WorldWideScience

Sample records for chromosphere

  1. Observing the solar chromosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    This review is split into two parts: one on chromospheric line formation in answer to the frequent question ``where is my line formed'', and one presenting state-of-the-art imagery of the chromosphere. In the first part I specifically treat the formation of the Na D lines, Ca II H&K, and Hα. In the

  2. Observing the Solar Chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Rutten, R J

    2007-01-01

    This review is split into two parts: one on chromospheric line formation in answer to the frequent question "where is my line formed", and one presenting state-of-the-art imagery of the chromosphere. In the first part I specifically treat the formation of the Na D lines, Ca II H & K, and Halpha. In the second I show DOT, IBIS, VAULT, and TRACE images as evidence that the chromosphere consists of fibrils of intrinsically different types. The straight-up ones are hottest. The slanted ones are filled by shocks and likely possess thin transition sheaths to coronal plasma. The ones hovering horizontally over "clapotispheric" cell interiors outline magnetic canopies and are buffeted by shocks, most violently in the quietest regions. In the absence of integral-field ultraviolet spectrometry, H$\\alpha$ remains the principal chromosphere diagnostic. The required fast-cadence profile-sampling imaging is an important quest for new telescope technology.

  3. A chromospheric conundrum?

    CERN Document Server

    Judge, Philip; Schmidt, Wolgang; Steiner, Oskar

    2010-01-01

    We examine spectra of the Ca II H line, obtained under good seeing conditions with the VTT Echelle Spectrograph in June of 2007, and higher resolution data of the Ca II 8542 Angstrom line from Fabry-Perot instruments. The VTT targets were areas near disk center which included quiet Sun and some dispersed plage. The infrared data included quiet Sun and plage associated with small pores. Bright chromospheric network emission patches expand little with wavelength from line wing to line center, i.e. with increasing line opacity and height. We argue that this simple observation has implications for the force and energy balance of the chromosphere, since bright chromospheric network emission is traditionally associated with enhanced local mechanical heating which increases temperatures and pressures. Simple physical considerations then suggest that the network chromosphere may not be able to reach horizontal force balance with its surroundings, yet the network is a long-lived structure. We speculate on possible rea...

  4. Stellar Chromospheric Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Jeffrey C.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The Sun, stars similar to it, and many rather dissimilar to it, have chromospheres, regions classically viewed as lying above the brilliant photosphere and characterized by a positive temperature gradient and a marked departure from radiative equilibrium. Stellar chromospheres exhibit a wide range of phenomena collectively called activity, stemming largely from the time evolution of their magnetic fields and the mass flux and transfer of radiation through the complex magnetic topology and the increasingly optically thin plasma of the outer stellar atmosphere. In this review, I will (1 outline the development of our understanding of chromospheric structure from 1960 to the present, (2 discuss the major observational programs and theoretical lines of inquiry, (3 review the origin and nature of both solar and stellar chromospheric activity and its relationship to, and effect on, stellar parameters including total energy output, and (4 summarize the outstanding problems today.

  5. Chromospheric activity as age indicator

    CERN Document Server

    Pace, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    Chromospheric activity has been calibrated and widely used as age indicator. However, it has been suggested that the viability of such an age indicator is, in the best case, limited to stars younger than about 1.5 Gyr. I aim to define the age range for which chromospheric activity is a robust astrophysical clock. I collected literature measurements of the S-index in field stars, which is a measure of the strength of the H and K lines of the Ca II and a proxy for chromospheric activity, and exploited the homogeneous database of temperature and age determinations for field stars provided by the Geneva-Copenhagen survey of the Solar neighbourhood. Field data, inclusive data previously used to calibrate chromospheric ages, confirm the result found using open cluster data, i.e. there is no decay of chromospheric activity after about 2 Gyr. The only existing indication supporting the viability of chromospheric ages larger than 2 Gyr, is the similarity of chromospheric activity levels in the components of 35 dwarf b...

  6. Stable umbral chromospheric structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, V. M. J.; Scullion, E.; Mathioudakis, M.; Kiselman, D.; Gallagher, P. T.; Keenan, F. P.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: We seek to understand the morphology of the chromosphere in sunspot umbra. We investigate if the horizontal structures observed in the spectral core of the Ca II H line are ephemeral visuals caused by the shock dynamics of more stable structures, and examine their relationship with observables in the H-alpha line. Methods: Filtergrams in the core of the Ca II H and H-alpha lines as observed with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope are employed. We utilise a technique that creates composite images and tracks the flash propagation horizontally. Results: We find 0.̋15 wide horizontal structures, in all of the three target sunspots, for every flash where the seeing is moderate to good. Discrete dark structures are identified that are stable for at least two umbral flashes, as well as systems of structures that live for up to 24 min. We find cases of extremely extended structures with similar stability, with one such structure showing an extent of 5''. Some of these structures have a correspondence in H-alpha, but we were unable to find a one-to-one correspondence for every occurrence. If the dark streaks are formed at the same heights as umbral flashes, there are systems of structures with strong departures from the vertical for all three analysed sunspots. Conclusions: Long-lived Ca II H filamentary horizontal structures are a common and likely ever-present feature in the umbra of sunspots. If the magnetic field in the chromosphere of the umbra is indeed aligned with the structures, then the present theoretical understanding of the typical umbra needs to be revisited. Movies associated to Figs. 3 and 4 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Diagnosis of solar chromospheric magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Hongqi(张洪起)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the measurements of the chromospheric magnetic field and the spatial configuration of the field at the lower solar atmosphere inferred by the distribution of the solar photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields. Some questions in the study of the chromospheric magnetic field are also presented.

  8. Chromospheric seismology above sunspot umbrae

    CERN Document Server

    Snow, B; Regnier, S

    2015-01-01

    The acoustic resonator is an important model for explaining the three-minute oscillations in the chromosphere above sunspot umbrae. The steep temperature gradients at the photosphere and transition region provide the cavity for the acoustic resonator, which allows waves to be both partially transmitted and partially reflected. In this paper, a new method of estimating the size and temperature profile of the chromospheric cavity above a sunspot umbra is developed. The magnetic field above umbrae is modelled numerically in 1.5D with slow magnetoacoustic wave trains travelling along magnetic fieldlines. Resonances are driven by applying the random noise of three different colours---white, pink and brown---as small velocity perturbations to the upper convection zone. Energy escapes the resonating cavity and generates wave trains moving into the corona. Line of sight (LOS) integration is also performed to determine the observable spectra through SDO/AIA. The numerical results show that the gradient of the coronal ...

  9. Structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijger, Johannes Mattheus

    2003-01-01

    The thesis "Structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere" of J.M. Krijger is a study on the behavior of the solar chromosphere, the thin layer just above the solar surface (photosphere) visible in purple red light during a total solar eclipse. The most important result of this thesis is that the

  10. Wave Heating of the Solar Chromosphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wolfgang Kalkofen

    2008-03-01

    The nonmagnetic interior of supergranulation cells has been thought since the 1940s to be heated by the dissipation of acoustic waves. But all attempts to measure the acoustic flux have failed to show sufficient energy for chromospheric heating. Recent space observations with TRACE, for example, have found 10% or less of the necessary flux. To explain the missing energy it has been speculated that the nonmagnetic chromosphere is heated mainly by waves related to the magnetic field. If that were correct, the whole chromosphere, magnetic as well as nonmagnetic, would be heated mainly by waves related to the magnetic field. But contrary to expectation, the radiation emerging from the nonmagnetic chromosphere shows none of the signatures of magnetic waves, only those of acoustic waves. Nearly all the heating of the nonmagnetic chromosphere must therefore be due to acoustic waves. In the magnetic network on the boundary of supergranulation cells, on the other hand, the small filling factor of the magnetic field in the photosphere implies that only a small fraction of the wave flux that travels upward to heat the chromosphere can be channeled by the magnetic field. Hence, while some of the energy that is dissipated in the magnetic network is in the form of magnetic waves, most of it must be in the form of acoustic waves. Thus, the quiet solar chromosphere, instead of being heated mainly by magneticwaves throughout, must be heated mainly by acoustic waves throughout. The full wave flux heating the quiet chromosphere must travel through the photosphere. In the nonmagnetic medium, this flux is essentially all in the form of acoustic waves; TRACE registers at most 10% of it, perhaps because of limited spatial resolution.

  11. Numerical studies of solar chromospheric jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Haruhisa

    2016-03-01

    The solar chromospheric jet is one of the most characteristic structures near the solar surface. The quantitative understanding of chromospheric jets is of substantial importance for not only the partially ionized phenomena in the chromosphere but also the energy input and dissipation processes in the corona. In this dissertation, the formation and dynamics of chromospheric jets are investigated using the radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We newly develop a numerical code for the radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the comprehensive modeling of solar atmosphere. Because the solar chromosphere is highly nonlinear, magnetic pressure dominated, and turbulent, a robust and high-resolution numerical scheme is required. In Chapter 2, we propose a new algorithm for the simulation of magnetohydrodynamics. Through the test problems and accuracy analyses, the proposed scheme is proved to satisfy the requirements. In Chapter 3, the effect of the non-local radiation energy transport, Spitzer-type thermal conduction, latent heat of partial ionization and molecule formation, and gravity are implemented to the magnetohydrodynamic code. The numerical schemes for the radiation transport and thermal conduction is carefully chosen in a view of the efficiency and compatibility with the parallel computation. Based on the developed radiation magnetohydrodynamic code, the formation and dynamics of chromospheric jets are investigated. In Chapter 4, we investigate the dependence of chromospheric jets on the coronal temperature in the two-dimensional simulations. Various scale of chromospheric jets with the parabolic trajectory are found with the maximum height of 2-8 Mm, lifetime of 2-7 min, maximum upward velocity of 10- 50 km/s, and deceleration of 100-350 m/s2. We find that chromospheric jets are more elongated under the cool corona and shorter under the hot corona. We also find that the pressure gradient force caused by the periodic shock waves accelerates some of the

  12. Misalignment between chromospheric features and magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; Carlsson, Mats; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    Observations of the upper chromosphere shows an enormous amount of intricate fine structure. Much of this comes in the form of linear features which are most often assumed to be well aligned with the direction of the magnetic field in the low plasma beta regime thought to dominate the upper chromosphere. We use advanced radiative MHD simulations including the effects of ion-neutral interactions (using the generalized Ohm's law) in the partially ionized chromosphere to show that the magnetic field is often not well aligned with chromospheric features. This occurs where the ambipolar diffusion is large, i.e., ions and neutral populations decouple as the ion-neutral collision frequency drops allowing the field to slip through the neutral population, currents perpendicular to the field are strong, and thermodynamic timescales are longer than or similar to the those of ambipolar diffusion. We find this often happens in dynamic spicule or fibril-like features at the top of the chromosphere. This has important conse...

  13. Detailed Chromospheric Activity Nature of KIC 9641031

    CERN Document Server

    Yoldaş, Ezgi

    2016-01-01

    This study depends on KIC 9641031 eclipsing binary system with a chromospherically active component. There are three type variations, such as geometrical variations due to eclipses, sinusoidal variations due to the rotational modulations and also flares, in the light curves obtained with the data taken from the Kepler Mission Database. Taking into account results obtained from KIC 9641031's observations in the Kepler Mission Database, we present and discuss the details of chromospheric activity. The sinusoidal light variations due to rotational modulation and the flare events were modelled separately. 92 different data subsets separated using the analytic models described in the literature were modelled separately to obtain the cool spot configuration. It is seen that just one component of the system is chromospherically active star. On this component, there are two active regions separated by about 180 deg longitudinally between the latitudes of +50 deg and +100 deg, whose locations and forms are rapidly cha...

  14. Simulations of chromospheric heating by ambipolar diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Khomenko, Elena

    2012-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for efficient heating of the solar chromosphere, based on non-ideal plasma effects. Three ingredients are needed for the work of this mechanism: (1) presence of neutral atoms; (2) presence of a non-potential magnetic field; (3) decrease of the collisional coupling of the plasma. Due to decrease of collisional coupling, a net relative motion appears between the neutral and ionized components, usually referred to as "ambipolar diffusion". This results in a significant enhancement of current dissipation as compared to the classical MHD case. We propose that the current dissipation in this situation is able to provide enough energy to heat the chromosphere by several kK on the time scale of minutes, or even seconds. In this paper, we show that this energy supply might be sufficient to balance the radiative energy losses of the chromosphere.

  15. Chromospheric LAyer SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narukage, Noriyuki; McKenzie, David E.; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Trujillo-Bueno, Javier; De Pontieu, Bart; Kubo, Masahito; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Kano, Ryouhei; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Masaki; Rachmeler, Laurel A.; Kobayashi, Ken; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Asensio Ramos, Andres; del Pino Aleman, Tanausu; Štępán, Jiri; Belluzzi, Luca; Larruquert, Juan Ignacio; Auchère, Frédéric; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Carlsson, Mattias J. L.

    2016-07-01

    The sounding rocket Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) was launched on September 3rd, 2015, and successfully detected (with a polarization accuracy of 0.1 %) the linear polarization signals (Stokes Q and U) that scattering processes were predicted to produce in the hydrogen Lyman-alpha line (Lyα 121.567 nm). Via the Hanle effect, this unique data set may provide novel information about the magnetic structure and energetics in the upper solar chromosphere. The CLASP instrument was safely recovered without any damage and we have recently proposed to dedicate its second flight to observe the four Stokes profiles in the spectral region of the Mg II h and k lines around 280 nm; in these lines the polarization signals result from scattering processes and the Hanle and Zeeman effects. Here we describe the modifications needed to develop this new instrument called the "Chromospheric LAyer SpectroPolarimeter" (CLASP2).

  16. Chromospheric diagnosis with forward scattering polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Carlin, E S

    2016-01-01

    Is it physically feasible to perform chromospheric diagnosis using spatial maps of scattering polarization at the solar disk center? To investigate it we synthesized polarization maps (in 8542 Angstroms) resulting from MHD solar models and NLTE radiative transfer calculations that consider Hanle effect and vertical macroscopic motions. After explaining the physical con- text of forward scattering and presenting our results, we arrive at the definition of Hanle polarity inversion lines. We show how such features can give support for a clearer chromospheric diagnosis in which the magnetic and dynamic effects in the scattering polarization could be disentangled.

  17. Chromospheric activity as age indicator. An L-shaped chromospheric-activity versus age diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, G.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Chromospheric activity has been calibrated and widely used as an age indicator. However, it has been suggested that the viability of this age indicator is, in the best case, limited to stars younger than about 1.5 Gyr. Aims: I aim to define the age range for which chromospheric activity is a robust astrophysical clock. Methods: I collected literature measurements of the S-index in field stars, which is a measure of the strength of the H and K lines of the Ca II and a proxy for chromospheric activity, and exploited the homogeneous database of temperature and age determinations for field stars provided by the Geneva-Copenhagen survey of the solar neighbourhood. Results: Field data, inclusive data previously used to calibrate chromospheric ages, confirm the result found using open cluster data, i.e. there is no decay of chromospheric activity after about 2 Gyr. Conclusions: The only existing indication supporting the viability of chromospheric ages older than 2 Gyr is the similarity of chromospheric activity levels in the components of 35 dwarf binaries. However, even in the most optimistic scenario, uncertainty in age determination for field stars and lack of sufficient data in open clusters make any attempt of calibrating an age activity relationship for old stars premature. The hypothesis that chromospheric activity follows the Skumanich law, i.e. that it is proportional to t- 1/2, should be relaxed. The data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr(130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/551/L8

  18. Reconnection Processes in the Chromosphere and Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Kazunari

    2012-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental key physical process in magnetized plasmas. Recent space solar observations revealed that magnetic reconnection is ubiquitous in the solar chromospheres and corona. Especially recent Hinode observations has found various types of tiny chromospheric jets, such as chromospheric anemone jets (Shibata et al. 2007), penumbral microjets (Katsukawa et al. 2007), light bridge jets from sunspot umbra (Shimizu et al. 2009), etc. It was also found that the corona is full of tiny X-ray jets (Cirtain et al. 2007). Often they are seen as helical spinning jets (Shimojo et al. 2007, Patsourakos et al. 2008, Pariat et al. 2009, Filippov et al. 2009, Kamio et al. 2010) with Alfvenic waves (Nishizuka et al. 2008, Liu et al. 2009) and there are increasing evidence of magnetic reconnection in these tiny jets. We can now say that as spatial resolution of observations become better and better, smaller and smaller flares and jets have been discovered, which implies that the magnetized solar atmosphere consist of fractal structure and dynamics, i.e., fractal reconnection. Bursty radio and hard X-ray emissions from flares also suggest the fractal reconnection and associated particle acceleration. Since magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) does not contain any characteristic length and time scale, it is natural that MHD structure, dynamics, and reconnection, tend to become fractal in ideal MHD plasmas with large magnetic Reynolds number such as in the solar atmosphere. We would discuss recent observations and theories related to fractal reconnection in the chromospheres and corona, and discuss possible implication to chromospheric and coronal heating.

  19. Helicity at Photospheric and Chromospheric Heights

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, S K; Sankarasubramanian, K

    2009-01-01

    In the solar atmosphere the twist parameter $\\alpha$ has the same sign as magnetic helicity. It has been observed using photospheric vector magnetograms that negative/positive helicity is dominant in the northern/southern hemisphere of the Sun. Chromospheric features show dextral/sinistral dominance in the northern/southern hemisphere and sigmoids observed in X-rays also have a dominant sense of reverse-S/forward-S in the northern/southern hemisphere. It is of interest whether individual features have one-to-one correspondence in terms of helicity at different atmospheric heights. We use UBF \\Halpha images from the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) and other \\Halpha data from Udaipur Solar Observatory and Big Bear Solar Observatory. Near-simultaneous vector magnetograms from the DST are used to establish one-to-one correspondence of helicity at photospheric and chromospheric heights. We plan to extend this investigation with more data including coronal intensities.

  20. Chromospheric changes in K stars with activity

    CERN Document Server

    Vieytes, Mariela; Diaz, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    We study the differences in chromospheric structure induced in K stars by stellar activity, to expand our previous work for G stars, including the Sun as a star. We selected six stars of spectral type K with 0.82$chromospheric models for the stars in the sample, in most cases in two different moments of activity. The models were constructed to obtain the best possible match with the Ca II K and the H$\\beta$ observed profiles. We also computed in detail the net radiative losses for each model to constrain the heating mechanism that can maintain the structure in the atmosphere. We find a strong correlation between these losses and \\Sc, the index generally used as a proxy for activity, as we found for G stars.

  1. The chilling truth about the solar chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    The notion that much of the solar gas in the low chromosphere is cool is discussed in terms of its validity. The dark CO absorption cores recorded at the extreme limb of the sun are described, including the 3-2 R14 line with a core-brightness temperature of 3620 K. A bifurcation in the plasma energy balance described to explain the high altitude cold gas is reviewed in terms of recent investigations. Spectral simulations of CO are described which examine the range of thermal profiles allowed by CO observations with low spatial resolution and limb darkening. Weak emission shoulders in the K line demonstrate that a cool chromosphere with Ca II emission is feasible, although the cold gas requires a surface coverage of as little as 20 percent to reproduce the limb darkening. To distinguish between the thermal bifurcation notion and the neophotosphere concept, observations of the high spatial resolution spectra of the CO bands are required.

  2. Heating of the magnetized solar chromosphere by partial ionization effects

    CERN Document Server

    Khomenko, Elena

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the heating of the magnetized solar chromosphere induced by the large fraction of neutral atoms present in this layer. The presence of neutrals, together with the decrease with height of the collisional coupling, leads to deviations from the classical MHD behavior of the chromospheric plasma. A relative net motion appears between the neutral and ionized components, usually referred to as ambipolar diffusion. The dissipation of currents in the chromosphere is enhanced orders of magnitude due to the action of ambipolar diffusion, as compared to the standard ohmic diffusion. We propose that a significant amount of magnetic energy can be released to the chromosphere just by existing force-free 10--40 G magnetic fields there. As a consequence, we conclude that ambipolar diffusion is an important process that should be included in chromospheric heating models, as it has the potential to rapidly heat the chromosphere. We perform analytical estimations and numerical simulations to prove this i...

  3. The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Kano, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N..; Ishikawa, R.; Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Hara, H.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T.; Ichimoto, K.; Giono, G.; Holloway, T.; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; DePontieu, B.; Casini, R.; Auchere F.; Bueno, J. Trujillo; Sainz, R. Manso; Belluzzi, L.; Ramos, A. Asensio; Stepan, J.; Carlsson, M.

    2014-01-01

    To Understand energy release process in the Sun including solar flares, it is essentially important to measure the magnetic field of the atmosphere of the Sun. Magnetic field measurement of the upper layers (upper chromosphere and above) was technically difficult and not well investigated yet. Upper chromosphere and transition region magnetic field measurement by Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) sounding rocket to be launched in 2015. The proposal is already selected and developments of the flight components are going.

  4. The infrared excess of cool giant stars - A chromospheric contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, D. L.; Snell, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The idea that the infrared excesses of evolved M stars may contain a contribution from a chromosphere is explored using alpha Ori and W Hya as test cases. The spectrum of alpha Ori between 8 and 30 millimicrons can be interpreted satisfactorily in terms of three components: a photosphere, a silicate dust cloud, and a cool chromosphere (temperature about 5000 K), which is optically thick at 14 millimicrons. A similar modelling for W Hya suggests a hotter chromosphere (temperature about 8000 K), with unit optical depth at 30 millimicrons. Some consequences of these chromospheres are briefly discussed.

  5. The quiet chromosphere. Old wisdom, new insights, future needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Robert J.

    2010-12-01

    The introduction to this review summarizes chromosphere observation with two figures. The first part showcases the historical emphasis on the eclipse chromosphere in the development of NLTE line formation theory and criticizes 1D modeling. The second part advertises recent breakthroughs after many decades of standstill. The third part discusses what may or should come next.

  6. Ubiquitous Fast Propagating Intensity Disturbances in Solar Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Kano, R.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Hara, H.; Giono, G.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.

    2016-01-01

    High cadence observations by the slit-jaw (SJ) optics system of the sounding rocket experiment "the Chromospheric Lyman Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP)" reveal ubiquitous intensity disturbances that recurrently propagate in either the chromosphere, transition region, or both at a speed much higher than the sound speed.

  7. Radiating Current Sheets in the Solar Chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    An MHD model of a Hydrogen plasma with flow, an energy equation, NLTE ionization and radiative cooling, and an Ohm's law with anisotropic electrical conduction and thermoelectric effects is used to self-consistently generate atmospheric layers over a $50$ km height range. A subset of these solutions contain current sheets, and have properties similar to those of the lower and middle chromosphere. The magnetic field profiles are found to be close to Harris sheet profiles, with maximum field strengths $\\sim 25-150$ G. The radiative flux $F_R$ emitted by individual sheets is $\\sim 4.9 \\times 10^5 - 4.5 \\times 10^6$ ergs-cm$^{-2}$-s$^{-1}$, to be compared with the observed chromospheric emission rate of $\\sim 10^7$ ergs-cm$^{-2}$-s$^{-1}$. Essentially all emission is from regions with thicknesses $\\sim 0.5 - 13$ km containing the neutral sheet. About half of $F_R$ comes from sub-regions with thicknesses 10 times smaller. A resolution $\\lesssim 5-130$ m is needed to resolve the properties of the sheets. The sheets...

  8. Internetwork chromospheric bright grains observed with IRIS

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; Carlsson, Mats; De Pontieu, Bart; Pereira, Tiago M D; Boerner, Paul; Hurlburt, Neal; Kleint, Lucia; Lemen, James; Tarbell, Ted D; Title, Alan; Wuelser, Jean-Pierre; Hansteen, Viggo H; Golub, Leon; McKillop, Sean; Reeves, Kathy K; Saar, Steven; Testa, Paola; Tian, Hui; Jaeggli, Sarah; Kankelborg, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) reveals small-scale rapid brightenings in the form of bright grains all over coronal holes and the quiet sun. These bright grains are seen with the IRIS 1330 \\AA, 1400 \\AA\\ and 2796 \\AA\\ slit-jaw filters. We combine coordinated observations with IRIS and from the ground with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) which allows us to have chromospheric (Ca II 8542 \\AA, Ca II H 3968 \\AA, H\\alpha, and Mg II k 2796 \\AA), and transition region (C II 1334 \\AA, Si IV 1402) spectral imaging, and single-wavelength Stokes maps in Fe I 6302 \\AA at high spatial (0.33"), temporal and spectral resolution. We conclude that the IRIS slit-jaw grains are the counterpart of so-called acoustic grains, i.e., resulting from chromospheric acoustic waves in a non-magnetic environment. We compare slit-jaw images with spectra from the IRIS spectrograph. We conclude that the grain intensity in the 2796 \\AA\\ slit-jaw filter comes from both the Mg II k core and wings. The signal in the C II ...

  9. The Lower Chromosphere in a Coronal Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplitskaya, R. B.; Turova, I. P.; Ozhogina, O. A.

    2007-07-01

    We study the Ca ii K, H, and λ 849.8 nm line profiles in two regions of the quiet Sun, one being located in the extensive low-latitude coronal hole observed on 3 through 5 August 2003, and the other being located outside the coronal hole. Comparison of the profiles was carried out separately for cells and cell boundaries of the chromospheric network. Our principal result is that space- and time-averaged profiles of the central self-reversal in the coronal hole sites differ from those outside of the hole: Intensities of the K3 and H3 central depressions are increased in the cells but are unchanged in the network; the height of the K2 peaks is reduced in the cells and particularly in the network; the central self-reversal asymmetry is intensified in the network. Distinctions appear at a high confidence level. Line wings as well as average characteristics of the infrared line remain practically unchanged. We discuss probable causes for this behavior of the lower chromosphere lines.

  10. Short dynamic fibrils in sunspot chromospheres

    CERN Document Server

    van der Voort, Luc Rouppe

    2013-01-01

    Sunspot chromospheres display vigorous oscillatory signature when observed in chromospheric diagnostics like the strong Ca II lines and H-alpha. New high-resolution sunspot observations from the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope show the ubiquitous presence of small-scale periodic jet-like features that move up and down. This phenomenon has not been described before. Their typical width is about 0.3 arcsec and they display clear parabolic trajectories in space-time diagrams. The maximum extension of the top of the jets is lowest in the umbra, a few 100 km, and progressively longer further away from the umbra in the penumbra, with the longest more than 1000 km. These jets resemble dynamic fibrils found in plage regions but at smaller extensions. LTE inversion of spectro-polarimetric Ca II 8542 observations enabled for a comparison of the magnetic field inclination and the properties of these short jets. We find that the most extended of these jets also have longer periods and tend to be located in regions with more ...

  11. Physics of the Solar Chromosphere: Beyond the Ideal MHD Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, James

    2015-08-01

    The solar chromosphere is the dynamic, physically complex, layer that lies between the visible solar surface and the magnetically dominated corona. Despite being a moderator of the amount of mass, magnetic field, and energy, that is transferred into the solar corona and the heliosphere and beyond, there are still important open questions regarding the chromosphere. Recent advancements in both observation and theoretical descriptions of the chromosphere have created new ideas about how the chromosphere controls the transfer of the above quantities from the Sun's interior into the heliosphere. Open questions still remain, such as, how is the chromosphere heated, and how do chromospheric events such as spicules, jets, reconnection, and wave propagation and dissipation contribute to the mass and energy balance in the solar atmosphere. Central to these questions are extensions to the standard magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) model of the Sun, such as non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium radiation, and multi-fluid physics. In this talk, we summarize the importance of these extensions and look for the necessary developments to answer open questions about the chromosphere.

  12. Chromospheric models for Altair (A7 IV-V)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, R. Freire; Gouttebroze, P.; Catalano, S.; Marilli, E.; Bruhweiler, F.; Kondo, Y.; Van Der Hucht, K.; Talavera, A.

    1995-01-01

    The star, Altair (A7 IV-V), is clearly shown to have Lyman-alpha emission of chromospheric origin, while no evidence is found for the Mg II emission reported in previous investigations. We present non-Local Thermodymanic Equilibrium (non-LTE) semiempirical models incorporating partial redistribution of the chromosphere of Altair that reproduce the observed Lyman-alpha emission and the Mg II resonance absorption at 2800 A. We unambiguously establihed that chromospheres exist at spectral types as early as A7 on the main sequence, and we also demonstrate that it very unlikely that the observed emission originates in a corotating expanding wind. This result represents a new challenge for chromospheric heating theories. It may indicate that both differential rotation and convection layers, at least near the equator, exist in this fast rotating (v sin i = 220 km/s) star.

  13. Particle Acceleration and Plasma Heating in the Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new mechanism of electron acceleration and plasma heating in the solar chromosphere, based on the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The instability develops at the chromospheric footpoints of a flare loop and deforms the local magnetic field. As a result, the electric current in the loop varies, and a resulting inductive electric field appears. A pulse of the induced electric field, together with the pulse of the electric current, propagates along the loop with the Alfvén velocity and begins to accelerate electrons up to an energy of about 1 MeV. Accelerated particles are thermalized in the dense layers of the chromosphere with the plasma density n ≈10^{14} - 10^{15} cm^{-3}, heating them to a temperature of about several million degrees. Joule dissipation of the electric current pulse heats the chromosphere at heights that correspond to densities n ≤10^{11} - 10^{13} cm^{-3}. Observations with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory indicate that chromospheric footpoints of coronal loops might be heated to coronal temperatures and that hot plasma might be injected upwards, which brightens ultra-fine loops from the photosphere to the base of the corona. Thereby, recent observations of the Sun and the model we propose stimulate a déjà vu - they are reminiscent of the concept of the chromospheric flare.

  14. The chromospherically active binary CFTuc revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doǧru, D.; Erdem, A.; Doǧru, S. S.; Zola, S.

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents results derived from analysis of new spectroscopic and photometric observations of the chromospherically active binary system CFTuc. New high-resolution spectra, taken at the Mt. John University Observatory in 2007, were analysed using two methods: cross-correlation and Fourier-based disentangling. As a result, new radial velocity curves of both components were obtained. The resulting orbital elements of CFTuc are a1 sini = 0.0254 +/- 0.0001au, a2sini = 0.0228 +/- 0.0001au, M1sini = 0.902 +/- 0.005Msolar and M2sini = 1.008 +/- 0.006Msolar. The cooler component of the system shows Hα and CaII H&K emissions. Using simultaneous spectroscopic and photometric observations, an anticorrelation between the Hα emission and the BV light curve maculation effects was found. This behaviour indicates a close spatial association between photospheric and chromospheric active regions. Our spectroscopic data and recent BV light curves were solved simultaneously using the Wilson-Devinney code. A dark spot on the surface of the cooler component was assumed to explain large asymmetries observed in the light curves. The following absolute parameters of the components were determined: M1 = 1.11 +/- 0.01Msolar, M2 = 1.23 +/- 0.01Msolar, R1 = 1.63 +/- 0.02Rsolar, R2 = 3.60 +/- 0.02Rsolar, L1 = 3.32 +/- 0.51Lsolar and L2 = 3.91 +/- 0.84Lsolar. The primary component has an age of about 5Gyr and is approaching its main-sequence terminal age. The distance to CFTuc was calculated to be 89 +/- 6pc from the dynamic parallax, neglecting interstellar absorption, in agreement with the Hipparcos value. The orbital period of the system was studied using the O-C analysis. The O-C diagram could be interpreted in terms of either two abrupt changes or a quasi-sinusoidal form superimposed on a downward parabola. These variations are discussed by reference to the combined effect of mass transfer and mass loss, the Applegate mechanism and also a light-time effect due to the existence of

  15. POSSIBLE CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY CYCLES IN AD LEO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buccino, Andrea P.; Petrucci, Romina; Mauas, Pablo J. D. [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (CONICET-UBA), C.C. 67 Sucursal 28, C1428EHA-Buenos Aires (Argentina); Jofré, Emiliano [Observatorio Astronómico de Córdoba, Córdoba (Argentina)

    2014-01-20

    AD Leo (GJ 388) is an active dM3 flare star that has been extensively observed both in the quiescent and flaring states. Since this active star is near the fully convective boundary, studying its long-term chromospheric activity in detail could be an appreciable contribution to dynamo theory. Here, using the Lomb-Scargle periodogram, we analyze the Ca II K line-core fluxes derived from CASLEO spectra obtained between 2001 and 2013 and the V magnitude from the ASAS database between 2004 and 2010. From both of these totally independent time series, we obtain a possible activity cycle with a period of approximately seven years and a less significant shorter cycle of approximately two years. A tentative interpretation is that a dynamo operating near the surface could be generating the longer cycle, while a second dynamo operating in the deep convection zone could be responsible for the shorter one. Based on the long duration of our observing program at CASLEO and the fact that we observe different spectral features simultaneously, we also analyze the relation between simultaneous measurements of the Na I index (R{sub D}{sup ′}), Hα, and Ca II K fluxes at different activity levels of AD Leo, including flares.

  16. Possible chromospheric activity cycles in AD Leo

    CERN Document Server

    Buccino, Andrea P; Jofré, Emiliano; Mauas, Pablo J D

    2013-01-01

    AD Leo (GJ 388) is an active dM3 flare star extensively observed both in the quiescent and flaring states. Since this active star is near the fully-convective boundary, to study in detail its long-term chromospheric activity could be an appreciable contribution for the dynamo theory. Here, we analyze with the Lomb-Scargle periodogram the Ca II K line-core fluxes derived from CASLEO spectra obtained between 2001 and 2013 and the V magnitude from the ASAS database between 2004 and 2010. From both totally independent time-series, we obtain a possible activity cycle of period $\\sim7$ years and a less-significant shorter one of $\\sim2$ years. A tentative interpretation is that a dynamo operating near the surface could be generating the longer cycle, while a second dynamo operating in the deep convection zone could be responsible for the shorter one. Based on the long duration of our observing program at CASLEO and the fact that we observe simultaneously different spectral features, we also analyze the relation bet...

  17. Chromospheric oscillations observed with BBSO and TRACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    We examine chromospheric oscillations in both a coronal hole (CH) and a quiet Sun (QS) region, by employing Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) data on September 14 and 16, 2004. For the CH, the average oscillation periods of network magnetic field and non-magnetic field (NMF) regions are 257 and 222 s, respectively, and the average period of network field is longer than that of NMF region by 15.8%. In the QS, the average oscillation period is the 225 s for network field and 212 s for the NMF region. The average period of the network field is also longer than that of the NMF region by 6.1%. For the network region, we find that the average period in the CH is longer than that in the QS by 14.2%. This difference between CH and QS is possibly caused by different magnetic configurations i.e. the open magnetic field in the CH and the close field in the QS.

  18. New insights into chromospheric structures from vector magnetic field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagg, A.

    During the last decade advances in instrumentation atomic physics and modeling have greatly improved the access to the chromospheric magnetic field vector High sensitivity polarimeters like the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter TIP2 VTT or the Spectro-Polarimeter for Infrared and Optical Regions SPINOR HAO lead to reliable Zeeman measurements using the He I 10830 nm triplet Theoretical modeling of the Hanle and the Paschen Back effect helped to significantly improve the analysis of polarization measurements in this triplet allowing to directly visualize the magnetic structure of spicules polar prominences and active regions In this presentation I will summarize the results of chromospheric magnetic field measurements using this interesting triplet obtained in the last couple of years and discuss the great potential it has to further uncover the complex structure of the chromosphere

  19. Evolution of Chromospheric Activity: M67 Red Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, A. K.; Whitney, B. A.; Pasquini, L.

    1999-08-01

    Echelle spectra of the Ca II H- and K-line region (λ3950) of 15 red giant stars in the open cluster M67 reveal atmospheric dynamics and determine chromospheric radiative losses in order to assess chromospheric heating requirements and to follow the evolution of chromospheric activity. M67 red giants in conjunction with giants in younger clusters create a continuous group of red giants in the color-magnitude diagram, with 0.1mass motions are well established at these luminosities. Radiative losses, as measured by emission strengths from Ca II, decrease smoothly with decreasing stellar effective temperature in M67 and connect well to a combined sample of warmer cluster giants (NGC 2477, IC 4756, and the Hyades) with Mrelated processes. The relative contribution of each heating mechanism changes with temperature in the stellar atmosphere, and these proportions may change during a star's evolution from the main sequence.

  20. Kinetic description of electron beams in the solar chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Daniel O.; Mauas, Pablo J.

    1992-01-01

    We formulate the relativistic Fokker-Plank equation for a beam of accelerated electrons interacting with a partially ionized plasma. In our derivation we conserved those terms contributing to velocity diffusion and found that this effect cannot be neglected a priori. We compute the terms accounting for elastic and inelastic collisions with neutral hydrogen and helium. Collisions with neutral hydrogen are found to be dominant throughout the chromosphere, except at the uppermost layers close to the transition region. As an application, we compute the loss of energy and momentum for a power-law beam impinging on the solar chromosphere, for a particular case in which the Fokker-Planck equation can be integrated analytically. We find that most of the beam energy is deposited in a relatively thin region of the chromosphere, a result which is largely insensitive to the theoretical method employed to compute the energy deposition rate.

  1. Kinetic description of electron beams in the solar chromosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, D.O.; Mauas, P.J. (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu (United States) Arcetri Osservatorio Astrofisico, Florence (Italy))

    1992-10-01

    We formulate the relativistic Fokker-Plank equation for a beam of accelerated electrons interacting with a partially ionized plasma. In our derivation we conserved those terms contributing to velocity diffusion and found that this effect cannot be neglected a priori. We compute the terms accounting for elastic and inelastic collisions with neutral hydrogen and helium. Collisions with neutral hydrogen are found to be dominant throughout the chromosphere, except at the uppermost layers close to the transition region. As an application, we compute the loss of energy and momentum for a power-law beam impinging on the solar chromosphere, for a particular case in which the Fokker-Planck equation can be integrated analytically. We find that most of the beam energy is deposited in a relatively thin region of the chromosphere, a result which is largely insensitive to the theoretical method employed to compute the energy deposition rate. 26 refs.

  2. Observing Episodic Coronal Heating Events Rooted in Chromospheric Activity

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Scott W

    2009-01-01

    We present results of a multi-wavelength study of episodic plasma injection into the corona of AR 10942. We exploit long-exposure images of the Hinode and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) spacecraft to study the properties of faint, episodic, "blobs" of plasma that are propelled upward along coronal loops that are rooted in the AR plage. We find that the source location and characteristic velocities of these episodic upflow events match those expected from recent spectroscopic observations of faint coronal upflows that are associated with upper chromospheric activity, in the form of highly dynamic spicules. The analysis presented ties together observations from coronal and chromospheric spectrographs and imagers, providing more evidence of the connection of discrete coronal mass heating and injection events with their source, dynamic spicules, in the chromosphere.

  3. CHROMOSPHERIC POLARIZATION IN THE PHOTOSPHERIC SOLAR OXYGEN INFRARED TRIPLET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Pino Alemán, Tanausú; Trujillo Bueno, Javier [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-07-20

    We present multilevel radiative transfer modeling of the scattering polarization observed in the solar O i infrared triplet around 777 nm. We demonstrate that the scattering polarization pattern observed on the solar disk forms in the chromosphere, far above the photospheric region where the bulk of the emergent intensity profiles originate. We investigate the sensitivity of the polarization pattern to the thermal structure of the solar atmosphere and to the presence of weak magnetic fields (10{sup −2}–100 G) through the Hanle effect, showing that the scattering polarization signals of the oxygen infrared triplet encode information on the magnetism of the solar chromosphere.

  4. Chromospheric Polarization in the Photospheric Solar Oxygen Infrared Triplet

    CERN Document Server

    Alemán, T del Pino

    2015-01-01

    We present multilevel radiative transfer modeling of the scattering polarization observed in the solar O I infrared triplet around 777 nm. We demonstrate that the scattering polarization pattern observed on the solar disk forms in the chromosphere, far above the photospheric region where the bulk of the emergent intensity profiles originates. We study the sensitivity of the polarization pattern to the thermal structure of the solar atmosphere and to the presence of weak magnetic fields (0.01 - 100 G) through the Hanle effect, showing that the scattering polarization signals of the oxygen infrared triplet encode information on the magnetism of the solar chromosphere.

  5. The Role of Partial Ionization Effects in the Chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Hansteen, Viggo H; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    The energy for the coronal heating must be provided from the convection zone. The amount and the method by which this energy is transferred into the corona depends on the properties of the lower atmosphere and the corona itself. We review: 1) how the energy could be built in the lower solar atmosphere; 2) how this energy is transferred through the solar atmosphere; and 3) how the energy is finally dissipated in the chromosphere and/or corona. Any mechanism of energy transport has to deal with the various physical processes in the lower atmosphere. We will focus on a physical process that seems to be highly important in the chromosphere and not deeply studied until recently: the ion-neutral interaction effects (INIE) in the chromosphere. We review the relevance and the role of the partial ionization in the chromosphere and show that this process actually impacts considerably the outer solar atmosphere. We include analysis of our 2.5D radiative MHD simulations with the Bifrost code (Gudiksen et al. 2011) includ...

  6. Coronal heating by resonant absorption: The effects of chromospheric coupling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belien, A. J. C.; Martens, P. C. H.; Keppens, R.

    1999-01-01

    We present the first 2.5 dimensional numerical model calculations of the nonlinear wave dynamics and heating by resonant absorption in coronal loops with thermal structuring of the transition region and higher chromosphere. The numerical calculations were done with the Versatile Advection Code. The

  7. Recognizing Chromospheric Objects via Markov Chain Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Saleem; Turmon, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    The solar chromosphere consists of three classes which contribute differentially to ultraviolet radiation reaching the earth. We describe a data set of solar images, means of segmenting the images into the constituent classes, and a novel high-level representation for compact objects based on a triangulated spatial membership function.

  8. Chromospheric and Coronal Wave Generation in a Magnetic Flux Sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yoshiaki; Steiner, Oskar; Hansteen, Viggo; Gudiksen, Boris; Wedemeyer, Sven; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-08-01

    Using radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar atmospheric layers from the upper convection zone to the lower corona, we investigate the self-consistent excitation of slow magneto-acoustic body waves (slow modes) in a magnetic flux concentration. We find that the convective downdrafts in the close surroundings of a two-dimensional flux slab “pump” the plasma inside it in the downward direction. This action produces a downflow inside the flux slab, which encompasses ever higher layers, causing an upwardly propagating rarefaction wave. The slow mode, excited by the adiabatic compression of the downflow near the optical surface, travels along the magnetic field in the upward direction at the tube speed. It develops into a shock wave at chromospheric heights, where it dissipates, lifts the transition region, and produces an offspring in the form of a compressive wave that propagates further into the corona. In the wake of downflows and propagating shock waves, the atmosphere inside the flux slab in the chromosphere and higher tends to oscillate with a period of ν ≈ 4 mHz. We conclude that this process of “magnetic pumping” is a most plausible mechanism for the direct generation of longitudinal chromospheric and coronal compressive waves within magnetic flux concentrations, and it may provide an important heat source in the chromosphere. It may also be responsible for certain types of dynamic fibrils.

  9. Chromospheric anemone jets and magnetic reconnection in partially ionized solar atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, K. A. P.; Shibata, K. [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Nishizuka, N. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa (Japan); Isobe, H. [Unit for Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    The solar optical telescope onboard Hinode with temporal resolution of less than 5 s and spatial resolution of 150 km has observed the lower solar atmosphere with an unprecedented detail. This has led to many important findings, one of them is the discovery of chromospheric anemone jets in the solar chromosphere. The chromospheric anemone jets are ubiquitous in solar chromosphere and statistical studies show that the typical length, life time and energy of the chromospheric anemone jets are much smaller than the coronal events (e.g., jets/flares/CMEs). Among various observational parameters, the apparent length and maximum velocity shows good correlation. The velocity of chromospheric anemone jets is comparable to the local Alfven speed in the lower solar chromosphere. Since the discovery of chromospheric anemone jets by Hinode, several evidences of magnetic reconnection in chromospheric anemone jets have been found and these observations are summarized in this paper. These observations clearly suggest that reconnection occurs quite rapidly as well as intermittently in the solar chromosphere. In the solar corona ({lambda}{sub i} > {delta}{sub SP}), anomalous resistivity arises due to various collisionless processes. Previous MHD simulations show that reconnection becomes fast as well as strongly time-dependent due to anomalous resistivity. Such processes would not arise in the solar chromosphere which is fully collisional and partially-ionized. So, it is unclear how the rapid and strongly time-dependent reconnection would occur in the solar chromosphere. It is quite likely that the Hall and ambipolar diffusion are present in the solar chromosphere and they could play an important role in driving such rapid, strongly time-dependent reconnection in the solar chromosphere.

  10. Optimal Electron Energies for Driving Chromospheric Evaporation in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Reep, Jeffrey; Alexander, David

    2015-01-01

    In the standard model of solar flares, energy deposition by a beam of electrons drives strong chromospheric evaporation leading to a significantly denser corona and much brighter emission across the spectrum. Chromospheric evaporation was examined in great detail by Fisher, Canfield, & McClymont (1985a,b,c), who described a distinction between two different regimes, termed explosive and gentle evaporation. In this work, we examine the importance of electron energy and stopping depths on the two regimes and on the atmospheric response. We find that with explosive evaporation, the atmospheric response does not depend strongly on electron energy. In the case of gentle evaporation, lower energy electrons are significantly more efficient at heating the atmosphere and driving up-flows sooner than higher energy electrons. We also find that the threshold between explosive and gentle evaporation is not fixed at a given beam energy flux, but also depends strongly on the electron energy and duration of heating. Furt...

  11. Evidence for Planet-induced Chromospheric Activity on HD 179949

    CERN Document Server

    Shkolnik, E; Bohlender, D A; Shkolnik, Evgenya; Walker, Gordon A.H.; Bohlender, David A.

    2003-01-01

    We have detected the synchronous enhancement of Ca II H & K emission with the short-period planetary orbit in HD 179949. High-resolution spectra taken on three observing runs extending more than a year show the enhancement coincides with phi ~ 0 (the sub-planetary point) of the 3.093-day orbit with the effect persisting for more than 100 orbits. The synchronous enhancement is consistent with planet-induced chromospheric heating by magnetic rather than tidal interaction. Something which can only be confirmed by further observations. Independent observations are needed to determine whether the stellar rotation is sychronous with the planet's orbit. Of the five 51 Peg-type systems monitored, HD 179949 shows the greatest chromospheric H & K activity. Three others show significant nightly variations but the lack of any phase coherence prevents us saying whether the activity is induced by the planet. Our two standards, tau Ceti and the Sun, show no such nightly variations.

  12. Solar Physics at Evergreen: Solar Dynamo and Chromospheric MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zita, E. J.; Maxwell, J.; Song, N.; Dikpati, M.

    2006-12-01

    We describe our five year old solar physics research program at The Evergreen State College. Famed for its cloudy skies, the Pacific Northwest is an ideal location for theoretical and remote solar physics research activities. Why does the Sun's magnetic field flip polarity every 11 years or so? How does this contribute to the magnetic storms Earth experiences when the Sun's field reverses? Why is the temperature in the Sun's upper atmosphere millions of degrees higher than the Sun's surface temperature? How do magnetic waves transport energy in the Sun’s chromosphere and the Earth’s atmosphere? How does solar variability affect climate change? Faculty and undergraduates investigate questions such as these in collaboration with the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder. We will describe successful student research projects, logistics of remote computing, and our current physics investigations into (1) the solar dynamo and (2) chromospheric magnetohydrodynamics.

  13. Analytical description of nonlinear acoustic waves in the solar chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Chae, Jongchul

    2017-02-01

    Aims: Vertical propagation of acoustic waves of finite amplitude in an isothermal, gravitationally stratified atmosphere is considered. Methods: Methods of nonlinear acoustics are used to derive a dispersive solution, which is valid in a long-wavelength limit, and a non-dispersive solution, which is valid in a short-wavelength limit. The influence of the gravitational field on wave-front breaking and shock formation is described. The generation of a second harmonic at twice the driving wave frequency, previously detected in numerical simulations, is demonstrated analytically. Results: Application of the results to three-minute chromospheric oscillations, driven by velocity perturbations at the base of the solar atmosphere, is discussed. Numerical estimates suggest that the second harmonic signal should be detectable in an upper chromosphere by an instrument such as the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph installed at the 1.6-m New Solar Telescope of the Big Bear Observatory.

  14. The effects of transients on photospheric and chromospheric power distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Samanta, T; Banerjee, D; Prasad, S Krishna; Mathioudakis, M; Jess, D; Pant, V

    2016-01-01

    We have observed a quiet Sun region with the Swedish 1-meter Solar Telescope (SST) equipped with CRISP Imaging SpectroPolarimeter. High-resolution, high-cadence, H$\\alpha$ line scanning images were taken to observe different layers of the solar atmosphere from the photosphere to upper chromosphere. We study the distribution of power in different period-bands at different heights. Power maps of the upper photosphere and the lower chromosphere show suppressed power surrounding the magnetic-network elements, known as "magnetic shadows". These also show enhanced power close to the photosphere, traditionally referred to as "power halos". The interaction between acoustic waves and inclined magnetic fields is generally believed to be responsible for these two effects. In this study we explore if small-scale transients can influence the distribution of power at different heights. We show that the presence of transients, like mottles, Rapid Blueshifted Excursions (RBEs) and Rapid Redshifted Excursions (RREs), can stro...

  15. A mechanism for deep chromospheric heating during solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, M. E.; Emslie, A. G.; Mauas, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    The role of the negative hydrogen ion, H(-), in the energy balance of the deep solar chromosphere is reexamined and it is found, in contrast with earlier authors, that H(-) is a source of heating at these levels. The response of this region to an ionizing flux of flare-associated UV radiation (1500 to 1900 A) is then addressed: it is found that the excess ionization of Si to Si(+) increases the local electron number density considerably, since most species are largely neutral at deep chromospheric levels. This in turn increases the electron-hydrogen atom association rate, the H(-) abundance, and the rate of absorption of photospheric radiation by this ion. It is found that the excess absorption by this process may lead to a substantial temperature enhancement at temperature minimum levels during flares.

  16. The galloping chromosphere. [H alpha observation of oscillating velocity fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, C.

    1974-01-01

    Oscillating velocity fields can be observed on H-alpha filtergrams as a shifting pattern of intensity fluctuations known as 'the galloping chromosphere'. The characteristics of this activity are those of horizontal running waves of typical period of about 300 sec and long wavelength (about 20,000 km) that can be interpreted as acoustic-gravity waves propagating in the acoustic domain. Periods are longer in dark, structured regions, and in fibrils, and the change is quantitatively consistent with the reduction of resonance frequency in a magnetic field of 1 to 10 gauss. These easily observed fluctuations thus offer a means of estimating magnetic-field strength at specific locations in the chromosphere. Phase velocities are high, ranging upward from typical values between 50 and 100 km per sec, and tending to be lower in active regions and toward the limb.

  17. The non-active stellar chromosphere: Ca II basal flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Martínez, M. I.; Schröder, K.-P.; Hauschildt, P.

    2014-11-01

    We analyse high-resolution, high-s/n European Southern Observatories (ESO)-archive spectra (from UVES, the UV echelle spectrograph) of 76 inactive or modestly active stars of spectral type G to M, main sequence and giants. Using PHOENIX model photospheres with Ca II K lines that match the observed line profiles, we (i) revise the effective temperatures, (ii) obtain a precise surface flux scale for each star and (iii) directly determine the exact surface fluxes of each Ca II K chromospheric emission with respect to the photospheric line profile. We find that our stellar sample exhibits a lower boundary to its chromospheric surface flux distribution with an unprecedented definition. From a subsample of the 25 least active stars, we obtain a simple empirical formula for the basal Ca II flux as a function of effective temperature: log {F^basal_{Ca II(H+K)}} = 7.05(± 0.31) log {T_eff} - 20.86(± 1.15). This is in good agreement with the Mg II basal flux. In a direct comparison with the large body of Mt Wilson S-measurements of the chromospheric Ca II emission and its well-defined cut-off, excellent agreement is achieved as well. A new result, however, is the small scatter of the least active star's fluxes about the basal flux. It is about 25 per cent and equals the residual uncertainties of our approach. At the same time, we do not find any evidence for a gravity dependence within these limits. This strongly confirms the basal flux as a well-defined and universal phenomenon, which characterizes every inactive chromosphere.

  18. A User-Friendly Code to Diagnose Chromospheric Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The physical interpretation of spectropolarimetric observations of lines of neutral helium, such as those of the 10830 A multiplet, represents an excellent opportunity for investigating the magnetism of plasma structures in the solar chromosphere. Here we present a powerful forward modeling and inversion code that permits either to calculate the emergent intensity and polarization for any given magnetic field vector or to infer the dynamical and magnetic properties from the observed Stokes pr...

  19. Chromospheric telescope of Baikal Astrophysical Observatory. New light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomorovsky, Valeriy; Kushtal, Galina; Lopteva, Lyubov; Proshin, Vladimir; Trifonov, Viktor; Chuprakov, Sergey; Khimich, Valeriy

    2016-06-01

    A chromospheric telescope is an important instrument for synoptic observations and solar research. After several decades of observations with the chromospheric telescope at Baikal Astrophysical Observatory, a need arose to improve the characteristics of this telescope and filter. A new reimaging lens to produce full-disk solar images 18 mm in diameter at the CCD camera Hamamatsu C-124 with a detector 36×24 mm (4000×2672 pixels) was designed and manufactured to replace the out-of-operation 50×50 mm Princeton Instruments camera. A contrast interference blocking filter and a new Iceland spar and quartz crystal plates instead of damaged ones were made and installed in the Hα birefringent filter (BF), manufactured by Bernhard Halle Nachfl. The optical immersion in the filter was changed. All telescope optics was cleaned and adjusted. We describe for the first time the design features and their related BF passband tuning. The wavefront interferograms of optical elements and telescope as a whole show that the wavefront distortion of the optical path is within 0.25 λ. The BF and pre-filter spectral parameters provide high-contrast monochromatic images. Besides, we give examples of solar chromospheric images in the Hα line core and wing.

  20. Do we have a radio powerful star without a chromosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurzadyan, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    Two radio stars are selected, both equally powerful in microwave radio emission, but one of which, HD 101379, with a superpower chromosphere, and the other one, HD 132742, without a noticable chromosphere. On International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) recordings of HD 132742, a binary system like HD 101319, the doublet 2800 Mg II appears in absorption. However, in the last case the faint emission traces of k and h Mg II have been discovered in the lowest parts of absorption profiles. The reconstructed profiles of these emission details seem to be shifted to the relation of absorption profiles, which may be interpreted as a confirmation of the non-chromospheric nature of these details. In the case of radio star HD 101379, also a binary system, on the contrary, the doublet 2800 Mg II appears as a strong emission, without shift. These limiting cases may be combined assuming that the sources of both types of emission, radio and magnesium doublet, are located in the space between the components of binary systems. The parameters of these sources are obtained.

  1. On the solar chromosphere observed at the limb with Hinode

    CERN Document Server

    Judge, Philip G

    2010-01-01

    Broad-band images in the Ca II H line, from the BFI instrument on the Hinode spacecraft, show emission from spicules emerging from and visible right down to the observed limb. Surprisingly, little absorption of spicule light is seen along their lengths. We present formal solutions to the transfer equation for given (ad-hoc) source functions, including a stratified chromosphere from which spicules emanate. The model parameters are broadly compatible with earlier studies of spicules. The visibility of Ca II spicules down to the limb in Hinode data seems to require that spicule emission be Doppler shifted relative to the stratified atmosphere, either by supersonic turbulent or organized spicular motion. The non-spicule component of the chromosphere is almost invisible in the broad band BFI data, but we predict that it will be clearly visible in high spectral resolution data. Broad band Ca II H limb images give the false impression that the chromosphere is dominated by spicules. Our analysis serves as a reminder ...

  2. Propagation of magnetically guided acoustic shocks in the solar chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foukal, P.; Smart, M.

    1981-01-01

    The propagation of a train of acoustic shocks guided by diverging magnetic fields through a static model of the solar chromospheric network and transition region is investigated. For initial flux densities of 1,000,000 ergs/sq cm/sec in the lower chromosphere, the local efficiency of acoustic transmission into the corona can be much higher than that calculated for a plane parallel atmosphere. Acoustic energy will tend to be deposited at higher chromospheric levels in diverging magnetic fields, and magnetic guiding may influence the temperature profile of the network and plages. The total flux that can be transmitted into the corona along such diverging fields is severely limited since the magnetic elements occupy a small fractional area of the photosphere and the transmission efficiency is a rapidly decreasing function of initial flux density. Diverging magnetic fields and a varying ratio of specific heats are not likely to allow high frequency shocks to dissipate high enough in a static atmosphere to contribute significantly to the coronal energy balance.

  3. Tracing Ca K grains through the chromosphere into the transition region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, S.; Deubner, F.-L.; Fleck, B.; Wilhelm, K.

    1997-01-01

    The propagation of Ca K grains from the lower chromosphere into the transition region is studied. Data from the solar ultraviolet measurement of emitted radiation (SUMER) and the VTT at Inzana (Tenerife) instruments were used. The purpose of the study was to investigate the formation of shock waves in the chromosphere. The most dynamical features in the chromosphere defined by the bright Ca II K emission in the filtergrams and spectrograms were analyzed.

  4. Structure and Dynamics of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    2002-04-01

    The grant supported research on the structure of the quiet, nonmagnetic chromosphere and on wave excitation and propagation in both the nonmagnetic chromosphere and the magnetic network. The work on the structure of the chromosphere culminated in the recognition that between two competing views of the solar chromosphere, older models by Avrett and collaborators (referred to as VAL) and the newer, dynamical model by Carlsson & Stein (referred to as CS), the clear decision is in favor of the older models, and this in spite of the evident lack of physics, which does not include wave motion and oscillations. The contrast between the static VAL models and the dynamical CS model can be stated most succinctly by comparing the temperature variation implied by the VAL models and the temperature fluctuations of the CS model, which are, respectively, of the order of 10% for the VAL model (at heights where hydrogen is 50% ionized) and a factor of 10 (at the upper boundary of their chromospheric model). The huge fluctuations of the CS model have never been observed, whereas the smaller temperature variations of the VAL models are consistent with ground-based and space-based observations. While it should be obvious which model describes the Sun and which one fails, the case is far from settled in the minds of solar physicists. Thus, much educational work remains to be done and, of course, more research to develop arguments that make the case more convincing. The research on waves and oscillations has been based on a unified theory of excitation of acoustic waves in the field-free atmosphere and of transverse and longitudinal waves in magnetic flux tubes located in the magnetic network by noting, first, that impulsive excitation of all these waves in gravitationally stratified media leads to oscillations at the respective cutoff frequencies and, second, that the observed oscillation frequencies in the nonmagnetic and magnetic parts of the chromosphere match corresponding cutoff

  5. DOT tomography of the solar atmosphere VII. Chromospheric response to acoustic events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.; van Veelen, B.; Sütterlin, P.

    2008-01-01

    We use synchronous movies from the Dutch Open Telescope sampling the G band, Ca ii H, and Hα with five-wavelength profile sampling to study the response of the chromosphere to acoustic events in the underlying photosphere. We first compare the visibility of the chromosphere in Ca ii H and Hα, demons

  6. Numerical RHD simulations of flaring chromosphere with Flarix

    CERN Document Server

    Heinzel, P; Varady, M; Karlicky, M; Moravec, Z

    2016-01-01

    Flarix is a radiation-hydrodynamical (RHD) code for modeling of the response of the chromosphere to a beam bombardment during solar flares. It solves the set of hydrodynamic conservation equations coupled with non-LTE equations of radiative transfer. The simulations are driven by high energy electron beams. We present results of the Flarix simulations of a flaring loop relevant to the problem of continuum radiation during flares. In particular we focus on properties of the hydrogen Balmer continuum which was recently detected by IRIS.

  7. Radiative diagnostics in the solar photosphere and chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, Jaime de la Cruz

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields on the surface of the Sun and stars in general imprint or modify the polarization state of the electromagnetic radiation that is leaving from the star. The inference of solar/stellar magnetic fields is performed by detecting, studying and modeling polarized light from the target star. In this review we present an overview of techniques that are used to study the atmosphere of the Sun, and particularly those that allow to infer magnetic fields. We have combined a small selection of theory on polarized radiative transfer, inversion techniques and we discuss a number of results from chromospheric inversions.

  8. Chromospheric emission of planet candidate systems - a way to identify false positives

    CERN Document Server

    Karoff, Christoffer; Boxano, Alfio; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou

    2016-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the presence of closely orbiting giant planets is associated with enhanced chromospheric emission of their host stars. The main cause for such a relation would likely be enhanced dynamo action induced by the planet. We present measurements of chromospheric emission in 234 planet candidate systems from the Kepler mission. This ensemble includes 37 systems with giant planet candidates, which show a clear emission enhancement. The enhancement, however, disappears when systems which are also identified as eclipsing binary candidates are removed from the ensemble. This suggests that a large fraction of the giant planet candidate systems with chromospheric emission stronger than the Sun are not giant planet system, but false positives. Such false-positive systems could be tidally interacting binaries with strong chromospheric emission. This hypotesis is supported by an analysis of 188 eclipsing binary candidates that show increasing chromospheric emission as function of decreasing orbi...

  9. ALFVÉNIC WAVE HEATING OF THE UPPER CHROMOSPHERE IN FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reep, J. W. [National Research Council Post-Doc Program, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Russell, A. J. B., E-mail: jeffrey.reep.ctr@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: arussell@maths.dundee.ac.uk [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Nethergate, Dundee, DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-10

    We have developed a numerical model of flare heating due to the dissipation of Alfvénic waves propagating from the corona to the chromosphere. With this model, we present an investigation of the key parameters of these waves on the energy transport, heating, and subsequent dynamics. For sufficiently high frequencies and perpendicular wave numbers, the waves dissipate significantly in the upper chromosphere, strongly heating it to flare temperatures. This heating can then drive strong chromospheric evaporation, bringing hot and dense plasma to the corona. We therefore find three important conclusions: (1) Alfvénic waves, propagating from the corona to the chromosphere, are capable of heating the upper chromosphere and the corona, (2) the atmospheric response to heating due to the dissipation of Alfvénic waves can be strikingly similar to heating by an electron beam, and (3) this heating can produce explosive evaporation.

  10. Electrostatic plasma instabilities driven by neutral gas flows in the solar chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Gogoberidze, G; Poedts, S; De Keyser, J

    2013-01-01

    We investigate electrostatic plasma instabilities of Farley-Buneman (FB) type driven by quasi-stationary neutral gas flows in the solar chromosphere. The role of these instabilities in the chromosphere is clarified. We find that the destabilizing ion thermal effect is highly reduced by the Coulomb collisions and can be ignored for the chromospheric FB-type instabilities. On the contrary, the destabilizing electron thermal effect is important and causes a significant reduction of the neutral drag velocity triggering the instability. The resulting threshold velocity is found as function of chromospheric height. Our results indicate that the FB type instabilities are still less efficient in the global chromospheric heating than the Joule dissipation of the currents driving these instabilities. This conclusion does not exclude the possibility that the FB type instabilities develop in the places where the cross-field currents overcome the threshold value and contribute to the heating locally. Typical length-scales...

  11. Multiwavelength studies of MHD waves in the solar chromosphere: An overview of recent results

    CERN Document Server

    Jess, D B; Verth, G; Fedun, V; Grant, S D T; Giagkiozis, I

    2015-01-01

    The chromosphere is a thin layer of the solar atmosphere that bridges the relatively cool photosphere and the intensely heated transition region and corona. Compressible and incompressible waves propagating through the chromosphere can supply significant amounts of energy to the interface region and corona. In recent years an abundance of high-resolution observations from state-of-the-art facilities have provided new and exciting ways of disentangling the characteristics of oscillatory phenomena propagating through the dynamic chromosphere. Coupled with rapid advancements in magnetohydrodynamic wave theory, we are now in an ideal position to thoroughly investigate the role waves play in supplying energy to sustain chromospheric and coronal heating. Here, we review the recent progress made in characterising, categorising and interpreting oscillations manifesting in the solar chromosphere, with an impetus placed on their intrinsic energetics.

