDF1/CXCL12 did not change. Functional studies demonstrated that acutely dissociated sensory neurons derived from LPC-injured animals responded with increased [Ca2+]i following exposure to MCP-1, IP-10, SDF1 and RANTES on POD 14 and 28, but these responses were largely absent by POD35. On days 14 and 28, rats received either saline or a CCR2 receptor antagonist isomer (CCR2 RA-[R] or its inactive enantiomer (CCR2 RA-[S] by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection. CCR2 RA-[R] treatment of nerve-injured rats produced stereospecific bilateral reversal of tactile hyperalgesia. Conclusion These results suggest that the presence of chemokine

  3. Quality of life of eye amputated patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie L R; Ekholm, Ola; Prause, Jan U;

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate eye-amputated patients’ health-related quality of life, perceived stress, self-rated health, job separation because of illness or disability and socioeconomic position. Methods: Patients were recruited from a tertiary referral centre situated in Copenhagen. Inclusion criteria......-administered questionnaire containing health-related quality of life (SF-36), the perceived stress scale and answered questions about self-rated health, job changes because of illness or disability and socioeconomic status. These results were compared with findings from the Danish Health Interview Survey 2005. Results: The...... the study population has retired or changed to a part-time job because of eye disease. The percentage of eye amputated patients, who were divorced or separated, was twice as high as in the general population. Conclusion: The impact of an eye amputation is considerable. The quality of life, perceived...

  4. Amputation for tumor of the upper arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blåder, S; Gunterberg, B; Markhede, G

    1983-04-01

    In a 10-year period 35 patients underwent a proximal amputation of the upper limb because of a malignant tumor. In 27 patients a forequarter amputation was made, in one a humeroscapular disarticulation and in seven an amputation through the humerus. The observed 5-year survival was 23 per cent. Twelve out of 23 patients followed for at least 3 years also survived 3 years. Fifteen living patients were questioned concerning prosthetic use and social and psychologic factors. Only three patients used a functional (mechanical) prosthesis and only five used a cosmetic prosthesis. The other seven patients rejected the use of a prosthesis. Half of the patients had the same occupation postoperatively as preoperatively. Activities of daily living did not constitute any major problem. One of three housekeepers needed daily help. One patient seemed to have suffered obvious psychologic damage. PMID:6845999

  5. AB211. Effect of early chronic low-dose tadalafil administration on erectile dysfunction after cavernous nerve injury in the rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Jun; Liu, Cundong; Yang, Jiankun; Zhou, Qizhao; Sun, Xiangzhou; Deng, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of early chronic tadalafil administration on erectile dysfunction after cavernous nerve (CN) injury in the rat model. Methods Using the CN crush injury model, animals were divided into four groups: no CN injury (sham), bilateral CN injury exposed to either no tadalafil (control) or tadalafil at a dose (2 mg/kg) daily postoperation for 4 weeks, and normal group. At the time point, we assessed erectile function by apomorphine test, measurement of maximum intracavernosal pressure (ICP)/mean arterial pressure (MAP) ratio with major pelvic ganglion (MPG) electrical stimulation. For the histological analyses, the mid-shaft of penis were harvested. Immunohistochemical antibody staining was performed for nNOS and the numbers of nNOS-positive nerve fibers were recorded. Results Penile erection was observed in 50% (6/12) of the rats for (1.13±0.92) times within 30 min in control group, as compared with 0% (0/11) of the rats for (0.00±0.00) times in CN crush group (P0.05), while ICP/MAP ratio after MPG electrical stimulation of control group was significantly higher than that of CN crush group (P<0.05), but significantly lower than that of sham group (P<0.05) and normal group (P<0.05). The numbers of nNOS-positive nerve fibers was significantly larger in control group than in CN crush group (54.11±5.02 vs. 21.34±3.17, P<0.05), but was significantly smaller than that of sham group (76.48±8.24, P<0.05) and normal group (81.09±7.25, P<0.05). Conclusions Early chronic low-dose tadalafil administration on erectile dysfunction after CN injury contributes to restoration of erectile function.

  6. Successful microsurgical replantation of an amputated penis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchit Garg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile amputation is an uncommon injury for which immediate surgical replantation is warranted. Microsurgical replantation is the “standard” method for penile replantation. Early replantation yields a high success and low complication rate. We report a case of a 34-year-old male who presented with amputation at the proximal penile shaft which was successfully replanted using microsurgical techniques. Minor skin necrosis was noted post-operatively which was debrided and covered with skin graft. Follow-up at 6 months showed satisfactory cosmetic appearance, normal voiding, return of sensations and erectile function. The level of evidence was V.

  7. Acupuncture and transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in the treatment of pain associated with chronic pancreatitis. A randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Søren; Christophersen, S J; Dawids, Steen; Hesse, J; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    1985-01-01

    In 23 patients with pancreatitis, daily pain for at least 3 months, and no abuse of alcohol, the pain-relieving effect of electroacupuncture (13 patients) or transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) (16 patients) was studied. In two prospective studies with a cross-over design, active...

  8. Neurolytic blockade of the obturator nerve in the treatment of idiopatic obturator neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćulafić Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Idiopathic obturator neuralgia is a rare chronic pain condition. It consists of pain radiating from the obturator nerve territory to the inner thigh. However, the symptomatic obturator neuralgia is commonly caused by the obturator canal bowel hernia that causes painful compressive neuropathy in more than 85% of the cases. Case report. A 61-year-old female who underwent right femoral amputation due to the occlusion of the aortofemoral vascular graft, complained of the pain characterized by its localization in the inguinal region and anterointernal side of the right inner thigh. Computer tomography and MRI findings excluded obturator canal herniation or lumbar plexopathy. A diagnosis of the obturator neuralgia was confirmed by an analgesic block of the obturator nerve. Thereafter, the neurolitic blockade of the right obturator nerve was done. The complete pain relief was achieved. Pain relief was complete in three-month follow-up period. Conclusion. Neurolitic blockade is an efficacious method in treating chronic pain caused by the idiopathic obturator neuralgia.

  9. Successful Replantation of Amputated Penile Shaft following Industrial Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ariafar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Penile amputation is an uncommon urological emergency. Although rare, traumatic amputation of penis is a challenging injury to treat. However, modern microsurgical reconstruction techniques have improved success rate of penile replantation and become the procedure of choice for managing these patients. Herein, we report on a case of penile amputation following an industrial accident.

  10. Chronic recording of hand prosthesis control signals via a regenerative peripheral nerve interface in a rhesus macaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Z. T.; Schroeder, K. E.; Vu, P. P.; Tat, D. M.; Bullard, A. J.; Woo, S. L.; Sando, I. C.; Urbanchek, M. G.; Cederna, P. S.; Chestek, C. A.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Loss of even part of the upper limb is a devastating injury. In order to fully restore natural function when lacking sufficient residual musculature, it is necessary to record directly from peripheral nerves. However, current approaches must make trade-offs between signal quality and longevity which limit their clinical potential. To address this issue, we have developed the regenerative peripheral nerve interface (RPNI) and tested its use in non-human primates. Approach. The RPNI consists of a small, autologous partial muscle graft reinnervated by a transected peripheral nerve branch. After reinnervation, the graft acts as a bioamplifier for descending motor commands in the nerve, enabling long-term recording of high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), functionally-specific electromyographic (EMG) signals. We implanted nine RPNIs on separate branches of the median and radial nerves in two rhesus macaques who were trained to perform cued finger movements. Main results. No adverse events were noted in either monkey, and we recorded normal EMG with high SNR (>8) from the RPNIs for up to 20 months post-implantation. Using RPNI signals recorded during the behavioral task, we were able to classify each monkey’s finger movements as flexion, extension, or rest with >96% accuracy. RPNI signals also enabled functional prosthetic control, allowing the monkeys to perform the same behavioral task equally well with either physical finger movements or RPNI-based movement classifications. Significance. The RPNI signal strength, stability, and longevity demonstrated here represents a promising method for controlling advanced prosthetic limbs and fully restoring natural movement.

  11. Contralateral Total Hip Arthroplasty After Hindquarter Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M. M. Sommerville

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the management and outcome of a 62-year old lady who developed severe osteoarthritis of the hip, nine years after a hindquarter amputation for radiation-induced sarcoma of the contralateral pelvis. The difficulties of stabilising the pelvis intraoperatively and the problems of postoperative rehabilitation are outlined. The operation successfully relieved her pain and restored limited mobility.

  12. Body Image, Relationships and Sexuality After Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Body Image, Relationships and Sexuality after Amputation Original article by Sandra Houston, PhD First Step - Volume 4, 2005 Translated into plain language by Helen Osborne of Health Literacy Consulting Text size Larger text Smaller text Java Required Print page Save and share ...

  13. Bilateral changes of TNF-α and IL-10 protein in the lumbar and cervical dorsal root ganglia following a unilateral chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svíženská Ivana

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a growing body of evidence that unilateral nerve injury induces bilateral response, the mechanism of which is not exactly known. Because cytokines act as crucial signaling molecules for response of peripheral nerves to injury, they may be induced to mediate the reaction in remote structures. Methods We studied levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α and interleukin 10 (IL-10 proteins using ELISA in the ipsilateral and contralateral lumbar (L4-L5 and cervical (C7-C8 dorsal root ganglia (DRG from naïve rats, rats operated on to create unilateral chronic constriction injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve, and sham-operated rats. Withdrawal thresholds for mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were measured in the ipsilateral and contralateral hind and forepaws. Results The ipsilateral hind paws of all rats operated upon for CCI displayed decreased withdrawal thresholds for mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, while no significant behavioral changes were found in the contralateral hind paws and both forepaws. Significantly lower baseline levels of TNF-α and IL-10 protein were measured by ELISA in the lumbar than cervical DRG of naïve rats. Bilateral elevation of TNF-α was induced in both the lumbar and cervical DRG by unilateral CCI of the sciatic nerve for 7 and 14 days, while the level of IL-10 protein was increased bilaterally in the lumbar DRG 1 and 3 days after operation. IL-10 levels declined bilaterally even below baseline level in both cervical and lumbar DRG 7 days from CCI and normalized after 14 days. In contrast to no significant changes in TNF-α, level of IL-10 protein was significantly increased in the ipsilateral lumbar DRG after 3 days and bilaterally in the lumbar DRG after 14 days from sham operation. Conclusions The results of our experiments show a bilateral elevation of TNF-α and IL-10 not only in the homonymous DRG but also in the heteronymous DRG unassociated with the injured

  14. A STUDY TO COMPARE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TRANSCUTANEOUS ELECTRICAL NERVE STIMULATION WITH RETRO - WALKING VERSUS ULTRASOUND THERAPY WITH RETRO - WALKING IN CHRONIC OSTEOARTHRITIS OF KNEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somashekar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Knee osteoarthritis (OA is a painful and degenerative joint diseases, the pain, joint stiffness associated with this condition have a dramatic impact on physical mobility and function. This study was done to assess the effectiveness of TENS and retro walking versus ultrasound therapy with retro walking in patients suffering from chronic knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: All the subjects were clinically diagnosed by orthopaedician with chronic knee osteoarthritis were screen ed after finding their suitability as per the inclusion criteria and were requested to participate in the study. Participants in the study were briefed about the nature of the study and their intervention. After briefing them about the study, their informe d written consent was taken. 60 chronic knee osteoarthritis patient were randomly divided into two groups with n=30 in each group, Group A - received TENS transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and retro walking, where group B - received ultrasound therap y with retro walking. The treatment was given 5 days a week. The total duration of treatment was 3 weeks. OUTCOMES MEASURES: The patie n ts were evaluated at the beginning of the intervention program, Day 1st, end of 1st week, end of 2nd week and end of 3rd week. All the Patients were requested to come for a follow up measurement after 3rd week of treatment program. All the patients were assessed for pain, functional outcome and range of motion by taking their VAS scale, WOMAC scale and universal goniometer. RESULTS: Both the groups showed statistically significant improvement in all three parameters (VAS, WOMAC and Range of motion by repeated test ANOVA. Independent t - test analysis of outcome measures when compared between the two groups showed that Group B outcome measures were significantly far better than the outcome measures of Group A. CONCLUSION: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation TENS with retro walking and therapeutic

  15. A randomised controlled trial to assess the efficacy of Laparoscopic Uterosacral Nerve Ablation (LUNA in the treatment of chronic pelvic pain: The trial protocol [ISRCTN41196151

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic pelvic pain is a common condition with a major impact on health-related quality of life, work productivity and health care utilisation. The cause of the pain is not always obvious as no pathology is seen in 40–60% of the cases. In the absence of pathology there is no established treatment. The Lee-Frankenhauser sensory nerve plexuses and parasympathetic ganglia in the uterosacral ligaments carry pain from the uterus, cervix and other pelvic structures. Interruption of these nerve trunks by laparoscopic uterosacral nerve ablation (LUNA may alleviate pain. However, the balance of benefits and risks of this intervention have not been reliably assessed. LUNA has, nevertheless, been introduced into practice, although there remains controversy regarding indications for LUNA. Hence, there is an urgent need for a randomised controlled trial to confirm, or refute, any worthwhile effectiveness. The principal hypothesis is that, in women with chronic pelvic pain in whom diagnostic laparoscopy reveals either no pathology or mild endometriosis (AFS score ≤ 5 LUNA alleviates pain and improves life quality at 12 months. Methods/Design The principal objective is to test the hypothesis that in women with chronic pelvic pain in whom diagnostic laparoscopy reveals either no pathology or mild endometriosis (AFS score ≤ 5 LUNA alleviates pain and improves life quality at 12 months. A multi-centre, prospective, randomised-controlled-trial will be carried out with blind assessment of outcomes in eligible consenting patients randomised at diagnostic laparoscopy to LUNA (experimental group or to no pelvic denervation (control group. Postal questionnaires including visual analogue scale for pain (primary outcome, an index of sexual satisfaction and the EuroQoL 5D-EQ instrument (secondary outcomes will be administered at 3, 6 and 12 months. The primary assessment of the effectiveness of LUNA will be from comparison of outcomes at the one

  16. Management of diabetic foot disease and amputation in the Irish health system: a qualitative study of patients' attitudes and experiences with health services.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Delea, Sarah

    2015-07-01

    Diabetes is an increasingly prevalent chronic illness that places a huge burden on the individual, the health system and society. Patients with active foot disease and lower limb amputations due to diabetes have a significant amount of interaction with the health care services. The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and experiences of foot care services in Ireland among people with diabetes and active foot disease or lower limb amputations.

  17. Pinched Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Pinched Nerve Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Pinched Nerve? The term "pinched nerve" is a colloquial term ...

  18. Nerve biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - nerve ... A nerve biopsy is most often done on a nerve in the ankle, forearm, or along a rib. The health care ... feel a prick and a mild sting. The biopsy site may be sore for a few days ...

  19. Novel Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG) Derivative as a New Therapeutic Strategy for Reducing Neuropathic Pain after Chronic Constriction Nerve Injury in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xifró, Xavier; Vidal-Sancho, Laura; Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Turrado, Carlos; Alberch, Jordi; Puig, Teresa; Verdú, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is common in peripheral nerve injury and often fails to respond to ordinary medication. Here, we investigated whether the two novel epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) polyphenolic derivatives, compound 23 and 30, reduce the neuropathic pain in mice chronic constriction nerve injury (CCI). First, we performed a dose-response study to evaluate nociceptive sensation after administration of EGCG and its derivatives 23 and 30, using the Hargreaves test at 7 and 21 days after injury (dpi). We daily administered EGCG, 23 and 30 (10 to 100 mg/Kg; i.p.) during the first week post-CCI. None of the doses of compound 23 caused significant pain diminution, whereas 50mg/kg was optimal for both EGCG and 30 to delay the latency of paw withdrawal. With 50 mg/Kg, we showed that EGCC prevented the thermal hyperalgesia from 7 to 21 dpi and compound 30 from 14 to 56 dpi. To evaluate the molecular mechanisms underpinning why EGCG and compound 30 differentially prevented the thermal hyperalgesia, we studied several biochemical parameters in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord at 14 and 56 dpi. We showed that the effect observed with EGCG and compound 30 was related to the inhibition of fatty acid synthase (FASN), a known target of these polyphenolic compounds. Additionally, we observed that EGCG and compound 30 reduced the expression of CCI-mediated inflammatory proteins and the nuclear localization of nuclear factor-kappa B at 14 dpi, but not at 56 dpi. We also strongly detected a decrease of synaptic plasma membrane levels of N-methyl-D-asparte receptor 2B in CCI-mice treated with compound 30 at 56 dpi. Altogether, compound 30 reduced the chronic thermal hyperalgesia induced by CCI better than the natural compound EGCG. Thus, our findings provide a rationale for the preclinical development of compound 30 as an agent to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:25855977

  20. Peripheral Nerve Injury Is Associated with Chronic, Reversible Changes in Global DNA Methylation in the Mouse Prefrontal Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Tajerian, Maral; Alvarado, Sebastian; Millecamps, Magali; Vachon, Pascal; Crosby, Cecilia; Bushnell, M. Catherine; Szyf, Moshe; Stone, Laura S.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in brain structure and cortical function are associated with many chronic pain conditions including low back pain and fibromyalgia. The magnitude of these changes correlates with the duration and/or the intensity of chronic pain. Most studies report changes in common areas involved in pain modulation, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC), and pain-related pathological changes in the PFC can be reversed with effective treatment. While the mechanisms underlying these changes are unknow...

  1. [Psychological adjustment following lower limb amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyi, Lilla Krisztina; Lábadi, Beatrix

    2015-09-27

    Rehabilitation of lower limb amputees and the fitting of their prosthesis depend highly on the psychological adjustment process and motivational state of the patient. The loss of a limb is extremely challenging and can cause various physical and psychological problems. Depression, anxiety, decreased well-being and quality of life, body image dissatisfaction and changes in self-concept and identity are frequent after lower limb amputation. In the interest of adjustment patients have to cope with the emerging changes and difficulties in their lifes as well as the problems in psychological functioning. It is important for them to accept the alterations in their body and identity, and integrate them in a new self-concept in which process motivation is a fundamental issue. The aim of this article is to review the literature on psychological consequences of lower limb amputation, and to propose an integrative way of rehabilitation for lower limb amputees. PMID:26550913

  2. Amputations in Sickle Cell Disease: Case Series and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximo, Claudia; Olalla Saad, Sara T; Thome, Eleonora; Queiroz, Ana Maria Mach; Lobo, Clarisse; Ballas, Samir K

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we describe four new patients with sickle cell disease who had limb amputations. Two of the patients had sickle cell anemia [Hb S (HBB: c.20A > T) (β(S)/β(S))] with refractory leg ulcers that required amputations. The third patient had sickle cell trait with an extensive leg ulcer that was associated with epidermoid carcinoma. The fourth patient had amputations of both forearms and feet due to a misdiagnosis of dactylitis. Review of the literature showed that the indications for amputations in sickle cell disease included three distinct categories: mythical beliefs, therapeutic and malpractice. All therapeutic amputations were for severely painful, large, recalcitrant leg ulcers that failed non-interventional therapies. Amputation resulted in pain relief and better quality of life. Phantom neuropathic pain was not a major issue post-operatively. It was absent, transient or well controlled with antidepressants. Limb function was restored post-amputation with prosthetic artificial limbs, wheelchairs or crutches. Malpractice amputations were due to misdiagnosis or to cryotherapy by exposing the painful limb to ice water resulting in thrombosis, gangrene and amputation. We strongly suggest that leg amputations should be considered in the management of certain patients with severe extensive refractory leg ulcers, and topical cryotherapy should never be used to manage sickle cell pain. PMID:27117565

  3. PSYCHIATRIC SEQUELAE OF AMPUTATION : I IMMEDIATE EFFECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Mall, C.P.; Trivedi, J.K.; U.S. Mishra; Sharma, V. P.; Dalal, P.K.; Katiyar, M.; Srivastava, Shrikant; Sinha, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-five subjects, who had undergone amputation within last 6 weeks, were studied for psychiatric complications, including phantom limb phenomena. The patients were interviewed on SCID, HRSD and HARS. Out of a total of 25 subjects, 8 (34.6%) developed psychiatric disorders - PTSD and major depression. The whole sample was thus divided into 2 groups-sick and nonsick. Phantom limb was seen in 88% subjects. No significant difference was present between the two groups with regard to presence o...

  4. Pediatric Traumatic Limb Amputation: The Principles of Management and Optimal Residual Limb Lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Adil Abbas; Javed, Ammar Asrar; Rao, Dominic Jordan; Corner, J Antony; Rosenfield, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric traumatic limb amputations are rare and their acute and long term management can be challenging in this subgroup of patients. The lengthy and costly hospital stays, and resulting physical and psychological implications leads to significant morbidity. We present a summary of treatment principles and the evidence base supporting the management options for this entity. The initial management focuses on resuscitating and stabilization of the patients, administration of appropriate and adequate analgesics, and broad spectrum antibiotics. The patient should ideally be managed by an orthopedic or a plastic surgeon and when an amputation is warranted, the surgical team should aim to conserve as much of the viable physis as possible aimed at allowing bone development in a growing child. A subsequent wound inspection should be performed to assess for signs of ischemia or non-viability of tissue. Depending on the child's age, approximations of the ideal residual limb length can be calculated using our guidelines, allowing an ideal stump length at skeletal maturity for a well-fitting and appropriate prosthesis. Myodesis and myoplasties can be performed according to the nature of the amputation. Removable rigid dressings are safe and cost effective offering better protection of the stump. Complications such as necrosis and exostosis, on subsequent examination, warrant further revisions. Other complications such as neuromas can be prevented by proximal division of the nerves. Successful rehabilitation can be accomplished with a multidisciplinary approach, involving physiotherapist, play therapist and a child psychiatrist, in addition to the surgeon and primary care providers. PMID:27308235

  5. Rehabilitation for bilateral amputation of fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Stapanian, Adrienne M.P.; Staley, Keith E.

    2010-01-01

    We describe reconstructive surgeries, therapy, prostheses, and adaptations for a patient who experienced bilateral amputation of all five fingers of both hands through the proximal phalanges in January 1992. The patient made considerable progress in the use of his hands in the 10 mo after amputation, including nearly a 120% increase in the active range of flexion of metacarpophalangeal joints. In late 1992 and early 1993, the patient had "on-top plasty" surgeries, in which the index finger remnants were transferred onto the thumb stumps, performed on both hands. The increased web space and functional pinch resulting from these procedures made many tasks much easier. The patient and occupational therapists set challenging goals at all times. Moreover, the patient was actively involved in the design and fabrication of all prostheses and adaptations or he developed them himself. Although he was discharged from occupational therapy in 1997, the patient continues to actively find new solutions for prehension and grip strength 18 yr after amputation.

  6. Deficits in foot skin sensation are related to alterations in balance control in chronic low back patients experiencing clinical signs of lumbar nerve root impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Lydia R; Bijman, Marc; Strzalkowski, Nicholas D J; Bent, Leah R; Brown, Stephen H M

    2015-05-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) patients with radiculopathy, or sciatica, experience pain, tingling or numbness radiating down their leg due to compression of the lumbar nerve root. The resulting reduction in somatosensory information from the foot sole may contribute to deficits in standing balance control. This work was designed to investigate the relationship between foot skin sensitivity and standing balance control in chronic LBP patients with associated radiculopathy. Patients (n=9) and matched healthy controls (n=9) were recruited to the study, and were tested for balance control in both quiet standing as well as during rapid arm raise perturbation trials on a force plate. Foot skin sensitivity was tested bilaterally for vibratory threshold (3, 40 and 250 Hz) and touch (monofilament) threshold. Results demonstrate that patients had reduced sensitivity to 250 Hz vibration in their affected compared to unaffected foot (at the great toe and heel), as well as compared to controls (at the great toe), but there were no differences with lower frequency vibratory testing or with monofilament testing. While there were no significant between-group differences in balance measures, moderate statistically significant correlations between 250 Hz sensitivity and quiet standing balance parameters were uncovered. Thus, patients demonstrate reduced high-frequency vibratory sensitivity at the foot sole, and correlations with quiet standing balance measures indicate a connection between these foot skin sensitivity deficits and alterations in balance control. Clinically, this identifies high frequency vibration testing as an important measure of skin sensitivity in patients with radiculopathy. PMID:25887249

  7. Development of the Tardivo Algorithm to Predict Amputation Risk of Diabetic Foot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Tardivo

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects almost 19% of the elderly population in Brazil and similar percentages around the world. Amputation of lower limbs in diabetic patients who present foot complications is a common occurrence with a significant reduction of life quality, and heavy costs on the health system. Unfortunately, there is no easy protocol to define the conditions that should be considered to proceed to amputation. The main objective of the present study is to create a simple prognostic score to evaluate the diabetic foot, which is called Tardivo Algorithm. Calculation of the score is based on three main factors: Wagner classification, signs of peripheral arterial disease (PAD, which is evaluated by using Peripheral Arterial Disease Classification, and the location of ulcers. The final score is obtained by multiplying the value of the individual factors. Patients with good peripheral vascularization received a value of 1, while clinical signs of ischemia received a value of 2 (PAD 2. Ulcer location was defined as forefoot, midfoot and hind foot. The conservative treatment used in patients with scores below 12 was based on a recently developed Photodynamic Therapy (PDT protocol. 85.5% of these patients presented a good outcome and avoided amputation. The results showed that scores 12 or higher represented a significantly higher probability of amputation (Odds ratio and logistic regression-IC 95%, 12.2-1886.5. The Tardivo algorithm is a simple prognostic score for the diabetic foot, easily accessible by physicians. It helps to determine the amputation risk and the best treatment, whether it is conservative or surgical management.

  8. Pirogow’s Amputation: A Modification of the Operation Method

    OpenAIRE

    Bueschges, M.; Muehlberger, T.; Mauss, K. L.; Bruck, J. C.; Ottomann, C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Pirogow's amputation at the ankle presents a valuable alternative to lower leg amputation for patients with the corresponding indications. Although this method offers the ability to stay mobile without the use of a prosthesis, it is rarely performed. This paper proposes a modification regarding the operation method of the Pirogow amputation. The results of the modified operation method on ten patients were objectified 12 months after the operation using a patient questionnaire (...

  9. Amputation of extremity in patients with atherosclerotic gangrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsareva Yu.O.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of investigation — to analyze the results of treatment of patients with atherosclerotic gangrene of a limb, to identify the causes of adverse outcomes amputation. Materials and methods: We analyzed the results of examination and treatment of 218 patients with atherosclerotic gangrene of the limb. Good outcome of amputation was considered the primary surgical wound healing of the stump. Suppuration, secondary healing, re-amputation and death we attributed to the adverse results of amputation. Results: The adverse outcomes of amputation due to technical errors in surgery, properly chosen level, inadequate drainage of the wound stump, an unsuccessful operation on the arteries of a limb, inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy, patient's age, functional capabilities of myocardium, the duration of critical ischemia, as well as the lack of psychological adaptation of patients before amputation. Conclusion: To decide the need for amputation in patients with atherosclerotic gangrene follows the assessment of possible vascular reconstructive surgery. In determining the level of amputation is necessary to objectively assess the degree of disruption of regional blood flow using multilevel manometry and laser Dopplerflowmetry. In preparation for amputation should be paid special attention to the correction of rheological and coagulation properties of blood, normalization of the functional state of the myocardium, as well as specialized psychotherapeutic training for timely and adequate psychological adaptation of the patient

  10. Chronic intermittent hypoxia in humans during 28 nights results in blood pressure elevation and increased muscle sympathetic nerve activity

    OpenAIRE

    Gilmartin, G. S.; Lynch, M; Tamisier, R.; Weiss, J W

    2010-01-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is thought to be responsible for the cardiovascular disease associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Increased sympathetic activation, altered vascular function, and inflammation are all putative mechanisms. We recently reported (Tamisier R, Gilmartin GS, Launois SH, Pepin JL, Nespoulet H, Thomas RJ, Levy P, Weiss JW. J Appl Physiol 107: 17–24, 2009) a new model of CIH in healthy humans that is associated with both increases in blood pressure and augme...

  11. FROM CULTURAL IMPOTENCE TO CULTURAL AMPUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhanov Vyacheslav Vladimirovich

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cultural space of any state is formed by a population that is within its borders. In this article, the author introduces a new cultural definitions «cultural impotence» and «cultural amputation», justifying their use, both in terms of population of the Russian Federation and the European Union and America. The article analyzes the state of society and the cultural factors that influence the development of society in Russia, there are options to bring the country out of a deep cultural crisis. Also established a close relationship between the domestic policy of the state and development of culture.

  12. Human Vagus Nerve Branching in the Cervical Region

    OpenAIRE

    Hammer, Niels; Glätzner, Juliane; Feja, Christine; Kühne, Christian; Meixensbeger, Jürgen; Planitzer, Uwe; Schleifenbaum, Stefan; Tillmann, Bernhard N.; Winkler, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vagus nerve stimulation is increasingly applied to treat epilepsy, psychiatric conditions and potentially chronic heart failure. After implanting vagus nerve electrodes to the cervical vagus nerve, side effects such as voice alterations and dyspnea or missing therapeutic effects are observed at different frequencies. Cervical vagus nerve branching might partly be responsible for these effects. However, vagus nerve branching has not yet been described in the context of vagus nerve...

  13. Development of phantom limb pain after femoral nerve block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Sadiah; Sifonios, Anthony N; Le, Vanny; Martinez, Marc E; Eloy, Jean D; Kaufman, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Historically, phantom limb pain (PLP) develops in 50-80% of amputees and may arise within days following an amputation for reasons presently not well understood. Our case involves a 29-year-old male with previous surgical amputation who develops PLP after the performance of a femoral nerve block. Although there have been documented cases of reactivation of PLP in amputees after neuraxial technique, there have been no reported events associated with femoral nerve blockade. We base our discussion on the theory that symptoms of phantom limb pain are of neuropathic origin and attempt to elaborate the link between regional anesthesia and PLP. Further investigation and understanding of PLP itself will hopefully uncover a relationship between peripheral nerve blocks targeting an affected limb and the subsequent development of this phenomenon, allowing physicians to take appropriate steps in prevention and treatment. PMID:24872817

  14. Nerve conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). The CNS contains the brain and the spinal cord and the PNS consists of thousands of nerves that connect the spinal cord to muscles and sensory receptors. A peripheral nerve is composed of nerve ...

  15. The Morphofunctional Effect of the Transplantation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Predegenerated Peripheral Nerve in Chronic Paraplegic Rat Model via Spinal Cord Transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinnitsa Buzoianu-Anguiano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI is limited by poor axonal and cellular regeneration as well as the failure to replace damaged myelin. Employed separately, both the transplantation of the predegenerated peripheral nerve (PPN and the transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs have been shown to promote the regrowth and remyelination of the damaged central axons in SCI models of hemisection, transection, and contusion injury. With the aim to test the effects of the combined transplantation of PPN and BMSC on regrowth, remyelination, and locomotor function in an adult rat model of spinal cord (SC transection, 39 Fischer 344 rats underwent SC transection at T9 level. Four weeks later they were randomly assigned to traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI without treatment, TSCI + Fibrin Glue (FG, TSCI + FG + PPN, and TSCI + FG + PPN + BMSCs. Eight weeks after, transplantation was carried out on immunofluorescence and electron microscope studies. The results showed greater axonal regrowth and remyelination in experimental groups TSCI + FG + PPN and TSCI + FG + PPN + BMSCs analyzed with GAP-43, neuritin, and myelin basic protein. It is concluded that the combined treatment of PPN and BMSCs is a favorable strategy for axonal regrowth and remyelination in a chronic SC transection model.

  16. The Morphofunctional Effect of the Transplantation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Predegenerated Peripheral Nerve in Chronic Paraplegic Rat Model via Spinal Cord Transection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzoianu-Anguiano, Vinnitsa; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; García-Vences, Elisa; Caballero-Chacón, Sara; Guizar-Sahagún, Gabriel; Chavez-Sanchez, Luis; Grijalva, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) is limited by poor axonal and cellular regeneration as well as the failure to replace damaged myelin. Employed separately, both the transplantation of the predegenerated peripheral nerve (PPN) and the transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been shown to promote the regrowth and remyelination of the damaged central axons in SCI models of hemisection, transection, and contusion injury. With the aim to test the effects of the combined transplantation of PPN and BMSC on regrowth, remyelination, and locomotor function in an adult rat model of spinal cord (SC) transection, 39 Fischer 344 rats underwent SC transection at T9 level. Four weeks later they were randomly assigned to traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) without treatment, TSCI + Fibrin Glue (FG), TSCI + FG + PPN, and TSCI + FG + PPN + BMSCs. Eight weeks after, transplantation was carried out on immunofluorescence and electron microscope studies. The results showed greater axonal regrowth and remyelination in experimental groups TSCI + FG + PPN and TSCI + FG + PPN + BMSCs analyzed with GAP-43, neuritin, and myelin basic protein. It is concluded that the combined treatment of PPN and BMSCs is a favorable strategy for axonal regrowth and remyelination in a chronic SC transection model. PMID:26634157

  17. Pulse-Wave Analysis of Optic Nerve Head Circulation Is Significantly Correlated with Kidney Function in Patients with and without Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoaki Shiba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine whether there is a significant correlation between the optic nerve head (ONH circulation determined by laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG and kidney function. Materials. Seventy-one subjects were investigated. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR and serum creatinine, cystatin C, and urinary albumin excretion were measured. The ONH circulation was determined by an analysis of the pulse wave of LSFG, and this parameter was named blowout time (BOT. Chronic kidney disease (CKD was defined to be present when the estimated GFR was <60 mL/min per 1.73 m2. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were used to determine the relationship between the BOT and the kidney function. We also examined whether there were significant differences in all parameters in patients with and without CKD. Results. BOT was significantly correlated with the level of creatinine (r=-0.24, P=0.04, the estimated GFR (r=0.42, P=0.0003, cystatin C (r=-0.29, P=0.01, and urinary albumin excretion (r=-0.29, P=0.01. The BOT level in subjects with CKD was significantly lower than that in subjects without CKD (P=0.002. Conclusion. BOT in ONH by LSFG can detect the organ damage such as kidney dysfunction, CKD.

  18. Usefulness of biventricular pacing to improve cardiac symptoms, exercise capacity and sympathetic nerve activity in patients with moderate to severe chronic heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although cardiac resynchronization using biventricular pacing (BVP) results in significant clinical improvement in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), there is no evidence of improvement in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). Eighteen patients with CHF (dilated cardiomyopathy/ischemic cardiomyopathy=14/4) and left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction 160 ms and dyssynchronous LV wall motion were classified into 2 groups based on the findings of 99mTc-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile (MIBI) quantitative gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) (QGS). Resynchronization was considered to be present when the difference between the QGS frame number for end-systole for the LV septal and lateral walls (dyssynchrony index) disappeared. Group A achieved resynchronization after BVP, but not Group B. In group A, New York Heart Association functional class (p=0.0002), specific activity scale (p=0.0001), total defect score (p123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging (p<0.05) were significantly improved after resynchronization. However, there was no significant change in group B. Cardiac resynchronization after BVP can improve cardiac symptoms, exercise capacity, and SNA in patients with moderate to severe CHF. (author)

  19. Estimation of amputation level with a laser Doppler flowmeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Jørgensen, J P; Vollmer-Larsen, B; Nielsen, S L; Alsbjørn, B

    1989-01-01

    Leg amputation levels were decided in 24 patients suffering from atherosclerosis, using the conventional techniques of segmental blood pressure and radioisotope skin clearance. The skin microcirculation was measured and recorded before operation with a laser doppler flowmeter. A high correlation...... was found between the successful amputation levels and the maximal blood perfusion of the skin measured in this way....

  20. Surgical fasciectomy of the trapezius muscle combined with neurolysis of the Spinal accessory nerve; results and long-term follow-up in 30 consecutive cases of refractory chronic whiplash syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman Michael

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic problems from whiplash trauma generally include headache, pain and neck stiffness that may prove refractory to conservative treatment modalities. As has previously been reported, such afflicted patients may experience significant temporary relief with injections of local anesthetic to painful trigger points in muscles of the shoulder and neck, or lasting symptomatic improvement through surgical excision of myofascial trigger points. In a subset of patients who present with chronic whiplash syndrome, the clinical findings suggest an affliction of the spinal accessory nerve (CN XI, SAN by entrapment under the fascia of the trapezius muscle. The present study was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of SAN neurolysis in chronic whiplash syndrome. Methods A standardized questionnaire and a linear visual-analogue scale graded 0-10 was used to assess disability related to five symptoms (pain, headache, insomnia, weakness, and stiffness before, and one year after surgery in a series of thirty consecutive patients. Results The preoperative duration of symptoms ranged from seven months to 13 years. The following changes in disability scores were documented one year after surgery: Overall pain decreased from 9.5 +/- 0.9 to 3.2 +/- 2.6 (p Conclusions Entrapment of the spinal accessory nerve and/or chronic compartment syndrome of the trapezius muscle may cause chronic debilitating pain after whiplash trauma, without radiological or electrodiagnostic evidence of injury. In such cases, surgical treatment may provide lasting relief.