  12. Alfv\\'enic Wave Heating of the Upper Chromosphere in Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Reep, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a numerical model of flare heating due to the dissipation of Alfv\\'enic waves propagating from the corona to the chromosphere. With this model, we present an investigation of the key parameters of these waves on the energy transport, heating, and subsequent dynamics. For sufficiently high frequencies and perpendicular wave numbers, the waves dissipate significantly in the upper chromosphere, strongly heating it to flare temperatures. This heating can then drive strong chromospheric evaporation, bringing hot and dense plasma to the corona. We therefore find three important conclusions: (1) Alfv\\'enic waves, propagating from the corona to the chromosphere, are capable of heating the upper chromosphere and the corona, (2) the atmospheric response to heating due to the dissipation of Alfv\\'enic waves can be strikingly similar to heating by an electron beam, and (3) this heating can produce explosive evaporation.

  13. Chromospheric heating by acoustic waves compared to radiative cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Sobotka, M; Švanda, M; Jurčák, J; del Moro, D; Berrilli, F

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic and magnetoacoustic waves are among the possible candidate mechanisms that heat the upper layers of solar atmosphere. A weak chromospheric plage near a large solar pore NOAA 11005 was observed on October 15, 2008 in the lines Fe I 617.3 nm and Ca II 853.2 nm with the Interferometric Bidimemsional Spectrometer (IBIS) attached to the Dunn Solar Telescope. Analyzing the Ca II observations with spatial and temporal resolutions of 0.4" and 52 s, the energy deposited by acoustic waves is compared with that released by radiative losses. The deposited acoustic flux is estimated from power spectra of Doppler oscillations measured in the Ca II line core. The radiative losses are calculated using a grid of seven 1D hydrostatic semi-empirical model atmospheres. The comparison shows that the spatial correlation of maps of radiative losses and acoustic flux is 72 %. In quiet chromosphere, the contribution of acoustic energy flux to radiative losses is small, only of about 15 %. In active areas with photospheric ma...

  14. Chromospheric Models and the Oxygen Abundance in Giant Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Dupree, A K; Kurucz, R L

    2016-01-01

    Realistic stellar atmospheric models of two typical metal-poor giant stars in Omega Centauri that include a chromosphere influence the formation of optical lines of Oxygen I: the forbidden lines (630nm, 636nm) and the infrared triplet (777.1-777.5 nm). One-dimensional semi-empirical non-LTE models are constructed based on observed Balmer lines. A full non-LTE formulation is applied in evaluating line strengths of O I including photoionization by the Lyman continuum and photoexcitation by Ly-alpha and Ly-beta. Chromospheric models (CHR) yield forbidden oxygen transitions that are stronger than in radiative/convective equilibrium (RCE) models. The triplet oxygen lines from high levels also appear stronger than produced in an RCE model. The inferred oxygen abundance from realistic CHR models for these two stars is decreased by factors ~3 as compared to values derived from RCE models. A lower oxygen abundance suggests that intermediate mass AGB stars contribute to the observed abundance pattern in globular cluste...

  15. Chromospheric Models and the Oxygen Abundance in Giant Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, A. K.; Avrett, E. H.; Kurucz, R. L.

    2016-04-01

    Realistic stellar atmospheric models of two typical metal-poor giant stars in Omega Centauri, which include a chromosphere (CHR), influence the formation of optical lines of O i: the forbidden lines (λ6300, λ6363) and the infrared triplet (λλ7771-7775). One-dimensional semi-empirical non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) models are constructed based on observed Balmer lines. A full non-LTE formulation is applied for evaluating the line strengths of O i, including photoionization by the Lyman continuum and photoexcitation by Lyα and Lyβ. Chromospheric models (CHR) yield forbidden oxygen transitions that are stronger than those in radiative/convective equilibrium (RCE) models. The triplet oxygen lines from high levels also appear stronger than those produced in an RCE model. The inferred oxygen abundance from realistic CHR models for these two stars is decreased by factors of ˜3 as compared to values derived from RCE models. A lower oxygen abundance suggests that intermediate-mass AGB stars contribute to the observed abundance pattern in globular clusters. A change in the oxygen abundance of metal-poor field giants could affect models of deep mixing episodes on the red giant branch. Changes in the oxygen abundance can impact other abundance determinations that are critical to astrophysics, including chemical tagging techniques and galactic chemical evolution.

  16. The Chromospheric Activity-Age Relation for M Dwarf Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, N. M.; Oswalt, T. D.; Hawley, S. L.

    2000-12-01

    We present preliminary results from our study in which we use moderate resolution spectroscopy to determine the correlation between the chromospheric activity and age of M dwarf stars in wide binary systems. We have observed ~50 M dwarf stars from our sample with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope. We measure the ratio of Hα luminosity to the bolometric luminosity (LHα /Lbol) of the M dwarf---a measure of activity that is proven to correlate well with age. This project is unique in that it will extend the chromospheric activity-age relation of low-mass main sequence stars beyond the ages provided by cluster methods. The ages so determined are also independent of the uncertainties in cluster age determinations. The technique has the potential to improve by at least a factor of two the precision and the range over which ages can currently be determined for main sequence stars. Work on this project is supported by the NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program grant NGT-50290 (N.M.S.).

  17. Chromospheric Plasma Ejections in a Light Bridge of a Sunspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Donguk; Chae, Jongchul; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Lim, Eun-Kyung; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Yang, Heesu; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Kwak, Hannah

    2017-02-01

    It is well-known that light bridges (LBs) inside a sunspot produce small-scale plasma ejections and transient brightenings in the chromosphere, but the nature and origin of such phenomena are still unclear. Utilizing the high-spatial and high-temporal resolution spectral data taken with the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph and the TiO 7057 Å broadband filter images installed at the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope of Big Bear Solar Observatory, we report arcsecond-scale chromospheric plasma ejections (1.″7) inside a LB. Interestingly, the ejections are found to be a manifestation of upwardly propagating shock waves as evidenced by the sawtooth patterns seen in the temporal-spectral plots of the Ca ii 8542 Å and Hα intensities. We also found a fine-scale photospheric pattern (1″) diverging with a speed of about 2 km s‑1 two minutes before the plasma ejections, which seems to be a manifestation of magnetic flux emergence. As a response to the plasma ejections, the corona displayed small-scale transient brightenings. Based on our findings, we suggest that the shock waves can be excited by the local disturbance caused by magnetic reconnection between the emerging flux inside the LB and the adjacent umbral magnetic field. The disturbance generates slow-mode waves, which soon develop into shock waves, and manifest themselves as the arcsecond-scale plasma ejections. It also appears that the dissipation of mechanical energy in the shock waves can heat the local corona.

  18. The Hβ Chromospheric Magnetic Field in a Quiescent Filament

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    We observed the line-of-sight magnetic field in the chromosphereandphotosphere of a large quiescent filament on the solar disk on September 6, 2001using the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope in Huairou Solar Observing Station. Thechromospheric and photospheric magnetograms together with Hβ filtergrams of thefilament were examined. The filament was located on the neutral line of the largescale longitudinal magnetic field in the photosphere and the chromosphere. Thelateral feet of the filament .were found to be related to magnetic structures with op-posite polarities. Two small lateral feet are linked to weak parasitic polarity. Thereis a negative magnetic structure in the photosphere under a break of the filament.At the location corresponding to the filament in the chromospheric magnetograms,the magnetic strength is found to be about 40-70 Gauss (measuring error about 39Gauss). The magnetic signal indicates the amplitude and orientation of the internalmagnetic field in the filament. We discuss several possible causes which may pro-duce such a measured signal. A twisted magnetic configuration inside the filamentis suggested .

  19. CHROMOSPHERIC MODELS AND THE OXYGEN ABUNDANCE IN GIANT STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupree, A. K.; Avrett, E. H.; Kurucz, R. L., E-mail: dupree@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    Realistic stellar atmospheric models of two typical metal-poor giant stars in Omega Centauri, which include a chromosphere (CHR), influence the formation of optical lines of O i: the forbidden lines (λ6300, λ6363) and the infrared triplet (λλ7771−7775). One-dimensional semi-empirical non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) models are constructed based on observed Balmer lines. A full non-LTE formulation is applied for evaluating the line strengths of O i, including photoionization by the Lyman continuum and photoexcitation by Lyα and Lyβ. Chromospheric models (CHR) yield forbidden oxygen transitions that are stronger than those in radiative/convective equilibrium (RCE) models. The triplet oxygen lines from high levels also appear stronger than those produced in an RCE model. The inferred oxygen abundance from realistic CHR models for these two stars is decreased by factors of ∼3 as compared to values derived from RCE models. A lower oxygen abundance suggests that intermediate-mass AGB stars contribute to the observed abundance pattern in globular clusters. A change in the oxygen abundance of metal-poor field giants could affect models of deep mixing episodes on the red giant branch. Changes in the oxygen abundance can impact other abundance determinations that are critical to astrophysics, including chemical tagging techniques and galactic chemical evolution.

  20. Basal Chromospheric Flux and Maunder Minimum-type Stars: The quiet-Sun Chromosphere as a Universal Phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, K -P; Martinez, M I Perez; Cuntz, M; Schmitt, J H M M

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We demonstrate the universal character of the quiet-Sun chromosphere among inactive stars (solar-type and giants). By assessing the main physical processes, we shed new light on some common observational phenomena. Methods: We discuss measurements of the solar Mt. Wilson S-index, obtained by the Hamburg Robotic Telescope around the extreme minimum year 2009, and compare the established chromospheric basal Ca II K line flux to the Mt. Wilson S-index data of inactive ("flat activity") stars, including giants. Results: During the unusually deep and extended activity minimum of 2009, the Sun reached S-index values considerably deeper than in any of its previously observed minima. In several brief periods, the Sun coincided exactly with the S-indices of inactive ("flat", presumed Maunder Minimum-type) solar analogues of the Mt. Wilson sample; at the same time, the solar visible surface was also free of any plages or remaining weak activity regions. The corresponding minimum Ca II K flux of the quiet Sun and ...

  1. Simulations of Alfven wave driving of the solar chromosphere - efficient heating and spicule launching

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, C S

    2016-01-01

    Two of the central problems in our understanding of the solar chromosphere are how the upper chromosphere is heated and what drives spicules. Estmates of the required chromospheric heating, based on radiative and conductive losses suggest a rate of $\\sim 0.1 \\mathrm{\\:erg\\:cm^{-3}\\:s^{-1}}$ in the lower chromosphere dropping to $\\sim 10^{-3} \\mathrm{\\:erg\\:cm^{-3}\\:s^{-1}}$ in the upper chromosphere (\\citet{Avrett1981}). The chromosphere is also permeated by spicules, higher density plasma from the lower atmosphere propelled upwards at speeds of $\\sim 10-20 \\mathrm{\\:km\\:s^{-1}}$, for so called Type-I spicules (\\citet{Pereira2012,Zhang2012}, reaching heights of $\\sim 3000-5000 \\mathrm{\\:km}$ above the photosphere. A clearer understanding of chromospheric dynamics, its heating and the formation of spicules, is thus of central importance to solar atmospheric science. For over thirty years it has been proposed that photospheric driving of MHD waves may be responsible for both heating and spicule formation. This ...

  2. The Chromospheric Solar Millimeter-wave Cavity; a Common Property in the Semi-empirical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Victor, De la Luz; Emanuele, Bertone

    2014-01-01

    The semi-empirical models of the solar chromosphere are useful in the study of the solar radio emission at millimeter - infrared wavelengths. However, current models do not reproduce the observations of the quiet sun. In this work we present a theoretical study of the radiative transfer equation for four semi- empirical models at these wavelengths. We found that the Chromospheric Solar Milimeter-wave Cavity (CSMC), a region where the atmosphere becomes locally optically thin at millimeter wavelengths, is present in the semi-empirical models under study. We conclude that the CSMC is a general property of the solar chromosphere where the semi-empirical models shows temperature minimum.

  3. A User-Friendly Code to Diagnose Chromospheric Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, A Asensio

    2007-01-01

    The physical interpretation of spectropolarimetric observations of lines of neutral helium, such as those of the 10830 A multiplet, represents an excellent opportunity for investigating the magnetism of plasma structures in the solar chromosphere. Here we present a powerful forward modeling and inversion code that permits either to calculate the emergent intensity and polarization for any given magnetic field vector or to infer the dynamical and magnetic properties from the observed Stokes profiles. This diagnostic tool is based on the quantum theory of spectral line polarization, which self-consistently accounts for the Hanle and Zeeman effects in the most general case of the incomplete Paschen-Back effect regime. We also take into account radiative transfer effects. An efficient numerical scheme based on global optimization methods has been applied. Our Stokes inversion code permits a fast and reliable determination of the global minimum.

  4. A User-Friendly Code to Diagnose Chromospheric Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2007-05-01

    The physical interpretation of spectropolarimetric observations of lines of neutral helium, such as those of the 10830 Å multiplet, represents an excellent opportunity for investigating the magnetism of plasma structures in the solar chromosphere. Here we present a powerful forward modeling and inversion code that permits either to calculate the emergent intensity and polarization for any given magnetic field vector or to infer the dynamical and magnetic properties from the observed Stokes profiles. This diagnostic tool is based on the quantum theory of spectral line polarization, which self-consistently accounts for the Hanle and Zeeman effects in the most general case of the incomplete Paschen-Back effect regime. We also take into account radiative transfer effects. An efficient numerical scheme based on global optimization methods has been applied. Our Stokes inversion code permits a fast and reliable determination of the global minimum.

  5. Chromospheric and Coronal Wave Generation in a Magnetic Flux Sheath

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Yoshiaki; Hansteen, Viggo; Gudiksen, Boris; Wedemeyer, Sven; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Using radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar atmospheric layers from the upper convection zone to the lower corona, we investigate the self-consistent excitation of slow magneto-acoustic body waves (slow modes) in a magnetic flux concentration. We find that the convective downdrafts in the close surroundings of a two-dimensional flux slab "pump" the plasma inside it in the downward direction. This action produces a downflow inside the flux slab, which encompasses ever higher layers, causing an upwardly propagating rarefaction wave. The slow mode, excited by the adiabatic compression of the downflow near the optical surface, travels along the magnetic field in the upward direction at the tube speed. It develops into a shock wave at chromospheric heights, where it dissipates, lifts the transition region, and produces an offspring in the form of a compressive wave that propagates further into the corona. In the wake of downflows and propagating shock waves, the atmosphere inside the flux slab in ...

  6. Evidence for Fine Structure in the Chromospheric Umbral Oscillation

    CERN Document Server

    Centeno, R; Collados, M; Bueno, J T

    2005-01-01

    Novel spectro-polarimetric observations of the \\ion{He}{1} multiplet are used to explore the dynamics of the chromospheric oscillation above sunspot umbrae. The results presented here provide strong evidence in support of the two-component model proposed by Socas-Navarro and co-authors. According to this model, the waves propagate only inside channels of sub-arcsecond width (the ``active'' component), whereas the rest of the umbra remains nearly at rest (the ``quiet'' component). Although the observations support the fundamental elements of that model, there is one particular aspect that is not compatible with our data. We find that, contrary to the scenario as originally proposed, the active component remains through the entire oscillation cycle and harbors both the upflowing and the downflowing phase of the oscillation.

  7. Dynamics of Chromospheric Upflows and Underlying Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Goode, Phil

    2013-01-01

    We used \\ha-0.1 nm and magnetic field (at 1.56$\\mu$) data obtained with the New Solar Telescope to study the origin of the disk counterparts to type II spicules, so-called rapid blueshifted excursions (RBEs). The high time cadence of our chromospheric (10 s) and magnetic field (45 s) data allowed us to generate x-t plots using slits parallel to the spines of the RBEs. These plots, along with potential field extrapolation, led us to suggest that the occurrence of RBEs is generally correlated with the appearance of new, mixed or unipolar fields in close proximity to network fields. RBEs show a tendency to occur at the interface between large-scale fields and small-scale dynamic magnetic loops and thus are likely to be associated with existence of a magnetic canopy. Detection of kinked and/or inverse "Y" shaped RBEs further confirm this conclusion.

  8. ACCELERATION OF TYPE II SPICULES IN THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Michael L., E-mail: mgoodman@wvhtf.org [Advanced Technologies Group, West Virginia High Technology Consortium Foundation, 1000 Galliher Drive, Fairmont, WV 26554 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    A 2.5D, time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic model is used to test the proposition that observed type II spicule velocities can be generated by a Lorentz force under chromospheric conditions. It is found that current densities localized on observed space and time scales of type II spicules and that generate maximum magnetic field strengths {<=}50 G can generate a Lorentz force that accelerates plasma to terminal velocities similar to those of type II spicules. Maximum vertical flow speeds are {approx}150-460 km s{sup -1}, horizontally localized within {approx}2.5-10 km from the vertical axis of the spicule, and comparable to slow solar wind speeds, suggesting that significant solar wind acceleration occurs in type II spicules. Horizontal speeds are {approx}20 times smaller than vertical speeds. Terminal velocity is reached {approx}100 s after acceleration begins. The increase in the mechanical and thermal energy of the plasma during acceleration is (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} ergs. The radial component of the Lorentz force compresses the plasma during the acceleration process by factors as large as {approx}100. The Joule heating flux generated during this process is essentially due to proton Pedersen current dissipation and can be {approx}0.1-3.7 times the heating flux of {approx}10{sup 6} ergs cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} associated with middle-upper chromospheric emission. About 84%-94% of the magnetic energy that accelerates and heats the spicules is converted into bulk flow kinetic energy.

  9. Simulations of Alfvén and Kink Wave Driving of the Solar Chromosphere: Efficient Heating and Spicule Launching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, C. S.; Arber, T. D.

    2016-10-01

    Two of the central problems in our understanding of the solar chromosphere are how the upper chromosphere is heated and what drives spicules. Estimates of the required chromospheric heating, based on radiative and conductive losses, suggest a rate of ˜0.1 erg cm-3 s-1 in the lower chromosphere and drops to ˜10-3 erg cm-3 s-1 in the upper chromosphere. The chromosphere is also permeated by spicules, higher density plasma from the lower atmosphere propelled upwards at speeds of ˜10-20 km s-1, for so-called Type I spicules, which reach heights of ˜3000-5000 km above the photosphere. A clearer understanding of chromospheric dynamics, its heating, and the formation of spicules is thus of central importance to solar atmospheric science. For over 30 years it has been proposed that photospheric driving of MHD waves may be responsible for both heating and spicule formation. This paper presents results from a high-resolution MHD treatment of photospheric driven Alfvén and kink waves propagating upwards into an expanding flux tube embedded in a model chromospheric atmosphere. We show that the ponderomotive coupling from Alfvén and kink waves into slow modes generates shocks, which both heat the upper chromosphere and drive spicules. These simulations show that wave driving of the solar chromosphere can give a local heating rate that matches observations and drive spicules consistent with Type I observations all within a single coherent model.

  10. Possible chromospheric activity cycles in II Peg, UX Ari and V711 Tau

    CERN Document Server

    Buccino, Andrea P

    2008-01-01

    We study the Mount Wilson indices we obtained indirectly from IUE high and low resolution spectra of the RS CVn-type systems II Peg (K2IV), UX Ari (K0IV+G5V) and V711 Tau (K1IV+G5V), extensively observed by IUE from 1978 to 1996. We analyze the activity signatures, which correspond to the primary star, with the Lomb-Scargle periodogram. From the analysis of V711 Tau data, we found a possible chromospheric cycle with a period of 18 years and a shorter near 3-year cycle, which could be associated to a chromospheric flip-flop cycle. The data of II Peg also suggest a chromospheric cycle of near 21 years and a flip-flop cycle of 9 years approximately. Finally, we obtained a possible chromospheric cycle of near 6 years for UX Ari.

  11. Effect of coronal temperature on the scale of solar chromospheric jets

    CERN Document Server

    Iijima, H

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of coronal temperature on the formation process of solar chromospheric jets using two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the region from the upper convection zone to the lower corona. We develop a new radiative magnetohydrodynamic code for the dynamic modeling of the solar atmosphere, employing a LTE equation of state, optically thick radiative loss in the photosphere, optically thin radiative loss in the chromosphere and the corona, and thermal conduction along the magnetic field lines. Many chromospheric jets are produced in the simulations by shock waves passing through the transition region. We find that these jets are projected farther outward when the coronal temperature is lower (similar to that in coronal holes) and shorter when the coronal temperature is higher (similar to that in active regions). When the coronal temperature is high, the deceleration of the chromospheric jets is consistent with the model in which deceleration is determined by the periodic chromo...

  12. Possible chromospheric activity cycles in II Peg, UX Ari and V711 Tau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccino, Andrea P.; Mauas, Pablo J. D.

    2009-02-01

    We study the Mount Wilson indices we obtained indirectly from IUE high and low resolution spectra of the RS CVn-type systems II Peg (K2IV), UX Ari (K0IV+G5V) and V711 Tau (K1IV+G5V), extensively observed by IUE from 1978 to 1996. We analyze the activity signatures, which correspond to the primary star, with the Lomb-Scargle periodogram. From the analysis of V711 Tau data, we found a possible chromospheric cycle with a period of 18 years and a shorter ~3 year cycle, which could be associated to a chromospheric flip-flop cycle. The data of II Peg also suggest a chromospheric cycle of ~21 years and a flip-flop cycle of ~9 years. Finally, we obtained a possible chromospheric cycle of ~6 years for UX Ari.

  13. The Magnetic Coupling of Chromospheres and Winds From Late Type Evolved Stars: Role of MHD Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, Vladimir; Leake, James; Carpenter, Kenneth

    2015-08-01

    Stellar chromospheres and winds represent universal attributes of stars on the cool portion of H-R diagram. In this paper we derive observational constrains for the chromospheric heating and wind acceleration from cool evolved stars and examine the role of Alfven waves as a viable source of energy dissipation and momentum deposition. We use a 1.5D magnetohydrodynamic code with a generalized Ohm's law to study propagation of Alfven waves generated along a diverging magnetic field in a stellar photosphere at a single frequency. We demonstrate that due to inclusion of the effects of ion-neutral collisions in magnetized weakly ionized chromospheric plasma on resistivity and the appropriate grid resolution, the numerical resistivity becomes 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than the physical resistivity. The motions introduced by non-linear transverse Alfven waves can explain non-thermally broadened and non-Gaussian profiles of optically thin UV lines forming in the stellar chromosphere of α Tau and other late-type giant and supergiant stars. The calculated heating rates in the stellar chromosphere model due to resistive (Joule) dissipation of electric currents on Pedersen resistivity are consistent with observational constraints on the net radiative losses in UV lines and the continuum from α Tau. At the top of the chromosphere, Alfven waves experience significant reflection, producing downward propagating transverse waves that interact with upward propagating waves and produce velocity shear in the chromosphere. Our simulations also suggest that momentum deposition by non-linear Alfven waves becomes significant in the outer chromosphere within 1 stellar radius from the photosphere that initiates a slow and massive winds from red giants and supergiants.

  14. Three-Dimensional Propagation of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in the Solar Chromosphere and Corona

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李波; 郑惠南; 王水

    2002-01-01

    We study the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave propagation in the solar atmosphere consisting of the chromosphere and corona. Pressure enhancement and velocity shear are implemented simultaneously at the bottom of the chromosphere. The global propagation of the incurred MHD waves, including fast-mode and slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves as well as Alfvén wave, can be identified. Wave front positions obtained numerically with respect to specific waves fit well with those calculated with local MHD wave speeds.

  15. Propagation of Alfv\\'enic Waves From Corona to Chromosphere and Consequences for Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Alexander J B

    2013-01-01

    How do magnetohydrodynamic waves travel from the fully ionized corona, into and through the underlying partially ionized chromosphere, and what are the consequences for solar flares? To address these questions, we have developed a 2-fluid model (of plasma and neutrals) and used it to perform 1D simulations of Alfv\\'en waves in a solar atmosphere with realistic density and temperature structure. Studies of a range of solar features (faculae, plage, penumbra and umbra) show that energy transmission from corona to chromosphere can exceed 20% of incident energy for wave periods of one second or less. Damping of waves in the chromosphere depends strongly on wave frequency: waves with periods 10 seconds or longer pass through the chromosphere with relatively little damping, however, for periods of 1 second or less, a substantial fraction (37%-100%) of wave energy entering the chromosphere is damped by ion-neutral friction in the mid and upper chromosphere, with electron resistivity playing some role in the lower ch...

  16. EFFECT OF CORONAL TEMPERATURE ON THE SCALE OF SOLAR CHROMOSPHERIC JETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima; Yokoyama, T.H., E-mail: h.iijima@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2015-10-20

    We investigate the effect of coronal temperature on the formation process of solar chromospheric jets using two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the region from the upper convection zone to the lower corona. We develop a new radiative magnetohydrodynamic code for the dynamic modeling of the solar atmosphere, employing an LTE equation of state, optically thick radiative loss in the photosphere, optically thin radiative loss in the chromosphere and the corona, and thermal conduction along the magnetic field lines. Many chromospheric jets are produced in the simulations by shock waves passing through the transition region. We find that these jets are projected farther outward when the coronal temperature is lower (similar to that in coronal holes) and shorter when the coronal temperature is higher (similar to that in active regions). When the coronal temperature is high, the deceleration of the chromospheric jets is consistent with the model in which deceleration is determined by the periodic chromospheric shock waves. However, when the coronal temperature is low, the gravitational deceleration becomes more important and the chromospheric jets approach ballistic motion.

  17. Toward A Self Consistent MHD Model of Chromospheres and Winds From Late Type Evolved Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, V. S.; Leake, J. E.; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first magnetohydrodynamic model of the stellar chromospheric heating and acceleration of the outer atmospheres of cool evolved stars, using α Tau as a case study. We used a 1.5D MHD code with a generalized Ohm's law that accounts for the effects of partial ionization in the stellar atmosphere to study Alfvén wave dissipation and wave reflection. We have demonstrated that due to inclusion of the effects of ion-neutral collisions in magnetized weakly ionized chromospheric plasma on resistivity and the appropriate grid resolution, the numerical resistivity becomes 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than the physical resistivity. The motions introduced by non-linear transverse Alfvé waves can explain non-thermally broadened and non-Gaussian profiles of optically thin UV lines forming in the stellar chromosphere of α Tau and other late-type giant and supergiant stars. The calculated heating rates in the stellar chromosphere due to resistive (Joule) dissipation of electric currents, induced by upward propagating non-linear Alfvé waves, are consistent with observational constraints on the net radiative losses in UV lines and the continuum from α Tau. At the top of the chromosphere, Alfvé waves experience significant reflection, producing downward propagating transverse waves that interact with upward propagating waves and produce velocity shear in the chromosphere. Our simulations also suggest that momentum deposition by non-linear Alfvé waves becomes significant in the outer chromosphere at 1 stellar radius from the photosphere. The calculated terminal velocity and the mass loss rate are consistent with the observationally derived wind properties in α Tau.

  18. The chromospherically--active binary CF Tuc revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Dogru, D; Dogru, S S; Zola, S

    2009-01-01

    New high-resolution spectra, of the chromospherically active binary system CF Tuc, taken at the Mt. John University Observatory in 2007, were analyzed using two methods: cross-correlation and Fourier--based disentangling. As a result, new radial velocity curves of both components were obtained. The resulting orbital elements of CF Tuc are: $a_{1}{\\sin}i$=$0.0254\\pm0.0001$ AU, $a_{2}{\\sin}i$=$0.0228\\pm0.0001$ AU, $M_{1}{\\sin}i$=$0.902\\pm0.005$ $M_{\\odot}$, and $M_{2}{\\sin}i$=$1.008\\pm0.006$ $M_{\\odot}$. The cooler component of the system shows H$\\alpha$ and CaII H & K emissions. Our spectroscopic data and recent $BV$ light curves were solved simultaneously using the Wilson-Devinney code. A dark spot on the surface of the cooler component was assumed to explain large asymmetries observed in the light curves. The following absolute parameters of the components were determined: $M_{1}$=$1.11\\pm0.01$ $M_{\\odot}$, $M_{2}$=$1.23\\pm0.01$ $M_{\\odot}$, $R_{1}$=$1.63\\pm0.02$ $R_{\\odot}$, $R_{2}$=$3.60\\pm0.02$ $R_{\\o...

  19. Hα Line Profile Asymmetries and the Chromospheric Flare Velocity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Simões, P. J. A.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Carlsson, M.; Jafarzadeh, S.; Allred, J. C.; Kowalski, A. F.; Kennedy, M.; Fletcher, L.; Graham, D.; Keenan, F. P.

    2015-11-01

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Hα and Ca ii λ8542 lines are studied using high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Hα line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca ii λ8542 line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesize spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Hα is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, we conclude that the steep velocity gradients in the flaring chromosphere modify the wavelength of the central reversal in the Hα line profile. The shift in the wavelength of maximum opacity to shorter and longer wavelengths generates the red and blue asymmetries, respectively.

  20. Chromospherically active stars. X - Spectroscopy and photometry of HD 212280

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Browning, Jared C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Morton, Mary D.; Hall, Douglas S.

    1993-01-01

    The system HD 212280 is a chromospherically active double lined spectroscopic binary with an orbital period of 45.284 days and an eccentricity of 0.50. The spectrum is composite with spectral types of G8 IV and F5-8 V for the components. An estimated inclination of 78 +/- 8 deg results in masses of 1.7 and 1.4 solar mass for the G subgiant and mid-F star, respectively. The distance to the system is estimated to be 112 pc. Photometric observations obtained between 1987 November and 1992 June reveal that HD 212280 is a newly identified variable star with a V amplitude of about 0.15 mag and a mean period of 29.46 days. Our V data were divided into 11 sets and in all but one case two spots were required to fit the data. Lifetimes of 650 days and a minimum of 1350 days have been determined for two of the four spots. The differential rotation coefficient of 0.05 is relatively small. The age of the system is about 1.9 X 10 exp 9 yrs. The G subgiant is rotating slower than pseudosynchronously while the F-type star is rotating faster.

  1. The Chromospherically Active Low-Mass Close Binary KIC 9761199

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoldaş, E.; Dal, H. A.

    2017-04-01

    We present the results obtained from the analyses of KIC 9761199's light variation acquired by the Kepler Mission. The temperature of the secondary component was found to be 3891±1 K, and the mass ratio was found to be 0.69±0.01 with an orbital inclination of 77°.4± 0°.1. Stellar spots separated by about 180° longitudinally were found around the latitudes of +47° and +30°. In addition, the OPEA model was derived for 94 detected flares. The plateau value was found to be 1.951±0.069 s, while the half-life value was found to be 1014 s. The flare frequency N1 was 0.01351 h-1, while the flare frequency N2 was 0.00006. Maximum flare rise time was 1118.098 s, while maximum flare total time was 6767.72 s. The chromospheric activity level of KIC 9761199 is at the expected level according to a B-V of 1m.303.

  2. Flocculent flows in the chromospheric canopy of a sunspot

    CERN Document Server

    Vissers, Gregal

    2012-01-01

    High-quality imaging spectroscopy in the H{\\alpha} line, obtained with the CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter (CRISP) at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) at La Palma and covering a small sunspot and its surroundings, are studied. They exhibit ubiquitous flows both along fibrils making up the chromospheric canopy away from the spot and in the superpenumbra. We term these flows "flocculent" to describe their intermittent character, that is morphologically reminiscent of coronal rain. The flocculent flows are investigated further in order to determine their dynamic and morphological properties. For the measurement of their characteristic velocities, accelerations and sizes, we employ a new versatile analysis tool, the CRisp SPectral EXplorer (CRISPEX), which we describe in detail. Absolute velocities on the order of 7.2-82.4 km/s are found, with an average value of 36.5\\pm5.9 km/s and slightly higher typical velocities for features moving towards the sunspot than away. These velocities are much higher than th...

  3. Upper Chromospheric Magnetic Field of a Sunspot Penumbra: Observations of Fine Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, J; Solanki, S K; Feller, A; Collados, M; Suárez, D Orozco; Schlichenmaier, R; Franz, M; Balthasar, H; Denker, C; Berkefeld, T; Hofmann, A; Kiess, C; Nicklas, H; Yabar, A Pastor; Rezaei, R; Schmidt, D; Schmidt, W; Sobotka, M; Soltau, D; Staude, J; Strassmeier, K G; Volkmer, R; von der Lühe, O; Waldmann, T

    2016-01-01

    The fine-structure of magnetic field of a sunspot penumbra in the upper chromosphere is to be explored and compared to that in the photosphere. High spatial resolution spectropolarimetric observations were recorded with the 1.5-meter GREGOR telescope using the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS). The observed spectral domain includes the upper chromospheric He I triplet at 1083.0 nm and the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and Ca I 1083.3 nm spectral lines. The upper chromospheric magnetic field is obtained by inverting the He I triplet assuming a Milne-Eddington type model atmosphere. A height dependent inversion was applied to the Si I 1082.7 nm and Ca I 1083.3 nm lines to obtain the photospheric magnetic field. We find that the inclination of the magnetic field shows variations in the azimuthal direction both in the photosphere, but also in the upper chromosphere. The chromospheric variations remarkably well coincide with the variations in the inclination of the photospheric field and resemble the well-known sp...

  4. Chromospheric polarimetry through multiline observations of the 850-nm spectral region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Noda, C.; Shimizu, T.; Katsukawa, Y.; de la Cruz Rodríguez, J.; Carlsson, M.; Anan, T.; Oba, T.; Ichimoto, K.; Suematsu, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Future solar missions and ground-based telescopes aim to understand the magnetism of the solar chromosphere. We performed a supporting study in Quintero Noda et al. focused on the infrared Ca II 8542 Å line and we concluded that it is one of the best candidates because it is sensitive to a large range of atmospheric heights, from the photosphere to the middle chromosphere. However, we believe that it is worth trying to improve the results produced by this line observing additional spectral lines. In that regard, we examined the neighbourhood solar spectrum looking for spectral lines which could increase the sensitivity to the atmospheric parameters. Interestingly, we discovered several photospheric lines which greatly improve the photospheric sensitivity to the magnetic field vector. Moreover, they are located close to a second chromospheric line which also belongs to the Ca II infrared triplet, i.e. the Ca II 8498 Å line, and enhances the sensitivity to the atmospheric parameters at chromospheric layers. We conclude that the lines in the vicinity of the Ca II 8542 Å line not only increase its sensitivity to the atmospheric parameters at all layers, but also they constitute an excellent spectral window for chromospheric polarimetry.

  5. Chromospheric activity on late-type star DM UMa using high-resolution spectroscopic observations

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, LiYun; Han, Xianming L; Chang, Liang; Wang, Daimei

    2016-01-01

    We present new 14 high-resolution echelle spectra to discuss the level of chromospheric activity of DM UMa in {He I} D3, {Na I} D1, D2, Halpha, and {Ca II} infrared triplet lines (IRT). It is the first time to discover the emissions above the continuum in the {He I} D3 lines on 2015 February 9 and 10. The emission on February 9 is the strongest one ever detected for DM UMa. We analysed these chromospheric active indicators by employing the spectral subtraction technique. The subtracted spectra reveal weak emissions in the {Na I} D1, D2 lines, strong emission in the Halpha line, and clear excess emissions in the {Ca II} IRT lines. Our values for the EW8542/EW8498 ratio are on the low side, in the range of 1.0-1.7. There are also clear phase variations of the level of chromospheric activity in equivalent width (EW) light curves in these chromospheric active lines (especially the Halpha line). These phenomena might be explained by flare events or rotational modulations of the level of chromospheric activity.

  6. Long-term chromospheric activity of non-eclipsing RS CVn-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.

    2009-02-01

    Context: The IUE database provides several UV high and low-resolution spectra of RS CVn-type stars from 1978 to 1996. In particular, many of these stars were monitored continuously during several seasons by IUE. Aims: Our main purpose is to study the short and long-term chromospheric activity of the RS CVn systems most observed by IUE: HD 22 468 (V711 Tau, HR 1099, K1IV+G5V), HD 21 242 (UX Ari, K0IV+G5V), and HD 224 085 (II Peg, K2IV). Methods: We first obtained the Mount Wilson index S from the IUE high and low-resolution spectra. Secondly, we used the Lomb-Scargle periodogram to analyse the mean annual index and the amplitude of the rotational modulation of the index S. Results: For HD 22 468 (V711 Tau, HR 1099), we find a possible chromospheric cycle with a period of ~18 years and a shorter cycle with a period of ~3 years, which could be associated to a chromospheric “flip-flop” cycle. The data of HD 224 085 (II Peg) also suggest a chromospheric cycle of ~21 years and a flip-flop cycle of ~9 years. Finally, we obtained a possible chromospheric cycle of ~7 years for HD 21 242 (UX Ari).

  7. What Do IRIS Observations of Mg II k Tell Us about the Solar Plage Chromosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Mats; Leenaarts, Jorrit; De Pontieu, Bart

    2015-08-01

    We analyze observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph of the Mg ii k line, the Mg ii UV subordinate lines, and the O i 135.6 {nm} line to better understand the solar plage chromosphere. We also make comparisons with observations from the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope of the Hα line, the Ca ii 8542 line, and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of the coronal 19.3 {nm} line. To understand the observed Mg ii profiles, we compare these observations to the results of numerical experiments. The single-peaked or flat-topped Mg ii k profiles found in plage imply a transition region at a high column mass and a hot and dense chromosphere of about 6500 K. This scenario is supported by the observed large-scale correlation between moss brightness and filled-in profiles with very little or absent self-reversal. The large wing width found in plage also implies a hot and dense chromosphere with a steep chromospheric temperature rise. The absence of emission in the Mg ii subordinate lines constrain the chromospheric temperature and the height of the temperature rise while the width of the O i 135.6 {nm} line sets a limit to the non-thermal velocities to around 7 km s-1.

  8. Key Properties of Solar Chromospheric Line Formation Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The distribution or wavelength-dependence of the formation regions of frequently used solar lines, Hα, Hβ, CaIIH and CaII8542, in quiet Sun, faint and bright flares is explored in the unpolarized case. We stress four aspects characterising the property of line formation process: 1) width of line formation core; 2) lineformation region; 3) influence of the temperature minimum region; and 4) wavelength ranges within which one can obtain pure chromospheric and photospheric filtergrams. It is shown that the above four aspects depend strongly on the atmo spheric physical condition and the lines used. The formation regions of all the wave length points within a line may be continuously distributed over one depth domain or discretely distributed because of no contribution coming from the temperature minimum reg:on, an important domain in the solar atmosphere that determines the distribution pattern of escape photons. On the other hand, the formation region of one wavelength point may cover only one height range or spread over two domains which are separated again by the temperature minimum region. Different lines may form in different regions in the quiet Sun. However, these line formation regions be come closer ir. solar flaring regions. Finally, though the stratification of line-of-sight velocity can alter the position of the line formation core within the line band and result in the asymmetry of the line formation core about the shifted line center, it can only lead to negligible changes in the line formation region or the line formation core width. All these results can be instructive to solar filtering observations.

  9. Chromospheric activity and rotational modulation of the RS Canum Venaticorum binary V711 Tauri during 1998-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dongtao; Gu, Shenghong

    2015-05-01

    We present long-term high-resolution spectroscopic observations of the very active RS Canum Venaticorum-type star V711 Tau, obtained during several observing runs from 1998 to 2004, and study its chromospheric activity. Using the spectral subtraction technique, several optical chromospheric activity indicators [including the He I D3, Na I D1, D2, Hα and Ca II infrared triplet (IRT) lines] formed at different atmospheric heights are analysed. Strong chromospheric emission supports earlier results that indicate that V711 Tau is a very active system. Two large optical flares were detected during our observations. The results suggest that the main part of chromospheric emission is attributed to the primary star of the system. The secondary also presents weak emission but is less active. The ratios of EW8542/EW8498 indicate that Ca II IRT emission arises predominantly from plage-like regions. We have found rotational modulation of chromospheric activity in the Hα and Ca II IRT lines, which suggests the presence of the chromospheric active longitudes over the surface of V711 Tau. Two active longitudes separated by about 180° were observed to dominate the activity, and the so-called flip-flop phenomenon was seen during our observations. Moreover, the chromospheric activity level shows a long-term variation that gradually increases from a deep minimum near the year 2002. A close spatial connection of photospheric spots and chromospheric active regions in both short and long timescales was found for V711 Tau.

  10. Ultraviolet jets and bright points in the solar chromosphere: I : search for one-to-one relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cook, J.W.; Rutten, R.J.; Hoekzema, N.M.

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectrograms and spectroheliograms of the solar chromosphere are used to test the suggestion (Dere et al. 1986, Rutten & Uitenbroek 1991a) that bright points observed at h = 1600 Å, chromospheric jets observed in CI lines near h = 1560 Å, and Ca II K2V bright points are associated with

  11. On the spatial scales of wave heating in the solar chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, Roberto; Ballester, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Dissipation of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave energy has been proposed as a viable heating mechanism in the solar chromospheric plasma. Here, we use a simplified one-dimensional model of the chromosphere to theoretically investigate the physical processes and the spatial scales that are required for the efficient dissipation of Alfv\\'en waves and slow magnetoacoustic waves. We consider the governing equations for a partially ionized hydrogen-helium plasma in the single-fluid MHD approximation and include realistic wave damping mechanisms that may operate in the chromosphere, namely Ohmic and ambipolar magnetic diffusion, viscosity, thermal conduction, and radiative losses. We perform an analytic local study in the limit of small amplitudes to approximately derive the lengthscales for critical damping and efficient dissipation of MHD wave energy. We find that the critical dissipation lengthscale for Alfv\\'en waves depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and ranges from 10~m to 1~km for realistic field ...

  12. Recent advances in measuring chromospheric magnetic fields in the He I 10830 Å line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagg, A.

    During the last decade advances in instrumentation, atomic physics and modeling have greatly improved the access to the chromospheric magnetic field vector. High sensitivity polarimeters like the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP2, VTT) or the Spectro-Polarimeter for Infrared and Optical Regions (SPINOR, HAO) lead to reliable Zeeman measurements using the He I 10830 Å triplet. The simultaneously measured Si I 10827 Å line provides additional information on the structure of the underlying photosphere. Theoretical modeling of the Hanle and the Paschen-Back effect helped to significantly improve the analysis of polarization measurements in the He I triplet, allowing to directly visualize the magnetic structure of spicules, polar prominences and active regions. Here, I will summarize the results of chromospheric magnetic field measurements using this interesting triplet obtained in the last couple of years and discuss the great potential it has to further uncover the complex structure of the chromosphere and its coupling to the photosphere.

  13. Chromospheric heating and structure as determined from high resolution 3D simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Carlsson, Mats; Gudiksen, Boris V

    2010-01-01

    We have performed 3D radiation MHD simulations extending from the convection zone to the corona covering a box 16 Mm$^3$ at 32 km spatial resolution. The simulations show very fine structure in the chromosphere with acoustic shocks interacting with the magnetic field. Magnetic flux concentrations have a temperature lower than the surroundings in the photosphere but higher in the low chromosphere. The heating is there mostly through ohmic dissipation preferentially at the edges of the flux concentrations. The magnetic field is often wound up around the flux concentrations. When acoustic waves travel up along the field this topology leads to swirling motions seen in chromospheric diagnostic lines such as the calcium infrared triplet.

  14. Chromospheric magnetic reconnection: Two-fluid simulations of coalescing current loops

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, P D

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To investigate magnetic reconnection rates during the coalescence of two current loops in the solar chromosphere, by altering the neutral-hydrogen to proton density ratio, ioniziation/recombination coefficients, collision frequency and relative helicity of the loops. Methods: 2.5D numerical simulations of the chromosphere were conducted using a newly developed two-fluid (ion-neutral) numerical code. Developed from the Artificial Wind scheme, the numerical code includes the effects of ion-neutral collisions, ionization/recombination, thermal/resistive diffusivity and collisional/resistive heating. Results: It was found that the rates of magnetic reconnection strongly depend on the neutral-hydrogen to proton density ratio; increasing the density ratio by a thousand-fold decreased the rate of magnetic reconnection by twenty-fold. This result implies that magnetic reconnection proceeds significantly faster in the upper chromosphere, where the density of ions (protons) and neutral-hydrogen is comparable, tha...

  15. Conditions for Photospherically Driven Alfvenic Oscillations to Heat the Solar Chromosphere by Pedersen Current Dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic model that includes a complete electrical conductivity tensor is used to estimate conditions for photospherically driven, linear, non-plane Alfvenic oscillations extending from the photosphere to the lower corona to drive a chromospheric heating rate due to Pedersen current dissipation that is comparable to the net chromospheric net radiative loss of $\\sim 10^7$ ergs-cm$^{-2}$-sec$^{-1}$. The heating rates due to electron current dissipation in the photosphere and corona are also computed. The wave amplitudes are computed self-consistently as functions of an inhomogeneous background (BG) atmosphere. The effects of the conductivity tensor are resolved numerically using a resolution of 3.33 m. The oscillations drive a chromospheric heating flux $F_{Ch} \\sim 10^7 - 10^8$ ergs-cm$^{-2}$-sec$^{-1}$ at frequencies $\

  16. Observation and numerical modeling of chromospheric evaporation during the impulsive phase of a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Imada, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the chromospheric evaporation flow during the impulsive phase of the flare by using the Hinode/EIS observation and 1D hydrodynamic numerical simulation coupled to the time-dependent ionization. The observation clearly shows that the strong redshift can be observed at the base of the flaring loop only during the impulsive phase. We performed two different numerical simulations to reproduce the strong downflows in FeXII and FeXV during the impulsive phase. By changing the thermal conduction coefficient, we carried out the numerical calculation of chromospheric evaporation in the thermal conduction dominant regime (conductivity coefficient kappa0 = classical value) and the enthalpy flux dominant regime (kappa0 = 0.1 x classical value). The chromospheric evaporation calculation in the enthalpy flux dominant regime could reproduce the strong redshift at the base of the flare during the impulsive phase. This result might indicate that the thermal conduction can be strongly suppressed in some cases o...

  17. A new approach for modelling chromospheric evaporation in response to enhanced coronal heating: 1 the method

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, C D; Cargill, P J; De Moortel, I

    2016-01-01

    We present a new computational approach that addresses the difficulty of obtaining the correct interaction between the solar corona and the transition region in response to rapid heating events. In the coupled corona, transition region and chromosphere system, an enhanced downward conductive flux results in an upflow (chromospheric evaporation). However, obtaining the correct upflow generally requires high spatial resolution in order to resolve the transition region. With an unresolved transition region, artificially low coronal densities are obtained because the downward heat flux jumps across the unresolved region to the chromosphere, underestimating the upflows. Here, we treat the lower transition region as a discontinuity that responds to changing coronal conditions through the imposition of a jump condition that is derived from an integrated form of energy conservation. To illustrate and benchmark this approach against a fully resolved one-dimensional model, we present field-aligned simulations of corona...

  18. Testing Wave Propagation Properties in the Solar Chromosphere with ALMA and IRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Bernard; Straus, Thomas; Wedemeyer, Sven

    2016-05-01

    Waves and oscillations are interesting not only from the point of view that they can propagate energy into the chromosphere and dissipate that energy to produce non-radiative heating, they also carry information about the structure of the atmosphere in which they propagate. Since the late 80s there is substantial evidence that the chromospheric wave field is dominated by a non-propagating component, presumably resulting from wave reflection at the transition region. Observations of Doppler oscillations measured in the Ca II infrared tripet lines, Ca II K, and He 10830 all show vanishing phase lags (i.e. vanishing travel time differences) between the various lines, in particular also for frequencies above the cut-off frequency. Why is the apparent phase speed of high frequency acoustic waves in the chromosphere so high? Are these results misleading because of complex radiation transfer effects in these optically thick lines? ALMA, which acts as a linear thermometer of the solar chromosphere, will provide measurements of the local plasma conditions that should be, at least in principle, much easier to interpret. Multi-wavelength time series of ALMA observations of the temperature fluctuations of inter-network oscillations should allow travel time measurements between different heights as these disturbances propagate through the chromosphere and thus should finally settle the long-standing question about the propagation characteristics of high frequency acoustic waves in the chromosphere. We plan to combine ALMA mm-observations with high resolution IRIS observations in the Mg II h and k lines, and until ALMA observations are available, will study the expected signals using time series of mm-maps from 3D radiation hydrodynamics simulations that are being prepared within the framework of the Solar Simulations for the Atacama Large Millimeter Observatory Network (SSALMON).

  19. MULTIPLE PLASMA EJECTIONS AND INTERMITTENT NATURE OF MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN SOLAR CHROMOSPHERIC ANEMONE JETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, K. A. P.; Nishida, K.; Shibata, K. [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Isobe, H. [Unit of Synergetic Study for Space, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Nishizuka, N., E-mail: singh@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: nishida@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: shibata@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: isobe@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: nishizuka.naoto@jaxa.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    The recent discovery of chromospheric anemone jets with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode has shown an indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection in the solar chromosphere. However, the basic nature of magnetic reconnection in chromosphere is still unclear. We studied nine chromospheric anemone jets from SOT/Hinode using Ca II H filtergrams, and we found multiple bright, plasma ejections along the jets. In most cases, the major intensity enhancements (larger than 30% relative to the background intensity) of the loop correspond to the timing of the plasma ejections. The typical lifetime and size of the plasma ejecta are about 20-60 s and 0.3-1.5 Mm, respectively. The height-time plot of jet shows many sub-structures (or individual jets) and the typical lifetime of the individual jet is about one to five minutes. Before the onset of the jet activity, a loop appears in Ca II H and gradually increases in size, and after few minutes several jets are launched from the loop. Once the jet activity starts and several individual jets are launched, the loop starts shrinking with a speed of {approx}4 km s{sup -1}. In some events, a downward moving blob with a speed of {approx}35 km s{sup -1} was observed, associated with the upward moving plasma along one of the legs of the loop hosting the jets. The upward moving plasma gradually developed into jets. Multiple plasma ejections in chromospheric anemone jet show the strongly time-dependent as well as intermittent nature of magnetic reconnection in the solar chromosphere.

  20. Tracing the Chromospheric and Coronal Magnetic Field with AIA, IRIS, IBIS, and ROSA Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Reardon, Kevin; Jess, Dave B.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the suitability of chromospheric images for magnetic modeling of active regions. We use high-resolution images (≈ 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 2{--}0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 3), from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer in the Ca ii 8542 Å line, the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument in the Hα 6563 Å line, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph in the 2796 Å line, and compare non-potential magnetic field models obtained from those chromospheric images with those obtained from images of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in coronal (171 Å, etc.) and in chromospheric (304 Å) wavelengths. Curvi-linear structures are automatically traced in those images with the OCCULT-2 code, to which we forward-fitted magnetic field lines computed with the Vertical-current Approximation Nonlinear Force Free Field code. We find that the chromospheric images: (1) reveal crisp curvi-linear structures (fibrils, loop segments, spicules) that are extremely well-suited for constraining magnetic modeling; (2) that these curvi-linear structures are field-aligned with the best-fit solution by a median misalignment angle of {μ }2≈ 4^\\circ -7° (3) the free energy computed from coronal data may underestimate that obtained from cromospheric data by a factor of ≈ 2-4, (4) the height range of chromospheric features is confined to h≲ 4000 km, while coronal features are detected up to h = 35,000 km; and (5) the plasma-β parameter is β ≈ {10}-5{--}{10}-1 for all traced features. We conclude that chromospheric images reveal important magnetic structures that are complementary to coronal images and need to be included in comprehensive magnetic field models, something that is currently not accomodated in standard NLFFF codes.

  1. On the dynamic nature of the prolate solar chromosphere: jet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, B.; Koutchmy, S.; Vilinga, J.

    2007-03-01

    Context: In "cool" spectral lines, the smoothed upper edge of the solar chromosphere is prolate in the South-North direction at the epoch of minimum solar activity and nearly spherically symmetric at the maximum phase. We attribute the effect to the dynamical nature of the upper chromosphere, which consists of a large number of small jet-like structures ascending into the corona. We could not resolve the source region of an individual jetlet, although similar but larger structures are visible, especially in EUV coronal lines. Aims: We consider the problem of the formation of an individual jet above the limb, assuming that a large number of jet-like events is responsible for the prolate solar upper chromosphere. We then assume that spicules, being the cool part of the phenomenon, behave similarly, and we will mainly concentrate the analysis on the magnetic origin of the event. Methods: Image processing is used to reveal the displacement of magnetic field tubes filled with coronal plasma and jet formation due to field aligned motion above the null point created in the corona by the emerging magnetic bipole. Results: The growth of the bipole leads to a reconnection of the field lines and to a specific plasma motion in the vicinity of the null point that results in a plasma flow along the spine line of the 3D null. We assume that similar but smaller processes could happen very often at a smaller scale in the chromosphere, near emerging magnetic ephemeral regions, forming numerous jetlets in the upper chromosphere. As the field aligned motion is guided by the magnetic field, at the epoch of low activity the large-scale structure of the polar magnetic field and the one of the quiet equatorial region is sufficiently different to explain the prolateness of the chromosphere.

  2. Theory of Collisional Two-Stream Plasma Instabilities in the Solar Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Chad Allen; Dimant, Yakov; Oppenheim, Meers; Fontenla, Juan

    2014-06-01

    The solar chromosphere experiences intense heating just above its temperature minimum. The heating increases the electron temperature in this region by over 2000 K. Furthermore, it exhibits little time variation and appears widespread across the solar disk. Although semi-empirical models, UV continuum observations, and line emission measurements confirm the existence of the heating, its source remains unexplained. Potential heating sources such as acoustic shocks, resistive dissipation, and magnetic reconnection via nanoflares fail to account for the intensity, persistence, and ubiquity of the heating. Fontenla (2005) suggested turbulence from a collisional two-stream plasma instability known as the Farley-Buneman instability (FBI) could contribute significantly to the heating. This instability is known to heat the plasma of the E-region ionosphere which bears many similarities to the chromospheric plasma. However, the ionospheric theory of the FBI does not account for the diverse ion species found in the solar chromosphere. This work develops a new collisional, two-stream instability theory appropriate for the chromospheric plasma environment using a linear fluid analysis to derive a new dispersion relationship and critical E x B drift velocity required to trigger the instability. Using a 1D, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, radiative transfer model and careful estimates of collision rates and magnetic field strengths, we calculate the trigger velocities necessary to induce the instability throughout the chromosphere. Trigger velocities as low as 4 km s^-1 are found near the temperature minimum, well below the local neutral acoustic speed in that region. From this, we expect the instability to occur frequently, converting kinetic energy contained in neutral convective flows from the photosphere into thermal energy via turbulence. This could contribute significantly to chromospheric heating and explain its persistent and ubiquitous nature.

  3. Chromospherically active stars. II - HD 82558, a young single BY Draconis variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Bopp, Bernard W.; Africano, John L.; Goodrich, Bret D.; Palmer, Leigh Hunter

    1986-01-01

    It is presently noted that the HD 82558 chromospherically active star is a young and rapidly rotating K2 V single BY Draconis variable with very strong far-UV emission features and an H-alpha line filled to the continuum level by emission. HD 82558 has constant velocity and is not a member of the Hyades Supercluster. Its light curve behavior, which appears to have been stable for several hundred rotation cycles, is reminiscent of that of the young, rapidly rotating, single K V variable H II 1883 in the Pleiades; this stability may be characteristic of young, single, chromospherically active stars.

  4. Chromospheric Observations of a Kink Wave in an On-disk Active Region Fibril

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietarila, A. M.; Aznar Cuadrado, R.; Hirzberger, J.; Solanki, S.

    2011-12-01

    Most observations of kink and Alfven waves in the chromosphere are made in off-limb spicules. Here we present observations of a kink wave in high spatial and temporal resolution Ca II 8542 data of an active region fibril on the solar disk. The properties of the observed wave are similar to kink waves in spicules. From the inferred wave phase and period we estimate the lower limit for the field strength in the chromospheric fibril to be a few hundred Gauss. The observations indicate that the event may have been triggered by a small-scale reconnection event higher up in the atmosphere.

  5. Observations of Chromospheric Anemone Jets with Hinode SOT and Hida Ca II Spectroheliogram

    CERN Document Server

    Morita, Satoshi; Ueno, Satoru; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Kitai, Reizaburo; Otsuji, Ken-ichi

    2010-01-01

    We present the first simultaneous observations of chromospheric "anemone" jets in solar active regions with Hinode SOT Ca II H broadband filetergram and Ca II K spetroheliogram on the Domeless Solar Telescope (DST) at Hida Observatory. During the coordinated observation, 9 chromospheric anemone jets were simultaneously observed with the two instruments. These observations revealed three important features, i.e.: (1) the jets are generated in the lower chromosphere, (2) the length and lifetime of the jets are 0.4-5 Mm and 40-320 sec, (3) the apparent velocity of the jets with Hinode SOT are 3-24 km/s, while Ca II K3 component at the jets show blueshifts (in 5 events) in the range of 2- 6 km/s. The chromospheric anemone jets are associated with mixed polarity regions which are either small emerging flux regions or moving magnetic features. It is found that the Ca II K line often show red or blue asymmetry in K2/K1 component: the footpoint of the jets associated with emerging flux regions often show redshift (2-...

  6. Inference of the chromospheric magnetic field orientation in the Ca ii 8542 Å line fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio Ramos, A.; de la Cruz Rodríguez, J.; Martínez González, M. J.; Socas-Navarro, H.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Solar chromospheric fibrils, as observed in the core of strong chromospheric spectral lines, extend from photospheric field concentrations suggesting that they trace magnetic field lines. These images have been historically used as proxies of magnetic fields for many purposes. Aims: Use statistical analysis to test whether the association between fibrils and magnetic field lines is justified. Methods: We use a Bayesian hierarchical model to analyze several tens of thousands of pixels in spectro-polarimetric chromospheric images of penumbrae and chromospheric fibrils. We compare the alignment between the field azimuth inferred from the linear polarization signals through the transverse Zeeman effect and the direction of the fibrils in the image. Results: We conclude that, in the analyzed fields of view, fibrils are often well aligned with the magnetic field azimuth. Despite this alignment, the analysis also shows that there is a non-negligible dispersion. In penumbral filaments, we find a dispersion with a standard deviation of 16°, while this dispersion goes up to 34° in less magnetized regions.

  7. Chromospheric Diagnosis with Ca II Lines: Forward Modeling in Forward Scattering. I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, E. S.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a synthetic tomography of the quiet solar chromosphere formed by spatial maps of scattering polarization. It has been calculated for the Ca II 8498, 8542, and 3934 Å lines by solving the non-LTE radiative transfer problem of the second kind in a three-dimensional atmosphere model obtained from realistic magneto-hydrodynamical simulations. Our investigation focuses on the linear polarization signals induced by kinematics, radiation field anisotropy, and the Hanle effect in forward-scattering geometry. Thus, instead of considering slit profiles at the limb as normally done in the study of the second solar spectrum, we synthesize and analyze spatial maps of polarization at the disk center. This allows us to understand the spatial signatures of dynamics and magnetic field in the linear polarization in order to discriminate them observationally. Our results suggest some ideas for chromospheric diagnosis that will be developed throughout a series of papers. In particular, Hanle polarity inversion lines and dynamic Hanle diagrams are two concepts introduced in the present work. We find that chromospheric dynamics and magnetic field topology create spatial polarization fingerprints that trace the dynamic situation of the plasma and the magnetic field. This allows us to reconstruct the magnetic field intensity in the middle chromosphere using Stokes V along grooves of null linear polarization. We finally address the problems of diagnosing Hanle saturation and kinematic amplification of scattering signals using Hanle diagrams.

  8. Spectro-polarimetric observation in UV with CLASP to probe the chromosphere and transition region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Ryouhei; Ishikawa, Ryohko; Winebarger, Amy R.; Auchère, Frédéric; Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Narukage, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Ken; Bando, Takamasa; Katsukawa, Yukio; Kubo, Masahito; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Giono, Gabriel; Hara, Hirohisa; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Sakao, Taro; Tsuneta, Saku; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Goto, Motoshi; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; De Pontieu, Bart; Casini, Roberto; Manso Sainz, Rafael; Asensio Ramos, Andres; Stepan, Jiri; Belluzzi, Luca; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-05-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a NASA sounding-rocket experiment that was performed in White Sands in the US on September 3, 2015. During its 5-minute ballistic flight, CLASP successfully made the first spectro-polarimetric observation in the Lyman-alpha line (121.57 nm) originating in the chromosphere and transition region. Since the Lyman-alpha polarization is sensitive to magnetic field of 10-100 G by the Hanle effect, we aim to infer the magnetic field information in such upper solar atmosphere with this experiment.The obtained CLASP data showed that the Lyman-alpha scattering polarization is about a few percent in the wings and the order of 0.1% in the core near the solar limb, as it had been theoretically predicted, and that both polarization signals have a conspicuous spatio-temporal variability. CLASP also observed another upper-chromospheric line, Si III (120.65 nm), whose critical field strength for the Hanle effect is 290 G, and showed a measurable scattering polarization of a few % in this line. The polarization properties of the Si III line could facilitate the interpretation of the scattering polarization observed in the Lyman-alpha line.In this presentation, we would like to show how the upper chromosphere and transition region are seen in the polarization of these UV lines and discuss the possible source of these complicated polarization signals.

  9. Chromospheric polarimetry through multi-line observations of the 850 nm spectral region

    CERN Document Server

    Noda, C Quintero; Katsukawa, Y; Rodriguez, J de la Cruz; Carlsson, M; Anan, T; Oba, T; Ichimoto, K; Suematsu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Future solar missions and ground-based telescopes aim to understand the magnetism of the solar chromosphere. We performed a supporting study in Quintero Noda et al. (2016) focused on the infrared Ca II 8542 A line and we concluded that is one of the best candidates because it is sensitive to a large range of atmospheric heights, from the photosphere to the middle chromosphere. However, we believe that it is worth to try improving the results produced by this line observing additional spectral lines. In that regard, we examined the neighbour solar spectrum looking for spectral lines that could increase the sensitivity to the atmospheric parameters. Interestingly, we discovered several photospheric lines that greatly improve the photospheric sensitivity to the magnetic field vector. Moreover, they are located close to a second chromospheric line that also belongs to the Ca II infrared triplet, i.e. the Ca II 8498 A line, and enhances the sensitivity to the atmospheric parameters at chromospheric layers. We conc...

  10. Long-term chromospheric activity of non-eclipsing RS CVn-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Buccino, Andrea P

    2008-01-01

    Context. The IUE database provides a large number of UV high and low-resolution spectra of RS CVn-type stars from 1978 to 1996. In particular, many of these stars were monitored continuously during several seasons by IUE. Aims. Our main purpose is to study the short and long-term chromospheric activity of the RS CVn systems most observed by IUE: HD 22468 (V711 Tau, HR 1099, K1IV+G5V), HD 21242 (UX Ari, K0IV+G5V) and HD 224085 (II Peg, K2IV). Methods. We first obtain the Mount Wilson index S from the IUE high and low-resolution spectra. Secondly, we analyse with the Lomb-Scargle periodogram the mean annual index S and the amplitude of its rotational modulation. Results. For HD 22468 (V711 Tau, HR 1099), we found a possible chromospheric cycle with a period of 18 years and a shorter cycle with a period of 3 years, which could be associated to a chromospheric "flip-flop" cycle. The data of HD 224085 (II Peg) also suggest a chromospheric cycle of 21 years and a flip-flop cycle of 9 years. Finally, we obtained a p...