  1. [Amputation and prosthesis attachment of the lower extremities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, I; Beirau, M; Ekkernkamp, A; Matthes, G

    2015-06-01

    Approximately 61,000 amputations are performed in Germany per year. In most cases the lower limbs are affected. The reasons for amputations are arteriosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, severe infections, tumors and complex trauma to the extremities. A decision must be made concerning whether a salvage procedure or amputation is appropriate, specially after trauma. In cases where the need for amputation is clear, the site of amputation needs to be planned in advance with the aim of creating a stump which allows sufficient prosthetic attachment. Adjuvant pain therapy is mandatory, especially in order to avoid subsequent phantom pain. The type of prosthetic restoration is influenced by the grade of mobility and personal requirements of patients. Moreover, aftercare and adjusted rehabilitation are recommended. PMID:26013390

  2. Differences in minor amputation rate in diabetic foot disease throughout Europe are in part explained by differences in disease severity at presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Battum, P; Schaper, N; Prompers, L;

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of minor amputation may vary significantly, and determinants of minor amputation have not been studied systematically. We evaluated minor amputation rate, the determinants of minor amputation and differences in amputation rate between European centres....

  3. Physical and social factors determining quality of life for veterans with lower-limb amputation(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan; Ipsen, Thomas; Doherty, Patrick; Langberg, Henning

    Purpose Most veterans live for many years after their war-related traumatic lower-limb amputation, which is why understanding which factors influence health-related quality of life (HRQoL) remains important to their long-term management. The objective of this study was to perform a review of the......-limb amputation(s), HRQoL outcome and veterans. Physical and social factors that influence HRQoL were extracted. Results The literature search identified 2073 citations, leading to the inclusion of 10 studies in the systematic review. Physical activity level, sport participation, level of amputation, back pain......, years of education, as well as duration and severity of phantom pain were found to be determining factors for HRQoL among veterans with lower-limb amputation. Conclusions The identified physical and social determinants were similar to those found in civilian traumatic amputees. More high quality...

  4. Mind-body interventions for treatment of phantom limb pain in persons with amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Vera Lucia; Faurot, Keturah R; Gaylord, Susan A; Mann, J Douglas; Sill, Morgan; Lynch, Chanee; Lee, Michael Y

    2012-08-01

    Phantom limb pain (PLP) is a significant source of chronic pain in most persons with amputation at some time in their clinical course. Pharmacologic therapies for this condition are often only moderately effective and may produce unwanted adverse effects. There is growing empirical evidence of the therapeutic effectiveness of mind-body therapies for the relief of chronic pain; therefore, an exploration of their role in relieving amputation-related chronic pain is warranted. We undertook a focused literature review on mind-body interventions for patients with amputation who experience PLP. Because of study heterogeneity, only descriptive presentations of the studies are presented. Only studies of hypnosis, imagery, and biofeedback, including visual mirror feedback, were found; studies on meditation, yoga, and tai chi/qigong were missing from the literature. Few studies of specific mind-body therapies were dedicated to management of PLP, with the exception of mirror visual therapy. Overall, studies were largely exploratory and reflect considerable variability in the application of mind-body techniques, making definitive conclusions inadvisable. Nevertheless, the weight of existing findings indicates that a mind-body approach to PLP pain management is promising and that specific methods may offer either temporary or long-term relief, either alone or in combination with conventional therapies. The authors discuss the potential for usefulness of specific mind-body therapies and the relevance of their mechanisms of action to those of PLP, including targeting cortical reorganization, autonomic nervous system deregulation, stress management, coping ability, and quality-of-life. The authors recommend more and better quality research exploring the efficacy and mechanisms of action. PMID:22286895

  5. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  6. FROM CULTURAL IMPOTENCE TO CULTURAL AMPUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вячеслав Владимирович Суханов

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cultural space of any state is formed by a population that is within its borders. In this article, the author introduces a new cultural definitions «cultural impotence» and «cultural amputation», justifying their use, both in terms of population of the Russian Federation and the European Union and America. The article analyzes the state of society and the cultural factors that influence the development of society in Russia, there are options to bring the country out of a deep cultural crisis. Also established a close relationship between the domestic policy of the state and development of culture.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-2-1

  7. Pirogow’s Amputation: A Modification of the Operation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bueschges

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pirogow’s amputation at the ankle presents a valuable alternative to lower leg amputation for patients with the corresponding indications. Although this method offers the ability to stay mobile without the use of a prosthesis, it is rarely performed. This paper proposes a modification regarding the operation method of the Pirogow amputation. The results of the modified operation method on ten patients were objectified 12 months after the operation using a patient questionnaire (Ankle Score. Material and Methods. We modified the original method by rotating the calcaneus. To fix the calcaneus to the tibia, Kirschner wire and a 3/0 spongiosa tension screw as well as a Fixateur externe were used. Results. 70% of those questioned who were amputated following the modified Pirogow method indicated an excellent or very good result in total points whereas in the control group (original Pirogow’s amputation only 40% reported excellent or very good result. In addition, the level of pain experienced one year after the completed operation showed different results in favour of the group being operated with the modified way. Furthermore, patients in both groups showed differences in radiological results, postoperative leg length difference, and postoperative mobility. Conclusion. The modified Pirogow amputation presents a valuable alternative to the original amputation method for patients with the corresponding indications. The benefits are found in the significantly reduced pain, difference in reduced radiological complications, the increase in mobility without a prosthesis, and the reduction of postoperative leg length difference.

  8. Level selection in leg amputation for arterial occlusive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, P

    1982-01-01

    In 102 leg amputations for arterial occlusion including 84 below-knee (BK), 16 above-knee (AD) and 2 through-knee (TK) amputations, the amputation level was determined by means of clinical criteria. The healing results and the selection of levels were then compared with sealed preoperative...... measurements of the skin perfusion pressure (SPP). Out of 62 BK amputations with an SPP above 30 mmHg wound healing failed in only 2 cases (3 per cent). Out of 13 BK amputations with an SPP between 20 and 30 mmHg 7 cases (54 per cent) failed and out of 9 BK amputations with an SPP below 20 mmHg no less than 8...... cases (89 per cent) failed to heal. The difference in failure rate is significant (P less than 0.0001). Out of the 15 failed BK amputations at low pressures (below 30 mmHg) only one case had local signs of ischaemia, which might have warned the surgeons. On the other hand, in 13 out of the 18 cases of...

  9. A modified scintigrafic technique for amputation level selection in diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modified 123I-antipyrine cutaneous washout technique for the selection of amputation levels is described. The modifications imply a reduction of time needed for the examination by simultaneous recordings on different levels, and a better patient acceptance by reducing inconvenience. Furthermore, both skin perfusion pressure (SPP) and skin blood flow (SBF) are determined from each clearance curve. In a prospective study among 26 diabetic patients presenting with ulcers or gangrene of the foot, both SPP and SBF were determined preoperatively on the selected level of surgery and on adjacent amputation sites. These 26 patients underwent 12 minor foot amputations and 17 major lower limb amputations. Two of these amputations failed to heal. SBF values appeared indicative for the degree of peripheral vascular disease, as low SBF values were found with low SPP values. SPP determinations revealed good predictive values: All surgical procedures healed when SPP>20 mmHg, but 2 out of 3 failed when SPP<2 mmHg. If SPP values would have been decisive, the amputation would have been converted to a lower level in 6 out of 17 cases. This modified scintigrafic technique provides accurate objective information for amputation level selection. (orig.)

  10. Effectiveness of nocturnal home oxygen therapy to improve exercise capacity, cardiac function and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with chronic heart failure and central sleep apnea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central sleep apnea, often found in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), has a high risk of poor prognosis. This study involved 20 patients with CHF (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 5 times/h who were divided into 2 groups: 10 patients treated with nocturnal home oxygen therapy (HOT) and 10 patients without HOT (non-HOT). All patients had dilated cardiomyopathy and underwent overnight polysomnography, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, and nuclear cardiac examinations to evaluate AHI, exercise capacity according to the specific activity scale and oxygen uptake at anaerobic threshold and peak exercise (peak VO2). Cardiac function according to 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) QGS, and the total defect score (TDS), H/M ratio and the washout rate (WR) on 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging were calculated for all patients. As compared with the non-HOT group, the HOT group demonstrated a greater reduction in AHI (26.1±9.1 to 5.1±3.4), 123I-MIBG TDS (31±8 to 25±9), and 123I-MIBG WR (48±8% to 41±5%) and a greater increase in the specific activity scale (4.0±0.9 to 5.8±1.2 Mets), peak VO2 (16.0±3.8 to 18.3±4.7 ml·min-1·kg-1), and LVEF (27±9% to 37±10%). HOT improves exercise capacity, cardiac function, and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with CHF and central sleep apnea. (author)

  11. Prospective comparison of noninvasive techniques for amputation level selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study prospectively compared the following tests for their accuracy in amputation level selection: transcutaneous oxygen, transcutaneous carbon dioxide, transcutaneous oxygen-to-transcutaneous carbon dioxide, foot-to-chest transcutaneous oxygen, intradermal xenon-133, ankle-brachial index, and absolute popliteal artery Doppler systolic pressure. All metabolic parameters had a high degree of statistical accuracy in predicting amputation healing whereas none of the other tests had statistical reliability. Amputation site healing was not affected by the presence of diabetes mellitus nor were the test results for any of the metabolic parameters

  12. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra; Carlos Alberto Duque Parra

    2006-01-01

    It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH). In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a co...

  13. Estimation of amputation level with a laser Doppler flowmeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Jørgensen, J P; Vollmer-Larsen, B;

    1989-01-01

    Leg amputation levels were decided in 24 patients suffering from atherosclerosis, using the conventional techniques of segmental blood pressure and radioisotope skin clearance. The skin microcirculation was measured and recorded before operation with a laser doppler flowmeter. A high correlation...

  14. Dilemmas in the indication for radiotherapy after breast amputation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article comments upon the decision to irradiate the chest-wall and regional glands after breast amputation. Ideas over the indications for radiotherapy by several medical centres are compared. (Auth.)

  15. Partial amputations of the foot for diabetic gangrene.

    OpenAIRE

    Turnbull, A. R.; Chester, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    Over a 5-year period 68 diabetic patients underwent 102 primary partial amputations of the foot for infected diabetic gangrene. Seventy (69%) of these operations healed without further local surgery, but five patients needed seven femoropopliteal bypass grafts (two bilateral) to achieve healing. In total, 32 primary operations needed revision by further surgery to the foot or by leg amputation. Of the original operations 31% were carried out by a consultant surgeon; the rest (69%) were perfor...

  16. A Salvage Operation for Total Penis Amputation Due to Circumcision

    OpenAIRE

    Bilsev Ince; Ayse Ozlem Gundeslioglu

    2013-01-01

    Circumcision is one of the most common rituals in Jewish and Islamic cultures. It may also be performed for phimosis correction or the treatment of recurrent balanitis. Although circumcision is considered to be a technically easy and safe surgical procedure with no significant risk, it may lead to severe complications such as necrotizing fasciitis or total penis amputation. In this report, we present a case of penis amputation at two levels occurring with third-degree burns due to electrocaut...

  17. Sciatic Neuroma Presenting Forty Years After Above-Knee Amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Kitcat, M; Hunter, J. E.; C.M. Malata

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a sciatic neuroma presenting forty years after above knee amputation. Patients developing neuroma following a limb amputation can present with stump pain which is commonly resistant to medical intervention. The length of interval from the initial injury to presentation is widely variable. Diagnosis relies on clinical suspicion and accurate assessment, radiological imaging and, if indicated, surgical exploration. MRI provides a better soft tissue definition than CT and is m...

  18. External leg amputation in conformal invariant three-point function

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Indrajit

    2009-01-01

    Amputation of external legs is carried out explicitly for the conformal invariant three-point function involving two spinors and one vector field. Our results are consistent with the general result that amputing an external leg in a conformal invariant Green function replaces a field by its conformal partner in the Green function. A star-triangle relation involving two spinors and one vector field, with general values of the scale dimensions, is derived and used for the calculation.

  19. Quality of Life of Nigerians with Unilateral Lower Limb Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Olusanjo Akosile

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine the QoL of Nigerians with lower limb amputation and to investigate the influence of some clinical and socio-demographic variables on it. Method: Forty-seven individuals with lower limb amputation participated in this study. Participants’ age, gender, marital status, occupation, time since amputation, level of amputation, affected limb and use of prosthesis were recorded. Quality of life was then measured using the WHO QOL-BREF. Data were analysed using mean and standard deviation, Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test at 0.05 alpha levels. Results: Participants’ overall health and QoL scores were 3.6(SD 0.9 and 3.9(SD 0.7 respectively. Male subjects had significantly higher scores than females in the domains of physical health (p = 0.007, social relationships (p = 0.024 and overall health (p = 0.012. Prosthesis-wearing subjects scored significantly higher in the domains of physical health (p = 0.015, psychological health (p = 0.008 and environment (p = 0.011 and overall health (0.033, than those not wearing prosthesis. Level of amputation, leg dominance and pre-amputation occupational category had no significant influence on participants’ QoL. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that the QoL of individuals with lower limb amputation in Nigeria is moderate. The only factors which have significant influence on some QoL domains are gender and use of prosthesis.Implications: Individuals with lower limb amputation, particularly females and those not wearing prosthesis, require special attention. Clinicians should identify barriers to the use of prosthesis so as to enhance their quality of life.

  20. Vascular surgery reduces the frequency of lower limb major amputations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Bøvling, Søren; Fasting, H; Henneberg, E W

    1994-01-01

    In June 1988 a Department of Vascular Surgery was established in the county of Viborg, Denmark. In this retrospective study of the periods 1986-87 and 1989-90, we have observed a significant rise in the number of patients evaluated by a vascular surgeon before amputation, from 19 to 49%. At the...... same time the number of major lower limb amputations significantly decreased. This reduction was most marked in 1990 probably due to a rise of 43% in the number of distal reconstructions. The distribution between below knee, through knee and mid-thigh amputation was unaffected by the increased vascular...... surgical activity. The frequency of major amputations in the county in 1986-87 of 40.9 per 100,000 per year declined by 25% to 30.9 per 100,000 per year in 1989-90. We conclude that vascular surgery reduces the number of major lower limb amputations and consequently all patients threatened with amputation...

  1. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Aug. 02, 2012 Microvascular cranial nerve palsy ( ...

  2. Alteração da camada de fibras nervosas da retina em usuários crônicos de cloroquina Retinal nerve fiber layer alteration in chronic users of chloroquine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela de Almeida Lyra Antunes

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a camada de fibras nervosas da retina (CFN por meio da polarimetria a laser, em pacientes em uso crônico de cloroquina. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 44 olhos de 22 pacientes em uso de cloroquina por doenças reumatológicas, por pelo menos um ano. Como controle, foram incluídos vinte indivíduos sem uso de cloroquina com idade, gênero e raça similares. Foram excluídos os pacientes que apresentavam história familiar de hipertensão ocular ou glaucoma. Ambos os olhos foram submetidos à análise da camada de fibras nervosas da retina, com o aparelho GDx® Nerve Fiber Analyser, pelo mesmo examinador. RESULTADOS: Nos usuários crônicos de cloroquina, verificou-se alteração em mais de dois parâmetros do GDx em 28 olhos (63,6%. Ocorreu também alteração no gráfico "Deviation from normal" com perda de fibras nervosas em 11 olhos (25%. Quando comparado com o grupo controle, os parâmetros que demonstraram diferença estatisticamente significante foram: Superior Ratio, Inferior Ratio, Superior Nasal, Elipse Modulation, The Number, Superior Average e Superior Integral. Houve também associação estatisticamente significante entre o tempo de uso de cloroquina e perda da CFN. CONCLUSÕES: Comprovou-se a associação entre o uso crônico da cloroquina e a alteração da CFN detectada pelo GDx. Desta forma, esses resultados podem contribuir para o diagnóstico precoce da perda de fibras nervosas na retinopatia por cloroquina.PURPOSES: To evaluate the retina nerve fiber layer by laser polarimetry in patients in chronic use of chloroquine. METHODS: Forty-four eyes of twenty-two patients were studied. These were in use of chloroquine due to rheumatic diseases during at least one year. As a control group, twenty patients without use of chloroquine with similar characteristics (age, gender and race were included. Patients who had a family history of ocular hypertension or glaucoma were not included in this group. Both eyes were

  3. Injury, nerve, and wound epidermis related electrophoretic and fluorographic protein patterns in forelimbs of adult newts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis and [35S]methionine fluorography were used to examine proteins in regenerating newt limbs, amputated denervated limbs, unamputated denervated limbs, and separated blastema mesodermal core and wound epidermis. A total of 27 protein electrophoretic bands were obtained from amputated limbs and 24 bands from unamputated limbs. Amputation resulted in the appearance of 4 new bands and the loss of 1 band as compared to unamputated limbs. These 5 banding differences were apparent on stained gels 3 days postamputation and were maintained through 10 weeks postamputation (complete regenerate stage). Only one band in unamputated limbs was always detectable on fluorographs, whereas virtually all of the stainable bands of amputated limbs were visible on fluorographs. Amputation clearly stimulated a marked, generalized increase in the synthesis of limb proteins. The 5 amputation induced changes were equally evident in stained gels of both innervated and denervated limbs. Amputated denervated limbs possessed a full set of fluorographic bands (including the 5 differences) through 18 days postamputation. However, denervation without amputation was not sufficient to alter the stainable banding pattern. Wound epidermis and mesodermal core both displayed the 5 banding differences and had identical banding patterns with the exception of one epidermal specific band. This band was also present in whole limb skin but was absent in unamputated mesodermal limb tissue. This was the only band of unamputated limbs that was consistently detectable by fluorography. It is concluded that amputation induces nerve independent changes in protein synthesis that are common to both mesodermal core and wound epidermis. These changes may represent preparation for cellular proliferation

  4. Treatment of Fingertip Amputation in Adults by Palmar Pocketing of the Amputated Part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Sun Jung

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background First suggested by Brent in 1979, the pocket principle is an alternative methodfor patients for whom a microsurgical replantation is not feasible. We report the successfulresults of a modified palmar pocket method in adults.Methods Between 2004 and 2008, we treated 10 patients by nonmicrosurgical replantationusing palmar pocketing. All patients were adults who sustained a complete fingertip amputationfrom the tip to lunula in a digits. In all of these patients, the amputation occurred due to a crushor avulsion-type injury, and a microsurgical replantation was not feasible. We used the palmarpocketing method following a composite graft in these patients and prepared the pocket in thesubcutaneous layer of the ipsilateral palm.Results Of a total of 10 cases, nine had complete survival of the replantation and one had20% partial necrosis. All of the cases were managed to conserve the fingernails, which led toacceptable cosmetic results.Conclusions A composite graft and palmar pocketing in adult cases of fingertip injuryconstitute a simple, reliable operation for digital amputation extending from the tip to thelunula. These methods had satisfactory results.

  5. Sensory cortical re-mapping following upper-limb amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This case study demonstrates the change of sensory cortical representations of the residual parts of the arm in an individual who underwent a trans-humeral amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation (TR. As a relatively new surgical technique, TR restores a direct neural connection from amputated sensorimotor nerves to specific target muscles. This method has been successfully applied to upper-limb and lower-limb amputees, and has shown effectiveness in regaining control signals via the newly re-innervated muscles. Correspondingly, recent study results have shown that motor representations for the missing limb move closer to their original locations following TR. Besides regaining motor control signals, TR also restores the sensation in the re-innervated skin areas. We therefore hypothesize that TR causes analogous cortical sensory remapping that may return closer to their original locations. In order to test this hypothesis, cortical activity in response to sensory-level electrical stimulation in different parts of the arm was studied longitudinally in one amputated individual before and up to 2 years after TR. Our results showed that 1 before TR, the cortical response to sensory electrical stimulation in the residual limb showed a diffuse bilateral pattern without a clear focus in either the time or spatial domain; and 2 2 years after TR, the sensory map of the reinnervated median nerve reorganized, showing predominant activity over the contralateral S1 hand area as well as moderate activity over the ipsilateral S1. Therefore, this work provides new evidence for long-term sensory cortical plasticity in the human brain after TR.

  6. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical ′cross-bridging′ to promote nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour period of 20 Hz electrical nerve stimulation via electrodes proximal to an injury site accelerates axon outgrowth to hasten target reinnervation in rats and humans, even after delayed surgery. A novel strategy of enticing donor axons from an otherwise intact nerve to grow through small nerve grafts (cross-bridges into a denervated nerve stump, promotes improved axon regeneration after delayed nerve repair. The efficacy of this technique has been demonstrated in a rat model and is now in clinical use in patients undergoing cross-face nerve grafting for facial paralysis. In conclusion, brief electrical stimulation, combined with the surgical technique of promoting the regeneration of some donor axons to ′protect′ chronically denervated Schwann cells, improves nerve regeneration and, in turn, functional outcomes in the management of peripheral nerve injuries.

  7. Establishing a cat model of acute optic nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In order to investigate the progress in optic nerve injury and the following regeneration and repair, many kinds of animal models of optic nerve injury have been established, such as models of acute and chronic ocular hypertension, compression, amputating wound, ischemia reperfusion or hypoxia,intravitreal injection of excitatory amino acids, etc. However, most of these models are established by squeezing intraorbital optic nerve, and suitable for ophthalmology, and there are fewer models suitable for the acute cranial contusion in neurosurgery.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes of optic nerve after acute injury, and the characteristics of methods for establishing model of acute optic nerve injury in cats.DESIGN: A complete randomized grouping and controlled animal trial.SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Ji'nan Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Twenty-eight healthy adult cats, common degree, either sex, weighing 2.0 - 3.5 kg, were provided by the animal experimental center of Fudan University. The cats were randomly divided into control group (n =3) and model group (n =25), and 5 cats in the model group were observed at 6 hours and 1,3, 7 and 14 days after injury respectively. JX-2000 biological signal processing system (Department of Physiology, Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA, Shanghai); Inverted phase contrast microscope (Olympus); Axioplan 2 imaging microgram analytical system (Labsystems).METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Jinan Military Area Command of Chinese PLA from June 2004 to June 2005. The cats in the model groups were made into models of acute optic nerve injury: The cats were anesthetized, then the limbs were fixed in a lateral recumbent position. Pterion approach in human was imitated, the operative incision was made along the line between lateral canthus and tragus, and it could be seen deep along the skull base that white

  8. Major limb amputations: A tertiary hospital experience in northwestern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalya Phillipo L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major limb amputation is reported to be a major but preventable public health problem that is associated with profound economic, social and psychological effects on the patient and family especially in developing countries where the prosthetic services are poor. The purpose of this study was to outline the patterns, indications and short term complications of major limb amputations and to compare our experience with that of other published data. Methods This was a descriptive cross-sectional study that was conducted at Bugando Medical Centre between March 2008 and February 2010. All patients who underwent major limb amputation were, after informed consent for the study, enrolled into the study. Data were collected using a pre-tested, coded questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 11.5 computer software. Results A total of 162 patients were entered into the study. Their ages ranged between 2–78 years (mean 28.30 ± 13.72 days. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 2:1. The majority of patients (76.5% had primary or no formal education. One hundred and twelve (69.1% patients were unemployed. The most common indication for major limb amputation was diabetic foot complications in 41.9%, followed by trauma in 38.4% and vascular disease in 8.6% respectively. Lower limbs were involved in 86.4% of cases and upper limbs in 13.6% of cases giving a lower limb to upper limb ratio of 6.4:1 Below knee amputation was the most common procedure performed in 46.3%. There was no bilateral limb amputation. The most common additional procedures performed were wound debridement, secondary suture and skin grafting in 42.3%, 34.5% and 23.2% respectively. Two-stage operation was required in 45.4% of patients. Revision amputation rate was 29.6%. Post-operative complication rate was 33.3% and surgical site infection was the most common complication accounting for 21.0%. The mean length of hospital stay was 22.4 days and mortality

  9. Nerve cells apoptosis and Fas and Caspase-8 expression among chronic alcoholic intoxication rats%慢性酒精中毒大鼠神经细胞凋亡及Fas、Caspase8蛋白的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段玉香; 张永利; 王彦

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究慢性酒精中毒大鼠神经细胞凋亡及Fas、Caspase8蛋白表达情况.方法 逐步增加饮水中酒精浓度,建立慢性酒精中毒大鼠动物模型,HE染色光镜下观察大鼠脑组织病理变化,Tunnel法检测大鼠脑细胞凋亡情况,免疫组化法检测Fas、Caspase8蛋白表达情况.结果 酒精组大脑皮质、海马、小脑等部位均有神经细胞数目缺失及细胞变性和损伤,酒精组各脑区凋亡细胞数和Fas、Casepse8蛋白表达阳性细胞数均高于对照组,两组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 慢性酒精中毒大鼠脑存在明显神经细胞凋亡,伴有Fas、Caspase-8蛋白表达增加,提示细胞死亡受体途径在慢性酒精中毒大鼠脑损伤病理过程中发挥作用.%Objective To understand nerve cells apoptosis and Fas and Casepse -8 protein expression status a-mong chronic alcoholic intoxication rats. Method Established chronic alcoholic intoxication rat model by increasing alcohol percentage of drinking gradually. Pathological changes were observed by light microscope, cells apoptosis and Fas and Casepse -8 protein expression were examined by Tunnel and Tmmunohistochemical method. Results In alcohol group, there were nerve cells missing, degeneration and damage in cerebral cortex, seahorse and cerebellum. The cells number of apoptosis and the positive cell of expression Fas and caspase -8 were obviously higher than control group, there was statistical significance between the 2 groups (P < 0.01) . Condusions There were obviously nerve cells apoptosis as well as the expression of Fas and Casepse -8 increased in the rats, which indicated that Fas and Casepse -8 protein attribute to nerve apoptosis and involved in the pathogenesis of chronic alcoholism.

  10. Risk factors for major amputation in hospitalised diabetic foot patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namgoong, Sik; Jung, Suyoung; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are the main cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients. Eight hundred and sixty diabetic patients were admitted to the diabetic wound centre of the Korea University Guro Hospital for foot ulcers between January 2010 and December 2013. Among them, 837 patients were successfully monitored until complete healing. Ulcers in 809 patients (96·7%) healed without major amputation and those in 28 patients (3·3%) healed with major amputation. Data of 88 potential risk factors including demographics, ulcer condition, vascularity, bioburden, neurology and serology were collected from patients in the two groups and compared. Among the 88 potential risk factors, statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed in 26 risk factors. In the univariate analysis, which was carried out for these 26 risk factors, statistically significant differences were observed in 22 risk factors. In a stepwise multiple logistic analysis, six of the 22 risk factors remained statistically significant. Multivariate-adjusted odds ratios were 11·673 for ulcers penetrating into the bone, 8·683 for dialysis, 6·740 for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, 6·158 for hind foot ulcers, 0·641 for haemoglobin levels and 1·007 for fasting blood sugar levels. The risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients were bony invasions, dialysis, GI disorders, hind foot locations, low levels of haemoglobin and elevated fasting blood sugar levels. PMID:26478562

  11. Characterization and diagnostic evaluation of chronic polyneuropathies induced by oxaliplatin and docetaxel comparing skin biopsy to quantitative sensory testing and nerve conduction studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, T; Schrøder, H D; Qvortrup, C;

    2014-01-01

    was to characterize the neuropathies with regard to symptoms, neurological signs and objective evidence of damage to the structure and function of the peripheral nerves. Furthermore, the diagnostic values of skin biopsy, quantitative sensory testing (QST) and nerve conduction studies (NCS) were...... fibre density in skin biopsies from the proximal and distal parts of the leg, QST and NCS. RESULTS: Clinically only sensory functions were affected. In general, neuropathy scores were higher in the oxaliplatin-treated group. Both sensory and motor fibres were affected in the NCS, showing predominantly...... after oxaliplatin or docetaxel treatment is a clinically sensory, axonal neuropathy affecting only small nerve fibres in some patients. NCS are often normal, whereas QST and skin biopsy have a higher diagnostic sensitivity....

  12. European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society Guideline on management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: Report of a joint task force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society - First Revision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.Y.K. van den Bergh; R.D.M. Hadden; P. Bouche; D.R. Cornblath; A. Hahn; I. Illa; C.L. Koski; J.M. Leger; E. Nobile-Orazio; J. Pollard; C. Sommer; P.A. van Doorn; I.N. van Schaik

    2010-01-01

    Background: Consensus guidelines on the definition, investigation, and treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) have been previously published in European Journal of Neurology and Journal of the Peripheral Nervous System. Objectives: To revise these guidelines. M

  13. Always Contact a Vascular Interventional Specialist Before Amputating a Patient with Critical Limb Ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with severe critical limb ischemia (CLI) due to long tibial artery occlusions are often poor candidates for surgical revascularization and frequently end up with a lower limb amputation. Subintimal angioplasty (SA) offers a minimally invasive alternative for limb salvage in this severely compromised patient population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of SA in patients with CLI caused by long tibial occlusions who have no surgical options for revascularization and are facing amputation. We retrospectively reviewed all consecutive patients with CLI due to long tibial occlusions who were scheduled for amputation because they had no surgical options for revascularization and who were treated by SA. A total of 26 procedures in 25 patients (14 males; mean age, 70 ± 15 [SD] years) were evaluated. Technical success rate was 88% (23/26). There were four complications, which were treated conservatively. Finally, in 10 of 26 limbs, no amputation was needed. A major amputation was needed in 10 limbs (7 below-knee amputations and 3 above-knee amputations). Half of the major amputations took place within 3 months after the procedure. Cumulative freedom of major amputation after 12 months was 59% (SE = 11%). In six limbs, amputation was limited to a minor amputation. Seven patients (28%) died during follow-up. In conclusion, SA of the tibial arteries seem to be a valuable treatment option to prevent major amputation in patients with CLI who are facing amputation due to lack of surgical options.

  14. Preventing amputation in adults with diabetes: identifying the risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Eleanor

    2015-06-01

    Good management of diabetes can reduce the risk of complications of the disease. When not well managed, diabetes is associated with the complications of heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease and amputations. Diabetes can reduce the blood supply to the feet and cause a loss of feeling. As a result, foot injuries do not heal well and the person may not realise that their foot is sore or injured. Damage to the foot may lead to the development of foot ulcers, which if left untreated may result in amputation of the limb. Preventive care is a priority, but when complications occur the next step is to halt progression. Therefore, effective foot care and timely treatment of foot ulcers are important in preserving foot function and mobility, and preventing amputation in adults with diabetes. PMID:26036406

  15. Microneurovascular reimplantation in a case of total penile amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatt Yogesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Amputation of the penis is a rare condition reported from various parts of the world as isolated cases or small series of patients; the common aetiology is self-mutilating sharp amputation or an avulsion or crush injury in an industrial accident. A complete reconstruction of all penile structures should be attempted in one stage which provides the best chance for full rehabilitation of the patient. We report here a single case of total amputation of the penis, which was successfully reattached by using a microsurgical technique. After surgery, near-normal appearance and function including a good urine flow and absence of urethral stricture, capabilities of erection and near normal sensitivity were observed.

  16. Transmetatarsal Amputation: A Case Series and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan McCallum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Foot ulceration is a major cause of morbidity amongst patients with diabetes. In severe cases of ulceration, osteomyelitis and amputation can ensue. A distinct lack of agreement exists on the most appropriate level of amputation in cases of severe foot ulceration/infection to provide predictable healing rates. This paper provides an overview of the transmetatarsal amputation (TMA as a limb salvage procedure and is written with the perspective and experiences of the Department of Podiatric Surgery at West Middlesex University Hospital (WMUH. We have reflected on the cases of 11 patients (12 feet and have found the TMA to be an effective procedure in the management of cases of severe forefoot ulceration and infection.

  17. Establishing a cat model of acute optic nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In order to investigate the progress in optic nerve injury and the following regeneration and repair, many kinds of animal models of optic nerve injury have been established, such as models of acute and chronic ocular hypertension, compression, amputating wound, ischemia reperfusion or hypoxia,intravitreal injection of excitatory amino acids, etc. However, most of these models are established by squeezing intraorbital optic nerve, and suitable for ophthalmology, and there are fewer models suitable for the acute cranial contusion in neurosurgery.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes of optic nerve after acute injury, and the characteristics of methods for establishing model of acute optic nerve injury in cats.DESIGN: A complete randomized grouping and controlled animal trial.SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Ji'nan Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Twenty-eight healthy adult cats, common degree, either sex, weighing 2.0 - 3.5 kg, were provided by the animal experimental center of Fudan University. The cats were randomly divided into control group (n =3) and model group (n =25), and 5 cats in the model group were observed at 6 hours and 1,3, 7 and 14 days after injury respectively. JX-2000 biological signal processing system (Department of Physiology, Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA, Shanghai); Inverted phase contrast microscope (Olympus); Axioplan 2 imaging microgram analytical system (Labsystems).METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Jinan Military Area Command of Chinese PLA from June 2004 to June 2005. The cats in the model groups were made into models of acute optic nerve injury: The cats were anesthetized, then the limbs were fixed in a lateral recumbent position. Pterion approach in human was imitated, the operative incision was made along the line between lateral canthus and tragus, and it could be seen deep along the skull base that white

  18. The use of bone bridges in transtibial amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto Auro Mitsuo

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We sought to describe the bone bridge technique in adults, and present a variation for use in children, as well as to present its applicability as an option in elective transtibial amputations. This paper presents a prospective study of 15 transtibial amputations performed between 1992 and 1995 in which the bone bridge technique was employed. The patients' ages ranged from 8 to 48 years, with an average of 22.5 years. This technique consisted of the preparation of a cylinder of periosteum extracted from the tibia and with cortical bone fragments attached to it to promote a tibiofibular synostosis on the distal extremity of the amputation stump. We noted that the cortical bone fragments were dispensable when the technique was employed in children, due to the increased osteogenic capacity of the periosteum. This led to a variation of the original technique, a bone bridge without the use of the cortical bone fragments. RESULTS: The average time spent with this procedure, without any significant variation between adults and children, was 171 minutes. The adaptation to the definitive prosthesis was accomplished between 20 and 576 days, with an average of 180 days. Revision of the procedure was necessary in 3 amputations. CONCLUSIONS: This technique may be employed in transtibial amputations in which the final length of the stump lies next to the musculotendinous transition of the gastrocnemius muscle, as well as in the revision of amputation stumps in children, where the procedure has been shown to be effective in the prevention of lesions due to excessive bone growth.

  19. [Lower limb salvage with a free fillet fibula flap harvested from the contralateral amputated leg].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyer, M; Corcella, D; Forli, A; Mesquida, V; Semere, A; Moutet, F

    2015-06-01

    We report a unusual case of "fillet flap" to reconstruct the lower limb with the amputated contralateral leg. This kind of procedure was first described by Foucher et al. in 1980 for traumatic hand surgery as the "bank finger". A 34-year-old man suffered a microlight accident with bilateral open legs fractures. A large skin defect of the left leg exposed the ankle, the calcaneus and a non-vascularized part of the tibial nerve (10 cm). The patient came to the OR for surgical debridement and had massive bone resection of the left calcaneus. The right leg showed limited skin defect at the lower part, exposing the medial side of the ankle and a tibial bone defect, measuring 10 cm. Salvage the left leg was impossible due to complex nerve, bones and skin associated injuries, so this leg was sacrificed and used as a donor limb, to harvest a free fibula flap for contralateral tibial reconstruction. At 18 months of follow-up, the patient was very satisfied, the clinical result was very good on both lower limbs and X-rays showed excellent integration of the free fibula flap. The patient had normal dailies occupations, can run and have bicycle sport practice with a functional left leg fit prosthesis. This case showed an original application of the "fillet flap concept" to resolve complex and rare traumatic situations interesting the both lower limbs. In our opinion, this strategy must be a part of the plastic surgeon skills in uncommon situations. PMID:25069828

  20. Bilateral elevation of interleukin-6 protein and mRNA in both lumbar and cervical dorsal root ganglia following unilateral chronic compression injury of the sciatic nerve

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dubový, P.; Brázda, Václav; Klusáková, I.; Hradilová-Svíženská, I.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 55 (2013). E-ISSN 1742-2094 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Unilateral nerve injury * Contralateral reaction * Remote ganglia Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.902, year: 2013

  1. Análise da camada de fibras nervosas da retina em usuários crônicos do tabaco e álcool Analysis of retinal nerve fiber layer in chronic tobacco and alcohol users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Ramos de Lima

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a camada de fibras nervosas (CFN da retina, através da polarimetria a laser (GDx, em usuários crônicos do tabaco e álcool. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 46 olhos de 23 indivíduos alcoólatras e tabagistas crônicos triados do Ambulatório de Oftalmologia da Fundação Altino Ventura (grupo estudo. Como grupo controle foram incluídos 32 olhos de 16 voluntários não-usuários do álcool e tabaco, com idade, gênero e raça similares, também triados da Fundação Altino Ventura. Ambos os olhos de todos os indivíduos foram submetidos à análise da camada de fibras nervosas da retina, com aparelho "GDx nerve fiber analyses" pelo mesmo examinador. RESULTADOS: No gráfico Deviation from normal, no grupo estudo ocorreu perda de fibras nervosas da retina em 43,4%, enquanto que no grupo controle houve perda apenas em 18,7%. Quanto aos parâmetros que analisam o GDx, quando comparados o grupo estudo com o grupo controle, observou-se diferença estatisticamente significante nos parâmetros: Ellipse modulation, Inferior ratio e Max modulation. CONCLUSÕES: Os dados comprovam a associação entre o uso crônico do tabaco e álcool e a alteração na camada de fibras nervosas da retina, podendo contribuir para o diagnóstico precoce desta neuropatia.PURPOSES: To evaluate the retinal nerve fiber layer using GDx in chronic alcohol and tobacco users. METHODS: Twenty-three chronic alcohol and tobacco users were studied (study group. As a control group, sixteen volunteers without use of alcohol and tobacco with similar characteristics (age, gender and race were included. Both eyes were tested for analysis of the retinal nerve fiber layer with GDx. RESULTS: There was alteration in the Deviation from normal graph with a loss of nerve fibers in 43.4% of patients in the study group. In the control group this alteration was observed in 14 eyes (18.7%. As regards the parameters that allow comparison between the study and control groups there was

  2. Factors related to successful job reintegration of people with a lower limb amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoppen, Tanneke; Boonstra, Antje; Groothoff, JW; van Sonderen, E; Goeken, LN; Eisma, Willem

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study demographically, amputation-, and employment-related factors that show a relationship to successful job reintegration of patients after lower limb amputation. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University hospital. Patients: Subjects had an acquired unilateral major amputati

  3. PSYCHIATRIC SEQUELAE OF AMPUTATION : II LONG TERM EFFECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, J.K.; Mall, C.P.; U.S. Mishra; Sharma, V. P.; Dalal, P.K.; Katiyar, M.; Srivastava, Shrikant; Sinha, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    Psychiatric sequelae present after 6 months to 2 years following amputation were studied in a group of 25 subjects. The subjects were screened on SCID, HRSD and HARS. The most common diagnoses were depressive disorder NOS (20.6%) and major depressive disorder (10.3%). Patients having right sided amputation were more psychiatrically ill than those with loss of a left limb. Phantom limb was seen in about two-thirds of the total sample-more in the sick group (about 88%) than in the non-sick grou...

  4. Amputated Lower Limb Fixation to the Fracture Table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamulin, Axel; Farshad, Mazda

    2015-11-01

    Fractures of the proximal and diaphyseal femur are frequently internally fixed using a fracture table with fracture reduction obtained by traction and adequate rotation exerted on the slightly abducted extremity. Although rare, these fractures may occur on an amputated limb. If so, standard use of a fracture table is not possible. To address this situation, the authors describe a simple novel technique allowing rigid fixation of the amputated limb to the traction device of the fracture table that provides accurate control of reduction in all planes. PMID:26558660

  5. Traumatic amputation of the left lower renal pole in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four children between 5 and 10 years old suffered traumatic amputation of the left lower renal pole following flank trauma. All patients were evaluated with excretory urography and isotope renography. The renal scan clearly demonstrated failure of perfusion of the lower renal pole and urinary extravasation, and was believed to be more valuable than the standard excretory urogram as a diagnostic tool. All children were managed similarly: delayed (72 to 96 hours) exploration, simple removal of the amputated segment and insertion of a Penrose drain. They all have done well. The patients were normotensive at followup and had excellent function of the remaining portion of the kidney

  6. Amputation and prosthesis implantation shape body and peripersonal space representations

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa Canzoneri; Marilena Marzolla; Amedeo Amoresano; Gennaro Verni; Andrea Serino

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about whether and how multimodal representations of the body (BRs) and of the space around the body (Peripersonal Space, PPS) adapt to amputation and prosthesis implantation. In order to investigate this issue, we tested BR in a group of upper limb amputees by means of a tactile distance perception task and PPS by means of an audio-tactile interaction task. Subjects performed the tasks with stimulation either on the healthy limb or the stump of the amputated limb, while wearin...

  7. Combat-related bridge synostosis versus traditional transtibial amputation: comparison of military-specific outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Plucknette, Benjamin F.; Krueger, Chad A.; Rivera, Jessica C.; Wenke, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine military-specific outcomes for transtibial amputations of US Service members using either the traditional technique (Burgess) or the Ertl technique. All US Service members sustaining transtibial, combat-related amputation from September 2001 through July 2011 were reviewed. Amputation type, mechanism of injury, time interval to amputation, age, sex, branch of service, rank, force, nature, and injury severity score were recorded. Outcomes were determined b...

  8. Radioisotope washout technique as a routine method for selection of amputation level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 36 amputations of the lower extremity the local skin perfusion pressure was measured preoperatively by an isotope washout technique. The result served as a guidance in the selection of amputation level. An overall healing rate of 94% was found with 64% of the amputations being below the knee. Thus, the isotope washout technique, used routinely, gives a reliable preoperative assessment of the chances of wound healing following below-knee and above-knee amputations. (author)

  9. Reduced incidence of lower-extremity amputations in a Danish diabetes population from 2000 to 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M E; Almdal, T P; Faerch, K

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic foot disease and amputations severely reduce quality of life and have major economic consequences. The aim of this study was to estimate time trends in the incidence of lower-extremity amputations in Danish people with diabetes.......Diabetic foot disease and amputations severely reduce quality of life and have major economic consequences. The aim of this study was to estimate time trends in the incidence of lower-extremity amputations in Danish people with diabetes....

  10. Nerve biopsy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  11. Sympathetic vasoconstrictor nerve function in alcoholic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K; Andersen, K; Smith, T;

    1984-01-01

    The peripheral sympathetic vasomotor nerve function was investigated in 18 male chronic alcoholics admitted for intellectual impairment or polyneuropathy. By means of the local 133Xenon washout technique, the sympathetic veno-arteriolar axon-reflex was studied. This normally is responsible for a 50...... (18% and 48% decrease respectively). However, in three patients with moderate neuropathy, and in one patient with no signs of neuropathy, this veno-arteriolar reflex was absent, indicating dysfunction of the peripheral sympathetic adrenergic nerve fibres. The three patients also showed a lesser degree...... alcohol comprise not only the peripheral sensory and motor nerve fibres, but also the thin pseudomotor and vasomotor nerves....

  12. Difficult to predict early failure after major lower-extremity amputations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Holm, Gitte; Gebuhr, Peter

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The successful outcome of a major amputation depends on several factors, including stump wound healing. The purpose of this study was to examine the criteria upon which the index amputation was based and to identify factors associated with early amputation failure after major non-tr...

  13. Affective Distress and Amputation-Related Pain Among Older Men with Long-Term, Traumatic Limb Amputations

    OpenAIRE

    Desmond, Deirdre; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2006-01-01

    Psychological distress and postamputation pain were investigated in a sample of 582 males with long-term limb amputations (mean time since amputation 639.3 months, standard deviation 166.1; range 240–784 months). Prevalence of significant depressive symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]-D score ≥ 8) was 32.0%, and 34.0% of respondents met the screening criterion for clinical anxiety (HADS-A score ≥ 8). Nearly one quarter (24.6%) of respondents reported significant post-...

  14. Incidence of re-amputation following partial first ray amputation associated with diabetes mellitus and peripheral sensory neuropathy: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L. Borkosky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus with peripheral sensory neuropathy frequently results in forefoot ulceration. Ulceration at the first ray level tends to be recalcitrant to local wound care modalities and off-loading techniques. If healing does occur, ulcer recurrence is common. When infection develops, partial first ray amputation in an effort to preserve maximum foot length is often performed. However, the survivorship of partial first ray amputations in this patient population and associated re-amputation rate remain unknown. Therefore, in an effort to determine the actual re-amputation rate following any form of partial first ray amputation in patients with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy, the authors conducted a systematic review. Only studies involving any form of partial first ray amputation associated with diabetes mellitus and peripheral sensory neuropathy but without critical limb ischemia were included. Our search yielded a total of 24 references with 5 (20.8% meeting our inclusion criteria involving 435 partial first ray amputations. The weighted mean age of patients was 59 years and the weighted mean follow-up was 26 months. The initial amputation level included the proximal phalanx base 167 (38.4% times; first metatarsal head resection 96 (22.1% times; first metatarsal-phalangeal joint disarticulation 53 (12.2% times; first metatarsal mid-shaft 39 (9% times; hallux fillet flap 32 (7.4% times; first metatarsal base 29 (6.7% times; and partial hallux 19 (4.4% times. The incidence of re-amputation was 19.8% (86/435. The end stage, most proximal level, following re-amputation was an additional digit 32 (37.2% times; transmetatarsal 28 (32.6% times; below-knee 25 (29.1% times; and LisFranc 1 (1.2% time. The results of our systematic review reveal that one out of every five patients undergoing any version of a partial first ray amputation will eventually require more proximal re-amputation. These results reveal that partial first ray

  15. Notes to Parents - When Your Child Has Undergone Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Margaret Hauser

    Designed to provide parents with basic information about the physical and emotional aspects of amputation, the booklet gives information about the grief response, body image, phantom limb sensation, stump care, and the prosthesis. The section on the grief process describes normal reactions to loss: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and…

  16. Case 6: amputation site on an ulcerated diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, José Neves Paulos

    2016-03-01

    A patient presented with diabetic gangrene on four toes and a moderately infected ulcer on the dorsum of the foot. Following amputation of the gangrenous toes, it was possible to salvage the remaining foot using a combination of antibiotics, octenilin Wound Irrigation Solution and Octiset. PMID:26949850

  17. Take Care of Yourself After an Amputation or Other Surgery

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-02-18

    This podcast provides health information for amputees on how to take care of yourself after an amputation or other surgery.  Created: 2/18/2010 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disability, Disability and Health Program.   Date Released: 2/18/2010.

  18. Intrauterine Idiopathic Amputation of the Head of a Porcine Foetus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, J. S.; Garoussi, M. T.

    2013-01-01

    amputation. A definitive cause could not be established because the placenta was not available. The most likely cause is strangulation of the neck. Such strangulation could be due to a defect of the allantoamnion with herniation of the foetal head or entanglement by amniotic constriction bands....

  19. The Morphofunctional Effect of the Transplantation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Predegenerated Peripheral Nerve in Chronic Paraplegic Rat Model via Spinal Cord Transection

    OpenAIRE

    Vinnitsa Buzoianu-Anguiano; Sandra Orozco-Suárez; Elisa García-Vences; Sara Caballero-Chacón; Gabriel Guizar-Sahagún; Luis Chavez-Sanchez; Israel Grijalva

    2015-01-01

    Functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) is limited by poor axonal and cellular regeneration as well as the failure to replace damaged myelin. Employed separately, both the transplantation of the predegenerated peripheral nerve (PPN) and the transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been shown to promote the regrowth and remyelination of the damaged central axons in SCI models of hemisection, transection, and contusion injury. With the aim to test the effects of ...

  20. The puerperium alters spinal cord plasticity following peripheral nerve injury

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez, Silvia; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro; Eisenach, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue and nerve damage can result in chronic pain. Yet, chronic pain after cesarean delivery is remarkably rare in women and hypersensitivity from peripheral nerve injury in rats resolves rapidly if the injury occurs in the puerperium. Little is known regarding the mechanisms of this protection except for a reliance on central nervous system oxytocin signaling. Here we show that density of inhibitory noradrenergic fibers in the spinal cord is greater when nerve injury is performed in rats du...

  1. Effect of primary and secondary wartime below-knee amputation on length of hospitalization and rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Jandrić Slavica; Topić Brano

    2002-01-01

    The results of below-knee amputations in 36 war wounded (mean age 35,42) were reviewed. The majority of the patients was wounded by land mines (94.4%). Most of them were between 25 and 35 years old. Bilateral amputation was done in 2.8% of cases. The amputation was performed on the day of wounding (primary below-knee amputation) in 30 (83.3%) amputees. Secondary amputation after the attempt to save the severely injured lower-limb was performed in 6 patients (16,7%) average 4.61 ± 11.67 days a...

  2. Substantial reduction in the number of amputations among patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Benjamin S B; Yderstraede, Knud B; Carstensen, Bendix;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to describe the trends in rates of amputation among individuals with and without diabetes. METHODS: We studied amputation rates in the County of Funen (approximately 0.5 million residents) during the period 1996-2011. Amputations were identified from the...... hospital administrative system, diabetes status by linkage with the Danish National Diabetes Register, and mortality and population data by extraction from Statistics Denmark. Amputation rates were analysed using proportional hazard models. We analysed the incidence of the first amputation at each level as...

  3. Analysis of predictor factors of limb amputation in patients with high-voltage electrical burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo García Álvarez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Limb amputation is considered one of the most devastating consequences of electrical injury. Any factors that correlate with the degree of muscle damage can be used to predict the necessity of limb amputation. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that can be used to predict limb amputation in high-voltage electrically injured patients. Methods: Eighty-two high-voltage electrically injured patients were admitted to the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Burns of National Arzobispo Loayza Hospital on a 5 year period. A retrospective analysis of the possible related risk factors between amputation and non-amputation patients was performed. Results: A total of 68 patients were enrolled for analysis. Thirteen patients underwent limb amputations. Multivariate analysis of the risk factors between amputation and non-amputation groups showed statistical significance for first 24 hour creatine kinase-isoenzyme MB (CKMB level. A serum CK-MB level above 14,955 U/L predicted high risk of limb amputation with high specificity (84% and sensitivity (77%. Only one patient with a remarkable decrease of creatine kinase (CPKt and CK-MB levels after fasciotomy avoided a major limb amputation. Conclusion: Our results suggest that CPK-MB level is an independent factor for prediction of limb amputation in patients with high-voltage electrical burns. We suggest that the addition of CPK-MB evaluation to clinical symptom screening may be a valuable method for early detection of muscle damage.

  4. Pattern of injury in those dying from traumatic amputation caused by bomb blast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, J B; Bowyer, G W; Cooper, G J; Crane, J

    1994-08-01

    Traumatic amputation of limbs caused by bomb blast carries a high risk of mortality. This paper describes 73 amputations in 34 deaths from bomb blast in Northern Ireland. The principal aim was to determine the sites of traumatic amputation to provide a biophysical basis for the development of protective measures. Few amputations were through joints; nearly all were through the bone shafts. The most common site in the tibia was the upper third. The distribution of femoral sites resulting from car bombs differed from that characterizing other types of explosion. For car bombs the principal site of amputation was the upper third; for other types of device it was the lower third. It is concluded that flailing is not a notable contributor to limb avulsion. The pattern of amputation is consistent with direct local pressure loads leading to bone fracture; the amputation itself is a secondary event arising from the flow of combustion products. PMID:7953338

  5. Lower limb amputations: differences between the genders and long-term survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, M; Saarinen, J; Suominen, V P; Virkkunen, J; Salenius, J

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate possible differences between genders in amputation incidence, revascularization activity before and survival after amputation. This population-based study was carried out in a well-defined geographical area, where all vascular surgical consultations and reconstructions are performed in one university hospital. All amputations performed in the region during 1990 - 1999 were identified from the hospital central registers. According to patient's identity codes, the Cause of Death Registry of Statistics Finland provided death data. Amputation data were cross-linked with the local vascular registry using identity codes. Women were found to be 8 years older than men (p < 0.0001). Major amputations comprised 73.4% in males and 77.7% in females. The age-standardized amputation incidence among males was 338 and among females 226 (per 10(6) inhabitants/year) (p < 0.001). The most prominent difference was seen in amputations due to trauma, where the age-adjusted major amputation incidence was over three-fold among males compared to females. The proportion of patients who had undergone vascular procedure before amputation was 23% in both genders. Median survival after amputation was 943 days in men and 716 in women (p = 0.01). When the higher age of women was considered, there was no significant difference between the genders. Survival was poorer among diabetics in both genders and the difference was significant in males. The amputation incidence was found to be higher in men compared to women in all etiologic subgroups except malignant tumour. Almost one in 4 patients had undergone vascular surgical reconstruction before amputation in both genders. There was no significant difference between the genders in survival after amputation. Subjects with diabetes had a poorer survival after major amputation than those without diabetes. PMID:17979013

  6. Electrophysiologic study of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy by using segmental stimulation in the median nerve and ulnar nerve%正中神经和尺神经分段刺激在慢性炎性脱髓鞘性多发性神经病中的电生理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晋荣; 王进华; 叶憬; 杨伟丽

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨运动神经传导速度(MCV)、复合肌肉动作电位(CMAP)与肌力减退的关系和传导阻滞(CB)在慢性炎性脱髓鞘性多发性神经病(chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis,CIDP)中的表现特点.方法 30例CIDP患者在进行常规MCV、远端潜伏期(DML)、F波、感觉神经传导速度(SCV)、肌电图(EMG)测定的基础上,在正中神经采用由远到近的“腕-肘-腋-Erb's点”4点3段刺激,尺神经采用由远到近的“腕-肘下-肘上-腋-Erb's点”5点4段刺激,记录各段刺激后CMAP各参数及MCV的变化.结果 CMAP波幅衰减、面积衰减、时程增加以及MCV减慢与临床肌力减退无相关性,dCMAP波幅与上肢远端肌力呈正相关;患者中80.00%在正中神经、73.33%在尺神经发现了1个或多个节段的CB,且出现节段无明显选择性.结论 dCMAP波幅降低与CIDP患者肌力减退有相关性.在CIDP中CB出现率高,且较为弥散地在各节段中出现.%Objective To investigate the relationship between motor conduction velocity (MCV) and compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and muscle strength impairment; and to study the characteristics of conduction block (CB) in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Methods 30 patients with CIDP formed the study population. All patients were examined by MCV, distal motor latency (DML), F wave, sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV) and electromyography (EMG). Stimulations were perfomed at 4 sites of the median nerve from distal to proximal (wrist, elbow, axilla, Erb' s point) and 5 sites of the ulnar nerve (wrist, below elbow, above elbow, axilla, Erb' s point), while all the parameters of CMAP and MCV were recorded. Results There were no correlations between the CAMP amplitude attenuation, area, duration increase, MCV reduction and the clinical muscle strength. However, there was positive correlation between the amplitude of the dCMAP and the distal muscle strength in the upper

  7. Reassessing cortical reorganization in the primary sensorimotor cortex following arm amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makin, Tamar R; Scholz, Jan; Henderson Slater, David; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Tracey, Irene

    2015-08-01

    The role of cortical activity in generating and abolishing chronic pain is increasingly emphasized in the clinical community. Perhaps the most striking example of this is the maladaptive plasticity theory, according to which phantom pain arises from remapping of cortically neighbouring representations (lower face) into the territory of the missing hand following amputation. This theory has been extended to a wide range of chronic pain conditions, such as complex regional pain syndrome. Yet, despite its growing popularity, the evidence to support the maladaptive plasticity theory is largely based on correlations between pain ratings and oftentimes crude measurements of cortical reorganization, with little consideration of potential contributions of other clinical factors, such as adaptive behaviour, in driving the identified brain plasticity. Here, we used a physiologically meaningful measurement of cortical reorganization to reassess its relationship to phantom pain in upper limb amputees. We identified small yet consistent shifts in lip representation contralateral to the missing hand towards, but not invading, the hand area. However, we were unable to identify any statistical relationship between cortical reorganization and phantom sensations or pain either with this measurement or with the traditional Euclidian distance measurement. Instead, we demonstrate that other factors may contribute to the observed remapping. Further research that reassesses more broadly the relationship between cortical reorganization and chronic pain is warranted. PMID:26072517

  8. Symptoms of PTSD Associated With Painful and Nonpainful Vicarious Reactivity Following Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giummarra, Melita J; Fitzgibbon, Bernadette M; Tsao, Jack W; Gibson, Stephen J; Rich, Anina N; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Chou, Michael; Bradshaw, John L; Alphonso, Aimee L; Tung, Monica L; Drastal, Carol A; Hanling, Steven; Pasquina, Paul F; Enticott, Peter G

    2015-08-01

    Although the experience of vicarious sensations when observing another in pain have been described postamputation, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We investigated whether vicarious sensations are related to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and chronic pain. In Study 1, 236 amputees completed questionnaires about phantom limb phenomena and vicarious sensations to both innocuous and painful sensory experiences of others. There was a 10.2% incidence of vicarious sensations, which was significantly more prevalent in amputees reporting PTSD-like experiences, particularly increased arousal and reexperiencing the event that led to amputation (φ = .16). In Study 2, 63 amputees completed the Empathy for Pain Scale and PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version. Cluster analyses revealed 3 groups: 1 group did not experience vicarious pain or PTSD symptoms, and 2 groups were vicarious pain responders, but only 1 had increased PTSD symptoms. Only the latter group showed increased chronic pain severity compared with the nonresponder group (p = .025) with a moderate effect size (r = .35). The findings from both studies implicated an overlap, but also divergence, between PTSD symptoms and vicarious pain reactivity postamputation. Maladaptive mechanisms implicated in severe chronic pain and physical reactivity posttrauma may increase the incidence of vicarious reactivity to the pain of others. PMID:26243674

  9. Predictive factors for lower extremity amputations in diabetic foot infections

    OpenAIRE

    Keng Lin, Wong; Aziz, Zameer; Nather, Aziz; Huak, Chan Yiong

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology of diabetic foot infections (DFIs) and its predictive factors for lower extremity amputations. A prospective study of 100 patients with DFIs treated at the National University Hospital of Singapore were recruited in the study during the period of January 2005- June 2005. A protocol was designed to document patient’s demographics, type of DFI, presence of neuropathy and/or vasculopathy and its final outcome. Predictive factors for li...

  10. Epidemiological Study on Reasons for Leg Amputation in Japanese

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Yoshitaka; IMAKI, Masahide; Ogawa, Yukiko; FUCHOKA, Satoshi; OKUDA, Kuniharu

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted, with special reference to elucidating the causes for lower limb amputation, which would have the most significant effect on "locomotion", the basis of independence of the aged. The subjects were leg amputees for whom artificial limbs had been fitted financed by various insurance policies in Osaka prefecture. The survey was conducted on 3, 138 subjects, from whom acceptable responses were obtained from 1, 460 (recovery rate, 46.5%). Questionnaires were mailed to each ...

  11. Human vagus nerve branching in the cervical region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Hammer

    Full Text Available Vagus nerve stimulation is increasingly applied to treat epilepsy, psychiatric conditions and potentially chronic heart failure. After implanting vagus nerve electrodes to the cervical vagus nerve, side effects such as voice alterations and dyspnea or missing therapeutic effects are observed at different frequencies. Cervical vagus nerve branching might partly be responsible for these effects. However, vagus nerve branching has not yet been described in the context of vagus nerve stimulation.Branching of the cervical vagus nerve was investigated macroscopically in 35 body donors (66 cervical sides in the carotid sheath. After X-ray imaging for determining the vertebral levels of cervical vagus nerve branching, samples were removed to confirm histologically the nerve and to calculate cervical vagus nerve diameters and cross-sections.Cervical vagus nerve branching was observed in 29% of all cases (26% unilaterally, 3% bilaterally and proven histologically in all cases. Right-sided branching (22% was more common than left-sided branching (12% and occurred on the level of the fourth and fifth vertebra on the left and on the level of the second to fifth vertebra on the right side. Vagus nerves without branching were significantly larger than vagus nerves with branches, concerning their diameters (4.79 mm vs. 3.78 mm and cross-sections (7.24 mm2 vs. 5.28 mm2.Cervical vagus nerve branching is considerably more frequent than described previously. The side-dependent differences of vagus nerve branching may be linked to the asymmetric effects of the vagus nerve. Cervical vagus nerve branching should be taken into account when identifying main trunk of the vagus nerve for implanting electrodes to minimize potential side effects or lacking therapeutic benefits of vagus nerve stimulation.

  12. Acetylcholinesterase activity and catecholamine content in thymic and splenic nerve fibres of white rats long after chronic exposure to physical factors and application of interleukin-1β

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and catecholamine (CA) content in nerve fibres of the thymus and spleen of white rats were studied 6 months after prolonged combined exposure to ionizing radiation and heat and after application of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Combined action of the physical factors induced a certain decrease in AChE activity and increase in CA content in both organs. Application of the cytokine to animals exposed to radiation and heat elicited a more pronounced decrease in AChE in these lymphoid organs and increase, especially in the spleen, in CA. The results suggest about enhanced responsiveness of the autonomic nervous system to IL-1β animals which had been long before exposed to prolonged combined action of radiation and heat

  13. Cervical Radiculopathy (Pinched Nerve)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the seven small vertebrae that form the neck. Spinal nerve root. AAOS does not endorse any treatments, procedures, ... whether your symptoms are caused by pressure on spinal nerve roots and nerve damage or by another condition ...

  14. Nerve conduction velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see how fast electrical signals move through a nerve. ... surface electrodes are placed on the skin over nerves at different spots. Each patch gives off a ...

  15. Optic Nerve Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Optic Nerve Imaging email Send this article to a friend ... measurements of nerve fiber damage (or loss). The Nerve Fiber Analyzer (GDx) uses laser light to measure ...

  16. Femoral nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The femoral nerve is located in the leg and supplies the muscles that assist help straighten the leg. It supplies sensation ... leg. One risk of damage to the femoral nerve is pelvic fracture. Symptoms of femoral nerve damage ...

  17. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ulnar nerve originates from the brachial plexus and travels down arm. The nerve is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near the surface of the body where ...

  18. Ulnar nerve entrapment by anconeus epitrochlearis ligament.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tiong, William H C

    2012-01-01

    Ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow is the second most common upper limb entrapment neuropathy other than carpal tunnel syndrome. There have been many causes identified ranging from chronic aging joint changes to inflammatory conditions or systemic disorders. Among them, uncommon anatomical variants accounts for a small number of cases. Here, we report our experience in managing ulnar nerve entrapment caused by a rare vestigial structure, anconeus epitrochlearis ligament, and provide a brief review of the literature of its management.

  19. Bloqueos nerviosos periféricos de la extremidad inferior para analgesia postoperatoria y tratamiento del dolor crónico Lower limb continuous peripheral nerve blocks for postoperative analgesia and chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Domingo

    2004-05-01

    , are the less known and rarely used. In this paper, we summarize the recent advances in lumbosacral plexus block, with special remark on continuous catheter blocks for postoperative analgesia and chronic pain treatment. The use of long action local anes-thetics combined with a weak motor block, like ropivacaine, permits the combination of a single skin injection technique to achieve an adequate intraoperative analgesia with continuous infusion ones for postoperative analgesia. A detailed knowledge of anatomy as well as cutaneous nerve distribution is needed for the performance of these techniques. The introduction of several image-based techniques, principally ultrasound imaging, may improve the accuracy of nerve localization and needle placement. It also can help to prevent accidental puncture to vessels and other neighbouring structures. Continuous plexus and peripheral nerve blocks offer the potential benefits of prolonged analgesia with fewer side effects, greater patient satisfaction, and faster functional recovery after surgery.

  20. Clinical effect and necessity of interventional treatment in diabetic foot before and after amputation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the clinical effect and necessity of interventional treatment in diabetic foot before and after amputation. Methods: Combined intravascular angioplasty with intraarterial medicine perfusing were carried out in fourteen patients with diabetic foot including 10 patients treated before amputation and 4 after amputation involving superficial femoral, deep femoral, tibial and fitular arteries. Among them seventeen vessels with irregular stenosis and obstruction were treated by intravascular angioplasty through balloon dilation. Results: The technical successful rate was 100%, no complication happened. The symptoms were relieved in all patients after treatment, including promotion of lower extremity arterial blood perfusion, reducing range of amputation and wound healing after amputation. Conclusions: Intravascular interventional treatment is safe, effective and valuable in diabetic foot before and after amputation. (authors)

  1. Distribution patterns of demyelination correlate with clinical profiles in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Kuwabara, S; Ogawara, K; Misawa, S; M. Mori; Hattori, T.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is a heterogeneous disorder having a wide clinical range, and is characterised by multifocal demyelination that can involve the distal nerve terminals, intermediate nerve segments, and nerve roots.

  2. Effects of short-term training on sensory and motor function in severed nerves of long-term human amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, G S; Krüger, T B; Sandhu, J S; Horch, K W

    2005-05-01

    Much has been studied and written about plastic changes in the CNS of humans triggered by events such as limb amputation. However, little is known about the extent to which the original pathways retain residual function after peripheral amputation. Our earlier, acute study on long-term amputees indicated that central pathways associated with amputated peripheral nerves retain at least some sensory and motor function. The purpose of the present study was to determine if these functional connections would be strengthened or improved with experience and training over several days time. To do this, electrodes were implanted within fascicles of severed nerves of long-term human amputees to evaluate the changes in electrically evoked sensations and volitional motor neuron activity associated with attempted phantom limb movements. Nerve stimulation consistently resulted in discrete, unitary, graded sensations of touch/pressure and joint-position sense. There was no significant change in the values of stimulation parameters required to produce these sensations over time. Similarly, while the amputees were able to improve volitional control of motor neuron activity, the rate and pattern of change was similar to that seen with practice in normal individuals on motor tasks. We conclude that the central plasticity seen after amputation is most likely primarily due to unmasking, rather than replacement, of existing synaptic connections. These results also have implications for neural control of prosthetic limbs. PMID:15846000

  3. Evaluation of variations of neck to shaft of femur in amputations above knee

    OpenAIRE

    Naraghi M; Hedayatpoor A

    1997-01-01

    In this study, we investigated variations of the angle between neck and shaft of femur after amputation of tigh above the knee. In amputated tigh the angle between neck and shaft of the femur is decreased than normal (nearly 90° degrees) (coax vara). The angle of the normal femur usually increases due to weight bearing (coax valga). In the patients that both tighs have been amputated the changes of the angle are equal.

  4. Evaluation of variations of neck to shaft of femur in amputations above knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naraghi M

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated variations of the angle between neck and shaft of femur after amputation of tigh above the knee. In amputated tigh the angle between neck and shaft of the femur is decreased than normal (nearly 90° degrees (coax vara. The angle of the normal femur usually increases due to weight bearing (coax valga. In the patients that both tighs have been amputated the changes of the angle are equal.

  5. Ischaemic wound complications in above-knee amputations in relation to the skin perfusion pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, P

    1980-01-01

    Healing of the stumps in 59 above-knee amputations was correlated with the local skin perfusion pressure (SPP) measured preoperatively as the external pressure required to stop isotope washout using 131I-(-) or 125I-(-) antipyrine mixed with histamine. Out of the 11 cases with an SPP below 30 mm...... ischaemic wound complications in above-knee amputations as has previously been shown to be the case in below-knee amputations....

  6. Surgical revascularization versus amputation for peripheral vascular disease in dialysis patients: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar Nirupama

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical treatment of peripheral vascular disease (PVD in dialysis patients is controversial. Methods We examined the post-operative morbidity and mortality of surgical revascularization or amputation for PVD in a retrospective analysis of United States Renal Data System. Propensity scores for undergoing amputation were derived from a multivariable logistic regression model of amputation. Results Of the Medicare patients initiated on dialysis from Jan 1, 1995 to Dec 31, 1999, patients underwent surgical revascularization (n = 1,896 or amputation (n = 2,046 in the first 6 months following initiation of dialysis were studied. In the logistic regression model, compared to claudication, presence of gangrene had a strong association with amputation [odds ratio (OR 19.0, 95% CI (confidence interval 13.86–25.95]. The odds of dying within 30 days and within1 year were higher (30 day OR: 1.85, 95% CI: 1.45–2.36; 1 yr OR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.25–1.71 in the amputation group in logistic regression model adjusted for propensity scores and other baseline factors. Amputation was associated with increased odds of death in patients with low likelihood of amputation (rd percentile of propensity score and moderate likelihood of amputation (33rd to 66th percentile but not in high likelihood group (>66th percentile. The number of hospital days in the amputation and revascularization groups was not different. Conclusion Amputation might be associated with higher mortality in dialysis patients. Where feasible, revascularization might be preferable over amputation in dialysis patients.

  7. Analysis of predictor factors of limb amputation in patients with high-voltage electrical burns

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermo García Álvarez; Guillermo Wiegering Cecchi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Limb amputation is considered one of the most devastating consequences of electrical injury. Any factors that correlate with the degree of muscle damage can be used to predict the necessity of limb amputation. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that can be used to predict limb amputation in high-voltage electrically injured patients. Methods: Eighty-two high-voltage electrically injured patients were admitted to the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surg...

  8. Quality of Life among Egyptian Patients with Upper and Lower Limb Amputation: Sex Differences

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, Salwa A.; Shebl, Amany M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Limb amputation is a life-changing event that can cause significant disruptions in many important areas of existence. Aim of this study. To evaluate the quality of life (QOL) of patients with limb amputation and identify the factors affecting the quality of life of patients with limb amputation among Egyptian patients. Research Design. It was a descriptive exploratory design. Setting. The study was conducted in Orthopedics and Surgical Department in Emergency Hospital at Mansou...

  9. Difficulty in Clinical Evaluation of Radial Nerve Injury due to Multiple Trauma to the Humerus, Wrist, and Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balik Mehmet Sabri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial nerve damage is frequently encountered in humeral fractures. The radial nerve is primarily damaged when the humerus gets fractured, while secondary damage maybe due to post-traumatic manipulations and surgical exploration. High impact traumatic nerve injury, serious neuropathic pain, lack of response to therapeutic interventions, and indifference to the Tinel test are indications for surgical intervention. Since most humeral fracture-induced low impact radial nerve injuries resolve spontaneously, conservative therapy is preferred. We present a patient with humeral fracture-associated radial nerve injury, accompanied with digital amputation and flexor tendon avulsion on the same arm. These injuries required immediate surgery, thus rendering the clinical evaluation of the radial nerve impossible. We would like to highlight and discuss the inherent difficulties associated with multiple trauma of the upper arm.

  10. Effect of primary and secondary wartime below-knee amputation on length of hospitalization and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jandrić Slavica

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of below-knee amputations in 36 war wounded (mean age 35,42 were reviewed. The majority of the patients was wounded by land mines (94.4%. Most of them were between 25 and 35 years old. Bilateral amputation was done in 2.8% of cases. The amputation was performed on the day of wounding (primary below-knee amputation in 30 (83.3% amputees. Secondary amputation after the attempt to save the severely injured lower-limb was performed in 6 patients (16,7% average 4.61 ± 11.67 days after wounding. Reamputation was necessary in 6 cases (16.7%. Time period from the beginning of rehabilitation to the fitting of prosthesis, was 36.25 ± 14.97 days for primary amputations, 32 ± 17.8 days for secondary amputations and 68.66 ± 33.52 days for reamputations. There was no significant correlation between the duration of rehabilitation to prosthetic management and the period between wounding and amputation (r = -0.102. The attempt to save the limb after severe below-knee injuries and the secondary amputation afterwards, did not significantly influence the ensuing rehabilitation and prosthetic works.

  11. A Clinical and Histological Analysis of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-12

    Ischemia; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Peripheral Vascular Disease; Vascular Disease; Arterial Occlusive Disease; Arteriosclerosis; Atherosclerosis; Cardiovascular Disease; Pathologic Processes; Orthopedic Procedures; Amputation

  12. Use of superficial peroneal nerve graft for treating peripheral nerve injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Ribak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical results from treating chronic peripheral nerve injuries using the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft donor source. METHODS: This was a study on eleven patients with peripheral nerve injuries in the upper limbs that were treated with grafts from the sensitive branch of the superficial peroneal nerve. The mean time interval between the dates of the injury and surgery was 93 days. The ulnar nerve was injured in eight cases and the median nerve in six. There were three cases of injury to both nerves. In the surgery, a longitudinal incision was made on the anterolateral face of the ankle, thus viewing the superficial peroneal nerve, which was located anteriorly to the extensor digitorum longus muscle. Proximally, the deep fascia between the extensor digitorum longus and the peroneal longus muscles was dissected. Next, the motor branch of the short peroneal muscle (one of the branches of the superficial peroneal nerve was identified. The proximal limit of the sensitive branch was found at this point. RESULTS: The average space between the nerve stumps was 3.8 cm. The average length of the grafts was 16.44 cm. The number of segments used was two to four cables. In evaluating the recovery of sensitivity, 27.2% evolved to S2+, 54.5% to S3 and 18.1% to S3+. Regarding motor recovery, 72.7% presented grade 4 and 27.2% grade 3. There was no motor deficit in the donor area. A sensitive deficit in the lateral dorsal region of the ankle and the dorsal region of the foot was observed. None of the patients presented complaints in relation to walking. CONCLUSIONS: Use of the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft source for treating peripheral nerve injuries is safe and provides good clinical results similar to those from other nerve graft sources.