  11. Study of FK Comae Berenices: VII. Correlating photospheric and chromospheric activity

    CERN Document Server

    Vida, K; Ilyin, I V; Oláh, K; Andersen, M I; Hackman, T

    2015-01-01

    We study the connection between the chromospheric and photospheric behaviour of the active late-type star FK Comae. We use spot temperature modelling, light curve inversion based on narrow- and wide-band photometric measurements, Halpha observations from 1997-2010, and Doppler maps from 2004-2010 to compare the behaviour of chromospheric and photospheric features. Investigating low-resolution Halpha spectra we find that the changes in the chromosphere seem to happen mainly on a time scale longer than a few hours, but shorter variations were also observed. According to the Halpha measurements prominences are often found in the chromosphere that reach to more than a stellar radius and are stable for weeks, and which seem to be often, but not every time connected with dark photospheric spots. The rotational modulation of the Halpha emission seems to typically be anticorrelated with the light curve, but we did not find convincing evidence of a clear connection in the long-term trends of the Halpha emission and th...

  12. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability and Excitation of Super-Dreicer Electric Fields in the Solar Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Kronshtadtov, P. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    Within the framework of the long-standing so-called "number problem" in the physics of solar flares, we consider the excitation of a super-Dreicer electric field at the leading edge of the electric current pulse that occurs at the chromospheric legs of a coronal magnetic loop as a result of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. It is shown that for a sufficiently strong electric current, I0 ≥ 10^{10} A, the current pulse propagates in the non-linear mode and generates a strong longitudinal electric field Ez, which strongly depends on the current ( Ez ∝ I03) and can exceed the Dreicer field ( Ez > ED). In this case, the bulk of electrons in the site of the current pulse is in a runaway mode, and the energy release rate in the chromosphere increases significantly. Super-Dreicer electric fields also provide injection of protons into the regime of acceleration by Langmuir turbulence generated by fast electrons at the leading edge of the electric current pulse. The electric field at the pulse edge can exceed the Dreicer field starting from the chromosphere level with the number density n ≈ 10^{13} cm^{-3}. At a lower current I0 < 10^{10} A, a super-Dreicer mode at the higher levels of the chromosphere with n < 10^{12} cm^{-3} occurs.

  13. What do iris observations of Mg II k tell us about the solar plage chromosphere?

    CERN Document Server

    Carlsson, Mats; De Pontieu, Bart

    2015-01-01

    We analyze observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph of the Mg II k line, the Mg II UV subordinate lines, and the O I 135.6 nm line to better understand the solar plage chromosphere. We also make comparisons with observations from the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope of the H{\\alpha} line, the Ca II 8542 line, and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of the coronal 19.3 nm line. To understand the observed Mg II profiles, we compare these observations to the results of numerical experiments. The single-peaked or flat-topped Mg II k profiles found in plage imply a transition region at a high column mass and a hot and dense chromosphere of about 6500 K. This scenario is supported by the observed large-scale correlation between moss brightness and filled-in profiles with very little or absent self-reversal. The large wing width found in plage also implies a hot and dense chromosphere with a steep chromospheric temperature rise. The absence of emission in the Mg II subo...

  14. Physical properties of the quiet solar chromosphere-corona transition region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunin-Barkovskaya, O. V.; Somov, B. V.

    2016-12-01

    The physical properties of the quiet solar chromosphere-corona transition region are studied. Here the structure of the solar atmosphere is governed by the interaction of magnetic fields above the photosphere. Magnetic fields are concentrated into thin tubes inside which the field strength is great. We have studied how the plasma temperature, density, and velocity distributions change along a magnetic tube with one end in the chromosphere and the other one in the corona, depend on the plasma velocity at the chromospheric boundary of the transition region. Two limiting cases are considered: horizontally and vertically oriented magnetic tubes. For various plasma densities we have determined the ranges of plasma velocities at the chromospheric boundary of the transition region for which no shock waves arise in the transition region. The downward plasma flows at the base of the transition region are shown to be most favorable for the excitation of shock waves in it. For all the considered variants of the transition region we show that the thermal energy transfer along magnetic tubes can be well described in the approximation of classical collisional electron heat conduction up to very high velocities at its base. The calculated extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission agrees well with the present-day space observations of the Sun.

  15. Chromospheric Nanoflares as a Source of Coronal Plasma: II. Repeating Nanoflares

    CERN Document Server

    Bradshaw, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    The million degree plasma of the solar corona must be supplied by the underlying layers of the atmosphere. The mechanism and location of energy release, and the precise source of coronal plasma, remain unresolved. In earlier work we pursued the idea that warm plasma is supplied to the corona via direct heating of the chromosphere by nanoflares, contrary to the prevailing belief that the corona is heated in-situ and the chromosphere is subsequently energized and ablated by thermal conduction. We found that single (low-frequency) chromospheric nanoflares could not explain the observed intensities, Doppler-shifts, and red/blue asymmetries in Fe XII and XIV emission lines. In the present work we follow up on another suggestion that the corona could be powered by chromospheric nanoflares that repeat on a timescale substantially shorter than the cooling/draining timescale. That is, a single magnetic strand is re-supplied with coronal plasma before the existing plasma has time to cool and drain. We perform a series ...

  16. Generation of Flows in the Solar Chromosphere Due to Magnetofluid Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, S M; Shatashvili, N L; Yoshida, Z; Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Nikol'skaya, Komunela I.; Shatashvili, Nana L.; Yoshida, Zensho

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that a generalized magneto-Bernoulli mechanism can effectively generate high velocity flows in the Solar chromosphere by transforming the plasma pressure energy into kinetic energy. It is found that at reasonable heights and for realistic plasma parameters, there is a precipitous pressure fall accompanied by a sharp amplification of the flow speed.

  17. Tracing the Chromospheric and Coronal Magnetic Field with AIA, IRIS, IBIS, and ROSA Data

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, M J; Jess, D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the suitability of chromospheric images for magnetic modeling of active regions. We use high-resolution images (0.1") from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) in the Ca II 8542 A line, the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) instrument in the H-alpha 6563 A line, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in the 2796 A line, and compare non-potential magnetic field models obtained from those chromospheric images with those obtained from images of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) in coronal (171 A, etc.) and in chromospheric (304 A) wavelengths. Curvi-linear structures are automatically traced in those images with the OCCULT-2 code, to which we forward-fitted magnetic field lines computed with the Vertical-Current Approximation Non-Linear Force Free Field (VCA-NLFFF) code. We find that the chromospheric images: (1) reveal crisp curvi-linear structures (fibrils, loop segments, spicules) that are extremely well-suited for constrainin...

  18. Toward A Self Consistent MHD Model of Chromospheres and Winds From Late Type Evolved Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, V S; Carpenter, K G

    2014-01-01

    We present the first magnetohydrodynamic model of the stellar chromospheric heating and acceleration of the outer atmospheres of cool evolved stars, using alpha Tau as a case study. We used a 1.5D MHD code with a generalized Ohm's law that accounts for the effects of partial ionization in the stellar atmosphere to study Alfven wave dissipation and wave reflection. We have demonstrated that due to inclusion of the effects of ion-neutral collisions in magnetized weakly ionized chromospheric plasma on resistivity and the appropriate grid resolution, the numerical resistivity becomes 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than the physical resistivity. The motions introduced by non-linear transverse Alfven waves can explain non-thermally broadened and non-Gaussian profiles of optically thin UV lines forming in the stellar chromosphere of alpha Tau and other late-type giant and supergiant stars. The calculated heating rates in the stellar chromosphere due to resistive (Joule) dissipation of electric currents, induced by ...

  19. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability and Excitation of Super-Dreicer Electric Fields in the Solar Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Kronshtadtov, P. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Within the framework of the long-standing so-called "number problem" in the physics of solar flares, we consider the excitation of a super-Dreicer electric field at the leading edge of the electric current pulse that occurs at the chromospheric legs of a coronal magnetic loop as a result of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. It is shown that for a sufficiently strong electric current, I0 ≥ 10^{10} A, the current pulse propagates in the non-linear mode and generates a strong longitudinal electric field Ez, which strongly depends on the current (Ez ∝ I03) and can exceed the Dreicer field (Ez > ED). In this case, the bulk of electrons in the site of the current pulse is in a runaway mode, and the energy release rate in the chromosphere increases significantly. Super-Dreicer electric fields also provide injection of protons into the regime of acceleration by Langmuir turbulence generated by fast electrons at the leading edge of the electric current pulse. The electric field at the pulse edge can exceed the Dreicer field starting from the chromosphere level with the number density n ≈ 10^{13} cm^{-3}. At a lower current I0 < 10^{10} A, a super-Dreicer mode at the higher levels of the chromosphere with n < 10^{12} cm^{-3} occurs.

  20. The effect of magnetic activity saturation in chromospheric flux-flux relationships

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Arnáiz, R M; Crespo-Chacón, I; Montes, D

    2011-01-01

    We present a homogeneous study of chromospheric and coronal flux-flux relationships using a sample of 298 late-type dwarf active stars with spectral types F to M. The chromospheric lines were observed simultaneously in each star to avoid spread due to long term variability. Unlike other works, we subtract the basal chromospheric contribution in all the spectral lines studied. For the first time, we quantify the departure of dMe stars from the general relations. We show that dK and dKe stars also deviate from the general trend. Studying the flux-colour diagrams we demonstrate that the stars deviating from the general relations are those with saturated X-ray emission and that those stars also present saturation in the H$\\alpha$ line. Using several age spectral indicators, we show that they are younger stars than those following the general relationships. The non-universality of flux-flux relationships found in this work should be taken into account when converting between fluxes in different chromospheric activ...

  1. MHD modeling of coronal loops: injection of high-speed chromospheric flows

    CERN Document Server

    Petralia, A; Orlando, S; Klimchuk, J A

    2014-01-01

    Observations reveal a correspondence between chromospheric type II spicules and bright upwardly moving fronts in the corona observed in the EUV band. However, theoretical considerations suggest that these flows are unlikely to be the main source of heating in coronal magnetic loops. We investigate the propagation of high-speed chromospheric flows into coronal magnetic flux tubes, and the possible production of emission in the EUV band. We simulate the propagation of a dense $10^4$ K chromospheric jet upwards along a coronal loop, by means of a 2-D cylindrical MHD model, including gravity, radiative losses, thermal conduction and magnetic induction. The jet propagates in a complete atmosphere including the chromosphere and a tenuous cool ($\\sim 0.8$ MK) corona, linked through a steep transition region. In our reference model, the jet's initial speed is 70 km/s, its initial density is $10^{11}$ cm$^{-3}$, and the ambient uniform magnetic field is 10 G. We explore also other values of jet speed and density in 1-...

  2. Ca II 854.2 nm Spectromagnetograms: A Powerful Chromospheric Diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, J. W.; Bertello, Luca; Branston, D.; Britanik, J.; Bulau, S.; Cole, L.; Gosain, Sanjay; Harker, Brian; Jones, Harrison P.; Marble, A.; Martinez Pillet, V.; Pevtsov, A.; Schramm, K.; Streander, Kim; Villegas, H.

    2016-05-01

    The transition from physical dominance by plasma flows in the photosphere to magnetic pressure in the solar chromosphere motivates as many diagnostic observations as possible across this important region. Among the few ground-accessible spectral lines formed within the chromosphere, the Ca II 854.2 nm line has the desirable properties of presence everywhere on the solar disk, Zeeman sensitivity, and narrow line width. Mapped observations of circular polarization within this line (spectromagnetograms) have been made at NSO infrequently since 1974, with regular daily full-disk observations starting in August 1996. Full-disk spectral observations of the complete Stokes polarization vector are now being made regularly since November 2015. It is not easy to estimate chromospheric magnetic field properties from the 854.2 nm line profile polarization. To provide rough quick-look vector field maps we found that the weak-field approximation provides a fair first estimate of the line-of-sight component but appears to be too simple to interpret the transverse magnetic field from frequently asymmetric, linearly-polarized line profiles. More realistic estimates of the chromospheric vector field, short of extremely lengthy, full 3D, non-local radiative transfer inversions, are being investigated. We briefly introduce recent instrumental modifications and observational characteristics, sample observations, and results concerning the expansion of the chromospheric field with increasing height, the presence of large areas of weak, nearly horizontal fields, and field estimates in plages, sunspots, flares, filaments, and filament channels. The Stokes spectra will be freely available to the community.This work utilizes SOLIS data obtained by the NSO Integrated Synoptic Program (NISP), managed by the National Solar Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  3. PROPERTIES OF CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION AND PLASMA DYNAMICS OF A SOLAR FLARE FROM IRIS OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Dominguez, Santiago Vargas; Kosovichev, Alexander G. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States); Sharykin, Ivan N.; Struminsky, Alexei B.; Zimovets, Ivan [Space Research Institute (IKI) of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of hot chromospheric plasma of solar flares is a key to understanding the mechanisms of flare energy release and particle acceleration. A moderate M1.0 class flare of 2014 June 12, (SOL2014-06-12T21:12) was simultaneously observed by NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and other spacecraft, and also by the New Solar Telescope at the BBSO. This paper presents the first part of our investigation focused on analysis of the IRIS data. Our analysis of the IRIS data in different spectral lines reveals a strong redshifted jet-like flow with a speed of ∼100 km s{sup −1} of the chromospheric material before the flare. Strong nonthermal emission of the C ii k 1334.5 Å line, formed in the chromosphere–corona transition region, is observed at the beginning of the impulsive phase in several small (with a size of ∼1″) points. It is also found that the C ii k line is redshifted across the flaring region before, during, and after the impulsive phase. A peak of integrated emission of the hot (1.1 · 10{sup 7} K) plasma in the Fe xxi 1354.1 Å line is detected approximately five minutes after the integrated emission peak of the lower temperature C ii k. A strong blueshift of the Fe xxi line across the flaring region corresponds to evaporation flows of the hot chromospheric plasma with a speed of 50 km s{sup −1}. Additional analysis of the RHESSI data supports the idea that the upper chromospheric dynamics observed by IRIS has features of “gentle” evaporation driven by heating of the solar chromosphere by accelerated electrons and by a heat flux from the flare energy release site.

  4. First Detection of Chromospheric Magnetic Field Changes during an X1-Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleint, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Stepwise changes of the photospheric magnetic field, which often becomes more horizontal, have been observed during many flares. Previous interpretations include coronal loops that contract, and it has been speculated that such jerks could be responsible for sunquakes. Here we report the detection of stepwise chromospheric line-of-sight magnetic field (B{}{LOS}) changes obtained through spectropolarimetry of Ca ii 8542 Å with DST/IBIS during the X1-flare SOL20140329T17:48. These changes are stronger (<640 Mx cm‑2) and appear in larger areas than their photospheric counterparts (<320 Mx cm‑2). The absolute value of {B}{LOS} more often decreases than increases. Photospheric changes are predominantly located near a polarity inversion line, and chromospheric changes near the footpoints of loops. The locations of changes are near, but not exactly co-spatial to hard X-ray emission and neither to enhanced continuum emission nor to a small sunquake. Enhanced chromospheric and coronal emission is observed in nearly all locations that exhibit changes of {B}{LOS}, but the emission also occurs in many locations without any {B}{LOS} changes. Photospheric and chromospheric changes of {B}{LOS} show differences in timing, sign, and size and seem independent of each other. A simple model of contracting loops yields changes of the opposite sign to those observed. An explanation for this discrepancy could be increasing loop sizes or loops that untwist in a certain direction during the flare. It is yet unclear which processes are responsible for the observed changes and their timing, size, and location, especially considering the incoherence between the photosphere and the chromosphere.

  5. Oscillations of the sun's chromosphere. II - H-alpha line centre and wing filtergram time sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneer, F.; von Uexkuell, M.

    1985-03-01

    In order to investigate the dynamics of the solar chromosphere we perform a Fourier analysis of time sequences (total duration 128 min) of Hα photographic filtergrams taken simultaneously at disc centre in line centre and ±0.5 Å from the line centre. The results are: (i) At low frequencies (periods >450 s) the brightness fluctuations are caused by the temporal evolution of Hα structures at the boundaries of the chromospheric network. We observe that much of the coarse chromospheric structure survives the 128 min time span. We derive lifetimes of 2-8 min for the small-scale structure and 5-20 min for the larger structures. (ii) The modal structure of the 5 min oscillation is clearly visible in the power spectra of the three filtergram. The fundamental (f) mode can be followed to high horizontal wavenumbers kh ≍3.7 Mm-1 and follows the expected relationship ω2f = gkh, where g is the surface gravity. (iii) A chromospheric resonant mode cannot be found in the k - ω plane. (iv) The higher resonant p modes reach into the acoustic wave domain (periods T ≍ 150 s) and thus require the transition zone as the upper reflecting layer. (v) We find no evidence for internal gravity waves. (vi) From a coherence and phase analysis we conclude that the brightness fluctuations of the chromospheric structure seen in -0.5 Å lead those in +0.5 Å by 2 min at kh =2 Mm -1 and by 4 min at kh =0.5 Mm-1. (vii) From the same coherence and phase analysis we can identify acoustic waves in the solar atmosphere with periods as short as 80 s. They possess as much power as the 5 min oscillations and are seen better outside the chromospheric network than within the network. (viii) The phase difference between intensity in Hα line centre and velocity, constructed from the two Hα wing filtergrams, decreases from about 90° at low frequencies and high wavenumbers to 0° at high frequencies and low wavenumbers. Tentatively we interpret this as a change from mainly standing waves for the low

  6. Full-Disk Chromospheric Vector Magnetograms with Ca II 854.2 nm line: Some Promising Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosain, Sanjay; Harvey, J. W.; Harker, Brian; Pillet, V. M.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Marble, Andrew R.; Bertello, Luca; + SOLIS-Team

    2016-05-01

    Over the last decade, the focus of solar magnetometry has shifted outward from the photosphere to the chromospheric layers. The reasons for this are many. With regards to instrumentation faster detectors with more sensitivity have become available, as have fast electro-optic modulators. Also, there are several potential benefits of observing vector fields in the chromospheric layer as the magnetic field is more force-free in this layer as compared to the photosphere. Coronal force-free field extrapolations are more reliable using chromospheric fields as the lower boundary condition and free magnetic energy is readily computed using the magnetic virial theorem. Recently, a full Stokes polarimeter for the chromospheric Ca II 854.2 nm spectral line was developed and installed in the Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) instrument on the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) telescope. We present details of this new polarimeter, full disk spectropolarimetric observations and vector magnetograms of the chromosphere, and examples of some promising applications (e.g., maps of normal component of electric current density in the chromosphere, free magnetic energy estimated using virial theorem, and non-potentiality parameter magnetic shear angle).This work utilizes SOLIS data obtained by the NSO Integrated Synoptic Program (NISP), managed by the National Solar Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation

  7. Chromospheric Sunspot Oscillations in H-alpha and Ca II 8542A

    CERN Document Server

    Maurya, Ram Ajor; Park, Hyungmin; Yang, Heesu; Song, Donguk; Cho, Kyuhyoun

    2013-01-01

    We study chromospheric oscillations including umbral flashes and running penumbral waves in a sunspot of active region (AR) using scanning spectroscopy in H-alpha and Ca II 8542A, with the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph (FISS) at the 1.6 meter New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory. A bisector method is applied to spectral observations to construct chromospheric Doppler velocity maps. Temporal sequence analysis of these shows enhanced high-frequency oscillations inside the sunspot umbra in both lines. Their peak frequency gradually decreases outward from the umbra. The oscillation power is found to be associated with magnetic-field strength and inclination, with different relationships in different frequency bands.

  8. Spicules and their on-disk counterparts, the main driver for solar chromospheric heating?

    CERN Document Server

    Puschmann, Klaus Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The question how the outer solar atmosphere is heated from solar photospheric temperatures of about 5800K up to solar chromospheric and coronal temperatures of about 20 000K and millions of degrees respectively, remained without any satisfying answer for centuries. On 4 May 2005, I recorded several time series of Halpha line scans with the GREGOR Fabry-Perot Interferometer, still deployed at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT), for different solar limb and on-disc positions as well for quiet sun at solar disk center. The spatially and temporally highly resolved time series of Halpha line parameters reveal the entire and detailed complexity as well as the overwhelming dynamics of spicules covering the entire solar disk, thus apparently confirming spicules as the potential driver for chromospheric heating of both the Sun and sun-like stars.

  9. Solar Hard X-ray Source Sizes in a Beam-Heated and Ionised Chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    O'Flannagain, A; Gallagher, P T

    2014-01-01

    Solar flare hard X-rays (HXRs) are produced as bremsstrahlung when an accelerated population of electrons interacts with the dense chromospheric plasma. HXR observations presented by using the Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) have shown that HXR source sizes are 3-6 times more extended in height than those predicted by the standard collisional thick target model (CTTM). Several possible explanations have been put forward including the multi-threaded nature of flare loops, pitch-angle scattering, and magnetic mirroring. However, the nonuniform ionisation (NUI) structure along the path of the electron beam has not been fully explored as a solution to this problem. Ionised plasma is known to be less effective at producing nonthermal bremsstrahlung HXRs when compared to neutral plasma. If the peak HXR emission was produced in a locally ionised region within the chromosphere, the intensity of emission will be preferentially reduced around this peak, resulting in a more extended source. Due to...

  10. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in solar chromospheric jets: theory and observation

    CERN Document Server

    Kuridze, D; Henriques, V; Mathioudakis, M; Keenan, F P; Hanslmeier, A

    2016-01-01

    Using data obtained by the high resolution CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter instrument on the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope, we investigate the dynamics and stability of quiet-Sun chromospheric jets observed at disk center. Small-scale features, such as Rapid Redshifted and Blueshifted Excursions, appearing as high speed jets in the wings of the H$\\alpha$ line, are characterized by short lifetimes and rapid fading without any descending behavior. To study the theoretical aspects of their stability without considering their formation mechanism, we model chromospheric jets as twisted magnetic flux tubes moving along their axis, and use the ideal linear incompressible magnetohydrodynamic approximation to derive the governing dispersion equation. Analytical solutions of the dispersion equation indicate that this type of jet is unstable to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), with a very short (few seconds) instability growth time at high upflow speeds. The generated vortices and unresolved turbulent flows associated...

  11. Heating of the partially ionized solar chromosphere by waves in magnetic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Shelyag, S; de Vicente, A; Przybylski, D

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we show a "proof of concept" of the heating mechanism of the solar chromosphere due to wave dissipation caused by the effects of partial ionization. Numerical modeling of non-linear wave propagation in a magnetic flux tube, embedded in the solar atmosphere, is performed by solving a system of single-fluid quasi-MHD equations, which take into account the ambipolar term from the generalized Ohm's law. It is shown that perturbations caused by magnetic waves can be effectively dissipated due to ambipolar diffusion. The energy input by this mechanism is continuous and shown to be more efficient than dissipation of static currents, ultimately leading to chromospheric temperature increase in magnetic structures.

  12. Modeling properties of chromospheric evaporation driven by thermal conduction fronts from reconnection shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Brannon, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection in the corona results in contracting flare loops, releasing energy into plasma heating and shocks. The hydrodynamic shocks so produced drive thermal conduction fronts (TCFs) which transport energy into the chromosphere and drive upflows (evaporation) and downflows (condensation) in the cooler, denser footpoint plasma. Observations have revealed that certain properties of the transition point between evaporation and condensation (the "flow reversal point" or FRP), such as temperature and velocity-temperature derivative at the FRP, vary between different flares. These properties may provide a diagnostic tool to determine parameters of the coronal energy release mechanism and the loop atmosphere. In this study, we develop a 1-D hydrodynamical flare loop model with a simplified three-region atmosphere (chromosphere/transition region/corona), with TCFs initiated by shocks introduced in the corona. We investigate the effect of two different flare loop parameters (post-shock temperature and tra...

  13. HEATING OF THE PARTIALLY IONIZED SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE BY WAVES IN MAGNETIC STRUCTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelyag, S.; Przybylski, D. [Department of Mathematics and Information Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Khomenko, E.; Vicente, A. de, E-mail: shelyag@gmail.com [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205, C/Vía Láctea, s/n, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we show a “proof of concept” of the heating mechanism of the solar chromosphere due to wave dissipation caused by the effects of partial ionization. Numerical modeling of non-linear wave propagation in a magnetic flux tube, embedded in the solar atmosphere, is performed by solving a system of single-fluid quasi-MHD equations, which take into account the ambipolar term from the generalized Ohm’s law. It is shown that perturbations caused by magnetic waves can be effectively dissipated due to ambipolar diffusion. The energy input by this mechanism is continuous and shown to be more efficient than dissipation of static currents, ultimately leading to chromospheric temperature increase in magnetic structures.

  14. The Hanle and Zeeman Effects in Solar Spicules: A Novel Diagnostic Window on Chromospheric Magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Bueno, J T; Centeno, R; Collados, M; Landi degl'Innocenti, E

    2005-01-01

    An attractive diagnostic tool for investigating the magnetism of the solar chromosphere is the observation and theoretical modeling of the Hanle and Zeeman effects in spicules, as shown in this letter for the first time. Here we report on spectropolarimetric observations of solar chromospheric spicules in the He I 10830 \\AA multiplet and on their theoretical modeling accounting for radiative transfer effects. We find that the magnetic field in the observed (quiet Sun) spicular material at a height of about 2000 km above the visible solar surface has a strength of the order of 10 G and is inclined by approximately $35^{\\circ}$ with respect to the local vertical direction. Our empirical finding based on full Stokes-vector spectropolarimetry should be taken into account in future magnetohydrodynamical simulations of spicules.

  15. The Chromospheric Solar Millimeter-wave Cavity, as a Result of the Temperature Minimum Region

    CERN Document Server

    De la Luz, V; Lara, A

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the local radio emission at the lower part of the solar atmosphere. To accomplish this, we have used a numerical code to simulate the emission and transport of high frequency electromagnetic waves from 2 GHz up to 10 THz. As initial conditions we used three well know chromospheric models. In this way, the generated synthetic spectra allows us to study the local emission and absorption processes with high resolution in both altitude and frequency. Associated with the temperature minimum predicted by these models we found that the local optical depth at millimeter wavelengths remains constant, producing an optically thin layer which is surrounded by two layers of high local emission. We call this structure the Chromospheric Solar Millimeter-wave Cavity (CSMC). The CSMC shows the complexity of the relationship between the theoretical temperature profile and the observed brightness temperature and may help to understand the dispersion of the observed brightness temper...

  16. Chromospheric diagnosis with Ca II lines: forward modeling in forward scattering (I)

    CERN Document Server

    Carlin, E S

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the first synthetic tomography of the quiet solar chromosphere formed by spatial maps of scattering polarization. It has been calculated for the CaII 8498, 8542 and 3934 A lines by solving the NLTE (non-local thermodynamical equilibrium) RT (radiative transfer) problem of the second kind in a 3D atmosphere model obtained from realistic MHD (magneto-hydrodynamical) simulations. Maps of circular polarization were calculated neglecting atomic polarization. Our investigation focuses on the linear polarization signals induced by kinematics, radiation field anisotropy and Hanle effect in forward-scattering geometry. Thus, instead of considering slit profiles at the limb as normally done in the study of the second solar spectrum, we synthetize and analyze spatial maps of polarization at disk center. It allows us to understand the spatial signatures of dynamics and magnetic field in the linear polarization for discriminating them observationally. Our results suggest new ideas for chromospheric diagno...

  17. An Automated Algorithm to Distinguish and Characterize Solar Flares and Associated Sequential Chromospheric Brightenings

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, M S; Jackiewicz, J; McNamara, B J; McAteer, R T J

    2011-01-01

    We present a new automated algorithm to identify, track, and characterize small-scale brightening associated with solar eruptive phenomena observed in H{\\alpha}. The temporal spatially-localized changes in chromospheric intensities can be separated into two categories: flare ribbons and sequential chromospheric brightenings (SCBs). Within each category of brightening we determine the smallest resolvable locus of pixels, a kernel, and track the temporal evolution of the position and intensity of each kernel. This tracking is accomplished by isolating the eruptive features, identifying kernels, and linking detections between frames into trajectories of kernels. We fully characterize the evolving intensity and morphology of the flare ribbons by observing the tracked flare kernels in aggregate. With the location of SCB and flare kernels identified, they can easily be overlaid on top of complementary data sets to extract Doppler velocities and magnetic field intensities underlying the kernels. This algorithm is ad...

  18. Simulations of the Mg II k and Ca II 8542 lines from an Alfv\\'en Wave-heated flare chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Kerr, Graham S; Russell, Alexander J B; Allred, Joel C

    2016-01-01

    We use radiation hydrodynamic simulations to examine two models of solar flare chromospheric heating: Alfv\\'en wave dissipation and electron beam collisional losses. Both mechanisms are capable of strong chromospheric heating, and we show that the distinctive atmospheric evolution in the mid-to-upper chromosphere results in Mg II k-line emission that should be observably different between wave-heated and beam-heated simulations. We also present Ca II 8542A profiles which are formed slightly deeper in the chromosphere. The Mg II k-line profiles from our wave-heated simulation are quite different from those from a beam-heated model and are more consistent with IRIS observations. The predicted differences between the Ca II 8542A in the two models are small. We conclude that careful observational and theoretical study of lines formed in the mid-to-upper chromosphere holds genuine promise for distinguishing between competing models for chromospheric heating in flares.

  19. Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability in Solar Chromospheric Jets: Theory and Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuridze, D.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Henriques, V.; Mathioudakis, M.; Keenan, F. P.; Hanslmeier, A.

    2016-10-01

    Using data obtained by the high-resolution CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter instrument on the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope, we investigate the dynamics and stability of quiet-Sun chromospheric jets observed at the disk center. Small-scale features, such as rapid redshifted and blueshifted excursions, appearing as high-speed jets in the wings of the Hα line, are characterized by short lifetimes and rapid fading without any descending behavior. To study the theoretical aspects of their stability without considering their formation mechanism, we model chromospheric jets as twisted magnetic flux tubes moving along their axis, and use the ideal linear incompressible magnetohydrodynamic approximation to derive the governing dispersion equation. Analytical solutions of the dispersion equation indicate that this type of jet is unstable to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), with a very short (few seconds) instability growth time at high upflow speeds. The generated vortices and unresolved turbulent flows associated with the KHI could be observed as a broadening of chromospheric spectral lines. Analysis of the Hα line profiles shows that the detected structures have enhanced line widths with respect to the background. We also investigate the stability of a larger-scale Hα jet that was ejected along the line of sight. Vortex-like features, rapidly developing around the jet’s boundary, are considered as evidence of the KHI. The analysis of the energy equation in the partially ionized plasma shows that ion-neutral collisions may lead to fast heating of the KH vortices over timescales comparable to the lifetime of chromospheric jets.

  20. HRTS observations of the fine structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere and transition zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dere, K. P.

    1983-01-01

    Arc-second UV observations of the Sun by the NRL High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS) have led to the discovery of dynamic fine structures such as 400 km/s coronal jets and chromospheric jets (spicules) and have provided new information about the structure and dynamics of the transition zone. These observations are reviewed and their relevance to the origin of the solar wind is discussed.

  1. Relationship Between Chromospheric Evaporation and Magnetic Field Topology in an M-Class Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Sharykin, Ivan N.; Zimovets, Ivan V.; Vargas Dominguez, Santiago

    2016-09-01

    Chromospheric evaporation is observed as Doppler blueshift during solar flares. It plays a key role in the dynamics and energetics of solar flares; however, its mechanism is still unknown. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of spatially resolved multi-wavelength observations of chromospheric evaporation during an M 1.0-class solar flare (SOL2014-06-12T21:12) using data from NASA’s Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and HMI/SDO (the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory), and high-resolution observations from VIS/NST (the Visible Imaging Spectrometer at the New Solar Telescope). The results show that the averaged over the flare region Fe xxi blueshift of the hot (107 K) evaporating plasma is delayed relative to the C ii redshift of the relatively cold (104 K) chromospheric plasma by about one minute. The spatial distribution of the delays is not uniform across the region and can be as long as two minutes in several zones. Using vector magnetograms from HMI, we reconstruct the magnetic field topology and the quasi-separatrix layer, and find that the blueshift delay regions as well as the Hα flare ribbons are connected to the region of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL) and an expanding flux rope via a system of low-lying loop arcades with a height of ≲4.5 Mm. As a result, the chromospheric evaporation may be driven by the energy release in the vicinity of PIL, and has the observed properties due to a local magnetic field topology.

  2. Modelling Chromospheric Line Profiles in NGC2808: Evidence of Mass Loss from RGB Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Mauas, P J D; Pasquini, L

    2006-01-01

    In this study we test the possibility that the asymmetry in the profiles of the H-alpha and Ca II K lines in red giant stars is due to the presence of an active chromosphere rather than to mass loss. To this end, we compare line profiles computed using relevant model chromospheres to profiles of the H-alpha and Ca II K lines observed in five red giant stars of the globular cluster NGC 2808. The spectra were taken with FLAMES during Science Verification, using the UVES mode at high resolution (R=43,000) for the H-alpha line, and GIRAFFE in MEDUSA mode (R=20,000) for the Ca II K line. We find that the observed profiles are better described if a negative (outward) velocity field is included in the model chromospheres. This leads to mass loss rates of a few 10**(-9) solar masses per year, very close to the requirements of the stellar evolution theory.

  3. A bimodal correlation between host star chromospheric emission and the surface gravity of hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Fossati, L; Lanza, A F

    2015-01-01

    The chromospheric activity index logR'HK of stars hosting transiting hot Jupiters appears to be correlated with the planets' surface gravity. One of the possible explanations is based on the presence of condensations of planetary evaporated material located in a circumstellar cloud that absorbs the CaII H&K and MgII h&k resonance line emission flux, used to measure chromospheric activity. A larger column density in the condensations, or equivalently a stronger absorption in the chromospheric lines, is obtained when the evaporation rate of the planet is larger, which occurs for a lower gravity of the planet. We analyze here a sample of stars hosting transiting hot Jupiters tuned in order to minimize systematic effects (e.g., interstellar medium absorption). Using a mixture model, we find that the data are best fit by a two-linear-regression model. We interpret this result in terms of the Vaughan-Preston gap. We use a Monte Carlo approach to best take into account the uncertainties, finding that the two...

  4. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium inversions from a 3D MHD chromospheric model

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, Jaime de la Cruz; Carlsson, Mats; Leenaarts, Jorrit

    2012-01-01

    The structure of the solar chromosphere is believed to be governed by magnetic fields, even in quiet-Sun regions that have a relatively weak photospheric field. During the past decade inversion methods have emerged as powerful tools for analyzing the chromosphere of active regions. The applicability of inversions to infer the stratification of the physical conditions in a dynamic 3D solar chromosphere has not yet been studied in detail. This study aims to establish the diagnostic capabilities of non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) inversion techniques of Stokes profiles induced by the Zeeman effect in the Ca II 8542 line. We computed the Ca II atomic level populations in a snapshot from a 3D radiation-MHD simulation of the quiet solar atmosphere in non-LTE using the 3D radiative transfer code Multi3d. These populations were used to compute synthetic full-Stokes profiles in the Ca II 8542 line using 1.5D radiative transfer and the inversion code Nicole. The profiles were then spectrally degraded to ac...

  5. Observation and numerical modeling of chromospheric evaporation during the impulsive phase of a solar flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imada, Shinsuke, E-mail: shinimada@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Murakami, Izumi, E-mail: murakami.izumi@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University of Advanced Studies), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Watanabe, Tetsuya, E-mail: watanabe.tetsuya@nao.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Department of Astronomical Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University of Advanced Studies), Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    We have studied the chromospheric evaporation flow during the impulsive phase of the flare by using the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer observation and 1D hydrodynamic numerical simulation coupled to the time-dependent ionization. The observation clearly shows that the strong redshift can be observed at the base of the flaring loop only during the impulsive phase. We performed two different numerical simulations to reproduce the strong downflows in FeXII and FeXV during the impulsive phase. By changing the thermal conduction coefficient, we carried out the numerical calculation of chromospheric evaporation in the thermal conduction dominant regime (conductivity coefficient κ{sub 0} = classical value) and the enthalpy flux dominant regime (κ{sub 0} = 0.1 × classical value). The chromospheric evaporation calculation in the enthalpy flux dominant regime could reproduce the strong redshift at the base of the flare during the impulsive phase. This result might indicate that the thermal conduction can be strongly suppressed in some cases of flare. We also find that time-dependent ionization effect is important to reproduce the strong downflows in Fe XII and Fe XV.

  6. Mass motion in upper solar chromosphere detected from solar eclipse observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Qu, Zhongquan; Yan, Xiaoli; Dun, Guangtao; Chang, Liang

    2016-05-01

    The eclipse-observed emission lines formed in the upper solar atmosphere can be used to diagnose the atmosphere dynamics which provides an insight to the energy balance of the outer atmosphere. In this paper, we analyze the spectra formed in the upper chromospheric region by a new instrument called Fiber Arrayed Solar Optic Telescope (FASOT) around the Gabon total solar eclipse on November 3, 2013. The double Gaussian fits of the observed profiles are adopted to show enhanced emission in line wings, while red-blue (RB) asymmetry analysis informs that the cool line (about 104 K) profiles can be decomposed into two components and the secondary component is revealed to have a relative velocity of about 16-45 km s^{-1}. The other profiles can be reproduced approximately with single Gaussian fits. From these fittings, it is found that the matter in the upper solar chromosphere is highly dynamic. The motion component along the line-of-sight has a pattern asymmetric about the local solar radius. Most materials undergo significant red shift motions while a little matter show blue shift. Despite the discrepancy of the motion in different lines, we find that the width and the Doppler shifts both are function of the wavelength. These results may help us to understand the complex mass cycle between chromosphere and corona.

  7. ALFVÉN WAVE HEATING OF THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE: 1.5D MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arber, T. D.; Brady, C. S. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Shelyag, S. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, 3800 (Australia)

    2016-02-01

    Physical processes that may lead to solar chromospheric heating are analyzed using high-resolution 1.5D non-ideal MHD modeling. We demonstrate that it is possible to heat the chromospheric plasma by direct resistive dissipation of high-frequency Alfvén waves through Pedersen resistivity. However, this is unlikely to be sufficient to balance radiative and conductive losses unless unrealistic field strengths or photospheric velocities are used. The precise heating profile is determined by the input driving spectrum, since in 1.5D there is no possibility of Alfvén wave turbulence. The inclusion of the Hall term does not affect the heating rates. If plasma compressibility is taken into account, shocks are produced through the ponderomotive coupling of Alfvén waves to slow modes and shock heating dominates the resistive dissipation. In 1.5D shock coalescence amplifies the effects of shocks, and for compressible simulations with realistic driver spectra, the heating rate exceeds that required to match radiative and conductive losses. Thus, while the heating rates for these 1.5D simulations are an overestimate, they do show that ponderomotive coupling of Alfvén waves to sound waves is more important in chromospheric heating than Pedersen dissipation through ion–neutral collisions.

  8. DETECTION OF SHOCK MERGING IN THE CHROMOSPHERE OF A SOLAR PORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Jongchul; Song, Donguk; Seo, Minju [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Suk; Park, Young-Deuk; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    It was theoretically demonstrated that a shock propagating in the solar atmosphere can overtake another and merge with it. We provide clear observational evidence that shock merging does occur quite often in the chromosphere of sunspots. Using Hα imaging spectral data taken by the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Soar Observatory, we construct time–distance maps of line-of-sight velocities along two appropriately chosen cuts in a pore. The maps show a number of alternating redshift and blueshift ridges, and we identify each interface between a preceding redshift ridge and the following blueshift ridge as a shock ridge. The important finding of ours is that two successive shock ridges often merge with each other. This finding can be theoretically explained by the merging of magneto-acoustic shock waves propagating with lower speeds of about 10 km s{sup −1} and those propagating at higher speeds of about 16–22 km s{sup −1}. The shock merging is an important nonlinear dynamical process of the solar chromosphere that can bridge the gap between higher-frequency chromospheric oscillations and lower-frequency dynamic phenomena such as fibrils.

  9. Relationship between chromospheric evaporation and magnetic field topology in M-class solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Sadykov, V M; Sharykin, I N; Zimovets, I V; Dominguez, S Vargas

    2016-01-01

    Chromospheric evaporation is observed as Doppler blueshift during solar flares. It plays one of key roles in dynamics and energetics of solar flares, however, its mechanism is still unknown. In this paper we present a detailed analysis of spatially-resolved multi-wavelength observations of chromospheric evaporation during an M 1.0 class solar flare (SOL2014-06-12T21:12) using data from the NASA's IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph) and HMI/SDO (Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory) telescopes, and VIS/NST (Visible Imaging Spectrometer at New Solar Telescope) high-resolution observations, covering the temperature range from 10^4 K to 10^7 K. The results show that the averaged over the region Fe XXI blueshift of the hot evaporating plasma is delayed relative to the C II redshift of the relatively cold chromospheric plasma by about 1 min. The spatial distribution of the delays is not uniform across the region and can be as long as 2 min in several zones. Using vector magne...

  10. First Detection of Chromospheric Magnetic Field Changes During an X1-Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kleint, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Stepwise changes of the photospheric magnetic field, which often becomes more horizontal, have been observed during many flares. Previous interpretations include coronal loops that contract and it has been speculated that such jerks could be responsible for sunquakes. Here we report the detection of stepwise chromospheric line-of-sight magnetic field (B$_{\\rm LOS}$) changes obtained through spectropolarimetry of Ca II 8542 \\AA\\ with DST/IBIS during the X1-flare SOL20140329T17:48. They are stronger ($<$640 Mx cm$^{-2}$) and appear in larger areas than their photospheric counterparts ($<$320 Mx cm$^{-2}$). The absolute value of B$_{\\rm LOS}$ more often decreases than increases. Photospheric changes are predominantly located near a polarity inversion line, chromospheric changes near footpoints of loops. The locations of changes are near, but not exactly co-spatial to hard X-ray (HXR) emission and neither to enhanced continuum emission, nor a small sunquake. Enhanced chromospheric and coronal emission is ob...

  11. HiRISE Mission to Address the Dynamical Chromosphere-Corona Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damé, Luc; Lamy, Philippe; von Fay-Siebenburgen (Erdélyi), Robert

    Several ground facilities and space missions are currently dedicated to the study of the Sun at high resolution and of the solar corona in particular. However, and despite significant progress with the advent of space missions and UV, EUV and XUV direct observations of the hot chro-mosphere and million degrees coronal plasma, much is yet to be achieved in the understanding of these high temperatures, fine dissipative structures and of the coronal heating in general. Recent missions have shown the definite role of waves and of the magnetic field deep in the inner corona, at the chromosphere-corona interface, where dramatic changes occur. The dynamics of the chromosphere and corona is controlled by the emerging magnetic field, guided by the coronal magnetic field. Accordingly, the direct measurement of the chromospheric and coronal magnetic fields is of prime importance. The solar corona consists of many thin loops or threads with the plasmas brightening and fading independently. The dynamics in each thread is believed to be related to the formation of filaments, each one being dynamic, in a non-equilibrium state. The mechanism sustaining that dynamics, oscillations or waves (Alfvén or MHD?), require both very high-cadence, multi-spectral observations, and high resolution. This is foreseen in the future Space Mission HiRISE, the ultimate new generation ultrahigh resolution, interferomet-ric and coronagraphic, Solar Physics Mission, proposed for ESA Cosmic Vision (pre-selected in 2007, and under preparation for 2012 second call). HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging and Spectroscopy Explorer), at the L1 Lagrangian point, provides meter class FUV imaging and spectro-imaging, EUV and XUV imaging and spectroscopy, and ultimate coronagraphy by a remote external occulter (satellites in formation flying 280 m apart) allowing to characterize temperature, densities and velocities in the solar upper chromosphere, transition zone and inner corona with, in particular, 2D very high

  12. An active region filament studied simultaneously in the chromosphere and photosphere. I. Magnetic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuckein, C.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Centeno, R.

    2012-03-01

    Aims: A thorough multiwavelength, multiheight study of the vector magnetic field in a compact active region filament (NOAA 10781) on 2005 July 3 and 5 is presented. We suggest an evolutionary scenario for this filament. Methods: Two different inversion codes were used to analyze the full Stokes vectors acquired with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP-II) in a spectral range that comprises the chromospheric He i 10 830 Å multiplet and the photospheric Si i 10 827 Å line. In addition, we used SOHO/MDI magnetograms, as well as BBSO and TRACE images, to study the evolution of the filament and its active region (AR). High-resolution images of the Dutch Open Telescope were also used. Results: An active region filament (formed before our observing run) was detected in the chromospheric helium absorption images on July 3. The chromospheric vector magnetic field in this portion of the filament was strongly sheared (parallel to the filament axis), whereas the photospheric field lines underneath had an inverse polarity configuration. From July 3 to July 5, an opening and closing of the polarities on either side of the polarity inversion line (PIL) was recorded, resembling the recently discovered process of the sliding door effect seen by Hinode. This is confirmed with both TIP-II and SOHO/MDI data. During this time, a newly created region that contained pores and orphan penumbrae at the PIL was observed. On July 5, a normal polarity configuration was inferred from the chromospheric spectra, while strongly sheared field lines aligned with the PIL were found in the photosphere. In this same data set, the spine of the filament is also observed in a different portion of the field of view and is clearly mapped by the silicon line core. Conclusions: The inferred vector magnetic fields of the filament suggest a flux rope topology. Furthermore, the observations indicate that the filament is divided in two parts, one which lies in the chromosphere and another one that stays

  13. Challenges to Understand Stellar Chromospheres and Stellar Activity: The Limit Case of Late-A and Early-F Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire Ferrero, R.; Gouttebroze, P.

    The onset of chromospheric activity appears at late-A and early-F stars where theories predict atmospheres in radiative equilibrium and shallow or non-existent convective zones. The detection of Ly-α emission cores in several A and F stars, first with the IUE satellite and then with the HST, gives evidence for the presence of chromospheric layers in these stars up to B - V = 0. ^m19 (Catalano et al. [CITE]). Semiempirical chromospheric models for Altair allowed us (Freire et al. [CITE]) to explain the observed emission profiles taking into account normal HI IS absorption. However, due to the very high rotational velocity we analyzed alternative hypotheses like the formation of Ly-α emissions into a corotating expanding wind, but we ruled out this alternative because we obtained inconsistent results. In addition, X-ray emission (originated surely in a corona) strengthen the presence of a chromosphere. Here we place the problem of chromospheric activity of late-A and early-F stars in the general context of the formation of over-photospheric stellar layers, comparing them with late-type star and solar cases.

  14. FAST MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE MEDIATED BY THE PLASMOID INSTABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Lei; Kliem, Bernhard; Lin, Jun [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Wu, Ning, E-mail: leini@ynao.ac.cn [School of Tourism and Geography, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming 650031 (China)

    2015-01-20

    Magnetic reconnection in the partially ionized solar chromosphere is studied in 2.5 dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations including radiative cooling and ambipolar diffusion. A Harris current sheet with and without a guide field is considered. Characteristic values of the parameters in the middle chromosphere imply a high magnetic Reynolds number of ∼10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} in the present simulations. Fast magnetic reconnection then develops as a consequence of the plasmoid instability without the need to invoke anomalous resistivity enhancements. Multiple levels of the instability are followed as it cascades to smaller scales, which approach the ion inertial length. The reconnection rate, normalized to the asymptotic values of magnetic field and Alfvén velocity in the inflow region, reaches values in the range ∼0.01-0.03 throughout the cascading plasmoid formation and for zero as well as for strong guide field. The outflow velocity reaches ≈40 km s{sup –1}. Slow-mode shocks extend from the X-points, heating the plasmoids up to ∼8 × 10{sup 4} K. In the case of zero guide field, the inclusion of both ambipolar diffusion and radiative cooling causes a rapid thinning of the current sheet (down to ∼30 m) and early formation of secondary islands. Both of these processes have very little effect on the plasmoid instability for a strong guide field. The reconnection rates, temperature enhancements, and upward outflow velocities from the vertical current sheet correspond well to their characteristic values in chromospheric jets.

  15. Acceleration of Type 2 Spicules in the Solar Chromosphere - 2: Viscous Braking and Upper Bounds on Coronal Energy Input

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic model is used to determine conditions under which the Lorentz force accelerates plasma to type 2 spicule speeds in the chromosphere. The model generalizes a previous model to include a more realistic pre-spicule state, and the vertical viscous force. Two cases of acceleration under upper chromospheric conditions are considered. The magnetic field strength for these cases is ~ this energy. Compressive heating dominates during the early phase of acceleration. The maximum energy injected into the corona by type 2 spicules, defined as the energy flux in the upper chromosphere, may largely balance total coronal energy losses in quiet regions, possibly also in coronal holes, but not in active regions. It is proposed that magnetic flux emergence in inter-granular regions drives type 2 spicules.

  16. YSO accretion shocks: magnetic, chromospheric or stochastic flow effects can suppress fluctuations of X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Matsakos, T; Stehlé, C; González, M; Ibgui, L; de Sá, L; Lanz, T; Orlando, S; Bonito, R; Argiroffi, C; Reale, F; Peres, G

    2013-01-01

    Context. Theoretical arguments and numerical simulations of radiative shocks produced by the impact of the accreting gas onto young stars predict quasi-periodic oscillations in the emitted radiation. However, observational data do not show evidence of such periodicity. Aims. We investigate whether physically plausible perturbations in the accretion column or in the chromosphere could disrupt the shock structure influencing the observability of the oscillatory behavior. Methods. We performed local 2D magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of an accretion shock impacting a chromosphere, taking optically thin radiation losses and thermal conduction into account. We investigated the effects of several perturbation types, such as clumps in the accretion stream or chromospheric fluctuations, and also explored a wide range of plasma-\\beta values. Results. In the case of a weak magnetic field, the post-shock region shows chaotic motion and mixing, smoothing out the perturbations and retaining a global periodic signature....

  17. Multifluid modeling of magnetosonic wave propagation in the solar chromosphere -- effects of impact ionization and radiative recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Maneva, Yana G; Lani, Andrea; Poedts, Stefaan

    2016-01-01

    In order to study chromospheric magnetosonic wave propagation including, for the first time, the effects of ion-neutral interactions in the partially ionized solar chromosphere, we have developed a new multi-fluid computational model, accounting for ionization and recombination reactions in gravitationally stratified magnetized collisional media. The two-fluid model used in our 2D numerical simulations treats neutrals as a separate fluid and considers charged species (electrons and ions) within the resistive MHD approach with Coulomb collisions and anisotropic heat flux determined by Braginskii's transport coefficients. The electromagnetic fields are evolved according to the full Maxwell equations and the solenoidality of the magnetic field is enforced with a hyperbolic divergence cleaning scheme. The initial density and temperature profiles are similar to VAL III chromospheric model in which dynamical, thermal and chemical equilibrium are considered to ensure comparison to existing MHD models and avoid artif...

  18. Chromospheric activity and rotation of FGK stars in the solar vicinity. An estimation of the radial velocity jitter

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Arnaiz, R; Montes, D; Eiroa, C; Montesinos, B

    2010-01-01

    Context: Chromospheric activity produces both photometric and spectroscopic variations that can be mistaken as planets. Large spots crossing the stellar disc can produce planet-like periodic variations in the light curve of a star. These spots clearly affect the spectral line profiles and their perturbations alter the line centroids creating a radial velocity jitter that might contaminate" the variations induced by a planet. Precise chromospheric activity measurements are needed to estimate the activity-induced noise that should be expected for a given star. Aims: We obtain precise chromospheric activity measurements and projected rotational velocities for nearby (d < 25 pc) cool (spectral types F to K) stars, to estimate their expected activity-related jitter. As a complementary objective, we attempt to obtain relationships between fluxes in different activity indicator lines, that permit a transformation of traditional activity indicators, i.e, CaII H & K lines, to others that hold noteworthy advanta...

  19. A high-resolution spectroscopic survey of late-type stars: chromospheric activity, rotation, kinematics, and age

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Santiago, J; Galvez-Ortiz, M C; Crespo-Chacon, I; Martinez-Arnaiz, R M; Fernandez-Figueroa, M J; De Castro, E; Cornide, M

    2010-01-01

    Aims: We present a compilation of spectroscopic data from a survey of 144 chromospherically active young stars in the solar neighborhood which may be used to investigate different aspects of the formation and evolution of the solar neighborhood in terms of kinematics and stellar formation history. The data have already been used by us in several studies. With this paper, we make all these data accessible to the scientific community for future studies on different topics. Methods: We performed spectroscopic observations with echelle spectrographs to cover the entirety of the optical spectral range simultaneously. Standard data reduction was performed with the IRAF ECHELLE package. We applied the spectral subtraction technique to reveal chromospheric emission in the stars of the sample. The equivalent width of chromospheric emission lines was measured in the subtracted spectra and then converted to fluxes using equivalent width-flux relationships. Radial and rotational velocities were determined by the cross-co...

  20. The embedded feature model for the interpretation of chromospheric contrast profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinitz, R.; Gebbie, K. B.; Bar, V.

    1977-01-01

    Contrast profiles obtained from chromospheric filtergrams and spectra of bright and dark mottles have to date been interpreted almost exclusively in terms of Becker's cloud model. Here we demonstrate the failure of this model to account in a physically consistent way for the observed contrasts. As an alternative, we introduce an embedded-feature model, restricting our discussion in this paper to stationary features. Our model is then characterized by three independent parameters: the density of absorbing atoms, the geometrical depth, and the profile of the absorption coefficient. An analytic approximation to the contrast resulting from such a model reproduces well the observed behavior of all types of contrast profiles.

  1. MHS sunspot model from deep sub-photospheric to chromospheric layers

    CERN Document Server

    Khomenko, E

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand the influence of magnetic fields on the propagation properties of waves, as derived from different local helioseismology techniques, forward modeling of waves is required. Such calculations need a model in magnetohydrostatic equilibrium as initial atmosphere to propagate oscillations through it. We provide a method to construct such a model in equilibrium for a wide range of parameters to be used for simulations of artificial helioseismologic data. The method combine the advantages of self-similar solutions and current-distributed models. A set of models is developed by numerical integration of magnetohydrostatic equations from the sub-photospheric to chromospheric layers.

  2. The Brightness Temperature of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere at 2.6 mm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Kazumasa; Shimojo, Masumi; Asayama, Shinichiro; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; White, Stephen; Bastian, Timothy; Saito, Masao

    2017-01-01

    The absolute brightness temperature of the Sun at millimeter wavelengths is an important diagnostic of the solar chromosphere. Because the Sun is so bright, measurement of this property usually involves the operation of telescopes under extreme conditions and requires a rigorous performance assessment of the telescope. In this study, we establish solar observation and calibration techniques at 2.6 mm wavelength for the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and accurately derive the absolute solar brightness temperature. We tune the superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) receiver by inducing different bias voltages onto the SIS mixer to prevent saturation. Then, we examine the linearity of the receiver system by comparing outputs derived from different tuning conditions. Furthermore, we measure the lunar filled beam efficiency of the telescope using the New Moon, and then derive the absolute brightness temperature of the Sun. The derived solar brightness temperature is 7700 ± 310 K at 115 GHz. The telescope beam pattern is modeled as a summation of three Gaussian functions and derived using the solar limb. The real shape of the Sun is determined via deconvolution of the beam pattern from the observed map. Such well-calibrated single-dish observations are important for high-resolution chromospheric studies because they provide the absolute temperature scale that is lacking from interferometer observations.

  3. Numerical simulations of chromospheric hard X-ray source sizes in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, Marina; Fletcher, Lyndsay; MacKinnon, Alec L

    2012-01-01

    X-ray observations are a powerful diagnostic tool for transport, acceleration, and heating of electrons in solar flares. Height and size measurements of X-ray footpoints sources can be used to determine the chromospheric density and constrain the parameters of magnetic field convergence and electron pitch-angle evolution. We investigate the influence of the chromospheric density, magnetic mirroring and collisional pitch-angle scattering on the size of X-ray sources. The time-independent Fokker-Planck equation for electron transport is solved numerically and analytically to find the electron distribution as a function of height above the photosphere. From this distribution, the expected X-ray flux as a function of height, its peak height and full width at half maximum are calculated and compared with RHESSI observations. A purely instrumental explanation for the observed source size was ruled out by using simulated RHESSI images. We find that magnetic mirroring and collisional pitch-angle scattering tend to ch...

  4. Modeling Properties Of Chromospheric Evaporation Driven By Thermal Conduction Fronts From Reconnection Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, Sean; Longcope, D.

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection in the corona results in contracting flare loops, releasing energy into plasma heating and shocks. These hydrodynamic shocks drive thermal conduction fronts (TCFs), which deposit energy into the chromosphere, driving upflows (evaporation) and downflows (condensation) across a range of temperatures. Observations have revealed that the transition between evaporation and condensation, the "velocity reversal point" (VRP), occurs at a characteristic temperature and with a characteristic slope, which vary between different flares. In this study, we develop a 1-D hydrodynamical flare loop model with a simplified three-region atmosphere (chromosphere / transition region (TR) / corona), with TCFs initiated by piston shocks introduced in the corona. We investigate the effect of three different flare loop parameters (post-shock temperature, TR temperature ratio, and TR thickness) on the temperature and slope of the VRP. We find that both of the evaporation characteristics have power-law relationships to the varied flare parameters, and we report the scaling exponents for our model. Finally, we develop a method to determine the best-fit post-shock temperature and TR temperature ratio based on the observed quantities, and discuss the results for two sets of published data.

  5. Dynamics of the Solar Magnetic Network. II. Heating the Magnetized Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, S. S.; van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    2008-06-01

    We consider recent observations of the chromospheric network and argue that the bright network grains observed in the Ca II H and K lines are heated by an as-yet-unidentified quasi-steady process. We propose that the heating is caused by dissipation of short-period magnetoacoustic waves in magnetic flux tubes (periods less than 100 s). Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of such waves are presented. We consider wave generation in the network due to two separate processes: (1) transverse motions at the base of the flux tube and (2) the absorption of acoustic waves generated in the ambient medium. We find that the former mechanism leads to efficient heating of the chromosphere by slow magnetoacoustic waves propagating along magnetic field lines. This heating is produced by shock waves with a horizontal size of a few hundred kilometers. In contrast, acoustic waves excited in the ambient medium are converted into transverse fast modes that travel rapidly through the flux tube and do not form shocks, unless the acoustic sources are located within 100 km from the tube axis. We conclude that the magnetic network may be heated by magnetoacoustic waves that are generated in or near the flux tubes.

  6. Dynamics of the Solar Magnetic Network. II. Heating the Magnetized Chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Hasan, S S

    2008-01-01

    We consider recent observations of the chromospheric network, and argue that the bright network grains observed in the Ca II H & K lines are heated by an as yet unidentified quasi-steady process. We propose that the heating is caused by dissipation of short-period magnetoacoustic waves in magnetic flux tubes (periods less than 100 s). Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of such waves are presented. We consider wave generation in the network due to two separate processes: (a) by transverse motions at the base of the flux tube; and (b) by the absorption of acoustic waves generated in the ambient medium. We find that the former mechanism leads to an efficient heating of the chromosphere by slow magnetoacoustic waves propagating along magnetic field lines. This heating is produced by shock waves with a horizontal size of a few hundred kilometers. In contrast, acoustic waves excited in the ambient medium are converted into transverse fast modes that travel rapidly through the flux tube and do not form shocks, unl...

  7. Ca II H and K Chromospheric Emission Lines in Late K and M Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Rauscher, E; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Rauscher, Emily

    2006-01-01

    We have measured the profiles of the Ca II H and K chromospheric emission lines in 147 main sequence stars of spectral type M5-K7 (0.30-0.55 solar masses) using multiple high resolution spectra obtained during six years with the HIRES spectrometer on the Keck 1 telescope. Remarkably, the average FWHM, equivalent widths, and line luminosities of Ca II H and K increase by a factor of 3 with increasing stellar mass over this small range of stellar masses. We fit the H and K lines with a double Gaussian model to represent both the chromospheric emission and the non-LTE central absorption. Most of the sample stars display a central absorption that is typically redshifted by ~0.1 km/s relative to the emission, but the nature of this velocity gradient remains unknown. The FWHM of the H and K lines increase with stellar luminosity, reminiscent of the Wilson-Bappu effect in FGK-type stars. Both the equivalent widths and FWHM exhibit modest temporal variability in individual stars. At a given value of M_v, stars exhibi...

  8. Limits of shock heating for the chromospheres of low-gravity stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelmavla, Diaa

    2016-07-01

    This work discusses theoretical limits of chromospheric heating by shock waves in stars with low surface gravity. The computations are self consistent, and based on waves generated in stellar convection zones. We employ the new finding of the mixing length parameter α = 1.8. The Ca~II~H+K and Mg~II~h+k fluxes are computed assuming partial redistribution (PRD). The results show the strong dependence of the number of formed shocks and their transmission through the atmosphere on the value of the surface gravity. For stars with solar gravity, heating by shock waves is very efficient, this efficiency decreases with decreasing the value of G. For fixed effective temperature and solar metallicity, the temperature of the chromosphere increase with increasing the stellar surface gravity. A linear correlation is found between the surface gravity and the number of transmitted shocks. The emitted Mg~II and Ca~II fluxes show also a linear dependance on G. It has been found that there is a clear threshold value of G where no shocks are formed. The theoretically computed basal Ca~II and Mg~II fluxes follow simple formulae as a function of stellar surface gravity.

  9. THE CHROMOSPHERIC SOLAR MILLIMETER-WAVE CAVITY ORIGINATES IN THE TEMPERATURE MINIMUM REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Luz, Victor [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Tonantzintla, Puebla, Mexico, Apdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 (Mexico); Raulin, Jean-Pierre [CRAAM, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP 01302-907 (Brazil); Lara, Alejandro [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico 04510 (Mexico)

    2013-01-10

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the local radio emission at the lower part of the solar atmosphere. To accomplish this, we have used a numerical code to simulate the emission and transport of high-frequency electromagnetic waves from 2 GHz up to 10 THz. As initial conditions, we used VALC, SEL05, and C7 solar chromospheric models. In this way, the generated synthetic spectra allow us to study the local emission and absorption processes with high resolution in both altitude and frequency. Associated with the temperature minimum predicted by these models, we found that the local optical depth at millimeter wavelengths remains constant, producing an optically thin layer that is surrounded by two layers of high local emission. We call this structure the Chromospheric Solar Millimeter-wave Cavity (CSMC). The temperature profile, which features temperature minimum layers and a subsequent temperature rise, produces the CSMC phenomenon. The CSMC shows the complexity of the relation between the theoretical temperature profile and the observed brightness temperature and may help us to understand the dispersion of the observed brightness temperature in the millimeter wavelength range.

  10. Alfv\\'en Wave Heating of the Solar Chromosphere: 1.5D models

    CERN Document Server

    Arber, T D; Shelyag, S

    2015-01-01

    Physical processes which may lead to solar chromospheric heating are analyzed using high-resolution 1.5D non-ideal MHD modelling. We demonstrate that it is possible to heat the chromospheric plasma by direct resistive dissipation of high-frequency Alfv\\'en waves through Pedersen resistivity. However this is unlikely to be sufficient to balance radiative and conductive losses unless unrealistic field strengths or photospheric velocities are used. The precise heating profile is determined by the input driving spectrum since in 1.5D there is no possibility of Alfv\\'en wave turbulence. The inclusion of the Hall term does not affect the heating rates. If plasma compressibility is taken into account, shocks are produced through the ponderomotive coupling of Alfv\\'en waves to slow modes and shock heating dominates the resistive dissipation. In 1.5D shock coalescence amplifies the effects of shocks and for compressible simulations with realistic driver spectra the heating rate exceeds that required to match radiative...