  13. Use of superficial peroneal nerve graft for treating peripheral nerve injuries☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribak, Samuel; da Silva Filho, Paulo Roberto Ferreira; Tietzmann, Alexandre; Hirata, Helton Hiroshi; de Mattos, Carlos Augusto; da Gama, Sérgio Augusto Machado

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical results from treating chronic peripheral nerve injuries using the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft donor source. Methods This was a study on eleven patients with peripheral nerve injuries in the upper limbs that were treated with grafts from the sensitive branch of the superficial peroneal nerve. The mean time interval between the dates of the injury and surgery was 93 days. The ulnar nerve was injured in eight cases and the median nerve in six. There were three cases of injury to both nerves. In the surgery, a longitudinal incision was made on the anterolateral face of the ankle, thus viewing the superficial peroneal nerve, which was located anteriorly to the extensor digitorum longus muscle. Proximally, the deep fascia between the extensor digitorum longus and the peroneal longus muscles was dissected. Next, the motor branch of the short peroneal muscle (one of the branches of the superficial peroneal nerve) was identified. The proximal limit of the sensitive branch was found at this point. Results The average space between the nerve stumps was 3.8 cm. The average length of the grafts was 16.44 cm. The number of segments used was two to four cables. In evaluating the recovery of sensitivity, 27.2% evolved to S2+, 54.5% to S3 and 18.1% to S3+. Regarding motor recovery, 72.7% presented grade 4 and 27.2% grade 3. There was no motor deficit in the donor area. A sensitive deficit in the lateral dorsal region of the ankle and the dorsal region of the foot was observed. None of the patients presented complaints in relation to walking. Conclusions Use of the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft source for treating peripheral nerve injuries is safe and provides good clinical results similar to those from other nerve graft sources. PMID:26962502

  14. Tactile, thermal, and electrical thresholds in patients with and without phantom limb pain after traumatic lower limb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Shengai Li,1,2 Danielle H Melton,1,2 Sheng Li1,2 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA; 2Neurorehabilitation Research Laboratory, TIRR Memorial Hermann Research Center, Houston, TX, USA Purpose: To examine whether there is central sensitization in patients with phantom limb pain (PLP after traumatic limb amputation. Methods: Seventeen patients after unilateral lower limb amputation secondary to trauma were enrolled. Ten patients had chronic PLP, while the other seven patients had no PLP. Tactile-sensation threshold, cold- and warm-sensation thresholds, cold- and heat-pain thresholds, electrical-sensation threshold (EST, and electrical-pain threshold on the distal residual limb and the symmetrical site on the sound limb were measured in all tested patients. Their thresholds were compared within the PLP and non-PLP group, and between the groups. Results: The novel findings included: 1 electrical-pain threshold was only decreased in the sound limb in the PLP group and there was no difference between two limbs in the non-PLP group, suggesting central sensitization in patients with PLP; and 2 EST was increased on the affected limb as compared to the sound limb within the PLP group, but there were no significant differences in EST between the PLP and non-PLP group. There were in general no significant differences in other tested thresholds within the groups and between groups. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate central sensitization in the patients with PLP after traumatic limb amputation. Keywords: central sensitization, pain threshold, human

  15. Predictive factors for lower extremity amputations in diabetic foot infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zameer Aziz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology of diabetic foot infections (DFIs and its predictive factors for lower extremity amputations. A prospective study of 100 patients with DFIs treated at the National University Hospital of Singapore were recruited in the study during the period of January 2005–June 2005. A protocol was designed to document patient's demographics, type of DFI, presence of neuropathy and/or vasculopathy and its final outcome. Predictive factors for limb loss were determined using univariate and stepwise logistic regression analysis. The mean age of the study population was 59.8 years with a male to female ratio of about 1:1 and with a mean follow-up duration of about 24 months. All patients had type 2 diabetes mellitus. Common DFIs included abscess (32%, wet gangrene (29%, infected ulcers (19%, osteomyelitis (13%, necrotizing fasciitis (4% and cellulitis (3%. Thirteen patients were treated conservatively, while surgical debridement or distal amputation was performed in 59 patients. Twenty-eight patients had major amputations (below or above knee performed. Forty-eight percent had monomicrobial infections compared with 52% with polymicrobial infections. The most common pathogens found in all infections (both monomicrobial and polymicrobial were Staphylococcus aureus (39.7%, Bacteroides fragilis (30.3%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26.0% and Streptococcus agalactiae (21.0%. Significant univariate predictive factors for limb loss included age above 60 years, gangrene, ankle-brachial index (ABI <0.8, monomicrobial infections, white blood cell (WBC count ≥ 15.0×109/L, erythrocyte sedimentation rate ≥100 mm/hr, C-reactive protein ≥15.0 mg/dL, hemoglobin (Hb ≤10.0g/dL and creatinine ≥150 µmol/L. Upon stepwise logistic regression, only gangrene, ABI <0.8, WBC ≥ 15.0×109/L and Hb ≤10.0g/dL were significant.

  16. Traumatic Amputation of Finger From an Alligator Snapping Turtle Bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert D; Nielsen, Cynthia L

    2016-06-01

    Legend states that the alligator snapping turtle (Macrochelys temminckii) should be handled with extreme caution as it has jaw strength powerful enough to bite a wooden broomstick in half. Tales of bite injuries from what is the largest freshwater turtle in North America exist anecdotally, yet there are few descriptions of medical encounters for such. The risk of infection from reptilian bites to the hand in an aquatic environment warrants thorough antibiotic treatment in conjunction with hand surgery consultation. We present the first case report of a near total amputation of an index finger in an adolescent boy who had been bitten by a wild "gator snapper." PMID:27116923

  17. A case of psychosis who amputated his finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Cemal Kaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Self-harm behavior is defined as the person’s intentional,direct injuring of some body tissue or the whole body mostoften done without suicidal intentions. Mild types of selfmutilationis seen frequently however more severe onesare rarely seen. Severe self-mutilation is generally a signof a serious psychiatric disorder and it can result in organand/or organ functionality loss. In this study we aimed topresent a schizophrenic patient with repetitive self-mutilation.As a conclusion, practicing clinicians should takeinto consideration the possibility of self-harm behavior inschizophrenia patients especially if they have high riskproperties.Key words: Schizophrenia, self-mutilation, amputation

  18. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, trans-forming growth factor-β1, nerve growth factor, resistin and hyaluronic acid as serum markers:comparison between recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Ganesh Kamath; C Ganesh Pai; Asha Kamath; Annamma Kurien

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diagnostic parameters that can predict the presence of chronic pancreatitis (CP) in patients with recur-rent pain due to pancreatitis would help to direct appropri-ate therapy. This study aimed to compare the serum levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), nerve growth factor (NGF), resis-tin and hyaluronic acid (HA) in patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) and CP to assess their ability to differenti-ate the two conditions. METHODS: Levels of serum markers assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were prospectively com-pared in consecutive patients with RAP, CP and in controls, and stepwise discriminant analysis was performed to identify the markers differentiating RAP from CP. RESULTS: One hundred and thirteen consecutive patients (RAP=32, CP=81) and 78 healthy controls were prospectively enrolled. The mean (SD) age of the patients was 32.0 (14.0) years; 89 (78.8%) were male. All markers were signiifcantly higher in CP patients than in the controls (P CONCLUSION: Serum resistin is a promising marker to dif-ferentiate between RAP and CP and needs validation in future studies, especially in those with early CP.

  19. Clinical value of lung uptake of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a myocardial sympathetic nerve imaging agent, in patients with chronic heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the clinical value of I-123 MIBG pulmonary accumulation and washout in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Nineteen patients with CHF and 15 normal volunteers (NL) were included. The uptake ratio of heart to mediastinum (H/M), that of lung fields to mediastinum (L/M), and washout rate (WR) of the heart and lung fields were calculated in anterior planar images and compared with results of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. In the CHF group, the lung uptake in delayed images increased and lung WR was decreased, suggesting pulmonary endothelial lesions. Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between right and left lung WR and pulmonary arterial diastolic pressure (PA(D)) and pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PA(S)) in the CHF group. Since the WR of MIBG reflected PA, it may be used as an index of severity of cardiac dysfunction. (author)

  20. The eye amputated - consequences of eye amputation with emphasis on clinical aspects, phantom eye syndrome and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie Louise Roed

    2010-01-01

    used with an increasing tendency until 2003. The Phantom eye syndrome is frequent among EA patients. Visual hallucinations were described by 42% of the patients. The content were mainly elementary visual hallucinations, with white or colored light as a continuous sharp light or as moving dots. The most...... limitations due to emotional problems and mental health. Patients with the indication painful blind eye are having lower scores in all aspects of health related quality of life and perceived stress than patients with the indication neoplasm and trauma. The percentage of eye amputated which is divorced...

  1. Very low survival rates after non-traumatic lower limb amputation in a consecutive series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Holm, Gitte; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate factors potentially influencing short- and long-term mortality in patients who had a non-traumatic lower limb amputation in a university hospital. A consecutive series of 93 amputations (16% toe/foot, 33% trans-tibial, 9% through knee and 42% tr...

  2. Surgical Management of Traumatic Penile Amputation: A Case Report and Review of the World Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer A. Raheem, MD

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: We review the literature and case reports on penile amputation and its etiology, surgical management, variables effecting outcomes, and its complications. Raheem OA, Mirheydar HS, Patel ND, Patel SH, Suliman A, and Buckley JC. Surgical management of traumatic penile amputation: A case report and review of the world literature. Sex Med 2015;3:49–53.

  3. Spinal, pelvic, and hip movement asymmetries in people with lower-limb amputation: Systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemakumar Devan, MPhty

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Following amputation, people with transfemoral amputation (TFA and transtibial amputation (TTA adapt with asymmetrical movements in the spinal and lower-limb joints. The aim of this review is to describe the trunk, lumbopelvic, and hip joint movement asymmetries of the amputated limb of people with TFA and TTA during functional tasks as compared with the intact leg and/or referent leg of nondisabled controls. Electronic databases were searched from inception to February 2014. Studies with kinematic data comparing (1 amputated and intact leg and (2 amputated and referent leg of nondisabled controls were included (26 articles. Considerable heterogeneity in the studies precluded data pooling. During stance phase of walking in participants with TFA, there is moderate evidence for increased trunk lateral flexion toward the amputated limb as compared with the intact leg and increased anterior pelvic tilt as compared with nondisabled controls. None of the studies investigated spinal kinematics during other functional tasks such as running, ramp walking, stair climbing, or obstacle crossing in participants with TFA or TTA. Overall, persons with TFA adapt with trunk and pelvic movement asymmetries at the amputated limb to facilitate weight transfer during walking. Among participants with TTA, there is limited evidence of spinal and pelvic asymmetries during walking.

  4. The place of radiotherapy after amputation in the treatment of mammacarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article deals with the decisions to irradiate the chest-wall and regional glands after mamma amputation. A scheme is given to indicate irradiation after mamma amputation for patients with a) 0-3 axillary gland metastases and b) over 3 axillary gland metastases. In this scheme special reference is made to the chest wall, axillary glands, parasternal glands and supraclavicular glands. (Auth.)

  5. Sexuality in people with a lower limb amputation : a topic too hot to handle?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, J. E. A.; Enzlin, P.; Geertzen, J. H. B.; Dijkstra, P. U.; Dekker, R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze whether, and by whom sexuality is discussed in amputation departments. The focus was on whether professionals received questions about sexuality from their patients with a lower limb amputation and whether they addressed sexuality themselves, as well

  6. A Salvage Operation for Total Penis Amputation Due to Circumcision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilsev Ince

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Circumcision is one of the most common rituals in Jewish and Islamic cultures. It may also be performed for phimosis correction or the treatment of recurrent balanitis. Although circumcision is considered to be a technically easy and safe surgical procedure with no significant risk, it may lead to severe complications such as necrotizing fasciitis or total penis amputation. In this report, we present a case of penis amputation at two levels occurring with third-degree burns due to electrocautery during circumcision. Although penile replantation was attempted, it was unsuccessful due to burn damage to the veins. After restoration of the functional structures, the penis was buried in the inguinal area by reepithelization to maintain blood circulation. The recovery of the penis was successful. This case is presented as a novel example of groin flap surgery to achieve a functionally and aesthetically acceptable outcome in a salvage operation for a penis with significant traumatic injury, which has not been previously reported in the literature.

  7. Surgical reimplantation of penile glans amputation in children during circumcision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouassida Khaireddine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circumcision is one of the oldest and most commonly performed surgical procedures. Unfortunately, various complications may occur during circumcision, ranging from trivial to tragic such as penile amputation which is a serious complication and a challenging injury to treat. We describe two cases of non-microsurgical successful reattachment of a distal penile glans which were amputated during circumcision. In the first case, a 5-year-old child underwent circumcision by an urologist under local anesthesia. In the second one, a 3-year-old child underwent circumcision by a general practitioner who used to make circumcision. In this article, the literature is reviewed; results and potential complications of this surgery are also discussed. Glans sensation was present, early morning erection was maintained, and there was an erectile response during penile manipulation in both cases. Although circumcision is not technically difficult, it should be taken seriously. The use of microsurgical reattachment is not always possible, especially in pediatric cases; it also requires special equipment and training.

  8. Kinematic analysis of males with transtibial amputation carrying military loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barri L. Schnall, MPT

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The biomechanical responses to load carriage, a common task for dismounted troops, have been well studied in nondisabled individuals. However, with recent shifts in the rehabilitation and retention process of injured servicemembers, there remains a substantial need for understanding these responses in persons with lower-limb amputations. Temporal-spatial and kinematic gait parameters were analyzed among 10 male servicemembers with unilateral transtibial amputation (TTA and 10 uninjured male controls. Participants completed six treadmill walking trials in all combinations of two speeds (1.34 and 1.52 m/s and three loads (none, 21.8, and 32.7 kg. Persons with TTA exhibited biomechanical compensations to carried loads that are comparable to those observed in uninjured individuals. However, several distinct gait changes appear to be unique to those with TTA, notably, increased dorsiflexion (deformation of the prosthetic foot/ankle, less stance knee flexion on the prosthetic limb, and altered trunk forward lean/excursion. Such evidence supports the need for future work to assess the risk for overuse injuries with carried loads in this population in addition to guiding the development of adaptive prosthetic feet/components to meet the needs of redeployed servicemembers or veterans/civilians in physically demanding occupations.

  9. Reduced Incidence of Foot-Related Hospitalisation and Amputation amongst Persons with Diabetes in Queensland, Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Lazzarini

    Full Text Available To determine trends in the incidence of foot-related hospitalisation and amputation amongst persons with diabetes in Queensland (Australia between 2005 and 2010 that coincided with changes in state-wide ambulatory diabetic foot-related complication management.All data from cases admitted for the principal reason of diabetes foot-related hospitalisation or amputation in Queensland from 2005-2010 were obtained from the Queensland Hospital Admitted Patient Data Collection dataset. Incidence rates for foot-related hospitalisation (admissions, bed days used and amputation (total, minor, major cases amongst persons with diabetes were calculated per 1,000 person-years with diabetes (diabetes population and per 100,000 person-years (general population. Age-sex standardised incidence and age-sex adjusted Poisson regression models were also calculated for the general population.There were 4,443 amputations, 24,917 hospital admissions and 260,085 bed days used for diabetes foot-related complications in Queensland. Incidence per 1,000 person-years with diabetes decreased from 2005 to 2010: 43.0% for hospital admissions (36.6 to 20.9, 40.1% bed days (391 to 234, 40.0% total amputations (6.47 to 3.88, 45.0% major amputations (2.18 to 1.20, 37.5% minor amputations (4.29 to 2.68 (p < 0.01 respectively. Age-sex standardised incidence per 100,000 person-years in the general population also decreased from 2005 to 2010: 23.3% hospital admissions (105.1 to 80.6, 19.5% bed days (1,122 to 903, 19.3% total amputations (18.57 to 14.99, 26.4% major amputations (6.26 to 4.61, 15.7% minor amputations (12.32 to 10.38 (p < 0.01 respectively. The age-sex adjusted incidence rates per calendar year decreased in the general population (rate ratio (95% CI; hospital admissions 0.949 (0.942-0.956, bed days 0.964 (0.962-0.966, total amputations 0.962 (0.946-0.979, major amputations 0.945 (0.917-0.974, minor amputations 0.970 (0.950-0.991 (p < 0.05 respectively.There were significant

  10. 神经阻滞疗法应用于慢性疼痛性肌腱炎48例临床观察%Effects of Nerve Block Therapy for 48 Patients with Chronic Pain Tendonitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易进科; 汤治中

    2015-01-01

    【目的】探讨神经阻滞疗法应用于慢性疼痛性肌腱炎的临床效果。【方法】选取本院2010年12月至2012年12月收治的慢性疼痛性肌腱炎患者96例作为研究对象,将患者按照数字随机的方法分为观察组和对照组,每组各48例。其中对照组采用常规的处理方法,包括休息、冷敷和使用布洛芬进行对症处理,观察组在对照组的基础上采用神经阻滞疗法进行相关治疗。观察两组患者治疗效果及不良反应情况,以及采用疼痛评分量表(VAS)对患者治疗后疼痛情况进行评分,并对患者治疗期间生活质量进行对比分析。【结果】观察组显效24例,有效20例,无效4例,总有效率为91.67%,对照组显效14例,有效18例,无效16例,总有效率为66.67%,两组总有效率比较差异具有统计学意义( P <0.05)。但对照组患者治疗过程中出现12例胃肠道反应,4例皮肤瘙痒,其他不良反应7例,不良反应发生率为47.92%,观察组在未出现不良情况( P <0.05)。治疗后观察组VAS评分显著低于对照组,两组相比(2.13±0.79vs4.03±0.68),差异具有统计学意义( P <0.05)。且采用神经阻滞疗法,患者的生活质量明显改善,其心理指数、情感指数和健康指数与对照组比较,差异且有统计学意义( P <0.05)。【结论】神经阻滞疗法对慢性疼痛性肌腱炎治疗效果显著,患者疼痛程度减轻,且提高了患者的生活质量。%[Objective] To explore the effects of nerve block therapy for chronic pain with tendinitis .[Methods] A total of 96 patients with chronic pain with tendinitis were recruited from December 2010 to De‐cember 2012 at our hospital .They were divided randomly into two groups ( n=48 each) .The control group received such conventional measures as rest ,cold compression and use of ibuprofen for symptomatic treat‐ment .And the

  11. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Dependent Cortical Plasticity in Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Kohei; Li, Shermaine; Zhuo, Min

    2016-01-01

    Many cortical areas play crucial roles in higher order brain functions such as pain and emotion-processing, decision-making, and cognition. Among them, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and insular cortex (IC) are two key areas. Glutamate mediates major excitatory transmission during long-term plasticity in both physiological and pathological conditions. Specifically related to nociceptive or pain behaviors, metabotropic glutamate subtype receptors (mGluRs) have been involved in different types of synaptic modulation and plasticity from periphery to the spinal cord. However, less is known about their functional roles in plasticity related to pain and its related behaviors within cortical regions. In this review, we first summarized previous studies of synaptic plasticity in both the ACC and IC, and discussed how mGluRs may be involved in both cortical long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD)-especially in LTD. The activation of mGluRs contributes to the induction of LTD in both ACC and IC areas. The loss of LTD caused by peripheral amputation or nerve injury can be rescued by priming ACC or IC with activations of mGluR1 receptors. We also discussed the potential functional roles of mGluRs for pain-related behaviors. We propose that targeting mGluRs in the cortical areas including the ACC and IC may provide a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of chronic pain, phantom pain or anxiety. PMID:27296638

  12. Prospective use of xenon 133Xe clearance for amputation level selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xenon 133Xe clearance was used to select the most distal amputation level that would allow sufficient blood flow for healing. Capillary blood flow was first measured at the most distal potential amputation level, then at successive proximal levels until an amputation site was found that had a capillary skin blood flow rate greater than or equal to 2.6 mL/min/100 g of tissue. Xenon 133Xe in saline was injected intracutaneously at each level, and flow rates were determined using a gamma camera interfaced with a computer system programmed for the Ketty-Schmidt formula modified for capillary blood flow. There were 45 cases, including one toes, six transmetatarsal, five Syme's, 25 below-knee, four knee disarticulation, three above-knee, and one hip disarticulation amputation. All amputations in patients with flow rates exceeding 2.4 mL/min/100 g of tissue healed, with two exceptions

  13. Review of 345 eye amputations carried out in the period 1996-2003, at Rigshospitalet, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie Louise Roed; Prause, Jan Ulrik; Johnson, Martin; Kamper-Jørgensen, Finn; Toft, Peter Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to identify the number of eye amputations, and the causative diagnoses, indications for surgery and surgical techniques applied, and to evaluate a possible change in surgical technique in a tertiary referral centre in Denmark. METHODS: The hospital database was...... screened using surgery codes for patients who had undergone bulbar evisceration, enucleation or orbital exenteration in the period 1996-2003. Patient records were reviewed for gender, age, time since surgery, causative diagnosis (the disease process leading to the indication for amputation), indication for...... eye amputation, type of surgery and whether an implant was applied. RESULTS: A total of 345 patients were identified as having undergone eye amputation during the 8-year period. Indications for eye amputation were: painful blind eye (127); neoplasm (119); infection (42); recent injury (25...

  14. Reconstruction of an Amputated Glans Penis With a Buccal Mucosal Graft: Case Report of a Novel Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Aboutaleb, Hamdy

    2014-01-01

    Penile amputation is a rare catastrophe and a serious complication of circumcision. Reconstruction of the glans penis may be indicated following amputation. Our report discusses a novel technique for reconfiguration of an amputated glans penis 1 year after a complicated circumcision. A 2-year-old male infant presented to us with glans penis amputation that had occurred during circumcision 1 year previously. The parents complained of severe meatal stenosis with disfigurement of the penis. Peni...

  15. Hypertrophic nerve roots in a case of Roussy-Levy syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haubrich, C.; Senderek, J.; Noth, J.; Toepper, R. [Neurologische Klinik, Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Krings, T. [Klinik fuer Neuroradiologische Diagnostik, Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Zuechner, S.; Schroeder, J.M. [Institut fuer Neuropathologie, Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2002-11-01

    Hypertrophic radiculopathy is a rare feature of neuropathies. Single cases of enlarged nerve roots have been described in hereditary motor sensory neuropathies (HMSN) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating diseases (CIDP). This is the first description of hypertrophied nerve roots in a patient with Roussy-Levy syndrome. MRI did not show contrast enhancement of the enlarged nerve roots or nodular lesions. (orig.)

  16. Rat whisker movement after facial nerve lesion: Evidence for autonomic contraction of skeletal muscle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heaton, J.T.; Sheu, S.H.; Hohman, M.H.; Knox, C.J.; Weinberg, J.S.; Kleiss, I.J.; Hadlock, T.A.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrissal whisking is often employed to track facial nerve regeneration in rats; however, we have observed similar degrees of whisking recovery after facial nerve transection with or without repair. We hypothesized that the source of non-facial nerve-mediated whisker movement after chronic denervati

  17. Nerve injuries about the elbow in the athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joshua D; Lintner, David M

    2014-09-01

    The athlete's elbow is a remarkable example of motion, strength, and durability. The stress placed on the elbow during sport, including the throwing motion, may lead to soft-tissue ligamentous and nerve injury. The thrower's elbow illustrates one example of possible nerve injury about the elbow in sport, related to chronic repetitive tensile and compressive stresses to the ulnar nerve associated with elbow flexion and valgus position. Besides the throwing athlete, nerve injury from high-energy direct-impact forces may also damage nerves around the elbow in contact sports. Detailed history and physical examination can often make the diagnosis of most upper extremity neuropathies. The clinician must be aware of the possibility of isolated or combined nerve injury as far proximal as the cervical nerve roots, through the brachial plexus, to the peripheral nerve terminal branches. Electrodiagnostic studies are occasionally beneficial for diagnosis with certain nerves. Nonoperative management is often successful in most elbow and upper extremity neuropathies. If conservative treatment fails, then surgical treatment should address all potentially offending structures. In the presence of medial laxity and concurrent ulnar neuritis, the medial ulnar collateral ligament warrants surgical treatment, in addition to transposition of the ulnar nerve. The morbidity of open surgical decompression of nerves in and around the elbow is potentially career threatening in the throwing athlete. This mandates an assessment of the adequacy of the nonsurgical treatment and a thorough preoperative discussion of the risks and benefits of surgery. PMID:25077754

  18. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve damage that occurs in people with diabetes is called diabetic neuropathy. This condition is a complicaiton ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by ... sugar level . This condition is more likely when the blood sugar ...

  19. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many ... viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known. Degenerative nerve diseases include Alzheimer's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Friedreich's ...

  20. Radial nerve dysfunction (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The radial nerve travels down the arm and supplies movement to the triceps muscle at the back of the upper arm. ... the wrist and hand. The usual causes of nerve dysfunction are direct trauma, prolonged pressure on the ...

  1. Sensory nerves and pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Qingfu; PENG, JIE

    2014-01-01

    Sensory nerves are a kind of nerve that conduct afferent impulses from the periphery receptors to the central nervous system (CNS) and are able to release neuromediators from the activated peripheral endings. Sensory nerves are particularly important for microcirculatory response, and stimulation of pancreatic sensory nerves releases a variety of neuropeptides such as substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), etc., leading to neurogenic inflammation characterized as the local ...

  2. The Furcal Nerve Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Harshavardhana, Nanjundappa S.; Harshad V. Dabke

    2014-01-01

    Atypical sciatica and discrepancy between clinical presentation and imaging findings is a dilemma for treating surgeon in management of lumbar disc herniation. It also constitutes ground for failed back surgery and potential litigations thereof. Furcal nerve (Furcal = forked) is an independent nerve with its own ventral and dorsal branches (rootlets) and forms a link nerve that connects lumbar and sacral plexus. Its fibers branch out to be part of femoral and obturator nerves in-addition to t...

  3. Tardy ulnar nerve palsy after fracture non-union medial epicondyle of humerus – An unusual case

    OpenAIRE

    Thiyam, Rajesh; Lalchandani, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Tardy ulnar nerve palsy is a chronic clinical condition characterised by delayed onset ulnar neuropathy. Typically tardy ulnar nerve palsy occurs as a consequence of non-union of lateral condyle in child resulting in cubitus valgus deformity which ultimately is the cause of ulnar nerve palsy. However very few literature are available for tardy ulnar nerve palsy as a result of old fracture of medial epicondyle without cubitus varus or valgus deformity. We report a rare case of tardy ulnar nerv...

  4. The Physics of Nerves

    CERN Document Server

    Heimburg, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The accepted model for nerve pulse propagation in biological membranes seems insufficient. It is restricted to dissipative electrical phenomena and considers nerve pulses exclusively as a microscopic phenomenon. A simple thermodynamic model that is based on the macroscopic properties of membranes allows explaining more features of nerve pulse propagation including the phenomenon of anesthesia that has so far remained unexplained.

  5. Intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Shah H; Kantharia C; Shenoy A

    1997-01-01

    Intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma are uncommon. Preoperative diagnosis of parotid tumour as schwannoma is difficult when facial nerve function is normal. A rare case of solitary schwannoma involving the upper branch of the facial nerve is described and the literature on the subject is reviewed.

  6. Laryngeal nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laryngeal nerve damage is injury to one or both of the nerves that are attached to the voice box. ... Injury to the laryngeal nerves is uncommon. When it does occur, it can be from: A complication of neck or chest surgery (especially thyroid, lung, ...

  7. Optic Nerve Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  8. Patterns of extremity traumas leading to amputation in lran:results of Iranian National Trauma Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Majid Moini; Mohammad R Rasouli; Ali Khaji; Farshad Farshidfar; Pedram Heidari

    2009-01-01

    Obiective: To determine the patterns of traumatic extremity injuries leading to amputation in Iran.Methotis: Data of Iranian National Trauma Project was used to identify patients with upper and lower extremity traumas undergoing amputation.This project was conducted in 8 major cities during 2000-2004.Results: of 17 753 traumatic Patients,164 (0.92%) had injuries to the extremities that resulted in the limb amputation.Of these,143 (87.2%) were men.The patient's mean age was 29.0 years±15.4 years and the highest incidence was seen in the age group of 21 to 30 years (34.1%).One hundred and four cases were occupational accidents (63.4%).Blunt trauma was in 54.9% of the cases.The most common reasons for amputation were respectively stabbings (37.8%) and crush injuries (31.7%).Amputation of hand fingers was the most frequent type of amputation (125 cases,76.2%).One patient died from severe associated injuries.Conclusions: This study shows the patterns of traumatic limb amputation in Iran,a developing country.Resuits of this study may be used in preventive strategic planning.

  9. An amputation resets positional information to a proximal identity in the regenerating zebrafish caudal fin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo Ana

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zebrafish has emerged as a powerful model organism to study the process of regeneration. This teleost fish has the ability to regenerate various tissues and organs like the heart, spinal cord, retina and fins. In this study, we took advantage of the existence of an excellent morphological reference in the zebrafish caudal fin, the bony ray bifurcations, as a model to study positional information upon amputation. We investigated the existence of positional information for bifurcation formation by performing repeated amputations at different proximal-distal places along the fin. Results We show that, while amputations performed at a long distance from the bifurcation do not change its final proximal-distal position in the regenerated fin, consecutive amputations done at 1 segment proximal to the bifurcation (near the bifurcation induce a positional reset and progressively shift its position distally. Furthermore, we investigated the potential role of Shh and Fgf signalling pathways in the determination of the bifurcation position and observed that they do not seem to be involved in this process. Conclusions Our results reveal that, an amputation near the bifurcation inhibits the formation of the regenerated bifurcation in the pre-amputation position, inducing a distalization of this structure. This shows that the positional memory for bony ray bifurcations depends on the proximal-distal level of the amputation.

  10. Quality of Life among Egyptian Patients with Upper and Lower Limb Amputation: Sex Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa A. Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Limb amputation is a life-changing event that can cause significant disruptions in many important areas of existence. Aim of this study. To evaluate the quality of life (QOL of patients with limb amputation and identify the factors affecting the quality of life of patients with limb amputation among Egyptian patients. Research Design. It was a descriptive exploratory design. Setting. The study was conducted in Orthopedics and Surgical Department in Emergency Hospital at Mansoura University Hospitals. Sample. A sample of convenience of 100 adult male and female patients who met the inclusion criteria was included. Tools. (a Structured interview questionnaire (SIQ was used to collect personal data, (b short form (36 health status questionnaires: this part was utilized to assess the quality of life among Egyptian patients with amputation. Results. The result of this study indicates that most participants experienced a change in the quality of life. There is a statistically significant difference between total QOL aspects and each of the following: age, gender, educational level, and type of work. Conclusion. Limb amputation tends to cause increased disability for those amputated patients. The age, gender, place of amputation, and marital status are found as statistically significant factors with physical component and psychological component.

  11. A developing world experience with distal foot amputations for diabetic limb salvage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Salahuddin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the functional outcome, morbidity, and viability of foot salvage in diabetic patients. Materials and methods: This prospective case series was conducted from March 2007 to December 2012 at the department of surgery Pakistan Ordnance Factories Hospital, Wah Cantt, Pakistan. 123 males and 26 female patients were included in the study. All the patients were treated after getting admitted in the hospital and wounds were managed with daily dressings, nursing care and debridement of necrotic tissue with adequate antibiotic coverage. Results: In total, 149 patients (mean age: 56±7.52 years with 171 amputations were included in the study. The mean duration of diabetes mellitus (DM was 9±4.43 years. Ninety-seven percent of the patients were diagnosed with type 2 DM. Wound debridement was performed under general anesthesia in 48 (33.2% patients, whereas local anesthesia was used for the rest of the patients after having good glycemic control and improvement in general health. The most common pathogen isolated from the infected wounds was Staphylococcus aureus in approximately 46% cases. Regarding the types of amputation, partial toe amputation was performed in 21 (12.2% cases, second-toe amputation in 60 (35% cases, hallux amputation in 41 (24% cases, multiple toe amputations in 29 (17% cases, bilateral feet involvement was observed in 16 (9.3% cases, and transmetatarsal amputation was performed in 4 (2.3% cases. The wounds healed well except in 19 cases where amputation had to be revised to a more proximal level. Thirty-nine patients died during the study period: 3 died of wound-related complications and 36 died of systemic complications. Conclusion: With the ever-increasing epidemic of DM, the number of patients with diabetic foot ulcers has also significantly risen. Early surgical management with good glycemic control and foot care with close monitoring can decrease amputations and thus foot salvage can be successfully

  12. A Canadian population-based description of the indications for lower-extremity amputations and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayssi, Ahmed; de Mestral, Charles; Forbes, Thomas L.; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Background To our knowledge, there have been no previously published reports characterizing lower-extremity amputations in Canada. The objective of this study was to describe the indications and outcomes of lower-extremity amputations in the Canadian population. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of all adult patients who underwent lower-extremity amputation in Canada between 2006 and 2009. Patients were identified from the Canadian Institute for Health Information’s Discharge Abstract Database, which includes all hospital admissions across Canada with the exception of the province of Quebec. Pediatric, trauma, and outpatients were excluded. Results During the study period, 5342 patients underwent lower-extremity amputations in 207 Canadian hospitals. The mean age was 67 ± 13 years, and 68% were men. Amputations were most frequently indicated after admission for diabetic complications (81%), cardiovascular disease (6%), or cancer (3%). In total, 65% of patients were discharged to another inpatient or long-term care facility, and 26% were discharged home with or without extra support. Most patients were diabetic (96%) and most (65%) required a below-knee amputation. Predictors of prolonged (> 7 d) hospital stay included amputation performed by a general surgeon; cardiovascular risk factors, such as diabetes, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, or hyperlipidemia; and undergoing the amputation in the provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador, New Brunswick, or British Columbia. Conclusion There is variability in the delivery of lower-extremity amputations and postoperative hospital discharges among surgical specialists and regions across Canada. Future work is needed to investigate the reasons for this variability and to develop initiatives to shorten postoperative hospital stays. PMID:27007090

  13. Expression of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Endothelin-1 in Skin Tissue from Amputated Limbs of Patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. George Groeneweg

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Impaired microcirculation during the chronic stage of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is related to increased vasoconstriction, tissue hypoxia, and metabolic tissue acidosis in the affected limb. Endothelial dysfunction is suggested to be the main cause of diminished blood flow. The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and endothelin-1(ET-1 relative to vascular density represented by the endothelial marker CD31-immunoreactivity in the skin tissue of patients with chronic CRPS. Methods. We performed immunohistochemical staining on sections of skin specimens obtained from the amputated limbs (one arm and one leg of two patients with CRPS. Results. In comparison to proximal specimens we found an increased number of migrated endothelial cells as well as an increase of eNOS activity in distal dermis specimens. Conclusions. We found indications that endothelial dysfunction plays a role in chronic CRPS.

  14. Motor cortex changes after amputation are modulated by phantom limb motor control rather than pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffin, Estelle E.; Pascal, Giraux,; Karen, Reilly,; Nathalie, Richard,

    retains a residual M1-c activity when amputees perform phantom limb movements (4-5). Except a correlation between phantom limb pain and M1-c expansion of the face (2-3), the relationship between the ability to voluntary move the phantom hand, the level of phantom limb pain, the degree of M1-c......Amputation of a limb induces reorganization within the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1-c) (1-3). In the case of hand amputation, M1-c areas evoking movements in the face and the remaining part of the upper-limb expand toward the hand area. Despite this expansion, the amputated hand still...

  15. Therapy-Resistant Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I: To Amputate or Not?

    OpenAIRE

    Bodde, M.I.; Dijkstra, P.U.; den Dunnen, W.F.A.; Geertzen, J. H. B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Amputation for the treatment of long-standing, therapy-resistant complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is controversial. An evidence-based decision regarding whether or not to amputate is not possible on the basis of current guidelines. The aim of the current study was to systematically review the literature and summarize the beneficial and adverse effects of an amputation for the treatment of long-standing, therapy-resistant CRPS-I. Methods: A literature search, using Me...

  16. A functional and psychosocial assessment of patients with post-Sudeck atrophy amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeinberg-Arazi, D; Heim, M; Nadvorna, H; Ner, I Z; Szeinberg, A; Azaria, M

    1993-04-01

    Twelve patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy were referred to a comprehensive orthopaedic rehabilitation center after failure of conservative management. Ten underwent amputation of the affected limb and, although functional improvement occurred in the patients undergoing lower limb amputation, psychosocial dysfunction persisted. All the patients required psychological support. In cases of post-Sudeck amputation, early orthopaedic diagnosis and referral to a comprehensive treatment center are recommended. In the 12 cases described here, apart from the obvious limb pathology, severe psychological inadequacies were found to be present. PMID:7682058

  17. Radiotherapy preserves fingers in the management of subungual squamous cell carcinoma, obviating the need for amputation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study of the use of radiotherapy in 12 patients with subungual squamous cell carcinoma of the finger was conducted at two radiotherapy departments in the Netherlands. This malignancy has little tendency to metastasize and is usually treated by amputation. Primary radiotherapy resulted in a permanent local control of 92% with only one serious adverse effect leading to an amputation of the initially involved digit. No regional or distant failure was seen during follow-up. Radiotherapy should be considered as an alternative for amputation to treat patients with subungual squamous cell carcinoma of the finger

  18. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch;

    2005-01-01

    The oxygen tension of the optic nerve is regulated by the intraocular pressure and systemic blood pressure, the resistance in the blood vessels and oxygen consumption of the tissue. The oxygen tension is autoregulated and moderate changes in intraocular pressure or blood pressure do not affect the...... optic nerve oxygen tension. If the intraocular pressure is increased above 40 mmHg or the ocular perfusion pressure decreased below 50 mmHg the autoregulation is overwhelmed and the optic nerve becomes hypoxic. A disturbance in oxidative metabolism in the cytochromes of the optic nerve can be seen at...... similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...

  19. [Ganglia of peripheral nerves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatagiba, M; Penkert, G; Samii, M

    1993-01-01

    The authors present two different types of ganglion affecting the peripheral nerves: extraneural and intraneural ganglion. Compression of peripheral nerves by articular ganglions is well known. The surgical management involves the complete removal of the lesion with preservation of most nerve fascicles. Intraneural ganglion is an uncommon lesion which affects the nerve diffusely. The nerve fascicles are usually intimately involved between the cysts, making complete removal of all cysts impossible. There is no agreement about the best surgical management to be applied in these cases. Two possibilities are available: opening of the epineural sheath lengthwise and pressing out the lesion; or resection of the affected part of the nerve and performing a nerve reconstruction. While in case of extraneural ganglion the postoperative clinical evolution is very favourable, only long follow up studies will reveal in case of intraneural ganglion the best surgical approach. PMID:8128785

  20. The Dehiscent Facial Nerve Canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertac Yetiser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accidental injury to the facial nerve where the bony canal defects are present may result with facial nerve dysfunction during otological surgery. Therefore, it is critical to know the incidence and the type of facial nerve dehiscences in the presence of normal development of the facial canal. The aim of this study is to review the site and the type of such bony defects in 144 patients operated for facial paralysis, myringoplasty, stapedotomy, middle ear exploration for sudden hearing loss, and so forth, other than chronic suppurative otitis media with or without cholesteatoma, middle ear tumors, and anomaly. Correlation of intraoperative findings with preoperative computerized tomography was also analyzed in 35 patients. Conclusively, one out of every 10 surgical cases may have dehiscence of the facial canal which has to be always borne in mind during surgical manipulation of the middle ear. Computerized tomography has some limitations to evaluate the dehiscent facial canal due to high false negative and positive rates.

  1. Assessment of nerve morphology in nerve activation during electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Tames, Jose; Yu, Wenwei

    2013-10-01

    The distance between nerve and stimulation electrode is fundamental for nerve activation in Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation (TES). However, it is not clear the need to have an approximate representation of the morphology of peripheral nerves in simulation models and its influence in the nerve activation. In this work, depth and curvature of a nerve are investigated around the middle thigh. As preliminary result, the curvature of the nerve helps to reduce the simulation amplitude necessary for nerve activation from far field stimulation.

  2. Nerve-identifying inguinal hernia repair : A surgical anatomical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijsmuller, A. R.; Lange, J. F. M.; Kleinrensink, G. J.; van Geldere, D.; Simons, M. P.; Huygen, F. J. P. M.; Jeekel, J.; Lange, J. F.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Pain syndromes of somatic and neuropathic origin are considered to be the main causes of chronic pain after open inguinal hernia repair. Nerve-identification during open hernia repair is suggested to be associated with less postoperative chronic pain. The aim of this study was to define

  3. Amputation-Free Survival after Crural Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty for Critical Limb Ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, M; Konge, L; Lönn, L; Schroeder, T V; Rørdam, P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: To evaluate the amputation-free survival after below the knee percutaneous transluminal angioplasty in a consecutive group of patients with critical ischemia of the lower extremity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 70 consecutive patients with critical ischemia were treated......-up clinical examinations were performed within 6 weeks and after 1 year. All medical records were crosschecked with the national vascular registry ensuring a valid 1-year status in 97% of the patients. RESULTS: A total of 15 major amputations were performed during follow-up, with 11 amputations performed...... within the first year. Complications after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty were rare. Cumulative mortality after 1 and 2 years was 22% and 34%, respectively. Amputation-free survival at 1 and 2 years of follow-up was 68% and 58%, respectively. There were no association between known risk factors...

  4. Predictors of lower-extremity amputation in patients with an infected diabetic foot ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickwell, Kirsty; Siersma, Volkert; Kars, Marleen;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Infection commonly complicates diabetic foot ulcers and is associated with a poor outcome. In a cohort of individuals with an infected diabetic foot ulcer, we aimed to determine independent predictors of lower-extremity amputation and the predictive value for amputation of the...... International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWGDF) classification system and to develop a risk score for predicting amputation. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We prospectively studied 575 patients with an infected diabetic foot ulcer presenting to 1 of 14 diabetic foot clinics in 10 European countries...... IWGDF system (area under the ROC curves 0.80, 0.78, and 0.67, respectively). CONCLUSIONS For individuals with an infected diabetic foot ulcer, we identified independent predictors of amputation, validated the prognostic value of the IWGDF classification system, and developed a new risk score for...

  5. Physical rehabilitation of patients with amputation stump of thigh because of trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efremova O.V.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is exposition essence of problem of renewal of ability to work of a problem of restoration after amputation at the hip. The analysis of the standard program of the standard in traumatology programs of physical rehabilitation of patients after amputation and presents the results of the developed physical rehabilitation of patients with amputating the thigh stumps due to injury. The authors propose to use the means of physical rehabilitation in accordance with the flow dynamics of the reparative processes after amputation and clinical features of injury. All this contributes to the development of compensatory own human capabilities, resulting in remission. Since these funds most physiological, their correct application does not cause complications.

  6. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  7. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  8. Psychological management, prevention and treatment of phantom pain after amputations for tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Tomeno, B.; Anract, P.; Ouaknine, M.

    1998-01-01

    Amputation for tumours is rarely carried out nowadays and has few specific technical features, apart from the rare cases where ingenuity is required to gain a few centimetres in length of a stump. As far as possible, the decision for amputation should not be imposed; it is better that the patient himself should take the initiative. The prosthesis and its constraints should be described honestly to avoid subsequent disappointment. Prevention of a painful phantom limb must always be undertaken,...

  9. Leg amputation following intramuscular injection of iron dextran in a 32 year old woman

    OpenAIRE

    Gloria Shalviri; Kheirollah Gholami; Naghmeh Javidnikou

    2015-01-01

    To inform healthcare professionals of a rare serious reaction leading to leg amputation following intramuscular injection of iron dextran and report comments for preventing such reactions.A case of leg amputation following intramuscular injection of iron dextran reported to Iranian Pharmacovigilance Center was reviewed. Patient and reaction data was collected by assessing the reported yellow card, patient chart review and interviewing with patient and physicians. World Health Organization def...

  10. Painful neuroma requiring surgical excision after lower limb amputation caused by landmine explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Sehirlioglu, Ali; Ozturk, Cagatay; Yazicioglu, Kamil; Tugcu, Ilknur; Yilmaz, Bilge; Goktepe, Ahmet Salim

    2007-01-01

    This article reports an analysis of 75 consecutive lower limb amputees who developed painful neuroma requiring surgical excision after lower limb amputation following landmine explosions. This retrospective study analyses the results of 75 patients who were treated for painful neuroma after lower limb amputation following landmine explosions between the years 2000 and 2006. The average time period from use of prosthesis to start of symptoms suggesting neuroma was 9.6 months. The average time ...

  11. Revisiting risks associated with mortality following initial transtibial or transfemoral amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara E. Bates, MD; Dawei Xie, PhD; Jibby E. Kurichi, MPH; Diane Cowper Ripley, PhD; Pui L. Kwong, MPH; Margaret G. Stineman, MD

    2013-01-01

    This study’s objective was to determine how treatment-, environmental-, and facility-level characteristics contribute to postdischarge mortality prediction. The study included 4,153 Veterans who underwent lower-limb amputation in Department of Veterans Affairs facilities during fiscal years 2003 and 2004. Veterans were followed 1 yr postamputation. A Cox regression identified characteristics associated with mortality risk after hospital discharge following amputation. Older age, higher amputa...

  12. Bilateral microvascular second toe transfer for bilateral post-traumatic thumb amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendra Nehete; Anita Nehete; Sandeep Singla; Harshad Adhav

    2012-01-01

    In bilateral thumb amputations, the functional impairment is serious and every attempt should be made to reconstruct the thumb. We report a case of bilateral post traumatic thumb amputation, reconstructed with bilateral second toe transfer. Only two such cases have been reported in literature so far. Though there are various modalities for the reconstruction of thumb, microvascular toe transfer has its own merits. The convalescent period is minimal with excellent function. It is bilaterally s...

  13. Partial amputation of the tongue-self-inflicted or physical assault?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthal, S; Bayer, R; Doerre, A; Dreßler, J

    2016-05-01

    Injuries of the tongue are generally self-inflicted lesions and occur during different diseases or external incidents. The amputation of the tongue is a rare event. In this article, we report about a woman presenting with a complete amputation of the anterior third of the tongue. The morphological findings, which are essential for the differentiation of self-inflicted injuries and injuries caused by a third party, are demonstrated. PMID:26387091

  14. External leg amputation in conformal-invariant three-point function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Indrajit

    2011-04-01

    Amputation of external legs is carried out explicitly for the conformal-invariant three-point function involving two spinors and one vector field. Our results are consistent with the general result that amputating an external leg in a conformal-invariant Green function replaces a field by its conformal partner in the Green function. A new star-triangle relation, involving two spinors and one vector field, is derived and used for the calculation.

  15. External leg amputation in conformal-invariant three-point function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amputation of external legs is carried out explicitly for the conformal-invariant three-point function involving two spinors and one vector field. Our results are consistent with the general result that amputating an external leg in a conformal-invariant Green function replaces a field by its conformal partner in the Green function. A new star-triangle relation, involving two spinors and one vector field, is derived and used for the calculation. (orig.)

  16. External leg amputation in conformal-invariant three-point function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, Indrajit [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Department of Theoretical Physics, Kolkata (India)

    2011-04-15

    Amputation of external legs is carried out explicitly for the conformal-invariant three-point function involving two spinors and one vector field. Our results are consistent with the general result that amputating an external leg in a conformal-invariant Green function replaces a field by its conformal partner in the Green function. A new star-triangle relation, involving two spinors and one vector field, is derived and used for the calculation. (orig.)

  17. Hip Arthroplasty in a Patient with Transfemoral Amputation: A New Tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Boussakri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Femoral fractures in amputation stump are challenging injuries to manage. The authors describe a case of a 51-year-old patient with a right above knee amputation, who had a right hip femoral neck fracture. In this technical note, we describe a technical and surgical procedure with intraoperative tips and tricks, in which we use commonly available materials, for the safe management in such clinical situations.

  18. Successful replantation of an amputated penis: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Riyach, Omar; El Majdoub, Aziz; Tazi, Mohammed Fadl; El Ammari, Jalal Eddine; El Fassi, Mohammed Jamal; Khallouk, Abdelhak; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Amputation of the penis is a rare traumatic injury reported from various parts of the world as isolated cases. A complete reconstruction of all penile structures should be attempted in one stage which provides the best chance for full rehabilitation of the patient. Case presentation We report the case of a 35-year-old Berber man who was admitted at the Emergency Department for incomplete criminal amputation of his penis, which was successfully reattached by using a macrosurgical ...

  19. Quality of Life Following Amputation or Limb Preservation in Patients with Lower Extremity Bone Sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Gary E Mason; Lele eAung; Sarah eGall; Meyers, Paul A; Robert eButler; Sarah eKrug; Mimi eKim; Healey, John H.; Richard eGorlick

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although functional differences have been described between patients with lower extremity bone sarcoma with amputation and limb preservation surgery, differences have not clearly been shown between the two groups related to quality of life. The aim of the study was to determine if there is a difference in overall quality of life in lower extremity bone sarcoma survivors related to whether they had an amputation or a limb preservation procedure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty-two lon...

  20. Metabolic and body composition changes in first year following traumatic amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carly S. Eckard, MS, RD

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Body composition and metabolism may change considerably after traumatic amputation because of muscle atrophy and an increase in adiposity. The purpose of this study was to quantify changes in weight, body composition, and metabolic rate during the first year following traumatic amputation in military servicemembers. Servicemembers without amputation were included for comparison. Participants were measured within the first 12 wk after amputation (baseline and at 6, 9, and 12 mo after amputation. Muscle mass, fat mass, weight, and metabolic rate were measured at each time point. There was a significant increase in weight and body mass index in the unilateral group between baseline and all follow-up visits (p < 0.01. Over the 12 mo period, total fat mass and trunk fat mass increased in both unilateral and bilateral groups; however, these changes were not statistically significant over time. Muscle mass increased in both the unilateral and bilateral groups despite percent of lean mass decreasing. No changes in resting metabolism or walking energy expenditure were observed in any group. The results of this study conclude that weight significantly increased because of an increase in both fat mass and muscle mass in the first year following unilateral and bilateral amputation.

  1. The Plasticity of Brain Gray Matter and White Matter following Lower Limb Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guangyao; Yin, Xuntao; Li, Chuanming; Li, Lei; Zhao, Lu; Evans, Alan C; Jiang, Tianzi; Wu, Jixiang; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that amputation induces functional reorganization in the sensory and motor cortices. However, the extent of structural changes after lower limb amputation in patients without phantom pain remains uncertain. We studied 17 adult patients with right lower limb amputation and 18 healthy control subjects using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Cortical thickness and fractional anisotropy (FA) of white matter (WM) were investigated. In amputees, a thinning trend was seen in the left premotor cortex (PMC). Smaller clusters were also noted in the visual-to-motor regions. In addition, the amputees also exhibited a decreased FA in the right superior corona radiata and WM regions underlying the right temporal lobe and left PMC. Fiber tractography from these WM regions showed microstructural changes in the commissural fibers connecting the bilateral premotor cortices, compatible with the hypothesis that amputation can lead to a change in interhemispheric interactions. Finally, the lower limb amputees also displayed significant FA reduction in the right inferior frontooccipital fasciculus, which is negatively correlated with the time since amputation. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the amputation of lower limb could induce changes in the cortical representation of the missing limb and the underlying WM connections. PMID:26587289

  2. Does unilateral transtibial amputation lead to greater metabolic demand during walking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Russell Esposito, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous literature reports greater metabolic demand of walking following transtibial amputation. However, most research focuses on relatively older, less active, and often dysvascular amputees. Servicemembers with traumatic amputation are typically young, fit, and highly active before and often following surgical amputation of their lower limb. This study compared the metabolic demand of walking in young, active individuals with traumatic unilateral transtibial amputation (TTA and nondisabled controls. Heart rate (HR, rate of oxygen consumption, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE were calculated as subjects walked at a self-selected velocity and at five standardized velocities based on leg length. The TTA group completed a Prosthetics Evaluation Questionnaire. Oxygen consumption (p = 0.89, net oxygen consumption (p = 0.32, and RPE (p = 0.14 did not differ between groups. Compared with controls, HR was greater in the TTA group and increased to a greater extent with velocity (p < 0.001. Overall, the TTA group rated their walking abilities as high (mean: 93% out of 100%. This is the first study to report equivalent metabolic demand between persons with amputation and controls walking at the same velocity. These results may reflect the physical fitness of the young servicemembers with traumatic amputations and may serve to guide outcome expectations in the future.

  3. The Plasticity of Brain Gray Matter and White Matter following Lower Limb Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guangyao; Yin, Xuntao; Li, Chuanming; Li, Lei; Zhao, Lu; Evans, Alan C.; Jiang, Tianzi; Wu, Jixiang; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that amputation induces functional reorganization in the sensory and motor cortices. However, the extent of structural changes after lower limb amputation in patients without phantom pain remains uncertain. We studied 17 adult patients with right lower limb amputation and 18 healthy control subjects using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Cortical thickness and fractional anisotropy (FA) of white matter (WM) were investigated. In amputees, a thinning trend was seen in the left premotor cortex (PMC). Smaller clusters were also noted in the visual-to-motor regions. In addition, the amputees also exhibited a decreased FA in the right superior corona radiata and WM regions underlying the right temporal lobe and left PMC. Fiber tractography from these WM regions showed microstructural changes in the commissural fibers connecting the bilateral premotor cortices, compatible with the hypothesis that amputation can lead to a change in interhemispheric interactions. Finally, the lower limb amputees also displayed significant FA reduction in the right inferior frontooccipital fasciculus, which is negatively correlated with the time since amputation. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the amputation of lower limb could induce changes in the cortical representation of the missing limb and the underlying WM connections. PMID:26587289

  4. The Plasticity of Brain Gray Matter and White Matter following Lower Limb Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyao Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has indicated that amputation induces functional reorganization in the sensory and motor cortices. However, the extent of structural changes after lower limb amputation in patients without phantom pain remains uncertain. We studied 17 adult patients with right lower limb amputation and 18 healthy control subjects using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Cortical thickness and fractional anisotropy (FA of white matter (WM were investigated. In amputees, a thinning trend was seen in the left premotor cortex (PMC. Smaller clusters were also noted in the visual-to-motor regions. In addition, the amputees also exhibited a decreased FA in the right superior corona radiata and WM regions underlying the right temporal lobe and left PMC. Fiber tractography from these WM regions showed microstructural changes in the commissural fibers connecting the bilateral premotor cortices, compatible with the hypothesis that amputation can lead to a change in interhemispheric interactions. Finally, the lower limb amputees also displayed significant FA reduction in the right inferior frontooccipital fasciculus, which is negatively correlated with the time since amputation. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the amputation of lower limb could induce changes in the cortical representation of the missing limb and the underlying WM connections.

  5. Tissue spectrophotometry and thermographic imaging applied to routine clinical prediction of amputation level viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Jon M.; Harrison, David K.; Hawthorn, Ian E.

    2002-06-01

    About 5% of British males over 50 years develop peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Of these about 2% ultimately require lower limb amputation. In 1995 we proposed a new technique using lightguide spectrophotometry to measure the oxygen saturation level of haemoglobin (SO2) in the skin as a method for predicting tissue viability. This technique, in combination with thermographic imaging, was compared with skin blood flow measurements using the I125)4- Iodoantipyrine (IAP) clearance technique. The optical techniques gave a sensitivity and selectivity of 1.0 for the prediction of successful outcome of a below knee amputation compared with a specificity of 93% using the traditional IAP technique at a below knee to above knee amputation ratio (BKA:AKA) of 75%. The present study assesses the routine clinical application of these optical techniques. The study is ongoing, but the data to date comprises 22 patients. 4 patients were recommended for above knee amputation (AKA) and 18 patients for below knee amputation on the basis of thermographic and tissue SO2 measurements. All but one of the predicted BKA amputations healed. The study to date produces evidence of 94% healing rate (specificity) for a BKA:AKA ratio of 82%. This compares favorably with the previous figures given above.

  6. Quality of Life Following Amputation or Limb Preservation in Patients with Lower Extremity Bone Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary E Mason

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Although functional differences have been described between patients with lower extremity bone sarcoma with amputation and limb preservation surgery, differences have not clearly been shown between the two groups related to quality of life. The aim of the study was to determine if there is a difference in overall quality of life in lower extremity bone sarcoma survivors related to whether they had an amputation or a limb preservation procedure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty-two long-term survivors of lower extremity bone sarcoma were studied to make a comparison of the overall quality of life, pain assessment and psychological evaluations in limb preservation and amputation patients. Forty-eight patients with limb preservation and thirty-four patients with amputations were enrolled in the study. Validated psychometric measures including the Quality of Life Questionnaire, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and visual analog scales were utilized.RESULTS: The overall quality of life of patients with limb preservation was significantly higher than patients with amputation (p-value < 0.01. Significant differences were noted in the categories of material well being, job satisfiers and occupational relations. CONCLUSION: The overall quality of life of patients with limb preservation appears to be better than for those patients with amputation based on the quality of life questionnaire in patients surviving lower extremity bone sarcoma. Further analysis needs to verify the results and focus on the categories that significantly affect the overall quality of life.

  7. Incidence, severity, and impact of hyperhidrosis in people with lower-limb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colby Hansen, MD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To assess the incidence and severity of self-reported hyperhidrosis in patients with amputation and understand its effects on prosthetic fit or function, a cross-sectional survey of patients at two amputee clinics was performed. Responses from 121 subjects with lower-limb amputation were analyzed. Of these subjects, 66% reported sweating to a degree that it interfered with daily activities, as measured by the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale. There was a significant association between sweating and interference with prosthetic fit and function. Sweating was more severe in cases of transtibial amputations, patients under the age of 60 yr, warm weather, and vigorous activity. There was no relationship between severity of sweating and time since amputation, etiology of amputation, duration of daily prosthetic use, or reported ability to perform functional tasks. Subjects reported trying multiple interventions, but the self-reported effectiveness of these treatments was low. Hyperhidrosis, a common problem associated with prosthetic usage, varies in severity and often interferes with daily activities. Sweating severity is associated with poor prosthetic fit and function. Risk factors include younger age and transtibial amputation status. Treatment strategies generally lack efficacy. The results of this study may provide guidance for future interventions and treatment options.

  8. Uterine autonomic nerve innervation plays a crucial role in regulating rat uterine mast cell functions during embryo implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xue-Jun; Huang, Li-Bo; Qiao, Hui-Li; Deng, Ze-Pei; Fa, Jing-Jing

    2009-12-01

    To explore the potential mechanism of how uterine innervations would affect the uterine mast cell (MC) population and functions during the periimplantation. We herein first examined the consequence of uterine neurectomy on embryo implantation events. We observed that amputation of autonomic nerves innervating the uterus led to on-time implantation failure in rats. Exploiting MC culture and ELISA approaches, we then further analyzed the effect of neurectomy on cellular histamine levels and its release from uterine MCs, to elucidate the relation of the autonomic nerves and local cellular immunity in the uterine during early pregnancy. We observed that disconnection of autonomic nerve innervation significantly increased the population of uterine MCs. Most interestingly, these increased number of uterine MCs in neuroectomized rats contained a much reduced cellular level of histamine. Our subsequent challenge experiments revealed that uterine MCs in nerve amputated rats exhibited enhanced histamine releasing rate in response to substance P and antiIgE, suggesting loss of nerve innervation in the uterus not only increases the population of uterine MCs, but also facilitates the release of histamine from MCs, thus subsequently interfere with the normal implantation process. Collectively, our findings provide a new line of evidence supporting the concept that immune-neuro-endocrine network plays important role during pregnancy establishment and maintenance. PMID:19765668

  9. Sciatic nerve injection injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung Kim, Hyun; Hyun Park, Sang

    2014-06-11

    Nerve injury is a common complication following intramuscular injection and the sciatic nerve is the most frequently affected nerve, especially in children, the elderly and underweight patients. The neurological presentation may range from minor transient pain to severe sensory disturbance and motor loss with poor recovery. Management of nerve injection injury includes drug treatment of pain, physiotherapy, use of assistive devices and surgical exploration. Early recognition of nerve injection injury and appropriate management are crucial in order to reduce neurological deficit and to maximize recovery. Sciatic nerve injection injury is a preventable event. Total avoidance of intramuscular injection is recommended if other administration routes can be used. If the injection has to be administered into the gluteal muscle, the ventrogluteal region (gluteal triangle) has a more favourable safety profile than the dorsogluteal region (the upper outer quadrant of the buttock). PMID:24920643

  10. The furcal nerve revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanjundappa S. Harshavardhana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Atypical sciatica and discrepancy between clinical presentation and imaging findings is a dilemma for treating surgeon in management of lumbar disc herniation. It also constitutes ground for failed back surgery and potential litigations thereof. Furcal nerve (Furcal = forked is an independent nerve with its own ventral and dorsal branches (rootlets and forms a link nerve that connects lumbar and sacral plexus. Its fibers branch out to be part of femoral and obturator nerves in-addition to the lumbosacral trunk. It is most commonly found at L4 level and is the most common cause of atypical presentation of radiculopathy/sciatica. Very little is published about the furcal nerve and many are unaware of its existence. This article summarizes all the existing evidence about furcal nerve in English literature in an attempt to create awareness and offer insight about this unique entity to fellow colleagues/ professionals involved in spine care.

  11. The Furcal Nerve Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabke, Harshad V.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical sciatica and discrepancy between clinical presentation and imaging findings is a dilemma for treating surgeon in management of lumbar disc herniation. It also constitutes ground for failed back surgery and potential litigations thereof. Furcal nerve (Furcal = forked) is an independent nerve with its own ventral and dorsal branches (rootlets) and forms a link nerve that connects lumbar and sacral plexus. Its fibers branch out to be part of femoral and obturator nerves in-addition to the lumbosacral trunk. It is most commonly found at L4 level and is the most common cause of atypical presentation of radiculopathy/sciatica. Very little is published about the furcal nerve and many are unaware of its existence. This article summarizes all the existing evidence about furcal nerve in English literature in an attempt to create awareness and offer insight about this unique entity to fellow colleagues/professionals involved in spine care. PMID:25317309

  12. Neuronal changes resulting in up-regulation of alpha-1 adrenoceptors after peripheral nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter D.Drummond

    2014-01-01

    Under normal conditions, the sympathetic neurotransmitter noradrenaline inhibits the pro-duction and release of pro-inlfammatory cytokines. However, after peripheral nerve and tissue injury, pro-inflammatory cytokines appear to induce the expression of the alpha1A-adreno-ceptor subtype on immune cells and perhaps also on other cells in the injured tissue. In turn, noradrenaline may act on up-regulated alpha1-adrenoceptors to increase the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6. In addition, the release of inflammatory mediators and nerve growth factor from keratinocytes and other cells may augment the expression of al-pha1-adrenoceptors on peripheral nerve ifbers. Consequently, nociceptive afferents acquire an abnormal excitability to adrenergic agents, and inlfammatory processes build. These mechanisms could contribute to the development of sympathetically maintained pain in conditions such as post-herpetic neuralgia, cutaneous neuromas, amputation stump pain and complex regional pain syndrome.

  13. "Reposition-flap": A therapeutic alternative in fingertips amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, N; Chassat, R; Couturier, C; Delpit, X; Masmejean, E

    2015-08-01

    After trans-phalanx fingertips amputations, there is usually a therapeutic problem related to the distal fragment quality. Replantation is not always possible. The aim of this study was to propose the "reposition-flap" surgical procedure as an alternative solution to various surgical strategies for distal stump coverage. It consisted in the association of a bone fragment osteosyntesis and a pedicular local flap implementation. Between 2001 and 2011, the reposition-flap surgical procedure was retrospectively tested in two hand trauma centers. We reviewed a cohort of 51 patients divided in two groups. The first one (20 patients) was the "reposition-flap" group, the second (31 patients) had a coverage with an other surgical procedure (simple regularisation or local flap). Sensibility, pulp trophicity, fingers mobility, digital length, nail appearance and radiologic consolidation of each patient were reviewed. "Reposition-flap" allowed 80% length of phalanx conservation. In comparison with regularisation, the aesthetic aspects of the nail's finger (no claw) were improved with this surgical procedure. However, the Quick DASH average revealed significant statistical differences instead of the statistics obtained with the mobility of the IPD and the sensitivity of the pulp. This procedure gave best aesthetic and functional results. PMID:25001417

  14. Effect of CO2 laser amputation on hydra regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Petrocellis, L.; Finizio, Andrea; Minei, R.; Mormile, Pasquale; Pierattini, Giovanni

    1994-08-01

    In order to investigate laser effects on biological specimens, Hydra, a coelenterate with high regeneration rate, was observed for ten days during regeneration after CO2 laser cutting. Control animals were cut with a razor blade immediately below the tentacle whorl under a dissecting microscope while they were in small glass petri dishes. They regenerated tentacles completely 8 to 10 days from the cutting. Hydra were cut in the same position with CO2 laser. As a first step, we studied the effect of the laser beam on the normal behaviour of hydra. For the cutting, we used four different power intensities: 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 W. At different power intensities the animals regenerated the tentacles. However in about 20% of the animals the amputation performed with 1 and 1.5 W originated a quicker regeneration of tentacles. No effect was observed on asexual reproduction of the polyps and therefore also no change of the bud index.

  15. Spinal accessory nerve neurilemmoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neurilemmoma of the spinal accessory nerve extending from the lower brain stem to the high cervical region, without typical jugular foramen syndome is presented. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a high cervical intradural extramedullary lesion in patients with lower cranial nerve(s) dysfunction. The value of intrathecal and intravenous contrast enhancement computed tomography (CT) myelogram is emphasized. 13 refs.; 3 figs

  16. Facial Nerve Neuroma Management

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Peter C; Osguthorpe, J. David

    1998-01-01

    Three facial nerve neuromas were identified in the academic year 1994-1995. Each case illustrates different management dilemmas. One patient with a grade III facial nerve palsy had a small geniculate ganglion neuroma with the dilemma of decompression versus resection clear nerve section margins. The second patient underwent facial neuroma resection with cable graft reconstruction, but the permanent sections were positive. The last patient had a massive neuroma in which grafting versus other f...

  17. Amputation history and rehabilitation of black men living in the greater Durban area who have had traumatic amputations of the lower limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Kubheka

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available A survey was undertaken amongst twenty five black men living in the greater Durban area who had had amputations of the lower limbs. The type of amputation care and the rehabilitation programme they underwent post-operatively is described. The sample included men from 24 to 50 years of age, of whom the majority were from rural areas. The amputation care intra and post-operatively was marked by the lack of emotional preparation pre-operatively, and lack of rehabilitation information and teaching afterwards. Most respondents had to find information for themselves. This lack of information and teaching seemed to impede physical rehabilitation, with stump sores and limited use of prostheses being the main problems. Vocational rehabilitation was almost totally absent. In contrast to the twenty two respondents who worked before their amputations, only four worked afterwards. The majority had to support their families alone; sixteen of them were totally reliant on a Disability Grant. These problems lead to social isolation, depression, loneliness and other psycho-social problems.

  18. Four-fold increase in foot ulcers in type 2 diabetic subjects without an increase in major amputations by a multidisciplinary setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedetoft, Christoffer; Rasmussen, Anne; Fabrin, Jesper;

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: We observed a large increase in type 2 diabetic subjects with foot ulcers in our diabetic outpatient foot clinic and wanted to identify the amputations rate and individuals at risk of amputations by comparing those who had had a regular control in the multidisciplinary foot clinic prior to...... the amputations and those who had not. METHODS: We examined all clinical records from the orthopaedic surgery department and the diabetic outpatient foot clinic of diabetic patients who underwent amputations for 6 years. RESULTS: Eighty-eight patients with type 2 diabetes underwent 142 amputations; 42...... major and 100 minor amputations. There was no increase in the number of major amputations in this period. In the group not followed in the foot clinic prior to amputations we showed a greater major amputations rate (p<0.05), although this group had a shorter duration of diabetes and less retinopathy...

  19. The use of high-density EEG to map out cortical motor activity and reorganization following lower-limb amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Valur Guðnason 1991

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Studies have shown that after amputation, changes occur in the sensory and motor cortex. These changes are called cortical reorganization, where adjacent cortical areas occupy the cortical area of the amputated limb. High-density electroencephalography (EEG) has been used to observe cortical reorganization in the motor cortex following upper limb amputation. The aim of this study was to use high-density EEG to map out motor cortical activity and cortical reorganization following...

  20. Muscle blood flow after amputation with special reference to the influence of osseous plugging of the medullary cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The muscle blood flow (MBF) in rabbits, subjectd to amputation of the crus was assessed by means of 133 Xenon and Histamine. It was shown that after the operation the flow in the amputation stump was initially reduced. MBF in the stump increased more rapidly and stayed at a higher level after closure by myoplasty than after amputation without myoplasty, and it was still further stimulated after osseous plugging of the medullary cavity. (author)

  1. Perioperative Nerve Blockade: Clues from the Bench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Suter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral and neuraxial nerve blockades are widely used in the perioperative period. Their values to diminish acute postoperative pain are established but other important outcomes such as chronic postoperative pain, or newly, cancer recurrence, or infections could also be influenced. The long-term effects of perioperative nerve blockade are still controversial. We will review current knowledge of the effects of blocking peripheral electrical activity in different animal models of pain. We will first go over the mechanisms of pain development and evaluate which types of fibers are activated after an injury. In the light of experimental results, we will propose some hypotheses explaining the mitigated results obtained in clinical studies on chronic postoperative pain. Finally, we will discuss three major disadvantages of the current blockade: the absence of blockade of myelinated fibers, the inappropriate duration of blockade, and the existence of activity-independent mechanisms.

  2. Intraoperative vagal nerve monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonetti, J P; Jellish, W S; Warf, P; Hudson, E

    1996-08-01

    A variety of benign and malignant neoplasms occur in the superior cervical neck, parapharyngeal space or the infratemporal fossa. The surgical resection of these lesions may result in postoperative iatrogenic injury to the vagus nerve with associated dysfunctional swallowing and airway protection. Anatomic and functional preservation of this critical cranial nerve will contribute to a favorable surgical outcome. Fourteen patients with tumors of the cervical neck or adjacent skull base underwent intraoperative vagal nerve monitoring in an attempt to preserve neural integrity following tumor removal. Of the 11 patients with anatomically preserved vagal nerves in this group, seven patients had normal vocal cord mobility following surgery and all 11 patients demonstrated normal vocal cord movement by six months. In an earlier series of 23 patients with tumors in the same region who underwent tumor resection without vagal nerve monitoring, 18 patients had anatomically preserved vagal nerves. Within this group, five patients had normal vocal cord movement at one month and 13 patients demonstrated normal vocal cord movement at six months. This paper will outline a technique for intraoperative vagal nerve monitoring utilizing transcricothyroid membrane placement of bipolar hook-wire electrodes in the vocalis muscle. Our results with the surgical treatment of cervical neck and lateral skull base tumors for patients with unmonitored and monitored vagal nerves will be outlined. PMID:8828272

  3. The Role of Continuous Peripheral Nerve Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    José Aguirre; Alicia Del Moral; Irina Cobo; Alain Borgeat; Stephan Blumenthal

    2012-01-01

    A continuous peripheral nerve block (cPNB) is provided in the hospital and ambulatory setting. The most common use of CPNBs is in the peri- and postoperative period but different indications have been described like the treatment of chronic pain such as cancer-induced pain, complex regional pain syndrome or phantom limb pain. The documented benefits strongly depend on the analgesia quality and include decreasing baseline/dynamic pain, reducing additional analgesic requirements, decrease of po...

  4. Hibernating myocardium results in partial sympathetic denervation and nerve sprouting

    OpenAIRE

    Stanley F. Fernandez; Ovchinnikov, Vladislav; Canty, John M.; Fallavollita, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Hibernating myocardium due to chronic repetitive ischemia is associated with regional sympathetic nerve dysfunction and spontaneous arrhythmic death in the absence of infarction. Although inhomogeneity in regional sympathetic innervation is an acknowledged substrate for sudden death, the mechanism(s) responsible for these abnormalities in viable, dysfunctional myocardium (i.e., neural stunning vs. sympathetic denervation) and their association with nerve sprouting are unknown. Accordingly, ma...

  5. Preoperative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for localizing superficial nerve paths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natori, Yuhei; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ayato

    2015-12-01

    During surgery, peripheral nerves are often seen to follow unpredictable paths because of previous surgeries and/or compression caused by a tumor. Iatrogenic nerve injury is a serious complication that must be avoided, and preoperative evaluation of nerve paths is important for preventing it. In this study, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was used for an in-depth analysis of peripheral nerve paths. This study included 27 patients who underwent the TENS procedure to evaluate the peripheral nerve path (17 males and 10 females; mean age: 59.9 years, range: 18-83 years) of each patient preoperatively. An electrode pen coupled to an electrical nerve stimulator was used for superficial nerve mapping. The TENS procedure was performed on patients' major peripheral nerves that passed close to the surgical field of tumor resection or trauma surgery, and intraoperative damage to those nerves was apprehensive. The paths of the target nerve were detected in most patients preoperatively. The nerve paths of 26 patients were precisely under the markings drawn preoperatively. The nerve path of one patient substantially differed from the preoperative markings with numbness at the surgical region. During surgery, the nerve paths could be accurately mapped preoperatively using the TENS procedure as confirmed by direct visualization of the nerve. This stimulation device is easy to use and offers highly accurate mapping of nerves for surgical planning without major complications. The authors conclude that TENS is a useful tool for noninvasive nerve localization and makes tumor resection a safe and smooth procedure. PMID:26420473

  6. A novel electrospun nerve conduit enhanced by carbon nanotubes for peripheral nerve regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenwen; Jiang, Xinquan; Cai, Ming; Zhao, Wen; Ye, Dongxia; Zhou, Yong; Zhu, Chao; Zhang, Xiuli; Lu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2014-04-01

    For artificial nerve conduits, great improvements have been achieved in mimicking the structures and components of autologous nerves. However, there are still some problems in conduit construction, especially in terms of mechanical properties, biomimetic surface tomography, electrical conductivity and sustained release of neurotrophic factors or cells. In this study, we designed and fabricated a novel electrospun nerve conduit enhanced by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on the basis of a collagen/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (collagen/PCL) fibrous scaffold. Our aim was to provide further knowledge about the mechanical effects and efficacy of MWNTs on nerve conduits as well as the biocompatibility and toxicology of MWNTs when applied in vivo. The results showed that as one component, carboxyl MWNTs could greatly alter the composite scaffold’s hydrophilicity, mechanical properties and degradability. The electrospun fibers enhanced by MWNTs could support Schwann cell adhesion and elongation as a substrate in vitro. In vivo animal studies demonstrated that the MWNT-enhanced collagen/PCL conduit could effectively promote nerve regeneration of sciatic nerve defect in rats and prevent muscle atrophy without invoking body rejection or serious chronic inflammation. All of these results showed that this MWNT-enhanced scaffold possesses good biocompatibility and MWNTs might be excellent candidates as engineered nanocarriers for further neurotrophic factor delivery research.