  11. First Direct Detection of Magnetic Fields in Starspots and Stellar Chromospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Berdyugina, S V; Afram, N; Suwald, F; Petit, P; Arnaud, J; Harrington, D M; Kuhn, J R

    2007-01-01

    Here we report on the first detection of circular polarization in molecular lines formed in cool magnetic regions (starspots) and in chromospheric emission lines formed in hot plages on the surfaces of active stars. Our survey of G-K-M stars included young main-sequence dwarfs and RS CVn-type giants and subgiants. All stars were found to possess surface magnetic fields producing Stokes V LSD signals in atomic lines of 0.05 to 0.5%. Several stars clearly showed circular polarization in molecular lines of 0.1 to 1%. The molecular Stokes V signal is reminiscent of that observed in sunspots. Chromospheric magnetic fields were detected on most active targets in Stokes V profiles of emission lines with peak polarization up to 2%. The observed molecular circular polarization on M dwarfs indicates single-polarity magnetic fields covering at least 10% of the stellar disk. Smaller signals on K stars imply that their magnetic fields are apparently weaker, more entangled than on M dwarfs, or more diluted by the bright ph...

  12. Observational Searches for Chromospheric -Mode Oscillations from CaII H-Line Observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Kariyappa; L. Damé; K. M. Hiremath

    2006-06-01

    We have used a high spatial and temporal resolution of long time sequence of spectra in CaII H-line obtained at the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) of the Sacramento Peak Observatory on a quiet region at the center of the solar disk over a large number of bright points and network elements to search for atmospheric (chromospheric) -mode oscillations. An important parameter of the H-line profile, intensity at H2V(IH2V), has been derived from a large number of line profiles. We derived the light curves of all the bright points and network elements. The light curves represent the main pulse with large intensity amplitude and followed by several follower pulses with lower intensity amplitudes. The light curves of these bright points would give an impression that one can as well draw curves towards and away from the highest peak (main pulse) showing an exponential growth and decay of the amplitudes. An exponential decaying function has been fitted for all the light curves of the bright points to determine the damping time of the modes that are more or less the same, and one value of the coefficient of exponent can represent reasonably well the decay for all the cases. The FFT analysis of temporal variation of both the bright points and the network elements indicates around 10-min periodicity. We speculate that this longer period of oscillation may be related to chromospheric -mode oscillations.

  13. Performance Characterization of the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) CCD Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Reyann; Kobayashi, Ken; Winebarger, Amy; Champey, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding rocket instrument currently being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), and other partners. The goal of this instrument is to observe and detect the Hanle effect in the scattered Lyman-Alpha UV (121.6nm) light emitted by the Sun's chromosphere. The polarized spectrum imaged by the CCD cameras will capture information about the local magnetic field, allowing for measurements of magnetic strength and structure. In order to make accurate measurements of this effect, the performance characteristics of the three on- board charge-coupled devices (CCDs) must meet certain requirements. These characteristics include: quantum efficiency, gain, dark current, read noise, and linearity. Each of these must meet predetermined requirements in order to achieve satisfactory performance for the mission. The cameras must be able to operate with a gain of 2.0+/- 0.5 e--/DN, a read noise level less than 25e-, a dark current level which is less than 10e-/pixel/s, and a residual non- linearity of less than 1%. Determining these characteristics involves performing a series of tests with each of the cameras in a high vacuum environment. Here we present the methods and results of each of these performance tests for the CLASP flight cameras.

  14. On fibrils and field lines: The nature of H$\\alpha$ fibrils in the solar chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Leenaarts, Jorrit; van der Voort, Luc Rouppe

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the solar chromosphere in the line-core of the \\Halpha\\ line show dark elongated structures called fibrils that show swaying motion. We performed a 3D radiation-MHD simulation of a network region, and computed synthetic \\Halpha\\ images from this simulation to investigate the relation between fibrils and the magnetic field lines in the chromosphere. The periods, amplitudes and phase-speeds of the synthetic fibrils are consistent with those observed. We analyse the relation between the synthetic fibrils and the field lines threading through them, and find that some fibrils trace out the same field line along the fibril's length, but there are also fibrils that sample different field lines at different locations along their length. Fibrils sample the same field lines on a time scale of $\\sim200$~s. This is shorter than their own lifetime. We analysed the evolution of the atmosphere along a number of field lines that thread through fibrils and find that they carry slow-mode waves that load mass in...

  15. Oscillatory Response of the Solar Chromosphere to a Strong Downflow above a Sunspot

    CERN Document Server

    Kwak, Hannah; Song, Donguk; Kim, Yeon-Han; Lim, Eun-Kyung; Madjarska, Maria S

    2016-01-01

    We report three-minute oscillations in the solar chromosphere driven by a strong downflow event in a sunspot. We used the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). The strong downflow event is identified in the chromospheric and transition region lines above the sunspot umbra. After the event, oscillations occur at the same region. The amplitude of the Doppler velocity oscillations is 2 km/s, and gradually decreases with time. In addition, the period of the oscillations gradually increases from 2.7 minutes to 3.3 minutes. In the IRIS 1330 slit-jaw images, we identify a transient brightening near the footpoint of the downflow detected in the Ha+0.5A image. The characteristics of the downflowing material are consistent with those of sunspot plumes. Based on our findings, we suggest that the gravitationally stratified atmosphere came to oscillate with three minute period in response to the impulsive downflow event as was theoretically i...

  16. The chromosphere of α Cen A as seen by the Herschel Space Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesinos, B.; Liseau, R.; DUNES Team

    2015-05-01

    Chromospheres and coronae are common phenomena on solar-type stars. Understanding the heating of those layers requires the direct access to the relevant empirical data. In particular, the chromospheric temperature minimum, i.e. the region of the atmosphere where the temperature undergoes a reversal and starts increasing to reach values of the order of MK in the corona, can be observed directly in the far infrared and in the submillimetre spectral regime. In this paper we present the results of the observations obtained in those ranges of the solar twin α Cen A. Similar to the Sun, the far infrared emission of this star originates in the temperature minimum above the stellar photosphere. To our knowledge, this is the first time a temperature minimum has been directly measured on a main-sequence star other than the Sun. This contribution is a summary of the the results presented in ``α Centauri in the far infrared. First measurements of the temperature minimum of a star other than the Sun'' (Liseau et al 2013, A&A, 549, L7) based on results from the Herschel} Open Time Key Project DUNES and APEX/LABOCA observations.

  17. The energy input mechanism into the lower transition regions between stellar chromospheres and coronae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1988-01-01

    The ratio of the emission line fluxes for the C II and C IV lines in the lower transition regions (T = 30,000 to 100,000 K) between stellar chromospheres and transition layers is shown to depend mainly on the temperature gradient in the line emitting regions which can therefore be determined from this line ratio. From the observed constant (within the limits of observational error) ratio of the emission line fluxes of the C II (1335 A) and C IV (1550 A) lines it is concluded that the temperature gradients in the lower transition layers are similar for the large majority of stars independently of T sub eff, L, and degree of activity. This means that the temperature dependence of the damping length for the mechanical flux must be the same for all these stars. Since for different kinds of mechanical fluxes the dependence of the damping length on gas pressure and temperature is quite different, it is concluded that the same heating mechanism must be responsible for the heating of all the lower transition layers of these stars, regardless of their chromospheric activity. Only the amount of mechanical flux changes. The T Tauri stars are exceptions: their emission lines are probably mainly due to circumstellar material.

  18. Overdamped Alfven waves due to ion-neutral collisions in the solar chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, R; Zaqarashvili, T V

    2014-01-01

    Alfvenic waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere and their dissipation may play an important role in atmospheric heating. In the partially ionized solar chromosphere, collisions between ions and neutrals are an efficient dissipative mechanism for Alfven waves with frequencies near the ion-neutral collision frequency. The collision frequency is proportional to the ion-neutral collision cross section for momentum transfer. Here, we investigate Alfven wave damping as a function of height in a simplified chromospheric model and compare the results for two sets of collision cross sections, namely those of the classic hard-sphere model and those based on recent quantum-mechanical computations. We find important differences between the results for the two sets of cross sections. There is a critical interval of wavelengths for which impulsively excited Alfven waves are overdamped as a result of the strong ion-neutral dissipation. The critical wavelengths are in the range from 1 km to 50 km for the hard-sphere cr...

  19. An active region filament studied simultaneously in the chromosphere and photosphere: I - Magnetic structure

    CERN Document Server

    Kuckein, C; Pillet, V Martinez

    2011-01-01

    A thorough multiwavelength, multiheight study of the vector magnetic field in a compact active region (AR) filament (NOAA10781) is presented. We suggest an evolutionary scenario for this filament. Full Stokes vectors were acquired with TIP-II in a spectral range which comprises the chromospheric He I 10830 A multiplet and the photospheric Si I 10827 A line. An AR filament (that was formed before our observing run) was detected in the He I absorption images on 2005 July 3rd. The chromospheric vector magnetic field in this portion of the filament was strongly sheared whereas the photospheric field lines underneath had an inverse polarity configuration. From July 3rd to July 5th, an opening and closing of the polarities at either side of the polarity inversion line (PIL) was recorded, resembling the recently discovered process of the sliding door effect seen by Hinode. During this time, a newly created region that contained pores and orphan penumbrae at the PIL was observed.On July 5th, a normal polarity configu...

  20. Discovery of Ubiquitous Fast Propagating Intensity Disturbances by the Chromospheric Lyman Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Kano, R.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Hara, H.; Giono, G.; Tsuneta, S.; Ishikawa, S.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Cirtain, J.; Champey, P.; Auchere, F.; Bueno, J. Trujillo; Ramos, A. Asensio; Stepan, J.; Belluzzi, L.; Sainz, R. Manso; De Pontieu, B.; Ichimoto, K.; Carlsson, M.; Casini, R.; Goto, M.

    2016-01-01

    High cadence observations by the slit-jaw (SJ) optics system of the sounding rocket experiment known as the Chromospheric Lyman Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) reveal ubiquitous intensity disturbances that recurrently propagate in one or both of the chromosphere or transition region at a speed much higher than the sound speed. The CLASP/SJ instrument provides a time series of 2D images taken with broadband filters centered on the Ly(alpha) line at a 0.6 s cadence. The fast propagating intensity disturbances are detected in the quiet Sun and in an active region, and at least 20 events are clearly detected in the field of view of 527'' x 527'' during the 5-minute observing time. The apparent speeds of the intensity disturbances range from 150 to 350 km/s, and they are comparable to the local Alfven speed in the transition region. The intensity disturbances tend to propagate along bright elongated structures away from areas with strong photospheric magnetic fields. This suggests that the observed propagating intensity disturbances are related to the magnetic canopy structures. The maximum distance traveled by the intensity disturbances is of about 10'', and the widths are a few arcseconds, which is almost determined by the pixel size of 1.''03. The timescale of each intensity pulse is shorter than 30 s. One possible explanation of the fast propagating intensity disturbances observed by CLASP is magneto-hydrodynamic fast mode waves.

  1. IUE ultraviolet spectra and chromospheric models of HR 1099 and UX Arietis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T.; Linsky, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    IUE spectra in the region 1150-3200 A of the RS CVn-type variables HR 1099 and UX Arietis are presented and analyzed in terms of chromospheric models. Measurements of Mg h and k lines and Ca II H-K and H alpha spectra are indicated which are found not to be correlated with orbital phase or radio flares and which suggest that the strong emission arises in the K star rather than the G star in these systems. Under the assumption that the UV emission lines are associated with the K star, surface gravities of log g = 3.6 and 3.4 and effective temperatures of 4850 and 5000 K are adopted for HR 1099 and UX Ari, respectively, along with solar metal abundances for each. Model calculations of the chromospheric structure necessary to account for observed C(+), Mg(+), Si(+) and Si(+2) line fluxes are presented which indicate that the transition region pressure lies in the range 0.18-1.0 dynes/sq cm, implying transition regions that are more extended than that of the sun and are not conductively heated. It is noted that pressure scaling laws and the use of Mg II and C II lines as pressure diagnostics may be invalid, possibly due to atmospheric inhomogeneities or gas flows.

  2. OSCILLATION OF NEWLY FORMED LOOPS AFTER MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shuhong [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Xiang, Yongyuan, E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn [Fuxian Solar Observatory, Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2016-03-10

    With the high spatial and temporal resolution Hα images from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope, we focus on two groups of loops with an X-shaped configuration in the dynamic chromosphere. We find that the anti-directed loops approach each other and reconnect continually. The connectivity of the loops is changed and new loops are formed and stack together. The stacked loops are sharply bent, implying that they are greatly impacted by the magnetic tension force. When another reconnection process takes place, one new loop is formed and stacks with the previously formed ones. Meanwhile, the stacked loops retract suddenly and move toward the balance position, performing an overshoot movement, which led to an oscillation with an average period of about 45 s. The oscillation of newly formed loops after magnetic reconnection in the chromosphere is observed for the first time. We suggest that the stability of the stacked loops is destroyed due to the attachment of the last new loop and then suddenly retract under the effect of magnetic tension. Because of the retraction, another lower loop is pushed outward and performs an oscillation with a period of about 25 s. The different oscillation periods may be due to their difference in three parameters, i.e., loop length, plasma density, and magnetic field strength.

  3. Time-dependent hydrogen ionisation in 3D simulations of the solar chromosphere. Methods and first results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenaarts, J.; Wedemeyer-Bohm, S.

    2006-01-01

    Context. The hydrogen ionisation degree deviates substantially from statistical equilibrium under the conditions of the solar chromosphere. A realistic description of this atmospheric layer thus must account for time-dependent non-equilibrium effects. Aims. Advancing the realism of numerical simulat

  4. Multi-fluid Modeling of Magnetosonic Wave Propagation in the Solar Chromosphere: Effects of Impact Ionization and Radiative Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneva, Yana G.; Alvarez Laguna, Alejandro; Lani, Andrea; Poedts, Stefaan

    2017-02-01

    In order to study chromospheric magnetosonic wave propagation including, for the first time, the effects of ion–neutral interactions in the partially ionized solar chromosphere, we have developed a new multi-fluid computational model accounting for ionization and recombination reactions in gravitationally stratified magnetized collisional media. The two-fluid model used in our 2D numerical simulations treats neutrals as a separate fluid and considers charged species (electrons and ions) within the resistive MHD approach with Coulomb collisions and anisotropic heat flux determined by Braginskiis transport coefficients. The electromagnetic fields are evolved according to the full Maxwell equations and the solenoidality of the magnetic field is enforced with a hyperbolic divergence-cleaning scheme. The initial density and temperature profiles are similar to VAL III chromospheric model in which dynamical, thermal, and chemical equilibrium are considered to ensure comparison to existing MHD models and avoid artificial numerical heating. In this initial setup we include simple homogeneous flux tube magnetic field configuration and an external photospheric velocity driver to simulate the propagation of MHD waves in the partially ionized reactive chromosphere. In particular, we investigate the loss of chemical equilibrium and the plasma heating related to the steepening of fast magnetosonic wave fronts in the gravitationally stratified medium.

  5. Persistent Sub-Yearly Chromospheric Variations in Lower Main-Sequence Stars: Tau Booe and alpha Com

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulik, Davesh; Donahue, Robert A.; Baliunas, Sallie L.

    1997-01-01

    The recent discoveries of extrasolar planetary systems around lower main-sequence stars such as tau Booe (HD 120136) has prompted further investigation into their stellar activity. A cursory analysis of tau Booe for cyclic chromospheric activity, based on its 30-yr record of Ca 2 H and K fluxes obtained as part of the HK Project from Mount Wilson Observatory, finds an intermediate, sub-yearly period (approximately 117 d) in chromospheric activity in addition to, and separate from, both its rotation (3.3 d) and long-term variability. As a persistent subyearly period in surface magnetic activity is unprecedented, we investigate this apparent anomaly further by examining chromospheric activity levels of other stars with similar mass, searching for variability in chromospheric activity with periods of less than one year, but longer than measured or predicted rotation. An examination of the time series of 40 mid-to-late F dwarfs yielded one other star for further analysis: alpha Com (HD 114378, P approximately 132 d). The variations for these two stars were checked for persistence and coherence. Based on these determinations, we eliminate the possibilities of rotation, long-term activity cycle, and the evolution of active regions as the cause of this variation in both stars. In particular, for tau Booe we infer that the phenomenon may be chromospheric in origin; however, beyond this, it is difficult to identify anything further regarding the cause of the activity variations, or even whether the observed modulation in the two stars have the same origin.

  6. Heating of the solar middle chromosphere by large-scale electric currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    A global resistive, two-dimensional, time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model is used to introduce and support the hypothesis that the quiet solar middle chromosphere is heated by resistive dissipation of large-scale electric currents which fill most of its volume. The scale height and maximum magnitude of the current density are 400 km and 31.3 m/sq m, respectively. The associated magnetic field is almost horizontal, has the same scale height as the current density, and has a maximum magnitude of 153 G. The current is carried by electrons flowing across magnetic field lines at 1 m/s. The resistivity is the electron contribution to the Pedersen resitivity for a weakly ionized, strongly magnetized, hydrogen gas. The model does not include a driving mechanism. Most of the physical quantities in the model decrease exponentially with time on a resistive timescale of 41.3 minutes. However, the initial values and spatial; dependence of these quantities are expected to be essentially the same as they would be if the correct driving mechanism were included in a more general model. The heating rate per unit mass is found to be 4.5 x 10(exp 9) ergs/g/s, independent of height and latitude. The electron density scale height is found to be 800 km. The model predicts that 90% of the thermal energy required to heat the middle chromosphere is deposited in the height range 300-760 km above the temperature minimum. It is shown to be consistent to assume that the radiation rate per unit volume is proportional to the magnetic energy density, and then it follows that the heating rate per unit volume is also proportional to the energy from the photosphere into the overlying chromosphere are briefly discussed as possible driving mechanisms for establishing and maintaining the current system. The case in which part of or all of the current is carried by protons and metal ions, and the contribution of electron-proton scattering to the current are also considered, with the conclusion

  7. Slender Ca II H fibrils mapping magnetic fields in the low solar chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Jafarzadeh, Shahin; Solanki, S K; Wiegelmann, T; Riethmueller, T; van Noort, M; Szydlarski, M; Rodriguez, J Blanco; Barthol, P; Iniesta, J C del Toro; Gandorfer, A; Gizon, L; Hirzberger, J; Knoelker, M; Pillet, V Martinez; Suarez, D Orozco; Schmidt, W

    2016-01-01

    A dense forest of slender bright fibrils near a small solar active region is seen in high-quality narrow-band Ca II H images from the SuFI instrument onboard the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. The orientation of these slender Ca II H fibrils (SCF) overlaps with the magnetic field configuration in the low solar chromosphere derived by magnetostatic extrapolation of the photospheric field observed with Sunrise/IMaX and SDO/HMI. In addition, many observed SCFs are qualitatively aligned with small-scale loops computed from a novel inversion approach based on best-fit numerical MHD simulation. Such loops are organized in canopy-like arches over quiet areas that differ in height depending on the field strength near their roots.

  8. Transition Region and Chromospheric Signatures of Impulsive Heating Events. II. Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Reep, Jeffrey W; Crump, Nicholas A; Simoes, Paulo J A

    2016-01-01

    Results from the Solar Maximum Mission showed a close connection between the hard X-ray and transition region emission in solar flares. Analogously, the modern combination of RHESSI and IRIS data can inform the details of heating processes in ways never before possible. We study a small event that was observed with RHESSI, IRIS, SDO, and Hinode, allowing us to strongly constrain the heating and hydrodynamical properties of the flare, with detailed observations presented in a previous paper. Long duration red-shifts of transition region lines observed in this event, as well as many other events, are fundamentally incompatible with chromospheric condensation on a single loop. We combine RHESSI and IRIS data to measure the energy partition among the many magnetic strands that comprise the flare. Using that observationally determined energy partition, we show that a proper multi-threaded model can reproduce these red-shifts in magnitude, duration, and line intensity, while simultaneously being well constrained by...

  9. The solar chromosphere as induction disk and the inverse Joule-Thomson effect

    CERN Document Server

    Vita-Finzi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The connection between nuclear fusion in the Sun's core and solar irradiance is obscured among other things by uncertainty over the mechanism of coronal heating. Data for solar wind density and velocity, sunspot number, and EUV flux suggest that electromagnetic energy from the Sun's convection zone is converted by induction through the chromosphere into thermal energy. The helium and hydrogen mixture exhaled by the Sun is then heated by the inverse Joule-Thomson effect when it expands via the corona into space. The almost complete shutdown of the solar wind on 10-11 May 1999 demonstrated that its velocity is a more faithful indicator of solar activity than are sunspots as it reflects short-term variations in coronal heating rather than quasicyclical fluctuations in the Sun's magnetism. Its reconstruction from the cosmic ray flux using isotopes spanning over 800,000 yr should therefore benefit the analysis and long-term forecasting of Earth and space weather.

  10. Dynamical Processes in Flux Tubes and their Role in Chromospheric Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. S. Hasan

    2000-09-01

    We model the dynamical interaction between magnetic flux tubes and granules in the solar photosphere which leads to the excitation of transverse (kink) and longitudinal (sausage) tube waves. The investigation is motivated by the interpretation of network oscillations in terms of flux tube waves. The calculations show that for magnetic field strengths typical of the network, the energy flux in transverse waves is higher than in longitudinal waves by an order of magnitude. But for weaker fields, such as those that might be found in internetwork regions, the energy fluxes in the two modes are comparable. Using observations of footpoint motions, the energy flux in transverse waves is calculated and the implications for chromospheric heating are pointed out.

  11. The key role of solar dynamics in the chromospheric Hanle polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Carlin, E S

    2016-01-01

    The quantum theory of polarized light allows one to model scattering in the solar atmosphere for inferring its properties. This powerful approach has revealed two key long-standing problems in solar physics: the puzzling dilemmas between theory and observations in several anomalously polarized spectral lines and the need for inferring the ubiquitous weak chromospheric magnetic fields, which requires discriminating the Hanle effect in dynamic optically thick plasmas. However, the ever-present dynamics, i.e., the temporal evolution of heatings and macroscopic motions, has been widely disregarded when modeling and interpreting the scattering polarization. This has hindered a consistent theoretical solution to the puzzle while falsifying the Hanle diagnosis. Here, we show that the dynamical evolution is a keystone for solving both problems because its systematic impact allows an explanation of the observations from 'anomalous' instantaneous polarization signals. Evolution accounted for, we reproduce amplitudes an...

  12. Prevalence of Small-scale Jets from the Networks of the Solar Transition Region and Chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, H; Cranmer, S R; De Pontieu, B; Peter, H; Martínez-Sykora, J; Golub, L; McKillop, S; Reeves, K K; Miralles, M P; McCauley, P; Saar, S; Testa, P; Weber, M; Murphy, N; Lemen, J; Title, A; Boerner, P; Hurlburt, N; Tarbell, T D; Wuelser, J P; Kleint, L; Kankelborg, C; Jaeggli, S; Carlsson, M; Hansteen, V; McIntosh, S W

    2014-01-01

    As the interface between the Sun's photosphere and corona, the chromosphere and transition region play a key role in the formation and acceleration of the solar wind. Observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveal the prevalence of intermittent small-scale jets with speeds of 80-250 km/s from the narrow bright network lanes of this interface region. These jets have lifetimes of 20-80 seconds and widths of 300 km or less. They originate from small-scale bright regions, often preceded by footpoint brightenings and accompanied by transverse waves with ~20 km/s amplitudes. Many jets reach temperatures of at least ~100000 K and constitute an important element of the transition region structures. They are likely an intermittent but persistent source of mass and energy for the solar wind.

  13. Examining the Flicker-Jitter Relation of K2 stars: the Dependence on Chromospheric Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhn, Jacob K.; Bastien, Fabienne A.; Wright, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Recently, Bastien et al. (2014) have shown that short timescale photometric variations from high-precision Kepler light curves, coined "flicker", can be linked to radial velocity (RV) noise, or "jitter", in chromospherically inactive stars. Observations of the sun show invariance in flicker over its 11-year activity cycle. Therefore, we seek to examine how well the relation holds for more active stars. Here we explore the relation between photometric flicker and RV jitter by extending the sample to stars observed by the recent K2 mission for which data have been released (Campaigns 0-8). The initial Kepler sample included 12 stars with surface gravities 3 TESS and other future telescopes which will produce high-precision light curves.

  14. Two-fluid modeling of magnetosonic wave propagation in the partially ionized solar chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneva, Yana; Alvarez Laguna, Alejandro; Lani, Andrea; Poedts, Stefaan

    2016-04-01

    We perform 2D two-fluid simulations to study the effects of ion-neutral interactions on the propagation of magnetosonic waves in the partially ionized solar chromosphere, where the number density of neutrals significantly exceeds the number density of protons at low heights. Thus modeling the neutral-ion interactions and studying the effect of neutrals on the ambient plasma properties becomes important for better understanding the observed emission lines and the propagation of disturbances from the photosphere to the transition region and the corona. The role of charged particles (electrons and ions) is combined within resistive MHD approach with Coulomb collisions and anisotropic heat flux determined by Braginskii's transport coefficients. The electromagnetic fields are evolved according to the full Maxwell equations, allowing for propagation of higher frequency waves neglected by the standard MHD approximation. Separate mass, momentum and energy conservation equations are considered for the neutrals and the interaction between the different fluids is determined by the chemical reactions, such as impact ionization, radiative recombination and charge exchange, provided as additional source terms. To initialize the system we consider an ideal gas equation of state with equal initial temperatures for the electrons, ions and the neutrals and different density profiles. The initial temperature and density profiles are height-dependent and follow VAL C atmospheric model for the solar chromosphere. We have searched for a chemical and collisional equilibrium between the ions and the neutrals to minimize any unphysical outflows and artificial heating induced by initial pressure imbalances. Including different magnetic field profiles brings new source of plasma heating through Ohmic dissipation. The excitation and propagation of the magnetosonic waves depends on the type of the external velocity driver. As the waves propagate through the gravitationally stratified media

  15. Precision VUV Spectro-Polarimetry for Solar Chromospheric Magnetic Field Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, R.; Bando, T.; Hara, H.; Ishikawa, S.; Kano, R.; Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Kobiki, T.; Narukage, N.; Suematsu, Y.; Tsuneta, S.; Aoki, K.; Miyagawa, K.; Ichimoto, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Auchère, F.; Clasp Team

    2014-10-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a VUV spectro-polarimeter optimized for measuring the linear polarization of the Lyman-α line (121.6 nm) to be launched in 2015 with NASA's sounding rocket (Ishikawa et al. 2011; Narukage et al. 2011; Kano et al. 2012; Kobayashi et al. 2012). With this experiment, we aim to (1) observe the scattering polarization in the Lyman-α line, (2) detect the Hanle effect, and (3) assess the magnetic fields in the upper chromosphere and transition region for the first time. The polarization measurement error consists of scale error δ a (error in amplitude of linear polarization), azimuth error Δφ (error in the direction of linear polarization), and spurious polarization ɛ (false linear polarization signals). The error ɛ should be suppressed below 0.1% in the Lyman-α core (121.567 nm ±0.02 nm), and 0.5% in the Lyman-α wing (121.567 nm ±0.05 nm), based on our scientific requirements shown in Table 2 of Kubo et al. (2014). From scientific justification, we adopt Δ φexercise polarization error budget, by investigating all the possible causes and their magnitudes of polarization errors, all of which are not necessarily verified by the polarization calibration. Based on these error budgets, we conclude that a polarization sensitivity of 0.1% in the line core, δ a<10% and Δ φ<2° can be achieved combined with the polarization calibration of the spectro-polarimeter and the onboard calibration at the Sun center(refer to Ishikawa et al. 2014, for the detail). We are currently conducting verification tests of the flight components and development of the UV light source for the polarization calibration. From 2014 spring, we will begin the integration, alignment, and calibration. We will update the error budgets throughout the course of these tests.

  16. The Key Role of Solar Dynamics in the Chromospheric Hanle Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, E. S.; Bianda, M.

    2016-11-01

    The quantum theory of polarized light allows one to model scattering in the solar atmosphere for inferring its properties. This powerful approach has revealed two key long-standing problems in solar physics: the puzzling dilemmas between theory and observations in several anomalously polarized spectral lines and the need for inferring the ubiquitous weak chromospheric magnetic fields, which requires discriminating the Hanle effect in dynamic optically thick plasmas. However, the ever-present dynamics, i.e., the temporal evolution of heatings and macroscopic motions, has been widely disregarded when modeling and interpreting the scattering polarization. This has hindered a consistent theoretical solution to the puzzle while falsifying the Hanle diagnosis. Here, we show that the dynamical evolution is a keystone for solving both problems because its systematic impact allows an explanation of the observations from “anomalous” instantaneous polarization signals. Evolution accounted for, we reproduce amplitudes and (spectral and spatial) shapes of the Ca i 4227 Å polarization at solar disk center, identifying a restrictive arrangement of magnetic fields, kinematics, heatings, and spatio-temporal resolution. We find that the joint action of dynamics, Hanle effect, and low temporal resolutions mimics Zeeman linear polarization profiles, the true weak-field Zeeman signals being negligible. Our results allow reinterpretation of many polarization signals of the solar spectra and support time-dependent scattering polarization as a powerful tool for deciphering the spatio-temporal distribution of chromospheric heatings and fields. This approach may be a key aid in developing the Hanle diagnosis for the solar atmosphere.

  17. Performance Characterization of UV Science Cameras Developed for the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champey, P.; Kobayashi, K.; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Hyde, D.; Robertson, B.; Beabout, D.; Beabout, B.; Stewart, M.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a science camera suitable for sub-orbital missions for observations in the UV, EUV and soft X-ray. Six cameras will be built and tested for flight with the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP), a joint National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) and MSFC sounding rocket mission. The goal of the CLASP mission is to observe the scattering polarization in Lyman-alpha and to detect the Hanle effect in the line core. Due to the nature of Lyman-alpha polarization in the chromosphere, strict measurement sensitivity requirements are imposed on the CLASP polarimeter and spectrograph systems; science requirements for polarization measurements of Q/I and U/I are 0.1 percent in the line core. CLASP is a dual-beam spectro-polarimeter, which uses a continuously rotating waveplate as a polarization modulator, while the waveplate motor driver outputs trigger pulses to synchronize the exposures. The CCDs are operated in frame-transfer mode; the trigger pulse initiates the frame transfer, effectively ending the ongoing exposure and starting the next. The strict requirement of 0.1 percent polarization accuracy is met by using frame-transfer cameras to maximize the duty cycle in order to minimize photon noise. Coating the e2v CCD57-10 512x512 detectors with Lumogen-E coating allows for a relatively high (30 percent) quantum efficiency at the Lyman-alpha line. The CLASP cameras were designed to operate with 10 e-/pixel/second dark current, 25 e- read noise, a gain of 2.0 +/- 0.5 and 1.0 percent residual non-linearity. We present the results of the performance characterization study performed on the CLASP prototype camera; dark current, read noise, camera gain and residual non-linearity.

  18. Fine structure of the age-chromospheric activity relation in solar-type stars I: The Ca II infrared triplet: Absolute flux calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Ribas, Ignasi

    2016-01-01

    Strong spectral lines are useful indicators of stellar chromospheric activity. They are physically linked to the convection efficiency, differential rotation, and angular momentum evolution and are a potential indicator of age. However, for ages > 2 Gyr, the age-activity relationship remains poorly constrained thus hampering its full application. The Ca II infrared triplet (IRT lines) has been poorly studied compared to classical chromospheric indicators. We report in this paper absolute chromospheric fluxes in the three Ca II IRT lines, based on a new calibration tied to up-to-date model atmospheres. We obtain the Ca II IRT absolute fluxes for 113 FGK stars from high signal-to-noise ratio and high-resolution spectra covering an extensive domain of chromospheric activity levels. We perform an absolute continuum flux calibration for the Ca II IRT lines anchored in atmospheric models calculated as an explicit function of effective temperatures, metallicity, and gravities avoiding the degeneracy present in photo...

  19. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The chromosphere is the site of weak emission lines characterizing the flash spectrum observed for a few seconds during a total eclipse. This layer of the solar atmosphere is known to possess an opaque Hα emission and a great number of spicules, which can extend well above the photosphere. A stunning variety of hydrogen emission lines have been observed in this region. The production of these lines has provided the seventeenth line of evidence that the Sun is comprised of condensed matter (Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen II: A critical assessment of current and primordial helium levels in Sun. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 2, 35–47. Contrary to the gaseous solar models, the simplest mechanism for the production of emission lines is the evaporation of excited atoms from condensed surfaces existing within the chromosphere, as found in spicules. This is reminiscent of the chemiluminescence which occurs during the condensation of silver clusters (Konig L., Rabin I., Schultze W., and Ertl G. Chemiluminescence in the Agglomeration of Metal Clusters. Science, v. 274, no. 5291, 1353–1355. The process associated with spicule formation is an exothermic one, requiring the transport of energy away from the site of condensation. As atoms leave localized surfaces, their electrons can occupy any energy level and, hence, a wide variety of emission lines are produced. In this regard, it is hypothesized that the presence of hydrides on the Sun can also facilitate hydrogen condensation in the chromosphere. The associated line emission from main group and transition elements constitutes the thirtieth line of evidence that the Sun is condensed matter. Condensation processes also help to explain why spicules manifest an apparently constant temperature over their entire length. Since the corona supports magnetic field lines, the random orientations associated with spicule formation suggests that the hydrogen condensates in the chromosphere are not metallic in

  20. Observation and modeling of main sequence star chromospheres. 3: Differential analysis of hydrogen lines versus activity level in M dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdebine, E. R.; Doyle, J. G.; Koscielecki, M.

    1995-02-01

    We use the constraints at the extremes in magnetic activity level to simulate the effect of varying magnetic non-thermal heating in dM and dMe chromospheres by varying the transition region pressure and temperature minimum. We built four grids of model atmospheres with temperature minimum either at 2,660 K or 3,000 K, and a range of transition region pressure. We found that when decreasing the transition region pressure (i.e. the chromospheric temperature gradient), the Balmer lines change rapidly from emission to strong absorption, then the profiles weaken and become narrower until they disappear totally (zero Halpha stars). The Paschen and Brackett series exhibit a qualitatively similar behavior, but the `emission domain' is at a higher column mass. The Brackett lines never really develop a strong absorption. In opposition with other series, the Lyman lines show a monotonous decrease and even change to absorption for very low density models. These differences are useful spectral diagnostics for M dwarf atmospheres. All hydrogen series, except the Lyman series for intermediate and high pressures, are sensitive to the temperature minimum when large changes are considered. We also investigated the effect of the temperature break zone and found it is important only for high pressure atmospheres. Our grids of models successfully reproduce all type of observed Halpha profiles: (1) high activity with strong emission and weak self-reversal, (2) filled in intermediate activity with inner wings in emission and the core in absorption, (3) intermediate activity with strong and broad absorption, (4) low activity with weak and narrow absorption, (5) `zero activity' with an undetectable profile. We discuss the line characteristics over this wide range of physical conditions. We analyze the ionization fraction and electron density for our series of chromospheres. Changes in the ionization fraction are important throughout the pressure range. Heavy elements are the main electron

  1. Simulations of the Mg II k and Ca II 8542 lines from an AlfvÉn Wave-heated Flare Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Graham S.; Fletcher, Lyndsay.; Russell, Alexander J. B.; Allred, Joel C.

    2016-08-01

    We use radiation hydrodynamic simulations to examine two models of solar flare chromospheric heating: Alfvén wave dissipation and electron beam collisional losses. Both mechanisms are capable of strong chromospheric heating, and we show that the distinctive atmospheric evolution in the mid-to-upper chromosphere results in Mg ii k-line emission that should be observably different between wave-heated and beam-heated simulations. We also present Ca ii 8542 Å profiles that are formed slightly deeper in the chromosphere. The Mg ii k-line profiles from our wave-heated simulation are quite different from those from a beam-heated model and are more consistent with Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph observations. The predicted differences between the Ca ii 8542 Å in the two models are small. We conclude that careful observational and theoretical study of lines formed in the mid-to-upper chromosphere holds genuine promise for distinguishing between competing models for chromospheric heating in flares.

  2. Magnetic cycles of Sun-like stars with different levels of coronal and chromospheric activity — comparison with the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimanovskaya, Elena; Bruevich, Vasiliy; Bruevich, Elena

    2016-09-01

    The atmospheric activity of the Sun and Sun-like stars is analyzed involving observations from the HK-project at the Mount Wilson Observatory, the California and Carnegie Planet Search Program at the Keck and Lick Observatories and the Magellan Planet Search Program at the Las Campanas Observatory. We show that for stars of F, G and K spectral classes, the cyclic activity, similar to the 11-yr solar cycle, is different: it becomes more prominent in K-stars. Comparative study of Sun-like stars with different levels of chromospheric and coronal activity confirms that the Sun belongs to stars with a low level of chromospheric activity and stands apart among these stars by its minimum level of coronal radiation and minimum level of variations in photospheric flux.

  3. Magnetic cycles of Sun-like stars with different levels of coronal and chromospheric activity -- comparison with the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Bruevich, E A; Shimanovskaya, E V

    2016-01-01

    The atmospheric activity of the Sun and Sun-like stars is analyzed involving observations from HK-project at the Mount Wilson Observatory, the California and Carnegie Planet Search Program at the Keck and Lick Observatories and the Magellan Planet Search Program at the Las Campanas Observatory. We show that for stars of F, G and K spectral classes, the cyclic activity, similar to the 11-yr solar cycles, is different: it becomes more prominent in K-stars. Comparative study of Sun-like stars with different levels of the chromospheric and coronal activity confirms that the Sun belongs to stars with the low level of the chromospheric activity and stands apart among these stars by the minimum level of its coronal radiation and the minimum level of its variations of the photospheric flux.

  4. The solar interface from the photosphere to the chromosphere and corona : contribution of eclipses and EUV filtergrams

    CERN Document Server

    Bazin, Cyrille

    2013-01-01

    Eclipses are very favourable for the photosphere- chromosphere and corona interface observation as the occultation takes place in space, free of parasitic light coming from the occulting disk (the Moon). Independently, EUV filtergrams of the limb region obtained in space were analyzed using one dimensional hydrostatic VAL models but this method ignores the ubiquitous magnetic field emergence phenomenon associated with the chromospheric network. A jump of temperature from 0.01 to 1 MK is observed near the 2 Mm heights and higher, further producing a permanent solar wind flow. The heating processes responsible for this temperature jump and for the flow are not yet fully understood. In this thesis, we reconsider these problems with new high cadence CCD flash spectra, white light (W-L) eclipse images and new EUV images obtained with space-borne instruments. We illustrate the mechanisms of low First Ionisation Potential (FIP) emission lines present in the low layers of the solar atmosphere, and nearby prominences....

  5. Evidence for collisional depolarization of the \\ion{Ba}{ii} ${\\lambda}4554$ line in the low chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Derouich, M

    2008-01-01

    Context. Rigorous modeling of the \\ion{Ba}{ii} ${\\lambda}4554$ formation is potentially interesting since this strongly polarized line forms in the solar chromosphere where the magnetic field is rather poorly known. Aims. To investigate the role of isotropic collisions with neutral hydrogen in the formation of the polarized \\ion{Ba}{ii} ${\\lambda}4554$ line and, thus, in the determination of the magnetic field. Methods. Multipole relaxation and transfer rates of the $d$ and p-states of \\ion{Ba}{ii} by isotropic collisions with neutral hydrogen are calculated. We consider a plane parallel layer of \\ion{Ba}{ii} situated at the low chromosphere and anisotropically illuminated from below which produces linear polarization in the ${\\lambda}4554$ line by scattering processes. To compute that polarization, we solve the statistical equilibrium equations for \\ion{Ba}{ii} levels including collisions, radiation and magnetic field effects. Results. Variation laws of the relaxation and transfer rates with hydrogen number ...

  6. RESOLVING THE FAN-SPINE RECONNECTION GEOMETRY OF A SMALL-SCALE CHROMOSPHERIC JET EVENT WITH THE NEW SOLAR TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Zhicheng; Chen, Bin; Goode, Philip R.; Cao, Wenda [Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Ji, Haisheng [Big Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Jets are ubiquitously present in both quiet and active regions on the Sun. They are widely believed to be driven by magnetic reconnection. A fan-spine structure has been frequently reported in some coronal jets and flares, and has been regarded as a signature of ongoing magnetic reconnection in a topology consisting of a magnetic null connected by a fan-like separatrix surface and a spine. However, for small-scale chromospheric jets, clear evidence of such structures is rather rare, although it has been implied in earlier works that showed an inverted-Y-shaped feature. Here we report high-resolution (0.″16) observations of a small-scale chromospheric jet obtained by the New Solar Telescope (NST) using 10830 Å filtergrams. Bi-directional flows were observed across the separatrix regions in the 10830 Å images, suggesting that the jet was produced due to magnetic reconnection. At the base of the jet, a fan-spine structure was clearly resolved by the NST, including the spine and the fan-like surface, as well as the loops before and after the reconnection. A major part of this fan-spine structure, with the exception of its bright footpoints and part of the base arc, was invisible in the extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray images (observed by the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly and the X-Ray Telescope, respectively), indicating that the reconnection occurred in the upper chromosphere. Our observations suggest that the evolution of this chromospheric jet is consistent with a two-step reconnection scenario proposed by Török et al.

  7. Optical alignment of the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter using sophisticated methods to minimize activities under vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giono, G.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ishikawa, R.; Narukage, N.; Kano, R.; Kubo, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Bando, T.; Hara, H.; Suematsu, Y.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Auchère, F.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2016-07-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding-rocket instrument developed at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) as a part of an international collaboration. The instrument main scientific goal is to achieve polarization measurement of the Lyman-α line at 121.56 nm emitted from the solar upper-chromosphere and transition region with an unprecedented 0.1% accuracy. The optics are composed of a Cassegrain telescope coated with a "cold mirror" coating optimized for UV reflection and a dual-channel spectrograph allowing for simultaneous observation of the two orthogonal states of polarization. Although the polarization sensitivity is the most important aspect of the instrument, the spatial and spectral resolutions of the instrument are also crucial to observe the chromospheric features and resolve the Ly-α profiles. A precise alignment of the optics is required to ensure the resolutions, but experiments under vacuum conditions are needed since Ly-α is absorbed by air, making the alignment experiments difficult. To bypass this issue, we developed methods to align the telescope and the spectrograph separately in visible light. We explain these methods and present the results for the optical alignment of the CLASP telescope and spectrograph. We then discuss the combined performances of both parts to derive the expected resolutions of the instrument, and compare them with the flight observations performed on September 3rd 2015.

  8. Acceleration of type 2 spicules in the solar chromosphere. II. Viscous braking and upper bounds on coronal energy input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Michael L., E-mail: mgoodman@wvhtf.org [Advanced Technologies Group, West Virginia High Technology Consortium Foundation, 1000 Galliher Drive, Fairmont, WV 26554 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    A magnetohydrodynamic model is used to determine conditions under which the Lorentz force accelerates plasma to type 2 spicule speeds in the chromosphere. The model generalizes a previous model to include a more realistic pre-spicule state, and the vertical viscous force. Two cases of acceleration under upper chromospheric conditions are considered. The magnetic field strength for these cases is ≤12.5 and 25 G. Plasma is accelerated to terminal vertical speeds of 66 and 78 km s{sup –1} in 100 s, compared with 124 and 397 km s{sup –1} for the case of zero viscosity. The flows are localized within horizontal diameters ∼80 and 50 km. The total thermal energy generated by viscous dissipation is ∼10 times larger than that due to Joule dissipation, but the magnitude of the total cooling due to rarefaction is ≳ this energy. Compressive heating dominates during the early phase of acceleration. The maximum energy injected into the corona by type 2 spicules, defined as the energy flux in the upper chromosphere, may largely balance total coronal energy losses in quiet regions, possibly also in coronal holes, but not in active regions. It is proposed that magnetic flux emergence in intergranular regions drives type 2 spicules.

  9. X-Shooter spectroscopy of young stellar objects III. Photospheric and chromospheric properties of Class III objects

    CERN Document Server

    Stelzer, B; Alcala, J M; Manara, C F; Biazzo, K; Covino, E; Rigliaco, E; Testi, L; Covino, S; D'Elia, V

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed X-Shooter/VLT spectra of 24 ClassIII sources from three nearby star-forming regions (sigmaOrionis, LupusIII, and TWHya). We determined the effective temperature, surface gravity, rotational velocity, and radial velocity by comparing the observed spectra with synthetic BT-Settl model spectra. We investigated in detail the emission lines emerging from the stellar chromospheres and combined these data with archival X-ray data to allow for a comparison between chromospheric and coronal emissions. Both X-ray and Halpha luminosity as measured in terms of the bolometric luminosity are independent of the effective temperature for early-M stars but decline toward the end of the spectral M sequence. For the saturated early-M stars the average emission level is almost one dex higher for X-rays than for Halpha: log(L_x/L_bol) = -2.85 +- 0.36 vs. log(L_Halpha/L_bol) = -3.72 +- 0.21. When all chromospheric emission lines (including the Balmer series up to H11, CaII HK, the CaII infrared triplet, and several HeI...

  10. Optical Alignment of the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter using Sophisticated Methods to Minimize Activities under Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giono, G.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ishikawa, R.; Narukage, N.; Kano, R.; Kubo, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Bando, T.; Hara, H.; Suematsu, Y.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.

    2016-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding-rocket instrument developed at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) as a part of an international collaboration. The in- strument main scientific goal is to achieve polarization measurement of the Lyman-alpha line at 121.56 nm emitted from the solar upper-chromosphere and transition region with an unprecedented 0.1% accuracy. For this purpose, the optics are composed of a Cassegrain telescope coated with a "cold mirror" coating optimized for UV reflection and a dual-channel spectrograph allowing for simultaneous observation of the two orthogonal states of polarization. Although the polarization sensitivity is the most important aspect of the instrument, the spatial and spectral resolutions of the instrument are also crucial to observe the chromospheric features and resolve the Ly- pro les. A precise alignment of the optics is required to ensure the resolutions, but experiments under vacuum conditions are needed since Ly-alpha is absorbed by air, making the alignment experiments difficult. To bypass this issue, we developed methods to align the telescope and the spectrograph separately in visible light. We will explain these methods and present the results for the optical alignment of the CLASP telescope and spectrograph. We will then discuss the combined performances of both parts to derive the expected resolutions of the instrument, and compare them with the flight observations performed on September 3rd 2015.

  11. Formation and Eruption of a Small Flux Rope in the Chromosphere Observed by NST, IRIS, and SDO

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Pankaj; Wang, Haimin; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Using high-resolution images from 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), we report the direct evidence of chromospheric reconnection at the polarity inversion line (PIL) between two small opposite polarity sunspots. Small jet-like structures (with velocities of ~20-55 km/s) were observed at the reconnection site before the onset of the first M1.0 flare. The slow rise of untwisting jets was followed by the onset of cool plasma inflow (~10 km/s) at the reconnection site, causing the onset of a two-ribbon flare. The reconnection between two sheared J-shaped cool H$\\alpha$ loops causes the formation of a small twisted flux rope (S shaped) in the chromosphere. In addition, Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) magnetograms show the flux cancellation (both positive and negative) during the first M1.0 flare. The emergence of negative flux and cancellation of positive flux (with shear flows) continue until the successful eruption of the flux rope. The newly formed chromospheric flux ro...

  12. Analysis of coronal and chromospheric hard X-ray sources in an eruptive solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimovets, Ivan; Golovin, Dmitry; Livshits, Moisey; Vybornov, Vadim; Sadykov, Viacheslav; Mitrofanov, Igor

    We have analyzed hard X-ray emission of an eruptive solar flare on 3 November 2010. The entire flare region was observed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. This gave us an information that chromospheric footpoints of flare magnetic loops were behind the east solar limb for an earth observer. Hard X-ray emission from the entire flare region was detected by the High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND) onboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft while hard X-rays from the coronal part of the flare region were detected by the RHESSI. This rare situation has allowed us to investigate both coronal and chromospheric sources of hard X-ray emission separately. Flare impulsive phase was accompanied by eruption of a magnetic flux rope and formation of a plasmoid detected by the AIA/SDO in the EUV range. Two coronal hard X-ray sources (S_{1} and S_{2}) were detected by the RHESSI. The upper source S_{1} coincided with the plasmoid and the lower source S_{2} was near the tops of the underlying flare loops that is in accordance with the standard model of eruptive flares. Imaging spectroscopy with the RHESSI has allowed to measure energetic spectra of hard X-ray emission from the S_{1} and S_{2} sources. At the impulsive phase peak they have power-law shape above ≈ 15 keV with spectral slopes gamma_{S_{1}}=3.46 ± 1.58 and gamma_{S_{2}}=4.64 ± 0.12. Subtracting spatially integrated spectrum of coronal hard X-ray emission measured by the RHESSI from the spectrum measured by the HEND we found spectrum of hard X-rays emitted from the footpoints of the flare loops (source S_{0}). This spectrum has a power-law shape with gamma_{S_{0}}=2.21 ± 0.57. It is shown that it is not possible to explain the measured spectra of the S_{2} and S_{0} sources in frames of the thin and thick target models respectively if we assume that electrons were accelerated in the energy release site situated below the plasmoid and above the flare loops as suggested by the standard flare model. To resolve the contradiction

  13. Solar Flare Chromospheric Line Emission: Comparison Between IBIS High-resolution Observations and Radiative Hydrodynamic Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Petrosian, Vahé; Dalda, Alberto Sainz; Liu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Solar flares involve impulsive energy release, which results in enhanced radiation in a broad spectral and at a wide height range. In particular, line emission from the chromosphere (lower atmosphere) can provide critical diagnostics of plasma heating processes. Thus, a direct comparison between high-resolution spectroscopic observations and advanced numerical modeling results can be extremely valuable, but has not been attempted so far. We present in this paper such a self-consistent investigation of an M3.0 flare observed by the Dunn Solar Telescope's (DST) Interferometric Bi-dimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) on 2011 September 24 that we have modeled with the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN (Carlsson & Stein 1992, 1997; Abbett & Hawley 1999; Allred et al. 2005). We obtained images and spectra of the flaring region with IBIS in H$\\alpha$ 6563 \\AA\\ and Ca II 8542 \\AA, and with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscope Imager (RHESSI) in X-rays. The latter was used to infer the non-thermal elect...

  14. Solar granulation from photosphere to low chromosphere observed in BaII 4554 A line

    CERN Document Server

    Kostik, R; Shchukina, N

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to characterize the statistical properties of solar granulation in the photosphere and low chromosphere up to 650 km. We use velocity and intensity variations obtained at different atmospheric heights from observations in BaII 4554 A. The observations were done during good seeing conditions at the VTT at the Observatorio del Teide on Tenerife. The line core forms rather high in the atmosphere and allows granulation properties to be studied at heights that have been not accessed before in similar studies. In addition, we analyze the synthetic profiles of the BaII 4554 A line by the same method computed taking NLTE effects into account in the 3D hydrodynamical model atmosphere. We suggest a 16-column model of solar granulation depending on the direction of motion and on the intensity contrast measured in the continuum and in the uppermost layer. We calculate the heights of intensity contrast sign reversal and velocity sign reversal. We show that both parameters depend strongly on th...

  15. The 3D structure of an active region filament as extrapolated from photospheric and chromospheric observations

    CERN Document Server

    Chaouche, L Yelles; Pillet, V Martínez; Moreno-Insertis, F

    2012-01-01

    The 3D structure of an active region (AR) filament is studied using nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolations based on simultaneous observations at a photospheric and a chromospheric height. To that end, we used the Si I 10827 \\AA\\ line and the He I 10830 \\AA\\ triplet obtained with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP) at the VTT (Tenerife). The two extrapolations have been carried out independently from each other and their respective spatial domains overlap in a considerable height range. This opens up new possibilities for diagnostics in addition to the usual ones obtained through a single extrapolation from, typically, a photospheric layer. Among those possibilities, this method allows the determination of an average formation height of the He I 10830 \\AA\\ signal of \\approx 2 Mm above the surface of the sun. It allows, as well, to cross-check the obtained 3D magnetic structures in view of verifying a possible deviation from the force- free condition especially at the photosphere. The extrapolati...

  16. Oscillatory behavior of chromospheric fine structures in a network and a semi-active regions

    CERN Document Server

    Bostanci, Z F; Al, N

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we study the periodicities of oscillations in dark fine structures using observations of a network and a semi-active region close to the solar disk center. We simultaneously obtained spatially high resolution time series of white light images and narrow band images in the H$\\alpha$ line using the 2D G\\"ottingen spectrometer, which were based on two Fabry-Perot interferometers and mounted in the VTT/Observatorio del Teide/Tenerife. During the observations, the H$\\alpha$ line was scanned at 18 wavelength positions with steps of 125 m\\AA. We computed series of Doppler and intensity images by subtraction and addition of the H$\\alpha$ $\\pm$ 0.3 \\AA\\ and $\\pm$ 0.7 \\AA\\ pairs, sampling the upper chromosphere and the upper photosphere, respectively. Then we obtained power, coherence and phase difference spectra by performing a wavelet analysis to the Doppler fluctuations. Here, we present comparative results of oscillatory properties of dark fine structures seen in a network and a semi-active reg...

  17. How important are electron beams in driving chromospheric evaporation in the 2014 March 29 flare?

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, Marina; Krucker, Säm; Graham, David

    2015-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution observations of chromospheric evaporation in the flare SOL2014-03-29T17:48. Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) observations of the FeXXI 1354.1 A line indicate evaporating plasma at a temperature of 10 MK along the flare ribbon during the flare peak and several minutes into the decay phase with upflow velocities between 30 km s$^{-1}$ and 200 km s$^{-1}$. Hard X-ray (HXR) footpoints were observed by RHESSI for two minutes during the peak of the flare. Their locations coincided with the locations of the upflows in parts of the southern flare ribbon but the HXR footpoint source preceded the observation of upflows in FeXXI by 30-75 seconds. However, in other parts of the southern ribbon and in the northern ribbon the observed upflows were not coincident with a HXR source in time nor space, most prominently during the decay phase. In this case evaporation is likely caused by energy input via a conductive flux that is established between the hot (25 MK) coronal source, ...

  18. The Chromospheric Solar Limb Brightening at Radio, Millimeter, Sub-millimeter, and Infrared Wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    De la Luz, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Observations of the emission at radio, millimeter, sub-millimeter, and infrared wavelengths in the center of the solar disk validate the auto-consistence of semi-empirical models of the chromosphere. Theoretically, these models must reproduce the emission at the solar limb. In this work, we tested both the VALC and the C7 semi-empirical models by computing their emission spectrum in the frequency range from 2 GHz to 10 THz, at solar limb altitudes. We calculate the Sun's theoretical radii as well as their limb brightening. Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) was computed for hydrogen, electron density, and H-. In order to solve the radiative transfer equation a 3D geometry was employed to determine the ray paths and Bremsstrahlung, H-, and inverse Bremsstrahlung opacity sources were integrated in the optical depth. We compared the computed solar radii with high resolution observations at the limb obtained by Clark (1994). We found that there are differences between observed and computed solar radii of ...

  19. Chromospheric Condensation and Quasi-periodic Pulsations in a Circular-ribbon Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Q M; Ning, Z J

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report our multiwavelength observations of the C3.1 circular-ribbon flare SOL2015-10-16T10:20 in AR 12434. The flare consisted of a circular flare ribbon (CFR), an inner flare ribbon (IFR) inside, and a pair of short parallel flare ribbons (PFRs). During the impulsive phase of the flare, "two-step" raster observations of \\textit{IRIS} with a cadence of 6 s and an exposure time of 2 s show plasma downflow at the CFR in the Si {\\sc iv} $\\lambda$1402.77 line, suggesting chromospheric condensation. The downflow speeds first increased rapidly from a few km s$^{-1}$ to the peak values of 45$-$52 km s$^{-1}$, before decreasing gradually to the initial levels. The decay timescales of condensation were 3$-$4 minutes, indicating ongoing magnetic reconnection. Interestingly, the downflow speeds are positively correlated with logarithm of the Si {\\sc iv} line intensity and time derivative of the \\textit{GOES} soft X-ray (SXR) flux in 1$-$8 {\\AA}. The radio dynamic spectra are characterized by a type \\Rm...

  20. Time-dependent hydrogen ionisation in the solar chromosphere. I: Methods and first results

    CERN Document Server

    Wedemeyer-Boehm, J L S

    2006-01-01

    An approximate method for solving the rate equations for the hydrogen populations was extended and implemented in the three-dimensional radiation (magneto-)hydrodynamics code CO5BOLD. The method is based on a model atom with six energy levels and fixed radiative rates. It has been tested extensively in one-dimensional simulations. The extended method has been used to create a three-dimensional model that extends from the upper convection zone to the chromosphere. The ionisation degree of hydrogen in our time-dependent simulation is comparable to the corresponding equilibrium value up to 500 km above optical depth unity. Above this height, the non-equilibrium ionisation degree is fairly constant over time and space, and tends to be at a value set by hot propagating shock waves. The hydrogen level populations and electron density are much more constant than the corresponding values for statistical equilibrium, too. In contrast, the equilibrium ionisation degree varies by more than 20 orders of magnitude between...

  1. Modelling chromospheric line profiles as diagnostics of velocity fields in {\\omega} Centauri red giant stars

    CERN Document Server

    Vieytes, M; Cacciari, C; Origlia, L; Pancino, E

    2010-01-01

    Context. Mass loss of ~0.1-0.3 M$_{\\odot}$ from Population II red giant stars (RGB) is a requirement of stellar evolution theory in order to account for several observational evidences in globular clusters. Aims. The aim of this study is to detect the presence of outward velocity fields, which are indicative of mass outflow, in six luminous red giant stars of the stellar cluster {\\omega} Cen. Methods. We compare synthetic line profiles computed using relevant model chromospheres to observed profiles of the H{\\alpha} and Ca II K lines. The spectra were taken with UVES (R=45,000) and the stars were selected so that three of them belong to the metal-rich population and three to the metal-poor population, and sample as far down as 1 to 2.5 magnitudes fainter than the respective RGB tips. Results. We do indeed reveal the presence of low-velocity outward motions in four of our six targets, without any apparent correlation with astrophysical parameters. Conclusions. This provides direct evidence that outward velocit...

  2. Chromospheric Rapid Blueshifted Excursions Observed with IBIS and Their Association with Photospheric Magnetic Field Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Na; Liu, Chang; Jing, Ju; Tritschler, Alexandra; Reardon, Kevin P; Lamb, Derek A; Deforest, Craig E; Denker, Carsten; Wang, Shuo; Liu, Rui; Wang, Haimin

    2014-01-01

    Chromospheric rapid blueshifted excursions (RBEs) are suggested to be the disk counterparts of type II spicules at the limb and believed to contribute to the coronal heating process. Previous identification of RBEs was mainly based on feature detection using Dopplergrams. In this paper, we study RBEs on 2011 October 21 in a very quiet region at the disk center, which were observed with the high-cadence imaging spectroscopy of the Ca II 8542 A line from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS). By using an automatic spectral analysis algorithm, a total of 98 RBEs are identified during a 11 minute period. Most of these RBEs have either a round or elongated shape, with an average area of 1.2 arcsec^2. The detailed temporal evolution of spectra from IBIS makes possible a quantitative determination of the velocity (~16 km/s) and acceleration (~400 m/s^2) of Ca II 8542 RBEs, and reveal an additional deceleration (~-160 m/s^2) phase that usually follows the initial acceleration. In addition, we also inv...

  3. Chromospheric activity and evolutionary age of the Sun and four solar twins

    CERN Document Server

    Mittag, M; Hempelmann, A; González-Pérez, J N; Schmitt, J H M M

    2016-01-01

    The activity levels of the solar-twin candidates HD 101364 and HD 197027 are measured and compared with the Sun, the known solar twin 18 Sco, and the solar-like star 51 Peg. Furthermore, the absolute ages of these five objects are estimated from their positions in the HR diagram and the evolutionary (relative) age compared with their activity levels. To represent the activity level of these stars, the Mount Wilson S-indices were used. To obtain consistent ages and evolutionary advance on the main sequence, we used evolutionary tracks calculated with the Cambridge Stellar Evolution Code. From our spectroscopic observations of HD 101364 and HD 197027 and based on the established calibration procedures, the respective Mount Wilson S-indices are determined. We find that the chromospheric activity of both stars is comparable with the present activity level of the Sun and that of 18 Sco, at least for the period in consideration. Furthermore, the absolute age of HD 101364, HD 197027, 51 Peg, and 18 Sco are found to ...

  4. The energy of waves in the photosphere and lower chromosphere: 1. Velocity statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, C; Rezaei, R; Collados, M

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic waves are one of the primary suspects besides magnetic fields for the chromospheric heating process to temperatures above radiative equilibrium (RE). We derived the mechanical wave energy as seen in line-core velocities to obtain a measure of mechanical energy flux with height for a comparison with the energy requirements in a semi-empirical atmosphere model. We analyzed a 1-hour time series and a large-area map of Ca II H spectra on the traces of propagating waves. We analyzed the velocity statistics of several spectral lines in the wing of Ca II H, and the line-core velocity of Ca II H. We converted the velocity amplitudes into volume and mass energy densities. For comparison, we used the increase of internal energy necessary to lift a RE atmosphere to the HSRA temperature stratification. We find that the velocity amplitude grows in agreement with linear wave theory and thus slower with height than predicted from energy conservation. The mechanical energy of the waves above around z~500 km is insuf...

  5. Generation of electric currents in the chromosphere via neutral-ion drag

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnoselskikh, V; Hudson, H S; Bale, S D; Abbett, W P; 10.1088/0004-637X/724/2/1542

    2010-01-01

    We consider the generation of electric currents in the solar chromosphere where the ionization level is typically low. We show that ambient electrons become magnetized even for weak magnetic fields (30 G); that is, their gyrofrequency becomes larger than the collision frequency while ion motions continue to be dominated by ion-neutral collisions. Under such conditions, ions are dragged by neutrals, and the magnetic field acts as if it is frozen-in to the dynamics of the neutral gas. However, magnetized electrons drift under the action of the electric and magnetic fields induced in the reference frame of ions moving with the neutral gas. We find that this relative motion of electrons and ions results in the generation of quite intense electric currents. The dissipation of these currents leads to resistive electron heating and efficient gas ionization. Ionization by electron-neutral impact does not alter the dynamics of the heavy particles; thus, the gas turbulent motions continue even when the plasma becomes f...

  6. Transition Region and Chromospheric Signatures of Impulsive Heating Events. I. Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Harry P; Crump, Nicholas A; Simoes, Paulo J A

    2016-01-01

    We exploit the high spatial resolution and high cadence of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the response of the transition region and chromosphere to energy deposition during a small flare. Simultaneous observations from RHESSI provide constraints on the energetic electrons precipitating into the flare footpoints while observations of XRT, AIA, and EIS allow us to measure the temperatures and emission measures from the resulting flare loops. We find clear evidence for heating over an extended period on the spatial scale of a single IRIS pixel. During the impulsive phase of this event the intensities in each pixel for the Si IV 1402.770, C II 1334.535, Mg II 2796.354 and O I 1355.598 emission lines are characterized by numerous, small-scale bursts typically lasting 60s or less. Red shifts are observed in Si IV, C II, and Mg II during the impulsive phase. Mg II shows red-shifts during the bursts and stationary emission at other times. The Si IV and C II profiles, in contrast, are ...

  7. Temporal Evolution of Chromospheric Oscillations in Flaring Regions: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsue, T.; Hill, F.; Stassun, K. G.