  7. A novel electrospun nerve conduit enhanced by carbon nanotubes for peripheral nerve regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For artificial nerve conduits, great improvements have been achieved in mimicking the structures and components of autologous nerves. However, there are still some problems in conduit construction, especially in terms of mechanical properties, biomimetic surface tomography, electrical conductivity and sustained release of neurotrophic factors or cells. In this study, we designed and fabricated a novel electrospun nerve conduit enhanced by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on the basis of a collagen/poly(ε-caprolactone) (collagen/PCL) fibrous scaffold. Our aim was to provide further knowledge about the mechanical effects and efficacy of MWNTs on nerve conduits as well as the biocompatibility and toxicology of MWNTs when applied in vivo. The results showed that as one component, carboxyl MWNTs could greatly alter the composite scaffold’s hydrophilicity, mechanical properties and degradability. The electrospun fibers enhanced by MWNTs could support Schwann cell adhesion and elongation as a substrate in vitro. In vivo animal studies demonstrated that the MWNT-enhanced collagen/PCL conduit could effectively promote nerve regeneration of sciatic nerve defect in rats and prevent muscle atrophy without invoking body rejection or serious chronic inflammation. All of these results showed that this MWNT-enhanced scaffold possesses good biocompatibility and MWNTs might be excellent candidates as engineered nanocarriers for further neurotrophic factor delivery research. (paper)

  8. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor of the Infraorbital Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addino, José Luis; Piccoletti, Laura; Pigni, María Mercedes; de Gordon, Maria José Rodriguez Arenas

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to report a large, rare, and ulcerative infiltrated skin lesion. Its diagnosis, therapeutic management, and progress are described. The patient is a 78-year-old white man, who presented with a 12-month ulcerative perforated lesion that had affected and infiltrated the skin, with easy bleeding. He had a history of hypertension, although controlled, was a 40-year smoker, had chronic atrial fibrillation, diabetes, and microangiopathy. During the consultation, the patient also presented with ocular obstruction due to an inability to open the eye. He mentioned having reduced vision. The computed tomography scan showed upper maxilla osteolysis without eye involvement. We underwent a radical resection in which upper maxilla and the anterior orbital margin were included. We used a Becker-type flap that allowed us to rebuild the cheek and to complete a modified neck dissection. Progress was favorable; the patient recovered ocular motility and his vision improved to 20/200. The final biopsy result was "malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, malignant schwannoma." Malignant schwannoma of the peripheral nerve is extremely rare. The total resection and reconstruction being completed in one surgery represented a challenge due to the difficulty in obtaining tissues in addition to the necessity of an oncological resection. PMID:27162577

  9. Sciatic nerve tumor and tumor-like lesions - uncommon pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciatic nerve mass-like enlargement caused by peripheral nerve sheath tumors or neurocutaneous syndromes such as neurofibromatosis or schwannomatosis has been widely reported. Other causes of enlargement, such as from perineuroma, fibromatosis, neurolymphoma, amyloidosis, endometriosis, intraneural ganglion cyst, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy are relatively rare. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent non-invasive tool for the evaluation of such lesions. In this article, the authors discuss normal anatomy of the sciatic nerve and MRI findings of the above-mentioned lesions. (orig.)

  10. Sciatic nerve tumor and tumor-like lesions - uncommon pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Thakkar, Rashmi S.; Carrino, John A.; Chhabra, Avneesh [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Maragakis, Nicholas; Hoeke, Ahmet; Sumner, Charlotte J.; Lloyd, Thomas E. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Belzberg, Allan J. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Sciatic nerve mass-like enlargement caused by peripheral nerve sheath tumors or neurocutaneous syndromes such as neurofibromatosis or schwannomatosis has been widely reported. Other causes of enlargement, such as from perineuroma, fibromatosis, neurolymphoma, amyloidosis, endometriosis, intraneural ganglion cyst, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy are relatively rare. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent non-invasive tool for the evaluation of such lesions. In this article, the authors discuss normal anatomy of the sciatic nerve and MRI findings of the above-mentioned lesions. (orig.)

  11. Feedforward control strategies of subjects with transradial amputation in planar reaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Metzger, MBE

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The rate of upper-limb amputations is increasing, and the rejection rate of prosthetic devices remains high. People with upper-limb amputation do not fully incorporate prosthetic devices into their activities of daily living. By understanding the reaching behaviors of prosthesis users, researchers can alter prosthetic devices and develop training protocols to improve the acceptance of prosthetic limbs. By observing the reaching characteristics of the nondisabled arms of people with amputation, we can begin to understand how the brain alters its motor commands after amputation. We asked subjects to perform rapid reaching movements to two targets with and without visual feedback. Subjects performed the tasks with both their prosthetic and nondisabled arms. We calculated endpoint error, trajectory error, and variability and compared them with those of nondisabled control subjects. We found no significant abnormalities in the prosthetic limb. However, we found an abnormal leftward trajectory error (in right arms in the nondisabled arm of prosthetic users in the vision condition. In the no-vision condition, the nondisabled arm displayed abnormal leftward endpoint errors and abnormally higher endpoint variability. In the vision condition, peak velocity was lower and movement duration was longer in both arms of subjects with amputation. These abnormalities may reflect the cortical reorganization associated with limb loss.

  12. Somatotype of the individuals with lower extremity amputation and its association with cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozumdar, Arupendra; Roy, Subrata K

    2008-03-01

    Anthropometric somatotyping is one of the methods to describe the shape of the human body, which shows some associations with an individual's health and disease condition, especially with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Individuals with lower extremity amputation (LEA) are known to be more vulnerable to the cardiovascular risk. The objectives of the present study are to report the somatotype of the individuals having lower extremity amputation, to study the possible variation in somatotype between two groups of amputated individuals, and to study the association between cardiovascular disease risk factor and somatotype components among individuals with locomotor disability. 102 adult male individuals with unilateral lower-extremity amputation residing in Calcutta and adjoining areas were investigated. The anthropometric data for somatotyping and data on cardiovascular risk traits (such as body mass index, blood pressure measurements, blood lipids) have been collected. The somatotyping technique of Carter & Heath (1990) has been followed. The result shows high mean values of endomorphy and mesomorphy components and a low mean value of the ectomorphy component among the amputated individuals having cardiovascular risks. The results of both discriminant analysis and logistic regression analysis show a significant relationship between somatotype components and CVD risk among the individuals with LEA. The findings of the present study support the findings of similar studies conducted on the normal population. Diagnosis of CVD risk condition through somatotyping can be utilized in prevention/treatment management for the individuals with LEA. PMID:18435209

  13. Symmetrical kinematics does not imply symmetrical kinetics in people with transtibial amputation using cycling model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lee Childers, PhD, CP

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available People with amputation move asymmetrically with regard to kinematics (joint angles and kinetics (joint forces and moments. Clinicians have traditionally sought to minimize kinematic asymmetries, assuming kinetic asymmetries would also be minimized. A cycling model evaluated locomotor asymmetries. Eight individuals with unilateral transtibial amputation pedaled with 172 mm-length crank arms on both sides (control condition and with the crank arm length shortened to 162 mm on the amputated side (CRANK condition. Pedaling kinetics and limb kinematics were recorded. Joint kinetics, joint angles (mean and range of motion [ROM], and pedaling asymmetries were calculated from force pedals and with a motion capture system. A one-way analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc compared kinetics and kinematics across limbs. Statistical significance was set to p amputated limb compared with the control condition. There were no differences in joint kinematics between the contralateral and amputated limbs during the CRANK condition. Pedaling asymmetries did not differ and were 23.0% +/– 9.8% and 23.2% +/– 12.0% for the control and CRANK conditions, respectively. Our results suggest that minimizing kinematic asymmetries does not relate to kinetic asymmetries as clinically assumed. We propose that future research should concentrate on defining acceptable asymmetry.

  14. Vibrational angioplasty in recanalization of chronic femoropopliteal arterial occlusions: Single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This prospective study aims to present the overall success rate, safety and long-term outcome of vibrational angioplasty technique, in the treatment of chronic total femoropopliteal occlusions in our institute. Methods: Between October 2000 and December 2008, patients with chronic total femoropoliteal arterial occlusions, treated with vibrational angioplasty during the same session after a failed attempt with conventional recanalization technique, were included. Patient's follow up included serial ankle-brachial index measurements and arterial duplex ultrasound examinations at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 months. Results: Twenty-seven patients (16 males and 11 females) and twenty-eight lesions were included in our study. Twenty-five lesions (89.3%) were successfully recanalized. Pain relief was noticed in twenty-one cases. From ten lesions with tissue loss (ulcer or gangrene) in successfully recanalized occlusions, six healed without major, or minor amputation. One non-healing amputation stump was healed after recanalization, without further complications. Four limbs underwent amputation (one minor and three major) despite successful recanalization, however all had an excellent healing of the amputation stump without further complications. The Kaplan–Meier test demonstrated 90%, 85% and 70% amputation-free survival rate at 12, 24 and 36 months, respectively. No major or minor complications were encountered. Conclusions: Vibrational angioplasty is a safe, effective and durable endovascular technique for the treatment of chronic total occlusions in patients with limb ischemia that would be difficult to recanalize using conventional intraluminal techniques

  15. Vibrational angioplasty in recanalization of chronic femoropopliteal arterial occlusions: Single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapralos, Ioannis, E-mail: jkapgr@yahoo.gr [251 Hellenic Air Force General Hospital, Athens (Greece); Kehagias, Elias, E-mail: eliaskmd@yahoo.gr [Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Ioannou, Christos, E-mail: ioannou@med.uoc.g [Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Bouloukaki, Izolde, E-mail: izolthi@gmail.com [Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Kostas, Theodoros, E-mail: kostasth@mailbox.gr [Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Katsamouris, Asterios, E-mail: asterios@med.uoc.gr [Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Tsetis, Dimitrios, E-mail: tsetis@med.uoc.gr [Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: This prospective study aims to present the overall success rate, safety and long-term outcome of vibrational angioplasty technique, in the treatment of chronic total femoropopliteal occlusions in our institute. Methods: Between October 2000 and December 2008, patients with chronic total femoropoliteal arterial occlusions, treated with vibrational angioplasty during the same session after a failed attempt with conventional recanalization technique, were included. Patient's follow up included serial ankle-brachial index measurements and arterial duplex ultrasound examinations at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 months. Results: Twenty-seven patients (16 males and 11 females) and twenty-eight lesions were included in our study. Twenty-five lesions (89.3%) were successfully recanalized. Pain relief was noticed in twenty-one cases. From ten lesions with tissue loss (ulcer or gangrene) in successfully recanalized occlusions, six healed without major, or minor amputation. One non-healing amputation stump was healed after recanalization, without further complications. Four limbs underwent amputation (one minor and three major) despite successful recanalization, however all had an excellent healing of the amputation stump without further complications. The Kaplan–Meier test demonstrated 90%, 85% and 70% amputation-free survival rate at 12, 24 and 36 months, respectively. No major or minor complications were encountered. Conclusions: Vibrational angioplasty is a safe, effective and durable endovascular technique for the treatment of chronic total occlusions in patients with limb ischemia that would be difficult to recanalize using conventional intraluminal techniques.

  16. Roles of renalase and renal sympathetic nerve activity in patients with chronic heart failure%肾胺酶与肾交感神经活性在慢性心力衰竭中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈平安; 李韶南; 雷晓明; 刘震

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the roles of renalase and renal sympathetic nerve activity in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods Plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensinⅠ (AngⅠ), angiotensin Ⅱ(AngⅡ),adrenaline (E), noradrenaline (NE) and renalase were determined in 60 patients with CHF (CHF group) and in 42 healthy cases (control group). Data were compared between patients with mild and serious CHF. Results PRA, E, NE and AngⅠincreased and renalase decreased in CHF group than those in control group. Compared with mild CHF, renalase and left ventricular ejection fraction decreased (P < 0.01, 0.034), while N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and PRA significantly increased (P<0.01). Linear correlation analysis showed that renalase was inversely correlated with Log NT-proBNP (r = -0.400, P = 0.002) and Log NE (r=-0.314, P = 0.014). Logistic regression analysis showed that NT-proBNP (OR = 6.963, 95%CI = 1.223 to 39.638), PRA (OR = 3.736, 95%CI = 1.031 to 13.540) and renalase (OR = 0.253, 95%CI = 0.069 to 0.927) were associated with increased NYHA classes. Conclusions PRA would increase while renalase would decrease in patients with CHF. PRA and renalase were correlated to the severity of CHF.%目的:探讨肾胺酶与局部肾交感活性在慢性心力衰竭中的作用。方法:测定60例慢性心力衰竭患者和42例对照组血浆肾素(PRA)、血管紧张素Ⅰ(AngⅠ)、血管紧张素Ⅱ(AngⅡ)、肾上腺素(E)、去甲肾上腺素(NE)及肾胺酶活性。观察不同纽约心功能分级(NYHA)心衰患者间PRA及肾胺酶等指标间的差异及相关关系。结果:心衰组PRA、E、NE、AngⅠ活性增高,肾胺酶活性降低。与轻微心衰组相比,严重心衰组肾胺酶活性及左室射血分数降低(P分别为<0.01、0.034),N末端脑钠尿肽前体(NT-proBNP)及PRA增高(均P<0.01)。线性相关分析显示肾胺酶活性与Log NT-proBNP(r=-0

  17. Accuracy of physical examination for chronic lumbar radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Iversen, Trond; Solberg, Tore K; Romner, Bertil; Wilsgaard, Tom; Nygaard, Øystein; Waterloo, Knut; Brox, Jens I; Ingebrigtsen, Tor

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical examination of patients with chronic lumbar radiculopathy aims to clarify whether there is nerve root impingement. The aims of this study were to investigate the association between findings at clinical examination and nerve root impingement, to evaluate the accuracy of clinical index tests in a specialised care setting, and to see whether imaging clarifies the cause of chronic radicular pain. Method...

  18. Silicone Molding and Lifetime Testing of Peripheral Nerve Interfaces for Neuroprostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupte, Kimaya [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering; Tolosa, Vanessa [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Micro- and Nanotechnology

    2016-08-10

    Implantable peripheral nerve cuffs have a large application in neuroprostheses as they can be used to restore sensation to those with upper limb amputations. Modern day prosthetics, while lessening the pain associated with phantom limb syndrome, have limited fine motor control and do not provide sensory feedback to patients. Sensory feedback with prosthetics requires communication between the nervous system and limbs, and is still a challenge to accomplish with amputees. Establishing this communication between the peripheral nerves in the arm and artificial limbs is vital as prosthetics research aims to provide sensory feedback to amputees. Peripheral nerve cuffs restore sensation by electrically stimulating certain parts of the nerve in order to create feeling in the hand. Cuff electrodes have an advantage over standard electrodes as they have high selective stimulation by bringing the electrical interface close to the neural tissue in order to selectively activate targeted regions of a peripheral nerve. In order to further improve the selective stimulation of these nerve cuffs, there is need for finer spatial resolution among electrodes. One method to achieve a higher spatial resolution is to increase the electrode density on the cuff itself. Microfabrication techniques can be used to achieve this higher electrode density. Using L-Edit, a layout editor, microfabricated peripheral nerve cuffs were designed with a higher electrode density than the current model. This increase in electrode density translates to an increase in spatial resolution by at least one order of magnitude. Microfabricated devices also have two separate components that are necessary to understand before implantation: lifetime of the device and assembly to prevent nerve damage. Silicone molding procedures were optimized so that devices do not damage nerves in vivo, and lifetime testing was performed on test microfabricated devices to determine their lifetime in vivo. Future work of this project

  19. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch;

    2005-01-01

    glaucoma patients is six times higher at a perfusion pressure of 30 mmHg, which corresponds to a level where the optic nerve is hypoxic in experimental animals, as compared to perfusion pressure levels above 50 mmHg where the optic nerve is normoxic. Medical intervention can affect optic nerve oxygen...... through a mechanism of vasodilatation and lowering of the intraocular pressure. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition reduces the removal of CO2 from the tissue and the CO2 accumulation induces vasodilatation resulting in increased blood flow and improved oxygen supply. This effect is inhibited by the cyclo...

  20. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  1. [Amputations. A five-year epidemiological study in Buenos Aires City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelevich, Alejandro; Kramer, Marcia; Maiarú, Mariano; Módica, Mariela; Ostolaza, Marco; Peralta, Federico

    2015-01-01

    An amputation is the removal of a limb by surgery or accident. The aim of this paper was to carry out an epidemiological analysis on patients with amputations treated at the Instituto de Rehabilitación Psicofísica between 2009 and 2013. This is a retrospective, observational and cross-sectional study. The analyzed data included a total of 262 patients: 180 men (68.7%) and 82 women (31.3%). Our population mainly included subjects with only one amputated lower limb (83.6%), of vascular etiology (mostly diabetics) and with an average age of 63.5 years. The second sample group comprised traumatic amputees (29.8%), with an average age of 37 years and with a higher frequency of phantom pain. The characteristics of these groups can make them to behave differently during rehabilitation. PMID:26707661

  2. Construction of An Experimental Hypogiossal Nerve Signals Record Platform in Rat Model of Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia in Vivo%慢性间歇低氧大鼠模型在体舌下神经电信号记录实验平台的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵景景; 文芳静; 王念; 范慧; 万志辉; 胡克

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To establish an experimental platform of the rat model of chronic intermittent hy-poxia simulating obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and to explore the activity of the hypoglossal nerve signals in vivo. Methods: Experiments were performed in the rat model of chronic intermittent hypoxia. These preparations included the gas source, the gas control delivery system, the intermittent hypoxia animal chambers, and the rats. In accordance with the requirement of experiment, the rats were given nitrogen and air alternately for 8 hours per day and the experiment lasted for 7 weeks. After the experiment, the hypoglossal nerve was isolated and the average peak amplitude and frequency of hypoglossal nerve discharges were recorded and analyzed with medical biological signal processor (MedLab U/C 501H). Results: The pre-test results showed that chronic intermittent hypoxia rat model could simulate the pathophysiological characteristics of the obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome in human, and the recorded signals from hypoglossal nerve are stable and reliable. Conclusion; The chronic intermittent hypoxia model proved simple, easy, practical, and reproducible, and the recorded signals of hypoglossal nerve are stable and reliable. The system is ideally suited for studies.%目的:建立一种以模拟阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停低通气综合征的慢性间歇低氧大鼠模型为基础、探讨在体舌下神经电信号活动的实验平台.方法:慢性间歇低氧大鼠模型由气源(氮气及空气)、电磁阀控制系统、间歇低氧动物仓、以及实验动物(大鼠)组成,按照实验要求对大鼠交替给予氮气和空气,每天8h,连续处理7周后,分离舌下神经,应用多通道生物信号采集与处理系统对舌下神经电信号进行处理与分析.结果:预实验结果显示,慢性间歇低氧大鼠模型能够模拟人体阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停低通气综合征的病理生理特征,所记录的电信号稳定、可靠.结论:

  3. High Ulnar Nerve Injuries: Nerve Transfers to Restore Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Jennifer Megan M

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are challenging problems. Nerve transfers are one of many options available to surgeons caring for these patients, although they do not replace tendon transfers, nerve graft, or primary repair in all patients. Distal nerve transfers for the treatment of high ulnar nerve injuries allow for a shorter reinnervation period and improved ulnar intrinsic recovery, which are critical to function of the hand. PMID:27094893

  4. 节段性运动神经传导测定在慢性炎性脱髓鞘性多发性神经根神经病和腓骨肌萎缩症1型之间的差异%Difference of segmental motor nerve conduction study between chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and Clarcot-Marie-Tooth type 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘明生; 崔丽英; 冯新红; 管宇宙; 李本红; 杜华

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨节段性运动神经传导测定在慢性炎性脱髓鞘性多发性神经根神经病(chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy,CIDP)和腓骨肌萎缩症1型(Charcot-MarieTooth type1,CMT1)鉴别诊断中的价值.方法 收集16例CIDP和13例CMT1患者,进行节段性运动神经传导测定,比较两组远端运动潜伏期、运动神经传导速度,以及近端和远端比较复合肌肉动作电位波幅、面积和时限变化的差异.结果 CIDP和CMT1患者远端运动潜伏期分别为(5.6±3.4)、(9.3±2.1)ms(t=5.347,P=0.000),运动传导速度分别为(31.1±14.3)、(22.2±5.8)m/s(t=6.369,P=0.000),近端和远端比较波幅下降百分比M5o分别为29.7%和4.9%(Z=7.141,P=0.000).在CIDP患者,所有测定神经中40.3%(25/62)远端潜伏期正常,18.1%(26/144)的神经节段传导速度正常,而在CMT1中所有测定神经的远端潜伏期均延长,所有测定节段的传导速度均减慢.在CIDP患者29.2%的神经节段可见传导阻滞或异常波形离散,而在CMT1仅有3.0%的节段可见传导阻滞(x2=20.829,P=0.000).结论 当针对CIDP和CMT1进行鉴别时,如果节段性运动神经传导测定发现传导阻滞和异常波形离散、不同神经节段传导速度下降程度差别较大,可以支持 CIDP的诊断.%Objective to assess the utility of segmental motor nerve conduction study in differential diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy(CIDP)and Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1(CMT1).Methods A segmental motor nerve conduction study was performed on 16 patients with CIDP and 13 patients with CMT1.Distal motor latency,motor nerve conduction velocity,the changes of amplitude,area and duration of compound motor action potential over conventional segment were compared between the groups.Results Distal motor latency was (5.6±3.4) ms in CIDP and (9.3±2.1) ms in CMT1(t=5.347 P=0.000),motor nerve conduction velocity was (31.1±14.3) m/s in CIDP and(22.2±5.8)m/s(t=6.369,P=0

  5. Nerve biopsy ifndings contribute to diagnosis of multiple mononeuropathy:78% of ifndings support clinical diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-shuang Zhang; A-ping Sun; Lu Chen; Rong-fang Dong; Yan-feng Zhong; Jun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Multiple mononeuropathy is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy involving two or more nerve trunks. It is a syndrome with many different causes. We reviewed the clinical, electrophysi-ological and nerve biopsy ifndings of 14 patients who suffered from multiple mononeuropathy in our clinic between January 2009 and June 2013. Patients were diagnosed with vasculitic neurop-athy (n = 6), perineuritis (n = 2), chronic inlfammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (n = 2) or Lewis-Sumner syndrome (n = 1) on the basis of clinical features, laboratory data, elec-trophysiological investigations and nerve biopsies. Two patients who were clinically diagnosed with vasculitic neuropathy and one patient who was clinically diagnosed with chronic inlfamma-tory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy were not conifrmed by nerve biopsy. Nerve biopsies conifrmed clinical diagnosis in 78.6% of the patients (11/14). Nerve biopsy pathological diagno-sis is crucial to the etiological diagnosis of multiple mononeuropathy.

  6. Sleep disturbances in chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.W.; Westeneng, H.J.; Hal, M.A. van; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Overeem, S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) is a relatively common mitochondrial disorder. In addition to extraocular muscle weakness, various other organs can typically be affected, including laryngeal and limb muscles, cerebrum, cerebellum, and peripheral nerves. Given this mul

  7. A clinical trial testing the efficacy of PDT in preventing amputation in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardivo, João Paulo; Adami, Fernando; Correa, João Antonio; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida S; Baptista, Mauricio S

    2014-09-01

    The feet of diabetic patients continue to be an unsolved problem in medicine. Uncontrolled neuropathy, ulceration and infection usually lead to amputation and presently there is no effective and reliable method that can be used to provide an efficient cure. Overall improvement in the salvage strategies, based on comprehensive pre-clinical evaluation, debridement, antibiotic therapy and follow up, has shown improvements in certain hospital settings, but the general picture for patients with diabetic foot is to have some sort of amputation, especially in underserved populations. It is clearly necessary to develop novel treatment strategies for this worldwide health problem. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality that uses light to generate in situ reactive oxygen species, which can cause cell death. PDT can be used to treat several diseases, including foot infections that do not respond well to antibiotic therapy. There are several characteristics of PDT that make it potentially ideal to treat diabetic feet: the photosensitizer is non-toxic in the dark, but after illumination it becomes a very efficient antimicrobial agent with topical use, and it can regenerate small bones, such as the phalanges. However, PDT is still not used in clinical practice to treat diabetic feet. Therefore, we decided to perform a clinical study to prove that PDT is an effective method to avoid amputation of infected diabetic feet. An inexpensive PDT protocol was developed and applied to 18 patients with osteomyelitis, classified as Grade 3 on the Wagner scale. Only one of these patients suffered amputation. At least two of them were cured from resistant bacteria strains without intravenous antibiotic therapy. In the control group of 16 patients, all of them ended up suffering amputation. The rate of amputation in the PDT group was 0.029 times the rate in the control group and the difference is clearly statistically significant (p=0.002). PMID:24814697

  8. Combat-related bridge synostosis versus traditional transtibial amputation: comparison of military-specific outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucknette, Benjamin F; Krueger, Chad A; Rivera, Jessica C; Wenke, Joseph C

    2016-04-01

    The aim of our study was to determine military-specific outcomes for transtibial amputations of US Service members using either the traditional technique (Burgess) or the Ertl technique. All US Service members sustaining transtibial, combat-related amputation from September 2001 through July 2011 were reviewed. Amputation type, mechanism of injury, time interval to amputation, age, sex, branch of service, rank, force, nature, and injury severity score were recorded. Outcomes were determined by analyzing military-specific medical review results, to include the following: Physical Evaluation Board Liaison Office (PEBLO) rating (0-100), PEBLO outcome (permanent retirement, temporary disability retirement, separation without benefits, continuation of active duty, or fit for redeployment), and the rate of redeployment. Amputation type (Ertl vs. Burgess) was determined by reviewing postoperative radiographs and radiology reports. Data from all of the above categories were compared for both Ertl and Burgess amputees. Of 512 subjects identified, 478 had radiographs or radiology reports distinguishing between Ertl or Burgess transtibial amputation. A total of 406 subjects underwent the Burgess procedure, and 72 subjects underwent the Ertl procedure. There was not a significant difference between the two groups in review board rating (p = 0.858), review board outcome (p = 0.102), or ability to deploy (p = 0.106); however, subjects that underwent the Ertl procedure remained on active duty at a significantly higher rate (p = 0.021). There is a higher rate of remaining on active duty using the Ertl technique. This study suggests that there is an improvement in functional outcome with the Ertl technique. PMID:26644067

  9. Clinical and theoretical parallels between desire for limb amputation and gender identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Anne A

    2006-06-01

    Desire for amputation of a healthy limb has usually been regarded as a paraphilia (apotemnophilia), but some researchers propose that it may be a disorder of identity, similar to Gender Identity Disorder (GID) or transsexualism. Similarities between the desire for limb amputation and nonhomosexual male-to-female (MtF) transsexualism include profound dissatisfaction with embodiment, related paraphilias from which the conditions plausibly derive (apotemnophilia and autogynephilia), sexual arousal from simulation of the sought-after status (pretending to be an amputee and transvestism), attraction to persons with the same body type one wants to acquire, and an elevated prevalence of other paraphilic interests. K. Freund and R. Blanchard (1993) proposed that nonhomosexual MtF transsexualism represents an erotic target location error, in which men whose preferred erotic targets are women also eroticize their own feminized bodies. Desire for limb amputation may also reflect an erotic target location error, occurring in combination with an unusual erotic target preference for amputees. This model predicts that persons who desire limb amputation would almost always be attracted to amputees and would display an increased prevalence of gender identity problems, both of which have been observed. Persons who desire limb amputation and nonhomosexual MtF transsexuals often assert that their motives for wanting to change their bodies reflect issues of identity rather than sexuality, but because erotic/romantic orientations contribute significantly to identity, such distinctions may not be meaningful. Experience with nonhomosexual MtF transsexualism suggests possible directions for research and treatment for persons who desire limb amputation. PMID:16799838

  10. Ectopic major transplantation for salvage of upper and lower extremity amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazerani Shahram

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Ectopic tissue transplanta- tion is not a new idea. Godina and his colleagues pioneered this method in the 1980s. This method is a last resort method of preserving an amputated body part, which consists of banking the amputated segment in an ectopic area and re- turning it to its native place at a later date. In this article we present our experience with this demanding procedure. Methods: Debridement was the mainstay of this procedure. The stump and amputated part are carefully de- brided and the stump was either closed primarily or covered by a flap. The amputated part was transplanted to one of several banking sites in the body and at a later date it will be transferred to its native site in an elective setting. Results: Seven patients meeting the set criteria for ectopic transplantation were enrolled in this study. The over- all success rate was about 70%, lower than expected but these are cases of severe crush injury. Although the func- tional recovery of these patients are very low, all of the successful cases except one could find a job as a janitor or light manual worker. No patient could return to his previous job. Conclusion: Ectopic transplantation of body parts is an accepted method of treatment of severely crushed ex- tremity or finger injuries. In our country an amputee has very little chance of finding a job instead a disabled person can. In addition in Iran cultures amputation is seen as pu- nishment of either the God or the society, so it is not well accepted and many patients persist on saving the limb even with no functional recovery. None of our successful cases could return to his previous occupation but almost all of them could find a job as janitors or light manual workers. Key words: Replantation; Transplantation; Extremities; Amputation, traumatic

  11. Calcium regulation in frog peripheral nerve by the blood-nerve barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this research were: (a) to investigate the characteristics of calcium transport across the perineurium and the endoneurial capillaries, and (b) to gain a better understanding of the extent of calcium homeostasis in the endoneurial space. To study the nature of calcium transport across the perineurium, the flux of radiotracer 45Ca was measured through the perineurial cylinder, isolated from the frog sciatic nerve, and through the perineurium into the nerve in situ. To study the nature of calcium transport across the endoneurial capillaries, the permeability-surface area product (PA) of 45Ca was determined as a function of the calcium concentration in the blood. To study calcium homeostasis, the calcium content of the frog sciatic nerve was determined as a function of chronic changes in plasma [Ca

  12. Prevalence and Characteristics of Phantom Limb Pain and Residual Limb Pain in the Long Term after Upper Limb Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Deirdre M.; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to describe the prevalence and characteristics of phantom limb pain and residual limb pain after upper limb amputation. One-hundred and forty-one participants (139 males; mean age 74.8 years; mean time since amputation 50.1 years) completed a self-report questionnaire assessing residual and phantom limb pain experience. Prevalence…

  13. Mortality After Nontraumatic Major Amputation Among Patients With Diabetes and Peripheral Vascular Disease: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorud, Jakob C; Plemmons, Britton; Buckley, Clifford J; Shibuya, Naohiro; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    High mortality rates have been reported after major amputations of a lower limb secondary to diabetes and peripheral vascular disease. However, the mortality rates have varied across studies. A systematic review of the 5-year mortality after nontraumatic major amputations of the lower extremity was conducted. A data search was performed of Medline using OVID, CINHAL, and Cochrane, 365 abstracts were screened, and 79 full text articles were assessed for eligibility. After review, 31 studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Overall, the 5-year mortality rate was very high among patients with any amputation (major and minor combined), ranging from 53% to 100%, and in patients with major amputations, ranging from 52% to 80%. Mortality after below-the-knee amputation ranged from 40% to 82% and after above-the-knee amputation from 40% to 90%. The risk factors for increased mortality included age, renal disease, proximal amputation, and peripheral vascular disease. Although our previous systematic review of the 5-year mortality after ulceration had much lower rates of death, additional studies are warranted to determine whether amputation hastens death or is a marker for underlying disease severity. PMID:26898398

  14. Impact of a diabetic foot care education program on lower limb amputation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M Al-Wahbi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah M Al-WahbiDepartment of Surgery, King Abdulaziz Medical City and King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyahd, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: Diabetic foot complications are a leading cause of lower extremity amputation. With the increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus in the Arab world, specifically in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the rate of amputation will rise significantly. A diabetic foot care program was implemented at King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in 2002. The program was directed at health care staff and patients to increase their awareness about diabetic foot care and prevention of complications. The purpose of this study was to perform a primary evaluation of the program’s impact on the rate of lower extremity amputation due to diabetic foot complications.Method: This pilot study was the first analysis of the diabetic foot care program and examined two groups of participants for comparison, ie, a “before” group having had diabetic foot ulcers managed between 1983, when the hospital was first established, and 2002 when the program began and an “after group” having had foot ulcers managed between 2002 and 2004, in the program’s initial phase. A total of 41 charts were randomly chosen retrospectively. A data sheet containing age, gender, medical data, and the presentation, management, and outcome of diabetic foot cases was used for the analysis.Results: The before group contained 20 patients (17 males and the after group contained 21 patients (16 males. There was no difference between the two groups with regard to age and comorbidities. The rate of amputation was 70% in the before group and 61.9% in the after group. There was a decrease in the percentage of toe amputation in the after group and an increase in the percentage of below-knee amputation in the before group. However, these changes were not significant.Conclusion: The program, although evaluated at an early

  15. Phantom-limb pain as a perceptual correlate of cortical reorganization following arm amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Flor, Herta; Elbert, Thomas; Knecht, Stefan; Wienbruch, Christian; Pantev, Christo; Birbaumer, Niels; Larbig, Wolfgang; Taub, Edward

    1995-01-01

    Although phantom-limb pain is a frequent consequence of the amputation of an extremity, little is known about its origin1-4. On the basis of the demonstration of substantial plasticity of the somatosensory cortex after amputation5 or somatosensory deafferentation in adult monkeys6, it has been suggested that cortical reorganization could account for some non-painful phantom-limb phenomena in amputees and that cortical reorganization has an adaptive (that is, pain-preventing) function2,5,7,8. ...

  16. Bilateral microvascular second toe transfer for bilateral post-traumatic thumb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Nehete

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In bilateral thumb amputations, the functional impairment is serious and every attempt should be made to reconstruct the thumb. We report a case of bilateral post traumatic thumb amputation, reconstructed with bilateral second toe transfer. Only two such cases have been reported in literature so far. Though there are various modalities for the reconstruction of thumb, microvascular toe transfer has its own merits. The convalescent period is minimal with excellent function. It is bilaterally symmetric and aesthetically superior to the osteoplastic reconstruction. The technical details are discussed, and the long term functional and aesthetic results are presented.

  17. Bilateral recurrent discloation of the patella associated with below knee amputation: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Prasanna

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recurrent dislocation of the patella in patients with below knee amputation is a known entity. Abnormally high-riding patella (patella alta and medial patellofemoral ligament insufficiency in these patients predisposes them to patellar instability. The established treatment of this problem is surgical realignment. Case presentation A 25 year old male patient with bilateral below knee amputation presented with bilateral recurrent dislocation of the patella while walking on knees on uneven ground. Clinical and radiographic studies showed patella alta. A simple shoe modification was used to treat this patient. Conclusions A simple shoe modification can be used to treat such a condition which is otherwise treated surgically.

  18. Stepwise surgical approach to diabetic partial foot amputations with autogenous split thickness skin grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal L. Ramanujam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the surgical treatment of severe diabetic foot infections, substantial soft tissue loss often accompanies partial foot amputations. These sizeable soft tissue defects require extensive care with the goal of expedited closure to inhibit further infection and to provide resilient surfaces capable of withstanding long-term ambulation. Definitive wound closure management in the diabetic population is dependent on multiple factors and can have a major impact on the risk of future diabetic foot complications. In this article, the authors provide an overview of autogenous skin grafting, including anatomical considerations, clinical conditions, surgical approach, and adjunctive treatments, for diabetic partial foot amputations.

  19. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get ... you change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. ...

  20. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T;

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide.......To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  1. Nerve Conduction Studies and Electromyography

    OpenAIRE

    Keyes, Robert D.

    1990-01-01

    Nerve conduction studies and electromyography can aid in the diagnosis of peripheral nervous system disease. The author reviews various techniques used during electromyography and nerve conduction studies. He reviews briefly peripheral nerve and muscle neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. The author defines terms used in nerve conduction studies and electromyography and relates terminology to the underlying pathophysiology and histopathology. He also reviews briefly typical nerve conduction and ...

  2. Pain and pain-related interference in adults with lower-limb amputation: Comparison of knee-disarticulation, transtibial, and transfemoral surgical sites

    OpenAIRE

    Behr, James; Friedly, Janna; Molton, Ivan; Morgenroth, David; Jensen, Mark P.; Smith, Douglas G.

    2009-01-01

    Pain and pain-related interference with physical function have not been thoroughly studied in individuals who have undergone knee-disarticulation amputations. The principal aim of this study was to determine whether individuals with knee-disarticulation amputations have worse pain and pain-related interference with physical function than do individuals with transtibial or transfemoral amputations. We analyzed cross-sectional survey data provided by 42 adults with lower-limb amputations. These...