    2016-10-01

    We have analyzed Hα intensity images obtained at a 1 minute cadence with the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) system to investigate the properties of oscillations in the 0-8 mHz frequency band at the location and time of strong M- and X-class flares. For each of three subregions within two flaring active regions, we extracted time series from multiple distinct positions, including the flare core and quieter surrounding areas. The time series were analyzed with a moving power-map analysis to examine power as a function of frequency and time. We find that, in the flare core of all three subregions, the low-frequency power (˜1-2 mHz) is substantially enhanced immediately prior to and after the flare, and that power at all frequencies up to 8 mHz is depleted at flare maximum. This depletion is both frequency- and time-dependent, which probably reflects the changing depths visible during the flare in the bandpass of the filter. These variations are not observed outside the flare cores. The depletion may indicate that acoustic energy is being converted into thermal energy at flare maximum, while the low-frequency enhancement may arise from an instability in the chromosphere and provide an early warning of the flare onset. Dark lanes of reduced wave power are also visible in the power maps, which may arise from the interaction of the acoustic waves and the magnetic field.

  8. Systematic radial flows in the chromosphere, transition region, and corona of the quiet sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Donald M.; Rottman, Gary J.; Orrall, Frank Q.

    1991-05-01

    An observational study of the systematic radial flows representative of the quiet sun's chromosphere, transition region, and corona is presented. A sounding rocket experiment (July 27, 1987) obtained high-resolution EUV spectra along a solar diameter with spatial resolution of 20 x 20 arcsec. The center-to-limb behavior of four representative lines (Si II 1533 A, Fe II 1563 A, C IV 1548 A, Ne VIII 770 A formed at different heights in the solar atmosphere is discussed. Assuming that horizontal motions cancel statistically so that the line-of-sight velocity approaches zero at the limb, the net radial downflow is approximately 7.5 + or - 1.0 km/s for C IV, 2.7 + or - 1.5 km/s for Fe II 1563 A, and upper limits of 0 + or - 1.2 km/s and 0 + or - 4 km/s for Si II and Ne VIII, respectively. The absolute wavelengths of each emission line were determined by direct comparison with wavelengths of known platinum lines generated by an inflight calibration lamp. The assumption of line-of-sight velocity approaching zero at the limb is then tested by comparing the wavelengths with recently published laboratory rest wavelengths of the solar emission lines.

  9. Mg II Chromospheric Emission Line Bisectors Of HD39801 And Its Relation With The Activity Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    García García, Leonardo Enrique; Pérez Martínez, M. Isabel

    2016-07-01

    Betelgeuse is a cool star of spectral type M and luminosity class I. In the present work, the activity cycle of Betelgeuse was obtained from the integrated emission flux of the Mg II H and K lines, using more than 250 spectra taken from the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) online database. Of which it was found, based on a Lomb Scargle periodogram, a cycle of 16 years, along with 2 sub-cycles with a period of the order of 0.60 and 0.65 years, which may be due to turbulence or possible stellar flares. In addition, an analysis of line asymmetry was made by means of the chromospheric emission line bisectors, due to the strong self-absorption observed in this lines, the blue and red wings were analyzed independently. In order to measure such asymmetry, a "line shift" was calculated, from which several cycles of variability were obtained from a Lomb Scargle periodogram, spanning from few months to 4 years. In the sense, the most significant cycle is about 0.44 and 0.33 years in the blue and red wing respectively. It is worth noting, that the rotation period of the star doesn't play an important role in the variability of the Mg II lines. This technique provides us with a new way to study activity cycles of evolved stars.

  10. IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AND CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN A SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Hui; Reeves, Katharine K.; Raymond, John C.; Chen, Bin; Murphy, Nicholas A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Li, Gang [Department of Physics and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Liu, Wei, E-mail: hui.tian@cfa.harvard.edu [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94305 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    Magnetic reconnection is believed to be the dominant energy release mechanism in solar flares. The standard flare model predicts both downward and upward outflow plasmas with speeds close to the coronal Alfvén speed. Yet, spectroscopic observations of such outflows, especially the downflows, are extremely rare. With observations of the newly launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we report the detection of a greatly redshifted (∼125 km s{sup –1} along the line of sight) Fe XXI 1354.08 Å emission line with a ∼100 km s{sup –1} nonthermal width at the reconnection site of a flare. The redshifted Fe XXI feature coincides spatially with the loop-top X-ray source observed by RHESSI. We interpret this large redshift as the signature of downward-moving reconnection outflow/hot retracting loops. Imaging observations from both IRIS and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory also reveal the eruption and reconnection processes. Fast downward-propagating blobs along these loops are also found from cool emission lines (e.g., Si IV, O IV, C II, Mg II) and images of AIA and IRIS. Furthermore, the entire Fe XXI line is blueshifted by ∼260 km s{sup –1} at the loop footpoints, where the cool lines mentioned above all exhibit obvious redshift, a result that is consistent with the scenario of chromospheric evaporation induced by downward-propagating nonthermal electrons from the reconnection site.

  11. Magnetic Diagnostics of the Chromosphere with the Mg II h-k Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Alemán, Tanausú del Pino; Sainz, Rafael Manso

    2016-01-01

    We developed a numerical code for polarized radiative transfer in a plane-parallel geometry that implements a recent formulation of partially coherent scattering by polarized multi-term atoms in arbitrary magnetic field regimes. This code allows the realistic modeling of the scattering polarization of important chromospheric lines, such as the Mg II h-k doublet, the Ca II H-K doublet and IR triplet, and lines of the H I Lyman and Balmer series. We present explicit results of the Mg II h-k doublet in a weakly magnetized atmosphere (20-100 G). These confirm the importance of partial redistribution effects in the formation of these lines, as pointed out by previous work in the non-magnetic case. We show that the presence of a magnetic field can produce measurable modifications of the broadband linear polarization even for relatively small field strengths (~10 G), while the circular polarization remains well represented by the classical magnetograph formula. Both these results open an important new window for the...

  12. Diagnosis of Magnetic and Electric Fields of Chromospheric Jets through Spectropolarimetric Observations of HI Paschen Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Anan, Tetsu; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic fields govern the plasma dynamics in the outer layers of the solar atmosphere, and electric fields acting on neutral atoms that move across the magnetic field enable us to study the dynamical coupling between neutrals and ions in the plasma. In order to measure the magnetic and electric fields of chromospheric jets, the full Stokes spectra of the Paschen series of neutral hydrogen in a surge and in some active region jets that took place at the solar limb were observed on May 5, 2012, using the spectropolarimeter of the Domeless Solar Telescope at Hida observatory, Japan. First, we inverted the Stokes spectra taking into account only the effect of magnetic fields on the energy structure and polarization of the hydrogen levels. Having found no definitive evidence of the effects of electric fields in the observed Stokes profiles, we then estimated an upper bound for these fields by calculating the polarization degree under the magnetic field configuration derived in the first step, with the additional ...

  13. Chromospheric Magnetic Reconnection caused by Photospheric Flux Emergence: Implications for Jet-like Events Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, J Y; Doyle, J G; Lu, Q M

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection in the low atmosphere, e.g. chromosphere, is investigated in various physical environments. Its implications for the origination of explosive events (small--scale jets) are discussed. A 2.5-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model in Cartesian coordinates is used. It is found that the temperature and velocity of the outflow jets as a result of magnetic reconnection are strongly dependent on the physical environments, e.g. the magnitude of the magnetic field strength and the plasma density. If the magnetic field strength is weak and the density is high, the temperature of the jets is very low (~10,000 K) as well as its velocity (~40 km/s). However, if environments with stronger magnetic field strength (20 G) and smaller density (electron density Ne=2x10^{10} cm^{-3}) are considered, the outflow jets reach higher temperatures of up to 600,000 K and a line-of-sight velocity of up to 130 km/s which is comparable with the observational values of jet-like events.

  14. Magneto-seismological insights into the penumbral chromosphere and evidence for wave damping in spicules

    CERN Document Server

    Morton, R J

    2014-01-01

    The observation of propagating magneto-hydrodynamic kink waves in magnetic structures and measurement of their properties (amplitude, phase speed) can be used to diagnose the plasma conditions in the neighbourhood of the magnetic structure via magneto-seismology (MS). We aim to reveal properties of the chromosphere/Transition Region above the sunspot penumbra using this technique. Hinode observed a sunspot as it was crossing the limb, providing a unique side on view of the sunspot atmosphere. The presence of large spicule-like jets is evident in \\ion{Ca}{II} H images. The jets are found to support transverse wave motions that displace the central axis, which can be interpreted as a kink wave. The properties of a wave event are measured and used to determine the magnetic and density stratification along the structure. We also measure the width of the spicule and the intensity profile along the structure. The measured wave properties reveal an initial rapid increase in amplitude with height above the solar surf...

  15. Radio Coverage from Chromosphere to Earth: FASR-LOFAR-SIRA Synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, D. E.; Kassim, N.; Gopalswamy, N.; Aschwanden, M. J.

    2003-12-01

    Radio emission is uniquely sensitive to a number of key plasma parameters (magnetic field, temperature, density, high-energy electrons, and various plasma waves) over heights ranging without gaps from the chromosphere, throughout the corona and heliosphere, to the Earth. Two ground-based radio arrays, the Frequency Agile Solar Radiotelescope (FASR) and the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR), together with the space-based Solar Imaging Radio Array (SIRA) are planned that will for the first time provide direct imaging of disturbances over this vast height range through interferometric imaging over their equally impressive frequency range of 24 GHz to 30 kHz. We describe the science goals of these instruments, focusing especially on the science addressed jointly by all three instruments. Among the examples are (1) simultaneous imaging of CMEs, flaring loops, and shock-associated (type II) emission and (2) imaging the propagation of electrons on open field lines (type III), from their acceleration point through the corona and heliosphere to the point where they are measured in situ by near-Earth spacecraft. In addition to spatially relating the different phenomena, the spectral information is rich in quantitative diagnostics. We give some examples of the revolutionary results we can expect from the combined instruments.

  16. Fine structure of the age-chromospheric activity relation in solar-type stars. I. The Ca II infrared triplet: Absolute flux calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Oliveira, D.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; Dutra-Ferreira, L.; Ribas, I.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Strong spectral lines are useful indicators of stellar chromospheric activity. They are physically linked to the convection efficiency, differential rotation, and angular momentum evolution and are a potential indicator of age. However, for ages > 2 Gyr, the age-activity relationship remains poorly constrained thus hampering its full application. Aims: The Ca II infrared triplet (IRT lines, λλ 8498, 8542, and 8662) has been poorly studied compared to classical chromospheric indicators. We report in this paper absolute chromospheric fluxes in the three Ca II IRT lines, based on a new calibration tied to up-to-date model atmospheres. Methods: We obtain the Ca II IRT absolute fluxes for 113 FGK stars from high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and high-resolution spectra covering an extensive domain of chromospheric activity levels. We perform an absolute continuum flux calibration for the Ca II IRT lines anchored in atmospheric models calculated as an explicit function of effective temperatures (Teff), metallicity ([Fe/H]), and gravities (log g) avoiding the degeneracy usually present in photometric continuum calibrations based solely on color indices. Results: The internal uncertainties achieved for continuum absolute flux calculations are ≈2% of the solar chromospheric flux, one order of magnitude lower than for photometric calibrations. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we gauge the impact of observational errors on the final chromospheric fluxes due to the absolute continuum flux calibration and find that Teffuncertainties are properly mitigated by the photospheric correction leaving [Fe/H] as the dominating factor in the chromospheric flux uncertainty. Conclusions: Across the FGK spectral types, the Ca II IRT lines are sensitive to chromospheric activity. The reduced internal uncertainties reported here enable us to build a new chromospheric absolute flux scale and explore the age-activity relation from the active regime down to very low activity levels and

  17. Chromospherically Active Stars in the RAVE Survey. II. Young Dwarfs in the Solar Neighborhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žerjal, M.; Zwitter, T.; Matijevič, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Kordopatis, G.; Munari, U.; Seabroke, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Wojno, J.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Conrad, C.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Kunder, A.; Navarro, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Siviero, A.; Watson, F. G.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2017-01-01

    A large sample of over 38,000 chromospherically active candidate solar-like stars and cooler dwarfs from the RAVE survey is addressed in this paper. An improved activity identification with respect to the previous study was introduced to build a catalog of field stars in the solar neighborhood with an excess emission flux in the calcium infrared triplet wavelength region. The central result of this work is the calibration of the age–activity relation for main-sequence dwarfs in a range from a few 10 {Myr} up to a few Gyr. It enabled an order of magnitude age estimation of the entire active sample. Almost 15,000 stars are shown to be younger than 1 {Gyr} and ∼2000 younger than 100 {Myr}. The young age of the most active stars is confirmed by their position off the main sequence in the J ‑ K versus {N}{UV}-V diagram showing strong ultraviolet excess, mid-infrared excess in the J ‑ K versus {W}1-{W}2 diagram, and very cool temperatures (J-K> 0.7). They overlap with the reference pre-main-sequence RAVE stars often displaying X-ray emission. The activity level increasing with the color reveals their different nature from the solar-like stars and probably represents an underlying dynamo-generating magnetic fields in cool stars. Of the RAVE objects from DR5, 50% are found in the TGAS catalog and supplemented with accurate parallaxes and proper motions by Gaia. This makes the database of a large number of young stars in a combination with RAVE’s radial velocities directly useful as a tracer of the very recent large-scale star formation history in the solar neighborhood. The data are available online in the Vizier database.

  18. CHROMOSPHERIC RAPID BLUESHIFTED EXCURSIONS OBSERVED WITH IBIS AND THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Na; Chen, Xin; Liu, Chang; Jing, Ju; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Haimin [Space Weather Research Laboratory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Tritschler, Alexandra; Reardon, Kevin P. [National Solar Observatory, Sacramento Peak, Sunspot, NM 88349-0062 (United States); Lamb, Derek A.; Deforest, Craig E. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302-5142 (United States); Denker, Carsten [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Liu, Rui, E-mail: na.deng@njit.edu [Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2015-02-01

    Chromospheric rapid blueshifted excursions (RBEs) are suggested to be the disk counterparts of type II spicules at the limb and believed to contribute to the coronal heating process. Previous identification of RBEs was mainly based on feature detection using Dopplergrams. In this paper, we study RBEs on 2011 October 21 in a very quiet region at the disk center, which were observed with the high-cadence imaging spectroscopy of the Ca II 8542 Å line from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS). By using an automatic spectral analysis algorithm, a total of 98 RBEs are identified during an 11 minute period. Most of these RBEs have either a round or elongated shape, with an average area of 1.2 arcsec{sup 2}. The detailed temporal evolution of spectra from IBIS makes possible a quantitative determination of the velocity (∼16 km s{sup –1}) and acceleration (∼400 m s{sup –2}) of Ca II 8542 RBEs, and reveals an additional deceleration (∼–160 m s{sup –2}) phase that usually follows the initial acceleration. In addition, we also investigate the association of RBEs with the concomitant photospheric magnetic field evolution, using coordinated high-resolution and high-sensitivity magnetograms made by Hinode. Clear examples are found where RBEs appear to be associated with the preceding magnetic flux emergence and/or the subsequent flux cancellation. However, further analysis with the aid of the Southwest Automatic Magnetic Identification Suite does not yield a significant statistical association between these RBEs and magnetic field evolution. We discuss the implications of our results in the context of understanding the driving mechanism of RBEs.

  19. Transition Region and Chromospheric Signatures of Impulsive Heating Events. II. Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reep, Jeffrey W.; Warren, Harry P.; Crump, Nicholas A.; Simões, Paulo J. A.

    2016-08-01

    Results from the Solar Maximum Mission showed a close connection between the hard X-ray (HXR) and transition region (TR) emission in solar flares. Analogously, the modern combination of RHESSI and IRIS data can inform the details of heating processes in ways that were never before possible. We study a small event that was observed with RHESSI, IRIS, SDO, and Hinode, allowing us to strongly constrain the heating and hydrodynamical properties of the flare, with detailed observations presented in a previous paper. Long duration redshifts of TR lines observed in this event, as well as many other events, are fundamentally incompatible with chromospheric condensation on a single loop. We combine RHESSI and IRIS data to measure the energy partition among the many magnetic strands that comprise the flare. Using that observationally determined energy partition, we show that a proper multithreaded model can reproduce these redshifts in magnitude, duration, and line intensity, while simultaneously being well constrained by the observed density, temperature, and emission measure. We comment on the implications for both RHESSI and IRIS observations of flares in general, namely that: (1) a single loop model is inconsistent with long duration redshifts, among other observables; (2) the average time between energization of strands is less than 10 s, which implies that for a HXR burst lasting 10 minutes, there were at least 60 strands within a single IRIS pixel located on the flare ribbon; (3) the majority of these strands were explosively heated with an energy distribution well described by a power law of slope ≈ -1.6; (4) the multi-stranded model reproduces the observed line profiles, peak temperatures, differential emission measure distributions, and densities.

  20. NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET EXCESS IN SLOWLY ACCRETING T TAURI STARS: LIMITS IMPOSED BY CHROMOSPHERIC EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingleby, Laura; Calvet, Nuria; Bergin, Edwin; McClure, Melissa [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 830 Dennison Building, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Herczeg, Gregory [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestriche Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Brown, Alexander; France, Kevin [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Alexander, Richard [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Edwards, Suzan [Department of Astronomy, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063 (United States); Espaillat, Catherine; Brown, Joanna [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gregory, Scott G.; Hillenbrand, Lynne [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Roueff, Evelyne; Abgrall, Herve [LUTH and UMR 8102 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, Section de Meudon, Place J. Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Valenti, Jeff [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Walter, Frederick [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Johns-Krull, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States); Ardila, David, E-mail: lingleby@umich.edu, E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu, E-mail: gregoryh@mpe.mpg.de [NASA Herschel Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); and others

    2011-12-20

    Young stars surrounded by disks with very low mass accretion rates are likely in the final stages of inner disk evolution and therefore particularly interesting to study. We present ultraviolet (UV) observations of the {approx}5-9 Myr old stars RECX-1 and RECX-11, obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as optical and near-infrared spectroscopic observations. The two stars have similar levels of near-UV emission, although spectroscopic evidence indicates that RECX-11 is accreting and RECX-1 is not. The line profiles of H{alpha} and He I {lambda}10830 in RECX-11 show both broad and narrow redshifted absorption components that vary with time, revealing the complexity of the accretion flows. We show that accretion indicators commonly used to measure mass accretion rates, e.g., U-band excess luminosity or the Ca II triplet line luminosity, are unreliable for low accretors, at least in the middle K spectral range. Using RECX-1 as a template for the intrinsic level of photospheric and chromospheric emission, we determine an upper limit of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} for RECX-11. At this low accretion rate, recent photoevaporation models predict that an inner hole should have developed in the disk. However, the spectral energy distribution of RECX-11 shows fluxes comparable to the median of Taurus in the near-infrared, indicating that substantial dust remains. Fluorescent H{sub 2} emission lines formed in the innermost disk are observed in RECX-11, showing that gas is present in the inner disk, along with the dust.

  1. Chromospheric and Coronal Activity in the 500 Myr old Open Cluster M37: Evidence for Coronal Stripping?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Alejandro; Agüeros, Marcel A.; Covey, Kevin R.; López-Morales, Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic survey to characterize chromospheric activity, as measured by {{H}}α emission, in low-mass members of the 500 Myr old open cluster M37. Combining our new measurements of {{H}}α luminosities ({L}{{H}α }) with previously cataloged stellar properties, we identify saturated and unsaturated regimes in the dependence of the {L}{{H}α }-to-bolometric luminosity ratio, {L}{{H}α }/{L}{bol}, on the Rossby number R o . All rotators with R o smaller than 0.03 ± 0.01 converge to an activity level of {L}{{H}α }/{L}{bol}=(1.27+/- 0.02)× {10}-4. This saturation threshold ({R}o,{sat}=0.03+/- 0.01) is statistically smaller than that found in most studies of the rotation–activity relation. In the unsaturated regime, slower rotators have lower levels of chromospheric activity, with {L}{{H}α }/{L}{bol}(R o ) following a power-law of index β =-0.51+/- 0.02, slightly shallower than that found for a combined ≈650 Myr old sample of Hyades and Praesepe stars. By comparing this unsaturated behavior to that previously found for coronal activity in M37 (as measured via the X-ray luminosity, {L}{{X}}), we confirm that chromospheric activity decays at a much slower rate than coronal activity with increasing R o . While a comparison of {L}{{H}α } and {L}{{X}} for M37 members with measurements of both reveals a nearly 1:1 relation, removing the mass-dependencies by comparing instead {L}{{H}α }/{L}{bol} and {L}{{X}}/{L}{bol} does not provide clear evidence for such a relation. Finally, we find that {R}o,{sat} is smaller for our chromospheric than for our coronal indicator of activity ({R}o,{sat}=0.03+/- 0.01 versus 0.09 ± 0.01). We interpret this as possible evidence for coronal stripping.

  2. HST Studies of the Chromospheres, Wind, and Mass-Loss Rates of Cool Giant and Supergiant Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    2000-01-01

    UV spectra of K-M giant and supergiant stars and of carbon stars have been acquired with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These spectra have been used to measure chromospheric flow and turbulent velocities, study the acceleration of their stellar winds, acquire constraints on their outer atmospheric structure, and enable estimates of their mass-loss rates. Results from our observations of the giant stars Gamma Dra (K5 III hybrid), Alpha Tau (K5 III), Gamma Cru (M3.4 III), Mu Gem (M3 IIIab), and 30 Her (MG III), the supergiants Alpha Ori (M2 Iab) and Lambda Vel (K5 Ib), and the carbon stars TX Psc (NO; C6,2) and TW Hor (NO; C7,2) will be summarized and compared. The high resolution and wavelength accuracy of these data have allowed the direct measurement of the acceleration of the stellar winds in the chromospheres of several of these stars (from initial velocities of 3-9 km/s to upper velocities of 15-25 km/s) and of the chromospheric macroturbulence (-25-35 km/s). The high signal-to-noise and large dynamic range of these spectra have allowed the detection and identification of numerous new emission features, including weak C IV emission indicative of hot transition-region plasma in the non-coronal giant Alpha Tau, many new fluorescent lines of Fe II, and the first detection of fluorescent molecular hydrogen emission and of Ca II recombination lines in the UV spectrum of a giant star. The UV spectrum of two carbon stars have been studied with unprecedented resolution and reveal extraordinarily complicated Mg II lines nearly smothered by circumstellar absorptions. Finally, comparison of synthetic UV emission line profiles computed with the Lamers et al. (1987) Sobolev with Exact Integration (SEI) code with observations of chromospheric emission lines overlain with wind absorption features provides estimates of the mass-loss rates for four of these stars.

  3. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere VII. Further Insights into the Chromosphere and Corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the liquid metallic hydrogen model of the Sun, the chromosphere is responsible for the capture of atomic hydrogen in the solar atmosphere and its eventual re-entry onto the photospheric surface (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere. Prog. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L15–L21. As for the corona, it represents a diffuse region containing both gaseous plasma and condensed matter with elevated electron affinity (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere V. On the Nature of the Corona. Prog. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L22–L25. Metallic hydrogen in the corona is thought to enable the continual harvest of electrons from the outer reaches of the Sun, thereby preserving the neutrality of the solar body. The rigid rotation of the corona is offered as the thirty-third line of evidence that the Sun is comprised of condensed matter. Within the context of the gaseous models of the Sun, a 100 km thick transition zone has been hypothesized to exist wherein temperatures increase dramatically from 104–106 K. Such extreme transitional temperatures are not reasonable given the trivial physical scale of the proposed transition zone, a region adopted to account for the ultra-violet emission lines of ions such as C IV, O IV, and Si IV. In this work, it will be argued that the transition zone does not exist. Rather, the intermediate ionization states observed in the solar atmosphere should be viewed as the result of the simultaneous transfer of protons and electrons onto condensed hydrogen structures, CHS. Line emissions from ions such as C IV, O IV, and Si IV are likely to be the result of condensation reactions, manifesting the involvement of species such as CH4, SiH4, H3O+ in the synthesis of CHS in the chromosphere. In addition, given the presence of a true solar surface at the level of the photosphere in the liquid metallic hydrogen model

  4. Hinode and IRIS observations of the magnetohydrodynamic waves propagating from the photosphere to the chromosphere in a sunspot

    CERN Document Server

    Kanoh, Ryuichi; Imada, Shinsuke

    2016-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves have been considered as energy sources for heating the solar chromosphere and the corona. Although MHD waves have been observed in the solar atmosphere, there are lack of quantitative estimates on the energy transfer and dissipation in the atmosphere. We performed simultaneous Hinode and IRIS observations of a sunspot umbra to derive the upward energy fluxes at two different atmospheric layers (photosphere and lower transition region) and estimate the energy dissipation. The observations revealed some properties of the observed periodic oscillations in physical quantities, such as their phase relations, temporal behaviors, and power spectra, making a conclusion that standing slow-mode waves are dominant at the photosphere with their high frequency leakage, which is observed as upward waves at the chromosphere and the lower transition region. Our estimate of upward energy fluxes are $2.0\\times10^7$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ at the photospheric level and $8.3\\times10^4$ erg cm$^{-2}...

  5. Hinode Observation of the Magnetic Fields in a Sunspot Light Bridge Accompanied by Long-Lasting Chromospheric Plasma Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Toshifumi; Katsukawa, Yukio; Kubo, Masahito; Lites, Bruce W.; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Tsuneta, Saku; Nagata, Shin'ichi; Shine, Richard A.; Tarbell, Theodore D.

    2009-05-01

    We present high-resolution magnetic field measurements of a sunspot light bridge (LB) that produced chromospheric plasma ejections intermittently and recurrently for more than 1 day. The observations were carried out with the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope on 2007 April 29 and 30. The spectro-polarimeter reveals obliquely oriented magnetic fields with vertical electric current density higher than 100 mA m-2 along the LB. The observations suggest that current-carrying highly twisted magnetic flux tubes are trapped below a cusp-shaped magnetic structure along the LB. The presence of trapped current-carrying flux tubes is essential for causing long-lasting chromospheric plasma ejections at the interface with pre-existing vertically oriented umbral fields. A bidirectional jet was clearly detected, suggesting magnetic reconnections occurring at very low altitudes, slightly above the height where the vector magnetic fields are measured. Moreover, we found another strong vertical electric current on the interface between the current-carrying flux tube and pre-existing umbral field, which might be a direct detection of the currents flowing in the current sheet formed at the magnetic reconnection sites.

  6. Where is the chromospheric response to conductive energy input from a hot pre-flare coronal loop?

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, Marina; Simões, Paulo J A

    2014-01-01

    Before the onset of a flare is observed in hard X-rays there is often a prolonged pre-flare or pre-heating phase with no detectable hard X-ray emission but pronounced soft X-ray emission suggesting that energy is being released and deposited into the corona and chromosphere already at this stage. This work analyses the temporal evolution of coronal source heating and the chromospheric response during this pre-heating phase to investigate the origin and nature of early energy release and transport during a solar flare. Simultaneous X-ray, EUV, and microwave observations of a well observed flare with a prolonged pre-heating phase are analysed to study the time evolution of the thermal emission and to determine the onset of particle acceleration. During the 20 minutes duration of the pre-heating phase we find no hint of accelerated electrons, neither in hard X-rays nor in microwave emission. However, the total energy budget during the pre-heating phase suggests that energy must be supplied to the flaring loop to...

  7. Chromospheric and Coronal Activity in the 500-Myr-old Open Cluster M37: Evidence for Coronal Stripping?

    CERN Document Server

    Núñez, Alejandro; Covey, Kevin R; López-Morales, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic survey to characterize chromospheric activity, as measured by H$\\alpha$ emission, in low-mass members of the 500-Myr-old open cluster M37. Combining our new measurements of H$\\alpha$ luminosities ($L_{H\\alpha}$) with previously cataloged stellar properties, we identify saturated and unsaturated regimes in the dependence of the $L_{H\\alpha}$-to-bolometric-luminosity ratio, $L_{H\\alpha}/L_{bol}$, on the Rossby number $R_o$. All rotators with Ro smaller than 0.03$\\pm$0.01 converge to an activity level of $L_{H\\alpha}/L_{bol}$ = (1.27$\\pm$0.02) x 10$^{-4}$. This saturation threshold ($R_{o,sat}$ = 0.03$\\pm$0.01) is statistically smaller than that found in most studies of the rotation-activity relation. In the unsaturated regime, slower rotators have lower levels of chromospheric activity, with $L_{H\\alpha}/L_{bol}$($R_o$) following a power-law of index $\\beta$ = -0.51$\\pm$0.02, slightly shallower than the one found for a combined $\\approx$650-Myr-old sample of Hyades and ...

  8. SUMER Observations Confirm the Dynamic Nature of the Quiet Solar Outer Atmosphere The Inter-network Chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Carlsson, M; Wilhelm, K; Carlsson, Mats; Judge, Philip G.; Wilhelm, Klaus

    1997-01-01

    On 12 March 1996 we obtained observations of the quiet Sun with the SUMER instrument. The observa- tions were sequences of 15-20 second exposures of ultraviolet emission line profiles and of the neighboring continua. These data contain signatures of the dynamics of the solar chromosphere that are uniquely useful because of wavelength coverage, moderate signal-to-noise ratios, and image stability. The dominant observed phenomenon is an oscillatory behavior that is analogous to the 3 minute oscillations seen in Ca II lines. The oscillations appear to be coherent over 3-8". At any time they occur over approx. 50 % of the area studied, and they appear as large perturbations in the intensities of lines and continua. The oscillations are most clearly seen in intensity variations in the UV (lambda > 912 A) continua, and they are also seen in the intensities and velocities of chromospheric lines of C I, N I and O I. Intensity brightenings are accompanied by blueshifts of typically 5 km s$^{-1}$. Phase differences bet...

  9. The behaviour of the excess CaII H & K and H$\\varepsilon$ emissions in chromospherically active binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Montes, D; Cornide, M; De Castro, E

    1995-01-01

    In this work we analyze the behaviour of the excess Ca~{\\sc ii} H \\& K and H\\epsilon emissions in a sample of 73 chromospherically active binary systems (RS~CVn and BY~Dra classes), of different activity levels and luminosity classes. This sample includes the 53 stars analyzed by Fern\\'andez-Figueroa et al. (1994) and the observations of 28 systems described by Montes et al. (1995c). By using the spectral subtraction technique (subtraction of a synthesized stellar spectrum constructed from reference stars of spectral type and luminosity class similar to those of the binary star components) we obtain the active-chromosphere contribution to the Ca~{\\sc ii} H \\& K lines in these 73 systems. We have determined the excess Ca~{\\sc ii} H \\& K emission equivalent widths and converted them into surface fluxes. The emissions arising from each component were obtained when it was possible to deblend both contributions. We have found that the components of active binaries are generally stronger emitters than s...

  10. Long Term Variations in Chromospheric Features from Ca-K Images at Kodaikanal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyal, Muthu; Singh, Jagdev; Ravindra, B.; Priya, T. G.; Amareswari, K.

    2014-01-01

    There is a collection of about 100 years of Ca-K line spectroheliograms at the Kodaikanal Observatory (KKL) obtained on daily basis with a single instrument that can be used to study long term variations of various chromospheric features. All the Ca-K images have been digitized using specially developed digitizers with uniform and highly stable light source, high quality lens and 4k×4k format CCD camera. The digitization has been carried out in a room with controlled temperature and humidity. The digitized data are in 16-bit format with pixel resolution of 0.86 arcsec. The digitized images have been calibrated by a process that includes flat-fielding, density to intensity conversion, centering the image, and rotation of the image to make the solar north pole in the fixed direction. Then we applied correction for the limb darkening effect and also made the background in the image uniform. The image background was normalized to unity that enabled us to use the intensity contrast to identify different features, such as plages, enhanced (EN), active (AN), and quite network on images and classified them by using different image contrast and area threshold values. After several experiments with different threshold values for different features and careful analysis of a large number of images, we could fix the threshold values of intensity contrast larger than 1.35 and area larger than 1 arcmin2 for plages, larger than 1.35 but area less than 1 arcmin2 for EN, and between 1.25 - 1.35 for AN. We compared the quarterly averaged and half yearly averaged plage areas obtained from KKL with the Mount Wilson (MWO) data and sunspot number. We find that the plage area extracted from the KKL is highly correlated with the MWO plage area, though there is a slight difference between the two data set in cycle 19. The plage area of KKL is also highly correlated with the sunspot number. The areas of EN and AN are also found to have smaller quasi-periodic variations apart from the solar

  11. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere VI. Helium in the Chromosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular hydrogen and hydrides have recently been advanced as vital agents in the generation of emission spectra in the chromosphere. This is a result of the role they play in the formation of condensed hydrogen structures (CHS within the chromosphere (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 3, 15–21. Next to hydrogen, helium is perhaps the most intriguing component in this region of the Sun. Much like other elements, which combine with hydrogen to produce hydrides, helium can form the well-known helium hydride molecular ion, HeH+, and the excited neutral helium hydride molecule, HeH∗. While HeH+ is hypothesized to be a key cosmologicalmolecule, its possible presence in the Sun, and that of its excited neutral counterpart, has not been considered. Still, these hydrides are likely to play a role in the synthesis of CHS, as the He I and He II emission lines strongly suggest. In this regard, the study of helium emission spectra can provide insight into the condensed nature of the Sun, especially when considering the 10830 Å line associated with the 23P→2 3S triplet state transition. This line is strong in solar prominences and can be seen clearly on the disk. The excessive population of helium triplet states cannot be adequately explained using the gaseous models, since these states should be depopulated by collisional processes. Conversely, when He-based molecules are used to build CHS in a liquid metallic hydrogen model, an ever increasing population of the 23S and 23P states might be expected. The overpopulation of these triplet states leads to the conclusion that these emission lines are unlikely to be produced through random collisional or photon excitation, as required by the gaseous models. This provides a significant hurdle for these models. Thus, the strong 23P→2 3S lines and the overpopulation of the helium triplet

  12. Chromospheric activity and rotation of FGK stars in the solar neighbourhood: characterizing possible exoplanetary system host stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Arnáiz, Raquel M.

    2011-06-01

    This dissertation has investigated the chromospheric activity and rotation of nearby cool stars, which can potentially host exoplanetary systems. 1. High-resolution echelle spectra have been obtained for 565 nearby (d ≤ 25 pc) cool (spectral types F to M) stars. The observations were taken using high resolution echelle optical spectrographs. The observations were designed to ensure a spectral coverage including all the optical magnetic activity indicator lines: from the Ca II H & K lines to the Ca II IRT, including all the Balmer lines Hα, Hβ, Hγ, Hδ, and H?. This fact has ensured a simultaneous analysis of the magnetic activity using different diagnostics. The spectral coverage of the spectra has also permitted a precise analysis of the stellar properties as well as rotational and radial velocities. 2. The suitability of the stars as targets in exoplanetary search surveys has been analysed using the results obtained in the spectroscopic survey. Using the measured chromospheric activity in the optical spectrum, activity-induced RV jitter has been calculated for the active stars in the sample. Although the intrinsic variability of stellar activity makes it impossible to directly subtract the computed values from the RV signal, it provides an estimation of the activity-related noise. Therefore, this values can be used to set the minimum detectable mass for a planet orbiting the star or to determine the minimal amplitude variation that could indicate the existence of a planet. The compilation of the activity, rotation and predicted activity-induced RV jitter build up into a catalogue that determines the suitability of the stars as targets in exoplanet search surveys. 3. The relationship between pairs of excess surface flux in different activity diagnostics has been analysed using the results from the spectroscopic survey. The results show a clear correlation between the activity measured in different optical indicators. This fact confirms previous findings and

  13. SALT observations of the chromospheric activity of transiting planet hosts: mass-loss and star-planet interactions★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staab, D.; Haswell, C. A.; Smith, Gareth D.; Fossati, L.; Barnes, J. R.; Busuttil, R.; Jenkins, J. S.

    2017-04-01

    We measured the chromospheric activity of the four hot Jupiter hosts WASP-43, WASP-51/HAT-P-30, WASP-72 and WASP-103 to search for anomalous values caused by the close-in companions. The Mount Wilson Ca II H & K S-index was calculated for each star using observations taken with the Robert Stobie Spectrograph at the Southern African Large Telescope. The activity level of WASP-43 is anomalously high relative to its age and falls among the highest values of all known main-sequence stars. We found marginal evidence that the activity of WASP-103 is also higher than expected from the system age. We suggest that for WASP-43 and WASP-103 star-planet interactions (SPI) may enhance the Ca II H & K core emission. The activity levels of WASP-51/HAT-P-30 and WASP-72 are anomalously low, with the latter falling below the basal envelope for both main-sequence and evolved stars. This can be attributed to circumstellar absorption due to planetary mass-loss, though absorption in the interstellar medium may contribute. A quarter of known short-period planet hosts exhibit anomalously low activity levels, including systems with hot Jupiters and low-mass companions. Since SPI can elevate and absorption can suppress the observed chromospheric activity of stars with close-in planets, their Ca II H & K activity levels are an unreliable age indicator. Systems where the activity is depressed by absorption from planetary mass-loss are key targets for examining planet compositions through transmission spectroscopy.

  14. Multifluid Modeling of the Partially Ionized Chromosphere with Effects of Impact Ionization, Radiative Recombination and Charge Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneva, Y. G.; Poedts, D. S.; Alvarez Laguna, A.; Lani, A.

    2015-12-01

    Neutrals play an important role in the evolution of the weakly ionized solar chromosphere where the number density of neutrals can vastly exceed the number density of protons. Therefore modeling the neutral-ion interactions and studying the effect of neutrals on the ambient plasma properties is an important task for better understanding the observed emission lines and the propagation of disturbances from the photosphere to the transition region and the corona. To pursue this goal we have developed two-fluid and three-fluid simulation setups to study the interaction between electrons, ions and neutrals in a reactive gravitationally stratified collisional media. The model considers the electrons and ions within the resistive MHD approach with Coulomb collisions and anisotropic heat flux determined by Braginskii's transport coefficients. The electromagnetic fields are evolved according to the full Maxwell equations, allowing for propagation of higher frequency waves neglected by the standard MHD approximation. Separate mass, momentum and energy conservation equations are considered for the neutrals and the interaction between the different fluids is determined by the chemical reactions, such as impact ionization, radiative recombination and charge exchange, provided as additional source terms. To initialize the system we consider an ideal gas equation of state with equal initial temperatures for the electrons, ions and the neutrals and different density profiles. The initial temperature and density profiles are height-dependent and follow VAL C atmospheric model for the solar chromosphere. We have searched for a chemical and collisional equilibrium between the ions and the neutrals in the hydrostatic case to avoid unphysical outflows and artificial heating induced by initial pressure imbalances. Next we consider ion-neutral interactions in magnetized plasma with an initial magnetic profile, corresponding to emerging magnetic funnel. Finally we include an external

  15. Performance Characterization of UV Science Cameras Developed for the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champey, Patrick; Kobayashi, Ken; Winebarger, Amy; Cirtin, Jonathan; Hyde, David; Robertson, Bryan; Beabout, Brent; Beabout, Dyana; Stewart, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a science camera suitable for sub-orbital missions for observations in the UV, EUV and soft X-ray. Six cameras will be built and tested for flight with the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP), a joint National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) and MSFC sounding rocket mission. The goal of the CLASP mission is to observe the scattering polarization in Lyman-alpha and to detect the Hanle effect in the line core. Due to the nature of Lyman-alpha polarization in the chromosphere, strict measurement sensitivity requirements are imposed on the CLASP polarimeter and spectrograph systems; science requirements for polarization measurements of Q/I and U/I are 0.1% in the line core. CLASP is a dual-beam spectro-polarimeter, which uses a continuously rotating waveplate as a polarization modulator, while the waveplate motor driver outputs trigger pulses to synchronize the exposures. The CCDs are operated in frame-transfer mode; the trigger pulse initiates the frame transfer, effectively ending the ongoing exposure and starting the next. The strict requirement of 0.1% polarization accuracy is met by using frame-transfer cameras to maximize the duty cycle in order to minimize photon noise. Coating the e2v CCD57-10 512x512 detectors with Lumogen-E coating allows for a relatively high (30%) quantum efficiency at the Lyman-$\\alpha$ line. The CLASP cameras were designed to operate with =10 e- /pixel/second dark current, = 25 e- read noise, a gain of 2.0 and =0.1% residual non-linearity. We present the results of the performance characterization study performed on the CLASP prototype camera; dark current, read noise, camera gain and residual non-linearity.

  16. Membership, lithium and chromospheric activity of the young open clusters IC 2391, IC 2602 and IC 4665 from GES (Gaia-ESO Survey) observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Garrido, M.; Montes, D.; Gutiérrez Albarrán, M. L.; Tabernero, H. M.; Gónzalez Hernández, J. I.; GES Survey Builders

    2017-03-01

    We conduct a comparative study of the main properties of the of the young open clusters IC 2391, IC 2602 and IC 4665, focusing on their membership, lithium abundance and level of chromospheric activity and possible accretion. We use the fundamental parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, and radial velocity) delivered by the Gaia-ESO survey (GES - https://www.gaia-eso.eu/) consortium in the four internal data release (iDR4) to select the members of these clusters among the UVES and GIRAFFE spectroscopic observations. Chromospheric activity criterium, and iterative process between radial velocity distribution and lithium-temperature diagram are applied to determinate what objects are members or non members of the clusters. All this information allowed us to characterize the properties of the members of these clusters and identify some field contaminant lithium-rich giants.

  17. Chromospheric activity on the late-type star V1355 Ori using Lijiang 1.8-m and 2.4-m telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Qing-Feng; Zhang, Li-Yun; Chang, Liang; Han, Xian-Ming; Lu, Hong-Peng; Zhang, Xi-Liang; Wang, Dai-Mei

    2016-10-01

    We obtained new high-resolution spectra using the Lijiang 1.8-m and 2.4-m telescopes to investigate the chromospheric activities of V1355 Ori as indicated in the behaviors of Ca ii H&K, Hδ, Hγ, Hβ, Na i D1, D2, Hα and Ca ii infrared triplet (IRT) lines. The observed spectra show obvious emissions above the continuum in Ca ii H&K lines, absorptions in the Hδ, Hγ, Hβ and Na i D1, D2 lines, variable behavior (filled-in absorption, partial emission with a core absorption component or emission above the continuum) in the Hα line, and weak self-reversal emissions in the strong filled-in absorptions of the Ca ii IRT lines. We used a spectral subtraction technique to analyze our data. The results show no excess emission in the Hδ and Hγ lines, very weak excess emissions in the Na i D1, D2 lines, excess emission in the Hβ line, clear excess emission in the Hα line, and excess emissions in the Ca ii IRT lines. The value of the ratio of EW8542/EW8498 is in the range 0.9 to 1.7, which implies that chromospheric activity might have been caused by plage events. The value of the ratio E Hα/E Hβ is above 3, indicating that the Balmer lines would arise from prominence-like material. We also found time variations in light curves associated with equivalent widths of chromospheric activity lines in the Na i D1, D2, Ca ii IRT and Hα lines in particular. These phenomena can be explained by plage events, which are consistent with the behavior of chromospheric activity indicators.

  18. Analysis of flares in the chromosphere and corona of main- and pre-main-sequence M-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Chacón, I.

    2015-11-01

    This Ph.D. Thesis revolves around flares on main- and pre-main-sequence M-type stars. We use observations in different wavelength ranges with the aim of analysing the effects of flares at different layers of stellar atmospheres. In particular, optical and X-ray observations are used so that we can study how flares affect, respectively, the chromosphere and the corona of stars. In the optical range we carry out a high temporal resolution spectroscopic monitoring of UV Ceti-type stars aimed at detecting non-white-light flares (the most typical kind of solar flares) in stars other than the Sun. With these data we confirm that non-white-light flares are a frequent phenomenon in UV Ceti-type stars, as observed in the Sun. We study and interpret the behaviour of different chromospheric lines during the flares detected on AD Leo. By using a simplified slab model of flares (Jevremović et al. 1998), we are able to determine the physical parameters of the chromospheric flaring plasma (electron density and electron temperature), the temperature of the underlying source, and the surface area covered by the flaring plasma. We also search for possible relationships between the physical parameters of the flaring plasma and other properties such as the flare duration, area, maximum flux and released energy. This work considerably extends the existing sample of stellar flares analysed with good quality spectroscopy in the optical range. In X-rays we take advantage of the great sensitivity, wide energy range, high energy resolution, and continuous time coverage of the EPIC detectors - on-board the XMMNewton satellite - in order to perform time-resolved spectral analysis of coronal flares. In particular, in the UV Ceti-type star CC Eri we study two flares that are weaker than those typically reported in the literature (allowing us to speculate about the role of flares as heating agents of stellar atmospheres); while in the pre-main-sequence M-type star TWA 11B (with no signatures of

  19. Temporal Evolution of Chromospheric Evaporation: Case Studies of the M1.1 Flare on 2014 September 6 and X1.6 Flare on 2014 September 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hui; Young, Peter R.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Chen, Bin; Liu, Wei; McKillop, Sean

    2015-10-01

    With observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, we track the complete evolution of ˜11 MK evaporation flows in an M1.1 flare on 2014 September 6 and an X1.6 flare on 2014 September 10. These hot flows, as indicated by the blueshifted Fe xxi 1354.08 Å line, evolve smoothly with a velocity decreasing exponentially from ˜200 km s-1 to almost stationary within a few minutes. We find a good correlation between the flow velocity and energy deposition rate as represented by the hard X-ray flux observed with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, or time derivative of the soft X-ray flux observed with the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites and the HINODE X-ray Telescope, which is in general agreement with models of nonthermal electron heating. The maximum blueshift of Fe xxi appears approximately at the same time as or slightly after the impulsive enhancement of the ultraviolet continuum and the Mg ii 2798.8 Å line emission, demonstrating that the evaporation flow is closely related to heating of the lower chromosphere. Finally, while the hot Fe xxi 1354.08 Å line is entirely blueshifted with no obvious rest component, cool chromospheric and transition region lines like Si iv 1402.77 Å are often not entirely redshifted but just reveal an obvious red wing enhancement at the ribbons, suggesting that the speed of chromospheric condensation might be larger than previously thought.

  20. HiRISE/NEOCE: an ESA M5 formation flying proposed mission combining high resolution and coronagraphy for ultimate observations of the chromosphere, corona and interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damé, Luc; Von Fay-Siebenburgen (Erdélyi), Robert

    2016-07-01

    The global understanding of the solar environment through the magnetic field emergence and dissipation, and its influence on Earth, is at the centre of the four major thematics addressed by HiRISE/NEOCE (High Resolution Imaging and Spectroscopy Explorer/New Externally Occulted Coronagraph Experiment). They are interlinked and also complementary: the internal structure of the Sun determines the surface activity and dynamics that trigger magnetic field structuring which evolution, variation and dissipation will, in turn, explain the coronal heating onset and the major energy releases that feed the influence of the Sun on Earth. The 4 major themes of HiRISE/NEOCE are: - fine structure of the chromosphere-corona interface by 2D spectroscopy in FUV at very high resolution; - coronal heating roots in inner corona by ultimate externally-occulted coronagraphy; - resolved and global helioseismology thanks to continuity and stability of observing at L1 Lagrange point; - solar variability and space climate with a global comprehensive view of UV variability as well. Recent missions have shown the definite role of waves and of the magnetic field deep in the inner corona, at the chromosphere-corona interface, where dramatic changes occur. The dynamics of the chromosphere and corona is controlled by the emerging magnetic field, guided by the coronal magnetic field. Accordingly, the direct measurement of the chromospheric and coronal magnetic fields is of prime importance. This is implemented in HiRISE/NEOCE, to be proposed for ESA M5 ideally placed at the L1 Lagrangian point, providing FUV imaging and spectro-imaging, EUV and XUV imaging and spectroscopy, and ultimate coronagraphy by a remote external occulter (two satellites in formation flying 375 m apart minimizing scattered light) allowing to characterize temperature, densities and velocities up to the solar upper chromosphere, transition zone and inner corona with, in particular, 2D very high resolution multi

  1. Slipping Magnetic Reconnection, Chromospheric Evaporation, Implosion, and Precursors in the 2014 September 10 X1.6-Class Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Dudik, Jaroslav; Janvier, Miho; Mulay, Sargam M; Karlicky, Marian; Aulanier, Guillaume; Del Zanna, Giulio; Dzifcakova, Elena; Mason, Helen E; Schmieder, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the occurrence of slipping magnetic reconnection, chromospheric evaporation, and coronal loop dynamics in the 2014 September 10 X-class flare. The slipping reconnection is found to be present throughout the flare from its early phase. Flare loops are seen to slip in opposite directions towards both ends of the ribbons. Velocities of 20--40 km\\,s$^{-1}$ are found within time windows where the slipping is well resolved. The warm coronal loops exhibit expanding and contracting motions that are interpreted as displacements due to the growing flux rope that subsequently erupts. This flux rope existed and erupted before the onset of apparent coronal implosion. This indicates that the energy release proceeds by slipping reconnection and not via coronal implosion. The slipping reconnection leads to changes in the geometry of the observed structures at the \\textit{IRIS} slit position, from flare loop top to the footpoints in the ribbons. This results in variations of the observed velocities of chromosph...

  2. New Insights into White-Light Flare Emission from Radiative-Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Chromospheric Condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, Adam F; Carlsson, Mats; Allred, Joel C; Uitenbroek, Han; Osten, Rachel A; Holman, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    (abridged) The heating mechanism at high densities during M dwarf flares is poorly understood. Spectra of M dwarf flares in the optical and near-ultraviolet wavelength regimes have revealed three continuum components during the impulsive phase: 1) an energetically dominant blackbody component with a color temperature of T $\\sim$ 10,000 K in the blue-optical, 2) a smaller amount of Balmer continuum emission in the near-ultraviolet at lambda $<$ 3646 Angstroms and 3) an apparent pseudo-continuum of blended high-order Balmer lines. These properties are not reproduced by models that employ a typical "solar-type" flare heating level in nonthermal electrons, and therefore our understanding of these spectra is limited to a phenomenological interpretation. We present a new 1D radiative-hydrodynamic model of an M dwarf flare from precipitating nonthermal electrons with a large energy flux of $10^{13}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. The simulation produces bright continuum emission from a dense, hot chromospheric condensat...

  3. Retrospective Conversion of Solar Data Printed in "Synoptic Maps of the Solar Chromosphere": A Scientific and Librarianship Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenceau, A.; Aboudarham, J.; Renié, C.

    2015-04-01

    Between 1928 and 2003, the Observatoire de Paris published solar activity maps and their corresponding data tables, first in the Annals of the Meudon Observatory, then in the Synoptic Maps of the Solar Chromosphere. These maps represent the main solar structures in a single view and spread out on a complete Carrington rotation as well as tables of associated data, containing various information on these structures such as positions, length, morphological characteristics, and behavior. Since 2003, these maps and data tables have not been released in print, as they are only published on the online BASS2000 database, the solar database maintained by LESIA (Laboratory for space studies and astrophysical instruments). In order to make the first 80 years of observations which were available only in paper accessible and usable, the LESIA and the Library of the Observatory have started a project to digitize the publications, enter the data with the assistance of a specialized company, and then migrate the files obtained in BASS2000 and in the Heliophysics Features Catalog created in the framework of the European project HELIO.

  4. Chromosphere to 1 AU Simulation of the 2011 March 7th Event: A Comprehensive Study of Coronal Mass Ejection Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, M; van der Holst, B; Sokolov, I; Toth, G; Vourlidas, A; de Koning, C A; Gombosi, T I

    2016-01-01

    We perform and analyze results of a global magnetohydrodyanmic (MHD) simulation of the fast coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2011 March 7. The simulation is made using the newly developed Alfv\\'en Wave Solar Model (AWSoM), which describes the background solar wind starting from the upper chromosphere and extends to 24 R$_{\\odot}$. Coupling AWSoM to an inner heliosphere (IH) model with the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) extends the total domain beyond the orbit of Earth. Physical processes included in the model are multi-species thermodynamics, electron heat conduction (both collisional and collisionless formulations), optically thin radiative cooling, and Alfv\\'en-wave turbulence that accelerates and heats the solar wind. The Alfv\\'en-wave description is physically self-consistent, including non-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) reflection and physics-based apportioning of turbulent dissipative heating to both electrons and protons. Within this model, we initiate the CME by using the Gibson...

  5. From CoRoT 102899501 to the Sun. A time evolution model of chromospheric activity on the main sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Gondoin, P; Fridlund, M; Frasca, A; Guenther, E W; Hatzes, A; Deeg, H J; Parviainen, H; Eigmueller, P; Deleuil, M

    2012-01-01

    Using a model based on the rotational modulation of the visibility of active regions, we analyse the high-accuracy CoRoT lightcurve of the active young star CoRoT102899501. Spectroscopic follow-up observations are used to derive its fundamental parameters. We compare its chromospheric activity level with a model of chrosmospheric activity evolution established by combining relationships between the R'HK index and the Rossby number with a recent model of stellar rotation evolution on the main sequence. We measure the spot coverage of the stellar surface as a function of time, and find evidence for a tentative increase from 5-14% at the beginning of the observing run to 13-29% 35 days later. A high level of magnetic activity on CoRoT102899501 is corroborated by a strong emission in the Balmer and Ca II HK lines (logR'HK ~ -4). The starspots used as tracers of the star rotation constrain the rotation period to 1.625+/-0.002 days and do not show evidence for differential rotation. The effective temperature (Teff=...

  6. Diagnosis of magnetic and electric fields of chromospheric jets through spectropolarimetric observations of H I Paschen lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anan, T.; Ichimoto, K. [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Gifu 506-1314 (Japan); Casini, R., E-mail: anan@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: ichimoto@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: casini@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2014-05-10

    Magnetic fields govern the plasma dynamics in the outer layers of the solar atmosphere, and electric fields acting on neutral atoms that move across the magnetic field enable us to study the dynamical coupling between neutrals and ions in the plasma. In order to measure the magnetic and electric fields of chromospheric jets, the full Stokes spectra of the Paschen series of neutral hydrogen in a surge and in some active region jets that took place at the solar limb were observed on 2012 May 5, using the spectropolarimeter of the Domeless Solar Telescope at Hida observatory, Japan. First, we inverted the Stokes spectra taking into account only the effect of magnetic fields on the energy structure and polarization of the hydrogen levels. Having found no definitive evidence of the effects of electric fields in the observed Stokes profiles, we then estimated an upper bound for these fields by calculating the polarization degree under the magnetic field configuration derived in the first step, with the additional presence of a perpendicular (Lorentz type) electric field of varying strength. The inferred direction of the magnetic field on the plane of the sky approximately aligns to the active region jets and the surge, with magnetic field strengths in the range 10 G < B < 640 G for the surge. Using magnetic field strengths of 70, 200, and 600 G, we obtained upper limits for possible electric fields of 0.04, 0.3, and 0.8 V cm{sup –1}, respectively. This upper bound is conservative, since in our modeling we neglected the possible contribution of collisional depolarization. Because the velocity of neutral atoms of hydrogen moving across the magnetic field derived from these upper limits of the Lorentz electric field is far below the bulk velocity of the plasma perpendicular to the magnetic field as measured by the Doppler shift, we conclude that the neutral atoms must be highly frozen to the magnetic field in the surge.

  7. Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability of Some Chromospheric Emission Lines Through the Solar Activity Cycles 21-23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göker, Ü. D.; Gigolashvili, M. Sh.; Kapanadze, N.

    2017-02-01

    A study of variations of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the wavelength ranges 121.5 nm-300.5 nm for the period 1981-2009 is presented. We used various data for ultraviolet (UV) spectral lines and international sunspot number (ISSN) from interactive data centers such as SME (NSSDC), UARS (GDAAC), SORCE (LISIRD) and SIDC, respectively. We reduced these data by using the MATLAB software package. In this respect, we revealed negative correlations of intensities of UV (289.5 nm-300.5 nm) spectral lines originating in the solar chromosphere with the ISSN index during the unusually prolonged minimum between the solar activity cycles (SACs) 23 and 24. We also compared our results with the variations of solar activity indices obtained by the ground-based telescopes. Therefore, we found that plage regions decrease while facular areas are increasing in SAC 23. However, the decrease in plage regions is seen in small sunspot groups (SGs), contrary to this, these regions in large SGs are comparable to previous SACs or even larger as is also seen in facular areas. Nevertheless, negative correlations between ISSN and SSI data indicate that these variations are in close connection with the classes of sunspots/SGs, faculae and plage regions. Finally, we applied the time series analysis of spectral lines corresponding to the wavelengths 121.5 nm-300.5 nm and made comparisons with the ISSN data. We found an unexpected increase in the 298.5 nm line for the Fe II ion. The variability of Fe II ion 298.5 nm line is in close connection with the facular areas and plage regions, and the sizes of these solar surface indices play an important role for the SSI variability, as well. So, we compared the connection between the sizes of faculae and plage regions, sunspots/SGs, chemical elements and SSI variability. Our future work will be the theoretical study of this connection and developing of a corresponding model.

  8. Chromosphere to 1 AU Simulation of the 2011 March 7th Event: A Comprehensive Study of Coronal Mass Ejection Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, M.; Manchester, W. B.; van der Holst, B.; Sokolov, I.; Tóth, G.; Vourlidas, A.; de Koning, C. A.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2017-01-01

    We perform and analyze the results of a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the fast coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2011 March 7. The simulation is made using the newly developed Alfvén Wave Solar Model (AWSoM), which describes the background solar wind starting from the upper chromosphere and extends to 24 R⊙. Coupling AWSoM to an inner heliosphere model with the Space Weather Modeling Framework extends the total domain beyond the orbit of Earth. Physical processes included in the model are multi-species thermodynamics, electron heat conduction (both collisional and collisionless formulations), optically thin radiative cooling, and Alfvén-wave turbulence that accelerates and heats the solar wind. The Alfvén-wave description is physically self-consistent, including non-Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin reflection and physics-based apportioning of turbulent dissipative heating to both electrons and protons. Within this model, we initiate the CME by using the Gibson-Low analytical flux rope model and follow its evolution for days, in which time it propagates beyond STEREO A. A detailed comparison study is performed using remote as well as in situ observations. Although the flux rope structure is not compared directly due to lack of relevant ejecta observation at 1 au in this event, our results show that the new model can reproduce many of the observed features near the Sun (e.g., CME-driven extreme ultraviolet [EUV] waves, deflection of the flux rope from the coronal hole, “double-front” in the white light images) and in the heliosphere (e.g., shock propagation direction, shock properties at STEREO A).

  9. Stellar model chromospheres. IV - The formation of the H-epsilon feature in the sun /G2 V/ and Arcturus /K2 III/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, T. R.; Linsky, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    The formation of the Balmer-series member H-epsilon in the near-red wing of the Ca II H line is discussed for two cases: the sun (H-epsilon absorption profile) and Arcturus (H-epsilon emission profile). It is shown that although the H-epsilon source functions in both stars are dominated by the Balmer-continuum radiation field through photoionizations, the line-formation problems in the two stars are quantitatively different, owing to a substantial difference in the relative importance of the stellar chromosphere temperature inversion as compared with the stellar photosphere.

  10. Evolution and Activity in the Solar Corona: A Comparison of Coronal and Chromospheric Structures Seen in Soft X-Rays, White Light and H-Alpha Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagenal, Fran

    2001-01-01

    The work completed under this project, 'Evolution and Activity in the Solar Corona: A Comparison of Coronal and Chromospheric Structures Seen in Soft X-Rays, White Light and H-Alpha Emission', includes the following presentations: (1) Analysis of H-alpha Observations of High-altitude Coronal Condensations; (2) Multi-spectral Imaging of Coronal Activity; (3) Measurement and Modeling of Soft X-ray Loop Arcades; (4) A Study of the Origin and Dynamics of CMEs; and various poster presentations and thesis dissertations.

  11. What Goes Up Doesn't Necessarily Come Down! - Connecting the Dynamics of the Chromosphere and Transition Region with TRACE, Hinode and SUMER

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, S W

    2009-01-01

    We explore joint observations of the South-East limb made by Hinode, TRACE and SOHO/SUMER on April 12, 2008 as part of the Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI) Quiet Sun Characterization targeted observing program. During the sequence a large, 10Mm long, macro-spicule was sent upward and crossed the line-of-sight of the SUMER slit, an event that affords us an opportunity to study the coupling of cooler chromospheric material to transition region emission formed as hot as 600,000K. This short article provides preliminary results of the data analysis.

  12. SYSTEMATIC MOTION OF FINE-SCALE JETS AND SUCCESSIVE RECONNECTION IN SOLAR CHROMOSPHERIC ANEMONE JET OBSERVED WITH THE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE/HINODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, K. A. P.; Nishida, K.; Shibata, K. [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Isobe, H., E-mail: singh@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Unit for Synergetic Study for Space, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2012-11-20

    The Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode allows observations with high spatiotemporal resolution and stable image quality. A {lambda}-shaped chromospheric anemone jet was observed in high resolution with SOT/Hinode. We found that several fine-scale jets were launched from one end of the footpoint to the other. These fine-scale jets ({approx}1.5-2.5 Mm) gradually move from one end of the footpoint to the other and finally merge into a single jet. This process occurs recurrently, and as time progresses the jet activity becomes more and more violent. The time evolution of the region below the jet in Ca II H filtergram images taken with SOT shows that various parts (or knots) appear at different positions. These bright knots gradually merge into each other during the maximum phase. The systematic motion of the fine-scale jets is observed when different knots merge into each other. Such morphology would arise due to the emergence of a three-dimensional twisted flux rope in which the axial component (or the guide field) appears in the later stages of the flux rope emergence. The partial appearance of the knots could be due to the azimuthal magnetic field that appears during the early stage of the flux rope emergence. If the guide field is strong and reconnection occurs between the emerging flux rope and an ambient magnetic field, this could explain the typical feature of systematic motion in chromospheric anemone jets.

  13. Semi-empirical Modeling of the Photosphere, Chromosphere, Transition Region, and Corona of the M-dwarf Host Star GJ 832

    CERN Document Server

    Fontenla, J M; Witbrod, Jesse; France, Kevin; Buccino, A; Mauas, Pablo; Vietes, Mariela; Walkowicz, Lucianne M

    2016-01-01

    Stellar radiation from X-rays to the visible provides the energy that controls the photochemistry and mass loss from exoplanet atmospheres. The important extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region (10--91.2~nm) is inaccessible and should be computed from a reliable stellar model. It is essential to understand the formation regions and physical processes responsible for the various stellar emission features in order to predict how the spectral energy distribution varies with age and activity levels. We compute a state-of-the-art semi-empirical atmospheric model and the emergent high-resolution synthetic spectrum of the moderately active M2~V star GJ~832 as the first of a series of models for stars with different activity levels. Using non-LTE radiative transfer techniques and including many molecular lines, we construct a one-dimensional simple model for the physical structure of the star's chromosphere, chromosphere-corona transition region, and corona. The synthesized spectrum for this model fits the continuum and lin...

  14. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere I. Continuous Emission and Condensed Matter Within the Chromosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The continuous spectrum of the solar photosphere stands as the paramount observation with regard to the condensed nature of the solar body. Studies relative to Kirchhoff’s law of thermal emission (e.g. Robitaille P.-M. Kirchhoff’s law of thermal emission: 150 years. Progr. Phys., 2009, v. 4, 3–13. and a detailed analysis of the stellar opacity problem (Robitaille P.M. Stellar opacity: The Achilles’ heel of the gaseous Sun. Progr. Phys., 2011, v. 3, 93–99 have revealed that gaseous models remain unable to properly account for the generation of this spectrum. Therefore, it can be stated with certainty that the photosphere is comprised of condensed matter. Beyond the solar surface, the chromospheric layer of the Sun also generates a weak continuous spectrum in the visible region. This emission exposes the presence of material in the condensed state. As a result, above the level of the photosphere, matter exists in both gaseous and condensed forms, much like within the atmosphere of the Earth. The continuous visible spectrum associated with the chromosphere provides the twenty-sixth line of evidence that the Sun is condensed matter.

  15. A coordinated optical and X-ray spectroscopic campaign on HD179949: searching for planet-induced chromospheric and coronal activity

    CERN Document Server

    Scandariato, G; Lanza, A F; Pagano, I; Fares, R; Shkolnik, E L; Bohlender, D; Cameron, A C; Dieters, S; Donati, J -F; Fiorenzano, A F Martìnez; Jardine, M; Moutou, C

    2013-01-01

    HD179949 is an F8V star, orbited by a close-in giant planet with a period of ~3 days. Previous studies suggested that the planet enhances the magnetic activity of the parent star, producing a chromospheric hot spot which rotates in phase with the planet orbit. However, this phenomenon is intermittent since it was observed in several but not all seasons. A long-term monitoring of the magnetic activity of HD179949 is required to study the amplitude and time scales of star-planet interactions. In 2009 we performed a simultaneous optical and X-ray spectroscopic campaign to monitor the magnetic activity of HD179949 during ~5 orbital periods and ~2 stellar rotations. We analyzed the CaII H&K lines as a proxy for chromospheric activity, and we studied the X-ray emission in search of flux modulations and to determine basic properties of the coronal plasma. A detailed analysis of the flux in the cores of the CaII H&K lines and a similar study of the X-ray photometry shows evidence of source variability, includ...

  16. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about 500...

  17. 2nd Joint Solar Dynamics Project data summary: Solar magnetic field, chromospheric and coronal observations near the time of the 11 June 1983 solar eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, D. G.; Fisher, R. R.; Garcia, C.; Najita, J. R.; Rock, K. A.; Seagraves, P. H.; Yasukawa, E.; McCabe, M. K.; Mickey, D. L.

    1983-07-01

    A comprehensive set of observations of the solar photosphere, chromosphere and corona is presented for one week on either side of the 11 June 1983 total solar eclipse. These observations, made at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory and at the University of Hawaii's Mees Solar Observatory on Haleakala, include H images of the disk and the limb, off-band H sunspot and Ca-II K-line images, together with observations of the white light corona. Photospheric longitudinal magnetic field estimates made from the Fe line at 6302.5 by the Mees observatory Stokes photopolarimeter are included. The data are presented as daily observations. In the case of the k-coronal observations and the magnetic field data, synoptic maps were constructed for this interval.

  18. Joint solar dynamics project data summary (2nd): solar magnetic field, chromospheric and coronal observations near the time of the 11 June 1983 solar eclipse. Technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sime, D.G.; Fisher, R.R.; Garcia, C.J.; Najita, J.R.; Rock, K.A.

    1983-07-01

    A comprehensive set of observations of the solar photosphere, chromosphere and corona is presented for one week on either side of the 11 June 1983 total solar eclipse. These observations, made at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory and at the University of Hawaii's Mees Solar Observatory on Haleakala, include H images of the disk and the limb, off-band H sunspot and Ca-II K-line images, together with observations of the white light corona. Also included are photospheric longitudinal magnetic field estimates made from the Fe line at 6302.5, by the Mees observatory Stokes photo-polarimeter. The data are presented as daily observations. In the case of the k-coronal observations and the magnetic field data, synoptic maps have been constructed for this interval.

  19. Solar fine-scale structures. I. Spicules and other small-scale, jet-like events at the chromospheric level: observations and physical parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Tsiropoula, G; Kontogiannis, I; Madjarska, M S; Doyle, J G; Suematsu, Y

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades the uninterrupted, high-resolution observations of the Sun, from the excellent range of telescopes aboard many spacecraft complemented with observations from sophisticated ground-based telescopes have opened up a new world producing significantly more complete information on the physical conditions of the solar atmosphere than before. The interface between the lower solar atmosphere where energy is generated by subsurface convection and the corona comprises the chromosphere, which is dominated by jet-like, dynamic structures, called mottles when found in quiet regions, fibrils when found in active regions and spicules when observed at the solar limb. Recently, space observations with Hinode have led to the suggestion that there should exist two different types of spicules called Type I and Type II which have different properties. Ground-based observations in the Ca II H and K filtergrams reveal the existence of long, thin emission features called straws in observations close to the l...

  20. Photospheric and chromospheric magnetic activity of seismic solar analogs. Observational inputs on the solar-stellar connection from Kepler and Hermes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Beck, P. G.; Egeland, R.; Pallé, P. L.; Mathur, S.; Metcalfe, T. S.; do Nascimento, J.-D., Jr.; Ceillier, T.; Andersen, M. F.; Triviño Hage, A.

    2016-11-01

    We identify a set of 18 solar analogs among the seismic sample of solar-like stars observed by the Kepler satellite rotating between 10 and 40 days. This set is constructed using the asteroseismic stellar properties derived using either the global oscillation properties or the individual acoustic frequencies. We measure the magnetic activity properties of these stars using observations collected by the photometric Kepler satellite and by the ground-based, high-resolution Hermes spectrograph mounted on the Mercator telescope. The photospheric (Sph) and chromospheric (S index) magnetic activity levels of these seismic solar analogs are estimated and compared in relation to the solar activity. We show that the activity of the Sun is comparable to the activity of the seismic solar analogs, within the maximum-to-minimum temporal variations of the 11-yr solar activity cycle 23. In agreement with previous studies, the youngest stars and fastest rotators in our sample are actually the most active. The activity of stars older than the Sun seems to not evolve much with age. Furthermore, the comparison of the photospheric, Sph, with the well-established chromospheric, S index, indicates that the Sph index can be used to provide a suitable magnetic activity proxy which can be easily estimated for a large number of stars from space photometric observations. Based on observations collected by the NASA Kepler space telescope and the Hermes spectrograph mounted on the 1.2 m Mercator telescope at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  1. On the Discovery of Fast Chromospheric Ejecta of up to 1500 km/s in the Corona within one Radius above the Solar Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, Shadia R.; Ding, Adalbert

    2016-05-01

    Using a dual channel imaging spectrograph, centered on the Fe XIV 530.3 nm and Fe XI 789.2 nm coronal forbidden lines, spectral observations were made during the total solar eclipse of 20 March 2015. The slit of the spectrograph covered approximately 8 Rs and was positioned parallel to, and starting at central meridian. The slit scanned the corona out to approximately 1.5 Rs above the limb throughout the duration of totality of approximately 2.5 minutes. Concentrations of Doppler redshifted coronal material ranging from 100 to 1500 km/s, with a spatial extent of up to 0.5 Rs, were detected at different locations along the slit and at the different slit positions. Surprisingly, chromospheric material, characterized by He I 587.6 nm, Mg I triplet 516.7, 517.2 and 518.4 nm, and Fe II 516.9 nm emission, was often associated with the Doppler shifts detected in Fe XIV. Mapping the location of these concentrations on the corresponding white light eclipse image renders a distribution reminiscent of a complex coronal mass ejection front moving away from the observer. Unfortunately, no STEREO observations were available during that time. The LASCO/C2 coronagraph showed very faint outflows, consistent with the bulk of the Doppler-shifted material moving away from the observer. The presence of cool chromospheric material moving away from the Sun provides the first corroboration of the solar origin of reported detection of neutral and low ionization state atoms in the solar wind.

  2. Semi-empirical Modeling of the Photosphere, Chromosphere, Transition Region, and Corona of the M-dwarf Host Star GJ 832

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenla, J. M.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Witbrod, Jesse; France, Kevin; Buccino, A.; Mauas, Pablo; Vieytes, Mariela; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2016-10-01

    Stellar radiation from X-rays to the visible provides the energy that controls the photochemistry and mass loss from exoplanet atmospheres. The important extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region (10-91.2 nm) is inaccessible and should be computed from a reliable stellar model. It is essential to understand the formation regions and physical processes responsible for the various stellar emission features to predict how the spectral energy distribution varies with age and activity levels. We compute a state-of-the-art semi-empirical atmospheric model and the emergent high-resolution synthetic spectrum of the moderately active M2 V star GJ 832 as the first of a series of models for stars with different activity levels. We construct a one-dimensional simple model for the physical structure of the star’s chromosphere, chromosphere-corona transition region, and corona using non-LTE radiative transfer techniques and many molecular lines. The synthesized spectrum for this model fits the continuum and lines across the UV-to-optical spectrum. Particular emphasis is given to the emission lines at wavelengths that are shorter than 300 nm observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, which have important effects on the photochemistry of the exoplanet atmospheres. The FUV line ratios indicate that the transition region of GJ 832 is more biased to hotter material than that of the quiet Sun. The excellent agreement of our computed EUV luminosity with that obtained by two other techniques indicates that our model predicts reliable EUV emission from GJ 832. We find that the unobserved EUV flux of GJ 832, which heats the outer atmospheres of exoplanets and drives their mass loss, is comparable to the active Sun. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS AR-09525.01A. These observations

  3. HADES RV Programme with HARPS-N at TNG. IV. Time resolved analysis of the Ca ii H&K and Hα chromospheric emission of low-activity early-type M dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandariato, G.; Maldonado, J.; Affer, L.; Biazzo, K.; Leto, G.; Stelzer, B.; Zanmar Sanchez, R.; Claudi, R.; Cosentino, R.; Damasso, M.; Desidera, S.; González Álvarez, E.; González Hernández, J. I.; Gratton, R.; Lanza, A. F.; Maggio, A.; Messina, S.; Micela, G.; Pagano, I.; Perger, M.; Piotto, G.; Rebolo, R.; Ribas, I.; Rosich, A.; Sozzetti, A.; Suárez Mascareño, A.

    2017-01-01

    Context. M dwarfs are prime targets for current and future planet search programs, particularly those focused on the detection and characterization of rocky planets in the habitable zone. In this context, understanding their magnetic activity is important for two main reasons: it affects our ability to detect small planets and it plays a key role in the characterization of the stellar environment. Aims: We analyze observations of the Ca ii H&K and Hα lines as diagnostics of chromospheric activity for low-activity early-type M dwarfs. Methods: We analyze the time series of spectra of 71 early-type M dwarfs collected in the framework of the HADES project for planet search purposes. The HARPS-N spectra simultaneously provide the Ca ii H&K doublet and the Hα line. We develop a reduction scheme able to correct the HARPS-N spectra for instrumental and atmospheric effects, and also to provide flux-calibrated spectra in units of flux at the stellar surface. The Ca ii H&K and Hα fluxes are then compared with each other, and their time variability is analyzed. Results: We find that the Ca ii H and K flux excesses are strongly correlated with each other, while the Hα flux excess is generally less correlated with the Ca ii H&K doublet. We also find that Hα emission does not increase monotonically with the Ca ii H&K line flux, showing some absorption before being filled in by chromospheric emission when Ca ii H&K activity increases. Analyzing the time variability of the emission fluxes, we derive a tentative estimate of the rotation period (on the order of a few tens of days) for some of the program stars, and the typical lifetime of chromospheric active regions (on the order of a few stellar rotations). Conclusions: Our results are in good agreement with similar previous studies. In particular, we find evidence that the chromospheres of early-type M dwarfs could be characterized by different filament coverage, affecting the formation mechanism of the Hα line. We also

  4. Photospheric and chromospheric magnetic activity of seismic solar analogs. Observational inputs on the solar/stellar connection from Kepler and Hermes

    CERN Document Server

    Salabert, D; Beck, P G; Egeland, R; Palle, P L; Mathur, S; Metcalfe, T S; Nascimento, J -D do; Ceillier, T; Andersen, M F; Hage, A Trivino

    2016-01-01

    We identify a set of 18 solar analogs among the seismic sample of solar-like stars observed by the Kepler satellite rotating between 10 and 40 days. This set is constructed using the asteroseismic stellar properties derived using either the global oscillation properties or the individual acoustic frequencies. We measure the magnetic activity properties of these stars using observations collected by the photometric Kepler satellite and by the ground-based, high-resolution Hermes spectrograph mounted on the Mercator telescope. The photospheric (Sph) and chromospheric (S index) magnetic activity levels of these seismic solar analogs are estimated and compared in relation to the solar activity. We show that the activity of the Sun is comparable to the activity of the seismic solar analogs, within the maximum-to-minimum temporal variations of the 11-year solar activity cycle 23. In agreement with previous studies, the youngest stars and fastest rotators in our sample are actually the most active. The activity of s...

  5. The 3rd Joint Solar Dynamics Project data summary: Solar magnetic field, chromospheric and coronal observations near the time of the 18 March 1988 solar eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, D. G.; Garcia, C. J.; Lundin, W. E.; Yasukawa, E. A.; Mickey, D. L.; Labonte, B.

    1988-11-01

    The general goal of the HAO/University of Hawaii Joint Solar Dynamics Project is to establish the relationships that exist between the solar magnetic field which is detected in the photosphere and the structure and evolution of the corona. The SOLDYN programs of 1982 and 1983 demonstrated the ability to use existing instruments to gather data of value in the pursuit of that goal. The goals for the observations in 1988 are as follows: (1) Document the state of the sun, from the photosphere up through the chromosphere and out into the corona for the approximately four-week interval around the total solar eclipse of 18 March 1988, and (2) Identify the relationship between the photospheric magnetic fields and the temperature and density structure of the corona. The reduced observations made during this SOLDYN 3 period necessary to achieve these goals are provided. The observations are presented both in the form of daily photographic and photo-electric measurements, and in synoptic format for the period.

  6. Joint Solar Dynamics Project data summary (3rd): Solar magnetic field, chromospheric and coronal observations near the time of the 18 March 1988 solar eclipse. Technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sime, D.G.; Garcia, C.J.; Lundin, W.E.; Yasukawa, E.A.

    1988-11-01

    The general goal of the HAO/University of Hawaii Joint Solar Dynamics Project is to establish the relationships that exist between the solar magnetic field, detected in the photosphere, and the structure and evolution of the corona. The SOLDYN programs of 1982 and 1983 demonstrated the ability to use existing instruments to gather data of value in the pursuit of that goal. The goals for the observations in 1988 are as follows: (1) document the state of the sun, from the photosphere up through the chromosphere and out into the corona for the approximately four-week interval around the total solar eclipse of 18 March 1988, and (2) identify the relationship between the photospheric magnetic fields and the temperature and density structure of the corona. This report contains the reduced observations made during this SOLDYN III period necessary to achieve these goals. They are presented both in the form of daily photographic and photoelectric measurements, and in synoptic format for the period.

  7. Three-dimensional radiative transfer simulations of the scattering polarization of the hydrogen Ly$\\alpha$ line in a MHD model of the chromosphere-corona transition region

    CERN Document Server

    Stepan, Jiri; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Probing the magnetism of the upper solar chromosphere requires measuring and modeling the scattering polarization produced by anisotropic radiation pumping in UV spectral lines. Here we apply PORTA (a novel radiative transfer code) to investigate the hydrogen Ly$\\alpha$ line in a 3D model of the solar atmosphere resulting from a state of the art MHD simulation. At full spatial resolution the linear polarization signals are very significant all over the solar disk, with a large fraction of the field of view showing line-center amplitudes well above the 1% level. Via the Hanle effect the line-center polarization signals are sensitive to the magnetic field of the model's transition region, even when its mean field strength is only 15 G. The breaking of the axial symmetry of the radiation field produces significant forward-scattering polarization in Ly$\\alpha$, without the need of an inclined magnetic field. Interestingly, the Hanle effect tends to decrease such forward-scattering polarization signals in most of ...

  8. Numerical MHD Simulation of the Coupled Evolution of Collisional Plasma and Magnetic Field in the Solar Chromosphere. I. Gradual and Impulsive Energisation

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseeva, L M

    2015-01-01

    The dynamical coupling between the solar chromospheric plasma and magnetic field is investigated by numerically solving a fully self-consistent, two-dimensional initial-value problem for the nonlinear collisional MHD equations including electric resistivity, thermal conduction, and, in some cases, gas-dynamic viscosity. The processes in the contact zone between two horizontal magnetic fields of opposite polarities are considered. The plasma is assumed to be initially motionless and having a temperature of 50,000 K uniform throughout the plasma volume; the characteristic magnetic field corresponds to a plasma $\\beta\\gtrsim 1$. In a physical-time interval of 17~seconds typically covered by a computational run, the plasma temperature gradually increases by a factor of two to three. Against this background, an impulsive (in 0.1 seconds or less) increase in the current-aligned plasma velocity occurs at the site of the current-layer thinning (sausage-type deformation, or $m=0$ pinch instability). Such a "velocity b...

  9. The ultracool dwarf DENIS-P J104814.7-395606. Chromospheres and coronae at the low-mass end of the main-sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Stelzer, B; Biazzo, K; Ercolano, B; Crespo-Chacon, I; Lopez-Santiago, J; Martinez-Arnaiz, R; Schmitt, J H M M; Rigliaco, E; Leone, F; Cupani, G

    2011-01-01

    We have obtained an XMM-Newton observation and a broad-band spectrum from the ultraviolet to the near infrared with X-Shooter for one of the nearest M9 dwarfs, DENIS-P J1048-3956 (4pc). We integrate these data by a compilation of activity parameters for ultracool dwarfs from the literature with the aim to advance our understanding of these objects by comparing them to early-M type dwarf stars and the Sun. Our deep XMM-Newton observation has led to the first X-ray detection of DENIS-P J1048-3956 (log Lx = 25.1) as well as the first measurement of its V band brightness (V = 17.35mag). Flux-flux relations between X-ray and chromospheric activity indicators are here for the first time extended into the regime of the ultracool dwarfs. The approximate agreement of DENIS-P J1048-3956 and other ultracool dwarfs with flux-flux relations for early-M dwarfs suggests that the same heating mechanisms work in the atmospheres of ultracool dwarfs, albeit weaker as judged from their lower fluxes. The observed Balmer decrement...

  10. Multi-wavelength high-resolution observations of a small-scale emerging magnetic flux event and the chromospheric and coronal response

    CERN Document Server

    Dominguez, Santiago Vargas; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art solar instrumentation is revealing magnetic activity of the Sun with unprecedented resolution. Observations with the 1.6m New Solar Telescope of the Big Bear Solar Observatory are making next steps in our understanding of the solar surface structure. Granular-scale magnetic flux emergence and the response of the solar atmosphere are among the key research. As part of a joint observing program with NASA's IRIS mission, the NST observed active region NOAA 11810 in photospheric and chromospheric wavelengths. Complimentary data are provided by SDO and Hinode space-based telescopes. The region displayed a group of solar pores, in the vicinity of which we detect a small-scale buoyant horizontal magnetic flux tube causing abnormal granulation and interacting with the pre-existing ambient field in upper atmospheric layers. Following the expansion of distorted granules at the emergence site, we observed a sudden appearance of an extended surge in the HeI data. IRIS catched ejection of a hot plasma jet...

  11. Starspot evolution, differential rotation, and magnetic cycles in the chromospherically active binaries lambda andromedae, sigma Geminorum, II Pegasi, and V711 Tauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Gregory W.; Eaton, Joel A.; Hamer, Jamesia; Hall, Douglas S.

    1995-01-01

    We have analyzed 15-19 yr of photoelectric photometry, obtained manually and with automated telescopes, of the chromospherically active binaries lambda And, sigma Gem, II Peg, and V711 Tau. These observations let us identify individual dark starspots on the stellar surfaces from periodic dimming of the starlight, follow the evolution of these spots, and search for long-term cyclic changes in the properties of these starspots that might reveal magnetic cycles analogous to the Sun's 11 yr sunspot cycle. We developed a computer code to fit a simple two-spot model to our observed light curves that allows us to extract the most easily determinable and most reliable spot parameters from the light curves, i.e., spot longitudes and radii. We then used these measured properties to identify individual spots and to chart their life histories by constructing migration and amplitude curves. We identified and followed 11 spots in lambda And, 16 in sigma Gem, 12 in II Peg, and 15 in V711 Tau. Lifetimes of individual spots ranged from a few months to longer than 6 yr. Differential rotation coefficients, estimated from the observed range of spot rotation periods for each star and defined by equation (2), were 0.04 for lambda And, 0.038 for sigma Gem, 0.005 for II Peg, and 0.006 for V711 Tau, versus 0.19 for the Sun. We searched for cyclic changes in mean brightness, B-V color index, and spot rotation period as evidence for long-term cycles. Of these, long-term variability in mean brightness appears to offer the best evidence for such cycles in these four stars. Cycles of 11.1 yr for lambda And, 8.5 yr for sigma Gem, 11 yr for II Peg, and 16 yr V711 Tau are implied by these mean brightness changes. Cyclic changes in spot rotation period were found in lambda And and possibly II Peg. Errors in B-V were too large for any long-term changes to be detectable.

  12. Long term changes in EUV and X-ray emissions from the solar corona and chromosphere as measured by the response of the Earth’s ionosphere during total solar eclipses from 1932 to 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Davis

    Full Text Available Measurements of the ionospheric E region during total solar eclipses in the period 1932–1999 have been used to investigate the fraction of Extreme Ultra Violet and soft X-ray radiation, 8, that is emitted from the limb corona and chromosphere. The relative apparent sizes of the Moon and the Sun are different for each eclipse, and techniques are presented which correct the measurements and, therefore, allow direct comparisons between different eclipses. The results show that the fraction of ionising radiation emitted by the limb corona has a clear solar cycle variation and that the underlying trend shows this fraction has been increasing since 1932. Data from the SOHO spacecraft are used to study the effects of short-term variability and it is shown that the observed long-term rise in 8 has a negligible probability of being a chance occurrence.

    Key words. Ionosphere (solar radiation and cosmic ray effects – Solar physics, astrophysics, and astronomy (corona and transition region

  13. The HADES RV Programme with HARPS-N@TNG IV. Time resolved analysis of the Ca ii H&K and H{\\alpha} chromospheric emission of low-activity early-type M dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Scandariato, G; Biazzo, K; Leto, G; Stelzer, B; Sanchez, R Zanmar; Claudi, R; Cosentino, R; Damasso, M; Desidera, S; Álvarez, E González; Hernández, J I González; Gratton, R; Lanza, A F; Maggio, A; Messina, S; Micela, G; Pagano, I; Perger, M; Piotto, G; Rebolo, R; Ribas, I; Rosich, A; Sozzetti, A; Mascareño, A Suárez

    2016-01-01

    M dwarfs are prime targets for planet search programs, particularly of those focused on the detection and characterization of rocky planets in the habitable zone. Understanding their magnetic activity is important because it affects our ability to detect small planets, and it plays a key role in the characterization of the stellar environment. We analyze observations of the Ca II H&K and H{\\alpha} lines as diagnostics of chromospheric activity for low-activity early-type M dwarfs. We analyze the time series of spectra of 71 early-type M dwarfs collected for the HADES project for planet search purposes. The HARPS-N spectra provide simultaneously the H&K doublet and the H{\\alpha} line. We develop a reduction scheme able to correct the HARPS-N spectra for instrumental and atmospheric effects, and to provide flux-calibrated spectra in units of flux at the stellar surface. The H&K and H{\\alpha} fluxes are compared with each other, and their variability is analyzed. We find that the H and K flux excesse...

  14. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - H-Alpha

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of H-alpha photographic datasets contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. Solar...

  15. Morphology and dynamics of photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Wöger, F; Rimmele, T

    2009-01-01

    We use joint observations obtained with the Hinode space observatory and the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) installed at the DST of the NSO/SP to investigate the morphology and dynamics of (a) non-magnetic and (b) magnetic regions in the fluctosphere. In inter-network regions with no significant magnetic flux contributions above the detection limit of IBIS, we find intensity structures with similar characteristics as those seen in numerical simulations by Wedemeyer-B\\"ohm (2008). The magnetic flux elements in the network are stable and seem to resemble the spatially extended counterparts to the underlying photospheric magnetic elements. We will explain some of the difficulties in deriving the magnetic field vector from observations of the fluctosphere.

  16. Chromospherically Active Low-Mass Close Binary: KIC 9761199

    CERN Document Server

    Yoldas, Ezgi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we present the results obtained from KIC 9761199's the photometrical data acquired by the Kepler Mission. The light curve of the system, the sinusoidal variation out-of-eclipses and instant-short term flare events in the entire light curves were analyzed. The temperature of the secondary component was found to be 3891+-1 K, while the mass ratio of the components (q) was found to be 0.69+-0.01, and the orbital inclination (i) was computed as 77.4+-0.1 degrees. The sinusoidal variation is caused by the stellar spots of two active regions separated by about 180 degrees longitudinally located around the latitudes of +47 and +30 degrees. In addition, 94 flares were detected and their parameters were computed. The OPEA model was derived for these flares and its parameters were computed. The Plateau value as saturation level for the active component was found to be 1.951+-0.069 s, while the half-life value was found to be 1014 s. The flare frequency N1 was found to be 0.01351 per hour, while the flare...

  17. Explosive Chromospheric Evaporation in a Circular-ribbon Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Q M; Ning, Z J; Su, Y N; Ji, H S; Guo, Y

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report our multiwavelength observations of the C4.2 circular-ribbon flare in active region (AR) 12434 on 2015 October 16. The short-lived flare was associated with positive magnetic polarities and a negative polarity inside, as revealed by the photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms. Such magnetic pattern is strongly indicative of a magnetic null point and spine-fan configuration in the corona. The flare was triggered by the eruption of a mini-filament residing in the AR, which produced the inner flare ribbon (IFR) and the southern part of a closed circular flare ribbon (CFR). When the eruptive filament reached the null point, it triggered null point magnetic reconnection with the ambient open field and generated the bright CFR and a blowout jet. Raster observations of the \\textit{Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph} (\\textit{IRIS}) show plasma upflow at speed of 35$-$120 km s$^{-1}$ in the Fe {\\sc xxi} 1354.09 {\\AA} line ($\\log T\\approx7.05$) and downflow at speed of 10$-$60 km s$^{-1}$ i...

  18. Physical Properties of a Sunspot Chromosphere with Umbral Flashes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, J de la Cruz; Socas-Navarro, H; van Noort, M

    2013-01-01

    We present new high-resolution spectro-polarimetric Ca II 8542 observations of umbral flashes in sunspots. At nearly 0.18", and spanning about one hour of continuous observation, this is the most detailed dataset published thus far. Our study involves both LTE and non-LTE inversions (but includes also a weak field analysis as a sanity check) to quantify temperatures, mass flows and the full magnetic field vector geometry. We confirm earlier reports that UFs have very fine structure with hot and cool material intermixed at sub-arcsecond scales. The shock front is roughly 1000 K hotter than the surrounding material. We do not observe significant fluctuations of the field in the umbra. In the penumbra, however, the passage of the running penumbral waves alter the magnetic field strength by some 200 G (peak-to-peak amplitude) but it does not change the field orientation (at least not significantly within our sensitivity of a few degrees). We find a trend of decreasing high-frequency modulation power for more incl...

  19. Halpha line profile asymmetries and the chromospheric flare velocity field

    CERN Document Server

    Kuridze, D; Simões, P J A; van der Voort, L Rouppe; Carlsson, M; Jafarzadeh, S; Allred, J C; Kowalski, A F; Kennedy, M; Fletcher, L; Graham, D; Keenan, F P

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Halpha and Ca II 8542 {\\AA} lines are studied using high spatial, temporal and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Halpha line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum, and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca II 8542 {\\AA} line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesise spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Halpha is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, w...

  20. Zero-Field Dichroism in the Solar Chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Sainz, R M

    2003-01-01

    We explain the linear polarization of the Ca II infrared triplet observed close to the edge of the solar disk. In particular, we demonstrate that the physical origin of the enigmatic polarizations of the 866.2 nm and 854.2 nm lines lies in the existence of atomic polarization in their metastable lower levels, which produces differential absorption of polarization components (dichroism). To this end, we have solved the problem of the generation and transfer of polarized radiation by taking fully into account all the relevant optical pumping mechanisms in multilevel atomic models. We argue that `zero-field' dichroism may be of great diagnostic value in astrophysics.

  1. Mg I as a probe of the solar chromosphere - The atomic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauas, Pablo J.; Avrett, Eugene H.; Loeser, Rudolf

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a complete atomic model for Mg I line synthesis, where all the atomic parameters are based on recent experimental and theoretical data. It is shown how the computed profiles at 4571 A and 5173 A are influenced by the choice of these parameters and the number of levels included in the model atom. In addition, observed profiles of the 5173 A b2 line and theoretical profiles for comparison (based on a recent atmospheric model for the average quiet sun) are presented.

  2. High Dispersion Spectroscopy of Solar-type Superflare Stars. II. Stellar Rotation, Starspots, and Chromospheric Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Notsu, Yuta; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2014-01-01

    We conducted high dispersion spectroscopic observations of 50 superflare stars with Subaru/HDS. These 50 stars were selected from the solar-type superflare stars that we had discovered from the Kepler data. More than half (34 stars) of these 50 target superflare stars show no evidence of binarity, and we estimated stellar parameters of these 34 stars in our previous study (Notsu et al. 2015, hereafter called Paper I). According to our previous studies using Kepler data, superflare stars show quasi-periodic brightness variations whose amplitude (0.1-10\\%) is much larger than that of the solar brightness variations (0.01-0.1\\%) caused by the existence of sunspots on the rotating solar surface. In this study, we investigated whether these quasi-periodic brightness variations of superflare stars are explained by the rotation of a star with fairly large starspots, by using stellar parameters derived in Paper I. First, we confirmed that the value of the projected rotational velocity $v \\sin i$ is consistent with th...

  3. Time-Dependent Turbulent Heating of Open Flux Tubes in the Chromosphere, Corona, and Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Woolsey, Lauren N

    2015-01-01

    We investigate several key questions of plasma heating in open-field regions of the corona that connect to the solar wind. We present results for a model of Alfven-wave-driven turbulence for three typical open magnetic field structures: a polar coronal hole, an open flux tube neighboring an equatorial streamer, and an open flux tube near a strong-field active region. We compare time-steady, one-dimensional turbulent heating models (Cranmer et al., 2007) against fully time-dependent three-dimensional reduced-magnetohydrodynamics modeling of BRAID (van Ballegooijen et al., 2011). We find that the time-steady results agree well with time-averaged results from BRAID. The time-dependence allows us to investigate the variability of the magnetic fluctuations and of the heating in the corona. The high-frequency tail of the power spectrum of fluctuations forms a power law whose exponent varies with height, and we discuss the possible physical explanation for this behavior. The variability in the heating rate is bursty...

  4. The spectroscopic binary system Gl 375. I. Orbital parameters and chromospheric activity

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz, Rodrigo F; Cincunegui, Carolina; Mauas, Pablo J D

    2007-01-01

    We study the spectroscopic binary system Gl 375. We employ medium resolution echelle spectra obtained at the 2.15 m telescope at the Argentinian observatory CASLEO and photometric observations obtained from the ASAS database. We separate the composite spectra into those corresponding to both components. The separated spectra allow us to confirm that the spectral types of both components are similar (dMe3.5) and to obtain precise measurements of the orbital period (P = 1.87844 days), minimum masses (M_1 sin^3 i = 0.35 M_sun and M_2 sin^3 i =0.33 M_sun) and other orbital parameters. The photometric observations exhibit a sinusoidal variation with the same period as the orbital period. We interpret this as signs of active regions carried along with rotation in a tidally synchronized system, and study the evolution of the amplitude of the modulation in longer timescales. Together with the mean magnitude, the modulation exhibits a roughly cyclic variation with a period of around 800 days. This periodicity is also ...

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Chromospheric models of dwarf M stars (Mauas+ 1997)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauas, P.; Falchi, A.; Pasquini, L.; Pallavicini, R.

    1997-04-01

    Tables 4 and 5 give the atmospheric parameters for our models of dM stars Gl 588 and Gl 628. The columns give the column mass in g/cm-2, the electron temperature in K, the microturbulent velocity in km/s; the continuum optical depth at 5000Å; the hydrogen, proton, and electron density in particles per cm-3; and the height h (in km) above the level where tau5000=1. (2 data files).

  6. Long-term chromospheric activity in southern M dwarfs: Gl 229 A and Gl 752 A

    CERN Document Server

    Buccino, Andrea P; Luoni, María Luisa; Mauas, Pablo J D

    2010-01-01

    Several late-type stars present activity cycles similar to that of the Sun. However, these cycles have been mostly studied in F to K stars. Due to their small intrinsic brightness, M dwarfs are not usually the targets of long-term observational studies of stellar activity, and their long-term variability is generally not known. In this work, we study the long-term activity of two M dwarf stars: Gl 229 A (M1/2) and Gl 752 A (M2.5). We employ medium resolution echelle spectra obtained at the 2.15 m telescope at the Argentinian observatory CASLEO between the years 2000 and 2010 and photometric observations obtained from the ASAS database. We analyzed Ca \\II K line-core fluxes and the mean V magnitude with the Lomb-Scargle periodogram, and we obtain possible activity cycles of $\\sim$4 yr and $\\sim$7 yr for Gl 229 A and Gl 752 A respectively.

  7. Determination of the chromospheric quiet network element area index and its variation between 2008 and 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jagdev Singh; Ravindra Belur; Selvendran Raju; Kumaravel Pichaimani; Muthu Priyal; Thambaje Gopalan Priya; Amareswari Kotikalapudi

    2012-01-01

    In general,it is believed that plages and sunspots are the main contributors to solar irradiance.There are small-scale structures on the Sun with intermediate magnetic fields that could also contribute to solar irradiance,but it has not yet been quantified how many of these small scale structures contribute and how much this varies over the solar cycle.We used Ca Ⅱ K images obtained from the telescope at the Kodaikanal observatory.We report a method to separate the network elements from the background structure and plage regions,and compute the changes in the network element area index during the minimum phase of the solar cycle and part of the ascending phase of cycle 24.The measured area occupied by the network elements is about 30% and the plages cover less than 1% of the solar disk during the observation period from February 2008 to 2011.During the extended period of minimum activity,it is observed that the network element area index decreases by about 7% compared to the area occupied by the network elements in 2008.A long term study of the network element area index is required to understand the variations over the solar cycle.

  8. NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET ABSORPTION, CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY, AND STAR-PLANET INTERACTIONS IN THE WASP-12 SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haswell, C. A.; Fossati, L.; Holmes, S.; Kolb, U. C.; Busuttil, R.; Carter, A. [Department of Physical Sciences, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Ayres, T.; France, K.; Froning, C. S. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 593 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0593 (United States); Street, R. A. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Inc., 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Hebb, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, 6301 Stevenson Center Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Cameron, A. Collier; Enoch, B. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Burwitz, V. [Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Rodriguez, J. [Observatori Astronomic de Mallorca, Cami de l' Observatori, E-07144 Costitx, Mallorca (Spain); West, R. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Pollacco, D.; Wheatley, P. J., E-mail: C.A.Haswell@open.ac.uk, E-mail: l.fossati@open.ac.uk, E-mail: cynthia.froning@colorado.edu, E-mail: leslie.hebb@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-20

    Extended gas clouds have been previously detected surrounding the brightest known close-in transiting hot Jupiter exoplanets, HD 209458 b and HD 189733 b; we observed the distant but more extreme close-in hot Jupiter system, WASP-12, with Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Near-UV (NUV) transits up to three times deeper than the optical transit of WASP-12 b reveal extensive diffuse gas, extending well beyond the Roche lobe. The distribution of absorbing gas varies between visits. The deepest NUV transits are at wavelength ranges with strong stellar photospheric absorption, implying that the absorbing gas may have temperature and composition similar to those of the stellar photosphere. Our spectra reveal significantly enhanced absorption (greater than 3{sigma} below the median) at {approx}200 individual wavelengths on each of two HST visits; 65 of these wavelengths are consistent between the two visits, using a strict criterion for velocity matching that excludes matches with velocity shifts exceeding {approx}20 km s{sup -1}. Excess transit depths are robustly detected throughout the inner wings of the Mg II resonance lines independently on both HST visits. We detected absorption in Fe II {lambda}2586, the heaviest species yet detected in an exoplanet transit. The Mg II line cores have zero flux, emission cores exhibited by every other observed star of similar age and spectral type are conspicuously absent. WASP-12 probably produces normal Mg II profiles, but the inner portions of these strong resonance lines are likely affected by extrinsic absorption. The required Mg{sup +} column is an order of magnitude greater than expected from the interstellar medium, though we cannot completely dismiss that possibility. A more plausible source of absorption is gas lost by WASP-12 b. We show that planetary mass loss can produce the required column. Our Visit 2 NUV light curves show evidence for a stellar flare. We show that some of the possible transit detections in resonance lines of rare elements may be due instead to non-resonant transitions in common species. We present optical observations and update the transit ephemeris.

  9. Determining Energy Balance in the Flaring Chromosphere from Oxygen V Line Ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, David R; Labrosse, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The impulsive phase of solar flares is a time of rapid energy deposition and heating in the lower solar atmosphere, leading to changes in the temperature and density structure of the region. We use an O V density diagnostic formed of the 192 to 248 line ratio, provided by Hinode EIS, to determine the density of flare footpoint plasma, at O V formation temperatures of 250,000 K, giving a constraint on the properties of the heated transition region. Hinode EIS rasters from 2 small flare events in December 2007 were used. Raster images were co-aligned to identify and establish the footpoint pixels, multiple-component Gaussian line fitting of the spectra was carried out to isolate the diagnostic pair, and the density was calculated for several footpoint areas. The assumptions of equilibrium ionization and optically thin radiation for the O V lines were found to be acceptable. Properties of the electron distribution, for one event, were deduced from earlier RHESSI hard X-ray observations and used to calculate the ...

  10. Imaging and Spectra of the Chromosphere and Corona at the 2013 Total Eclipse in Gabon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Davis, Allen B.; Demianski, Marek; Rusin, Vojtech; Saniga, Metod; Seaton, Daniel B; Gaintatzis, Pavlos; Voulgaris, Aristeidis; Lucas, Robert; Edwards, Zophia; Zeiler, Michael; Kentrianakis, Michael

    2014-06-01

    We successfully observed the 3 November 2013 eclipse's 59 s of totality in clear sky from the centerline of totality where it exited La Lope National Park in Gabon, close to the maximum totality available on land. Our wide-field imaging showed two CMEs and an erupting prominence. We compare our images with those obtained elsewhere in totality to assess motion and dynamics. Our imaging observations are also compared with near-simultaneous observations from SDO/AIA, SDO/HMI, Hinode/XRT, SOHO/LASCO, SOHO/EIT, PROBA2/SWAP, and STEREO/SECCHI. We also have flash and coronal spectra, which continue to show overall warming of the corona in 2012 and 2013 through studies we have made over the solar cycle that include the ratio of intensities of the coronal red (Fe X 637.4 nm) and green (Fe XIV 530.3 nm) forbidden lines.The Williams College 2013 total-eclipse expedition was supported in part by grant 9327-13 from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society. Our continued work on the 2012 eclipse results is supported in part by grant AGS-1047726 from Solar Terrestrial Research/NSF AGS.

  11. The detection of upwardly propagating waves channelling energy from the chromosphere to the low corona

    CERN Document Server

    Freij, N; Nelson, C J; Mumford, S; Wedemeyer, S; Erdélyi, R

    2014-01-01

    There have been ubiquitous observations of wave-like motions in the solar atmosphere for decades. Recent improvements to space- and ground-based observatories have allowed the focus to shift to smaller magnetic structures on the solar surface. In this paper, high-resolution ground-based data taken using the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope is combined with co-spatial and co-temporal data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite to analyze running penumbral waves (RPWs). RPWs have always been thought to be radial wave propagation that occurs within sunspots. Recent research has suggested that they are in fact upwardly propagating field-aligned waves (UPWs). Here, RPWs within a solar pore are observed for the first time and are interpreted as UPWs due to the lack of a penumbra that is required to support RPWs. These UPWs are also observed co-spatially and co-temporally within several SDO/AIA elemental lines that sample the transition region and low corona. T...

  12. Ca II H sunspot tomography from the photosphere to the chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, V. M. J.; Kiselman, D.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: We aim at gaining insight into the thermal properties of different small-scale structures related to sunspots. Methods: We use filtergrams in the Ca ii H filter at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope to study the relationship between fine structure at different heights in a sunspot. Results: The methods for destretching and aligning the different image data work well. The magnetic spine structure in the outer parts of the sunspot penumbra is found to be associated with higher intensities in the Ca ii H wing passbands but with less steep vertical temperature gradients. Dark lanes in a light bridge behave very similarly to dark cores in penumbral filaments. Fibril structures are seen in the line-core images over the umbra and penumbra. Conclusions: The observations add support to the idea that penumbral filaments, light bridges, and umbral dots are caused by similar processes of overturning convection. Observations in the Ca ii H & K wings are a promising observable, complementing others, for testing simulation results for sunspots at high spatial resolution.

  13. Extreme-infrared brightness profile of the solar chromosphere obtained during the total eclipse of 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, C.; Jefferies, J. T.; Clark, T. A.; Harrison, R. A.; Carter, M. K.; Watt, G.; Becklin, E. E.; Roellig, T. L.; Braun, D. C.; Naylor, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    A temperature profile in 1.3 mm radiation with about 300 km resolution at the sun was obtained during the total eclipse of 1991. The observations indicate that spicules reach a temperature of 8000 K at 3000-4000 km above the photosphere. This temperature is lower than those of many spicule models.

  14. Transverse Motions of Chromospheric Type II Spicules Observed by the New Solar Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Yurchyshyn, V; Abramenko, V

    2012-01-01

    Using high resolution off-band \\ha\\ data from the New Solar Telescope and Morlet wavelet analysis technique, we analyzed transverse motions of type II spicules observed near the North Pole of the Sun. Our new findings are that i) some of the observed type II spicules display kink or an inverse "Y" features, suggesting that their origin may be due to magnetic reconnection, and ii) type II spicules tend to display coherent transverse motions/oscillations. Also, the wavelet analysis detected significant presence of high frequency oscillations in type II spicules, ranging from 30 to 180 s with the the average period of 90 s. We conclude that at least some of type II spicules and their coherent transverse motions may be caused by reconnection between large scale fields rooted in the intergranular lanes and and small-scale emerging dipoles, a process that is know to generate high frequency kink mode MHD waves propagating along the magnetic field lines.

  15. Generation of superDreicer electric fields in the solar chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Kronshtadtov, P. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The electric field generation at the front of the current pulse, which originates in a coronal magnetic loop owing to the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor magnetic instability at loop footpoints, has been considered. During the τA ≈ l/V A ≈ 5-25 s time (where l is the plasma plume height entering a magnetic loop as a result of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability), a disturbance related to the magnetic field tension B ϕ( r,t), "escapes" the instability region with the Alfvén velocity in this case. As a result, an electric current pulse Iz( z - V A t), at the front of which an induction magnetic field E z, which is directed along the magnetic tube axis and can therefore accelerate particles, starts propagating along a magnetic loop with a characteristic scale of Δξ ≈ l. In the case of sufficiently large currents, when B ϕ 2/8π > p, an electric current pulse propagates nonlinearly, and a relatively large longitudinal electric field originates E z ≈ 2 I z 3 V A/ c 4a2Bz 2l, which can be larger than the Dreicer field, depending on the electric current value.

  16. Photospheric, Chromospheric and Helioseismic Signatures of a Large Flare in Super-active Region NOAA 10486

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok Ambastha

    2006-06-01

    NOAA 10486 produced several powerful flares, including the 4B/X17.2 superflare of October 28, 2003/11:10 UT. This flare was extensively covered by the H and GONG instruments operated at the Udaipur Solar Observatory (USO). The central location of the active region on October 28, 2003was well-suited for the ring diagram analysis to obtain the 3-D power spectra and search for helioseismic response of this large flare on the amplitude, frequency and width of the p-modes. Further, using USO observations, we have identified the sites of new flux emergences, large proper motions and line-of-sight velocity flows in the active region and their relationship with the flare.

  17. The Connection between the Corona and Chromosphere during a Multiple Event Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirtain, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    NOAA AR 10940 (Jan 25 2007 - Feb 09 2007) rotated into view producing a CME and EIT wave, and followed by at least 27 B and C class flares as rotated across the disk. As it reached the west limb it proceeded to produce a sequence of jets and filament eruptions that were observed in unprecedented detail. I present observations from TRACE, EIT, HINODE XRT / SOT / EIS, RHESSI, GOES 12 and STEREO-A COR 1 to investigate part of the sequence of events that lead to a filament eruption and sympathetic jet at 02:30 - 03:00 02/09/07. I concentrate on the topology changes and infer that external breakout reconnection was the mechanism that lead to the removal of overlying field and subsequent filament eruption I will also discuss the instrument development activities at MSFC.

  18. The Radiated Energy Budget of Chromospheric Plasma in a Major Solar Flare Deduced From Multi-Wavelength Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Milligan, Ryan O; Dennis, Brian R; Hudson, Hugh S; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Allred, Joel C; Chamberlin, Phillip C; Ireland, Jack; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents measurements of the energy radiated by the lower solar atmosphere, at optical, UV, and EUV wavelengths, during an X-class solar flare (SOL2011-02-15T01:56) in response to an injection of energy assumed to be in the form of nonthermal electrons. Hard X-ray observations from RHESSI were used to track the evolution of the parameters of the nonthermal electron distribution to reveal the total power contained in flare accelerated electrons. By integrating over the duration of the impulsive phase, the total energy contained in the nonthermal electrons was found to be $>2\\times10^{31}$ erg. The response of the lower solar atmosphere was measured in the free-bound EUV continua of H I (Lyman), He I, and He II, plus the emission lines of He II at 304\\AA\\ and H I (Ly$\\alpha$) at 1216\\AA\\ by SDO/EVE, the UV continua at 1600\\AA\\ and 1700\\AA\\ by SDO/AIA, and the WL continuum at 4504\\AA, 5550\\AA, and 6684\\AA, along with the Ca II H line at 3968\\AA\\ using Hinode/SOT. The summed energy detected by these in...

  19. Characteristics and Evolution of the Magnetic Field and Chromospheric Emission in an Active Region Core Observed by Hinode

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    numerical model. These results rule out the possibility of low frequency impul- sive heating of monolithic loops on the spatial scales resolved in the...This also sets an upper limit on the spatial scale of coronal heat- ing in loops, whether the fundamental structures are monolithic or composed of...Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT, Delabou- diniere et al. 1995) and Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI, Scher- rer et al. 1995). The FOV of the

  20. On the Doppler Shift and Asymmetry of Stokes Profiles of Photospheric FeI and Chromospheric MgI Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Solanki 1995). Theoretical calculation (Altrock & Canfield 1974; Lites et al. 1988; Mauas et al. 1988) and observational analysis (Briand & Solanki 1998...Degenhardt, D. 1994, ApJ, 425, L113 Mauas , P. J., Avrett, E. H., & Loeser, R. 1988, ApJ, 330, 1008 Mickey, D. L. 1985, Sol. Phys., 97, 223 Rimmele

  1. Coronal vs chromospheric heating through co-spatial return currents during the 19 and 20 Jan 2005 solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaoui, Meriem; Holman, Gordon D.

    2016-05-01

    The high electron flux required to explain the bremsstrahlung X-ray emission observed from solar flares is expected to be accompanied by a neutralizing co-spatial return current. In addition to resupplying the acceleration region with electrons, this return current will both heat the coronal plasma and flatten the electron distribution at lower energies. This flattening in the electron distribution in turn flattens the X-ray spectrum. We have found that return-current collisional thick-target model (RCCTTM) of Holman (2012) provides an acceptable fit to X-ray spectra with strong breaks for 18 flares observed with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). This is a 1D model similar to the collisional thick-target model (CTTM) with two additional assumptions: (1) electrons lose some of their energy through return current losses along their path to the thick target, where they lose all their remaining energy through Coulomb collisions; (2) the non-thermal beam is streaming in a warm target, which means that electrons will be thermalized at a non-zero energy. We assume this energy to be equal to the analytical value derived by Kontar et al. 2015. We show that return-current heating in the corona is about an order of magnitude higher than the heating at the footpoints at times during the flare.

  2. Full-disk Synoptic Observations of the Chromosphere Using H$_{\\alpha}$ Telescope at the Kodaikanal Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Ravindra, B; Rangarajan, K E; Bagare, S P; Jagdev, Singh; Kemkar, P M M; Lancelot, J P; Thulasidharen, K C; Gabriel, F; Selvendran, R

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the installation and observations of a new solar telescope installed on 7th October, 2014 at the Kodaikanal Observatory. The telescope is a refractive type equipped with a tunable Lyot H$_{\\alpha}$ filter. A CCD camera of 2k$\\times$2k size makes the image of the Sun with a pixel size of 1.21$^{\\prime\\prime}$ pixel$^{-1}$ with a full field-of-view of 41$^{\\prime}$. The telescope is equipped with a guiding system which keeps the image of the Sun within a few pixels throughout the observations. The FWHM of the Lyot filter is 0.4\\AA~and the filter is motorized, capable of scanning the H$_{\\alpha}$ line profile at a smaller step size of 0.01\\AA. Partial-disk imaging covering about 10$^{\\prime}$, is also possible with the help of a relay lens kept in front of the CCD camera. In this paper, we report the detailed specifications of the telescope, filter unit, its installation, observations and the procedures we have followed to calibrate and align the data. We also present preliminary results wi...

  3. Chromospheric evaporation flows and density changes deduced from Hinode/EIS during an M1.6 flare

    CERN Document Server

    Gömöry, P; Su, Y; Temmer, M; Thalmann, J K

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed high-cadence sit-and-stare observations acquired with the Hinode/EIS spectrometer and HXR measurements acquired with RHESSI during an M-class flare. During the flare impulsive phase, we observe no significant flows in the cooler Fe XIII line but strong upflows, up to 80-150 km/s, in the hotter Fe XVI line. The largest Doppler shifts observed in the Fe XVI line were co-temporal with the sharp intensity peak. The electron density obtained from a Fe XIII line pair ratio exhibited fast increase (within two minutes) from the pre-flare level of 5.01x10^(9) cm^(-3) to 3.16x10^(10) cm^(-3) during the flare peak. The nonthermal energy flux density deposited from the coronal acceleration site to the lower atmospheric layers during the flare peak was found to be 1.34x10^(10) erg/s/cm^(2) for a low-energy cut-off that was estimated to be 16 keV. During the decline flare phase, we found a secondary intensity and density peak of lower amplitude that was preceded by upflows of 15 km/s that were detected in both ...

  4. H-alpha spectra of dynamic chromospheric processes in five well-observed X-ray flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Penn, Matthew J.; Wulser, Jean-Pierre; Kiplinger, Alan L.

    1990-01-01

    Simultaneous H-alpha and hard X-ray (HXR) spectra were obtained for five solar flares to determine the relationship of H-alpha profiles and the nonthermal part of the flare represented by the hard X-ray burst. All five flares exhibited impulsive-phase redshifted H-alpha in emission, which was temporarily and spatially associated with intense HXR emission and broad impulsive-phase H-alpha wings. A few small regions within two flares showed a blueshifted H-alpha emission which appeared only early in the impulsive phase and was temporally correlated with the HXR emission but not with broad H-alpha wings. Finally, there were both redshifted and blueshifted absorption spectra with properties fully consistent with those known for erupting and untwisting filaments.

  5. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Chromospheric Emission, Accretion Properties, and Rotation in $\\gamma$ Velorum and Chamaeleon I

    CERN Document Server

    Frasca, A; Lanzafame, A C; Alcalá, J M; Brugaletta, E; Klutsch, A; Stelzer, B; Sacco, G G; Spina, L; Jeffries, R D; Montes, D; Alfaro, E J; Barentsen, G; Bonito, R; Gameiro, J F; Lopez-Santiago, J; Pace, G; Pasquini, L; Prisinzano, L; Sousa, S G; Gilmore, G; Randich, S; Micela, G; Bragaglia, A; Flaccomio, E; Bayo, A; Costado, M T; Franciosini, E; Hill, V; Hourihane, A; Jofre', P; Lardo, C; Maiorca, E; Masseron, T; Morbidelli, L; Worley, C C

    2014-01-01

    We use the fundamental parameters delivered by the GES consortium in the first internal data release to select the members of $\\gamma$ Vel and Cha I among the UVES and GIRAFFE spectroscopic observations. A total of 140 $\\gamma$ Vel members and 74 Cha I members were studied. We calculated stellar luminosities through spectral energy distributions, while stellar masses were derived by comparison with evolutionary tracks. The spectral subtraction of low-activity and slowly rotating templates, which are rotationally broadened to match the $v\\sin i$ of the targets, enabled us to measure the equivalent widths (EWs) and the fluxes in the H$\\alpha$ and H$\\beta$ lines. The H$\\alpha$ line was also used for identifying accreting objects and for evaluating the mass accretion rate ($\\dot M_{\\rm acc}$). The distribution of $v\\sin i$ for the members of $\\gamma$ Vel displays a peak at about 10 km s$^{-1}$ with a tail toward faster rotators. There is also some indication of a different $v\\sin i$ distribution for the members o...

  6. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere VIII. "Futile" Processes in the Chromosphere (Letters to Progress in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the liquid metallic hydrogen solar model (LMHSM, the chr omosphere is the site of hydrogen condensation (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metall ic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosp here. Progr. Phys. , 2013, v. 3, L15–L21. Line emission is associated with the di ssipation of energy from condensed hydrogen structures, CHS. Previously considere d reactions resulted in hy- drogen atom or cluster addition to the site of condensation. In this work, an additional mechanism is presented, wherein atomic or molecular specie s interact with CHS, but do not deposit hydrogen. These reactions channel heat away f rom CHS, enabling them to cool even more rapidly. As a result, this new class of proce sses could complement true hydrogen condensation reactions by providing an auxil iary mechanism for the re- moval of heat. Such ‘futile’ reactions lead to the formation of activated atoms, ions, or molecules and might contribute to line emission from such sp ecies. Evidence that com- plimentary ‘futile’ reactions might be important in the chr omosphere can be extracted from lineshape analysis.

  7. Photospheric and chromospheric activity in V405 And: An M dwarf binary with components on the two sides of the full convection limit

    CERN Document Server

    Vida, K; Kővári, Zs; Korhonen, H; Bartus, J; Hurta, Zs; Posztobányi, K

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the fast rotating (P_orb=P_rot=0.465d) active dwarf binary V405 And (M0V+M5V) using photometric BV(RI)_C and optical spectroscopic data. The light variation is caused by the combined effect of spottedness and binarity with a small eclipse. From the available light and radial velocity curves we estimate the system parameters. Three flare events happened during the observations: two were found in the spectroscopic data and one was observed photometrically in BV(RI)_C colours. An interesting eruptive phenomenon emerged from the photometric measurements which can be interpreted as a series of post-flare eruptions lasting for at least 3 orbits (rotations) of the system, originating from trans-equatorial magnetic loops, which connect the active regions in the two hemispheres. The two components of V405 And have masses well over and below the theoretical limit of full convection. This rare property makes the binary an ideal target for observing and testing models for stellar dynamo action.

  8. Investigation of the Chromosphere-Corona Interface with the Upgraded Very high angular Resolution ULtraviolet Telescope (VAULT2.0) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a three-year effort to upgrade our existing sub-arcsecond Lyman-alpha telescope payload to improve the observing cadence by a factor of 2, increase the...

  9. Applying New Methods to Flare Prediction II: Realization of Methods for Photospheric Vector Magnetic Field Data and Their Extension into the Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    23 7 Interactions: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 1 Invited Lectures and...approach, along with the approach of (16) was applied to an MHD simulation of a rising flux tube (7) for which the helicity, and hence the total twist, could...Improved Virial Estimate of Solar Active Region Energy”, Astrophys. J., 636, 1151. Abstract The MHD virial theorem may be used to estimate the magnetic

  10. Evolution of chromospheres and coronae in solar mass stars - A far-ultraviolet and soft X-ray comparison of Arcturus /K2 III/ and Alpha Centauri A /G2 V/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, T. R.; Simon, T.; Linsky, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    IUE far-UV and Einstein Observatory soft X-ray observations for the red giant Arcturus and the nearby yellow dwarf Alpha-Centauri A, which are archetypes of solar mass stars in different stages of evolution, are compared. Evidence is found for neither coronal soft X-ray emission from the red giant, at surface flux levels of only 0.0006 that detected previously for the yellow dwarf, nor C II and IV resonance line emission at surface flux levels of only 0.02 those of the yellow dwarf. The resonance line upper limits and previous detections of the C II intersystem UV multiplet 0.01 near 2325 A provide evidence for an Arcturus outer atmosphere that is geometrically extended, tenuous and cool. The red giant has, in addition, a prominent cool stellar wind. An extensive tabulation of line identifications, widths and fluxes for the IUE far-UV echelle spectra of the two stars is given, and two competing explanations for the Wilson-Bappu effect are discussed.

  11. The Impulsive Phase in Solar Flares: Recent Multi-wavelength Results and their Implications for Microwave Modeling and Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2013-01-01

    This short paper reviews several recent key observations of the processes occurring in the lower atmosphere (chromosphere and photosphere) during flares. These are: evidence for compact and fragmentary structure in the flare chromosphere, the conditions in optical flare footpoints, step-like variations in the magnetic field during the flare impulsive phase, and hot, dense 'chromospheric' footpoints. The implications of these observations for microwaves are also discussed.

  12. SOHO/CDS observations of waves above the network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gömöry, P.; Rybák, J.; Kucera, A.; Curdt, W.; Wöhl, H.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze temporal variations in the intensities and the Doppler shifts of He i 584.33 Å (chromosphere), Ov 629.73 Å (transition region), and Mg ix 368.07 Å (corona) measured in and above chromospheric network near disk center with the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) onboard the Solar and Hel

  13. Chromosomes Emission of Planet Candidate Host Stars: A Way to Identify False Positives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Albrecht, Simon; Bonanno, Alfio; Faurschou Knudsen, Mads

    2016-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that the presence of closely orbiting giant planets is associated with enhanced chromospheric emission of their host stars. The main cause for such a relation would likely be enhanced dynamo action induced by the planet. We present measurements of chromospheric emission in 234 planet candidate systems from the Kepler mission. This ensemble includes 37 systems with giant-planet candidates, which show a clear emission enhancement. The enhancement, however, disappears when systems that are also identified as eclipsing binary candidates are removed from the ensemble. This suggests that a large fraction of the giant-planet candidate systems with chromospheric emission stronger than the Sun are not giant-planet systems, but false positives. Such false-positive systems could be tidally interacting binaries with strong chromospheric emission. This hypothesis is supported by an analysis of 188 eclipsing binary candidates that show increasing chromospheric emission as function of decreasing orbital period.

  14. Non-WKB Models of the FIP Effect: The Role of Slow Mode Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Laming, J Martin

    2011-01-01

    A model for element abundance fractionation between the solar chromosphere and corona is further developed. The ponderomotive force due to Alfven waves propagating through, or reflecting from the chromosphere in solar conditions generally accelerates chromospheric ions, but not neutrals, into the corona. This gives rise to what has become known as the First Ionization Potential (FIP) Effect. We incorporate new physical processes into the model. The chromospheric ionization balance is improved, and the effect of different approximations is discussed. We also treat the parametric generation of slow mode waves by the parallel propagating Alfven waves. This is also an effect of the ponderomotive force, arising from the periodic variation of the magnetic pressure driving an acoustic mode, which adds to the background longitudinal pressure. This can have subtle effects on the fractionation, rendering it quasi-mass independent in the lower regions of the chromosphere. We also briefly discuss the change in the fracti...

  15. Atmospheric Heating and Wind Acceleration in Cool Evolved Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, Vladimir S

    2014-01-01

    A chromosphere is a universal attribute of stars of spectral type later than ~F5. Evolved (K and M) giants and supergiants (including the zeta Aurigae binaries) show extended and highly turbulent chromospheres, which develop into slow massive winds. The associated continuous mass loss has a significant impact on stellar evolution, and thence on the chemical evolution of galaxies. Yet despite the fundamental importance of those winds in astrophysics, the question of their origin(s) remains unsolved. What sources heat a chromosphere? What is the role of the chromosphere in the formation of stellar winds? This chapter provides a review of the observational requirements and theoretical approaches for modeling chromospheric heating and the acceleration of winds in single cool, evolved stars and in eclipsing binary stars, including physical models that have recently been proposed. It describes the successes that have been achieved so far by invoking acoustic and MHD waves to provide a physical description of plasma...

  16. Wave heating in magnetic flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    1990-01-01

    The bright chromosphere in the quiet sun is confined to magnetic elements (flux tubes), which are located in the interior of the supergranulation cells and within the network that surrounds the cells. The paper discusses the heating of the gas in the magnetic elements of the cell interior. These intranetwork flux tubes are closely associated with bright points, which are heated by large-amplitude compressive waves with periods near the acoustic cutoff that travel outward from the photosphere and dissipate their energy in the chromosphere. The energy flux of these long-period waves appears to be sufficient for the heating of the low and middle chromosphere in the bright points.

  17. Channeling 5-min photospheric oscillations into the solar outer atmosphere through small-scale vertical magnetic flux tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Khomenko, E; Collados, M; Bueno, J Trujillo

    2008-01-01

    We report two-dimensional MHD simulations which demonstrate that photospheric 5-min oscillations can leak into the chromosphere inside small-scale vertical magnetic flux tubes. The results of our numerical experiments are compatible with those inferred from simultaneous spectropolarimetric observations of the photosphere and chromosphere obtained with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP) at 10830 A. We conclude that the efficiency of energy exchange by radiation in the solar photosphere can lead to a significant reduction of the cut-off frequency and may allow for the propagation of the 5 minutes waves vertically into the chromosphere.

  18. Dynamics of the solar atmosphere above a pore with a light bridge

    CERN Document Server

    Sobotka, M; Jurcak, J; Heinzel, P; Del Moro, D; Berrilli, F

    2013-01-01

    Context: Solar pores are small sunspots lacking penumbra with prevailing vertical magnetic field component. They can include light bridges at places with locally reduced magnetic field. Like sunspots, they exhibit a wide range of oscillatory phenomena. Aims: A large isolated pore with a light bridge (NOAA 11005) is studied to obtain characteristics of a chromospheric filamentary structure around the pore, to analyse oscillations and waves in and around the pore, and to understand the structure and brightness of the light bridge. Methods: Spectral imaging observations in the line Ca II 854.2 nm and a complementary spectropolarimetry in Fe I lines, obtained with the DST/IBIS spectrometer and HINODE/SOT spectropolarimeter, are used to measure photospheric and chromospheric velocity fields, oscillations, waves, magnetic field in the photosphere, and acoustic energy flux and radiative losses in the chromosphere. Results: The chromospheric filamentary structure around the pore has all important characteristics of a...

  19. AN ATLAS OF FAR-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA OF THE ZETA AURIGAE BINARY 31 CYGNI WITH LINE IDENTIFICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Wendy Hagen [Whitin Observatory, Wellesley College, 106 Central Street, Wellesley, MA 02481 (United States); Bennett, Philip D., E-mail: wbauer@wellesley.edu [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary' s University, Halifax, NS B3H 3C3 (Canada)

    2014-04-01

    The ζ Aurigae system 31 Cygni (K4 Ib + B4 V) was observed by the FUSE satellite during total eclipse and at three phases during chromospheric eclipse. We present the coadded, calibrated spectra and atlases with line identifications. During total eclipse, emission from high ionization states (e.g., Fe III and Cr III) shows asymmetric profiles redshifted from the systemic velocity, while emission from lower ionization states (e.g., Fe II and O I) appears more symmetric and is centered closer to the systemic velocity. Absorption from neutral and singly ionized elements is detected during chromospheric eclipse. Late in chromospheric eclipse, absorption from the K star wind is detected at a terminal velocity of ∼80 km s{sup –1}. These atlases will be useful for interpreting the far-UV spectra of other ζ Aur systems, as the observed FUSE spectra of 32 Cyg, KQ Pup, and VV Cep during chromospheric eclipse resemble that of 31 Cyg.

  20. Solar Features - Prominences and Filaments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Prominences and filaments are two manifestations of the same phenomenon. Both prominences and filaments are features formed above the chromosphere by cool dense...