  3. [Biophysics of nerve excitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kol'e, O R; Maksimov, G V

    2010-01-01

    The studies testifying to the presence of the interrelation between the physiological functions of the organism and physical and chemical processes in nerves are discussed. Changes in some physical and chemical parameters observed both upon elicited rhythmic exaltation of nerves and during the spontaneous rhythmic activity of neurons are analyzed. Upon rhythmic exaltation, a complex of physical and chemical processes is triggered, and reversible structural and metabolic rearrangements at the subcellular and molecular levels occur that do not take place during the generation of a single action potential. Thus, only in conditions of rhythmic exaltation of a nerve, it is possible to reveal those processes that provide exaltation of nerves in the organism. The future possibilities of the investigations combining the biophysical and physiological approaches are substantiated. Characteristic changes in physicochemical parameters are observed in nerves during the generation of a series of action potentials of different frequency and duration ("frequency dependence") under normal physiological conditions, as well as in extreme situations and in nerve pathology. The structural and metabolic rearrangements are directly related to the mode of rhythmic exaltation and proceed both in the course of rhythmic exaltation and after its termination. Participation and the basic components of the nervous fulcrum (an axon, Shwan cell, myelin, subcellular organelles) in the realization of rhythmic exaltation is shown. In the coordination of all processes involved in rhythmic exaltation, the main role is played by the systems of redistribution and transport of intercellular and endocellular calcium. The idea is put forward that myelin of nerve fibers is not only an isolator, but also an "intercellular depot" of calcium and participates in the redistribution of different ions. Thus, the rhythmic excitation is of great importance in the realization of some physiological functions, the

  4. Identification of trunk and pelvis movement compensations in patients with transtibial amputation using angular momentum separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Brecca M; Murray, Amanda M; Christiansen, Cory L; Davidson, Bradley S

    2016-03-01

    Patients with unilateral dysvascular transtibial amputation (TTA) have a higher risk of developing low back pain than their healthy counterparts, which may be related to movement compensations used in the absence of ankle function. Assessing components of segmental angular momentum provides a unique framework to identify and interpret these movement compensations alongside traditional observational analyses. Angular momentum separation indicates two components of total angular momentum: (1) transfer momentum and (2) rotational momentum. The objective of this investigation was to assess movement compensations in patients with dysvascular TTA, patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), and healthy controls (HC) by examining patterns of generating and arresting trunk and pelvis segmental angular momenta during gait. We hypothesized that all groups would demonstrate similar patterns of generating/arresting total momentum and transfer momentum in the trunk and pelvis in reference to the groups (patients with DM and HC). We also hypothesized that patients with amputation would demonstrate different (larger) patterns of generating/arresting rotational angular momentum in the trunk. Patients with amputation demonstrated differences in trunk and pelvis transfer angular momentum in the sagittal and transverse planes in comparison to the reference groups, which indicates postural compensations adopted during walking. However, patients with amputation demonstrated larger patterns of generating and arresting of trunk and pelvis rotational angular momentum in comparison to the reference groups. These segmental rotational angular momentum patterns correspond with high eccentric muscle demands needed to arrest the angular momentum, and may lead to consequential long-term effects such as low back pain. PMID:26979898

  5. Hindquarter amputation: is it still needed and what are the outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimer, R J; Chandrasekar, C R; Carter, S R; Abudu, A; Tillman, R M; Jeys, L

    2013-01-01

    A total of 157 hindquarter amputations were carried out in our institution during the last 30 years. We have investigated the reasons why this procedure is still required and the outcome. This operation was used as treatment for 13% of all pelvic bone sarcomas. It was curative in 140 and palliative in 17, usually to relieve pain. There were 90 primary procedures (57%) with the remaining 67 following the failure of previous operations to control the disease locally. The indication for amputation in primary disease was for large tumours for which limb-salvage surgery was no longer feasible. The peri-operative mortality was 1.3% (n = 2) and major complications of wound healing or infection arose in 71 (45%) patients. The survival at five years after hindquarter amputation with the intent to cure was 45%, and at ten years 38%. Local recurrence occurred in 23 patients (15%). Phantom pain was a significant problem, and only 20% used their prosthesis regularly. Functional scores were a mean of 57%. With careful patient selection the oncological results and functional outcomes of hindquarter amputation justify its continued use. PMID:23307686

  6. Computed tomography in low-back-pain after femur-amputation for osteogenic sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following amputation of a lower extremity for osteogenic sarcoma, the lumbar muscles receive an asymmetric strain. This predisposes to low-back-pain. When this occurs, tumour-recurrence must be excluded. This report demonstrates the usefulness of high-resolution computer tomography (CT) in this clinical situation. (orig.)

  7. Case 2: amputation site and infected toe on the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Severe infection resulted in the amputation of one toe and surgical debridement of necrotic tissue on another toe in the same diabetic foot. The postoperative wounds healed quickly and uneventfully following use of octenilin Wound Gel and a foam dressing. PMID:26949846

  8. Taking Care of Your New Arm or Leg After an Amputation

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-02-18

    This podcast provides health information on taking care of a new arm or leg after an amputation.  Created: 2/18/2010 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disability, Disability and Health Program.   Date Released: 2/18/2010.

  9. [Amputation in low-income countries: particularities in epidmiological features and management practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisseriex, H; Rogez, D; Thomas, M; Truffaut, S; Compere, S; Mercier, H; Dochez, F; Lapeyre, E; Thefenne, L

    2011-12-01

    The epidemiological features and management practices associated with amputation in low-income countries, generally synonymous with the tropics, are different from those observed in Western countries. Unlike developed countries, amputation most frequently involves traumatic injury in young active people. However, Westernization of the lifestyle is leading to an increasing number of cases involving diabetes and atherosclerotic disease. In the developing world, leprosy and Buruli ulcer are still significant etiologic factors for amputation. In war-torn countries, use of antipersonnel landmines is another major cause of amputation with characteristic features. Management of amputees in the developing world is hindered by the lack of facilities for rehabilitation and prosthetic fitting. Many international organizations are supporting national programs to develop such facilities. In addition to being affordable, prosthetics and orthotics must be adapted to the living conditions of a mostly rural amputee population, i.e., heat, humidity, and farm work. The rehabilitation process must be part of a global handicap policy aimed at changing attitudes about disability and reintegrating amputees both socially and professionally. PMID:22393622

  10. Decrease in (Major Amputations in Diabetics: A Secondary Data Analysis by AOK Rheinland/Hamburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie May

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. In two German regions with 11.1 million inhabitants, 6 networks for specialized treatment of DFS were implemented until 2008. Data provided for accounting purposes was analysed in order to determine changes in the rate of diabetics requiring amputations in the years before and after the implementation. Method. Data covering 2.9 million people insured by the largest insurance company between 2007 and 2013 was analysed by the use of log-linear Poisson regression adjusted for age, gender and region. Results. The rate of diabetics needing major amputations fell significantly by 9.5% per year (p<0.0001 from 217 to 126 of 100,000 patients per year. The rate of diabetics needing amputations of any kind fell from 504 to 419 of 100,000 patients per year (p=0.0038. Discussion. The networks integrate health care providers in an organised system of shared care. They educate members of the medical community and the general public. At the same time, a more general disease management program for people with diabetes was implemented, which may also have contributed to this decrease. At the end of the observation period, the rate of diabetics requiring amputations was still high. For this reason, further expansion of organised specialized care is urgently needed.

  11. Auto-amputated Ovarian Cyst with Compression Sequelae: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Bilal Mirza

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian  cysts  contribute  a  major  share  of  cystic  lesions in  fetal  life. Quite often, these cysts are benign and resolve spontaneously. Occasionally, these cysts can twist, resulting in ovarian loss. We report a case of auto-amputated ovarian cyst presetting with intestinal obstruction.

  12. Instrumented Measurement of Balance and Postural Control in Individuals with Lower Limb Amputation: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakaran, Prasath; Johnson, Gillian M.; Sullivan, S. John; Nitz, Jennifer C.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of balance and postural performance that underpins activities of daily living is important in the rehabilitation of individuals with a lower limb amputation (LLA), and there are a number of methods and strategies available for this purpose. To provide an evidence-based choice of approach, this review aims to critically review the tasks…

  13. Resilience in patients with amputation because of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodde, Marlies I.; Schrier, Ernst; Krans, Hilde K.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although controversial, an amputation for longstanding and therapy-resistant Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I (CRPS-I) may improve quality of life and pain intensity. Resilience, the way people deal with adversity in a positive way may be related to these positive outcomes. This study

  14. Total hip arthroplasty in a patient with arthrogryphosis and an ipsilateral above knee amputation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leonard, Michael

    2010-10-01

    The authors present the case of a young man with arthrogryphosis multiplex congenita and an above knee amputation who underwent an ipsilateral total hip replacement. The unique aspects of the case and technical difficulties are highlighted. Follow-up at five years revealed an excellent clinical and radiological outcome.

  15. Sequential compression biomechanical device versus primary amputation in patients with critical limb ischemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tawfick, Wael A

    2013-10-01

    Introduction: Patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI), who are unsuitable for intervention, face the consequence of primary amputation. Sequential compression biomechanical device (SCBD) therapy provides a limb salvage option for these patients. Objectives: To assess the outcome of SCBD in patients with severe CLI who are unsuitable for revascularization. Primary end points were limb salvage and 30-day mortality. Methods: From 2005 to 2012, 189 patients with severe CLI were not suitable for revascularization. In all, 171 joined the SCBD program. We match controlled 75 primary amputations. Results: All patients were Rutherford category 4 or higher. Sustained clinical improvement was 68% at 1 year. Mean toe pressure increased from 19.9 to 35.42 mm Hg, P < .0001. Mean popliteal flow increased from 35.44 to 55.91 cm\\/sec, P < .0001. The 30-day mortality was 0.6%. Limb salvage was 94% at 5 years. Freedom from major adverse clinical events was 62.5%. All-cause survival was 69%. Median cost of managing a primary amputation patient is €29 815 compared to €3985 for SCBD. We treated 171 patients with artassist at a cost of €681 965. However, primary amputation for 75 patients cost €2 236 125. Conclusion: The SCBD therapy is a cost-effective and clinically effective solution in patients with CLI having no option of revascularization. It provides adequate limb salvage while providing relief of rest pain without any intervention.

  16. Wound healing in above-knee amputations in relation to skin perfusion pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, P; Dovey, H; Lassen, N A

    1979-01-01

    In 59 above-knee amputations healing of the stumps was correlated with the local skin perfusion pressure (SPP) measured preoperatively as the external pressure required to stop isotope washout using 1318-- or 125I--antipyrine mixed with histamine. Out of the 11 cases with an SPP below 30 mmHg no...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in optic nerve lesions with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the optic nerve was performed in 10 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) using short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) pulse sequences, and the results were compared with the visual evoked potentials (VEP). The 10 patients had optic neuritis in the chronic or remitting phase together with additional symptoms or signs allowing a diagnosis of clinically definite or probable MS. Sixteen optic nerves were clinically affected and 4 were unaffected. MRI was performed using a 0.5 tesla supeconducting unit, and multiple continuous 5 mm coronal and axial STIR images were obtained. A lesion was judged to be present if a focal or diffuse area of increased signal intensity was detectd in the optic nerve. In VEP, a delay in peak latency or no P 100 component was judged to be abnormal. With regard to the clinically affected optic nerves, MRI revealed a region of increased signal intensity in 14/16 (88%) and the VEP was abnormal in 16/16 (100%). In the clinically unaffected optic nerves, MRI revealed an increased signal intensity in 2/4 (50%). One of these nerves had an abnormal VEP and the other had a VEP latency at the upper limit of normal. The VEP was abnormal in 1/4 (25%). In the clinically affected optic nerves, the degree of loss of visual acuity was not associated with the longitudinal extent of the lesions shown by MRI. The mean length was 17.5 mm in optic nerves with a slight disturbance of visual acuity and 15.0 mm in nerves with severe visual loss. MRI using STIR pulse sequences was found to be almost as sensitive as VEP in detecting both clinically affected and unaffected optic nerve lesions in patients with MS, and was useful in visualizing the location or size of the lesions. (author)

  18. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  19. Salvage versus amputation: Utility of mangled extremity severity score in severely injured lower limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical utility of Mangled extremity severity score (MESS in severely injured lower limbs. Materials and Methods: Retrospectively 25 and prospectively 36 lower limbs in 58 patients with high-energy injuries were evaluated with the use of MESS, to assist in the decision-making process for the care of patients with such injuries. Difference between the mean MESS scores for amputated and salvaged limbs was analyzed. Results: In the retrospective study 4.65 (4.65 ± 1.32 was the mean score for the salvaged limbs and 8.80 (8.8 ± 1.4 for the amputated limbs. In the prospective study 4.53 (4.53 ± 2.44 was the mean score for the salvaged limbs and 8.83 (8.83 ± 2.34 for the amputated limbs. There was a significant difference in the mean scores for salvaged and amputated limbs. Retrospective 21 (84% and prospective 29 (80.5% limbs remained in the salvage pathway six months after the injury. Conclusion: MESS could predict amputation of severely injured lower limbs, having score of equal or more than 7 with 91% sensitivity and 98% specificity. There was a significant difference in the mean MESS scores in the prospective study (n=36, 4.53 (4.53 ± 2.44 in thirty salvaged limbs (83.33% and 8.83 (8.83 ± 2.34 in six amputated limbs (16.66% with a P -value 0.002 ( P -value < 0.01. Similarly there was a significant difference in the mean MESS score in the retrospective study (n=25, 4.65 (4.65 ± 1.32 in twenty salvaged limbs (80% and 8.80 (8.8 ± 1.4 in five amputated limbs (20% with a P -value 0.00005 ( P -value < 0.01. MESS is a simple and relatively easy and readily available scoring system which can help the surgeon to decide the fate of the lower extremity with a high-energy injury.

  20. Proximal major limb amputations – a retrospective analysis of 45 oncological cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goertz Ole

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proximal major limb amputations due to malignant tumors have become rare but are still a valuable treatment option in palliation and in some cases can even cure. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse outcome in those patients, including the postoperative course, survival, pain, quality of life, and prosthesis usage. Methods Data of 45 consecutive patients was acquired from patient's charts and contact to patients, and general practitioners. Patients with interscapulothoracic amputation (n = 14, shoulder disarticulation (n = 13, hemipelvectomy (n = 3 or hip disarticulation (n = 15 were included. Results The rate of proximal major limb amputations in patients treated for sarcoma was 2.3% (37 out of 1597. Survival for all patients was 42.9% after one year and 12.7% after five years. Survival was significantly better in patients with complete tumor resections. Postoperative chemotherapy and radiation did not prolong survival. Eighteen percent of the patients with malignant disease developed local recurrence. In 44%, postoperative complications were observed. Different modalities of postoperative pain management and the site of the amputation had no significant influence on long-term pain assessment and quality of life. Eighty-seven percent suffered from phantom pain, 15.6% considered their quality of life worse than before the operation. Thirty-two percent of the patients who received a prosthesis used it regularly. Conclusion Proximal major limb amputations severely interfere with patients' body function and are the last, albeit valuable, option within the treatment concept of extremity malignancies or severe infections. Besides short survival, high complication rates, and postoperative pain, patients' quality of life can be improved for the time they have remaining.

  1. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Diabetic Lower Limb Amputation: A Clinic-Based Case Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Beverly T.; Vangaveti, Venkat N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of and risk factors for lower limb amputation in a specialist foot clinic-based setting. Methods. A retrospective quantitative study was conducted, using clinical and biochemical profiles of diabetic foot patients attending the High Risk Foot Clinic at The Townsville Hospital, Australia, between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2013. Results. The total study sample included 129 subjects, comprising 81 males and 48 females with M : F ratio of 1.7 : 1. Twenty-three subjects were Indigenous Australians, representing 17.8% of the study population. The average age of the cohort was 63.4 years ± 14.1 years [CI 90.98–65.89]. Lower limb amputation was identified as a common and significant outcome (n = 44), occurring in 34.1%, more commonly amongst the Indigenous Australians (56.5% versus 29.2%; p = 0.94, OR 0.94). Risk factors most closely associated with amputation included diabetic retinopathy (p = 0.00, OR 4.4), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery (p = 0.01, OR 4.1), Charcot's arthropathy (p = 0.01, OR 2.9), and Indigenous ethnicity (p = 0.01, OR 3.4). Although average serum creatinine, corrected calcium, and glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (Hba1c) levels were higher amongst amputees they were statistically insignificant. Conclusions. Lower limb amputation is a common outcome and linked to ethnicity and neurovascular diabetic complications amongst subjects with diabetic foot ulcer. Further research is needed to identify why risk of lower limb amputation seems to differ according to ethnicity.

  2. European Federation of Neurological Societies Peripheral Nerve Society guideline on management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: report of a joint task force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society (Reprinted from Journal of the Peripheral Nervous System, vol 10, pg 220-228, 2005)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.C. Hughes; P. Bouche; D.R. Cornblath; E. Evers; R.D.M. Hadden; A. Hahn; I. Illa; C.L. Koski; J.M. Leger; E. Nobile-Orazio; J. Pollard; C. Sommer; P. van den Bergh; P.A. van Doorn; I.N. van Schaik; M.M. Mehndiratta; R. Hughes; J.B. Winer; R. de Haan; M. Vermeulen; P. Agarwal

    2006-01-01

    Numerous sets of diagnostic criteria have sought to define chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and randomized trials and systematic reviews of treatment have been published. The objective is to prepare consensus guidelines on the definition, investigation and treatment o

  3. Assessment of gait stability, harmony, and symmetry in subjects with lower-limb amputation evaluated by trunk accelerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Iosa, PhD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of upper-body accelerations is a promising and simple technique for quantitatively assessing some general features of gait such as stability, harmony, and symmetry. Despite the growing literature on elderly healthy populations and neurological patients, few studies have used accelerometry to investigate these features in subjects with lower-limb amputation. We enrolled four groups of subjects: subjects with transfemoral amputation who walked with a locked knee prosthesis, subjects with transfemoral amputation who walked with an unlocked knee prosthesis, subjects with transtibial amputation, and age-matched nondisabled subjects. We found statistically significant differences for stability (p < 0.001, harmony (p < 0.001, and symmetry (p < 0.001 of walking, with general trends following the noted order of subjects, but with the lowest laterolateral harmony in subjects with transtibial amputation. This study is the first to investigate upper-body acceleration of subjects with unilateral lower-limb amputation during walking who were evaluated upon dismissal from a rehabilitation hospital; it is also the first study to differentiate the sample in terms of level of amputation and type of prosthesis used.

  4. Cranial nerve palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  5. Nerve Transfers in Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ida K

    2016-05-01

    Hand and upper extremity function is instrumental to basic activities of daily living and level of independence in cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Nerve transfer surgery is a novel and alternate approach for restoring function in SCI. This article discusses the biologic basis of nerve transfers in SCI, patient evaluation, management, and surgical approaches. Although the application of this technique is not new; recent case reports and case series in the literature have increased interest in this field. The challenges are to improve function, achieve maximal gains in function, avoid complications, and to primum non nocere. PMID:27094894

  6. Neuromuscular Ultrasound of Cranial Nerves

    OpenAIRE

    Tawfik, Eman A.; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few re...

  7. High division of sciatic nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Tripti Shrivastava; Lalit Garg; B. K. Mishra; Neeta Chhabra

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Sciatic nerve is the largest and thickest nerve in the human body with a long course in the inferior extremity. It divides into tibial and common peroneal nerves which can occur at any level from the sacral plexus to the inferior part of the popliteal space. Sciatic nerve variations are relatively common. These variations may contribute to clinical conditions ex sciatica, coccygodynia and piriformis syndrome and have important clinical implications in anaesthesiology, neurolog...

  8. Neurostimulation for chronic cluster headache

    OpenAIRE

    Wolter, Tilman; Kaube, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Neurostimulation techniques for the treatment of primary headache syndromes, particularly of chronic cluster headache, have received much interest in recent years. Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) has yielded favourable clinical results and, despite the limited numbers of published cases, is becoming a routine treatment for refractory chronic cluster headache in specialized centres. Meanwhile, other promising techniques such as spinal cord stimulation (SCS) or sphenopalate ganglion stimulati...

  9. Progress of peripheral nerve repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈峥嵘

    2002-01-01

    Study on repair of peripheral nerve injury has been proceeding over a long period of time. With the use of microsurgery technique since 1960s,the quality of nerve repair has been greatly improved. In the past 40 years, with the continuous increase of surgical repair methods, more progress has been made on the basic research of peripheral nerve repair.

  10. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  11. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T;

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta...

  12. Chronic Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infections that cause chronic diarrhea be prevented? Chronic Diarrhea What is chronic diarrhea? Diarrhea that lasts for more than 2-4 ... represent a life-threatening illness. What causes chronic diarrhea? Chronic diarrhea has many different causes; these causes ...

  13. Motivation, effort and life circumstances as predictors of foot ulcers and amputations in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Christine; Guassora, Ann Dorrit; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen;

    2014-01-01

    population and health registers. The associations between patient motivation, effort and life circumstances and foot ulcer prevalence 6 years after diabetes diagnosis and the incidence of amputation in the following 13 years were analysed using odds ratios from logistic regression and hazard ratios from Cox...... of the patients' own effort was associated with amputation (hazard ratio 7.12, 95% CI 3.40-14.92). When general practitioners assessed the influence of patients' life circumstances as 'poor' vs 'good', the amputation incidence increased (hazard ratio 2.97, 95% CI 1.22-7.24). 'Poor' vs 'very good' patient...... motivation was also associated with a higher amputation incidence (hazard ratio 7.57, 95% CI 2.43-23.57), although not in fully adjusted models. CONCLUSIONS: General practitioners' existing knowledge of patients' life circumstances, motivation and effort in diabetes management should be included in treatment...

  14. Contribution of Near-InfraRed Spectroscopy (NIRS) to the Evaluation of Healing After Amputation of the Leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-14

    A Stabilized Definitive Prosthesis (Procedure 1); Definitive Prosthesis With a Contact Socket (Procedure 1); Patients in the Initial Phase (Temporary Prosthesis, Rehabilitation) Following Unilateral Post- Transtibial Amputation (Procedure 2)

  15. 急慢性迷走神经刺激对大鼠海洛因复吸行为的影响及作用机制%Effect and mechanism of acute and chronic vagus nerve stimulation on heroin relapse in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱华强; 于静; 陈为升; 唐甩恩; 符丹; 刘惠芬; 周文华

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨急慢性迷走神经刺激(VNS)对大鼠海洛因复吸行为可能的干预作用及机制.方法:SD大鼠每天进行4h的海洛因自身给药训练,持续14d,建立具有强迫性觅药和给药特征的自身给药模型.随后所有大鼠植入VNS电极,恢复后进行10 d的海洛因觅药行为消退训练,期间分组给予急性VNS、慢性VNS或假刺激.消退结束后测定各组大鼠条件性线索诱导下的海洛因觅药行为的恢复(即海洛因复吸行为).免疫荧光法检测中枢核团c-Fos的表达水平.结果:海洛因复吸行为测定结果显示,与假刺激对照组比较,急性VNS组和慢性VNS组的有效鼻触数均明显降低(P<0.01).免疫荧光的结果显示,与对照组比较,急性VNS组(P<0.05)和慢性VNS组(P<0.01)中央杏仁核(Ce)的c-Fos表达水平均明显降低,而边缘下区(IL)的c-Fos表达水平均明显升高(P<0.05).结论:急慢性VNS均能够显著抑制大鼠的海洛因复吸行为,其机制可能与Ce和IL脑区神经元激活的改变有关.%AIM: To investigate the therapeutic effect of vagus nerve stimulation ( VNS) on heroin relapse in rats and its possible mechanism. METHODS: The SD rats were trained to self-administer heroin by nose-poking in a daily 4 hours session for consecutive 14 days, to establish an animal model of compulsive drug-seeking and drug-taking. The electrode was implanted into the left vagus nerve and followed by several days recovery, all rats were then trained to 10 daily extinction session and divided into 3 groups: sham control, acute VNS and chronic VNS. The rats in the chronic VNS group were given VNS 2 hours before all extinction and relapse test session, while the rats in the acute VNS group were given VNS 2 hours only before relapse test session. Cue-induced heroin relapse test were measured 24 hours after last extinction session. After relapse testing, c-Fos levels in brain regions of rats were measured by immuno- fluorescence. RESULTS

  16. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Foer, Bert [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: bert.defoer@GZA.be; Kenis, Christoph [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: christophkenis@hotmail.com; Van Melkebeke, Deborah [Department of Neurology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Deborah.vanmelkebeke@Ugent.be; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: jphver@yahoo.com; Somers, Thomas [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Thomas.somers@GZA.be; Pouillon, Marc [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: marc.pouillon@GZA.be; Offeciers, Erwin [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Erwin.offeciers@GZA.be; Casselman, Jan W. [Department of Radiology, AZ Sint-Jan AV Hospital, Ruddershove 10, Bruges (Belgium); Consultant Radiologist, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Academic Consultent, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: jan.casselman@azbrugge.be

    2010-05-15

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  17. Treatment of Chronic Phantom Limb Pain Using a Trauma-Focused Psychological Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Roos, C; Veenstra, AC; Jongh, A. de; den Hollander-Gijsman, ME; van der Wee, NJA; Zitman, FG; van Rood, YR

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic phantom limb pain (PLP) is a disabling chronic pain syndrome for which regular pain treatment is seldom effective. Pain memories resulting from long-lasting preamputation pain or pain flashbacks, which are part of a traumatic memory, are reported to be powerful elicitors of PLP.OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether a psychological treatment directed at processing the emotional and somatosensory memories associated with amputation reduces PLP.METHODS: Ten consecutive participan...

  18. Peripheral nerve injuries resulting from common surgical procedures in the lower portion of the abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulz, P; Pfeiffer, K M

    1982-03-01

    Twenty-three patients had a painful ilioinguinal and/or iliohypogastric nerve entrapment syndrome following common surgical procedures in the lower portion of the abdomen (appendectomy, repair of inguinal hernia, and gynecologic procedures through transverse incision). The diagnostic triad of nerve entrapment after operation comprises (1) typical burning or lancinating pain near the incision that radiates to the area supplied by the nerve, (2) clear evidence of impaired sensory perception of the nerve, and (3) pain relieved by infiltration with anesthetic for local effects at the site where the two nerves leave the internal oblique muscle. Surgical repair of the scar with resection of the compromised nerve is the most effective treatment. Sixteen patients became symptom free after neurectomy, seven still suffer chronic pain in the scar. PMID:7065874

  19. Tactile, thermal, and electrical thresholds in patients with and without phantom limb pain after traumatic lower limb amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Melton DH; Li S

    2015-01-01

    Shengai Li,1,2 Danielle H Melton,1,2 Sheng Li1,2 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA; 2Neurorehabilitation Research Laboratory, TIRR Memorial Hermann Research Center, Houston, TX, USA Purpose: To examine whether there is central sensitization in patients with phantom limb pain (PLP) after traumatic limb amputation. Methods: Seventeen patients after unilateral lower limb amputation secondary to trauma were...

  20. Disappearance of “phantom limb” and amputated arm usage during dreaming in REM sleep behaviour disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Vetrugno, Roberto; Arnulf, Isabelle; Montagna, Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    Limb amputation is followed, in approximately 90% of patients, by “phantom limb” sensations during wakefulness. When amputated patients dream, however, the phantom limb may be present all the time, part of the time, intermittently or not at all. Such dreaming experiences in amputees have usually been obtained only retrospectively in the morning and, moreover, dreaming is normally associated with muscular atonia so the motor counterpart of the phantom limb experience cannot be observed directl...

  1. PERCEIVED INDEPENDENCE AND LIMITATIONS IN RISING AND SITTING DOWN AFTER REHABILITATION FOR A LOWER-LIMB AMPUTATION

    OpenAIRE

    de Laat, Fred A.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Rommers, Gerardus M.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Roorda, Leo D

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study perceived independence in rising and perceived limitations in rising and sitting down in persons after a lower-limb amputation and the relationship of these perceptions with personal and clinical characteristics. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects/patients: Persons with a lower-limb amputation wearing a prosthesis (n=172). Methods: Perceived independence in rising was assessed with the Locomotor Capabilities Index. Limitations in rising and sitting down were assessed ...

  2. Canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling control the regeneration of amputated rodent vibrissae follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yan-Ping; Huang, Keng; Xu, Yan-Min; Chen, Xian-Cai; Li, Hai-Hong; Cai, Bo-Zhi; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Huan; Li, Yu; Lin, Chang-Min

    2016-02-01

    Although mammals are notoriously poor at regeneration compared with many lower-order species, the hair follicle, particular to mammals, is capable of regeneration following partial amputation. The detailed internal mechanism of this phenomenon is still unclear. Development and regrowth of the hair follicle depends on dermal-epidermal interaction within the hair follicle. Previous studies have shown that Wnt/β-catenin, Shh, Bmp, PDGF, TGF and Notch signals all take part in the development and growth of the hair follicle, and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling additionally plays an indispensable role in hair follicle morphogenesis and regrowth. In this study, we investigated the localization, as well as, protein levels of Wnt/β-catenin signaling molecules during amputated whisker follicle regeneration. PMID:26742765

  3. Amputees by choice: body integrity identity disorder and the ethics of amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, Tim; Levy, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Should surgeons be permitted to amputate healthy limbs if patients request such operations? We argue that if such patients are experiencing significant distress as a consequence of the rare psychological disorder named Body Integrity Identity Disorder (BIID), such operations might be permissible. We examine rival accounts of the origins of the desire for healthy limb amputations and argue that none are as plausible as the BIID hypothesis. We then turn to the moral arguments against such operations, and argue that on the evidence available, none is compelling. BIID sufferers meet reasonable standards for rationality and autonomy: so as long as no other effective treatment for their disorder is available, surgeons ought to be allowed to accede to their requests. PMID:15948330

  4. Dynamic stability of running: The effects of speed and leg amputations on the maximal Lyapunov exponent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we study dynamic stability during running, focusing on the effects of speed, and the use of a leg prosthesis. We compute and compare the maximal Lyapunov exponents of kinematic time-series data from subjects with and without unilateral transtibial amputations running at a wide range of speeds. We find that the dynamics of the affected leg with the running-specific prosthesis are less stable than the dynamics of the unaffected leg and also less stable than the biological legs of the non-amputee runners. Surprisingly, we find that the center-of-mass dynamics of runners with two intact biological legs are slightly less stable than those of runners with amputations. Our results suggest that while leg asymmetries may be associated with instability, runners may compensate for this effect by increased control of their center-of-mass dynamics

  5. Crossover replantation after bilateral traumatic lower limb amputations: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Jun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Replantation of a limb to the contralateral stump after bilateral traumatic amputations is rare. To the best of our knowledge, there are only a few reports of crossover lower limb replantation in the literature. Case presentation We treated a 37-year-old Chinese woman with bilateral lower limb crush injuries sustained in a traffic accident. Her lower limb injuries were at different anatomic levels. We performed emergency bilateral amputations followed by crossover replantation. Five years later, the woman had recovered well, and had perfect movement and stability in her replanted leg. After reviewing the literature, we thought that presentation of our patient’s case might provide useful information for clinicians. Conclusions Crossover replantation should be considered when evaluating a patient with bilateral lower limb injuries, thus allowing the patient to touch the ground and stand using their own foot.

  6. Dynamic stability of running: The effects of speed and leg amputations on the maximal Lyapunov exponent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Look, Nicole [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Arellano, Christopher J.; Grabowski, Alena M.; Kram, Rodger [Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); McDermott, William J. [The Orthopedic Specialty Hospital, Murray, Utah 84107 (United States); Bradley, Elizabeth [Department of Computer Science, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA and Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, we study dynamic stability during running, focusing on the effects of speed, and the use of a leg prosthesis. We compute and compare the maximal Lyapunov exponents of kinematic time-series data from subjects with and without unilateral transtibial amputations running at a wide range of speeds. We find that the dynamics of the affected leg with the running-specific prosthesis are less stable than the dynamics of the unaffected leg and also less stable than the biological legs of the non-amputee runners. Surprisingly, we find that the center-of-mass dynamics of runners with two intact biological legs are slightly less stable than those of runners with amputations. Our results suggest that while leg asymmetries may be associated with instability, runners may compensate for this effect by increased control of their center-of-mass dynamics.

  7. Secondary reconstruction of below knee amputation stump with free anterolateral thigh flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadam Dinesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Below knee stump preservation reduces ambulatory energy expenditure and improves the quality of life. Reconstruction of soft tissue loss around the stump is a challenging task. Below knee stump reconstruction demands stable skin with sufficient soft tissue to allow weigh bearing. Microsurgical tissue transfer is increasingly being used as a salvage option. Anterolateral thigh flap with additional vastus lateralis muscle provides extra cushioning effect. We report two cases of amputation below knee successfully salvaged. The anterolteral flap with abundant tissue and stable skin offers a reliable option for cover. Two patients with below knee amputation were reconstructed secondarily. After 6 to 20 months of follow -up, stumps showed no signs of pressure effects. Patients are able to bear 50-70 hours of weight per week.

  8. Progesterone and peripheral nerve regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Fan; Haichao Li; Yuwei Wang; Yanglin Zheng; Lianjun Jia; Zhihui Wang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of progesterone on peripheral nerve regeneration.DATA SOURCES: An online search of Medline and OVID databases was under taken to identify articles about progesterone and peripheral nerve regeneration published in English between January 1990 and June 2004 by using the keywords of "peripheral nerve, injury, progesterone, regeneration".STUDY SELECTION: The data were primarily screened, those correlated with progesterone and peripheral nerve regeneration were involved, and their original articles were further searched, the repetitive studies or reviews were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 59 articles about progesterone and peripheral nerve regeneration were collected, and 26 of them were involved, the other 33 excluded ones were the repetitive studies or reviews.DATA SYNTHESIS: Recent researches found that certain amount of progesterone could be synthetized in peripheral nervous system, and the expression of progesterone receptor could be found in sensory neurons and Schwann cells. After combined with the receptor, endogenous and exogenous progesterone can accelerate the formation of peripheral nerve myelin sheath, also promote the axonal regeneration.CONCLUSION: Progesterone plays a role in protecting neurons, increasing the sensitivity of nerve tissue to nerve growth factor, and accelerating regeneration of nerve in peripheral nerve regeneration, which provides theoretical references for the treatment of demyelinated disease and nerve injury, as well as the prevention of neuroma, especially that the in vivo level of progesterone should be considered for the elderly people accompanied by neuropathy and patients with congenital luteal phase defect, which is of positive significance in guiding the treatment.

  9. Plantar rotational flap technique for panmetatarsal head resection and transmetatarsal amputation: a revision approach for second metatarsal head transfer ulcers in patients with previous partial first ray amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffeli, Troy J; Reinking, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Transfer ulcers beneath the second metatarsal head are common after diabetes-related partial first ray amputation. Subsequent osteomyelitis of the second ray can further complicate this difficult situation. We present 2 cases depicting our plantar rotational flap technique for revision surgery involving conversion to either panmetatarsal head resection or transmetatarsal amputation (TMA). These cases are presented to demonstrate our indications, procedure selection criteria, flap technique, operative pearls, and staging protocol. The goals of this surgical approach are to excise and close the plantar ulcer beneath the second metatarsal head, remove any infected bone, allow staged surgery if needed, remove all remaining metatarsal heads to decrease the likelihood of repeat transfer ulcers, preserve the toes when practical, avoid excessive shortening of the foot, avoid multiple longitudinal dorsal incisions, and create a functional and cosmetically appealing foot. The flap is equally suited for either panmetatarsal head resection or TMA. The decision to pursue panmetatarsal head resection versus TMA largely depends on the condition of the remaining toes. Involvement of osteomyelitis in the base of the second proximal phalanx, the soft tissue viability of the remaining toes, the presence of a preoperative digital deformity, and the likelihood that saving the lesser toes will be beneficial from a cosmetic or footwear standpoint are factors we consider when deciding between panmetatarsal head resection and TMA. Retrospective chart review identified prompt healing of the flap in both patients. Neither patient experienced recurrent ulcers or required subsequent surgery within the first 12 months postoperatively. PMID:23910736

  10. Conservative management of phantom-limb and amputation-stump pain.

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    The causes of pain in the amputation stump or in the so-called phantom limb are far from clear and a wide variety of methods of treatment have been used with varying degrees of success. Surgical techniques do not always give lasting relief and it is suggested that conservative methods such as vibration therapy and various forms of electrical stimulation may prove more helpful.

  11. Proximal major limb amputations – a retrospective analysis of 45 oncological cases

    OpenAIRE

    Goertz Ole; Langer Stefan; Steinstraesser Lars; Hauser Joerg; Khadra Ammar; Lehnhardt Marcus; Daigeler Adrien; Steinau Hans-Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Proximal major limb amputations due to malignant tumors have become rare but are still a valuable treatment option in palliation and in some cases can even cure. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse outcome in those patients, including the postoperative course, survival, pain, quality of life, and prosthesis usage. Methods Data of 45 consecutive patients was acquired from patient's charts and contact to patients, and general practitioners. Patients with inter...

  12. Diabetic foot infections: effective microorganisms and factors affecting the frequency of osteomyelitis and amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Sonmezer, Meliha Cagla; TULEK, Necla; Ozsoy, Metin; Erdinc, Fatma; Ertem, Gunay

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Diabetic foot infections are common reason for hospitalization and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. We aimed to evaluate the clinic features and predisposed causes of osteomyelitis and amputation of patients with diabetic foot infections. Methods. Patients with diabetic foot infections who admitted and hospitalized at Infection Diseases and Clinical Microbiology department between January 2012 and July 2014 were included. Osteomyelitis was evaluated using magnetic...

  13. Medical and Social Aspects of High Amputations in Patients with Obliterating Atherosclerosis of Lower Extremities

    OpenAIRE

    Gudz, I. M.; Hnatyshchak, A. I.

    2014-01-01

    Obliterating atherosclerosis of the lower extremities is one of the main causes of limb ischemia, that can result in high amputation of the lower limb (HALL). Despite the large number of publications on this subject, medical and social effects of HALL on the patients’ life are studied insufficiently. In some studies a significant impact of financial situation, the level of education, and accessibility of qualified vascular surgery care on the HALL index was stated. As this intervention is con...

  14. Genital self-amputation or the Klingsor syndrome: Successful non-microsurgical penile replantation

    OpenAIRE

    El Harrech, Y.; Abaka, N.; Ghoundale, O.; D Touiti

    2013-01-01

    Self-mutilations of the external genitals in psychiatric patients also known as Klingsor syndrome is a rare urologic trauma. Men with religious conflicts, low self-esteem, unresolved transsexual issues and feelings of guilt are the most vulnerable. This condition requires immediate surgical intervention. Currently replantation involves meticulous microsurgery and has become the primary method for managing these patients. In this paper, we report a case of self amputation of penis in a patient...

  15. Selective amputation of the pharynx identifies a FoxA-dependent regeneration program in planaria

    OpenAIRE

    Adler, Carolyn E.; Seidel, Chris W.; McKinney, Sean A.; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    eLife digest Some animals can regrow whole limbs or organs after amputation. Flatworms called planaria, for example, can regenerate their whole body from small pieces. This remarkable ability depends on neoblasts—a type of stem cell found in planaria that can detect damaged or lost organs, migrate to the site of damage, produce the required cells, and integrate into the remaining tissues. Researchers hope that studying these animals will reveal ways to use stem cells to regenerate injured lim...