  1. On the 3D Structure of the Magnetic Field in Regions of Emerging Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, A Asensio

    2010-01-01

    We explore the photospheric and chromospheric magnetic field in an emerging flux region. An image of the equivalent width of the He I 10830 A red blended component shows the presence of filamentary structures that might be interpreted as magnetic loops. We point out that the magnetic field strength in the chromosphere resembles a smoothed version of that found in the photosphere and that it is not correlated at all with the above-mentioned equivalent width map. Lacking other diagnostics, this suggests that one cannot discard the possibility that the chromospheric field we infer from the observations is tracing the lower chromosphere of the active region instead of tracing the magnetic field along loops. If the He I line is formed within magnetic loops, we point out a potential problem that appears when interpreting observations using only one component along the line-of-sight.

  2. Spectropolarimetric investigation of the propagation of magnetoacoustic waves and shock formation in sunspot atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Centeno, R; Collados, M; Bueno, Javier Trujillo; Centeno, Rebecca; Collados, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Velocity oscillations in sunspot umbrae have been measured simultaneously in two spectral lines: the photospheric Silicon I 10827 A line and the chromospheric Helium I 10830 A multiplet. From the full Stokes inversion of temporal series of spectropolarimetric observations we retrieved, among other parameters, the line of sight velocity temporal variations at photospheric and chromospheric heights. Chromospheric velocity oscillations show a three minute period with a clear sawtooth shape typical of propagating shock wave fronts. Photospheric velocity oscillations have basically a five minute period, although the power spectrum also shows a secondary peak in the three minute band which has proven to be predecessor for its chromospheric counterpart. The derived phase spectra yield a value of the atmospheric cut-off frequency around 4 mHz and give evidence for the upward propagation of higher frequency oscillation modes. The phase spectrum has been reproduced with a simple model of linear vertical propagation of ...

  3. Observations of high-frequency and high-wavenumber solar oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, D. N.; Scherrer, P. H.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    Doppler shift measurements of the Na D1 absorption line reveal solar oscillations in a new regime of frequency and wavenumber. Oscillations of vertical velocities in the temperature minimum and low chromosphere of the sun are observed with frequencies ranging up to 9.5 mHz. The fundamental modes appear with wavenumbers up to 5.33/Mm (equivalent spherical harmonic degree 3710). No evidence for chromospheric modes of 3-minute period is reported.

  4. Position of the source of particles in solar electron events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-yi; Huang, Yong-nian

    The ISEE-3 data for 51 solar electron events are analyzed and classified into Fe-rich and Fe-poor events. For Fe-rich events, the source is found to be in the high chromosphere; for the Fe-poor events, in the region between the chromosphere and corona. In both cases the source position differs from the position of the corresponding flare. A process of formation of these two types of events is proposed.

  5. Non-WKB Models of the FIP Effect: Implications for Solar Coronal Heating and the Coronal Helium and Neon Abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Laming, J Martin

    2009-01-01

    We revisit in more detail a model for element abundance fractionation in the solar chromosphere, that gives rise to the "FIP Effect" in the solar corona and wind. Elements with first ionization potential below about 10 eV, i.e. those that are predominantly ionized in the chromosphere, are enriched in the corona by a factor 3-4. We model the propagation of Alfven waves through the chromosphere using a non-WKB treatment, and evaluate the ponderomotive force associated with these waves. Under solar conditions, this is generally pointed upwards in the chromosphere, and enhances the abundance of chromospheric ions in the corona. Our new approach captures the essentials of the solar coronal abundance anomalies, including the depletion of He relative to H, and also the putative depletion of Ne, recently discussed in the literature. We also argue that the FIP effect provides the strongest evidence to date for energy fluxes of Alfven waves sufficient to heat the corona. However it appears that these waves must also be...

  6. Formation and Plasma Circulation of Solar Prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2016-05-01

    Solar prominences are long-lived cool and dense plasma curtains in the hot and rarefied outer solar atmosphere or corona. The physical mechanism responsible for their formation and especially for their internal plasma circulation has been uncertain for decades. The observed ubiquitous downflows in quiescent prominences are difficult to interpret because plasma with high conductivity seems to move across horizontal magnetic field lines. Here we present three-dimensional numerical simulations of prominence formation and evolution in an elongated magnetic flux rope as a result of in situ plasma condensations fueled by continuous plasma evaporation from the solar chromosphere. The prominence is born and maintained in a fragmented, highly dynamic state with continuous reappearance of multiple blobs and thread structures that move mainly downward, dragging along mass-loaded field lines. The circulation of prominence plasma is characterized by the dynamic balance between the drainage of prominence plasma back to the chromosphere and the formation of prominence plasma via continuous condensation. Plasma evaporates from the chromosphere, condenses into the prominence in the corona, and drains back to the chromosphere, establishing a stable chromosphere-corona plasma cycle. Synthetic images of the modeled prominence with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly closely resemble actual observations, with many dynamical threads underlying an elliptical coronal cavity.

  7. New Insights on Late-A and Early-F Star Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire Ferrero, R.; Catalano, S.; Marilli, E.; Gouttebroze, P.; Talavera, A.; Bruhweiler, F.

    The onset of chromospheric activity in late-A and early-F stars is here discussed. The detection of Ly- emission core in several A and F atars with the IUE satellite, gives evidence for the presence of chromospheric layers in these stars up to B - V = 0m.19 (Marilli et al., 1996). Semiempirical chromospheric models for Altair allowed us (Freire Ferrero et al., 1995) to explain the observed emission profiles taking into account normal H I interstellar (IS) absorption. However, due to the very high rotational velocity, we analysed alternative hypotheses to explain the observed emissions: (1) circumstellar or shell matter; (2) co-rotating expanding optically thin wind. We ruled out these hypotheses because their effects are negligible and as a consequence, this result reinforces the chromospheric origin of the observed Ly- core in Altair. The stars of our sample, having observed Ly- profilies similar to Altair's and similar stellar and IS properties, should reproduce similar chromospheric behaviour. Here we discuss several important questions that are raised by these results.

  8. BIDIRECTIONAL OUTFLOWS AS EVIDENCE OF MAGNETIC RECONNECTION LEADING TO A SOLAR MICROFLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jie; Ding, M. D.; Li, Ying; Yang, Kai; Cheng, Xin; Fang, Cheng [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Chen, Feng [Max-Plank-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, D-37077, Göttingen (Germany); Cao, Wenda, E-mail: dmd@nju.edu.cn [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314-9672 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    Magnetic reconnection is a rapid energy release process that is believed to be responsible for flares on the Sun and stars. Nevertheless, such flare-related reconnection is mostly detected to occur in the corona, while there have been few studies concerning the reconnection in the chromosphere or photosphere. Here, we present both spectroscopic and imaging observations of magnetic reconnection in the chromosphere leading to a microflare. During the flare peak time, chromospheric line profiles show significant blueshifted/redshifted components on the two sides of the flaring site, corresponding to upflows and downflows with velocities of ±(70–80) km s{sup −1}, comparable with the local Alfvén speed as expected by the reconnection in the chromosphere. The three-dimensional nonlinear force-free field configuration further discloses twisted field lines (a flux rope) at a low altitude, cospatial with the dark threads in He i 10830 Å images. The instability of the flux rope may initiate the flare-related reconnection. These observations provide clear evidence of magnetic reconnection in the chromosphere and show the similar mechanisms of a microflare to those of major flares.

  9. The challenges of the models of solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, A. V.; Zaitsev, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    The challenges of `standard' model of solar flares motivated by new observations with the spacecrafts and ground-based telescopes are presented. The most important problems are in situ heating of photospheric and chromospheric loop footpoints up to the coronal temperatures without precipitating particle beams accelerated in the corona, and the sunquakes which are unlikely to be explained by the impact of highenergy particles producing hard X-ray emission. There is also the long-standing `number problem' in the physics of solar flares. It is shown that modern observations favored an important role of the electric currents in the energy release processes in the low solar atmosphere. Particle acceleration mechanism in the electric fields driven by the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the chromosphere is proposed. The electric current value I ≥ 1010 A, needed for the excitation of super-Dreicer electric fields in the chromosphere is determined. It is shown that both Joule dissipation of the electric currents and the particles accelerated in the chromosphere can be responsible for in situ heating of the low solar atmosphere. Alternative model of the solar flare based on the analogy between the flaring loop and an equivalent electric circuit which is good tool for the electric current diagnostics is presented. Interaction of a current-carrying loop with the partially-ionized plasma of prominence in the context of particle acceleration is considered. The role of plasma radiation mechanism in the sub-THz emission from the chromosphere is discussed.

  10. He I vector magnetic field maps of a sunspot and its superpenumbral fine-structure

    CERN Document Server

    Schad, T A; Lin, H; Tritschler, A

    2015-01-01

    Advanced inversions of high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of the He I triplet at 1083 nm are used to generate unique maps of the chromospheric magnetic field vector across a sunspot and its superpenumbral canopy. The observations were acquired by the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) on 29 January 2012. Multiple atmospheric models are employed in the inversions, as superpenumbral Stokes profiles are dominated by atomic-level polarization while sunspot profiles are Zeeman-dominated but also exhibit signatures perhaps induced by symmetry breaking effects of the radiation field incident on the chromospheric material. We derive the equilibrium magnetic structure of a sunspot in the chromosphere, and further show that the superpenumbral magnetic field does not appear finely structured, unlike the observed intensity structure. This suggests fibrils are not concentrations of magnetic flux but rather distinguished by individualized thermalization. We also dire...

  11. Clasp/SJ Observation of Time Variations of Lyman-Alpha Emissions in a Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, S.; Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Kano, R.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Bando, T.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Auchere, F.

    2016-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding rocket experiment launched on September 3, 2015 to investigate the solar chromosphere, and the slit-jaw (SJ) optical system took Lya images with the high time cadence of 0.6 s. By the CLASP/SJ observation, many time variations in the solar chromosphere with the time scale of time variations and relation to the coronal structure observed by SDO/AIA. We compared the Ly(alpha) time variations at footpoints of coronal magnetic fields observed by AIA 211 Å (approx.2 MK) and AIA 171 Å (0.6 MK), and non-loop regions. As the result, we found the time variations had more in the footpoint regions. On the other hand, the time variations had no dependency on the temperature of the loop.

  12. A Correlation Between Stellar Activity and the Surface Gravity of Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, Joel D

    2010-01-01

    Recently Knutson et al. (2010) have demonstrated a correlation between the presence of temperature inversions in the atmospheres of hot Jupiters, and the chromospheric activity levels of the host stars. Here we show that there is also a correlation, with greater than 99.5% confidence, between the surface gravity of hot Jupiters and the activity levels of the host stars, such that high surface gravity planets tend be found around high activity stars. We also find a less significant positive correlation between planet mass and chromospheric activity, but no significant correlation is seen between planet radius and chromospheric activity. We consider the possibility that this may be due to an observational bias against detecting lower mass planets around higher activity stars, but conclude that this bias is only likely to affect the detection of planets much smaller than those considered here. Finally, we speculate on physical origins for the correlation, including the possibility that the effect of stellar inso...

  13. Magnetic structure of an activated filament in a flaring active region

    CERN Document Server

    Sasso, C; Solanki, S K

    2013-01-01

    While the magnetic field in quiescent prominences has been widely investigated, less is known about the field in activated prominences. We introduce observational results on the magnetic field structure of an activated filament in a flaring active region. We study, in particular, its magnetic structure and line-of-sight flows during its early activated phase, shortly before it displays signs of rotation. We invert the Stokes profiles of the chromospheric He I 10830 A triplet and the photospheric Si I 10827 A line observed in this filament by the VTT on Tenerife. Using these inversion results we present and interpret the first maps of velocity and magnetic field obtained in an activated filament, both in the photosphere and the chromosphere. Up to 5 different magnetic components are found in the chromospheric layers of the filament, while outside the filament a single component is sufficient to reproduce the observations. Magnetic components displaying an upflow are preferentially located towards the centre of...

  14. Numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection in the lower solar atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yan Xu; Cheng Fang; Ming-De Ding; Dan-Hui Gao

    2011-01-01

    Observations indicate that Ellerman bombs (EBs) and chromospheric microflares both occur in the lower solar atmosphere, and share many common features,such as temperature enhancements, accompanying jet-like mass motions, short lifetime, and so on. These strongly suggest that EBs and chromospheric microflares could both probably be induced by magnetic reconnection in the lower solar atmosphere.With gravity, ionization and radiation considered, we perform two-dimensional numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection in the lower solar atmosphere. The influence of different parameters, such as intensity of the magnetic field and anomalous resistivity, on the results are investigated. Our result demonstrates that the temperature increases are mainly due to the joule dissipation caused by magnetic reconnection.The spectral profiles of EBs and chromospheric microflares are calculated with the non-LTE radiative transfer theory and compared with observations. It is found that the typical features of the two phenomena can be qualitatively reproduced.

  15. Observations of the forward scattering Hanle effect in the Ca i 4227 {\\AA} line

    CERN Document Server

    Bianda, M; Anusha, L S; Stenflo, J O; Nagendra, K N; Holzreuter, R; Sampoorna, M; Frisch, H; Smitha, H N

    2011-01-01

    Chromospheric magnetic fields are notoriously diffcult to measure. The chromospheric lines are broad, while the fields are producing a minuscule Zeeman-effect polarization. A promising diagnostic alternative is provided by the forward-scattering Hanle effect, which can be recorded in chromospheric lines such as the He i 10830 {\\AA} and the Ca i 4227 {\\AA} lines. We present a set of spectropolarimetric observations of the full Stokes vector obtained near the center of the solar disk in the Ca i 4227 {\\AA} line with the ZIMPOL polarimeter at the IRSOL observatory.We detect a number of interesting forward-scattering Hanle effect signatures, which we model successfully using polarized radiative transfer. Here we focus on the observational aspects, while a separate companion paper deals with the theoretical modeling.

  16. ALMA observations of alpha Centauri: First detection of main-sequence stars at 3mm wavelength

    CERN Document Server

    Liseau, R; Bayo, A; Bertone, E; Black, J H; del Burgo, C; Chavez, M; Danchi, W; De la Luz, V; Eiroa, C; Ertel, S; Fridlund, M C W; Justtanont, K; Krivov, A; Marshall, J P; Mora, A; Montesinos, B; Nyman, L -A; Olofsson, G; Sanz-Forcada, J; Thebault, P; White, G J

    2014-01-01

    The precise mechanisms that provide the non-radiative energy for heating the chromosphere and the corona of the Sun and those of other stars constitute an active field of research. By studying stellar chromospheres one aims at identifying the relevant physical processes. Defining the permittable extent of the parameter space can also serve as a template for the Sun-as-a-star. Earlier observations with Herschel and APEX have revealed the temperature minimum of alpha Cen, but these were unable to spatially resolve the binary into individual components. With the data reported here, we aim at remedying this shortcoming. Furthermore, these earlier data were limited to the wavelength region between 100 and 870mu. In the present context, we intend to extend the spectral mapping to longer wavelengths, where the contrast between stellar photospheric and chromospheric emission becomes increasingly evident. ALMA is particularly suited to point sources, such as unresolved stars. ALMA provides the means to achieve our obj...

  17. A Unified Picture of the FIP and Inverse FIP Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Laming, J M

    2004-01-01

    We discuss models for coronal abundance anomalies observed in the coronae of the sun and other late-type stars following a scenario first introduced by Schwadron, Fisk & Zurbuchen of the interaction of waves at loop footpoints with the partially neutral gas. Instead of considering wave heating of ions in this location, we explore the effects on the upper chromospheric plasma of the wave ponderomotive forces. These can arise as upward propagating waves from the chromosphere transmit or reflect upon reaching the chromosphere-corona boundary, and are in large part determined by the properties of the coronal loop above. Our scenario has the advantage that for realistic wave energy densities, both positive and negative changes in the abundance of ionized species compared to neutrals can result, allowing both FIP and Inverse FIP effects to come out of the model. We discuss how variations in model parameters can account for essentially all of the abundance anomalies observed in solar spectra. Expected variations...

  18. Wave propagation and shock formation in different magnetic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Centeno, Rebecca; Bueno, Javier Trujillo

    2008-01-01

    Velocity oscillations "measured" simultaneously at the photosphere and the chromosphere -from time series of spectropolarimetric data in the 10830 A region- of different solar magnetic features allow us to study the properties of wave propagation as a function of the magnetic flux of the structure (i.e. two different-sized sunspots, a tiny pore and a facular region). While photospheric oscillations have similar characteristics everywhere, oscillations measured at chromospheric heights show different amplitudes, frequencies and stages of shock development depending on the observed magnetic feature. The analysis of the power and the phase spectra, together with simple theoretical modeling, lead to a series of results concerning wave propagation within the range of heights of this study. We find that, while the atmospheric cut-off frequency and the propagation properties of the different oscillating modes depend on the magnetic feature, in all the cases the power that reaches the high chromosphere above the atmo...

  19. Transient behavior of a flare-associated solar wind. I - Gas dynamics in a radial open field region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, F.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical investigation is conducted into the way in which a solar wind model initially satisfying both steady state and energy balance conditions is disturbed and deformed, under the assumption of heating that correspoonds to the energy release of solar flares of an importance value of approximately 1 which occur in radial open field regions. Flare-associated solar wind transient behavior is modeled for 1-8 solar radii. The coronal temperature around the heat source region rises, and a large thermal conductive flux flows inward to the chromosphere and outward to interplanetary space along field lines. The speed of the front of expanding chromospheric material generated by the impingement of the conduction front on the upper chromosphere exceeds the local sound velocity in a few minutes and eventually exceeds 100 million cm/sec.

  20. Intercalibration of the hard X-ray spectrometers on the PVO and ICE (ISEE-3) spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, S. R.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Fenimore, E. E.; Laros, J. G.

    1988-01-01

    The energetic photon spectrometers aboard the ICE and PVO (Pioneer Venus Orbiter) are described briefly, and the procedure for their in-flight calibrations is discussed. Successful intercalibration of these two instruments led to stereoscopic observations of 100 keV-2 MeV photon sources in solar flares and the study of the directivity and height structure of these sources. The impulsive hard X-ray source is found to extend from the chromosphere to the corona, the brightness of the source decreasing rapidly with increase in height above the chromosphere. The analysis so far indicates no systematic directivity for the hard X-ray source. The observations are consistent with energetic electrons accelerated in the corona propagating downward toward the chromosphere. However, when avaraged over the duration of an impulsive hard X-ray flare, the 'beaming' of electrons is found to be small in most flares.

  1. Spectro-Polarimetric Properties of Small-Scale Plasma Eruptions Driven by Magnetic Vortex Tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Kitiashvili, Irina N

    2014-01-01

    Highly turbulent nature of convection on the Sun causes strong multi-scale interaction of subsurface layers with the photosphere and chromosphere. According to realistic 3D radiative MHD numerical simulations ubiquitous small-scale vortex tubes are generated by turbulent flows below the visible surface and concentrated in the intergranular lanes. The vortex tubes can capture and amplify magnetic field, penetrate into chromospheric layers and initiate quasi-periodic flow eruptions that generates Alfv\\'enic waves, transport mass and energy into the solar atmosphere. The simulations revealed high-speed flow patterns, and complicated thermodynamic and magnetic structures in the erupting vortex tubes. The spontaneous eruptions are initiated and driven by strong pressure gradients in the near-surface layers, and accelerated by the Lorentz force in the low chromosphere. In this paper, the simulation data are used to further investigate the dynamics of the eruptions, their spectro-polarimetric characteristics for the...

  2. Experimental Estimation of CLASP Spatial and Spectral Resolutions: Results of the Instrument's Optical Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giono, G.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ishikawa, R.; Narukage, N.; Bando, T.; Kano, R.; Suematsu, Y.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Auchere, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter is a sounding rocket experiment design to measure for the first time the polarization signal of the Lyman-Alpha line (121.6nm), emitted in the solar upper-chromosphere and transition region. This instrument aims to detect the Hanle effect's signature hidden in the Ly-alpha polarization, as a tool to probe the chromospheric magnetic field. Hence, an unprecedented polarization accuracy is needed ((is) less than 10 (exp -3). Nevertheless, spatial and spectral resolutions are also crucial to observe chhromospheric feature such as spicules, and to have precise measurement of the Ly-alpha line core and wings. Hence, this poster will present how the telescope and the spectrograph were separately aligned, and their combined spatial and spectral resolutions.

  3. Predictability of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, Peter; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2009-05-01

    Solar flares are significant drivers of space weather. With the availability of high cadence solar chromospheric and photospheric data from the USAF's Optical Solar PAtrol Network (OSPAN; photosphere and chromosphere imaging) Telescope and the Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG; photosphere magnetic imaging), at the National Solar Observatory, we have gained insights into potential uses of the data for solar flare prediction. We apply the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to parameterize the flaring system and extract consistent observables at solar chromospheric and photospheric layers that indicate a viable recognition of flaring activity. Rather than limiting ourselves to a few known indicators of solar activity, PCA helps us to characterize the entire system using several tens of variables for each observed layer. The components of the Eigen vectors derived from PCA help us recognize and quantify innate characteristics of solar flares and compare them. We will present an analysis of these results to explore the viability of PCA to assist in predicting solar flares.

  4. Radiative accretion shocks along nonuniform stellar magnetic fields in classical T Tauri stars

    CERN Document Server

    Orlando, S; Argiroffi, C; Reale, F; Peres, G; Miceli, M; Matsakos, T; Stehle', C; Ibgui, L; de Sa, L; Chie`ze, J P; Lanz, T

    2013-01-01

    (abridged) AIMS. We investigate the dynamics and stability of post-shock plasma streaming along nonuniform stellar magnetic fields at the impact region of accretion columns. We study how the magnetic field configuration and strength determine the structure, geometry, and location of the shock-heated plasma. METHODS. We model the impact of an accretion stream onto the chromosphere of a CTTS by 2D axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Our model takes into account the gravity, the radiative cooling, and the magnetic-field-oriented thermal conduction. RESULTS. The structure, stability, and location of the shocked plasma strongly depend on the configuration and strength of the magnetic field. For weak magnetic fields, a large component of B may develop perpendicular to the stream at the base of the accretion column, limiting the sinking of the shocked plasma into the chromosphere. An envelope of dense and cold chromospheric material may also develop around the shocked column. For strong magnetic fields, th...

  5. Magnetoacoustic Waves in the Solar Stratified Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑惠南; 王水; 吴式灿; 李波

    2001-01-01

    The propagation of magnetoacoustic waves in the solar atmosphere consisting of the photosphere, chromosphere and corona has been studied numerically by time-dependent multi-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation. Pressure disturbances are introduced at the bottom of the chromosphere and at the bottom of the corona, respectively. The computational results show that incurred fast and slow MHD waves propagate away from the source of the disturbances. The fast MHD wave propagates as an expansive wave in the radial direction, while the slow one steepens and it may evolve into a slow shock. We suggest that the extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope wave observed by the SOHO and Moreton wave are a fast MHD wave propagating in the corona and in the chromosphere, respectively.

  6. Sequential Chomospheric Brightening: An Automated Approach to Extracting Physics from Ephemeral Brightening

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, Michael S; Jackiewicz, Jason; McAteer, R T James; McNamara, Bernie J

    2012-01-01

    We make a comparison between small scale chromospheric brightenings and energy release processes through examining the temporal evolution of sequential chromospheric brightenings (SCBs), derive propagation velocities, and propose a connection of the small-scale features to solar flares. Our automated routine detects and distinguishes three separate types of brightening regularly observed in the chromosphere: plage, flare ribbon, and point brightenings. By studying their distinct dynamics, we separate out the flare-associated bright points commonly known as SCBs and identify a propagating Moreton wave. Superimposing our detections on complementary off-band images, we extract a Doppler velocity measurement beneath the point brightening locations. Using these dynamic measurements, we put forward a connection between point brightenings, the erupting flare, and overarching magnetic loops. A destabilization of the pre-flare loop topology by the erupting flare directly leads to the SCBs observed.

  7. Small-scale dynamo magnetism as the driver for heating the solar atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, Tahar; Luciani, Jean-François; Aly, Jean-Jacques

    2015-06-11

    The long-standing problem of how the solar atmosphere is heated has been addressed by many theoretical studies, which have stressed the relevance of two specific mechanisms, involving magnetic reconnection and waves, as well as the necessity of treating the chromosphere and corona together. But a fully consistent model has not yet been constructed and debate continues, in particular about the possibility of coronal plasma being heated by energetic phenomena observed in the chromosphere. Here we report modelling of the heating of the quiet Sun, in which magnetic fields are generated by a subphotospheric fluid dynamo intrinsically connected to granulation. We find that the fields expand into the chromosphere, where plasma is heated at the rate required to match observations (4,500 watts per square metre) by small-scale eruptions that release magnetic energy and drive sonic motions. Some energetic eruptions can even reach heights of 10 million metres above the surface of the Sun, thereby affecting the very low corona. Extending the model by also taking into account the vertical weak network magnetic field allows for the existence of a mechanism able to heat the corona above, while leaving unchanged the physics of chromospheric eruptions. Such a mechanism rests on the eventual dissipation of Alfvén waves generated inside the chromosphere and that carry upwards the required energy flux of 300 watts per square metre. The model shows a topologically complex magnetic field of 160 gauss on the Sun's surface, agreeing with inferences obtained from spectropolarimetric observations, chromospheric features (contributing only weakly to the coronal heating) that can be identified with observed spicules and blinkers, and vortices that may be possibly associated with observed solar tornadoes.

  8. Kink waves in an active region dynamic fibril

    CERN Document Server

    Pietarila, A; Hirzberger, J; Solanki, S K

    2011-01-01

    We present high spatial and temporal resolution Ca II 8542 observations of a kink wave in an on-disk chromospheric active region fibril. The properties of the wave are similar to those observed in off-limb spicules. From the observed phase and period of the wave we determine a lower limit for the field strength in the chromospheric active region fibril located at the edge of a sunspot to be a few hundred Gauss. We find indications that the event was triggered by a small-scale reconnection event higher up in the atmosphere.

  9. Kink Waves in an Active Region Dynamic Fibril

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietarila, A.; Aznar Cuadrado, R.; Hirzberger, J.; Solanki, S. K.

    2011-10-01

    We present high spatial and temporal resolution Ca II 8542 Å observations of a kink wave in an on-disk chromospheric active region fibril. The properties of the wave are similar to those observed in off-limb spicules. From the observed phase and period of the wave we determine a lower limit for the field strength in the chromospheric active region fibril located at the edge of a sunspot to be a few hundred gauss. We find indications that the event was triggered by a small-scale reconnection event higher up in the atmosphere.

  10. Continuum and line emission of flares on red dwarf stars: origin of the blue continuum radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Morchenko, E S

    2016-01-01

    There are two types of models that explain the appearance of the blue continuum radiation during the impulsive phase of stellar flares. Grinin and Sobolev (Astrophysics, vol. 13, 348, 1977) argue that this component of the optical continuum is formed in "the transition layer between the chromosphere and the photosphere". Katsova et al. (Astrophysics, vol. 17, 156, 1981) have "raised" the source of the white-light continuum up to the dense region in the perturbed chromosphere. In the present contribution (the main paper was submitted to journal "Astrophysics"), we show that the statement by Katsova et al. is erroneous.

  11. A Quasi-One-Dimensional Model for a Solar Flux Tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨志良; 张洪起; 张枚; 冯学尚

    2002-01-01

    We develop the quasi-one-dimensional flux tube model with magnetohydrodynamical equations. In order to know whether the magnetic field can maintain their similar structurefrom photosphere to chromosphere, we suppose that the flux tube is thin in radius relative to the length, and that the quantities in the cross section are averaged.The radii of the flux tube and the magnetic field are numerically simulated. One of the important results shows that the flux tube does not expand as quickly as the existing model when it is out of the photosphere with high velocity. This is consistent with observations of the magnetic field in the photosphere and chromosphere.

  12. Empirical studies of solar flares: Comparison of X-ray and H alpha filtergrams and analysis of the energy balance of the X-ray plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The physics of solar flares was investigated through a combined analysis of X-ray filtergrams of the high temperature coronal component of flares and H alpha filtergrams of the low temperature chromospheric component. The data were used to study the magnetic field configuration and its changes in solar flares, and to examine the chromospheric location and structure of X-ray bright points (XPB) and XPB flares. Each topic and the germane data are discussed. The energy balance of the thermal X-ray plasma in flares, while not studied, is addressed.

  13. Coordinated soft X-ray and H-alpha observation of solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarro, D. M.; Canfield, R. C.; Metcalf, T. R.; Lemen, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Soft X-ray, Ca XIX, and H-alpha observations obtained for a set of four solar flares in the impulsive phase are analyzed. A blue asymmetry was observed in the coronal Ca XIX line during the soft-Xray rise phase in all of the events. A red asymmetry was observed simultaneously in chromospheric H-alpha at spatial locations associated with enhanced flare heating. It is shown that the impulsive phase momentum of upflowing soft X-ray plasma equalled that of the downflowing H-alpha plasma to within an order of magnitude. This supports the explosive chromospheric evaporation model of solar flares.

  14. Mode transformation and frequency change with height in 3D numerical simulations of magneto-acoustic wave propagation in sunspots

    CERN Document Server

    Felipe, T; Collados, M

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of magnetoacoustic wave propagation are performed in a sunspot atmosphere with a computational domain covering from the photosphere to the chromosphere. The wave source, with properties resembling the solar spectrum, is located at different distances from the axis of the sunspot for each simulation. These results are compared with the theory of mode transformation and also with observational features. Simulations show that the dominant oscillation frequency in the chromosphere decreases with the radial distance from the sunspot axis. The energy flux of the different wave modes involved, including de Alfv\\'en mode, is evaluated and discussed.

  15. Energy balance in the solar transition region. II - Effects of pressure and energy input on hydrostatic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenla, J. M.; Avrett, E. H.; Loeser, R.

    1991-01-01

    The radiation of energy by hydrogen lines and continua in hydrostatic energy-balance models of the transition region between the solar chromosphere and corona is studied using models which assume that mechanical or magnetic energy is dissipated in the hot corona and is then transported toward the chromosphere down the steep temperature gradient of the transition region. These models explain the average quiet sun and also the entire range of variability of the Ly-alpha lines. The relations between the downward energy flux, the pressure of the transition region, and the different hydrogen emission are described.

  16. Electric Current Equilibrium in the Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Filippov, Boris

    2013-01-01

    A hyperbolic flux-tube configuration containing a null point below the flux rope is considered as a pre-eruptive state of coronal mass ejections that start simultaneously with flares. We demonstrate that this configuration is unstable and cannot exist for a long time in the solar corona. The inference follows from general equilibrium conditions and from analyzing simple models of the flux-rope equilibrium. A direct consequence of the stable flux-rope equilibrium in the corona are separatrices in the horizontal-field distribution in the chromosphere. They can be recognized as specific "herring-bone structures" in a chromospheric fibril pattern.

  17. Electric Current Equilibrium in the Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, Boris

    2013-04-01

    A hyperbolic flux-tube configuration containing a null point below the flux rope is considered as a pre-eruptive state of coronal mass ejections that start simultaneously with flares. We demonstrate that this configuration is unstable and cannot exist for a long time in the solar corona. The inference follows from general equilibrium conditions and from analyzing simple models of the flux-rope equilibrium. A direct consequence of the stable flux-rope equilibrium in the corona are separatrices in the horizontal-field distribution in the chromosphere. They can be recognized as specific "herring-bone structures" in a chromospheric fibril pattern.

  18. CaII Κ Imaging to Understand UV Irradiance Variability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Kariyappa

    2000-09-01

    To identify and understand the underlying physical mechanisms of total solar and UV irradiance variability and to estimate the contribution of various chromospheric features to UV irradiance, detailed analysis of spatially resolved data is required. The various chromospheric features have been segregated and different parameters have been derived from CaII Κ Spectroheliograms of NSO/Sac Peak and Kodaikanal Observatory and compared with UV irradiance flux measured in MgII h and k lines by NOAA 9 satellite. The important results of this detailed analysis of CaII Κ Images of 1992 together with UV irradiance data will be discussed in this paper.

  19. 13CO mapping study for massive molecular cloud cores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Yuefang

    2001-01-01

    [1] Zirin, H., Astrophysics of the Sun, Chapter 7, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988.[2] Shine, R. A., Linsky, J. L., Physical properties of solar chromospheric plages II. Chromospheric plage models, Solar Phys., 1974, 39: 49.[3] Kelch, W. L., Linsky, J. L., Physical properties of solar chromospheric plages III. Models based on CaII and MgII observations, Solar Phys., 1978, 58: 37.[4] Lemaire, P., Goutlebroze, J. C., Vial, J. C. et al., Physical properties of the solar chromosphere deduced from optically thick lines, A & A, 1981, 103: 160.[5] Fontenla, J. M., Avrett, E. H., Loeser, R., Energy balance in the solar transition region II. Effects of pressure and energy input on hydrostatic models, ApJ, 1991, 377: 712.[6] Fontenla, J. M., Avrett, E. H., Loeser, R., Energy balance in the solar transition region III. Helium emission in hydrostatic, constant-abundance models with diffusion, ApJ, 1993, 406: 319.[7] Pierce, A. K., Slaughter, C., Solar limb darkening I: λλ(30337297), Solar Phys., 1977, 51: 25.[8] Pierce, A. K., Slaughter, C., Weinberger, D., Solar limb darkening in the interval 740424018*!, II, Solar Phys., 1977, 52: 179.[9] Nechel, H., Labs, D., The solar radiation between 3300 and 12500*!, Solar Phys., 1984, 90: 205.[10] Vernazza, J. E., Avrett, E. H., Loeser, R., Structure of the solar chromosphere I. Basic computations and summary of the results, ApJ, 1973, 184: 605.[11] Mihalas, D., Stellar Atmospheres, San Francisco: W. H. Freeman and Company, 1978.[12] Fang, C., Hnoux, J. -C., Self-consistent model of flare heated solar chromosphere, A & A, 1983, 118: 139.[13] Ding, M. D., Fang, C., A semi-empirical model of sunspot penumbra, A & A, 1989, 225: 204.[14] Vernazza, J. E., Avrett, E. H., Loeser, R., Structure of the solar chromosphere III. Models of the EUV brightness components of the quiet Sun, ApJ Suppl., 1981, 45: 635.[15] Canfield, R. C., Athey, R

  20. Semi-empirical model of solar plages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG; Cheng

    2001-01-01

    [1] Zirin, H., Astrophysics of the Sun, Chapter 7, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988.[2] Shine, R. A., Linsky, J. L., Physical properties of solar chromospheric plages II. Chromospheric plage models, Solar Phys., 1974, 39: 49.[3] Kelch, W. L., Linsky, J. L., Physical properties of solar chromospheric plages III. Models based on CaII and MgII observations, Solar Phys., 1978, 58: 37.[4] Lemaire, P., Goutlebroze, J. C., Vial, J. C. et al., Physical properties of the solar chromosphere deduced from optically thick lines, A & A, 1981, 103: 160.[5] Fontenla, J. M., Avrett, E. H., Loeser, R., Energy balance in the solar transition region II. Effects of pressure and energy input on hydrostatic models, ApJ, 1991, 377: 712.[6] Fontenla, J. M., Avrett, E. H., Loeser, R., Energy balance in the solar transition region III. Helium emission in hydrostatic, constant-abundance models with diffusion, ApJ, 1993, 406: 319.[7] Pierce, A. K., Slaughter, C., Solar limb darkening I: λλ(30337297), Solar Phys., 1977, 51: 25.[8] Pierce, A. K., Slaughter, C., Weinberger, D., Solar limb darkening in the interval 740424018*!, II, Solar Phys., 1977, 52: 179.[9] Nechel, H., Labs, D., The solar radiation between 3300 and 12500*!, Solar Phys., 1984, 90: 205.[10] Vernazza, J. E., Avrett, E. H., Loeser, R., Structure of the solar chromosphere I. Basic computations and summary of the results, ApJ, 1973, 184: 605.[11] Mihalas, D., Stellar Atmospheres, San Francisco: W. H. Freeman and Company, 1978.[12] Fang, C., Hnoux, J. -C., Self-consistent model of flare heated solar chromosphere, A & A, 1983, 118: 139.[13] Ding, M. D., Fang, C., A semi-empirical model of sunspot penumbra, A & A, 1989, 225: 204.[14] Vernazza, J. E., Avrett, E. H., Loeser, R., Structure of the solar chromosphere III. Models of the EUV brightness components of the quiet Sun, ApJ Suppl., 1981, 45: 635.[15] Canfield, R. C., Athey, R

  1. TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF MULTIPLE EVAPORATING RIBBON SOURCES IN A SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, D. R.; Cauzzi, G., E-mail: dgraham@arcetri.astro.it [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2015-07-10

    We present new results from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) showing the dynamic evolution of chromospheric evaporation and condensation in a flare ribbon, with the highest temporal and spatial resolution to date. IRIS observed the entire impulsive phase of the X-class flare SOL2014-09-10T17:45 using a 9.4 s cadence “sit-and-stare” mode. As the ribbon brightened successively at new positions along the slit, a unique impulsive phase evolution was observed for many tens of individual pixels in both coronal and chromospheric lines. Each activation of a new footpoint displays the same initial coronal upflows of up to ∼300 km s{sup −1} and chromospheric downflows up to 40 km s{sup −1}. Although the coronal flows can be delayed by over 1 minute with respect to those in the chromosphere, the temporal evolution of flows is strikingly similar between all pixels and consistent with predictions from hydrodynamic flare models. Given the large sample of independent footpoints, we conclude that each flaring pixel can be considered a prototypical, “elementary” flare kernel.

  2. Photospheric Origin of Three-minute Oscillations in a Sunspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jongchul; Lee, Jeongwoo; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Song, Donguk; Cho, Kyungsuk; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2017-02-01

    The origin of the three-minute oscillations of intensity and velocity observed in the chromosphere of sunspot umbrae is still unclear. We investigated the spatio-spectral properties of the 3 minute oscillations of velocity in the photosphere of a sunspot umbra as well as those in the low chromosphere using the spectral data of the Ni i λ5436, Fe i λ5435, and Na i D2 λ5890 lines taken by the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. As a result, we found a local enhancement of the 3 minute oscillation power in the vicinities of a light bridge (LB) and numerous umbral dots (UDs) in the photosphere. These 3 minute oscillations occurred independently of the 5 minute oscillations. Through wavelet analysis, we determined the amplitudes and phases of the 3 minute oscillations at the formation heights of the spectral lines, and they were found to be consistent with the upwardly propagating slow magnetoacoustic waves in the photosphere with energy flux large enough to explain the chromospheric oscillations. Our results suggest that the 3 minute chromospheric oscillations in this sunspot may have been generated by magnetoconvection occurring in the LB and UDs.

  3. Spectral response of the solar atmosphere to an X-class flare event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacatus, Daniela Adriana; Donea, Alina

    2016-05-01

    The only X-class flare of 2015 observed by IRIS occurred at 16:22 UT on 11 March 2015, in AR 12297. This flare generated significant seismic transients in the photosphere at the eastern location of the flare. IRIS observations of the chromosphere and transition region help us understand the physics of the sunquake. In this work we will analyse this event using data from IRIS, SDO, and RHESSI. The IRIS rasters scanned the area between the main footpoints of the solar flare, and a wealth of chromospheric information has been inferred about the dynamics of the event. The main X-ray emission dominates the eastern flare footpoint, being missed by the IRIS slit. Significant enhancements in the chromospheric and TR lines intensities were identified. The forbidden line of Fe XXI 1354.1 Å is detected after the flare peak revealing the coronal responses to the flare. Plasma downflows of up to 300 km/s were identified in the majority of the observed lines, consistent with magnetic field local reconfiguration. We have also analysed an erupting filament developing at an earlier time, which moved rapidly towards the eastern part of the active region. We discuss the possibility that this filament might have pre-conditioned the chromosphere for the flare process.

  4. The lower solar atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    This "rapporteur" report discusses the solar photosphere and low chromosphere in the context of chemical composition studies. The highly dynamical nature of the photosphere does not seem to jeopardize precise determination of solar abundances in classical fashion. It is still an open question how th

  5. Non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization in 2D simulations of the solar atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenaarts, J.; Carlsson, M.; Hansteen, V.; Rutten, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Context: The ionization of hydrogen in the solar chromosphere and transition region does not obey LTE or instantaneous statistical equilibrium because the timescale is long compared with important hydrodynamical timescales, especially of magneto-acoustic shocks. Since the pressure, temperature, and

  6. Atmospheric Models of Flare Stars The Quiescent State of Ad Leo

    CERN Document Server

    Mauas, P

    1994-01-01

    We compute a semi-empirical atmospheric model for the dMe star AD Leo, which constitutes the first model computed to match the continuum observations, as well as a wide set of chromospheric spectral lines. We find good agreement between the computed and observed spectral features, with the exception of the Ca II K line.

  7. Internetwork dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    This review places current research in quiet-Sun chromospheric dynamics in the context of past and future work, concentrating on observational aspects of three-minute oscillations and Ca II K2V grains. The subject is of interest at present because observations and simulations come together to permit

  8. PROPERTIES OF UMBRAL DOTS AS MEASURED FROM THE NEW SOLAR TELESCOPE DATA AND MHD SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilcik, A.; Yurchyshyn, V. B.; Abramenko, V.; Goode, P. R.; Cao, W. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States); Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Kitai, R.; Watanabe, H. [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto 607-8417 (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    We studied bright umbral dots (UDs) detected in a moderate size sunspot and compared their statistical properties to recent MHD models. The study is based on high-resolution data recorded by the New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory and three-dimensional (3D) MHD simulations of sunspots. Observed UDs, living longer than 150 s, were detected and tracked in a 46 minute long data set, using an automatic detection code. A total of 1553 (620) UDs were detected in the photospheric (low chromospheric) data. Our main findings are (1) none of the analyzed UDs is precisely circular, (2) the diameter-intensity relationship only holds in bright umbral areas, and (3) UD velocities are inversely related to their lifetime. While nearly all photospheric UDs can be identified in the low chromospheric images, some small closely spaced UDs appear in the low chromosphere as a single cluster. Slow-moving and long-living UDs seem to exist in both the low chromosphere and photosphere, while fast-moving and short-living UDs are mainly detected in the photospheric images. Comparison to the 3D MHD simulations showed that both types of UDs display, on average, very similar statistical characteristics. However, (1) the average number of observed UDs per unit area is smaller than that of the model UDs, and (2) on average, the diameter of model UDs is slightly larger than that of observed ones.

  9. Temporal evolution of multiple evaporating ribbon sources in a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, D R

    2015-01-01

    We present new results from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph showing the dynamic evolution of chromospheric evaporation and condensation in a flare ribbon, with the highest temporal and spatial resolution to date. IRIS observed the entire impulsive phase of the X-class flare SOL2014-09-10T17:45 using a 9.4 second cadence `sit-and-stare' mode. As the ribbon brightened successively at new positions along the slit, a unique impulsive phase evolution was observed for many tens of individual pixels in both coronal and chromospheric lines. Each activation of a new footpoint displays the same initial coronal up-flows of up to ~300 km/s, and chromospheric downflows up to 40 km/s. Although the coronal flows can be delayed by over 1 minute with respect to those in the chromosphere, the temporal evolution of flows is strikingly similar between all pixels, and consistent with predictions from hydrodynamic flare models. Given the large sample of independent footpoints, we conclude that each flaring pixel can be c...

  10. The Light Curve Variations of The Active Binaries With Hot Subdwarf Component

    CERN Document Server

    Sipahi, E; Sipahi, Esin; Evren, Serdar

    2006-01-01

    We present the light curve variations of the two active binaries with hot subdwarf component. According to the brightness variations outside of the eclipses, the giant components of the systems are chromospherically active stars. The dark and cool active structures on this components cause the variations of the total light of the systems.

  11. Two-dimensional equilibrium in coronal magnetostatic flux tubes: an accurate equilibrium solver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belien, A. J. C.; Poedts, S.; Goedbloed, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    To study linearized magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, continuous spectra, and instabilities in coronal magnetic flux tubes that are anchored in dense chromospheric and photospheric regions, a two-dimensional numerical code, called PARIS, has been developed. PARIS solves the pertinent nonlinear Grad-S

  12. iota Horologi, the first coronal activity cycle in a young solar-like star

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz-Forcada, J; Metcalfe, T S; 10.1051/0004-6361/201321388

    2013-01-01

    Context: The shortest chromospheric (Ca II H&K) activity cycle (1.6 yr) has been recently discovered in the young (~600 Myr) solar-like star iota Hor. Coronal X-ray activity cycles have only been discovered in a few stars other than the Sun, all of them with an older age and a lower activity level than iota Hor. Aims: We intended to find the X-ray coronal counterpart of the chromospheric cycle for i Hor. This represents the first X-ray cycle observed in an active star, as well as the paradigm of the first coronal cycles in the life of a solar-like star. Methods: We monitored i Hor with XMM-Newton observations spanning almost two years. The spectra of each observation are fit with two-temperature coronal models to study the long-term variability of the star. Results: We find a cyclic behavior in X-rays very similar to the contemporaneous chromospheric cycle. The continuous chromospheric monitoring for more than three cycle lengths shows a trend toward decreasing amplitude, apparently modulated by a longer ...

  13. Infrared Observations with the 1.6 Meter New Solar Telescope in Big Bear: Origins of Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    have suggested that it may be finely structured on a subarcsecond scale representing a mix of hot and cool plasma elements. In this study...Yurchyshyn, 2012, Phys. Scr ., 86, 018402   Observation of a Non-radial Penumbral in a Flux Emerging Region under Chromospheric Canopy Fields

  14. Generation of Electrojets in Weakly Ionized Plasmas through a Collisional Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Dimant, Yakov S; Fletcher, Alex C

    2016-01-01

    Intense electric currents called electrojets occur in weakly ionized magnetized plasmas. An example occurs in the Earth's ionosphere near the magnetic equator where neutral winds drive the plasma across the geomagnetic field. Similar processes take place in the Solar chromosphere and MHD generators. This letter argues that not all convective neutral flows generate electrojets and it introduces the corresponding universal criterion for electrojet formation, $\

  15. Dynamic Lyα jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koza, J.; Rutten, R.J.; Vourlidas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Context. The solar chromosphere and transition region are highly structured and complex regimes. A recent breakthrough has been the identification of dynamic fibrils observed in Hα as caused by field-aligned magnetoacoustic shocks. Aims. We seek to find whether such dynamic fibrils are also observed

  16. Giants of eclipse the ζ [Zeta] Aurigae stars and other binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Griffin, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The zeta Aurigae stars are the rare but illustrious sub-group of binary stars that undergo the dramatic phenomenon of "chromospheric eclipse". This book provides detailed descriptions of the ten known systems, illustrates them richly with examples of new spectra, and places them in the context of stellar structure and evolution. Comprised of a large cool giant plus a small hot dwarf, these key eclipsing binaries reveal fascinating changes in their spectra very close to total eclipse, when the hot star shines through differing heights of the "chromosphere", or outer atmosphere, of the giant star. The phenomenon provides astrophysics with the means of analyzing the outer atmosphere of a giant star and how that material is shed into space. The physics of these critical events can be explained qualitatively, but it is more challenging to extract hard facts from the observations, and tough to model the chromosphere in any detail. The book offers current thinking on mechanisms for heating a star's chromosphere an...

  17. Bidirectional outflows as evidence of magnetic reconnection leading to a solar microflare

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Jie; Li, Ying; Yang, Kai; Cheng, Xin; Chen, Feng; Fang, Cheng; Cao, Wenda

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a rapid energy release process that is believed to be responsible for flares on the Sun and stars. Nevertheless, such flare-related reconnection is mostly detected to occur in the corona, while there have been few studies concerning the reconnection in the chromosphere or photosphere. Here we present both spectroscopic and imaging observations of magnetic reconnection in the chromosphere leading to a microflare. During the flare peak time, chromospheric line profiles show significant blueshifted/redshifted components on the two sides of the flaring site, corresponding to upflows and downflows with velocities of $\\pm$(70--80) km s$^{-1}$, comparable with the local Alfv\\'{e}n speed as expected by the reconnection in the chromosphere. The three-dimensional nonlinear force-free field configuration further discloses twisted field lines (a flux rope) at a low altitude, cospatial with the dark threads in He I 10830 \\r{A} images. The instability of the flux rope may initiate the flare-related...

  18. Basic Properties of Plasma-Neutral Coupling in the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Plasma-neutral coupling (PNC) in the solar atmosphere concerns the effects of collisions between charged and neutral species’. It is most important in the chromosphere, which is the weakly ionized, strongly magnetized region between the weakly ionized, weakly magnetized photosphere and the strongly ionized, strongly magnetized corona. The charged species’ are mainly electrons, protons, and singly charged heavy ions. The neutral species’ are mainly hydrogen and helium. The resistivity due to PNC can be several orders of magnitude larger than the Spitzer resistivity. This enhanced resistivity is confined to the chromosphere, and provides a highly efficient dissipation mechanism unique to the chromosphere. PNC may play an important role in many processes such as heating and acceleration of plasma; wave generation, propagation, and dissipation; magnetic reconnection; maintaining the near force-free state of the corona; and limiting mass flux into the corona. It might play a major role in chromospheric heating, and be responsible for the existence of the chromosphere as a relatively thin layer of plasma that emits a net radiative flux 10-100 times greater than that of the overlying corona. The required heating rate might be generated by Pedersen current dissipation triggered by the rapid increase of magnetization with height in the lower chromosphere, where most of the net radiative flux is emitted. Relatively cool regions of the chromosphere might be regions of minimal Pedersen current dissipation due to smaller magnetic field strength or perpendicular current density. This talk will discuss PNC from an MHD point of view, and focus on the basic parameters that determine its effectiveness. These parameters are ionization fraction, magnetization, and the electric field that drives current perpendicular to the magnetic field. By influencing this current and the electric field that drives it, PNC directly influences the rate at which energy is exchanged between the

  19. NST and IRIS multi-wavelength observations of an M1.0 class solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Domínguez, Santiago; Sadykov, Viacheslav; Kosovichev, Alexander; Sharykin, Ivan; Struminsky, Alexei; Zimovets, Ivan

    2015-08-01

    Although solar flares are the most energetic events in the Solar System and have direct impact in the interplanetary space and ultimately in our planet, there are still many unresolved issues concerning their generation, the underlying processes of particle acceleration involved, the effect at different layer in the solar atmosphere, among others. This work presents new coordinated observations from the New Solar Telescope (NST) and the space telescope IRIS that acquired simultaneous observations of an M1.0 class flare occurred on 12 June, 2014 in active region NOAA 12087. NST filtergrams using the TiO filter, together with chromospheric data from the Halpha line allow us to study the evolution of the event from the first signs of the intensification of the intensity in the region. We focused on a small portion where the intensity enhancement in Halpha (blue and red wings) seems to be triggered, and discovered a rapid expansion of a flux-rope structure near the magnetic neutral line, in the sequence of high-resolution photospheric images. IRIS observations evidenced strong emission of the chromospheric and transition region lines during the flare. Jet-like structures are detected before the initiation of the flare in chromospheric lines and strong non-thermal emission in the transition region at the beginning of the impulsive phase. Evaporation flows with velocities up to 50 km/s occurred in the hot chromospheric plasma. We interpreted the result in terms of the “gentle” evaporation that occurs after accelerated particles heat the chromosphere.

  20. ON THE ACTIVE REGION BRIGHT GRAINS OBSERVED IN THE TRANSITION REGION IMAGING CHANNELS OF IRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skogsrud, H.; Voort, L. Rouppe van der; Pontieu, B. De [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2016-02-01

    The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) provides spectroscopy and narrow band slit-jaw (SJI) imaging of the solar chromosphere and transition region at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. Combined with high-resolution context spectral imaging of the photosphere and chromosphere as provided by the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope (SST), we can now effectively trace dynamic phenomena through large parts of the solar atmosphere in both space and time. IRIS SJI 1400 images from active regions, which primarily sample the transition region with the Si iv 1394 and 1403 Å lines, reveal ubiquitous bright “grains” which are short-lived (two to five minute) bright roundish small patches of sizes 0.″5–1.″7 that generally move limbward with velocities up to about 30 km s{sup −1}. In this paper, we show that many bright grains are the result of chromospheric shocks impacting the transition region. These shocks are associated with dynamic fibrils (DFs), most commonly observed in Hα. We find that the grains show the strongest emission in the ascending phase of the DF, that the emission is strongest toward the top of the DF, and that the grains correspond to a blueshift and broadening of the Si iv lines. We note that the SJI 1400 grains can also be observed in the SJI 1330 channel which is dominated by C ii lines. Our observations show that a significant part of the active region transition region dynamics is driven from the chromosphere below rather than from coronal activity above. We conclude that the shocks that drive DFs also play an important role in the heating of the upper chromosphere and lower transition region.

  1. The Solar-Stellar Connection (NAG5-6124: SOHO Guest Investigator Program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    1997-01-01

    The following is a final report from the SOHO Guest Investigator program to use the SUMER far-UV spectrometer to obtain imaging spectroscopy in support of the goals of the so-called "solar-stellar connection." In particular, a major emphasis was utilization of the long-slit time-resolved maps of the solar surface in bright far-UV emission lines to deduce how particular aspects of the temporally and spatially averaged line profiles trace back to individual structural features of the magnetically disturbed outer atmosphere; to help interpret the unresolved line profiles from high quality stellar observations (say, with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph). The researchers served two tours of duty in the SOHO Operations Center as SUMER planners, during which time we conducted an extensive series of observing programs. These can be divided into three general categories: surface mapping, translimb spectroscopy, and active region diagnostics. We have analyzed some of the large volumes of data to the point where we have presented them in poster papers, and in invited papers at national and international meetings. Listed below are the titles of the preliminary publications we have written, including brief abstracts to indicate the main results. (1) Chromospheric structure and Dynamics-- Observations -- The chromosphere is a highly structured dynamic 'layer' of the solar outer atmosphere. Here, not only are the effects of mechanical heating first evident (moving upward in altitude from the deep photosphere), but also the amount of nonradiative energy deposited is far greater than in the albeit much hotter overlying transition region and corona. Further, the chromosphere is by far the thickest zone of the solar atmosphere with respect to the pressure scale height. A major goal of stellar astrophysics is to understand how the chromosphere is heated and why it adopts its peculiar structure. A cursory examination of solar filtergrams and high-resolution movies demonstrates

  2. The cause of spatial structure in solar He i 1083 nm multiplet images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaarts, Jorrit; Golding, Thomas; Carlsson, Mats; Libbrecht, Tine; Joshi, Jayant

    2016-10-01

    Context. The He i 1083 nm is a powerful diagnostic for inferring properties of the upper solar chromosphere, in particular for the magnetic field. The basic formation of the line in one-dimensional models is well understood, but the influence of the complex three-dimensional structure of the chromosphere and corona has however never been investigated. This structure must play an essential role because images taken in He i 1083 nm show structures with widths down to 100 km. Aims: We aim to understand the effect of the three-dimensional temperature and density structure in the solar atmosphere on the formation of the He i 1083 nm line. Methods: We solved the non-LTE radiative transfer problem assuming statistical equilibrium for a simple nine-level helium atom that nevertheless captures all essential physics. As a model atmosphere we used a snapshot from a 3D radiation-MHD simulation computed with the Bifrost code. Ionising radiation from the corona was self-consistently taken into account. Results: The emergent intensity in the He i 1083 nm is set by the source function and the opacity in the upper chromosphere. The former is dominated by scattering of photospheric radiation and does not vary much with spatial location. The latter is determined by the photonionisation rate in the He i ground state continuum, as well as the electron density in the chromosphere. The spatial variation of the flux of ionising radiation is caused by the spatially-structured emissivity of the ionising photons from material at T ≈ 100 kK in the transition region. The hotter coronal material produces more ionising photons, but the resulting radiation field is smooth and does not lead to small-scale variation of the UV flux. The corrugation of the transition region further increases the spatial variation of the amount of UV radiation in the chromosphere. Finally we find that variations in the chromospheric electron density also cause strong variation in He i 1083 nm opacity. We compare our

  3. Co-existence of two plasma phases in solar and AGN coronas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubičela A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we have juxtaposed two distant cosmic locations of the Sun and AGN where neutral hydrogen appears in a close connection with hot coronas. Besides the solar photosphere, chromosphere and prominences where the presence of neutral hydrogen is well established, its emission quite high in hot solar corona is still puzzling. Some of earlier observations where Hα emission in solar corona was detected in eclipse and in daily coronagraphic observations are reviewed. A proper theoretical explanation of this cold chromospheric-type emission in the hot corona does not exist yet. On the other side, a similar emission of hydrogen lines is present in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs. Much research work is currently being done in this field. We outline some of the concepts of the AGN structure prevailing in the astrophysics today.

  4. Electrons re-acceleration at the footpoints of Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Turkmani, Rim

    2010-01-01

    Hinode's observations revealed a very dynamic and complex chromosphere. This require revisiting the assumption that the chromospheric footpoints of solar flares are areas where accelerated particles only lose energy due to collisions. Traditionally electrons are thought to be accelerated in the coronal part of the loop, then travel to the footpoints where they lose their energy and radiate the observed Hard X-ray. Increasing observational evidence challenges this assumption. We review the evidence against this assumption and present the new Local Re-acceleration Thick Target Model (LRTTM) where at the footpoints electrons receive a boost of re-acceleration in addition to the usual collisional loses. Such model may offer an alternative to the 'standard' collisional thick target injection model (TTM) (Brown 1971) of solar HXR burst sources, requiring far fewer electrons and solving some recent problems with the TTM interpretation. We look at the different scenarios which could lead to such re-acceleration and p...

  5. Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere. III - Nonlinear waves on open flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollweg, J. V.; Jackson, S.; Galloway, D.

    1982-01-01

    Consideration is given the nonlinear propagation of Alfven waves on solar magnetic flux tubes, where the tubes are taken to be vertical, axisymmetric and initially untwisted and the Alfven waves are time-dependent axisymmetric twists. The propagation of the waves into the chromosphere and corona is investigated through the numerical solution of a set of nonlinear, time-dependent equations coupling the Alfven waves into motions that are parallel to the initial magnetic field. It is concluded that Alfven waves can steepen into fast shocks in the chromosphere, pass through the transition region to produce high-velocity pulses, and then enter the corona, which they heat. The transition region pulses have amplitudes of about 60 km/sec, and durations of a few tens of seconds. In addition, the Alfven waves exhibit a tendency to drive upward flows, with many of the properties of spicules.

  6. Spatially Resolved Images and Solar Irradiance Variability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Kariyappa

    2008-03-01

    The Sun is the primary source of energy that governs both the terrestrial climate and near-earth space environment. Variations in UV irradiances seen at earth are the sum of global (solar dynamo) to regional (active region, plage, network, bright points and background) solar magnetic activities that can be identified through spatially resolved photospheric, chromospheric and coronal features. In this research, the images of CaII K-line (NSO/Sac Peak) have been analysed to segregate the various chromospheric features.We derived the different indices and estimated their contribution from the time series data to total CaII K emission flux and UV irradiance variability. A part of the important results from this research is discussed in this paper.

  7. A Bcool spectropolarimetric survey of over 150 solar-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Marsden, Stephen; Jeffers, Sandra; Nascimento, Jose-Dias do; Carter, Bradley; Brown, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Bcool project, over 150 solar-type stars chosen mainly from planet search databases have been observed between 2006 and 2013 using the NARVAL and ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeters on the Telescope Bernard Lyot (Pic du Midi, France) and the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (Mauna Kea, USA), respectively. These single 'snapshot' observations have been used to detect the presence of magnetic fields on 40% of our sample, with the highest detection rates occurring for the youngest stars. From our observations we have determined the mean surface longitudinal field (or an upper limit for stars without detections) and the chromospheric surface fluxes, and find that the upper envelope of the absolute value of the mean surface longitudinal field is directly correlated to the chromospheric emission from the star and increases with rotation rate and decreases with age.

  8. Discovery of three new RS Canum Venaticorum-like counterparts to HEAO I X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. A. H.; Tuohy, I. R.; Remillard, R. A.; Bradt, H. V.; Schwartz, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    The identification of three high-latitude HEAO I Scanning Modulation Collimator X-ray sources with the chromospherically active RS CVn-like stars HD 113816, HD 146413, and HD 39576 is reported. Optical observations, including coude spectroscopy and broad-band and narrow band photoelectric photometry are presented. The Ca II emission strength of all three stars shows that they are chromospherically active. HD 146413 and HD 39576 exhibit variable X-ray emission in the 1-13 keV energy range, while HD 113816 is a softer and steadier source. The level of X-ray flux detected from these three stars is some one to two orders of magnitude higher than predicted empirically from the Ca II emission fluxes. It is proposed that this emission results from flarelike activity.

  9. Morphological Properties of Slender Ca ii H Fibrils Observed by Sunrise II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafeira, R.; Lagg, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Jafarzadeh, S.; van Noort, M.; Barthol, P.; Blanco Rodríguez, J.; del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Hirzberger, J.; Knölker, M.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Schmidt, W.

    2017-03-01

    We use seeing-free high spatial resolution Ca ii H data obtained by the Sunrise observatory to determine properties of slender fibrils in the lower solar chromosphere. In this work we use intensity images taken with the SuFI instrument in the Ca ii H line during the second scientific flight of the Sunrise observatory to identify and track elongated bright structures. After identification, we analyze theses structures to extract their morphological properties. We identify 598 slender Ca ii H fibrils (SCFs) with an average width of around 180 km, length between 500 and 4000 km, average lifetime of ≈400 s, and average curvature of 0.002 arcsec‑1. The maximum lifetime of the SCFs within our time series of 57 minutes is ≈2000 s. We discuss similarities and differences of the SCFs with other small-scale, chromospheric structures such as spicules of type I and II, or Ca ii K fibrils.

  10. Morphological properties of slender Ca II H fibrils observed by SUNRISE II

    CERN Document Server

    Gafeira, R; Solanki, Sami K; Jafarzadeh, Shahin; Van Noort, M; Barthol, P; Rodriguez, J Blanco; Iniesta, J C del Toro; Gandorfer, A; Gizon, L; Hirzberger, J; Knolker, M; Suarez, D Orozco; Riethmüller, T L; Schmidt, W

    2016-01-01

    We use seeing-free high spatial resolution Ca II H data obtained by the SUNRISE observatory to determine properties of slender fibrils in the lower solar chromosphere. In this work we use intensity images taken with the SUFI instrument in the Ca II H line during the second scientific flight of the SUNRISE observatory to identify and track elongated bright structures. After the identification, we analyze theses structures in order to extract their morphological properties. We identify 598 slender Ca II H fibrils (SCFs) with an average width of around 180 km, a length between 500 km and 4000 km, an average lifetime of ~400 s, and an average curvature of 0.002 arcsec^-1. The maximum lifetime of the SCFs within our time series of 57 minutes is ~2000 s. We discuss similarities and differences of the SCFs with other small-scale, chromospheric structures such as spicules of type I and II, or Ca II K fibrils.

  11. Rapidly Rotating, X-ray Bright Stars in the Kepler Field

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, Steve B; Boyd, Padi; Smith, Krista Lynne; Gelino, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    We present Kepler light curves and optical spectroscopy of twenty X-ray bright stars located in the Kepler field of view. The stars, spectral type FK, show evidence for rapid rotation including chromospheric activity 100 times or more above the Sun at maximum and flaring behavior in their light curves. Eighteen of our objects appear to be (sub)giants and may belong to the class of FK Com variables, that is evolved rapidly spinning single stars with no excretion disk and high levels of chromospheric activity. Such stars are rare and are likely the result of W UMa binary mergers, a process believed to produce the FK Com class of variable and their descendants. The FK Com stage, including the presence of an excretion disk, is short-lived but leads to longer-lived stages consisting of single, rapidly rotating evolved (sub)giants with high levels of stellar activity.

  12. Synthetic activity indicators for M-type dwarf stars

    CERN Document Server

    Wedemeyer, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a set of time-dependent 3D RMHD simulations of a M-dwarf star representative of AD Leo, which extend from the upper convection zone into the chromosphere. The 3D model atmospheres are characterized by a very dynamic and intermittent structure on small spatial and temporal scales and a wealth of physical processes, which by nature cannot be described by means of 1D static model atmospheres. Artificial observations of these models imply that a combination of complementary diagnostics such as Ca II lines and the continuum intensity from UV to millimeter wavelengths, probe various properties of the dynamics, thermal and magnetic structure of the photosphere and the chromosphere and thus provide measures of stellar activity, which can be compared to observations. The complicated magnetic field structure and its imprint in synthetic diagnostics may have important implications for the understanding and characterization of stellar activity and with it possibly for the evaluation of planetary habitabi...

  13. Ellerman Bombs, Type II White-light Flares and Magnetic Reconnection in the Solar Lower Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Ellerman bombs and Type II white-light flares share many common features despite the large energy gap between them. Both are considered to result from local heating in the solar lower atmosphere. This paper presents numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection occurring in such a deep atmosphere, with the aim to account for the common features of the two phenomena. Our numerical results manifest the following two typical characteristics of the assumed reconnection process: (1) magnetic reconnection saturates in ~600-900 s, which is just the lifetime of the two phenomena; (2) ionization in the upper chromosphere consumes quite a large part of the energy released through reconnection, making the heating effect most significant in the lower chromosphere. The application of the reconnection model to the two phenomena is discussed in detail.

  14. Observational Consequences of Coronal Heating Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan C.; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The coronal heating problem remains unsolved today, 80 years after its discovery, despite 50 years of suborbital and orbital coronal observatories. Tens of theoretical coronal heating mechanisms have been suggested, but only a few have been able to be ruled out. In this talk, we will explore the reasons for the slow progress and discuss the measurements that will be needed for potential breakthrough, including imaging the solar corona at small spatial scales, measuring the chromospheric magnetic fields, and detecting the presence of high temperature, low emission measure plasma. We will discuss three sounding rocket instruments developed to make these measurements: the High resolution Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP), and the Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS).

  15. Stochastic transients as a source of quasi-periodic processes in the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Ding; Jiao, Fangran; Walsh, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Solar dynamics and turbulence occur at all heights of the solar atmosphere and could be described as stochastic processes. We propose that finite lifetime transients recurring at a certain place could trigger quasi-periodic processes in the associated structures. In this study, we developed a mathematical model for finite lifetime and randomly occurring transients, and found that quasi-periodic processes, with period longer than the time scale of the transients, are detectable intrinsically in form of trains. We simulate their propagation in an empirical solar atmospheric model with chromosphere, transition region and corona. We found that, due to the filtering effect of the chromospheric cavity, only the resonance period of the acoustic resonator is able to propagate to the upper atmosphere, such a scenario is applicable to slow magnetoacoustic waves in sunspots and active regions. If the thermal structure of the atmosphere is less wild and acoustic resonance does not take effect, the long period oscillation...

  16. The white-light flare of 1982 June 15 - Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauas, P.J.D. (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents spectral observations of the continuum as well as the profiles of 29 selected atomic lines for the two continuum-emitting kernels of the June 15 1982 white-light flare, and for the neighboring quiet sun. It is found that one of the kernels does not show enhanced emission in chromospheric lines, particularly in H-alpha, although it presents the same level of white-light emission as the other kernel. This suggests that both kernels have the same thermal structure in the continuum-emitting region, but a different structure in the chromosphere, thus supporting the hypothesis that the continuum emission is of photospheric origin, and due to H(-). 11 refs.

  17. The white-light flare of 1982 June 15 - Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauas, Pablo J. D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents spectral observations of the continuum as well as the profiles of 29 selected atomic lines for the two continuum-emitting kernels of the June 15 1982 white-light flare, and for the neighboring quiet sun. It is found that one of the kernels does not show enhanced emission in chromospheric lines, particularly in H-alpha, although it presents the same level of white-light emission as the other kernel. This suggests that both kernels have the same thermal structure in the continuum-emitting region, but a different structure in the chromosphere, thus supporting the hypothesis that the continuum emission is of photospheric origin, and due to H(-).

  18. The variability of Sun-like stars: reproducing observed photometric trends

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, A I; Krivova, N A; Schmutz, W K; Ball, W T; Knaack, R; Rozanov, E V; Unruh, Y C

    2014-01-01

    The Sun and stars with low magnetic activity levels, become photometrically brighter when their activity increases. Magnetically more active stars display the opposite behaviour and get fainter when their activity increases. We reproduce the observed photometric trends in stellar variations with a model that treats stars as hypothetical Suns with coverage by magnetic features different from that of the Sun. The presented model attributes the variability of stellar spectra to the imbalance between the contributions from different components of the solar atmosphere, such as dark starspots and bright faculae. A stellar spectrum is calculated from spectra of the individual components, by weighting them with corresponding disc area coverages. The latter are obtained by extrapolating the solar dependences of spot and facular disc area coverages on chromospheric activity to stars with different levels of mean chromospheric activity. We have found that the contribution by starspots to the variability increases faster...

  19. The histeresis of the indices of solar activity and of the ionospheric indices in 11-yr cycles. The histeresis of the stellar activity indices in the cyclic activity similar to the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Bruevich, E A; Kazachevskaya, T V; Katyushina, V V; Nusinov, A A

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the effect of the hysteresis, which manifests itself in an ambiguous relationship of radiation from the photosphere, chromosphere and corona on the rise and decline phases of the solar and stellar activity cycles have done. Some indices of solar activity: the flux of the hydrogen Lyman-alpha emission, the 10.7 cm flux, the sunspot number SSN, the flux in the coronal green line 530.3 nm, the solar constant TSI and the 280 nm Mg II flux were studied. The stars with the well-determined cycles were examined to detect the effect of hysteresis between the chromosphere's S-index CaII fluxes versus the photosphere's fluxes Fphotosphere.

  20. Resonant energy conversion of 3-minute intensity oscillations into Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Kuridze, D

    2007-01-01

    Nonlinear coupling between 3-minute oscillations and Alfven waves in the solar lower atmosphere is studied. 3-minute oscillations are considered as acoustic waves trapped in a chromospheric cavity and oscillating along transversally inhomogeneous vertical magnetic field. It is shown that under the action of the oscillations the temporal dynamics of Alfven waves is governed by Mathieu equation. Consequently, the harmonics of Alfven waves with twice period and wavelength of 3-minute oscillations grow exponentially in time near the layer where the sound and Alfven speeds equal. Thus the 3-minute oscillations are resonantly absorbed by pure Alfven waves near this resonant layer. The resonant Alfven waves may penetrate into the solar corona taking energy from the chromosphere. Therefore the layer c_s=v_A may play a role of energy channel for otherwise trapped acoustic oscillations.

  1. SADE: The starspot and dynamo explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, P. C. H.; Acton, L. W. A.; Klumpar, D.; Kankelborg, C.; Stern, R. A.; Peres, G.; Culhane, J. L.

    2003-09-01

    We propose a mission called SADE, the Starspot And Dynamo Explorer, to study dynamo activity in nearby late-type stars. The onboard instruments will be a Ca-K telescope for magnetically dominated chromospheric emission, and an X-ray grazing incidence telescope to study coronal emission. We design the mission for a life-time of 15 years or longer to capture a full activity cycle for most solar-type stars. We aim to firmly establish the spectrum of the relation between chromospheric and corona' emission in late-type stars, and capture one or more stars going into or coming out of a Maunder type minimum. Operation costs will be kept to a minimum by automating mission operations to a maximum, and have the science operations be carried out by students at Montana State University.

  2. Si III OV Bright Line of Scattering Polarized Light That Has Been Observed in the CLASP and Its Center-to-Limb Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsukawa, Yukio; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Kano, Ryohei; Kubo, Masahito; Noriyuki, Narukage; Kisei, Bando; Hara, Hirohisa; Yoshiho, Suematsu; Goto, Motouji; Ishikawa, Shinnosuke; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, Ken

    2017-01-01

    The CLASP (Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro- Polarimeter) rocket experiment, in addition to the ultraviolet region of the Ly alpha emission line (121.57 nm), emission lines of Si III (120.65 nm) and OV (121.83 nm) is can be observed. These are optically thin line compared to a Ly alpha line, if Rarere captured its polarization, there is a possibility that dripping even a new physical diagnosis chromosphere-transition layer. In particular, OV bright light is a release from the transition layer, further, three P one to one S(sub 0) is a forbidden line (cross-triplet transition between lines), it was not quite know whether to polarization.

  3. Non-equilibrium CO chemistry in the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, A A; Carlsson, M; Cernicharo, J

    2003-01-01

    Investigating the reliability of the assumption of instantaneous chemical equilibrium (ICE) for calculating the CO number density in the solar atmosphere is of crucial importance for the resolution of the long-standing controversy over the existence of `cool clouds' in the chromosphere, and for determining whether the cool gas owes its existence to CO radiative cooling or to a hydrodynamical process. Here we report the first results of such an investigation in which we have carried out time-dependent gas-phase chemistry calculations in radiation hydrodynamical simulations of solar chromospheric dynamics. We show that while the ICE approximation turns out to be suitable for modeling the observed infrared CO lines at the solar disk center, it may substantially overestimate the `heights of formation' of strong CO lines synthesized close to the edge of the solar disk, especially concerning vigorous dynamic cases resulting from relatively strong photospheric disturbances. This happens because during the cool phase...

  4. Suprathermal electron distributions in the solar transition region

    CERN Document Server

    Vocks, C; Mann, G

    2016-01-01

    Suprathermal tails are a common feature of solar wind electron velocity distributions, and are expected in the solar corona. From the corona, suprathermal electrons can propagate through the steep temperature gradient of the transition region towards the chromosphere, and lead to non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution functions (VDFs) with pronounced suprathermal tails. We calculate the evolution of a coronal electron distribution through the transition region in order to quantify the suprathermal electron population there. A kinetic model for electrons is used which is based on solving the Boltzmann-Vlasov equation for electrons including Coulomb collisions with both ions and electrons. Initial and chromospheric boundary conditions are Maxwellian VDFs with densities and temperatures based on a background fluid model. The coronal boundary condition has been adopted from earlier studies of suprathermal electron formation in coronal loops. The model results show the presence of strong suprathermal tails ...

  5. Hysteresis Effect in the Activity Indices of the Atmospheres of the Sun and Solar-Type Stars During the Rising and Falling Phases of Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruevich, E. A.; Yakunina, G. V.

    2016-09-01

    The hysteresis effect that shows up as a nonunique relationship among the emissions from the photosphere, chromosphere, and corona during the rising and falling phases of solar and stellar activity is analyzed. The following solar indices are analyzed and compared in different phases of the cycle: the radiative flux in the hydrogen Lyman alpha line FLα, radio emission at 10.7 cm F10.7, the sunspot number SSN, the radiative flux in the 530.0 nm green coronal line F530.3, the solar constant TSI, and the relative flux ratio c/w (ratio of the fluxes in the center and in the wings) for the 280 nm Mg II line. In stars with cycles, a hysteresis effect is observed between the CaII chromospheric S-activity index for stars in the Mount Wilson HK project and the photospheric flux Fph for these stars.

  6. A regularization method for extrapolation of solar potential magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, G. A.; Musielak, Z. E.

    1992-01-01

    The mathematical basis of a Tikhonov regularization method for extrapolating the chromospheric-coronal magnetic field using photospheric vector magnetograms is discussed. The basic techniques show that the Cauchy initial value problem can be formulated for potential magnetic fields. The potential field analysis considers a set of linear, elliptic partial differential equations. It is found that, by introducing an appropriate smoothing of the initial data of the Cauchy potential problem, an approximate Fourier integral solution is found, and an upper bound to the error in the solution is derived. This specific regularization technique, which is a function of magnetograph measurement sensitivities, provides a method to extrapolate the potential magnetic field above an active region into the chromosphere and low corona.

  7. Observations and modelling of Helium lines in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Simões, Paulo J A; Labrosse, Nicolas; Kerr, Graham S

    2015-01-01

    We explore the response of the He II 304 {\\AA} and He I 584 {\\AA} line intensities to electron beam heating in solar flares using radiative hydrodynamic simulations. Comparing different electron beams parameters, we found that the intensities of both He lines are very sensitive to the energy flux deposited in the chromosphere, or more specifically to the heating rate, with He II 304 {\\AA} being more sensitive to the heating than He I 584 {\\AA}. Therefore, the He line ratio increases for larger heating rates in the chromosphere. A similar trend is found in observations, using SDO/EVE He irradiance ratios and estimates of the electron beam energy rate obtained from hard X-ray data. From the simulations, we also found that spectral index of the electrons can affect the He ratio but a similar effect was not found in the observations.

  8. Stellar Evidence of a Solar Dynamo in Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Metcalfe, Travis S; van Saders, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Precise photometry from the Kepler space telescope allows not only the measurement of rotation in solar-type field stars, but also the determination of reliable masses and ages from asteroseismology. These critical data have recently provided the first opportunity to calibrate rotation-age relations for stars older than the Sun. The evolutionary picture that emerges is surprising: beyond middle-age the efficiency of magnetic braking is dramatically reduced, implying a fundamental change in angular momentum loss beyond a critical Rossby number (Ro~2). We compile published chromospheric activity measurements for the sample of Kepler asteroseismic targets that were used to establish the new rotation-age relations. We use these data along with a sample of well characterized solar analogs from the Mount Wilson HK survey to develop a qualitative scenario connecting the evolution of chromospheric activity to a fundamental shift in the character of differential rotation. We conclude that the Sun is in a transitional ...

  9. Cool stars, stellar systems, and the sun; Proceedings of the 6th Cambridge Workshop, Seattle, WA, Sept. 18-21, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, George (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on cool stars, stellar systems, and the sun encompasses stellar chromospheres and coronae, binary stars, the stellar evolution of contracting stars and red giants, stellar evolution abundances of the elements, mass loss and envelopes, and stellar pulsation. Specific issues addressed include theories regarding the acoustic and magnetic heating of stellar chromospheres and coronae, stellar granulation, wave heating in magnetic flux tubes, observations of the solar Ca-II lines, longitudinal-transverse magnetic tube waves in the solar atmosphere, radio emission from rapidly rotating cool giant stars, and spot temperatures and area coverages on active dwarf stars. Also addressed are the optical and UV spectra of RS-CVn stars, emission lines from T-Tauri stars, the spectroscopy of HR1614 group stars, red giants in external galaxies, the rotation of evolved stars, the transition from red giant to planetary nebula, and radiative transfer in the dynamic atmospheres of variable stars.

  10. Simulated interaction of MHD shock waves with a complex network-like region

    CERN Document Server

    Santamaria, Irantzu C; Collados, Manuel; de Vicente, Angel

    2016-01-01

    We provide estimates of the wave energy reaching the solar chromosphere and corona in a network-like magnetic field topology, including a coronal null point. The waves are excited by an instantaneous strong subphotospheric source and propagate through the subphotosphere, photosphere, chromosphere, transition region, and corona with the plasma beta and other atmospheric parameters varying by several orders of magnitude. We compare two regimes of the wave propagation: a linear and nonlinear regime. While the amount of energy reaching the corona is similar in both regimes, this energy is transmitted at different frequencies. In both cases the dominant periods of waves at each height strongly depend on the local magnetic field topology, but this distribution is only in accordance with observations in the nonlinear case.

  11. The stellar atmosphere simulation code Bifrost

    CERN Document Server

    Gudiksen, Boris V; Hansteen, Viggo H; Hayek, Wolfgang; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Martínez-Sykora, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Context: Numerical simulations of stellar convection and photospheres have been developed to the point where detailed shapes of observed spectral lines can be explained. Stellar atmospheres are very complex, and very different physical regimes are present in the convection zone, photosphere, chromosphere, transition region and corona. To understand the details of the atmosphere it is necessary to simulate the whole atmosphere since the different layers interact strongly. These physical regimes are very diverse and it takes a highly efficient massively parallel numerical code to solve the associated equations. Aims: The design, implementation and validation of the massively parallel numerical code Bifrost for simulating stellar atmospheres from the convection zone to the corona. Methods: The code is subjected to a number of validation tests, among them the Sod shock tube test, the Orzag-Tang colliding shock test, boundary condition tests and tests of how the code treats magnetic field advection, chromospheric ...

  12. Observational evidence for enhanced magnetic activity of superflare stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; De Cat, Peter; Bonanno, Alfio; Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Fu, Jianning; Frasca, Antonio; Inceoglu, Fadil; Olsen, Jesper; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Shi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-24

    Superflares are large explosive events on stellar surfaces one to six orders-of-magnitude larger than the largest flares observed on the Sun throughout the space age. Due to the huge amount of energy released in these superflares, it has been speculated if the underlying mechanism is the same as for solar flares, which are caused by magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here, we analyse observations made with the LAMOST telescope of 5,648 solar-like stars, including 48 superflare stars. These observations show that superflare stars are generally characterized by larger chromospheric emissions than other stars, including the Sun. However, superflare stars with activity levels lower than, or comparable to, the Sun do exist, suggesting that solar flares and superflares most likely share the same origin. The very large ensemble of solar-like stars included in this study enables detailed and robust estimates of the relation between chromospheric activity and the occurrence of superflares.

  13. Solar Polarimetry - from Turbulent Magnetic Fields to Sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleint, Lucia

    2016-07-01

    Polarimetric measurements are essential to investigate the solar magnetic field. Scattering polarization and the Hanle effect allow us to probe the turbulent magnetic field and the still open questions of its strength and variability. Directed magnetic fields can be detected via the Zeeman effect. To derive their orientation and strength, so-called inversion codes are used, which iteratively modify a model atmosphere and calculate the resulting polarization profiles that are then compared to the observations. While photospheric polarimetry is well-established, chromospheric polarimetry is still in its infancy, especially because it requires a treatment in non-LTE, making it a complex non-linear problem. But some of the most important open questions concern the strength and geometry of the chromospheric magnetic field. In this talk, I will review different polarimetric analysis techniques and recent advances in magnetic field measurements going from the small scales of turbulent magnetic fields to changes of magnetic fields in an active region during flares.

  14. Recent progresses in the simulation of small-scale magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Steiner, Oskar

    2007-01-01

    New high-resolution observations reveal that small-scale magnetic flux concentrations have a delicate substructure on a spatial scale of 0.1''. Its basic structure can be interpreted in terms of a magnetic flux sheet or tube that vertically extends through the ambient weak-field or field-free atmosphere with which it is in mechanical equilibrium. A more refined interpretation comes from new three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations that are capable of reproducing the corrugated shape of magnetic flux concentrations and their signature in the visible continuum. Furthermore it is shown that the characteristic asymmetric shape of the contrast profile of facular granules is an effect of radiative transfer across the rarefied atmosphere of the magnetic flux concentration. I also discuss three-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the integral layers from the top of the convection zone to the mid-chromosphere. They show a highly dynamic chromospheric magnetic field, marked by rapidly movi...

  15. Measurements of Ca II Infrared Triplet Lines of Young Stellar Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Moto'oka, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    Equivalent widths and line widths of Ca II infrared triplet emission lines were measured in high-resolution optical spectra of 39 young stellar objects.We found that the equivalent widths of the emission lines decrease with stellar evolution. It has been often claimed that strong chromospheric activity is generated by a dynamo process caused by fast rotation of the photosphere. However, we found no clear correlation between the strength of the Ca II lines and the stellar rotation velocity. Instead, we found that the objects with high mass accretion rates had stronger Ca II emission lines. This correlation supports the turbulent chromosphere model or the magnetic accretion theory for classical T Tauri stars. We also noticed that the equivalent widths of Ca II lines of transitional disk objects are one-tenth of those of classical T Tauri stars, even if the masses of the circumstellar disks are comparable.

  16. Submillimeter solar limb profiles determined from observations of the total solar eclipse of 1988 March 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, T. L.; Becklin, E. E.; Jefferies, J. T.; Kopp, G. A.; Lindsey, C. A.; Orrall, F. Q.; Werner, M. W.

    1991-01-01

    Observations were made of the extreme solar limb in six far-infrared wavelength bands ranging from 30 to 670 micron using the Kuiper Airborne Observatory during the total eclipse of the sun on 1988 March 18. By observations of the occultation of the solar limb by the moon, it was possible to obtain a spatial resolution of 0.5 arcsec normal to the limb. The solar limb was found to be extended with respect to the visible limb at all of these wavelengths, with the extension increasing with wavelength. Limb brightening was observed to increase slightly with increasing wavelength, and no sign of a sharp emission spike at the extreme limb was found at any of these wavelengths. The observations can be well fitted by a chromospheric model incorporating cool dense spicules in the lower chromosphere.

  17. Evidence of Non-Thermal Particles in Coronal Loops Heated Impulsively by Nanoflares

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola; Allred, Joel; Carlsson, Mats; Reale, Fabio; Daw, Adrian; Hansteen, Viggo; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Liu, Wei; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; McKillop, Sean; Reeves, Kathy; Saar, Steve; Tian, Hui; Lemen, Jim; Title, Alan; Boerner, Paul; Hurlburt, Neal; Tarbell, Ted; Wuelser, J P; Kleint, Lucia; Kankelborg, Charles; Jaeggli, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The physical processes causing energy exchange between the Sun's hot corona and its cool lower atmosphere remain poorly understood. The chromosphere and transition region (TR) form an interface region between the surface and the corona that is highly sensitive to the coronal heating mechanism. High resolution observations with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) reveal rapid variability (about 20 to 60 seconds) of intensity and velocity on small spatial scales at the footpoints of hot dynamic coronal loops. The observations are consistent with numerical simulations of heating by beams of non-thermal electrons, which are generated in small impulsive heating events called "coronal nanoflares". The accelerated electrons deposit a sizable fraction of their energy in the chromosphere and TR. Our analysis provides tight constraints on the properties of such electron beams and new diagnostics for their presence in the nonflaring corona.

  18. H$\\alpha$ and EUV observations of a partial CME

    CERN Document Server

    Christian, Damian J; Antolin, Patrick; Mathioudakis, Mihalis

    2015-01-01

    We have obtained H$\\alpha$ high spatial and time resolution observations of the upper solar chromosphere and supplemented these with multi-wavelength observations from the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) and the {\\it Hinode} ExtremeUltraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The H$\\alpha$ observations were conducted on 11 February 2012 with the Hydrogen-Alpha Rapid Dynamics Camera (HARDcam) instrument at the National Solar Observatory's Dunn Solar Telescope. Our H$\\alpha$ observations found large downflows of chromospheric material returning from coronal heights following a failed prominence eruption. We have detected several large condensations ("blobs") returning to the solar surface at velocities of $\\approx$200 km s$^{-1}$ in both H$\\alpha$ and several SDO AIA band passes. The average derived size of these "blobs" in H$\\alpha$ is 500 by 3000 km$^2$ in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the direction of travel, respectively. A comparison of our "blob" widths to those found from coronal rain, indicate...

  19. Driving Solar Spicules and Jets with Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence: Testing a Persistent Idea

    CERN Document Server

    Cranmer, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    The solar chromosphere contains thin, highly dynamic strands of plasma known as spicules. Recently, it has been suggested that the smallest and fastest (Type II) spicules are identical to intermittent jets observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. These jets appear to expand out along open magnetic field lines rooted in unipolar network regions of coronal holes. In this paper we revisit a thirty-year-old idea that spicules may be caused by upward forces associated with Alfven waves. These forces involve the conversion of transverse Alfven waves into compressive acoustic-like waves that steepen into shocks. The repeated buffeting due to upward shock propagation causes nonthermal expansion of the chromosphere and a transient levitation of the transition region. Some older models of wave-driven spicules assumed sinusoidal wave inputs, but the solar atmosphere is highly turbulent and stochastic. Thus, we model this process using the output of a time-dependent simulation of reduced magnetohydrodynamic...

  20. LEMUR: Large European Module for solar Ultraviolet Research. European contribution to JAXA's Solar-C mission

    CERN Document Server

    Teriaca, Luca; Auchère, Frédéric; Brown, Charles M; Buchlin, Eric; Cauzzi, Gianna; Culhane, J Len; Curdt, Werner; Davila, Joseph M; Del Zanna, Giulio; Doschek, George A; Fineschi, Silvano; Fludra, Andrzej; Gallagher, Peter T; Green, Lucie; Harra, Louise K; Imada, Shinsuke; Innes, Davina; Kliem, Bernhard; Korendyke, Clarence; Mariska, John T; Martínez-Pillet, Valentin; Parenti, Susanna; Patsourakos, Spiros; Peter, Hardi; Poletto, Luca; Rutten, Rob; Schühle, Udo; Siemer, Martin; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Socas-Navarro, Hector; Solanki, Sami K; Spadaro, Daniele; Trujillo-Bueno, Javier; Tsuneta, Saku; Dominguez, Santiago Vargas; Vial, Jean-Claude; Walsh, Robert; Warren, Harry P; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Winter, Berend; Young, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the solar outer atmosphere requires concerted, simultaneous solar observations from the visible to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and soft X-rays, at high spatial resolution (between 0.1" and 0.3"), at high temporal resolution (on the order of 10 s, i.e., the time scale of chromospheric dynamics), with a wide temperature coverage (0.01 MK to 20 MK, from the chromosphere to the flaring corona), and the capability of measuring magnetic fields through spectropolarimetry at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Simultaneous spectroscopic measurements sampling the entire temperature range are particularly important. These requirements are fulfilled by the Japanese Solar-C mission (Plan B), composed of a spacecraft in a geosynchronous orbit with a payload providing a significant improvement of imaging and spectropolarimetric capabilities in the UV, visible, and near-infrared with respect to what is available today and foreseen in the near future. The Large European Module for solar Ultraviolet Research...

  1. Cloud modeling of a quiet solar region in H-alpha

    CERN Document Server

    Bostanci, Z F

    2010-01-01

    We present chromospheric cloud modeling on the basis of H-alpha profile-sampling images taken with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). We choose the required reference background profile by using theoretical NLTE profile synthesis. The resulting cloud parameters are converted into estimates of physical parameters (temperature and various densities). Their mean values compare well with the VAL-C model.

  2. H$\\mathbf{\\alpha}$ Intensity Oscillations in Large Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ram Ajor Maurya; Ashok Ambastha

    2008-03-01

    We reinvestigate the problem of Hα intensity oscillations in large flares, particularly those classified as X-class flares. We have used high spatial and temporal resolution digital observations obtained from Udaipur Solar Observatory during the period 1998–2006 and selected several events. Normalized Lomb–Scargle periodogram method for spectral analysis was used to study the oscillatory power in quiet and active chromospheric locations, including the flare ribbons.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: High-precision abundances for stars with planets (Ramirez+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, I.; Melendez, J.; Asplund, M.

    2013-11-01

    High-precision stellar parameters and chemical abundances are presented for 111 stars; 52 of them are late-F type dwarfs and 59 are metal-rich solar analogs. The atomic linelist employed in the derivation of chemical abundances is also given. This linelist includes hyperfine structure parameters for some species. The stars' isochrone masses and ages are also reported, along with estimates of chromospheric activity. (5 data files).

  4. Dislocations in magnetohydrodynamic waves in a stellar atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Ariste, A; Collados, M; Khomenko, E

    2013-08-23

    We describe the presence of wave front dislocations in magnetohydrodynamic waves in stratified stellar atmospheres. Scalar dislocations such as edges and vortices can appear in Alfvén waves, as well as in general magnetoacoustic waves. We detect those dislocations in observations of magnetohydrodynamic waves in sunspots in the solar chromosphere. Through the measured charge of all the dislocations observed, we can give for the first time estimates of the modal contribution in the waves propagating along magnetic fields in solar sunspots.

  5. Computed profiles of the solar C I multiplets at 1561 and 1657 A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauas, Pablo J.; Avrett, Eugene H.; Loeser, Rudolf

    1989-01-01

    A nine-level atomic model is presented for C I lines synthesis in the sun. All the atomic parameters are based on recent experimental and theoretical data. Profiles of the multiplets at 1561 and 1657 A are computed from a model of the solar chromosphere. The sensitivity of the results to changes in the atomic parameters is examined. Partial frequency redistribution must be included in these lines to obtain agreement between calculated and observed profiles.

  6. Modifications of thick-target model: re-acceleration of electron beams by static and stochastic electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varady, M.; Karlický, M.; Moravec, Z.; Kašparová, J.

    2014-03-01

    Context. The collisional thick-target model (CTTM) of the impulsive phase of solar flares, together with the famous Carmichael, Sturrock, Hirayama, and Kopp-Pneuman (CSHKP) model, presented for many years a "standard" model, which straightforwardly explained many observational aspects of flares. On the other hand, many critical issues appear when the concept is scrutinised theoretically or with the new generation of hard X-ray (HXR) observations. The famous "electron number problem" or problems related to transport of enormous particle fluxes though the corona represent only two of them. To resolve the discrepancies, several modifications of the CTTM appeared. Aims: We study two of them based on the global and local re-acceleration of non-thermal electrons by static and stochastic electric fields during their transport from the coronal acceleration site to the thick-target region in the chromosphere. We concentrate on a comparison of the non-thermal electron distribution functions, chromospheric energy deposits, and HXR spectra obtained for both considered modifications with the CTTM itself. Methods: The results were obtained using a relativistic test-particle approach. We simulated the transport of non-thermal electrons with a power-law spectrum including the influence of scattering, energy losses, magnetic mirroring, and also the effects of the electric fields corresponding to both modifications of the CTTM. Results: We show that both modifications of the CTTM change the outcome of the chromospheric bombardment in several aspects. The modifications lead to an increase in chromospheric energy deposit, change of its spatial distribution, and a substantial increase in the corresponding HXR spectrum intensity. Conclusions: The re-acceleration in both models reduces the demands on the efficiency of the primary coronal accelerator, on the electron fluxes transported from the corona downwards, and on the total number of accelerated coronal electrons during flares.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VLT/NaCo Large program I. Sample (Desidera+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desidera, S.; Covino, E.; Messina, S.; Carson, J.; Hagelberg, J.; Schlieder, J. E.; Biazzo, K.; Alcala, J.; Chauvin, G.; Vigan, A.; Beuzit, J. L.; Bonavita, M.; Bonnefoy, M.; Delorme, P.; D'Orazi, V.; Esposito, M.; Feldt, M.; Girardi, L.; Gratton, R.; Henning, T.; Lagrange, A. M.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Launhardt, R.; Marmier, M.; Melo, C.; Meyer, M.; Mouillet, D.; Moutou, C.; Segransan, D.; Udry, S.; Zaidi, C. M.

    2014-10-01

    Stellar parameters for 86 stars observed in NaCo Large Program and their wide companions are presented. These include coordinates, magnitudes, spectral types, metallicity, mass, distance, radial velocities, proper motions, space velocities Xray luminosity, chromospheric emission, rotation period, projected rotational velocity, lithium equivalent width, effective temperature, age (Tables 9-12). Table D1 summarizes the details of the rotation period search (results for individual segments and for the whole timeseries). (13 data files).

  8. Mechanisms of Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. R. Verma

    2006-06-01

    The Sun is a mysterious star. The high temperature of the chromosphere and corona present one of the most puzzling problems of solar physics. Observations show that the solar coronal heating problem is highly complex with many different facts. It is likely that different heating mechanisms are at work in solar corona. Recent observations show that Magnetic Carpet is a potential candidate for solar coronal heating.

  9. Progress on Solar Physics in China During 2004 - 2006

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Yihua; AI Guoxiang

    2006-01-01

    The solar physics studies in China during 2004-2006 from solar interior to solar atmospheres and solar-interplanetary space are summarized. These researches are arranged under the topics of solar interior, photosphere, chromosphere and transition region, corona, flares and CMEs (and the associated radio bursts, X-ray/γ-ray bursts and particle acceleration), solar wind, solar cycle, and ground-based instrumentation.

  10. Emergence of Granular-sized Magnetic Bubbles Through the Solar Atmosphere. III. The Path to the Transition Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Ada; Hansteen, Viggo H.; Bellot Rubio, Luis Ramón; de la Cruz Rodríguez, Jaime; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc

    2016-07-01

    We study, for the first time, the ascent of granular-sized magnetic bubbles from the solar photosphere through the chromosphere into the transition region and above. Such events occurred in a flux emerging region in NOAA 11850 on 2013 September 25. During that time, the first co-observing campaign between the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) spacecraft was carried out. Simultaneous observations of the chromospheric Hα 656.28 nm and Ca II 854.2 nm lines, plus the photospheric Fe i 630.25 nm line, were made with the CRISP spectropolarimeter at the Spitzer Space Telescope (SST) reaching a spatial resolution of 0.″14. At the same time, IRIS was performing a four-step dense raster of the emerging flux region, taking slit jaw images at 133 (C II, transition region), 140 (Si IV, transition region), 279.6 (Mg II k, core, upper chromosphere), and 283.2 nm (Mg II k, wing, photosphere). Spectroscopy of several lines was performed by the IRIS spectrograph in the far- and near-ultraviolet, of which we have used the Si IV 140.3 and the Mg II k 279.6 nm lines. Coronal images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of the Solar Dynamics Observatory were used to investigate the possible coronal signatures of the flux emergence events. The photospheric and chromospheric properties of small-scale emerging magnetic bubbles have been described in detail in Ortiz et al. Here we are able to follow such structures up to the transition region. We describe the properties, including temporal delays, of the observed flux emergence in all layers. We believe this may be an important mechanism of transporting energy and magnetic flux from subsurface layers to the transition region and corona.

  11. Dislocations in magnetohydrodynamic waves in a stellar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Ariste, A López; Khomenko, E

    2013-01-01

    We describe the presence of wavefront dislocations in magnetohydrodynamic waves in stratified stellar atmospheres. Scalar dislocations such as edges and vortices can appear in Alfv\\'en waves, as well as in general magneto-acoustic waves. We detect those dislocations in observations of magnetohydrodynamic waves in sunspots in the solar chromosphere. Through the measured charge of all the dislocations observed, we can give for the first time estimates of the modal contribution in the waves propagating along magnetic fields in solar sunspots.

  12. Plage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A region of intensified emission in the solar chromosphere. Plages are revealed in monochromatic images obtained in the light of various emission lines, for example, the hydrogen-α line and the `H' and `K' lines of ionized calcium. The name derives from the French word for `beach', an allusion to the fact that these features stand out like bright sandy beaches against the fainter background of th...

  13. Magnetic Bipoles in Emerging Flux Regions on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, C. S.; Livi, S. H. B.

    1990-11-01

    ABSTRACT. We analyse magnetograms and H-alpha filtergrams of an Emerging Flux Region. Small bipoles have been observed on the magnetograms emerging between opposite polarities. Separation velocities of the opposite poles for 45 bipoles observed on June 9, 1985 have been measured and are in the range 0.5 contribuciones de los bipolos emergentes. Key words: SUN-CHROMOSPHERE - SUN-MAGNETIC FIELDS

  14. On the rarity of FK Com stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, W.; Stencel, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Very high-dispersion spectra (2.5 A/mm) were obtained of 31 southern late-type stars, predominantly early G giants, in an effort to find new rapidly rotating, active stars which would be FK Com-like. Measurements of linewidths and the strength of chromospheric Ca II K-line emission are presented, but no new star could be added to the class of 'rapid rotators'. Space densities and evolutionary lifetimes for FK Com stars are discussed.

  15. The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) NASA SMEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemen, James; Title, A.; De Pontieu, B.; Schrijver, C.; Tarbell, T.; Wuelser, J.; Golub, L.; Kankelborg, C.

    2011-05-01

    The solar chromosphere and transition region (TR) is highly structured, dynamic, and intimately connected to the corona. It requires more than ten times the energy required to heat the corona, and yet it has received far less interest because of the complexity of the required observational and analytical tools. In the TR the density drops by six orders of magnitude and the temperature increases by three orders of magnitude. Hinode observations reveal the importance the magnetic field has on this region of the solar atmosphere that acts as the interface between the photosphere and the corona. The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) was selected for a NASA SMEX mission in 2009 and is scheduled to launch in December 2012. IRIS addresses critical questions in order to understand the flow of energy and mass through the chromosphere and TR, namely: (1) Which types of non-thermal energy dominate in the chromosphere and beyond? (2) How does the chromosphere regulate mass and energy supply to the corona and heliosphere? (3) How do magnetic flux and matter rise through the lower atmosphere, and what roles dos flux emergence play in flares and mass ejections? These questions are addressed with a high-resolution imaging spectrometer that observes Near- and Far-VU emissions that are formed at temperatures between 5,000K and 1.5 x 106 K. IRIS has a field-of-view of 120 arcsec, a spatial resolution of 0.4 arcsec, and velocity resolution of 0.5 km/s. Members of the IRIS investigation team are developing advanced radiative MHD codes to facilitate comparison with and interpretation of observations. We present the status of the IRIS observatory development, which completed its Critical Design Review in December 2010.

  16. Variable magnetic field geometry of the young sun HN Peg (HD 206860)

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The large-scale magnetic field of solar-type stars reconstructed from their spectropolarimetric observations provide important insight into their underlying dynamo processes.We aim to investigate the temporal variability of the large-scale surface magnetic field and chromospheric activity of a young solar analogue, the G0 dwarf HN Peg.The large-scale surface magnetic field topology is reconstructed using Zeeman Doppler Imaging at six observational epochs covering seven years.We also investiga...

  17. Magnetic fields of an active region filament from full Stokes analysis of Si I 1082.7 nm and He I 1083.0 nm

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Z; Solanki, S; Liu, Y

    2012-01-01

    Vector magnetic fields of an active region filament in the photosphere and upper chromosphere are obtained from spectro-polarimetric observations recorded with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP II) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT). We apply Milne-Eddington inversions on full Stokes vectors of the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and the upper chromospheric He I triplet at 1083.0 nm to obtain magnetic field vector and velocity maps in two atmosphere layers. We find that: (1)A complete filament was already present in H$\\alpha$ at the beginning of the TIP II data acquisition. Only a partially formed one, composed of multiple small threads, was present in He I. (2) The AR filament comprises two sections. One shows strong magnetic field intensities, about 600 - 800 G in the upper chromosphere and 800 - 1000 G in the photosphere. The other exhibits only comparatively weak magnetic field strengths in both layers. (3) The Stokes V signal is indicative of a dip in the magnetic field strength close to the chr...

  18. ALMA's view of the Sun's nearest neighbours: The submm/mm SEDs of the alpha Centauri binary and a new source

    CERN Document Server

    Liseau, R; O'Gorman, E; Bertone, E; Chavez, M; Tapia, F

    2016-01-01

    The precise mechanisms that provide the non-radiative energy for heating the chromosphere and the corona of the Sun and other stars are at the focus of intense contemporary research. Observations at submm/mm wavelengths are particularly useful to obtain information about the run of the temperature in the upper atmosphere of Sun-like stars. We used ALMA to study the chromospheric emission of the aCen binary system in all six available frequency bands during Cycle2 in 2014/15. Since ALMA is an interferometer, the multi-telescope array is particularly suited for the observation of point sources. With its large collecting area, the sensitivity is high enough to allow the observation of nearby main-sequence stars at submm/mm wavelengths for the first time. The comparison of the observed spectral energy distributions with theoretical model computations provides the chromospheric structure in terms of temperature and density above the stellar photosphere and the quantitative understanding of the primary emission pro...

  19. 3D MHD modeling of twisted coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Reale, F; Guarrasi, M; Mignone, A; Peres, G; Hood, A W; Priest, E R

    2016-01-01

    We perform MHD modeling of a single bright coronal loop to include the interaction with a non-uniform magnetic field. The field is stressed by random footpoint rotation in the central region and its energy is dissipated into heating by growing currents through anomalous magnetic diffusivity that switches on in the corona above a current density threshold. We model an entire single magnetic flux tube, in the solar atmosphere extending from the high-beta chromosphere to the low-beta corona through the steep transition region. The magnetic field expands from the chromosphere to the corona. The maximum resolution is ~30 km. We obtain an overall evolution typical of loop models and realistic loop emission in the EUV and X-ray bands. The plasma confined in the flux tube is heated to active region temperatures (~3 MK) after ~2/3 hr. Upflows from the chromosphere up to ~100 km/s fill the core of the flux tube to densities above 10^9 cm^-3. More heating is released in the low corona than the high corona and is finely ...

  20. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF ELECTRON-DRIVEN EVAPORATION IN TWO SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.; Zhang, Q. M., E-mail: lidong@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2015-11-01

    We have explored the relationship between hard X-ray (HXR) emissions and Doppler velocities caused by the chromospheric evaporation in two X1.6 class solar flares on 2014 September 10 and October 22, respectively. Both events display double ribbons and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph slit is fixed on one of their ribbons from the flare onset. The explosive evaporations are detected in these two flares. The coronal line of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å shows blueshifts, but the chromospheric line of C i 1354.29 Å shows redshifts during the impulsive phase. The chromospheric evaporation tends to appear at the front of the flare ribbon. Both Fe xxi and C i display their Doppler velocities with an “increase-peak-decrease” pattern that is well related to the “rising-maximum-decay” phase of HXR emissions. Such anti-correlation between HXR emissions and Fe xxi Doppler shifts and correlation with C i Doppler shifts indicate the electron-driven evaporation in these two flares.

  1. 12 Years of Stellar Activity Observations in Argentina

    CERN Document Server

    Mauas, Pablo J D; Diaz, R; Vieytes, M; Petrucci, R; Jofre, E; Abrevaya, X; Luoni, M L; Valenzuela, P

    2012-01-01

    We present an observational program we started in 1999, to systematically obtain mid-resolution spectra of late-type stars, to study in particular chromospheric activity. In particular, we found cyclic activity in four dM stars, including Prox-Cen. We directly derived the conversion factor that translates the known S index to flux in the Ca II cores, and extend its calibration to a wider spectral range. We investigated the relation between the activity measurements in the calcium and hydrogen lines, and found that the usual correlation observed is the product of the dependence of each flux on stellar color, and it is not always preserved when simultaneous observations of a particular star are considered. We also used our observations to model the chromospheres of stars of different spectral types and activity levels, and found that the integrated chromospheric radiative losses, normalized to the surface luminosity, show a unique trend for G and K dwarfs when plotted against the S index.

  2. Solar Magnetic Flux Tube Simulations with Time-Dependent Ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Fawzy, Diaa E; Rammacher, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    In the present work we expand the study of time-dependent ionization previously identified to be of pivotal importance for acoustic waves in solar magnetic flux tube simulations. We focus on longitudinal tube waves (LTW) known to be an important heating agent of solar magnetic regions. Our models also consider new results of wave energy generation as well as an updated determination of the mixing length of convection now identified as 1.8 scale heights in the upper solar convective layers. We present 1-D wave simulations for the solar chromosphere by studying tubes of different spreading as function of height aimed at representing tubes in environments of different magnetic filling factors. Multi-level radiative transfer has been applied to correctly represent the total chromospheric emission function. The effects of time-dependent ionization are significant in all models studied. They are most pronounced behind strong shocks and in low density regions, i.e., the middle and high chromosphere. Concerning our m...

  3. Library of medium-resolution fiber optic echelle spectra of F, G, K and M field dwarfs to giant stars

    CERN Document Server

    Montes, D; Welty, A D; Montes, David; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Welty, Alan D.

    1999-01-01

    We present a library of Penn State Fiber Optic Echelle (FOE) observations of a sample of field stars with spectral types F to M and luminosity classes V to I. The spectral coverage is from 3800 AA to 10000 AA with nominal a resolving power 12000. These spectra include many of the spectral lines most widely used as optical and near-infrared indicators of chromospheric activity such as the Balmer lines (H_alpha, H_beta), Ca II H & K, Mg I b triplet, Na I D_{1} and D_{2}, He I D_{3}, and Ca II IRT lines. There are also a large number of photospheric lines, which can also be affected by chromospheric activity, and temperature sensitive photospheric features such as TiO bands. The spectra have been compiled with the goal of providing a set of standards observed at medium resolution. We have extensively used such data for the study of active chromosphere stars by applying a spectral subtraction technique. However, the data set presented here can also be utilized in a wide variety of ways ranging from radial vel...

  4. On the inversion of the scattering polarization and the Hanle effect signals in the hydrogen Lyman-$\\alpha$ line

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, R; Belluzzi, L; Sainz, R Manso; Stepan, J; Bueno, J Trujillo; Goto, M; Tsuneta, S

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic field measurements in the upper chromosphere and above, where the gas-to-magnetic pressure ratio $\\beta$ is lower than unity, are essential for understanding the thermal structure and dynamical activity of the solar atmosphere. Recent developments in the theory and numerical modeling of polarization in spectral lines have suggested that information on the magnetic field of the chromosphere-corona transition region could be obtained by measuring the linear polarization of the solar disk radiation at the core of the hydrogen Lyman-$\\alpha$ line at 121.6~nm, which is produced by scattering processes and the Hanle effect. The Chromospheric Lyman-$\\alpha$ Spectropolarimeter (CLASP) sounding rocket experiment aims to measure the intensity (Stokes $I$) and the linear polarization profiles ($Q/I$ and $U/I$) of the hydrogen Lyman-$\\alpha$ line. In this paper we clarify the information that the Hanle effect can provide by applying a Stokes inversion technique based on a database search. The database contains a...

  5. Fluxes in H\\alpha and Ca II H and K for a sample of Southern stars

    CERN Document Server

    Cincunegui, C; Mauas, P J D; Cincunegui, Carolina; D\\'iaz, Rodrigo F.; Mauas, Pablo J. D.

    2007-01-01

    The main chromospheric activity indicator is the S index, which is esentially the ratio of the flux in the core of the Ca II H and K lines to the continuum nearby, and is well studied basically for stars from F to K. Another usual chromospheric proxy is the H\\alpha line, which is beleived to be tightly correlated with the Ca II index. In this work we characterize both chromospheric activity indicators, one associated with the H and K Ca II lines and the other with H\\alpha, for the whole range of late type stars, from F to M. We present periodical medium-resolution echelle observations covering the complete visual range, which were taken at the CASLEO Argentinean Observatory. These observations are distributed along 7 years. We use a total of 917 flux-calibrated spectra for 109 stars which range from F6 to M5. We statistically study these two indicators for stars of different activity levels and spectral types. We directly derive the conversion factor which translate the known S index to flux in the Ca II core...

  6. PRECURSOR OF SUNSPOT PENUMBRAL FORMATION DISCOVERED WITH HINODE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Toshifumi [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Ichimoto, Kiyoshi [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kamitakara-cho, Takayama, Gifu 506-1314 (Japan); Suematsu, Yoshinori, E-mail: shimizu.toshifumi@isas.jaxa.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2012-03-10

    We present observations of a precursory signature that would be helpful for understanding the formation process of sunspot penumbrae. The Hinode Solar Optical Telescope successfully captured the entire evolution of a sunspot from the pore to a large well-developed sunspot with penumbra in an emerging flux region appearing in NOAA Active Region 11039. We found an annular zone (width 3''-5'') surrounding the umbra (pore) in Ca II H images before the penumbra formed around the umbra. The penumbra developed as if to fill the annular zone. The annular zone shows weak magnetogram signals, meaning less magnetic flux or highly inclined fields there. Pre-existing ambient magnetic field islands were distributed at the outer edge of the annular zone and did not come into the zone. There are no strong systematic flow patterns in the zone, but we occasionally observed small magnetic flux patches streaming out. The observations indicate that the annular zone is different from the sunspot moat flow region and that it represents the structure in the chromosphere. We conclude that the annular zone reflects the formation of a magnetic canopy overlying the region surrounding the umbra at the chromospheric level, long before the formation of the penumbra at the photospheric level. The magnetic field structure in the chromosphere needs to be considered in the formation process of the penumbrae.

  7. The detection and characterization of high frequency and high wavenumber solar oscillations. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, David Neil

    1992-01-01

    Doppler shift measurements of the Na D(sub 1) absorption line have revealed solar oscillations in a new regime of frequency and wavenumber. Oscillations of vertical velocities in the temperature minimum and low chromosphere of the Sun are observed with frequencies ranging up to 9.5 mHz. There is no evidence for chromospheric modes of 3 minute period. This indicates that the chromosphere does not form a good cavity for acoustic waves. The fundamental-modes appear with wavenumbers up to 5.57 M per m (equivalent spherical harmonic degree, 3877). The frequencies lie below the predicted values at wavenumbers above 1 M per m. The values are in agreement with previous measurements that exist for wavenumbers up to 2.67 M per m. Spatial maps of velocity power show that high wavenumber oscillations are suppressed in active regions. The shape of the power depression indicates that wave motion is affected in the layer of atmosphere where the measurement is made. The f-modes are suppressed in the same way as p-modes, indicating that the mechanism for wave suppression affects velocity fluctuations. Mode frequencies are not affected by the magnetic fields by more than 50 micro Hz, the precision of the measurement.

  8. The delta upsilon = 1 fundamental bands of carbon monoxide in late-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, G.; Ayres, T.; Saar, S.; Jennings, D.

    1987-01-01

    A program was begun to develop the fundamental vibration-rotation bands of CO near 4.7 micron, as a tool to investigate the properties of late type stellar atmospheres. The strong delta v = 1 lines are sensitive probes of the thermal structure of the outer layers, which can be strongly affected by the CO, itself: cooling in the fundamental lines can depress the surface temperature to low values that are in sharp contrast with those derived from chromospheric diagnostics like Ca II K and Mg II k. Cool atmospheric models are being constructed to reproduce observed high resolution CO spectra of several late-type stars. The sensitivity is illustrated of CO LTE spectra to variations in T sub eff, log g, (Fe/H), and isotopic abundances of C and O for a grid of such models. In parallel, the assumptions of LTE line formation are tested using newly available cross sections for translational-to-vibrational energy exchange in collisions of atomic H on CO. In addition, spectra of CO and Ca II K calculated from semi-empirical UV based hot chromospheric models are used to estimate geometrical filling factors for the CO dominated and chromospheric regions on the stellar surface, in the spirit of Ayres' thermal bifurcation scenario.

  9. Emergence of granular-sized magnetic bubbles through the solar atmosphere. III. The path to the transition region

    CERN Document Server

    Ortiz, Ada; Rubio, Luis Ramon Bellot; Rodriguez, Jaime de la Cruz; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; van der Voort, Luc Rouppe

    2016-01-01

    We study the ascent of granular-sized magnetic bubbles from the solar photosphere through the chromosphere into the transition region and above, for the first time. Such events occurred in a flux emerging region in NOAA 11850 on September 25, 2013. During that time, the first co-observing campaign between the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope and the IRIS spacecraft was carried out. Simultaneous observations of the chromospheric H$\\alpha$ 656.28 nm and \\ion{Ca}{2} 854.2 nm lines, plus the photospheric \\ion{Fe}{1} 630.25 nm line, were made with the CRISP spectropolarimeter at the SST reaching a spatial resolution of 0."14. At the same time, IRIS was performing a four-step dense raster of the said emerging flux region, taking slit-jaw images at 133 (C~{\\sc ii}, transition region), 140 (\\ion{Si}{4}, transition region), 279.6 (\\ion{Mg}{2} k, core, upper chromosphere), and 283.2 nm (\\ion{Mg}{2} k, wing, photosphere). Spectroscopy of several lines was performed by the IRIS spectrograph in the far and near ultraviolet, of...

  10. Unresolved fine-scale structure in solar coronal loop-tops

    CERN Document Server

    Scullion, Eamon; Wedemeyer, Sven; Antolin, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    New and advanced space-based observing facilities continue to lower the resolution limit and detect solar coronal loops in greater detail. We continue to discover even finer sub-structures within coronal loop cross sections, in order to understand the nature of the solar corona. Here, we push this lower limit further to search for the finest coronal loop sub-structures, through taking advantage of the resolving power of the Swedish 1- m Solar Telescope (SST) / CRisp Imaging Spectro-Polarimeter (CRISP), together with co-observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) / Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA). High resolution imaging of the chromospheric H-alpha 656.28 nm spectral line core and wings can, under certain circumstances, allow one to deduce the topology of the local magnetic environment of the solar atmosphere where its observed. Here, we study post-flare coronal loops, which become filled with evaporated chromosphere that rapidly condenses into chromospheric clumps of plasma (detectable in H-alpha...

  11. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of the outer layers of stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, T. P., Jr.; Linsky, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of the extended atmospheres and circumstellar envelopes of early-type and cool stars are reviewed. UV spectra of OB stars have shown that mass loss occurs in virtually all these stars and in many Be stars, and the Copernicus satellite has also provided information on the physical conditions and variability of the winds. The winds have been interpreted in terms of hot coronal wind models, imperfect flow models and radiation pressure models, and estimates of mass loss ranging from 10 to the -10th to 9 x 10 to the -6th solar masses/year have been obtained. Further UV data of faint stars, additional wavelengths and time variability are required. Recent UV and X-ray experiments have detected stellar chromospheres, transition regions coronas and winds in cool stars. Semiempirical line-profile and line-flux models and purely theoretical atmospheric models have been constructed to explain chromosphere, corona and wind data, and future observations of the physical properties of stellar chromospheres, coronas and winds, terms in the energy balance equation, stellar activity and its long-term variability and atmospheric modifications due to the presence of companion stars are proposed for such missions as Spacelab.

  12. Spectropolarimetric capabilities of Ca II 8542 A line

    CERN Document Server

    Noda, C Quintero; Rodríguez, J de la Cruz; Katsukawa, Y; Ichimoto, K; Anan, T; Suematsu, Y

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of space and ground-based solar missions aim to study the magnetic properties of the solar chromosphere using the infrared Ca II lines and the He I 10830 {\\AA} line. The former seem to be the best candidates to study the stratification of magnetic fields in the solar chromosphere and their relation to the other thermodynamical properties underlying the chromospheric plasma. The purpose of this work is to provide a detailed analysis of the diagnostic capabilities of the Ca II 8542 {\\AA} line, anticipating forthcoming observational facilities. We study the sensitivity of the Ca II 8542 {\\AA} line to perturbations applied to the physical parameters of reference semi-empirical 1D model atmospheres using response functions and we make use of 3D MHD simulations to examine the expected polarization signals for moderate magnetic field strengths. Our results indicate that the Ca II 8542 {\\AA} line is mostly sensitive to the layers enclosed between $\\log$ $\\tau=[0,-5.5]$, under the physical conditio...

  13. NON-EQUILIBRIUM HELIUM IONIZATION IN AN MHD SIMULATION OF THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Carlsson, Mats [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Leenaarts, Jorrit, E-mail: thomas.golding@astro.uio.no, E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no, E-mail: jorrit.leenaarts@astro.su.se [Institute for Solar Physics, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-02-01

    The ionization state of the gas in the dynamic solar chromosphere can depart strongly from the instantaneous statistical equilibrium commonly assumed in numerical modeling. We improve on earlier simulations of the solar atmosphere that only included non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization by performing a 2D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulation featuring non-equilibrium ionization of both hydrogen and helium. The simulation includes the effect of hydrogen Lyα and the EUV radiation from the corona on the ionization and heating of the atmosphere. Details on code implementation are given. We obtain helium ion fractions that are far from their equilibrium values. Comparison with models with local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) ionization shows that non-equilibrium helium ionization leads to higher temperatures in wavefronts and lower temperatures in the gas between shocks. Assuming LTE ionization results in a thermostat-like behavior with matter accumulating around the temperatures where the LTE ionization fractions change rapidly. Comparison of DEM curves computed from our models shows that non-equilibrium ionization leads to more radiating material in the temperature range 11–18 kK, compared to models with LTE helium ionization. We conclude that non-equilibrium helium ionization is important for the dynamics and thermal structure of the upper chromosphere and transition region. It might also help resolve the problem that intensities of chromospheric lines computed from current models are smaller than those observed.

  14. Dynamics in Sunspot Umbra as Seen in New Solar Telescope and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph Data

    CERN Document Server

    Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Kilcik, Ali

    2014-01-01

    We analyse sunspot oscillations using Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) slit-jaw and spectral data and narrow-band chromospheric images from the New Solar Telescope (NST) for the main sunspot in NOAA AR 11836. We report that the difference between the shock arrival times as measured the Mg II k 2796.35\\AA\\ and Si IV 1393.76\\AA\\ line formation levels changes during the observed period and peak-to-peak delays may range from 40~s to zero. The intensity of chromospheric shocks also displays a long term (about 20~min) variations. NST's high spatial resolution \\ha\\ data allowed us to conclude that in this sunspot umbral flashes (UFs) appeared in the form of narrow bright lanes stretched along the light bridges and around clusters of umbral bright points. Time series also suggested that UFs preferred to appear on the sunspot-center side of light bridges, which may indicate the existence of a compact sub-photospheric driver of sunspot oscillations. The sunspot's umbra as seen in the IRIS chromospheric and ...

  15. The Atmospheric Response to High Nonthermal Electron Beam Fluxes in Solar Flares. I. Modeling the Brightest NUV Footpoints in the X1 Solar Flare of 2014 March 29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Allred, Joel C.; Daw, Adrian; Cauzzi, Gianna; Carlsson, Mats

    2017-02-01

    The 2014 March 29 X1 solar flare (SOL20140329T17:48) produced bright continuum emission in the far- and near-ultraviolet (NUV) and highly asymmetric chromospheric emission lines, providing long-sought constraints on the heating mechanisms of the lower atmosphere in solar flares. We analyze the continuum and emission line data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the brightest flaring magnetic footpoints in this flare. We compare the NUV spectra of the brightest pixels to new radiative-hydrodynamic predictions calculated with the RADYN code using constraints on a nonthermal electron beam inferred from the collisional thick-target modeling of hard X-ray data from Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. We show that the atmospheric response to a high beam flux density satisfactorily achieves the observed continuum brightness in the NUV. The NUV continuum emission in this flare is consistent with hydrogen (Balmer) recombination radiation that originates from low optical depth in a dense chromospheric condensation and from the stationary beam-heated layers just below the condensation. A model producing two flaring regions (a condensation and stationary layers) in the lower atmosphere is also consistent with the asymmetric Fe ii chromospheric emission line profiles observed in the impulsive phase.

  16. Photometric and spectroscopic observations of three rapidly rotating late-type stars: EY Dra, V374 Peg and GSC 02038-00293

    CERN Document Server

    Korhonen, H; Husarik, M; Mahajan, S; Szczygiel, D; Olah, K

    2010-01-01

    Here, BV(RI)c broad band photometry and intermediate resolution spectroscopy in Halpha region are presented for two rapidly rotating late-type stars: EY Dra and V374 Peg. For a third rapid rotator, GSC 02038-00293, intermediate resolution Halpha spectroscopy and low resolution spectroscopy are used for spectral classification and stellar parameter investigation of this poorly known object. The low resolution spectrum of GSC 02038-00293 clearly indicates that it is a K-type star. Its intermediate resolution spectrum can be best fitted with a model with Teff=4750K and vsini=90km/s, indicating a very rapidly rotating mid-K star. The Halpha line strength is variable, indicating changing chromospheric emission on GSC 02038-00293. In the case of EY Dra and V374 Peg, the stellar activity in the photosphere is investigated from the photometric observations, and in the chromosphere from the Halpha line. The enhanced chromospheric emission in EY Dra correlates well with the location of the photospheric active regions, ...

  17. Strong Blue Asymmetry in Hα Line as a Preflare Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyuhyoun; Lee, Jeongwoo; Chae, Jongchul; Wang, Haimin; Ahn, Kwangsu; Yang, Heesu; Lim, Eun-kyung; Maurya, Ram Ajor

    2016-10-01

    Chromospheric activities before solar flares provide important clues to the mechanisms that initiate solar flares, but are as yet poorly understood. We report a significant and rapid Hα line broadening before the solar flare SOL2011-09-29T18:08 that was detected using the unprecedented high-resolution Hα imaging spectroscopy with the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph (FISS) installed on the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory. The strong Hα broadening extends as a blue excursion up to -4.5 Å and as a red excursion up to 2.0 Å, which implies a mixture of velocities in the range of -130 km s^{-1} to 38 km s-1 derived by applying the cloud model, comparable to the highest chromospheric motions reported before. The Hα blueshifted broadening lasts for about six minutes and is temporally and spatially correlated with the start of a rising filament, which is later associated with the main phase of the flare as detected by the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The potential importance of this Hα blueshifted broadening as a preflare chromospheric activity is briefly discussed within the context of the two-step eruption model.

  18. A semi-empirical model for the M star GJ832 using modeling tools developed for computing semi-empirical solar models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsky, Jeffrey; Fontenla, Juan; France, Kevin

    2016-05-01

    We present a semi-empirical model of the photosphere, chromosphere, transition region, and corona for the M2 dwarf star GJ832, which hosts two exoplanets. The atmospheric model uses a modification of the Solar Radiation Physical Modeling tools developed by Fontenla and collaborators. These computer codes model non-LTE spectral line formation for 52 atoms and ions and include a large number of lines from 20 abundant diatomic molecules that are present in the much cooler photosphere and chromosphere of this star. We constructed the temperature distribution to fit Hubble Space Telescope observations of chromospheric lines (e.g., MgII), transition region lines (CII, CIV, SiIV, and NV), and the UV continuum. Temperatures in the coronal portion of the model are consistent with ROSAT and XMM-Newton X-ray observations and the FeXII 124.2 nm line. The excellent fit of the model to the data demonstrates that the highly developed model atmosphere code developed to explain regions of the solar atmosphere with different activity levels has wide applicability to stars, including this M star with an effective temperature 2200 K cooler than the Sun. We describe similarities and differences between the M star model and models of the quiet and active Sun.

  19. Dynamics of Subarcsecond Bright Dots in the Transition Region above Sunspots and Their Relation to Penumbral Micro-jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Tanmoy; Tian, Hui; Banerjee, Dipankar; Schanche, Nicole

    2017-02-01

    Recent high-resolution observations have revealed that subarcsecond bright dots (BDs) with sub-minute lifetimes appear ubiquitously in the transition region (TR) above sunspot penumbra. The presence of penumbral micro-jets (PMJs) in the chromosphere was previously reported. It was proposed that both the PMJs and BDs are formed due to a magnetic reconnection process and may play an important role in heating of the penumbra. Using simultaneous observations of the chromosphere from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode and observations of the TR from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, we study the dynamics of BDs and their relation to PMJs. We find two types of BDs, one that is related to PMJs, and another that does not show any visible dynamics in the SOT Ca ii H images. From a statistical analysis we show that these two types have different properties. The BDs that are related to PMJs always appear at the top of the PMJs, the vast majority of which show inward motion and originate before the generation of the PMJs. These results may indicate that the reconnection occurs at the lower coronal/TR height and initiates PMJs at the chromosphere. This formation mechanism is in contrast with the formation of PMJs by reconnection in the (upper) photosphere between differently inclined fields.

  20. 3D MHD modeling of twisted coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, F.; Orlando, S.; Guarrasi, M.; Mignone, A.; Peres, G.; Hood, A. W.; Priest, E. R.

    2016-10-01

    We perform MHD modeling of a single bright coronal loop to include the interaction with a non-uniform magnetic field. The field is stressed by random footpoint rotation in the central region and its energy is dissipated into heating by growing currents through anomalous magnetic diffusivity that switches on in the corona above a current density threshold. We model an entire single magnetic flux tube in the solar atmosphere extending from the high-β chromosphere to the low-β corona through the steep transition region. The magnetic field expands from the chromosphere to the corona. The maximum resolution is ∼30 km. We obtain an overall evolution typical of loop models and realistic loop emission in the EUV and X-ray bands. The plasma confined in the flux tube is heated to active region temperatures (∼3 MK) after ∼2/3 hr. Upflows from the chromosphere up to ∼100 km s‑1 fill the core of the flux tube to densities above 109 cm‑3. More heating is released in the low corona than the high corona and is finely structured both in space and time.