  16. Auto-amputated Ovarian Cyst with Compression Sequelae: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Mirza

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian  cysts  contribute  a  major  share  of  cystic  lesions in  fetal  life. Quite often, these cysts are benign and resolve spontaneously. Occasionally, these cysts can twist, resulting in ovarian loss. We report a case of auto-amputated ovarian cyst presetting with intestinal obstruction.

  17. Ovarian torsion and amputation resulting in partially calcified, pedunculated cystic mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three children with torsion and amputation of the right ovary are presented. The detached ovary resulted in a cystic mass containing necrotic material and a solid, partially clacified mural node. The cysts were attached to the omentum, to the mesentery of the transverse colon, or to the lower edge of the liver by a long twisted pedicle containing thin-walled vascular spaces. The radiographic and sonographic findings were quite similar and clearly reflected the operative and pathologic changes. (orig.)

  18. Effect of traumatic brain injury among U.S. servicemembers with amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell J. Rauh, PhD, PT, MPH; Hilary J. Aralis, MS; Ted Melcer, PhD; Caroline A. Macera, PhD; Pinata Sessoms, PhD; Jamie Bartlett, PhD; Michael R. Galarneau, MS

    2013-01-01

    Servicemembers with combat-related limb loss often require substantial rehabilitative care. The prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI), which may impair cognitive and functional abilities, among servicemembers has increased. The primary objectives of this study were to determine the frequency of TBI among servicemembers with traumatic amputation and examine whether TBI status was associated with discharge to civilian status and medical and rehabilitative service use postamputation. U.S. s...

  19. Bionic ankle–foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Herr, Hugh M.; Grabowski, Alena M

    2011-01-01

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biolog...

  20. The utilization of a suture bridge construct for tibiofibular instability during transtibial amputation without distal bridge synostosis creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Louis R; Tintle, Scott M; D'Alleyrand, Jean-Claude G; Potter, Benjamin K

    2013-10-01

    Symptomatic distal tibiofibular instability is a known complication of trauma-related transtibial amputations. Overt proximal tibiofibular dislocations, which are easily recognized on routine radiographs, may occur concurrently with the traumatic injury or amputation. More commonly, however, the proximal tibiofibular joint remains structurally intact in the presence of distal instability due to the loss of the distal syndesmotic structures and damage to the interosseous membrane, resulting in fibular angulation and distal tibiofibular diastasis. Some authors have espoused treating this instability with the creation of a distal tibiofibular bridge synostosis (the so-called Ertl procedure or modifications there of) to prevent potentially painful discordant motion and to minimize the prominence of the residual distal fibula. Recent studies, however, have suggested an increase in complication and reoperation rates in transtibial amputations that received a bridge synostosis compared with standard transtibial amputations. Additionally, although there are several described techniques for bridge synostosis creation, most are dependent on having sufficient remaining fibula to construct the bone bridge without unnecessary shortening of the tibia; however, sufficient residual fibula is not always available after traumatic and trauma-related amputations. We propose a technique utilizing a suture bridge to restore tibiofibular stability when performing transtibial amputations in patients with proximal tibiofibular dislocations or distal diastasis, avoiding the potential need for a distal bridge synostosis. PMID:23429174

  1. Global trends in incidence of lower limb amputation: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Godlwana

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to compile a literature report on the global epidemiology of lower limb amputations. Specifically it aimed at capturing information on the incidence of traumatic and non-traumatic lowerlimb amputations throughout the world, to identify the etiology including diseases and lifestyle habits associated with lower limb amputees (LLA in boththe developed and the developing countries, to identify the demographiccharacteristics, age, sex, race, geographical location of the people undergoing LLA including the levels of amputation as pointed out by the literature. Aliterature search was conducted. Different keyword combinations were used togather as much literature on the subject as possible. The authors systemicallyreviewed literature from some parts of Europe, Asia, North and South America and South Africa. The data was analyzed and presented under various themes. The existing literature shows that diabetes is the leading cause of LLA and trauma accounts for the minority of these cases. The incidence of LLA can be predicted by gender, age, maritalstatus, level of education and socio-economic status. Information on LLA in South Africa is almost absent.

  2. Revisiting risks associated with mortality following initial transtibial or transfemoral amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara E. Bates, MD, MBA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study’s objective was to determine how treatment-, environmental-, and facility-level characteristics contribute to postdischarge mortality prediction. The study included 4,153 Veterans who underwent lower-limb amputation in Department of Veterans Affairs facilities during fiscal years 2003 and 2004. Veterans were followed 1 yr postamputation. A Cox regression identified characteristics associated with mortality risk after hospital discharge following amputation. Older age, higher amputation level, and more comorbidities increased mortality likelihood. Patients who had inpatient procedures for pulmonary and renal problems had higher hazards of postdischarge death than those who did not (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.16–3.77, and HR = 2.22, 95% CI = 1.80–2.74, respectively. Patients who had central nervous system procedures had higher hazards of death early postdischarge (HR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.60–3.11 at 0 d, but this association became insignificant by 180 d. Patients in a surgical intensive care unit (ICU, medical ICU, or medical bed section at the time of discharge were more likely to die than patients on a surgical bed section. Patients hospitalized in the Midwest were less likely to die early after discharge than patients in the Mountain Pacific region, but this regional effect became insignificant by 90 d. Adding treatment-, environmental-, and facility-level characteristics contributed additional information to a mortality risk model.

  3. Angiographic findings and need for amputation in high tension electrical injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because it is difficult to estimate the extent of deep tissue injury clinically, angiography was carried out in 28 patients with signs of damage from current flow through the body. Eight of the arteriograms showed normal extremities, 6 showed changes of small arteries, and 38 showed injury to the main arteries. In the latter group there were 24 total arterial occlusions, narrow irregular lumens in 10, and 4 had occlusion and distal refilling. Changes in the main arteries were most often seen near major joints where the internal body resistance as well as the density of the current are higher. Injury to the main arteries resulted in severe neuromuscular damage or amputation of the limb, whereas injury to small arteries resulted in little functional deficit. Of the 25 amputations 19 were at the level of the arterial occlusion. Spasmolytic drugs did not increase filling. We concluded that early angiography is valuable for the detection of deep injury and often indicates the level of adequate amputation or the need for immediate exploration. In some patients it indicated the necessity for arterial reconstruction. (au)

  4. Unani treatment and leech therapy saved the diabetic foot of a patient from amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, S M Arif

    2016-04-01

    Every 30 seconds, a lower limb amputation is carried out due to diabetes throughout the world. The mortality rate due to diabetic foot gangrene is just next to that of cancer. As tissue death cannot be reversed, surgical removal of the affected tissue (debridement) or amputation of the limb is the only treatment option left when gangrene has advanced. The present case study illustrates an option to treat poorly healing diabetic wounds with Unani medicine (blood purifier and deobstruent) besides hirudotherapy. The study was performed on a 60-year-old woman suffering from diabetic foot (on the left) grade 5 and facing the prospect of imminent amputation. The patient was having severe pain (80 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale) in the gangrenous foot and foul-smelling with necrosed areas. Wound dressing was done with unripe papaya as it has a very good role in clearing necrotising area and hirudotherapy was also used in poorly healing wounds. The pain score decreased to 0-10 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale within 20 days and no further pain relieving medication was required. Over a time interval of nearly 3·5 months, necrotic areas disappeared and the wound was completely healed. PMID:24809835

  5. [Basic principles and difficulties relating to rehabilitation in diabetic patients following amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindra, Martin; Věchtová, Bohuslava; Bielmeierová, Jana

    2015-06-01

    Vascular diseases as a result of diabetes mellitus are the most frequent indication for amputation in the Czech republic. Diabetic patients following amputation, unlike the other amputees, very frequently suffer multiple complications. These are both of general and local nature and pose a limitation to rehabilitation care as well as a prosthesis use. The main goal of therapeutic rehabilitation is the practice of locomotion with a prosthesis (artificial limb) and the patients full return to normal life. A team of closely cooperating specialists is involved. The rehabilitation care of amputees is divided into acute and aftercare. Within preoperative care we try to improve the patients physical and psychological condition. Following surgery we verticalize the patient as soon as possible depending on his/her possibilities and condition, we carry out breathing and vascular gymnastics and prevention of thromboembolic disease and we start the care of the stump. When the stump has been healed and shaped, the patient is provided with an artificial limb. The patients equipped with an artificial limb take a walking course where they learn how to handle the limb as well as walk indoors and outdoors and cope with common terrain unevenness.Key words: amputation - diabetes mellitus - walking with an artificial limb - prosthesis - lower limb prosthetics. PMID:26258981

  6. Wound healing in above-knee amputations in relation to skin perfusion pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 59 above-knee amputations healing of the stumps was correlated with the local skin perfusion pressure (SPP) measured preoperatively as the external pressure required to stop isotope washout using 132I--or 125I--antipyrine mixed with histamine. Out of the 11 cases with an SPP below 30 mmHg no less than nine (82 per cent) suffered severe wound complications. Out of the 48 cases with an SPP above 30 mmHg severe wound complications occurred in only four cases (8 per cent). The difference in wound complication rate is highly significant (P<0.01). The postoperative SPP measured on the stumps was on average only slightly and insignificantly higher than the preoperative values, explaining why the preoperative values related so closely to the postoperative clinical course. We conclude that the SPP can be used to predict ischaemic wound complications in above-knee amputations as has previously been shown to be the case in below-knee amputations. (author)

  7. Active dorsiflexing prostheses may reduce trip-related fall risk in people with transtibial amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah J. Rosenblatt, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available People with amputation are at increased risk of falling compared with age-matched, nondisabled individuals. This may partly reflect amputation-related changes to minimum toe clearance (MTC that could increase the incidence of trips and fall risk. This study determined the contribution of an active dorsiflexing prosthesis to MTC. We hypothesized that regardless of speed or incline the active dorsiflexion qualities of the ProprioFoot would significantly increase MTC and decrease the likelihood of tripping. Eight people with transtibial amputation walked on a treadmill with their current foot at two grades and three velocities, then repeated the protocol after 4 wk of accommodation with the ProprioFoot. A mixed-model, repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to compare MTC. Curves representing the likelihood of tripping were derived from the MTC distributions and a multiple regression was used to determine the relative contributions of hip, knee, and ankle angles to MTC. Regardless of condition, MTC was approximately 70% larger with the ProprioFoot (p < 0.001 and the likelihood of tripping was reduced. Regression analysis revealed that MTC with the ProprioFoot was sensitive to all three angles, with sensitivity of hip and ankle being greater. Overall, the ProprioFoot may increase user safety by decreasing the likelihood of tripping and thus the pursuant likelihood of a fall.

  8. Spontaneous Radial Nerve Palsy Subsequent to Non-Traumatic Neuroma

    OpenAIRE

    Adel Ebrahimpour; Shahram Nazerani; Reza Tavakoli Darestani; Salim Khani

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Spontaneous radial palsy is a not rare finding in hand clinics. The anatomy of the radial nerve renders it prone to pressure paralysis as often called “Saturday night palsy”. This problem is a transient nerve lesion and an acute one but the case presented here is very unusual in that it seems this entity can also occur as an acute on chronic situation with neuroma formation.Case Presentation: A 61 year-old man presented with the chief complaint of inability to extend the wrist a...

  9. Surgical fasciectomy of the trapezius muscle combined with neurolysis of the Spinal accessory nerve; results and long-term follow-up in 30 consecutive cases of refractory chronic whiplash syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman Michael; Champagne Lloyd P; Nystrom N Ake; Blix Elisabet

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic problems from whiplash trauma generally include headache, pain and neck stiffness that may prove refractory to conservative treatment modalities. As has previously been reported, such afflicted patients may experience significant temporary relief with injections of local anesthetic to painful trigger points in muscles of the shoulder and neck, or lasting symptomatic improvement through surgical excision of myofascial trigger points. In a subset of patients who pres...

  10. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savleen Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65% than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED.

  11. Optic nerve hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Savleen; Jain, Sparshi; Sodhi, Harsimrat B S; Rastogi, Anju; Kamlesh

    2013-05-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65%) than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED). PMID:24082663

  12. Microarray and cDNA sequence analysis of transcription during nerve-dependent limb regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryant Susan V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray analysis and 454 cDNA sequencing were used to investigate a centuries-old problem in regenerative biology: the basis of nerve-dependent limb regeneration in salamanders. Innervated (NR and denervated (DL forelimbs of Mexican axolotls were amputated and transcripts were sampled after 0, 5, and 14 days of regeneration. Results Considerable similarity was observed between NR and DL transcriptional programs at 5 and 14 days post amputation (dpa. Genes with extracellular functions that are critical to wound healing were upregulated while muscle-specific genes were downregulated. Thus, many processes that are regulated during early limb regeneration do not depend upon nerve-derived factors. The majority of the transcriptional differences between NR and DL limbs were correlated with blastema formation; cell numbers increased in NR limbs after 5 dpa and this yielded distinct transcriptional signatures of cell proliferation in NR limbs at 14 dpa. These transcriptional signatures were not observed in DL limbs. Instead, gene expression changes within DL limbs suggest more diverse and protracted wound-healing responses. 454 cDNA sequencing complemented the microarray analysis by providing deeper sampling of transcriptional programs and associated biological processes. Assembly of new 454 cDNA sequences with existing expressed sequence tag (EST contigs from the Ambystoma EST database more than doubled (3935 to 9411 the number of non-redundant human-A. mexicanum orthologous sequences. Conclusion Many new candidate gene sequences were discovered for the first time and these will greatly enable future studies of wound healing, epigenetics, genome stability, and nerve-dependent blastema formation and outgrowth using the axolotl model.

  13. Nerve conduction and excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Moldovan, Mihai

    2009-01-01

    counterparts in the peripheral nervous system, in some instances without peripheral nervous system symptoms. Both hereditary and acquired demyelinating neuropathies have been studied and the effects on nerve pathophysiology have been compared with degeneration and regeneration of axons. SUMMARY: Excitability....... Studies of different metabolic neuropathies have assessed the influence of uremia, diabetes and ischemia, and the use of these methods in toxic neuropathies has allowed pinpointing damaging factors. Various mutations in ion channels associated with central nervous system disorders have been shown to have......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review is aimed at providing information about the role of nerve excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders. It has been known for many years that the insight into peripheral nerve pathophysiology provided by conventional nerve conduction studies is limited. Nerve...

  14. Vagus nerve stimulation and stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagus nerve stimulation and stereotactic radiosurgery represent novel and less invasive therapeutics for medically intractable epilepsy. Chronic stimulation of the left vagus nerve with implanted generator and electrodes inhibits seizure susceptibility of the cerebral cortices. While the underlying mechanisms of the effect remains to be further elucidated, the efficacy and safety of vagus nerve stimulation have been established by randomized clinical trials in the United States and European countries. It has been widely accepted as a treatment option for patients with medically intractable epilepsy and for whom brain surgery is not indicated. The primary indication of vagus nerve stimulation in the clinical trials was localization-related epilepsy in adult patients but efficacy in a wide range of patient groups such as generalized epilepsy and children has been reported. Improvements in daytime alertness, mood, higher cognitive functions and overall quality of life have been reported other than the effect on epileptic seizures. Since the devices are not approved for clinical use in Japan by the Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry, there exist barriers to provide this treatment to patients at present. Stereotactic radiosurgery has been used for temporal lobe epilepsy and hypothalamic hamartoma, but it is still controversial whether the therapy is more effective and less invasive than brain surgery. Promising results of gamma knife radiosurgery for medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis have been reported essentially from one French center. Results from others were not as favorable. There seems to be an unignorable risk of brain edema and radiation necrosis when the delivered dose over the medial temporal structures is high enough to abolish epileptic seizures. A randomized clinical trial comparing different marginal doses is ongoing in the United States. Clinical trials like this, technical advancement and standardization

  15. Repair of sciatic nerve defects using tissue engineered nerves

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Caishun; Lv, Gang

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we constructed tissue-engineered nerves with acellular nerve allografts in Sprague-Dawley rats, which were prepared using chemical detergents-enzymatic digestion and mechanical methods, in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells of Wistar rats cultured in vitro, to repair 15 mm sciatic bone defects in Wistar rats. At postoperative 12 weeks, electrophysiological detection results showed that the conduction velocity of regenerated nerve after repair with tissue-engine...

  16. Axonal and perikaryal involvement in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Nagamatsu, M; TERAO, S; Misu, K.; M. Li; Hattori, N; Ichimura, M.; Sakai, M; Yamamoto, H.; Watanabe, H.(Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117, Heidelberg, Germany); Riku, S; Ikeda, E; Hata, J; Oda, M; M. Satake; Nakamura, N

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess the extent of loss of myelinated nerve fibres and spinal motor neuron loss in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), a clinicopathological study was conducted on biopsied sural nerves and necropsied spinal cords from patients with CIDP.
METHODS—The myelinated fibre pathology of 71 biopsied sural nerves and motor neuron pathology of nine necropsied spinal cords at L4 levels in patients with CIDP were quantitatively and immunohistoche...

  17. Fastklemt nerve som årsag til svære postoperative smerter fra arvæv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael; Venzo, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Entrapment of a cutaneous nerve in a surgical scar may cause chronic post-operative pain. The condition presents with similar symptoms as a traumatic neuroma or as an anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome, which, however, is often idiopathic. We present a case, where entrapment of a...

  18. Demographics of Lower Limb Amputations in the Pakistan Military: A Single Center, Three-Year Prospective Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Farooq A; Ayaz, Saeed B; Mansoor, Sahibzada N; Qureshi, Ali R; Fahim, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION : The Pakistan military has been actively engaged in the war against terror for more than a decade. Many officers and soldiers have lost their limbs in this war. But the data on traumatic lower limb amputations in Pakistan is sparse. The aim of this study is to prospectively document the epidemiological profile of lower limb military amputees presenting at the largest rehabilitation centre of Pakistan over a three-year period. MATERIALS & METHODS : A prospective three-year survey was conducted at the Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (AFIRM), Pakistan. One hundred twenty-three consecutive patients with lower limb amputations were enrolled in the survey. The demographic data, etiology, associated injuries, complications profile, and type of prosthesis provided were documented. The data analysis was done using the statistical analysis tool SPSS V 20 (IBM®,NY, USA). RESULTS : All patients were male. Most had traumatic amputation (119), were between 20-40 years (106), with unilateral amputation (115). Mine blast injury was the leading cause in 73 (59.3%) and most (58.5%) were fitted with modular prosthesis. Transtibial amputation was the commonest level (65), followed by transfemoral (30). The time of surgical amputation was not documented in 87% of the patients. Half of the patients (54%) had associated injuries. Seventy-nine patients had at least one complication with phantom pain being the commonest in 25% cases. CONCLUSIONS : This is the largest prospective demographic survey of lower limb amputees in Pakistan military to date. Scores of soldiers and civilians in Pakistan have suffered lower limb amputation. The availability of demographic data can improve the trauma and rehabilitation services for better understanding and management of such cases. There is a need to conduct large scale community-based epidemiological surveys to direct future policies and develop amputee rehabilitation services in the public sector. PMID:27186448

  19. Superior gluteal nerve entrapment between two bellies of piriformis muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Y

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A double belly composition of piriformis muscle with superior gluteal nerve entrapment between the two muscle masses was detected. Piriformis muscle and its relation to sciatic nerve has been suggested as a cause of piriformis syndrome. Patients suffering from buttock pain are most often diagnosed as having piriformis syndrome, where anatomical variation of the piriformis is an important contributor. The present variation showed two distinct bellies of piriformis muscle. Interestingly the superior gluteal nerve was interposed between the two bellies. Such incidental findings on cadavers may help the clinicians to establish a rare yet important cause of piriformis syndrome. Furthermore, such observations are also relevant to the radiologists while interpreting MRI scans in cases of undiagnosed chronic gluteal pain.

  20. Ultrasound-Guided Greater Occipital Nerve Blocks and Pulsed Radiofrequency Ablation for Diagnosis and Treatment of Occipital Neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    VanderHoek, Matthew David; Hoang, Hieu T; Goff, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Occipital neuralgia is a condition manifested by chronic occipital headaches and is thought to be caused by irritation or trauma to the greater occipital nerve (GON). Treatment for occipital neuralgia includes medications, nerve blocks, and pulsed radiofrequency ablation (PRFA). Landmark-guided GON blocks are the mainstay in both the diagnosis and treatment of occipital neuralgia. Ultrasound is being utilized more and more in the chronic pain clinic to guide needle advancement when performing...

  1. Arterial catecholamine levels in morphine-treated rats subjected to sympathetic nerve stimulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, C. M.; S. Dai; Ogle, C. W.

    1989-01-01

    1. The effect of acute or chronic morphine treatment on the changes in arterial noradrenaline and adrenaline levels in response to sympathetic nerve stimulation was studied in rats. 2. Rats which had been chronically treated with morphine in their drinking fluid for 21 days were shown to be morphine-tolerant, as revealed by the tail-immersion test for analgesia. 3. It was found that animals given either acute or chronic morphine treatment had similar basal concentrations of arterial catechola...

  2. L'influence de l' "eye movement desensitization and reprocessing" sur la douleur fantôme des patients amputés

    OpenAIRE

    Grand, Kevin; Bonny, Marion; Portuesi, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Les douleurs fantômes sont présentes chez 70 à 90 % des sujets suite à une amputation. Ces douleurs influencent négativement le quotidien des amputés. Il existe de nombreux traitements, mais aucun ne fait l’unanimité. Problématique : L’incidence des amputations est exponentielle à l’augmentation du nombre de personnes présentant une atteinte vasculaire. Différents changements s’effectuent lors d’une amputation, notamment au niveau du système nerveux qui engendre fréquemment des...

  3. Use of sup(99m)technetium-pyrophosphate scintiscanning to determine the optimum amputation height in cases of arterial occlusion at the lower extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work investigates whether sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate scintiscanning is a suitable method to determine the optimum amputation height in cases of peripheral arterial occlusive disease. 10 patients were examined who had to be amputated between 1979 and 1981 for advanced arterial occlusive disease at the lower extremity. Throughout, the scintigraphic results and height of successful amputations were found to be in accordance. The amputation plane was chosen in the zone above the highest sup(99m)Tc-PYP accumulation. The advantages of scintiscanning are presented. (orig./MG)

  4. Trigeminal nerve schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Kashyap

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal schwannomas are uncommon slow growing encapsulated tumours composed of schwann cells. Trigeminal schwannomas are the second most common type of schwannoma, after the far more common acoustic schwannoma. In this case definite diagnosis could not be made after 1 CT (computerized tomography scan and 3 MRI (magnetic resonance imaging (outside hospital but finally after proper clinical examination and discussion with radiologist about the best diagnostic imaging in this case we reached to a diagnosis of trigeminal nerve schwannoma after MRI brain with contrast. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(5.000: 1739-1741

  5. MR findings of facial nerve on oblique sagittal MRI using TMJ surface coil: normal vs peripheral facial nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the findings of normal facial nerve, as seen on oblique sagittal MRI using a TMJ (temporomandibular joint) surface coil, and then to evaluate abnormal findings of peripheral facial nerve palsy. We retrospectively reviewed the MR findings of 20 patients with peripheral facial palsy and 50 normal facial nerves of 36 patients without facial palsy. All underwent oblique sagittal MRI using a T MJ surface coil. We analyzed the course, signal intensity, thickness, location, and degree of enhancement of the facial nerve. According to the angle made by the proximal parotid segment on the axis of the mastoid segment, course was classified as anterior angulation (obtuse and acute, or buckling), straight and posterior angulation. Among 50 normal facial nerves, 24 (48%) were straight, and 23 (46%) demonstrated anterior angulation; 34 (68%) showed iso signal intensity on T1W1. In the group of patients, course on the affected side was either straight (40%) or showed anterior angulation (55%), and signal intensity in 80% of cases was isointense. These findings were similar to those in the normal group, but in patients with post-traumatic or post-operative facial palsy, buckling, of course, appeared. In 12 of 18 facial palsy cases (66.6%) in which contrast materials were administered, a normal facial nerve of the opposite facial canal showed mild enhancement on more than one segment, but on the affected side the facial nerve showed diffuse enhancement in all 14 patients with acute facial palsy. Eleven of these (79%) showed fair or marked enhancement on more than one segment, and in 12 (86%), mild enhancement of the proximal parotid segment was noted. Four of six chronic facial palsy cases (66.6%) showed atrophy of the facial nerve. When oblique sagittal MR images are obtained using a TMJ surface coil, enhancement of the proximal parotid segment of the facial nerve and fair or marked enhancement of at least one segment within the facial canal always suggests pathology of

  6. An unusual ulnar nerve-median nerve communicating branch.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogbergen, M M; Kauer, J M

    1992-01-01

    Branching of the ulnar nerve distal to the origin of the dorsal cutaneous branch was investigated in 25 hands in one of which an anatomical variation was observed. This finding may be of importance in the evaluation of certain entrapment phenomena of the ulnar nerve or unexplained sensory loss after trauma or surgical intervention in that particular area.

  7. Accuracy of physical examination for chronic lumbar radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Iversen, Trond; Solberg, Tore; Romner, Bertil; Wilsgaard, Tom; Nygaard, Øystein Petter; Waterloo, Knut; Brox, Jens Ivar; Ingebrigtsen, Tor

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clinical examination of patients with chronic lumbar radiculopathy aims to clarify whether there is nerve root impingement. The aims of this study were to investigate the association between findings at clinical examination and nerve root impingement, to evaluate the accuracy of clinical index tests in a specialised care setting, and to see whether imaging clarifies the cause of chronic radicular pain. Methods: A total of 116 patients referred with symptoms of lumbar r...

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging appearances following hindquarter amputation for pelvic musculoskeletal malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe our experience of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances after hindquarter amputation, focusing on the normal pattern of time-related changes in signal intensity within the amputation flap and appearances of local disease recurrence. This was a retrospective review of the records of patients identified on our orthopaedic oncology database who had undergone hindquarter amputation at our centre. Examinations were divided into one group consisting of 'normal' postoperative findings and another group demonstrating local recurrence. 'Normal' postoperative findings were assessed for signal intensity, morphology and presence of the 'muscle texture sign' within the amputation flap. Examinations were grouped according to time from surgery. Examinations demonstrating local recurrence were assessed for site, signal intensity, morphology and axial dimensions of recurrent tumour. Comparison was made to pre-operative imaging. Thirty-five patients with postoperative MR images were identified. Seventy-seven examinations were reviewed (range 1-18 per patient). The 'normal group' comprised 18 patients (seven female, 11 male, mean age 44 years, range 16-75 years), with 47 examinations reviewed. The 'muscle texture sign' was preserved in all examinations in this group. Up to 6 months after surgery, 100% (10) of examinations showed hyperintense T2- and short-tau inversion recovery (STIR-weighted) signals within the muscle flap, indicating oedema. Only after 4 years was the muscle flap signal isointense in all cases (13). Up to 6 months after surgery, 50% (5 of 10) of examinations demonstrated flap swelling, but after 1 year, 100% (28) showed atrophy. Twenty percent (2 of 10) of examinations 0-6 months from surgery showed hyperintense T1-weighted signal within the muscle flap, consistent with fatty infiltration, but after 2 years, 100% (20) showed a hyperintense T1-weighted signal. The 'local recurrence' group comprised 20 patients (six female, 14 male, mean age 45

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging appearances following hindquarter amputation for pelvic musculoskeletal malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotnis, Nikhil A.; Davies, A.M.; James, Steven L.J. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Grimer, Robert J. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital Foundation Trust, Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    To describe our experience of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances after hindquarter amputation, focusing on the normal pattern of time-related changes in signal intensity within the amputation flap and appearances of local disease recurrence. This was a retrospective review of the records of patients identified on our orthopaedic oncology database who had undergone hindquarter amputation at our centre. Examinations were divided into one group consisting of 'normal' postoperative findings and another group demonstrating local recurrence. 'Normal' postoperative findings were assessed for signal intensity, morphology and presence of the 'muscle texture sign' within the amputation flap. Examinations were grouped according to time from surgery. Examinations demonstrating local recurrence were assessed for site, signal intensity, morphology and axial dimensions of recurrent tumour. Comparison was made to pre-operative imaging. Thirty-five patients with postoperative MR images were identified. Seventy-seven examinations were reviewed (range 1-18 per patient). The 'normal group' comprised 18 patients (seven female, 11 male, mean age 44 years, range 16-75 years), with 47 examinations reviewed. The 'muscle texture sign' was preserved in all examinations in this group. Up to 6 months after surgery, 100% (10) of examinations showed hyperintense T2- and short-tau inversion recovery (STIR-weighted) signals within the muscle flap, indicating oedema. Only after 4 years was the muscle flap signal isointense in all cases (13). Up to 6 months after surgery, 50% (5 of 10) of examinations demonstrated flap swelling, but after 1 year, 100% (28) showed atrophy. Twenty percent (2 of 10) of examinations 0-6 months from surgery showed hyperintense T1-weighted signal within the muscle flap, consistent with fatty infiltration, but after 2 years, 100% (20) showed a hyperintense T1-weighted signal. The 'local recurrence

  10. Conservative Surgery of Diabetic Forefoot Osteomyelitis: How Can I Operate on This Patient Without Amputation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Lázaro-Martínez, Jose L; Alvaro-Afonso, Francisco Javier; Molinés-Barroso, Raúl

    2015-06-01

    Surgery is necessary in many cases of diabetic foot osteomyelitis. The decision to undertake surgery should be based on the clinical presentation of diabetic foot osteomyelitis. Surgery is required when the bone is protruding through the ulcer, there is extensive bone destruction seen on x-ray or progressive bone damage on sequential x-ray while undergoing antibiotic treatment, the soft tissue envelope is destroyed, and there is gangrene or spreading soft tissue infection. Several issues should be taken into account when considering surgery for treating diabetic foot osteomyelitis. It is necessary to have a surgeon available with diabetic foot expertise. Regarding location of diabetic foot osteomyelitis, it is important to consider whether isolated bone or a joint is involved. In cases in which osteomyelitis is associated with a bone deformity, surgery should be able to correct this. The surgeon should always reflect about whether extensive/radical surgery could destabilize the foot. The forefoot is the most frequent location of diabetic foot osteomyelitis and is associated with better prognosis than midfoot and hindfoot osteomyelitis. Many surgical procedures can be performed in patients with diabetes and forefoot ulcers complicated by osteomyelitis while avoiding amputations. Performing conservative surgeries without amputations of any part of the foot is not always feasible in cases in which the infection has destroyed the soft tissue envelope. Attempting conservative surgery in such cases risks infected tissues remaining in the wound bed leading to failure. The election of different surgical options depends on the expertise of the surgeons selected for the multidisciplinary teams. It is the aim of this article to provide a sample of surgical techniques in order to remove the bone infection from the forefoot while avoiding amputations. PMID:25256285

  11. The modified Pirogoff's amputation in treating diabetic foot infections: surgical technique and case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Nather

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This paper describes the surgical technique of a modified Pirogoff's amputation performed by the senior author and reports the results of this operation in a single surgeon case series for patients with diabetic foot infections. Methods: Six patients with diabetic foot infections were operated on by the National University Hospital (NUH diabetic foot team in Singapore between November 2011 and January 2012. All patients underwent a modified Pirogoff's amputation for diabetic foot infections. Inclusion criteria included the presence of a palpable posterior tibial pulse, ankle brachial index (ABI of more than 0.7, and distal infections not extending proximally beyond the midfoot level. Clinical parameters such as presence of pulses and ABI were recorded. Preoperative blood tests performed included a glycated hemoglobin level, hemoglobin, total white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, albumin, and creatinine levels. All patients were subjected to 14 sessions of hyperbaric oxygen therapy postoperatively and were followed up for a minimum of 10 months. Results: All six patients had good wound healing. Tibio-calcaneal arthrodesis of the stump was achieved in all cases by 6 months postoperatively. All patients were able to walk with the prosthesis. Conclusions: The modified Pirogoff's amputation has been found to show good results in carefully selected patients with diabetic foot infections. The selection criteria included a palpable posterior tibial pulse, distal infections not extending proximally beyond the midfoot level, ABI of more than 0.7, hemoglobin level of more than 10 g/dL, and serum albumin level of more than 30 g/L.

  12. Penile amputation and scrotal urethrostomy followed by chemotherapy in a dog with penile hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolfer, Luiz; Schmit, Joanna M; McNeill, Amy L; Ragetly, Chantal A; Bennett, R Avery; McMichael, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    A 7 yr old castrated male standard poodle weighing 25 kg was presented with a 5 day history of hematuria, dysuria, and the presence of a 2.5 cm, firm swelling within the prepuce. Abdominal radiographs revealed a soft-tissue mass on the distal prepuce and lysis of the cranial margin of the os penis. The patient was sedated and an ulcerated hemorrhagic mass was identified at the tip of the penis. The mass was diagnosed as hemangiosarcoma via incisional biopsy. A penile amputation with scrotal urethrostomy was performed followed by chemotherapy with doxorubicin. PMID:25415220

  13. Physical Rehabilitation for Disabled People with Insulin-independent Diabetes after Single Leg Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya A. Pilosyan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the program of physical rehabilitation for the disabled people with insulin-independent diabetes, who came through single leg amputation. The program includes phantom-impulsive gymnastics, exercises for the remaining leg, back and shoulders, for the improvement of stump functional state, equilibrium exercises and exercises for arms supporting function development. Set of therapeutic exercises involves exercise machine training. The application of the developed physical rehabilitation program at the stage of preparation for fitting the prosthesis and learning to walk on prosthetic leg has proved its efficiency according to test results, biomedical methods of research and increases the motor activity of 100% percent of patients.

  14. Isolated cranial nerve palsies in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zadro, Ivana; Barun, Barbara; Habek, Mario; Brinar, Vesna V.

    1997-01-01

    During a 10 year period 24 patients with definite multiple sclerosis with isolated cranial nerve palsies were studied (third and fourth nerve: one patient each, sixth nerve: 12 patients, seventh nerve: three patients, eighth nerve: seven patients), in whom cranial nerve palsies were the presenting sign in 14 and the only clinical sign of an exacerbation in 10 patients. MRI was carried out in 20 patients and substantiated corresponding brainstem lesions in seven patients (...

  15. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) in dentistry- A review

    OpenAIRE

    Kasat, Vikrant O.; Gupta, Aditi; Ladda, Ruchi; Kathariya, Mitesh; Saluja, Harish; Farooqui, Anjum Ara

    2014-01-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological method which is widely used by medical and paramedical professionals for the management of acute and chronic pain in a variety of conditions. Similarly, it can be utilized for the management of pain during various dental procedures as well as pain due to various conditions affecting maxillofacial region. This review aims to provide an insight into clinical research evidence available for the analgesic and non analgesic ...

  16. Combination of spinal anesthesia and peripheral nerve block: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Vildan Temel; Sedat Kaya; Gönül Ölmez Kavak; Haktan Karaman; Adnan Tüfek; Feyzi Çelik

    2010-01-01

    Regional anaesthesia has advantages such as, control of postoperative pain, early mobilization, and does not affect respiratory function. In recent years, regional anaesthesia had improved by the application of the peripheral nerve stimulator and ultrasound guided blocks, new local anaesthetic drugs with the use of additional adjunctive agents. Especially in emergency conditions, combination of regional anaesthesia may avoid the complications of general anesthesia in patients with chronic dis...

  17. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma Masquerading as Optic Neuritis

    OpenAIRE

    Alroughani, R.; Behbehani, R

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuritis is a common presentation of demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis. It typically presents with acute painful monocular vision loss, whereas chronic optic neuropathy can be caused by compressive lesions along the anterior visual pathway, genetic, toxic, or nutritional causes. We report an unusual presentation mimicking optic neuritis, which was subsequently diagnosed as optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Misinterpretation of white matter lesions on MRI of brain an...

  18. Quantifying Demyelination in NK venom treated nerve using its electric circuit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, H. K.; Das, D.; Doley, R.; Sahu, P. P.

    2016-03-01

    Reduction of myelin in peripheral nerve causes critical demyelinating diseases such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, etc. Clinical monitoring of these diseases requires rapid and non-invasive quantification of demyelination. Here we have developed formulation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in terms of demyelination considering electric circuit model of a nerve having bundle of axons for its quantification from NCV measurements. This approach has been validated and demonstrated with toad nerve model treated with crude Naja kaouthia (NK) venom and also shows the effect of Phospholipase A2 and three finger neurotoxin from NK-venom on peripheral nerve. This opens future scope for non-invasive clinical measurement of demyelination.

  19. The vagus nerve and the inflammatory reflex—linking immunity and metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlov, Valentin A.; Kevin J Tracey

    2012-01-01

    The vagus nerve has an important role in regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and efferent vagus nerve-mediated cholinergic signalling controls immune function and proinflammatory responses via the inflammatory reflex. Dysregulation of metabolism and immune function in obesity are associated with chronic inflammation, a critical step in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cholinergic mechanisms within the inflammatory reflex have, in the past 2 years, been imp...

  20. Functional Deficits of Cranial Nerves in Patients with Jugular Foramen Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Raquet, F.; Mann, W.; Amedee, R.; Maruer, J.; Gilsbach, J

    1991-01-01

    Lower cranial neuropathies are a leading presenting symptom in patients with tumors involving the jugular foramen. The purpose of this study is to assess acute and chronic functional deficits along with neurologic findings in 31 patients who underwent resection of a tumor involving the jugular foramen. Preoperative nerve dysfunction made intraoperative preservation unlikely, while postoperative lower cranial nerve dysfunction was found to be transient in many patients. Compensation of permane...